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Sample records for causing cord compression

  1. ANTERIOR CERVICAL INTRADURAL ARACHNOID CYST - A RARE CAUSE OF SPINAL CORD COMPRESSION

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    Kollam Chandra Sekhar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Arachnoid cysts of spinal cord are relatively uncommon lesions. Most of them arise dorsal to the cord, and anteriorly placed intradural arachnoid cyst is a rare cause of cervical cord compression. To the best of our knowledge, only 30 cases were reported in the literature. We present a case of anterior cervical intradural arachnoid cyst with review of literature. METHODS We performed a literature search for anteriorly placed intradural arachnoid cysts in the cervical spinal cord through http://pubmed.com, a well-known worldwide internet medical address. To the best of our knowledge, only 30 cases were reported in the literature. We reviewed the literature with illustration of our case. We present a case of a 40-year-old male patient who presented with insidious onset of radicular pain. MRI cervical spine demonstrated cervical intradural cystic lesion extending from C2 to upper border of C4, lying anteriorly with compression over the cord. Cervical laminectomy followed by wide cyst fenestration and subtotal excision of cyst was done. Histopathological diagnosis was arachnoid cyst. RESULTS Patient totally recovered from his pain and sensory symptoms within a week and motor symptoms improved gradually over a period of six to eight weeks. With two years followup, patient had no further complaints. CONCLUSION Anterior cervical intradural arachnoid cysts are rare. These are amenable to resection through posterior approach safely with good postoperative recovery.

  2. Spinal cord compression caused by anaplastic large cell lymphoma in an HIV infected individual

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    Kumar Susheel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphomas occur with an increased frequency in patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection. These are usually high-grade immunoblastic lymphomas and primary central nervous system lymphomas. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL is a distinct type of non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma. It is uncommon in HIV infected individuals. We describe here an uncommon presentation of this relatively rare lymphoma in the form of spinal cord compression syndrome in a young HIV infected individual.

  3. Analysis of the Relationship Between the Epidural Spinal Cord Compression (ESCC) Scale and Paralysis Caused by Metastatic Spine Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uei, Hiroshi; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Maseda, Masafumi

    2018-04-15

    A retrospective, single-institute, and radiographic study. To evaluate the relationship between the epidural spinal cord compression (ESCC) scale and the severity of metastatic spine tumor-induced paralysis. The ESCC scale is used to evaluate the grade of spinal cord compression on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, few studies have investigated the relationship between such MRI findings and paralysis. The subjects were 467 patients with metastatic spine tumors and grade 1b or worse spinal cord compression according to the ESCC scale. Evaluations using this scale were performed by three spine surgeons, and results that were obtained by two or more surgeons were adopted. We also examined patients whose spinal cord compression deteriorated by one grade or more to American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) grade C or worse within the first 3 weeks after MRI. The kappa coefficients for inter- and intraexaminer variability were 0.90 and 0.95, respectively. ASIA grade D or worse paralysis developed in at least 50% of the patients with ESCC grade 1b or worse spinal cord compression at the C1-T2 and at least 50% of those with ESCC grade 1c or worse spinal cord compression at the T3-L5. The frequency of ASIA grade C or worse paralysis was high among the patients with ESCC grade 2 or worse spinal cord compression at the C7-L1. Nineteen patients experienced rapid deterioration of one grade or more to ASIA grade C or worse paralysis within the first 3 weeks after MRI. Of these, paralysis occurred in at least 30% of the patients with anterolateral or circumferential cord compression combined with ESCC grade 2 or 3 compression at the C7-L1. The severity of paralysis was not correlated with the ESCC scale. Patients with anterolateral or circumferential ESCC grade 2 or 3 cord compression at the C7-L1 are at high risk of rapidly progressive paralysis. 4.

  4. Non-traumatic spinal cord compression at Parirenyatwa Hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Compression of the spinal cord by encroachment on its space is of major importance as a cause of injury to its tissues, with serious neurological consequences. Patients with non-traumatic spinal cord compression represent a significant proportion of paraplegic/paretic individuals attended to in the neurosurgical units in ...

  5. Thoracic spinal cord compression by a tophus.

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    Ntsiba, Honoré; Makosso, Edouard; Moyikoua, Armand

    2010-03-01

    We report a case of thoracic (T10) spinal cord compression by a tophus in a patient with known chronic gout. Spastic paraplegia developed gradually over 6 months in this 43-year-old man with hypertension, alcohol abuse, and chronic gouty arthritis with tophi. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography visualized an intradural nodule measuring 1.5cm in diameter at the level of T10, as well as geodes in the left T10 lamina and left T9-T10 articular processes. The nodule was removed surgically and shown by histological examination to be a tophus. The neurological impairments resolved rapidly and completely. We found about 60 similar cases in the literature. Spinal cord compression in a patient with chronic gout can be caused by a tophus. Copyright 2010 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Vertebral hemangiosarcoma as a cause of spinal cord compression in a horse Hemangiossarcoma de vértebra como causa de compressão da medula espinhal em um eqüino

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    Claudio Severo Lombardo de Barros

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available A case compression of the spinal cord in a horse by a tumor located in the vertebra is described. A 10-year-old gelding was euthanized after being found recumbent with hind limb paresis of unknown duration. At necropsy an hemangiosarcoma was detected in the vertebral body of T3. The tumoral mass invaded upwards through the bone tissue of the vertebral body into the vertebral canal, compressing the spinal cord and causing Wallerian degeneration at T1-3 levels of the cord.É relatado um caso de compressão da medula espinhal em um cavalo por um tumor localizado na vértebra. Um eqüino, macho, castrado de 10 anos de idade foi sacrificado após ser encontrado em decúbito com paresia dos membros posteriores de duração desconhecida. Na necropsia, um hemangiossarcoma foi detectado no corpo da vértebra T3. A massa invadia o tecido ósseo do corpo da vértebra, penetrava o canal vertebral e comprimia a medula espinhal, causando degeneração walleriana ao nível dos segmentos T1-3.

  7. Diffusion tensor imaging in spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wei; Qin, Wen; Hao, Nanxin; Wang, Yibin; Zong, Genlin

    2012-01-01

    Background Although diffusion tensor imaging has been successfully applied in brain research for decades, several main difficulties have hindered its extended utilization in spinal cord imaging. Purpose To assess the feasibility and clinical value of diffusion tensor imaging and tractography for evaluating chronic spinal cord compression. Material and Methods Single-shot spin-echo echo-planar DT sequences were scanned in 42 spinal cord compression patients and 49 healthy volunteers. The mean values of the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy were measured in region of interest at the cervical and lower thoracic spinal cord. The patients were divided into two groups according to the high signal on T2WI (the SCC-HI group and the SCC-nHI group for with or without high signal). A one-way ANOVA was used. Diffusion tensor tractography was used to visualize the morphological features of normal and impaired white matter. Results There were no statistically significant differences in the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy values between the different spinal cord segments of the normal subjects. All of the patients in the SCC-HI group had increased apparent diffusion coefficient values and decreased fractional anisotropy values at the lesion level compared to the normal controls. However, there were no statistically significant diffusion index differences between the SCC-nHI group and the normal controls. In the diffusion tensor imaging maps, the normal spinal cord sections were depicted as fiber tracts that were color-encoded to a cephalocaudal orientation. The diffusion tensor images were compressed to different degrees in all of the patients. Conclusion Diffusion tensor imaging and tractography are promising methods for visualizing spinal cord tracts and can provide additional information in clinical studies in spinal cord compression

  8. Spinal cord compression from Wegener’s granulomatosis: an unusual presentation

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    Roy, Deb; Phan, Kevin; Mobbs, Ralph J.; Selby, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Wegener’s granulomatosis (WG) causing spinal cord compression is very rare with only few cases reported in literature. We present a case report with review of literature. A 55-year-old lady with known WG presented with acute on chronic spinal cord compression. MRI scan revealed spinal cord compression anteriorly and posteriorly at T2–T5 level. Patient underwent urgent surgical decompression with excision of the posterior dural lesion with synthetic duraplasty. Patient made good neurological recovery. Histopathology revealed features consistent with WG. A rare case of spinal cord compression from WG is presented. Urgent surgical decompression with duraplasty resulted in good neurological outcome. PMID:28097250

  9. Growing rod erosion through the lamina causing spinal cord compression in an 8-year-old girl with early-onset scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abduljabbar, Fahad H; Waly, Feras; Nooh, Anas; Ouellet, Jean

    2016-09-01

    Early-onset scoliosis often occurs by the age of 5 years and is attributed to many structural abnormalities. Syndromic early-onset scoliosis is considered one of the most aggressive types of early-onset scoliosis. Treatment starts with serial casting and bracing, but eventually most of these patients undergo growth-sparing procedures, such as a single growing rod, dual growing rods, or a vertical expandable titanium prosthetic rib. This case report aimed to describe an unusual complication of erosion of a growing rod through the lamina that caused spinal cord compression in an 8-year-old girl with early-onset scoliosis. This is a case report. A retrospective chart review was used to describe the clinical course and radiographic findings of this case after rod erosion into the spinal canal. The patient underwent successful revision surgery removing the rod without neurologic complications. Patients with syndromic early-onset scoliosis are more prone to progressive curves and severe rotational deformity. We believe that the severe kyphotic deformity in addition to the dysplastic nature of the deformity in this population may predispose them to this unusual complication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. MRI Findings of Early-Stage Hyperacute Hemorrhage Causing Extramedullary Compression of the Cervical Spinal Cord in a Dog with Suspected Steroid-Responsive Meningitis-Arteritis

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    Adriano Wang-Leandro

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A 9-month-old female Weimaraner was presented to the emergency service due to episodes of fever and neck pain. Physical examination revealed a stiff neck posture and elevated body temperature. Shortly after clinical examination was performed, the dog developed peracute onset of non-ambulatory tetraparesis compatible with a C1–C5 spinal cord (SC lesion. Immediately thereafter (<1 h, MRI of the cervical SC was performed with a 3-T scanner. A left ventrolateral intradural-extramedullary SC compression caused by a round-shaped structure at the level of C3––C4 was evidenced. The structure was iso- to slightly hyperintense in T1-weighted (T1W sequences compared to SC parenchyma and hyperintense in T2-weighted, gradient echo, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery. Moreover, the structure showed a strong homogeneous contrast uptake in T1W sequences. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis revealed a mixed pleocytosis, as well as elevated protein and erythrocyte count. Early-stage hyperacute extramedullary hemorrhage was suspected due to immune mediated vasculitis. The dog was maintained under general anesthesia and artificial ventilation for 24 h and long-term therapy with corticosteroids and physiotherapy was initiated. Eight weeks after initial presentation, the dog was ambulatory, slightly tetraparetic. Follow-up MRI showed a regression of the round-shaped structure and pleocytosis was not evident in CSF analysis. This report describes an early-stage hyperacute extramedullary hemorrhage, a condition rarely recorded in dogs even in experimental settings.

  11. Spinal cord compression--an oncologic emergency.

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    Frank, A R

    1990-08-01

    Spinal cord compression secondary to epidural metastatic tumor is an emergency clinical situation that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment if permanent neurologic damage is to be prevented. Physicians caring for patients with cancer must maintain a high index of suspicion for this problem. Back pain is a common clinical situation in the general population but in the cancer patient, one should consider this sign indicative of possible spinal cord compression even though a long tumor-free interval has occurred since the original diagnosis of neoplasm. The diagnosis is established by thorough neurologic examination, plain x-rays, myelography, CT and MRI scanning. Once the diagnosis is established, treatment is instituted with steroids, decompressive surgery and postoperative irradiation or external irradiation alone depending upon the emergent nature of the clinical situation. Regardless of the initial treatment, patients with spinal cord compression require management in a multi-disciplinary fashion. Early therapy will result in the best relief of symptoms and maintenance of the ability to walk. The ultimate prognosis of such patients is very dismal in view of the metastatic nature of their disease but prompt diagnosis and treatment is necessary to prevent devastating sequelae for the patients and their families.

  12. Acute Thoracolumbar Spinal Cord Injury: Relationship of Cord Compression to Neurological Outcome.

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    Skeers, Peta; Battistuzzo, Camila R; Clark, Jillian M; Bernard, Stephen; Freeman, Brian J C; Batchelor, Peter E

    2018-02-21

    Spinal cord injury in the cervical spine is commonly accompanied by cord compression and urgent surgical decompression may improve neurological recovery. However, the extent of spinal cord compression and its relationship to neurological recovery following traumatic thoracolumbar spinal cord injury is unclear. The purpose of this study was to quantify maximum cord compression following thoracolumbar spinal cord injury and to assess the relationship among cord compression, cord swelling, and eventual clinical outcome. The medical records of patients who were 15 to 70 years of age, were admitted with a traumatic thoracolumbar spinal cord injury (T1 to L1), and underwent a spinal surgical procedure were examined. Patients with penetrating injuries and multitrauma were excluded. Maximal osseous canal compromise and maximal spinal cord compression were measured on preoperative mid-sagittal computed tomography (CT) scans and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by observers blinded to patient outcome. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grades from acute hospital admission (≤24 hours of injury) and rehabilitation discharge were used to measure clinical outcome. Relationships among spinal cord compression, canal compromise, and initial and final AIS grades were assessed via univariate and multivariate analyses. Fifty-three patients with thoracolumbar spinal cord injury were included in this study. The overall mean maximal spinal cord compression (and standard deviation) was 40% ± 21%. There was a significant relationship between median spinal cord compression and final AIS grade, with grade-A patients (complete injury) exhibiting greater compression than grade-C and D patients (incomplete injury) (p compression as independently influencing the likelihood of complete spinal cord injury (p compression. Greater cord compression is associated with an increased likelihood of severe neurological deficits (complete injury) following

  13. Thalassemia, extramedullary hematopoiesis, and spinal cord compression: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Bukhari, Syed Sarmad; Junaid, Muhammad; Rashid, Mamoon Ur

    2016-01-01

    Background: Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) refers to hematopoiesis outside of the medulla of the bone. Chronic anemia states such as thalassemia can cause hematopoietic tissue to expand in certain locations. We report a case of spinal cord compression due to recurrent spinal epidural EMH, which was treated with a combination of surgery and radiotherapy. Pakistan has one of the highest incidence and prevalence of thalassemia in the world. We describe published literature on diagnosis and m...

  14. Thalassemia, extramedullary hematopoiesis, and spinal cord compression: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Syed Sarmad; Junaid, Muhammad; Rashid, Mamoon Ur

    2016-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) refers to hematopoiesis outside of the medulla of the bone. Chronic anemia states such as thalassemia can cause hematopoietic tissue to expand in certain locations. We report a case of spinal cord compression due to recurrent spinal epidural EMH, which was treated with a combination of surgery and radiotherapy. Pakistan has one of the highest incidence and prevalence of thalassemia in the world. We describe published literature on diagnosis and management of such cases. An 18-year-old male presented with bilateral lower limb paresis. He was a known case of homozygous beta thalassemia major. He had undergone surgery for spinal cord compression due to EMH 4 months prior to presentation. Symptom resolution was followed by deterioration 5 days later. He was operated again at our hospital with complete resection of the mass. He underwent local radiotherapy to prevent recurrence. At 2 years follow-up, he showed complete resolution of symptoms. Follow-up imaging demonstrated no residual mass. The possibility of EMH should be considered in every patient with ineffective erythropoiesis as a cause of spinal cord compression. Treatment of such cases is usually done with blood transfusions, which can reduce the hematopoietic drive for EMH. Other options include surgery, hydroxyurea, radiotherapy, or a combination of these on a case to case basis.

  15. SPINAL CORD COMPRESSION DUE TO TUMOURS AT KENYATTA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-07-07

    Jul 7, 2000 ... SPINAL CORD COMPRESSION DUE TO TUMOURS AT KENYATTA NATIONAL HOSPITAL,. NAIROBI. N.J.M. MWANG'OMBE and M.B. OUMA. ABSTRACT. Objective: To determine the frequency of different types of tumours associated with cord compression, their mode of presentation and treatment ...

  16. Prognosis in patients with symptomatic metastatic spinal cord compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgen, Søren Schmidt; Lund-Andersen, Casper; Larsen, Claus Falck

    2013-01-01

    A retrospective cohort study of 2321 patients consecutively admitted to one center and diagnosed with acute symptoms of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC).......A retrospective cohort study of 2321 patients consecutively admitted to one center and diagnosed with acute symptoms of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC)....

  17. Ventral extradural spinal meningeal cyst causing cord compression: neurosurgical treatment Cisto meníngeo extradural ventral do canal espinhal causando compressão medular: tratamento neurocirúrgico

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    Daniel Monte-Serrat Prevedello

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Spinal extradural meningeal cysts are typically formed by a thin fibrotic membranous capsule, macroscopically similar that of an arachnoid membrane, filled by cerebro spinal fluid and related to a nerve root or to the posterior midline. Ventral location is extremely rare and when it occurs they usually cause spinal cord herniation through the ventral dural gap. A 61 year-old man who began with a two years long history of insidious tetraparesis, spasticity and hyperreflexia in lower extremities, and flaccid atrophy of upper limbs, without sensory manifestations, is presented. Investigation through magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an extensive spinal ventral extradural cystic collection from C6 to T11. The lesion was approached through a laminectomy and a cyst-peritoneal shunt was introduced. The cyst reduced in size significantly and the patient is asymptomatic over a 48 months follow-up. This is the first reported case of a spontaneous ventral extradural spinal meningeal cyst causing cord compression. Cyst-peritoneal shunt was effective in the treatment of the case and it should be considered in cases in which complete resection of the cyst is made more difficult or risky by the need of more aggressive surgical maneuvers.Cistos meníngeos extradurais espinhais são formados tipicamente por estreita cápsula membranosa fibrótica, macroscopicamente semelhante a uma membrana de aracnóide, repleta de líquor e relacionada com uma raiz nervosa ou com a linha média posterior. Eles são extremamente raros em posição anterior e, quando ocorrem, habitualmente causam herniação da medula espinhal pela falha dural ventral. O caso de um homem de 61 anos de idade que iniciou com tetraparesia, espasticidade e hiperreflexia em membros inferiores, e flacidez com hipotrofia nos membros superiores, sem manifestação sensitiva, é apresentado. A investigação com ressonância magnética demonstrou extensa coleção cística extradural ventral

  18. Spinal cord blood flow measured by 14C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography during and after graded spinal cord compression in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtz, A.; Nystroem, B.G.; Gerdin, B.

    1989-01-01

    The relations between degree of thoracic spinal cord compression causing myelographic block, reversible paraparesis, and extinction of the sensory evoked potential on one hand, and spinal cord blood flow on the other, were investigated. This was done in rats using the blocking weight-technique and 14 C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography. A load of 9 g caused myelographic block. Five minutes of compression with that load caused a reduction of spinal cord blood flow to about 25%, but 5 and 60 minutes after the compression spinal cord blood flow was restored to 60% of the pretrauma value. A load of 35 g for 5 minutes caused transient paraparesis. Recovery to about 30% was observed 5 and 60 minutes thereafter. During compression at a load of 55 g, which caused almost total extinction of sensory evoked potential and irreversible paraplegia, spinal cord blood flow under the load ceased. The results indicate that myelographic block occurs at a load which does not cause irreversible paraparesis and that a load which permits sensory evoked potential to be elicited results in potentially salvageable damage

  19. Spinal meningioma: relationship between degree of cord compression and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Simon; Gregson, Barbara; Mitchell, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to find the relationships between the degree of cord compression as seen on MRIs with persisting cord atrophy after decompression and patient outcomes in spinal meningiomas. We undertook a retrospective analysis of 31 patients' pre- and postoperative MRIs, preoperative functional status and their outcomes at follow-up. The following metrics were analysed; percentage cord area at maximum compression, percentage tumour occupancy and percentage cord occupancy. These were then compared with outcome as measured by the Nurick scale. Of the 31 patients, 27 (87%) had thoracic meningiomas, 3 (10%) cervical and 1 (3%) cervicothoracic. The meningiomas were pathologically classified as grade 1 (29) or grade 2 (2) according to the WHO classification. The average remaining cord cross-sectional area was 61% of the estimated original value. The average tumour occupancy of the canal was 72%. The average cord occupancy of the spinal canal at maximum compression was 20%. No correlation between cord cross-section area and Nurick Scale was seen. On the postoperative scan, the average cord area had increased to 84%. No correlation was seen between this value and outcome. We found that cross-section area measurements on MRI scans have no obvious relationship with function before or after surgery. This is a base for future research into the mechanism of cord recovery and other compressive cord conditions.

  20. Cervical Spinal Cord Compression: A Rare Presentation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chime, Chukwunonso; Arjun, Shiva; Reddy, Pavithra; Niazi, Masooma

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary malignancy of liver. Distant metastasis to various organs is well known. Skeletal metastasis is also reported to various locations. Vertebral metastasis has been reported mostly to thoracic spine. However, cervical spinal cord involvement leading to cord compression has been reported very rarely in literature. We present a case of 58-year-old male with liver cirrhosis presenting as neck pain. Further work-up revealed metastatic HCC to cervical spinal cord resulting in acute cord compression. Patient has been treated with neurosurgical intervention. PMID:28299213

  1. Approaches to radiotherapy in metastatic spinal cord compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppl, Morten Hiul

    2018-04-01

    Metastatic spinal cord compression is caused by the progression of metastatic lesions within the vicinity of the spinal cord. The consequences are very severe with loss of neurological function and severe pain. The standard treatment is surgical intervention followed by radiotherapy or radiotherapy alone. However, the majority of patients are treated with radiotherapy only due to contraindications to surgery and technical inoperability. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is a technology to deliver higher radiation dose to the radiotherapy target with the use of spatial coordinates. This modality has shown positive results in treating lesions in brain and lungs. Hence, it could prove beneficial in metastatic spinal cord compression. We designed and planned a trial to investigate this method in patients with metastatic spinal cord compression. The method was usable but the trial was stopped prematurely due to low accrual that made comparison with surgery impossible. Low accrual is a known problem for trials evaluating new approaches in radiotherapy. Target definition in radiotherapy of metastatic spinal cord compression is defined by patient history, examination and imaging. Functional imaging could provide information to guide target definition with the sparring of normal tissue e.g. spinal cord and hematopoietic tissue of the bone marrow. In future trials this may be used for dose escalation of spinal metastases. The trial showed that PET/MRI was feasible in this group of patients but did not change the radiotherapy target in the included patients. Neurological outcome is similar irrespective of course length and therefore single fraction radiotherapy is recommended for the majority of patients. In-field recurrence is a risk factor of both short and long fractionation schemes and re-irradiation have the potential risk of radiation-induced myelopathy. In a retrospective study of re-irradiation, we investigated the incidence of radiation-induced myelopathy. In our study

  2. Spinal cord compression secondary to bone metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma

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    Doval, Dinesh Chandra; Bhatia, Komal; Vaid, Ashok Kumar; Pavithran, Keechelat; Sharma, Jai Bhagwan; Hazarika, Digant; Jena, Amarnath

    2006-01-01

    Bone metastases are rare in primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Spinal cord compression (SCC) due to bone metastases occur commonly in patients with lung and breast carcinomas, and metastatic HCC is an unusual cause of SCC. Spinal cord compression is an oncologic emergency and treatment delays can lead to irreversible consequences. Thus, the awareness that SCC could be a potential complication of bone metastases due to HCC is of significance in initiation of early treatment that can improve the quality of life and survival of the patients, if diagnosed earlier. This paper describes four cases of primary HCC with varied manifestations of SCC due to bone metastases. The first patient presented primarily with the symptoms of bone pains corresponding to the bone metastases sites rather than symptoms of associated hepatic pathology and eventually developed SCC. The second patient, diagnosed as having HCC, developed extradural SCC leading to paraplegia during the course of illness, for which he underwent emergency laminectomy with posterior fixation. The third patient developed SCC soon after the primary diagnosis and had to undergo emergency laminectomy. Post laminectomy he had good neurological recovery. The Fourth patient presented primarily with radicular pains rather than frank paraplegia as the first manifestation of SCC. PMID:16937544

  3. [Spinal cord compression due to extramedullary hematopoiesis in a patient with myelofibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijikata, Yasuhiro; Ando, Tetsuo; Inagaki, Tomonori; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Ito, Mizuki; Sobue, Gen

    2014-01-01

    Development and growth of hematopoietic tissue outside of the bone marrow is termed extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH). It occurs in patients with hematological diseases such as myelofibrosis and thalassemia. Liver and spleen are the usual sites of EMH. However, spinal cord compression caused by EMH is a rare complication. A 65-year-old man with myelofibrosis was admitted to our hospital with progressive paraparesis. Thoracic spine MRI revealed epidural masses causing cord compression. Histological examination of the epidural mass showed evidence of EMH consisting of megakaryocytic and erythroid hyperplasia. After surgical decompression and radiotherapy, lower limb weakness and sensory disturbance were significantly improved. MRI showed disappearance of the spinal cord compression. With this therapy, he had no recurrence until he died of myelofibrosis. Spinal EMH should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with hematological diseases presenting with paraparesis. Surgical decompression and radiotherapy are effective approaches for the treatment of paraparesis due to EMH.

  4. Rare Case of Spinal Cord Compression as Initial Presentation of Thymic Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Prabhsimranjot; Sinha, Ankur; Malhotra, Sonali; Chandra, Abhinav Binod; Solomon, William; Huang, Yiwu

    2017-01-01

    Thymic carcinomas are rare aggressive cancers with limited clinical trial data. Its usual treatment is surgical resection with variable response to chemotherapy and radiation. It usually presents as anterior mediastinal mass with late sequela of metastases to the lymph nodes, pleura and bones. We present of thymic carcinoma with a rare initial presentation of vertebral metastases causing spinal cord compression.

  5. Rare Case of Spinal Cord Compression as Initial Presentation of Thymic Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prabhsimranjot; Sinha, Ankur; Malhotra, Sonali; Chandra, Abhinav Binod; Solomon, William; Huang, Yiwu

    2017-01-01

    Thymic carcinomas are rare aggressive cancers with limited clinical trial data. Its usual treatment is surgical resection with variable response to chemotherapy and radiation. It usually presents as anterior mediastinal mass with late sequela of metastases to the lymph nodes, pleura and bones. We present of thymic carcinoma with a rare initial presentation of vertebral metastases causing spinal cord compression. PMID:29147447

  6. Spinal cord compression due to tumours at Kenyatta Nationa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the frequency of different types of tumours associated with cord compression, their mode of presentation and treatment outcome. Design: Retrospective study. Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH), a teaching and referral hospital in Nairobi, Kenya, from January 1985 to December 1994.

  7. Radiotherapy of metastatic spinal cord compression in very elderly patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rades, Dirk; Hoskin, Peter J.; Karstens, Johann H.; Rudat, Volker; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    Owing to the aging of the population, the proportion of elderly patients receiving cancer treatment has increased. This study investigated the results of radiotherapy (RT) for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) in the very elderly, because few data are available for these patients. The data

  8. Increased MR signal intensity secondary to chronic cervical cord compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, M; Sakamoto, Y; Miyawaki, M; Bussaka, H

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance images of 128 patients with compressive lesions of the cervical spinal canal were reviewed to determine whether a high signal intensity lesion within the spinal cord was present on T2 and proton density weighted spin echo images. Such high signal intensity was observed in 24 cases or 18.8%. The incidence was higher in herniated disk (32.4%), atlanto-axial dislocation (28.6%), and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (22.7%), whereas the abnormality was found sporadically in cervical spondylosis and vertebral body tumors. The high intensity lesion on T2 weighted images was generally observed in patients with constriction or narrowing of the spinal cord. The lesion was not demonstrated on T1 weighted spin echo images. Spinal cord constriction or localized narrowing seemed to be the most important predisposing factor in producing such a high signal intensity. The pathophysiologic basis of such an abnormality was presumed to be myelomalacia or cord gliosis secondary to a long-standing compressive effect of the spinal cord.

  9. Increased MR signal intensity secondary to chronic cervical cord compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Miyawaki, M.; Bussaka, H.

    1987-11-01

    Magnetic resonance images of 128 patients with compressive lesions of the cervical spinal canal were reviewed to determine whether a high signal intensity lesion within the spinal cord was present on T2 and proton density weighted spin echo images. Such high signal intensity was observed in 24 cases or 18.8%. The incidence was higher in herniated disk (32.4%), atlanto-axial dislocation (28.6%), and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (22.7%), whereas the abnormality was found sporadically in cervical spondylosis and vertebral body tumors. The high intensity lesion on T2 weighted images was generally observed in patients with constriction or narrowing of the spinal cord. The lesion was not demonstrated on T1 weighted spin echo images. Spinal cord constriction or localized narrowing seemed to be the most important predisposing factor in producing such a high signal intensity. The pathophysiologic basis of such an abnormality was presumed to be myelomalacia or cord gliosis secondary to a long standing compressive effect of the spinal cord.

  10. Spinal cord compression due to metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, C.M. de; Matushita, J.P.K.; Silva, M.A.F. da; Koch, H.A.

    1986-01-01

    A study of 20 patients with medullary compression syndrome due to lesions not related to the central nervous system is presented. Plain films of the spine and myelography are made to determine the level of osseous involvement, the level of the spinal block and to planning radiotherapy. (Author) [pt

  11. A progressive compression model of thoracic spinal cord injury in mice: function assessment and pathological changes in spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-dong Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-traumatic injury accounts for approximately half of clinical spinal cord injury, including chronic spinal cord compression. However, previous rodent spinal cord compression models are mainly designed for rats, few are available for mice. Our aim is to develop a thoracic progressive compression mice model of spinal cord injury. In this study, adult wild-type C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups: in the surgery group, a screw was inserted at T9 lamina to compress the spinal cord, and the compression was increased by turning it further into the canal (0.2 mm post-surgery every 2 weeks up to 8 weeks. In the control group, a hole was drilled into the lamina without inserting a screw. The results showed that Basso Mouse Scale scores were lower and gait worsened. In addition, the degree of hindlimb dysfunction in mice was consistent with the degree of spinal cord compression. The number of motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord was reduced in all groups of mice, whereas astrocytes and microglia were gradually activated and proliferated. In conclusion, this progressive compression of thoracic spinal cord injury in mice is a preferable model for chronic progressive spinal cord compression injury.

  12. Thoracic spondylolisthesis and spinal cord compression in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Yasutaka; Yamada, Hiroshi; Ebara, Hidehumi; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Iwanaga, Takeshi; Shimozaki, Kengo; Kitano, Yoshiyuki; Kagechika, Kenji; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2017-04-01

    Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis has long been regarded as a benign asymptomatic clinical entity with an innocuous clinical course. Neurological complications are rare in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. However, if they do occur, the consequences are often significant enough to warrant major neurosurgical intervention. Neurological complications occur when the pathological process of ossification in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis extends to other vertebral ligaments, causing ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligaments and/or ossification of the ligamentum flavum. Thoracic spondylolisthesis with spinal cord compression in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis has not previously been reported in the literature. A 78-year-old Japanese man presented with a 6-month history of gait disturbance. A magnetic resonance imaging scan of his cervical and thoracic spine revealed anterior spondylolisthesis and severe cord compression at T3 to T4 and T10 to T11, as well as high signal intensity in a T2-weighted image at T10/11. Computed tomography revealed diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis at T4 to T10. He underwent partial laminectomy of T10 and posterior fusion of T9 to T12. The postoperative magnetic resonance imaging revealed resolution of the spinal cord compression and an improvement in the high signal intensity on the T2-weighted image. We report the first case of thoracic spondylolisthesis and spinal cord compression in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. Neurosurgical intervention resulted in a significant improvement of our patient's neurological symptoms.

  13. Biomechanical effects of spinal cord compression due to ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament and ligamentum flavum: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Khuyagbaatar, Batbayar; Kim, Kyungsoo

    2013-09-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) and ossification of the ligamentum flavum (OLF) have been recognized as causes of myelopathy due to thickening of the ligaments resulting in narrowing of the spinal canal and compression of the spinal cord. However, few studies have focused on predicting stress distribution under conditions of OPLL and OLF based on clinical aspects such as the relationship between level of stress and severity of neurologic symptoms because direct in vivo measurement of stress is very restrictive. In this study, a three-dimensional finite element model of the spinal cord in T12-L1 was developed based on MR images. The von-Mises stresses in the cord and the cross-sectional area of the cord were investigated for various grades and shapes of spinal cord compression in OPLL and OLF. Substantial increases in maximum stresses resulting in the manifestation of spinal cord symptoms occurred when the cross-sectional area was reduced by 30-40% at 60% compression of the antero-posterior diameter of the cord in OPLL and at 4mm compression in OLF. These results indicate that compression greater than these thresholds may induce spinal symptoms, which is consistent with clinical observations. Copyright © 2013 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Multilevel thoracic hemangioma with spinal cord compression in a pediatric patient: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Jacob; Sayama, Christina M; Adesina, Adekunle M; Lam, Sandi K; Luerssen, Thomas G; Jea, Andrew

    2014-09-01

    Vertebral hemangiomas are common benign vascular tumors of the spine. It is very rare for these lesions to symptomatically compress neural elements. If spinal cord compression does occur, it usually involves only a single level. Multilevel vertebral hemangiomas causing symptomatic spinal cord compression have never been reported in the pediatric population to the best of our knowledge. We report the case of a 15-year-old boy presenting with progressive paraparesis due to thoracic spinal cord compression from a multilevel thoracic hemangioma (T5-T10) with epidural extension. Because of his progressive neurological deficit, he was initially treated with urgent multilevel decompressive laminectomies from T4 to T11. This was to be followed by radiotherapy for residual tumor, but the patient was unfortunately lost to follow-up. He re-presented 3 years later with recurrent paraparesis and progressive disease. This was treated with urgent radiotherapy with good response. As of 6 months follow-up, he has made an excellent neurological recovery. In this report, we present the first case of a child with multilevel vertebral hemangiomas causing symptomatic spinal cord compression and review the literature to detail the pathophysiology, management, and treatment of other cases of spinal cord compression by vertebral hemangiomas.

  15. Cord Compression due to Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in an Adolescent with Known Beta Thalassemia Major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan COHLER

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 16 year-old male with ß thalassemia major and gait disturbances that had not been given blood transfusions due to a severe childhood transfusion reaction. Thoracic spine MRI demonstrated hematopoietic marrow throughout the spine and epidural masses causing cord compression consistent with extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH. After treatment with steroids, radiotherapy and monitored blood transfusions, the patient demonstrated significant improvement of his paraspinal lesions and near complete resolution of his neurological symptoms. While EMH causing cord compression in adolescents is rare in the current era of bone marrow transplantation or chronic transfusions, it should be considered when thalassemia major patients present with neurological deficits. The well defined imaging features of EMH can play a central role in its diagnosis and management, especially because surgical and / or radiotherapeutic intervention are often considered in cases of failed medical treatment.

  16. Cord Compression due to Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in an Adolescent with Known Beta Thalassemia Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soman, Salil; Rosenfeld, David L; Roychowdhury, Sudipta; Drachtman, Richard A; Cohler, Alan

    2009-01-01

    We describe a 16 year-old male with β thalassemia major and gait disturbances that had not been given blood transfusions due to a severe childhood transfusion reaction. Thoracic spine MRI demonstrated hematopoietic marrow throughout the spine and epidural masses causing cord compression consistent with extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH). After treatment with steroids, radiotherapy and monitored blood transfusions, the patient demonstrated significant improvement of his paraspinal lesions and near complete resolution of his neurological symptoms. While EMH causing cord compression in adolescents is rare in the current era of bone marrow transplantation or chronic transfusions, it should be considered when thalassemia major patients present with neurological deficits. The well defined imaging features of EMH can play a central role in its diagnosis and management, especially because surgical and / or radiotherapeutic intervention are often considered in cases of failed medical treatment. PMID:22470615

  17. Cord Compression due to Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in an Adolescent with Known Beta Thalassemia Major

    OpenAIRE

    Soman, Salil; Rosenfeld, David L; Roychowdhury, Sudipta; Drachtman, Richard A; Cohler, Alan

    2009-01-01

    We describe a 16 year-old male with ß thalassemia major and gait disturbances that had not been given blood transfusions due to a severe childhood transfusion reaction. Thoracic spine MRI demonstrated hematopoietic marrow throughout the spine and epidural masses causing cord compression consistent with extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH). After treatment with steroids, radiotherapy and monitored blood transfusions, the patient demonstrated significant improvement of his paraspinal lesions a...

  18. Laminectomy without instrumentation for surgical treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression

    OpenAIRE

    Borges, Paulo Alvim; Teixeira, William Gemio Jacobsen; Narazaki, Douglas Kenji; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Ghilardi, Cesar Salge; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Camargo, Olavo Pires de; Barros Filho, Tarcisio Eloy Pessoa de

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the development of mechanical complications as a result of spinal decompression or cauda equina in patients with metastatic tumors of the spine via laminectomy or laminoartrectomy without fixation. METHODS: We studied the medical records of all patients submitted to spine decompression with laminectomy without fixation. The decompression was indicated to treat cord compression or cauda equina caused by metastatic tumors. Patients were evaluated for the development of p...

  19. Preoperative embolization in surgical treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Caroline

    2017-07-01

    An increasing number of patients develop symptomatic spinal metastasis and increasing evidence supports the benefit of surgical decompression and spinal stabilization combined with radiation therapy. However, surgery for metastatic spinal disease is known to be associated with a risk of substantial intraoperative blood loss and perioperative allogenic blood transfusion. Anemia is known to increase morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing surgery, but studies also indicate that transfusion with allogenic red blood cells (RBC) may lead to worse outcomes. To reduce intraoperative bleeding preoperative embolization has been used in selected cases suspected for hypervascular spinal metastases, but no randomized trial has examined the effect. The final decision on whether preoperative embolization should be performed is based on the preoperative digital subtraction angiography (DSA) tumor blush, and as such considered the "gold standard" for determining the vascularity of spinal metastases. Reliability studies evaluating vascularity ratings of DSA tumor blush have not been published before. This PhD thesis is based on three studies with the following aims: I. To assess whether perioperative allogenic blood transfusions in patients undergoing surgical treatment for spinal metastases independently influence patient survival (Study 1). II. To assess whether preoperative transcatheter arterial embolization of spinal metastases reduces blood loss, the need for transfusion with allogenic RBC and surgery time in the surgical treatment of patients with symptomatic metastatic spinal cord compression (Study 2). III. To describe the vascularity of metastasis causing spinal cord compression (Study 2). IV. To evaluate inter- and intra-observer agreement in the assessment of the vascularity of spinal metastases using DSA tumor blush (Study 3). In conclusion the findings of this thesis demonstrate that preoperative embolization in patients with symptomatic spinal metastasis

  20. Amnioinfusion for potential or suspected umbilical cord compression in labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeyr, G Justus; Lawrie, Theresa A

    2012-01-18

    Amnioinfusion aims to prevent or relieve umbilical cord compression during labour by infusing a solution into the uterine cavity. To assess the effects of amnioinfusion for potential or suspected umbilical cord compression on maternal and perinatal outcome . We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 October 2011). Randomised trials of amnioinfusion compared with no amnioinfusion in women with babies at risk of umbilical cord compression in labour. The original review had one author only (Justus Hofmeyr (GJH)). For this update, two authors (GJH and T Lawrie) assessed 13 additional trial reports for eligibility and quality. We extracted data and checked for accuracy. We have included 19 studies, with all but two studies having fewer than 200 participants. Transcervical amnioinfusion for potential or suspected umbilical cord compression was associated with the following reductions: caesarean section overall (13 trials, 1493 participants; average risk ratio (RR) 0.62, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.46 to 0.83); fetal heart rate (FHR) decelerations (seven trials, 1006 participants; average RR 0.53, 95% CI 0.38 to 0.74); Apgar score less than seven at five minutes (12 trials, 1804 participants; average RR 0.47, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.72); meconium below the vocal cords (three trials, 674 participants, RR 0.53, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.92); postpartum endometritis (six trials, 767 participants; RR 0.45, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.81) and maternal hospital stay greater than three days (four trials, 1051 participants; average RR 0.45, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.78). Transabdominal amnioinfusion showed similar trends, though numbers studied were small.Mean cord umbilical artery pH was higher in the amnioinfusion group (seven trials, 855 participants; average mean difference 0.03, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.06) and there was a trend toward fewer neonates with a low cord arterial pH (less than 7.2 or as defined by trial authors) in the amnioinfusion group (eight trials, 972

  1. Spinal cord compression in {beta}-thalassemia: follow-up after radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, Silvana Fahel da; Figueiredo, Maria Stella; Cancado, Rodolfo Delfini; Nakadakare, Fernando; Segreto, Roberto; Kerbauy, Jose [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina

    1998-12-01

    Spinal cord compression due to extramedullary hematopoiesis is a well-described bu rare syndrome encountered in several hematologic disorders, including {beta}-thalassemia. We report a case of a patient with intermediate {beta}-thalassemia and crural paraparesis due to spinal cord compression by a paravertebral extramedullary mass. She was successfully treated with low-dose radiotherapy and transfusions. After splenectomy, she was regularly followed up for over four years without transfusion or recurrence of spinal cord compression. Extramedullary hematopoiesis should be investigated in patients with hematologic disorders and spinal cord symptoms. The rapid recognition and treatment with radiotherapy can dramatically alleviate symptoms. (author)

  2. Spinal cord compression in b-thalassemia: follow-up after radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Fahel da Fonseca

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Spinal cord compression due to extramedullary hematopoiesis is a well-described but rare syndrome encountered in several clinical hematologic disorders, including b-thalassemia. CASE REPORT: We report the case of a patient with intermediate b-thalassemia and crural paraparesis due to spinal cord compression by a paravertebral extramedullary mass. She was successfully treated with low-dose radiotherapy and transfusions. After splenectomy, she was regularly followed up for over four years without transfusion or recurrence of spinal cord compression. DISCUSSION: Extramedullary hematopoiesis should be investigated in patients with hematologic disorders and spinal cord symptoms. The rapid recognition and treatment with radiotherapy can dramatically alleviate symptoms.

  3. Spinal cord compression in β-thalassemia: follow-up after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Silvana Fahel da; Figueiredo, Maria Stella; Cancado, Rodolfo Delfini; Nakadakare, Fernando; Segreto, Roberto; Kerbauy, Jose

    1998-01-01

    Spinal cord compression due to extramedullary hematopoiesis is a well-described bu rare syndrome encountered in several hematologic disorders, including β-thalassemia. We report a case of a patient with intermediate β-thalassemia and crural paraparesis due to spinal cord compression by a paravertebral extramedullary mass. She was successfully treated with low-dose radiotherapy and transfusions. After splenectomy, she was regularly followed up for over four years without transfusion or recurrence of spinal cord compression. Extramedullary hematopoiesis should be investigated in patients with hematologic disorders and spinal cord symptoms. The rapid recognition and treatment with radiotherapy can dramatically alleviate symptoms. (author)

  4. Spinal cord compression due to epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis in thalassaemia: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydingoez, Ue.; Oto, A.; Cila, A. [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)

    1997-12-01

    Spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis is very rare in thalassaemia. A 27-year-old man with thalassaemia intermedia presented with symptoms and signs of spinal cord compression. MRI showed a thoracic spinal epidural mass, representing extramedullary haematopoietic tissue, compressing the spinal cord. Following radiotherapy, serial MRI revealed regression of the epidural mass and gradual resolution of spinal cord oedema. (orig.) With 3 figs., 6 refs.

  5. The prevalence and phenotype of activated microglia/macrophages within the spinal cord of the hyperostotic mouse (twy/twy changes in response to chronic progressive spinal cord compression: implications for human cervical compressive myelopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Hirai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cervical compressive myelopathy, e.g. due to spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament is a common cause of spinal cord dysfunction. Although human pathological studies have reported neuronal loss and demyelination in the chronically compressed spinal cord, little is known about the mechanisms involved. In particular, the neuroinflammatory processes that are thought to underlie the condition are poorly understood. The present study assessed the localized prevalence of activated M1 and M2 microglia/macrophages in twy/twy mice that develop spontaneous cervical spinal cord compression, as a model of human disease. METHODS: Inflammatory cells and cytokines were assessed in compressed lesions of the spinal cords in 12-, 18- and 24-weeks old twy/twy mice by immunohistochemical, immunoblot and flow cytometric analysis. Computed tomography and standard histology confirmed a progressive spinal cord compression through the spontaneously development of an impinging calcified mass. RESULTS: The prevalence of CD11b-positive cells, in the compressed spinal cord increased over time with a concurrent decrease in neurons. The CD11b-positive cell population was initially formed of arginase-1- and CD206-positive M2 microglia/macrophages, which later shifted towards iNOS- and CD16/32-positive M1 microglia/macrophages. There was a transient increase in levels of T helper 2 (Th2 cytokines at 18 weeks, whereas levels of Th1 cytokines as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, nerve growth factor (NGF and macrophage antigen (Mac-2 progressively increased. CONCLUSIONS: Spinal cord compression was associated with a temporal M2 microglia/macrophage response, which may act as a possible repair or neuroprotective mechanism. However, the persistence of the neural insult also associated with persistent expression of Th1 cytokines and increased prevalence of activated M1 microglia/macrophages, which may lead to neuronal loss and

  6. Functional status of patients with metastatic spinal cord compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Danielle Zacaron; Leite, Isabel Cristina Gonçalves; Guerra, Maximiliano Ribeiro

    2018-04-06

    This prospective study was conducted to evaluate the functional status and clinical features of inpatients with metastatic spinal cord compression and to explore possible associated factors and the correlation with neurological deficits. Cases were identified through an active search in the hospital units of the National Cancer Institute. For 47 patients, clinical and demographic characteristics were collected; functional status was measured by the Functional Independence Measure; modified Tokuhashi score was used to predict survival time; neurological deficits were measured using the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale; and general condition was evaluated using the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale. The correlation between the level of neurological deficits and functional status was calculated using the Spearman correlation test. The difference in the functional independence score according to neurological status was assessed with the Kruskall-Wallis test. The degree of functional status was associated with Karnofsky Performance Status, level of neurological deficits, ability to walk, survival time, and skin color (p < 0.05). There was difference in the functional status (p = 0.004) and in the motor domain (p = 0.001) according to the level of neurological deficits. The correlation of the Functional Independence Measure with level of neurological deficits and with Karnofsky Performance Status was moderate (r = 0.46, p < 0.02). The Functional Independence Measure was adequate for evaluating the functional status of patients with metastatic spinal cord compression. Palliative rehabilitation should be integrated early and strategies should be linked to the prognosis of survival.

  7. Real-time direct measurement of spinal cord blood flow at the site of compression: relationship between blood flow recovery and motor deficiency in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Yuichiro; Ogata, Tadanori; Morino, Tadao; Hino, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Haruyasu

    2007-08-15

    An in vivo study to measure rat spinal cord blood flow in real-time at the site of compression using a newly developed device. To evaluate the change in thoracic spinal cord blood flow by compression force and to clarify the association between blood flow recovery and motor deficiency after a spinal cord compression injury. Until now, no real-time measurement of spinal cord blood flow at the site of compression has been conducted. In addition, it has not been clearly determined whether blood flow recovery is related to motor function after a spinal cord injury. Our blood flow measurement system was a combination of a noncontact type laser Doppler system and a spinal cord compression device. The rat thoracic spinal cord was exposed at the 11th vertebra and spinal cord blood flow at the site of compression was continuously measured before, during, and after the compression. The functioning of the animal's hind-limbs was evaluated by the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scoring scale and the frequency of voluntary standing. Histologic changes such as permeability of blood-spinal cord barrier, microglia proliferation, and apoptotic cell death were examined in compressed spinal cord tissue. The spinal blood flow decreased on each increase in the compression force. After applying a 5-g weight, the blood flow decreased to compression), while no significant difference was observed between the 20-minute ischemia group and the sham group. In the 20-minute ischemia group, the rats whose spinal cord blood flow recovery was incomplete showed significant motor function loss compared with rats that completely recovered blood flow. Extensive breakdown of blood-spinal cord barrier integrity and the following microglia proliferation and apoptotic cell death were detected in the 40-minute complete ischemia group. Duration of ischemia/compression and blood flow recovery of the spinal cord are important factors in the recovery of motor function after a spinal cord injury.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of malignant extradural tumors with acute spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lien, H.H.; Blomlie, V.; Heimdal, K.; Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo; Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-six cancer patients with extradural spinal metastatic disease and acute symptoms of spinal cord compression underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 1.5 T. Cord involvement was found in all 36, 7 of whom had lesions at 2 different sites. Vertebral metastases in addition to those corresponding to the cord compressions were detected in 27 patients, and 18 of these had widespread deposits. MR displayed the extent of the tumors in the craniocaudal and lateral directions. The ability to identify multiple sites of cord and vertebral involvement and to delineate tumor accurately makes MR the examination of choice in cancer patients with suspected spinal cord compression. It obviates the need for myelography and postmyelography CT in this group of patients. (orig.)

  9. Fifteen-year follow-up of a patient with beta thalassaemia and extramedullary haematopoietic tissue compressing the spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niggemann, P.; Krings, T.; Thron, A. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, RWTH-Aachen Hosital (Germany); Hans, F. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, RWTH Aachen Hospital (Germany); 1

    2005-04-01

    A long-term follow-up of a patient with beta thalassaemia with intra- and extraspinal extramedullary haematopoietic tissue compressing the spinal cord is presented. Extramedullary haematopoietic nodules are a rare cause of spinal cord compression and should be included in the differential diagnosis, especially in patients from Mediterranean countries. Treatment with radiation therapy solely failed, giving rise to the need of surgical intervention. Surgical decompression of the spine and the removal of the culprit lesion compressing the spine were performed. Postinterventional radiation therapy was applied to the spine. A relapse had to be treated again by surgical means combined with postinterventional radiation therapy. A complete relief of the symptoms and control of the lesion could be obtained.

  10. Fifteen-year follow-up of a patient with beta thalassaemia and extramedullary haematopoietic tissue compressing the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niggemann, P.; Krings, T.; Thron, A.; Hans, F.

    2005-01-01

    A long-term follow-up of a patient with beta thalassaemia with intra- and extraspinal extramedullary haematopoietic tissue compressing the spinal cord is presented. Extramedullary haematopoietic nodules are a rare cause of spinal cord compression and should be included in the differential diagnosis, especially in patients from Mediterranean countries. Treatment with radiation therapy solely failed, giving rise to the need of surgical intervention. Surgical decompression of the spine and the removal of the culprit lesion compressing the spine were performed. Postinterventional radiation therapy was applied to the spine. A relapse had to be treated again by surgical means combined with postinterventional radiation therapy. A complete relief of the symptoms and control of the lesion could be obtained

  11. Spatial and temporal expression levels of specific microRNAs in a spinal cord injury mouse model and their relationship to the duration of compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziu, Mateo; Fletcher, Lauren; Savage, Jennifer G; Jimenez, David F; Digicaylioglu, Murat; Bartanusz, Viktor

    2014-02-01

    spinal cord compression causes alterations in the expression of different miRNAs in the acute phase of injury. Their expression is related to the duration of the compression of the spinal cord. These findings suggest that early decompression of the spinal cord may have an important modulating effect on the molecular cascade triggered during secondary injury through the changes in expression levels of specific microRNAs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. MR imaging of spinal factors and compression of the spinal cord in cervical myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokubun, Shoichi; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Minoru; Ishii, Sukenobu; Tani, Shotaro; Sato, Tetsuaki.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of surgical 109 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy were retrospectively reviewed to examine whether MR imaging would replace conventional radiological procedures in determining spinal factors and spinal cord compression in this disease. MR imaging was useful in determining spondylotic herniation, continuous type of ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament, and calcification of yellow ligament, probably replacing CT myelography, discography, and CT discography. When total defect of the subarachnoid space on T2-weighted images and block on myelograms were compared in determining spinal cord compression, the spinal cord was affected more extensively by 1.3 intervertebral distance (IVD) on T2-weighted images. When indentation of one third or more in anterior and posterior diameter of the spinal cord was used as spinal cord compression, the difference in the affected extension between myelography and MR imaging was 0.2 IVD on T1-weighted images and 0.6 IVD on T2-weighted images. However, when block was seen in 3 or more IVD on myelograms, the range of spinal cord compression tended to be larger on T1-weighted images. For a small range of spinal cord compression, T1-weighted imaging seems to be helpful in determining the range of decompression. When using T2-weighted imaging, the range of decompression becomes large, frequently including posterior decompression. (N.K.)

  13. Reverse Lhermitte's phenomenon provoked by cervical cord compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiann-Jy; Kung, Kuo-Luon; Chen, Chi-Jen; Yeh, Yi-Shian; Chen, Dem-Lion; Tang, Yao-Mao

    2012-03-01

    Lhermitte's phenomenon (LP) is a rare manifestation, which is defined when a sudden electric-shock sensation transmitted down the spine induced by neck flexion; however, the reverse LP is defined when symptoms are induced by neck extension, not flexion. Because reports of LP are limited in the Taiwan literature, we report this case. A 74-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with sudden onset of right neck pain when extending the neck. The pain mimicked an electric shock and radiated to the left shoulder. Imaging showed spondylosis and spondylolisthesis without any spinal canal stenosis. A neck collar was recommended, and the strange phenomenon did not recur over the following year. However, long-term follow-up and aggressive workup are recommended to rule in or rule out the possibility of multiple sclerosis in the future. Although LP represents spinal demyelination disorders, reverse LP is induced by extrinsic compression of the cervical cord, and neck collar immobilization rather than intravenous or oral medication is recommended.

  14. Spinal cord compression secondary to extramedullary hematopoiesis in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lindsay M; Skeen, Todd M

    2013-03-15

    An 11-year-old spayed female Siberian Husky was evaluated because of a 2-week history of progressive paraparesis. Results of neurologic examination were consistent with a T3-L3 myelopathy. There were no abnormalities on CBC, and hypercalcemia was noted on serum biochemical analysis. Several hypoechoic splenic nodules were evident on abdominal ultrasonography, and results of fine-needle aspiration cytology were consistent with splenic extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH). Two compressive, extradural masses in the dorsal epidural space of the thoracolumbar region of the spinal cord were seen on MRI images. A dorsal laminectomy was performed to remove the extradural spinal masses. Results of histologic examination of tissue samples were consistent with EMH. Following surgery, clinical signs of paraparesis resolved, and there was no recurrence of the masses 24 months after surgery. Extramedullary hematopoesis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in dogs in which results of diagnostic imaging indicate a epidural mass. In human patients, spinal EMH usually occurs secondary to an underlying hematologic disease, but it can also occur spontaneously. Treatment options reported for humans include surgical decompression, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and blood transfusion. The dog of this report responded favorably to surgical decompression and was clinically normal 2 years after surgery.

  15. Effects of cord compression on fetal blood flow distribution and O2 delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itskovitz, J.; LaGamma, E.F.; Rudolph, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    The authors used the radionuclide microsphere technique in nine fetal lambs to examine the effect of partial cord compression on distribution of cardiac output and O 2 delivery to fetal organs and venous flow patterns. With a 50% reduction in umbilical blood flow the fraction of fetal cardiac output distributed to the brain, heart, carcass, kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract increased. Pulmonary blood flow fell. O 2 delivery to the brain and myocardium was maintained but was reduced to peripheral, renal, and gastrointestinal circulations. Hepatic blood flow decreased and O 2 delivery fell by 75%. The proportion of umbilical venous blood passing through the ductus venosus increased from 43.9 to 71.8%. The preferential distribution of ductus venosus blood flow through the foramen ovale was enhanced and the proportion of O 2 delivery to upper body organs derived from the ductus venosus increased. Abdominal inferior vena caval blood flow increased, and it was also preferentially distributed through the foramen ovale and constituted the major fraction of the arterial blood supply to the upper body organs. Thus cord compression modified the distribution of cardiac output and the patterns of venous returns in the fetus. This pattern of circulatory response differs from that observed with other causes of reduced O 2 delivery

  16. Vocal cord paralysis due to extralaryngeal causes : evaluation with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Hwa; Mo, Jong Hyun; Moon, Sung Hee; Na, Dong Gyu; Byun, Hong Sik; Cho, Jae Min; Han, Boo Kyung; Son, Young Ik; Baek, Chung Whan

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the use of CT in patients with vocal cord paralysis due to extralaryngeal causes, and to use CT for the assessment of extralaryngeal diseases causing vocal cord paralysis. We prospectively studied the results of CT in 41 patients with vocal cord paralysis in whom laryngoscopy revealed no laryngeal cause and physical examination demonstrated no definite extralaryngeal cause. The extralaryngeal cause of vocal cord palsy was determined after comprehensive clinical diagnosis. Enhanced CT scans were acquired from the skull base and continued to the level of the aorticopulmonary window. We used CT to assess the detection rate for extralaryngeal causes and to extimate the extent of extralaryngeal disease and the distribution of lesions. CT revealed that in 20 of 41 patients(49%) the extralarygeal causes of vocal paralysis were as follows : thyroid cancer(n=10), nodal disease(n=6), esophageal cancer(n=2), neurogenic tumor(n=1), aortic aneurysm(n=1). Lesions were located on the left side in 13 patients(65%), and in the tracheoesophageal groove in 15(75%). In patients with vocal cord paralysis in whom no definite lesion is seen on physical examination , CT could be a useful primary imaging method for the assessment of extralaryngeal causes

  17. The Radiation Therapy for Spinal Cord Compression in Hematologic Malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Ah; Choi, Ihl Bohng; Chung, Su Mi

    1994-01-01

    Spinal cord compression, an oncologic emergency, is a rare complication of hematologic malignancy. Our experience was obtained with a series 32 patients following retrospective analysis for assessing the role of radiation therapy and identifying the prognostic factors affecting on treatment outcome. Diagnosis was usually made by means of radiologic study such as myelography or computerized tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neurologic examination. Five cases were diagnosed by subjective symptom only with high index of suspicion. In 31 cases, the treatment consisted in radiation therapy alone and the remained one patient had laminectomy before radiation therapy because of diagnostic doubts. Total treatment doses ranged from 800 cGy to 4000 cGy with median of 2999 cGy. Initially large fraction size more than 250 cGy were used in 13 patients with rapidly progressed neurologic deficit. The clinical parameters considered in evaluating the response to treatment were backache, motor-sensory performance and sphincter function. Half on all patients showed good response. Partial response and no response were noted in 37.5% and 12.5%, respectively. Our results showed higher response rate than those of other solid tumor series. The degree of neurologic deficit an that time of diagnosis was the most important predictor of treatment outcome. The elapsed time from development of symptoms to start of treatment was significantly affected on the outcome. But histology of primary tumor, total dose and use of initial large fraction size were not significantly affect on the outcome. These results confirmed the value of early diagnosis and treatment especially in radiosensitive hematologic malignancy

  18. Radiotherapy of metastatic spinal cord compression in very elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, Dirk; Hoskin, Peter J.; Karstens, Johann H.; Rudat, Volker; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Owing to the aging of the population, the proportion of elderly patients receiving cancer treatment has increased. This study investigated the results of radiotherapy (RT) for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) in the very elderly, because few data are available for these patients. Methods and Materials: The data from 308 patients aged ≥75 years who received short-course (treatment time 1-5 days) or long-course RT (2-4 weeks) for MSCC were retrospectively analyzed for functional outcome, local control, and survival. Furthermore, nine potential prognostic factors were investigated: gender, performance status, interval from tumor diagnosis to MSCC, tumor type, number of involved vertebrae, other bone or visceral metastases, ambulatory status, and speed at which motor deficits developed. Results: Improvement of motor deficits occurred in 25% of patients, with no further progression of MSCC in an additional 59%. The 1-year local control and survival rate was 92% and 43%, respectively. Improved functional outcomes were associated with ambulatory status and slower developing motor deficits. Improved local control resulted from long-course RT. Improved survival was associated with a longer interval from tumor diagnosis to MSCC, tumor type (breast/prostate cancer, myeloma/lymphoma), lack of visceral or other bone metastases, ambulatory status, and a slower development of motor deficits. Conclusion: Short- and long-course RT are similarly effective in patients aged ≥75 years regarding functional outcome and survival. Long-course RT provided better local control. Patients with better expected survival should receive long-course RT and others short-course RT. The criteria for selection of an appropriate regimen for MSCC in very elderly patients should be the same as for younger individuals

  19. The relationship between central motor conduction time and spinal cord compression in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikita, T; Tanaka, N; Nakanishi, K; Kamei, N; Sumiyoshi, N; Kotaka, S; Adachi, N; Ochi, M

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective study. Few studies have reported a relationship between central motor conduction time (CMCT), which evaluates corticospinal function, and degree of spinal cord compression in patients with myelopathy. Thus, there is no consensus on predicting the degree of prolonged CMCT on the basis of the degree of spinal cord compression. If a correlation exists between CMCT and spinal cord compression, then spinal cord compression may be a useful noninvasive clinical indicator of corticospinal function. Therefore, this study evaluated the relationship between CMCT and cervical spinal cord compression measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Hiroshima University Hospital in Japan. We studied 33 patients undergoing laminoplasty. Patients exhibited significant cervical spinal cord compression on both MRI and intraoperative electrophysiological examination. We assessed transcranial magnetic stimulation measurement of CMCT; spinal cord compression parameters such as area, lateral diameter, anteroposterior diameter and flattening of the spinal cord at the lesion site and C2/3 levels on MRI; and pre- versus postoperative Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores. Correlations between CMCT and flattening as well as anteroposterior diameter of the spinal cord at the lesion level were observed. Strong correlations between CMCT and the ratio of the flattening and anteroposterior diameter parameters at the lesion level to that at the C2/3 level were also observed. Measurement of spinal cord compression may be useful for the evaluation of corticospinal function as a proxy for CMCT in patients with CSM.

  20. Effect of melatonin on the functional recovery from experimental traumatic compression of the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiaveto-de-Souza, A.; Silva, C.A. da; Defino, H.L.A.; Bel, E.A.Del

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is an extremely severe condition with no available effective therapies. We examined the effect of melatonin on traumatic compression of the spinal cord. Sixty male adult Wistar rats were divided into three groups: sham-operated animals and animals with 35 and 50% spinal cord compression with a polycarbonate rod spacer. Each group was divided into two subgroups, each receiving an injection of vehicle or melatonin (2.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) 5 min prior to and 1, 2, 3, and 4 h after injury. Functional recovery was monitored weekly by the open-field test, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan locomotor scale and the inclined plane test. Histological changes of the spinal cord were examined 35 days after injury. Motor scores were progressively lower as spacer size increased according to the motor scale and inclined plane test evaluation at all times of assessment. The results of the two tests were correlated. The open-field test presented similar results with a less pronounced difference between the 35 and 50% compression groups. The injured groups presented functional recovery that was more evident in the first and second weeks. Animals receiving melatonin treatment presented more pronounced functional recovery than vehicle-treated animals as measured by the motor scale or inclined plane. NADPH-d histochemistry revealed integrity of the spinal cord thoracic segment in sham-operated animals and confirmed the severity of the lesion after spinal cord narrowing. The results obtained after experimental compression of the spinal cord support the hypothesis that melatonin may be considered for use in clinical practice because of its protective effect on the secondary wave of neuronal death following the primary wave after spinal cord injury

  1. Effect of melatonin on the functional recovery from experimental traumatic compression of the spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiaveto-de-Souza, A. [Departamento de Morfofisiologia, Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Silva, C.A. da [Departamento de Morfologia,Estomatologia e Fisiologia, Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Defino, H.L.A. [Departamento de Orthopedia e Traumatologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Bel, E.A.Del [Departamento de Morfologia,Estomatologia e Fisiologia, Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2013-04-12

    Spinal cord injury is an extremely severe condition with no available effective therapies. We examined the effect of melatonin on traumatic compression of the spinal cord. Sixty male adult Wistar rats were divided into three groups: sham-operated animals and animals with 35 and 50% spinal cord compression with a polycarbonate rod spacer. Each group was divided into two subgroups, each receiving an injection of vehicle or melatonin (2.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) 5 min prior to and 1, 2, 3, and 4 h after injury. Functional recovery was monitored weekly by the open-field test, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan locomotor scale and the inclined plane test. Histological changes of the spinal cord were examined 35 days after injury. Motor scores were progressively lower as spacer size increased according to the motor scale and inclined plane test evaluation at all times of assessment. The results of the two tests were correlated. The open-field test presented similar results with a less pronounced difference between the 35 and 50% compression groups. The injured groups presented functional recovery that was more evident in the first and second weeks. Animals receiving melatonin treatment presented more pronounced functional recovery than vehicle-treated animals as measured by the motor scale or inclined plane. NADPH-d histochemistry revealed integrity of the spinal cord thoracic segment in sham-operated animals and confirmed the severity of the lesion after spinal cord narrowing. The results obtained after experimental compression of the spinal cord support the hypothesis that melatonin may be considered for use in clinical practice because of its protective effect on the secondary wave of neuronal death following the primary wave after spinal cord injury.

  2. Local control and survival in spinal cord compression from lymphoma and myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallington, M.; Mendis, S.; Premawardhana, U.; Sanders, P.; Shahsavar-Haghighi, K.

    1997-01-01

    Background: Between 1979 and 1989, 48 cases of extradural spinal cord and cauda equina compression in patients with lymphoma (24) and myeloma (24) received local radiation therapy for control of cord compression. Twenty five (52%) of the cases were treated by surgical decompression prior to irradiation. Thirty five (73%) of the cases received chemotherapy following the diagnosis of spinal cord compression. Post-treatment outcome was assessed at a minimum follow-up of 24 months to determine the significant clinical and treatment factors following irradiation. Results: Seventeen (71%) of the lymphoma and 15 (63%) of the myeloma patients achieved local control, here defined as improvement to, or maintenance of ambulation with minimal or no assistance for 3 months from the start of radiotherapy. At a median follow-up of 30 (2-98) for the lymphoma and 10 (1-87) months for the myeloma patients, the results showed that survival following local radiation therapy for cord compression was independently influenced by the underlying disease type in favour of lymphoma compared to myeloma (P<0.01). The median duration of local control and survival figures were 23 and 48 months for the lymphomas compared to 4.5 and 10 months for the myeloma cases. Survival was also independently influenced by preservation of sphincter function at initial presentation (P<0.02) and the achievement of local control following treatment (P<0.01). Discussion: We conclude that while disease type independently impacts on outcome following treatment of spinal cord compression in lymphoma and myeloma, within both of these disease type the achievement of local control of spinal cord compression is an important management priority, for without local control survival may be adversely affected

  3. Radiological diagnosis of chronic spinal cord compressive lesion at thoraco-lumbar junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyanagi, Izumi; Isu, Toyohiko; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Akino, Minoru; Abe, Hiroshi; Tashiro, Kunio; Miyasaka, Kazuo; Abe, Satoru; Kaneda, Kiyoshi

    1988-01-01

    Radiological findings in five cases with chronic spinal cord compressive lesion at thoraco-lumbar junction were reported. Three cases had spondylosis and two cases had ossification of yellow ligament (OYL). The levels of the lesions were T12/L1 in three cases and T11/12 in two cases. Two out of three spondylotic patients had also OYL at the same level. The five cases consisted of three men and two women. The ages ranged from 42 to 60 years old with a mean age of 53 years old. Neurologically, every patient showed flaccid paresis and sensory disturbance of the legs. Two cases had sensory disturbance of stocking type. The intervals from the onset of the symptoms to the final diagnosis were 6 months, 7 years, 8 years, 11 years and 12 years. Myelography showed anterior spinal cord compression by bony spur in spondylotic patients, and posterior compression by OYL in other cases. Myelography in flexion posture disclosed the cord compression by bony spur more clearly in two out of three spondylotic patients. Delayed CT-myelography showed intramedullary filling of contrast material in two cases, which indicated degenerative change or microcavitation due to long term compression of the spinal cord. MRI was taken in three spondylotic patients and could directly show compression of the spinal cord. Difficulty in detecting abnormality at thoraco-lumbar junction on plain roentgenogram, and similarity of the symptoms to peripheral nerve disease often lead to a delay in diagnosis. The significance of dynamic myelography and delayed CT-myelography when dealing with such a lesion was discussed here. MRI is also a useful method for diagnosing a compressive lesion at the thoraco-lumbar junction. (author)

  4. Radiological diagnosis of chronic spinal cord compressive lesion at thoraco-lumbar junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Izumi; Isu, Toyohiko; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Akino, Minoru; Abe, Hiroshi; Tashiro, Kunio; Miyasaka, Kazuo; Abe, Satoru; Kaneda, Kiyoshi

    1988-10-01

    Radiological findings in five cases with chronic spinal cord compressive lesion at thoraco-lumbar junction were reported. Three cases had spondylosis and two cases had ossification of yellow ligament (OYL). The levels of the lesions were T12/L1 in three cases and T11/12 in two cases. Two out of three spondylotic patients had also OYL at the same level. The five cases consisted of three men and two women. The ages ranged from 42 to 60 years old with a mean age of 53 years old. Neurologically, every patient showed flaccid paresis and sensory disturbance of the legs. Two cases had sensory disturbance of stocking type. The intervals from the onset of the symptoms to the final diagnosis were 6 months, 7 years, 8 years, 11 years and 12 years. Myelography showed anterior spinal cord compression by bony spur in spondylotic patients, and posterior compression by OYL in other cases. Myelography in flexion posture disclosed the cord compression by bony spur more clearly in two out of three spondylotic patients. Delayed CT-myelography showed intramedullary filling of contrast material in two cases, which indicated degenerative change or microcavitation due to long term compression of the spinal cord. MRI was taken in three spondylotic patients and could directly show compression of the spinal cord. Difficulty in detecting abnormality at thoraco-lumbar junction on plain roentgenogram, and similarity of the symptoms to peripheral nerve disease often lead to a delay in diagnosis. The significance of dynamic myelography and delayed CT-myelography when dealing with such a lesion was discussed here. MRI is also a useful method for diagnosing a compressive lesion at the thoraco-lumbar junction.

  5. The relation between location of cervical cord compression and the location of myelomalacia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smorgick, Yossi; Anekstein, Yoram; Tal, Sigal; Yassin, Amit; Tamir, Eran; Mirovsky, Yigal

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the location of the cervical cord compression and the increased signal intensity within the cervical cord on T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) in patients with cervical myelopathy and myelomalacia. We reviewed 1,615 MRI reports from January 2011 to May 2013 from a single institution. Of the 1,615 reports reviewed, 168 patients were diagnosed with increased signal intensity within the cervical spine on T2WI. After applying the exclusion criteria 82 patients were included in the study. The MRIs of these 82 patients were then reviewed and the location of the increased signal intensity on T2WI in relation to the location of the pressure on the spinal cord was recorded. In more than 50 % of the cases the lesions with increased signal intensity on T2WI either were located distal to the pressure on the spinal cord or started at the level of the pressure and extended to an area distal to the pressure. In 26 out of the 92 lesions with increased signal intensity on T2WI, the lesion started proximal to the pressure on the spinal cord and extended distal to it. In only 3 out of the 92 lesions, the lesion with increased signal intensity on T2WI was solely located proximal to the pressure on the spinal cord. In 5 other cases the lesion with increased signal intensity on T2WI started proximal to the level of pressure on the spinal cord and extended into the level of pressure on the spinal cord (p < 0.001; Table 1). Cervical myelomalacia may appear proximal, distal or at the level of the compressed cord. It rarely appears solely proximal to the pressure area on the cord. (orig.)

  6. “White Cord Syndrome” of Acute Tetraplegia after Anterior Cervical Decompression and Fusion for Chronic Spinal Cord Compression: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsley R. Chin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paralysis is the most feared postoperative complication of ACDF and occurs most often due to an epidural hematoma. In the absence of a clear etiology, inadequate decompression or vascular insult such as ischemia/reperfusion injury are the usual suspects. Herewith we report a case of complete loss of somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs during elective ACDF at C4-5 and C5-6 followed by postoperative C6 incomplete tetraplegia without any discernible technical cause. A postoperative MRI demonstrated a large area of high signal changes on T2-weighted MRI intrinsic to the cord “white cord syndrome” but no residual compression. This was considered consistent with spinal cord gliosis with possible acute edema. The acute decompression of the herniated disc resulted in cord expansion and rush-in reperfusion. We postulate that this may have led to disruption in the blood brain barrier (BBB and triggered a cascade of reperfusion injuries resulting in acute neurologic dysfunction. At 16 months postoperatively our patient is recovering slowly and is now a Nurick Grade 4.

  7. Acetabular paralabral cyst causing compression of the sciatic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caoimhe Byrne, MB BCh BAO

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Acetabular paralabral cysts are common. They vary in their clinical presentation and may be asymptomatic or cause pain and restriction at the hip joint. In rare instances they may cause symptoms by compressing local neurovascular structures. We report a case of symptomatic compression of the sciatic nerve by a posteriorly displaced acetabular paralabral cyst.

  8. Spinal cord injury - Symptoms and causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and symptoms: Loss of movement Loss or altered sensation, including the ability to feel heat, cold and touch Loss of bowel or bladder control Exaggerated reflex activities or spasms Changes in sexual function, sexual ... or an intense stinging sensation caused by damage to the nerve fibers in ...

  9. [Unusual ischemic cord compression by discal hernia (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergeret, J; Noble, Y; Barat, M; Guérin, J; Arné, L

    The discal hernia are unfrequent in dorsal localization and neurological appearances are deceptive. We report a case with amyotrophic and fasciculations developing a progressive spinal cord amyotrophy aspect. The complementary investigations (gaz myelography and spinal angiography) show the discal hernia in T11-T12 which was operated successfully. The vascular factor role is discussed about semiologic and pathogenic view.

  10. Hydralazine inhibits compression and acrolein-mediated injuries in ex vivo spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Kristin; Nehrt, Genevieve; Ouyang, Hui; Duerstock, Brad; Shi, Riyi

    2008-02-01

    We have previously shown that acrolein, a lipid peroxidation byproduct, is significantly increased following spinal cord injury in vivo, and that exposure to neuronal cells results in oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, increased membrane permeability, impaired axonal conductivity, and eventually cell death. Acrolein thus may be a key player in the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury, where lipid peroxidation is known to be involved. The current study demonstrates that the acrolein scavenger hydralazine protects against not only acrolein-mediated injury, but also compression in guinea pig spinal cord ex vivo. Specifically, hydralazine (500 mumol/L to 1 mmol/L) can significantly alleviate acrolein (100-500 mumol/L)-induced superoxide production, glutathione depletion, mitochondrial dysfunction, loss of membrane integrity, and reduced compound action potential conduction. Additionally, 500 mumol/L hydralazine significantly attenuated compression-mediated membrane disruptions at 2 and 3 h following injury. This was consistent with our findings that acrolein-lys adducts were increased following compression injury ex vivo, an effect that was prevented by hydralazine treatment. These findings provide further evidence for the role of acrolein in spinal cord injury, and suggest that acrolein-scavenging drugs such as hydralazine may represent a novel therapy to effectively reduce oxidative stress in disorders such as spinal cord injury and neurodegenerative diseases, where oxidative stress is known to play a role.

  11. Causes of Acquired Vocal Cord Palsy in Indian Scenario.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna Sebastian

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Vocal cord paresis or paralysis occurs due to lesion in the vagus nerve. Vocal cord paralysis can lead to dysphonia as well as dysphagia which lead the patient to frustration and emotional problems. The literature available on the etiology and the problems faced by them in Indian population is very scanty. Hence a prospective study was done on 41 Patients with vocal cord palsy who were referred to the Department of ENT for voice assessment and management from March 1st 2012 till 1st August 2012. The medical and surgical reports were examined. They were evaluated by an otorhinolaryngologist, and a Speech Language Pathologist. Diagnosis was made based on video stroboscopic findings. We also examined voice-related quality of life (V-RQOL outcomes in these patients. In this study, endo-tracheal intubation (15/41; 36.5% was the major cause of vocal cord palsy. The second major cause for vocal cord palsy in our study was surgical trauma (iatrogenic which constituted 26.8% (11/41, out of which thyroidectomy contributed to 81.81% (9/11 and cardiac surgery (Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG contributed to 18.18% (2/11. Neurological problems caused 14.63% (6/41 of the total cases. Non-surgical trauma constituted 9.75% (4/41 of the total patients. Left recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis was found as a complication of heart disease in 7.3%(3/41. Tuberculosis of lungs and cancer of lungs accounted to be the rarest causes. Hoarseness of voice was the most common symptom with associated dysphagia in a few. The voice related quality of life of these patients was found to be poor. They were found to have problems in the social-emotional domain and physical functioning domain.

  12. A survival score for patients with metastatic spinal cord compression from prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rades, D.; Douglas, S.; Veninga, T.; Bajrovic, A.; Stalpers, L. J. A.; Hoskin, P. J.; Rudat, V.; Schild, S. E.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and validate a survival scoring system for patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) from prostate cancer. Of 436 patients, 218 patients were assigned to the test group and 218 patients to the validation group. Eight potential prognostic factors (age,

  13. Extradural thoracic spinal cord compression : Unusual initial presentation of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Nicholas. A.; van Dijk, J. Marc C.; Slart, Riemer. H. J. A.; Coppes, Maarten. H.; van Imhoff, Gustaaf. W.; Verschuuren, Eric. A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a serious complication after solid-organ transplantation. We report a lung transplant recipient presenting with lower limb weakness as a result of extradural cord compression from PTLD. Diagnosis was made by laminectomy of T-3 with partial

  14. Primary vertebral and spinal epidural non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boukobza, M.; Mazel, C.; Touboul, E.

    1996-01-01

    We examined eight patients with primary spinal epidural non-Hodgkin's lymphoma presenting with spinal cord compression and proven histologically after laminectomy (7 cases) or biopsy (1 case) by MRI. The most common findings were an isointense or low signal relative to the spinal cord on T1-weighted images (T1WI) and high signal on T2-weighted images (T2WI). Spinal cord compression, vertebral bone marrow and paravertebral extension were assessed. Contrast enhancement was intense in seven of the eight cases and homogeneous in all of them. T2WI (performed in 2 cases) may be useful to distinguish metastatic carcinomas and sarcomas. T1WI demonstrated the full extent of the epidural lesion, which was well-delineated in all cases. When the paravertebral extension is not well-defined, a study with contrast medium should be performed. (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab

  15. Rhabdomyosarcome para vertebral : cause rare de compression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Le rhabdomyosarcome est la tumeur maligne mésenchymateuse la plus fréquente chez l'enfant. Il se voit essentiellement au niveau des extrémités et la sphère ORL. La localisation paravertébrale avec compression médullaire est beaucoup plus rare. Les auteurs rapportent un cas de rhabdomyosarcome paravertébral ...

  16. Profile of malignant spinal cord compression: One year study at regional cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Tariq Rasool

    2016-01-01

    Results: Most of the patients were in the age group of 41–60 years and there was no gender preponderance in patients. Female breast cancer was the most common incident (15.5% malignancy followed by multiple myeloma, lung, and prostatic carcinoma. Lower dorsal spine was the most common site of compression (35% followed by lumbar (31% and mid-dorsal (26% spine. 70 (91% patients had cord compression subsequent to bone metastasis while as other patients had leptomeningeal metastasis. In 31 (40% patients, spinal cord compression was the presenting symptom. Overall, only 26 patients had motor improvement after treatment. Conclusion: Grade of power before treatment was predictive of response to treatment and overall outcome of motor or sensory functions. Neurodeficit of more than 10 days duration was associated with poor outcome in neurological function.

  17. Mechanical properties of the human spinal cord under the compressive loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Alireza; Shojaei, Ahmad; Tehrani, Pedram

    2017-12-01

    The spinal cord as the most complex and critical part of the human body is responsible for the transmission of both motor and sensory impulses between the body and the brain. Due to its pivotal role any types of physical injury in that disrupts its function following by shortfalls, including the minor motor and sensory malfunctions as well as complicate quadriplegia and lifelong ventilator dependency. In order to shed light on the injuries to the spinal cord, the application of the computational models to simulate the trauma impact loading to that are deemed required. Nonetheless, it has not been fulfilled since there is a paucity of knowledge about the mechanical properties of the spinal cord, especially the cervical one, under the compressive loading on the grounds of the difficulty in obtaining this tissue from the human body. This study was aimed at experimentally measuring the mechanical properties of the human cervical spinal cord of 24 isolated fresh samples under the unconfined compressive loading at a relatively low strain rate. The stress-strain data revealed the elastic modulus and maximum/failure stress of 40.12±6.90 and 62.26±5.02kPa, respectively. Owing to the nonlinear response of the spinal cord, the Yeoh, Ogden, and Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic material models have also been employed. The results may have implications not only for understanding the linear elastic and nonlinear hyperelastic mechanical properties of the cervical spinal cord under the compressive loading, but also for providing a raw data for investigating the injury as a result of the trauma thru the numerical simulations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Vertebral metastases with high risk of symptomatic malignant spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamamoto, Yasushi; Kataoka, Masaaki; Senba, Takatoshi

    2009-01-01

    To find vertebral metastases with high risk of symptomatic malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC), features of vertebral metastases caused motor deficits of the lower extremities were examined. From 2004 through 2006, 78 patients with metastases of the thoracic and/or the cervical spine were treated with radiation therapy (RT). Of these, 86 irradiated lesions in 73 patients were evaluable by magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography at the initiation of RT and were reviewed retrospectively in this study. Twenty-eight patients (38%) had motor deficits at the initiation of RT. Assessed factors were age, sex, primary disease (lung, breast, digestive system and other cancer), lamina involvement, main level of tumor location and vertebral-body involvement. Incidence of motor deficits at the initiation of RT was 55% for lesions with lamina involvement and 5% for lesions without lamina involvement (P 0.9999, P=0.7798, P=0.1702 and P=0.366, respectively). Vertebral metastases with lamina involvement tended to cause symptomatic MSCC. Latent development of MSCC occurred more frequently in the MTS compared with other levels of the thoracic and the cervical spine. (author)

  19. High-speed video analysis improves the accuracy of spinal cord compression measurement in a mouse contusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournely, Marion; Petit, Yvan; Wagnac, Éric; Laurin, Jérôme; Callot, Virginie; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean

    2018-01-01

    Animal models of spinal cord injuries aim to utilize controlled and reproducible conditions. However, a literature review reveals that mouse contusion studies using equivalent protocols may show large disparities in the observed impact force vs. cord compression relationship. The overall purpose of this study was to investigate possible sources of bias in these measurements. The specific objective was to improve spinal cord compression measurements using a video-based setup to detect the impactor-spinal cord time-to-contact. A force-controlled 30kDyn unilateral contusion at C4 vertebral level was performed in six mice with the Infinite Horizon impactor (IH). High-speed video was used to determine the time-to-contact between the impactor tip and the spinal cord and to compute the related displacement of the tip into the tissue: the spinal cord compression and the compression ratio. Delayed time-to-contact detection with the IH device led to an underestimation of the cord compression. Compression values indicated by the IH were 64% lower than those based on video analysis (0.33mm vs. 0.88mm). Consequently, the mean compression ratio derived from the device was underestimated when compared to the value derived from video analysis (22% vs. 61%). Default time-to-contact detection from the IH led to significant errors in spinal cord compression assessment. Accordingly, this may explain some of the reported data discrepancies in the literature. The proposed setup could be implemented by users of contusion devices to improve the quantative description of the primary injury inflicted to the spinal cord. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Somatosensory evoked potentials (S.E.P.) in slow pathological compression of the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossini, P M; Greco, F; David, P; Pisano, L; De Palma, L; Tonali, P

    1979-12-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials (S.E.P.) were used to examine twelve patients who had slow compressive lesions of the spinal cord (ten cases of spondylotic myelopathy, one neurinoma, one metastasis of a vertebral body). 73 per cent of the recordings were found to be abnormally reduced in amplitude, and/or showed prolonged latency times aa regards the primary and secondary complex. Patients with a clinical lesion of the dorsal column showed a clear reduction in amplitude in the recordings (sometimes coupled with slowed latency), especially in the primary complex. Patients with symptoms indicative of an injury to the ventrolateral region of the spinal cord showed tracings with alterations most of all related to the secondary complex. In 76 per cent of cases, the somatosensory evoked potentials were in accordance with the level of the compression, the degree of invalidity, and the clinical picture.

  1. Contemporary treatment with radiosurgery for spine metastasis and spinal cord compression in 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Sam Uel; Yoon, Han Hah; Stessin, Alexander; Gutman, Fred; Rosiello, Arthur; Davis, Raphael [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook (United States)

    2015-03-15

    With the progress of image-guided localization, body immobilization system, and computerized delivery of intensity-modulated radiation delivery, it became possible to perform spine radiosurgery. The next question is how to translate the high technology treatment to the clinical application. Clinical trials have been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of spine radiosurgery and efficacy of the treatment in the setting of spine metastasis, leading to the randomized trials by a cooperative group. Radiosurgery has also demonstrated its efficacy to decompress the spinal cord compression in selected group of patients. The experience indicates that spine radiosurgery has a potential to change the clinical practice in the management of spine metastasis and spinal cord compression.

  2. Extramedullary hematopoiesis with spinal cord compression in a child with thalassemia intermedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ileri, Talia; Azik, Fatih; Ertem, Mehmet; Uysal, Zumrut; Gozdasoglu, Sevgi

    2009-09-01

    Spinal cord compression due to extramedullary hematopoiesis is an extremely rare complication of thalassemia intermedia. No cases with this complication have been reported in the first decade of life, because masses of heterotropic marrow developed in patients as a result of continuous erythropoiesis. We report the 9-year-old patient suffering from thalassemia intermedia and presenting spinal cord compression. We also review the literature about treatment options, because there is no consensus about the optimal treatment of these patients. Our patient was successfully treated with radiation therapy followed by hydroxyurea. With this combination therapy, he had no recurrence during the 4-year follow-up period. Clinical awareness of this phenomenon with the early treatment is essential for optimizing the successful outcome.

  3. Severe hemorrhage from the umbilical cord at birth: a preventable cause of neonatal shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neetu; Suresh, Gautham

    2013-01-01

    Posthemorrhagic anemia is a rare but important cause of anemia in neonates, second only to hemolytic anemia of newborn. Most cases of posthemorrhagic anemia are reported from fetomaternal hemorrhage or umbilical cord accidents in utero. This case report describes a preterm infant who developed severe anemia and shock immediately after delivery related to an acute hemorrhage through patent umbilical cord vessels secondary to a tear in the umbilical cord at the site of cord clamping. We believe that umbilical cord bleeding from errors in cord clamping could be an important cause of acute blood loss in the delivery room and that it may result in significant clinical morbidity, especially in extremely premature infants.

  4. Acute complete paraplegia of 8-year-old girl caused by spinal cord infarction following minor trauma complicated with longitudinal signal change of spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Kosei; Tanaka, Yuji; Kanai, Hiroyuki; Oshima, Yasushi

    2017-05-01

    Spinal cord infarction followed by minor trauma in pediatric patients is rare and causes serious paralysis. Fibrocartilaginous embolism (FCE) is a possible diagnosis and there have been no consecutive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reports. Here, we report a case of an acute complete paraplegia with spinal cord infarction and longitudinal spinal cord signal change following minor trauma in an 8-year-old girl. An 8-year-old girl presented to our hospital emergency services with total paraplegia 2 h after she hit her back and neck after doing a handstand and falling down. She completely lost pain, temperature sensation, and a sense of vibration below her bilateral anterior thighs. Four hours later on MRI, the T2-weighted sequence showed no spinal cord compression or signal change in vertebral bodies. The patient was treated with rehabilitation after complete bed rest. A week after the trauma, the T2-weighted sequence indicated longitudinal extension of the lesion between T11 and C6 vertebral level with ring-shaped signal change. In addition, the diffusion-weighted MRI showed increased signal below C6 vertebral level. Two weeks after the trauma, we performed the T2 star sequence images, which showed minor bleeding at T11 vertebral area and spinal cord edema below C6. Four weeks after the trauma, MRI showed minor lesion at C6 vertebral level, but spinal cord atrophy was observed at T11 vertebral level without disc signal change. Thirteen weeks after the trauma, her cervical spinal cord became almost intact and severe atrophy of the spinal cord at T11 vertebral level. At 1 year following her injury, complete paraplegia remained with sensory loss below T11 level. Her clinical presentation, lack of evidence for other plausible diagnosis, and consecutive MRI findings made FCE at T11 vertebral level with pencil-shaped softening the most likely diagnosis. In addition, consecutive cervical MRI indicated minor cervical spinal cord injury. This Grand Round case highlights

  5. Motor network recovery in patients with chronic spinal cord compression: a longitudinal study following decompression surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Kayla; Goncalves, Sandy; Bartha, Robert; Duggal, Neil

    2018-01-19

    OBJECTIVE The authors used functional MRI to assess cortical reorganization of the motor network after chronic spinal cord compression and to characterize the plasticity that occurs following surgical intervention. METHODS A 3-T MRI scanner was used to acquire functional images of the brain in 22 patients with reversible cervical spinal cord compression and 10 control subjects. Controls performed a finger-tapping task on 3 different occasions (baseline, 6-week follow-up, and 6-month follow-up), whereas patients performed the identical task before surgery and again 6 weeks and 6 months after spinal decompression surgery. RESULTS After surgical intervention, an increased percentage blood oxygen level-dependent signal and volume of activation was observed within the contralateral and ipsilateral motor network. The volume of activation of the contralateral primary motor cortex was associated with functional measures both at baseline (r = 0.55, p motor area 6 months after surgery was associated with increased function 6 months after surgery (r = 0.48, p motor network plays complementary roles in maintaining neurological function in patients with spinal cord compression and may be critical in the recovery phase following surgery.

  6. Isolated Spinal Metastasis with Spinal Cord Compression Leads to a Diagnosis of a Follicular Thyroid Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshkezi, Gentian; Galgano, Michael; Libohova, Silva; Marawar, Satya

    2015-10-12

    Thyroid carcinoma initially presents with clinical symptoms due to metastatic lesions in less than 5% of cases. Spinal cord compression from an epidural metastatic lesion as a first symptom is extremely rare. One would expect such a presentation to occur much later in the course of the disease. We are presenting a case report of a follicular thyroid carcinoma that presented with spinal cord compression from a thoracic epidural metastatic lesion in a previously healthy 55-year-old male. A single metastasis of follicular thyroid carcinoma presenting with posterior spinal cord compression is rare. In this particular case, our management included a mid-thoracic laminectomy, followed by resection of the epidural lesion. Once the surgical pathology confirmed the diagnosis of a follicular thyroid carcinoma, the general surgery team performed a near total thyroidectomy, after which he received radioactive iodine therapy. The patient is symptom-free at his three-year follow-up. Initial presentation of follicular thyroid carcinoma with symptomatic thoracic myelopathy from an epidural metastasis is very uncommon. An early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention provided an excellent outcome.

  7. Spinal cord compression secondary to extramedullary hematopoiesis: A rareness in a young adult with thalassemia major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fareed, Shehab; Soliman, Ashraf T; De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Kohla, Samah; Soliman, Dina; Khirfan, Diala; Tambuerello, Adriana; Talaat, Mohamed; Nashwan, Abdulqadir; Caparrotti, Palmira; Yassin, Mohamed A

    2017-08-23

    We report a case of a thalassemia major male patient with back pain associated to severe weakness in lower extremities resulting in the ability to ambulate only with assistance. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of  thoracic and lumbosacral spine was requested. A posterior intraspinal extradural mass lesion compressing the spinal cord at the level of thoracic T5-8 was present, suggesting an extramedullary hematopoietic centre, compressing the spinal cord. He was treated successfully with thalassemia major alone. The patient was treated with blood transfusion, dexamethasone, morphine and paracetamol, followed by radiotherapy in 10 fractions to the spine (daily fraction of 2Gy from T3 to T9, total dose 20 Gy). His pain and neurologic examination quickly improved. A new MRI of the spine, one week after radiotherapy, showed an improvement of the extramedullary hematopoietic mass compression. In conclusion, EMH should be considered in every patient with ineffective erythropoiesis and spinal cord symptoms. MRI is the most effective method of demonstrating EMH. The rapid recognition and treatment can dramatically alleviate symptoms. There is still considerable controversy regarding indications, benefits, and risks of each of modality of treatment due to the infrequency of this disorder.

  8. Is Nuchal Cord a Perfect Scapegoat: A Retrospective Analysis from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mubeen

    Background: Entanglement of the umbilical cord around the fetal neck (nuchal cord) is quite a common finding at delivery. It is often assumed that nuchal cord causes cord compression and thus low birth weight and intrapartum complications. Aim: The aim of this article is to study the effect of nuchal cord on the mode of ...

  9. Wegener granulomatosis causing compressive optic neuropathy in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakalu, Vinay K; Ahmad, Amjad Z

    2009-01-01

    Wegener granulomatosis is an uncommon illness in children that is known to cause myriad ophthalmic complications, but it is rarely a cause of compressive optic neuropathy. A 17-year-old Hispanic boy with Wegener granulomatosis developed unilateral loss of vision, pain, and proptosis of the left eye. CT findings revealed enlargement of bilateral lacrimal glands with compression of the left optic nerve. The patient was admitted for high-dose intravenous corticosteroids and daily oral cyclophosphamide treatment. The patient's vision, pain, and proptosis improved dramatically, and he is now stable on mycophenolate mofetil and prednisone.

  10. Diffusion tensor tractography of normal and compressed spinal cord: a preliminary study at 3.0 T MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei; Chang Shixin; Hao Nanxin; Du Yushan; Wang Yibin; Zong Genlin; Cao Kaiming; Lu Jianping; Zhao Cheng; Qin Wen

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the feasibility and clinical values of diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) in the spinal cord at 3.0 T MR. Methods: Forty patients with spinal cord compression including cervical cord herniation and cervical spondylosis (30 cases), tumors in spinal canal (9 cases) and old injury in cervical vertebrae (1 cases) and 20 healthy volunteers participated in this study. Single-shot spin- echo echo-planar diffusion tensor sequence for tractography of the spinal cord was performed. The fibers of spinal cord were visualized by using fiber tracking software. Results: On the DTT maps, the normal spinal cord was depicted as a fiber tract showing color-encoded cephalocaudally, which indicated anisotropy in the cephalocaudal direction. By setting two ROI, the main spinal cord fiber tracts, such as corticospinal or spinothalamic tract, were visualized. The tracts from two sides of the brain did not completely cross. It was asymmetric in the number of tracts on the two sides in most normal subjects (8/10). The tracts of all patients with cord compression were seen oppressed or damaged in different degrees. The DTT in patients with cervical spondylosis and extramedullary-intradural neurolemmoma demonstrated that tracts were oppressed but not damaged. The DTT in one ependymoma showed that tract was markedly compressed and slightly damaged. Conclusion: DTT is a promising tool for demonstrating the spinal cord tracts and abnormalities, can provide useful information for the localization of compression and evaluation of the impairment extent on the white matter tracts of the spinal cord. (authors)

  11. Severe Hemorrhage from the Umbilical Cord at Birth: A Preventable Cause of Neonatal Shock

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Neetu; Suresh, Gautham

    2013-01-01

    Posthemorrhagic anemia is a rare but important cause of anemia in neonates, second only to hemolytic anemia of newborn. Most cases of posthemorrhagic anemia are reported from fetomaternal hemorrhage or umbilical cord accidents in utero. This case report describes a preterm infant who developed severe anemia and shock immediately after delivery related to an acute hemorrhage through patent umbilical cord vessels secondary to a tear in the umbilical cord at the site of cord clamping. We believe...

  12. Spinal cord compression due to extramedullary hematopoiesis in beta-thalassemia intermedia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munn, Rita K.; Kramer, Carol A.; Arnold, Susanne M.

    1998-01-01

    Background: Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) occurs in many disorders, including thalassemias and other hemoglobinopathies, and commonly presents in the spleen and liver. We present a case of spinal cord compression in a patient with beta-thalassemia intermedia, and review the literature and available treatment options. Patient and Methods: A 35-year-old black female with beta-thalassemia intermedia presented with a 3-week history of back pain and lower extremity weakness. Neurologic examination was consistent with spinal cord compression, and gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed this diagnosis. She was given intravenous steroids and radiotherapy was begun in 200 cGy fractions to a total dose of 2000 cGy. Results: At the completion of radiotherapy the patient was ambulatory with mild residual weakness. MRI scans 16 months later showed smaller, but persistent masses, and she remains asymptomatic 5 years from her diagnosis. Conclusion: Recognition of spinal cord EMH requires prompt physical examination and MRI for accurate diagnosis. EMH can be managed with radiation, surgery, transfusions, or a combination of these therapies. Radiation in conservative doses of (750-3500 cGy) is non-invasive, avoids the surgical risks of potentially severe hemorrhage and incomplete resection, and has a high complete remission rate in the majority of patients. Relapse rates are moderate (37.5%), but retreatment provides excellent chance for second remission

  13. Congenital spondylolysis of the cervical spine with spinal cord compression: MR and CT studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, M.J.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Molla, E.; Poyatos, C.; Cerda, E. de la; Urrizola, J.

    1997-01-01

    Spondylolysis of the cervical spine is a rare disorder that is characterized by a defect in the articular mass between the superior and inferior facets of a cervical vertebra. It is considered to be congenital because it is usually associated with dysplastic changes, especially involving the posterior arch of the vertebra, which differentiates it from its traumatic equivalent. We present two cases of spondylolysis of the cervical spine without spondylolisthesis, which were studied by means of magnetic resonance (MR) and computerized tomography (CT). One patient showed contralateral involvement at two levels and the other had a single lesion presenting canal stenosis with chronic spinal cord compression, an unusual association in previously reported series. the combination of MR and CT makes it possible to limit the spectrum of bone changes and their impact on the spinal cord in these patients. (Author) 12 refs

  14. A rat model of chronic syringomyelia induced by epidural compression of the lumbar spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Yeoun; Kim, Shin Won; Kim, Saet Pyoul; Kim, Hyeonjin; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Seung-Ki; Paek, Sun Ha; Pang, Dachling; Wang, Kyu-Chang

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE There has been no established animal model of syringomyelia associated with lumbosacral spinal lipoma. The research on the pathophysiology of syringomyelia has been focused on Chiari malformation, trauma, and inflammation. To understand the pathophysiology of syringomyelia associated with occult spinal dysraphism, a novel animal model of syringomyelia induced by chronic mechanical compression of the lumbar spinal cord was created. METHODS The model was made by epidural injection of highly concentrated paste-like kaolin solution through windows created by partial laminectomy of L-1 and L-5 vertebrae. Behavioral outcome in terms of motor (Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan score) and urinary function was assessed serially for 12 weeks. Magnetic resonance images were obtained in some animals to confirm the formation of a syrinx and to monitor changes in its size. Immunohistochemical studies, including analysis for glial fibrillary acidic protein, NeuN, CC1, ED-1, and caspase-3, were done. RESULTS By 12 weeks after the epidural compression procedure, syringomyelia formation was confirmed in 85% of the rats (34 of 40) on histology and/or MRI. The syrinx cavities were found rostral to the epidural compression. Motor deficit of varying degrees was seen immediately after the procedure in 28% of the rats (11 of 40). In 13 rats (33%), lower urinary tract dysfunction was seen. Motor deficit improved by 5 weeks after the procedure, whereas urinary dysfunction mostly improved by 2 weeks. Five rats (13%, 5 of 40) died 1 month postoperatively or later, and 3 of the 5 had developed urinary tract infection. At 12 weeks after the operation, IHC showed no inflammatory process, demyelination, or accelerated apoptosis in the spinal cords surrounding the syrinx cavities, similar to sham-operated animals. CONCLUSIONS A novel experimental model for syringomyelia by epidural compression of the lumbar spinal cord has been created. The authors hope that it will serve as an important research

  15. Eagle Syndrome Causing Vascular Compression with Cervical Rotation: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirtaş, Hakan; Kayan, Mustafa; Koyuncuoğlu, Hasan Rıfat; Çelik, Ahmet Orhan; Kara, Mustafa; Şengeze, Nihat

    2016-01-01

    Eagle syndrome is a condition caused by an elongated styloid process. Unilateral face, neck and ear pain, stinging pain, foreign body sensation and dysphagia can be observed with this syndrome. Rarely, the elongated styloid process may cause pain by compressing the cervical segment of the internal carotid and the surrounding sympathetic plexus, and that pain spreading along the artery can cause neurological symptoms such as vertigo and syncope. In this case report we presented a very rare eagle syndrome with neurological symptoms that occurred suddenly with cervical rotation. The symptoms disappeared as suddenly as they occurred, with the release of pressure in neutral position. We also discussed CT angiographic findings of this case. Radiological diagnosis of the Eagle syndrome that is manifested with a wide variety of symptoms and causes diagnostic difficulties when it is not considered in the differential diagnosis is easy in patients with specific findings. CT angiography is a fast and effective examination in terms of showing compression in patients with the Eagle syndrome that is considered to be atypical and causes vascular compression

  16. Dynamic' MR imaging of the cervical cord in patients with cervical spondylosis and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament; Significance of dynamic cord compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Tetsuo; Itoh, Takayuki; Takahashi, Akira (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Yanagi, Tsutomu; Yamamura, Akiko

    1992-01-01

    This investigation was designed to assess the influence of dynamic cord compression on severity and course of myelopathy. Sixty-seven patients consisted of 54 cases of cervical spondylosis and 13 cases of ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament. These patients underwent 'dynamic' MRI imaging of the cervical spine. MR images in the sagittal view were obtained in three different neck positions: flexion, neutral, and extension. MR imaging was performed with a 0.15 T resistive unit. For technical reasons, the body coil was used. The pulse sequence was 500/30 (Tr msec/echo time msec) for T1 images. The spinal cord compression was accelerated in 32 cases when extended, in 2 cases when flexsed, and in 4 cases when both extended and flexed. In 21 cases, we compared myelograms with MR images in the same neck position. Findings of myelograms well corresponded with those of MR images on 83 percent of intervertebral levels. The patients with dynamic cord compression were proved to have severer long tract signs, and their disability was regressive or progressive case by case for an average of 21-month follow-up. The 'dynamic' MR imaging can provide dynamic nature of spinal cord compression, and prognostic clues. (author).

  17. The role of radiation therapy in the management of spinal cord compression due to extramedullary haematopoiesis in thalassaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singhal, S.; Sharma, S.; Dixit, S.; De, S.; Chander, S.; Rath, G.K.; Mehta, V.S.

    1992-01-01

    Extramedullary haematopoiesis associated with thalassaemia leading to spinal cord compression is an extremely rare event in the course of the disease. The efficacy of radiation therapy is advocated in the management of such a complication. Two patients with thalassaemia, who had presented with spinal cord compression, were successfully treated by a modest dose of local radiotherapy. In one of the patients, however, radiotherapy was resorted to after an initial decompressive laminectomy and partial removal of the intraspinal haematopoietic mass proved unsuccessful. The other patient was managed solely by radiation therapy. (Author)

  18. Severe Hemorrhage from the Umbilical Cord at Birth: A Preventable Cause of Neonatal Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neetu Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Posthemorrhagic anemia is a rare but important cause of anemia in neonates, second only to hemolytic anemia of newborn. Most cases of posthemorrhagic anemia are reported from fetomaternal hemorrhage or umbilical cord accidents in utero. This case report describes a preterm infant who developed severe anemia and shock immediately after delivery related to an acute hemorrhage through patent umbilical cord vessels secondary to a tear in the umbilical cord at the site of cord clamping. We believe that umbilical cord bleeding from errors in cord clamping could be an important cause of acute blood loss in the delivery room and that it may result in significant clinical morbidity, especially in extremely premature infants.

  19. What are the Causes of Spinal Cord Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  20. Solitary vertebral plasmacytoma causing compression fracture in a patient with multiple vertebral hemangiomas: a diagnosis easily missed!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shagufta Wahab

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The imaging mimics, acute osteoporotic compression fractures, metastasis and malignant melanoma or plasmacytoma pathological fractures are the important clinical problems in geriatric age group that need to be differentiated due to their grossly differing prognostic and therapeutic implications. There are few suggestive features on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI that help differentiate between these entities. Hemangiomas are very common benign spinal tumors that have characteristic features on MRI. In the setting of multiple vertebral hemangiomas causing cord compression in elderly patients, the scenario is even more complex with four different entities with different prognostic profiles. We report such a diagnostic dilemma we encountered in a middle aged female patient with multiple vertebral hemangiomas and compression fracture in D10 vertebra.

  1. Preexisting severe cervical spinal cord compression is a significant risk factor for severe paralysis development in patients with traumatic cervical spinal cord injury without bone injury: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oichi, Takeshi; Oshima, Yasushi; Okazaki, Rentaro; Azuma, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate whether preexisting severe cervical spinal cord compression affects the severity of paralysis once patients develop traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) without bone injury. We retrospectively investigated 122 consecutive patients with traumatic CSCI without bone injury. The severity of paralysis on admission was assessed by the American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale (AIS). The degree of preexisting cervical spinal cord compression was evaluated by the maximum spinal cord compression (MSCC) and was divided into three categories: minor compression (MSCC ≤ 20 %), moderate compression (20 % paralysis (AIS A-C) on admission. Our study included 103 males and 19 females with mean age of 65 years. Sixty-one patients showed severe paralysis (AIS A-C) on admission. The average MSCC was 22 %. Moderate compression was observed in 41, and severe in 20. Soft-tissue damage was observed in 91. A multivariate analysis showed that severe cervical spinal cord compression significantly affected the severity of paralysis at the time of injury, whereas both mild and moderate compression did not affect it. Soft-tissue damage was also significantly associated with severe paralysis on admission. Preexisting severe cervical cord compression is an independent risk factor for severe paralysis once patients develop traumatic CSCI without bone injury.

  2. Rupture of sigmoid colon caused by compressed air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wan-Bin; Hu, Ji-Lin; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Xian-Xiang; Zhang, Mao-Shen; Liu, Guang-Wei; Zheng, Xue-Feng; Lu, Yun

    2016-03-14

    Compressed air has been generally used since the beginning of the 20(th) century for various applications. However, rupture of the colon caused by compressed air is uncommon. We report a case of pneumatic rupture of the sigmoid colon. The patient was admitted to the emergency room complaining of abdominal pain and distention. His colleague triggered a compressed air nozzle against his anus as a practical joke 2 h previously. On arrival, his pulse rate was 126 beats/min, respiratory rate was 42 breaths/min and blood pressure was 86/54 mmHg. Physical examination revealed peritoneal irritation and the abdomen was markedly distended. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed a large volume of air in the abdominal cavity. Peritoneocentesis was performed to relieve the tension pneumoperitoneum. Emergency laparotomy was done after controlling shock. Laparotomy revealed a 2-cm perforation in the sigmoid colon. The perforation was sutured and temporary ileostomy was performed as well as thorough drainage and irrigation of the abdominopelvic cavity. Reversal of ileostomy was performed successfully after 3 mo. Follow-up was uneventful. We also present a brief literature review.

  3. Re-inventing the wheel: assessing malignant spinal cord compression outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, P.

    1997-01-01

    There are now several functional indices that assess response to the treatment of malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC). Both Functional Independence Measure and the Barthel Index have provided more useful evaluations of post-treatment function for MSCC the ambulation versus non-ambulation. However, they failed to include a scale of pain experienced by most patients. In this issue of the Journal, Milross et al have proposed an MSCC-specific outcome index, the Functional Improvement Score (FIS), which incorporates scores for pain, weakness, ambulatory status and bladder sphincter control. The author argued that controlled trials assessing the optimum management of MSCC are needed to quantify the quality of life and functional outcome measurements

  4. Health-related Quality of Life in Patients with Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgen, Søren Schmidt; Engelholm, Svend A.; Larsen, Claus F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Improvements in cancer treatment have resulted in an increased number of patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). Because patients with MSCC often have a limited expected survival time, maintenance of a high functional level and quality of life are important. However......, there is limited information about health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with MSCC. The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of routine assessment of HRQoL based on the Euroqol-5 dimensions (EQ-5D) questionnaire in a cohort of patients consecutively admitted for evaluation of acute...... and subsequent radiotherapy and 0.63 (95% CI, 0.56–0.70) for patients treated with radiotherapy alone. Conclusions: Measurement of HRQoL in patients consecutively admitted for evaluation of acute symptoms of MSCC is feasible and detects significant changes over time between treatment modalities and different...

  5. Experimental study of dynamic diffusion tensor imaging in spinal cord of goats under persistent compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jicun; Liu Huaijun; He Dan; Huang Boyuan; Cui Caixia; Wang Zhihong; Xu Yingjin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the dynamic changes of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in spinal cord of goats with persistent compression injury. Methods: Eighteen goats weighted 20-25 kg were divided into three groups with completely random design: A, B and C. A balloon catheter was inserted into the epidural space at C3-4 level via intervertabral foramen for each goat. The balloon was inflated by injection of variable volumes of saline in group A and B 10 days following operation. The volume of saline was 0.3 ml in group A and 0.2 ml in group B, respectively. The compression sustained for 40 days. Group C served as uncompressed control without injection of saline. The locomotor rating score was applied to each group. Conventional MRI and DTI were performed. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)and fractional anisotropy(FA) values were measured. Histopathological assessments of the compressed spinal cord were performed 50 days following operation with light microscope and transmission electron microscopy. Results: Before operation, the locomotor rating score was 5, the ADC value was (1.23 ± 0.05) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s and the FA value was (0.72 ± 0.05) each group. Of six goats in Group A, the locomotor rating score severely decreased and reached (1.5 ± 0.4)on the 40 th day after compression. The ADC value at compression site decreased soon and reached the minimum (0.75 ± 0.04) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s on the 5 th day after compression. Then the ADC value increased gradually, restored normal on the 10 th day or so, then became markedly higher than normal and reached (1.61±0.05) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s on the 40 th day. The FA value at compression site decreased soon, reached (0.54±0.04)on the 1st day, then decreased gradually and reached (0.43± 0.05) on the 40 th day. It appeared high signal intensity on T 2 WI on the 10 th day. In Group B, the locomotor rating score was moderately decreased and reached (3.4 ± 0.5) on the 40 th day. The ADC value at compression site decreased slightly

  6. Ambulation and survival following surgery in elderly patients with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itshayek, Eyal; Candanedo, Carlos; Fraifeld, Shifra; Hasharoni, Amir; Kaplan, Leon; Schroeder, Josh E; Cohen, José E

    2017-12-28

    Metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC) is a disabling consequence of disease progression. Surgery can restore/preserve physical function, improving access to treatments that increase duration of survival; however, advanced patient age may deter oncologists and surgeons from considering surgical management. Evaluate the duration of ambulation and survival in elderly patients following surgical decompression of MESCC. Retrospective file review of a prospective database, under IRB waiver of informed consent, of consecutive patients treated in an academic tertiary care medical center from 8/2008-3/2015. Patients ≥65 years presenting neurological and/or radiological signs of cord compression due to metastatic disease, who underwent surgical decompression. Duration of ambulation and survival. Patients underwent urgent multidisciplinary evaluation and surgery. Ambulation and survival were compared with age, pre- and postoperative neurological (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] Impairment Scale [AIS]) and performance status (Karnofsky Performance Status [KPS], and Tokuhashi Score using Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, Pearson correlation coefficient, Cox regression model, log rank analysis, and Kaplan Meir analysis. 40 patients were included (21 male, 54%; mean age 74 years, range 65-87). Surgery was performed a mean 3.8 days after onset of motor symptoms. Mean duration of ambulation and survival were 474 (range 0-1662) and 525 days (range 11-1662), respectively; 53% of patients (21/40) survived and 43% (17/40) retained ambulation for ≥1 year. There was no significant relationship between survival and ambulation for patients aged 65-69, 70-79, or 80-89, although Kaplan Meier analysis suggested stratification. There was a significant relationship between duration of ambulation and pre- and postoperative AIS (p=0.0342, p=0.0358, respectively) and postoperative KPS (p=0.0221). Tokuhashi score was not significantly related to duration of

  7. Positioning and spinal bracing for pain relief in metastatic spinal cord compression in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Siew Hwa; Grant, Robin; Kennedy, Catriona; Kilbride, Lynn

    2015-09-24

    This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 3 (Lee 2012) on patient positioning (mobilisation) and bracing for pain relief and spinal stability in adults with metastatic spinal cord compression.Many patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) have spinal instability, but their clinician has determined that due to their advanced disease they are unsuitable for surgical internal fixation. Mobilising may be hazardous in the presence of spinal instability as further vertebral collapse can occur. Current guidance on positioning (whether a patient should be managed with bed rest or allowed to mobilise) and whether spinal bracing is helpful, is contradictory. To investigate the correct positioning and examine the effects of spinal bracing to relieve pain or to prevent further vertebral collapse in patients with MSCC. For this update, we searched for relevant studies from February 2012 to 31 March 2015. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and MEDLINE In Process, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, TRIP, SIGN, NICE, UK Clinical Research Network, National Guideline Clearinghouse and PEDro database. We also searched the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT), ClinicalTrials.gov, UK Clinical Trials Gateway (UKCTG), WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) and Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR).For the original version, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, CANCERLIT, NICE, SIGN, AMED, TRIP, National Guideline Clearinghouse, and PEDro database, in February 2012. We selected randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of adults with MSCC of interventions on positioning (mobilisation) and bracing. Two review authors independently assessed each possible study for inclusion and quality. For the original version of the review, we screened 1611 potentially relevant studies. No studies met the inclusion criteria

  8. Inpatient rehabilitation outcomes in patients with malignant spinal cord compression compared to other non-traumatic spinal cord injury: A population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Christian D; Voth, Jennifer; Jaglal, Susan B; Craven, B Catharine

    2015-11-01

    To compare and describe demographic characteristics, clinical, and survival outcomes in patients admitted for inpatient rehabilitation following malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC) or other causes of non-traumatic spinal cord injury (NT-SCI). A retrospective cohort design was employed, using data retrieved from administrative databases. Rehabilitation facilities or designated rehabilitation beds in Ontario, Canada, from April 2007 to March 2011. Patients with incident diagnoses of MSCC (N = 143) or NT-SCI (N = 1,274) admitted for inpatient rehabilitation. Demographic, impairment, functional outcome (as defined by the Functional Independence Measure (FIM)), discharge, healthcare utilization, survival, and tumor characteristics. There was a significant improvement in the FIM from admission to discharge (mean change 20.1 ± 14.3, <0.001) in the MSCC cohort. NT-SCI patients demonstrated a higher FIM efficiency (1.2 ± 1.7 vs. 0.8 ± 0.8, <0.001) and higher total (24.0 ± 14.4 vs. 20.1 ± 14.3, <0.001) FIM gains relative to MSCC cases. However, there were no differences between the MSCC and NT-SCI cohorts in length of stay (34.6 ± 30.3 vs. 37.5 ± 35.2, P = 0.8) or discharge FIM (100.7 ± 19.6 vs. 103.3 ± 18.1, P = 0.1). Three-month, 1-year, and 3-year survival rates in the MSCC and NT-SCI cohorts were 76.2% vs. 97.6%, 46.2% vs. 93.7%, and 27.3% vs. 86.7%, respectively. The majority (65.0%) of patients with MSCC was discharged home and met their rehabilitation goals (75.5%) at comparable rates to patients with NT-SCI (69.7 and 81.3%). Despite compromised survival, patients with MSCC make clinically significant functional gains and exhibit favorable discharge outcomes following inpatient rehabilitation. Current administrative data suggests the design and scope of inpatient rehabilitation services should reflect the unique survival-related prognostic factors in patients with MSCC.

  9. Subclinical respiratory dysfunction in chronic cervical cord compression: a pulmonary function test correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagavatula, Indira Devi; Bhat, Dhananjaya I; Sasidharan, Gopalakrishnan M; Mishra, Rakesh Kumar; Maste, Praful Suresh; Vilanilam, George C; Sathyaprabha, Talakkad N

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Respiratory abnormalities are well documented in acute spinal cord injury; however, the literature available for respiratory dysfunction in chronic compressive myelopathy (CCM) is limited. Respiratory dysfunction in CCM is often subtle and subclinical. The authors studied the pattern of respiratory dysfunction in patients with chronic cord compression by using spirometry, and the clinical and surgical implications of this dysfunction. In this study they also attempted to address the postoperative respiratory function in these patients. METHODS A prospective study was done in 30 patients in whom cervical CCM due to either cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) was diagnosed. Thirty age-matched healthy volunteers were recruited as controls. None of the patients included in the study had any symptoms or signs of respiratory dysfunction. After clinical and radiological diagnosis, all patients underwent pulmonary function tests (PFTs) performed using a standardized Spirometry Kit Micro before and after surgery. The data were analyzed using Statistical Software SPSS version 13.0. Comparison between the 2 groups was done using the Student t-test. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used for PFT results and Nurick classification scores. A p value compression (n = 21, 70%) followed by OPLL (n = 9, 30%). The average patient age was 45.06 years. Degenerative cervical spine disease has a relatively younger onset in the Indian population. The majority of the patients (n = 28, 93.3%) had compression at or above the C-5 level. Ten patients (33.3%) underwent an anterior approach and discectomy, 11 patients (36.7%) underwent decompressive laminectomy, and the remaining 9 underwent either corpectomy with fusion or laminoplasty. The mean preoperative forced vital capacity (FVC) (65%) of the patients was significantly lower than that of the controls (88%) (p < 0.001). The mean postoperative FVC (73.7%) in the patients showed

  10. Change in electrocardiogram T-wave amplitude during umbilical cord compression is predictive of fetal condition in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, T; Okamura, K; Tanigawara, S; Shintaku, Y; Akagi, K; Endo, H; Yajima, A

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the usefulness of the dynamic change in T/QRS ratio in fetal electrocardiograms in predicting the fetal condition when repetitive variable decelerations are seen in intrapartum cardiotocograms. We investigated the relationship, using linear regression and Wilcoxon's test, between T/QRS and blood gas values, catecholamine concentrations, and blood pressure during repetitive cord compression in five chronically instrumented lamb fetuses. T/QRS during cord compression correlated significantly (p less than 0.01) with fetal arterial pH (r = -0.7711), norepinephrine concentration (r = 0.7551), and duration of elevated blood pressure during compression (r = -0.8619). Fetal arterial pH and base excess were lower, the duration of elevated blood pressure during compression was shorter, and carbon dioxide partial pressure and catecholamine concentrations were higher in the stage with higher (greater than 0.50) T/QRS during compression (p less than 0.005). We can estimate the severity of fetal distress by measuring T/QRS near the bottom of the decelerations.

  11. Paraplegia aguda por compressão da medula espinhal torácica causada por tofo gotoso Acute paraplegia resulting from spinal cord compression by tophaceous gout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Massato Hasegawa

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available O acometimento axial pela gota é um evento raro, e o envolvimento da coluna torácica foi descrito em apenas 17 casos na literatura. Apresentamos um caso de paciente do sexo masculino de 48 anos com história de gota, sob tratamento irregular com alopurinol e colchicina, que desenvolveu paraplegia aguda decorrente de compressão medular por tofo gotoso. Realizou-se o diagnóstico por meio de ressonância magnética e anatomia patológica. Foi tratado com antiinflamatórios e descompressão cirúrgica com melhora importante, porém parcial. Apesar de o acometimento medular pelo tofo ser um evento raro, deve ser considerado nos casos de síndrome de compressão medular em pacientes com antecedente de gotaAxial gout is a rare condition and the involvement of the thoracic spine has been described only 17 times in the literature. This paper presents the case of a 48 year-old male patient with a history of gout, under irregular treatment with allopurinol and colchicines, who developed acute paraplegia resulting from spinal cord compression by tophaceous gout. The diagnosis was made using magnetic resonance imaging and anatomic pathology. The patient was treated with anti-inflammatory drugs and surgical decompression and showed important, albeit partial, improvement. Thus, although tophi rarely affect the spinal cord, they should be considered as a possibility in cases of spinal cord compression syndrome in patients with a history of gout

  12. Frequency of unexpected multifocal metastasis in patients with acute spinal cord compression. Evaluation by low-field MR imaging in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heldmann, U; Myschetzky, P S; Thomsen, H S

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate, in an acute care service, the frequency of multiple-level lesion involvement in patients with clinically suspected spinal cord compression or spinal blockage.......The aim of the study was to estimate, in an acute care service, the frequency of multiple-level lesion involvement in patients with clinically suspected spinal cord compression or spinal blockage....

  13. Choroid Plexus in the Central Canal of the Spinal Cord Causing Recurrent Syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtaya, Anan; Sadek, Ahmed-Ramadan; Nicoll, James A R; Nader-Sepahi, Ali

    2018-03-01

    Syringomyelia is a fluid-filled cavitation within the substance of the spinal cord. This condition usually follows a primary pathology that disrupts the normal cerebrospinal fluid circulation or disturbs the microcirculation and cytoarchitecture of the spinal cord parenchyma. However, an etiology of recurrent syringomyelia resulting from an ectopic choroid plexus (CP) has not been discussed. Ectopic CP rests may be found within the central nervous system. Although there has been a single report, describing ectopic intramedullary spinal cord CP, to our knowledge, extra-cranial nonmalignant CP in the central canal of the spinal cord has not been reported. We report CP in the central canal of the spinal cord in a 23-year-old male patient who had developmental delay and diabetes mellitus type I who presented with dissociated sensory changes and muscle wastage predominantly on the right upper and lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a multiloculated spinal cord syringomyelia stretching from cervical (C3) to the conus medullaris causing recurrent neurologic deficits. A biopsy of the central canal spinal cord lesion revealed CP. Decompression and syringosubarachnoid shunt insertion stabilized the patient's neurology. Our illustrative case reveals the presence of CP in the central canal of the spinal cord that may suggest a role in the etiology of recurrent syringomyelia. Although management poses a challenge to neurosurgeons, prompt decompression and shunting of the syringomyelia remains a favorable approach with acceptable outcomes. Further investigation into the pathophysiology of central canal CP ectopic causing recurrent syringomyelia and its correlation with spinal cord development may help future treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Relationship of motor deficits and imaging features in metastatic epidural spinal cord compression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Bin; Liu, Yao-Sheng; Li, Ding-Feng; Fan, Hai-Tao; Huai, Jian-Ye; Guo, Jun; Wang, Lei; Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Ping; Cui, Qiu; Jiang, Wei-Hao; Cao, Yun-Cen; Jiang, Ning; Sui, Jia-Hong; Zhang, Bin; Zhou, Jiu

    2010-06-15

    To explore the relationship of motor deficits of the lower extremities with the imaging features of malignant spinal cord compression (MESCCs). From July 2006 through December 2008, 56 successive MESCC patients were treated at our department. All were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography and were scored according to motor deficits Frankel grading on admission. Imaging assessment factors of main involved vertebrae were level of vertebral metastatic location, epidural space involvement, vertebral body involvement, lamina involvement, posterior protrusion of posterior wall, pedicle involvement, continuity of main involved vertebrae, fracture of anterior column, fracture of posterior wall, location in upper thoracic spine and/or cervicothoracic junction. Occurrence was the same between paralytic state of MESCCs and epidural space involvement of imaging features. Multiple regression equation showed that paralytic state had a linear regression relationship with imaging factors of lamina involvement (X1), posterior protrusion of posterior wall (X2), location in upper thoracic spine and/or cervicothoracic junction (X7) of main involved vertebrae. The optimal regression equation of paralytic state (Y) and imaging feature (X) was Y = -0.009 +0.639X, + 0.149X, +0.282X. Lamina involvement of main involved vertebrae has a greatest influence upon paralytic state of MESCC patients. Imaging factors of lamina involvement, posterior protrusion of posterior wall, location in upper thoracic spine and/or cervicothoracic junction of main involved vertebrae can predict the paralytic state of MESCC patients. MESCC with lamina involvement is more easily encroached on epidural space.

  15. Developing an early alert system for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC): Red Flag credit cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnpenney, Jackie; Greenhalgh, Sue; Richards, Lena; Crabtree, Annamaria; Selfe, James

    2015-01-01

    To produce a user-friendly list of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) Red Flags for non-specialist 'generalist' front-line clinicians working in primary-care settings. The issue of identifying MSCC early to prevent serious long-term disability was a key theme identified by the Task and Finish Group at Greater Manchester and Cheshire Cancer Network (GMCCN) in 2009. It was this group who initially brokered and then coordinated the current development as part of their strategic approach to improving care for MSCC patients. A consensus-building approach that considered the essential minimum data requirements to raise the index of suspicion suggestive of MSCC was adopted. This followed a model of cross-boundary working to facilitate the mutual sharing of expertise across a variety of relevant clinical specialisms. A guideline aimed at helping clinicians to identify the early signs and symptoms of MSCC was produced in the form of a credit card. This credit card includes key statements about MSCC, signposting to key sources of additional information and a user-friendly list of Red Flags which has been developed into an eight-item Red Flag mnemonic. To date, an excess of 120,000 cards have been printed by a variety of organisations and the distribution of the cards is ongoing across the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland.

  16. Road collisions as a cause of traumatic spinal cord injury in ireland, 2001-2010.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smith, Eimear

    2014-01-01

    Road collisions remain the leading cause of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) in the world. Half of all TSCIs in Ireland in 2000 were caused by road collisions. Since then, there has been a downward trend in road fatalities coincident with implemented road safety strategies.

  17. Re-irradiation of brain metastases and metastatic spinal cord compression: clinical practice suggestions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranzano, Ernesto; Trippa, Fabio; Pacchiarini, Diamante; Chirico, Luigia; Basagni, Maria Luisa; Rossi, Romina; Bellavita, Rita; Schiavone, Concetta; Italiani, Marco; Muti, Marco

    2005-01-01

    The recent improvements of therapeutic approaches in oncology have allowed a certain number of patients with advanced disease to survive much longer than in the past. So, the number of cases with brain metastases and metastatic spinal cord compression has increased, as has the possibility of developing a recurrence in areas of the central nervous system already treated with radiotherapy. Clinicians are reluctant to perform re-irradiation of the brain, because of the risk of severe side effects. The tolerance dose for the brain to a single course of radiotherapy is 50-60 Gy in 2 Gy daily fractions. New metastases appear in 22-73% of the cases after whole brain radiotherapy, but the percentage of reirradiated patients is 3-10%. An accurate selection must be made before giving an indication to re-irradiation. Patients with Karnofsky performance status > 70, age variable associated with an increased risk of unacceptable acute and/or chronic neurotoxicity. Re-treatment of brain metastases can be done with whole brain radiotherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Most patients had no relevant radiation-induced toxicity after a second course of whole brain radiotherapy or stereotactic radiosurgery. There are few data on fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in the re-irradiation of brain metastases. In general, the incidence of an "in-field" recurrence of spinal metastasis varies from 2.5-11% of cases and can occur 2-40 months after the first radiotherapy cycle. Radiation-induced myelopathy can occur months or years (6 months-7 years) after radiotherapy, and the pathogenesis remains obscure. Higher radiotherapy doses, larger doses per fraction, and previous exposure to radiation could be associated with a higher probability of developing radiation-induced myelopathy. Experimental data indicate that also the total dose of the first and second radiotherapy, interval to re-treatment, length of the irradiated spinal cord, and age of the

  18. Exostose múltipla hereditária com compressão medular Hereditary multiple exostosis with cervical cord compression: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Jorge Facure

    1975-06-01

    Full Text Available Os autores registram um caso raro de exostose múltipla hereditária em que ocorreu compressão medular pelo crescimento de massa cartilaginosa na luz do canal raqueano. A descompessão cirúrgica por laminectomia resultou em pronta regressão do quadro neurológico.A case of hereditary multiple exostoses successfully operated is reported. The patient, a 15 year-old white brazilian boy, was admitted with tetraplegia and Babinski's sign. Early diagnosis followed by prompt surgery may prevent permanent spinal cord damage.

  19. Narrow cervical canal in 1211 asymptomatic healthy subjects: the relationship with spinal cord compression on MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Hiroaki; Yukawa, Yasutsugu; Suda, Kota; Yamagata, Masatsune; Ueta, Takayoshi; Kato, Fumihiko

    2016-07-01

    Narrow cervical canal (NCC) has been a suspected risk factor for later development of cervical myelopathy. However, few studies have evaluated the prevalence in asymptomatic subjects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of NCC in a large cohort of asymptomatic volunteers. This study was a cross-sectional study of 1211 asymptomatic volunteers. Approximately 100 men and 100 women representing each decade of life from the 20s to the 70s were included in this study. Cervical canal anteroposterior diameters at C5 midvertebral level on X-rays, and the prevalence of spinal cord compression (SCC) and increased signal intensity (ISI) changes on MRI were evaluated. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to determine the cut-off value of the severity of canal stenosis resulting in SCC. NCC (<14 mm) was observed in 123 (10.2 %) subjects. SCC and ISI were found in 64 (5.3 %) and 28 (2.3 %) subjects, respectively. The prevalence of NCC was significantly higher in females and older subjects, but the occurrence of severe NCC (<12 mm) did not increase with age. The canal size in subjects with SCC or ISI was significantly smaller than in those without SCC (p < 0.0001). The cut-off values of cervical canal stenosis resulting in SCC were 14.8 and 13.9 mm in males and females, respectively. The prevalence of NCC was considerably lower among asymptomatic healthy volunteers; the cervical canal diameter in subjects with SCC or ISI was significantly smaller than in asymptomatic subjects; NCC is a risk factor for SCC.

  20. Neuroblastoma with symptomatic spinal cord compression at diagnosis: treatment and results with 76 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bernardi B; Pianca, C; Pistamiglio, P; Veneselli, E; Viscardi, E; Pession, A; Alvisi, P; Carli, M; Donfrancesco, A; Casale, F; Giuliano, M G; di Montezemolo, L C; Di Cataldo, A; Lo Curto, M; Bagnulo, S; Schumacher, R F; Tamburini, A; Garaventa, A; Clemente, L; Bruzzi, P

    2001-01-01

    To report on the treatment of patients with newly diagnosed neuroblastoma presenting with spinal cord compression (SCC). Of 1,462 children with neuroblastoma registered between 1979 and 1998, 76 (5.2%) presented with signs/symptoms of SCC, including motor deficit in 75 patients (mild in 43, moderate in 22, severe [ie, paraplegia] in 10), pain in 47, sphincteric deficit in 30, and sensory loss in 11. Treatment of SCC consisted of radiotherapy in 11 patients, laminectomy in 32, and chemotherapy in 33. Laminectomy was more frequently performed in cases with favorable disease stages and in those with severe motor deficit, whereas chemotherapy was preferred in patients with advanced disease. Thirty-three patients achieved full neurologic recovery, 14 improved, 22 remained stable, and eight worsened, including three who become paraplegic. None of the 10 patients with grade 3 motor deficit, eight of whom were treated by laminectomy, recovered or improved. In the other 66 patients, the neurologic response to treatment was comparable for the three therapeutic modalities. All 11 patients treated by radiotherapy and 26 of 32 patients treated by laminectomy, but only two of 33 treated by chemotherapy, received additional therapy for SCC. Fifty-four of 76 patients are alive at time of the analysis, with follow-up of 4 to 209 months (median, 139 months). Twenty-six (44%) of 54 survivors have late sequelae, mainly scoliosis and sphincteric deficit. Radiotherapy, laminectomy, and chemotherapy showed comparable ability to relieve or improve SCC. However, patients treated with chemotherapy usually did not require additional therapy, whereas patients treated either with radiotherapy or laminectomy commonly did. No patient presenting with (or developing) severe motor deficit recovered or improved. Sequelae were documented in 44% of surviving patients.

  1. Fixed cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, L.M.; DiChiro, G.; DeSouza, B.; McCullough, D.C.; McVeigh, E.; Hefffez, D.

    1989-01-01

    Pulsatile longitudinal motion of the spinal cord was examined with MR phase imaging in healthy subjects and in cases involving cord tethering and compression. Asymptomatic patients with a low conus medullaris demonstrated normal cord motion. Clinical improvement was associated with improved cord motion after surgical untethering, provided permanent neurologic damage had not occurred. Decreased and unchanged cord motion was associated with unchanged neurologic deficits. In cases of normal cord motion and possible retethering versus syringomyelia, clinical improvement occurred after shunting only. MR imaging of pulsatile cord motion can be clinically useful in the evaluation of diseases restricting motion of the neuraxis

  2. Cervical spinal cord compression from delayed epidural scar tissue formation around plate lead for SCS. Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzi, G; Volpentesta, G; Chirchiglia, D; Della Torre, A; Lavano, F; Lavano, A

    2015-10-02

    Cervical spinal compression is a serious and rare complication of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) that can occur using leads placed via open surgical approach. The present report describe a case of cervical plate lead implant that developed spinal and radicular compression symptoms after seven years due to the growth of fibrotic epidural mass at the level of lead. A review of literature is provided. A 59-year-old woman with 3-year history of left arm post-traumatic complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) was treated with SCS performed with the implant of paddle lead in the epidural space from C3-C5. Seven years later she reported progressive paresthesia along the spine and the limbs, gait ataxia with sensation of weakness in the legs, increased muscle tone and tendon reflexes in the lower extremities and decrease in effectiveness of stimulation. Cervical CT showed a tissue mass into the cervical canal posteriorly to the lead. This finding was confirmed by MR performed after lead removal that also allowed to document the amount of spinal cord compression. The patient underwent C4-C5-C6 laminectomy and a thick scar was removed from the dura. After surgery there was progressive and incomplete improvement of neurological signs but symptoms related to algodystrophy recurred partly. The formation of hypertrophic epidural scar tissue at the level of lead implant must be taken into consideration in presence of the onset of progressive cervical myelopathy in patient treated with SCS using laminectomy lead.

  3. Prognosis in patients with symptomatic metastatic spinal cord compression: survival in different cancer diagnosis in a cohort of 2321 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgen, Søren Schmidt; Lund-Andersen, Casper; Larsen, Claus Falck; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Dahl, Benny

    2013-07-15

    A retrospective cohort study of 2321 patients consecutively admitted to one center and diagnosed with acute symptoms of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). To assess the possible change in 1-year survival for patients with MSCC from year 2005 through 2010 with respect to the primary cancer diagnosis. An increasing number of patients are offered surgical treatment for MSCC. Among the reasons for this development are high evidence clinical studies, improved surgical techniques, and an increasing number of patients being treated for an oncological condition. Preoperative scoring systems are routinely used in the evaluation of these patients, and the primary oncological diagnosis is an important variable in all these systems. To our knowledge, no studies in a large group of patients have assessed the change in survival in these patients. This is of relevance because such changes in survival could have implications on the scoring systems used in the preoperative evaluation. All patients referred to the university hospital, Rigshospitalet, suspected of acute symptoms caused by spinal metastases and diagnosed with MSCC from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2010, were included in a retrospective cohort, n = 2321. For all patients primary tumor, treatment, and 1-year survival was registered. The overall 1-year survival did not change significantly from 2005 to 2010, but there was a significant increase in 1-year survival for the subgroups of patients with lung cancer hazard ratio = 0.93 (P = 0.008, 95% CI: 0.83-0.98) and renal cancer hazard ratio = 0.77 (P = 0.004, 95% CI: 0.56-0.92). Patients with MSCC from pulmonary and renal cancers experienced improved survival in the study period. No improvement was seen for patients with other oncological diagnoses. This corresponds to reports from oncological studies and could affect preoperative scoring systems.

  4. Moderate precision of prognostic scoring systems in a consecutive, prospective cohort of 544 patients with metastatic spinal cord compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgen, Søren Schmidt; Nielsen, Dennis Hallager; Larsen, Claus Falck

    2014-01-01

    cohort of patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). METHODS: In 2011, we conducted a prospective cohort study of 544 patients who were consecutively admitted with MSCC to one treatment facility. Patients estimated survival were assessed with the Tokuhashi Revised score and the Tomita score...... and compared to the observed survival. We assessed how precise the scoring systems predicted survival with McNemar's test. The prognostic value was illustrated with Kaplan-Meier curves, and the individual prognostic components were analyzed with Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: The mean age was 65 years...

  5. Strategy for Bone Metastases Treatment in Patients with Impending Cord Compression or Vertebral Fractures: A Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasulova, N.; Lyubshin, V.; Djalalov, F.; Kim, K. H.; Nazirova, L.; Ormanov, N.; Arybzhanov, D.

    2011-01-01

    Impending spinal cord compression and vertebral fractures are considered contraindications for radionuclide bone pain palliation therapy. However, most of the patients with widespread bone metastases already have weakened vertebral segments that may be broken. Therefore, local field external-beam radiotherapy or percutaneous vertebroplasty (VP) should be considered to improve the patient's quality of life and to institute subsequent appropriate treatment, including radionuclide therapy for bone pain palliation. The objective of this study was to develop a strategy for an effective treatment of bone metastases in patients with widespread bone metastases and intolerable pain, associated with impending cord compression or vertebral fractures. Eleven patients (5 females and 6 males, aged 32-62 years; mean age 53.8 ± 2.7 years) with multiple skeletal metastases from carcinomas of prostate (n = 3), breast (n = 3) and lung (n = 5) were studied. Their mean pain score measured on a visual analogue scale of 10 was found to be 8.64 ± 0.15 (range 8-9) and the mean number of levels with impending cord compression or vertebral fracture was 2.64 ± 0.34 (range 1–4). All patients underwent vertebroplasty and after 3–7 days received Sm-153 ethylene diamine tetra methylene phosphonic acid (EDTMP) therapy. Sm-153 EDTMP was administered according to the recommended standard bone palliation dose of 37 MBq/kg body weight. Whole body (WB) bone scan, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed before and after treatment in all patients. Pain relief due to stabilization of vertebrae after VP occurred within the first 12 hours (mean 4.8 ± 1.2 hours; range 0.5–12 hours), and the mean pain score was reduced to 4.36 ± 0.39 (range 2–6). Subsequent to Sm-153 EDTMP treatment, further pain relief occurred after 3.91 ± 0.39 days (range 2-6 days) and the pain score decreased to 0.55 ± 0.21 (range 0–2). The responses to treatment were found to be

  6. Imaging Factors that Distinguish Between Patients with Asymptomatic and Symptomatic Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy with Mild to Moderate Cervical Spinal Cord Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jun Ming; Zhang, Jing Tao; Yang, Da Long; Yang, Yi Peng; Xia, He Huan; Yang, Liu

    2017-10-13

    BACKGROUND Not all patients with spinal cord compression due to cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) have clinical symptoms and signs. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the imaging findings in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients with CSM with mild to moderate cervical spinal cord compression. MATERIAL AND METHODS A retrospective clinical study included 68 patients. Group A (n=30) had no symptoms and signs; group B (n=38) had symptoms and signs of cervical myelopathy. The age, sex, body mass index (BMI), history of steroid treatment, duration of symptoms, number of spondylotic cervical segments, Torg ratio, range of motion (ROM), incidence of cervical segmental instability, overall curvature of the cervical spine, direction of spinal cord compression, and spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal intensity were compared. RESULTS For groups A and B, the Torg ratio was 90.3% and 83.6% (Pvariable, independently associated with cervical segmental instability (OR=5.898, P=0.037), an MRI T2-weighted intramedullary high signal (OR=9.718, P=0.002), and Torg ratio (OR=0.155, P=0.006). CONCLUSIONS Cervical segmental instability, a high intramedullary signal on T2-weighted MRI, and the Torg ratio had the greatest capacity to distinguish between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients with CSM with mild to moderate cervical spinal cord compression.

  7. Bee Venom Acupuncture Reduces Interleukin-6, Increases Interleukin-10, and Induces Locomotor Recovery in a Model of Spinal Cord Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento de Souza, Raquel; Silva, Fernanda Kohn; Alves de Medeiros, Magda

    2017-06-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) initiate a series of molecular and cellular events in which inflammatory responses can lead to major neurological dysfunctions. The present study aims to investigate whether bee venom (BV) acupuncture applied at acupoints ST36 (Zusanli) and GV3 (Yaoyangquan) could minimize locomotor deficits and the magnitude of neural tissue losses, and change the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines after an SCI by compression. Wistar rats were subjected to an SCI model by compression in which a 2-French Fogarty embolectomy catheter was inflated in the extradural space. The effects of BV acupuncture, in which 20 μL of BV diluted in saline (0.08 mg/kg) was injected at acupoints GV3 and ST36 [BV(ST36+GV3)-SCI] was compared with BV injected at nonacupoints [BV(NP)-SCI] and with no treatment [group subjected only to SCI (CTL-SCI)]. The BV(ST36+GV3)-SCI group showed a significant improvement in the locomotor performance and a decrease of lesion size compared with the controls. BV acupuncture at the ST36 + GV3 increased the expression of interleukin-10 (anti-inflammatory) at 6 hours and reduced the expression of interleukin-6 (proinflammatory) at 24 hours after SCI compared with the controls. Our results suggest that BV acupuncture can reduce neuroinflammation and induce recovery in the SCI compression model. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. CDC WONDER: Compressed Mortality - Underlying Cause of Death

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CDC WONDER Mortality - Underlying Cause of Death online database is a county-level national mortality and population database spanning the years since 1979...

  9. Extramedullary hematopoiesis presented as cytopenia and massive paraspinal masses leading to cord compression in a patient with hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin

    OpenAIRE

    Katchi, Tasleem; Kolandaivel, Krishna; Khattar, Pallavi; Farooq, Taliya; Islam, Humayun; Liu, Delong

    2016-01-01

    Background Extramedullary hematopoeisis (EMH) can occur in various physiological and pathologic states. The spleen is the most common site of EMH. Case presentation We report a case with hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin with extramedullary hematopoiesis presented as cord compression and cytopenia secondary to multi-paraspinal masses. Conclusion Treatment can be a challenge. Relapse is a possibility.

  10. Extramedullary hematopoiesis presented as cytopenia and massive paraspinal masses leading to cord compression in a patient with hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katchi, Tasleem; Kolandaivel, Krishna; Khattar, Pallavi; Farooq, Taliya; Islam, Humayun; Liu, Delong

    2016-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoeisis (EMH) can occur in various physiological and pathologic states. The spleen is the most common site of EMH. We report a case with hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin with extramedullary hematopoiesis presented as cord compression and cytopenia secondary to multi-paraspinal masses. Treatment can be a challenge. Relapse is a possibility.

  11. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of stress response in a spinal cord clip compression injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamankhah, Mahmood; Eftekharpour, Eftekhar; Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila; Boutros, Paul C; San-Marina, Serban; Fehlings, Michael G

    2013-08-28

    The aneurysm clip impact-compression model of spinal cord injury (SCI) is a standard injury model in animals that closely mimics the primary mechanism of most human injuries: acute impact and persisting compression. Its histo-pathological and behavioural outcomes are extensively similar to human SCI. To understand the distinct molecular events underlying this injury model we analyzed global mRNA abundance changes during the acute, subacute and chronic stages of a moderate to severe injury to the rat spinal cord. Time-series expression analyses resulted in clustering of the majority of deregulated transcripts into eight statistically significant expression profiles. Systematic application of Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment pathway analysis allowed inference of biological processes participating in SCI pathology. Temporal analysis identified events specific to and common between acute, subacute and chronic time-points. Processes common to all phases of injury include blood coagulation, cellular extravasation, leukocyte cell-cell adhesion, the integrin-mediated signaling pathway, cytokine production and secretion, neutrophil chemotaxis, phagocytosis, response to hypoxia and reactive oxygen species, angiogenesis, apoptosis, inflammatory processes and ossification. Importantly, various elements of adaptive and induced innate immune responses span, not only the acute and subacute phases, but also persist throughout the chronic phase of SCI. Induced innate responses, such as Toll-like receptor signaling, are more active during the acute phase but persist throughout the chronic phase. However, adaptive immune response processes such as B and T cell activation, proliferation, and migration, T cell differentiation, B and T cell receptor-mediated signaling, and B cell- and immunoglobulin-mediated immune response become more significant during the chronic phase. This analysis showed that, surprisingly, the diverse series of molecular events that occur in the acute and subacute

  12. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of stress response in a spinal cord clip compression injury model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The aneurysm clip impact-compression model of spinal cord injury (SCI) is a standard injury model in animals that closely mimics the primary mechanism of most human injuries: acute impact and persisting compression. Its histo-pathological and behavioural outcomes are extensively similar to human SCI. To understand the distinct molecular events underlying this injury model we analyzed global mRNA abundance changes during the acute, subacute and chronic stages of a moderate to severe injury to the rat spinal cord. Results Time-series expression analyses resulted in clustering of the majority of deregulated transcripts into eight statistically significant expression profiles. Systematic application of Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment pathway analysis allowed inference of biological processes participating in SCI pathology. Temporal analysis identified events specific to and common between acute, subacute and chronic time-points. Processes common to all phases of injury include blood coagulation, cellular extravasation, leukocyte cell-cell adhesion, the integrin-mediated signaling pathway, cytokine production and secretion, neutrophil chemotaxis, phagocytosis, response to hypoxia and reactive oxygen species, angiogenesis, apoptosis, inflammatory processes and ossification. Importantly, various elements of adaptive and induced innate immune responses span, not only the acute and subacute phases, but also persist throughout the chronic phase of SCI. Induced innate responses, such as Toll-like receptor signaling, are more active during the acute phase but persist throughout the chronic phase. However, adaptive immune response processes such as B and T cell activation, proliferation, and migration, T cell differentiation, B and T cell receptor-mediated signaling, and B cell- and immunoglobulin-mediated immune response become more significant during the chronic phase. Conclusions This analysis showed that, surprisingly, the diverse series of molecular events that

  13. NK1 receptor blockade is ineffective in improving outcome following a balloon compression model of spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Victoria Leonard

    Full Text Available The neuropeptide substance P (SP is a well-known mediator of neurogenic inflammation following a variety of CNS disorders. Indeed, inhibition of SP through antagonism of its receptor, the tachykinin NK1 receptor, has been shown to be beneficial following both traumatic brain injury and stroke. Such studies demonstrated that administration of an NK1 receptor antagonist reduced blood-brain-barrier permeability, edema development and improved functional outcome. Furthermore, our recent studies have demonstrated a potential role for SP in mediating neurogenic inflammation following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI. Accordingly, the present study investigates whether inhibition of SP may similarly play a neuroprotective role following traumatic SCI. A closed balloon compression injury was induced at T10 in New Zealand White rabbits. At 30 minutes post-injury an NK1 receptor antagonist was administered intravenously. Animals were thereafter assessed for blood spinal cord barrier (BSCB permeability, spinal water content (edema, intrathecal pressure (ITP, and histological and functional outcome from 5 hours to 2 weeks post-SCI. Administration of an NK1 receptor antagonist was not effective in reducing BSCB permeability, edema, ITP, or functional deficits following SCI. We conclude that SP mediated neurogenic inflammation does not seem to play a major role in BSCB disruption, edema development and consequential tissue damage seen in acute traumatic SCI. Rather it is likely that the severe primary insult and subsequent hemorrhage may be the key contributing factors to ongoing SCI injury.

  14. Arterial compression of nerve is the primary cause of trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Song; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Jia-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Whether arterial or venous compression or arachnoid adhesions are primarily responsible for compression of the trigeminal nerve in patients with trigeminal neuralgia is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the causes of trigeminal nerve compression in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. The surgical findings in patients with trigeminal neuralgia who were treated by micro vascular decompression were compared to those in patients with hemifacial spasm without any signs or symptoms of trigeminal neuralgia who were treated with microvascular decompression. The study included 99 patients with trigeminal neuralgia (median age, 57 years) and 101 patients with hemifacial spasm (median age, 47 years). There were significant differences between the groups in the relationship of artery to nerve (p relationship of vein to nerve. After adjustment for age, gender, and other factors, patients with vein compression of nerve or with artery compression of nerve were more likely to have trigeminal neuralgia (OR = 5.21 and 42.54, p = 0.026 and p compression of the trigeminal nerve is the primary cause of trigeminal neuralgia and therefore, decompression of veins need not be a priority when performing microvascular dissection in patients with trigeminal neuralgia.

  15. Disc herniation, occult on preoperative imaging but visualized microsurgically, as the cause of idiopathic thoracic spinal cord herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Christian T; Fung, Christian; Piechowiak, Eike; Gralla, Jan; Raabe, Andreas; Beck, Jürgen

    2018-03-01

    Idiopathic spinal cord herniation (ISCH) through an anterior dural defect is rare and the cause is uncertain. Recently, through interpreting imaging studies, disc herniation was proposed to be a major cause for ISCH. We describe the case of a 50-year-old woman with progressive myelopathy who was diagnosed with a thoracic spinal cord herniation. Microsurgical exploration revealed an anterior vertical dural defect and a small concomitant disc herniation, occult on the preoperative imaging, which caused the dural defect and led to ISCH. This intraoperative finding corroborates the emerging notion that disc herniation is the underlying cause of ISCH.

  16. Rapid but not slow spinal cord compression elicits neurogenic pulmonary edema in the rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šedý, Jiří; Zicha, Josef; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Jendelová, Pavla; Syková, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 2 (2009), s. 269-277 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR GA309/06/1246 Grant - others:EC FP6 projekt RESCUE(FR) LSHB-CT-2005-518233; GA MZd(CZ) 1A8697; GA MZd(CZ) NR8339; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0538; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Program:1M; 1M Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : neurogenic pulmonary edema * rat * spinal cord injury Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.430, year: 2009

  17. Objective measures of motor dysfunction after compression spinal cord injury in adult rats: correlations with locomotor rating scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semler, Joerg; Wellmann, Katharina; Wirth, Felicitas; Stein, Gregor; Angelova, Srebrina; Ashrafi, Mahak; Schempf, Greta; Ankerne, Janina; Ozsoy, Ozlem; Ozsoy, Umut; Schönau, Eckhard; Angelov, Doychin N; Irintchev, Andrey

    2011-07-01

    Precise assessment of motor deficits after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) in rodents is crucial for understanding the mechanisms of functional recovery and testing therapeutic approaches. Here we analyzed the applicability to a rat SCI model of an objective approach, the single-frame motion analysis, created and used for functional analysis in mice. Adult female Wistar rats were subjected to graded compression of the spinal cord. Recovery of locomotion was analyzed using video recordings of beam walking and inclined ladder climbing. Three out of four parameters used in mice appeared suitable: the foot-stepping angle (FSA) and the rump-height index (RHI), measured during beam walking, and for estimating paw placement and body weight support, respectively, and the number of correct ladder steps (CLS), assessing skilled limb movements. These parameters, similar to the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scores, correlated with lesion volume and showed significant differences between moderately and severely injured rats at 1-9 weeks after SCI. The beam parameters, but not CLS, correlated well with the BBB scores within ranges of poor and good locomotor abilities. FSA co-varied with RHI only in the severely impaired rats, while RHI and CLS were barely correlated. Our findings suggest that the numerical parameters estimate, as intended by design, predominantly different aspects of locomotion. The use of these objective measures combined with BBB rating provides a time- and cost-efficient opportunity for versatile and reliable functional evaluations in both severely and moderately impaired rats, combining clinical assessment with precise numerical measures.

  18. MicroRNA dysregulation in Spinal Cord Injury: causes, consequences and therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel eNieto-Díaz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Trauma to the spinal cord causes permanent disability to more than 180,000 people every year worldwide. The initial mechanical damage triggers a complex set of secondary events involving the neural, vascular, and immune systems that largely determine the functional outcome of the spinal cord injury (SCI. Cellular and biochemical mechanisms responsible for this secondary injury largely depend on activation and inactivation of specific gene programs. Recent studies indicate that microRNAs function as gene expression switches in key processes of the SCI. Microarray data from rodent contusion models reveal that SCI induces changes in the global microRNA expression patterns. Variations in microRNA abundance largely result from alterations in the expression of the cells at the damaged spinal cord. However, microRNA expression levels after SCI are also influenced by the infiltration of immune cells to the injury site and the death and migration of specific neural cells after injury. Evidences on the role of microRNAs in the SCI pathophysiology have come from different sources. Bioinformatic analysis of microarray data has been used to identify specific variations in microRNA expression underlying transcriptional changes in target genes, which are involved in key processes in the SCI. Direct evidences on the role of microRNAs in SCI are scarcer, although recent studies have identified several microRNAs (miR-21, miR/486, miR-20 involved in key mechanisms of the SCI such as cell death or astrogliosis, among others. From a clinical perspective, different evidences make clear that microRNAs can be potent therapeutic tools to manipulate cell state and molecular processes in order to enhance functional recovery. The present article reviews the actual knowledge on how injury affects microRNA expression and the meaning of these changes in the SCI pathophysiology, to finally explore the clinical potential of microRNAs in the SCI.

  19. Metastatic spinal cord compression from basal cell carcinoma of the skin treated with surgical decompression and vismodegib: case report and review of Hedgehog signalling pathway inhibition in advanced basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrane, J; Carswell, S; Talbot, T

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of a 66-year-old man with locally advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC) causing spinal cord compression, which was treated with spinal surgery and subsequent vismodegib. The patient presented with a large fungating chest wall lesion and a metastasis in T8 that was causing cord compression. He had neurosurgical decompression of the T8 lesion and fixation of the spine. Punch biopsy from the fungating chest wall lesion showed a BCC with some malignant squamous differentiation (basosquamous). Histopathological examination of the metastatic lesion in T8 at the time of surgical decompression identified features identical to the punch biopsy. The patient was referred to the oncology clinic for adjuvant treatment. In light of his metastatic disease and the large area over his chest wall that could not fully be covered by radiotherapy, he was treated with the novel oral Hedgehog signalling pathway (HHSP) inhibitor vismodegib, which led to marked improvement. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  20. Effect of DSPE-PEG on compound action potential, injury potential and ion concentration following compression in ex vivo spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aihua; Huo, Xiaolin; Zhang, Guanghao; Wang, Xiaochen; Zhang, Cheng; Wu, Changzhe; Rong, Wei; Xu, Jing; Song, Tao

    2016-05-04

    It has been shown that polyethylene glycol (PEG) can reseal membrane disruption on the spinal cord, but only high concentrations of PEG have been shown to have this effect. Therefore, the effect of PEG is somewhat limited, and it is necessary to investigate a new approach to repair spinal cord injury. This study assesses the ability of 1, 2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(poly (ethylene glycol)) 2000] (DSPE-PEG) to recover physiological function and attenuate the injury-induced influx of extracellular ions in ex vivo spinal cord injury. Isolated spinal cords were subjected to compression injury and treated with PEG or DSPE-PEG immediately after injury. The compound action potential (CAP) was recorded before and after injury to assess the functional recovery. Furthermore, injury potential, the difference in gap potentials before and after compression, and the concentration of intracellular ions were used to evaluate the effect of DSPE-PEG on reducing ion influx. Data showed that the injury potential and ion concentration of the untreated, PEG and DSPE-PEG group, without significant difference among them, are remarkably higher than those of the intact group. Moreover, the CAP recovery of the DSPE-PEG and PEG treated spinal cords was significantly greater than that of the untreated spinal cords. The level of CAP recovery in the DSPE-PEG and PEG treated groups was the same, but the concentration of DSPE-PEG used was much lower than the concentration of PEG. These results suggest that instant application of DSPE-PEG could effectively repair functional disturbance in SCI at a much lower concentration than PEG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Opalski syndrome caused by vertebral artery compression of the lateral surface of the medulla oblongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembo, Tomohisa; Tanahashi, Norio

    2013-01-01

    A 55-year-old man presented with vertigo, nystagmus, and gait ataxia followed by left hemiparesis (Opalski syndrome). T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed vascular compression of the left lateral side of the medulla oblongata by the left vertebral artery. On diffusion tensor imaging, the level of fractional anisotropy (FA) in the left corticospinal fibers caudal to the pyramidal decussation was lower than that observed in the right corticospinal fibers. Opalski syndrome caused by vascular compression is very rare. This is the first reported case of Opalski syndrome that was imaged on FA.

  2. Functional abnormalities of the cervical cord and lower medulla and their effect on pain: observations in chronic pain patients with incidental mild Chiari I malformation and moderate to severe cervical cord compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimineur, Mark; Kitaj, Madeline; Kravitz, Edward; Kalizewski, Tamara; Sood, Pardeep

    2002-01-01

    Abnormalities of central sensory processing may play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic pain. The Chiari I malformation is a congenital hindbrain anomaly characterized by protrusion of the cerebellar tonsils into the upper cervical canal, with variable effects on the lower brain stem and cervical cord. The purpose of this study was to compare sensory function and pain among patients with chronic pain who had these disorders incidentally diagnosed, to assess the effect on pain in these patients in comparison with those without central nervous system disease. Retrospective study in which pain, mood, and sensory function in 32 patients with chronic pain who had mild Chiari I malformation were compared with that in 53 patients with chronic pain who had moderate to severe compression of the cervical spinal cord and 52 patients with chronic pain who had no apparent central nervous system disorder. Data had been collected previously as part of standard clinical assessments, including clinical neurological examinations, quantitative sensory testing, pain drawings, and psychometric testing with the Symptom Checklist 90. All subjects were patients of a hospital-based pain management practice who had been accepted for treatment over a 5-year period. Both the Chiari I and cervical compression groups had long tract signs evident on clinical neurological examination. Quantitative sensory testing indicated elevations in the trigeminal territory among patients with Chiari I malformation and on the neck, hands, and feet in both the Chiari I and cervical compression groups. The extent of pain and mood disturbance was greatest in the Chiari I group and least in the group with no central nervous system disorder. Complex regional pain syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporal mandibular joint disorder were more common among the Chiari I malformation group than among the other groups. Quantitative sensory analysis indicates sensory dysfunction associated with Chiari I malformation and

  3. How effective is a virtual consultation process in facilitating multidisciplinary decision-making for malignant epidural spinal cord compression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, David; Grabarz, Daniel; Wang, Lisa; Bezjak, Andrea; Fehlings, Michael G; Fosker, Christopher; Rampersaud, Raja; Wong, Rebecca K S

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of a virtual consultation (VC) process in determining treatment strategy for patients with malignant epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC). A prospective clinical database was maintained for patients with MESCC. A virtual consultation process (involving exchange of key predetermined clinical information and diagnostic imaging) facilitated rapid decision-making between oncologists and spinal surgeons. Diagnostic imaging was reviewed retrospectively (by R.R.) for surgical opinions in all patients. The primary outcome was the accuracy of virtual consultation opinion in predicting the final treatment recommendation. After excluding 20 patients who were referred directly to the spinal surgeon, 125 patients were eligible for virtual consultation. Of the 46 patients who had a VC, surgery was recommended in 28 patients and actually given to 23. A retrospective review revealed that 5/79 patients who did not have a VC would have been considered surgical candidates. The overall accuracy of the virtual consultation process was estimated at 92%. The VC process for MESCC patients provides a reliable means of arriving at a multidisciplinary opinion while minimizing patient transfer. This can potentially shorten treatment decision time and enhance clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. How Effective Is a Virtual Consultation Process in Facilitating Multidisciplinary Decision-Making for Malignant Epidural Spinal Cord Compression?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzpatrick, David [Palliative Radiation Oncology Program and Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto (Canada); St Luke' s Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Grabarz, Daniel [Palliative Radiation Oncology Program and Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto (Canada); Centro Oncologia Mendel and Associados, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Wang, Lisa [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto (Canada); Bezjak, Andrea [Palliative Radiation Oncology Program and Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto (Canada); Fehlings, Michael G. [Division of Neurosurgery, Krembil Neuroscience Center, Spinal Program, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto (Canada); Fosker, Christopher [Palliative Radiation Oncology Program and Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto (Canada); Rampersaud, Raja [Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Krembil Neuroscience Center, Spinal Program, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto (Canada); Wong, Rebecca K.S., E-mail: rebecca.wong@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Palliative Radiation Oncology Program and Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of a virtual consultation (VC) process in determining treatment strategy for patients with malignant epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC). Methods and Materials: A prospective clinical database was maintained for patients with MESCC. A virtual consultation process (involving exchange of key predetermined clinical information and diagnostic imaging) facilitated rapid decision-making between oncologists and spinal surgeons. Diagnostic imaging was reviewed retrospectively (by R.R.) for surgical opinions in all patients. The primary outcome was the accuracy of virtual consultation opinion in predicting the final treatment recommendation. Results: After excluding 20 patients who were referred directly to the spinal surgeon, 125 patients were eligible for virtual consultation. Of the 46 patients who had a VC, surgery was recommended in 28 patients and actually given to 23. A retrospective review revealed that 5/79 patients who did not have a VC would have been considered surgical candidates. The overall accuracy of the virtual consultation process was estimated at 92%. Conclusion: The VC process for MESCC patients provides a reliable means of arriving at a multidisciplinary opinion while minimizing patient transfer. This can potentially shorten treatment decision time and enhance clinical outcomes.

  5. Breast cancer patients with metastatic spinal cord compression. Number of extraspinal organs involved by metastases influences survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, A; Bartscht, T; Karstens, J H; Schild, S E; Rades, D

    2014-03-01

    The goal of the present work was to investigate the predictive value of the number of extraspinal organs involved by metastases for the survival of patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) from breast cancer. Data of 145 breast cancer patients who received 10 fractions of 3 Gy of radiotherapy (RT) alone for MSCC were retrospectively analyzed. Seven potential prognostic factors were investigated including age, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance score, number of involved vertebrae, interval from breast cancer diagnosis to RT of MSCC, ambulatory status prior to RT, time to developing motor deficits, and the number of involved extraspinal organs. The 1-year survival rates for involvement of 0, 1, 2, and ≥ 3 extraspinal organs were 86, 73, 36, and 16 % (p number of involved extraspinal organs remained significant (risk ratio 2.19; 95 % confidence interval 1.61-3.00; p number of extraspinal organs involved by metastases is an independent prognostic factor of survival in patients with MSCC from breast cancer.

  6. Defining spinal instability and methods of classification to optimise care for patients with malignant spinal cord compression: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheehan, C.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of Malignant Spinal Cord Compression (MSCC) is thought to be increasing in the UK due to an aging population and improving cancer survivorship. The impact of such a diagnosis requires emergency treatment. In 2008 the National Institute of Clinical Excellence produced guidelines on the management of MSCC which includes a recommendation to assess spinal instability. However, a lack of guidelines to assess spinal instability in oncology patients is widely acknowledged. This can result in variations in the management of care for such patients. A spinal instability assessment can influence optimum patient care (bed rest or encouraged mobilisation) and inform the best definitive treatment modality (surgery or radiotherapy) for an individual patient. The aim of this systematic review is to attempt to identify a consensus definition of spinal instability and methods by which it can be classified. - Highlights: • A lack of guidance on metastatic spinal instability results in variations of care. • Definitions and assessments for spinal instability are explored in this review. • A Spinal Instability Neoplastic Scoring (SINS) system has been identified. • SINS could potentially be adopted to optimise and standardise patient care.

  7. An audit of current practice and management of metastatic spinal cord compression at a regional cancer centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sui, J

    2012-02-01

    Metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is an oncological emergency requiring prompt recognition and management to preserve neurological function and mobility. We performed an audit to assess current practice of MSCC against current best practice as outlined by NICE. Our retrospective audit identified 10 patients from January to December 2009 with confirmed MSCC. The most common primary tumours were prostate 3 (30%), breast 3 (30%) and lung 2 (20%). Pain was the main presenting symptom 9 (90%), followed by weakness 7 (70%) and sensory changes 1 (10%). 5 (50%) had MRI within 24 hours and only 6 (60%) underwent full MRI scan. 8 (80%) had corticosteroids before MRI scan. 6 (60%) received radiotherapy within 24 hours. Only 4 (40%) were referred to orthopaedics and none of these patients had been recommended surgery. Up 14 days following radiological confirmation of MSCC, the number of patients who were unable to walk increased by 20%. Only 5 (50%) were discharged during this period of study. Our audit reported a number of variances in management compared to NICE guideline. These can be improved by following a\\'fast track\\' referral pathway and regular education for junior doctors and primary care doctors.

  8. Metastatic spinal cord compression in non-small cell lung cancer patients. Prognostic factors in a series of 356 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, D.; Douglas, S.; Veninga, T.; Bajrovic, A.; Stalpers, L.J.A.; Hoskin, P.J.; Rudat, V.; Schild, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have an unfavorable prognosis compared to most other MSCC patients. This study was performed to identify prognostic factors for functional outcome and survival in these patients after radiotherapy (RT) alone. Data of 356 patients irradiated for MSCC from NSCLC were retrospectively analyzed. Ten potential prognostic factors were investigated including age, gender, Eastern cooperative Oncology Group performance score (ECOG-PS), number of involved vertebrae, pre-RT ambulatory status, other bone metastases, visceral metastases, interval from cancer diagnosis to RT of MSCC, time developing motor deficits before RT, and the radiation schedule. On multivariate analysis, better functional outcome was associated with pre-RT ambulatory status (estimate: -0.84, p = 0.022), no visceral metastases (estimate: -1.15, p 15 months (estimate: +0.48, p = 0.019), and slower (> 7 days) development of motor deficits (estimate: +1.56, p 15 months (RR 0.84, p = 0.035), and slower (> 7 days) development of motor deficits (RR 0.78, p < 0.001). This study identified additional independent prognostic factors for outcomes after radiotherapy of MSCC from NSCLC. These prognostic factors can be used for stratification in future trials and can help develop prognostic scores for MSCC from NSCLC. (orig.)

  9. An Intensive Locomotor Training Paradigm Improves Neuropathic Pain following Spinal Cord Compression Injury in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Elizabeth A; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2015-05-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is often associated with both locomotor deficits and sensory dysfunction, including debilitating neuropathic pain. Unfortunately, current conventional pharmacological, physiological, or psychological treatments provide only marginal relief for more than two-thirds of patients, highlighting the need for improved treatment options. Locomotor training is often prescribed as an adjunct therapy for peripheral neuropathic pain but is rarely used to treat central neuropathic pain. The goal of this study was to evaluate the potential anti-nociceptive benefits of intensive locomotor training (ILT) on neuropathic pain consequent to traumatic SCI. Using a rodent SCI model for central neuropathic pain, ILT was initiated either 5 d after injury prior to development of neuropathic pain symptoms (the "prevention" group) or delayed until pain symptoms fully developed (∼3 weeks post-injury, the "reversal" group). The training protocol consisted of 5 d/week of a ramping protocol that started with 11 m/min for 5 min and increased in speed (+1 m/min/week) and time (1-4 minutes/week) to a maximum of two 20-min sessions/d at 15 m/min by the fourth week of training. ILT prevented and reversed the development of heat hyperalgesia and cold allodynia, as well as reversed developed tactile allodynia, suggesting analgesic benefits not seen with moderate levels of locomotor training. Further, the analgesic benefits of ILT persisted for several weeks once training had been stopped. The unique ability of an ILT protocol to produce robust and sustained anti-nociceptive effects, as assessed by three distinct outcome measures for below-level SCI neuropathic pain, suggests that this adjunct therapeutic approach has great promise in a comprehensive treatment strategy for SCI pain.

  10. Wheelchair marathon racing causes striated muscle distress in individuals with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, M; Tajima, F; Furusawa, K; Mizushima, T; Ogata, H

    1999-03-01

    To assess the effects of wheelchair marathon racing in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) on circulating muscle enzymes and myoglobin. Thirty-one men with SCI, including 25 wheelchair marathon athletes and 6 sedentary men. Serum myoglobin (Mb), creatine kinase (CK) activity, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were measured in participants of the 1995 Oita International Wheelchair Marathon Race (42.195 km). Blood samples were obtained 24 hours before, immediately after, 24 hours after, and 7 days after the race. Marathon racing resulted in significant increases in serum Mb, total CK activity, and LDH (pathletes with SCI. Completion of the marathon race did not cause cardiac muscle damage, however. Elevated muscle enzyme levels likely resulted from muscle distress rather than from dehydration.

  11. Transconjunctival orbital emphysema caused by compressed air injury: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Sunu; Vasu, Usha; Francis, Febson; Nazareth, Colin

    2008-01-01

    Orbital emphysema following conjunctival tear in the absence of orbital wall fracture, caused by air under pressure is rare. Usually orbital emphysema is seen in facial trauma associated with damage to the adjacent paranasal sinuses or facial bones. To the best of our knowledge, there have been only eight reports of orbital emphysema following use of compressed air during industrial work. The air under pressure is pushed through the subconjunctival space into the subcutaneous and retrobulbar spaces. We present here a rare cause of orbital emphysema in a young man working with compressed air gun. Although the emphysema was severe, there were no orbital bone fracture and the visual recovery of the patient was complete without attendant complications.

  12. Re-irradiation of metastatic spinal cord compression: A feasibility study by volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy for in-field recurrence creating a dosimetric hole on the central canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancosu, Pietro; Navarria, Piera; Bignardi, Mario; Cozzi, Luca; Fogliata, Antonella; Lattuada, Paola; Santoro, Armando; Urso, Gaetano; Vigorito, Sabrina; Scorsetti, Marta

    2010-01-01

    When local recurrences arise within an irradiated region involving metastatic spinal cord compression, the dose limit to the spinal cord reduces the chance to re-treat the patient by 3D-conformational RT technique. The possibility of using volumetric modulated arc RT by RapidArc was evaluated for dose sparing at spinal cord level and preserving target coverage. A clinically satisfactory PTV coverage and dose sparing to the spinal cord were obtained. An upcoming trial on patients will provide clinical outcomes.

  13. Unilateral Vocal Cord Paralysis cases in KOHI - Etiologic Review of Mediastinal Causes

    OpenAIRE

    Sefa, A; Nagavci, L; Imeraga, D

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between unilateral vocal cord paralysis and meditational pathology. To review the anatomical relationship of mediastinal structures to the path of the unilateral vocal cord paralysis. Methods: Cross sectional study,analytical held at the Occupational Health Institute. The sample consisted of patients with Unilateral Vocal Cord paralysis of sex and age between 40-80 years.Nasolaryngoscopy flexible, CT scan, Magnetic resonance, biopsy are diagnostic...

  14. Elastic stresses and plastic deformations in 'Santa Clara' tomato fruits caused by package dependent compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PEREIRA ADRIANA VARGAS

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the fruit compression behavior aiming to develop new tomato packages. Deformations caused by compression forces were observed inside packages and in individual 'Santa Clara' tomato fruit. The forces applied by a transparent acrylic lever to the fruit surface caused pericarp deformation and the flattened area was proportional to the force magnitude. The deformation was associated to the reduction in the gas volume (Vg, caused by expulsion of the air from the loculus cavity and reduction in the intercellular air volume of the pericarp. As ripening advanced, smaller fractions of the Vg reduced by the compressive force were restored after the stress was relieved. The lack of complete Vg restoration was an indication of permanent plastic deformations of the stressed cells. Vg regeneration (elastic recovery was larger in green fruits than in the red ones. The ratio between the applied force and the flattened area (flattening pressure, which depends on cell turgidity, decreased during ripening. Fruit movements associated with its depth in the container were observed during storage in a transparent glass container (495 x 355 x 220 mm. The downward movement of the fruits was larger in the top layers because these movements seem to be driven by a summation of the deformation of many fruits in all layers.

  15. Impact of Symptomatic Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression on Survival of Patients with Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Gustavo Telles; Bergmann, Anke; Thuler, Luiz Claudio Santos

    2017-12-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the most common primary tumor sites among patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). This disorder is related to neurologic dysfunction and can reduce the quality of life, but the association between MSCC and death is unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of the occurrence of symptomatic MSCC on overall survival of patients with NSCLC. A cohort study was carried out involving 1112 patients with NSCLC who were enrolled between 2006 and 2014 in a single cancer center. Clinical and sociodemographic data were extracted from the physical and electronic records. Survival analysis of patients with NSCLC was conducted using the Kaplan-Meier method. A log-rank test was used to assess differences between survival curves. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were carried out to quantify the relationship between the independent variable (MSCC) and the outcome (overall survival). During the study period, the incidence of MSCC was 4.1%. Patients who presented with MSCC were 1.43 times more likely to die than were those with no history of MSCC (hazard ratio, 1.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-2.00; P = 0.031). The median survival time was 8.04 months (95% CI, 6.13-9.96) for those who presented MSCC and 11.95 months (95% CI, 10.80-13.11) for those who did not presented MSCC during the course of disease (P = 0.002). MSCC is an important and independent predictor of NSCLC worse survival. This effect was not influenced by sociodemographic and clinical factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Functional outcome and survival after radiotherapy of metastatic spinal cord compression in patients with cancer of unknown primary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, Dirk; Fehlauer, Fabian; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Basic, Hiba; Hoskin, Peter J.; Rudat, Volker; Karstens, Johann H.; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP) account for about 10% of patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). This study aims to define the appropriate radiation regimen for these patients. Methods and Materials: Data of 143 CUP patients irradiated for MSCC were retrospectively evaluated. Short-course radiotherapy (RT) (1x8 Gy, 5x4 Gy, n = 68) and long-course RT (10x3 Gy, 15x2.5 Gy, 20x2 Gy, n = 75) plus 8 further potential prognostic factors (age, gender, performance status, visceral metastases, other bone metastases, number of involved vertebrae, ambulatory status, time of developing motor deficits before RT) were compared for functional outcome and survival. Results: Improvement of motor function occurred in 10% of patients, no further progression of motor deficits in 57%, and deterioration in 33%. On multivariate analysis, functional outcome was positively associated with slower development of motor deficits (p < 0.001), absence of visceral metastases (p = 0.008) and other bone metastases (p = 0.027), and ambulatory status (p = 0.054), not with the radiation regimen (p = 0.74). Recurrence of MSCC in the irradiated region occurred in 7 patients after median 6 months. Median survival was 4 months. On multivariate analysis, better survival was significantly associated with absence of visceral metastases (p < 0.001), absence of other bone metastases (p = 0.005), ambulatory status (p = 0.001), and slower development of motor deficits (p = 0.030). Conclusions: For MSCC treatment in patients with CUP, no significant difference was observed between short-course and long-course RT regarding functional outcome and survival. Short-course RT appears preferable, at least for patients with a poor predicted survival, as it is more patient convenient and more cost-effective

  17. Selecting treatment for patients with malignant epidural spinal cord compression-does age matter?: results from a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, John H; Gokaslan, Ziya; McCormick, Paul; Tibbs, Phillip A; Kryscio, Richard J; Patchell, Roy A

    2009-03-01

    Randomized clinical trial. OBJECTIVE.: To determine if age affects outcomes from differing treatments in patients with spinal metastases. Recently, class I data were published supporting surgery with radiation over radiation alone for patients with malignant epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC). However, the criteria to properly select candidates for surgery remains controversial and few independent variables which predict success after treatment have been identified. Data for this study was obtained in a randomized clinical trial comparing surgery versus radiation for MESCC. Hazard ratios were determined for the effect of age and the interaction between age and treatment. Age estimates at which prespecified relative risks could be expected were calculated with greater than 95% confidence to suggest possible age cut points for further stratification. Multivariate models and Kaplan-Meier curves were tested using stratified cohorts for both treatment groups in the randomized trial each divided into 2 age groups. Secondary data analysis with age stratification demonstrated a strong interaction between age and treatment (hazard ratio = 1.61, P = 0.01), such that as age increases, the chances of surgery being equal to radiation alone increases. The best estimate for the age at which surgery is no longer superior to radiation alone was calculated to be between 60 and 70 years of age (95% CI), using sequential prespecified relative risk ratios. Multivariate modeling and Kaplan-Meier curves for stratified treatment groups showed that there was no difference in outcome between treatments for patients >or=65 years of age. Ambulation preservation was significantly prolonged in patients variable in predicting preservation of ambulation and survival for patients being treated for spinal metastases. Our results provide compelling evidence for the first time that particular age cut points may help in selecting patients for surgical or nonsurgical intervention based on outcome.

  18. A 2011 Updated Systematic Review and Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Malignant Extradural Spinal Cord Compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loblaw, D. Andrew; Mitera, Gunita; Ford, Michael; Laperriere, Normand J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To update the 2005 Cancer Care Ontario practice guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of adult patients with a suspected or confirmed diagnosis of extradural malignant spinal cord compression (MESCC). Methods: A review and analysis of data published from January 2004 to May 2011. The systematic literature review included published randomized control trials (RCTs), systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and prospective/retrospective studies. Results: An RCT of radiation therapy (RT) with or without decompressive surgery showed improvements in pain, ambulatory ability, urinary continence, duration of continence, functional status, and overall survival. Two RCTs of RT (30 Gy in eight fractions vs. 16 Gy in two fractions; 16 Gy in two fractions vs. 8 Gy in one fraction) in patients with a poor prognosis showed no difference in ambulation, duration of ambulation, bladder function, pain response, in-field failure, and overall survival. Retrospective multicenter studies reported that protracted RT schedules in nonsurgical patients with a good prognosis improved local control but had no effect on functional or survival outcomes. Conclusions: If not medically contraindicated, steroids are recommended for any patient with neurologic deficits suspected or confirmed to have MESCC. Surgery should be considered for patients with a good prognosis who are medically and surgically operable. RT should be given to nonsurgical patients. For those with a poor prognosis, a single fraction of 8 Gy should be given; for those with a good prognosis, 30 Gy in 10 fractions could be considered. Patients should be followed up clinically and/or radiographically to determine whether a local relapse develops. Salvage therapies should be introduced before significant neurologic deficits occur.

  19. Do elderly patients benefit from surgery in addition to radiotherapy for treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, D.; Huttenlocher, S.; Evers, J.N.; Bajrovic, A.; Karstens, J.H.; Rudat, V.; Schild, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of elderly cancer patients has gained importance. One question regarding the treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is whether elderly patients benefit from surgery in addition to radiotherapy? In attempting to answer this question, we performed a matched-pair analysis comparing surgery followed by radiotherapy to radiotherapy alone. Data from 42 elderly (age > 65 years) patients receiving surgery plus radiotherapy (S + RT) were matched to 84 patients (1:2) receiving radiotherapy alone (RT). Groups were matched for ten potential prognostic factors and compared regarding motor function, local control, and survival. Additional matched-pair analyses were performed for the subgroups of patients receiving direct decompressive surgery plus stabilization of involved vertebrae (DDSS, n = 81) and receiving laminectomy (LE, n = 45). Improvement of motor function occurred in 21% after S + RT and 24% after RT (p = 0.39). The 1-year local control rates were 81% and 91% (p = 0.44), while the 1-year survival rates were 46% and 39% (p = 0.71). In the matched-pair analysis of patients receiving DDSS, improvement of motor function occurred in 22% after DDSS + RT and 24% after RT alone (p = 0.92). The 1-year local control rates were 95% and 89% (p = 0.62), and the 1-year survival rates were 54% and 43% (p = 0.30). In the matched-pair analysis of patients receiving LE, improvement of motor function occurred in 20% after LE + RT and 23% after RT alone (p = 0.06). The 1-year local control rates were 50% and 92% (p = 0.33). The 1-year survival rates were 32% and 32% (p = 0.55). Elderly patients with MSCC did not benefit from surgery in addition to radiotherapy regarding functional outcome, local control of MSCC, or survival. (orig.)

  20. A 2011 Updated Systematic Review and Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Malignant Extradural Spinal Cord Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loblaw, D. Andrew, E-mail: andrew.loblaw@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Mitera, Gunita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Ford, Michael [Division of Orthopedic Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Laperriere, Normand J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To update the 2005 Cancer Care Ontario practice guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of adult patients with a suspected or confirmed diagnosis of extradural malignant spinal cord compression (MESCC). Methods: A review and analysis of data published from January 2004 to May 2011. The systematic literature review included published randomized control trials (RCTs), systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and prospective/retrospective studies. Results: An RCT of radiation therapy (RT) with or without decompressive surgery showed improvements in pain, ambulatory ability, urinary continence, duration of continence, functional status, and overall survival. Two RCTs of RT (30 Gy in eight fractions vs. 16 Gy in two fractions; 16 Gy in two fractions vs. 8 Gy in one fraction) in patients with a poor prognosis showed no difference in ambulation, duration of ambulation, bladder function, pain response, in-field failure, and overall survival. Retrospective multicenter studies reported that protracted RT schedules in nonsurgical patients with a good prognosis improved local control but had no effect on functional or survival outcomes. Conclusions: If not medically contraindicated, steroids are recommended for any patient with neurologic deficits suspected or confirmed to have MESCC. Surgery should be considered for patients with a good prognosis who are medically and surgically operable. RT should be given to nonsurgical patients. For those with a poor prognosis, a single fraction of 8 Gy should be given; for those with a good prognosis, 30 Gy in 10 fractions could be considered. Patients should be followed up clinically and/or radiographically to determine whether a local relapse develops. Salvage therapies should be introduced before significant neurologic deficits occur.

  1. A new instrument for estimating the survival of patients with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression from esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, Dirk; Huttenlocher, Stefan; Bajrovic, Amira; Karstens, Johann H.; Bartscht, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    This study was initiated to create a predictive instrument for estimating the survival of patients with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC) from esophageal cancer. In 27 patients irradiated for MESCC from esophageal cancer, the following nine characteristics were evaluated for potential impact on survival: age, gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance score, histology, number of involved vertebrae, ambulatory status before irradiation, further bone metastases, visceral metastases, and dynamic of developing motor deficits before irradiation. In addition, the impact of the radiation regimen was investigated. According to Bonferroni correction, p-values of < 0.006 were significant representing an alpha level of < 0.05. ECOG performance score (p < 0.001), number of involved vertebrae (p = 0.005), and visceral metastases (p = 0.004) had a significant impact on survival and were included in the predictive instrument. Scoring points for each characteristic were calculated by dividing the 6-months survival rates (in %) by 10. The prognostic score for each patient was obtained by adding the scoring points of the three characteristics. The prognostic scores were 4, 9, 10, 14 or 20 points. Three prognostic groups were formed, 4 points (n = 11), 9–14 points (n = 12) and 20 points (n = 4). The corresponding 6-months survival rates were 0%, 33% and 100%, respectively (p < 0.001). Median survival times were 1 month, 5 months and 16.5 months, respectively. This new instrument allows the physician estimate the 6-months survival probability of an individual patient presenting with MESCC from esophageal cancer. This is important to know for optimally personalizing the treatment of these patients

  2. Paravertebral cutaneous hemangiosarcoma in dog causing medular compression / Hemangiossarcoma cutâneo paravertebral em cão causando compressão medular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Frederico Rodrigues Loureiro Bracarense

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A seven-year-old male Scottish terrier was examined at the Veterinary Hospital of the Universidade Estadual de Londrina due to a toracolumbar syndrome classified as V degree and a mass in lumbar region back right of slow growth with evaluation of two months. Myelography showed an interruption of the column of contrast between the 11th and 12th thoracic vertebrae. A hemilaminectomy was performed in this region. Spinal cord compression at this location was not observed, however during the caudal enlargement of hemilaminectomy it was visualized in the region of the fourth lumbar vertebrae, a spinal cord deviation to the left, due to the presence of a reddish mass at the right side that was diagnosed as a tumor infiltration in the vertebrae with cord compression. Surgical removal with appropriate margin was not possible. In histology, the tumor was classified as hemangiosarcoma. This report emphasizes the importance of considering the possibility of cancer as differential diagnosis of paraplegias, even in acute clinical changes.Um cão macho, Scottish Terrier, de sete anos foi atendido no Hospital Veterinário da Universidade Estadual de Londrina por apresentar paraplegia grau V e um nódulo em região dorso lombar direita de crescimento lento, com evolução de dois meses. Foi realizado mielografia, visibilizando-se interrupção na coluna de contraste entre as vértebras torácicas 11ª e 12ª. Assim, procedeu-se à hemilaminectomia nesta região, não sendo constatado compressão medular, procedendo-se a ampliação caudal da abertura da lâmina vertebral T12. Na região da quarta vértebra lombar observou-se um desvio da medula espinhal para o lado esquerdo devido à presença de uma massa de coloração avermelhada proveniente do lado direito, diagnosticando-se infiltração tumoral em vértebras com compressão medular, não sendo possível sua remoção cirúrgica. Na histologia classificou-se o tumor como hemangiossarcoma. Este relato

  3. Thoracic stenosis causing lateral compression of the spinal cord in two immature Dogues de Bordeaux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalin, C E; Pratt, J N J; Smith, P M; Jeffery, N D

    2009-01-01

    This case report describes a novel developmental vertebral malformation in two young Dogues de Bordeaux, which was diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging. Both dogs were treated surgically with reasonable success.

  4. Laminoplasty versus conservative treatment for acute cervical spinal cord injury caused by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament after minor trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yong; Chen, Liang; Dong, Ren-Bin; Feng, Yu; Yang, Hui-Lin; Tang, Tian-Si

    2014-02-01

    No reports to date have accurately evaluated the management for acute spinal cord injury (SCI) caused by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) after minor trauma. To assess whether outcomes of laminoplasty is better than conservative treatment. A retrospective study. Thirty-one patients underwent surgery (L group) and 29 patients underwent conservative treatment (C group). Disability, muscle strength, sensation, and general health status. Patients were managed according to routine clinical practice and the results between groups were compared. Clinical and radiographic outcomes were assessed at admission, discharge, 6 months and at the final visit. Causes for trauma, duration of hospital stay, and complication were also evaluated. Causes for trauma included falling, traffic accidents and sports. Mixed and segmental types were the most frequent cause of OPLL resulting into SCI. Duration of hospital stay and complications were less in the L group. Motor and sensory scores increased in the L group at discharge (p.05); scores improved significantly in the C group at 6 months (p.05); scores in the L group were higher than in the C group at each time point after surgery (p.05). Lordotic angle and range of motion were maintained in both the groups, with no significance between groups (p>.05). High-signal intensity decreased at 6 months (p.05); Significant difference was detected between the groups at 6 months and at the final visit (ptrauma. Although spontaneous improvement of SCI without surgery is often observed, laminoplasty has more satisfactory outcomes, prevents late compression of cord, and reduces perioperative complications, although with no significant benefit in cervical alignment and range of motion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Pediatric orbital emphysema caused by a compressed-air pistol shot: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Mingorance, A; Reyes-Dominguez, S B; León-León, M C

    2014-09-01

    We report the case of a 2 year-old child with orbital emphysema secondary to a compressed-air gun shot in the malar region, with no evidence of orbital wall fracture. Conservative treatment was applied, and no complications were observed. Orbital emphysema in the absence of an orbital wall fracture is a rare situation. Orbital emphysema is usually seen in facial trauma associated with damage to the adjacent paranasal sinuses or facial bones. To our knowledge there have been very few reports of orbital emphysema caused by a compressed-air injury. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Aging and Spinal Cord Injury: External Causes of Injury and Implications for Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuying; Tang, Ying; Allen, Victoria; DeVivo, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Despite a consistent trend toward older age at time of spinal cord injury (SCI), little is known about the external causes of SCI in the elderly. To examine environmental circumstances, documented by International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification codes, at time of SCI among older adults. Data on individuals injured in 2005 or later were retrieved from the National SCI Database. Demographics, injury profiles, and external causes of injury were compared between the study group (age >60 years, n = 1,079) and reference group (age 16-45 years, n = 3,579) using chi-square and Student t tests. Among the elderly, falls were the most common etiology of SCI (60%), followed by transport accidents (24%) and complications of medical and surgical care (12%). In the younger group, transport accidents were the most common etiology of SCI (49%), followed by falls (22%) and assault (21%). Falls on the same level (30%), from stairs and steps (22%), and other slipping, tripping, and stumbling (11%) were the most common mechanisms of falls in the elderly group. Among motor vehicle accidents, car occupant injured in a collision with another car was the most common mechanism of injury among the elderly (28%). There is an urgent need for effective fall prevention programs among the elderly to reduce SCI in this expanding population. Details on the mechanisms of falls and other major causes of SCI among the elderly provided in this study should inform the development of future interventions for high-risk persons, activities, and environments.

  7. Prognostic factors in metastatic spinal cord compression: a prospective study using multivariate analysis of variables influencing survival and gait function in 153 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helweg-Larsen, Susanne; Soerensen, Per Soelberg; Kreiner, Svend

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Based on a very large patient cohort followed prospectively for at least a year or until death, we analyzed the prognostic significance of various clinical and radiological variables on posttreatment ambulatory function and survival. Methods and Materials: During a 3((1)/(2))-year period we prospectively included 153 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of spinal cord compression due to metastatic disease. The patients were followed with regular neurological examinations by the same neurologist for a minimum period of 11 months or until death. The prognostic significance of five variables on gait function and survival time after treatment was analyzed. Results: The type of the primary tumor had a direct influence on the interval between the diagnosis of the primary malignancy and the occurrence of spinal cord compression (p < 0.0005), and on the ambulatory function at time of diagnosis (p = 0.016). There was a clear correlation between the degree of myelographic blockage and gait function (p = 0.000) and between gait function and sensory disturbances (p = 0.000). The final gait was dependent on the gait function at time of diagnosis (p < 0.0005). Survival time after diagnosis depended directly on the time from primary tumor diagnosis until spinal cord compression (p = 0.002), on the ambulatory function at the time of diagnosis (p = 0.018), and on the ambulatory function after treatment. Conclusions: The pretreatment ambulatory function is the main determinant for posttreatment gait function. Survival time is rather short, especially in nonambulatory patients, and can only be improved by restoration of gait function in nonambulatory patients by immediate treatment

  8. Acute Compressive Myelopathy Caused by Spinal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Combined Effect of Asymptomatic Cervical Spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Toshinari; Fukuda, Hitoshi; Kurosaki, Yoshitaka; Handa, Akira; Chin, Masaki; Yamagata, Sen

    2016-11-01

    Patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by hemorrhagic arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) usually presents with meningeal signs, including headache and nausea, and focal neurologic deficit is found in rare cases. In this article, we report a case of acute compressive cervical myelopathy caused by hemorrhagic AVF at the craniocervical junction. A 73-year-old woman was transferred to our hospital for sudden headache and subsequent left hemiparesis. Head computed tomography scan showed SAH exclusively in the posterior fossa, and catheter angiography revealed a perimedullary arteriovenous fistula at the craniocervical junction as a source of the SAH. Detailed neurologic examination showed the sensory disturbance of bilateral upper extremities and bladder and rectal disturbance, suggesting concurrent cervical myelopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed disk herniation at the C4-5 level, spinal SAH deposition above the C4-5 level, and accompanying myelomalacia. No intramedullary hemorrhage was found. Spinal SAH alone rarely causes focal neurologic deficit. However, this case suggests spinal SAH can cause acute compressive myelopathy when complicated with preexisting spinal canal stenosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Incidence and Treatment Patterns in Hospitalizations for Malignant Spinal Cord Compression in the United States, 1998-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mak, Kimberley S.; Lee, Leslie K.; Mak, Raymond H.; Wang, Shuang; Pile-Spellman, John; Abrahm, Janet L.; Prigerson, Holly G.; Balboni, Tracy A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize patterns in incidence, management, and costs of malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC) hospitalizations in the United States, using population-based data. Methods and Materials: Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, an all-payer healthcare database representative of all U.S. hospitalizations, MSCC-related hospitalizations were identified for the period 1998-2006. Cases were combined with age-adjusted Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results cancer death data to estimate annual incidence. Linear regression characterized trends in patient, treatment, and hospital characteristics, costs, and outcomes. Logistic regression was used to examine inpatient treatment (radiotherapy [RT], surgery, or neither) by hospital characteristics and year, adjusting for confounding. Results: We identified 15,367 MSCC-related cases, representing 75,876 hospitalizations. Lung cancer (24.9%), prostate cancer (16.2%), and multiple myeloma (11.1%) were the most prevalent underlying cancer diagnoses. The annual incidence of MSCC hospitalization among patients dying of cancer was 3.4%; multiple myeloma (15.0%), Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas (13.9%), and prostate cancer (5.5%) exhibited the highest cancer-specific incidence. Over the study period, inpatient RT for MSCC decreased (odds ratio [OR] 0.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61-0.81), whereas surgery increased (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.17-1.84). Hospitalization costs for MSCC increased (5.3% per year, p < 0.001). Odds of inpatient RT were greater at teaching hospitals (OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.19-1.67), whereas odds of surgery were greater at urban institutions (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.29-2.58). Conclusions: In the United States, patients dying of cancer have an estimated 3.4% annual incidence of MSCC requiring hospitalization. Inpatient management of MSCC varied over time and by hospital characteristics, with hospitalization costs increasing. Future studies are required to determine the impact of treatment patterns on MSCC

  10. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: two cases with cervical spinal cord compression Polirradiculoneuropatia desmielinizante inflamatória crônica: dois casos com síndrome de compressão medular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos R.G. de Freitas

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP is a peripheral nerve disorder probably due to an immunological disturb. It evolves either in a steadily progressive or in a relapsing and fluctuating course. Weakness is mainly in the lower limbs proximally and distally. The electromyography is demyelinating. The cerebral spinal fluid protein is most of times elevated. Sometimes enlarged nerves are found. There are few cases described with spinal cord compression due to hypertrophic spinal nerve roots. Two patients (females, 66 and 67 years old with diagnosis of a long standing CIDP are described. In the first one, the evolution was characterized by remission and relapsing course. The second patient had a chronic and progressive course. These patients presented after a long evolution a cervical spinal cord compression syndrome due to hypertrophic cervical roots. Neurologists must be aware of the possibility of development of spinal cord compression by enlarged spinal roots in patients with a long standing CIDP.A polirradiculoneuropatia desmielinizante inflamatória crônica (PDIC é uma afecção dos nervos periféricos de natureza autoimune, com evolução por surtos de exacerbação e remissão ou de evolver progressivo. O acometimento motor é predominante, com fraqueza proximal e distal nos membros inferiores. A eletroneuromiografia é do tipo desmielinizante com bloqueio de condução nervosa em dois ou mais nervos. Há aumento de proteínas do líquor. Com a evolução da doença pode haver espessamento dos nervos distal e/ou proximalmente. Excepcionalmente ocorre compressão da medula espinhal em qualquer segmento por raízes próximas hipertrofiadas. Foram estudadas duas mulheres de 66 e 67 anos respectivamente com quadro de PDIC de longa evolução. A primeira tinha evolução por surtos e na segunda o evolver era progressivo. Nos dois casos o espessamento proximal dos nervos provocou síndrome de compressão medular alta

  11. Multiple thoracic vertebral compression fractures caused by non-accidental injury: case report with radiological-pathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twomey, Eilish L.; Iemsawatdikul, Kriengkrai; Stephens, Boyd G.; Gooding, Charles A. [Department of Radiology, University of California at San Francisco, 505 Parnassus Avenue, Box 0628, 94143-0628, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2004-08-01

    We report a 21-month-old boy with multiple contiguous thoracic vertebral compression fractures involving eight vertebral bodies, attributable to non-accidental injury. No subluxation was associated, however, there was extensive injury to the upper cervical and lower lumbar regions of the spinal cord. Anterosuperior beaking, thought to represent a previous injury, was evident in a mid-lumbar vertebra. Clinical examination revealed bilateral retinal hemorrhages and retinoschisis. Death occurred as a result of severe brain edema with bilateral subdural and subarachnoid hemorrhages. Radiological-pathological correlation is presented. (orig.)

  12. Radiation dermatitis caused by a bolus effect from an abdominal compression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, Michael; Wei, Randy L.; Yu, Suhong; Sehgal, Varun; Klempner, Samuel J.; Daroui, Parima

    2016-01-01

    American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 176 evaluated the dosimetric effects caused by couch tops and immobilization devices. The report analyzed the extensive physics-based literature on couch tops, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) frames, and body immobilization bags, while noting the scarcity of clinical reports of skin toxicity because of external devices. Here, we present a clinical case report of grade 1 abdominal skin toxicity owing to an abdominal compression device. We discuss the dosimetric implications of the utilized treatment plan as well as post hoc alternative plans and quantify differences in attenuation and skin dose/build-up between the device, a lower-density alternative device, and an open field. The description of the case includes a 66-year-old male with HER2 amplified poorly differentiated distal esophageal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemo-radiation and the use of an abdominal compression device. Radiation was delivered using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with 2 arcs using abdominal compression and image guidance. The total dose was 50.4 Gy delivered over 40 elapsed days. With 2 fractions remaining, the patient developed dermatitis in the area of the compression device. The original treatment plan did not include a contour of the device. Alternative post hoc treatment plans were generated, one to contour the device and a second with anterior avoidance. In conclusion, replanning with the device contoured revealed the bolus effect. The skin dose increased from 27 to 36 Gy. planned target volume (PTV) coverage at 45 Gy was reduced to 76.5% from 95.8%. The second VMAT treatment plan with an anterior avoidance sector and more oblique beam angles maintained PTV coverage and spared the anterior wall, however at the expense of substantially increased dose to lung. This case report provides an important reminder of the bolus effect from external devices such as abdominal compression. Special

  13. Microvascular Decompression for Classical Trigeminal Neuralgia Caused by Venous Compression: Novel Anatomic Classifications and Surgical Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Fu, Xianming; Ji, Ying; Ding, Wanhai; Deng, Dali; Wang, Yehan; Jiang, Xiaofeng; Niu, Chaoshi

    2018-05-01

    Microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve is the most effective treatment for trigeminal neuralgia. However, when encountering classical trigeminal neuralgia caused by venous compression, the procedure becomes much more difficult, and failure or recurrence because of incomplete decompression may become frequent. This study aimed to investigate the anatomic variation of the culprit veins and discuss the surgical strategy for different types. We performed a retrospective analysis of 64 consecutive cases in whom veins were considered as responsible vessels alone or combined with other adjacent arteries. The study classified culprit veins according to operative anatomy and designed personalized approaches and decompression management according to different forms of compressive veins. Curative effects were assessed by the Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) pain intensity score and BNI facial numbness score. The most commonly encountered veins were the superior petrosal venous complex (SPVC), which was artificially divided into 4 types according to both venous tributary distribution and empty point site. We synthetically considered these factors and selected an approach to expose the trigeminal root entry zone, including the suprafloccular transhorizontal fissure approach and infratentorial supracerebellar approach. The methods of decompression consist of interposing and transposing by using Teflon, and sometimes with the aid of medical adhesive. Nerve combing (NC) of the trigeminal root was conducted in situations of extremely difficult neurovascular compression, instead of sacrificing veins. Pain completely disappeared in 51 patients, and the excellent outcome rate was 79.7%. There were 13 patients with pain relief treated with reoperation. Postoperative complications included 10 cases of facial numbness, 1 case of intracranial infection, and 1 case of high-frequency hearing loss. The accuracy recognition of anatomic variation of the SPVC is crucial for the

  14. Spinal cord contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yazhou; Zhao, Xianghui

    2014-04-15

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and limited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result.

  15. Congenital cervical dermal sinus tract caused tethered cord syndrome in an adult: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Karatas, Y; Ustun, ME

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to report on a 34-year-old woman who presented with tethered cord syndrome due to dermal sinüs tract. A 34-year-old woman had got dermal sınüs tract admitted to our hospital with swelling on the neck, pain and numbness on the left upper limb. She was treated by surgical removal of dermal sinuses and untethering the spinal cord which is stretched by the dermal sinus. Congenital dermal sinus tracts are uncommon types of cranial and spinal dysraphisms. They can oc...

  16. Combining Bone Marrow Stromal Cells with Green Tea Polyphenols Attenuates the Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier Permeability in Rats with Compression Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, De-shui; Liu, Li-bo; Cao, Yang; Wang, Yan-song; Bi, Yun-long; Wei, Zi-Jian; Tong, Song-ming; Lv, Gang; Mei, Xi-fan

    2015-06-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) combined with green tea polyphenols (GTPs) on the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) permeability after spinal cord injury (SCI) in the rat model. In the model of SCI rats, we found that the water content and the BSCB permeability were decreased by BMSCs and GTPs treatment, and their combination had a synergistic effect. Further, the motor function of rats was also greatly improved by BMSCs and GTPs administration. After treated by the combination of BMSCs and GTPs, SCI rats showed the up-regulated expression of tight junction (TJ) associated proteins claudin-5, occludin and ZO-1 by Western blot, which was more remarkable than that in the single treatment. The increased expression levels of claudin-5, occludin, and ZO-1 were the most obvious in the spinal cord microvessels using immunohistochemistry assay. This led to the conclusion that the combination of BMSCs and GTPs could decrease the BSCB permeability by up-regulating protein expression levels of claudin-5, occludin, and ZO-1. In addition, after BMSCs and GTPs administration, the results of Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed a significant decrease in protein expression level and the activation of nuclear factor-кB (NF-кB) p65. Our results indicated that combination of BMSCs and GTPs could improve motor function after SCI, which might be correlated with improvements in BSCB integrity, and that NF-кB might be involved in the modulating process.

  17. Dynamic cervicomedullary cord compression and alterations in cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in children with achondroplasia: review of an 11-year surgical case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Debraj; Pressman, Barry D; Krakow, Deborah; Rimoin, David L; Danielpour, Moise

    2014-09-01

    Achondroplasia may be associated with compression at the cervicomedullary junction. Determining which patients are at greatest risk for neurological complications of cervicomedullary compression can be difficult. In the current study the authors reviewed their records to determine the incidence and clinical significance of dynamic cervicomedullary stenosis and obstruction of CSF flow along with surgical outcomes following posterior fossa decompression. The authors reviewed 34 consecutive cases involving symptomatic children with achondroplasia undergoing cervicomedullary decompression performed by a single surgeon over 11 years. Of these patients, 29 had undergone preoperative dynamic MRI of the cervicomedullary junction with cine (cinema) CSF flow studies; 13 of these patients underwent postoperative dynamic MRI studies. Clinical outcomes included changes in polysomnography, head circumference percentile, and fontanel characteristics. Radiographic outcomes included changes in dynamic spinal cord diameter, improvement in CSF flow at the foramen magnum, and change in the Evans ratio. Patients were predominantly female, with a mean age at presentation of 6.6 years and mean follow-up of 3.7 years (range 1-10 years). All patients had moderate to excellent improvement in postoperative polysomnography, slight decrease in average head circumference percentile (from 46.9th percentile to 45.7th percentile), and no subjective worsening of fontanel characteristics. The Evans ratio decreased by 2%, spinal cord diameter increased an average of 3.1 mm, 5.2 mm, and 0.2 mm in the neutral, flexed, and extended positions, respectively, and CSF flow improved qualitatively in all 3 positions. There were no postoperative infections, CSF leaks, or other major complications. None of the patients undergoing initial foramen magnum decompression performed at our medical center required reoperation. Patients with achondroplasia and symptomatic cervicomedullary compression have increased risk

  18. Os odontoideum with "free-floating" atlantal arch causing C1-2 anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis with cervicomedullary compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behari Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Os odontoideum (OO with C1-2 anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis may cause cervicomedullary injury both from anterior and posterior aspects. We analyzed fourteen such patients for biomechanical issues, radiological features and management of OO with free-floating atlantal arch and review pertinent literature. Materials and Methods: Fourteen patients having nonsyndromic, reducible atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD with orthotopic OO were analyzed. During neck flexion, their C1 anterior arch-os complex displaced anteriorly relative to remnant odontoid-C2 body. The posteriorly directed hypoplastic remnant odontoid sliding below the atlas and forward translation of the C1 posterior arch caused concomitant cervicomedullary compression. During neck extension, there was retrolisthesis of the "free-floating" C1 arch-os complex into spinal canal. Spinal stenosis and lateral C1-2 facet dislocation; Klippel-Feil anomaly; and posterior circulation infarcts were also present in one patient each, respectively. Posterior C1-2 (n=10 or occipitocervical fusion (n=3 was performed in neutral position to stabilize atlantoaxial movements. Results: Follow-up (mean, 3.9 years assessment revealed improvement in spasticity and weakness in 13 patients. One patient had neurological deterioration following C1-2 posterior sublaminar fusion, requiring its conversion to occipitocervical contoured rod fusion. One patient with posterior circulation stroke died prior to any operative intervention. Follow-up lateral view radiographs showed a bony union or a stable construct in these 13 patients. Conclusions: OO with free-floating atlantal arch may precipitate cord injury both during neck flexion and extension. This condition may be overlooked unless lateral radiographs of craniovertebral junction are undertaken in neck extension, along with the usual ones in neutral and flexed positions. Etiological factors include C1 ring-OO unrestrained movements above the hypoplastic

  19. Epidural tumour (calcified fibroma) as cause of a 'Cervical Syndrome'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotrowski, W.P.

    1983-01-01

    A calcified fibroma caused a so called cervical syndrome not responding to medical treatment. In the computerized tomography a compression of the cervical spinal cord could be demonstrated. From this the indication for the operation was given. (Author)

  20. Survival and cause of death after traumatic spinal cord injury. A long-term epidemiological survey from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartkopp, A; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Seidenschnur, A M

    1997-01-01

    Life expectancy among individuals with spinal cord injuries (SCI) has remained lower than in the normal population, even with optimal medical management. But significant improvement has been achieved, as will be illustrated in this retrospective study of an unselected group of traumatic survivors...... treatment and were rehabilitated at the centre for Spinal Cord Injured in Hornbaek, Denmark. At the end of the follow-up, 31st December 1992, 236 (197 men and 39 women) had died. The commonest causes of death were lung diseases, particularly pneumonia; suicide; and ischaemic heart disease. Among...... of SCI, dead or still living. There has been a complete follow-up over 4 decades, information being obtained from available medical records, death certificates, and post mortem records. The survey included a total of 888 individuals (713 men and 175 women) who had survived the injury and primary...

  1. Survival and cause of death after traumatic spinal cord injury. A long-term epidemiological survey from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartkopp, A; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Seidenschnur, A M

    1997-01-01

    Life expectancy among individuals with spinal cord injuries (SCI) has remained lower than in the normal population, even with optimal medical management. But significant improvement has been achieved, as will be illustrated in this retrospective study of an unselected group of traumatic survivors...... treatment and were rehabilitated at the centre for Spinal Cord Injured in Hornbaek, Denmark. At the end of the follow-up, 31st December 1992, 236 (197 men and 39 women) had died. The commonest causes of death were lung diseases, particularly pneumonia; suicide; and ischaemic heart disease. Among...... and pneumonia. A significant decrease in the overall mortality was observed from the first (1953-1973) to the second half of the observation period (1972-1992). Similarly the survival curves for both men and women demonstrate that the gap in survival probability between the normal population and the SCI has...

  2. Effect and safety of spinal cord stimulation for treatment of chronic pain caused by diabetic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, C.; de Vos, Cecile C.; Rajan, Vinayakrishnan; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van der Aa, Hans E.; Buschman, H.P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been shown effective as a therapy for different chronic painful conditions, but the effectiveness of this treatment for pain as a result of peripheral diabetic neuropathy is not well established. The primary objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect

  3. Unexpected changes of rat cervical spinal cord tolerance caused by inhomogeneous dose distributions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, H.P.; Luijk, P. van; Coppes, R.P.; Schippers, J.M.; Konings, A.W.T.; Kogel, A.J. van der

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: The effects of dose distribution on dose-effect relationships have been evaluated and, from this, iso-effective doses (ED(50)) established. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Wistar rats were irradiated on the cervical spinal cord with single doses of unmodulated protons (150 MeV) to obtain sharp

  4. Unexpected changes of rat cervical spinal cord tolerance caused by inhomogeneous dose distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, HP; van Luijk, P; Coppes, RP; Schippers, JM; Konings, AWT; van der Kogel, AJ

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of dose distribution on dose-effect relationships have been evaluated and, from this, iso-effective doses (ED(50)) established. Methods and Materials: Wistar rats were irradiated on the cervical spinal cord with single doses of unmodulated protons (150MeV) to obtain sharp

  5. MeHg Developing Exposure Causes DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Elicits Cell Cycle Arrest in Spinal Cord Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana F. Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurotoxicity caused by methylmercury (MeHg is well documented; however, the developmental neurotoxicity in spinal cord is still not fully understood. Here we investigated whether MeHg affects the spinal cord layers development. Chicken embryos at E3 were treated in ovo with 0.1 μg MeHg/50 μL saline solution and analyzed at E10. Thus, we performed immunostaining using anti-γ-H2A.X to recognize DNA double-strand breaks and antiphosphohistone H3, anti-p21, and anti-cyclin E to identify cells in proliferation and cell cycle proteins. Also, to identify neuronal cells, we used anti-NeuN and anti-βIII-tubulin antibodies. After the MeHg treatment, we observed the increase on γ-H2A.X in response to DNA damage. MeHg caused a decrease in the proliferating cells and in the thickness of spinal cord layers. Moreover, we verified that MeHg induced an increase in the number of p21-positive cells but did not change the cyclin E-positive cells. A significantly high number of TUNEL-positive cells indicating DNA fragmentation were observed in MeHg-treated embryos. Regarding the neuronal differentiation, MeHg induced a decrease in NeuN expression and did not change the expression of βIII-tubulin. These results showed that in ovo MeHg exposure alters spinal cord development by disturbing the cell proliferation and death, also interfering in early neuronal differentiation.

  6. New imaging characteristics for predicting postoperative neurologic status in patients with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression. A retrospective analysis of 81 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Mingxing; Liu, Shubin; Yang, Shaoxing; Liu, Yaosheng; Wang, Cheng; Gao, Hongjun

    2017-06-01

    Several clinical features have been proposed for the prediction of postoperative functional outcome in patients with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC). However, few articles address the relationship between preoperative imaging characteristics and the postoperative neurologic status. This study aims to analyze the postoperative functional outcome and to identify new imaging parameters for predicting postoperative neurologic status in patients with MESCC. This study is a retrospective consecutive case series of patients with MESCC who were treated surgically. We assessed 81 consecutive patients who were treated with decompressive surgery for MESCC between 2013 and 2015. Eight imaging characteristics were analyzed for postoperative motor status by logistic regression models. Neurologic function was assessed using the Frankel grade preoperatively and postoperatively. The following imaging characteristics were assessed for postoperative motor status: location of lesions in the spine, lamina involvement, retropulsion of the posterior wall, number of vertebrae involved, pedicle involvement, fracture of any involved vertebrae, T2 signal of the spinal cord at the compression site, and circumferential angle of spinal cord compression (CASCC). The postoperative neurologic outcome was better than the preoperative neurologic status (p<.01). In the entire group, 40.7% of the patients were non-ambulatory before the surgical procedure, whereas 77.8% of the patients could walk after surgery (p=.01). In the multivariate analysis, the location of the lesions (odds ratio [OR]: 3.89, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19-12.77, p=.02) and CASCC (OR: 2.31, 95% CI: 1.44-3.71, p<.01) were significantly associated with postoperative neurologic outcome. A CASCC of more than 180° was associated with an increased OR that approached significance, and the larger the CASCC, the higher the risk of poor postoperative neurologic status. The postoperative neurologic status was

  7. Spinal Cord Kinking in Thoracic Myelopathy Caused by Ossification of the Ligamentum Flavum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Wang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: SK is a rare radiological phenomenon. It is typically located at the thoracolumbar junction, where the CM is compressed by the OLF. Our findings indicate that these patients may benefit from a posterior decompressive procedure.

  8. A Mouse Model of Ischemic Spinal Cord Injury with Delayed Paralysis Caused by Aortic Cross-clamping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Hamdy; Ankeny, Daniel P.; Guan, Zhen; Wei, Ping; McTigue, Dana M.; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Spinal cord ischemia and paralysis are devastating perioperative complications that can accompany open or endovascular repair surgery for aortic aneurysms. Here, we report on the development of a new mouse model of spinal cord ischemia with delayed paralysis induced by cross-clamping the descending aorta. Methods Transient aortic occlusion was produced in mice by cross clamping the descending aorta through a lateral thoracotomy. To establish an optimal surgical procedure with limited mortality, variable cross-clamp times and core temperatures were tested between experiments. Results The onset of paresis or paralysis and postsurgical mortality varied as a function of cross-clamp time and core temperature that was maintained during the period of cross-clamp. Using optimal surgical parameters (7.5 min cross-clamp duration @ 33°C core temperature), the onset of paralysis is delayed 24–36 h postreperfusion and > 95% of mice survive through 9 weeks postsurgery. These mice are further stratified into two groups, with 70% (n = 19/27) of mice developing severe hindlimb paralysis and the remaining mice showing mild, though still permanent, behavioral deficits. Conclusion This new model should prove useful as a preclinical tool for screening neuroprotective therapeutics and for defining the basic biological mechanisms that cause delayed paralysis and neurodegeneration after transient spinal cord ischemia. PMID:20808212

  9. Survival in patients with metastatic spinal cord compression from prostate cancer is associated with the number of extra-spinal organs involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Axel; Bartscht, Tobias; Karstens, Johann H; Schild, Steven E; Rades, Dirk

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the predictive value of the number of extra-spinal organs involved by metastases for survival in metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) from prostate cancer. In 95 patients irradiated with 10 × 3 Gy for MSCC from prostate cancer, seven factors were investigated: Age, performance score, number of involved vertebrae, interval from prostate cancer diagnosis to MSCC, pre-radiotherapy ambulatory status, time to motor deficits development, number of involved extra-spinal organs. Six-month survival rates for 0, 1 and ≥ 2 involved extra-spinal organs, were 81, 53 and 33%, respectively (pnumber of involved extra-spinal organs maintained significance (risk ratio 1.88, p=0.023). Better performance score (pcancer diagnosis to radiotherapy of MSCC (pnumber of extra-spinal organs involved by metastases predicts survival in patients with MSCC from prostate cancer.

  10. A rare case of spinal cord compression due to cervical spine metastases from paraganglioma of the jugular foramen-how should it be treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Chourmouzi, Danai; Gkasdaris, Grigorios; Katsaridis, Vasileios; Eleftheriadis, Eleftherios; Givissis, Panagiotis

    2018-02-01

    Paragangliomas are benign neoplasms that arise from the autonomic nervous system and the associated paraganglia. Although benign, they have been shown to possess metastatic potential. Involvement of the spine is rare. Even rarer is considered the involvement of the cervical spine. We report a case of a patient with a history of an extra-adrenal non-functional paraganglioma of the jugular foramen which was initially treated with intra-arterial embolization. After a 3-year disease-free follow-up, the patient was presented with symptoms of spinal cord compression due to spinal metastases in C2 and C3 vertebrae. The patient was then treated with surgical decompression and external beam radiation. Therapeutic management with additional treatment options is now under discussion by a multidisciplinary team. Paraganglioma of the jugular foramen with spinal metastasis is an uncommon presentation where increased physician awareness and long-term follow-up are mandatory for all patients with history of paraganglioma.

  11. Transient activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling reporter in fibrotic scar formation after compression spinal cord injury in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagami, Takashi; Pleasure, David E; Lam, Kit S; Zhou, Chengji J

    2018-02-19

    After traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), a scar may form with a fibrotic core (fibrotic scar) and surrounding reactive astrocytes (glial scar) at the lesion site. The scar tissue is considered a major obstacle preventing regeneration both as a physical barrier and as a source for secretion of inhibitors of axonal regeneration. Understanding the mechanism of scar formation and how to control it may lead to effective SCI therapies. Using a compression-SCI model on adult transgenic mice, we demonstrate that the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling reporter TOPgal (TCF/Lef1-lacZ) positive cells appeared at the lesion site by 5 days, peaked on 7 days, and diminished by 14 days post injury. Using various representative cell lineage markers, we demonstrate that, these transiently TOPgal positive cells are a group of Fibronectin(+);GFAP(-) fibroblast-like cells in the core scar region. Some of them are proliferative. These results indicate that Wnt/β-catenin signaling may play a key role in fibrotic scar formation after traumatic spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Overview of Spinal Cord Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blockage of the Spinal Cord’s Blood Supply Cervical Spondylosis Compression of the Spinal Cord Hereditary Spastic Paraparesis ... compressed by bone (which may result from cervical spondylosis or a fracture), an accumulation of blood (hematoma), ...

  13. Fibroma condromixóide da coluna torácica: Relato de caso e revisão da literatura Chondromyxoid fibroma compressing the spinal cord: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Baldoino Leal Filho

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam caso de compressão medular torácica por lesão da quinta articulação costovertebral à direita. O diagnóstico pré-operatório, com mielotomografia, foi de processo expansivo intrarraquidiano extradural ao nível de T5. Feita a abordagem cirúrgica por laminectomia, com ressecção apenas da lesão intrarraquidiana. O diagnóstico de fibroma condromixóide somente foi definido com o estudo histopatológico. A paciente teve importante melhora neurológica. Decidiu-se pelo acompanhamento clínico e radiológico. Após dois anos houve recidiva do processo para dentro do canal raquidiano. Desta vez, foi realizada abordagem posterolateral à direita, por costotransversectomia e retirada da lesão. O diagnóstico histopatológico foi o mesmo. A paciente evoluiu com melhora neurológica e está sendo feito o seguimento há dois anos. Chamamos a atenção para a raridade do caso e discutimos a conduta.A case of chondromyxoid fibroma (CMF arising from the Sth right costovertebral junction and spreading into spinal canal causing spinal cord compression is presented. A myelotomography revealed a complete block at T5 level. The patient underwent a decompressive laminectomy with removal of an epidural tumor. This specimen was sent for pathological examination and interpreted as a CMF. The patient had a neurological improvement, post operative MRI revealed a spinal cord free of compression, and we decided on the follow up of the case. Two years later there was reccurrence of the tumor. A posterolateral access by costotransversectomy was made and the lesion was resected. The patient had a neurological improvement which persists on the follow up (two years, at present. Clinical, radiologic and histologic findings, surgical management and recurrence are discussed. The pertinent literature is reviewed.

  14. An unusual case of rapidly progressed cervical compression myelopathy caused by overnight inappropriate usage of Smartphone device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen-Ya; Wang, Jia-Chi

    2017-05-01

    A 38-year-old man was healthy before presenting to our clinic with pain and marked weakness in the right upper extremity. He stated that the symptoms developed the day after he accidentally fell asleep while playing with his Smartphone half-lying on his back with two thick pillows supporting his upper back. Physical examination revealed significant increase in deep tendon reflexes in the lower extremities and clonus. Hoffman's sign was positive in the left upper extremity. Magnetic resonance image showed high signal change on T2-weighted images of the left spinal cord at the C4-5 level, which was indicative of compression myelopathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Patients' perceptions of the causes of their success and lack of success in achieving their potential in spinal cord rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belciug, Marian P

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the patients' perception of the causes of their success and lack of success in achieving their potential in rehabilitation and their emotional reactions to the outcome of their rehabilitation. Thirty-five patients with spinal cord injury who were participating in the Rehabilitation Program at Hamilton Health Sciences completed a questionnaire pertaining to their (a) perception of the outcome of their rehabilitation, (b) causal explanations for the outcome, and (c) emotional reactions following the outcome. The results indicate that the patients who achieved their potential in rehabilitation (the successful group) attributed their success primarily to 'psychological causes'. The patients who did not achieve their potential in rehabilitation (the unsuccessful group) attributed their lack of success to 'medical and treatment-related causes', causes that they perceived as being variable over time. With the exception of the emotion of 'disappointment', the two groups did not differ in their emotional reactions to the outcome of their rehabilitation. In conclusion, the patients who achieved their potential in rehabilitation attributed their success to causes that enhanced their self-esteem (they did not feel that they depended on others for their success). The patients who did not achieve their potential in rehabilitation attributed their lack of success to causes that they perceived as being changeable over time; this allowed them to expect that they will achieve their potential at a later time. Causal explanations for rehabilitation outcomes have implications for the motivation of persons with spinal cord injury to achieve their potential in rehabilitation.

  16. Back to the drawing board-relearn the clinical skills: A root cause analysis of a missed case of bilateral vocal cord paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suruchi Ambasta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral vocal cord paralysis being misdiagnosed as bronchial asthma has been reported in the literature on several occasions. Diagnosing this condition needs precise clinical acumen which could lead us to make an integrated diagnostic and treatment plan. Here, we report another missed case of bilateral vocal cord paralysis and the root cause analysis of the incident. This report emphasises the need for appropriate clinical examinations and workup during the pre-operative assessment.

  17. Rehabilitative potential of Ayurveda for neurological deficits caused by traumatic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Rastogi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is associated with worst outcomes and requires a prolonged rehabilitation. Ayurvedic indigenous methods of rehabilitation are often utilized to treat such conditions. A case of SCI was followed up for 3 months upon an Ayurvedic composite intervention and subsequently reported. The composite treatment plan involved Ayurvedic oral medications as well as a few selected external and internal pancha karma procedures. A substantial clinical and patient centered outcome improvement in existing neurological deficits and quality of life was observed after 3 months of the Ayurvedic treatment given to this case.

  18. A cervical ligamentum flavum cyst in an 82-year-old woman presenting with spinal cord compression: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brotis Alexandros G

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We report on a very rare case of a cervical ligamentum flavum cyst, which presented with progressive myelopathy and radiculopathy. The cyst was radically extirpated and our patient showed significant recovery. A review of the relevant literature yielded seven cases. Case presentation An 82-year-old Greek woman presented with progressive bilateral weakness of her upper extremities and causalgia, cervical pain, episodes of upper extremity numbness and significant walking difficulties. Her neurological examination showed diffusely decreased motor strength in both her upper and lower extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging of her cervical spine demonstrated a large, well-demarcated cystic lesion on the dorsal aspect of her spinal cord at the C3 to C4 level, significantly compressing the spinal cord at this level, in close proximity to the yellow ligament and the C3 left lamina. The largest diameter of this lesion was 1.4 cm, and there was no lesion enhancement after the intravenous administration of a paramagnetic contrast. The lesion was surgically removed after a bilateral C3 laminectomy. The thick cystic wall was yellow and fibro-elastic in consistency, while its content was gelatinous and yellow-brownish. A postoperative cervical-spine magnetic resonance image was obtained before her discharge, demonstrating decompression of her spinal cord and dural expansion. Her six-month follow-up evaluation revealed complete resolution of her walking difficulties, improvement in the muscle strength of her arms (4+/5 in all the affected muscle groups, no causalgia and a significant decrease in her preoperative upper extremity numbness. Conclusion Cervical ligamentum flavum cysts are rare benign lesions, which should be included in the list of differential diagnosis of spinal cystic lesions. They can be differentiated from other intracanalicular lesions by their hypointense appearance on T1-weighted and hyperintense appearance on T2

  19. Spinal cord-specific deletion of the glutamate transporter GLT1 causes motor neuron death in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Kaori; Tanaka, Kohichi

    2018-03-04

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of motor neurons. The precise mechanisms that cause the selective death of motor neurons remain unclear, but a growing body of evidence suggests that glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity has been considered to play an important role in the mechanisms of motor neuron degeneration in ALS. Reductions in glutamate transporter GLT1 have been reported in animal models of ALS and the motor cortex and spinal cord of ALS patients. However, it remains unknown whether the reduction in GLT1 has a primary role in the induction of motor neuron degeneration in ALS. Here, we generated conditional knockout mice that lacked GLT1 specifically in the spinal cord by crossing floxed-GLT1 mice and Hoxb8-Cre mice. Hoxb8-Cre/GLT1 flox/flox mice showed motor deficits and motor neuron loss. Thus, loss of the glial glutamate transporter GLT1 is sufficient to cause motor neuron death in mice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Congenital cervical dermal sinus tract caused tethered cord syndrome in an adult: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Y; Ustun, M E

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to report on a 34-year-old woman who presented with tethered cord syndrome due to dermal sinüs tract. A 34-year-old woman had got dermal sınüs tract admitted to our hospital with swelling on the neck, pain and numbness on the left upper limb. She was treated by surgical removal of dermal sinuses and untethering the spinal cord which is stretched by the dermal sinus. Congenital dermal sinus tracts are uncommon types of cranial and spinal dysraphisms. They can occur in the midline of the craniospinal axis from the occiput to the sacral region. For dermal sinuses, cervical region is very rare location that is reported in the literature. They are diagnosed usually in childhood with skin signs, neurological deficits, local infections and meningitis. We present a rare case of dermal sinus tract located in cervical region. Early diagnosis and treatment of cervical dermal sinus tract are important to prevent neurological deficits.

  1. Pleural malignant mesothelioma causing cord infiltration through the nerve root. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okura, Hidehiro; Suga, Yasuo; Akiyama, Osamu; Kudo, Kentaro; Tsutsumi, Satoshi; Abe, Yusuke; Yasumoto, Yukimasa; Ito, Masanori; Izumi, Hiroshi; Shiomi, Kazu

    2009-04-01

    A 61-year-old man presented with a rare pleural malignant mesothelioma of the spine manifesting as progressive weakness of the bilateral lower extremities, numbness in the body and both legs, and dysfunction of the bladder and bowel. He had previous occupational exposure to asbestos while working at a car repair shop and had undergone right panpleuropneumonectomy under a diagnosis of sarcomatous type mesothelioma in the right pleural space. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine with gadolinium showed an enhanced intramedullary tumor at the T4 level. Operative findings disclosed the clouded and swollen right posterior nerve root, and the pial surface was covered by clouded arachnoid-like membrane. The removed part of the T4 posterior nerve root and intramedullary tumor revealed malignant mesothelioma with invasion spreading along the posterior nerve root. He died of respiratory failure 3 months after the diagnosis. This case shows that spinal metastasis must be considered if a patient with pleural malignant mesothelioma shows neurological worsening and neuroimaging shows an abnormal lesion in the thoracic spinal cord. However, the patient's neurological condition is very difficult to improve in the presence of spinal cord infiltration.

  2. Case of acute optic nerve compression caused by tuberculum sellae meningioma with optic canal involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Y

    2012-05-01

    sellae meningioma can cause acute visual symptoms due to optic canal involvement. Early consultation with a neurosurgeon is necessary. Visual evoked potentials and optical coherence tomography are sensitive and helpful in following patients with optic nerve compression.Keywords: optic nerve compression, tuberculum sellae meningioma, optic canal involvement, pattern visual evoked potentials, optical coherence tomography

  3. Comprehensive Analysis To Assess And Remove Causes Of Decline Flow In An Offshore Compression Module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Alexis Neri Quezadas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In a three stages compression module at an offshore installation was detected a sudden decrease in managed flow decreasing from 108 to 87 million standard cubic feet by day MMSCFD. Thermodynamic analysis on performance of three stages of compression axial compressor and power turbine was carried out. Each compression stage were found operating efficiently according to ranges indicated by manufacturer. However a power loss about 1200 hp was detected in turbine so that the problem between the power turbine and the main gearbox MG was focused. Boroscopic and thermographic inspections were carried out detecting hot spots and contaminants deposition. Upon disassembling MG lubrication ducts were detected partially obstructed by silicone.

  4. Comparative analysis of the time-dependent functional and molecular changes in spinal cord degeneration induced by the G93A SOD1 gene mutation and by mechanical compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priestley John V

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations of the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 gene are linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, an invariably fatal neurological condition involving cortico-spinal degeneration. Mechanical injury can also determine spinal cord degeneration and act as a risk factor for the development of ALS. Results We have performed a comparative ontological analysis of the gene expression profiles of thoracic cord samples from rats carrying the G93A SOD1 gene mutation and from wild-type littermates subjected to mechanical compression of the spinal cord. Common molecular responses and gene expression changes unique to each experimental paradigm were evaluated against the functional development of each animal model. Gene Ontology categories crucial to protein folding, extracellular matrix and axonal formation underwent early activation in both experimental paradigms, but decreased significantly in the spinal cord from animals recovering from injury after 7 days and from the G93A SOD1 mutant rats at end-stage disease. Functional improvement after compression coincided with a massive up-regulation of growth-promoting gene categories including factors involved in angiogenesis and transcription, overcoming the more transitory surge of pro-apoptotic components and cell-cycle genes. The cord from G93A SOD1 mutants showed persistent over-expression of apoptotic and stress molecules with fewer neurorestorative signals, while functional deterioration was ongoing. Conclusion this study illustrates how cytoskeletal protein metabolism is central to trauma and genetically-induced spinal cord degeneration and elucidates the main molecular events accompanying functional recovery or decline in two different animal models of spinal cord degeneration.

  5. Evaluation of the distortions of the digital chest image caused by the data compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Yutaka; Kunieda, Etsuo; Ogawa, Koichi; Tukamoto, Nobuhiro; Hashimoto, Shozo; Aoki, Makoto; Kurotani, Kenichi.

    1988-01-01

    The image data compression methods using orthogonal transforms (Discrete cosine transform, Discrete fourier transform, Hadamard transform, Haar transform, Slant transform) were analyzed. From the points of the error and the speed of the data conversion, the discrete cosine transform method (DCT) is superior to the other methods. The block quantization by the DCT for the digital chest image was used. The quality of data compressed and reconstructed images by the score analysis and the ROC curve analysis was examined. The chest image with the esophageal cancer and metastatic lung tumors was evaluated at the 17 checkpoints (the tumor, the vascular markings, the border of the heart and ribs, the mediastinal structures and et al). By our score analysis, the satisfactory ratio of the data compression is 1/5 and 1/10. The ROC analysis using normal chest images superimposed by the artificial coin lesions was made. The ROC curve of the 1/5 compressed ratio is almost as same as the original one. To summarize our study, the image data compression method using the DCT is thought to be useful for the clinical use and the 1/5 compression ratio is a tolerable ratio. (author)

  6. Pitfalls with the "chest compression-only" approach: the challenge of an unusual cause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid Bjørn

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chest compression-only (CC-only is now incorporated in the Norwegian protocol for dispatch guided CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation in cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac aetiology. We present a case that is unique and instructive as well as unusual. It reminds us of the challenges that face bystanders, dispatch centres and ambulance services when faced with possible cardiac arrest. This case report describes a 50 year old man in a rural community. He had suffered a heart attack 8 months previously, and was found unconscious with respiratory arrest in his garden one morning. Due to the proximity to the ambulance station, the paramedics were on the scene within three minutes. A chain-saw was lying beside him, but no external injuries were seen. The patient had no radial pulse, central cyanosis and respiratory gasps approximately every 30 seconds. Ventilation with bag and mask was given, and soon a femoral pulse could be palpated. Blood sugar was elevated and ECG (electrocardiogram was normal. GCS (Glasgow Coma Scale was 3. Upon arrival of the physician staffed air ambulance, further examination revealed bilateral miosis of the pupils and continuing bradypnoea. Naloxone was given with an immediate effect and the patient woke up. The patient denied intake of narcotics, but additional information from the dispatch centre revealed that he was hepatitis C positive. After a few hours, the patient admitted to have obtained a fentanyl transdermal patch from an acquaintance, having chewed it before falling unconscious. This case report shows the importance as well as the challenges of identifying a non-cardiac cause of possible cardiac arrest, and the value of providing causal therapy.

  7. A Rare Case of Atretic Uterus Causing Compression Over the Sigmoid Colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirish Vaidya

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pseudo-hermaphroditism is so called when a person is born with primary sex characteristics of one sex but develops the secondary sexual characteristics that are different sex from what would actually be expected on the basis of the primary sex (testis or ovaries. Sometimes, there is partial appearance of the either of the external sex organs together that is a one between a typical penis and clitoris. In rest of the cases, the expected external sex organs are seen. Thus, pseudo-hermaphroditism can be difficult to identify until puberty. The condition may also remain hidden until adulthood. Male pseudo-hermaphroditism is an individual with XY karyotype and testes is present with a partial or complete female phenotype. This condition is attributed to hypoandrogenism in XY individuals. There is a lack in the action or presence of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. This is a case report of a 60-year-old male who presented to the surgery out-patient services with complain of lower abdominal pain since 6 months. After proper clinical history and consent, the patient was subjected to endoscopy and contrast enhanced CT of abdomen. On endoscopy, there was restriction at passing the probe beyond the distal end of sigmoid colon and the probe could not be passed beyond it. A stricture of unknown etiology was reported. CT revealed an ill-defined elongated enhancing soft tissue lesion noted in right side of pelvis superolateral to the urinary bladder causing compression over the sigmoid colon with no obvious bowel connection. Exploratory laparotomy was them performed which revealed an elongated soft tissue lesion adherent to the sigmoid colon without obvious communication to the bowel lumen. The organ of origin could not be confirmed. The lesion was excised and sent for histopathology which revealed atretic uterine tissue.

  8. Surgical techniques influence local environment of injured spinal cord and cause various grafted cell survival and integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shaoping; Saltos, Tatiana M; Iredia, Idiata W; Tom, Veronica J

    2018-01-01

    Cellular transplantation to repair a complete spinal cord injury (SCI) is tremendously challenging due to the adverse local milieu for graft survival and growth. Results from cell transplantation studies yield great variability, which may possibly be due to the surgical techniques employed to induce an SCI. In order to delineate the influence of surgery on such inconsistency, we compared lesion morphology and graft survival as well as integration from different lesion methodologies of SCI. Surgical techniques, including a traditional approach cut+microaspiration, and two new approaches, cut alone as well as crush, were employed to produce a complete SCI, respectively. Approximately half of the rats in each group received injury only, whereas the other half received grafts of fetal brainstem cells into the lesion gap. Eight weeks after injury with or without graft, histological analysis showed that the cut+microaspiration surgery resulted in larger lesion cavities and severe fibrotic scars surrounding the cavity, and cellular transplants rarely formed a tissue bridge to penetrate the barrier. In contrast, the majority of cases treated with cut alone or crush exhibited smaller cavities and less scarring; the grafts expanded and blended extensively with the host tissue, which often built continuous tissue bridging the rostral and caudal cords. Scarring and cavitation were significantly reduced when microaspiration was avoided in SCI surgery, facilitating graft/host tissue fusion for signal transmission. The result suggests that microaspiration frequently causes severe scars and cavities, thus impeding graft survival and integration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Blocking weight-induced spinal cord injury in rats: effects of TRH or naloxone on motor function recovery and spinal cord blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtz, A.; Nystroem, B.; Gerdin, B.

    1989-01-01

    The ability of thyotropin releasing hormone (TRH) or naloxone to reduce the motor function deficit and to improve the spinal cord blood flow (SCBF) was investigated in a rat spinal cord compression injury model. Spinal cord injury was induced by compression for 5 min with a load of 35 g on a 2.2 x 5.0 mm sized compression plate causing a transient paraparesis. One group of animals was given TRH, one group naloxone and one group saline alone. Each drug was administered intravenously as a bolus dose of 2 mg/kg 60 min after injury followed by a continuous infusion of 2 mg/kg/h for 4 h. The motor performance was assessed daily on the inclined plant until Day 4, when SCBF was measured with the 14 C-iodoantipyrine autoradiographic method. It was found that neither TRH nor naloxone had promoted motor function recovery or affected SCBF 4 days after spinal cord injury. (author)

  10. The Biochemical, Histopathological and Clinical Comparison of the Neuroprotective Effects of Subcutaneous Adalimumab and Intravenous Methylprednisolone in an Experimental Compressive Spinal Cord Trauma Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Haydar; Karatay, Mete; Erdem, Yavuz; Yildirim, Ali Erdem; Sertbas, Idris; Karatay, Eylem; Kul, Halil; Guvenc, Yahya; Koksal, Ismet; Menekse, Guner; Alagoz, Fatih; Kertmen, Huseyin Hayri; Caydere, Muzaffer

    To evaluate the neuroprotective effects of adalimumab in an experimental spinal cord injury model and compare them with those of the widely-used methylprednisolone. Forty male Wistar rats were divided into 5 as the sham, trauma, adalimumab, methylprednisolone, and adalimumab+methylprednisolone groups. Only laminectomy was performed in the sham group. Laminectomy and trauma was performed to the trauma group but no treatment was given. A single dose of 40 mg/kg subcutaneous adalimumab was administered after the laminectomy and trauma to group 3. A single dose of intravenous 30 mg/kg methylprednisolone was administered right after laminectomy and trauma to group 4. Single doses of 40 mg/kg adalimumab and 30 mg/kg methylprednisolone were administered together after laminectomy and trauma to group 5. Serum malondialdehyde (MDA), TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels were measured and sections were obtained for histopathological study at the end of the 7 th day. MDA, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels in serum were significantly decreased in the adalimumab group with clinical and histopathological improvement not less than the methylprednisolone group. The serum MDA levels were similar when the two drugs were given together or separately but there was a statistically quite significant decrease in TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels with concurrent use. Statistically significantly better results were obtained on histopathological evaluation with the use of both drugs together. This study revealed that adalimumab is as effective as methylprednisolone in compressive spinal cord injury in rats.

  11. Syrinx of the Spinal Cord and Brain Stem

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blockage of the Spinal Cord’s Blood Supply Cervical Spondylosis Compression of the Spinal Cord Hereditary Spastic Paraparesis ... Blockage of the Spinal Cord’s Blood Supply Cervical Spondylosis Compression of the Spinal Cord Hereditary Spastic Paraparesis ...

  12. [When the cause of dyspnea is on larynx. Asthma of difficult control, resistant to treatment? Vocal cords dysfunction? or Both?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacre Hazouri, José Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Dyspnea is a symptom whose diagnosis requires the exclusion of other diseases with which it can be confused, such as asthma and a variety of pulmonary and heart diseases. Dyspnea originated in the larynx may occur due to obstruction by a tumor or other affections in situ, interfering the airway, such as: edema by infections or inflammatory processes, a traumatism, an abnormal movement of the larynx structures, such as the inappropriate or absent of the vocal cords or the laryngospasm. Severity of larynx dyspnea may be to mild to acute, risking the life. This paper reviews the normal laryngeal function and the anatomic, obstructive, and functional disorders that can lead to dyspnea. Some suggestions are also made to determine the cause and treat these diseases.

  13. Virtual reality improves embodiment and neuropathic pain caused by spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozeg, Polona; Palluel, Estelle; Ronchi, Roberta; Solcà, Marco; Al-Khodairy, Abdul-Wahab; Jordan, Xavier; Kassouha, Ammar; Blanke, Olaf

    2017-10-31

    To investigate changes in body ownership and chronic neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) using multisensory own body illusions and virtual reality (VR). Twenty patients with SCI with paraplegia and 20 healthy control participants (HC) participated in 2 factorial, randomized, repeated-measures design studies. In the virtual leg illusion (VLI), we applied asynchronous or synchronous visuotactile stimulation to the participant's back (either immediately above the lesion level or at the shoulder) and to the virtual legs as seen on a VR head-mounted display. We tested the effect of the VLI on the sense of leg ownership (questionnaires) and on perceived neuropathic pain (visual analogue scale pain ratings). We compared illusory leg ownership with illusory global body ownership (induced in the full body illusion [FBI]), by applying asynchronous or synchronous visuotactile stimulation to the participant's back and the back of a virtual body as seen on a head-mounted display. Our data show that patients with SCI are less sensitive to multisensory stimulations inducing illusory leg ownership (as compared to HC) and that leg ownership decreased with time since SCI. In contrast, we found no differences between groups in global body ownership as tested in the FBI. VLI and FBI were both associated with mild analgesia that was only during the VLI specific for synchronous visuotactile stimulation and the lower back position. The present findings show that VR exposure using multisensory stimulation differently affected leg vs body ownership, and is associated with mild analgesia with potential for SCI neurorehabilitation protocols. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  14. Transitional cell carcinoma of urinary bladder with metastasis in lumbar vertebrae and spinal cord compression in an ocelot(Leopardus pardalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Y.R. Nakagaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a case of nonpapillary and infiltrative transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the urinary bladder with metastasis of lumbar vertebrae and spinal cord compression in an adult female ocelot (Leopardus pardalis, from the Mato Grosso state, Brazil. The ocelot had pelvic limb paralysis and skin ulcers in the posterior region of the body and was submitted to euthanasia procedure. At necropsy was observed a multilobulated and irregular shaped, yellowish to white nodule in the urinary bladder. The nodule had a soft consistency and arised from the mucosa of the urinary bladder extending throughout the muscular layers and the serosa. Nodules of similar appearance infiltrating the vertebral column the at L6 and L7 vertebrae with corresponding spinal canal invasion were also observed. The histological evaluation showed epithelial neoplastic proliferation in the urinary bladder with characteristics of nonpapillary and infiltrative TCC, with positive immunohistochemical staining for pancytokeratin, and strong immunostaining for cytokeratin of low molecular weight, and weak or absent labeling for high molecular weight cytokeratin. This is the first report of TCC of urinary bladder in ocelot in Brazil.

  15. Utility of MR imaging in pediatric spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felsberg, G.J.; Tien, R.D.; Osumi, A.K.; Cardenas, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated the utility of MR imaging in pediatric patients with acute and subacute spinal cord injuries. MR imaging of 22 pediatric patients with suspected traumatic spinal cord injuries was reviewed. MR findings were correlated with physical examination and compared to available radiographs and CT examinations performed at time of presentation. Twelve patients had abnormalities on MR imaging. Seven had spinal cord contusions; five contusions were hemorrhagic. Five of seven patients with cord contusion had normal radiographs and CT exams. Six patients with normal radiographs and CT examinations had abnormal MR studies revealing cord contusion, ligamentous injury, disc herniation, and epidural hematoma. MR is useful in initial evaluation of pediatric patients with spinal cord injuries and in prognosis of future neurologic function. In the setting of spinal cord symptomatology and negative radiographic studies, MR imaging should be performed. Surgically correctable causes of cord compression demonstrated by MR imaging include disc herniation, epidural hematoma, and retropulsed fracture fragments. The entity of spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormality is a diagnosis of exclusion which should only be made after radiologic investigation with radiographs, high-resolution thin-section CT, and MR imaging. (orig.)

  16. Transfer of maternal IgE can be a common cause of increased IgE levels in cord blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Pipper, Christian Bressen; Bisgaard, Hans

    2010-01-01

    IgE in cord blood is thought to be a product of the fetus. A high level of total IgE is therefore used as a measure of atopic propensity in the newborn. We recently found strong evidence that allergen-specific IgE in cord blood was the result of transfer of maternal IgE to fetal blood or cord blood...... (maternofetal transfer) rather than fetal production. This also suggests that total IgE in cord blood might primarily be a maternal product....

  17. MR imaging of compressive cervical myelopathy after surgery; High signal intensity of the spinal cord on T2 weighted images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mimura, Fumitoshi; Fujiwara, Kazuhisa; Otake, Shoichiro (Tenri Hospital, Nara (Japan)) (and others)

    1990-06-01

    We reviewed the MR images of 32 patients with cervical myelopathy, showing lesions of high signal intensity in the spinal cord on the sagittal T2 weighted images (T2WI) after surgery: 16 with ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL); 9 with spondylosis; 4 with disc herniation and 3 with trauma. All images were obtained on a superconducting 1.5 Tesla system. The lesions were classified into five groups, according to the shape and grade of signal intensity on the sagittal T2WI: (I) oval-shaped lesion of signal intensity less brighter than CSF with blurred margin, (II) longitudinal linear-shaped lesion of signal intensity similar to CSF, (III) spindle-shaped lesion of signal intensity similar to CSF, (IV) round-shaped lesion of signal intensity similar to CSF, and (V) mixed-types lesions which consisted of group I and II. The present study was summarized as follows: Oval-shaped lesions were seen in the cases of disc herniation and spondylosis with relatively short duration of the symptom, presumptively with relatively short duration of the symptom, presumptively indicative of edema. Most cases of OPLL and spondylosis showed linear-shaped lesions, suggesting necrosis and/or cavitations of the central gray matter. One case of spondylosis developed a spindle-shaped lesion, implicating syringomyelia. Round-shaped lesions were seen in the cases of spinal trauma, suggesting postraumatic cyst. In a case of mixed-typed lesion examined pre- and postoperatively, only an oval-shaped lesion decreased in size after surgery. (author).

  18. Importance of Direct Antiglobulin Test (DAT in Cord Blood: Causes of DAT (+ in a Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Valsami

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: Although ABO incompatibility remains the main reason of DAT (+, other causes (e.g., alloimmunization, drugs should also be explored. The relevant impact of DAT (+ on HDN development should be considered.

  19. Compressão medular em bovinos associada à vacinação contra febre aftosa Spinal cord compression in cattle associated whit vaccination against foot and mouth disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luisa Alves Marques

    2012-10-01

    a white liquid in the left muscle Longissimus lumborum (two animals and yellowish firm mass compressing the spinal cord between vertebrae T11 and T12 (one animal and L3 and L5 vertebrae (one animal. The myositis and the pyogranulomatous paquimeningitis were characterized by multifocal to coalescing areas showing clear spherical spaces of various sizes centrally located corresponding to the oil adjuvant of FMD vaccine removed by histologic processing. It has been determined the diagnosis of spinal cord compression secondary to vaccine granuloma.

  20. Endovascular treatment of external iliac vein stenosis caused by graft compression after kidney transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willamax Oliveira de Sousa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A 57-year old patient presented with approximately 80% stenosis of the left external iliac vein due to compression by the renal graft after kidney transplantation. The initial clinical manifestation of this vascular complication was progressive edema of the left lower limb, starting in the foot during the immediate postoperative period and reaching the thigh. Renal function also deteriorated during the first four months after transplantation. Venous Doppler ultrasound findings were suggestive of a diagnosis of extrinsic compression by the kidney graft and so phlebography was ordered, confirming stenosis of the left external iliac vein. The patient was initially treated with balloon angioplasty, but there was still residual stenosis so a stent was inserted, eliminating the stenosis. The edema reduced over time and the patient's renal function improved. While vascular complications are rare, and potentially severe, events, success rates are good if treatment is started early.

  1. Complications and Causes of Death in Spinal Cord Injury Patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Most common complication and cause of death following SCI are muscle spasm and respiratory failure respectively. The risk factors associated with mortality are age, GCS<9, cervical spinal injury, and complete neurologic injury and those for complications were cervical spinal injury and Frankel Type A injury.

  2. Residual Stress State in Single-Edge Notched Tension Specimen Caused by the Local Compression Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yifan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D finite element analyses (FEA are performed to simulate the local compression (LC technique on the clamped single-edge notched tension (SE(T specimens. The analysis includes three types of indenters, which are single pair of cylinder indenters (SPCI, double pairs of cylinder indenters (DPCI and single pair of ring indenters (SPRI. The distribution of the residual stress in the crack opening direction in the uncracked ligament of the specimen is evaluated. The outcome of this study can facilitate the use of LC technique on SE(T specimens.

  3. Strontium-89 (Metastron) and the bisphosphonate olpadronate reduce the incidence of spinal cord compression in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer metastatic to the skeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerdjbalie-Maikoe, Vidya; Pelger, Rob C.M.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, G.A.B.; Arndt, Jan-Willem; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Papapoulos, Socrates E.; Hamdy, Neveen A.T.

    2002-01-01

    Spinal cord compression (SCC) is a devastating complication of metastatic cancer. We investigated the potential beneficial effect of two palliative therapies - strontium-89 (Metastron) and the nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate olpadronate - on the incidence of SCC in hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) metastatic to the skeleton. We retrospectively studied 415 patients with histologically proven prostate cancer who underwent bone scintigraphy at the time of diagnosis and were followed up at the Leiden University Medical Center between 1990 and 1999. Medical or surgical castration was undertaken in 172 patients with evidence for skeletal metastases. Within 2 years, 147 of these patients (85%) developed HRPC associated with severe progressive bone pain. Palliative treatment was given to 131 patients in the form of local radiotherapy (n=10), 89 Sr (n=46) or intravenous olpadronate (n=66), with (n=57) or without (n=9) maintenance oral olpadronate. Nine patients received both 89 Sr and olpadronate at various intervals. Sixteen patients who did not receive any of these treatments were used as historical controls. There was no significant difference in baseline characteristics between treatment modalities. The incidence of SCC was 17% in the whole group, and highest in controls receiving no palliation (50%). None of the patients treated with local radiotherapy, only 4% of patients receiving 89 Sr and 21% of patients given olpadronate developed this complication. Our findings suggest a significant reduction in SCC in patients with symptomatic HRPC metastatic to the skeleton who receive palliative therapies. Local radiotherapy completely prevents the incidence of SCC, 89 Sr leads to an important decrease in this complication and olpadronate induces a significant, albeit smaller decrease in the incidence of SCC. The use of these agents opens new avenues in the difficult management of patients with advanced prostate cancer who are most at risk of developing SCC. (orig.)

  4. Traumatic spinal cord injury caused by suspected hyperflexion of the atlantoaxial joint in a 10-year-old cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Wessmann

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A 10-year-old cat presented 5 days after a traumatic event with acute recumbency followed by some clinical improvement. The neuroanatomical localisation was the C1–C5 spinal cord segments. Initial survey radiographs, including lateral flexed views, showed no convincing abnormalities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed a marked focal intramedullary lesion at the level of the dens and suspected oedema extending over C2–C3 vertebrae, suggesting early syrinx formation. The cat made an initial excellent recovery on restricted exercise without medical treatment. The MRI changes largely resolved on follow-up MRI 4 weeks later yet recurred following a relapse 4 months later. At this stage, a post-traumatic syrinx had developed. Moreover, the suspected atlantoaxial instability was finally diagnosed on radiography with fully flexed lateral views. A hyperflexion injury causing tearing of the atlantoaxial ligaments was considered most likely given the lack of malformations or fractures. The cat made a full recovery on conservative management. Relevance and novel information This is the first report of sequential MRI findings in a cat with atlantoaxial instability. Moreover, post-traumatic syringomyelia formation following atlantoaxial injury has not been reported. Sequential MRI aids in the diagnosis of hyperflexion injury if survey radiographs fail to identify atlantoaxial instability.

  5. Velamentous Cord Insertion in a Singleton Pregnancy: An Obscure Cause of Emergency Cesarean—A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Rocha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 2% of low-risk pregnant women still require an emergency Cesarean section after the onset of labor. Because it is likely that half of these cases are associated with placental and umbilical cord abnormalities, it is thought that prenatal detection of such abnormalities would reduce the number of emergency cesarean sections in low-risk women. Velamentous cord insertion is an abnormal cord insertion in which the umbilical vessels diverge as they traverse between the amnion and chorion before reaching the placenta. With a reported incidence of 1% in singleton pregnancies, it has been associated with several obstetric complications. This condition has been diagnosed by ultrasonography with a sensitivity of 67% and specificity of 100% in the second trimester. The present case highlights the importance of the systematic assessment of the placental cord insertion site at routine obstetric ultrasound and the potential of identifying pregnancies with velamentous insertion and, therefore, those at risk for obstetric complications.

  6. Bilateral vocal cord palsy causing stridor as the only symptom of syringomyelia and Chiari I malformation, a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Yousif

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Although uncommon, formation of a syrinx should be considered for patients who present with stridor and reiterates the importance of MRI as an important investigative tool of bilateral vocal cord palsy.

  7. Numerical Analysis on the Compressible Flow Characteristics of Supersonic Jet Caused by High-Pressure Pipe Rupture Using CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jong-Kil; Yoon, Jun-Kyu [Gachon Univ., Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang-Chu [KEPCO-E& C, Kimchun (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    A rupture in a high-pressure pipe causes the fluid in the pipe to be discharged in the atmosphere at a high speed resulting in a supersonic jet that generates the compressible flow. This supersonic jet may display complicated and unsteady behavior in general . In this study, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed to investigate the compressible flow generated by a supersonic jet ejected from a high-pressure pipe. A Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model was selected to analyze the unsteady nature of the flow, which depends upon the various gases as well as the diameter of the pipe. In the CFD analysis, the basic boundary conditions were assumed to be as follows: pipe of diameter 10 cm, jet pressure ratio of 5, and an inlet gas temperature of 300 K. During the analysis, the behavior of the shockwave generated by a supersonic jet was observed and it was found that the blast wave was generated indirectly. The pressure wave characteristics of hydrogen gas, which possesses the smallest molecular mass, showed the shortest distance to the safety zone. There were no significant difference observed for nitrogen gas, air, and oxygen gas, which have similar molecular mass. In addition, an increase in the diameter of the pipe resulted in the ejected impact caused by the increased flow rate to become larger and the zone of jet influence to extend further.

  8. A Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Patients With Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy: Recommendations for Patients With Mild, Moderate, and Severe Disease and Nonmyelopathic Patients With Evidence of Cord Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehlings, Michael G; Tetreault, Lindsay A; Riew, K Daniel; Middleton, James W; Aarabi, Bizhan; Arnold, Paul M; Brodke, Darrel S; Burns, Anthony S; Carette, Simon; Chen, Robert; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Dettori, Joseph R; Furlan, Julio C; Harrop, James S; Holly, Langston T; Kalsi-Ryan, Sukhvinder; Kotter, Mark; Kwon, Brian K; Martin, Allan R; Milligan, James; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Nagoshi, Narihito; Rhee, John; Singh, Anoushka; Skelly, Andrea C; Sodhi, Sumeet; Wilson, Jefferson R; Yee, Albert; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2017-09-01

    Guideline development. The objective of this study is to develop guidelines that outline how to best manage (1) patients with mild, moderate, and severe myelopathy and (2) nonmyelopathic patients with evidence of cord compression with or without clinical symptoms of radiculopathy. Five systematic reviews of the literature were conducted to synthesize evidence on disease natural history; risk factors of disease progression; the efficacy, effectiveness, and safety of nonoperative and surgical management; the impact of preoperative duration of symptoms and myelopathy severity on treatment outcomes; and the frequency, timing, and predictors of symptom development. A multidisciplinary guideline development group used this information, and their clinical expertise, to develop recommendations for the management of degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). Our recommendations were as follows: (1) "We recommend surgical intervention for patients with moderate and severe DCM." (2) "We suggest offering surgical intervention or a supervised trial of structured rehabilitation for patients with mild DCM. If initial nonoperative management is pursued, we recommend operative intervention if there is neurological deterioration and suggest operative intervention if the patient fails to improve." (3) "We suggest not offering prophylactic surgery for non-myelopathic patients with evidence of cervical cord compression without signs or symptoms of radiculopathy. We suggest that these patients be counseled as to potential risks of progression, educated about relevant signs and symptoms of myelopathy, and be followed clinically." (4) "Non-myelopathic patients with cord compression and clinical evidence of radiculopathy with or without electrophysiological confirmation are at a higher risk of developing myelopathy and should be counselled about this risk. We suggest offering either surgical intervention or nonoperative treatment consisting of close serial follow-up or a supervised trial of

  9. The comparative study of clinical efficacy and safety of baclofen vs tolperisone in spasticity caused by spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejun Luo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we compared the clinical efficacy and safety of baclofen vs tolperisone in spasticity caused by spinal cord injury. A total of 150 patients were enrolled in the present study and were divided into two groups with 75 patients in each group, receiving baclofen or tolperisone, respectively. We used Modified Ashworth Scale, Medical research council scale, Barthel Index, and Coefficient of efficacy to measure clinical efficacy. After 6-week treatment, both groups demonstrated significant improvement in muscle tone, muscle strength and functional outcome (Group I, 1.55 ± 0.053, 2.79 ± 0.032, 59.31 ± 1.32; Group II, 1.57 ± 0.053, 3.04 ± 0.032, 73 ± 1.32 respectively. There was no significant difference regarding improvement in muscle tone and muscle strength between the two groups (Group I, 1.055 ± 0.053 vs Group II, 1.57 ± 0.053; Group I, 2.79 ± 0.032 vs Group II, 3.04 ± 0.032, p > 0.05. However, the improvement in functional outcomes was greater in group II as compared to that in group I (Group I, 59.31 ± 1.32 vs Group II, 73 ± 1.32, p < 0.05. In addition, overall efficacy coefficient was greater for group II as compared to group I (Group I, 3.6 vs Group II, 2.3, p < 0.05. Group I had more side effects compared to Group II. Compared to baclofen, tolperisone offers greater improvement in activities of daily living compared to baclofen.

  10. Serious axillary nerve injury caused by subscapular artery compression resulting from use of backpacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haninec, Pavel; Mencl, Libor; Bačinský, Peter; Kaiser, Radek

    2013-12-01

    A palsy of the brachial plexus elements caused by carrying a heavy backpack is a very rare injury usually occurring in soldiers or hikers, and recovery is usually spontaneous. We describe here the case of male civilian presenting with an isolated serious axillary nerve palsy associated with chronic backpack use. During the surgery, a dumbbell-shaped neuroma-in-continuity was found which was caused by direct pressure from the subscapular artery. After resection of the neuroma, a nerve graft from the sural nerve was used to reconstruct the nerve. Reinnervation was successful and the patient was able to abduct his arm to its full range, with full muscle strength, within 24 months. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. A rare cause of dysphagia: compression of the esophagus by an anterior cervical osteophyte due to ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albayrak, Ilknur; Bağcacı, Sinan; Sallı, Ali; Kucuksen, Sami; Uğurlu, Hatice

    2013-09-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory rheumatological disease affecting the axial skeleton with various extra-articular complications. Dysphagia due to a giant anterior osteophyte of the cervical spine in AS is extremely rare. We present a 48-year-old male with AS suffering from progressive dysphagia to soft foods and liquids. Esophagography showed an anterior osteophyte at C5-C6 resulting in esophageal compression. The patient refused surgical resection of the osteophyte and received conservative therapy. However, after 6 months there was no improvement in dysphagia. This case illustrates that a large cervical osteophyte may be the cause of dysphagia in patients with AS and should be included in the diagnostic workup in early stages of the disease.

  12. Sciatic nerve ligation causes impairment of mitochondria associated with changes in distribution, respiration, and cardiolipin composition in related spinal cord neurons in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilhoff, Gerburg; Becker, Axel; Kropf, Siegfried; Schild, Lorenz

    2016-10-01

    Sciatic nerve irritation is often associated with disturbed Ca(2+) homeostasis in related neurons of the spinal cord. Since mitochondria substantially contribute to Ca(2+) homeostasis and little information is available, we studied the effects of loose sciatic nerve ligation, a chronic constriction injury (CCI), on neuronal mitochondria of the L3-L6 regions. Three groups of rats (untreated, sham operated, and ligated) were explored. For the characterization of mitochondria, specimens of the L3-L6 spinal cord regions were evaluated with respect to intracellular localization using pyruvate dehydrogenase immunohistochemistry and Mitotracker Red, and the ATP producing machinery by LC-MS/MS technique for the analysis of cardiolipin and high-resolution respirometry for the measurement of oxygen consumption. Therefore, the phospholipid cardiolipin supports electron transfer within the respiratory chain as part of mitochondrial respiration and is of high impact on the physical properties of the mitochondrial membrane system. Histological analysis of spinal cord motor neurons revealed clustering of mitochondria in ipsilateral samples from ligated animals 14 days after the insult. This phenomenon was similarly evident in the respective contralateral side. The intensity of MT-Red staining was enhanced exclusively at the ipsilateral side, indicating increased mitochondrial activity. CCI of the sciatic nerve caused massive changes in the composition of cardiolipin reflecting mitochondrial impairment in the early phase followed by regeneration processes as late response. Sciatic nerve CCI caused decrease in the capacity of mitochondrial ATP production that recovered within 14 days after treatment. In conclusion, we provide evidence that clustering of mitochondria, already verified for the spinal cord sensory neurons after CCI, also occurs in the respective motor neurons. Further we have demonstrated transient impairment of the capacity of mitochondrial ATP production in tissue

  13. Excellent and durable response to radiotherapy in a rare case of spinal cord compression due to extra-medullary hematopoiesis in β-thalassemia intermedia: case report and clinicoradiological correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yathiraj, Prahlad H; Singh, Anshul; Vidyasagar, Sudha; Varma, Muralidhar; Mamidipudi, Vidyasagar

    2017-04-01

    Spinal cord compression (SCC) is an unusual sequale of extra-medullary hematopoiesis (EMH). We report a patient diagnosed with β-thalassemia intermedia at the age of 7 years presenting as a 24-year-old with symptoms suggestive of paraparesis. MR imaging revealed long masses of EMH opposite T5-T11 and L5-S2 vertebrae with cord compression at T6 vertebrae. Patient was treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to a low dose of 20 Gy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks. The patient had symptomatic relief of paraparesis by the 5th fraction and nearly regained full power in bilateral lower limbs by EBRT conclusion. Patient was begun on hydroxyurea post EBRT and was symptom free at 2-month follow up. With a follow-up of 18 months so far, he remains asymptomatic and free of recurrence. MRI correlation of pre-EBRT, post-EBRT and at first follow-up showed a significant reduction in the size of EMH, increase in diameter of spinal canal post EBRT but a persistent edema which had no clinical manifestation. Though there was a 58% drop in leukocyte count by the end of EBRT, there was no leukocytopenia. We suggest that EBRT should be treatment of choice for SCC due to EMH as it produces as rapid and durable response with minimal acute hematological side-effects.

  14. Peliosis hepatis causing inferior vena cava compression in a 3-year-old child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiorns, Melanie P.; Rossi, Umberto G.; Roebuck, Derek J. [Great Ormond Street Children' s NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-02-01

    Peliosis hepatis is a rare benign condition characterized by oval or irregular, multiple blood-filled spaces within the liver parenchyma. It is most commonly seen in adults and may be idiopathic, but has various associations including malignancy, infection and drugs. The imaging findings are often non-specific and the condition may be mistaken for multiple abscesses, metastases or vascular malformations. Peliosis hepatis is an especially rare condition in children and to our knowledge only six cases have been described in the literature. Our case describes and illustrates peliosis in a 3-year-old girl and is the first described in any age group to cause complete IVC obstruction. The patient subsequently made a full recovery. (orig.)

  15. Comparing three-dimensional volume-rendered CT images with fibreoptic tracheobronchoscopy in the evaluation of airway compression caused by tuberculous lymphadenopathy in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plessis, Jaco du; George, Reena [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Radiology, Tygerberg (South Africa); Goussard, Pierre; Gie, Robert [Tygerberg Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Cape Town (South Africa); Andronikou, Savvas [University of Cape Town, Department of Radiology, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2009-07-15

    Lymphobronchial tuberculosis (TB) causes airway compression in 38% of patients. The airway obstruction is conventionally assessed with fibreoptic tracheobronchoscopy (FTB). Multidetector-row spiral computed tomography (MDCT) with three-dimensional volume rendering (3-D VR) has significantly improved the imaging of the airways. No previous studies have assessed the accuracy of 3-D VR in determining the degree of airway compression in children due to TB lymphadenopathy. To compare 3-D VR CT to FTB for the assessment of airway compression due to TB lymphadenopathy in children. Included in the study were 26 children presenting with symptoms of airway compression caused by pulmonary TB. MDCT of the chest and FTB were performed in all patients. Retrospective 3-D VR reconstruction of the major airways was performed from the original CT raw data and used to evaluate the tracheobronchial tree for site and degree of airway compression and then compared to the FTB findings. FTB was used as the reference standard By FTB 87 sites of airway compression were identified. Using the 3-D VR technique, 138 sites of airway compression were identified, of which 78 (90%) matched with the sites identified by FTB. The sensitivity and specificity of 3-D VR when compared with that of FTB was 92% and 85%, respectively. In four patients (15%), severe narrowing of the bronchus intermedius made FTB evaluation of the right middle and right lower lobe bronchi impossible. VR demonstrated significant distal obstruction in three of these four patients 3-D VR demonstrates a very good correlation with FTB in determining airway compression caused by TB lymphadenopathy in children. In combination with FTB, 3-D VR adds confidence to the bronchoscopy findings and complements FTB by adding additional information on the status of the airway distal to severe obstructions unreachable by FTB. (orig.)

  16. Survival analysis of malignant epidural spinal cord compression after palliative radiotherapy using Tokuhashi scoring system and the impact of systemic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mui, Wing Ho; Lam, Tai Chung; Wong, Frank Chi Sing; Sze, Wing King

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies have shown similar clinical outcomes of both single and multi-fraction (Fr) radiation therapy among malignant epidural spinal cord compression (MSCC) patients with poor prognosis; whereas, patients expected to have longer survival may require long-course radiotherapy to prevent local failure. However, such a poor prognosis risk group has not yet been clearly identified for use in daily clinical practice. We examined if the known predictive Tokuhashi scoring system could be adapted in MSCC patients treated with palliative radiation therapy. A retrospective review of the treatment outcomes of MSCC patients who received palliative radiotherapy from January 2014 to May 2015 was conducted. The patients were stratified into two groups according to the Tokuhashi scoring system: group 1 (score 8), expected survival >6 months. Their survival was tested against subsequent systemic therapy (chemotherapy, targeted or hormonal therapy) and other risk factors including age, primary site, visceral metastasis, baseline motor function, prior radiotherapy and radiotherapy fractionation (single or multiple). The outcomes of 119 patients were studied, 116 (97.5%) patients had already succumbed. The overall median survival was 55 days (range, 4-576 days). Ninety-three patients (78.2%) belonged to group 1. The median dose delivered was 25 Gy in 5 Frs [range, 7 Gy in 2 Frs-40 Gy in 10 Frs (to the cauda equina)]. Only nine patients (7.6%) received single-Fr radiotherapy, all belonging to Tokuhashi group 1. Patients belonging to group 1 had shorter median survival than group 2; 49 and 108 days, respectively (P=0.003). Among all the patients, subsequent systemic treatment [hazard ratio (HR) =0.407; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.236-0.702; P=0.001], non-visceral metastasis (HR =0.608; 95% CI, 0.387-0.956; P=0.031) and primary lung or breast or prostate cancer (P=0.029) were associated with better survival in multivariate analysis. For patients in group 1, primary breast or

  17. Umbilical cord and preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaya-C, M; Salcedo-Betancourt, J; Galvis, S H; Ortiz, A M; Gutierrez, S; Bernal, J E

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with abnormalities in the umbilical cord in several ways: morphological, biochemical and functional. Alteration in blood vessels of the placenta, decidua and circulatory system of the fetus might be related to factors that cause preeclampsia and may be associated with alterations of the umbilical cord. This study aimed to analyze the relationship between each type of umbilical cord abnormality and the different subtypes of hypertensive gestational disorders. We conducted a prospective study on consecutive autopsies and its placentas, looking for abnormalities in the umbilical cord's features and their clinical associations. Umbilical cord abnormalities including length, diameter, insertion, entanglements, knots and coils were associated with maternal gestational hypertension. In women with gestational hypertension, umbilical cord abnormalities are associated with fetal and neonatal consequences.

  18. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-11-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was caused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunosuppressed cancer patient.

  19. Disabling Vertigo and Tinnitus Caused by Intrameatal Compression of the Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery on the Vestibulocochlear Nerve: A Case Report, Surgical Considerations, and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghei-Razavi, Hamid; Darvish, Omid; Schick, Uta

    2013-01-01

    Microvascular compression of the vestibulocochlear nerve is known as a cause of tinnitus and vertigo in the literature, but our review of the literature shows that the compression is usually located in the cerebellopontine angle and not intrameatal. We present a case of intrameatal compression of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) on the vestibulocochlear nerve of a 40-year-old woman with symptoms of disabling vertigo and intermittent high-frequency tinnitus on the left side without any hearing loss for ∼ 4 years. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain did not show any abnormality, but magnetic resonance angiography showed a left intrameatal AICA loop as a possible cause of the disabling symptoms. After the exclusion of other possible reasons for disabling vertigo, surgery was indicated. The intraoperative findings proved the radiologic findings. The large AICA loop was found extending into the internal auditory canal and compressing the vestibulocochlear nerve. The AICA loop was mobilized and separated from the vestibulocochlear nerve. The patient's symptoms resolved immediately after surgery, and no symptoms were noted during 2 years of follow-up in our clinic. Her hearing was not affected by the surgery. In addition to other common reasons, such as acoustic neuroma, disabling vertigo and tinnitus can occur from an intrameatal arterial loop compression of the vestibulocochlear nerve and may be treated successfully by drilling the internal acoustic meatus and separating the arterial conflict from the vestibulocochlear nerve. PMID:25083388

  20. Preliminary Results for the Treatment of a Pain-Causing Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fracture with a Sky Bone Expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jin Bo; Tang, Xue Ming; Xu, Nan Wei; Bao, Hong Tao [Changzhou No 2. Hospital, Changzhou (China)

    2008-10-15

    Vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) are common complications of osteoporosis. The expansion of VCFs with a Sky Bone Expander is a new procedure which improves kyphotic deformities and decreases pain associated with VCFs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the preliminary results for the treatment of painful osteoporotic VCFs with a Sky Bone Expander. Twenty-six patients with pain-causing VCFs were treated with a Sky Bone Expander. This operation involved the percutaneous insertion of the Sky Bone Expander into a fractured vertebral body transpedicularly. Following the expansion, the Sky Bone Expander was contracted and removed, resulting in a cavity to be filled with bone cement. All fractures were analyzed for improvement in sagittal alignment. Clinical complications, pain relief and ambulation status were evaluated 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after the operation. Twenty-four hours after the operation, all the patients treated experienced some degree of pain relief. In addition, no postoperative neurologic complications were noted. The average operative time was 42.4 {+-} 15.5 min per vertebra. Moreover, an average cement volume of 3.5 mL (range, 2.5 {+-} 5.0 mL) was injected per vertebra. The average anterior height was 18.4 {+-} 5.1 mm preoperatively and 20.5 {+-} 5.3 mm postoperatively (p < 0.01). Furthermore, the average midline height was 15.5 {+-} 5.2 mm preoperatively and 18.9 {+-} 4.0 mm postoperatively (p < 0.01). The Cobb angle improved from 18.5 {+-} 8.2 degrees preoperatively to 9.2 {+-} 4.0 degrees postoperatively (p < 0.01). The Visual Anabog Scale scores decreased from 7.7 {+-} 1.8 points preoperatively to 3.1 {+-} 2.0, 2.9 {+-} 1.7, 2.6 {+-} 1.5 and 2.9 {+-} 11.3 after 1 day, 1 week, 1 month and 3 months after the operation, respectively. Cement extrusion was observed in four patients without any neurologic symptoms. As a result of this study, we can postulate that the expansion of compressed vetrebra with a Sky Bone Expander

  1. Tethered spinal cord syndrome with lumbar segmental stenosis treated with XLIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettore Carpineta, MD

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Literature review of adults TCS associated with lumbar spinal degenerative disease as lumbar canal stenosis or disc herniation, is reported. Moderate entity of traction of spinal cord may remain asymptomatic in childhood and may result in delayed neurological deficits in adult life. The stretching of conus medullaris and spinal nerves of cauda equina, reduces regional blood flow and causes neural death and fibrous tissue replacement. Sudden or progressive onset of paraparesis with spastic gait, bladder dysfunction and acute low back pain in patient with history of spinal dysraphism must be considered as possible lumbar spinal cord compression caused by low lying cord related to TCS. Surgical decompression should be performed as early as possible to ensure neurological recovery. XLIF approach seems to be safe and fast and represent an excellent surgical option to obtain spinal cord indirect decompression and lumbar interbody fusion.

  2. First Autologous Cord Blood Therapy for Pediatric Ischemic Stroke and Cerebral Palsy Caused by Cephalic Molding during Birth: Individual Treatment with Mononuclear Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jensen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial laceration due to traumatic birth injury is an extremely rare event affecting approximately one newborn per a population of 4.5 million. However, depending on the mode of injury, the resulting brain damage may lead to lifelong sequelae, for example, cerebral palsy for which there is no cure at present. Here we report a rare case of neonatal arterial ischemic stroke and cerebral palsy caused by fetal traumatic molding and parietal depression of the head during delivery caused by functional cephalopelvic disproportion due to a “long pelvis.” This patient was treated by autologous cord blood mononuclear cells (45.8 mL, cryopreserved, TNC 2.53×10e8 with a remarkable recovery. Active rehabilitation was provided weekly. Follow-up examinations were at 3, 18, 34, and 57 months. Generous use of neonatal head MRI in case of molding, craniofacial deformity, and a sentinel event during parturition is advocated to enhance diagnosis of neonatal brain damage as a basis for fast and potentially causative treatment modalities including autologous cord blood transplantation in a timely manner.

  3. [Our experience with laminectomy in the treatment of spinal cord disease caused by cervical arthrosis: apropos of 42 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueye, E M; Sakho, Y; Badiane, S B; Ba, M C; Ndoye, N; Diene, S M; Gueye, M

    1999-01-01

    Cervical spondylotic arthRosis may lead to a myelopathy and the question which can rise is: posterior surgical decompression is adequate regarding the others surgical technics discussed? In this paper the authors describe the postoperative results of 42 patients who have been operated on by laminectomy from 1971 to 1995 at Fann Hospital in Dakar. The median age was 42 years and the median delay between the onset of neurological disorders and operation was 5.9 months. All patients showed symptoms of spinal cord and root disturbances. Neuro-imaging studies with plan X-rays and myelography reveal arthrosis and the impact of this arthrosis on nervous system. With a follow up of 6 months we found a mortality rate of 4.7% (two cases of death), 66.8% of good results and 28.5% of fail. Eighteen months post surgery results were respectively 52.3% and 45.7% of good and poor results. The complications of the laminectomy were peri operative hemorrhage (19%); sepsis (21.4%); spine cord traumatic injuries (9.5%) spondylolisthesis (4.7%). Laminectomy has been found to improve "spine syndrome"; paresthesia; fasciculations, and sensory deficits. Also three level laminectomy and surgery which can take place before six months are good prognosis factors. The authors stressed on laminectomy because of our low medical care situations particularly that no other surgical procedures through the modern literature leads to better results.

  4. Alignment of Astrocytes Increases Neuronal Growth in Three-Dimensional Collagen Gels and Is Maintained Following Plastic Compression to Form a Spinal Cord Repair Conduit

    OpenAIRE

    East, Emma; de Oliveira, Daniela Blum; Golding, Jon P.; Phillips, James B.

    2010-01-01

    After injury to the spinal cord, reactive astrocytes form a glial scar consisting of highly ramified cell processes that constitute a major impediment to repair, partly due to their lack of orientation and guidance for regenerating axons. In some nonmammalian vertebrates, successful central nervous system regeneration is attributed to the alignment of reactive glia, which guide axons across the lesion site. Here, a three-dimensional mammalian cell-seeded collagen gel culture system was used t...

  5. High thoracic ossification of ligamentum flavum causing partial Horner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Ha; Lee, Su Hun; Lee, Jun Seok; Song, Geun Sung; Son, Dong Wuk

    2018-02-28

    We report a case of high thoracic ossification of the ligamentum flavum (OLF) causing a partial Horner's syndrome. A 57-year-old man developed a walking disorder, as well as right-sided miosis and anhidrosis. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a spinal cord compressing T2-T3 OLF. The patient improved after surgery.

  6. Extrinsic tracheal compression caused by scoliosis of the thoracic spine and chest wall degormity: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Kyong min Sarah; Lee, Bae Young; Kim, Hyeon Sook; Song, Kyung Sup; Kang, Hyeon Hul; Lee, Sang Haak; Moon, Hwa Sik [St. Paul' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Extrinsic airway compression due to chest wall deformity is not commonly observed. Although this condition can be diagnosed more easily with the help of multidetector CT, the standard treatment method has not yet been definitely established. We report a case of an eighteen-year-old male who suffered from severe extrinsic tracheal compression due to scoliosis and straightening of the thoracic spine, confirmed on CT and bronchoscopy. The patient underwent successful placement of tracheal stent but later died of bleeding from the tracheostomy site probably due to tracheo-brachiocephalic artery fistula. We describe the CT and bronchoscopic findings of extrinsic airway compression due to chest wall deformity as well as the optimal treatment method, and discuss the possible explanation for bleeding in the patient along with review of the literature.

  7. Extrinsic tracheal compression caused by scoliosis of the thoracic spine and chest wall degormity: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Kyong min Sarah; Lee, Bae Young; Kim, Hyeon Sook; Song, Kyung Sup; Kang, Hyeon Hul; Lee, Sang Haak; Moon, Hwa Sik

    2014-01-01

    Extrinsic airway compression due to chest wall deformity is not commonly observed. Although this condition can be diagnosed more easily with the help of multidetector CT, the standard treatment method has not yet been definitely established. We report a case of an eighteen-year-old male who suffered from severe extrinsic tracheal compression due to scoliosis and straightening of the thoracic spine, confirmed on CT and bronchoscopy. The patient underwent successful placement of tracheal stent but later died of bleeding from the tracheostomy site probably due to tracheo-brachiocephalic artery fistula. We describe the CT and bronchoscopic findings of extrinsic airway compression due to chest wall deformity as well as the optimal treatment method, and discuss the possible explanation for bleeding in the patient along with review of the literature.

  8. Preventable long-term complications of suprapubic cystostomy after spinal cord injury: Root cause analysis in a representative case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Gurpreet

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although complications related to suprapubic cystostomies are well documented, there is scarcity of literature on safety issues involved in long-term care of suprapubic cystostomy in spinal cord injury patients. Case Presentation A 23-year-old female patient with tetraplegia underwent suprapubic cystostomy. During the next decade, this patient developed several catheter-related complications, as listed below: (1 Suprapubic catheter came out requiring reoperation. (2 The suprapubic catheter migrated to urethra through a patulous bladder neck, which led to leakage of urine per urethra. (3 Following change of catheter, the balloon of suprapubic catheter was found to be lying under the skin on two separate occasions. (4 Subsequently, this patient developed persistent, seropurulent discharge from suprapubic cystostomy site as well as from under-surface of pubis. (5 Repeated misplacement of catheter outside the bladder led to chronic leakage of urine along suprapubic tract, which in turn predisposed to inflammation and infection of suprapubic tract, abdominal wall fat, osteomyelitis of pubis, and abscess at the insertion of adductor longus muscle Conclusion Suprapubic catheter should be anchored securely to prevent migration of the tip of catheter into urethra and accidental dislodgment of catheter. While changing the suprapubic catheter, correct placement of Foley catheter inside the urinary bladder must be ensured. In case of difficulty, it is advisable to perform exchange of catheter over a guide wire. Ultrasound examination of urinary bladder is useful to check the position of the balloon of Foley catheter.

  9. Vocal Cord Paralysis and its Etiologies: A Prospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Javad Seyed Toutounchi; Mahmood Eydi; Samad EJ Golzari; Mohammad Reza Ghaffari; Nashmil Parvizian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Vocal cord paralysis is a common symptom of numerous diseases and it may be due to neurogenic or mechanical fixation of the cords. Paralysis of the vocal cords is just a symptom of underlying disease in some cases; so, clinical diagnosis of the underlying cause leading to paralysis of the vocal cords is important. This study evaluates the causes of vocal cord paralysis. Methods: In a prospective study, 45 patients with paralyzed vocal cord diagnosis were examined by tests such a...

  10. Amniotomy and cord prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohain, Judy Slome

    2013-01-01

    Research shows that artificially rupturing the amniotic sac (amniotomy) can cause umbilical cord prolapse. Amniotomy became a routine part of obstetrical care with the introduction of active management, without evidence of benefit. In the 30 years since active management was introduced, the rate at which amniotomy causes umbilical cord prolapse has not been directly studied. Two controlled studies from Turkey from 2002 and 2006 are the only published studies that provide enough data to extract the rate at which cord prolapse follows amniotomy. They show that 1 cord prolapse results from every 300 amniotomies (0.3%). There is data suggesting amniotomy may also increase neonatal GBS infection, maternal pain and fetal blood loss if placental blood vessels are punctured.

  11. Over-expression of PUMA correlates with the apoptosis of spinal cord cells in rat neuropathic intermittent claudication model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neuropathic intermittent claudication (NIC is a typical clinical symptom of lumbar spinal stenosis and the apoptosis of neurons caused by cauda equina compression (CEC has been proposed as an important reason. Whereas, the factors and the mechanism involved in the process of apoptosis induced by CEC remain unclear. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: In our modified rat model of NIC, a trapezoid-shaped silicon rubber was inserted into the epidural space under the L5 and L6 vertebral plate. Obvious apoptosis was observed in spinal cord cells after compression by TUNEL assay. Simultaneously, qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry showed that the expression levels of PUMA (p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis and p53 were upregulated significantly in spinal cord under compression, while the expression of p53 inhibitor MDM2 and SirT2 decreased in the same region. Furthermore, CEC also resulted in the upregulation of Bcl-2 pro-apoptotic genes expression and caspase-3 activation. With the protection of Methylprednisolone, the upregulation of PUMA and p53 expression as well as the decrease of MDM2 and SirT2 in spinal cord were partially rescued in western bolt analysis. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that over-expression of PUMA correlates with CEC caused apoptosis of spinal cord cells, which is characterized by the increase of p53, Bax and Bad expression. PUMA upregulation might be crucial to induce apoptosis of spinal cord cells through p53-dependent pathway in CEC.

  12. Spinal cord injuries in older children: is there a role for high-dose methylprednisolone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Bhawana; Suresh, Srinivasan

    2011-12-01

    We present a retrospective case series of 15 children (aged 8-16 years) with blunt traumatic spinal cord injury who were treated with methylprednisolone as per the National Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study protocol. Of all patients, 12 (80%) were male. Causes were sports injuries (n = 9), motor vehicle crashes (n = 2), and falls (n = 4). Most injuries were nonskeletal (n = 14), and all patients had incomplete injury of the spinal cord. The most common location of tenderness was cervical (n = 7). Of the 15 patients, methylprednisolone was initiated within 3 hours in 13 patients and between 3 and 8 hours in 2 patients. All patients received the medication for 23 hours as per the National Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study protocol. Of the 15 patients, 13 recovered completely by 24 hours and were discharged with a diagnosis of spinal cord concussion. One patient had compression fracture of T5 and T3-T5 spinal contusion but no long-term neurological deficit. One patient was discharged with diagnosis of C1-C3 spinal cord contusion (by magnetic resonance imaging) and had partial recovery at 2 years after injury. All patients with a diagnosis of cord concussion had normal plain films of the spine and computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings. None of the patients had any associated major traumatic injuries to other organ systems. The high-dose steroid therapy did not result in any serious bacterial infections.

  13. Experimental spinal cord trauma: a review of mechanically induced spinal cord injury in rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullahi, Dauda; Annuar, Azlina Ahmad; Mohamad, Masro; Aziz, Izzuddin; Sanusi, Junedah

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that animal spinal cord compression (using methods such as clips, balloons, spinal cord strapping, or calibrated forceps) mimics the persistent spinal canal occlusion that is common in human spinal cord injury (SCI). These methods can be used to investigate the effects of compression or to know the optimal timing of decompression (as duration of compression can affect the outcome of pathology) in acute SCI. Compression models involve prolonged cord compression and are distinct from contusion models, which apply only transient force to inflict an acute injury to the spinal cord. While the use of forceps to compress the spinal cord is a common choice due to it being inexpensive, it has not been critically assessed against the other methods to determine whether it is the best method to use. To date, there is no available review specifically focused on the current compression methods of inducing SCI in rats; thus, we performed a systematic and comprehensive publication search to identify studies on experimental spinalization in rat models, and this review discusses the advantages and limitations of each method.

  14. Idiopathic Cervical Hematomyelia in an Infant: Spinal Cord Injury without Radiographic Abnormality Caused by a Trivial Trauma? Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiaschi, Pietro; Severino, Mariasavina; Ravegnani, Giuseppe Marcello; Piatelli, Gianluca; Consales, Alessandro; Accogli, Andrea; Capra, Valeria; Cama, Armando; Pavanello, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous or idiopathic intramedullary bleeding is a very rare event in pediatric patients. This diagnosis requires an extended clinical, laboratory, and radiologic work-up to rule out all potential causes of hematomyelia. However, children may present with hematomyelia or spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormality even after a minor trauma. A 15-month-old girl presented with a 24-hour history of progressive neurologic deficits. A trivial trauma had occurred a few days before the clinical onset. Head computed tomography scan and craniospinal magnetic resonance imaging revealed an isolated hemorrhagic central medullary lesion extending from the obex to C3 level. No underlying causes of intramedullary bleeding were identified. In the absence of obvious vascular abnormalities, the patient underwent an urgent occipitocervical decompression with hematoma evacuation. Postoperatively, the patient's motor symptoms rapidly resolved, and she was discharged with cervical collar immobilization. We discuss the differential diagnosis of intramedullary bleeding in children, focusing on the diagnostic protocol and therapeutic options in this age group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Schwannosis induced medullary compression in VACTERL syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Treacy, A

    2011-10-21

    A 7-year-old boy with a history of VACTERL syndrome was found collapsed in bed. MRI had shown basilar invagination of the skull base and narrowing of the foramen magnum. Angulation, swelling and abnormal high signal at the cervicomedullary junction were felt to be secondary to compression of the medulla. Neuropathologic examination showed bilateral replacement of the medullary tegmentum by an irregularly circumscribed cellular lesion which was composed of elongated GFAP\\/S 100-positive cells with spindled nuclei and minimal atypia. The pathologic findings were interpreted as intramedullary schwannosis with mass effect. Schwannosis, is observed in traumatized spinal cords where its presence may represent attempted, albeit aberrant, repair by inwardly migrating Schwann cells ofperipheral origin. In our view the compressive effect of the basilar invagination on this boy\\'s medulla was of sufficient magnitude to have caused tumoral medullary schwannosis with resultant intermittent respiratory compromise leading to reflex anoxic seizures.

  16. Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Abroun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Stem cells are naïve or master cells. This means they can transform into special 200 cell types as needed by body, and each of these cells has just one function. Stem cells are found in many parts of the human body, although some sources have richer concentrations than others. Some excellent sources of stem cells, such as bone marrow, peripheral blood, cord blood, other tissue stem cells and human embryos, which last one are controversial and their use can be illegal in some countries. Cord blood is a sample of blood taken from a newborn baby's umbilical cord. It is a rich source of stem cells, umbilical cord blood and tissue are collected from material that normally has no use following a child’s birth. Umbilical cord blood and tissue cells are rich sources of stem cells, which have been used in the treatment of over 80 diseases including leukemia, lymphoma and anemia as bone marrow stem cell potency.  The most common disease category has been leukemia. The next largest group is inherited diseases. Patients with lymphoma, myelodysplasia and severe aplastic anemia have also been successfully transplanted with cord blood. Cord blood is obtained by syringing out the placenta through the umbilical cord at the time of childbirth, after the cord has been detached from the newborn. Collecting stem cells from umbilical blood and tissue is ethical, pain-free, safe and simple. When they are needed to treat your child later in life, there will be no rejection or incompatibility issues, as the procedure will be using their own cells. In contrast, stem cells from donors do have these potential problems. By consider about cord blood potency, cord blood banks (familial or public were established. In IRAN, four cord blood banks has activity, Shariati BMT center cord blood bank, Royan familial cord blood banks, Royan public cord blood banks and Iranian Blood Transfusion Organ cord blood banks. Despite 50,000 sample which storage in these banks, but the

  17. Spinal cord injury in rats: inability of nimodipine or anti-neutrophil serum to improve spinal cord blood flow or neurologic status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtz, A.; Nystroem, B.; Gerdin, B.

    1989-01-01

    The role of a calcium-mediated increase in vascular resistance and of vascular damage caused by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs) in the development of neurologic deficit and disturbance of spinal cord circulation following spinal cord compression was studied in the rat. Spinal cord injury was induced by 5 min of compression with a load of 35 g on a 2.2 x 5.0 mm compression plate. This caused transient paraparesis. The rats received either the calcium receptor antagonist nimodipine or an anti-rat neutrophil serum (ANS). Nimodipine was infused i.v. for 4 h in an amount of 1.5 μg/kg/min starting 60 min after trauma. The number of circulating PMNLs was depleted by intraperiotoneal injection of an ANS raised in sheep given 12 h before trauma. This caused a reduction to about 2% of the pre-ANS value. Controls received saline or normal sheep serum. The motor performance was assessed daily on the inclined plane. On day one, the day after injury, the capacity angle had decreased from about 63 deg. preoperatively to close to 32 deg. in the experimental groups. There was then a slow improvement in both the control and experimental groups and on day 4 the capacity angle was close to 43 deg. in all 3 groups. Spinal cord blood flow, as measured with the 14 C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography method, was similar in all groups on day 4. As neither the neurologic dysfunction nor the spinal cord blood flow was affected by post-trauma treatment with nimodipine or pretreatment with ANS, the possibility that calcium-mediated vasoconstriction or PMNLs play a role in the development of posttraumatic neuroligic disability was not supported by this study. (author)

  18. Rapid recovery and altered neurochemical dependence of locomotor central pattern generation following lumbar neonatal spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züchner, Mark; Kondratskaya, Elena; Sylte, Camilla B; Glover, Joel C; Boulland, Jean-Luc

    2018-01-15

    Spinal compression injury targeted to the neonatal upper lumbar spinal cord, the region of highest hindlimb locomotor rhythmogenicity, leads to an initial paralysis of the hindlimbs. Behavioural recovery is evident within a few days and approaches normal function within about 3 weeks. Fictive locomotion in the isolated injured spinal cord cannot be elicited by a neurochemical cocktail containing NMDA, dopamine and serotonin 1 day post-injury, but can 3 days post-injury as readily as in the uninjured spinal cord. Low frequency coordinated rhythmic activity can be elicited in the isolated uninjured spinal cord by NMDA + dopamine (without serotonin), but not in the isolated injured spinal cord. In both the injured and uninjured spinal cord, eliciting bona fide fictive locomotion requires the additional presence of serotonin. Following incomplete compression injury in the thoracic spinal cord of neonatal mice 1 day after birth (P1), we previously reported that virtually normal hindlimb locomotor function is recovered within about 3 weeks despite substantial permanent thoracic tissue loss. Here, we asked whether similar recovery occurs following lumbar injury that impacts more directly on the locomotor central pattern generator (CPG). As in thoracic injuries, lumbar injuries caused about 90% neuronal loss at the injury site and increased serotonergic innervation below the injury. Motor recovery was slower after lumbar than thoracic injury, but virtually normal function was attained by P25 in both cases. Locomotor CPG status was tested by eliciting fictive locomotion in isolated spinal cords using a widely used neurochemical cocktail (NMDA, dopamine, serotonin). No fictive locomotion could be elicited 1 day post-injury, but could within 3 days post-injury as readily as in age-matched uninjured control spinal cords. Burst patterning and coordination were largely similar in injured and control spinal cords but there were differences. Notably, in both groups there

  19. Dyspnea Caused by Atlantoaxial Subluxation in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Yi Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atlantoaxial subluxation is a well-known but poorly recognized disease in rheumatoid patients. We report a patient with rheumatoid arthritis whose chief complaint was dyspnea on arrival to the emergency department (ED. After further investigation, spinal cord compression caused by atlantoaxial subluxation was diagnosed. This is an uncommon but important case that ED physicians should be aware of.

  20. Cochleovestibular Nerve Compression Syndrome Caused by Intrameatal Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Loop: Synthesis of Best Evidence for Clinical Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Giacomo; Messina, Raffaella; Carai, Andrea; Colafati, Giovanna Stefania; Savioli, Alessandra; Randi, Franco; De Benedictis, Alessandro; Cossu, Silvia; Fontanella, Marco Maria; Marras, Carlo Efisio

    2016-12-01

    Intrameatal cochleovestibular neurovascular conflict is a rare condition with specific clinical and therapeutic implications. Although surgery is commonly indicated in other neurovascular conflicts, for this subset of patients there is little evidence to guide treatment decisions. Moving from a case description, we performed a review of the literature on this topic to systematically present the best available evidence to guide clinical decisions. We performed a literature review on reported cases of surgically treated intrameatal anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA)-cochleovestibular nerve neurovascular conflict, analyzing preoperative clinical data, surgical techniques, and outcomes. We analyzed the levels of evidence using the King's College guidelines. We found 35 studies of neurovascular compression of the cochleovestibular nerve by AICA for 536 patients operated on to resolve their neurovascular conflict. Only 4 of these studies describe intrameatal AICA neurovascular conflicts, for 9 cases, including our own. Tinnitus was the most frequent symptom (9/9), followed by vertigo (2/9). Our case was the only one showing unilateral hearing loss. Surgery consisted of microsurgical mobilization of the AICA loop performed through a retrosigmoid craniotomy. Tinnitus and vertigo resolved after surgery in all cases, whereas hearing loss did not improve after surgery. Surgical treatment offers the best results for tinnitus and vertigo, but it seems to have no effect on hearing loss, not even at long-term follow-up. Microvascular decompression should be proposed to intrameatal symptomatic patients before the onset of hearing loss. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Thoracic spinal cord compression secondary to metastatic synovial sarcoma: case report Compresión de la medula espinal torácica por metástasis secundaria de sarcoma sinovial: relato de caso Compressão da medula espinhal torácica por metástase secundária de sarcoma sinovial: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Arnold

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma is an uncommon malignant soft tissue neoplasm, occurring primarily in adolescents and young adults. It is prevalent in the periarticular soft tissues near large joints of the extremities and rarely involves the trunk. Metastases are not uncommon and usually involve the lungs; metastasis to the thoracic spine is rare. We report the case of a 47-year-old man with a history of synovial sarcoma of the lower back, with subsequent metastases to the lung, penis, and perineum (all previously resected, presenting with a 3-month history of low back pain and lower extremity paresthesias. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated multiple lesions involving multiple contiguous vertebral bodies, with the mass at T12 compressing the spinal cord. The patient underwent T11-T12 laminectomy, transpedicular decompression, tumor debulking, and posterior fixation and fusion. The patient died six months later due to disease progression. Although not curative, decompression and stabilization of the spine are often necessary in patients who present spinal cord compression.El sarcoma sinovial es una neoplasia rara de los tejidos blandos que afecta adolescentes y adultos jóvenes. Su mayor prevalencia es en las grandes articulaciones de las extremidades y raramente ataca el tronco. Las lesiones metastásicas son raras y generalmente atacan los pulmones, siendo que las metástasis de columna torácica son raras. Será relatado el cuadro clínico de un paciente de 47 años de edad con tres meses de historia de dolor lumbar y presentando metástasis de sarcoma sinovial en la columna lumbar. La resonancia magnética demostraba lesiones contiguas del cuerpo vertebral y compresión del canal vertebral al nivel de T12. El paciente fue sometido a la laminectomía de T11-T12, descompresión transpedicular, remoción de tejido tumoral y artrodesis con fijación posterior. El paciente fue a óbito después de seis meses debido a la progresión de la enfermedad

  2. Age-related changes of the spinal cord: A biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Tomoya; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Nishida, Norihiro; Ichihara, Kazuhiko; Sakuramoto, Itsuo; Ohgi, Junji; Funaba, Masahiro; Imajo, Yasuaki; Suzuki, Hidenori; Chen, Xian; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2018-03-01

    Although it is known that aging plays an important role in the incidence and progression of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), the underlying mechanism is unclear. Studies that used fresh bovine cervical spinal cord report the gray matter of the cervical spinal cord as being more rigid and fragile than the white matter. However, there are no reports regarding the association between aging an tensile and Finite Element Method (FEM). Therefore, FEM was used based on the data pertaining to the mechanical features of older bovine cervical spinal cord to explain the pathogenesis of CSM in elderly patients. Tensile tests were conducted for white and gray matter separately in young and old bovine cervical spinal cords, and compared with their respective mechanical features. Based on the data obtained, FEM analysis was further performed, which included static and dynamic factors to describe the internal stress distribution changes of the spinal cord. These results demonstrated that the mechanical strength of young bovine spinal cords is different from that of old bovine spinal cords. The gray matter of the older spinal cord was significantly softer and more resistant to rupture compared with that of younger spinal cords (Pspinal cords in response to similar compression, when compared with young spinal cords. These results demonstrate that in analyzing the response of the spinal cord to compression, the age of patients is an important factor to be considered, in addition to the degree of compression, compression speed and parts of the spinal cord compression factor.

  3. Characteristic anatomical conformation of the vertebral artery causing vascular compression against the root exit zone of the facial nerve in patients with hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Soo; Koh, Eun-Jeong; Choi, Ha-Young; Lee, Jong-Myong

    2015-03-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is caused by tortuous offending vessels near the facial nerve root exit zone. However, the definitive mechanism of offending vessel formation remains unclear. We hypothesized that vascular angulation and tortuosity, probably caused by uneven vertebral artery blood flow, result in vascular compression of the facial nerve root exit zone. The authors observed two anatomical characteristics of the vertebrobasilar arterial system in 120 subjects in the surgical group and 188 controls. The presence of the dominant vertebral artery (DVA) and laterality of the vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) were observed. We also analyzed the morphological characteristics of the surgical group showing the presence of DVA. The morphological characteristics were classified into three types: type I had the VBJ and DVA on the same side, type II had the VBJ within 2 mm of the midline, and type III had the VBJ opposite the DVA. The DVA was more prevalent in the surgical group than in the control group (71 % versus 54 %, P DVA on the left (P DVA on the right (P DVA, which corresponds with the laterality of the HFS. In the surgical group with the DVA and HFS on the same side, type I was predominant, but in the surgical group with a contralateral DVA and HFS, type III was predominant. The presence of a DVA and shifting of the VBJ on the same side plays a role in the angulation and tortuosity of vessels in the perivertebrobasilar junction, resulting in neurovascular compression of the facial nerve root exit zone and thereby causing HFS.

  4. Aortic dissection presenting with secondary pulmonary hypertension caused by compression of the pulmonary artery by dissecting hematoma: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Hun; Ryu, Sang Wan; Choi, Yong Sun; Ahn, Byoung Hee

    2004-01-01

    The rupture of an acute dissection of the ascending aorta into the space surrounding the pulmonary artery is an uncommon occurrence. No previous cases of transient pulmonary hypertension caused by a hematoma surrounding the pulmonary artery have been documented in the literature. Herein, we report a case of acute aortic dissection presenting as secondary pulmonary hypertension

  5. Acute traumatic central cord syndrome: MRI-pathological correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quencer, R.M.; Bunge, R.P.; Egnor, M.; Green, B.A.; Puckett, W.; Naidich, T.P.; Post, M.J.D.; Norenberg, M.

    1992-01-01

    The acute traumatic central cord syndrome (ATCCS) is commonly stated to result from an injury which affects primarily the center of the spinal cord and is frequently hemorrhagic. To test the validity of this widely disseminated hypothesis, the magnetic resonance images [MRI] of 11 consecutive cases of ATCCS caused by closed injury to the spine were analyzed and correlated with the gross pathological and histological features of 3 cervical spinal cords obtained at post mortem from patients with ATCCS, including 2 of patients studied by MRI. In this study, the MRI and pathological observations indicate that ATCCS is predominantly a white matter injury and that intramedullary hemorrhage is not a necessary feature of the syndrome; indeed, it is probably an uncommon event in ATCCS. We suggest that the most common mechanism of injury in ATCCS may be direct compression of the cervical spinal cord by buckling of the ligamenta flava into an already narrowed cervical spinal canal; this would explain the predominance of axonal injury in the white matter of the lateral columns. (orig./GDG)

  6. Percutanous vertebroplasty for vertebral compression fracture in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Osteoporotic vertebral fractures are common in the geriatric age group. Treatment options are influenced by the severity of symptoms, the presence or otherwise of spinal cord compression, level of spinal compression, degree of vertebral height collapse and the integrity of the posterior spinal elements. Aim: We ...

  7. Cervical Cord-Canal Mismatch: A New Method for Identifying Predisposition to Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Aria; Montejo, Julio; Sun, Xin; Virojanapa, Justin; Kolb, Luis E; Abbed, Khalid M; Cheng, Joseph S

    2017-12-01

    The risk for spinal cord injuries (SCIs) ranging from devastating traumatic injuries, compression because of degenerative pathology, and neurapraxia is increased in patients with congenital spinal stenosis. Classical diagnostic criteria include an absolute anteroposterior diameter of spinal cord, which varies across patients, independent of canal size. Recent large magnetic resonance imaging studies of population cohorts have allowed newer methods to emerge that account for both cord and canal size by measuring a spinal cord occupation ratio (SCOR). A SCOR defined as ≥70% on midsagittal imaging or ≥80% on axial imaging appears to be an effective method of identifying cord-canal mismatch, but requires further validation. Cord-canal size mismatch predisposes patients to SCI because of 1) less space within the canal lowering the amount of degenerative changes needed for cord compression, and 2) less cerebrospinal fluid surrounding the spinal cord decreasing the ability to absorb kinetic forces directed at the spine. Patients with cord-canal mismatch have been reported to be at a substantially higher risk of traumatic SCI, and present with degenerative cervical myelopathy at a younger age than patients without cord-canal mismatch. However, neurologic outcome after SCI has occurred does not appear to be different in patients with or without a cord-canal mismatch. Recognition that canal and cord size are both factors which predispose to SCI supports that cord-canal size mismatch rather than a narrow cervical canal in isolation should be viewed as the underlying mechanism predisposing to SCI. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Case report of deep vein thrombosis caused by artificial urinary sphincter reservoir compressing right external iliac vein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus J Yip

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial urinary sphincters (AUSs are commonly used after radical prostatectomy for those who are incontinent of urine. However, they are associated with complications, the most common being reservoir uprising or migration. We present a unique case of occlusive external iliac and femoral vein obstruction by the AUS reservoir causing thrombosis. Deflation of the reservoir and anticoagulation has, thus far, not been successful at decreasing thrombus burden. We present this case as a rare, but significant surgical complication; explore the risk factors that may have contributed, and other potential endovascular therapies to address this previously unreported AUS complication.

  9. Haemorrhagic necrosis of the grey matter of the spinal cord due to accidental injection of iopamidol in a patient with multiple neurofibromas; a clinico-pathological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, R.A.C.; Wintzen, A.R.; Voormolen, J.H.C.; Vielvoye, G.J.; Bots, G.T.A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Cervical laminectomy was performed in a 34-year old man with multiple spinal neurofibromas because of a slowly progressive medullary compression. Four weeks later a rapid deterioration necessitated iopamidol myelography by left lateral cervical puncture at C2 level. Despite the establishment of adequate spinal fluid contact, resulting in imaging of the subarachnoid space, part of the contrast medium entered the spinal cord, thus delineating a syrinx from the upper cervical extending to the upper thoracic level. After the puncture the patient developed triplegia, involving the left arm and both legs and a paresis of the right arm. He died from aspiration pneumonia. Autopsy revealed haemorrhagic necrosis of the spinal grey matter. This adverse effect of myelography is argued to have been conditioned by the extreme immobility and displacement of the spinal cord due to the presence of multiple neurofibromas. The deterioration four weeks after the operation was probably caused by a further compression of the spinal cord. (orig.)

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available menu Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ...

  15. Optical measurement of blood flow changes in spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J P; Kyriacou, P A; George, K J; Langford, R M

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about cell death in spinal cord tissue following compression injury, despite compression being a key component of spinal injuries. Currently models are used to mimic compression injury in animals and the effects of the compression evaluated by observing the extent and duration of recovery of normal motor function in the days and weeks following the injury. A fibreoptic photoplethysmography system was used to investigate whether pulsation of the small arteries in the spinal cord occurred before, during and after compressive loads were applied to the tissue. It was found that the signal amplitudes were reduced and this reduction persisted for at least five minutes after the compression ceased. It is hoped that results from this preliminary study may improve knowledge of the mechanism of spinal cord injury.

  16. Optical measurement of blood flow changes in spinal cord injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J P; Kyriacou, P A [Biomedical Engineering Research Group, City University London, Northampton Square, London (United Kingdom); George, K J [Neuroscience Centre, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End, London (United Kingdom); Langford, R M, E-mail: justin.phillips.1@city.ac.u [Pain and Anaesthesia Research Centre, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, West Smithfield, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Little is known about cell death in spinal cord tissue following compression injury, despite compression being a key component of spinal injuries. Currently models are used to mimic compression injury in animals and the effects of the compression evaluated by observing the extent and duration of recovery of normal motor function in the days and weeks following the injury. A fibreoptic photoplethysmography system was used to investigate whether pulsation of the small arteries in the spinal cord occurred before, during and after compressive loads were applied to the tissue. It was found that the signal amplitudes were reduced and this reduction persisted for at least five minutes after the compression ceased. It is hoped that results from this preliminary study may improve knowledge of the mechanism of spinal cord injury.

  17. Clinical course of non-operated patients with spinal cord tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamata, Michihiro; Kinouchi, Junnosuke; Maruiwa, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Masaya; Matsumoto, Morio; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2003-01-01

    The clinical course of spinal cord tumors in 24 non-operated patients who were followed by MRI for more than 1 year was investigated retrospectively. Only 7 patients were positive in neurological symptoms. 7 patients had multiple tumors, and the histopathologic diagnosis in 16 patients was neurinoma. The MRI findings changed in 4 patients, and follow-up MR images showed rapid growth of 2 neurinomas. The clinical manifestations did not change in 17 patients, but they improved in 3 patients whose symptoms were not caused by tumors and improved after temporary worsening caused by tumor growth in 2 patients. They worsened in 2 patients with intramedullary tumors associated with neurological symptoms. The diameter of the spinal cord of the patients with intramedullary tumors increased, making the spinal cord susceptible to both anterior and posterior compression. Finally, the clinical course of the patients with spinal cord tumors did not deteriorate rapidly, except in the patients with intramedullary tumor associated with neurological manifestations. We concluded that when spinal cord tumors that are asymptomatic or associated with minor symptoms are diagnosed as neurinoma or neurofibroma based on the MRI findings, early surgery should not be performed and followed by meticulous follow-up. (author)

  18. Cord Blood

    OpenAIRE

    Saeed Abroun

    2014-01-01

      Stem cells are naïve or master cells. This means they can transform into special 200 cell types as needed by body, and each of these cells has just one function. Stem cells are found in many parts of the human body, although some sources have richer concentrations than others. Some excellent sources of stem cells, such as bone marrow, peripheral blood, cord blood, other tissue stem cells and human embryos, which last one are controversial and their use can be illegal in some countries. Cord...

  19. "Compressed" Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Reeves, Galen; Gastpar, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The field of compressed sensing has shown that a sparse but otherwise arbitrary vector can be recovered exactly from a small number of randomly constructed linear projections (or samples). The question addressed in this paper is whether an even smaller number of samples is sufficient when there exists prior knowledge about the distribution of the unknown vector, or when only partial recovery is needed. An information-theoretic lower bound with connections to free probability theory and an upp...

  20. Uterine hypertonia and nuchal cord causing severe fetal bradycardia in a parturient receiving combined spinal-epidural analgesia during labor: Case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Srivastava

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetal bradycardia is common following spinal opioids administered for pain relief during labor. This slowing is usually benign and short lived. Although it leads to some anxiety among obstetricians and anesthesiologists, it rarely results in urgent operative delivery. Here, we are reporting a case where urgent caesarean delivery was needed due to severe and persistent fetal bradycardia following low-dose intrathecal fentanyl. Fetal bradycardia possibly was due to hypertonic uterine contractions complicated by tightly wrapped cord round the neck.

  1. Cord prolapse, associated factors and fetal outcome: a report of 47 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cord prolapse is a condition in which the umbilical cord comes ahead of the presenting part. Fetal demise occurs as a consequence of the compression of the cord by the presenting part. We conducted this study to determine profile of pregnancy and its outcome at the Central Hospital Yaounde, Cameroon. This was an ...

  2. Spinal cord involvement in tuberculous meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, R K; Malhotra, H S; Gupta, R

    2015-09-01

    To summarize the incidence and spectrum of spinal cord-related complications in patients of tuberculous meningitis. Reports from multiple countries were included. An extensive review of the literature, published in English, was carried out using Scopus, PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Tuberculous meningitis frequently affects the spinal cord and nerve roots. Initial evidence of spinal cord involvement came from post-mortem examination. Subsequent advancement in neuroimaging like conventional lumbar myelography, computed tomographic myelography and gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance-myelography have contributed immensely. Spinal involvement manifests in several forms, like tuberculous radiculomyelitis, spinal tuberculoma, myelitis, syringomyelia, vertebral tuberculosis and very rarely spinal tuberculous abscess. Frequently, tuberculous spinal arachnoiditis develops paradoxically. Infrequently, spinal cord involvement may even be asymptomatic. Spinal cord and spinal nerve involvement is demonstrated by diffuse enhancement of cord parenchyma, nerve roots and meninges on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. High cerebrospinal fluid protein content is often a risk factor for arachnoiditis. The most important differential diagnosis of tuberculous arachnoiditis is meningeal carcinomatosis. Anti-tuberculosis therapy is the main stay of treatment for tuberculous meningitis. Higher doses of corticosteroids have been found effective. Surgery should be considered only when pathological confirmation is needed or there is significant spinal cord compression. The outcome in these patients has been unpredictable. Some reports observed excellent recovery and some reported unfavorable outcomes after surgical decompression and debridement. Tuberculous meningitis is frequently associated with disabling spinal cord and radicular complications. Available treatment options are far from satisfactory.

  3. Symptomatic epidural lipomatosis of the spinal cord in a child: MR demonstration of spinal cord injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, Alberto [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, 505 Parnassus Av, L-371, University of California-San Francisco, CA 94143-0628 (United States); Servicio de Radiodiagnostico, Seccion de Neurorradiologia, Hospital Universitario ' ' 12 de Octubre' ' , 28040 Madrid (Spain); Barkovich, James A. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, 505 Parnassus Av, L-371, University of California-San Francisco, CA 94143-0628 (United States); Mateos, Fernando; Simon, Rogelio [Seccion de Neurpediatria, Servicio de Neurologia, Hospital Universitario ' ' 12 de Octubre' ' , 28041 Madrid (Spain)

    2002-12-01

    We report a case of symptomatic epidural lipomatosis in an 8-year-old girl with Cushing's syndrome secondary to longstanding high-dose steroid therapy for Crohn's disease. MR imaging of the spine revealed massive diffuse epidural fat compressing the entire spinal cord with T2 prolongation in the central gray matter of the cord suggesting ischemic myelopathy. This finding has not been previously demonstrated on imaging. A proposed mechanism underlying these findings is discussed. (orig.)

  4. Neuroimaging for spine and spinal cord surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Izumi [Hokkaido Neurosurgical Memorial Hospital (Japan); Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Hida, Kazutoshi

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging of the spine and spinal cord are described based upon our clinical experiences with spinal disorders. Preoperative neuroradiological examinations, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computerized tomography (CT) with three-dimensional reconstruction (3D-CT), were retrospectively analyzed in patients with cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (130 cases), spinal trauma (43 cases) and intramedullary spinal cord tumors (92 cases). CT scan and 3D-CT were useful in elucidating the spine pathology associated with degenerative and traumatic spine diseases. Visualization of the deformity of the spine or fracture-dislocation of the spinal column with 3D-CT helped to determine the correct surgical treatment. MR imaging was most important in the diagnosis of both spine and spinal cord abnormalities. The axial MR images of the spinal cord were essential in understanding the laterality of the spinal cord compression in spinal column disorders and in determining surgical approaches to the intramedullary lesions. Although non-invasive diagnostic modalities such as MR imaging and CT scans are adequate for deciding which surgical treatment to use in the majority of spine and spinal cord disorders, conventional myelography is still needed in the diagnosis of nerve root compression in some cases of cervical spondylosis. (author)

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute trauma of the spine and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradzki, J.; Paprzycki, W.; Jankowski, R.; Nowak, S.

    1993-01-01

    30 patients with acute neurologic deficits following spine trauma were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging. 15 patients had hemorrhagic necrosis of spinal cord and 9 patients had contusion and/or oedema of spinal cord. 21 patients had compression of spinal cord. MRI appears to be useful in the diagnosis of acute cord injury. MRI in acute phase of spine injury can be predictive of the eventual motor recovery of the patient. (author)

  6. Development of an Animal Model of Thoracolumbar Burst Fracture-Induced Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    spinal cord impactor and sustained balloon compression. 2. Keywords Spinal cord injury, spine trauma , burst fracture, large animal model 3...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0013 TITLE: DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANIMAL MODEL OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE-INDUCED ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANIMAL MODEL OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE-INDUCED ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY 5b. GRANT

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult ... LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury ... Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical Director, Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Program, Rehabilitation Institute ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 ...

  12. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury ... a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injury? play_arrow What kind of surgery is common after a spinal cord injury? play_ ... How soon after a spinal cord injury should surgery be performed? play_arrow Is it common to ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy ... Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, ... Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW ...

  17. Compression-Based Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Rezagah, Farideh Ebrahim; Jalali, Shirin; Erkip, Elza; Poor, H. Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Modern compression algorithms exploit complex structures that are present in signals to describe them very efficiently. On the other hand, the field of compressed sensing is built upon the observation that "structured" signals can be recovered from their under-determined set of linear projections. Currently, there is a large gap between the complexity of the structures studied in the area of compressed sensing and those employed by the state-of-the-art compression codes. Recent results in the...

  18. Topologically preserving straightening of spinal cord MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leener, Benjamin; Mangeat, Gabriel; Dupont, Sara; Martin, Allan R; Callot, Virginie; Stikov, Nikola; Fehlings, Michael G; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-10-01

    To propose a robust and accurate method for straightening magnetic resonance (MR) images of the spinal cord, based on spinal cord segmentation, that preserves spinal cord topology and that works for any MRI contrast, in a context of spinal cord template-based analysis. The spinal cord curvature was computed using an iterative Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) approximation. Forward and inverse deformation fields for straightening were computed by solving analytically the straightening equations for each image voxel. Computational speed-up was accomplished by solving all voxel equation systems as one single system. Straightening accuracy (mean and maximum distance from straight line), computational time, and robustness to spinal cord length was evaluated using the proposed and the standard straightening method (label-based spline deformation) on 3T T 2 - and T 1 -weighted images from 57 healthy subjects and 33 patients with spinal cord compression due to degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). The proposed algorithm was more accurate, more robust, and faster than the standard method (mean distance = 0.80 vs. 0.83 mm, maximum distance = 1.49 vs. 1.78 mm, time = 71 vs. 174 sec for the healthy population and mean distance = 0.65 vs. 0.68 mm, maximum distance = 1.28 vs. 1.55 mm, time = 32 vs. 60 sec for the DCM population). A novel image straightening method that enables template-based analysis of quantitative spinal cord MRI data is introduced. This algorithm works for any MRI contrast and was validated on healthy and patient populations. The presented method is implemented in the Spinal Cord Toolbox, an open-source software for processing spinal cord MRI data. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1209-1219. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. Compression embedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-07-07

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique are disclosed. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%. 21 figs.

  20. Spontaneous herniation of the thoracic spinal cord : a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Sung Chan; Lee, Seong Ro; Park, Dong Woo; Joo, Kyung Bin

    2001-01-01

    Spontaneous herniation of the spinal cord is a rare disease entity in which spinal cord substance is herniated through a previously uninjured and/or untouched dural. It is a cause of myelopathy that is treatable but difficult to diagnose. We report the CT and MR findings of a case of spontaneous thoracic spinal cord through a dural defect

  1. Development of an instrumented spinal cord surrogate using optical fibers: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchinello, Yann; Wagnac, Éric; Ung, Bora; Petit, Yvan; Pradhan, Prabin; Peyrache, Louis-Marie; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc

    2017-10-01

    In vitro replication of traumatic spinal cord injury is necessary to understand its biomechanics and to improve animal models. During a traumatic spinal cord injury, the spinal cord withstands an impaction at high velocity. In order to fully assess the impaction, the use of spinal canal occlusion sensor is necessary. A physical spinal cord surrogate is also often used to simulate the presence of the spinal cord and its surrounding structures. In this study, an instrumented physical spinal cord surrogate is presented and validated. The sensing is based on light transmission loss observed in embedded bare optical fibers subjected to bending. The instrumented surrogate exhibits similar mechanical properties under static compression compared to fresh porcine spinal cords. The instrumented surrogate has a compression sensing threshold of 40% that matches the smallest compression values leading to neurological injuries. The signal obtained from the sensor allows calculating the compression of the spinal cord surrogate with a maximum of 5% deviation. Excellent repeatability was also observed under repetitive loading. The proposed instrumented spinal cord surrogate is promising with satisfying mechanical properties and good sensing capability. It is the first attempt at proposing a method to assess the internal loads sustained by the spinal cord during a traumatic injury. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord ... by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About ... By Topic Media Resources Donate to support families facing spinal cord ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... OTR/L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, ... the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? ...

  4. Above-level mechanical hyperalgesia in rats develops after incomplete spinal cord injury but not after cord transection, and is reversed by amitriptyline, morphine and gabapentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, Valerie S; Kalous, Adrianna; Keast, Janet R; Osborne, Peregrine B

    2010-10-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a major cause of persistent neuropathic pain of central origin. Recent evidence suggests neuropathic pain in clinically complete SCI patients correlates with limited sensory function below the lesion (sensory discomplete). On this basis we examined if the onset of mechanical hyperalgesia was different in rodents after a severe incomplete clip-compression SCI versus a complete spinal cord transection at thoracic segment T13. Above-level withdrawal behaviors evoked by forepaw stimulation provided evidence of mechanical hyperalgesia after incomplete but not complete SCI, whereas below-level responses evoked by hindpaw stimulation revealed hypersensitivity after both injuries. The latency of the above-level response was 4-5 wks but was longer after a moderate clip-compression injury. Mechanical hyperalgesia was fully reversed by three analgesic drugs used in treating neuropathic SCI pain, but their duration of action differed significantly, showing a rank order of amitriptyline (24-48 h)≫morphine (6 h)>gabapentin (2 h). Evidence of central sensitization in cervical spinal cord segments that receive sensory projections from the forelimbs was provided by immunohistochemistry for Zif268, a functional marker of neuroplasticity. Zif268-immunoreactive neurons in laminae I/II increased in response to repetitive noxious forepaw stimulation in the incomplete SCI group, and this response was reduced in the complete transection and sham-operated groups. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that neuropathic pain of cord origin is more likely to develop after SCI when there is an incomplete loss of axons traversing the lesion. Copyright © 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Risk factors in iatrogenic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalva-Iborra, A; Alcanyis-Alberola, M; Grao-Castellote, C; Torralba-Collados, F; Giner-Pascual, M

    2017-09-01

    In the last years, there has been a change in the aetiology of spinal cord injury. There has been an increase in the number of elderly patients with spinal cord injuries caused by diseases or medical procedures. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency of the occurrence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury in our unit. The secondary aim is to study what variables can be associated with a higher risk of iatrogenesis. A retrospective, descriptive, observational study of patients with acute spinal cord injury admitted from June 2009 to May 2014 was conducted. The information collected included the patient age, aetiology, neurological level and grade of injury when admitted and when discharged, cardiovascular risk factors, a previous history of depression and any prior treatment with anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs. We applied a logistic regression. The grade of statistical significance was established as Pinjury was the thoracic level (48%). The main aetiology of spinal cord injury caused by iatrogenesis was surgery for degenerative spine disease, in patients under the age of 30 were treated with intrathecal chemotherapy. Iatrogenic spinal cord injury is a frequent complication. A statistically significant association between a patient history of depression and iatrogenic spinal cord injury was found as well as with anticoagulant and antiplatelet drug use prior to iatrogenic spinal cord injury.

  6. Spinal cord injury arising in anaesthesia practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, D W; Bedforth, N M; Hardman, J G

    2018-01-01

    Spinal cord injury arising during anaesthetic practice is a rare event, but one that carries a significant burden in terms of morbidity and mortality. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury. We will then discuss injuries relating to patient position, spinal cord hypoperfusion and neuraxial techniques. The most serious causes of spinal cord injury - vertebral canal haematoma, spinal epidural abscess, meningitis and adhesive arachnoiditis - will be discussed in turn. For each condition, we draw attention to practical, evidence-based measures clinicians can undertake to reduce their incidence, or mitigate their severity. Finally, we will discuss transient neurological symptoms. Some cases of spinal cord injury during anaesthesia can be ascribed to anaesthesia itself, arising as a direct consequence of its conduct. The injury to a spinal nerve root by inaccurate and/or incautious needling during spinal anaesthesia is an obvious example. But in many cases, spinal cord injury during anaesthesia is not caused by, related to, or even associated with, the conduct of the anaesthetic. Surgical factors, whether direct (e.g. spinal nerve root damage due to incorrect pedicle screw placement) or indirect (e.g. cord ischaemia following aortic surgery) are responsible for a significant proportion of spinal cord injuries that occur concurrently with the delivery of regional or general anaesthesia. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  7. Left Lobe Mobilization Strategy of Right-Sided Major Hepatectomy for Treatment of a Tumor Causing Severe Inferior Vena Cava Compression: A Novel Strategy Using the Modified Liver-Hanging Maneuver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kenichiro; Kubo, Norio; Ishii, Norihiro; Tsukagoshi, Mariko; Igarashi, Takamichi; Watanabe, Akira; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Shirabe, Ken

    2018-02-14

    Massive bleeding during major hepatectomy is associated with greater mortality and morbidity.1 Our previous study shows that inferior vena cava (IVC) compression by tumor and an anterior approach without the liver-hanging maneuver (LHM) are risk factors for massive bleeding.2 The LHM is useful for controlling bleeding in deeper parenchymal transection planes.3 However, severe compression of the IVC by tumor makes it difficult to insert a hanging tape.4 The study shows a novel modified LHM strategy for severe IVC compression to minimize intraoperative bleeding. The procedure was disassembled into six steps: (1) the glissonian bifurcation is encircled using an extrahepatic approach (2) the hepatic ligaments are dissected, and the root of each hepatic vein trunk is exposed (3) the left lobe is fully mobilized, and the short hepatic veins are carefully dissected with a systematic procedure established from hemi-left lobe procurement in living donor liver transplantation5 (4) the tape is inserted from the space between the right and middle hepatic vein trunks into the glissonian bifurcation along the anterior surface of the IVC (5) liver parenchymal transection is performed with upward pulling of the tape (6) the right hepatic vein is dissected, and the right lobe is dissected from the diaphragm and the right hepatic ligaments. Right hepatectomy with this procedure was performed for two patients with IVC compressed by hepatocellular carcinoma. The operative times were respectively 483 and 396 min. The respective estimated blood losses were 1195 and 485 ml, without transfusion. Both patients had acceptable outcomes without complications. The novel modified LHM strategy ensured minimal bleeding in the resection of a huge liver tumor causing severe IVC compression.

  8. Chest compression pauses during defibrillation attempts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deakin, Charles D.; Koster, Rudolph W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review This article summarizes current knowledge of the causes and consequences of interruption of chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Recent findings Pauses in chest compressions occur during analysis of the heart rhythm, delivery of ventilation, interventions such

  9. Vocal cord dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckert, James; Deckert, Linda

    2010-01-15

    Vocal cord dysfunction involves inappropriate vocal cord motion that produces partial airway obstruction. Patients may present with respiratory distress that is often mistakenly diagnosed as asthma. Exercise, psychological conditions, airborne irritants, rhinosinusitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, or use of certain medications may trigger vocal cord dysfunction. The differential diagnosis includes asthma, angioedema, vocal cord tumors, and vocal cord paralysis. Pulmonary function testing with a flow-volume loop and flexible laryngoscopy are valuable diagnostic tests for confirming vocal cord dysfunction. Treatment of acute episodes includes reassurance, breathing instruction, and use of a helium and oxygen mixture (heliox). Long-term management strategies include treatment for symptom triggers and speech therapy.

  10. A study of measurement of the spinal cord of cervical myelopathy with CT-myelography and forecast of operative result from the size of the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosawa, Yoshimitsu

    1985-01-01

    The antero-posterior (AP) and transverse (T) diameter and the T area of the spinal canal, dural canal, and spinal cord were measured using CT-myelography (CT-M) in 44 patients with cervical myelopathy (CM) and 20 control subjects. The AP diameter of these canals and cord and the T diameter of the spinal canal were smaller in the CM group than in the control group. Postoperative CT-M showed that the dural canal and spinal cord had an increase in the AP diameter and T area and a decrease in the T diameter. Preoperative symptoms were well correlated with the AP diameter and the T area of the spinal canal, dural canal, and spinal cord, and spinal cord compression. The symptoms tended to be milder with larger AT diameter and T area of the spinal canal, dural canal, and spinal cord and with smaller spinal cord compression and deformity. Functional damage was reversible in patients with slight spinal cord compression. Favorable operative outcome tended to be achieved when the preoperative AP diameter and T area of the spinal cord were ≥ 5 mm and ≥ 50 mm 2 , respectively. (Namekawa, K.)

  11. Compressed Counting Meets Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ping; Zhang, Cun-Hui; Zhang, Tong

    2013-01-01

    Compressed sensing (sparse signal recovery) has been a popular and important research topic in recent years. By observing that natural signals are often nonnegative, we propose a new framework for nonnegative signal recovery using Compressed Counting (CC). CC is a technique built on maximally-skewed p-stable random projections originally developed for data stream computations. Our recovery procedure is computationally very efficient in that it requires only one linear scan of the coordinates....

  12. Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD) module supports the maintenance of local and national registries for the tracking of patients with spinal cord injury and disease...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord ... SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, MS Occupational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Katie Powell, OT ... does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow ... arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_ ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect stem-cell treatments to become available for spinal cord injuries? ...

  17. Cord blood testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003403.htm Cord blood testing To use the sharing features on this page, ... the baby to the mother's womb. Cord blood testing can be done to evaluate a newborn's health. ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources ... Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By Topic Media Resources Donate to support families facing spinal cord ...

  20. Spinal cord stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007560.htm Spinal cord stimulation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What ... Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation ... Rogers, PT Recreational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_ ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries. The website does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, ... spinal cord injuries. The website does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, ...

  6. Radiography used to measure internal spinal cord deformation in an in vivo rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, E; Whyte, T; Liu, J; Tetzlaff, W; Cripton, P A

    2018-04-11

    Little is known about the internal mechanics of the in vivo spinal cord during injury. The objective of this study was to develop a method of tracking internal and surface deformation of in vivo rat spinal cord during compression using radiography. Since neural tissue is radio-translucent, radio-opaque markers were injected into the spinal cord. Two tantalum beads (260 µm) were injected into the cord (dorsal and ventral) at C5 of nine anesthetized rats. Four beads were glued to the lateral surface of the cord, caudal and cranial to the injection site. A compression plate was displaced 0.5 mm, 2 mm, and 3 mm into the spinal cord and lateral X-ray images were taken before, during, and after each compression for measuring bead displacements. Potential bead migration was monitored for by comparing displacements of the internal and glued surface beads. Dorsal beads moved significantly more than ventral beads with a range in averages of 0.57-0.71 mm and 0.31-0.35 mm respectively. Bead displacements during 0.5 mm compressions were significantly lower than 2 mm and 3 mm compressions. There was no statistically significant migration of the internal beads. The results indicate the merit of this technique for measuring in vivo spinal cord deformation. The pattern of bead displacements illustrates the complex internal and surface deformations of the spinal cord during transverse compression. This information is needed for validating physical and finite element spinal cord surrogates and to define relationships between loading parameters, internal cord deformation, and biological and functional outcomes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Heather Taylor, PhD Michelle Meade, PhD Jonathon Rose, PhD The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, ... Cord Injury Katie Powell, OT Mary Jane Mulcahey, PhD, OTR/L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types of illnesses and disabilities Spinal cord injury Spinal cord injury Read advice from Dr. Jeffrey Rabin , a pediatric ... your health on a daily basis. Living with spinal cord injury — your questions answered top What are pediatric ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... down on the nerve parts that carry signals. Spinal cord injuries can be complete or incomplete. With a complete ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, PsyD ... Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation ...

  12. Central Cord Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... finding better ways to prevent, treat, and ultimately cure neurological disorders such as central cord syndrome. Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Spinal ... cord syndrome is the most common form of incomplete spinal cord injury characterized by impairment in the arms and hands and to a lesser extent in the legs. ...

  13. Spinal cord lesions - The rehabilitation perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Filipa

    2006-02-01

    The present study provides an overview of the spinal cord injury focusing mainly on aspects related to rehabilitation. Spinal cord injury affects young people in an active phase of life, determining severe handicaps. Most of the lesions are traumatic, caused by car accidents. Until fifty years ago, the survival of individuals with spinal cord injury was very reduced and the leading cause of death was renal failure. Due to developments in medical knowledge and technical advances, the survival rates have significantly improved. The causes of death have also changed being respiratory complications, particularly pneumonia, the leading causes. Immediately after a spinal cord lesion there is a phase of spinal shock which is characterized by flaccid paralysis and bladder and bowel retention. Progressively there is a return of the spinal cord automatism with the beginning of some reflex activities. Based on neurological evaluation it is pos-sible to predict motor and functional recovery and establish the rehabilitation program. We can consider three phases on the rehabilitation program: the first while the patient is still in bed, directed to prevent or treat complications due to immobility and begin sphincters reeducation; the second phase is intended to achieve wheelchair autonomy; the last phase is training in ortostatism. The rehabilitation program also comprises sports and recreational activities, psychological and social support in order to achieve an integral of the individual with a spinal cord injury. © 2006 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia/SPP.

  14. Celiac artery compression syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotsakis, J N; Lambidis, C D; Lioulias, A G; Skouteli, E T; Bastounis, E A; Livesay, J J

    2000-04-01

    Celiac artery compression syndrome occurs when the median arcuate ligament of the diaphragm causes extrinsic compression of the celiac trunk. We report a case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with a three-month history of postprandial abdominal pain, nausea and some emesis, without weight loss. There was a bruit in the upper mid-epigastrium and the lateral aortic arteriography revealed a significant stenosis of the celiac artery. At operation, the celiac axis was found to be severely compressed anteriorly by fibers forming the inferior margin of the arcuate ligament of the diaphragm. The ligament was cut and a vein by-pass from the supraceliac aorta to the distal celiac artery was performed. The patient remains well and free of symptoms two and a half years since operation.In this report we discuss the indications and the therapeutic options of this syndrome as well as a review of the literature is being given.

  15. Homocysteine causes disruptions in spinal cord morphology and changes the expression of Pax 1/9 and Sox 9 gene products in the axial mesenchyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobus, Karoline; Ammar, Dib; Nazari, Evelise Maria; Müller, Yara Maria Rauh

    2013-06-01

    Neural tube defects (NTD) involve disruptions in the axial mesenchyme, and are related to an imbalance between folic acid (FA) and homocysteine (Hcy). This study evaluated the effects of FA/Hcy imbalance on cell proliferation and expression of the Pax 1/9 and Sox 9 gene products in the axial mesenchyme of chickens. Embryos were incubated (38°C) and pretreated at 24 h and treated at 46 h of incubation. The experimental groups were: FA-pretreated with saline and treated with 0.5 μg FA/saline; Hcy-pretreated with 50 μl saline and treated with 20 μmol D,L-Hcy/50 μl saline; FA+Hcy-pretreated with 0.5 μg FA/50 μl saline and treated with 20 μmol D,L-Hcy/50 μl saline; and the control embryos were pretreated and treated with saline. Embryos were analyzed at E4 and E6. Immunohistochemistry was performed to identify proliferating cells and the expression of the gene products of Pax 1/9 and Sox 9. Total RNA of the E4 embryos was extracted and a RT-qPCR assay was performed to quantify Pax 1/9 mRNA expression. Hcy treatment caused spinal NTD and abnormalities in axial mesenchyme development, affecting the distribution of sclerotomal cells and chondrification. Hcy also reduced cell proliferation and changed the expression of Pax 1/9 and Sox 9 in the mesenchyme. Our data clarified the relationship between spinal NTD genesis and disruptions of Pax 1/9 and Sox 9 gene products in the axial mesenchyme caused by the FA/Hcy imbalance. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Compressive beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Sound source localization with sensor arrays involves the estimation of the direction-of-arrival (DOA) from a limited number of observations. Compressive sensing (CS) solves such underdetermined problems achieving sparsity, thus improved resolution, and can be solved efficiently with convex...

  17. Vocal cord paralysis and its etiologies: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed Toutounchi, Seyed Javad; Eydi, Mahmood; Golzari, Samad Ej; Ghaffari, Mohammad Reza; Parvizian, Nashmil

    2014-01-01

    Vocal cord paralysis is a common symptom of numerous diseases and it may be due to neurogenic or mechanical fixation of the cords. Paralysis of the vocal cords is just a symptom of underlying disease in some cases; so, clinical diagnosis of the underlying cause leading to paralysis of the vocal cords is important. This study evaluates the causes of vocal cord paralysis. In a prospective study, 45 patients with paralyzed vocal cord diagnosis were examined by tests such as examination of the pharynx, larynx, esophagus, thyroid, cervical, lung, and mediastinum, brain and heart by diagnostic imaging to investigate the cause vocal cord paralysis. The study was ended by diagnosing the reason of vocal cord paralysis at each stage of the examination and the clinical studies. The mean duration of symptoms was 18.95±6.50 months. The reason for referral was phonation changes (97.8%) and aspiration (37.8%) in the subjects. There was bilateral paralysis in 6.82%, left paralysis in 56.82% and right in 63.36% of subjects. The type of vocal cord placement was midline in 52.8%, paramedian in 44.4% and lateral in 2.8% of the subjects. The causes of vocal cords paralysis were idiopathic paralysis (31.11%), tumors (31.11%), surgery (28.89%), trauma, brain problems, systemic disease and other causes (2.2%). An integrated diagnostic and treatment program is necessary for patients with vocal cord paralysis. Possibility of malignancy should be excluded before marking idiopathic reason to vocal cord paralysis.

  18. Vocal Cord Paralysis and its Etiologies: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Javad Seyed Toutounchi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vocal cord paralysis is a common symptom of numerous diseases and it may be due to neurogenic or mechanical fixation of the cords. Paralysis of the vocal cords is just a symptom of underlying disease in some cases; so, clinical diagnosis of the underlying cause leading to paralysis of the vocal cords is important. This study evaluates the causes of vocal cord paralysis.Methods: In a prospective study, 45 patients with paralyzed vocal cord diagnosis were examined by tests such as examination of the pharynx, larynx, esophagus, thyroid, cervical, lung, and mediastinum, brain and heart by diagnostic imaging to investigate the cause vocal cord paralysis. The study was ended by diagnosing the reason of vocal cord paralysis at each stage of the examination and the clinical studies.Results: The mean duration of symptoms was 18.95±6.50 months. The reason for referral was phonation changes (97.8% and aspiration (37.8% in the subjects. There was bilateral paralysis in 6.82%, left paralysis in 56.82% and right in 63.36% of subjects. The type of vocal cord placement was midline in 52.8%, paramedian in 44.4% and lateral in 2.8% of the subjects. The causes of vocal cords paralysis were idiopathic paralysis (31.11%, tumors (31.11%, surgery (28.89%, trauma, brain problems, systemic disease and other causes (2.2%.Conclusion: An integrated diagnostic and treatment program is necessary for patients with vocal cord paralysis. Possibility of malignancy should be excluded before marking idiopathic reason to vocal cord paralysis.

  19. The Healing of Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells on Motor Functions in Acute Spinal Cord Injury of Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Gashmardi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Spinal cord injury is a devastating damage that can cause motor and sensory deficits reducing quality of life and life expectancy of patients. Stem cell transplantation can be one of the promising therapeutic strategies. Bone marrow is a rich source of stem cells that is able to differentiate into various cell types. In this study, bone marrow stem cells were transplanted into mice spinal cord injury model to evaluate the motor function test. Methods: Bone marrow stem cells were isolated from 3 mice. Thirty six mice were randomly divided into 3 groups: the control, sham and experimental. In sham group, mice were subjected to spinal cord compression. In experimental group, one day after lesion, isolated stem cells (200,000 were injected intravenously. Assessment of locomotor function was done by Toyama Mouse Score (TMS after 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 week post-injury. The data were analyzed using one-way Analysis of Variance and Tukey tests and statistical software Graph Pad and SPSS.P > 0/05 was considered as significant difference.  Results: The score of TMS after cell transplantation was higher in cell transplantation group (experimental, while it was significantly higher after fifth week when compared to other groups. Conclusion: The increase in TMS score in cell transplantation group showed that injection of stem cells in acute spinal cord injury can have a therapeutic effect and promote locomotor function.

  20. Biomaterials for revascularization and immunomodulation after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, Agnes E; Maldonado-Lasuncion, Ines; Oudega, Martin

    2018-01-23

    Spinal cord injury causes immediate damage to the nervous tissue accompanied by loss of motor and sensory function. The limited self-repair competence of injured nervous tissue underscores the need for reparative interventions to recover function after spinal cord injury. The vasculature of the spinal cord plays a crucial role in spinal cord injury and repair. Ruptured and sheared blood vessels in the injury epicenter and blood vessels with a breached blood-spinal cord barrier in the surrounding tissue cause bleeding and inflammation, which contribute to the overall tissue damage. The insufficient formation of new functional vasculature in and near the injury impedes endogenous tissue repair and limits the prospect of repair approaches. Limiting the loss of blood vessels, stabilizing the blood-spinal cord barrier, and promoting the formation of new blood vessels are therapeutic targets for spinal cord repair. Inflammation is an integral part of injury-mediated vascular damage, with deleterious and reparative consequences. Inflammation and the formation of new blood vessels are intricately interwoven. Biomaterials can be effectively used for promoting and guiding blood vessel formation or modulating the inflammatory response after spinal cord injury, thereby governing the extent of damage and the success of reparative interventions. This review deals with the vasculature after spinal cord injury, the reciprocal interactions between inflammation and blood vessel formation, and the potential of biomaterials to support revascularization and immunomodulation in damaged spinal cord nervous tissue. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  1. Mammographic compression in Asian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susie; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2017-01-01

    To investigate: (1) the variability of mammographic compression parameters amongst Asian women; and (2) the effects of reducing compression force on image quality and mean glandular dose (MGD) in Asian women based on phantom study. We retrospectively collected 15818 raw digital mammograms from 3772 Asian women aged 35-80 years who underwent screening or diagnostic mammography between Jan 2012 and Dec 2014 at our center. The mammograms were processed using a volumetric breast density (VBD) measurement software (Volpara) to assess compression force, compression pressure, compressed breast thickness (CBT), breast volume, VBD and MGD against breast contact area. The effects of reducing compression force on image quality and MGD were also evaluated based on measurement obtained from 105 Asian women, as well as using the RMI156 Mammographic Accreditation Phantom and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) slabs. Compression force, compression pressure, CBT, breast volume, VBD and MGD correlated significantly with breast contact area (pAsian women. The median compression force should be about 8.1 daN compared to the current 12.0 daN. Decreasing compression force from 12.0 daN to 9.0 daN increased CBT by 3.3±1.4 mm, MGD by 6.2-11.0%, and caused no significant effects on image quality (p>0.05). Force-standardized protocol led to widely variable compression parameters in Asian women. Based on phantom study, it is feasible to reduce compression force up to 32.5% with minimal effects on image quality and MGD.

  2. Arterial Blood Supply to the Spinal Cord in Animal Models of Spinal Cord Injury. A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazensky, David; Flesarova, Slavka; Sulla, Igor

    2017-12-01

    Animal models are used to examine the results of experimental spinal cord injury. Alterations in spinal cord blood supply caused by complex spinal cord injuries contribute significantly to the diversity and severity of the spinal cord damage, particularly ischemic changes. However, the literature has not completely clarified our knowledge of anatomy of the complex three-dimensional arterial system of the spinal cord in experimental animals, which can impede the translation of experimental results to human clinical applications. As the literary sources dealing with the spinal cord arterial blood supply in experimental animals are limited and scattered, the authors performed a review of the anatomy of the arterial blood supply to the spinal cord in several experimental animals, including pigs, dogs, cats, rabbits, guinea pigs, rats, and mice and created a coherent format discussing the interspecies differences. This provides researchers with a valuable tool for the selection of the most suitable animal model for their experiments in the study of spinal cord ischemia and provides clinicians with a basis for the appropriate translation of research work to their clinical applications. Anat Rec, 300:2091-2106, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Speech Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry D. Gibson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Speech compression is a key technology underlying digital cellular communications, VoIP, voicemail, and voice response systems. We trace the evolution of speech coding based on the linear prediction model, highlight the key milestones in speech coding, and outline the structures of the most important speech coding standards. Current challenges, future research directions, fundamental limits on performance, and the critical open problem of speech coding for emergency first responders are all discussed.

  4. Spinal Cord Injury in the Geriatric Population: Risk Factors, Treatment Options, and Long-Term Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikpeze, Tochukwu C; Mesfin, Addisu

    2017-06-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) are sustained by more than 12 500 patients per year in the United States and more globally. The SCIs disproportionately affect the elderly, especially men. Approximately 60% of these injuries are sustained traumatically through falls, but nontraumatic causes including infections, tumors, and medication-related epidural bleeding have also been documented. Preexisting conditions such as ankylosing spondylitis and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis can render the spine stiff and are risk factors as well as cervical spondylosis and ensuing cervical stenosis. Treatment options vary depending on the severity, location, and complexity of the injury. Surgical management has been growing in popularity over the years and remains an option as it helps reduce spinal cord compression and alleviate pain. Elevating mean arterial pressures to prevent spinal cord ischemia and avoiding the second hit of SCI have become more common as opposed to high dose steroids. Ongoing clinical trials with pharmacological agents such as minocycline and riluzole have shown early, promising results in their ability to reduce cellular damage and facilitate recovery. Though SCI can be life changing, the available treatment options have aimed to reduce pain and minimize complications and maintain quality of life alongside rehabilitative services.

  5. Pattern of spinal compression (retrospective and prospective clinical study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Abubakr Darrag Salim

    1997-04-01

    Seventy two patients with spinal cord compressions were admitted to the national centre for neurological sciences in the period between january 1995 and december 1996. Male female ratio was 2.5:1 and the mean age was 40.5 years, myelogram was found to be the most helpful investigation in (90.3%) of patients and plain x-ray was abnormal in (43%) of patients. Tumors were found as the cause of compression in (26.4%), disc prolapse in (26.4%) of patients, spinal injuries in 13.8%, arachnoid cysts in (8.3%) of patients and tuberculosis in (8.3%). Other causes like spinal osteopathy, syringomyelia, spinal hematomas, spinal canal stenosis and spinal haemangiomas were also encountered. Thick ligamentum flavum was found in (25%) of cases, mostly in association with other pathologies, and as the sole compressing pathology in only two patients. The patients were followed up for a period from one month to two years, 41.6% of them were cured completely, while 37.5% were partially improved, 5.6% showed no improvement, 5.6% were died, 9.7% lost their follow up. The factors affecting the outcome were found to be, the duration of the condition before presentation for treatment, presence of blocks in myelograms, and the type of the pathology, disc and benign tumors gave the best outcome. Urinary complications like urine incontinence, urinary tract infection, and urine retention, were observed in (26.4%, 30.6%, 11.1%) of patients respectively, D.V.T. occurred in (15.3%) of patients and the mortality rate was (5.6%) and the major cause of death was pulmonary embolism. (Author)

  6. Quantitative analysis of relationship between the deformity of spinal cord and symptom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Kazunori; Honma, Takao; Uchiyama, Seiji; Matsumoto, Mineo; Amami, Kenichi

    1986-01-01

    Metrizamide CT (M-CT) scans of the spinal cord and dural canal were obtained in 35 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) and 7 control subjects. There was a significant correlation between the deformity of the spinal cord shown on M-CT and both the severity and bilateral difference of symptoms. The decrease in the compression ratio of the spinal cord was of great importance in the determination of the degree of symptoms. M-CT failed to evaluate individual neurologic symptoms and clinical stages, and to predict prognosis. It was suggested that the deformed spinal cord is responsible for the occurrence of CSM symptoms, and that the severity becomes worse with progressing clinical symptoms in association with the compression of the spinal cord. (Namekawa, K.)

  7. Spinal cord infarction; Spinaler Infarkt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumann, N.; Shariat, K.; Ulmer, S.; Stippich, C.; Ahlhelm, F.J. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland)

    2012-05-15

    Infarction of the spinal cord can cause a variety of symptoms and neurological deficits because of the complex vascular supply of the myelon. The most common leading symptom is distal paresis ranging from paraparesis to tetraplegia caused by arterial ischemia or infarction of the myelon. Venous infarction, however, cannot always be distinguished from arterial infarction based on the symptoms alone. Modern imaging techniques, such as computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) assist in preoperative planning of aortic operations to reliably identify not only the most important vascular structure supplying the spinal cord, the artery of Adamkiewicz, but also other pathologies such as tumors or infectious disorders. In contrast to CT, MRI can reliably depict infarction of the spinal cord. (orig.) [German] Die durch einen Rueckenmarkinfarkt verursachte Symptomatik kann aufgrund der komplexen Blutversorgung des Myelons zu unterschiedlichen neurologischen Ausfaellen fuehren. Dabei steht haeufig die durch eine arterielle Minderperfusion des Myelons bedingte Querschnittssymptomatik im Vordergrund. Venoes induzierte Mikrozirkulationsstoerungen sind anhand des neurologischen Befundes klinisch nicht immer von arteriellen Infarkten zu unterscheiden. Die moderne Bildgebung unter Einsatz der CT- (CTA) und MR-Angiographie (MRA) dient dem Ausschluss nichtvaskulaerer Ursachen fuer die Symptomatik wie Entzuendungen und Tumoren sowie der praeoperativen Planung vor der Aortenchirurgie zum Nachweis der fuer die Myelondurchblutung entscheidenden A. Adamkiewicz. Im Gegensatz zur CT kann mittels MRT ein Infarkt im Myelon mit hoher Verlaesslichkeit nachgewiesen werden. (orig.)

  8. Laryngospasm: What Causes It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laryngospasm: What causes it? What causes laryngospasm? Answers from Edward C. Rosenow III, M.D. Laryngospasm (luh-RING-go-spaz-um) is a spasm of the vocal ... be alarming, but it's not life-threatening. The cause of vocal cord spasms is often unknown, but ...

  9. CASE REPORT Extramedullary haematopoiesis causing spinal cord ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (major) or heterozygous (minor) forms of the condition exist.1. Defective globin chains lead to excessive haemolysis and compensatory haematopoiesis within bone marrow, which in turn leads to enlargement of the medullary cavities and thinning of cortices. Extrusion of bone marrow through a defect of a severely thinned ...

  10. Emergency MRI of the spine and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourrette, J.H.; Le Vot, J.; Solacroup, J.C.; Leonetti, P.; Muyard, B.; Gueguen, E.; Clavel, G.; Colineau, X.; Abony, E.

    1995-01-01

    Out of 137 cases concerning the spine and spine cord, the authors demonstrate that MRI is nowadays fully integrated in urgency investigations. In all cord compression suspiscions and in spine trauma investigations, it's place is found. Coil and software improvements allow to put CT and MR scanning delays on a line. This study underlines the necessity of being equipped with non magnetic life support systems allowing management of very fragile patients. In traumas, MR provides the lesion's authentification, it's type, it's unique localisation or not, and therefore an early functional prognosis. The discovery of spine cord involving lesions in neoplasic conditions allows to follow a therapeutic strateging for maintaining the motor function. In the end, the authors discuss about practical utility of MR in scubadiving decompression accidents. No lesion of the spine cord has been demonstrated in 25 patients, probably because of technical insufficiency. (authors). 42 refs., 5 tabs., 8 figs

  11. Conservative Management Of Third Trimester Cervical Spinal Cord ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spinal cord injury, though an important cause of morbidity appears to be uncommon in pregnant women or perhaps, has not been accurately documented among them. Superimposed on the many impairments resulting from spinal cord injury is the presence of the foetus in the womb, which in itself normally brings about ...

  12. Vocal cord paralysis associated with Ramsay Hunt syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Eva Rye; Mey, Kristianna

    2014-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome is defined by herpes zoster oticus and peripheral facial nerve palsy which is often associated with otalgia. The syndrome is, in rare cases, associated with other cranial nerve paralyses including the vagal nerve causing unilateral vocal cord paralysis. Vocal cord paralysis...

  13. The correlation between evoked spinal cord potentials and magnetic resonance imaging before Surgery in cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Kosuke; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Taguchi, Toshihiko; Kato, Yoshihiko; Imajo, Yasuaki; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the correlation between electrophysiological examination and MRI diagnosis. Twenty-four patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy were examined with magnetic resonance imaging and evoked spinal cord potentials (ESCPs) before surgery. In all the patients, only the intervertebral level was symptomatic, as shown by ESCPs. ESCPs following median nerve stimulation (MN-ESCPs), transcranial electric stimulation (TCE-ESCPs), and spinal cord stimulation (Spinal-ECSPs) were recorded. The patients were grouped into two groups as follows: group A, all ESCPs were abnormal; group B, normal spinal cord stimulation. Spinal cord transverse area and compression ratio (central and 1/4-lateral anteroposterior diameter divided by transverse diameter) were measured on T1-weighted axial imaging, with abnormal ESCPs as indicators of spinal cord morphology. Central and 1/4-lateral compression ratio was significantly lower in group A. Spinal cord morphology of magnetic resonance imaging is useful for functional diagnosis. (author)

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Read Bio Medical Director, Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Program, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago play_arrow What is ... What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising new ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, Physical Therapy-Lokomat T. George Hornby, PhD, PT Empowering the Patient After Spinal Cord Injury Guy W. Fried, MD Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal ... injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions ... PhD Michelle Meade, PhD Jonathon Rose, PhD The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, MS ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work ... cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Hospital to Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with a New Injury Robin Dorman, PsyD Sex and Fertility After Spinal Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, ...

  20. Split Cord Malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurdal Gezercan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Split cord malformations are rare form of occult spinal dysraphism in children. Split cord malformations are characterized by septum that cleaves the spinal canal in sagittal plane within the single or duplicated thecal sac. Although their precise incidence is unknown, split cord malformations are exceedingly rare and represent %3.8-5 of all congenital spinal anomalies. Characteristic neurological, urological, orthopedic clinical manifestations are variable and asymptomatic course is possible. Earlier diagnosis and surgical intervention for split cord malformations is associated with better long-term fuctional outcome. For this reason, diagnostic imaging is indicated for children with associated cutaneous and orthopedic signs. Additional congenital anomalies usually to accompany the split cord malformations. Earlier diagnosis, meticuolus surgical therapy and interdisciplinary careful evaluation and follow-up should be made for good prognosis. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(2.000: 199-207

  1. MR imaging findings in subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Jun; Lee, Jae Hee; Lee, Sung Yong; Chung, Sung Woo

    2000-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency can cause neurologic complications in the spinal cord, brain, and optic and peripheral nerves. Subacute combined degeneration is a rare disease of demyelinating lesions of the spinal cord, affecting mainly the posterior and lateral columns of the thoracic cord. We report the MR imaging findings of a case of subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord in a patient with vitamin B12 deficiency and mega loblastic anemia. (author)

  2. Effects of Cantharellus Cibarius Hydro-Alcoholic Extract on NT3, NGF Gene Expression after Sciatic Nerve Compression in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Ajami

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The expression of neurotrophic factors, which cause increasing of the survival and regeneration of neurons, is changed in response to nerve injury. Cantharellus cibarius has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. So, the aim of present study was to determine the effects of hydro-alcoholic extract of Cantharellus cibarius on expression level of NT3 gene after sciatic nerve compression in rats. Methods: First the hydro-alcoholic extract of Cantharellus cibarius was prepared by the Soxhlet method. In this study, 36 Wistar male rats , 250-300 gr, were randomly divided into 3 groups consisted of 12 rats in each group. They were control, compression (1, 7, 14 and 28 days and experimental (1, 7, 14 and 28 days groups. Experimental groups were treated by 75 mg / kg of hydro-alcoholic extract of Cantharellus cibarius and to induce the stress in control group, saline serum was injected. In compression and experimental groups, the sciatic nerve of right leg was compressed for 60 seconds. The first injection of extract in the experimental group was performed intraperitoneally and immediately after the compression and the second one was injected 7 days later. Then, the sampling was performed of lumbar spinal cord on 1, 7, 14 and 28 days in compression and experimental groups and the total RNA was extracted from the spinal cord segments, cDNA was synthesized and after that the alteration of gene expression of NT3 and NGF samples was studied real time PCR method and Data were analyzed by Tukey test and SPSS 16 softwere. Results: The expression of NT3 and NGF showed significant increase in compression group compared to the control group, (p<0.05. Also, it is shown significant increase of expression of NT3 and NGF in the experimental group compared to the compression group, (p<0.05. Conclusion: According to these findings, hydro alcoholic extract of Cantharellus cibarius has an anti oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects that increase the

  3. Infantile Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in a Case of Chediak-Higashi Syndrome Caused by a Mutation in the LYST/CHS1 Gene Presenting With Delayed Umbilical Cord Detachment and Diarrhea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Agergaard, Charlotte N; Jakobsen, Marianne A

    2015-01-01

    A 2-month-old female infant, born to consanguineous parents, presented with infections in skin and upper respiratory tract. She was notable for delayed umbilical cord detachment, partial albinism, and neurological irritability. Giant granules were present in white blood cells. The intracellular p...

  4. Human bone marrow-derived and umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells for alleviating neuropathic pain in a spinal cord injury model

    OpenAIRE

    Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Nasirinezhad, Farinaz; Shardi Manaheji, Homa; Janzadeh, Atousa; Hosseini, Mostafa; Keshavarz, Mansoor

    2016-01-01

    Background Stem cell therapy can be used for alleviating the neuropathic pain induced by spinal cord injuries (SCIs). However, survival and differentiation of stem cells following their transplantation vary depending on the host and intrinsic factors of the cell. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine the effect of stem cells derived from bone marrow (BM-MSC) and umbilical cord (UC-MSC) on neuropathic pain relief. Methods A compression model was used to induce SCI in a rat model. A w...

  5. Multishot diffusion-weighted MR imaging features in acute trauma of spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jin Song; Huan, Yi

    2014-01-01

    To analyse diffusion-weighted MRI of acute spinal cord trauma and evaluate its diagnostic value. Conventional MRI and multishot, navigator-corrected DWI were performed in 20 patients with acute spinal cord trauma using 1.5-T MR within 72 h after the onset of trauma. Twenty cases were classified into four categories according to the characteristics of DWI: (1) Oedema type: ten cases presented with variable hyperintense areas within the spinal cord. There were significant differences in the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between lesions and unaffected regions (t = -7.621, P < 0.01). ADC values of lesions were markedly lower than those of normal areas. (2) Mixed type: six cases showed heterogeneously hyperintense areas due to a mixture of haemorrhage and oedema. (3) Haemorrhage type: two cases showed lesions as marked hypointensity due to intramedullary haemorrhage. (4) Compressed type (by epidural haemorrhage): one of the two cases showed an area of mild hyperintensity in the markedly compressed cord due to epidural haematoma. Muti-shot DWI of the spinal cord can help visualise and evaluate the injured spinal cord in the early stage, especially in distinguishing the cytotoxic oedema from vasogenic oedema. It can assist in detecting intramedullary haemorrhage and may have a potential role in the evaluation of compressed spinal cord. (orig.)

  6. Multishot diffusion-weighted MR imaging features in acute trauma of spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jin Song; Huan, Yi [Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an (China)

    2014-03-15

    To analyse diffusion-weighted MRI of acute spinal cord trauma and evaluate its diagnostic value. Conventional MRI and multishot, navigator-corrected DWI were performed in 20 patients with acute spinal cord trauma using 1.5-T MR within 72 h after the onset of trauma. Twenty cases were classified into four categories according to the characteristics of DWI: (1) Oedema type: ten cases presented with variable hyperintense areas within the spinal cord. There were significant differences in the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between lesions and unaffected regions (t = -7.621, P < 0.01). ADC values of lesions were markedly lower than those of normal areas. (2) Mixed type: six cases showed heterogeneously hyperintense areas due to a mixture of haemorrhage and oedema. (3) Haemorrhage type: two cases showed lesions as marked hypointensity due to intramedullary haemorrhage. (4) Compressed type (by epidural haemorrhage): one of the two cases showed an area of mild hyperintensity in the markedly compressed cord due to epidural haematoma. Muti-shot DWI of the spinal cord can help visualise and evaluate the injured spinal cord in the early stage, especially in distinguishing the cytotoxic oedema from vasogenic oedema. It can assist in detecting intramedullary haemorrhage and may have a potential role in the evaluation of compressed spinal cord. (orig.)

  7. Spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging in suspected multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lycklama a Nijeholt, G.J.; Bergers, E.; Castelijns, J.A.; Barkhof, F.; Uitdehaag, B.M.J.; Polman, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    We examined the value of spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnostic work-up of multiple sclerosis (MS). Forty patients suspected of having MS were examined within 24 months after the start of symptoms. Disability was assessed, and symptoms were categorized as either brain or spinal cord. Work-up further included cerebrospinal fluid analysis and standard proton-density, T2-, and T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced brain and spinal cord MRI. Patients were categorized as either clinically definite MS (n = 13), laboratory-supported definite MS (n = 14), or clinically probable MS (n = 4); four patients had clinically probable MS, and in nine MS was suspected. Spinal cord abnormalities were found in 35 of 40 patients (87.5 %), consisting of focal lesions in 31, only diffuse abnormalities in two, and both in two. Asymptomatic spinal cord lesions occurred in six patients. All patients with diffuse spinal cord abnormality had clear spinal cord symptoms and a primary progressive disease course. In clinically definite MS, the inclusion of spinal imaging increased the sensitivity of MRI to 100 %. Seven patients without a definite diagnosis had clinically isolated syndromes involving the spinal cord. Brain MRI was inconclusive, while all had focal spinal cord lesions which explained symptoms and ruled out other causes. Two other patients had atypical brain abnormalities suggesting ischemic/vascular disease. No spinal cord abnormalities were found, and during follow-up MS was ruled out. Spinal cord abnormalities are common in suspected MS, and may occur asymptomatic. Although diagnostic classification is seldom changed, spinal cord imaging increases diagnostic sensitivity of MRI in patients with suspected MS. In addition, patients with primary progressive MS may possibly be earlier diagnosed. Finally, differentiation with atypical lesions may be improved. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation of mammogram compression efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przelaskowski, A.; Surowski, P.; Kukula, A.

    2005-01-01

    quality of 0.6 bpp and 0.1 bpp reconstructions was decreased. The compression performance of the most effective reversible coders is rather unsatisfactory. The subjective rating with the diagnostic criteria of image quality was more sensitive to distortions caused by lossy compression compared with the pathology detection test. The observers constituted 14:1 as the accepted ratio of lossy wavelet compression for test mammograms. This is significantly higher than the mean ratio of 2:1 achieved with lossless methods. (author)

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of experimental spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Kumano, Kouichi; Kadoya, Satoru

    1989-01-01

    Correlation between pathological findings and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of experimental cord injury were investigated. Cord injuries were made on ten Wistar rats weighing 80-170 gm by epidural compression of the thoracic cord with a Biemer cerebral vascular clip for 5-20 seconds. Several hours after the procedure animals were examined by spin echo axial MR images with a pulse sequence of TR/TE=1000/36 msec. MR studies were repeated on 4 animals 3-7 days after the initial examination. Immediately after the latest MRI examination animals were sacrificed and fixed with 10% formalin. Three micron thickness paraffin sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin were evaluated under a microscope. The pathological finding was hemorrhagic necrosis with edema of various severity depending on duration of clip application. The hemorrhagic necrosis was observed either unilaterally or bilaterally to the cord. MR findings of the cord were of high intensity in five animals which were severely injured, while central low intensity of the injured cord appeared in three mildly injured animals. Of the remaining two animals which had mild injury, one showed unilateral high intensity, while no definitive change was demonstrated in the other. The high intensity in the MRI suggested edema associated with hemorrhagic necrosis rather than hemorrhage. The central low intensity appearing in the mildly injured cord might be hemorrhage in the gray matter. It is concluded that MRI was useful to diagnose not only the level and severity but also the pathological process in the injured cord, and thus to estimate the prognosis of the cord injuries. (author)

  10. Trauma: Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Matthew J; Martin, Matthew J

    2017-10-01

    Injuries to the spinal column and spinal cord frequently occur after high-energy mechanisms of injury, or with lower-energy mechanisms, in select patient populations like the elderly. A focused yet complete neurologic examination during the initial evaluation will guide subsequent diagnostic procedures and early supportive measures to help prevent further injury. For patients with injury to bone and/or ligaments, the initial focus should be spinal immobilization and prevention of inducing injury to the spinal cord. Spinal cord injury is associated with numerous life-threatening complications during the acute and long-term phases of care that all acute care surgeons must recognize. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Growth discordance of monoamniotic twin because of difference of cords diameter in forked umbilical cord: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yongbing; Sun, Yu; Yang, Huixia

    2017-09-01

    A case of monochorionic-monoamniotic (MCMA) twin pregnancy with growth discordance because of difference of cord diameter in forked umbilical cord is reported.MCMA twins were diagnosed at 12 weeks of gestation and twin growth discordance was considered during the follow-up twice-weekly visits to the ultrasound and prenatal care units. The pregnancy was terminated at 34 weeks. Two live female babies weighing 2510 g and 1940 g were delivered. Examination of placenta and umbilical cords after birth showed that the 2 cords merged into a conjoint cord 1 cm from insertion to the placenta (forked umbilical cord). Placental color injection showed that the 2 fetuses shared the same placenta area. The diameters of the 2 cords were significantly different (1.5 vs 0.8 cm). This caused an unequal distribution of blood and nutrients, which is the real reason of twin growth discordance in this case.This case reveals that the diameter discordance of cords can be an important factor for twin growth discordance. Few relevant cases have previously been reported. Cords diameter measurement is suggested for ultrasound surveillance of twin growth discordance.

  12. Compression limits in cascaded quadratic soliton compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2008-01-01

    Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency.......Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency....

  13. Breaking the News in Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshblum, Steven; Fichtenbaum, Joyce

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Breaking the bad news in terms of prognosis for significant motor recovery following a neurologically complete spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the most difficult tasks for the spinal cord medicine specialist. Learning the skills to facilitate this communication is extremely important to better assist patients to understand their prognosis as well as foster hope for their future. If bad news is delivered poorly it can cause confusion and long-lasting distress and resentment; if done well, it may assist understanding, adjustment, and acceptance. This article provides the physician who cares for patients with SCI with some concepts to consider when discussing prognosis with patients and their families. PMID:18533406

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  16. Cord-Blood Banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... types of mature blood cells found in blood — red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Cord-blood stem cells also may have the potential to give rise to other cell types in the body. Some ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  1. Parachute Cord Tension Sensor

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To design and fabricate a light weight (few oz), very small (~2 inch length) parachute cord tension sensor demonstrator device.A major challenge for the CPAS (The...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal ... health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

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  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, ... OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, PsyD Understanding ... does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, Physical Therapy-Lokomat T. George Hornby, PhD, PT Empowering ... Rogers, SW Marguerite David, MSW Kathy Hulse, MSW Physical Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Laura Wehrli, PT ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW Marguerite ... does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children ...

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    Full Text Available ... Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, PsyD ... Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, Physical ...

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  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  19. A Direct Comparison between Norepinephrine and Phenylephrine for Augmenting Spinal Cord Perfusion in a Porcine Model of Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streijger, Femke; So, Kitty; Manouchehri, Neda; Gheorghe, Ana; Okon, Elena B; Chan, Ryan M; Ng, Benjamin; Shortt, Katelyn; Sekhon, Mypinder S; Griesdale, Donald E; Kwon, Brian K

    2018-03-28

    Current clinical guidelines recommend elevating the mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) to increase spinal cord perfusion in patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI). This is typically achieved with vasopressors such as norepinephrine (NE) and phenylephrine (PE). These drugs differ in their pharmacological properties and potentially have different effects on spinal cord blood flow (SCBF), oxygenation (PO 2 ), and downstream metabolism after injury. Using a porcine model of thoracic SCI, we evaluated how these vasopressors influenced intraparenchymal SCBF, PO 2 , hydrostatic pressure, and metabolism within the spinal cord adjacent to the injury site. Yorkshire pigs underwent a contusion/compression SCI at T10 and were randomized to receive either NE or PE for MAP elevation of 20 mm Hg, or no MAP augmentation. Prior to injury, a combined SCBF/PO 2 sensor, a pressure sensor, and a microdialysis probe were inserted into the spinal cord adjacent to T10 at two locations: a "proximal" site and a "distal" site, 2 mm and 22 mm from the SCI, respectively. At the proximal site, NE and PE resulted in little improvement in SCBF during cord compression. Following decompression, NE resulted in increased SCBF and PO 2 , whereas decreased levels were observed for PE. However, both NE and PE were associated with a gradual decrease in the lactate to pyruvate (L/P) ratio after decompression. PE was associated with greater hemorrhage through the injury site than that in control animals. Combined, our results suggest that NE promotes better restoration of blood flow and oxygenation than PE in the traumatically injured spinal cord, thus providing a physiological rationale for selecting NE over PE in the hemodynamic management of acute SCI.

  20. SUMO expression shortens the lag phase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast growth caused by complex interactive effects of major mixed fermentation inhibitors found in hot-compressed water-treated lignocellulosic hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakody, Lahiru N; Kadowaki, Masafumi; Tsuge, Keisuke; Horie, Kenta; Suzuki, Akihiro; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Kitagaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The complex inhibitory effects of inhibitors present in lignocellulose hydrolysate suppress the ethanol fermentation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although the interactive inhibitory effects play important roles in the actual hydrolysate, few studies have investigated glycolaldehyde, the key inhibitor of hot-compressed water-treated lignocellulose hydrolysate. Given this challenge, we investigated the interactive effects of mixed fermentation inhibitors, including glycolaldehyde. First, we confirmed that glycolaldehyde was the most potent inhibitor in the hydrolysate and exerted interactive inhibitory effects in combination with major inhibitors. Next, through genome-wide analysis and megavariate data modeling, we identified SUMOylation as a novel potential mechanism to overcome the combinational inhibitory effects of fermentation inhibitors. Indeed, overall SUMOylation was increased and Pgk1, which produces an ATP molecule in glycolysis by substrate-level phosphorylation, was SUMOylated and degraded in response to glycolaldehyde. Augmenting the SUMO-dependent ubiquitin system in the ADH1-expressing strain significantly shortened the lag phase of growth, released cells from G2/M arrest, and improved energy status and glucose uptake in the inhibitor-containing medium. In summary, our study was the first to establish SUMOylation as a novel platform for regulating the lag phase caused by complex fermentation inhibitors.

  1. RhoA/Rho kinase in spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangbing Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A spinal cord injury refers to an injury to the spinal cord that is caused by a trauma instead of diseases. Spinal cord injury includes a primary mechanical injury and a much more complex secondary injury process involving inflammation, oxidation, excitotoxicity, and cell death. During the secondary injury, many signal pathways are activated and play important roles in mediating the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury. Among them, the RhoA/Rho kinase pathway plays a particular role in mediating spinal degeneration and regeneration. In this review, we will discuss the role and mechanism of RhoA/Rho kinase-mediated spinal cord pathogenesis, as well as the potential of targeting RhoA/Rho kinase as a strategy for promoting both neuroprotection and axonal regeneration.

  2. Ultrasound, color - normal umbilical cord (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is a normal color Doppler ultrasound of the umbilical cord performed at 30 weeks gestation. The cord is ... the cord, two arteries and one vein. The umbilical cord is connected to the placenta, located in the ...

  3. Assessment of rat spinal cord injury models

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a complicated and devastating condition, causing different extents of motor, sensory and autonomic dysfunctions. In addition, there is a risk for secondary complications after SCI including posttraumatic syringomyelia (PTS) that can cause further functional loss. Since there is no available effective treatment, tremendous efforts have been made to develop new therapeutic strategies to promote functional recovery after SCI. In experimental r...

  4. Rupture of esophagus by compressed air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Tan, Yuyong; Huo, Jirong

    2016-11-01

    Currently, beverages containing compressed air such as cola and champagne are widely used in our daily life. Improper ways to unscrew the bottle, usually by teeth, could lead to an injury, even a rupture of the esophagus. This letter to editor describes a case of esophageal rupture caused by compressed air.

  5. Force balancing in mammographic compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Branderhorst, W.; de Groot, J. E.; Neeter, L. M. F. H.; van Lier, M. G. J. T. B.; Neeleman, C.; den Heeten, G. J.; Grimbergen, C. A.

    2016-01-01

    In mammography, the height of the image receptor is adjusted to the patient before compressing the breast. An inadequate height setting can result in an imbalance between the forces applied by the image receptor and the paddle, causing the clamped breast to be pushed up or down relative to the body

  6. Photoplethysmographic sensors for perfusion measurements in spinal cord tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J P; Kyriacou, P A, E-mail: Justin.Phillips.1@city.ac.uk [School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University London, EC1V 0HB (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-17

    Sensors for recording photoplethysmographic signals from the nervous tissue of the spinal cord are described. The purpose of these sensors is to establish whether perfusion is compromised in various states of injury which occur in certain animal models of spinal cord injury, for example compression injury. Various measures of perfusion are applicable such as the amplitude of the photoplethysmograph signal and the oxygen saturation, measured using a dual wavelength configuration. Signals are usually compared to baseline measurements made in uninjured subjects. This paper describes two types of probe, one based on optical fibres, and one in which optotes are placed in direct contact with the tissue surface. Results from a study based on a compression model utilising a fibreoptic sensor are presented.

  7. Trauma of the spine and spinal cord: imaging strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parizel, P M; van der Zijden, T; Gaudino, S; Spaepen, M; Voormolen, M H J; Venstermans, C; De Belder, F; van den Hauwe, L; Van Goethem, J

    2010-03-01

    Traumatic injuries of the spine and spinal cord are common and potentially devastating lesions. We present a comprehensive overview of the classification of vertebral fractures, based on morphology (e.g., wedge, (bi)concave, or crush fractures) or on the mechanism of injury (flexion-compression, axial compression, flexion-distraction, or rotational fracture-dislocation lesions). The merits and limitations of different imaging techniques are discussed, including plain X-ray films, multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection. There is growing evidence that state-of-the-art imaging techniques provide answers to some of the key questions in the management of patients with spine and spinal cord trauma: is the fracture stable or unstable? Is the fracture recent or old? Is the fracture benign or malignant? In summary, we show that high-quality radiological investigations are essential in the diagnosis and management of patients with spinal trauma.

  8. Compression for preventing recurrence of venous ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E Andrea; Bell-Syer, Sally E M

    2014-09-09

    Up to 1% of adults will have a leg ulcer at some time. The majority of leg ulcers are venous in origin and are caused by high pressure in the veins due to blockage or weakness of the valves in the veins of the leg. Prevention and treatment of venous ulcers is aimed at reducing the pressure either by removing/repairing the veins, or by applying compression bandages/stockings to reduce the pressure in the veins.The majority of venous ulcers heal with compression bandages, however ulcers frequently recur. Clinical guidelines therefore recommend that people continue to wear compression, usually in the form of hosiery (tights, stockings, socks) after their ulcer heals, to prevent recurrence. To assess the effects of compression (socks, stockings, tights, bandages) in preventing the recurrence of venous ulcers. If compression does prevent ulceration compared with no compression, then to identify whether there is evidence to recommend particular levels of compression (high, medium or low, for example), types of compression, or brands of compression to prevent ulcer recurrence after healing. For this second update we searched The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 4 September 2014) which includes the results of regular searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 8). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs)evaluating compression bandages or hosiery for preventing the recurrence of venous ulcers. Two review authors undertook data extraction and risk of bias assessment independently. Four trials (979 participants) were eligible for inclusion in this review. One trial in patients with recently healed venous ulcers (n = 153) compared recurrence rates with and without compression and found that compression significantly reduced ulcer recurrence at six months (Risk ratio (RR) 0.46, 95% CI 0.27 to 0.76).Two trials compared high-compression hosiery (equivalent to UK class 3) with

  9. Depression and Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Urinary Tract Infections: Indwelling (Foley) Catheter Depression and Spinal Cord Injury [ Download this pamphlet: “Depression and Spinal Cord Injury” (PDF - 477KB)] Depression is a common illness that ...

  10. What Is Spinal Cord Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Condition Information Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print Spinal Cord Injury (SCI): Condition Information What is SCI? SCI is ... 3 National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Spinal cord injury: Hope through research. Retrieved June 19 , 2013 , from ...

  11. Overview of Spinal Cord Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Is the Spinal Cord Damaged? The spine (spinal column) contains the spinal cord, which is divided into four sections: Cervical (neck) Thoracic (chest) Lumbar (lower back) Sacral (pelvis). Each section is referred ...

  12. Spinal cord compression secondary to hemangiosarcoma in a saddlebred stallion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, S

    1999-01-01

    Hemangiosarcoma in the spinal canal was diagnosed in a 25-year-old stallion showing progressive and symmetrical 4-limb ataxia, proprioceptive deficits, and weakness. On necropsy, an extradural mass consisting of spindle-shaped cells and numerous free erythrocytes was found at the level of C7-T1. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed a neoplasm of endothelial origin. PMID:10646067

  13. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging correlation in acute spinal cord injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramon, S.; Dominguez, R.; Ramirez, L.; Garcia Fernandez, L. [University Hospital Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain)

    1998-04-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) patients`outcome with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed within the first 15 days following trauma. We retrospectively analyzed 55 SCI patients. Early functional prognosis may be established on the basis of clinical presentation of SCI and associated MRI. Cord hemorrhage and transection are irreversible, while edema has a potential for neurological recovery. Cord contusion tends to be associated with an incomplete SCI, unlike the compression pattern, in which the prognosis depends on the degree of the initial neurological damage. (author)

  14. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging correlation in acute spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramon, S.; Dominguez, R.; Ramirez, L.; Garcia Fernandez, L.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) patients'outcome with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed within the first 15 days following trauma. We retrospectively analyzed 55 SCI patients. Early functional prognosis may be established on the basis of clinical presentation of SCI and associated MRI. Cord hemorrhage and transection are irreversible, while edema has a potential for neurological recovery. Cord contusion tends to be associated with an incomplete SCI, unlike the compression pattern, in which the prognosis depends on the degree of the initial neurological damage. (author)

  15. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-01-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was cauused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunsupporessed cancer patient. (orig.)

  16. Diagnosis of cervical spinal cord disorders with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, Naohito; Iizuka, Tadashi

    1991-01-01

    From September 1987 through May 1989, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been performed in 58 patients with myelopathy and 9 patients with spinal cord injuries. This study was designed to determine the rate of spinal cord stricture and changes of signal intensities. Increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images was more frequently observed than decreased intensity on T1-weighted images in the group of myelopathy (19/58 vs 10/58). In the group of spinal cord injuries, however, there was no significant difference in the incidence between increased intensity on T2-weighted images (4/9) and decreased intensity on T1-weighted images (7/9). Twelve patients with chronic compressive spinal myelopathy tended to have an increased intensity on T2-weighted images. In such cases, although JOA scores were low before surgery, signal intensity returned to that without marked signal changes. In chronic compressive cervical myelopathy, the degree of preoperative compression was the same as the postoperative JOA scores. Regarding cervical spinal injury, there was a good correlation between the size of low signal area and the degree of paralysis. (N.K.)

  17. Spinal Cord Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a surgical treatment for chronic neuropathic pain that is refractory to other treatment. Originally described by Shealy et al. in 1967(1), it is used to treat a range of conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I)(2), angina pectoris(3), radicular...... pain after failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)(4), pain due to peripheral nerve injury, stump pain(5), peripheral vascular disease(6) and diabetic neuropathy(7,8); whereas phantom pain(9), postherpetic neuralgia(10), chronic visceral pain(11), and pain after partial spinal cord injury(12) remain more...

  18. Infantile hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in a case of chediak-higashi syndrome caused by a mutation in the LYST/CHS1 gene presenting with delayed umbilical cord detachment and diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Christian; Agergaard, Charlotte N; Jakobsen, Marianne A; Møller, Michael B; Fisker, Niels; Barington, Torben

    2015-03-01

    A 2-month-old female infant, born to consanguineous parents, presented with infections in skin and upper respiratory tract. She was notable for delayed umbilical cord detachment, partial albinism, and neurological irritability. Giant granules were present in white blood cells. The intracellular perforin content in CD8 T cells seems to correlate to the immune activation state of the patient with 82% and 8% perforin-containing CD8 T cells at active and nonactive hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) disease, respectively. HLH was confirmed by hemophagocytosis in bone marrow and absent natural killer cell activity. The patient carried a homozygous G>A mutation in the 3' splice site of intron 24 of the LYST/CHS1 gene, leading to the use of an alternative YAG splice site located in exon 25, introducing a premature STOP codon (L2355fsX2370; NP_000072.2). The early-onset accelerated phase in this severe phenotype of Chediak-Higashi syndrome was probably induced by rotaviral infection. Interestingly, the intracellular perforin content in CD8 T cells seems to correlate to the immune activation state of the patient. Late separation of the umbilical cord in concordance with clinical symptoms should lead to evaluation of a possible neutrophil dysfunction including Chediak-Higashi syndrome before onset of HLH.

  19. Rectal perforation by compressed air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Jin

    2017-07-01

    As the use of compressed air in industrial work has increased, so has the risk of associated pneumatic injury from its improper use. However, damage of large intestine caused by compressed air is uncommon. Herein a case of pneumatic rupture of the rectum is described. The patient was admitted to the Emergency Room complaining of abdominal pain and distension. His colleague triggered a compressed air nozzle over his buttock. On arrival, vital signs were stable but physical examination revealed peritoneal irritation and marked distension of the abdomen. Computed tomography showed a large volume of air in the peritoneal cavity and subcutaneous emphysema at the perineum. A rectal perforation was found at laparotomy and the Hartmann procedure was performed.

  20. Spinal cord stimulation therapy for localized central pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirato, Masafumi; Takahashi, Akio; Watanabe, Katsushige; Kazama, Ken; Yoshimoto, Yuhei

    2008-01-01

    We studied the pathophysiology of localized central pain and the surgical result of spinal cord stimulation. There were 10 cases; 7 males and 3 females from 24 to 77 years old. Pain was caused by peripheral nerve injury in one case, spinal cord injury in two cases and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) (thalamic pain) in 7 cases. All cases were treated by epidural spinal cord stimulation and followed from 0.8 to 8.8 years. Sufficient pain relief was achieved in one case of peripheral nerve and spinal cord injury and in 4 cases of CVD. Moderate pain control was achieved in 2 cases of CVD. In one each case of spinal cord injury and of CVD, pain control was ineffective. In cases with thalamic pain, we studied the correlation between the surgical result of spinal cord stimulation and the clinical features, MRI, fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET), and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) findings before operation. MRI revealed a small to moderate sized lesion on the thalamus or putamen in each case. PET also showed decreased accumulation of FDG on the affected thalamus. In all cases without one fair responder to spinal cord stimulation, we could recognize definite SEP originating in the sensory cortex ipsilateral side to the CVD lesion during contralateral median or posterior tibial nerve stimulation. In the good responders, we could recognize SEP originating in the sensory cortex of the lesion side with less delayed latency or decreased amplitude than in the moderate responders. In this group, test stimulation with low voltage on the spinal cord evoked a sensory effect (paresthesia) over the painful part of the body. Spinal cord stimulation proved to be an effective treatment for localized central pain. In cases with localized central pain after CVD, we could expect to ameliorate the intractable pain in those cases in which SEP or spinal cord test stimulation revealed that the thalamo-cortical system was preserved. (author)

  1. Intravenous Infusion of Magnesium Chloride Improves Epicenter Blood Flow during the Acute Stage of Contusive Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradov, Johongir M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Vasospasm, hemorrhage, and loss of microvessels at the site of contusive or compressive spinal cord injury lead to infarction and initiate secondary degeneration. Here, we used intravenous injection of endothelial-binding lectin followed by histology to show that the number of perfused microvessels at the injury site is decreased by 80–90% as early as 20 min following a moderate T9 contusion in adult female rats. Hemorrhage within the spinal cord also was maximal at 20 min, consistent with its vasoconstrictive actions in the central nervous system (CNS). Microvascular blood flow recovered to up to 50% of normal volume in the injury penumbra by 6 h, but not at the epicenter. A comparison with an endothelial cell marker suggested that many microvessels fail to be reperfused up to 48 h post-injury. The ischemia was probably caused by vasospasm of vessels penetrating the parenchyma, because repeated Doppler measurements over the spinal cord showed a doubling of total blood flow over the first 12 h. Moreover, intravenous infusion of magnesium chloride, used clinically to treat CNS vasospasm, greatly improved the number of perfused microvessels at 24 and 48 h. The magnesium treatment seemed safe as it did not increase hemorrhage, despite the improved parenchymal blood flow. However, the treatment did not reduce acute microvessel, motor neuron or oligodendrocyte loss, and when infused for 7 days did not affect functional recovery or spared epicenter white matter over a 4 week period. These data suggest that microvascular blood flow can be restored with a clinically relevant treatment following spinal cord injury. PMID:23302047

  2. Mechanical Compression and Nucleus Pulposus Application on Dorsal Root Ganglia Differentially Modify Evoked Neuronal Activity in the Thalamus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Elin; Brisby, Helena; Rask, Katarina

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A combination of mechanical compression caused by a protruding disc and leakage of nucleus pulposus (NP) from the disc core is presumed to contribute to intervertebral disc hernia-related pain. Experimental models of disc hernia including both components have resulted in changes in neuronal activity at the level of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord, but changes within the brain have been less well studied. However, acute application of NP to a DRG without mechanical compression rapidly increases neuronal activity in the thalamus, a major brain relay nucleus processing information from sensory pathways including ascending nociceptive tracts. The combination of mechanical compression and NP might therefore result in further increases in central neuronal activity. Using an experimental disc herniation rat model including both mechanical compression and NP the present study aimed to investigate changes in neuronal activity in the contralateral thalamic ventral posterior lateral nucleus in vivo. Measurements were obtained while electrically stimulating the ipsilateral sciatic nerve at Aδ fiber intensities. The L4 DRG was subjected to light mechanical compression and NP exposure, and acute changes in evoked thalamic responses were recorded for up to 40 min. In order to compare effects in naïve animals with effects following a longer period of NP exposure, animals that were either disc-punctured or sham-operated 24 h previously were also included. In all animals, light mechanical compression of the DRG depressed the number of evoked neuronal responses. Prior NP exposure resulted in less potent changes following mechanical compression (80% of baseline) than that observed in naïve animals (50%). During the subsequent NP application, the number of evoked responses compared to baseline increased in pre-exposed animals (to 87%) as well as in naïve animals (72%) in which the removal of the mechanical compression resulted in a further increase (106

  3. Spinal cord injury and male infertility: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Finger, Guilherme; Souza, Olívia Egger de; Pasqualotto, Fabio Firmbach

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries remain an important factor of morbimortality in current society, involving mainly males from adolescence to adulthood. Among the sequelae caused by spinal cord injuries, the impairment of the sexual system is highly relevant since it affects the quality of sexual life and paternity. Infertility is secondary to multiple events such as erectile dysfunction, anejaculation, seminal biochemical modification and morphology of spermatozoa. Current therapies for the infertile spi...

  4. Unveil Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiteng

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the applicability of compressed sensing theory. We take a genuine look at both experimental results and theoretical works. We answer the following questions: 1) What can compressed sensing really do? 2) More importantly, why?

  5. A Compressive Superresolution Display

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2014-06-22

    In this paper, we introduce a new compressive display architecture for superresolution image presentation that exploits co-design of the optical device configuration and compressive computation. Our display allows for superresolution, HDR, or glasses-free 3D presentation.

  6. Anterior spinal cord syndrome of unknown etiology

    OpenAIRE

    Klakeel, Merrine; Thompson, Justin; Srinivasan, Rajashree; McDonald, Frank

    2015-01-01

    A spinal cord injury encompasses a physical insult to the spinal cord. In the case of anterior spinal cord syndrome, the insult is a vascular lesion at the anterior spinal artery. We present the cases of two 13-year-old boys with anterior spinal cord syndrome, along with a review of the anatomy and vasculature of the spinal cord and an explanation of how a lesion in the cord corresponds to anterior spinal cord syndrome.

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, Physical Therapy-Lokomat T. George Hornby, PhD, PT Empowering the ... Rogers, SW Marguerite David, MSW Kathy Hulse, MSW Physical Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Laura Wehrli, PT Isa ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When ...

  12. Microbunching and RF Compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-01-01

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  13. Hyperspectral data compression

    CERN Document Server

    Motta, Giovanni; Storer, James A

    2006-01-01

    Provides a survey of results in the field of compression of remote sensed 3D data, with a particular interest in hyperspectral imagery. This work covers topics such as compression architecture, lossless compression, lossy techniques, and more. It also describes a lossless algorithm based on vector quantization.

  14. Compression test assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariotis, A. H. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A compression test assembly is described which prevents buckling of small diameter rigid specimens undergoing compression testing and permits attachment of extensometers for strain measurements. The test specimen is automatically aligned and laterally supported when compressive force is applied to the end caps and transmitted to the test specimen during testing.

  15. Primary intramedullary spinal cord tumour in pregnancy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Kyoko; Orisaka, Makoto; Yamamoto, Makoto; Nishijima, Koji; Yoshida, Yoshio

    2018-01-01

    Primary spinal cord tumours can lead to severe neurological complications and even death. Pregnant women often complain of discomfort of the lower limbs, which is usually caused by sciatica. Here we present the case of a pregnant woman, who was initially considered to have sciatica, but was finally diagnosed with a primary intramedullary spinal cord tumour. A 28-year-old pregnant woman presented to our hospital with inexplicable numbness in her lower limbs. She was initially considered to have sciatica, but acute deterioration of neurological symptoms and plain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings suggested malignancy. The patient was finally diagnosed with a primary intramedullary spinal cord tumour at the C3-Th5 region. An emergency caesarean section was performed, after which the spinal cord lesion was evaluated using contrast-enhanced MRI, positron emission tomography with 2-deoxy-2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-d-glucose integrated with computed tomography, and spinal angiography, and further treatment was initiated. However, while the patient's spinal cord tumour surgery was performed in early postpartum, her paraplegia and bladder and rectal disturbances remained unchanged even 1 year after surgery. Because of the low incidence of spinal cord tumours during pregnancy, no definite reports have been published on the treatment of pregnant patients with spinal cord tumours. Although safe imaging tests during pregnancy are limited, intervention in such patients should be performed as early as possible to avoid irreversible neurological deterioration.

  16. THE THREE-STRANDED CORD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Redmond

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Schoolmen did much of their most interesting and original philosophizing in theology. An example is the dilemma in Renaissance Scholasticism on free will: how can we act freely if God causes and knows our actions? Basic issues are involved here: the antinomy between freedom and determination, modal semantics, tense logic, the logical status of counterfacts. Mexican Jesuits Matías Blanco (d. 1734 and Antonio Peralta (d. 1736 wrote books on the subject. We describe here the “disjunctive” solution that Blanco advanced in his Funiculus triplex (The Three-Stranded Cord, published posthumously in Mexico in 1746. When someone is faced with choosing between B and C, conjectures Blanco, God does not actualize either, but rather their disjunction B-or-C. Blanco calls for a truce in the “war” among the contending schools so that they may consider his solution–for he thinks it may indeed be acceptable to all.

  17. Trends in newborn umbilical cord care practices in Sokoto and Bauchi States of Nigeria: the where, who, how, what and the ubiquitous role of traditional birth attendants: a lot quality assurance sampling survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abegunde, Dele; Orobaton, Nosa; Beal, Katherine; Bassi, Amos; Bamidele, Moyosola; Akomolafe, Toyin; Ohanyido, Francis; Umar-Farouk, Olayinka; Danladi, Saba'atu

    2017-11-09

    Neonatal infections caused by unsafe umbilical cord practices account for the majority of neonatal deaths in Nigeria. We examined the trends in umbilical cord care practices between 2012 and 2015 that coincided with the introduction of chlorhexidine digluconate 7.1% gel in Bauchi and Sokoto States. We obtained data from three rounds of lot quality assurance samples (LQAS) surveys conducted in 2012, 2013 and 2015. Households were randomly sampled in each round that totaled 1140 and 1311 households in Bauchi and Sokoto States respectively. Mothers responded to questions on cord care practices in the last delivery. Coverage estimates of practice indicators were obtained for each survey period. Local Government Area (LGA) estimates for each indicator were obtained with α ≤ 5%, and β ≤20% statistical errors and aggregated to State-level estimates with finite sample correction relative to the LGA population. Over 75 and 80% of deliveries in Bauchi and Sokoto States respectively took place at home. The proportion of deliveries in public facilities reported by mothers ranged from 19% in 2012 to 22.4% in 2015 in Bauchi State and from 12.9 to 13.2% in 2015 in Sokoto State. Approximately 50% of deliveries in Bauchi and more than 80% in Sokoto States were assisted by traditional birth attendants (TBAs) or relatives and friends, with little change in the survey periods. In Bauchi and in Sokoto States, over 75% and over 80% of newborn cords were cut with razor blades underscoring the pervasive role of the TBAs in the immediate postpartum period. Use of chlorhexidine digluconate 7.1% gel for cord dressing significantly increased to the highest level in 2015 in both States. Health workers who attended deliveries in health facilities switched from methylated spirit to chlorhexidine. There were no observable changes in cord care practices among the TBAs. Unsafe umbilical cord care practices remained prevalent in Bauchi and Sokoto States of Nigeria, although a recent

  18. Fetal Umbilical Cord Length and Associated Intrapatum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shoulder dystocia, hand prolapse in a transverse lying fetus, abruptio placentae and prolonged second stage of labour had shorter cords while fetal distress, cord prolapse and mecunium stained liquor had longer cords when compared with the mean umbilical cord length of the study population. Conclusion: Umbilical cord ...

  19. Compressible effect algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudder, Stan

    2004-08-01

    We define a special type of additive map J on an effect algebra E called a compression. We call J(1) the focus of J and if p is the focus of a compression then p is called a projection. The set of projections in E is denoted by P(E). A compression J is direct if J( a) ≤ a for all a ɛ E. We show that direct compressions are equivalent to projections onto components of cartesian products. An effect algebra E is said to be compressible if every compression on E is uniquely determined by its focus and every compression on E has a supplement. We define and characterize the commutant C(p) of a projection p and show that a compression with focus p is direct if and only if C(p) = E. We show that P(E) is an orthomodular poset. It is proved that the cartesian product of effect algebras is compressible if and only if each component is compressible. We then consider compressible sequential effect algebras, Lüders maps and conditional probabilities.

  20. Compressing Binary Decision Diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Esben Rune; Satti, Srinivasa Rao; Tiedemann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to ......-2 bits per node. Empirical results for our compression technique are presented, including comparisons with previously introduced techniques, showing that the new technique dominate on all tested instances......The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to 1...

  1. Compressing Binary Decision Diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rune Hansen, Esben; Srinivasa Rao, S.; Tiedemann, Peter

    The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to ......-2 bits per node. Empirical results for our compression technique are presented, including comparisons with previously introduced techniques, showing that the new technique dominate on all tested instances.......The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to 1...

  2. Sudden viscous dissipation in compressing plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovits, Seth; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2015-11-01

    Compression of a turbulent plasma or fluid can cause amplification of the turbulent kinetic energy, if the compression is fast compared to the turnover and viscous dissipation times of the turbulent eddies. The consideration of compressing turbulent flows in inviscid fluids has been motivated by the suggestion that amplification of turbulent kinetic energy occurred on experiments at the Weizmann Institute of Science Z-Pinch. We demonstrate a sudden viscous dissipation mechanism whereby this amplified turbulent kinetic energy is rapidly converted into thermal energy, which further increases the temperature, feeding back to further enhance the dissipation. Application of this mechanism in compression experiments may be advantageous, if the plasma can be kept comparatively cold during much of the compression, reducing radiation and conduction losses, until the plasma suddenly becomes hot. This work was supported by DOE through contract 67350-9960 (Prime # DOE DE-NA0001836) and by the DTRA.

  3. Is "Delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping" Beneficial for Premature Newborns?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir-Mohammad Armanian

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The appropriate moment for clamping the umbilical cord is controversial. Immediate cord clamping (ICC is an item of active management of the third stage of labor (AMTSL. Unclamped umbilical cord may cause inconvenience in preterm neonates because they commonly need some levels of emergent services. Some studies revealed delayed cord clamping (DCC of preterm neonates results in better health conditions like lower rates of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, less morbidities in labor room and lower risk of postpartum hemorrhage. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of delayed umbilical cord clamping on premature neonatal outcomes. Materials and Methods: In this single‑center randomized control trial study, sixty premature neonates (gestational age ≤ 34 weeks were randomly assigned to ICC (cord clamped at 5–10 seconds or DCC (30–45 seconds groups and followed up in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. Primary outcomes were 1st and 5th minute Apgar score, average of level of hematocrit after birth, intra ventricle hemorrhage and need some levels of resuscitation. Results: Differences in demographic characteristics were not statistically significant. After birth, neonates who had delayed clamping had significantly higher mean hematocrit after at 4-hour of birth (49.58+5.15gr/dl vs. 46.58+5.40gr/dlin DCC vs. ICC groups, respectively (P=0.031. Delayed cord clamping reduced the duration of need to nasal continues positive airway pressure (NCPAP (86.7% and 60.0% in ICC and DCC groups, respectively, P= 0.039. Attractively, the results showed lower incidence of clinical sepsis in delayed cord clamping neonates (53.3% vs. 23.3% in ICC and DCC groups, respectively, P=0.033. Conclusion: Prematurity complications might decrease by delay umbilical cord clamping which improve the hematocrit, duration of need to NCPAP and incidence of clinical sepsis. Furthermore, DCC may have no negative impact on neonatal resuscitation.

  4. Investigation into Regeneration Mechanism of Hydroalcoholic Lavender (Lavandula officianalis Extract through the Evaluation of NT3 Gene Expression after Sciatic Nerve Compression in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Naderi Allaf

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Retrograde transport to the alpha motoneurons causes spinal degeneration. The neurotrophic factor (NT3 increases the number of myelinated axons in the dorsal root, leads to differentiation and survival of sensory neurons, parasympathetic motoneurons and prevents cell death. Lavender is a plant in the family Lamiaceae which is reported to have antioxidant, antispasmodic, diuretic, anti-asthmatic, refrigerant, and antipyretic effects. This study examined NT3 gene expression changes after sciatic nerve compression in rats, in the presence of Lavandula officinalis extract. Materials and Methods: Lavender Soxhlet hydroalcoholic extraction was prepared. 36 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 groups including control, compression and treatment (compression group + hydroalcoholic extract of Lavender injections 75mg/kg groups. In controls the muscle was opened without damage to gain access to the sciatic nerve. In compression and treatment groups, the sciatic nerve (right leg was compressed. The extract was injected intraperitoneally in two occasions. A biopsy was taken from the spinal cord segments L4-L6 on day 28, total RNA was extracted and cDNA was synthesized and NT3 gene expression changes were analyzed by ANOVA test by using SPSS software. Results: The results showed that NT3 gene expression had a significant reduction in compression group compared to the control group (p<0.001 and it had a significant increase in treatment group compared with the compression group (p<0.001. Conclusion: A significant increase in gene expression shows that Lavandula officinalis hydroalcoholic extract improves nerve regeneration via NT3 gene expression.

  5. Relationship between the morphologic alterations of vocal cords from adult autopsies and the cause of death Avaliação morfológica da membrana basal das cordas vocais de adultos autopsiados e sua correlação com as causas de óbito

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Karina Marques Salge

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to identify the possible alteration in the thickness of the epithelium basal membrane of the vocal cords and correlate it with the cause of death. METHOD: Larynxes collected from adult autopsies during the period of 1993 to 2001 were utilized. We used the hematoxylin-eosin and periodic acid-Schiff staining methods for the morphological and morphometric analysis. RESULTS: Sixty-six vocal cords were analysed; increased thickness was identified in 14 cases (21.2%, with equal proportions between the genders. Increased vocal-cord thickness was more frequent in patients of the white ethnicity (12 cases, 85.7%. Respiratory alterations were found in 10 (71.4% of the cases with increased vocal-cord thickness. Of the patients that were maintained with mechanical ventilation before death, 7 (18.4% had thickening of the basal membrane. Among the smokers, 9 (19.63% had basal membrane thickening. CONCLUSION: No statistically significant differences were found between the cases in which the cause of death was related to respiratory diseases as compared to non-respiratory diseases and the thickening of the basal membrane of the vocal cords. However, new studies are needed in order to verify the etiopathogenesis of this thickening.OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste trabalho foi identificar as possíveis alterações na espessura da membrana basal das cordas vocais e relacionar estas com a causa de morte. MÉTODO: Foram utilizadas laringes coletadas de adultos autopsiados, no período de 1993 até 2001. Realizamos as colorações da Hematoxilina- Eosina e Ácido Periódico de Schiff, onde foi medido o diâmetro da membrana basal. RESULTADOS: Foram analisadas 66 cordas vocais, o espessamento foi identificado em 14 casos (21,2%, sendo encontrado em proporções iguais entre os sexos, sendo freqüente em pacientes da cor branca (12 casos, 85,7%. Foram encontradas alterações respiratórias em 10 (71,4% dos casos com espessamento

  6. Acute spinal cord injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Izunaga, H.; Sato, R.; Shinzato, I.; Korogi, Y.; Yamashita, Y.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on sequential MR images and neurologic findings that were correlated in 40 acute spinal cord injuries. Within 1 week after injury, frequent initial MR changes appeared isointense on both T1- and T2-weighted images and isointense on T1- and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. After 2 months, hypointensity appeared on T1-weighted images and hyperintensity persisted or appeared on T2-weighted images. Clinical improvements were observed in patients with isointensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images at the initial examination. A larger area of hyperintensity on subsequent T2-weighted images was correlated with no neurologic improvement. MR findings were good indicators of the spinal cord injury

  7. International Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvorak, M F; Itshayek, E; Fehlings, M G

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Survey of expert opinion, feedback and final consensus. OBJECTIVE: To describe the development and the variables included in the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data set. SETTING: International working group. METHODS......: A committee of experts was established to select and define data elements. The data set was then disseminated to the appropriate committees and organizations for comments. All suggested revisions were considered and both the International Spinal Cord Society and the American Spinal Injury Association endorsed...... spinal intervention and procedure is coded (variables 1 through 7) and the spinal segment level is described (variables 8 and 9). Sample clinical cases were developed to illustrate how to complete it. CONCLUSION: The International SCI Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data Set...

  8. The Protective Effect of Spinal Cord Stimulation Postconditioning Against Spinal Cord Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huixian; Dong, Xiuhua; Jin, Mu; Cheng, Weiping

    2018-01-18

    Delayed paraplegia due to spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) remains one of the most severe complications of thoracoabdominal aneurysm surgery, for which effective prevention and treatment is still lacking. The current study investigates whether spinal cord stimulation (SCS) postconditioning has neuroprotective effects against spinal cord IRI. Ninety-six New Zealand white male rabbits were randomly divided into four groups as follows: a sham group and three experimental groups (C group, 2 Hz group, and 50 Hz group) n = 24/group. Spinal cord ischemia was induced by transient infrarenal aortic balloon occlusion for 28 min, after which rabbits in group C underwent no additional intervention, while rabbits in the other two experimental groups underwent 2 Hz or 50 Hz epidural SCS for 30 min at the onset of reperfusion and then daily until sacrifice. Hind limb neurologic function of rabbits was assessed using Jacob scale. Lumbar spinal cords were harvested immediately after sacrifice for histological examination and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. The number of viable α-motor neurons in ventral horn was counted and TUNEL-positive rate of α-motor neurons was calculated. Spinal cord IRI was caused by transient infrarenal aorta occlusion for 28 min. Both 2 Hz and 50 Hz SCS postconditioning had neuroprotective effects, particularly the 2 Hz SCS postconditioning. Comparing to C group and 50 Hz group, rabbits in the 2 Hz group demonstrated better hind limb motor function and a lower rate of TUNEL-positive α-motor neuron after eight hours, one day, three days, and seven days of spinal cord reperfusion. More viable α-motor neurons were preserved after one and three days of spinal cord reperfusion in 2 Hz group rabbits than in C group and 50 Hz group rabbits. SCS postconditioning at 2 Hz protected the spinal cord from IRI. © 2018 International Neuromodulation Society.

  9. MRI in chronic spinal cord trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curati, W.L.; Kingsley, D.P.E.; Kendall, B.E.; Moseley, I.F.

    1992-01-01

    Eighty-seven patients aged 16-68 years have been examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following spinal injury. The MRI findings have been correlated with length of history between trauma and investigation, extent of residual function and site of injury. They include changes at the site of injury consistent with myelomalacia in 37%, a syrinx in 40%, persistent cord compression in 32% and atrophy in 18%. An extensive syrinx can develop within 2 months of injury and it is nearly twice as common in patients with complete paralysis as in those whose paralysis was incomplete. It is suggested that investigation and management of spinal trauma should include early and repeated MRI examinations to detect sequelae at an early stage. (orig.)

  10. Tumors of the spinal cord and canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, U.L.; Brady, L.W.

    1987-01-01

    Most spine (primary and secondary) neoplasms should receive curative or palliative radiation therapy. Data from the literature support its use as a beneficial treatment modality. Meningiomas and neurofibromas should be resected and irradiated postoperatively if removed subtotally or if the histopathology is malignant. The prognosis for patients with these tumors is generally good. Intramedullary tumors should be biopsied and irradiated when neoplastic histology has been established. The prognosis for these patients is unsatisfactory for high-grade astrocytomas but is more reasonable for ependymomas and vascular malformations. A favorable exception may be the myxopapillary ependymoma in the lumbosacral region. It should be maximally resected with sparing of cauda equina function but then irradiated postoperatively. The primary intent should be to eradicate the tumor. Radiation therapy is the main treatment modality, with steroid medication, in cases of cord compression

  11. Angiomyxoma of the Umbilical Cord

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Hung-Pin; Hsu, Chin-Yuan; Chen, Chih-Ping; Su, Tsung-Hsien

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Angiomyxoma is a rare tumor of the umbilical cord and is associated with increased perinatal morbidity and mortality. However, the management of these pregnancies in the third trimester is not clearly defined. We present a case of an angiomyxoma of the umbilical cord diagnosed in the second trimester, and highlight the contribution of color Doppler imaging to the early diagnosis of cord anomalies. Case Report: A 29 year-old, gravida 3, para 1, woman had elevated maternal serum a...

  12. Neural plasticity after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Yang, Xiaoyu; Jiang, Lianying; Wang, Chunxin; Yang, Maoguang

    2012-02-15

    Plasticity changes of uninjured nerves can result in a novel neural circuit after spinal cord injury, which can restore sensory and motor functions to different degrees. Although processes of neural plasticity have been studied, the mechanism and treatment to effectively improve neural plasticity changes remain controversial. The present study reviewed studies regarding plasticity of the central nervous system and methods for promoting plasticity to improve repair of injured central nerves. The results showed that synaptic reorganization, axonal sprouting, and neurogenesis are critical factors for neural circuit reconstruction. Directed functional exercise, neurotrophic factor and transplantation of nerve-derived and non-nerve-derived tissues and cells can effectively ameliorate functional disturbances caused by spinal cord injury and improve quality of life for patients.

  13. Reaction to topical capsaicin in spinal cord injury patients with and without central pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Pedersen, Louise H.; Terkelsen, Astrid J.

    2007-01-01

    of a spinal cord injury which already is hyperexcitable, would cause enhanced responses in patients with central pain at the level of injury compared to patients without neuropathic pain and healthy controls. Touch, punctuate stimuli, cold stimuli and topical capsaicin was applied above, at, and below injury......Central neuropathic pain is a debilitating and frequent complication to spinal cord injury (SCI). Excitatory input from hyperexcitable cells around the injured grey matter zone is suggested to play a role for central neuropathic pain felt below the level of a spinal cord injury. Direct evidence...... at the level of injury. Keywords: Spinal cord injury; Neuropathic pain; Capsaicin; Neuronal hyperexcitability; Hyperalgesia; Blood flow...

  14. Effect of Teriparatide, Vibration and the Combination on Bone Mass and Bone Architecture in Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Rehabil. 1998;79(9): 1133–6. 42. Keating JF, Kerr M, Delargy M. Minimal trauma causing fractures in patients with spinal cord injury. Disabil Rehabil...Minimal trauma causing fractures in patients with spinal cord injury. Disabil Rehabil. 1992;14:108–9. 21. Martınez AA, Cuenca J, Herrera A, Domingo J... Spinal Cord Injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Thomas J. Schnitzer, MD, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Northwestern University Evanston, IL 60208 REPORT

  15. Sexually dimorphic nuclei in the spinal cord control male sexual functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka eSakamoto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Lower spinal cord injuries frequently cause sexual dysfunction in men, including erectile dysfunction and an ejaculation disorder. This indicates that the important neural centers for male sexual function are located within the lower spinal cord. It is interesting that the lumbar spinal segments contain several neural circuits, showing a clear sexually dimorphism that, in association with neural circuits of the thoracic and sacral spinal cord, are critical in expressing penile reflexes during sexual behavior. To date, many sex differences in the spinal cord have been discovered. Interestingly, most of these are male dominant. Substantial evidence of sexually dimorphic neural circuits in the spinal cord have been reported in many animal models, but major issues remain unknown. For example, it is not known how the different circuits cooperatively function during male sexual behavior. In this review, therefore, the anatomical and functional significance of the sexually dimorphic nuclei in the spinal cord corresponding to the expression of male sexual behavior is discussed.

  16. Symptomatic spinal cord deformity secondary to a redundant intramedullary shunt catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quencer, R.M.; Montalvo Morse, B.M.; Green, B.A.; Eismont, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    Right arm pain, motor and sensory loss in the right arm and right facial numbness recurred in a 27 year old quadraplegic shortly after a posttraumatic spinal cord cyst (PTSCC) was shunted via a catheter into the adjacent subarachnoid space. Although shunt malfunction was clinically suspected, metrizamide computed tomography (MCT) suggested that redundancy of the catheter had caused deformity of the spinal cord. This hypothesis was confirmed at surgery when intraoperative spinal sonography (IOSS) showed that the spinal cord deformity at C 1 -C 2 disappeared when the catheter was withdrawn. This case shows that new or recurrent spinal cord symptoms may be due to a mechanical deformity of the cord rather than shunt malfunction, that restricting the length of the shunt catheter which is used to decompress PTSCCs is important, and that IOSS is an indispensible tool for visualizing the changes in spinal cord morphology during shunting procedures. (orig.)

  17. Compressed sensing & sparse filtering

    CERN Document Server

    Carmi, Avishy Y; Godsill, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    This book is aimed at presenting concepts, methods and algorithms ableto cope with undersampled and limited data. One such trend that recently gained popularity and to some extent revolutionised signal processing is compressed sensing. Compressed sensing builds upon the observation that many signals in nature are nearly sparse (or compressible, as they are normally referred to) in some domain, and consequently they can be reconstructed to within high accuracy from far fewer observations than traditionally held to be necessary. Apart from compressed sensing this book contains other related app

  18. zlib compression library

    OpenAIRE

    Gailly, Jean-loup; Adler, Mark

    2004-01-01

    (taken from http://www.gzip.org/ on 2004-12-01) zlib is designed to be a free, general-purpose, legally unencumbered -- that is, not covered by any patents -- lossless data-compression library for use on virtually any computer hardware and operating system. The zlib data format is itself portable across platforms. Unlike the LZW compression method used in Unix compress(1) and in the GIF image format, the compression method currently used in zlib essentially never expands the data. (LZW ca...

  19. Breaking of rod-shaped model material during compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Kulaviak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The breakage of a model anisometric dry granular material caused by uniaxial compression was studied. The bed of uniform rod-like pasta particles (8 mm long, aspect ratio 1:8 was compressed (Gamlen Tablet Press and their size distribution was measured after each run (Dynamic Image Analysing. The compression dynamics was recorded and the effect of several parameters was tested (rate of compression, volume of granular bed, pressure magnitude and mode of application. Besides the experiments, numerical modelling of the compressed breakable material was performed as well, employing the DEM approach (Discrete Element Method. The comparison between the data and the model looks promising.

  20. Emittance Growth during Bunch Compression in the CTF-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, Tor O

    1999-02-26

    Measurements of the beam emittance during bunch compression in the CLIC Test Facility (CTF-II) are described. The measurements were made with different beam charges and different energy correlations versus the bunch compressor settings which were varied from no compression through the point of full compression and to over-compression. Significant increases in the beam emittance were observed with the maximum emittance occurring near the point of full (maximal) compression. Finally, evaluation of possible emittance dilution mechanisms indicate that coherent synchrotron radiation was the most likely cause.

  1. Emittance Growth during Bunch Compression in the CTF-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raubenheimer, Tor O.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of the beam emittance during bunch compression in the CLIC Test Facility (CTF-II) are described. The measurements were made with different beam charges and different energy correlations versus the bunch compressor settings which were varied from no compression through the point of full compression and to over-compression. Significant increases in the beam emittance were observed with the maximum emittance occurring near the point of full (maximal) compression. Finally, evaluation of possible emittance dilution mechanisms indicate that coherent synchrotron radiation was the most likely cause

  2. ADVANCED RECIPROCATING COMPRESSION TECHNOLOGY (ARCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danny M. Deffenbaugh; Klaus Brun; Ralph E. Harris; J. Pete Harrell; Robert J. Mckee; J. Jeffrey Moore; Steven J. Svedeman; Anthony J. Smalley; Eugene L. Broerman; Robert A Hart; Marybeth G. Nored; Ryan S. Gernentz; Shane P. Siebenaler

    2005-12-01

    The U.S. natural gas pipeline industry is facing the twin challenges of increased flexibility and capacity expansion. To meet these challenges, the industry requires improved choices in gas compression to address new construction and enhancement of the currently installed infrastructure. The current fleet of installed reciprocating compression is primarily slow-speed integral machines. Most new reciprocating compression is and will be large, high-speed separable units. The major challenges with the fleet of slow-speed integral machines are: limited flexibility and a large range in performance. In an attempt to increase flexibility, many operators are choosing to single-act cylinders, which are causing reduced reliability and integrity. While the best performing units in the fleet exhibit thermal efficiencies between 90% and 92%, the low performers are running down to 50% with the mean at about 80%. The major cause for this large disparity is due to installation losses in the pulsation control system. In the better performers, the losses are about evenly split between installation losses and valve losses. The major challenges for high-speed machines are: cylinder nozzle pulsations, mechanical vibrations due to cylinder stretch, short valve life, and low thermal performance. To shift nozzle pulsation to higher orders, nozzles are shortened, and to dampen the amplitudes, orifices are added. The shortened nozzles result in mechanical coupling with the cylinder, thereby, causing increased vibration due to the cylinder stretch mode. Valve life is even shorter than for slow speeds and can be on the order of a few months. The thermal efficiency is 10% to 15% lower than slow-speed equipment with the best performance in the 75% to 80% range. The goal of this advanced reciprocating compression program is to develop the technology for both high speed and low speed compression that will expand unit flexibility, increase thermal efficiency, and increase reliability and integrity

  3. Correlation of force control with regional spinal DTI in patients with cervical spondylosis without signs of spinal cord injury on conventional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Påvel G; Sanchez, Katherine; Ozcan, Fidan; Rannou, François; Poiraudeau, Serge; Feydy, Antoine; Maier, Marc A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate spinal cord structure in patients with cervical spondylosis where conventional MRI fails to reveal spinal cord damage. We performed a cross-sectional study of patients with cervical spondylosis without conventional MRI findings of spinal cord damage and healthy controls. Subjects were studied using spinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), precision grip and foot force-tracking tasks, and a clinical examination including assessment of neurological signs. A regional analysis of lateral and medial spinal white matter across multiple cervical levels (C1-C5) was performed. DTI revealed reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased radial diffusivity (RD) in the lateral spinal cord at the level of greatest compression (lowest Pavlov ratio) in patients (p spondylosis had greater error and longer release duration in both grip and foot force-tracking. Similar spinal cord deficits were present in patients without neurological signs. Increased error in grip and foot tracking (low accuracy) correlated with increased RD in the lateral spinal cord at the level of greatest compression (p ≤ 0.01). Spinal DTI can detect subtle spinal cord damage of functional relevance in cervical spondylosis, even in patients without signs on conventional T2-imaging and without neurological signs. DTI reveals spinal cord changes in cervical spondylosis with few symptoms. DTI changes were present despite normal spinal cord on conventional MRI. DTI parameters correlated with force control accuracy in hand and foot. Spinal DTI is a promising technique for patients with cervical spondylosis.

  4. Acute Traumatic Cervical Cord Injury in Pediatric Patients with os Odontoideum: A Series of 6 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengfeng; Wang, Honggang; Liu, Chao

    2015-06-01

    Os odontoideum can lead to instability of the atlantoaxial joint and places the spinal cord at significant risk for acute traumatic catastrophic events or chronic neurologic change. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively review acute cervical cord injury after minor trauma in 6 pediatric patients with os odontoideum. Between 2012 and 2013, 6 pediatric patients with os odontoideum who suffered acute traumatic cervical cord injury were reviewed retrospectively. Their clinical history, neurologic symptoms, radiological investigations, follow-up period, American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment classification, and motor score were reviewed. There were 2 male and 4 female subjects ranging in age from 4 to 18 years (mean 11.8 years). Before the traumatic injury, 2 cases were asymptomatic and 4 complained of myelopathic feature with unsteadiness on feet. Falls were the most common injury (n = 5), followed by a minor motor vehicle accident (n = 1). Atlantoaxial instability and cord compression were presented in all cases with dynamic cervical lateral radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. Most patients presented with spinal cord thinning and hyperintensity on T2-weighted sequences in magnetic resonance imaging. Spinal cord compression was anterior in 2 cases and both anterior and posterior in 4. Two patients was classified as ASIA B, 1 as ASIA C, and 3 as ASIA D category on admission. Two patients presented with respiratory failure with mechanical ventilation for over 2 weeks in perioperative period. Postoperatively, all patients improved neurologically and clinically after underwent posterior atlantoaxial fixation and fusion. Pediatric patients with asymptomatic or myelopathic atlantoaxial instability secondary to os odontoideum are at risk for acute spinal cord injury even after minor traumatic injury. Sufficient fixation and fusion should be undertaken as prophylactic treatment of developing myelopathy and to improve neurologic symptoms with

  5. Clinical and imaging findings in spinal cord arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Heum; Kim, Dong Ik; Yoon, Pyeong Ho; Jeon, Pyoung; Ihn, Yeon Kwon

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the findings of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and selective spinal angiography of spinal cord arteriovenous malformations (SCAVMs) and to investigate the correlation of these findings with the development of clinical symptoms. In 16 patients diagnosed as suffering from SCAVMs, MR imaging and selective spinal angiograms were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with clinical symptoms. Clinical data were reviewed, especially concerning the mode of onset of clinical symptoms, and MR images of SCAVMs were evaluated with regard to the following parameters: spinal cord swelling with T2 hyperintensity, cord atrophy, intramedullary hemorrhage, and contrast enhancement of the spinal cord. Selective spinal angiographic findings of SCAVMs were also evaluated in terms of the following , parameters: type of SCAVM, presence of aneurysms, and patterns of venous drainage. Imaging findings were also correlated with the development of clinical symptoms. Systematic evaluation of the findings of MR imaging and angiography provides detailed information on the type of AVM and status of the spinal cord parenchyma, and this can be correlated with clinical manifestations of SCAVM. In patients suffering from this condition, spinal cord dysfunction due to venous congestion appears to be the main cause of clinical symptoms. (author). 18 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  6. Acute neck pain caused by pseudogout attack of calcified cervical yellow ligament: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Abe, Toshiki; Abe, Eiji; Kikuchi, Kazuma; Noguchi, Hideaki; Konno, Norikazu; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-05-30

    Calcification of the yellow ligament sometimes compresses the spinal cord and can induce myelopathy. Usually, the calcification does not induce acute neck pain. We report a case of a patient with acute neck pain caused by calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate in a calcified cervical yellow ligament. A 70-year-old Japanese woman presented with acute neck pain. She had a moderately high fever (37.5 °C), and her neck pain was so severe that she could not move her neck in any direction. Computed tomography showed a high-density area between the C5 and C6 laminae suspicious for calcification of the yellow ligament. Magnetic resonance imaging showed intermediate-signal intensity on T1-weighted imaging and high-signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging surrounding a low-signal region on both T1- and T2-weighted imaging with cord compression. There was a turbid, yellow fluid collection in the yellow ligament at the time of operation. Histologically, calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals were found in the fluid, and she was diagnosed as having a pseudogout attack of the yellow ligament. Pseudogout attack of the cervical yellow ligament is rare, but this clinical entity should be added to the differential diagnosis of acute neck pain, especially when calcification of the yellow ligament exists.

  7. Directly measuring spinal cord blood flow and spinal cord perfusion pressure via the collateral network: correlations with changes in systemic blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kise, Yuya; Kuniyoshi, Yukio; Inafuku, Hitoshi; Nagano, Takaaki; Hirayasu, Tsuneo; Yamashiro, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    During thoracoabdominal surgery in which segmental arteries are sacrificed over a large area, blood supply routes from collateral networks have received attention as a means of avoiding spinal cord injury. The aim of this study was to investigate spinal cord blood supply through a collateral network by directly measuring spinal cord blood flow and spinal cord perfusion pressure experimentally. In beagle dogs (n = 8), the thoracoabdominal aorta and segmental arteries L1-L7 were exposed, and a temporary bypass was created for distal perfusion. Next, a laser blood flow meter was placed on the spinal dura mater in the L5 region to measure the spinal cord blood flow. The following were measured simultaneously when the direct blood supply from segmental arteries L2-L7 to the spinal cord was stopped: mean systemic blood pressure, spinal cord perfusion pressure (blood pressure within the aortic clamp site), and spinal cord blood flow supplied via the collateral network. These variables were then investigated for evidence of correlations. Positive correlations were observed between mean systemic blood pressure and spinal cord blood flow during interruption of segmental artery flow both with (r = 0.844, P flow with and without distal perfusion (r = 0.803, P network from outside the interrupted segmental arteries, and high systemic blood pressure (∼1.33-fold higher) was needed to obtain the preclamping spinal cord blood flow, whereas 1.68-fold higher systemic blood pressure was needed when distal perfusion was halted. Spinal cord blood flow is positively correlated with mean systemic blood pressure and spinal cord perfusion pressure under spinal cord ischemia caused by clamping a wide range of segmental arteries. In open and endovascular thoracic and thoracoabdominal surgery, elevating mean systemic blood pressure is a simple and effective means of increasing spinal cord blood flow, and measuring spinal cord perfusion pressure seems to be useful for monitoring

  8. Cutting the Cord-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the view from the rear hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting from the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn took place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

  9. Cutting the Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the view from the front hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting off the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn could take place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

  10. Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplant and surgical decompression in a dog with chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Katsutoshi; Harada, Yasuji; Kunimi, Maki; Takemitsu, Hiroshi; Hara, Yasushi; Nakamura, Tatsuo; Tagawa, Masahiro

    2015-02-01

    In dogs with deep analgesia caused by acute spinal cord injury from thoracolumbar disk herniation, autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplant may improve recovery. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplant in a dog that had paraplegia and deep analgesia caused by chronic spinal cord injury. Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplant was performed in a dog having paraplegia and analgesia for 3 years that was caused by a chronic spinal cord injury secondary to Hansen type I thoracolumbar disk herniation. Functional recovery was evaluated with electrophysiologic studies and the Texas Spinal Cord Injury Scale. Somatosensory evoked potentials were absent before transplant but were detected after transplant. Functional improvement was noted (Texas Spinal Cord Injury Scale: before transplant, 0; after transplant, 6). No adverse events were observed. Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplant into the subarachnoid space may be a safe and beneficial treatment for chronic spinal cord injury in dogs.

  11. Severe Ventral Erosion of Penis Caused by Indwelling Urethral Catheter and Inflation of Foley Balloon in Urethra—Need to Create List of “Never Events in Spinal Cord Injury” in order to Prevent These Complications from Happening in Paraplegic and Tetraplegic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Vaidyanathan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Never Events are serious, largely preventable patient safety incidents that should not occur if the available preventative measures have been implemented. We propose that a list of “Never Events” is created for spinal cord injury patients in order to improve the quality of care. To begin with, following two preventable complications related to management of neuropathic bladder may be included in this list of “Never Events.” (i Severe ventral erosion of glans penis and penile shaft caused by indwelling urethral catheter; (ii incorrect placement of a Foley catheter leading to inflation of Foley balloon in urethra. If a Never Event occurs, health professionals should report the incident through hospital risk management system to National Patient Safety Agency's Reporting and Learning System, communicate with the patient, family, and their carer as soon as possible about the incident, undertake a comprehensive root cause analysis of what went wrong, how, and why, and implement the changes that have been identified and agreed following the root cause analysis.

  12. Spinal cord stress injury assessment (SCOSIA): clinical applications of mechanical modeling of the spinal cord and brainstem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kenneth H.; Choi, Jae; Wilson, William; Berry, Joel; Henderson, Fraser C., Sr.

    2009-02-01

    Abnormal stretch and strain is a major cause of injury to the spinal cord and brainstem. Such forces can develop from age-related degeneration, congenital malformations, occupational exposure, or trauma such as sporting accidents, whiplash and blast injury. While current imaging technologies provide excellent morphology and anatomy of the spinal cord, there is no validated diagnostic tool to assess mechanical stresses exerted upon the spinal cord and brainstem. Furthermore, there is no current means to correlate these stress patterns with known spinal cord injuries and other clinical metrics such as neurological impairment. We have therefore developed the spinal cord stress injury assessment (SCOSIA) system, which uses imaging and finite element analysis to predict stretch injury. This system was tested on a small cohort of neurosurgery patients. Initial results show that the calculated stress values decreased following surgery, and that this decrease was accompanied by a significant decrease in neurological symptoms. Regression analysis identified modest correlations between stress values and clinical metrics. The strongest correlations were seen with the Brainstem Disability Index (BDI) and the Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS), whereas the weakest correlations were seen with the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scale. SCOSIA therefore shows encouraging initial results and may have wide applicability to trauma and degenerative disease involving the spinal cord and brainstem.

  13. Anisotropic Concrete Compressive Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2017-01-01

    When the load carrying capacity of existing concrete structures is (re-)assessed it is often based on compressive strength of cores drilled out from the structure. Existing studies show that the core compressive strength is anisotropic; i.e. it depends on whether the cores are drilled parallel...

  14. Cord Blood-Derived Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells: Current Challenges in Engraftment, Infection, and Ex Vivo Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiro Kita

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Umbilical cord blood has served as an alternative to bone marrow for hematopoietic transplantation since the late 1980s. Numerous clinical studies have proven the efficacy of umbilical cord blood. Moreover, the possible immaturity of cells in umbilical cord blood gives more options to recipients with HLA mismatch and allows for the use of umbilical cord blood from unrelated donors. However, morbidity and mortality rates associated with hematopoietic malignancies still remain relatively high, even after cord blood transplantation. Infections and relapse are the major causes of death after cord blood transplantation in patients with hematopoietic diseases. Recently, new strategies have been introduced to improve these major problems. Establishing better protocols for simple isolation of primitive cells and ex vivo expansion will also be very important. In this short review, we discuss several recent promising findings related to the technical improvement of cord blood transplantation.

  15. Imaging evaluation of vocal cord paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Marcelo de Mattos; Magalhaes, Fabiana Pizanni; Dadalto, Gabriela Bijos; Moura, Marina Vimieiro Timponi de [Axial Centro de Imagem, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: marcelomgarcia@superig.com.br, e-mail: ce@axialmg.com.br

    2009-09-15

    Vocal cord paralysis is a common cause of hoarseness. It may be secondary to many types of lesions along the cranial nerve X pathway and its branches, particularly the laryngeal recurrent nerves. Despite the idiopathic nature of a great number of cases, imaging methods play a very significant role in the investigation of etiologic factors, such as thyroid and esophagus neoplasias with secondary invasion of the laryngeal recurrent nerves. Other conditions such as aortic and right subclavian artery aneurysms also may be found. The knowledge of local anatomy and related diseases is of great importance for the radiologist, so that he can tailor the examination properly to allow an appropriate diagnosis and therapy planning. Additionally, considering that up to 35% of patients with vocal cord paralysis are asymptomatic, the recognition of radiological findings indicative of this condition is essential for the radiologist who must warn the referring physician on the imaging findings. In the present study, the authors review the anatomy and main diseases related to vocal cord paralysis, demonstrating them through typical cases evaluated by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, besides describing radiological findings of laryngeal abnormalities indicative of this condition. (author)

  16. Adenocarcinoma of the prostate and metastatic medullary compression. A retrospective study of 22 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens de Lichtenberg, M; Kvist, E; Hjortberg, P

    1992-01-01

    A retrospective study of 709 patients with prostatic cancer was carried out. Twenty-two developed medullary cord compression (an incidence of 3%). All but two of the 22 patients were treated by radiation and 10 had additional hormonal treatment. Ten had some benefit from the treatment, but only 2...

  17. Alterations in cardiac autonomic control in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Liu, Nan; Malmqvist, Lasse; Wecht, Jill Maria; Krassioukov, Andrei

    2018-01-01

    A spinal cord injury (SCI) interferes with the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The effect on the cardiovascular system will depend on the extent of damage to the spinal/central component of ANS. The cardiac changes are caused by loss of supraspinal sympathetic control and relatively increased parasympathetic cardiac control. Decreases in sympathetic activity result in heart rate and the arterial blood pressure changes, and may cause arrhythmias, in particular bradycardia, with the risk of cardiac arrest in those with cervical or high thoracic injuries. The objective of this review is to give an update of the current knowledge related to the alterations in cardiac autonomic control following SCI. With this purpose the review includes the following subheadings: 2. Neuro-anatomical plasticity and cardiac control 2.1 Autonomic nervous system and the heart 2.2 Alteration in autonomic control of the heart following spinal cord injury 3. Spinal shock and neurogenic shock 3.1 Pathophysiology of spinal shock 3.2 Pathophysiology of neurogenic shock 4. Autonomic dysreflexia 4.1 Pathophysiology of autonomic dysreflexia 4.2 Diagnosis of autonomic dysreflexia 5. Heart rate/electrocardiography following spinal cord injury 5.1 Acute phase 5.2 Chronic phase 6. Heart rate variability 6.1 Time domain analysis 6.2 Frequency domain analysis 6.3 QT-variability index 6.4 Nonlinear (fractal) indexes 7. Echocardiography 7.1 Changes in cardiac structure following spinal cord injury 7.2 Changes in cardiac function following spinal cord injury 8. International spinal cord injury cardiovascular basic data set and international standards to document the remaining autonomic function in spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Testing framework for compression methods

    OpenAIRE

    Štoček, Ondřej

    2008-01-01

    There are many algorithms for data compression. These compression methods often achieve different compression rate and also use computer resources differently. In practice a combination of compression is usually used instead of standalone compression methods. The software tool can be evolved, where we can easily combine existing compression methods to new one and test it consequently. Main goal of this work is to propound such tool and implement it. Further goal is to implement basic library ...

  19. Ethical issues relating the the banking of umbilical cord blood in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdez-Martinez Edith

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Umbilical cord banks are a central component, as umbilical cord tissue providers, in both medical treatment and scientific research with stem cells. But, whereas the creation of umbilical cord banks is seen as successful practice, it is perceived as a risky style of play by others. This article examines and discusses the ethical, medical and legal considerations that arise from the operation of umbilical cord banks in Mexico. Discussion A number of experts have stated that the use of umbilical cord goes beyond the mere utilization of human tissues for the purpose of treatment. This tissue is also used in research studies: genetic studies, studies to evaluate the effectiveness of new antibiotics, studies to identify new proteins, etc. Meanwhile, others claim that the law and other norms for the functioning of cord banks are not consistent and are poorly defined. Some of these critics point out that the confidentiality of donor information is handled differently in different places. The fact that private cord banks offer their services as "biological insurance" in order to obtain informed consent by promising the parents that the tissue that will be stored insures the health of their child in the future raises the issue of whether the consent is freely given or given under coercion. Another consideration that must be made in relation to privately owned cord banks has to do with the ownership of the stored umbilical cord. Summary Conflicts between moral principles and economic interests (non-moral principles cause dilemmas in the clinical practice of umbilical cord blood storage and use especially in privately owned banks. This article presents a reflection and some of the guidelines that must be followed by umbilical cord banks in order to deal with these conflicts. This reflection is based on the fundamental notions of ethics and public health and seeks to be a contribution towards the improvement of umbilical cord banks

  20. A comparative experimental study on engine operating on premixed charge compression ignition and compression ignition mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhiogade Girish E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available New combustion concepts have been recently developed with the purpose to tackle the problem of high emissions level of traditional direct injection Diesel engines. A good example is the premixed charge compression ignition combustion. A strategy in which early injection is used causing a burning process in which the fuel burns in the premixed condition. In compression ignition engines, soot (particulate matter and NOx emissions are an extremely unsolved issue. Premixed charge compression ignition is one of the most promising solutions that combine the advantages of both spark ignition and compression ignition combustion modes. It gives thermal efficiency close to the compression ignition engines and resolves the associated issues of high NOx and particulate matter, simultaneously. Premixing of air and fuel preparation is the challenging part to achieve premixed charge compression ignition combustion. In the present experimental study a diesel vaporizer is used to achieve premixed charge compression ignition combustion. A vaporized diesel fuel was mixed with the air to form premixed charge and inducted into the cylinder during the intake stroke. Low diesel volatility remains the main obstacle in preparing premixed air-fuel mixture. Exhaust gas re-circulation can be used to control the rate of heat release. The objective of this study is to reduce exhaust emission levels with maintaining thermal efficiency close to compression ignition engine.

  1. Radio frequency pulse compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1988-12-01

    High gradients require peak powers. One possible way to generate high peak powers is to generate a relatively long pulse at a relatively low power and compress it into a shorter pulse with higher peak power. It is possible to compress before dc to rf conversion as is done for the relativistic klystron or after dc to rf conversion as is done with SLED. In this note only radio frequency pulse compression (RFPC) is considered. Three methods of RFPC will be discussed: SLED, BEC, and REC. 3 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  2. Experimental contusion of spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemecek, S.; Suba, P.

    1982-01-01

    In 34 rabbits with intensive acute spinal trauma caused by an impact, 125 I-labelled human albumin (IHSA) was i.v. administered before injury and the animals were killed after 3 and 24 hours. In another series of experiments, IHSA was administered after injury, i.e., one hour before killing the animals, if they survived, and after 3, 24 and 48 hours. The radioactivity was measured in 1 cm long portions of the spinal cord and compared with serum values. The outflow of plasma from blood vessels was restricted to the site of the injury proper and declined with the period of survival. Exudation was minimal, but still present 48 hours after injury. From this site, as revealed by administration of IHSA before injury, the vasogenic oedema was propagated longitudinally by the spine to neighbouring segments. After 24 hours it proceeded further than after 3 hours. This investigation confirms and supplements former findings pertaining to the microscopic evaluation of spinal trauma after administration of Evans blue. Radioisotope labelled albumin revealed more sensitively the presence of albumin in tissue than Evans blue. (author)

  3. Civilian gunshot injuries of the spinal cord: a systematic review of the current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Gursukhman S; Ghag, Arvindera; Prokuski, Vanessa; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Radcliff, Kristen E

    2013-12-01

    The principles that guide management of spinal cord injury (SCI) derive from injury resulting from blunt trauma, not gunshot wounds. Civilian gunshot-induced spinal cord injury (CGSWSCI) is a common, potentially serious cause of neurological deficit; there is disagreement about whether the same approaches used for SCI caused by blunt-force trauma should apply to gunshot-induced SCI. We reviewed the literature to answer the following questions regarding presentation and outcome of gunshot wound-induced SCI: (1) Are there differences in recovery prognosis between complete SCI and other patterns of SCI in CGSWSCI. (2) Does the use of steroids improve neurological recovery? (3) Does surgery to remove the bullet affect neurological recovery in CGSWSCI? (4) Does surgery result in an increased risk of complications of treatment? We performed a systematic literature review of articles related to civilian gunshot injuries to the spine. Information relating to incidence, pattern of neurological injury, associated injuries, treatment, neurological outcome, and associated complications was extracted. Three independent reviewers assessed the strength of evidence present in the literature by examining quality, quantity, and consistency of results. A total of 15 articles met the predetermined inclusion criteria. Complete SCIs are associated with the worst functional recovery regardless of treatment. Steroids do not appear to have any added benefit in terms of restoring sensory and motor function. There appears to be some neurologic benefit to surgical decompression with intracanalicular bullet retrieval in patients with an incomplete lesion and a cauda equina syndrome. Complication rates are greater in operated patients. These findings should be interpreted with caution because of considerable heterogeneity among the studies in the literature on gunshot-induced SCI and because of generally poor-quality study design and a high associated risk of selection bias. Supportive

  4. Spinal cord injuries in South African Rugby Union (1980 - 2007 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    related spinal cord injuries (SCIs) in South Africa, a retrospective case-series study was conducted on injuries that occurred between 1980 and 2007. We aimed to identify preventable causes to reduce the overall rate of SCIs in South African ...

  5. How plastic are human spinal cord motor circuitries?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lasse; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Perez, Monica A

    2017-01-01

    Human and animal studies have documented that neural circuitries in the spinal cord show adaptive changes caused by altered supraspinal and/or afferent input to the spinal circuitry in relation to learning, immobilization, injury and neurorehabilitation. Reversible adaptations following, e...

  6. The Neuroprotective Effect of Kefir on Spinal Cord Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven, Mustafa; Akman, Tarik; Yener, Ali Umit; Sehitoglu, Muserref Hilal; Yuksel, Yasemin; Cosar, Murat

    2015-05-01

    The main causes of spinal cord ischemia are a variety of vascular pathologies causing acute arterial occlusions. We investigated neuroprotective effects of kefir on spinal cord ischemia injury in rats. Rats were divided into three groups : 1) sham operated control rats; 2) spinal cord ischemia group fed on a standard diet without kefir pretreatment; and 3) spinal cord ischemia group fed on a standard diet plus kefir. Spinal cord ischemia was performed by the infrarenal aorta cross-clamping model. The spinal cord was removed after the procedure. The biochemical and histopathological changes were observed within the samples. Functional assessment was performed for neurological deficit scores. The kefir group was compared with the ischemia group, a significant decrease in malondialdehyde levels was observed (pkefir group were significantly higher than ischemia group (pkefir group is compared with ischemia group, there was a significant decrease in numbers of dead and degenerated neurons (pkefir group compared with ischemia group (pkefir group were significantly higher than ischemia group at 24 h (pkefir pretreatment in spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion reduced oxidative stress and neuronal degeneration as a neuroprotective agent. Ultrastructural studies are required in order for kefir to be developed as a promising therapeutic agent to be utilized for human spinal cord ischemia in the future.

  7. How Do I Deal with Depression and Adjustment to My Spinal Cord Injury?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... worsen pain, make sleep difficult, cause loss of energy, take away your enjoyment of life and make ... pamphlets on depression with spinal cord injury and potential treatment options. Related pages What is a complete ...

  8. Compressed Video Segmentation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kobla, Vikrant; Doermann, David S; Rosenfeld, Azriel

    1996-01-01

    ... changes in content and camera motion. The analysis is performed in the compressed domain using available macroblock and motion vector information, and if necessary, discrete cosine transform (DCT) information...

  9. Mechanical chest compressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Matthew

    2012-09-13

    The authors of this study state that there is a lack of evidence about the efficiency of mechanical devices in producing chest compressions as an adjunct to resuscitation during cardiorespiratory arrest.

  10. Biaxial compression test technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansard, E. T.

    1975-01-01

    Fixture and technique have been developed for predicting behavior of stiffened skin panels under biaxial compressive loading. Tester can load test panel independently in longitudinal and transverse directions. Data can also be obtained in combined mode.

  11. Muon cooling: longitudinal compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yu; Antognini, Aldo; Bertl, Wilhelm; Hildebrandt, Malte; Khaw, Kim Siang; Kirch, Klaus; Papa, Angela; Petitjean, Claude; Piegsa, Florian M; Ritt, Stefan; Sedlak, Kamil; Stoykov, Alexey; Taqqu, David

    2014-06-06

    A 10  MeV/c positive muon beam was stopped in helium gas of a few mbar in a magnetic field of 5 T. The muon "swarm" has been efficiently compressed from a length of 16 cm down to a few mm along the magnetic field axis (longitudinal compression) using electrostatic fields. The simulation reproduces the low energy interactions of slow muons in helium gas. Phase space compression occurs on the order of microseconds, compatible with the muon lifetime of 2  μs. This paves the way for the preparation of a high-quality low-energy muon beam, with an increase in phase space density relative to a standard surface muon beam of 10^{7}. The achievable phase space compression by using only the longitudinal stage presented here is of the order of 10^{4}.

  12. Craniocaudal motion velocity in the cervical spinal cord in degenerative disease as shown by MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, H.; Inaba, F.; Hirabuki, N.; Nakamura, H. [Osaka University Medical School (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Sakurai, K. [Osaka Teishin Hospital (Japan); Iwasaki, M. [Osaka University Medical School, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery; Harada, K. [Kaizuka Municipal Hospital (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate, by means of MR phase imaging, the effects of compression on the velocity of craniocaudal motion in the spinal cord. Material and Methods: Spin-echo sequences with velocity encoding gradients were used to examine 12 patients with cervical spondylosis and 6 normal volunteers. Oblique-axial phase images at 3 levels (cranial, middle and caudal), were obtained with prospective electrocardiogram gating. The middle level was set at the site where the spinal cord was most severely compressed, and the cranial and caudal sections were set where it was not compressed. Time-velocity curves were generated at these 3 levels and focal velocity change was correlated with motor function in the lower extremities. Results and Conclusion: The cord showed a higher motion velocity at the compression level than at noncompression levels. This paradoxical increase in velocity was observed in 7 out of 8 patients whose lower extremity motor function was impaired. Four patients with normal lower extremity motor function did not demonstrate this increase in velocity. An increase in motion velocity was therefore found to correlate with impaired lower extremity motor function. (orig.).

  13. Deterministic Compressed Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    programs. Examples of such algorithms are the interior point methods [51, 52], Lasso modification to LARS [106, 171], homotopy methods [99], weighted...component analysis . IEEE Signal Processing Letters, 9(2):40–42, 2002. [171] S. J. Kim, K. Koh, M. Lustig, S. Boyd, and D. Gorinevsky. A method for...53 7.3 Analysis of the GAME Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 III Expander-Based Compressed Sensing 61 8 Efficient Compressed

  14. Blind Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Gleichman, Sivan; Eldar, Yonina C.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental principle underlying compressed sensing is that a signal, which is sparse under some basis representation, can be recovered from a small number of linear measurements. However, prior knowledge of the sparsity basis is essential for the recovery process. This work introduces the concept of blind compressed sensing, which avoids the need to know the sparsity basis in both the sampling and the recovery process. We suggest three possible constraints on the sparsity basis that can ...

  15. The Study of Effects of Aqueous and Alcoholic Extracts of Portulaca oleracea Leaves on NT3 Gene Expression in Degeneration of Alpha Neurons after Sciatic Nerve Compression in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokoufe Hejazi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The injuries of peripheral nervous system cause the death of a number of motor cells of the spinal cord. Neurotrophins family genes such as NT3 involve in neuronal survive after nerve injury and their expression changes after it. With due attention to the expansion of portulaca pleracea in the world study was conducted to determine the effects of alcoholic and aqueous extracts of Potulaca oleracea on the NT3 gene expression after sciatic nerve compression in rat. Materials and Methods: This study was performed on 88 male wistar rats that randomly were divided in 13 groups of 6 each. They consisted of control group, 4 compression groups (The sciatic nerve was compressed with locker pincer and 8 treatment groups: compression + treatment with dose of 75 mg/kg of alcoholic and aqueous extract of Portulaca oleracea on days 1 and 7 (never compression was done on the first day. In all groups, Total RNA was extracted from the lumbar spinal cord segment in 1, 7, 14, 28 days and cDNA was synthesized, then NT3 expression changes were compared in groups. Results: There was a significant increase in NT3 gene expression in the compression group compared to control (p<0.001. The NT3 gene expression shows significant increase (p<0.05 in the treatment groups with alcoholic extract (except 1& 28 days. Also, there was no significant difference in gene expression between treatment group with acqueous extract and compression group in 1 and 7 days. A significant decrease was seen in the treatment groups with aqueous extract of purslane compared to compression (p<0.05. The NT3 gene expression shows significant increase in the treatment groups with alcoholic extract compared to treatment groups with aqueous extract in all days (p<0.05. Conclusion: The results reveal the Portulaca oleracea leaves extracts increase the NT3 gene expression after sciatic nerve injury. This effect is more in alcoholic extract than aqueous extract.

  16. Mesenteric plasmacytoma: An unusual cause of an abdominal mass

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 69-year-old HIV-positive man who was not on antiretroviral therapy and had an absolute CD4+ count of 632 cells/μl ... There were no lytic lesions in the spine or pelvis, and no clinical or radiological signs of ... by tumour mass invasion include bone pain and spinal cord compression. Hypercalcaemia is a common ...

  17. Peripheral and central sensitization in remote spinal cord regions contribute to central neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Susan M; Du, Junhui; Tan, Huai Yu; Nesic, Olivera; Hargett, Gregory L; Bopp, Anne C; Yamani, Ammar; Lin, Qing; Willis, William D; Hulsebosch, Claire E

    2009-12-15

    Central neuropathic pain (CNP) developing after spinal cord injury (SCI) is described by the region affected: above-level, at-level and below-level pain occurs in dermatomes rostral, at/near, or below the SCI level, respectively. People with SCI and rodent models of SCI develop above-level pain characterized by mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Mechanisms underlying this pain are unknown and the goals of this study were to elucidate components contributing to the generation of above-level CNP. Following a thoracic (T10) contusion, forelimb nociceptors had enhanced spontaneous activity and were sensitized to mechanical and thermal stimulation of the forepaws 35 days post-injury. Cervical dorsal horn neurons showed enhanced responses to non-noxious and noxious mechanical stimulation as well as thermal stimulation of receptive fields. Immunostaining dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells and cord segments with activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3, a marker for neuronal injury) ruled out neuronal damage as a cause for above-level sensitization since few C8 DRG cells expressed AFT3 and cervical cord segments had few to no ATF3-labeled cells. Finally, activated microglia and astrocytes were present in thoracic and cervical cord at 35 days post-SCI, indicating a rostral spread of glial activation from the injury site. Based on these data, we conclude that peripheral and central sensitization as well as reactive glia in the uninjured cervical cord contribute to CNP. We hypothesize that reactive glia in the cervical cord release pro-inflammatory substances which drive chronic CNP. Thus a complex cascade of events spanning many cord segments underlies above-level CNP.

  18. Medical image of the week: bilateral vocal cord paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Hook CJ

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old morbidly obese woman with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure secondary to pulmonary emboli required emergency intubation. She was described by the anesthesiologist as having a difficult airway. The patient was liberated from the ventilator after two days. Following extubation she complained of hoarse voice and dyspnea. Physical exam revealed audible stridor. The upper airway was normal by CAT imaging. Flow-volume curve demonstrated marked flattening of both the inspiratory and expiratory limbs, consistent with a fixed extra-thoracic obstruction (Figure 1. Endoscopy revealed the vocal cords to be in the adducted position, with minimal movement throughout the respiratory cycle, consistent with bilateral vocal cord paralysis (Figure 2. Traumatic intubation follows thyroid surgery as the most common cause of bilateral vocal cord paralysis (1. In a minority of patients spontaneous recovery may occur. Surgical treatment options include cordotomy or tracheostomy. Nocturnal BIPAP has been used in patients who decline surgery (2.

  19. Systolic Compression of Epicardial Coronary and Intramural Arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiddin, Saidi A.; Fananapazir, Lameh

    2002-01-01

    It has been suggested that systolic compression of epicardial coronary arteries is an important cause of myocardial ischemia and sudden death in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We examined the associations between sudden death, systolic coronary compression of intra- and epicardial arteries, myocardial perfusion abnormalities, and severity of hypertrophy in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We reviewed the angiograms from 57 children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy for the presence of coronary and septal artery compression; coronary compression was present in 23 (40%). The left anterior descending artery was most often affected, and multiple sites were found in 4 children. Myocardial perfusion abnormalities were more frequently present in children with coronary compression than in those without (94% vs 47%, P = 0.002). Coronary compression was also associated with more severe septal hypertrophy and greater left ventricular outflow gradient. Septal branch compression was present in 65% of the children and was significantly associated with coronary compression, severity of septal hypertrophy, and outflow obstruction. Multivariate analysis showed that septal thickness and septal branch compression, but not coronary compression, were independent predictors of perfusion abnormalities. Coronary compression was not associated with symptom severity, ventricular tachycardia, or a worse prognosis. We conclude that compression of coronary arteries and their septal branches is common in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and is related to the magnitude of left ventricular hypertrophy. Our findings suggest that coronary compression does not make an important contribution to myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; however, left ventricular hypertrophy and compression of intramural arteries may contribute significantly. (Tex Heart Inst J 2002;29:290–8) PMID:12484613

  20. The effect of Sativex in neuropathic pain and spasticity in spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Sven Robert; Hansen, Rikke Bod Middelhede; Johansen, Inger Lauge

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Neuropathic pain and spasticity after spinal cord injury represent significant but still unresolved problems, which cause considerable suffering and reduced quality of life for patients with spinal cord injury. Treatment of neuropathic pain and spasticity is complicated and patients...... often receive incomplete relief from present available and recommended treatment. Cannabinoids has shown efficacy on both neuropathic pain and spasticity in patients with spinal cord injury, but the studies one the topic has been too small to make a general conclusion for patients with spinal cord...... injury. Aims: To investigate the effect of Sativex (cannabinoid agonist given as an oral mucosal spray), on neuropathic pain and spasticity in patients with spinal cord injury. Methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study. We will include 30 patients with neuropathic pain...