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Sample records for causing community-acquired urinary

  1. Characterization of Escherichia coli causing community acquired urinary tract infections in Mexico City.

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    Belmont-Monroy, Laura; Ribas-Aparicio, Rosa María; Navarro-Ocaña, Armando; Manjarrez-Hernández, H Ángel; Gavilanes-Parra, Sandra; Aparicio-Ozores, Gerardo; Cauich-Sánchez, Patricia Isidra; Garza-Ramos, Ulises; Molina-López, José

    2017-02-01

    The O25-ST131 clone was identified within 169 uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains. The 44.8% of the 29 O25-ST131 clones detected were positive to least to one extended-spectrum β-lactamase gene. The phylogroup D was mainly found. The O25-ST131 clone appeared to be associated with community-acquired UTI in Mexico City.

  2. Urinary tract infection caused by community-acquired extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing bacteria in infants.

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    Kim, Yun Hee; Yang, Eun Mi; Kim, Chan Jong

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by resistant strains of bacteria is increasingly prevalent in children. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics and risk factors for UTI caused by community-acquired extended-spectrum β-lactamase (CA-ESBL)-producing bacteria in infants. This was a retrospective study performed over 5 years in a single Korean center. Hospitalized infants with febrile UTI were enrolled and divided into two groups (CA-ESBL vs. CA non-ESBL UTI). The yearly prevalence was calculated. Baseline characteristics and clinical course such as fever duration, laboratory and radiological findings were compared between the two groups. Risk factors associated with the CA-ESBL UTI were investigated. Among the enrolled infants (n=185), 31 (17%) had CA-ESBL UTI. The yearly prevalence of ESBL of CA-ESBL UTI increased during the study (0% in 2010, 22.2% in 2015). Infants with CA-ESBL UTI had a longer duration of fever after initiating antibiotics (2.0±1.1 vs. 1.5±0.6 days, p=0.020). Cortical defects on renal scan and early treatment failure were more frequent in CA-ESBL (64.5 vs. 42.2%, p=0.023; 22.6 vs. 4.5%, p=0.001). A logistic regression analysis revealed that urinary tract abnormalities and previous UTI were independent risk factors for CA-EBSL UTI (odds ratio, 2.7; p=0.025; 10.3; p=0.022). The incidence of UTI caused by ESBL-producing bacteria has increased in Korean infants. Recognition of the clinical course and risk factors for ESLB-producing UTI may help to determine appropriate guidelines for its management. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  3. Community-acquired febrile urinary tract infection caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing bacteria in hospitalised infants.

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    Hernández Marco, Roberto; Guillén Olmos, Elena; Bretón-Martínez, José Rafael; Giner Pérez, Lourdes; Casado Sánchez, Benedicta; Fujkova, Julia; Salamanca Campos, Marina; Nogueira Coito, José Miguel

    2017-05-01

    Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria are infrequent pathogens of urinary tract infections in children. The objective of our study was to investigate the presence, clinically associated characteristics and risk factors for acquisition of urinary tract infection/acute pyelonephritis (UTI/APN) in hospitalised children <2years old caused by community-acquired ESBL. A case-control study in a second level community hospital in Spain, in which 537 episodes of UTI/APN were investigated in a retrospective study between November 2005 and August 2014. Cases were patients with ESBL strains. For each case, four ESBL-negative controls were selected. A questionnaire with the variables of interest was completed for every patient, and the groups were compared. ESBL-positive strains were found in 19 (3,5%) cultures. Of these 16 (84%) were Escherichia coli. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) of any grade was more frequent in the ESBL group (60 vs. 29%), although without statistical significance. Relapses were more frequent in the ESBL group (42% vs. 18%) (P=.029; OR=3.2; 95%CI: 1.09-9.5). The prevalence of UTI/APN due to ESBL-positive strains increased slightly from 2.7% in the period 2005-2009 to 4.4% in the period 2010-2014. ESBL UTI/APN were associated with more frequent relapses. VUR of any grade was twice more frequent in the ESBL group. Piperacillin/tazobactam, fosfomycin and meropenem showed an excellent activity. Aminoglycosides may be a therapeutic option, and in our patients gentamicin was the antibiotic most used. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  4. Resistance to fluoroquinolones and treatment failure/short-term relapse of community-acquired urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli.

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    Gagliotti, Carlo; Buttazzi, Rossella; Sforza, Stefano; Moro, Maria Luisa

    2008-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the impact of resistance to fluoroquinolones on the short-term outcome of community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by Escherichia coli. Patients were identified and followed, during 2006, using the health care databases of the Emilia-Romagna Region. The outcome of interest was the treatment failure/short-term relapse (the re-isolation of E. coli from urine between 4 and 30 days after the first isolation). Resistance to fluoroquinolones increases the risk of treatment failure/short-term relapse in women with uncomplicated community-acquired UTIs caused by E. coli (Rate Ratio=1.85, 95% CI 1.32-2.60). The efficacy of fluoroquinolones for community-acquired UTIs of men was significantly modified by the resistance status of E. coli. Prescription of these agents was associated with a reduced occurrence of the outcome only in men with a ciprofloxacin sensitive first isolate (Rate Ratio=0.50, 95% CI 0.25-0.99). Resistance to fluoroquinolones of E. coli is a growing problem with a negative impact on the outcome of community-acquired UTIs; therefore, the prescription of these agents should be limited to infections for which they are recommended, avoiding their use in uncomplicated UTIs.

  5. Risk factors for community-acquired urinary tract infection caused by ESBL-producing bacteria in children.

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    Kizilca, Ozgur; Siraneci, Rengin; Yilmaz, Alev; Hatipoglu, Nevin; Ozturk, Erkut; Kiyak, Aysel; Ozkok, Dilek

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the risk factors of antimicrobial resistance in children with urinary tract infection caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria. A total of 344 patients diagnosed with urinary tract infection (UTI) between January 2008 and December 2009 were enrolled in this retrospective study. Causative microorganisms were ESBL-producing bacteria in 148 patients and non-ESBL-producing bacteria in 196 patients. There was no difference between the two groups regarding distribution of age, sex and length of follow up. The most frequent causative agent was Escherichia coli, of which 41.4% were ESBL producing. Among Klebsiella species, 53.2% were ESBL producing. The proportion of ESBL-producing bacteria that were resistant to antibiotics was 83.1% for trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, 18.2% for nitrofurantoin, 47.3% for quinolones, and 39.9% for aminoglycosides. For non-ESBL-producing bacteria, the resistance rate was 62.2% for trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, 4.6% for nitrofurantoin, 9.7% for quinolones, and 9.7% for aminoglycosides. Age <1 year, high UTI recurrence rate, long duration of prophylaxis, use of cephalosporins for prophylaxis, hospitalization within the previous 3 months and clean intermittent catheterization were found to be significant risk factors for ESBL-producing bacteria (P < 0.05). Logistic regression analysis identified age <1 year and high recurrence UTI rate to be independent risk factors, increasing the risk 1.74-fold and 2.25-fold, respectively. Recognition of the risk factors for ESBL-producing bacteria may be helpful to determine new policies in the management of UTI. Recurrence of UTI should be prevented especially in the first year of life, and prophylactic cephalosporins should be avoided. © 2012 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2012 Japan Pediatric Society.

  6. Urinary tract infections caused by community-acquired extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing and nonproducing bacteria: a comparative study.

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    Dayan, Noam; Dabbah, Husein; Weissman, Irith; Aga, Ibrahim; Even, Lea; Glikman, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    To study the clinical characteristics and associated risk factors of urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by community-acquired extended-spectrum β-lactamase (CA-ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae. A case-control study at a large community hospital in northern Israel, comparing children who had UTI due to CA-ESBL (n = 25) and CA non-ESBL (n = 125) in 2008-2011. Data were collected from medical charts, telephonic questionnaires administered to all participants, and groups were compared. During the study period, the yearly incidence of CA-ESBL UTI increased significantly. There were no significant differences between the CA-ESBL and CA non-ESBL groups in demographics and clinical outcome. Compared with CA non-ESBL UTI, children with CA-ESBL UTI had a longer hospital stay (5.9 ± 3.3 vs 3.9 ± 2.3 days; P = .003) and higher rates of recent hospitalization (28% vs 4%; P = .001), previous UTI (40% vs 13%; P = .003), urinary tract anomalies (32% vs 5%; P urinary tract anomalies or recurrent UTI) with cephalexin and those with previous hospitalizations are at increased risk for CA-ESBL UTI. Although not associated with higher rates of complications, the multidrug resistant phenotype of CA-ESBL isolates poses a challenge in choosing appropriate empiric and definitive therapy and prolongs hospital stay. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Community acquired urinary tract infection: etiology and bacterial susceptibility

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    Dias Neto José Anastácio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Urinary tract infections (UTI are one of the most common infectious diseases diagnosed. UTI account for a large proportion of antibacterial drug consumption and have large socio-economic impacts. Since the majority of the treatments begins or is done completely empirically, the knowledge of the organisms, their epidemiological characteristics and their antibacterial susceptibility that may vary with time is mandatory. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to report the prevalence of uropathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility of the community acquired UTI diagnosed in our institution and to provide a national data. METHODS: We analyzed retrospectively the results of urine cultures of 402 patients that had community acquired urinary tract infection in the year of 2003. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients in this study was 45.34 ± 23.56 (SD years. There were 242 (60.2% females and 160 (39.8% males. The most commonly isolated organism was Escherichia coli (58%. Klebsiella sp. (8.4% and Enterococcus sp.(7.9% were reported as the next most common organisms. Of all bacteria isolated from community acquired UTI, only 37% were sensitive to ampicillin, 51% to cefalothin and 52% to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The highest levels of susceptibility were to imipenem (96%, ceftriaxone (90%, amikacin (90%, gentamicin (88%, levofloxacin (86%, ciprofloxacin (73%, nitrofurantoin (77% and norfloxacin (75%. CONCLUSION: Gram-negative agents are the most common cause of UTI. Fluoroquinolones remains the choice among the orally administered antibiotics, followed by nitrofurantoin, second and third generation cephalosporins. For severe disease that require parenteral antibiotics the choice should be aminoglycosides, third generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones or imipenem, which were the most effective.

  8. Escherichia coli sequence type 73 as a cause of community acquired urinary tract infection in men and women in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

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    de Souza da-Silva, Ana Paula; de Sousa, Viviane Santos; Martins, Natacha; da Silva Dias, Rubens Clayton; Bonelli, Raquel Regina; Riley, Lee W; Moreira, Beatriz Meurer

    2017-02-07

    Escherichia coli clones ST131, ST69, ST95, and ST73 are frequent causes of urinary tract infections (UTI) and bloodstream infections. Specific clones and virulence profiles of E. coli causing UTI in men has been rarely described. The aim of this study was to characterize patient and clonal characteristics of community-acquired UTI caused by E. coli in men (n=12) and women (n=127) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, complementing a previous work. We characterized isolates in phylogenetic groups, ERIC2-PCR and PFGE types, MLST, genome similarity and virulence gene-profiles. UTI from men were more frequently caused by phylogenetic group B2 isolates (83% versus 42%, respectively, P = 0.01), a group with significantly higher virulence scores compared with women. ST73 was the predominant clone in men (50%) and the second most frequent in women (12%), with the highest virulence score (mean and median=9) among other clones. ST73 gnomes formed at least six clusters. E. coli from men carried significantly higher numbers of virulence genes, such as sfa/focDE (67% versus 27%), hlyA (58% versus 24%), cnf 1 (58% versus 16%), fyuA (100% versus 82%) and MalX (92% versus 44%), compared with isolates from women. These data suggest the predominance and spread of ST73 isolates likely relates to an abundance of virulence determinants.

  9. Determinants of quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli causing community-acquired urinary tract infection in Bejaia, Algeria.

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    Betitra, Yanat; Teresa, Vinuesa; Miguel, Viñas; Abdelaziz, Touati

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of quinolone resistance and the association with other resistance markers among Esherichia coli (E. coli) strains isolated from outpatient with urinary tract infection in north of Algeria. A total of 30 nalidixic acid-resistant E. coli isolates from outpatient with urinary tract infections from January 2010 to April 2011 in north of Algeria (Bejaia) were studied. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by disc diffusion assay, minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of quinolone were determined by microdilution. Mutations in the Quinolone Resistance-Determining Region (QRDR) of gyrA and parC genes and screening for qnr (A, B and S) and bla genes were done by PCR and DNA sequencing. Most of the E. coli isolates (56.66%) were shown to carry mutations in gyrA and parC (gyrA: Ser83Leu + Asp87Asn and parC:Ser80Ile). While, 16.66% had only an alteration in gyrA: Ser83Leu. One isolate produced qnrB-like and two qnrS-like. Four isolates were CTX-M-15 producers associated with TEM-1 producing in one case. Co-expression of blaCTX-M-15 and qnrB was determined in one E. coli isolate. Our findings suggested the community emergence of gyrA and parC alterations and Qnr determinants that contributed to the development and spread of fluoroquinolone resistance in Algerian E. coli isolates. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Multidrug resistance dissemination by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli causing community-acquired urinary tract infection in the Central-Western Region, Brazil.

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    Gonçalves, Laura Fernandes; de Oliveira Martins-Júnior, Paulo; de Melo, Ana Beatriz Fabrício; da Silva, Rafaella Christina Rocha Moreira; de Paulo Martins, Vicente; Pitondo-Silva, André; de Campos, Tatiana Amabile

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work was to analyse extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli strains isolated from outpatients with signs of cystitis in Hospital Universitário de Brasília (Brasília, Brazil) during the period July 2013 to April 2014. E. coli isolated from urine culture were identified and their antibiotic susceptibility profile was determined by VITEK 2. ESBL-producing strains identified were submitted to PCR for Clermont phylotyping, CTX-M group typing and virulence determinant detection, and clonal relationships were determined by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR. One strain belonging to each cluster of the dendrogram obtained by ERIC-PCR was selected for multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Among 324 uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) analysed, 23 (7.1%) were identified as producing ESBL. All ESBL-producing strains were multidrug-resistant (MDR), i.e. presented non-susceptibility to at least one agent in three or more antimicrobial categories. Of the 23 ESBL-producing UPEC strains, 9 were assigned to phylogenetic group B2 and 7 each belonged to phylogenetic groups D and A. Virulence genotyping showed that aer was the most prevalent gene observed among the strains (21/23), followed by traT (18/23), pap (5/23), afa (5/23), PAI (5/23), cnf (3/23) and sfa (1/23). Analysis of the dendrogram showed that multidrug resistance and CTX-M ESBL groups were distributed among all strains, independent of clonality and phylogroup. Sequence types (STs) associated with pandemic resistance clones, such as B2-ST131 and D-ST648, were observed among the isolates. In conclusion, the results showed worrisome evidence of the potential for antibiotic multiresistant dissemination among community-acquired urinary tract infection caused by UPEC. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Risk factors for community-acquired urinary tract infections caused by ESBL-producing enterobacteriaceae--a case-control study in a low prevalence country.

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    Arne Søraas

    Full Text Available Community-acquired urinary tract infection (CA-UTI is the most common infection caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae, but the clinical epidemiology of these infections in low prevalence countries is largely unknown. A population based case-control study was conducted to assess risk factors for CA-UTI caused by ESBL-producing E. coli or K. pneumoniae. The study was carried out in a source population in Eastern Norway, a country with a low prevalence of infections caused by ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae. The study population comprised 100 cases and 190 controls with CA-UTI caused by ESBL-producing and non-ESBL-producing E. coli or K. pneumoniae, respectively. The following independent risk factors of ESBL-positive UTIs were identified: Travel to Asia, The Middle East or Africa either during the past six weeks (Odds ratio (OR = 21; 95% confidence interval (CI: 4.5-97 or during the past 6 weeks to 24 months (OR = 2.3; 95% CI: 1.1-4.4, recent use of fluoroquinolones (OR = 16; 95% CI: 3.2-80 and β-lactams (except mecillinam (OR = 5.0; 95% CI: 2.1-12, diabetes mellitus (OR = 3.2; 95% CI: 1.0-11 and recreational freshwater swimming the past year (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.0-4.0. Factors associated with decreased risk were increasing number of fish meals per week (OR = 0.68 per fish meal; 95% CI: 0.51-0.90 and age (OR = 0.89 per 5 year increase; 95% CI: 0.82-0.97. In conclusion, we have identified risk factors that elucidate mechanisms and routes for dissemination of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in a low prevalence country, which can be used to guide appropriate treatment of CA-UTI and targeted infection control measures.

  12. Surveillance of acute community acquired urinary tract bacterial infections

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    Sibanarayan Rath; Rabindra N. Padhy

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To record the antibiotic resistance of community acquired uropathogens over a period of 24 months (May 2011-April 2012). Methods: Urine samples from patients of outpatient department (OPD) were used for isolating urinary tract infection (UTI)-causing bacteria that were cultured on suitable selective media and identified by biochemical tests. Their antibiograms were ascertained by Kirby-Bauer’s disc diffusion method, using 17 antibiotics of 5 different classes. Results: From 2137 urine samples 1332 strains of pathogenic bacteria belonging to 11 species were isolated. Two Gram-positives, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis and nine Gram-negatives, Acinetobacter baumannii, Citrobacter sp., Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated. Both S. aureus and E. faecalis were vancomycin resistant, and resistant-strains of all pathogens increased in each 6-month period of study. Particularly, all Gram-negatives were resistant to nitrofurantoin and co-trimoxazole, the most preferred antibiotics of empiric therapy for UTI, but were moderately resistant to gentamicin, ampicillin, amoxyclav, ofloxacin and gatifloxacin. Most Gram-negatives produced extended spectrum β-lactamase. Conclusions: It was concluded that periodic surveillance of pathogens is an essential corollary in effective health management in any country, as empiric therapy is a common/essential practice in effective clinical management.

  13. Detection of CTX-M-15 beta-lactamases in Enterobacteriaceae causing hospital- and community-acquired urinary tract infections as early as 2004, in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

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    Manyahi, Joel; Moyo, Sabrina J; Tellevik, Marit Gjerde; Ndugulile, Faustine; Urassa, Willy; Blomberg, Bjørn; Langeland, Nina

    2017-04-17

    The spread of Extended Spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) among Enterobacteriaceae and other Gram-Negative pathogens in the community and hospitals represents a major challenge to combat infections. We conducted a study to assess the prevalence and genetic makeup of ESBL-type resistance in bacterial isolates causing community- and hospital-acquired urinary tract infections. A total of 172 isolates of Enterobacteriaceae were collected in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, from patients who met criteria of community and hospital-acquired urinary tract infections. We used E-test ESBL strips to test for ESBL-phenotype and PCR and sequencing for detection of ESBL genes. Overall 23.8% (41/172) of all isolates were ESBL-producers. ESBL-producers were more frequently isolated from hospital-acquired infections (32%, 27/84 than from community-acquired infections (16%, 14/88, p community, respectively. Bla SHV-12 genotypes were only detected in hospital-acquired infections. bla CTX-M-15 is a predominant gene conferring ESBL-production in Enterobacteriaceae causing both hospital- and community-acquired infections in Tanzania.

  14. Tsukamurella infection: a rare cause of community-acquired pneumonia.

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    Mehta, Yatin B; Goswami, Raktima; Bhanot, Nitin; Mehta, Zankhana; Simonelli, Paul

    2011-06-01

    A 79-year-old Asian man was admitted with community-acquired pneumonia. Antimycobacterial therapy was initiated when sputum smears revealed acid fast bacilli. The patient was, however, diagnosed to have pneumonia secondary to Tsukamurella spp. This is an exceedingly rare cause of pneumonia, especially in immunocompetent individuals. Clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment strategies of Tsukamurella pneumonia are discussed with a literature review.

  15. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of Klebsiella pneumoniae from community-acquired recurrent urinary tract infections.

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    Lin, W H; Kao, C Y; Yang, D C; Tseng, C C; Wu, A B; Teng, C H; Wang, M C; Wu, J J

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the pathogenesis of recurrent urinary tract infection (RUTI) and whether it is attributable to reinfection with a new strain or relapse with the primary infecting strain is of considerable importance. Because previous studies regarding community-acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae RUTI are inconclusive, we undertook this study to evaluate the characteristics of the host and the bacterial agent K. pneumoniae in RUTI. A prospective study was designed, using consecutive patients diagnosed with community-acquired K. pneumoniae-related UTI from January 2007 to December 2009. Of the total 468 consecutive episodes, we found 7 patients with RUTI. All the patients with RUTI were elderly (median, 74 years), with diabetes (100 %, 7 out of 7). Clinical K. pneumoniae isolates derived from the same patients with RUTI revealed identical genomic fingerprints, indicating that K. pneumoniae UTI relapsed despite appropriate antibiotic therapy. The antimicrobial resistance, growth curve and biofilm formation of the recurrent isolates did not change. K. pneumoniae strains causing RUTI had more adhesion and invasiveness than the colonization strains (p recurrent strains with the community-acquired UTI strains, the prevalence of diabetes mellitus was significant (100 % vs 53.7 %, p = 0.03) in the RUTI group. Our data suggest that K. pneumoniae strains might be able to persist within the urinary tract despite appropriate antibiotic treatment, and the greater adhesion and invasiveness in the recurrent strains may play an important role in recurrent infections.

  16. Community-Acquired urinary tract infection by pseudomonas oryzihabitans

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    Sunita M Bhatawadekar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas oryzihabitans and Chrysomonas luteola has been placed in CDC group Ve2 and Ve1 respectively. These bacteria appear to be emerging pathogens. P. oryzihabitans was isolated from cases of bacteremia, CNS infections, wound infections, peritonitis, sinusitis, catheter associated infections in AIDS patient, and pneumonia. Most of the reports of P. oryzihabitans infection were of nosocomial origin in individuals with some predisposing factors. We report here a case of community acquired UTI by P. oryzihabitans in an immune-competent patient with stricture of urethra.

  17. CIPROFLOXACIN RESISTANCE PATTERN AMONG BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED URINARY TRACT INFECTION.

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    Reis, Ana Carolina Costa; Santos, Susana Regia da Silva; Souza, Siane Campos de; Saldanha, Milena Góes; Pitanga, Thassila Nogueira; Oliveira, Ricardo Riccio

    2016-07-11

    To identify the main bacterial species associated with community-acquired urinary tract infection (UTI) and to assess the pattern of ciprofloxacin susceptibility among bacteria isolated from urine cultures. We conducted a retrospective study in all the patients with community-acquired UTI seen in Santa Helena Laboratory, Camaçari, Bahia, Brazil during five years (2010-2014). All individuals who had a positive urine culture result were included in this study. A total of 1,641 individuals met the inclusion criteria. Despite the fact that participants were female, we observed a higher rate of resistance to ciprofloxacin in males. The most frequent pathogens identified in urine samples were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. Antimicrobial resistance has been observed mainly for ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole + trimethoprim and ciprofloxacin. Moreover, E. coli has shown the highest rate of ciprofloxacin resistance, reaching 36% of ciprofloxacin resistant strains in 2014. The rate of bacterial resistance to ciprofloxacin observed in the studied population is much higher than expected, prompting the need for rational use of this antibiotic, especially in infections caused by E. coli. Prevention of bacterial resistance can be performed through control measures to limit the spread of resistant microorganisms and a rational use of antimicrobial policy.

  18. CIPROFLOXACIN RESISTANCE PATTERN AMONG BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED URINARY TRACT INFECTION

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    Ana Carolina Costa REIS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Objective: To identify the main bacterial species associated with community-acquired urinary tract infection (UTI and to assess the pattern of ciprofloxacin susceptibility among bacteria isolated from urine cultures. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study in all the patients with community-acquired UTI seen in Santa Helena Laboratory, Camaçari, Bahia, Brazil during five years (2010-2014. All individuals who had a positive urine culture result were included in this study. Results: A total of 1,641 individuals met the inclusion criteria. Despite the fact that participants were female, we observed a higher rate of resistance to ciprofloxacin in males. The most frequent pathogens identified in urine samples were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. Antimicrobial resistance has been observed mainly for ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole + trimethoprim and ciprofloxacin. Moreover, E. coli has shown the highest rate of ciprofloxacin resistance, reaching 36% of ciprofloxacin resistant strains in 2014. Conclusion: The rate of bacterial resistance to ciprofloxacin observed in the studied population is much higher than expected, prompting the need for rational use of this antibiotic, especially in infections caused by E. coli. Prevention of bacterial resistance can be performed through control measures to limit the spread of resistant microorganisms and a rational use of antimicrobial policy.

  19. CIPROFLOXACIN RESISTANCE PATTERN AMONG BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED URINARY TRACT INFECTION

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    REIS, Ana Carolina Costa; SANTOS, Susana Regia da Silva; de SOUZA, Siane Campos; SALDANHA, Milena Góes; PITANGA, Thassila Nogueira; OLIVEIRA, Ricardo Riccio

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective: To identify the main bacterial species associated with community-acquired urinary tract infection (UTI) and to assess the pattern of ciprofloxacin susceptibility among bacteria isolated from urine cultures. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study in all the patients with community-acquired UTI seen in Santa Helena Laboratory, Camaçari, Bahia, Brazil during five years (2010-2014). All individuals who had a positive urine culture result were included in this study. Results: A total of 1,641 individuals met the inclusion criteria. Despite the fact that participants were female, we observed a higher rate of resistance to ciprofloxacin in males. The most frequent pathogens identified in urine samples were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. Antimicrobial resistance has been observed mainly for ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole + trimethoprim and ciprofloxacin. Moreover, E. coli has shown the highest rate of ciprofloxacin resistance, reaching 36% of ciprofloxacin resistant strains in 2014. Conclusion: The rate of bacterial resistance to ciprofloxacin observed in the studied population is much higher than expected, prompting the need for rational use of this antibiotic, especially in infections caused by E. coli. Prevention of bacterial resistance can be performed through control measures to limit the spread of resistant microorganisms and a rational use of antimicrobial policy. PMID:27410913

  20. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of acute community-acquired urinary tract infections in adult hospitalised patients.

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    Piljic, Dilista; Piljic, Dragan; Ahmetagic, Sead; Ljuca, Farid; Porobic Jahic, Humera

    2010-02-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) cause a great number of morbidity and mortality. These infections are serious complications in pregnancy, patients with diabetes, polycystic kidneys disease, sickle cell anaemia, kidney transplant and in patients with functional or structural anomalies of the urinary tract. The aim of this investigation was to determine a dominant causative agents of UTI and some of the clinical and laboratory characteristics of acute community-acquired UTI in adult hospitalised patients. We studied 200 adult patients with acute community-acquired UTI hospitalised in the Clinic for Infectious Diseases Tuzla from January 2006 to December 2007. The patients were divided into two groups: a group of patients with E. coli UTI (147) and a group of patients with non-E. coli UTI (53). In these two groups, the symptoms and signs of illness, blood test and urine analysis results were analysed. Our results have shown that the patients with E. coli UTI frequently had fever higher than 38,5 degrees C (p<0,0001), chills (p=0,0349), headache (p=0,0499), cloudy urine (p<0,0001), proteinuria (p=0,0011) and positive nitrite-test (p=0,0002). The patients with non-E. coli UTI frequently had fever lower than 38,5 degrees C (p<0,0001) and urine specific gravity <1015 (p=0,0012). There was no significant difference in blood test results between patients with E. coli and non-E. coli UTI. These clinical and laboratory findings can lead us to early etiological diagnosis of these UTI before urine culture detection of causative agents, which takes several days. Early etiological diagnosis of the E. coli and non-E. coli UTI is necessary for an urgent administration of appropriate empirical antibiotic treatment. This is very important in prevention of irreversible kidney damage, prolonged treatment, complications, as well as recidives and chronicity of the illness.

  1. Monitoring of Etiological Structure of Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in Kazan, Russia, 2012-2013

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    Elvira R. Shaidullina

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs represent a serious public health problem. UTIs can be caused by different pathogens, but most common causative agents include Escherichia coli, Klebsiellapneumoniae and Enterococcus facials. The structure of agents of UTIs varies depending on the sex, age, localization and complications of infection. Here, we present data analysis of bacteriological samples collected at the therapeutic and diagnostic center "Biomed", Kazan, for the period from January 2012 to December 2013. Of the 2300 positive samples 2490 uropathogenic isolates were isolated. Analysis of infection frequency showed that majority of community-acquired UTIs occur in women of childbearing age (20 to 40 years. Comparative analysis of etiological structure of UTIs showed that more than half of the UTI cases in women were caused by E. coli (51.8%, whereas the most cases of UTIs in men were associated with E. facials (30.1%.

  2. Etiologic profile and antimicrobial susceptibility of community-acquired urinary tract infection in two Cameroonian towns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoachere, Jane-Francis Tatah Kihla; Yvonne, Suylika; Akum, Njom Henry; Seraphine, Esemu Nkie

    2012-05-07

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) represents one of the most common diseases encountered in community medical practice. In resource poor settings, treatment is usually empiric due to the high cost and long duration required for reporting diagnosis by culture and antibiotic susceptibility testing. With the growing problem of drug resistance knowledge of antibiotic susceptibility pattern is pertinent for successful eradication of invading pathogens. Our study, the first of its kind in Cameroon, analyzed the distribution and antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria causing community-acquired urinary tract infection (CAUTI) in two towns (Bamenda and Buea) with a large number of young and middle aged persons, to provide data that could guide empiric treatment. We cultured 235 urine specimens and analyzed the antibiotic susceptibility of isolates by the disc diffusion technique. Uropathogens were recovered from 137 (58.3%), with prevalence rates in Buea and Bamenda being 65.9% and 54% respectively. Predominant pathogens were Escherichia coli (31.4%), Klebsiella oxytoca (25.5%) and Staphylococcus spp (24.1%). Geographic variation in uropathogen distribution and antibiotic susceptibility was observed, and a significant difference in pathogen distribution with respect to gender. The 20-39 years age group had the highest prevalence of infection. All pathogens isolated were detected in this group. Isolates exhibited low susceptibility to antibiotics tested. Bamenda isolates generally exhibited lower susceptibility compared to those from Buea. Regional variation in etiology of CAUTI and antibiotic susceptibility observed in our study emphasizes the need to establish local and national antimicrobial resistance monitoring systems in Cameroon to provide information for the development of CAUTI treatment guidelines.

  3. Etiologic profile and antimicrobial susceptibility of community-acquired urinary tract infection in two Cameroonian towns

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    Akoachere Jane-Francis Tatah

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urinary tract infection (UTI represents one of the most common diseases encountered in community medical practice. In resource poor settings, treatment is usually empiric due to the high cost and long duration required for reporting diagnosis by culture and antibiotic susceptibility testing. With the growing problem of drug resistance knowledge of antibiotic susceptibility pattern is pertinent for successful eradication of invading pathogens. Our study, the first of its kind in Cameroon, analyzed the distribution and antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria causing community-acquired urinary tract infection (CAUTI in two towns (Bamenda and Buea with a large number of young and middle aged persons, to provide data that could guide empiric treatment. Findings We cultured 235 urine specimens and analyzed the antibiotic susceptibility of isolates by the disc diffusion technique. Uropathogens were recovered from 137 (58.3%, with prevalence rates in Buea and Bamenda being 65.9% and 54% respectively. Predominant pathogens were Escherichia coli (31.4%, Klebsiella oxytoca (25.5% and Staphylococcus spp (24.1%. Geographic variation in uropathogen distribution and antibiotic susceptibility was observed, and a significant difference in pathogen distribution with respect to gender. The 20–39 years age group had the highest prevalence of infection. All pathogens isolated were detected in this group. Isolates exhibited low susceptibility to antibiotics tested. Bamenda isolates generally exhibited lower susceptibility compared to those from Buea. Conclusion Regional variation in etiology of CAUTI and antibiotic susceptibility observed in our study emphasizes the need to establish local and national antimicrobial resistance monitoring systems in Cameroon to provide information for the development of CAUTI treatment guidelines.

  4. [Increasing incidence of community-acquired pneumonia caused by atypical microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazón-Varela, M A; Alonso-Valle, H; Muñoz-Cacho, P; Gallo-Terán, J; Piris-García, X; Pérez-Mier, L A

    2017-09-01

    Knowing the most common microorganisms in our environment can help us to make proper empirical treatment decisions. The aim is to identify those microorganisms causing community-acquired pneumonia. An observational, descriptive and prospective study was conducted, including patients over 14 years with a clinical and radiographic diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia during a 383 consecutive day period. A record was made of sociodemographic variables, personal history, prognostic severity scales, progress, and pathogenic agents. The aetiological diagnosis was made using blood cultures, detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila urinary antigens, sputum culture, influenza virus and Streptococcus pyogenes detection. Categorical variables are presented as absolute values and percentages, and continuous variables as their means and standard deviations. Of the 287 patients included in the study (42% women, mean age 66±22 years), 10.45% died and 70% required hospital admission. An aetiological diagnosis was achieved in 43 patients (14.98%), with 16 microorganisms found in 59 positive samples. The most frequently isolated pathogen was Streptococcus pneumonia (24/59, 41%), followed by gram-negative enteric bacilli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens and Enterobacter cloacae isolated in 20% of the samples (12/59), influenza virus (5/59, 9%), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (3/59, 5%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2/59, 3%), Moraxella catarrhalis (2/59, 3%), Legionella pneumophila (2/59, 3%), and Haemophilus influenza (2/59, 3%). Polymicrobial infections accounted for 14% (8/59). A high percentage of atypical microorganisms causing community-acquired pneumonia were found. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Emergence of Raoultella ornithinolytica on O'ahu: a case of community-acquired R. ornithinolytica urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasone, Elizabeth S; Kaneshiro, Ricky; Min, Kathleen; Tokeshi, Jinichi

    2015-05-01

    Human infection with Raoultella ornithinolytica is rare, with only ten cases having been reported previously. This case report describes a local patient diagnosed with community-acquired R. ornithinolytica urinary tract infection in 2014.

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of Escherichia coli isolates as agents of community-acquired urinary tract infection (2008-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Nisel; Ağuş, Neval; Bayram, Arzu; Şamlıoğlu, Pınar; Şirin, M Cem; Derici, Yeşer Karaca; Hancı, Sevgi Yılmaz

    2016-03-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most frequently seen community-acquired infections worldwide. E. coli causes 90% of urinary system infections. To guide the empirical therapy, the resistance pattern of E. coli responsible for community-acquired UTI was evaluated throughout a seven-year period in this study. The urine cultures of patients with urinary tract infections admitted to outpatient clinics between 1(st) January 2008 and 31(st) December 2014 were analyzed. Presence of ≥10(5) colony-forming units/mL in urine culture media was considered as significant for UTI. Isolated bacteria were identified by standard laboratory techniques or automated system VITEK2 (BioMerieux, France) and BD PhoenixTM 100 (BD, USA), as required. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method using Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) criteria. A total of 13281 uropathogens were isolated. Overall E. coli accounted for 8975 (67%) of all isolates. Resistance rates of E. coli to antimicrobial agents was demonstrated to be as follows: ampicillin 66.9%, cefazolin 30.9%, cefuroxime 30.9%, ceftazidime 14.9%, cefotaxime 28%, cefepime 12%, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid 36.9%, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SXT) 20%, ciprofloxacin 49.9%, amikacin 0.3%, gentamycin 24%, nitrofurantoin 0.9%, and fosfomycin 4.3%. There was no resistance to imipenem nor meropenem. The frequency of ESBL-producing E. coli strains was 24%. It is concluded that fosfomycin and nitrofurantoin are appropriate empirical therapy for community-acquired UTI empirical therapy, but the fluoroquinolones and the TMP-SXT shall not be used in the emprical treatment of UTI at this stage. In conclusion, as resistance rates show regional differences, it is necessary to regularly examine regional resistance rates to determine the appropriate empiric antibiotic treatment and national antibiotic usage policies must be reorganized according to data obtained from these studies.

  7. Evaluation of Sofia Fluorescent immunoassay analyzer for pneumococcal urinary antigen detection in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Diego; López-Olaizola, Maddi; de la Caba, Idoia; Cilla, Gustavo

    2017-10-01

    The Sofia Streptococcus pneumoniae FIA® test was prospectively evaluated in non-concentrated urine samples of 106 hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia. The test detected pneumococcal urinary antigen in 24/31 (77.4%) confirmed pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia episodes. The specificity of the test was 86.7% (92% after urine heating). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. [Clinical analysis of 22 cases community-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa urinary tract infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiao-Hong; Zhou, Wen; Zhang, Xue-Mei; Yin, Yi-Bing; Jing, Chun-Mei; Liu, Lan; Zhao, Jie

    2013-04-01

    To study the characteristics of community-acquired urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) in children, analyze the risk factors and the susceptibility of antibiotics, thus to provide references to the diagnosis and medication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA)-CAUTIs. Mothod Totally 22 cases of PA-CAUTIs were selected in one hospital from Jan, 2006 to Jan, 2012, their clinical information, laboratory results and radiological images were collected, and were compared with the CAUTIs cased by E. coli of those randomly selected over the same period. In those 22 cases with PA-CAUTIs, the mean value of protein level was (32.25 ± 13.81) mg/ml, 19 of them were hospitalized, 6 had urinary operation history, 7 of them had long-term usage of glucocorticoids or immunosuppressive agents, and 20 had underlying diseases. A total of 22 children with 26 PA-CAUTIs episodes were compared to E. coli-CAUTIs. Compared with E. coli-CAUTIs patients, children with PA-CAUTIs more often presented with a lower albumin (P = 0.017), a history of urinary operation(P = 0.03), more cases had a history of urinary operation (P = 0.03), a long-term usage of glucocorticoids or immunosuppressive medication (P = 0.044). Through multivariate logistic regression of variables that were significant in univariate analysis (with hospitalizations, long-term usage of glucocorticoids or immunosuppressive, albumin, underlying disease and urinary operation histories), and it turned out that underlying diseases (odds ratio 8.500, 95% CI 1.513 - 47.761, P = 0.037) and with urinary operation histories (odds ratio 6.196, 95% CI 1.120 - 34.273, P = 0.037) were proved as the independent risk factors for PA-CAUTIs. Those PA bacterial strains had a 36.36% resistance rate to piperacillin, aztreonam and gentamicin, a 31.82% resistance rate to cefepime and ceftazidime, while the resistance rate (4.55%) to carbapenem antibiotics was relatively low, only to bacillosporin all the strains were sensitive. Underlying diseases and the

  9. FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH EXTENDED SPECTRUM β-LACTAMASE PRODUCING ESCHERICHIA COLI IN COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED URINARY TRACT INFECTION AT HOSPITAL EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT, BANGKOK, THAILAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savatmorigkorngul, Sorravit; Poowarattanawiwit, Pongsuree; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak; Sittichanbuncha, Yuwares

    2016-03-01

    Urinary tract infection or UTI is most commonly caused by Escherichia coli. This study investigated the prevalence of and risk factors for extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing (ESBL) E. coli in community-acquired UTI presenting at the Emergency Department, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. A retrospective review was conducted over a one-year period (2014) of case histories of patients over 15 years of age diagnosed with (n = 159) and without culture-positive (n = 249) ESBL E. coli. Backward stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed four independent risk factors for UTI caused by ESBL E. coli, namely, urinary catheter use, previous UTI in which ESBL E. coli was present, and previous use of antibiotics cephalosporin and penicillin. This information should be useful in devising future public health prevention and control programs for ESBL E. coli-associated community-acquired UTI.

  10. Chlamydia psittaci : a relevant cause of community-acquired pneumonia in two Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoorenberg, S M C; Bos, W J W; van Hannen, E J; Dijkstra, F; Heddema, E R; van Velzen-Blad, H; Heijligenberg, R; Grutters, J C; de Jongh, B M; Meijvis, SCA

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Of all hospitalised community-acquired pneumonias (CAPs) only a few are known to be caused by Chlamydia psittaci. Most likely the reported incidence, ranging from of 0% to 2.1%, is an underestimation of the real incidence, since detection of psittacosis is frequently not incorporated in

  11. Prevalence of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates in Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifpour, Mohammad; Gholipour, Abolfazl; Damavandi, Mohammad Sadegh

    2016-01-01

    Background Klebsiella pneumoniae is a family member of Enterobacteriaceae. Isolates of K. pneumoniae produce enzymes that cause decomposition of third generation cephalosporins. These enzymes are known as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL). Resistance of K. pneumoniae to beta-lactamase antibiotics is commonly mediated by beta-lactamase genes. Objectives The aim of this study was to identify the ESBL produced by K. pneumoniae isolates that cause community-acquired and nosocomial urinary tract infections within a one-year period (2013 to 2014) in Kashani and Hajar university hospitals of Shahrekord, Iran. Patients and Methods From 2013 to 2014, 150 strains of K. pneumoniae isolate from two different populations with nosocomial and community-acquired infections were collected. The strains were then investigated by double disk synergism and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results The study population of 150 patients with nosocomial and community-acquired infections were divided to two groups of 75 each. We found that 48 of the K. pneumoniae isolates in the patients with nosocomial infection and 39 isolates in those with community-acquired infections produced ESBL. The prevalence of TEM1, SHV1 and VEB1 in ESBL-producing isolates in nosocomial patients was 24%, 29.3% and 10.6%, and in community-acquired patients, 17.3%, 22.7% and 8%, respectively. Conclusions The prevalence of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolate is of great concern; therefore, continuous investigation seems essential to monitor ESBL-producing bacteria in patients with nosocomial and community-acquired infections. PMID:27226874

  12. Population-based surveillance for hypermucoviscosity Klebsiella pneumoniae causing community-acquired bacteremia in Calgary, Alberta

    OpenAIRE

    Gisele Peirano; Johann DD. Pitout; Laupland, Kevin B.; Bonnie Meatherall; Daniel B Gregson

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of hypermucoviscosity isolates among Klebsiella pneumoniae causing community-acquired bacteremia were investigated. The hypermucoviscous phenotype was present in 8.2% of K pneumoniae isolates, and was associated with rmpA and the K2 serotype; liver abscesses were the most common clinical presentation. The present analysis represents the first population-based surveillance study of hypermucoviscosity among K pneumoniae causing bacteremia.

  13. Gender and Age-Dependent Etiology of Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections

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    Enrico Magliano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTIs are among the most frequent community-acquired infections worldwide. Escherichia coli is the most common UTI pathogen although underlying host factors such as patients’ age and gender may influence prevalence of causative agents. In this study, 61 273 consecutive urine samples received over a 22-month period from outpatients clinics of an urban area of north Italy underwent microbiological culture with subsequent bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of positive samples. A total of 13 820 uropathogens were isolated and their prevalence analyzed according to patient’s gender and age group. Overall Escherichia coli accounted for 67.6% of all isolates, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (8.8%, Enterococcus faecalis (6.3%, Proteus mirabilis (5.2%, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2.5%. Data stratification according to both age and gender showed E. coli isolation rates to be lower in both males aged ≥60 years (52.2%, E. faecalis and P. aeruginosa being more prevalent in this group (11.6% and 7.8%, resp., as well as in those aged ≤14 years (51.3% in whom P. mirabilis prevalence was found to be as high as 21.2%. Streptococcus agalactiae overall prevalence was found to be 2.3% although it was shown to occur most frequently in women aged between 15 and 59 years (4.1%. Susceptibility of E. coli to oral antimicrobial agents was demonstrated to be as follows: fosfomycin (72.9%, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (72.9%, ciprofloxacin (76.8%, ampicillin (48.0%, and amoxicillin/clavulanate (77.5%. In conclusion, both patients’ age and gender are significant factors in determining UTIs etiology; they can increase accuracy in defining the causative uropathogen as well as providing useful guidance to empiric treatment.

  14. Bacterial Etiology and Antibiotic Resistance Profile of Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in a Cameroonian City

    OpenAIRE

    Rolf Nyah-tuku Nzalie; Hortense Kamga Gonsu; Sinata Koulla-Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Community-acquired urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are usually treated empirically. Geographical variations in etiologic agents and their antibiotic sensitivity patterns are common. Knowledge of antibiotic resistance trends is important for improving evidence-based recommendations for empirical treatment of UTIs. Our aim was to determine the major bacterial etiologies of CAUTIs and their antibiotic resistance patterns in a cosmopolitan area of Cameroon for comparison with pres...

  15. Causes of non-adherence to therapeutic guidelines in severe community-acquired pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Gattarello,Simone; Ramírez, Sergio; Almarales,José Rafael; Borgatta, Bárbara; Lagunes, Leonel; Encina, Belén; Rello, Jordi; ,

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the adherence to Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines and the causes of lack of adherence during empirical antibiotic prescription in severe pneumonia in Latin America. Methods A clinical questionnaire was submitted to 36 physicians from Latin America; they were asked to indicate the empirical treatment in two fictitious cases of severe respiratory infection: community-acquired pneumonia and nosocomial pneumonia. Results In the case of...

  16. Community-Acquired Pyelonephritis in Pregnancy Caused by KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Asma; Naeger Murphy, Nina; Wiest, Peter; Osborn, Melissa; Garber, Kathleen; Hecker, Michelle; Hurless, Kelly; Rudin, Susan D.; Jacobs, Michael R.; Kalayjian, Robert C.; Salata, Robert A.; van Duin, David; Harris, Patrick N. A.

    2015-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) usually infect patients with significant comorbidities and health care exposures. We present a case of a pregnant woman who developed community-acquired pyelonephritis caused by KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae. Despite antibiotic treatment, she experienced spontaneous prolonged rupture of membranes, with eventual delivery of a healthy infant. This report demonstrates the challenge that CRE may pose to the effective treatment of common infections in obstetric patients, with potentially harmful consequences to maternal and neonatal health. PMID:26185273

  17. Severe community-acquired pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae in young female patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milačić Nena

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma pneumonia is common agent causing community acquired pneumonia in younger population. However, the course of illness is usually benign and is rarely associated with pulmonary complications. We report a 27 years old female patient with unilateral pneumonia followed by pleural effusion and adhesions on the same side. This potential source of infection should be considered in young patients where resolution of symptoms from pneumonia is delayed.

  18. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Escherichia coli strains from samples collected before and after pivmecillinam or placebo treatment of uncomplicated community-acquired urinary tract infection in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnaes, Karen; Sandvang, Dorthe; Lundgren, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    The primary infecting Escherichia coli strains from 156 women with community-acquired uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) randomized to pivmecillinam or placebo and the E. coli strains causing UTI at two follow-up visits were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In the piv......The primary infecting Escherichia coli strains from 156 women with community-acquired uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) randomized to pivmecillinam or placebo and the E. coli strains causing UTI at two follow-up visits were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE...

  19. Causes of non-adherence to therapeutic guidelines in severe community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattarello, Simone; Ramírez, Sergio; Almarales, José Rafael; Borgatta, Bárbara; Lagunes, Leonel; Encina, Belén; Rello, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    To assess the adherence to Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines and the causes of lack of adherence during empirical antibiotic prescription in severe pneumonia in Latin America. A clinical questionnaire was submitted to 36 physicians from Latin America; they were asked to indicate the empirical treatment in two fictitious cases of severe respiratory infection: community-acquired pneumonia and nosocomial pneumonia. In the case of community acquired pneumonia, 11 prescriptions of 36 (30.6%) were compliant with international guidelines. The causes for non-compliant treatment were monotherapy (16.0%), the unnecessary prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics (40.0%) and the use of non-recommended antibiotics (44.0%). In the case of nosocomial pneumonia, the rate of adherence to the Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines was 2.8% (1 patient of 36). The reasons for lack of compliance were monotherapy (14.3%) and a lack of dual antibiotic coverage against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (85.7%). If monotherapy with an antipseudomonal antibiotic was considered adequate, the antibiotic treatment would be adequate in 100% of the total prescriptions. The compliance rate with the Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines in the community-acquired pneumonia scenario was 30.6%; the most frequent cause of lack of compliance was the indication of monotherapy. In the case of nosocomial pneumonia, the compliance rate with the guidelines was 2.8%, and the most important cause of non-adherence was lack of combined antipseudomonal therapy. If the use of monotherapy with an antipseudomonal antibiotic was considered the correct option, the treatment would be adequate in 100% of the prescriptions.

  20. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Eschericia coli strains from samples collected before and after pivmecillinam or placebo treatment of uncomplicated community-acquired urinary tract infection in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnæs, K; Sandvang, D; Lundgren, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    The primary infecting Escherichia coli strains from 156 women with community-acquired uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) randomized to pivmecillinam or placebo and the E. coli strains causing UTI at two follow-up visits were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE...

  1. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Escherichia coli strains from samples collected before and after pivmecillinam or placebo treatment of uncomplicated community-acquired urinary tract infection in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnaes, Karen; Sandvang, Dorthe; Lundgren, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    The primary infecting Escherichia coli strains from 156 women with community-acquired uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) randomized to pivmecillinam or placebo and the E. coli strains causing UTI at two follow-up visits were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE...

  2. Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Empyema Caused by Citrobacter koseri in an Immunocompetent Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Ariza-Prota

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrobacter species, belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae, are environmental organisms commonly found in soil, water, and the intestinal tracts of animals and humans. Citrobacter koseri is known to be an uncommon but serious cause of both sporadic and epidemic septicemia and meningitis in neonates and young infants. Most cases reported have occurred in immunocompromised hosts. The infections caused by Citrobacter are difficult to treat with usual broad spectrum antibiotics owing to rapid generation of mutants and have been associated with high death rates in the past. We believe this is the first case described in the literature of a community-acquired pneumonia and empyema caused by Citrobacter koseri in an immunocompetent adult patient.

  3. Plasmid mediated multiple antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from community acquired infection of urinary tract in Aligarh Hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asad U Khan; Saeedut Zafar Ali; Mohammed S Zaman

    2008-01-01

    This study was to investigate the current trends of multiple drug resistance in bacteria against antibiotics for the proper empirical treatmen.Clinical isolates were collected from community-acquired infection of urinary tract patients in Aligarh India from March 1999 to August 1999.Antibiotic susceptibility test was performed,using the disc diffusion method followed by plasmid isolation by the method of Kado and Liu.Transfer experiments were performed by the method of Lederberg and Cohen.Clinical study revealed that this infection was more common in young women.Various strains of E.coli isolated during the course of study were found to show multiple antibiotic resistance which was further characterized as plasmid-borne drug resistance.This study shows that E.coli may be one of the important causative agents of urinary tract infection (UTI )in young women.

  4. [The diagnosis and therapy of first community acquired urinary tract infection in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Dan; Grossman, Zachi

    2009-11-01

    A first urinary tract infection (UTI) in childhood is more prevalent in females Circumcision generally protects males from UTI, however, during the month following the procedure, the prevalence of infection increases up to 12 times in circumcised boys when compared with those not circumcised. Almost all the infections are caused by aerobic Gram-negative bacteria of which E. coli are responsible for 70-90% of the cases. Signs and symptoms of UTI vary in different age groups. Factors associated with the likelihood of UTI are: non-circumcised male, fever > 40 degrees C, and a fever > 39 degrees C for more than 48 hours with no other focus of infection on physical examination. Urinalysis and urine microscopy are screening tests for UTI. In children with clinical symptoms and signs suggesting UTI, the results of these tests have a positive predictive value (if both are positive), or negative predictive value (if both are negative) approximating 100%. The definitive diagnosis of UTI is based on the urine culture. Bag urine culture is associated with a very high rate of contamination. Therefore, in non-toilet trained children, urine culture should be obtained directly from the urinary bladder either by supra pubic aspiration or in and out transurethral catheterization. Mid stream clean voided urine specimens obtained from circumcised males in the first months of life are also acceptable. Depending on the clinical presentation, oral therapy can begin from as early as two months of age, and the recommended empiric drugs for first febrile UTI are cefuroxime axetil, or amoxicillin clavulanate. Cephlexin is recommended for cystitis.

  5. Molecular Epidemiology of Staphylococcus saprophyticus Isolated from Women with Uncomplicated Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infection▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widerström, Micael; Wiström, Johan; Ferry, Sven; Karlsson, Carina; Monsen, Tor

    2007-01-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a common cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in women. Little is known about the molecular epidemiology of S. saprophyticus UTIs. In the current study, we compared 76 isolates of S. saprophyticus prospectively isolated from women with uncomplicated UTI participating in a randomized placebo-controlled treatment trial performed in northern Sweden from 1995 to 1997 with 50 strains obtained in 2006 from five different locations in northern Europe with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The aim was to elucidate the molecular epidemiology of this uropathogenic species and to investigate whether specific clones are associated with UTI in women. A total of 47 different PFGE profiles were detected among the 126 analyzed isolates. Ten clusters consisting of 5 to 12 isolates each showing PFGE DNA similarity of >85% were identified. Several clusters of genetically highly related isolates were detected in the original trial as well as among isolates obtained during 2006 from different locations. In the original trial, clonal persistence was found among 16 of 21 (76%) patients examined in the placebo group at follow-up 8 to 10 days after inclusion, indicating a low spontaneous short-time bacteriological cure rate. We conclude that multiple clones of S. saprophyticus were causing lower UTIs in women. The result suggests that some human-pathogenic clones of S. saprophyticus are spread over large geographical distances and that such clones may persist over long periods of time. PMID:17344356

  6. Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolated from women with uncomplicated community-acquired urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widerström, Micael; Wiström, Johan; Ferry, Sven; Karlsson, Carina; Monsen, Tor

    2007-05-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a common cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in women. Little is known about the molecular epidemiology of S. saprophyticus UTIs. In the current study, we compared 76 isolates of S. saprophyticus prospectively isolated from women with uncomplicated UTI participating in a randomized placebo-controlled treatment trial performed in northern Sweden from 1995 to 1997 with 50 strains obtained in 2006 from five different locations in northern Europe with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The aim was to elucidate the molecular epidemiology of this uropathogenic species and to investigate whether specific clones are associated with UTI in women. A total of 47 different PFGE profiles were detected among the 126 analyzed isolates. Ten clusters consisting of 5 to 12 isolates each showing PFGE DNA similarity of >85% were identified. Several clusters of genetically highly related isolates were detected in the original trial as well as among isolates obtained during 2006 from different locations. In the original trial, clonal persistence was found among 16 of 21 (76%) patients examined in the placebo group at follow-up 8 to 10 days after inclusion, indicating a low spontaneous short-time bacteriological cure rate. We conclude that multiple clones of S. saprophyticus were causing lower UTIs in women. The result suggests that some human-pathogenic clones of S. saprophyticus are spread over large geographical distances and that such clones may persist over long periods of time.

  7. Differential characteristics of healthcare-associated compared to community-acquired febrile urinary tract infections in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithson, A; Ramos, J; Bastida, M T; Bernal, S; Jove, N; Niño, E; Msabri, N; Porrón, R

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse the characteristics of healthcare-associated febrile urinary tract infection (HCA-FUTI) compared to community-acquired FUTI (CA-FUTI) in men. An ambispective cross-sectional study in which we recorded clinical and microbiology data and outcomes from males with FUTI attended in the Emergency Department was carried out. A total of 479 males with FUTI, 162 (33.8%) HCA-FUTI and 317 (66.2%) CA-FUTI, were included. HCA-FUTI patients were older (p < 0.001), had higher Charlson scores (p < 0.001) and received previous antimicrobial treatment more frequently (p < 0.001) compared to CA-FUTI patients. HCA-FUTI was less likely caused by Escherichia coli (p < 0.001) and more frequently by Klebsiella spp. (p = 0.02), Enterobacter spp. (p < 0.001) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (p < 0.001). Resistance to ceftriaxone (p = 0.006), gentamicin (p < 0.001), quinolones (p < 0.001), co-trimoxazole (p = 0.001) and fosfomycin (p = 0.009) was higher among E. coli strains isolated from males with HCA-FUTI and so was the prevalence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase and AmpC E. coli and Klebsiella spp.-producing strains (p = 0.012). Inadequate antimicrobial treatment and all-cause in-hospital mortality was associated with HCA-FUTI (p < 0.001 and p = 0.004, respectively). Independent factors for mortality were severe sepsis or septic shock [odds ratio (OR) 29; 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.9-214] and cirrhosis (OR 23.7; 95% CI: 1.6-350.6). Male patients with HCA-FUTI have different clinical characteristics, outcomes and microbiological features compared to CA-FUTI patients. Previous contact with the healthcare system has to be taken into consideration when deciding the optimal antimicrobial treatment in males with FUTI.

  8. Time-based distribution of Staphylococcus saprophyticus pulsed field gel-electrophoresis clusters in community-acquired urinary tract infections

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    Viviane Santos de Sousa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of urinary tract infections (UTI by Staphylococcus saprophyticus has not been fully characterised and strain typing methods have not been validated for this agent. To evaluate whether epidemiological relationships exist between clusters of pulsed field gel-electrophoresis (PFGE genotypes of S. saprophyticus from community-acquired UTI, a cross-sectional surveillance study was conducted in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In total, 32 (16% female patients attending two walk-in clinics were culture-positive for S. saprophyticus. Five PFGE clusters were defined and evaluated against epidemiological data. The PFGE clusters were grouped in time, suggesting the existence of community point sources of S. saprophyticus. From these point sources, S. saprophyticus strains may spread among individuals.

  9. Time-based distribution of Staphylococcus saprophyticus pulsed field gel-electrophoresis clusters in community-acquired urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Viviane Santos de; Rabello, Renata Fernandes; Dias, Rubens Clayton da Silva; Martins, Ianick Souto; Santos, Luisa Barbosa Gomes da Silva dos; Alves, Elisabeth Mendes; Riley, Lee Woodford; Moreira, Beatriz Meurer

    2013-02-01

    The epidemiology of urinary tract infections (UTI) by Staphylococcus saprophyticus has not been fully characterised and strain typing methods have not been validated for this agent. To evaluate whether epidemiological relationships exist between clusters of pulsed field gel-electrophoresis (PFGE) genotypes of S. saprophyticus from community-acquired UTI, a cross-sectional surveillance study was conducted in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In total, 32 (16%) female patients attending two walk-in clinics were culture-positive for S. saprophyticus. Five PFGE clusters were defined and evaluated against epidemiological data. The PFGE clusters were grouped in time, suggesting the existence of community point sources of S. saprophyticus. From these point sources, S. saprophyticus strains may spread among individuals.

  10. Escherichia coli: an unknown and infrequent cause of community acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Luis Alberto; Zalacain, Rafael; Gómez, Ainhoa; Camino, Jesús; Jaca, Carmen; Núñez, Juan Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Our aim was to describe the incidence, clinical characteristics and outcome of community acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by Escherichia coli through the analysis of a cohort of patients with this condition. This study includes all the patients who were admitted to our hospitals because of CAP caused by E. coli, diagnosed with highly reliable microbiological techniques, such as blood culture, bronchoscopic protected specimen brush (PSB) or transthoracic needle aspiration (TNA). 29 patients were enrolled, representing 0.4% of CAP cases admitted. Main symptoms were fever and dyspnoea. 18 patients were classified into class IV and class V of the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). Diagnosis was based on blood culture in 24 cases, PSB in 4 cases and by TNA in 1 case. Three of the patients died, the longer time evolution of the symptoms being the only factor related to higher mortality (p<0.05). Mean hospitalization time was 7.1+/-3.1 d, and correlated with severity at admission (r=0.43; p<0.003). This study demonstrates that CAP caused by E. coli is infrequent. It has an unspecific presentation and mortality rate is 10.3%, associated with longer time before admission to hospital.

  11. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Eschericia coli strains from samples collected before and after pivmecillinam or placebo treatment of uncomplicated community-acquired urinary tract infection in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnæs, K; Sandvang, D; Lundgren, Bettina;

    2006-01-01

    The primary infecting Escherichia coli strains from 156 women with community-acquired uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) randomized to pivmecillinam or placebo and the E. coli strains causing UTI at two follow-up visits were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In the piv......, constituting a reservoir for recurrent UTI.......The primary infecting Escherichia coli strains from 156 women with community-acquired uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) randomized to pivmecillinam or placebo and the E. coli strains causing UTI at two follow-up visits were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE......). The finding that the majority of UTIs at follow-up are caused by the primary infecting E. coli strain supports the theory of a vaginal and rectal reservoir but could also support the recent discovery that E. coli strains are able to persist in the bladder epithelium despite appropriate antibiotic treatment...

  12. Community-acquired urinary tract infections: Causative agents and their resistance to antimicrobial drugs

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    Đorđević Zorana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Urinary tract infections (UTIs are among the most common infections in outpatients. The aim of this study was to define the causative agents of urinary tract infections and their resistance to antimicrobial drugs in the urban area of central Serbia, as well as to evaluate eventual differences associated with age and gender of the patients. Methods. This retrospective study analysed data taken from routine, consecutively collected urine cultures of outpatients with symptomatic UTIs, collected from the Department of Microbiology, Institute of Public Health in Kragujevac, Serbia, from January 2009 to December 2013. Results. There were 71,905 urine cultures, and 24,713 (34.37% of them were positive for bacterial pathogens. The most common pathogen was Escherichia coli (E. coli (56.56%, followed by Klebsiella spp. (16.20%, Proteus spp. (14.68%, Enterococcus spp. (5.29% and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (3.74%. E. coli and Enterococcus spp. isolation rates were lower in males ≥ 60 years old (23.71% and 4.87%, respectively, while Klebsiella spp. was more prevalent in this group (32.06%. The most common causative agents isolated from 15–29 years old male patients were Enterococcus spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (13.28% each. Among women, the isolation rate of E.coli was high in all age groups (around 70%. Proteus spp. was frequently isolated from females ≤ 14 years old (13.27%, while Klebsiella spp. was the most frequent in the oldest age female group (10.99%. Conclusion. Choice of antibiotics for treatment of UTIs should be governed not only by the local resistance patterns, but also by gender and age of patients.

  13. Outbreaks of Infection Caused by Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Canadian Correctional Facility

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    Cheryl L Main

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has been identified in prison settings in the United States. The present study investigated two clusters of skin and soft tissue infection caused by community-acquired (CA MRSA in a correctional facility in southern Ontario.

  14. Etiology and anti-microbial sensitivity of organisms causing community acquired pneumonia: A single hospital study

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    Resmi U Menon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to identify the common etiological pathogens causing community acquired pneumonia (CAP in our hospital and sensitivity patterns to the common antibiotics used. Materials and Methods: This study was undertaken in a 750 bedded multi-specialty referral hospital in Kerala catering to both urban and semi-urban populations. It is a prospective study of patients who attended the medical out-patient department and those admitted with a clinical diagnosis of CAP, during the year 2009. Data were collected based on detailed patient interview, clinical examination and laboratory investigations. The latter included sputum culture and sensitivity pattern. These were tabulated and percentage incidence of etiological pathogens calculated. The antimicrobial sensitivity pattern was also classified by percentage and expressed as bar diagram. Results: The study showed Streptococcus pneumoniae to be the most common etiological agent for CAP, in our hospital setting. The other organisms isolated in order of frequency were Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Alpha hemolytic streptococci, Escherichia coli, Beta hemolytic streptococci and atypical coli. S. pneumoniae was most sensitive to linezolid, followed by amoxicillin-clavulanate (augmentin, cloxacillin and ceftriaxone. Overall, the common pathogens causing CAP showed highest sensitivity to amikacin, followed by ofloxacin, gentamycin, amoxicillin-clavulanate (augmentin, ceftriaxone and linezolid. The least sensitivity rates were shown to amoxicillin and cefoperazone. Conclusion: In a hospital setting, empirical management for cases of CAP is not advisable. The present study has shown S. pneumoniae as the most likely pathogen and either linezolid or amikacin as the most likely effective antimicrobial in cases of CAP, in our setting.

  15. Ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli community-acquired upper urinary tract infection: associated characteristics in patients of a national hospital in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Montañez Valverde, Raúl A.; Médico Cirujano, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Miembro, Sociedad Científica de San Fernando, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Montenegro Idrogo, Juan J.; Médico Cirujano, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Miembro, Sociedad Científica de San Fernando, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Arenas Significación, Fernando R.; Médico Cirujano, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Miembro, Asociación para el Desarrollo de la Investigación Estudiantil en Ciencias de la Salud ADIECS, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Vásquez Alva, Rolando; Médico Cirujano, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Jefe Departamento de Emergencia, especialista en Medicina Interna y en Medicina de Emergencias, Hospital Edgardo Rebagliati Martins, Lima, Perú

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Urinary tract infections (UTI) represent a common health problem. In Peru Escherichia coli resistance rates to ciprofloxacin vary from 31% to 69.8%. Objectives. To determine the frequency and characteristics associated with community-acquired ciprofloxacinresistant E. coli upper urinary tract infection (cUTI). Design. Cross-sectional study. Setting. Emergency Department, Edgardo Rebagliati Martins Hospital, Lima, Peru. Participants. Patients diagnosed with cUTI in 2010. Interven...

  16. Susceptibility of Escherichia coli from community-acquired urinary tract infection to fosfomycin, nitrofurantoin, and temocillin in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Mi-Ran; Kim, Seong-Jong; Kim, Yeonjae; Kim, Jieun; Choi, Tae Yeal; Kang, Jung Oak; Wie, Seong-Heon; Ki, Moran; Cho, Young Kyun; Lim, Seung-Kwan; Lee, Jin Seo; Kwon, Ki Tae; Lee, Hyuck; Cheong, Hee Jin; Park, Dae Won; Ryu, Seong Yeol; Chung, Moon-Hyun; Pai, Hyunjoo

    2014-08-01

    With increase of multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli in community-acquired urinary tract infections (CA-UTI), other treatment option with a therapeutic efficacy and a low antibiotic selective pressure is necessary. In this study, we evaluated in vitro susceptibility of E. coli isolates from CA-UTI to fosfomycin (FM), nitrofurantoin (NI), temocillin (TMO) as well as trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SMX), ciprofloxacin (CIP) and cefepime (FEP). The minimal inhibitory concentrations were determined by E-test or agar dilution method according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines, using 346 E. coli collected in 12 Korean hospitals from March 2010 to February 2011. FM, NI and TMO showed an excellent susceptibility profile; FM 100% (346/346), TMO 96.8% (335/346), and NI 99.4% (344/346). Conversely, resistance rates of CIP and SMX were 22% (76/346) and 29.2% (101/349), respectively. FEP still retained an activity of 98.5%. In Korea, NI and TMO in addition to FM are a good therapeutic option for uncomplicated CA-UTI, especially for lower UTI.

  17. Bacterial Etiology and Antibiotic Resistance Profile of Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in a Cameroonian City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsu, Hortense Kamga; Koulla-Shiro, Sinata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Community-acquired urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are usually treated empirically. Geographical variations in etiologic agents and their antibiotic sensitivity patterns are common. Knowledge of antibiotic resistance trends is important for improving evidence-based recommendations for empirical treatment of UTIs. Our aim was to determine the major bacterial etiologies of CAUTIs and their antibiotic resistance patterns in a cosmopolitan area of Cameroon for comparison with prescription practices of local physicians. Methods. We performed a cross-sectional descriptive study at two main hospitals in Yaoundé, collecting a clean-catch mid-stream urine sample from 92 patients having a clinical diagnosis of UTI. The empirical antibiotherapy was noted, and identification of bacterial species was done on CLED agar; antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Results. A total of 55 patients had samples positive for a UTI. Ciprofloxacin and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid were the most empirically prescribed antibiotics (30.9% and 23.6%, resp.); bacterial isolates showed high prevalence of resistance to both compounds. Escherichia coli (50.9%) was the most common pathogen, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (16.4%). Prevalence of resistance for ciprofloxacin was higher compared to newer quinolones. Conclusions. E. coli and K. pneumoniae were the predominant bacterial etiologies; the prevalence of resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotics was high. PMID:27667998

  18. Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Human Adenovirus in Immunocompetent Adults: A Multicenter Case Series.

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    Dingyu Tan

    Full Text Available Severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP caused by human adenovirus (HAdV, especially HAdV type 55 (HAdV-55 in immunocompetent adults has raised increasing concerns. Clinical knowledge of severe CAP and acute respiratory distress syndrome induced by HAdV-55 is still limited, though the pathogen has been fully characterized by whole-genome sequencing.We conducted a multicentre retrospective review of all consecutive patients with severe CAP caused by HAdV in immunocompetent adults admitted to the Emergency Department Intensive Care Unit of two hospitals in Northern China between February 2012 and April 2014. Clinical, laboratory, radiological characteristics, treatments and outcomes of these patients were collected and analyzed.A total of 15 consecutive severe CAP patients with laboratory-confirmed adenovirus infections were included. The median age was 30 years and all cases were identified during the winter and spring seasons. HAdV-55 was the most frequently (11/15 detected HAdV type. Persistent high fever, cough and rapid progression of dyspnea were typically reported in these patients. Significantly increased pneumonia severity index (PSI, respiratory rate, and lower PaO2/FiO2, hypersensitive CRP were reported in non-survivors compared to survivors (P = 0.013, 0.022, 0.019 and 0.026, respectively. The rapid development of bilateral consolidations within 10 days after illness onset were the most common radiographic finding, usually accompanied by adjacent ground glass opacities and pleural effusions. Total mortality was 26.7% in this study. Corticosteroids were prescribed to 14 patients in this report, but the utilization rate between survivors and non-survivors was not significant.HAdV and the HAdV-55 sub-type play an important role among viral pneumonia pathogens in hospitalized immunocompetent adults in Northern China. HAdV should be tested in severe CAP patients with negative bacterial cultures and a lack of response to antibiotic

  19. Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Sequence Type 131 Subgroups O25b and O16 Among Extraintestinal Escherichia coli Isolates from Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefzy, Enas Mamdouh; Hassuna, Noha Anwar

    2017-03-01

    The multidrug-resistant sequence type 131 (ST131) Escherichia coli is a spreading epidemiological burden particularly among isolates resistant to fluoroquinolones. We aimed to evaluate the commonality of ST131-O25b and ST131-O16 among fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli isolates causing community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs) at Fayoum University Hospital, in Egypt. Ninety-two fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli isolates were subjected to multiplex PCR for detection of ST131 of either O25b or O16 subgroups. Positive isolates were then assessed for antimicrobial susceptibility and virulence genotyping. Out of 92 fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli isolates, 56 (60.9%) isolates were O25b/O16 subgroups of ST131, including 44 (78.6%) ST131-O25b and 12 (21.4%) ST131-O16 subgroups. All the O25b/O16 ST131 isolates were sensitive to meropenem, where ST131-O25b isolates were significantly more resistant to extended spectrum cephalosporins compared to S131-O16 strains. All the O25b/O16 ST131 isolates harbored three or more of the virulence factors associated with extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli status. ST131-O16 showed a significantly higher virulence score than ST131-O25b isolates. Our results bring to highlight the emergence of O25b/O16 ST131 isolates between community acquired UTIs among Egyptian patients. This is the first report for the presence of O16 isolates in Egypt, showing a lower predominance than the O25b subgroup. The high prevalence of O25b/O16 ST131 isolates requires strict stewardship on antimicrobial use, notably fluoroquinolones, to control the endemicity of such emerging multidrug-resistant clone in the community.

  20. Gatifloxacin used for therapy of outpatient community-acquired pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ronald N; Andes, David R; Mandell, Lionel A; Gothelf, Samantha; Ehrhardt, Anton F; Nicholson, Susan C

    2002-09-01

    Gatifloxacin is an advanced-generation fluoroquinolone with demonstrated efficacy and safety as therapy for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). As part of a phase IV postmarketing surveillance program (TeqCES), 136 outpatients with CAP whose sputum was culture-positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae were enrolled in an open-label trial of oral gatifloxacin 400 mg daily for 7 to 14 days. An antibiogram of isolates showed 100% susceptibility to gatifloxacin (MIC(90) 0.5 micro g/mL) and respective susceptibilities of 67%, 70%, and 80% to penicillin, erythromycin, and tetracycline. Clinical cure was achieved in 95.3% of evaluable patients, including seven patients infected with penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (MIC > or =2 micro g/mL). The bacteriologic eradication rate for S. pneumoniae was 94.5%. Diarrhea, nausea, and dizziness, the most common adverse events in CAP patients (pneumoniae including multidrug-resistant strains, with the newer 8-methoxy-fluoroquinolone, gatifloxacin.

  1. Factors associated with community-acquired urinary tract infections among adults attending assessment centre, Mulago Hospital Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabugo, Deus; Kizito, Samuel; Ashok, Dave Dhara; Graham, Kiwanuka Alexander; Nabimba, Ronald; Namunana, Sandra; Kabaka, M Richard; Achan, Beatrice; Najjuka, Florence C

    2016-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are a common medical problem affecting the general population and thus commonly encountered in medical practice, with the global burden of UTIs at about 150 million people. Because uropathogens largely originate from colonic flora, they are easy to predict, and this is the rationale for empirical treatment in Community Acquired-UTI (CA-UTIs). With the increasing prevalence of drug-resistant bacteria among adults with CA-UTI in Uganda, it is no longer adequate to manage CA-UTIs on empiric regimen without revising the susceptibility patterns of common CA-UTI causative agents. Thus in this study we set out to identify: The factors associated with CA-UTIs, the common uropathogens and the drug sensitivity patterns of the common uropathogens cultured. This was a cross-sectional study that was conducted in adults who presented with symptoms of a UTI at Mulago Hospital, assessment center. There were 139 patients who consented to the study and were recruited, an interviewer administered questionnaire was used to collect information from the study participants as regards demographic, social and clinical characteristics and Mid Stream Urine (MSU) samples were collected for urinalysis, culture and antibiotic susceptibility testing using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique was applied to the isolates.Numeric data were summarized using measures of central tendency while the categorical data was summarized using proportions and percentages. Age, female sex and marital status were factors that were significantly associated with CA-UTIs. Fifty four (54) cultures were positive for UTI with 26 giving pure growths. The commonest uropathogen isolated was Escherichia coli at 50%, this was followed by Staphylococcus aureus at 15.4%. The sensitivity of Escherichia coli to Ampicillin and Nitrofurantoin were78.6%, 64.3% respectively, and the sensitivity of Staphylococcus aureus to ciprofloxacin, Nitrofurantoin and gentamycin were 100%, 66.7% and 66

  2. Risk factors for resistance to ciprofloxacin in community-acquired urinary tract infections due to Escherichia coli in an elderly population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Marlies; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C; Goessens, Wil H F; de Visser, Herman; Hofman, Albert; Stricker, Bruno H; Verbon, Annelies

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance to ciprofloxacin is rising worldwide, especially in bacteria causing urinary tract infections (UTIs). Prudent use of current antibiotic drugs is therefore necessary. We analysed (modifiable) risk factors for ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli. Urinary cultures of UTIs caused by E. coli were collected from participants in the Rotterdam Study, a prospective cohort study in an elderly population, and analysed for susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to investigate several possible risk factors for resistance. Ciprofloxacin resistance in 1080 E. coli isolates was 10.2%. Multivariate analysis showed that higher age (OR 1.03; 95% CI 1.00-1.05) and use of two (OR 5.89; 95% CI 3.45-10.03) and three or more (OR 3.38; 95% CI 1.92-5.97) prescriptions of fluoroquinolones were associated with ciprofloxacin resistance, while no association between fluoroquinolone use more than 1 year before culture and ciprofloxacin resistance could be demonstrated. Furthermore, a high intake of pork (OR 3.68; 95% CI 1.36-9.99) and chicken (OR 2.72; 95% CI 1.08-6.85) and concomitant prescription of calcium supplements (OR 2.51; 95% CI 1.20-5.22) and proton pump inhibitors (OR 2.04; 95% CI 1.18-3.51) were associated with ciprofloxacin resistance. Ciprofloxacin resistance in community-acquired UTI was associated with a high intake of pork and chicken and with concomitant prescription of calcium supplements and proton pump inhibitors. Modification of antibiotic use in animals as well as temporarily stopping the prescription of concomitant calcium and proton pump inhibitors need further evaluation as strategies to prevent ciprofloxacin resistance. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Worrisome high frequency of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli in community-acquired urinary tract infections: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Tokumori, Franco; Irey-Salgado, Claudia; Málaga, Germán

    2017-02-01

    There has been a sustained and dramatic increase in community-acquired urinary tract infections (CA-UTI) caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria over recent years. Despite this, no studies have been performed in low- or middle-income countries. The main objective of this case-control study was to describe ESBL CA-UTI and its risk factors. Outpatients with CA-UTI seen at the Hospital Cayetano Heredia during 2015 were identified. Patients were contacted by telephone. After consent had been obtained, a questionnaire concerning previously identified risk factors was applied. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted using Stata version 13. The overall frequency of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli was 40.85%. Sixty-seven cases and 105 controls were included in this study. The following main risk factors were identified on multivariate analysis: previous antibiotic use (odds ratio (OR) 3.09), previous hospitalization (OR 2.92), and previous surgery (OR 2.75). Chronic corticosteroid use (OR 24.32, 95% confidence interval 2.39-246.92) was also identified as a risk factor. ESBL E. coli accounted for more than 40% of CA-UTIs during 2015. A history of previous hospitalization, surgery, and antibiotic use should be considered when treating this type of infection. Action should be taken to confirm these worrisome results and avoid the major consequences for public health. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Clinical and bacteriological efficacies of sitafloxacin against community-acquired pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae: nested cohort within a multicenter clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Jiro; Niki, Yoshihito; Kadota, Jun-Ichi; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kaku, Mitsuo; Watanabe, Akira; Aoki, Nobuki; Hori, Seiji; Tanigawara, Yusuke; Cash, Haley L; Kohno, Shigeru

    2013-06-01

    We evaluated the clinical and bacteriological efficacy of oral sitafloxacin (STFX) in clinically diagnosed community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. Additionally, we cultured these patient samples to test the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of levofloxacin (LVFX), moxifloxacin (MFLX), STFX, and penicillin G (PCG), as well as identified mutations in the quinolone resistance determinant regions (QRDRs) in LVFX-resistant strains. This study is a nested cohort from a prospective, multicenter clinical trial consisting of 139 patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), from which 72 were included in this study. After diagnosis of CAP caused by S. pneumoniae, STFX (50 mg twice daily, or 100 mg once daily) was orally administered for 7 days. Sixty-five patient sputum samples were then cultured for MIC analysis. In a LVFX-resistant strain that was identified, mutations in the QRDRs of the gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes were examined. Of 72 patients eligible for this study, S. pneumoniae was successfully cultured from the sputum of 65 patients, and only 7 patients were diagnosed by urinary antigen only. Clinical improvement of CAP was obtained in 65 of the 69 clinically evaluable patients (65/69, 94.2 %). Eradication of S. pneumoniae was observed in 62 patients of the 65 bacteriologically evaluable patients (62/65, 95.4 %). Additionally, STFX showed the lowest MIC distribution compared with LVFX, MFLX, and PCG, and no major adverse reactions were observed. STFX treatment in patients with CAP caused by S. pneumoniae was found to be highly effective both clinically (94.2 %) and bacteriologically (95.4 %).

  5. TRENDS IN ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE AMONG UROPATHOGENS WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO ESCHERICHIA COLI IN COMMUNITY ACQUIRED PEDIATRIC URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS FROM KERALA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Resistance of uropathogens to commonly used antibiotics is increasingly reported from India in adults. There is little data on resistance patterns in childhood community acquired urinary tract infections (UTI. AIMS: To study antibiotic resistanc e trends of uropathogens isolated in community acquired UTI in children from a geographic area. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Prospective study conducted in a northern Kerala tertiary pediatric centre between November 2012 and October 2014. METHODS : Urine samples were obtained by clean catch midstream, bladder catheterization or supra - pubic aspiration. Bacterial growth, when significant were identified by standard biochemical reactions with antibiogram by Kirby Bauers disc diffusion method. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS : P roportions were calculated and statistical significance obtained by Chi - square. RESULTS : Of the 1387 cultures with suspected community acquired UTI, 274 (19.75% were positive. Mean age of study group was 28.52 months and 64.6% were boys. Escherichia coli (E.coli was the predominant pathogen [189(69%] followed by Klebsiella 50(18.2%. Citrobacter, Enterococcus, Proteus and Pseudomonas constituted less than 6%. All urinary isolates showed high combined resistance to most commonly used antimicrobials inclu ding beta - lactam antibiotics (84.3% to cefotaxime, 83.2% to cefixime, 74.5% to ampicillin, quinolones (54.2% to ciprofloxacin, 46.4% to norfloxacin, 32.8% to levofloxacin, 52.9% to co - trimoxazole, 30.2% to gentamicin, 24.1% to nitrofurantoin and 14.2% to netilmicin. E.coli was highly resistant tocephalosporins and ampicillin (>80%. CONCLUSIONS: There is increasing resistance amongst E.coli coli and Klebsiella to third generation cephalosporins in pediatric age group. It is important to generate regional data on antibiogram pattern to guide therapy.

  6. Antibacterial Susceptibilities of Escherichia coli from Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in the Faroe Islands, Associations with Antibacterial Sales, and Comparison with Iceland and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Marita Debess; Gislason, Hannes; Gaini, Shahin

    2017-01-01

    Currently, data on Escherichia coli antibacterial susceptibilities in the Faroe Islands are lacking. The aim was to investigate the antibacterial susceptibilities of E. coli from patients with community-acquired urinary tract infections in the Faroe Islands, correlate with antibacterial sales, an.......77 (Std. Error = 0.624, p-value = 0.002) and β1 = 0.26 (Std. Error = 0.020, p-value = 4e-7) for the steep and gradual groups, respectively. This knowledge can potentially be used to predict and control the future increase in E. coli resistance with antibacterial sales.......Currently, data on Escherichia coli antibacterial susceptibilities in the Faroe Islands are lacking. The aim was to investigate the antibacterial susceptibilities of E. coli from patients with community-acquired urinary tract infections in the Faroe Islands, correlate with antibacterial sales...... methods and criteria. Logistic regression (quasibinomial) of the antibacterial resistance proportions versus mean sales during the period of 2008-2011 was used to determine association. Nonsusceptibility to at least 1 of the 14 antibacterial drugs investigated was found in 54% of the E. coli isolates...

  7. Healthcare-associated, community-acquired and hospital-acquired bacteraemic urinary tract infections in hospitalized patients: a prospective multicentre cohort study in the era of antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horcajada, J P; Shaw, E; Padilla, B; Pintado, V; Calbo, E; Benito, N; Gamallo, R; Gozalo, M; Rodríguez-Baño, J

    2013-10-01

    The clinical and microbiological characteristics of community-onset healthcare-associated (HCA) bacteraemia of urinary source are not well defined. We conducted a prospective cohort study at eight tertiary-care hospitals in Spain, from October 2010 to June 2011. All consecutive adult patients hospitalized with bacteraemic urinary tract infection (BUTI) were included. HCA-BUTI episodes were compared with community-acquired (CA) and hospital-acquired (HA) BUTI. A logistic regression analysis was performed to identify 30-day mortality risk factors. We included 667 episodes of BUTI (246 HCA, 279 CA and 142 HA). Differences between HCA-BUTI and CA-BUTI were female gender (40% vs 69%, p infection and hospital acquisition. © 2012 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2012 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  8. Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Empyema Caused by Citrobacter koseri in an Immunocompetent Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel Angel Ariza-Prota; Ana Pando-Sandoval; Marta García-Clemente; Ramón Fernández; Pere Casan

    2015-01-01

    Citrobacter species, belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae, are environmental organisms commonly found in soil, water, and the intestinal tracts of animals and humans. Citrobacter koseri is known to be an uncommon but serious cause of both sporadic and epidemic septicemia and meningitis in neonates and young infants. Most cases reported have occurred in immunocompromised hosts. The infections caused by Citrobacter are difficult to treat with usual broad spectrum antibiotics owing to rapi...

  9. Hospitalization for community-acquired febrile urinary tract infection: Validation and impact assessment of a clinical prediction rule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalenhoef, J.E. (Janneke E.); van der Starre, W.E. (Willize E.); A. Vollaard (Albert); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); Delfos, N.M. (Nathalie M.); E.M.S. Leyten (Eliane M. S.); Koster, T. (Ted); Ablij, H.C. (Hans C.); J.W. van 't Wout (Jan ); J.T. van Dissel (Jaap); C. van Nieuwkoop (Cees)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: There is a lack of severity assessment tools to identify adults presenting with febrile urinary tract infection (FUTI) at risk for complicated outcome and guide admission policy. We aimed to validate the Prediction Rule for Admission policy in Complicated urinary Tract InfeCt

  10. Evaluation of the suitability of root cause analysis frameworks for the investigation of community-acquired pressure ulcers: a systematic review and documentary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Caroline; Drennan, Vari M

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the suitability of root cause analysis frameworks for the investigation of community-acquired pressure ulcers. The objective was to identify the extent to which these frameworks take account of the setting where the ulcer originated as being the person's home rather than a hospital setting. Pressure ulcers involving full-thickness skin loss are increasingly being regarded as indicators of nursing patient safety failure, requiring investigation using root cause analysis frameworks. Evidence suggests that root cause analysis frameworks developed in hospital settings ignore the unique dimensions of risk in home healthcare settings. A systematic literature review and documentary analysis of frameworks used to investigate community-acquired grade three and four pressure ulcers by home nursing services in England. No published papers were identified for inclusion in the review. Fifteen patient safety investigative frameworks were collected and analysed. Twelve of the retrieved frameworks were intended for the investigation of community-acquired pressure ulcers; seven of which took account of the setting where the ulcer originated as being the patient's home. This study provides evidence to suggest that many of the root cause analysis frameworks used to investigate community-acquired pressure ulcers in England are unsuitable for this purpose. This study provides researchers and practitioners with evidence of the need to develop appropriate home nursing root cause analysis frameworks to investigate community-acquired pressure ulcers. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Molecular epidemiology of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae causing community-acquired pneumonia in adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Puig

    Full Text Available Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi is an opportunistic pathogen which causes a variety of respiratory infections. The objectives of the study were to determine its antimicrobial susceptibility, to characterize the β-lactam resistance, and to establish a genetic characterization of NTHi isolates. Ninety-five NTHi isolates were analyzed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and multi locus sequence typing (MLST. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by microdilution, and the ftsI gene (encoding penicillin-binding protein 3, PBP3 was PCR amplified and sequenced. Thirty (31.6% isolates were non-susceptible to ampicillin (MIC ≥ 2 mg/L, with 10 of them producing β-lactamase type TEM-1 as a resistance mechanism. After ftsI sequencing, 39 (41.1% isolates showed amino acid substitutions in PBP3, with Asn526 → Lys being the most common (69.2%. Eighty-four patients were successfully treated with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ceftriaxone and levofloxacin. Eight patients died due either to aspiration or complication of their comorbidities. In conclusion, NTHi causing CAP in adults shows high genetic diversity and is associated with a high rate of reduced susceptibility to ampicillin due to alterations in PBP3. The analysis of treatment and outcomes demonstrated that NTHi strains with mutations in the ftsI gene could be successfully treated with ceftriaxone or fluoroquinolones.

  12. Idiopathic neonatal necrotising fasciitis caused by community-acquired MSSA encoding Panton Valentine Leukocidin genes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dunlop, Rebecca L E

    2012-02-01

    Neonatal necrotising fasciitis is very rare in comparison to the adult presentation of the disease and a Plastic Surgeon may only encounter one such case during his or her career. Often this is initially misdiagnosed and managed as simple cellulitis. It generally affects previously healthy babies, the site is often the lower back area and a history of minor skin trauma may be elicited. The causative organism is usually Streptococcus or polymicrobial, as is the case in the adult population. We present the case of a previously healthy 11-day-old infant with idiopathic, rapidly progressive necrotising fasciitis of the back, cause by Methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infection. The strain was isolated and found to encode the Panton-Valentine Leukocidin genes, which have been associated with particularly severe necrotising infections in other sites, with high mortality. These strains are the subject of specific treatment and eradication guidance in the UK but awareness of this and the importance of obtaining detailed culture typing is likely to be low amongst Plastic Surgeons.

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibility, risk factors and prevalence of bla cefotaximase, temoneira, and sulfhydryl variable genes among Escherichia coli in community-acquired pediatric urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisha, Kallyadan V; Veena, Shetty A; Rathika, Shenoy D; Vijaya, Shenoy M; Avinash, Shetty K

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli has become an important challenge among pediatric patients with community-acquired urinary tract infection (UTI). The aim of this study was to assess the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, associated risk factors and to survey the frequency of bla cefotaximase (CTX-M), bla temoneira (TEM), and bla sulfhydryl variable (SHV) genotypes in ESBL-producing E. coli isolated from children with community-acquired UTI. This was a prospective study conducted from November 2012 to March 2016 in a tertiary care center. E. coli isolated in urine cultures from children aged ≤18 years was identified and confirmed for ESBL production. ESBL-positive strains were screened for ESBL encoding genes. Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test were used to compare the difference in antibiotic susceptibility with respect to ESBL positive and negative, and binary logistic regression was used to identify the risk factors associated with ESBL production. Among 523 E. coli isolates, 196 (37.5%) were ESBL positive, >90% were resistant to cephalosporins, and 56% were resistant to fluoroquinolones. Least resistance was observed for imipenem, netilmicin, and nitrofurantoin (2%, 8.6%, 15.3%). Association between ESBL production and drug resistance was significant for ceftazidime (P community-acquired pediatric UTI carries more than one type of beta-lactamase coding genes correlating their increased antibiotic resistance. Aggressive infection control policy, routine screening for detecting ESBL isolates in clinical samples, and antimicrobial stewardship are the keys to prevent their dissemination in community settings.

  14. FREEQUNCY OF ESCHERICHIA COLI IN PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY ACQUIRED URINARY TRACT INFECTION AND THEIR RESISTANCE PATTERN AGAINST SOME COMMONLY USED ANTI BACTERIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Waseem; Jamshed, Fareeda; Ahmad, Wajeeha

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a very common health problem and Escherichia coli (E coli) are the most common organisms associated with community acquired UTI. Unfortunately these bacteria have developed extensive resistance against most of the commonly used antibacterials. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency and resistance pattern of E. Coli in patients of community acquired UTI in an area in northern part of Pakistan. Urine specimens were collected from patients who were clinically diagnosed as community acquired UTI. Urine routine examination (Urine RE) was done and samples positive for UTI (Pus cells >10/High Power Field) were included in the study. These samples were inoculated on Eosin Methylene Blue (EMB) agar plates and incubated at 37 degrees C for 36 hours. Suspected colonies were then inoculated further on EMB plates for pure cultures of E. Coli characterized by certain morphological characteristics. IMViC was applied for the confirmation of E coli. In vitro antibiotic susceptibility tests of E. Coli were performed with standardized commercial susceptibility discs (OXOID). Out of 50 specimens, positive for UTI by urine RE, 20 showed pure growth of E. Coli on culture (40%). The majority of the isolates (28%; n=14) were from women while only 12% (n=6) were from men. Escherichia coli showed a high rate of resistance towards Ampicillin (90%), Tetracycline (70%), Erythromycin (70%) and Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole (55%). Sparfloxacin showed better results (45%) than ciprofloxacin (50%). Out of 20 E. Coli isolates, two (10%) were resistant to all the antibacterials except chloramphenicol, eight isolates (40%) showed resistance to six or more than six while 14 (70%) were resistant to four or more than four drugs. Rate of resistance of E. Coli against commonly used antibacterials was quite high and majority of the strains showed multidrug resistance.

  15. Community Acquired Spondylodiscitis caused by Escherichia Coli; Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Javier Fonseca del Pozo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Vertebral osteomyelitis, or spondylodiscitis, is a rare disease with increasing prevalence in recent years due to a greater number of spinal surgical procedures, nosocomial bacteraemia, an aging population and intravenous drug addiction. Haematogenous infection is the most common cause of spondylodiscitis. We report a 47-year-old man diagnosed with Escherichia coli spondylodiscitis. The patient initially presented with a 4-day history of inflammatory, mechanical pain in the lower back suggesting sciatica. Treatment included NSAIDs and opioids. Two days after discharge from hospital following an admission due to an upper GI bleeding, the back pain intensified, precipitating a new attendance to the emergency department; during which lumbosacral radiography showed marked reduction of L2/L3 intervertebral space. After a new admission to the rheumatology unit due to worsening of symptoms and raised inflammatory markers, an expedited MRI showed loss of intervertebral disc space at L2/L3, with an irregular high intensity area at L2; suggesting a fluid collection extending to adjacent soft tissues. Fluoroscopy-guided core needle bone biopsies were reported positive for Escherichia coli sensitive to ceftriaxone. The patient was treated (received treatment with a three week course of ceftriaxone following a formal diagnosis of E. coli spondylodiscitis. Follow-up MRI demonstrated complete recovery with the patient able to return (has returned to normal activity. In this case we highlight the importance of correct and timely diagnosis of spondylodiscitis. Diagnosis of spondylodiscitis is often difficult, delayed or even missed due to the rarity of the disease but can lead to devastating consequences. Therefore a high index of suspicion is needed for prompt diagnosis to ensure improved long-term outcomes.

  16. "Population structure of drug-susceptible,-resistant and ESBL-producing Escherichia coli from community-acquired urinary tract".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Frederik Boëtius; Nielsen, Jesper Boye; Schønning, Kristian; Littauer, Pia; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Løbner-Olesen, Anders; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2016-04-11

    Escherichia coli is the most common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI). The pathogenic isolates are becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics; with a worldwide dissemination of resistant sequence types (ST). We characterized three different uropathogenic E. coli populations, from non-hospitalized patients to describe the genetic kinship between resistant and susceptible isolates. We studied the populations by use of multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and abbreviated-multi locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (a-MLVA). Urine samples submitted for testing, by general practitioners, were identified at Dept. of Clinical Microbiology at Hvidovre Hospital, Denmark, from Oct. 2011 to July 2012. We included 94 fully susceptible, 94 resistant (non-ESBL) and 98 Extended Spectrum Beta-lactamases- (ESBL)-producing E. coli isolates. The ESBL population was dominated vastly by ST131 (51 %), ST38 (9 %) and ST69 (6 %). In the resistant group ST69 (18 %), ST73 (11 %) and ST131 (15 %) were the largest clusters. In the susceptible population more STs and a-MLVA codes were identified compared to the other groups and ST73 and ST95 were found as the only clusters with 16 % and 6 %, respectively. Ninety-eight per cent of the ESBL-producing E. coli isolates were CTX-M-producers. ST131 dominated the population of community-associated uropathogenic ESBL-producing E. coli, but was less frequent among non-ESBL-producing E. coli. The fully susceptible E. coli population was a much more diverse group than the resistant and ESBL-producing E. coli populations. Overall, these findings suggest that dominant ESBL-producing lineages are derived from UPEC lineages already established in the general UPEC population.

  17. Prevalence of community acquired urinary tract infections in silchar medical college, Assam, India and its antimicrobial susceptibility profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indu Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was conducted to know the rate of prevalence of community acquired UTI infections in both males and females, Assam, North-East India. Materials and Methods: A 50 μl of urine sample from each of the subjects was streaked on cystine lactose electrolyte-deficient agar medium. The plates were incubated overnight at 37°C. Pure, isolated colonies of each type was separately cultured and characterized. The susceptibility of the clinical isolates to routinely prescribed antibiotics in the hospital was performed against various antibiotics. Results: Of the total 40 patients, 26 positive samples were obtained of which 19 females (73.07% and 7 male (26.92% patients were shown to be urine culture positive. The most commonly isolated bacterium was Escherichia coli with a frequency rate of (33.3% followed by Staphyloccous aureus (22.2%, Klebsiella pnemoniae (11.1%, coagulase negative Staphylococcus (CoNS (7.4%, Pseudomonas sp. (7.4%, Proteus myxofaciens (3.7%, Proteus mirabilis (3.7%, Edwardsiella tarda (3.7%, Morganella morganii (3.7%, and Citrobacter fruendii (3.7%. Analysis of the samples showed that UTI was more common in females of younger age group as compared with males. It was also observed that the patients responded effectively to imepenem (IE, cepefime, amikacin, norfloxacin, and co-trimoxazole antimicrobial agents against Gram-negative bacilli. Furthermore, the most effective antibiotics against Gram-positive cocci was found to be ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, IE, and penicillin G (benzyl penicillin. Conclusions: Antibiotics have been in use for a long period and more often the misuse of antimicrobial drugs has today led to a general rise in the emergence of resistant bacteria.

  18. Community-acquired necrotizing pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST30-SCCmecIVc-spat019-PVL positive in San Antonio de Areco, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Silvina; Murzicato, Sofía; Sandoval, Orlando; Fernández-Canigia, Liliana; Mollerach, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is the first cause of skin and soft tissue infections, but can also produce severe diseases such as bacteremia, osteomyelitis and necrotizing pneumonia. Some S. aureus lineages have been described in cases of necrotizing pneumonia worldwide, usually in young, previously healthy patients. In this work, we describe a fatal case of necrotizing pneumonia due to community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus clone ST30-SCCmecIVc-spat019-PVL positive in an immunocompetent adult patient. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Community-acquired necrotizing pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST30-SCCmecIVc-spat019-PVL positive in San Antonio de Areco, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Fernández

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is the first cause of skin and soft tissue infections, but can also produce severe diseases such as bacteremia, osteomyelitis and necrotizing pneumonia. Some S. aureus lineages have been described in cases of necrotizing pneumonia worldwide, usually in young, previously healthy patients. In this work, we describe a fatal case of necrotizing pneumonia due to community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus clone ST30-SCCmecIVc-spat019-PVL positive in an immunocompetent adult patient.

  20. Hospitalization for community-acquired febrile urinary tract infection: validation and impact assessment of a clinical prediction rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalenhoef, Janneke E; van der Starre, Willize E; Vollaard, Albert M; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Delfos, Nathalie M; Leyten, Eliane M S; Koster, Ted; Ablij, Hans C; Van't Wout, Jan W; van Dissel, Jaap T; van Nieuwkoop, Cees

    2017-06-06

    There is a lack of severity assessment tools to identify adults presenting with febrile urinary tract infection (FUTI) at risk for complicated outcome and guide admission policy. We aimed to validate the Prediction Rule for Admission policy in Complicated urinary Tract InfeCtion LEiden (PRACTICE), a modified form of the pneumonia severity index, and to subsequentially assess its use in clinical practice. A prospective observational multicenter study for model validation (2004-2009), followed by a multicenter controlled clinical trial with stepped wedge cluster-randomization for impact assessment (2010-2014), with a follow up of 3 months. Paricipants were 1157 consecutive patients with a presumptive diagnosis of acute febrile UTI (787 in validation cohort and 370 in the randomized trial), enrolled at emergency departments of 7 hospitals and 35 primary care centers in the Netherlands. The clinical prediction rule contained 12 predictors of complicated course. In the randomized trial the PRACTICE included guidance on hospitalization for high risk (>100 points) and home discharge for low risk patients (urinary tract infection, futher improvement is necessary to reduce the occurrence of secondary hospital admissions. NTR4480 http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=4480 , registered retrospectively 25 mrt 2014 (during enrollment of subjects).

  1. Skin infections caused by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: clinical and microbiological characteristics of 11 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido Pérez, A; Baniandrés Rodríguez, O; Ceballos Rodríguez, M C; Mendoza Cembranos, M D; Campos Domínguez, M; Suárez Fernández, R

    2014-03-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is an emerging pathogen that causes skin and soft-tissue infections. To describe the clinical characteristics of skin infections caused by CA-MRSA and correlations with the available demographic and microbiological data. This was a descriptive study of patients with a microbiologically confirmed diagnosis of CA-MRSA infection treated in a dermatology department between June 2009 and December 2011. We recorded demographic details, the clinical characteristics of lesions, and the treatments used. We studied 11 patients (5 men and 6 women); 91% were under 40 years of age and had no relevant past medical history. The most common presentation was a skin abscess (with or without cellulitis). In all such cases, marked tissue necrosis and little or no purulent exudate was observed when the abscess was drained. Fifty percent of these abscesses had been treated previously with β-lactam antibiotics, and in all cases the lesions resolved after surgical drainage, which was combined in 63% of cases with quinolones or cotrimoxazole. Today, skin infections due to CA-MRSA affect healthy young athletes who have no contact with healthcare settings. The most common presentation is a skin abscess characterized by marked tissue necrosis and little or no purulent exudate. In cases with these characteristics in susceptible patients, the involvement of CA-MRSA as the causative agent should be suspected. The abscesses should be drained whenever possible and, if necessary, antibiotic treatment should be prescribed; empirical use of β-lactam antibiotics should be avoided. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  2. Phenotypic and genotypic evaluation of beta-lactamases (ESBL and KPC) among enterobacteria isolated from community-acquired monomicrobial urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Vanessa Cordeiro; da Silva, Vânia Lúcia; Barros, Renata; Bastos, André Netto; de Andrade Bastos, Lucas Quinnet; de Andrade Bastos, Victor Quinnet; Diniz, Cláudio Galuppo

    2014-12-01

    Beta-lactamases enzymes such as extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) and carbapenemase type beta-lactamases (KPC) confer resistance to beta-lactam drugs among Gram-negative rods, mainly Enterobacteriaceae, as those frequently related to urinary tract infections (UTI). The aim of this study was to evaluate ESBL and KPC among enterobacteria isolated from monomicrobial UTI and to establish correlations between the presence of genetic markers and the phenotypic resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. Out of 12 304 urine samples collected during 2009, 93 enterobacteria showing an ESBL phenotype were recovered. Imipenem was used for KPC screening and modified disk approximation assay was used for detection of ESBL phenotype. Polymerase chain reaction was used for screening of bla(SHV), bla(TEM), bla(CTX-M), and bla(KPC). Considering the isolated bacteria showing ESBL phenotype 56% of the isolates were positive for two genes. The bla(TEM) was the most frequent (87·1%). Neither KPC phenotype nor bla(KPC)-harboring bacteria were observed. Monitoring the antimicrobial resistance is extremely important to sustain empirical therapy of community-acquired urinary tract infections (Co-UTI).

  3. Comparison of the effectiveness and antibiotic cost among ceftriaxone, ertapenem, and levofloxacin in treatment of community-acquired complicated urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-An; Yang, Ya-Sung; Wang, Jing-Xun; Lin, Hsin-Chung; Lin, De-Yu; Chiu, Chun-Hsiang; Yeh, Kuo-Ming; Lin, Jung-Chung; Chang, Feng-Yee

    2016-04-01

    To study characteristics of patients with community-acquired complicated urinary tract infections (cUTIs) and to compare effectiveness and antibiotic cost of treatment with ceftriaxone (CRO), levofloxacin (LVX), and ertapenem (ETP). This retrospective study enrolled patients who had community-acquired cUTIs admitted to Division of Infectious Diseases in a single medical center from January 2011 to March 2013. Effectiveness, antibiotic cost, and clinical characteristics were compared among patients treated with CRO, LVX, and ETP. There were 358 eligible cases, including 139 who received CRO, 128 treated with ETP, and 91 with LVX. The most common pathogen was Escherichia coli. The susceptibilities of these three agents were higher and more superior than first-line antibiotics. Treatment with ETP was associated with a significantly shorter time to defervescence since admission (CRO: 39 hours, ETP: 30 hours, and LVX: 38 h; p = 0.031) and shorter hospitalization stay (CRO: 4 days, ETP: 3 days, and LVX: 4 days; p < 0.001). However, the average antibiotic costs in the CRO group were significantly lower than that in the other two groups [CRO: 62.4 United States dollars (USD), ETP: 185.33 USD, and LVX: 204.85 USD; p < 0.001]. The resistance of cUTIs isolates to first-line antibiotic is high. Using ETP, CRO, and LVX in the treatment of cUTIs for good clinical response should be suggested. Among the three agents, ETP had better susceptibility than CRO and LVX, reached defervescence sooner, and was associated with shorter hospital stays. However, using CRO in cUTIs was less expensive than the other two agents. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. "Population structure of drug-susceptible, -resistant and ESBL-producing Escherichia coli from community-acquired urinary tract infections"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Frederik Boetius; Nielsen, Jesper Boye; Schønning, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Escherichia coli is the most common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI). The pathogenic isolates are becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics; with a worldwide dissemination of resistant sequence types (ST). We characterized three different uropathogenic E. coli populations, ...

  5. Distribution of virulence genes and genotyping of CTX-M-15-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from patients with community-acquired urinary tract infection (CA-UTI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Reza; Memariani, Hamed; Sorouri, Rahim; Memariani, Mojtaba

    2016-11-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is one of the most important agents of community-acquired urinary tract infection (CA-UTI). In addition to extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), a number of virulence factors have been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of K. pneumoniae, including capsule, siderophores, and adhesins. Little is known about the genetic diversity and virulence content of the CTX-M-15-producing K. pneumoniae isolated from CA-UTI in Iran. A total of 152 K. pneumoniae isolates were collected from CA-UTI patients in Tehran from September 2015 through April 2016. Out of 152 isolates, 40 (26.3%) carried blaCTX-M-15. PCR was performed for detection of virulence genes in CTX-M-15-producing isolates. Furthermore, all of these isolates were subjected to multiple-locus variable-number of tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA). Using MLVA method, 36 types were identified. CTX-M-15-producing K. pneumoniae isolates were grouped into 5 clonal complexes (CCs). Of these isolates, mrkD was the most prevalent virulence gene (95%), followed by kpn (60%), rmpA (37.5%), irp (35%), and magA (2.5%). No correlation between MLVA types or CCs and virulence genes or antibiotic resistance patterns was observed. Overall, it is thought that CTX-M-15-producing K. pneumoniae strains isolated from CA-UTI have arisen from different clones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A preliminary report on the susceptibility to aminoglycosides of Escherichia coli isolated from the community-acquired urinary tract infections in adults in south-east Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidecka-Skwarzynska Magdalena

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available World-wide, urinary tract infections (UTIs are an important clinical problem. In such, the most frequently isolated uropathogen is Escherichia coli. In the treatment of uncomplicated UTIs, e.g. cystitis, the widely used antibiotics are nitrofurantoin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, fosfomycin trometamol or ciprofloxacin, while the treatment of pyelonephritis requires the usage of antibiotics with a broader spectrum of activity, such as cephalosporins of the 3rd and 4th generation, aminoglycosides or even carbapenems. The aim of this study was to assess the susceptibility to aminoglycosides (such as amikacin, gentamicin, netilmicin and tobramycin of E. coli isolated from UTIs in adult community patients living in Lubelszczyzna. We found that all of the 86 strains of E. coli encountered were susceptible to amikacin. Moreover, the prevalence of susceptibility to tobramycin, gentamicin or netilmicin among the tested strains was found to be 89,5%, 90,7% or 94,2%, respectively. The data obtained in the present study shows the high susceptibility to aminoglycosides of E. coli isolated from the community-acquired UTIS in adults. These data, together with that derived from current literature, indicate that aminoglycosides, when employed in combination therapy with other antibiotics, may still be very useful group of antibacterial agents in the treatment of UTI’s in Poland.

  7. Antimicrobial Resistance Among Uropathogens That Cause Childhood Community-acquired Urinary Tract Infections in Central Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubov, Renata; van den Akker, Machiel; Machamad, Kaba; Hochberg, Amit; Nadir, Erez; Klein, Adi

    2017-01-01

    In this retrospective study 829 positive urine cultures were analyzed. Escherichia coli bacterium was the leading uropathogen (86%). Almost 60% were resistant to ampicillin and first generation cephalosporins, and about 30% of them resistant to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Almost none of them were resistant to second and third generation cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, ciprofloxacin or nitrofurantoin.

  8. Antibacterial Susceptibilities of Escherichia coli from Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in the Faroe Islands, Associations with Antibacterial Sales, and Comparison with Iceland and Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnussen, Marita Debess; Gislason, Hannes; Gaini, Shahin; Kristinsson, Karl G

    2017-05-24

    Currently, data on Escherichia coli antibacterial susceptibilities in the Faroe Islands are lacking. The aim was to investigate the antibacterial susceptibilities of E. coli from patients with community-acquired urinary tract infections in the Faroe Islands, correlate with antibacterial sales, and compare with Iceland and Denmark. From 2009 to 2010 and in 2012, 12 general practitioners from the Faroe Islands were recruited to provide urine samples from patients. Antibacterial susceptibilities were determined by disc diffusion testing according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute methods and criteria. Logistic regression (quasibinomial) of the antibacterial resistance proportions versus mean sales during the period of 2008-2011 was used to determine association. Nonsusceptibility to at least 1 of the 14 antibacterial drugs investigated was found in 54% of the E. coli isolates and was most common to ampicillin (46%), followed by sulfamethoxazole (39%), trimethoprim (27%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (27%), and sales and antibacterial resistances. For the resistances in the Faroe Islands compared with data from Denmark and Iceland, we infer two groups of resistances indicating different responses-one steep and one gradual-to antibacterial sales. For these two groups, we find β1 = 4.77 (Std. Error = 0.624, p-value = 0.002) and β1 = 0.26 (Std. Error = 0.020, p-value = 4e-7) for the steep and gradual groups, respectively. This knowledge can potentially be used to predict and control the future increase in E. coli resistance with antibacterial sales.

  9. [Diagnosis and treatment of community-acquired urinary tract infections in adults: what has changed. Comments on the 2008 guidelines of the French Health Products Safety Agency (AFSSAPS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, François

    2010-01-01

    This article comments on the new recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of adult patients with community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs), issued in 2008 by the French Health Products Safety Agency (AFSSAPS). The terms uncomplicated and complicated UTIs have been retained ; complicated UTIs are those with risk factor for complication (rather than with established complications). In women, age (>or= 65 years) is no longer considered itself a risk factor for complications. In men, cystitis must be treated as prostatitis. The bacterial levels defining UTIs have been revised, but levels below the threshold cannot be used to rule out UTI in the presence of symptoms. For uncomplicated cystitis, only fosfomycin-trometamol is recommended as a first-line treatment, essentially because of its ecological advantages (resistance uncommon, no cross resistance with other antibiotic classes, specific class, sparing others). For recurrent cystitis, prophylactic antibiotic treatment must be limited to cases when other preventive measures are impossible. For complicated cystitis, the principle is to delay antibiotic therapy until the resistance profile results are available, when possible (because of the high risk of resistance). Delay must be avoided during pregnancy, however, because of maternal-fetal risks. The strategy for uncomplicated pyelonephritis has been simplified : no plain abdominal radiography, antibiotic therapy shortened to 10-14 days (even 7 days for regimen or relay including fluoroquinolone), and no routine verification by urine culture. For prostatitis, PSA testing is not recommended during the acute phase of prostatitis, and a 14-day antibiotic regimen is enough for the easiest-to-treat infections.

  10. Seroepidemiology of Coxiella burnetii Infection and its Frequency as a Cause of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Marrie

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study tested acute and convalescent serum samples from 788 patients hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia in seven Canadian provinces for antibodies to Coxiella burnetii. One hundred nine patients (13.8% had antibodies to this microorganism, and seven patients had acute Q fever. Serological evidence of infection with C burnetii was present in patients from all seven provinces. Three of the seven cases of acute Q fever were from Manitoba, suggesting that there may be unrecognized cases of Q fever in this province. In addition, a case of acute Q fever in Newfoundland, where there had previously been no reported cases, was noted, although subsequently, an outbreak of Q fever on goat farms has been reported.

  11. Community-acquired pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in critically-ill patients: systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Carballo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Despite methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA having often been associated with nosocomial pneumonia, the condition of some MRSA CAP patients is severe enough to warrant their being admitted to ICU. Objective: The purpose of this study is to conduct a systematic review of the literature on antibiotic treatment of MRSA CAP in critically-ill patients. Material and methods: An online search was conducted for locating articles on MRSA CAP in critically ill patients. Relevant publications were identified in PUBMED, the BestPractice database, UpToDate database and the Cochrane Library for articles published in English within the December 2001 - April 2016 time frame. Results: A total of 70 articles were found to have been published, 13 (18.8% having been included and 57 (81.4% excluded. Cohort studies were predominant, having totaled 16 in number (20.7% as compared to one sole cross-sectional study (3.5%. Conclusions: The experience in the treatment of MRSA CAP in patients requiring admission to ICU is quite limited. Vancomycin or linezolid seem to be the treatments of choice for MRSA CAP, although there not be any specific recommendation in this regard. It may be useful to use alternative routes, such as administration via aerosolized antibiotics, continuous infusion or in association with other antibiotics.

  12. Community-acquired urinary tract infections by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Zenica-Doboj Canton, Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Saric

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and antimicrobial resistance of ESBL-producing strains in the community-acquired urinary tract infections (CAUTIs, which is necessary for antimicrobial therapy selection. From January 2003 to September 2004, 4,112 consecutive, non-duplicate coliform isolates from CAUTIs were analyzed. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing to fifteen antimicrobials was performed by disc-diffusion method. Double-disk synergy test (DDST with amoxicillin-clavulanat, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone and aztreonam, and Etest strips with PM/PML (AB Biodisk was performed according to CLSI recommendation in order to detect the ESBL producers. The overall incidence of ESBL producing strains was 2.6% (108/4112, it was significantly higher in males, 8.4% (79/936 than in females, 0.9% (29/3176. The highest prevalence of ESBL producers was noted in the oldest and youngest age group: 4.8% (52/106 and 2.6% (27/1045, respectively. An increase from 2.2% (52/2402 to 3.3% (56/1710, and a shift of ESBL producers toward the age group 0-6 years (1.6% and 3.8%, respectively in this period was observed. The incidence of ESBL producing strains among isolated Klebsiella spp. were 7.8% (83/1060, E. coli 0.7% (18/2561, Citrobacter spp. 0.6% (1/156, Enterobacter spp. 7.7% (3/39 and Proteus spp. 1.0% ( 3/297. Among ESBL producing isolates Klebsiella spp. predominated, 76.9% (83/108, followed by E. coli 16.7% (18/108. ESBL producing strains showed significantly higher resistance rates to all tested antibiotics as compared to to non-ESBL-producers. The increase and shift toward the youngest age group of the ESBL producer incidences is of our concern. Further studies are required to detect ESBL types in terms of highly different geographical dissemination of these isolates.

  13. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Eschericia coli strains from samples collected before and after pivmecillinam or placebo treatment of uncomplicated community-acquired urinary tract infection in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnæs, K; Sandvang, D; Lundgren, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    The primary infecting Escherichia coli strains from 156 women with community-acquired uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) randomized to pivmecillinam or placebo and the E. coli strains causing UTI at two follow-up visits were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE......). In the pivmecillinam treatment group PFGE showed that among patients having a negative urine culture at the first follow-up 77% (46/60) had a relapse with the primary infecting E. coli strain and 23% (14/60) had reinfection with a new E. coli strain at the second follow-up. Among patients having E. coli at the first...... follow-up PFGE showed that 80% (32/40) had persistence with the primary infecting E. coli strain, 15% (6/40) had reinfection with a new E. coli strain, and 5% (2/40) had different E. coli strains at the two follow-up visits (one had reinfection followed by relapse, and the other had persistence followed...

  14. Community-acquired pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in critically-ill patients: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo, Nuria; De Antonio-Cuscó, Marta; Echeverría-Esnal, Daniel; Luque, Sonia; Salas, Esther; Grau, Santiago

    2017-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Despite methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) having often been associated with nosocomial pneumonia, the condition of some MRSA CAP patients is severe enough to warrant their being admitted to ICU. The purpose of this study is to conduct a systematic review of the literature on antibiotic treatment of MRSA CAP in critically-ill patients. An online search was conducted for locating articles on MRSA CAP in critically ill patients. Relevant publications were identified in PUBMED, the BestPractice database, UpToDate database and the Cochrane Library for articles published in English within the December 2001 - April 2016 time frame. A total of 70 articles were found to have been published, 13 (18.8%) having been included and 57 (81.4%) excluded. Cohort studies were predominant, having totaled 16 in number (20.7%) as compared to one sole cross-sectional study (3.5%). The experience in the treatment of MRSA CAP in patients requiring admission to ICU is quite limited. Vancomycin or linezolid seem to be the treatments of choice for MRSA CAP, although there not be any specific recommendation in this regard. It may be useful to use alternative routes, such as administration via aerosolized antibiotics, continuous infusion or in association with other antibiotics. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  15. [National S3 guideline on uncomplicated urinary tract infection: recommendations for treatment and management of uncomplicated community-acquired bacterial urinary tract infections in adult patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenlehner, F M E; Schmiemann, G; Hoyme, U; Fünfstück, R; Hummers-Pradier, E; Kaase, M; Kniehl, E; Selbach, I; Sester, U; Vahlensieck, W; Watermann, D; Naber, K G

    2011-02-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) belong to the most frequent bacterial infections in outpatients. Increasing antibiotic resistance rates and a new appreciation of the epidemiological side effects of antibiotics ("collateral damage") have warranted an update of the guidelines on uncomplicated UTI as an S3 clinical guideline. The guideline was developed by the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Urologie (DGU) in collaboration with the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Allgemein- und Familienmedizin (DEGAM), Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gynäkologie und Geburtshilfe (DGGG), Deutsche Gesellschaft für Hygiene und Mikrobiologie (DGHM), Deutsche Gesellschaft für Infektiologie (DGI), Deutsche Gesellschaft für Nephrologie (DGfN), Paul-Ehrlich-Gesellschaft für Chemotherapie (PEG) and a patient representative. The systematic review of the literature on the topics of the guideline was performed for the time period of 1 January 1998 to 30 April 2008 in the databases of the Cochrane Library and MEDLINE. International guidelines of the years 1999-2007 were included. Uncomplicated UTI comprise uncomplicated cystitis and uncomplicated pyelonephritis. The leading uropathogen is Escherichia coli. The choice of the antibiotic substance follows the five primary aspects: (1) individual patient risk and antibiotic pretreatment; (2) bacterial spectrum and antibiotic susceptibility; (3) effectivity of the antimicrobial substance demonstrated in clinical studies; (4) epidemiological effects ("collateral damage"); and (5) adverse effects. If antibiotics such as trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole or fluoroquinolones have previously been given, the risk for pathogens to become resistant against these substances is increased. Because of increasing resistance rates of E. coli against trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole also in uncomplicated UTI, trimethoprim alone or in combination with sulfamethoxazole is no longer regarded as the first-line agent in the empiric treatment of uncomplicated cystitis, unless the regional

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibility, risk factors and prevalence of bla cefotaximase, temoneira, and sulfhydryl variable genes among Escherichia coli in community-acquired pediatric urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kallyadan V Nisha

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: ESBL-producing E. coli from community-acquired pediatric UTI carries more than one type of beta-lactamase coding genes correlating their increased antibiotic resistance. Aggressive infection control policy, routine screening for detecting ESBL isolates in clinical samples, and antimicrobial stewardship are the keys to prevent their dissemination in community settings.

  17. "Population structure of drug-susceptible, -resistant and ESBL-producing Escherichia coli from community-acquired urinary tract infections"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Frederik Boëtius; Nielsen, Jesper Boye; Schønning, Kristian;

    2016-01-01

    , from non-hospitalized patients to describe the genetic kinship between resistant and susceptible isolates. We studied the populations by use of multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and abbreviated-multi locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (a-MLVA). Urine samples submitted for testing......BACKGROUND: Escherichia coli is the most common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI). The pathogenic isolates are becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics; with a worldwide dissemination of resistant sequence types (ST). We characterized three different uropathogenic E. coli populations...

  18. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Prostatic Abscess Presenting as Acute Urinary Retention: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naboush, Ali; Abou Yassine, Ali; Yasmin, Mohamad; Mobarakai, Neville

    2013-01-01

    Background. Community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains have emerged as a substantial cause of infection in individuals without exposure to the healthcare system. Prostatic abscess is an uncommon disease. To date, there are only 6 published reports of a prostatic abscess secondary to CA-MRSA. Case Description. A 52-year-old diabetic Caucasian presented to the emergency department with severe lower abdominal pain of few hours duration, urinary frequency, and dribbling over the last 3 weeks. Physical examination was remarkable for an enlarged nontender prostate. A urine analysis showed pyuria while urine cultures grew CA-MRSA. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis showed multiple prostate abscesses and a thickened urinary bladder wall. A TURP was performed by the urology team and pathology showed severe acute and chronic prostatitis with abscess formation and necrotic tissue. Our treatment regimen included IV vancomycin followed by oral trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and rifampin. Eradication of CA-MRSA was confirmed by follow-up cultures 2 months following discharge. Conclusion. This case illustrates the successful identification, diagnosis, and prompt treatment of a prostatic abscess secondary to CA-MRSA in a diabetic patient without recent hospitalization. Early treatment with antibiotics and transurethral resection of the prostate abscess led to a shortened hospital stay and decreased morbidity.

  19. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Prostatic Abscess Presenting as Acute Urinary Retention: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Naboush

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA strains have emerged as a substantial cause of infection in individuals without exposure to the healthcare system. Prostatic abscess is an uncommon disease. To date, there are only 6 published reports of a prostatic abscess secondary to CA-MRSA. Case Description. A 52-year-old diabetic Caucasian presented to the emergency department with severe lower abdominal pain of few hours duration, urinary frequency, and dribbling over the last 3 weeks. Physical examination was remarkable for an enlarged nontender prostate. A urine analysis showed pyuria while urine cultures grew CA-MRSA. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis showed multiple prostate abscesses and a thickened urinary bladder wall. A TURP was performed by the urology team and pathology showed severe acute and chronic prostatitis with abscess formation and necrotic tissue. Our treatment regimen included IV vancomycin followed by oral trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and rifampin. Eradication of CA-MRSA was confirmed by follow-up cultures 2 months following discharge. Conclusion. This case illustrates the successful identification, diagnosis, and prompt treatment of a prostatic abscess secondary to CA-MRSA in a diabetic patient without recent hospitalization. Early treatment with antibiotics and transurethral resection of the prostate abscess led to a shortened hospital stay and decreased morbidity.

  20. Detection of respiratory viral and bacterial pathogens causing pediatric community-acquired pneumonia in Beijing using real-time PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tie-Gang Zhang; Ai-Hua Li; Min Lyu; Meng Chen; Fang Huang; Jiang Wu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the etiology and prevalence of pediatric CAP in Beijing using a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. Methods: Between February 15, 2011 and January 18, 2012, 371 pediatric patients with CAP were enrolled at Beijing Children's Hospital. Sixteen respiratory viruses and two bacteria were detected from tracheal aspirate specimens using commercially available multiplex real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) kits. Results: A single viral pathogen was detected in 35.3%of enrolled patients, multiple viruses in 11.6%, and virus/bacteria co-infection in 17.8%. In contrast, only 6.5%of patients had a single bacterial pathogen and 2.2%were infected with multiple bacteria. The etiological agent was unknown for 26.7% of patients. The most common viruses were respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (43.9%), rhinovirus (14.8%), parainfluenza virus (9.4%), and adenovirus (8.6%). In patients under three years of age, RSV (44.6%), rhinovirus (12.8%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (9.9%) were the most frequent pathogens. In children aged 3e7 years, S. pneumoniae (38.9%), RSV (30.6%), Haemophilus influenzae (19.4%), and adenovirus (19.4%) were most prevalent. Finally in children over seven years, RSV (47.3%), S. pneumoniae (41.9%), and rhinovirus (21.5%) infections were most frequent. Conclusions: Viral pathogens, specifically RSV, were responsible for the majority of CAP in pediatric patients. However, both S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae contributed as major causes of disease. Commercially available multiplexing real-time PCR allowed for rapid detection of the etiological agent. Copyright © 2015, Chinese Medical Association Production. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of KeAi Communications Co., Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

  1. Community-acquired urinary tract infection in hospitalized children: etiology and antimicrobial resistance. A comparison between first episode and recurrent infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakran, Waheeb; Smolkin, Vladislav; Odetalla, Ahmad; Halevy, Raphael; Koren, Ariel

    2015-05-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is common in infants and children, and Escherichia coli is the leading pathogen. The aims of this study were to compare first episode of UTI with recurrent infection, reveal organisms that cause UTI, uropathogen resistance, and presence of bacteria producing extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL). The first-UTI group included 456 children. E coli was the leading pathogen (80.5%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found in 1.5%. The uropathogens were resistant to gentamicin (3.41%) and cefuroxime (5.71%), and highly resistant to cefamezin (37.39%). The recurrent-infection group included 106 children. E coli was also the leading pathogen, but 7.5% of the isolates were P aeruginosa (P = .002 compared with first-episode group); 6.6% were ESBL-producing bacteria compared with 1.1% in the first-episode group (P = .002). E coli is the leading pathogen in both groups. P aeruginosa and ESBL-producing bacteria were more common in the recurrent infection group.

  2. Increasing resistance in community-acquired urinary tract infections in Latin America, five years after the implementation of national therapeutic guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bours, P. H. A.; Polak, R.; Hoepelman, A. I. M.; Delgado, E.; Jarquin, A.; Matute, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The worldwide increasing resistance to antibiotics has complicated antimicrobial treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs), especially in Latin America. This study aimed to report the present etiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of UTIs, and the effects of the national guidelines

  3. Infectious caused by community-acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA: three-years experience of an universitary hospital in Rome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Altieri

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available To date methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is one of the most common pathogens causing nosocomial infections(1. In Europe the proportion of MRSA is increasing sharply and the distribution varies from country to country. In recent years there has, in various parts of the world, the emergence of infection with strains of S. aureus methicillin-resistant community-acquired (CA-MRSA than those circulating in hospitals(2. These strains contain a gene that confers resistance to methicillin (mec A SSC mec IV which is usually associated with the gene for Leukocidin Panton Valentine (PVL toxin responsible for necrosis of skin and soft tissue (3. In 2006-2008, at the Laboratory of Bacteriology PolyclinicTor Vergata,were isolated a total of 738 strains of S. aureus from biological samples of different nature (oral, vaginal secretions, wound swab, secreted headset, etc ... of patients related to our surgeries.The identification and study of drug sensitivity of strains were performed with the automatic VITEK2 (bioMérieux. Of the 738 strains of S. aureus identified 212 (28.7% were resistant to methicillin (MRSA, with an increasing trend over the years: 46 isolates, respectively, in 2006, 76 in 2007 and 90 in 2008. The highest frequency of MRSA (varying between 85% and 95% was detected in wound swabs from the dispensary and diabetes (diabetic foot.

  4. Evaluation of Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Zoonotic Pathogens in an Area with a High Density of Animal Farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijskens, E G W; Smit, L A M; Rossen, J W A; Heederik, D; Koopmans, M

    2016-03-01

    Intensive animal farming could potentially lead to outbreaks of infectious diseases. Clinicians are at the forefront of detecting unusual diseases, but the lack of specificity of zoonotic disease symptoms makes this a challenging task. We evaluated patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with known and unknown aetiology in an area with a high livestock density and a potential association with animal farms in the proximity. Between 2008 and 2009, a period coinciding with a large Q fever outbreak in the Netherlands, patients with CAP were tested for the presence of possible respiratory pathogens. The presence and number of farm animals within 1 km of the patients' home address were assessed using geographic information system (GIS) and were compared between cases and age-matched control subjects. Of 408 patients with CAP, pathogens were detected in 275 (67.4%) patients. The presence of sheep and the number of goats were associated with CAP caused by Coxiella burnetii in a multiple logistic regression model (P 0.10). The use of GIS in combination with aetiology of CAP could be potentially used to target diagnostics and to identify outbreaks of rare zoonotic disease. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. A preliminary report on the susceptibility to aminoglycosides of Escherichia coli isolated from the community-acquired urinary tract infections in adults in south-east Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Fidecka-Skwarzynska Magdalena; Juda Marek; Maziarczyk Lucyna; Malm Anna

    2015-01-01

    World-wide, urinary tract infections (UTIs) are an important clinical problem. In such, the most frequently isolated uropathogen is Escherichia coli. In the treatment of uncomplicated UTIs, e.g. cystitis, the widely used antibiotics are nitrofurantoin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, fosfomycin trometamol or ciprofloxacin, while the treatment of pyelonephritis requires the usage of antibiotics with a broader spectrum of activity, such as cephalosporins of the 3rd and 4th generation, aminoglyco...

  6. Evaluation of Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Zoonotic Pathogens in an Area with a High Density of Animal Farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijskens, E. G .W.; Smit, L. A. M.; Rossen, J. W. A.; Heederik, D; Koopmans, M

    2015-01-01

    Intensive animal farming could potentially lead to outbreaks of infectious diseases. Clinicians are at the forefront of detecting unusual diseases, but the lack of specificity of zoonotic disease symptoms makes this a challenging task. We evaluated patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) wi

  7. Evaluation of Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Zoonotic Pathogens in an Area with a High Density of Animal Farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijskens, E G W; Smit, L A M; Rossen, J W A; Heederik, D; Koopmans, M

    2016-01-01

    Intensive animal farming could potentially lead to outbreaks of infectious diseases. Clinicians are at the forefront of detecting unusual diseases, but the lack of specificity of zoonotic disease symptoms makes this a challenging task. We evaluated patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) wi

  8. Evaluation of Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Zoonotic Pathogens in an Area with a High Density of Animal Farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijskens, E G W; Smit, L A M; Rossen, J W A; Heederik, D; Koopmans, M

    Intensive animal farming could potentially lead to outbreaks of infectious diseases. Clinicians are at the forefront of detecting unusual diseases, but the lack of specificity of zoonotic disease symptoms makes this a challenging task. We evaluated patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP)

  9. The efficacy of pivmecillinam: 3 days or 5 days t.i.d against community acquired uncomplicated lower urinary tract infections - a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansåker, Filip; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Bjerrum, Lars; Dahl Knudsen, Jenny

    2016-12-01

    Uncomplicated lower urinary tract infections (LUTI) are very common, and presumably around 200,000 female patients are treated for this annually in Denmark. The current Danish national clinical practice guidelines recommend pivmecillinam as a first-line drug (i.e., 400 mg t.i.d. for 3 days). Pivmecillinam is also one of the first-line drugs recommended in the international guidelines for LUTIs (i.e., 400 mg b.i.d. for 5 days). The international recommended duration is based on evidence saying that a 7-day regimen is better than a 3-day regimen. However, no data says that a 5-day regimen is superior to a 3-day regimen. With this study we aim to identify and to compare the efficacy of pivmecillinam 400 mg t.i.d in a 3-day respectively 5-day regimen, against community acquired uncomplicated LUTI, i.e., in women at the age of 18-70 year old. The general practitioner will at consultation give a suitable patient the opportunity to participate in the study. If the patient will give her consent, a double-blinded kit (i.e., the antibiotic with/without placebo, questionnaires and self-urinary samples) will be given to the patient. We aim for 161 evaluable patients in each arm. Pivmecillinam is an excellent choice against urinary tract infections and we believe this study will fill in the gaps and strengthen the evidence on the treatment against one of the most common infections in our society. Thus, aiming to provide a more rational and ecological beneficial antimicrobial therapy. EudraCTno.: 2014-001321-32 .

  10. Study of the Resistance of Escherichia Coli Which Creates Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections to Ciprofloxacin and Co-Trimoxazole Antibiotics in Sari Hospitals, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasemian Roya

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Escherichia coli is the most important etiologic factor in urinary tract infection (UTI, which is becoming resistant to the common antibiotics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the resistance of this bacterium to the antibiotics that are commonly used. Materials and Methods: A descriptive study conducted in patients with uncomplicated UTI referring to Sari hospitals during 2013-2014. For this purpose, samples that had positive urine culture were selected and evaluated with antibiogram. In addition, E-Test MIC method was used for antibiotics ciprofloxacin and co-trimoxazole. SPSS software was used for data analysis. Results: Of the 101 patients studied, 83 (82.2% were females and 18 (17.8% were male. The mean age of patients was 40.32 ± 3.22 years. The most sensitivity was seen to nitrofurantoin (92.07%, gentamicin (76.23%. Most resistance was also seen to the antibiotics amoxicillin (74.25%, co-trimoxazole (64.35% and ciprofloxacin (36.63%. In E-Test MIC method, 23.7% were resistant to the ciprofloxacin and 43.5% to co-trimoxazole. Conclusion: Due to the high antibiotic resistance that was observed to ciprofloxacin and co-trimoxazole in this study, it seems a better alternative antibiotic such as nitrofurantoin should be used for the empirical treatment of patients with UTIs.

  11. Virulence factors and phylogenetic grouping of Escherichia coli isolates from patients with bacteraemia of urinary tract origin relate to sex and hospital- vs. community-acquired origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt-Rasmussen, Line; Ejrnæs, Karen; Lundgren, Bettina;

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, Escherichia coli is a leading cause of bloodstream infections. Bacteraemia cases in both community- and hospital-acquired infections are often due to E. coli, and it is a major cause of mortality from these infections. These invasive infections are primarily due to extraintestinal path...

  12. Community-Acquired Acute Kidney Injury: A Nationwide Survey in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yafang; Wang, Jinwei; Su, Tao; Qu, Zhen; Zhao, Minghui; Yang, Li

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to describe the burden of community-acquired acute kidney injury (AKI) in China based on a nationwide survey about AKI. Cross-sectional and retrospective study. A national sample of 2,223,230 hospitalized adult patients from 44 academic/local hospitals in Mainland China was used. AKI was defined according to the 2012 KDIGO AKI creatinine criteria or an increase or decrease in serum creatinine level of 50% during the hospital stay. Community-acquired AKI was identified when a patient had AKI that could be defined at hospital admission. The rate, cause, recognition, and treatment of community-acquired AKI were stratified according to hospital type, latitude, and economic development of the regions in which the patients were admitted. All-cause in-hospital mortality and recovery of kidney function at hospital discharge. 4,136 patients with community-acquired AKI were identified during the 2 single-month snapshots (January 2013 and July 2013). Of these, 2,020 (48.8%) had cases related to decreased kidney perfusion; 1,111 (26.9%), to intrinsic kidney disease; and 499 (12.1%), to urinary tract obstruction. In the north versus the south, more patients were exposed to nephrotoxins or had urinary tract obstructions. 536 (13.0%) patients with community-acquired AKI had indications for renal replacement therapy (RRT), but only 347 (64.7%) of them received RRT. Rates of timely diagnosis and appropriate use of RRT were higher in regions with higher per capita gross domestic product. All-cause in-hospital mortality was 7.3% (295 of 4,068). Delayed AKI recognition and being located in northern China were independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality, and referral to nephrology providers was an independent protective factor. Possible misclassification of AKI and community-acquired AKI due to nonstandard definitions and missing data for serum creatinine. The features of community-acquired AKI varied substantially in different regions of China and were closely

  13. Recognising and managing community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Vanessa

    2015-11-18

    Pneumonia remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK and yet the seriousness of the disease is underestimated. Pneumonia can be life-threatening because the delicate tissues of the alveoli and pulmonary capillaries are susceptible to damage from the inflammatory response. This damage leads to consolidation that prevents the diffusion of oxygen and carbon dioxide, and this in turn can lead to respiratory failure. This article summarises guidance on the diagnosis and management of community-acquired pneumonia, and also includes information on the prevention of pneumonia. This information should be valuable to nurses working in a variety of clinical areas since patients with community-acquired pneumonia are encountered in primary, intermediate, secondary and critical care.

  14. Systematic review and meta-analysis of a urine-based pneumococcal antigen test for diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Alison; Xie, Xuanqian; Teltscher, Marty; Dendukuri, Nandini

    2013-07-01

    Standard culture methods for diagnosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia take at least 24 h. The BinaxNOW urine-based test for S. pneumoniae (BinaxNOW-SP) takes only 15 min to conduct, potentially enabling earlier diagnosis and targeted treatment. This study was conducted to assess whether the use of BinaxNOW-SP at the time of hospital admission would provide adequate sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in adult patients. We searched PubMed, EMBASE/OVID, Cochrane Collaboration, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, INAHTA, and CADTH for diagnostic or etiologic studies of hospitalized predominately adult patients with clinically defined CAP that reported the diagnostic performance of BinaxNOW-SP versus cultures. Two authors independently extracted study details and diagnostic two-by-two tables. We found that 27 studies met our inclusion criteria, and three different reference standards were used between them. A bivariate meta-analysis of 12 studies using a composite of culture tests as the reference standard estimated the sensitivity of BinaxNOW-SP as 68.5% (95% credibility interval [CrI], 62.6% to 74.2%) and specificity as 84.2% (95% CrI, 77.5% to 89.3%). A meta-analysis of all 27 studies, adjusting for the imperfect and variable nature of the reference standard, gave a higher sensitivity of 74.0% (CrI, 66.6% to 82·3%) and specificity of 97.2% (CrI, 92.7% to 99.8%). The analysis showed substantial heterogeneity across studies, which did not decrease with adjustment for covariates. We concluded that the higher pooled sensitivity (compared to culture) and high specificity of BinaxNOW-SP suggest it would be a useful addition to the diagnostic workup for community-acquired pneumonia. More research is needed regarding the impact of BinaxNOW-SP on clinical practice.

  15. The first report in Brazil of severe infection caused by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rozenbaum

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA is an emergent pathogen in Brazil. However, there are no data on the prevalence of CA-MRSA. We report here the first well-characterized case of severe life-threatening CA-MRSA infection in a child living in Rio de Janeiro city. The patient had many complications including hematogenous osteomyelitis and involvement of multiple sites requiring drainage of soft-tissue abscess, and pleural and pericardial empyema. The MRSA isolates recovered were genotyped using PFGE, SCCmec typing and multilocus sequence typing. Disk diffusion tests were performed following Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. In addition, the presence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL was assessed by PCR amplification, using specific primers for lukF-pv (encoding for the F subunit of the PVL. The bacterial isolates were related to the ST30-SCCmecIV lineage (Oceania Southwest Pacific clone, a PVL producer CA-MRSA previously detected in Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. Also, the isolates analyzed were susceptible to all non-β-lactam antibiotics tested. The present report demonstrates that disseminated CA-MRSA disease is also occurring in Rio de Janeiro. Thus, the empirical treatment of moderate or severe infections suspected of being associated with CA-MRSA needs to be reviewed in order to allow prompt initiation of an effective therapy that also covers these microorganisms.

  16. Spectrum and potency of ceftaroline against leading pathogens causing community-acquired respiratory tract and skin and soft tissue infections in Latin America, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Flamm

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ceftaroline, the active metabolite of the prodrug ceftaroline fosamil, is a cephalosporin with in vitro bactericidal activity against Gram-positive organisms, including methicillinsusceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus, β-haemolytic and viridans group streptococci, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, as well as common Gram-negative organisms. In this study a total of 986 isolates collected in 2010 from patients in 15 medical centers in five Latin American countries from the Assessing Worldwide Antimicrobial Resistance Evaluation Program were identified as community-acquired respiratory tract or skin and soft tissue infection pathogens. Ceftaroline was the most potent agent tested against S. pneumoniae with a MIC90 value (0.12 µg/mL that was eight-fold lower than ceftriaxone, levofloxacin, and linezolid. Its spectrum of coverage (100.0% susceptible was similar to tigecycline, linezolid, levofloxacin and vancomycin. Against Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis, ceftaroline was the most active agent tested. The activity of ceftaroline against S. aureus (including MRSA was similar to that of vancomycin and tetracycline (MIC90,1 µg/mL and linezolid (MIC90,2 Jg/mL. The 1-haemolytic streptococci exhibited 100.0% susceptibility to ceftaroline. Ceftaroline activity against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., and Enterobacter spp. was similar to that of ceftriaxone and ceftazidime. These parenteral cephalosporin agents have potent activity against non-extended-spectrum These parenteral cephalosporin agents have potent activity against non-extended-spectrum-lactamase-phenotype strains, but are not active against extended-spectrum β-lactamase-phenotype strains. These results confirm the in vitro activity of ceftaroline against pathogens common in communityacquired respiratory tract and skin and soft tissue infection in Latin America, and suggest that ceftaroline fosamil could be an important therapeutic option for these infections.

  17. Treatment of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young R; Houngue, Coovi; Hall, Ronald G

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is the sixth leading cause of death in the USA. Adherence to the 2007 Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society community-acquired pneumonia guidelines has been associated with improved clinical outcomes. However, choice between guideline-recommended treatments is at the discretion of the prescribing clinician. This review is intended to discuss the characteristics of these treatment options including dosing frequency, dose adjustment for renal/hepatic dysfunction, serious/common adverse events, drug interactions, lung penetration, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic target and effect of obesity to help guide antimicrobial selection. An increasing portion of patients are receiving expanded empiric coverage for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as recommended by the American Thoracic Society and Infectious Diseases Society of America for healthcare-associated pneumonia. However, this expanded coverage may not be achieving the desired improvements in clinical outcomes. We expect this increasingly diverse spectrum of patients with pneumonia to eventually result in the merger of these two guidelines to include all patients with pneumonia.

  18. Characteristics of Escherichia coli causing persistence or relapse of urinary tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnæs, Karen; Stegger, Marc; Reisner, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTIs) pose a major problem but little is known about characteristics of Escherichia coli associated with RUTI. This study includes E. coli from 155 women with community-acquired lower urinary tract infections (UTIs) randomized to one of three dosing regiments...

  19. Diagnosis and Treatment of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Karymdzhanov

    2016-03-01

    The initial antibiotic therapy of community-acquired pneumonia is carried out empirically. In the treatment of severe community-acquired pneumonia in children from 2 months to 5 years, the drug of choice is amoxicillin orally. Macrolides are the drugs of choice for children aged 5 to 16 years. In severe pneumonia, drugs of choice are amoxicillin clavulanate, 2nd–4th generation cephalosporins. In general, the duration of antibiotic therapy in the community-acquired pneumonia caused by typical bacteria is 7–10 days, by atypical bacteria — 10–14 days. In the real clinical practice, the errors associated with the choice of drug, route of administration, dosage, regimen of application, length of treatment are frequent during antibacterial therapy.

  20. Corticosteroids for all adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia?

    OpenAIRE

    Ger Rijkers; Simone Spoorenberg; Stefan Vestjens; Werner Albrich

    2015-01-01

    Corticosteroid therapy as adjunctive treatment in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a promising but controversial subject. The potentially beneficial effect of corticosteroids is based on the ability of steroids to dampen an excessive inflammatory response that often occurs in patients with CAP. This excessive inflammatory response can cause damage to the lungs and other organs, and is associated with poor outcome.

  1. Prevention and Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werkhoven, C.H. van

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. CAP is one of the major contributors of antibiotic consumption and thus contributes to development of antibiotic resistance through selective antibiotic pressure. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most commo

  2. Community-acquired pneumonia; Ambulant erworbene Pneumonien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poetter-Lang, S.; Herold, C.J. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Wien (Austria)

    2017-01-15

    The diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is often not possible based only on the clinical symptoms and biochemical parameters. For every patient with the suspicion of CAP, a chest radiograph in two planes should be carried out. Additionally, a risk stratification for the decision between outpatient therapy or hospitalization is recommended. Based on the evaluation of the different radiological patterns as well as their extent and distribution, a rough allocation to so-called pathogen groups as well as a differentiation between viral and bacterial infections are possible; however, because different pathogens cause different patterns an accurate correlation is not feasible by relying purely on imaging. The radiological findings serve as proof or exclusion of pneumonia and can also be used to evaluate the extent of the disease (e.g. monolobular, multilobular, unilateral or bilateral). In cases of prolonged disease, suspicion of complications (e.g. pleural effusion or empyema, necrotizing pneumonia or abscess) or comorbid conditions (e.g. underlying pulmonary or mediastinal diseases) computed tomography is an important diagnostic tool in addition to chest radiography. Ultrasound is often used to diagnose pleural processes (e.g. parapneumonic effusion or pleural empyema). (orig.) [German] Anhand der klinischen Symptome und laborchemischen Befundkonstellation alleine ist es oft nicht moeglich, die Diagnose einer ambulant erworbenen Pneumonie (''community-acquired pneumonia'', CAP) zu stellen. Bei jedem Patienten mit Verdacht auf CAP sollte eine Roentgenthoraxaufnahme in 2 Ebenen angefertigt werden. Weiter muss eine Risikostratifizierung im Sinne der Entscheidung ambulante Therapie vs. Hospitalisierung erfolgen. Anhand der Analyse radiologischer Muster sowie deren Verteilung und Ausdehnung koennen eine grobe Zuordnung zu sogenannten Erregergruppen sowie eine Differenzierung zwischen viralen und bakteriellen Infektionen gelingen. Da

  3. [A rare cause of urinary obstruction: urogenital tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekak, H; Rabii, R; Moufid, K; Joual, A; Debbagh, A; Bennani, A; el Mrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    2003-04-01

    The authors reported a rare cause of urogenital tuberculosis complicated by an obstructive acute renal failure in 44 years old man with solitary anatomic kidney. The authors insisted of using the upper urinary tract opacification by percutaneous nephrostomy for diagnosis, the urogenital tuberculosis with this exploration, we can suspected the tuberculosis by abnormalities of the radiologic imagine, and confirmed the koch bacilli urinary into urinary tract. The upper chance of positives of finding koch bacilli in higher than urinary bladder.

  4. Community-acquired pneumonia among smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirall, Jordi; Blanquer, José; Bello, Salvador

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have left absolutely no doubt that tobacco increases susceptibility to bacterial lung infection, even in passive smokers. This relationship also shows a dose-response effect, since the risk reduces spectacularly 10 years after giving up smoking, returning to the level of non-smokers. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the causative microorganism responsible for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) most frequently associated with smoking, particularly in invasive pneumococcal disease and septic shock. It is not clear how it acts on the progress of pneumonia, but there is evidence to suggest that the prognosis for pneumococcal pneumonia is worse. In CAP caused by Legionella pneumophila, it has also been observed that smoking is the most important risk factor, with the risk rising 121% for each pack of cigarettes smoked a day. Tobacco use may also favor diseases that are also known risk factors for CAP, such as periodontal disease and upper respiratory viral infections. By way of prevention, while giving up smoking should always be proposed, the use of the pneumococcal vaccine is also recommended, regardless of the presence of other comorbidities. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Atypical pathogens in community acquired pneumonia of Egyptian children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deraz TE; El Sahriggy SA; Shaheen MA; Motawea AA; Gomaa HE; Fawzy SH; Mohamed AA

    2009-01-01

    Objective:Diagnosis of atypical pathogens as an aetiology for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP)in chil-dren is a challenge world wide.The aim of this study was to detect the frequency of atypical pathogens as a cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP)in Egyptian children.Methods:From 50 children (with age ranged from 2 months to 1 2 years)hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia;respiratory sputum samples were collected by induction or spontaneously.All samples were subjected to conventional cultures and Polymer-ase Chain Reaction(PCR)technique DNA extraction for identification of Mycoplasma,Chlamydia pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila.Results:A definite pathogen was identified in 78% of the studied children;30%typical bacteria,8% candida albicans and atypical bacteria in 40% of the pneumonic children.Chlamydia pneumoniae was isolated from 26% of the children while Mycoplasma pneumoniae was isolated from 1 4%, whereas Legionella pneumophilla was not isolated at all.Conclusion:Atypical pathogens are evident as a po-tential aetiology for community-acquired pneumonia in (1 3.3%)of young and (80%)of older Egyptian chil-dren.

  6. Community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii: clinical characteristics, epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Carina; Murray, Gerald L; Paulsen, Ian T; Peleg, Anton Y

    2015-05-01

    Community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii (CA-Ab) is a rare but serious cause of community-acquired pneumonia in tropical regions of the world. CA-Ab infections predominantly affect individuals with risk factors, which include excess alcohol consumption, diabetes mellitus, smoking and chronic lung disease. CA-Ab pneumonia presents as a surprisingly fulminant course and is characterized by a rapid onset of fever, severe respiratory symptoms and multi-organ dysfunction, with a mortality rate reported as high as 64%. It is unclear whether the distinct clinical syndrome caused by CA-Ab is because of host predisposing factors or unique bacterial characteristics, or a combination of both. Deepening our understanding of the drivers of overwhelming CA-Ab infection will provide important insights into preventative and therapeutic strategies.

  7. Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Farida (Helmia)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ __Background:__ Knowledge about the etiology and management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in Indonesia is lacking. __Methods:__ Hospital-based and a population-based cohort studies were carried out during 2007-2011 in Semarang, Indonesia. __Results:__

  8. Immunomodulation in community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remmelts, H.H.F.

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common disease with considerable morbidity and mortality, despite effective antibiotic treatment. In this thesis, we showed that the major causative microorganisms in CAP trigger distinct inflammatory response profiles in the host. While an inflammatory respon

  9. Improving outcomes in patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Bewick, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a leading cause of adult morbidity and mortality worldwide despite decades of effective antibiotics and vaccination initiatives. There have been no recent significant improvements in outcomes, including 30-day mortality. The bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most prevalent causative pathogen in CAP, being found in up to half of cases. In September 2006 a childhood pneumococcal vaccine (PCV-7) was introduced, leading to reductions in vaccine-type (...

  10. Hospital-acquired and Community-acquired Uropathogens; Modelling of Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aija ?ilevi?a

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections are among the most common human infections. They may be community-acquired or nosocomial, and caused by a variety of microorganisms. In the present study, we analysed more than 4000 urine samples collected from in-patients and outpatients, and registered the differences in the etiological spectrum of agents. The most widespread uropathogens are gram-negative rods, from them E. coli, Klebsiella spp. and the non-fermentive genus Pseudomonas. Women are more intensively affected by E. coli. From gram-positive cocci, the leading agents are coagulase negative Staphylococci, followed by S. aureus. No differences were registered between the genders. Polyresistance among gram-negative uropathogens is high.

  11. [National consensus for management of community acquired pneumonia in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldías P, Fernando; Pérez C, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an acute respiratory infection that affects pulmonary parenchyma, and is caused by community acquired microorganisms. In Chile, pneumonia represents the main cause of death due to infectious diseases and is the third specific cause of mortality in adults. In 1999, an experts committee in representation of "Sociedad Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias", presented the first National Guidelines for the Treatment of Adult Community Acquired Pneumonia, mainly based in foreign experience and documents, and adapted it to our National Health System Organization. During the last decade, impressive epidemiological and technological changes have occurred, making the update of guidelines for treatment of NAC by several international scientific societies, necessary. These changes include: new respiratory pathogens that are being identified in CAP and affect adult patients (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila); the increasing senescent adult population that carries multiple co-morbidities; the emergence of antimicrobial resistance among respiratory pathogens associated to massive antibiotic prescription; the development by the pharmaceutical industry of new drugs that are effective for pneumonia treatment (macrolides, ketolides and respiratory fluorquinolones); and the development of new diagnostic techniques for detection of antigens, antibodies, and bacterial DNA by molecular biology, useful in respiratory infections. Based on these antecedents, an Advisory Committee of "Sociedad Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias" and "Sociedad Chilena de Infectología" has reviewed the national and international evidence about CAP management in adults in order to update clinical recommendations for our country.

  12. Community-acquired pneumonia in older patients: does age influence systemic cytokine levels in community-acquired pneumonia?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Emer

    2009-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of death in the elderly. The age-related increase in comorbid illnesses plays a part but the effect of aging on the immune response may be equally important. We aimed to evaluate patients with CAP for evidence of a muted response to infection in elderly patients admitted to hospital compared with a younger patient group.

  13. Sero diagnosis of Legionella infection in community acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Sabah; Chaudhry, Rama; Passi, Kapil; Sharma, Sutikshan; K, Padmaja; Dhawan, Benu; Dey, A B

    2010-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila has been increasingly recognized as an emerging pathogen responsible for community acquired pneumonia (CAP) worldwide. In India, the actual burden is not known. The present study was thus undertaken to see the presence of Legionella infection in patients with community acquired pneumonia admitted in a tertiary care centre in north India. Both children and adults (n=113) with symptoms of pneumonia were included in the study. Clinical samples (blood, urine, nasopharyngeal aspirates, bronchoalveolar lavage, sputum, etc.) were collected and subjected to culture and other tests. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was done by commercial kits for all the three classes of immunoglobulins (IgG, IgM & IgA). Urinary antigen was also detected using commercial kits. Culture was performed on 51 respiratory tract fluid samples. Serum samples of 44 healthy controls were also screened for the presence of anti-legionella antibodies (IgG, IgM & IgA). Thirty one of the 113 cases (27.43%) were serologically positive. Anti-legionella IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies were positive in 7.96, 15.92 and 11.50 per cent patients respectively. In controls, seropositivity was 9.09 (4/44). IgA was positive in 3 and IgM, IgG combined in one. Antigenuria detection by Microwell ELISA kit showed 17.69 per cent positivity. Four antigenuria positive patients were also serologically positive; of these two patients were positive for IgM, hence considered as confirmed cases of Legionella infection. None of the sample was culture positive. Combination of serology and antigenuria detection may be a valuable tool for the diagnosis of Legionella infection in absence of culture positivity. In order to evaluate the actual burden of Legionella in community acquired pneumonia, further studies with larger samples need to be done.

  14. Analysis of causes and factors associated with antimicrobial treatment failure in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia%社区获得性肺炎治疗失败的原因和危险因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨丹榕; 唐洁; 张云娇; 徐凌; 沈策

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the causes and risk factors of antimicrobial treatment failure in patients with community-acquired pneumonia(CAP). Methods Hospitalized adults with CAP from January 2006 to December 2006 were analyzed retrospectively. Treatment failure was defined as appearance of nonresponding pneumonia and progressive pneumonia. Patient's clinical features were analyzed. Results All of 378 patients were involved in this study. Total antimicrobial treatment failure was happened in 50 patients(32 patients with non-responding pneumonia and 18 patients with progressive pneumonia). The causes were infectious (35 patients,70% ), non-infectious (11 patients,22% ) and undetermined (4 patients,8% ).Mortality of antimicrobial treatment failure was 18%(9/50, 8 patients died of infectious cause, 1 patient had no clear cause of death). Stepwise Logistic regression analysis showed that C-reactive protein, multilobar pneumonia,albumin < 30 g/L,renal function lesion,liver function lesion were related with antimicrobial treatment failure. Independent factors of treatment failure were multilobar pneumonia (P= 0.002) ,albumin <30 g/L(P = 0.001 ) and renal function lesion (P = 0.000). Conclusion The major challenge associated with antimicrobial treatment failure in hospitalized patients with CAP is infection, most of which is infection of drug resistant strain.%目的 探讨社区获得性肺炎(CAP)治疗失败的原因和危险因素.方法 回顾性分析2006年1-12月拟诊CAP入院病例378例,以无反应性肺炎及进展性肺炎定义治疗失败,以此分析治疗失败CAP患者的临床特征,探讨治疗失败的原因,并进行高危因素分析.结果 378例CAP患者中,治疗失败50例,其中无反应性肺炎32例,进展性肺炎18例.分析失败原因:感染性原因35例,占70%;非感染性原因11例,占22%;无法明确原因4例,占8%.50例患者中共有9例死亡(18%),8例为感染性原因,1例为无法明确原因.C反应蛋

  15. Urinary Incontinence: Causes and Methods of Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebling, Tomas L.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the third of a multi-part series offering the most timely educational information, innovative approaches, products and technology solutions as well as coping and stigma-fighting approaches available on the subject of incontinence. Here, the author introduces the types and physiology of urinary incontinence. The author also…

  16. A Molecular Biomarker to Diagnose Community-acquired Pneumonia on Intensive Care Unit Admission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scicluna, Brendon P; Klein Klouwenberg, Peter M C; van Vught, Lonneke A; Wiewel, Maryse A; Ong, David S Y; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Franitza, Marek; Toliat, Mohammad R; Nürnberg, Peter; Hoogendijk, Arie J; Horn, Janneke; Cremer, Olaf L; Schultz, Marcus J; Bonten, Marc J; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) accounts for a major proportion of intensive care unit (ICU) admissions for respiratory failure and sepsis. Diagnostic uncertainty complicates case management, which may delay appropriate cause-specific treatment. Objectives: To characterize the blood

  17. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Eschericia coli strains from samples collected before and after pivmecillinam or placebo treatment of uncomplicated community-acquired urinary tract infection in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnæs, K; Sandvang, D; Lundgren, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    ). The finding that the majority of UTIs at follow-up are caused by the primary infecting E. coli strain supports the theory of a vaginal and rectal reservoir but could also support the recent discovery that E. coli strains are able to persist in the bladder epithelium despite appropriate antibiotic treatment...

  18. The Modern Diagnostic Approach to Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, James D

    2016-12-01

    Respiratory tract infections, the majority of which are community acquired, are among the leading causes of death worldwide and a leading indication for hospital admission. The burden of disease demonstrates a "U"-shaped distribution, primarily affecting young children as the immune system matures, and older adults as the process of immunosenescence and accumulation of comorbidities leads to increased susceptibility to infection. Diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is traditionally based on demonstration of a new infiltrate on a chest radiograph in a patient presenting with an acute respiratory illness or sepsis. Advances in diagnosis have been slow, and although there are increasing data on the value of computed tomography or lung ultrasound as more sensitive diagnostic methodologies, they are not widely used as initial diagnostic tests. There are a wide range of differential diagnoses and pneumonia "mimics" which should be considered in patients presenting with CAP. Once the diagnosis of CAP has been made, identifying the causative microorganism is the next stage in the diagnostic process. Traditional culture-based approaches are relatively insensitive and achieve a positive diagnosis in only 30 to 70% of cases, even when rigorously applied. Urinary antigen tests, polymerase chain reaction assays, and even next-generation sequencing technologies have become available and are increasing the rates of positive diagnosis. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, the accurate diagnosis of CAP and determining the causative pathogen are ever more important. Getting these both right is key in reducing both morbidity and mortality from CAP, and appropriate antimicrobial stewardship which is now an international healthcare priority.

  19. Factors associated with community-acquired urinary tract infections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UTI in ... it is no longer adequate to manage CA-UTIs on empiric regimen without revising the ... can be used to effect the change of the current recommendations in the Uganda Clinical Guidelines as regards empirical management of CA-UTIs.

  20. Factors associated with community-acquired urinary tract infections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Age, female sex and marital status were factors that were significantly associated with CA-UTIs. Fifty four (54) .... tests including, urease, and motility tests, including triple ... The zones of inhibition diameters were measured using.

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility profile of community-acquired urinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M.S. Barry

    2017-04-28

    Apr 28, 2017 ... recruitment of patients coming from different social classes. An information ..... that the majority of isolates were highly sensitive to imipenem, this drug should ... ment due to its high purchase price and its route of administration.

  2. [Causes and diagnosis of female urinary incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorsch, I; Soljanik, I; Stanislaus, P; Bauer, R; Mayer, M; Hocaoglu, Y; Becker, A; May, F

    2007-09-20

    The primary cause of stress incontinence is birth traumata. However, obesity, asthma, chronic constipation or hard physical work can also overtax the pelvic floor and lead to injury of the connective tissue and a slackening of the ligamentous apparatus. Pelvic floor defects are initially diagnosed simply through a thorough urogynaecological examination. To predict the success of a surgical treatment, the functions can be tested by performing simulated operations.

  3. Antibiograms from community-acquired uropathogens in Gulu, northern Uganda - a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Odongo, Charles O; Anywar, Denis A; Luryamamoi, Kenneth; Odongo, Pancras

    2013-01-01

    Background Urinary tract infections (UTI) are common in clinical practice and empirical treatment is largely employed due to predictability of pathogens. However, variations in antibiotic sensitivity patterns do occur, and documentation is needed to inform local empirical therapy. The current edition of the Uganda Clinical Guidelines recommends amoxicillin or cotrimoxazole as choice drugs for empirical treatment of community-acquired UTI. From our clinical observations, we suspected that this...

  4. Comparative Genomics of Escherichia coli Strains Causing Urinary Tract Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria; Schembri, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    The virulence determinants of uropathogenic Escherichia coli have been studied extensively over the years, but relatively little is known about what differentiates isolates causing various types of urinary tract infections. In this study, we compared the genomic profiles of 45 strains from a range...

  5. Significance of anaerobes and oral bacteria in community-acquired pneumonia.

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    Kei Yamasaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular biological modalities with better detection rates have been applied to identify the bacteria causing infectious diseases. Approximately 10-48% of bacterial pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia are not identified using conventional cultivation methods. This study evaluated the bacteriological causes of community-acquired pneumonia using a cultivation-independent clone library analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of bronchoalveolar lavage specimens, and compared the results with those of conventional cultivation methods. METHODS: Patients with community-acquired pneumonia were enrolled based on their clinical and radiological findings. Bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were collected from pulmonary pathological lesions using bronchoscopy and evaluated by both a culture-independent molecular method and conventional cultivation methods. For the culture-independent molecular method, approximately 600 base pairs of 16S ribosomal RNA genes were amplified using polymerase chain reaction with universal primers, followed by the construction of clone libraries. The nucleotide sequences of 96 clones randomly chosen for each specimen were determined, and bacterial homology was searched. Conventional cultivation methods, including anaerobic cultures, were also performed using the same specimens. RESULTS: In addition to known common pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia [Streptococcus pneumoniae (18.8%, Haemophilus influenzae (18.8%, Mycoplasma pneumoniae (17.2%], molecular analysis of specimens from 64 patients with community-acquired pneumonia showed relatively higher rates of anaerobes (15.6% and oral bacteria (15.6% than previous reports. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that anaerobes and oral bacteria are more frequently detected in patients with community-acquired pneumonia than previously believed. It is possible that these bacteria may play more important roles in community-acquired pneumonia.

  6. Procalcitonin and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulia, Bivona; Luisa, Agnello; Concetta, Scazzone; Bruna, Lo Sasso; Chiara, Bellia; Marcello, Ciaccio

    2015-12-07

    The role of procalcitonin (PCT) as a biomarker for sepsis in adults is well documented, while its role in infections affecting neonatal children remains controversial. Among these infections, Community-Acquired pneumonia (CAP) has been studied extensively, because it's the second cause of death in children in developing countries, and one of the most frequent causes of hospitalization in industrialized countries. The PubMed database and the Cochrane Library were used to search for the following keywords: CAP, procalcitonin, and children. Thirteen articles were studied to determine the role of PCT in CAP management, specifically its usefulness for distinguishing pneumococcal infections from viral and unknown infections, for predicting severity and the correct antibiotic treatment. This paper focuses on the studies performed to identify the best inflammatory biomarker for CAP management. Although there is an increase in studies confirming the usefulness of PCT in CAP management in children, further studies are needed to have better understanding of its role for pediatric CAP management.

  7. Rapid urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae in adults with community-acquired pneumonia: clinical use and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Aaron M; Beekmann, Susan E; Polgreen, Philip M; Moore, Matthew R

    2014-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is the most common bacterial etiology of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in adults, a leading cause of death. The majority of pneumococcal CAP is diagnosed by blood culture, which likely underestimates the burden of disease. The 2007 CAP guidelines recommend routine use of the rapid pneumococcal urinary antigen (UAg) test. To assess the how pneumococcal UAg testing is being used among hospitalized adult CAP patients and what barriers restrict its use, a Web-based survey was distributed in 2013 to 1287 infectious disease physician members of the Emerging Infectious disease Network of the Infectious Disease Society of America. Of 493 eligible responses, 65% use the pneumococcal UAg test. The primary barrier to UAg use was availability (46%). UAg users reported ordering fewer other diagnostic tests and tailoring antibiotic therapy. Increased access to UAg tests could improve pneumonia management and pneumococcal CAP surveillance.

  8. Clinical features and antimicrobial resistance of community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae in infants%婴幼儿社区获得性肺炎克雷伯菌肺炎的临床特点及耐药分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何丽芸; 王应建; 李季美

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨婴幼儿社区获得性肺炎克雷伯菌肺炎的临床特点及耐药特征.方法 收集2007 ~2011年65例婴幼儿社区获得性肺炎克雷伯菌肺炎住院病例,对其临床资料进行回顾性分析.结果 65例患儿中,≤3个月小婴儿37例(57%),4个月~ 17例(26%),7个月~7例(11%),13 ~24个月4例(6%).患儿临床表现及X线胸片特点与其他细菌性肺炎无明显差异.产超广谱β内酰胺酶(ESBLs)肺炎克雷伯菌检出40株,检出率为62%.肺炎克雷伯菌对亚胺培南、美罗培南、阿米卡星敏感率为100%,但对青霉素、头孢菌素普遍耐药;产ESBLs菌株对青霉素类、头孢菌素类、阿莫西林/棒酸、氨苄西林/舒巴坦、复方新诺明、庆大霉素、环丙沙星及氨曲南的耐药率显著高于非产ESBLs菌株,呈多重耐药性.结论 社区获得性肺炎克雷伯菌肺炎常见于3个月内的小婴儿.产ESBLs菌株在肺炎克雷伯菌社区获得性肺炎感染中非常流行,其耐药率高,且呈多重耐药性.%Objective To study the clinical features and antimicrobial resistance of community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae in infants. Methods The clinical data of 65 infants with community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae between 2007 and 2011 were retrospectively studied. Results Of the 65 infants, 37 cases (57% ) were aged ≤ 3 months, 17 cases (26% ) over 4 months, 7 cases (11%) over 7 months and 4 cases (6% ) between 13 and 24 months. There were no significant differences in clinical manifestations and chest X-ray features between the infants with community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae and those with other bacterial pneumonia. Forty strains (62% ) of ESBLs-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae were detected. Klebsiella pneumoniae was 100% sensitive to imipenem, meropenem and amikacin but resistant to penicillins and cephalosporins. The resistance rates of ESBLs-producing strains to

  9. Failure of levofloxacin treatment in community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia

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    Grossi Paolo

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. High global incidence of macrolide and penicillin resistance has been reported, whereas fluoroquinolone resistance is uncommon. Current guidelines for suspected CAP in patients with co-morbidity factors and recent antibiotic therapy recommend initial empiric therapy using one fluoroquinolone or one macrolide associated to other drugs (amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, broad-spectrum cephalosporins. Resistance to fluoroquinolones is determined by efflux mechanisms and/or mutations in the parC and parE genes coding for topoisomerase IV and/or gyrA and gyrB genes coding for DNA gyrase. No clinical cases due to fluoroquinolone-resistant S. pneumoniae strains have been yet reported from Italy. Case presentation A 72-year-old patient with long history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and multiple fluoroquinolone treatments for recurrent lower respiratory tract infections developed fever, increased sputum production, and dyspnea. He was treated with oral levofloxacin (500 mg bid. Three days later, because of acute respiratory insufficiency, the patient was hospitalized. Levofloxacin treatment was supplemented with piperacillin/tazobactam. Microbiological tests detected a S. pneumoniae strain intermediate to penicillin (MIC, 1 mg/L and resistant to macrolides (MIC >256 mg/L and fluoroquinolones (MIC >32 mg/L. Point mutations were detected in gyrA (Ser81-Phe, parE (Ile460-Val, and parC gene (Ser79-Phe; Lys137-Asn. Complete clinical response followed treatment with piperacillin/tazobactam. Conclusion This is the first Italian case of community-acquired pneumonia due to a fluoroquinolone-resistant S. pneumoniae isolate where treatment failure of levofloxacin was documented. Molecular analysis showed a group of mutations that have not yet been reported from Italy and has been detected only twice in Europe. Treatment with piperacillin

  10. Garenoxacin in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia

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    Biswanath Biswas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is a major cause of adult mortality in Asia. Empirical use of antibiotics depends on the pathogens that are commonly responsible. Evolution of resistant pathogens in CAP has added to the burden of treating physicians. Microbiological culture and antibiotic sensitivity testing are helpful for the treatment of such respiratory tract infections. Klebsiella pneumoniae though uncommon pathogen of CAP has been reported in many cases. Garenoxacin a newer fl uoroquinolone has found its utility in the treatment of respiratory tract infections. Providing symptomatic relief to the patient with the use of analgesics, antipyretics and cough preparations are also an essential part of the management. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(6.000: 1093-1095

  11. Changing bacteriological profile and mortality trends in community acquired pneumonia

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    Sagar Khadanga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are very few and conflicting Indian data regarding the bacteriological etiology of community acquired pneumonia (CAP. Adding to this agony, there is no credible data from the eastern part of India. This is a cross-sectional study and descriptive in nature over a period of 1-year. Of the 464 cases of the study population, we could isolate aerobic bacteria in 149 patients (32.1%. Streptococcus pneumoniae has been identified as the most common organism causing CAP (68/149. Gram-negative bacilli (GNB as a group exceeded marginally over S. pneumoniae (69/149. Among GNB, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most common organism (31/69, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (29/69. Staphylococcus aureus was identified in (12/149 cases. Co-amoxyclav is still the most sensitive drug for S. pneumoniae. P. aeruginosa was most sensitive to imipenam followed by piperacillin-tazobactam.

  12. Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Children: A Multidisciplinary Consensus Review

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    Donald E Low

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is common among children and may have viral, bacterial or, occasionally, other causes. The etiology is complex, with age-related trends, and differs from that in adult CAP, necessitating different management guidelines. There is an absence of current guidelines for the management of pediatric CAP (PCAP that take into account changing etiologies, antimicrobial-resistance issues and the use of newly licensed antimicrobials. The present review does not provide specific guidelines, but it reviews the literature and presents currrent approaches to the treatment of PCAP. To compile the review, an expert panel was convened to provide a consensus. The review discusses the etiology, diagnosis and antimicrobial treatment of PCAP as well as indications for referral to a hospital emergency department. The goal of the review is to provide those involved with treatment of PCAP in the community setting with information that can be used to make effective treatment choices.

  13. Drug resistance of pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia in children%儿童社区获得性肺炎病原菌耐药性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕菊红; 刘胜利; 王玉

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the drug resistance of the pathogens isolated from children with communityacquired pneumonia in Baoji area, which will contribute to the proposing of coping strategies and guiding rational use of antibiotics. METHODS The sputum samples from 1240 hospitalized children with community-acquired pneumonia from Jan 2008 to Dec 2010 were isolated and cultured; identification and susceptibility testing were performed. RESULTS In 612 strains, gram-negative bacteria accounted for 63. 6%, gram-positive bacteria accounted for 26. 1 % , and fungi accounted for 10. 3%. The main gram-negative bacteria included Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, which had the highest resistance rate to ampicillin, but susceptible to imipenem, ciprofloxacin and piperacillin-sodium. The main gram-positive bacteria included Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus. The resistance rate of S. Pneumoniae was 74. 5% to penicillin and 96. 4% to macrolides. CONCLUSION Since p-lactam and macrolide antibiotics are used widely in pediatrics, the distribution and drug resistance of the pathogens isolated from children are different from adults. ESBLs and AmpC enzymes produced by pathogens in children are higher than in adults. Comprehensive measures should be taken for scientific and reasonable use of antibiotics.%目的 调查分析宝鸡地区儿童社区获得性肺炎病原菌的分布及耐药性,指导临床合理使用抗菌药物.方法 对2008年1月-2010年12月儿科住院符合社区获得性肺炎1240例患儿,送痰液标本进行分离培养,做菌株鉴定和药敏试验.结果 共分离出病原菌612株,其中革兰阴性菌占63.6%;革兰阳性菌占26.1%;真菌占10.3%,革兰阴性菌以大肠埃希菌、肺炎克雷伯菌为主,对氨苄西林耐药率最高,敏感的抗菌药物为亚胺培南、环丙沙星、哌拉西林/他唑巴坦;革兰阳性菌中以肺炎链球菌和金黄色葡萄球菌为主,肺炎链球菌对

  14. Elderly patients with community-acquired pneumonia are not treated according to current guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt Damsgaard, Tove; Klausen, Henrik Hedegaard; Christiansen, Christina;

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly patients, and the most important cause of death in the developed world. Optimised treatment and care will benefit patients as well as the health economy. This study investigated in-hospital compliance with g...

  15. Elderly patients with community-acquired pneumonia are not treated according to current guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt Damsgaard, Tove; Klausen, Henrik Hedegaard; Christiansen, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly patients, and the most important cause of death in the developed world. Optimised treatment and care will benefit patients as well as the health economy. This study investigated in-hospital compliance...... with guidelines for treatment and care of patients with CAP....

  16. Older Adults: A Proposal for the Management of Community-acquired Pneumonia

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    Miguel Ángel Serra Valdés

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: community-acquired pneumonia is the leading cause of hospitalization among older adults. It has a high fatality rate. At present, there are several risk and prognosis scores and different clinical practice guidelines available. Objective: to develop a proposal for the management of community-acquired pneumonia in older adults, applicable in both primary care, and the hospital setting. Methods: a search on community-acquired pneumonia, especially in older adults or the elderly, was conducted using index terms and existing guidelines from different countries, companies and regional consensus included in Clinical Evidence, The Cochrane Library, PubMed, Google Scholar, MEDLINE, LIS, Scielo, Medscape, LILACS, Latindex, HINARI, MEDIGRAPHIC-NEWS and others. The publications providing high-quality evidence in accordance with the criteria of the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluations approach were selected. Results: a proposal for practical management of community-acquired pneumonia at any level of care in our health system was developed considering the list of medications currently available in the country. Epidemiology, risk factors, risk stratification, treatment, and fatality rate were considered. Conclusions: community-acquired pneumonia is a current problem and future challenge. This proposal can be used by professionals treating this condition at any level of care. Its application could improve care and quality of life and reduce the fatality rate and costs.

  17. Resistencia antimicrobiana en la infección urinaria por Escherichia coli adquirida en la comunidad: ¿Cuál antibiótico voy a usar? Antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli from community-acquired urinary tract infections: What antimicrobial to use?

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    Claudia Elena Guajardo-Lara

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar la resistencia del uropatógeno comunitario más frecuente, Escherichia coli, a diversos antimicrobianos y deducir opciones de manejo empírico. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Del 14 de julio de 2005 al 13 julio de 2006 se estudiaron cepas de Escherichia coli aisladas de urocultivos de pacientes que asistieron a la consulta externa de la Clínica Nova y del Hospital San José, en Monterrey, Nuevo León, México. Se identificó la bacteria y se determinó susceptibilidad a antibióticos mediante método automatizado. Se compararon los resultados entre las dos instituciones y la frecuencia de resistencia a antimicrobianos entre mujeres de entre 15 a 50 años de edad y > 50. RESULTADOS: Se analizaron 652 urocultivos: 303 (46.5% de Clínica Nova y 349 (53.5% del Hospital San José. Las cepas aisladas fueron resistentes a ampicilina, en 67.2%; a trimetoprim-sulfametoxazol, en 59.2%; a cefazolina, en 35.6%, y a ciprofloxacino, en 24.7%. CONCLUSIONES: La resistencia a trimetoprim-sulfametoxazol y ciprofloxacino, considerados de elección en el manejo empírico de las infecciones de vías urinarias adquiridas en la comunidad, es alta. Las opciones de manejo son pocas.OBJECTIVE: Determine antibiotic resistance of community-acquired uropathogen Escherichia coli and infer therapeutic options. MATERIAL AND METHODS: E. coli strains isolated from urine during a one-year period were studied. Identification and susceptibility tests were performed. RESULTS: A total of 652 isolates were included from patients in two institutions, a healthcare clinic 303 (46.5% and a hospital 349 ( 53.5%. The antimicrobials with higher resistance rates were ampicillin 67.2%, trimethoprim-sulfametoxazole 59.2%, cefazolin 35.6% and ciprofloxacin 24.7%. CONCLUSIONS: Resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin used for empiric treatment in community urinary infections is high, and there are few available treatment options.

  18. Community-acquired acute kidney injury in adults in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu, Dwomoa; Okyere, Perditer; Boima, Vincent; Matekole, Michael; Osafo, Charlotte

    We review recent published data on demographics, causes, diagnoses, treatment, and outcome of acute kidney injury (AKI) in Africa. A review of the incidence, etiology, diagnoses, and treatment of AKI in adults in Africa from studies published between the years 2000 and 2015. The incidence of AKI in hospitalized patients in Africa ranges from 0.3 to 1.9% in adults. Between 70 and 90% of cases of AKI are community acquired. Most patients with AKI are young with a weighted mean age of 41.3 standard deviation (SD) 9.3 years, and a male to female ratio of 1.2 : 1.0. Medical causes account for between 65 and 80% of causes of AKI. This is followed by obstetric causes in 5 - 27% of cases and surgical causes in 2 - 24% of cases. In the reported studies, between 17 and 94% of patients who needed dialysis received this. The mortality of AKI in adults in Africa ranged from 11.5 to 43.5%. Most reported cases of AKI in Africa originate in the community. The low incidence of hospital-acquired AKI is likely to be due to under ascertainment. Most patients with AKI in Africa are young and have a single precipitating cause. Prominent among these are infection, pregnancy complications and nephrotoxins. Early treatment can improve clinical outcomes.

  19. Emergence of community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection: the experience of a French hospital and review of the literature

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    Maja Ogielska

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: CDI can cause community-acquired diarrhoea, and CA-CDI may be more severe than HCA-CDI. Prospective studies of CDI involving people from the general community without risk factors are required to confirm this observation.

  20. Adenomyomatous polyp causing acute urinary retention in a postmenopausal woman

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    Selver Özekinci

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A case of adenomyomatous polyp (AP causig acute urinary retention in postmenopausal period is presented. A 65-year-old, G8P8 women admitted to our clinic with the complaint of vaginal bleeding and vaginal mass was identified. During preoperative hospitalization she complained about not able to urinate. Serum urea and creatinine levels increased [66 mg/dL (range= 10-45 and 2,49 mg/dL (range= 0. 6-1.3 respectively]. Emergent abdominopelvic tomography showed vaginal mass and overdistended bladder. Mass was removed by vaginal route and abdominal hysterectomy was also performed. Pathologic examination revealed non-malignant AP with massive necrosis. A variety of female reproductive tract diseases can cause urinary obstruction. Treatment choice depends on reproductive expectance of the patient. J Clin Exp Invest 2011; 2 (3: 312-314.

  1. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus": Considerations for School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Aniltta; Letizia, MariJo

    2007-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) is a disease-causing organism that has been present in hospital settings since the 1960s. However, a genetically distinct strain of MRSA, called community-acquired methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (CA-MRSA), has emerged in recent years in community settings among healthy…

  2. [Differential diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis and community-acquired pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deĭkina, O N; Mishin, V Iu; Demikhova, O V

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to enhance the efficiency of differential diagnosis of pneumonia and pulmonary tuberculosis. A hundred and fifty-nine adult patients were examined. These included 78 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 81 with community-acquired p neumonia. The clinical features of infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis (n = 48) and mild community-acquired pneumonia (n = 51) were compared. The course of caseous pneumonia (n = 30) was compared with that of moderate and severe community-acquired pneumonia (n = 30). Significant differences in the manifestations of the intoxication and bronchopulmonary syndrome were not found in patients with community-acquired pneumonia and infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis. Physical studies showed that in patients with community-acquired pneumonia, moist rale (54.9%) and crepitation (11.8%) were prevalent, but in those with infiltrative tuberculosis rale was absent in 60.4% of cases and the pattern of respiration was unchanged in 79.2%. Chest X-ray studies indicated that in patients with community-acquired pneumonia, lower lobar inflammatory changes were predominant in 62.8% of cases whereas in those with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis the process was mainly bilateral (43.8%) with the presence of destructive changes (83.3%) and bronchogenic dissemination (66.7%). In patients with caseous pneumonia, the intoxication syndrome was more significant than in those with severe community-acquired pneumonia. Chest X-ray studies demonstrated that in patients with caseous pneumonia, specific changes were bilateral with the involvement of 2 lobes or more, with destruction and bronchogenic dissemination while in those with community-acquired pneumonia, the pulmonary processes were predominantly bilateral (76.6%) at the lower lobar site (36.7%).

  3. Pulmonary infiltrates during community acquired Gram-negative bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjeldsøe-Nielsen, Hans; Gjeraa, Kirsten; Berthelsen, Birgitte G

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to describe the frequency of pulmonary infiltrates on chest X-ray (CXR) during community acquired Gram-negative bacteremia at a single centre in Denmark.......The primary aim of this study was to describe the frequency of pulmonary infiltrates on chest X-ray (CXR) during community acquired Gram-negative bacteremia at a single centre in Denmark....

  4. Emerging Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Pneumonia

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    Dragana Orlovic

    2009-04-01

    patient each. Sputum samples were collected at the time of admission and all grew MRSA. Two isolates were resistant only to oxacillin, while four were also resistant to levofloxacin (3 isolates, erythromycin (2 isolates, ciprofloxacin (1 isolate, and/or clindamycin (1 isolate. One patient had concurrent Pseudomonas bacteremia, and another had Pseudomonas isolated from sputum culture in addition to MRSA. All patients had abnormal chest radiographs; three had focal unilateral pneumonia, two had bilateral pneumonia, and one had a lung abscess. The latter patient also had evidence of metastatic infection with sternoclavicular osteomyelitis. Three patients required ventilatory support; two of these subjects died and one was discharged to hospice care. None of the six patients had any epidemiologic connection to one another. Conclusion: CA-MRSA is becoming an increasingly important cause of community-acquired pneumonia in many parts of the world, and in these regions empiric antibiotic treatment guidelines should be reconsidered.

  5. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of urinary calculus caused by melamine in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Li-qun; Shen, Ying; Wang, Xiao-man; He, Le-jian; Xin, Yue; Hu, Yan-xiu

    2009-02-05

    Intake of melamine can cause renal and ureteral lithiasis in infants and children. The present study aimed to understand the value of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of renal and ureteral lithiasis in infants and young children caused by melamine, and the characteristics of ultrasonograms of melamine-associated calculi. Ultrasonographic examination on the urinary system was performed for 28 332 children who ingested milk powder that was possibly tainted with melamine; 395 of the children were diagnosed by ultrasonography as having urinary calculus, and 231 cases had lump-like calculi and 164 cases had sand gravel-like calculi. The features of the calculi, the sites of obstruction and the status of hydronephrosis and hydroureterosis were analyzed. Ultrasonographic reexamination was performed for 116 patients and the findings were compared with those of the first ultrasonography, and the short-term expulsion of the calculi was evaluated. Most of the 395 patients with urinary lithiasis, except for those who developed renal failure, had no symptoms. The whole profile of the calculi could be seen in most of the cases, because the echogenicity of the calculi with no sharp or absent acoustical shadowing, was weaker as compared with those from calcium-containing calculi. Comet tail sign could be seen behind the echogenicity of single gravel calculus. The rate of diagnostic consistency of ureteral lithiasis between the ultrasound and the results of clinical observation (including stones expelled spontaneously or after cystoscopic intervention) in 51 cases for 76 ureters was 100%. Percutaneous renal biopsy was performed for one case, and histopathological examination showed flocculent, fine strip-like, ellipse and circular deeply stained sand gravel-like material in the renal tubules, and the circular calculi were found to be attached to the walls of the tubules. Chemical analysis of the calculi expelled from 12 cases showed that the main contents of the calculi were uric

  6. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of urinary calculus caused by melamine in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Li-qun; SHEN Ying; WANG Xiao-man; HE Le-jian; XIN Yue; HU Yan-xiu

    2009-01-01

    Background Intake of melamine can cause renal and ureteral lithiasis in infants and children. The present study aimed to understand the value of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of renal and ureteral lithiasis in infants and young children caused by melamine, and the characteristics of ultrasonograms of melamine-associated calculi.Methods Ultrasonographic examination on the urinary system was performed for 28 332 children who ingested milk powder that was possibly tainted with melamine; 395 of the children were diagnosed by ultrasonography as having urinary calculus, and 231 cases had lump-like calculi and 164 cases had sand gravel-like calculi. The features of the calculi, the sites of obstruction and the status of hydronephrosis and hydroureterosis were analyzed. Ultrasonographic reexamination was performed for 116 patients and the findings were compared with those of the first ultrasonography, and the short-term expulsion of the calculi was evaluated.Results Most of the 395 patients with urinary lithiasis, except for those who developed renal failure, had no symptoms. The whole profile of the calculi could be seen in most of the cases, because the echogenicity of the calculi with no sharp or absent acoustical shadowing, was weaker as compared with those from calcium-containing calculi. Comet tail sign could be seen behind the echogenicity of single gravel calculus. The rate of diagnostic consistency of ureteral lithiasis between the ultrasound and the results of clinical observation (including stones expelled spontaneously or after cystoscopic intervention) in 51 cases for 76 ureters was 100%. Percutaneous renal biopsy was performed for one case, and histopathological examination showed flocculent, fine strip-like, ellipse and circular deeply stained sand gravel-like material in the renal tubules, and the circular calculi were found to be attached to the walls of the tubules. Chemical analysis of the calculi expelled from 12 cases showed that the main contents

  7. Distribution and resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing hospital and community-acquired infections%医院感染与社区感染肺炎链球菌分布与耐药性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢朝云; 熊芸; 孙静; 胡杨; 杨忠玲

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the differences in resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing hospital in‐fections and community‐acquired infections ,so as to provide reference for the clinical treatment of S .pneumoniae infections .METHODS A comparative analysis was conducted on 140 clinical strains of S . pneumoniae isolated from clinical infection specimens during Jun .2011 to Apr .2014 .The strains were identified by VITEK‐2 Com‐pact and VITEK GP identification card .The Kirby‐Bauer method was used for drug sensitivity test .The SPSS 19 .0 software was used for statistical analysis .RESULTS The resistance of isolated S . pneumoniae to penicillin G ,oxacillin ,clindamycin ,erythromycin ,azithromycin was respectively 46 .43% ,76 .43% ,87 .14% ,92 .14% , 89 .29% .The drug resistance rate of hospital infections and community‐acquired infections to penicillin G ,oxacil‐lin ,erythromycin ,amikacin and ciprofloxacin was respectively 70 .77% ,25 .33% ;93 .85% ,61 .33% ;98 .46% , 86 .67% ;100 .00% ,66 .67% ;10 .77% ,0 .The resistance rate of S .pneumoniae was significeatly higher for hos‐pital infections than for community‐acquired infections (P<0 .05) .CONCLUSION The resistance rate of S .pneu‐moniae to commonly used antimicrobial drugs continues to rise ,especially for hospital infection .Clinicians should pay attention to strengthening drug sensitivity monitoring and the changes of clinical infection bacteria as well as bacterial resistance ,make targeted selection of drugs with high sensitivity ,perform inoculation of S .pneumoniae vaccine ,so as to effective control and slow dow n the increase of bacterial resistance .%目的:分析医院感染与社区感染肺炎链球菌的耐药性差异,为临床治疗肺炎链球菌感染提供参考依据。方法对2011年6月-2014年4月临床感染标本中分离的肺炎链球菌140株比较分析,用VITEK‐2 Compact及VITEK GP鉴定卡鉴定,药敏试验用K‐B法,数据采用SPSS 19.0软

  8. The prevalence of O serogroups of Escherichia coli strains causing acute urinary tract infection in children in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Emamghorashi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study was to determine the prevalence of O serogroups of Escherichia coli (E. coli strains that cause community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTI in children. In this study, 96 children with UTI referred to two Jahrom University-affiliated Hospitals in Iran were enrolled, during the period from August 2005 to August 2006. Drug sensitivity was tested by disk diffusion method and serotyping done by slide agglutination method. A total of 96 E. coli strains were isolated from urine samples of the study children whose age ranged from one month to 14 years. Cystitis was diagnosed in 49.2% and pyelonephritis in 50.8% of the study patients. Maximum drug resistance was seen with ampicilin (80.2% and the least with imipenem (1.1%. The most common type of O antigen was O1 (12.2%. There was significant correlation between the presence of O antigens and sensitivity to nalidixic acid and gentamicin (P < 0.05. This is the first report of E. coli serotyping in children with UTI from the south of Iran and their relation to antibiotic resistance and clinical presentation. Further studies from other parts of Iran and on other serotypes are recommended.

  9. 'Atypical' bacteria are a common cause of community-acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    influenza. rological together of these n ed. For nza-like isolation. ,7 or an cific ove the me the par ... Departments of Medicine and Medical Microbiology, Groote Schuur. Hospital and ..... identify conventional bacteria or viruses. Thirdly, more ...

  10. Risk factors and outcome of community-acquired pneumonia due to Gram-negative bacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falguera, Miquel; Carratalà, Jordi; Ruiz-Gonzalez, Agustín; Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Gazquez, Isabel; Dorca, Jordi; Gudiol, Francesc; Porcel, José M

    2009-01-01

    Several sets of guidelines have advocated initial antibiotic treatment for community-acquired pneumonia due to Gram-negative bacilli in patients with specific risk factors. However, evidence to support this recommendation is scarce. We sought to identify risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia due to Gram-negative bacilli, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and to assess outcomes. An observational analysis was carried out on prospectively collected data for immunocompetent adults hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia in two acute-care hospitals. Cases of pneumonia due to Gram-negative bacilli were compared with those of non-Gram-negative bacilli causes. Sixty-one (2%) of 3272 episodes of community-acquired pneumonia were due to Gram-negative bacilli. COPD (odds ratio (OR) 2.4, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2-5.1), current use of corticosteroids (OR 2.8, 95% CI: 1.2-6.3), prior antibiotic therapy (OR 2.6, 95% CI: 1.4-4.8), tachypnoea >or=30 cycles/min (OR 2.1, 95% CI: 1.1-4.2) and septic shock at presentation (OR 6.1, 95% CI: 2.5-14.6) were independently associated with Gram-negative bacilli pneumonia. Initial antibiotic therapy in patients with pneumonia due to Gram-negative bacilli was often inappropriate. These patients were also more likely to require admission to the intensive care unit, had longer hospital stays, and higher early (Gram-negative bacilli is uncommon, but is associated with a poor outcome. The risk factors identified in this study should be considered when selecting initial antibiotic therapy for patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

  11. A Rare Cause of Acute Urinary Retention: Retroperitoneal Ganglioneuroma and Concurrent Mediastineal Schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih Budak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The underlying prior cause at the old male patients refered with acute urinary retention is frequently benign prostatic hypertrophy and urethral pathologies. Acute urinary retention can develop with obstruction as well as neurogenic causes. Neurogenic tumors develops from the cells which takes its origin from the neural crest and they can be seen every neural tissue. In this study rarely seen retroperitoneal ganglioneuroma which causes acute urinary retention and coexisting asymptomatic mediastineal schwannoma case is presented.

  12. Antibiotic Treatment Strategies for Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Douwe F.; Van Werkhoven, Cornelis H.; Van Elden, Leontine J R; Thijsen, Steven F T; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Kluytmans, Jan A J W; Boersma, Wim G.; Compaijen, Clara J.; Van Der Wall, Eva; Prins, Jan M.; Oosterheert, Jan J.; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The choice of empirical antibiotic treatment for patients with clinically suspected community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) who are admitted to non-intensive care unit (ICU) hospital wards is complicated by the limited availability of evidence. We compared strategies of empirical treatment

  13. Diabetes and risk of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smit, Jesper; Søgaard, Mette; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with diabetes may experience higher risk of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) than patients without diabetes due to decreased immunity or coexisting morbidities. We investigated the risk of community-acquired (CA) SAB in persons with and without diabetes. DESIGN: Using...

  14. Hydrocephalus in adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Soemirien Kasanmoentalib; M.C. Brouwer; A. van der Ende; D. van de Beek

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the occurrence, treatment, and outcome of hydrocephalus complicating community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults. Methods: Case series from a prospective nationwide cohort study from Dutch hospitals from 2006 to 2009. Results: Hydrocephalus was diagnosed in 26 of 577 epi

  15. Antibiotic Treatment Strategies for Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Douwe F.; Van Werkhoven, Cornelis H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338003207; Van Elden, Leontine J R; Thijsen, Steven F T; Hoepelman, Andy I M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074382160; Kluytmans, Jan A J W; Boersma, Wim G.; Compaijen, Clara J.; Van Der Wall, Eva; Prins, Jan M.; Oosterheert, Jan J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/234602236; Bonten, Marc J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123144337

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The choice of empirical antibiotic treatment for patients with clinically suspected community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) who are admitted to non-intensive care unit (ICU) hospital wards is complicated by the limited availability of evidence. We compared strategies of empirical treatment (al

  16. [Nutritional status and mortality in community acquired pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pecci, María Soledad; Carlson, Damián; Montero-Tinnirello, Javier; Parodi, Roberto L; Montero, Antonio; Greca, Alcides A

    2010-01-01

    Pneumonias are a major cause of morbidity and mortality and their prognosis depends on many factors including nutritional status. This study analyzed the relationship between malnutrition and the risk of death in Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) patients. This is a prospective observational study. The Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) was used as a screening tool to appraise the nutritional status. Ninety-eight patients with CAP requiring hospitalization were included consecutively from October 2004 to September 2006. The clinical, bacteriological and laboratory features were recorded. Patient's nutritional condition was assessed using the SGA. The monitoring was performed until discharge, death or shunt. Persistent cough or fever, the presence of pleural effusion, malignancies or long hospitalization were associated with worse prognosis. Mortality increased in proportion to the degree of malnutrition. Thirty two CAP patients (32.65%) were classified as SGA-category A; 44 (44.90%) as SGA-B, and 22 (22.45%) as SGA-C. Pneumonia resulted in death in 3/32 SGA-A (9.37%), 8/44 SGA-B (18.18%) and 10/22 SGA-C patients. SGA-C patients showed significantly higher odds ratios for death in comparison to SGA-A patients (OR = 6.085, CI95%: 1.071-34.591; p = 0.042). Considering death as the outcome variable, SGA-A class had the highest negative predictive value (0.906), while SGA-C class showed the highest positive predictive value (0.455). These results link the nutritional status to the NAC evolution prognostic. SGA provides a simple estimation of the nutritional status and it is a good predictor of the risk of death in CAP patients.

  17. Soluble RAGE as a severity marker in community acquired pneumonia associated sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is considered the most important cause of death from infectious disease in developed countries. Severity assessment scores partially address the difficulties in identifying high-risk patients. A lack of specific and valid pathophysiologic severity markers affect early and effective sepsis therapy. HMGB-1, sRAGE and RAGE have been involved in sepsis and their potential as severity markers has been proposed. The aim of this study was to eva...

  18. Audit of Physicians’ Adherence to a Preprinted Order Set for Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowkes, Curt T; Gee, Carol; Bluemink, Tammy; Cole, Dana; Falkner, Barbara L; Hamour, Abu A

    2010-01-01

    Background: Community-acquired pneumonia is the seventh leading cause of death in Canada. Previous studies have shown reductions in both mortality rate and length of hospital stay with the use of guideline-concordant empiric therapy and standardized preprinted orders. Objectives: The primary objective was to determine adherence to the preprinted order for community-acquired pneumonia at the University Hospital of Northern British Columbia (UHNBC). The study also had the following secondary objectives: to assess the appropriateness of prescribing of levofloxacin in relation to institutional recommendations; to determine adherence with recent guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the American Thoracic Society (ATS) for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia; and to determine all-cause mortality, duration of IV antibiotic therapy, and length of stay for the various regimens reviewed. Methods: A retrospective observational chart review was conducted of patients with community-acquired pneumonia who were admitted between November 2007 and February 2008. Exclusion criteria were designed to eliminate patients who did not have this condition. Descriptive statistics were used to assess adherence with the preprinted order. Secondary outcomes were analyzed with the Pearson χ2 test, t tests, and analysis of variance. Results: In total, the charts for 113 patients were reviewed, and 58 patients were included in the study. The preprinted order for community-acquired pneumonia was used for 25 (43%) of the 58 patients; however, for only 4 (7%) of these admissions were all sections of the preprinted order used correctly. No statistically significant differences in length of stay were found for any of the antibiotic combinations assessed. However, the proportion of patients treated according to the IDSA–ATS guidelines was significantly greater when the preprinted order was used (p = 0.012). In addition, use of the preprinted order encouraged

  19. Dilemmas in the diagnosis of acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Matthijs C; Thwaites, Guy E; Tunkel, Allan R; van de Beek, Diederik

    2012-11-10

    Rapid diagnosis and treatment of acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis reduces mortality and neurological sequelae, but can be delayed by atypical presentation, assessment of lumbar puncture safety, and poor sensitivity of standard diagnostic microbiology. Thus, diagnostic dilemmas are common in patients with suspected acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis. History and physical examination alone are sometimes not sufficient to confirm or exclude the diagnosis. Lumbar puncture is an essential investigation, but can be delayed by brain imaging. Results of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination should be interpreted carefully, because CSF abnormalities vary according to the cause, patient's age and immune status, and previous treatment. Diagnostic prediction models that use a combination of clinical findings, with or without test results, can help to distinguish acute bacterial meningitis from other causes, but these models are not infallible. We review the dilemmas in the diagnosis of acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis, and focus on the roles of clinical assessment and CSF examination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Тhe features of severe community acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avramenko I.V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on data from a prospective analysis for the year of observation, the article presents information about the features of severe community acquired pneumonia in patients who were hospitalized at the department of pulmonology (or therapy, as well as department of the intensive care from three teaching hospitals in Dnepropetrovsk, namely "Dnipropetrovsk City Hospital №6», "Dnipropetrovsk City Hospital №2», "Dnipropetrovsk City Hospital №16», which are the clinical ones of "Dnepropetrovsk Medical Academy of the Ministry of Health Ukraine". Dependence of the severity of the condition shown on duration of illness before admission, features of season character of disease. The effect of breathing exercises on the course of the disease. The results can be the basis for a more personal approach to the development of diagnostic and therapeutic programs for patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia.

  1. 32 year old man with "community-acquired' pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill K. Gersh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community-acquired pneumonia is a common reason for hospital admission; however underlying pathogens vary depending on host immunity and circulating pathogens in the community. Case Summary: A 32 year old man from Malawi presented with community-acquired pneumonia. After failing outpatient management, he was admitted and found to have underlying HIV disease. His diagnostic work up was initially inconclusive for M. tuberculosis (TB and thus his diagnostic evaluation and treatment focused on other etiologies. He was ultimately diagnosed with TB after an invasive procedure and had a rapid clinical response after initiating TB treatment. Conclusion: Both failure to recognize that TB can present with a syndrome similar to bacterial pneumonia and over-reliance on diagnostic testing delayed the diagnosis of TB. Delays in diagnosis contributed to substantial morbidity and risked nosocomial transmission. Despite declining incidence in the US, providers should remain cognizant of diagnostic limitations for TB disease and have a low threshold for empiric treatment.

  2. Predictors of inferior outcome in community acquired bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streharova, A; Krcmery, V; Kisac, P; Kalavsky, E; Holeckova, K; Lesnakova, A; Luzinsky, L; Adamkovicova, E; Pavlikova, Z; Spilakova, N; Kacunova, B; Dovalova, V; Wiczmandyova, O; Spanik, S; Liskova, A; Chovancova, D; Kovac, M; Ondrusova, A; Bauer, F; Benca, J; Rudinsky, B; Sramka, M; Kralova, J; Krsakova, J; Krumpolcova, M; Findova, L; Svabova, V; Sladeckova, V; Seckova, S; Saniova, J; Pavlicova, B; Taziarova, M; Bukovinova, P; Kolenova, A; Horvathova, E; Hvizdak, F; Luzica, R; Rolnikova, B; Bocakova, A; Grey, E; Bielova, M; Huttova, M; Sabo, I; Jalili, N

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess mortality and sequellae within cases from Nationwide survey of community acquired meningitis and identify risk factors for inferior outcome. Risk factors such as underlying disease (diabetes mellitus, cancer, trauma, neonatal age, splenectomy, alcoholism, sepsis, other infections), etiology, clinical symptoms and outcome (death, improvement and cured after modifications of ATB therapy, cured without change of therapy, cured with neurologic sequellae) were recorded and analysed with univariate analysis (chi2 or t test for trends, CDC Atlanta 2004). Analysing risk factors for inferior outcome (death or cured with neurologic sequellae), we compared patients who died or survived with neurologic sequellae to all patients with community acquired bacterial meningitis. Univariate analysis showed that trauma (palcohol abuse (pdiabetes, S. aureus (pdiabetes mellitus (palcoholism (palcohol abuse (p<0.05), craniocerbral trauma (p<0.05) and less common in meningitis with pneumococcal etiology (p<0.05).

  3. Principles of Antibiotic Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Michael T; Niederman, Michael S

    2016-12-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) encompasses a broad spectrum of disease severity and may require outpatient, inpatient, or intensive care management. Successful treatment hinges on expedient delivery of appropriate antibiotic therapy tailored to both the likely offending pathogens and the severity of disease. This review summarizes key principles in starting treatment and provides recommended empiric therapy regimens for each site of care. In addition, we discuss the antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory role macrolides play in CAP, as well as specific information for managing individual CAP pathogens such as community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. We also examine several novel antibiotics being developed for CAP and review the evidence guiding duration of therapy and current best practices for the transition of hospitalized patients from intravenous antibiotics to oral therapy. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. Combination antibiotic therapy for community-acquired pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Caballero, Jesus; Rello, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common and potentially serious illness that is associated with morbidity and mortality. Although medical care has improved during the past decades, it is still potentially lethal. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequent microorganism isolated. Treatment includes mandatory antibiotic therapy and organ support as needed. There are several antibiotic therapy regimens that include β-lactams or macrolides or fluoroquinolones alone or in combination. Co...

  5. Epidemiology and risk factors for community-acquired blood stream infection caused by extended spectrum β-lactamases-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumonia strains%社区获得性血流感染产 ESBLs 大肠埃希菌与肺炎克雷伯菌流行情况及危险因素初步分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟敏; 张凯; 黄湘宁; 殷琳; 刘鑫; 喻华; 黄文芳; 唐荣珍; 奉婷

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the incidences, risk factors, genotypes and epidemiology of community-acquired blood stream infection caused by extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs)-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumonia strains and to analyze the sensitivity of those ESBLs producing strains to commonly used antibiotics. Methods Forty-two patients who were diagnosed with community-ac-quired blood stream infection caused by Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumonia strains in Sichuan Provincial People′s Hospital were recruited in this study. Disc diffusion method was used for the phenotypic confirmato-ry test of ESBLs. Agar dilution method was performed to measure the antimicrobial susceptibility of the ESBLs-producing strains to 13 clinically commonly used antibiotics. Genotypes of the ESBLs-producing strains were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was used to analyze the epidemiology of ESBLs-producing strains. Logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze the risk factors for community-acquired blood stream infection. Results The ESBLs-producing Escherichia coli strains accounted for 56. 3% (18 / 32) and the ESBLs-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae strains accounted for 20% (2 / 10). All of the 20 ESBLs-producing strains were sensitive to imipenem, meropenem, ertapen-em, nitrofurantoin and moxalactam. The ESBLs-producing strains sensitive to amikacin, piperacillin-tazobactam and fosfomycin accounted for 95% , 90% and 85% , respectively. Drug resistance rates of the 20 strains to cefotaxime, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and cefepime were relatively high accounting for 100% , 80% , 80% and 75% , respectively. Among the 20 ESBLs-producing strains, 7 strains only carried the CTM gene, while the other 13 strains were all positive for two genotypes of ESBLs, mainly identified as TEM+CTM-M-14 and TEM+CTM-15 genotypes. The 18 Escherichia coli strains were classified into 10 ST types, most of which were ST131

  6. Outcome of community-acquired pneumonia: influence of age, residence status and antimicrobial treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothe, H; Bauer, T; Marre, R; Suttorp, N; Welte, T; Dalhoff, K

    2008-07-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia remains a major cause of mortality in developed countries. There is much discrepancy in the literature regarding factors influencing the outcome in the elderly population. Data were derived from a multicentre prospective study initiated by the German Competence Network for Community-Acquired Pneumonia. Patients with community-acquired pneumonia (n = 2,647; 1,298 aged or = 65 yrs) were evaluated, of whom 72.3% were hospitalised and 27.7% treated in the community. Clinical history, residence status, course of disease and antimicrobial treatment were prospectively documented. Microbiological investigations included cultures and PCR of respiratory samples and blood cultures. Factors related to mortality were included in multivariate analyses. The overall 30-day mortality was 6.3%. Elderly patients exhibited a significantly higher mortality rate that was independently associated with the following: age; residence status; confusion, urea, respiratory frequency and blood pressure (CURB) score; comorbid conditions; and failure of initial therapy. Increasing age remained predictive of death in the elderly. Nursing home residents showed a four-fold increased mortality rate and an increased rate of gram-negative bacillary infections compared with patients dwelling in the community. The CURB score and cerebrovascular disease were confirmed as independent predictors of death in this subgroup. Age and residence status are independent risk factors for mortality after controlling for comorbid conditions and disease severity. Failure of initial therapy was the only modifiable prognostic factor.

  7. Community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection: an increasing public health threat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta A

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Arjun Gupta, Sahil Khanna Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: There has been a startling shift in the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection over the last decade worldwide, and it is now increasingly recognized as a cause of diarrhea in the community. Classically considered a hospital-acquired infection, it has now emerged in populations previously considered to be low-risk and lacking the traditional risk factors for C. difficile infection, such as increased age, hospitalization, and antibiotic exposure. Recent studies have demonstrated great genetic diversity for C. difficile, pointing toward diverse sources and a fluid genome. Environmental sources like food, water, and animals may play an important role in these infections, apart from the role symptomatic patients and asymptomatic carriers play in spore dispersal. Prospective strain typing using highly discriminatory techniques is a possible way to explore the suspected diverse sources of C. difficile infection in the community. Patients with community-acquired C. difficile infection do not necessarily have a good outcome and clinicians should be aware of factors that predict worse outcomes in order to prevent them. This article summarizes the emerging epidemiology, risk factors, and outcomes for community-acquired C. difficile infection. Keywords: community acquired infection, Clostridium difficile, epidemiology, risk factors, outcome

  8. Extended-spectrum ß-Lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae as a Common Cause of Urinary Tract Infections in Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidanagama, Dhammika; Tippalagama, Rashmi; Lewkebandara, Rashmi; Joyce, Maria; Nicholson, Bradly P.; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Bodinayake, Champica K.; De Silva, Aruna Dharshan; Woods, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Extended-spectrum ß-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE) are increasingly reported as pathogens in urinary tract infections (UTIs). However, in Sri Lanka, the clinical and molecular epidemiology of ESBL-PE implicated in UTIs has not been well described. Materials and Methods We conducted prospective, laboratory-based surveillance from October to December 2013 at a tertiary care hospital in southern Sri Lanka and enrolled patients ≥1 year of age with clinically relevant UTIs due to ESBL-PE. Isolate identity, antimicrobial drug susceptibility, and ESBL production were determined. Presence of ß-lactamase genes, bla SHV, bla TEM, and bla CTX-M, was identified by polymerase chain reaction. Results During the study period, Enterobacteriaceae were detected in 184 urine samples, with 74 (40.2%) being ESBL producers. Among 47 patients with ESBL-PE who had medical records available, 38 (80.9%) had clinically significant UTIs. Most UTIs (63.2%) were community acquired and 34.2% were in patients with diabetes. Among 36 cultured ESBL-PE isolates, significant susceptibility (>80%) was only retained to amikacin and the carbapenems. The group 1 bla CTX-M gene was present in 90.0% of Escherichia coli isolates and all Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter cloacae isolates. The bla SHV and bla TEM genes were more common in K. pneumoniae (75% and 50%) and E. cloacae (50% and 50%) isolates than in E. coli (10% and 20%) isolates, respectively. Conclusion The majority of UTIs caused by ESBL-PE were acquired in the community and due to organisms carrying the group 1 CTX-M ß-lactamase. Further epidemiologic studies of infections due to ESBL-PE are urgently needed to better prevent and treat these infections in South Asia. PMID:27704730

  9. Study of family physicians' practices in case of urinary tract infections caused by enterobacteriaceae secreting extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miclot, C; Antoniotti, G; Forestier, E

    2015-03-01

    Urinary tract infections caused by enterobacteriaceae secreting extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (EESBL) is an issue for most family physicians. The aim of our study was to evaluate their practice in case of EESBL discovered after urinalysis and culture (U/C). This epidemiological and retrospective study was conducted from the January 1, to December 31, 2012, in 5 laboratories of Savoie and Isere. Results of U/C prescribed by family physicians and positive for EESBL were collected. The data collected with questionnaires, concerned characteristics of the infection, antibiotic treatment adequateness, the implementation of specific hygiene measures, and risk factors for EESBL infection. One hundred and three U/C out of 19,494 were considered, and 56 questionnaires were collected. The rate of EESBL positive U/C was 0.60%. The antibiotic treatment was adequate for 35 patients (62.5%). Specific hygiene measures were implemented for 22 patients (32.3%). Both antibiotic treatment and specific hygiene measures were initiated for 13 patients (23.2%). Fourteen cases of community-acquired infections (25%) were reported. Five patients (8.9%) had traveled to an endemic zone in the previous 6 months. The concomitant initiation of both antibiotic treatment and specific hygiene measures in case of U/C positive for EESBL is insufficient when managed by family physicians. It could be improved by offering tools for the management of these infections, by developing EESBL networks between hospital and family physicians, and epidemiological surveillance in community settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Extended spectrum beta lactamase producing organisms causing urinary tract infections in Sri Lanka and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern -A hospital based cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, M M P S C; Luke, W A N V; Miththinda, J K N D; Wickramasinghe, R D S S; Sebastiampillai, B S; Gunathilake, M P M L; Silva, F H D S; Premaratna, R

    2017-02-10

    Extended Spectrum Beta- Lactamase producing organisms causing urinary tract infections (ESBL-UTI) are increasing in incidence and pose a major burden to health care. While ESBL producing Klebsiella species seem to account for most nosocomial outbreaks, ESBL-producing E. coli have been isolated from both hospitalized and non-hospitalized patients. Although 95-100% ESBL organisms are still considered sensitive to meropenem, rapid emergence of carbapenem resistance has been documented in many countries. The objective of this study was to evaluate urinary tract infections caused by ESBL producers and the antibiotic susceptibility patterns in Sri Lanka. Patients with confirmed ESBL-UTI admitted to Professorial Medical Unit, Colombo North Teaching Hospital from January - June 2015 were recruited to the study. Their urine culture and antibiotic susceptibility reports were evaluated after obtaining informed written consent. Of 61 culture positive ESBL-UTIs, E. coli caused 53 (86.8%), followed by Klebsiella in 8 (13.1%).30 (49.1%) had a history of hospitalization within the past three months and included 6/8(75%) of Klebsiella UTI and 24/53(45.2%) of E.coli UTI. Antibiotic susceptibility of ESBL organisms were; Meropenem 58 (95%), Imipenem 45 (73.7%), Amikacin 37 (60.6%) and Nitrofurantoin 28(45.9%). In 3(4.9%), E.coli were resistant to Meropenem. These three patients had received multiple antibiotics including meropenem in the recent past for recurrent UTI. We observed a higher percentage of E. coli over Klebsiella as ESBL producing organisms suggesting most ESBL-UTIs to be community acquired, Carbapenems seem to remain as the first line therapy for majority of ESBL-UTIs in the local setting. However 4.9% prevalence of meropenem resistance is alarming compared to other countries. Although prior antibiotic utilization and hospitalization may contribute to emergence of ESBL producing Klebsiella and E.coli in Sri Lanka, high prevalence of community acquired ESBL-E. coli needs

  11. Urinary Tract Infection Caused by a Capnophilic Proteus mirabilis Strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trapman, M.; Ingen, J. van; Keijman, J.; Swanink, C.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    From a urine sample from a patient with a urinary tract infection, a carbon dioxide-dependent Proteus mirabilis strain was isolated. It is important to perform urine cultures in 5% carbon dioxide and an anaerobic atmosphere if bacteria prominent in Gram stains do not grow on routine media in ambient

  12. Urinary Tract Infection Caused by a Capnophilic Proteus mirabilis Strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trapman, M.; Ingen, J. van; Keijman, J.; Swanink, C.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    From a urine sample from a patient with a urinary tract infection, a carbon dioxide-dependent Proteus mirabilis strain was isolated. It is important to perform urine cultures in 5% carbon dioxide and an anaerobic atmosphere if bacteria prominent in Gram stains do not grow on routine media in ambient

  13. Rapidly fatal community-acquired pneumonia due to Klebsiella pneumoniae complicated with acute myocarditis and accelerated idioventricular rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Tzu-Yi; Lin, Chou-Jui; Lee, Shih-Wei; Chuang, Chun-Pin; Jong, Yuh-Shiun; Chen, Wen-Jone; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2012-08-01

    We describe a previously healthy 52-year-old man with rapidly fatal community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae. The patient developed acute renal dysfunction, accelerated idioventricular rhythm (acute myocarditis), lactic acidosis and septic shock. He died within 15 hours after admission despite intravenous levofloxacin (750 mg daily) and aggressive medical treatment.

  14. Do We Know When, What and For How Long to Treat? Antibiotic Therapy for Pediatric Community-acquired Pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, Susanna; Cohen, Robert; Domingo, Javier Diez; Pecurariu, Oana Falup; Greenberg, David; Heininger, Ulrich; Knuf, Markus; Lutsar, Irja; Principi, Nicola; Rodrigues, Fernanda; Sharland, Mike; Spoulou, Vana; Syrogiannopoulos, George A.; Usonis, Vytautas; Vergison, Anne; Schaad, Urs B.

    2012-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common cause of morbidity among children in developed countries and accounts for an incidence of 10-40 cases per 1000 children in the first 5 years of life. Given the clinical, social and economic importance of CAP, there is general agreement that prompt and a

  15. Polymicrobial community-acquired pneumonia: An emerging entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cillóniz, Catia; Civljak, Rok; Nicolini, Antonello; Torres, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Polymicrobial aetiology in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is more common than previously recognized. This growing new entity can influence inflammation, host immunity and disease outcomes in CAP patients. However, the true incidence is complicated to determine and probably underestimated due mainly to many cases going undetected, particularly in the outpatient setting, as the diagnostic yield is restricted by the sensitivity of currently available microbiologic tests and the ability to get certain types of clinical specimens. The observed rate of polymicrobial cases may also lead to new antibiotic therapy considerations. In this review, we discuss the pathogenesis, microbial interactions in pneumonia, epidemiology, biomarkers and antibiotic therapy for polymicrobial CAP.

  16. Acute urinary retention caused by seminoma in a case of persistent Mullerian duct syndrome

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    Jayesh Modi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary symptoms have been described secondary to a pelvic mass originating from the ovary, uterus, cervix, prostate, or rectum. Persistent Mullerian duct syndrome is a rare form of intersex disorder, characterized by the presence of uterus and fallopian tubes in an otherwise 46 XY male. We report an adult male with bilateral cryptorchidism and a pelvic mass, who presented with acute urinary retention, and was diagnosed with a seminoma of the right testis, intratubular germ cell neoplasia of the left testis with the presence of Mullerian remnants. Pelvic mass was caused due to seminoma is a rare cause of urinary retention.

  17. Bacterial characteristics of importance for recurrent urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejrnæs, Karen

    2011-04-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infectious diseases encountered in clinical practice and account for significant morbidity and high medical costs. Escherichia coli is the most predominant pathogen causing 80-90% of community-acquired UTIs and 30-50% of nosocomially-acquired UTIs. Recurrent UTIs (RUTIs) are reported in 25% of women within 6 months of an acute UTI episode and pose a major problem. The aim of the present thesis was to look for bacterial characteristics of importance for recurrence of UTI caused by E. coli. The thesis is based on three papers. The study is based on E. coli from 236 Swedish women with community-acquired symptomatic lower UTI from a large study of 1162 patients treated with one of three different dosing regimens of pivmecillinam or placebo. The women were evaluated clinically and bacteriologically at the initial visit and at two scheduled follow-up visits. According to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and culture results all primary infecting E. coli (initial isolates, pretherapy) were assigned into whether the initial infection was followed by cure, persistence, reinfection or relapse during follow-up. The prevalence of virulence factor genes (VFGs), phylogenetic groups, biofilm formation, plasmids and resistance to antimicrobials among primary infecting E. coli causing persistence or relapse at the follow-up visits were compared with the prevalence of these among E. coli followed by cure or reinfection. Previous studies of RUTI using phenotypically based typing methods or less specific DNA based typing methods have concluded, that RUTIs are mainly attributable to reinfection with new strains. However, applying PFGE showed that 77% of RUTIs were caused by a relapse with the primary infecting E. coli (Paper I). This may support the recent observation that E. coli can invade and replicate within the murine bladder forming biofilm-like intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs) and establish

  18. A Correlative Study of Different Pathogens Caused by Community Acquired Pneumonia in Association with Helico-bacter Pylori Infection%社区获得性肺炎致病原与幽门螺杆菌的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪丽月; 洪原城; 黄种杰; 金润女

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the correlation of helicobacter pylori (Hp) and community-acquired pneumonia with different pathogens. Methods 206 patients with community acquired pneumonia were randomly selected between March 2012 and January 2015 in respiratory department of our hospital inpatient department and outpatient department. Sputum spec-imen of patients was used for pathogenic bacteria culture, and 40 healthy controls were selected. Both groups used the routine blood test for Hp concentrations and comparative analysis. Results Different pathogens of community acquired pneumonia in Hp antibody positive rate was higher than that of control group ( P0. 05 ) . Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Hp antibody positive rates were significantly higher than those of Chlamydia trachomatis and pneumonia mycoplasma (P0.05),而感染流感嗜血杆菌和肺炎链球菌Hp抗体阳性率均显著高于衣原体与肺炎支原体(P<0.05)。结论社区获得性肺炎患者血清Hp抗体阳性率高,提示Hp感染可能增加感染社区获得性肺炎的概率。

  19. Plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli causing urinary tract infection in the Auckland community likely to be resistant to commonly prescribed antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinkovic, Dragana; Morris, Arthur J; Dyet, Kristin; Bakker, Sarah; Heffernan, Helen

    2015-03-13

    To estimate the prevalence and characterise plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamase (PMACBL)- producing Escherichia coli in the Auckland community. All cefoxitin non-susceptible (NS) E. coli identified at the two Auckland community laboratories between 1 January and 31 August 2011 were referred to ESR for boronic acid double-disc synergy testing, to detect the production of AmpC beta-lactamase, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to identify the presence of PMACBL genes. PMACBL-producing isolates were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and PCR was used to determine their phylogenetic group and to identify multilocus sequence type (ST)131. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing and detection of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) were performed according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. 101 (51%) and 74 (37%) of 200 non-duplicate cefoxitin-NS E. coli were PMACBL producers or assumed hyper-producers of chromosomal AmpC beta-lactamase, respectively. The prevalence of PMACBL-producing E. coli was 0.4%. PMACBL-producing E. coli were significantly less susceptible to norfloxacin, trimethoprim and nitrofurantoin than E. coli that produced neither a PMACBL nor an ESBL. Very few (4%) PMACBL-producing E. coli co-produced an ESBL. Most (88%) of the PMACBL-producing isolates had a CMY-2-like PMACBL. The PMACBL-producing E. coli isolates were diverse based on their PFGE profiles, 44% belonged to phylogenetic group D, and only four were ST131. 100 of the 101 PMACBL-producing E. coli were cultured from urine, and were causing urinary tract infection (UTI) in the majority of patients. The median patient age was 56 years and most (94%) of the patients were women. A greater proportion of patients with community-acquired UTI caused by PMACBL-producing E. coli received a beta-lactam antimicrobial than patients with community-acquired UTI caused by other non-AmpC, non-ESBL-producing E. coli. Thirty-six (43%) patients with community-acquired

  20. Pulmonary Embolism Mimicking Community Acquired Pneumonia: A Case Report

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    Ibrahim Koc

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute pulmonary trombo embolism is a form of venous thromboembolism that is common and sometimes even may be fatal. Patients might present with variable clinical presentation and often have non-specific complaints which make the diagnosis challenging. Here we aimed to report a thirty years old male who was diagnosed with community acquired pneumonia but further investigations revealed pulmonary embolism. A thirty years old male presented to our clinic with right sided chest pain and shortness of breath. Chest radiograph revealed right sided consolidations and pleural effusion. His physical examination revealed high body temperature (38 C° and oxygen saturation on room air was 85 %. The patient did not respond to the antibiotherapy and oxygen supply. Computed tomography angiography of the chest revealed right sided pulmonary embolism with pneumonia. Blood and sputum cultures revealed no bacteria. Cardiovascular disease panel revealed heterozygous mutation in prothrombine G20210A and metilentetrahidrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T. In conclusion pulmonary embolism may mimic community acquired pneumonia thus clinicians must be carefull during the diagnostic process.

  1. [ANEMIC SYNDROME IN PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnevsky, A V; Esaulenko, I E; Ovsyannikov, E S; Labzhaniya, N B; Voronina, E V; Chernov, A V

    2016-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia remains a most widespread acute infectious disease of socio-economic significance all over the world. Up to 30% of the patients present with anemia responsible for the unfavourable prognosis and elevated mortality. Not infrequently, anemia is not diagnosed during the hospital stay und therefore remains uncorrected. Severe anemia results in enhanced hypercapnia and slowed maturation of red blood cells in the bone marrow which facilitates the development of ischemic syndrome. Hepcidin, a mediator of inflammation and iron-regulatory hormone, plays an important role in the clinical course of community-acquired pneumonia. Hepsidin production increases during inflammation; it suppresses erythtropoiesis and depletes the iron depot leading to so-called anemia of inflammation. Hypoxia and anemia activate erythtropoiesis, and the released erythropoietin inhibits hepsidin production. During pneumonia resolution, hepsidin promotes recovery from anemia by activating iron absorption. The curreni literature contains few data on the use of hepcidin as a diagnostic marker of anemia. The necessity oftreating anemia in patients with pneumonia under hospital conditions is a matter of discussion. Direct involvement of hepcidin in iron metabolism creates a prerequisite for the treatment of anemia. Medicamental suppression of its activity by stimulating erythtropoiesis can facilitate normalization of iron metabolism and restoration of hemoglobin level.

  2. Clinical features of endemic community-acquired psittacosis

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    J.M. Branley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Following a large outbreak of community-acquired psittacosis in 2002 in residents of the Blue Mountains, New South Wales, Australia, we reviewed new cases in this area over a 7-year period from 2003 to 2009. Using the 2010 criteria from the Centers for Disease Control National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System, 85 patients with possible psittacosis were identified, of which 48 were identified as definite or probable infection. Clinical features of these cases are summarized. In addition to Chlamydia-specific serology, specimens, where available, underwent nucleic acid testing for chlamydial DNA using real-time PCR. Chlamydophila psittaci DNA was detected in samples from 23 patients. Four of 18 specimens were culture positive. This is the first description of endemic psittacosis, and is characterized in this location by community-acquired psittacosis resulting from inadvertent exposure to birds. The disease is likely to be under-diagnosed, and may often be mistaken for gastroenteritis or meningitis given the frequency of non-respiratory symptoms, particularly without a history of contact with birds. Clinical characteristics of endemic and outbreak-associated cases were similar. The nature of exposure, risk factors and reasons for the occurrence of outbreaks of psittacosis require further investigation.

  3. Community-acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess: an emerging infection in Ireland and Europe.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moore, R

    2013-02-05

    INTRODUCTION: Klebsiella pneumoniae has emerged as a predominant cause of community-acquired mono-microbial pyogenic liver abscess. This was first described in Taiwan and has been widely reported in Asia. This infectious entity has been described in Europe, with single case reports predominating. METHODS: We present three cases in one year from our institution in Ireland and review the European literature to date. RESULTS\\/CONCLUSION: Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome is now emerging in Europe and notably is not restricted to individuals of Asian descent.

  4. A rare case of community acquired Burkholderia cepacia infection presenting as pyopneumothorax in an immunocompetent individual

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suman S Karanth; Hariharan Regunath; Kiran Chawla; Mukhyaprana Prabhu

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia (B. cepacia) infection is rarely reported in an immunocompetent host. It is a well known occurence in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic granulomatous disease where it increases both morbidity and mortality. It has also been included in the list of organisms causing nosocomial infections in an immunocompetent host, most of them transmitted from the immunocompromised patient in which this organism harbors. We report a rare case of isolation of B. cepacia from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of an immunocompetent agriculturist who presented with productive cough and fever associated with a pyopneumothorax. This is the first case of community acquired infection reported in an immunocompetent person in India.

  5. Community acquired bilateral upper lobe Pneumonia with acute adrenal insufficiency: A new face of Achromobacter xylosoxidans

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    Suman S Karanth

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAchromobacter xylosoxidans is an uncommon pathogen of low virulence known to cause serious nosocomial infection in the immunocompromised. Its inherent multi-drug resistance makes treatment difficult. Community-acquired infections are rare despite its ubiquitous existence. We present a 50-year-old immunocompetent woman who presented with one-month history of coughing with expectoration who was subsequently diagnosed with bilateral upper lobe pneumonia and acute adrenal insufficiency. Achromobacter xylosoxidans was isolated from sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage culture. The acute adrenal insufficiency recovered after appropriate antibiotic therapy. Amongst the myriad of presentations, we highlight the rarity of acute adrenal insufficiency triggered by the infection.

  6. Community acquired bilateral upper lobe pneumonia with acute adrenal insufficiency: A new face of Achromobacter Xylosoxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanth, Suman S; Gupta, Anurag; Prabhu, Mukhyaprana

    2012-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an uncommon pathogen of low virulence known to cause serious nosocomial infection in the immunocompromised. Its inherent multi-drug resistance makes treatment difficult. Community-acquired infections are rare despite its ubiquitous existence. We present a 50-year-old immunocompetent woman who presented with one-month history of coughing with expectoration who was subsequently diagnosed with bilateral upper lobe pneumonia and acute adrenal insufficiency. Achromobacter xylosoxidans was isolated from sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage culture. The acute adrenal insufficiency recovered after appropriate antibiotic therapy. Amongst the myriad of presentations, we highlight the rarity of acute adrenal insufficiency triggered by the infection.

  7. A rare case of community acquired Burkholderia cepacia infection presenting as pyopneumothorax in an immunocompetent individual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman S Karanth

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cepacia (B. cepacia infection is rarely reported in an immunocompetent host. It is a well known occurence in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic granulomatous disease where it increases both morbidity and mortality. It has also been included in the list of organisms causing nosocomial infections in an immunocompetent host, most of them transmitted from the immunocompromised patient in which this organism harbors. We report a rare case of isolation of B. cepacia from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of an immunocompetent agriculturist who presented with productive cough and fever associated with a pyopneumothorax. This is the first case of community acquired infection reported in an immunocompetent person in India.

  8. Antimicrobial resistance in pathogens causing urinary tract infections in a rural community of Odisha, India

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    Muktikesh Dash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antimicrobial resistance of urinary tract pathogens has increased worldwide. Empiric treatment of community-acquired urinary tract infection (CA-UTI is determined by antimicrobial resistance patterns of uropathogens in a population of specific geographical location. Objectives: This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of CA-UTI in rural Odisha, India, and the effect of gender and age on its prevalence as well as etiologic agents and the resistance profile of the bacterial isolates. Materials and Methods: Consecutive clean-catch mid-stream urine samples were collected from 1670 adult patients. The urine samples were processed and microbial isolates were identified by conventional methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on all bacterial isolates by Kirby Bauer′s disc diffusion method. Results: The prevalence of UTI was significantly higher in females compared with males (females 45.2%, males 18.4%, OR = 2.041, 95% CI = 1.64-2.52, P ≤ 0.0001. Young females within the age group of 18-37 years and elderly males (≥68 years showed high prevalence of UTI. Escherichia coli (68.8% was the most prevalent isolate followed by Enterococcus spp. (9.7%. Amikacin and nitrofurantoin were the most active antimicrobial agents which showed low resistance rate of 5.8% and 9.8%, respectively. Conclusion: Our study revealed E. coli as the pre-dominant bacterial pathogen. Nitrofurantoin should be used as empirical therapy for uncomplicated CA-UTIs. In the Indian setting, routine urine cultures may be advisable, since treatment failure is likely to occur with commonly used antimicrobials. Therefore, development of regional surveillance programs is necessary for implementation of national CA-UTI guidelines.

  9. [Clinical features and outcome of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obed, Mora; García-Vidal, Carolina; Pessacq, Pedro; Mykietiuk, Analia; Viasus, Diego; Cazzola, Laura; Domínguez, M Angeles; Calmaggi, Anibal; Carratalà, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the epidemiological and clinical features, treatment and prognosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in two different geographic regions where community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) infections have different frequencies. Observational study of patients admitted to two hospitals (one in Argentina, the other in Spain) between March 2008 and June 2012. We documented 16 cases of CAP caused by MRSA. MRSA accounted for 15 of 547 (2.7%) cases of CAP in Hospital Rodolfo Rossi and 1 of 1258 (0,08%) cases at the Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge (P ≤ .001). Most patients were young and previously healthy. Multilobar infiltrates, cavitation and skin and soft tissue involvement were frequent. All patients had positive blood cultures. Five patients required admission to the intensive care unit. Early mortality (≤ 48 hours) was 19%, and overall mortality (≤ 30 days) was 25%. CAP caused by MRSA causes high morbidity and mortality rates. It should be suspected in areas with a high prevalence of CA-MRSA infections, and especially in young and healthy patients who present with multilobar pneumonia with cavitation. Mortality is mainly related to septic shock and respiratory failure and occurs early in most cases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. Bacteriological and clinical profile of Community acquired pneumonia in hospitalized patients

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    Shah Bashir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to obtain comprehensive insight into the bacteriological and clinical profile of community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization. The patient population consisted of 100 patients admitted with the diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, as defined by British Thoracic society, from December 1998 to Dec 2000, at the Sher- i-Kashmir institute of Medical Sciences Soura, Srinagar, India. Gram negative organisms were the commonest cause (19/29, followed by gram positive (10/29. In 71 cases no etiological cause was obtained. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the commonest pathogen (10/29, followed by Staphylococcus aureus (7/29, Escherichia coli (6/29, Klebsiella spp. (3/29, Streptococcus pyogenes (1/29, Streptococcus pneumoniae (1/29 and Acinetobacter spp. (1/29. Sputum was the most common etiological source of organism isolation (26 followed by blood (6, pleural fluid (3, and pus culture (1. Maximum number of patients presented with cough (99%, fever (95%, tachycardia (92%, pleuritic chest pain (75%, sputum production (65% and leucocytosis (43%. The commonest predisposing factors were smoking (65%, COPD (57%, structural lung disease (21%, diabetes mellitus (13%, and decreased level of consciousness following seizure (eight per cent and chronic alcoholism (one per cent. Fourteen patients, of whom, nine were males and five females, died. Staphylococcus aureus was the causative organism in four, Pseudomonas in two, Klebsiella in one, and no organism was isolated in seven cases. The factors predicting mortality at admission were - age over 62 years, history of COPD or smoking, hypotension, altered sensorium, respiratory failure, leucocytosis, and s0 taphylococcus pneumonia and undetermined etiology. The overall rate of identification of microbial etiology of community-acquired pneumonia was 29%, which is very low, and if serological tests for legionella, mycoplasma and viruses are performed the diagnostic yield would

  11. Bacteriological and clinical profile of Community acquired pneumonia in hospitalized patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Bashir Ahmed; Singh, Gurmeet; Naik, Muzafar Ahmed; Dhobi, Ghulam Nabi

    2010-01-01

    The aim of our study was to obtain comprehensive insight into the bacteriological and clinical profile of community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization. The patient population consisted of 100 patients admitted with the diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), as defined by British Thoracic society, from December 1998 to Dec 2000, at the Sher- i-Kashmir institute of Medical Sciences Soura, Srinagar, India. Gram negative organisms were the commonest cause (19/29), followed by gram positive (10/29). In 71 cases no etiological cause was obtained. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the commonest pathogen (10/29), followed by Staphylococcus aureus (7/29), Escherichia coli (6/29), Klebsiella spp. (3/29), Streptococcus pyogenes (1/29), Streptococcus pneumoniae (1/29) and Acinetobacter spp. (1/29). Sputum was the most common etiological source of organism isolation (26) followed by blood (6), pleural fluid (3), and pus culture (1). Maximum number of patients presented with cough (99%), fever (95%), tachycardia (92%), pleuritic chest pain (75%), sputum production (65%) and leucocytosis (43%). The commonest predisposing factors were smoking (65%), COPD (57%), structural lung disease (21%), diabetes mellitus (13%), and decreased level of consciousness following seizure (eight per cent) and chronic alcoholism (one per cent). Fourteen patients, of whom, nine were males and five females, died. Staphylococcus aureus was the causative organism in four, Pseudomonas in two, Klebsiella in one, and no organism was isolated in seven cases. The factors predicting mortality at admission were - age over 62 years, history of COPD or smoking, hypotension, altered sensorium, respiratory failure, leucocytosis, and staphylococcus pneumonia and undetermined etiology. The overall rate of identification of microbial etiology of community-acquired pneumonia was 29%, which is very low, and if serological tests for legionella, mycoplasma and viruses are performed the diagnostic yield would

  12. Assessment of renal dysfunction using urinary markers in canine babesiosis caused by Babesia rossi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defauw, P; Schoeman, J P; Smets, P; Goddard, A; Meyer, E; Liebenberg, C; Daminet, S

    2012-12-21

    Renal damage is deemed a common, yet poorly documented, complication in canine babesiosis. Serum urea and creatinine are insensitive and non-specific markers of early renal dysfunction and their measurements are influenced by hemolysis caused by babesiosis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to use urinary markers to assess the localization and degree of renal dysfunction in dogs with Babesia rossi infection. Urinary immunoglobulin G (uIgG) and urinary C-reactive protein (uCRP) were measured as markers for glomerular dysfunction, while urinary retinol-binding protein (uRBP) was used as a marker for tubular dysfunction. Eighteen dogs presenting with uncomplicated babesiosis were included and compared with eight clinically healthy dogs. Previously validated commercial ELISA kits were used for the measurement of uIgG, uCRP, and uRBP. Results were related to urinary creatinine concentrations (c). Dogs with babesiosis had significantly higher concentrations of all three measured urinary markers compared to healthy dogs. Except for urinary protein/c ratio (UPC), routine urinary and serum markers for renal function (urine specific gravity (USG), serum urea and creatinine (sCr)) were not significantly different between dogs with babesiosis and healthy dogs. All three urinary markers were positively correlated with each other and with UPC. The data supports the presence of both glomerular and tubular dysfunction in dogs suffering from uncomplicated B. rossi infection. Urinary markers were superior to USG, serum urea and creatinine concentrations for the early detection of renal dysfunction in dogs with babesiosis.

  13. Hospital Resource Utilisation by Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, S

    2017-09-01

    Little data is available on the resource utilisation of patients admitted with Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) in Ireland. A retrospective review of 50 randomly-selected patients admitted to Beaumont Hospital with CAP was undertaken. The mean length of stay of patients with CAP was 12 days (+\\/- 16 days). All patients were emergency admissions, all had a chest x-ray, a C-reactive protein blood test, and occupied a public bed at some point during admission. Common antimicrobial therapies were intravenous (IV) amoxicillin\\/clavulanic acid and oral clarithromycin; 60% received physiotherapy. The estimated mean cost of CAP per patient was €14,802.17. Costs arising from admission to hospital with CAP are substantial, but efforts can be undertaken to ensure that resources are used efficiently to improve patient care such as discharge planning and fewer in-hospital ward transfers

  14. The changing face of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

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    P Kale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is an important cause of infection, both in hospitalised patients with significant healthcare exposure and in patients without healthcare risk factors. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA are known for their rapid community transmission and propensity to cause aggressive skin and soft tissue infections and community-acquired pneumonia. The distinction between the healthcare-associated (HA-MRSA and CA-MRSA is gradually fading owing to the acquisition of multiple virulence factors and genetic elements. The movement of CA-MRSA strains into the nosocomial setting limits the utility of using clinical risk factors alone to designate community or HA status. Identification of unique genetic characteristics and genotyping are valuable tools for MRSA epidemiological studies. Although the optimum pharmacotherapy for CA-MRSA infections has not been determined, many CA-MRSA strains remain broadly susceptible to several non-β-lactam antibacterial agents. This review aimed at illuminating the characteristic features of CA-MRSA, virulence factors, changing clinical settings and molecular epidemiology, insurgence into the hospital settings and therapy with drug resistance.

  15. Community-acquired vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium: a case report from Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, N S; Karunakaran, R; Ngeow, Y F; Awang, R

    2005-09-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are formidable organisms renowned for their ability to cause infections with limited treatment options and their potential for transferring resistance genes to other Gram-positive bacteria. Usually associated with nosocomial infections, VRE are rarely reported as a cause of community-acquired infection. Presented here is a case of community-acquired infection due to vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. The patient had been applying herbal leaves topically to his cheek to treat a buccal space abscess, resulting in a burn of the overlying skin. From pus aspirated via the skin a pure culture of E. faecium was grown that was resistant to vancomycin with a MIC of >256 microg ml-1 by the E test and resistant to teicoplanin by disc diffusion, consistent with the VanA phenotype. The organism was suspected of contaminating the leaf and infecting the patient via the burnt skin. This case highlights the need for further studies on the community prevalence of VRE among humans and animals to define unrecognized silent reservoirs for VRE, which may pose a threat to public health.

  16. A review of the role of Haemophilus influenzae in community-acquired pneumonia

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    Mary PE Slack

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In an era when Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib conjugate vaccine is widely used, the incidence of Hib as a cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP has dramatically declined. Non-typeable H. influenzae (NTHi strains and, occasionally, other encapsulated serotypes of H. influenzae are now the cause of the majority of invasive H. influenzae infections, including bacteraemic CAP. NTHi have long been recognised as an important cause of lower respiratory tract infection, including pneumonia, in adults, especially those with underlying diseases. The role of NTHi as a cause of non-bacteraemic CAP in children is less clear. In this review the evidence for the role of NTHi and capsulated strains of H. influenzae will be examined.

  17. Diarrheagenic enteroaggregative Escherichia coli causing urinary tract infection and bacteremia leading to sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, K; Engeler Dusel, J; Hugentobler, M; Beutin, L; Sägesser, G; Stephan, R; Hächler, H; Nüesch-Inderbinen, M

    2014-04-01

    We report a case of a 55-year-old immunocompromised female who presented to the emergency department with severe diarrhea and vomiting following travel to the Philippines. Stool bacteriology revealed a mixed infection involving an enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and two distinct strains of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC). During hospitalization, urine and blood culture tested positive for one of the diarrheagenic EAEC strains, necessitating urinary catheterization, intensive care, and antimicrobial treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, followed by meropenem. Although known to occasionally cause urinary tract infections, EAEC have not been previously associated with sepsis. Our report highlights the potential of EAEC to cause severe extraintestinal infections.

  18. Higher incidence of perineal community acquired MRSA infections among toddlers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blumenthal Robert M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A six-fold increase in pediatric MRSA infections, prompted us to examine the clinical profile of children with MRSA infections seen at Mercy Children's Hospital, Toledo, Ohio and to characterize the responsible strains. Methods Records were reviewed of pediatric patients who cultured positive for MRSA from June 1 to December 31, 2007. Strain typing by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFT and DiversiLab, SCCmec typing, and PCR-based lukSF-PV gene (encodes Panton-Valentine leukocidin, arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME and cap5 gene detection was performed. Results Chart review of 63 patients with MRSA infections revealed that 58(92% were community acquired MRSA (CAMRSA. All CAMRSA were skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI. Twenty five (43% patients were aged mec type IVa and lukSF-PV gene positive. Nearly all contained ACME and about 80% were cap5 positive. Of the 58 USA300 strains by PFT, 55(95% were also identified as USA300 via the automated repetitive sequence-based PCR method from DiversiLab. Conclusions CAMRSA SSTI of the perineum was significantly more common among toddlers and that of the extremities in older children. The infecting strains were all USA300 PFT. Further studies are needed to identify the unique virulence and colonization characteristics of USA300 strains in these infections.

  19. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: Outpatient treatment and prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Andrés Martín, A; Tagarro García, A; Escribano Montaner, A; Figuerola Mulet, J; García García, J J; Moreno-Galdó, A; Rodrigo Gonzalo de Lliria, C; Ruiz Contreras, J; Saavedra Lozano, J

    2015-12-01

    There have been significant changes in community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children in the last decade. These changes relate to epidemiology and clinical presentation. Resistance to antibiotics is also a changing issue. These all have to be considered when treating CAP. In this document, two of the main Spanish pediatric societies involved in the treatment of CAP in children, propose a consensus concerning therapeutic approach. These societies are the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases. The Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (CAV-AEP) has also been involved in the prevention of CAP. An attempt is made to provide up-to-date guidelines to all paediatricians. The first part of the statement presents the approach to ambulatory, previously healthy children. We also review the prevention with currently available vaccines. In a next second part, special situations and complicated forms will be addressed. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. [Microbiologic diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez P, Patricio; Calvo A, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Microbiological analysis allows us to identify the etiology of pneumonia and its in vitro susceptibility pattern. Antibiotic treatment directed against a known pathogen enables us to narrow antibacterial spectrum of action, and to reduce costs, drug adverse effects risk and antibiotic resistance. However it is unnecessary to perform extended microbiological studies in all patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP). Etiological studies must be based in pneumonia severity, epidemiological risk factors and clinical response to empirical treatment. Routine microbiological analysis for ambulatory patients is not recommended. In patients with persistent cough and worsening in their general conditions, a sputum sample must be obtained to perform an acid-fast smear and Mycobacterium culture. The risk of complications and death of patients hospitalized with CAP justifies basic microbiological exploration (sputum Gram staining and culture, blood cultures, pleural fluid culture) intending to obtain a more accurate etiology of pulmonary infection and to guide specific antibiotic treatment. Paired serum samples obtained to document atypical pathogen infections (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae) and urine sample to detect Legionella pneumophila antigenuria are recommended in all CAP severely ill patients that are admitted to ICU, in those not responding to betalactamic drug treatment and in selected patients with specific epidemiological risks. A microbiological study would be useful in management of patients with severe CAP pneumonia outbreaks with clinical-epidemiological particular characteristics, and in-patients with empirical antimicrobial treatment failure.

  1. Professions and Working Conditions Associated With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirall, Jordi; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Bolíbar, Ignasi; Palomera, Elisabet; Roig, Jordi; Boixeda, Ramon; Bartolomé, Maria; de la Torre, Mari; Parra, Olga; Torres, Antoni

    2015-12-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is not considered a professional disease, and the effect of different occupations and working conditions on susceptibility to CAP is unknown. The aim of this study is to determine whether different jobs and certain working conditions are risk factors for CAP. Over a 1-year period, all radiologically confirmed cases of CAP (n=1,336) and age- and sex-matched controls (n=1,326) were enrolled in a population-based case-control study. A questionnaire on CAP risk factors, including work-related questions, was administered to all participants during an in-person interview. The bivariate analysis showed that office work is a protective factor against CAP, while building work, contact with dust and sudden changes of temperature in the workplace were risk factors for CAP. The occupational factor disappeared when the multivariate analysis was adjusted for working conditions. Contact with dust (previous month) and sudden changes of temperature (previous 3 months) were risk factors for CAP, irrespective of the number of years spent working in these conditions, suggesting reversibility. Some recent working conditions such as exposure to dust and sudden changes of temperature in the workplace are risk factors for CAP. Both factors are reversible and preventable. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Steroids for community-acquired pneumonia? not in my house!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuberski T

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. In response to the paper by PR Bauer and VN Iyer (1 entitled “Corticosteroids and Influenza A Associated Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome” published in the Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care (SWJPCC on November 18, 2016. That paper presents a single case report of a patient with community-acquired pneumonia in Arizona attributed to influenza A. The patient was treated with steroids and improved. For a variety of reasons, a case report like this should not be published unless accompanied by a note pointing out the implications of such a report. The audience of SWJPCC is generally going to be made up of two groups, mainly from Arizona. Those with experience who would say that the treating physicians were lucky (but in the back of their minds this case might give them a reason to use steroids in similar circumstances and those with little or no experience, who will say …

  3. Community Acquired Chronic Arthritis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Previously Healthy Pregnant Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut Yilmaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Septic arthritis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is uncommon in the immunocompetent population, despite its occurrence in younger patients with open injuries and in intravenous drug abusers. Here we report a case of septic arthritis caused by P. aeruginosa. This case is unique for several reasons. First, it is a case of septic arthritis in a pregnant woman with no traditional risk factors reported in the literature including history of prior traumatic events, hospitalisation, or chronic underlying disease. She was suspected of having transient osteoporosis associated with pregnancy to involve both hip joints. Second, this is the first reported case of a community acquired chronic septic arthritis due to P. aeruginosa involving large joints of both upper and lower extremities. The patient was treated successfully with a combination of ceftazidime and amikacin for 4 weeks followed by oral ciprofloxacin 750 mg twice daily for 8 weeks.

  4. Imipenem resistance in nonfermenters causing nosocomial urinary tract infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taneja N

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli (nonfermenters have emerged as important nosocomial pathogens causing opportunistic infections in immunocompromised hosts. These organisms show high level of resistance to b-lactam agents, fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides. Imipenem is a carbapenem antibiotic, which can be very useful for treatment of infections caused by nonfermenters. Eighty-five nonfermenters causing nosocomial UTI were tested for MIC to imipenem by agar dilution method. Resistance to other antimicrobial agents was compared between imipenem sensitive (S and resistance (R groups. Overall 36.4% of nonfermenters were resistant to imipenem. Forty two percent of P. aeruginosa and 18.5% of Acinetobacter baumanii were imipenem resistant. Other nonfermenters showed variable resistance, resistance in Alcaligenes spp. being very high. More than 70% of the nonfermenters were resistant to ceftazidime, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. Piperacillin and amikacin had the best in vitro susceptibility. No significant difference was found in the antibiotic susceptibility profile among imipenem sensitive (S or resistant (R strains.

  5. Long-term anorectal, urinary and sexual dysfunction causing distress after radiotherapy for anal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunesen, K G; Nørgaard, M; Lundby, L

    2015-01-01

    to the dysfunction of pelvic organs after radiotherapy for anal cancer. METHOD: A questionnaire regarding anorectal, urinary and sexual symptoms was sent to anal cancer patients without recurrence or colostomy, diagnosed during 1996-2003, and treated with curative intent (chemo)radiotherapy at three Danish centres....... For each symptom we assessed frequency and severity and the level of symptom-induced distress (no, little, moderate or great distress). RESULTS: Of 94 eligible patients, 84 (89%) returned the completed questionnaire at a median of 33 months after radiotherapy. Incontinence for solid stools, liquid stools......%. Stress, urge or another type of urinary incontinence occurred at least monthly in 45% and caused great distress in 21%. Urinary urgency occurred at least monthly in 48% but only caused great distress in 14%. Sexual desire was severely decreased in 58% and only 24% were satisfied with their sexual...

  6. Causes of gas formations in the urinary tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenett, M.; Hollihan, K.; Longin, F.

    1985-01-01

    During diagnostic procedures for various diseases, five patients underwent intravenous pyelograms which showed gas formations in the collector system, in absence of acute stmptoms. Laboratory chemical, bacteriologic and radiologic examinations explained the origin of these gas formations. In one patient with diabetes mellitus and in another with an esophageal neoplasm, infections were caused by gas forming bacteria. In three cases, bladder fistula formations were present by Crohn's disease, colon diverticulosis and a gynecological malignancy.

  7. Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O78:H10, the cause of an outbreak of urinary tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Bente; Scheutz, Flemming; Andersen, Rebecca L

    2012-01-01

    In 1991, multiresistant Escherichia coli O78:H10 strains caused an outbreak of urinary tract infections in Copenhagen, Denmark. The phylogenetic origin, clonal background, and virulence characteristics of the outbreak isolates, and their relationship to nonoutbreak O78:H10 strains according...

  8. Treatment Approaches to Urinary Stones Caused by Forgotten DJ Stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergun Alma

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ureteral DJ stents have been used widely for years in urology practice. With increased use, complications have been increased and forgotton stents have started to cause problems. The most common complications are early pain and irritative symptoms. Late complications are bacterial colonization and stone formation because of the biofilm covering the stents. Treatment for a forgotten stent varies on many factors, such as stent localization and stone formation. In this article, we aimed to discuss our clinic approach on two different cases in light to current literature. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(Suppl 1: 58-63

  9. Prevalência e suscetibilidades bacterianas das infecções comunitárias do trato urinário, em Hospital Universitário de Brasília, no período de 2001 a 2005 Prevalence and bacterial susceptibility of community acquired urinary tract infection in University Hospital of Brasília, 2001 to 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelle Cristina da Silva Pires

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A infecção do trato urinário é uma das afecções mais comuns da clínica médica, sendo mandatório o conhecimento epidemiológico da mesma e do perfil de sensibilidade dos agentes etiológicos. O estudo teve como objetivo identificar os agentes etiológicos mais freqüentes e o perfil de sensibilidade aos antimicrobianos das bactérias isoladas de uroculturas de pacientes ambulatoriais atendidos no Hospital Universitário de Brasília no período de 2001 a 2005. Foram analisadas 2.433 uroculturas positivas realizadas no laboratório de microbiologia do Hospital Universitário de Brasília. A Escherichia coli foi a bactéria mais isolada (62,4%, seguida de Klebsiella pneumoniae (6,8% e Proteus mirabillis (4,7%. A Escherichia coli apresentou maior sensibilidade à amicacina (98,6%, gentamicina (96,2%, nitrofurantoína (96,3%, e às quinolonas ciprofloxacina (90,9% e norfloxacina (89,8%, com baixa sensibilidade ao sulfametoxazol-trimetoprima (50,6%. As outras bactérias apresentaram similar padrão de sensibilidade. Em conclusão, a Escherichia coli foi a bactéria mais isolada, sendo altamente sensível aos amiglicosídeos, nitrofurantoína e quinolonas.Urinary tract infection is among the most common infectious diseases in clinical medicine, and knowledge of its epidemiology and the sensitivity profile of the etiological agents is mandatory. The aim of this study was to identify the most frequent etiological agents and the profile of sensitivity to antimicrobial agents of the bacteria isolated from urine cultures from outpatients at the University Hospital of Brasília between 2001 and 2005. From analyses at the hospital’s microbiology laboratory, there were 2,433 positive urine cultures. Escherichia coli was the most commonly isolated bacteria (62.4%, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (6.8% and Proteus mirabilis (4.7%. Escherichia coli showed the highest sensitivity to amikacin (98.6%, gentamicin (96.2%, nitrofurantoin (96.3% and the

  10. Undiagnosed nephrogenic diabetes insipidus as a cause of acute urinary retention in a young soldier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Jin; Shin, Y S; Choi, H; Kim, M K; Jeong, Y B; Park, J K

    2016-10-01

    We present a case of undiagnosed nephrogenic diabetes insipidus as a cause of acute urinary retention in a 21-year-old male soldier. Soldiers live in close quarters, and have a regimented lifestyle that may not allow for frequent voiding; therefore, undiagnosed nephrogenic diabetes insipidus may result in acute urinary retention. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Behavior of sensitivity and resistance in urine cultures of adult patients with urinary infection Manizales, 2009.

    OpenAIRE

    Cardona Botero, Marcela; Coral Castro, Sayra Catalina; Castaño Castrillón, José Jaime; Profesor titular, facultad de ciencias de la salud, universidad de manizales.; Gallo Martínez, Ximena; Gañán Luque, Alejandra; García Fernández, Yandri Lorena; López Cardona, Viviana; Pineda Hernández, Paula Johana; Serna Osorio, Carlos Fernando; Villegas Arenas, Oscar Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Background: In medical practice, Urinary Infection is among the most common community-acquired infections, mainly affecting the female population and occupies between the second and third leading cause of consultations in health centers. This study aims to describe and analyze the epidemiology of this disease in adult patients who consulted in two health centers Manizales(Caldas, Colombia) 2009.Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study which included clinical and laboratory findings of 1...

  12. Norovirus Genotypes in Hospital Settings - Differences between Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franck, Kristina Træholt; Nielsen, Rikke Thoft; Holzknecht, Barbara Juliane;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  Norovirus is a major cause of gastroenteritis and hospital outbreaks, leading to substantial morbidity and direct healthcare expenses as well as indirect societal costs. The aim of the study was to estimate the proportion of nosocomial norovirus infections among inpatients tested...... positive for norovirus in Denmark, 2002-2010, and to study the distribution of norovirus genotypes among inpatients with nosocomial and community-acquired norovirus infections, respectively. METHODS:  Admission and stool sampling dates from 3656 NoV infected patients were used to estimate the proportion...... of nosocomial infections. The associations between nosocomial infection and patient age, gender, and norovirus genotype GII.4 were examined. RESULTS:  Of the 3656 inpatients, 63% were classified as having nosocomial infections. Among these 9 capsid and 8 polymerase norovirus genotypes were detected whereas...

  13. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Institutionalized Adults with Developmental Disabilities1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borer, Abraham; Gilad, Jacob; Yagupsky, Pablo; Peled, Nechama; Porat, Nurith; Trefler, Ronit; Shprecher-Levy, Hannah; Riesenberg, Klaris; Shipman, Miriam

    2002-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has recently been reported to emerge in the community setting. We describe the investigation and control of a community-acquired outbreak of MRSA skin infections in a closed community of institutionalized adults with developmental disabilities. In a 9-month period in 1997, 20 (71%) of 28 residents had 73 infectious episodes. Of the cultures, 60% and 32% obtained from residents and personnel, respectively, grew S. aureus; 96% and 27% were MRSA. All isolates were genetically related by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and belonged to a phage type not previously described in the region. No known risk factors for MRSA acquisition were found. However, 58 antibiotic courses had been administered to 16 residents during the preceding 9 months. Infection control measures, antibiotic restriction, and appropriate therapy resulted in successful termination of this outbreak. Selective antibiotic pressure may result in the emergence, persistence, and dissemination of MRSA strains, causing prolonged disease. PMID:12194775

  14. [A Case of Hyperammonemia Caused by Urinary Tract Infection Due to Urease-Producing Bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emura, Masahiro; Tsuchihashi, Kazunari; Shimizu, Yosuke; Kanamaru, Sojun; Matoba, Shun; Ito, Noriyuki

    2016-08-01

    We present here a rare case of hyperammonemia without liver dysfunction or portal-systemic shunting. The patient was an 80-year-old woman with a history of neurogenic bladder. She was admitted to a nearby hospital for vomiting, diarrhea and consciousness disturbance. Two days after admission, she was transferred to our hospital because of persistant consciousness disturbance. Laboratory data revealed hyperammonemia, but there was no indication of liver dysfunction. Moreover abdominal computed tomography did not reveal any clear finding of liver disease or portal-systemic shunting, but we noted multiple large bladder diverticula. Antibiotic therapy, tracheal intubation, ventilator management and bladder catheterization were performed. The patient's level of consciousness improved rapidly. Urinary culture revealed Bacteroides ureolyticus (urease-producing bacteria). The patient was diagnosed with hyperammonemia and a urinary tract infection due to urease-producing bacteria. Thus, physicians should be aware that obstructive urinary tract infections due to urease-producing bacteria can also be the cause of hyperammonemia.

  15. Viral and bacterial aetiology of community-acquired pneumonia in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijskens, Elisabeth G. W.; van Erkel, Adriana J. M.; Palmen, Fernand M. H.; Buiting, Anton G. M.; Kluytmans, Jan A. J. W.; Rossen, John W. A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Modern molecular techniques reveal new information on the role of respiratory viruses in community-acquired pneumonia. In this study, we tried to determine the prevalence of respiratory viruses and bacteria in patients with community-acquired pneumonia who were admitted to the hospital.

  16. Bartonella spp. and Coxiella burnetii Associated with Community-Acquired, Culture-Negative Endocarditis, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Rinaldo Focaccia; Castelli, Jussara Bianchi; Mansur, Alfredo Jose; Pereira dos Santos, Fabiana; Colombo, Silvia; do Nascimento, Elvira Mendes; Paddock, Christopher D; Brasil, Roosecelis Araújo; Velho, Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira; Drummond, Marina Rovani; Grinberg, Max; Strabelli, Tania Mara Varejao

    2015-08-01

    We evaluated culture-negative, community-acquired endocarditis by using indirect immunofluorescent assays and molecular analyses for Bartonella spp. and Coxiella burnetii and found a prevalence of 19.6% and 7.8%, respectively. Our findings reinforce the need to study these organisms in patients with culture-negative, community-acquired endocarditis, especially B. henselae in cat owners.

  17. Viral and bacterial aetiology of community-acquired pneumonia in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijskens, Elisabeth G. W.; van Erkel, Adriana J. M.; Palmen, Fernand M. H.; Buiting, Anton G. M.; Kluytmans, Jan A. J. W.; Rossen, John W. A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Modern molecular techniques reveal new information on the role of respiratory viruses in community-acquired pneumonia. In this study, we tried to determine the prevalence of respiratory viruses and bacteria in patients with community-acquired pneumonia who were admitted to the hospital.

  18. Exploratory efficacy endpoints in the Community-Acquired Pneumonia Immunization Trial in Adults (CAPiTA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Webber, Chris; Patton, Michael; Patterson, Scott; Schmoele-Thoma, Beate; Huijts, Susanne M; Bonten, Marc J M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Community-Acquired Pneumonia Immunization Trial in Adults (CAPiTA) assessed vaccine-type community-acquired pneumonia (VT-CAP) and vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease (VT-IPD) prevention with 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) in adults aged ⩾65years. We report

  19. How well do discharge diagnoses identify hospitalised patients with community-acquired infections?--a validation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pilsgaard Henriksen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Credible measures of disease incidence, trends and mortality can be obtained through surveillance using manual chart review, but this is both time-consuming and expensive. ICD-10 discharge diagnoses are used as surrogate markers of infection, but knowledge on the validity of infections in general is sparse. The aim of the study was to determine how well ICD-10 discharge diagnoses identify patients with community-acquired infections in a medical emergency department (ED, overall and related to sites of infection and patient characteristics. METHODS: We manually reviewed 5977 patients admitted to a medical ED in a one-year period (September 2010-August 2011, to establish if they were hospitalised with community-acquired infection. Using the manual review as gold standard, we calculated the sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratios of discharge diagnoses indicating infection. RESULTS: Two thousand five hundred eleven patients were identified with community-acquired infection according to chart review (42.0%, 95% confidence interval [95%CI]: 40.8-43.3% compared to 2550 patients identified by ICD-10 diagnoses (42.8%, 95%CI: 41.6-44.1%. Sensitivity of the ICD-10 diagnoses was 79.9% (95%CI: 78.1-81.3%, specificity 83.9% (95%CI: 82.6-85.1%, positive likelihood ratio 4.95 (95%CI: 4.58-5.36 and negative likelihood ratio 0.24 (95%CI: 0.22-0.26. The two most common sites of infection, the lower respiratory tract and urinary tract, had positive likelihood ratios of 8.3 (95%CI: 7.5-9.2 and 11.3 (95%CI: 10.2-12.9 respectively. We identified significant variation in diagnostic validity related to age, comorbidity and disease severity. CONCLUSION: ICD-10 discharge diagnoses identify specific sites of infection with a high degree of validity, but only a moderate degree when identifying infections in general.

  20. Fluorocycline TP-271 Is Potent against Complicated Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Corey; O’Brien, William; Hackel, Meredith; Minyard, Mary Beth; Waites, Ken B.; Dubois, Jacques; Murphy, Timothy M.; Slee, Andrew M.; Weiss, William J.; Sutcliffe, Joyce A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT TP-271 is a novel, fully synthetic fluorocycline antibiotic in clinical development for the treatment of respiratory infections caused by susceptible and multidrug-resistant pathogens. TP-271 was active in MIC assays against key community respiratory Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae (MIC90 = 0.03 µg/ml), methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA; MIC90 = 0.25 µg/ml), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA; MIC90 = 0.12 µg/ml), Streptococcus pyogenes (MIC90 = 0.03 µg/ml), Haemophilus influenzae (MIC90 = 0.12 µg/ml), and Moraxella catarrhalis (MIC90 ≤0.016 µg/ml). TP-271 showed activity (MIC90 = 0.12 µg/ml) against community-acquired MRSA expressing Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). MIC90 values against Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, and Chlamydia pneumoniae were 0.004, 1, and 4 µg/ml, respectively. TP-271 was efficacious in neutropenic and immunocompetent animal pneumonia models, generally showing, compared to the burden at the start of dosing, ~2 to 5 log10 CFU reductions against MRSA, S. pneumoniae, and H. influenzae infections when given intravenously (i.v.) and ~1 to 4 log10 CFU reductions when given orally (p.o.). TP-271 was potent against key community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) pathogens and was minimally affected, or unaffected, by tetracycline-specific resistance mechanisms and fluoroquinolone or macrolide drug resistance phenotypes. IMPORTANCE Rising resistance rates for macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and β-lactams in the most common pathogens associated with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) are of concern, especially for cases of moderate to severe infections in vulnerable populations such as the very young and the elderly. New antibiotics that are active against multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus are needed for use in the empirical treatment of the most severe forms of this disease. TP-271 is a promising

  1. Three-year multicenter surveillance of community-acquired listeria monocytogenes meningitis in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grill-Díaz Fabio

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Listeria monocytogenes is the third most frequent cause of bacterial meningitis. The aim of this study is to know the incidence and risk factors associated with development of acute community-acquired Lm meningitis in adult patients and to evaluate the clinical features, management, and outcome in this prospective case series. Methods A descriptive, prospective, and multicentric study carried out in 9 hospitals in the Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Diseases (REIPI over a 39-month period. All adults patients admitted to the participating hospitals with the diagnosis of acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis (Ac-ABM were included in this study. All these cases were diagnosed on the basis of a compatible clinical picture and a positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF culture or blood culture. The patients were followed up until death or discharge from hospital. Results Two hundred and seventy-eight patients with Ac-ABM were included. Forty-six episodes of Lm meningitis were identified in 46 adult patients. In the multivariate analysis only age (OR 1.026; 95% CI 1.00-1.05; p = 0.042, immunosupression (OR 2.520; 95% CI 1.05-6.00; p = 0.037, and CSF/blood glucose ratio (OR 39.42; 95% CI 4.01-387.50; p = 0.002 were independently associated with a Lm meningitis. The classic triad of fever, neck stiffness and altered mental status was present in 21 (49% patients, 32% had focal neurological findings at presentation, 12% presented cerebellum dysfunction, and 9% had seizures. Twenty-nine (68% patients were immunocompromised. Empirical antimicrobial therapy was intravenous ampicillin for 34 (79% of 43 patients, in 11 (32% of them associated to aminoglycosides. Definitive ampicillin plus gentamicin therapy was significantly associated with unfavourable outcome (67% vs 28%; p = 0.024 and a higher mortality (67% vs 32%; p = 0.040.The mortality rate was 28% (12 of 43 patients and 5 of 31 (16.1% surviving patients developed adverse

  2. Determinants for hospitalization in " low-risk" community acquired pneumonia

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    Aliyu Muktar H

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variable decision in managing community acquired pneumonia (CAP is the initial site of care; in-patient versus outpatient. These variations persist despite comprehensive practice guidelines. Patients with a Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI score lower than seventy have low risk for complications and outpatient antibiotic management is recommended in this group. These patients are generally below the age of fifty years, non-nursing home residents, HIV negative and have no major cardiac, hepatic, renal or malignant diseases. Methods A retrospective analysis of 296 low-risk CAP patients evaluated within a year one period at St. Agnes Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland was undertaken. All patients were assigned a PSI score. 208 (70% were evaluated and discharged from the emergency department (E.D. to complete outpatient antibiotic therapy, while 88 (30% were hospitalized. Patients were sub-stratified into classes I-V according to PSI. A comparison of demographic, clinical, social and financial parameters was made between the E.D. discharged and hospitalized groups. Results Statistically significant differences in favor of the hospitalized group were noted for female gender (CI: 1.46-5.89, p= 0.0018, African Americans (CI: 0.31-0.73, p= 0.004, insurance coverage (CI: 0.19-0.63, p= 0.0034, temperature (CI: 0.04-0.09, p= 0.0001 and pulse rate (CI: 0.03-0.14, p= 0.0001. No statistically significant differences were observed between the two groups for altered mental status, hypotension, tachypnea, laboratory/radiological parameters and social indicators (p>0.05. The average length of stay for in-patients was 3.5 days at about eight time's higher cost than outpatient management. There was no difference in mortality or treatment failures between the two groups. The documentation rate and justifications for hospitalizing low risk CAP patients by admitting physicians was less than optimal. Conclusions High fever, tachycardia, female gender

  3. Pharmacotherapy and the risk for community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mody Lona

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some forms of pharmacotherapy are shown to increase the risk of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether pharmacotherapy with proton pump inhibitors (PPI, inhaled corticosteroids, and atypical antipsychotics was associated with the increased risk for CAP in hospitalized older adults with the adjustment of known risk factors (such as smoking status and serum albumin levels. Methods A retrospective case-control study of adults aged 65 years or older at a rural community hospital during 2004 and 2006 was conducted. Cases (N = 194 were those with radiographic evidence of pneumonia on admission. The controls were patients without the discharge diagnosis of pneumonia or acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (N = 952. Patients with gastric tube feeding, ventilator support, requiring hemodialysis, metastatic diseases or active lung cancers were excluded. Results Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the current use of inhaled corticosteroids (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.56-5.35 and atypical antipsychotics (AOR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.23-4.15 was an independent risk factor for CAP after adjusting for confounders, including age, serum albumin levels, sex, smoking status, a history of congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease, and COPD, the current use of PPI, β2 agonist and anticholinergic bronchodilators, antibiotic(s, iron supplement, narcotics, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The crude OR and the AOR of PPI use for CAP was 1.41 [95% CI = 1.03 - 1.93] and 1.18 [95% CI = 0.80 - 1.74] after adjusting for the above confounders, respectively. Lower serum albumin levels independently increased the risk of CAP 1.89- fold by decreasing a gram per deciliter (AOR = 2.89, 95% CI = 2.01 - 4.16. Conclusion Our study reaffirmed that the use of inhaled corticosteroids and atypical antipsychotics was both

  4. VALIDIFICATION OF SMART-COP IN PREDICTING THE NEED FOR IRVS IN COMMUNITY ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA (CAP PATIENTS

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    Uphar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia has been considered a health problem for ages. Despite being the cause of significant morbidity and mortality. Delay in ICU admission of CAP patients has been shown to be associated with increased mortality. The ‘SMART-COP’ is a simple tool that is the result of an extensive study on CAP called the Australian CAP Study (ACAPS. OBJECTIVE To assess the validity the SMART-COP severity scoring tool in patients of Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP. MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifty patients of CAP admitted in the intensive care units of R. L. Jalappa Hospital, Kolar, above the age of 18yrs with a diagnosis of community acquired pneumonia. RESULTS We noted a progression in the need for ICU support and need for ventilatory and ionotropic support with increasing score assigned on the SMART-COP. Thirty day mortality in the patients also showed a linear pattern with increase in the score assigned to the patients. Mortality was high in the very high risk group and high risk group. CONCLUSION With 68.5% of the patients requiring invasive ventilator support and 75% of the patients requiring inotropic support in the high risk group, it can be safely concluded that SMART-COP scoring system can be used in the patients of community acquired pneumonia to predict the need for IRVS.

  5. Acute Renal Failure in Association with Community-Acquired Clostridium difficile Infection and McKittrick-Wheelock Syndrome

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    Robert M. Learney

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 65-year-old Caucasian woman who experienced two separate episodes of acute renal failure within an 18-month period, both requiring emergency admission and complicated treatment. Each episode was precipitated by hypovolaemia from intestinal fluid losses, but from two rare and independent pathologies. Her first admission was attributed to community-acquired Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD and was treated in the intensive therapy unit. She returned 18 months later with volume depletion and electrolyte disturbances, but on this occasion a giant hypersecretory villous adenoma of the rectum (McKittrick-Wheelock syndrome was diagnosed following initial abnormal findings on digital rectal examination by a junior physician. Unlike hospital-acquired C. difficile, community-acquired infection is not common, although increasing numbers are being reported. Whilst community-acquired CDAD can be severe, it rarely causes acute renal failure. This case report highlights the pathological mechanisms whereby C. difficile toxin and hypersecretory villous adenoma of the rectum can predispose to acute renal failure, as well as the values of thorough clinical examination in the emergency room, and early communication with intensivist colleagues in dire situations.

  6. Prevalence and resistance pattern of Moraxella catarrhalis in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

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    Shaikh SBU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Safia Bader Uddin Shaikh, Zafar Ahmed, Syed Ali Arsalan, Sana Shafiq Department of Pulmonology, Liaquat National Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan Introduction: Moraxella catarrhalis previously considered as commensal of upper respiratory tract has gained importance as a pathogen responsible for respiratory tract infections. Its beta-lactamase-producing ability draws even more attention toward its varying patterns of resistance. Methods: This was an observational study conducted to evaluate the prevalence and resistance pattern of M. catarrhalis. Patients aged 20–80 years admitted in the Department of Chest Medicine of Liaquat National Hospital from March 2012 to December 2012 were included in the study. Respiratory samples of sputum, tracheal secretions, and bronchoalveolar lavage were included, and their cultures were followed. Results: Out of 110 respiratory samples, 22 showed positive cultures for M. catarrhalis in which 14 were males and eight were females. Ten samples out of 22 showed resistance to clarithromycin, and 13 samples out of 22 displayed resistance to erythromycin, whereas 13 showed resistance to levofloxacin. Hence, 45% of the cultures showed resistance to macrolides so far and 59% showed resistance to quinolones. Conclusion: Our study shows that in our environment, M. catarrhalis may be resistant to macrolides and quinolones; hence, these should not be recommended as an alternative treatment in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections caused by M. catarrhalis. However, a study of larger sample size should be conducted to determine if the recommendations are required to be changed. Keywords: community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections or pneumonia, M. catarrhalis, antibiotic resistance, gram-negative diplococcic, Pakistan

  7. Fulfilment assessment of the good clinical practices guidelines for community acquired pneumonia.

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    Iris Gonzalez Morales

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community acquired pneumonia is the most common cause of infections found during the medical practice. Objective: To assess the fulfilment of the good clinical practices guidelines for the treatment of community acquired pneumonia. Methods: Prospective, descriptive study of series of cases developed in the Hospital “Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima” between January, 1st and June 30th, 2006. 500 patients were studied which main diagnosis was pneumonia or bronchial pneumonia. The assessment tool includes four questions. A single-varied analysis was performed, with a confidence interval of 95%. The final result of this measurement was the fulfilment of the guidelines as excellent, fine, acceptable and not well, as well as the outcome in living and dead patients. Results: Patients older than 65 years of age are the most affected by  this disease and fatality is also higher in this age group; 40, 6% of admitted patients are classified as type III. Not performing thoracic radiography and inappropriate treatment led to a higher lethality risk. 53, 2 % of the clinical histories reflects a bad fulfillment of the guide, likewise the biggest lethality  was found  in that group (36,8 percent. Conclusions: The patients with pneumonias non serious are those that more are admitted in the center, with a non negligible lethality, although the highest  was found in the classes IV and V of pnemonia, that were considered the most serious pneumonias. The global adherence to the guide can be related with the final outcome of the patient.

  8. Distribution of community-acquired gram negative microorganisms detected in urine samples of pediatric patients and antibiotic resistance patterns at 2013

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    Seçil Conkar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to determine the antibiotic susceptibility and distribution of community-acquired microorganisms obtained from urine samples of patients admitted to our clinic in Diyarbakır, and also detect the ratio of extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing E.coli and Klebsiella strains in urine samples, and identify the antibiotics that can be used for the empiric treatment by investigating the susceptibility of extended spectrum beta-lactamase positive strains. Methods: Patients admitted to the pediatric polyclinic of our hospital between the dates 1 January-31 December were included in the study. 1167 urine samples sent to Microbiology Laboratory were examined. E.coli and Klebsiella spp. strains isolated from the urine cultures were identified with traditional methods and the Biomerium Vitek-2 compact system. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed in accordance with the recommendations of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute using Biomerium Vitek-2 compact system. Results: 959 E.coli from 1167 urine samples and other microorganisms from 26 of 182 Klebsiella spp. were isolated. Extended spectrum beta-lactamase production was detected in 445 (46.4% of E.coli strains and in 72 (39.5% of Klebsiella spp.strains. Amicasin resistance was determined as 9.4% in Extended spectrum beta-lactamase positive E.coli strains, while amicasin resistance was detected as 11% in Extended spectrum beta-lactamase positive Klebsiella spp. strains. Conclusion: Resistance development against the antibiotics has been increasingly observed in most of the microorganisms that cause urinary tract infection. We are in the opinion that this study is important for our hospital, as urinary tract infection factors vary according to centers.

  9. A Rare Cause of Acute Abdomen: Urinary Bladder Rupture due to Foley Catheter

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    Ömer Engin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Urinary bladder rupture is usually found due to blunt or penetrating traumas and iatrogenic injuries, and spontaneous intraperitoneal perforation is very rare. 57 years old male patient was consulted to general surgery department due to abdominal pain, nausia-vomiting and fever. He had Diabetes Mellitus, Multiple Sclerosis, Leriche Syndrome and operation for benign prostatic hypertrophy 5 years ago on his medical history which the case catheterised him urinary bladder himself frequently in nonsterile conditions. He did not care about sterility. On physical examination, suprapubic defence and rebound was noted more prominently on right lower quadrant. He was taken to operating room with the diagnosis of acute abdomen. On exploration, infection was seen on all layers of the whole urinary bladder, abscess formation and necrosis causing a microperforation which is detected by methylene blue was also present. Intraabdominal abscess drainage, cystostomy and primary suturing of the urinary bladder was performed. Patient died due to sepsis at the 9.th post operative day.

  10. Evaluation of Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Enterobacteriaceae Causing Urinary Tract Infections in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Tansarli, Giannoula S.; Athanasiou, Stavros; Falagas, Matthew E

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibility of Enterobacteriaceae causing urinary tract infections (UTIs) in adults in Africa. The PubMed database was systematically searched to identify relevant studies published after 2000. Google, World Health Organization, and African Field Epidemiology networks were also searched. Twenty-eight studies, accounting for 381,899 urine isolates from 14 African countries, met the inclusion criteria. Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., and Pro...

  11. Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O78:H10, the Cause of an Outbreak of Urinary Tract Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Olesen, Bente; Scheutz, Flemming; Andersen, Rebecca L.; Menard, Megan; Boisen, Nadia; Johnston, Brian; Hansen, Dennis S.; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Nataro, James P.; Johnson, James R

    2012-01-01

    In 1991, multiresistant Escherichia coli O78:H10 strains caused an outbreak of urinary tract infections in Copenhagen, Denmark. The phylogenetic origin, clonal background, and virulence characteristics of the outbreak isolates, and their relationship to nonoutbreak O78:H10 strains according to these traits and resistance profiles, are unknown. Accordingly, we extensively characterized 51 archived E. coli O78:H10 isolates (48 human isolates from seven countries, including 19 Copenhagen outbrea...

  12. Labial fusion causing urinary incontinence and recurrent urinary tract infection in a postmenopausal female: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirim, Ayhan; Hasirci, Eray

    2011-01-01

    A 73-year-old postmenopausal woman was admitted with recurrent urinary tract infection and a history of incontinence. General physical examination was normal. Complete labial fusion was noticed on genital examination. Surgical intervention was performed. This therapy alleviated incontinence and recurrent urinary tract infection.

  13. INFEKSI KOMUNITAS (IK/INFEKSI LUAR RUMAH SAKIT (ILRS (COMMUNITY ACQUIRED INFECTION DI RUMAH SAKIT KHUSUS PENYAKIT MENULAR, JAKARTA

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    Janas Janas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A one year prospective study was conducted at the Infectious Diseases Hospital (IDH of Jakarta in 1982-1983 to survey the rate of community acquired infection (CAI. Blood culture, rectal swab, urine culture and in some patients cerebro spinal fluid culture were obtained randomly from hospitalized patient at the time of admission. From 723 patients with age 2 months-70 years, who were examined and fulfilled the study criteria, 504 (69,7% patients were positive for CAI resulted in total of 611 CAIs. Based on anatomical location, this number consists of 53.5% CAI of GI Tract, 20.9% CAI of Urinary Tract, 9.5% CAI bacteremia and 0.6% CAI involving central nervous system. Incidence rate was significantly higher in female (74.1% compared to male (65.7% (p<0.02. It was also higher in >12 years patients (73.9% compared to children <12 years (p<0,01. Diarrhea patients had significantly higher CAI (77.4% compared to febrile patients (55.2% (p<0,01. Patients who had not received antibiotic prior to admission had higher rate of CAI (70.9% compared to who received it prior to admission (67.1% Etiologic agents most commonly recovered were gram negative bacterias (94.9% with Vibrio cholerae (48.6% as the leading cause, and only 5.1% were gram positive. Some of bacteria found as the etiologic agent of CAI, were Salmonella group D, Salmonella group E4, Proteus vulgaris and ruttgerii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Mima polymorpha, Alkaligenes sp showed high rate of resistancy to commonly used antibiotics. (Ampicillin, Tetracycline, Chloramphenicol and Trimethoprim + Sulfamethoxazole. Average duration of hospitalization for CAI cases (6,4 days was longer than in cases without CAI (4,3 days. There were 11 deaths (2.2% in cases with CAI and 2 deaths (1.4% in patients without CAI, with death rate was higher in males (2.4% compared to female (1.9%, and highest was in less than 1 year old age group patient (13.6%, also significantly higher in febrile patients compared to

  14. INFEKSI KOMUNITAS (IK/INFEKSI LUAR RUMAH SAKIT (ILRS (COMMUNITY ACQUIRED INFECTION DI RUMAH SAKIT KHUSUS PENYAKIT MENULAR, JAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janas Janas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A one year prospective study was conducted at the Infectious Diseases Hospital (IDH of Jakarta in 1982-1983 to survey the rate of community acquired infection (CAI. Blood culture, rectal swab, urine culture and in some patients cerebro spinal fluid culture were obtained randomly from hospitalized patient at the time of admission. From 723 patients with age 2 months-70 years, who were examined and fulfilled the study criteria, 504 (69,7% patients were positive for CAI resulted in total of 611 CAIs. Based on anatomical location, this number consists of 53.5% CAI of GI Tract, 20.9% CAI of Urinary Tract, 9.5% CAI bacteremia and 0.6% CAI involving central nervous system. Incidence rate was significantly higher in female (74.1% compared to male (65.7% (p<0.02. It was also higher in >12 years patients (73.9% compared to children <12 years (p<0,01. Diarrhea patients had significantly higher CAI (77.4% compared to febrile patients (55.2% (p<0,01. Patients who had not received antibiotic prior to admission had higher rate of CAI (70.9% compared to who received it prior to admission (67.1% Etiologic agents most commonly recovered were gram negative bacterias (94.9% with Vibrio cholerae (48.6% as the leading cause, and only 5.1% were gram positive. Some of bacteria found as the etiologic agent of CAI, were Salmonella group D, Salmonella group E4, Proteus vulgaris and ruttgerii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Mima polymorpha, Alkaligenes sp showed high rate of resistancy to commonly used antibiotics. (Ampicillin, Tetracycline, Chloramphenicol and Trimethoprim + Sulfamethoxazole. Average duration of hospitalization for CAI cases (6,4 days was longer than in cases without CAI (4,3 days. There were 11 deaths (2.2% in cases with CAI and 2 deaths (1.4% in patients without CAI, with death rate was higher in males (2.4% compared to female (1.9%, and highest was in less than 1 year old age group patient (13.6%, also significantly higher in febrile patients compared to

  15. Resistance profile for pathogens causing urinary tract infection in a pediatric population, and antibiotic treatment response, at a university hospital 2010-2011

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    Catalina María Vélez Echeverri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Urinary tract infection (UTI is one of the most common bacterial infections in childhood and causes acute and chronic morbidity and long-term hypertension and chronic kidney disease.ObjectivesTo describe the demographic characteristics, infectious agents, patterns of antibiotic resistance, etiologic agent and profile of susceptibility and response to empirical treatment of UTI in a pediatric population.Methods:This is a descriptive, retrospective study.Results:Included in the study were 144 patients, 1:2.06 male to female ratio. The most common symptom was fever (79.9% and 31.3% had a history of previous UTI. 72.0% of the patients had positive urine leukocyte count (>5 per field, urine gram was positive in 85.0% of samples and gram negative bacilli accounted for 77.8% for the total pathogens isolated. The most frequent uropathogens isolated were Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Our E.coli isolates had a susceptibility rate higher than 90% to most of the antibiotics used, but a resistance rate of 42.6% to TMP SMX and 45.5% to ampicillin sulbactam. 6.3% of E. coliwas extended-spectrum beta-lactamases producer strains. The most frequent empirical antibiotic used was amikacin, which was used in 66.0% of the patients. 17 of 90 patients who underwent voiding cistouretrography (VCUG had vesicoureteral reflux.Conclusion:This study revealed that E. coli was the most frequent pathogen of community acquired UTI. We found that E. coli and other uropathogens had a high resistance rate against TMP SMX and ampicillin sulbactam. In order to ensure a successful empirical treatment, protocols should be based on local epidemiology and susceptibility rates. 

  16. Analysis of the Clinical Characteristics and Antibiotics Resistance of Community-acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章税锋; 徐志江; 王林峰

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to study the clinical characteristics of infections by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and the condition of antibiotics resistance of the clinical isolates in order to guide for the rational use of antibiotics. With the clinical isolates from cases of hospital-acquired MRSA at the same period as contro|s, the clinical characteristics of infections by community-acquired MRSA in Hangzhou area and the pattern of non-β-lactamase antibiotics resistance were determined in this study. It was found that the average age of patients with community-acquired MRSA infections was 30.89 + 13.3, in comparison with those of the hospital-acquired patients of 56.0 + 11.8, appearing to be younger than those of the latter, and the former showing no any basic illness. Both of the former and the latter were sensitive to vancomycin ( 100% vs 100% ), and they had the same degrees of sensitivity to rifampicin, fosfomycin, and STM/TMP (86.8%vs88.1%, P>0.05; 81.6% vs 82.9%, P>0.05; and 52.6% vs 61.9%, P>0.05, respectively). The former was more sensitive to netimycin, chndamycin, erythromycin and minocycline than those of the latter (73.7% vs50.5%, P<0.01; 60.5% vs45.7%, P<0.05; 28.9% vs 11.4%, P<0.01; and81.6% vs58.6%, P<0.01 respectively). Meanwhile, the incidence of multi-resistant strain of isolates in the former was significantly lowerthan that of the latter (31.6% vs 81.0%, P < 0.01). In conclusion, it appears that the strains of clinical isolates isolated from patients with the community-acquired MRSA infections show different clinical characteristics and antimicrobial susceptibility in comparison with those of the hospital-acquired cases of infection, and this necessitates an alteration in the chemotherapy of infections suspected to be caused by community-acquired MRSA.

  17. [Evaluation of the antimicrobial susceptibility of community-acquired urinary tract infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passadouro, Rui; Fonseca, Raquel; Figueiredo, Felícia; Lopes, Andreia; Fernandes, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    IntroduçÉo: As infeções do trato urinário, depois das infeções respiratórias, sÉo as mais comuns na comunidade. O conhecimento sobre a prevalência das estirpes microbianas e a sua suscetibilidade aos antibióticos é fundamental para instituir uma terapêutica empírica eficaz. O objetivo deste estudo foi determinar os padrões de suscetibilidade aos antibióticos das estirpes bacterianas isoladas em uroculturas positivas efetuadas em doentes da regiÉo centro de Portugal.Material e Métodos: Procedemos a uma análise documental dos 6008 resultados de uroculturas, a disponibilizar aos médicos no ano de 2013, a maioria das quais executadas através do sistema automatizado VITEK 2 da bioMérieux. A análise dos dados foi efetuada através do SPSS versÉo 21.Resultados: A maioria (80%) das 6008 uroculturas positivas foi efetuada no sexo feminino. A Escherichia coli foi a bactéria mais prevalente na amostra (65,9%), seguida pela Klebsiella spp (12%). A Nitrofurantoína apresentou elevada eficácia (96%) para as estirpes de E. coli, bem como a Fosfomicina (96,6%). A Amoxicilina-Écido Clavul'nico apresentou um nível de eficácia de apenas 81,1%, para o mesmo gérmen. As quinolonas apresentaram eficácia para 78% das estirpes de E. coli, sendo inferior à registada para a Fosfomicina e para a Nitrofurantoína.DiscussÉo: O presente estudo revelou que a E. coli foi o agente patogénico predominante nas infeções do trato urinário da comunidade (65,9%) apresentando percentagens de sensibilidade elevadas à Fosfomicina (96,6%) e à Nitrofurantoína (96%).ConclusÉo: Recomenda-se a monitorizaçÉo do perfil sensibilidade dos microrganismos aos antibióticos, de modo a otimizar a terapêutica empírica das ITU.

  18. The value of signs and symptoms in differentiating between bacterial, viral and mixed aetiology in patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijskens, Elisabeth G. W.; Koopmans, Marion; Palmen, Fernand M. H.; van Erkel, Adriana J. M.; Mulder, Paul G. H.; Rossen, John W. A.

    2014-01-01

    Current diagnostics for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) include testing for a wide range of pathogens, which is costly and not always informative. We compared clinical and laboratory parameters of patients with CAP caused by different groups of pathogens to evaluate the potential for targeted dia

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Extremely Drug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ST357) Strain CMC_VB_PA_B22862 Isolated from a Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pragasam, Agila Kumari; Yesurajan, Francis; Doss C, George Priya; George, Biju; Devanga Ragupathi, Naveen Kumar; Walia, Kamini

    2016-01-01

    Extremely drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains causing severe infections have become a serious concern across the world. Here, we report draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa with an extremely drug-resistant profile isolated from a patient with community-acquired bloodstream infection in India.

  20. The value of signs and symptoms in differentiating between bacterial, viral and mixed aetiology in patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijskens, Elisabeth G. W.; Koopmans, Marion; Palmen, Fernand M. H.; van Erkel, Adriana J. M.; Mulder, Paul G. H.; Rossen, John W. A.

    2014-01-01

    Current diagnostics for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) include testing for a wide range of pathogens, which is costly and not always informative. We compared clinical and laboratory parameters of patients with CAP caused by different groups of pathogens to evaluate the potential for targeted dia

  1. Impact of antibiotic de-escalation on clinical outcomes in community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viasus, Diego; Simonetti, Antonella F; Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Niubó, Jordi; Dorca, Jordi; Carratalà, Jordi

    2017-02-01

    Although antibiotic de-escalation is regarded as a measure that reduces selection pressure, adverse drug effects and costs, evidence supporting this practice in community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia (CAPP) is lacking. We carried out a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of a cohort of hospitalized adults with CAPP. Pneumococcal aetiology was established in patients with one or more positive cultures for Streptococcus pneumoniae obtained from blood, sterile fluids or sputum, and/or a positive urinary antigen test. De-escalation therapy was considered when the initial antibiotic therapy was narrowed to penicillin, amoxicillin or amoxicillin/clavulanate within the first 72 h after admission. The primary outcomes were 30 day mortality and length of hospital stay (LOS). Adjustment for confounders was performed with multivariate and propensity score analyses. Of 1410 episodes of CAPP, antibiotic de-escalation within the first 72 h after admission was performed in 166 cases. After adjustment, antibiotic de-escalation was not associated with a higher risk of mortality (OR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.24-2.81), but it was found to be a protective factor for prolonged LOS (above the median) (OR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.30-0.70). Similar results were found in patients classified into high-risk pneumonia severity index classes (IV-V), those with clinical instability and those with bacteraemia. No significant differences were documented in adverse drug reactions or readmission (Antibiotic de-escalation seems to be safe and effective in reducing the duration of LOS, and did not adversely affect outcomes of patients with CAPP, even those with bacteraemia and severe disease, and those who were clinically unstable. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Results of Performing Blood Cultures at Hospital Admission in Patients with Community-acquired Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris González Morales

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: community-acquired pneumonia is a major health problem worldwide, in Cuba and in the province of Cienfuegos. Objective: to report the results of blood cultures performed at hospital admission in patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Methods: a prospective descriptive study was conducted in the Gustavo Aldereguía Lima Hospital in Cienfuegos, during the second half of 2012. It included 52 patients with community-acquired pneumonia who underwent blood culture at their admission to the hospital. Results: only five patients (9.6% of the cases had a positive test result; Streptococcus pneumoniae was isolated from only one positive culture; Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae were isolated from the rest. Conclusions: the percentage obtained in this study confirms the low diagnostic yield of blood cultures performed at admission in patients with community-acquired pneumonia; the low isolation rate of S. pneumoniae in our study was also significant.

  3. Bedside Evaluation of Cerebral Energy Metabolism in Severe Community-Acquired Bacterial Meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Schulz, Mette; Jacobsen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    community-acquired meningitis utilizing intracerebral microdialysis and bedside biochemical analysis. According to previous studies, cerebral ischemia was defined as lactate/pyruvate (LP) ratio >30 with intracerebral pyruvate level

  4. Efficacy of Corticosteroids in Community-acquired Pneumonia A Randomized Double-Blinded Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, Dominic; Daniels, Johannes M. A.; de Graaff, Casper S.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Boersma, Wim G.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Some studies have shown a beneficial effect of corticosteroids in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), possibly by diminishing local and systemic antiinflammatory host response. Objectives: To assess the efficacy of adjunctive prednisolone treatment in patients hospitalized w

  5. Predictors of bacteraemia in patients with suspected community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Werkhoven, Cornelis H; Huijts, Susanne M; Postma, Douwe F; Oosterheert, Jan Jelrik; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The diagnostic yield of blood cultures is limited in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Yet, positive blood culture results provide important information for antibiotic treatment and for monitoring epidemiologic trends. We investigated the potential of clinical predictor

  6. Characteristics of Colon Microbiocenosis in Toddlers with Community-Acquired Pneumonia Associated with Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. Smiyan

    2014-03-01

    Thus, impaired bowel microbiota in children with community-acquired pneumonia associated with iron deficiency anemia may be a reason to include probiotic preparation into the complex of pathogenetic therapy.

  7. Escherichia coli clonal group A causing bacteraemia of urinary tract origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt-Rasmussen, L; Olsen, S S; Jakobsen, L

    2013-01-01

    Clin Microbiol Infect ABSTRACT: Escherichia coli clonal group A (CgA) causes disease in humans. This is the first study investigating the prevalence of CgA among E. coli from non-urine, extraintestinal infections in a northern European country. E. coli blood (n = 196) and paired urine (n = 195......) isolates from the same patients with bacteraemia of urinary tract origin were analysed. The isolates were collected from January 2003 through May 2005 at four hospitals in Copenhagen, Denmark. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns, antimicrobial resistance and patient characteristics were...... a distinctive VAG profile. The blood and urine isolates from each pair were found to be related in 26 of 27 CgA blood/urine pairs, confirming a urinary tract origin of infection. Furthermore, a relationship between the PFGE patterns of CgA blood/urine isolates and CgA isolates from UTI patients in general...

  8. [Abdominal-pelvic actinomycosis with urinary tract involvement, secondary to gynecologic infection caused by intrauterine device].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez García, M D; Rodríguez Alonso, A; Núñez López, A; Ojea Calvo, A; Alonso Rodrigo, A; Rodríguez Iglesias, B; Barros Rodríguez, M; Benavente Delgado, J; González-Carreró Fojón, J; Nogueira March, J L

    2000-02-01

    Abdomino-pelvic actinomycosis is a condition caused by Actinomyces israelii, a Gram-positive opportunistic bacteria that triggers and develops the infection only in previously injured tissues, and then slowly progresses and spreads until it extrinsically affects the urinary tract. Use of an intrauterine device is a known risk factor to suffer from this disease. Relative risk in IUD users is two- to four-fold higher compared to IUD non-users. Risk increased with prolonged IUD use. Treatment is by removal of the causative agent, surgical resection of necrotic tissues and administration of intravenous Penicillin G, 4 million units every 4 hours for 30 days, followed by Amoxicillin 500 mg every 8 hours for 12 months. This paper contributes two cases of abdomino-pelvic actinomycosis with urinary tract involvement in IUD users. Standard treatment was employed with good evolution.

  9. Clinical effects and bronchoalveolar transfer of levofloxacin in patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林耀广; 苏薇; 徐作军; 白彦

    2001-01-01

    @@To evaluate the clinical effects and bronchoalveolar transfer of levofloxacin (LVFX) in patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Twenty-eight outpatients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) were observed in an open-label, noncomparative study. The concentrations of levofloxacin in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured  by  high-performance  liquid  chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection in 10 patients and 15 non-levofloxacin users.

  10. Risk factors for healthcare-acquired urinary tract infections caused by multi-drug resistant microorganisms

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    Đorđević Zorana M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Healthcare-acquired urinary tract infections (HAUTI make up to 40% of all healthcareacquired infections and contribute significantly to hospital morbidity, mortality, and overall cost of treatment. Objective. The aim of our study was to investigate possible risk factors for development of HAUTI caused by multi-drug resistant pathogens. Methods. The prospective case-control study in a large tertiary-care hospital was conducted during a five-year period. The cases were patients with HAUTI caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR pathogens, and the controls were patients with HAUTI caused by non-MDR pathogens. Results. There were 562 (62.6% patients with MDR isolates and 336 (37.4% patients with non-MDR isolates in the study. There were four significant predictors of HAUTI caused by MDR pathogens: hospitalization before insertion of urinary catheter for more than eight days (ORadjusted = 2.763; 95% CI = 1.352-5.647; p = 0.005, hospitalization for more than 15 days (ORadjusted = 2.144; 95% CI = 1.547-2.970; p < 0.001, previous stay in another department (intensive care units, other wards or hospitals (ORadjusted = 2.147; 95% CI = 1.585-2.908; p < 0.001, and cancer of various localizations (ORadjusted = 2.313; 95% CI = 1.255-4.262; p = 0.007. Conclusion. Early removal of urinary catheter and reduction of time spent in a hospital or in an ICU could contribute to a decrease in the rate of HAUTI caused by MDR pathogens.

  11. Community-acquired Serratia marcescens spinal epidural abscess in a patient without risk factors: Case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkins, Michael D; Gregson, Daniel B

    2008-05-01

    Serratia marcescens has rarely been reported as an agent of invasive disease in patients presenting from the community. Furthermore, S marcescens is frequently opportunistic, affecting individuals with serious medical comorbidities including immune suppression and diabetes. A case of a community-acquired S marcescens spontaneous lumbar epidural abscess presenting as cauda equina syndrome is reported in a previously well 36-year-old man with no identifiable risk factors. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of invasive S marcescens causing disease in a patient with no medical comorbidities.

  12. Incidence Rate of Community-Acquired Sepsis Among Hospitalized Acute Medical Patients-A Population-Based Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Laursen, Christian B; Jensen, Thøger Gorm

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: Sepsis is a frequent cause of admission, but incidence rates based on administrative data have previously produced large differences in estimates. The aim of the study was to estimate the incidence of community-acquired sepsis based on patients' symptoms and clinical findings at arrival...... to the hospital. DESIGN:: Population-based survey. SETTING:: Medical emergency department from September 1, 2010, to August 31, 2011. PATIENTS:: All patients were manually reviewed using a structured protocol in order to identify the presence of infection. Vital signs and laboratory values were collected...

  13. Community-Acquired Serratia Marcescens Spinal Epidural Abscess in a Patient Without Risk Factors: Case Report and Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Parkins

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Serratia marcescens has rarely been reported as an agent of invasive disease in patients presenting from the community. Furthermore, S marcescens is frequently opportunistic, affecting individuals with serious medical comorbidities including immune suppression and diabetes. A case of a community-acquired S marcescens spontaneous lumbar epidural abscess presenting as cauda equina syndrome is reported in a previously well 36-year-old man with no identifiable risk factors. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of invasive S marcescens causing disease in a patient with no medical comorbidities.

  14. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing bacteria caused less than 5% of urinary tract infections in a paediatric emergency centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacmel, Lisa; Timsit, Sandra; Ferroni, Agnès; Auregan, Clémentine; Angoulvant, François; Chéron, Gérard

    2017-01-01

    The last decade has seen a significant increase in extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) secreting organisms responsible for paediatric urinary tract infections (UTIs), particularly in community-acquired infections. These expose patients to the risks of antibiotic treatment failure and renal scarring. This prospective study examined the prevalence and risk factors of febrile ESBL UTIs and their treatment in the paediatric emergency department of a university hospital. In this prospective observational study, all children from 0 to 16 years of age with febrile UTIs were included from May 2012 to April 2013. Cases with and without ESBL involvement were compared. Of the 474 diagnosed febrile UTIs, 22 (4.6%) with a 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of 2.9-6.9 were due to an ESBL-producing organism. Escherichia coli was found in 85% of cases. Significant odds ratios (OR) for ESBL urinary tract infections were prior hospitalisation (OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.6-10.8), urinary tract abnormalities (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.5-10.2) and previous antibiotic treatment (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.2-8.8). All ESBL urinary tract infections had positive outcomes. The prevalence of febrile ESBL urinary tract infections was less than 5% in a paediatric emergency department. This low rate was not high enough to justify changing our guidelines. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Microbial Etiology of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Among Infants and Children Admitted to the Pediatric Hospital, Ain Shams University

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Seify, Magda Yehia; Fouda, Eman Mahmoud; Ibrahim, Hanan Mohamed; Fathy, Maha Muhammad; Husseiny Ahmed, Asmaa Al; Khater, Walaa Shawky; El Deen, Noha Nagi Mohammed Salah; Abouzeid, Heba Galal Mohamed; Hegazy, Nancy Riyad Ahmed; Elbanna, Heba Salah Sayed

    2016-01-01

    Background While recognizing the etiology of community-acquired pneumonia is necessary for formulating local antimicrobial guidelines, limited data is published about this etiology in Egyptian pediatric patients. Objectives To determine the frequency of bacterial and viral pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) among immunocompetent Egyptian infants and preschool children. Methods Ninety infants and preschool-age children admitted to our hospital with CAP were prospectively included in the study. Etiological agents were identified using conventional bacteriological identification methods and IgM antibodies detection against common atypical respiratory bacteria and viruses. Results An etiology was identified in 59 patients (65.5%). Bacterial pathogens were detected in 43 (47.8%) of the cases while viral pathogens were detected in 23 (25.5%). Coinfection with more than one etiologic agent was evident in seven patients (7.8%). The most common typical bacterial cause of pneumonia was Staphylococcus aureus (n = 12, 13.3%), followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 7, 7.8%, each). The commonest atypical bacterium was Mycoplasma pneumoniae (n = 10, 11.1%), whereas the commonest viral etiology was influenza viruses (n = 11, 12.2%). Conclusion Although we could not determine the causative agent in some studied cases, this study provides preliminary data regarding the spectrum and frequency of microorganisms causing CAP in Egyptian infants and preschool children.

  16. Antipsychotic drug use and community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Trifirò (Gianluca)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAntipsychotics are generally distinguished as atypical and typical agents, which are indicated in the treatment of acute and chronic psychoses and other psychiatric disorders. In April 2005, the US Food and Drug Administration issued a warning about the increased risk of all-cause mortal

  17. Duration of Antimicrobial Therapy in Community Acquired Pneumonia: Less Is More

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Rita Pinzone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Community acquired pneumonia (CAP represents the most common cause of infection-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. Appropriate treatment of CAP is challenging and sometimes limited by the availability to obtain rapid and timely identification of the etiologic agent in order to initiate or deescalate the correct antimicrobial therapy. As a consequence, prescribers frequently select empiric antimicrobial therapy using clinical judgment, local patterns of antimicrobial resistance, and, sometimes, individual patient expectations. These issues may contribute to prolonged courses of inappropriate therapy. In this review, we discuss the evidence and recommendations from international guidelines for the management of CAP and the clinical trials that specifically addressed duration of antimicrobial therapy for CAP in adults. In randomized controlled trials comparing the clinical efficacy of a short-course antimicrobial regimen versus an extended-course regimen, no differences in terms of clinical success, bacterial eradication, adverse events, and mortality were observed. The use of biomarkers, such as procalcitonin, to guide the initiation and duration of antimicrobial therapy may reduce total antibiotic exposure and treatment duration, healthcare costs, and the risk of developing antimicrobial resistance. In clinical practice, antimicrobial stewardship interventions may improve the management of CAP and may help in reducing treatment duration. Sometimes “less is more” in CAP.

  18. Clinical predictors for Legionella in patients presenting with community-acquired pneumonia to the emergency department

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    Frei Reno

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legionella species cause severe forms of pneumonia with high mortality and complication rates. Accurate clinical predictors to assess the likelihood of Legionella community-acquired pneumonia (CAP in patients presenting to the emergency department are lacking. Methods We retrospectively compared clinical and laboratory data of 82 consecutive patients with Legionella CAP with 368 consecutive patients with non-Legionella CAP included in two studies at the same institution. Results In multivariate logistic regression analysis we identified six parameters, namely high body temperature (OR 1.67, p Legionella CAP. Using optimal cut off values of these six parameters, we calculated a diagnostic score for Legionella CAP. The median score was significantly higher in Legionella CAP as compared to patients without Legionella (4 (IQR 3–4 vs 2 (IQR 1–2, p Legionella pneumonia. Conversely, of the 73 patients (16% with ≥4 points, 66% of patients had Legionella CAP. Conclusion Six clinical and laboratory parameters embedded in a simple diagnostic score accurately identified patients with Legionella CAP. If validated in future studies, this score might aid in the management of suspected Legionella CAP.

  19. EXOME SEQUENCING REVEALS PRIMARY IMMUNODEFICIENCIES IN CHILDREN WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA SEPSIS

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    Samira Asgari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available One out of three pediatric sepsis deaths in high income countries occur in previously healthy children. Primary immunodeficiencies have been postulated to underlie fulminant sepsis, but this concept remains to be confirmed in clinical practice. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa is a common bacterium mostly associated with healthcare-related infections in immunocompromised individuals. However, in rare cases, it can cause sepsis in previously healthy children. We used exome sequencing and bioinformatic analysis to systematically search for genetic factors underpinning severe P. aeruginosa infection in the pediatric population. We collected blood samples from 11 previously healthy children, with no family history of immunodeficiency, who presented with severe sepsis due to community-acquired P. aeruginosa bacteremia. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood or tissue samples obtained intravitam or postmortem. We obtained high-coverage exome sequencing data and searched for rare loss-of-function variants. After rigorous filtrations, 12 potentially causal variants were identified. 2 out of 8 (25% fatal cases were found to carry novel pathogenic variants in primary immunodeficiency genes, including BTK and DNMT3B. This study demonstrates that exome sequencing allows to identify rare, deleterious human genetic variants responsible for fulminant sepsis in apparently healthy children. Diagnosing primary immunodeficiencies in such patients is of high relevance to survivors and affected families. We propose that unusually severe and fatal sepsis cases in previously healthy children should be considered for exome/genome sequencing to search for underlying primary immunodeficiencies.

  20. Exome Sequencing Reveals Primary Immunodeficiencies in Children with Community-Acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Samira; McLaren, Paul J; Peake, Jane; Wong, Melanie; Wong, Richard; Bartha, Istvan; Francis, Joshua R; Abarca, Katia; Gelderman, Kyra A; Agyeman, Philipp; Aebi, Christoph; Berger, Christoph; Fellay, Jacques; Schlapbach, Luregn J

    2016-01-01

    One out of three pediatric sepsis deaths in high income countries occur in previously healthy children. Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) have been postulated to underlie fulminant sepsis, but this concept remains to be confirmed in clinical practice. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium mostly associated with health care-related infections in immunocompromised individuals. However, in rare cases, it can cause sepsis in previously healthy children. We used exome sequencing and bioinformatic analysis to systematically search for genetic factors underpinning severe P. aeruginosa infection in the pediatric population. We collected blood samples from 11 previously healthy children, with no family history of immunodeficiency, who presented with severe sepsis due to community-acquired P. aeruginosa bacteremia. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood or tissue samples obtained intravitam or postmortem. We obtained high-coverage exome sequencing data and searched for rare loss-of-function variants. After rigorous filtrations, 12 potentially causal variants were identified. Two out of eight (25%) fatal cases were found to carry novel pathogenic variants in PID genes, including BTK and DNMT3B. This study demonstrates that exome sequencing allows to identify rare, deleterious human genetic variants responsible for fulminant sepsis in apparently healthy children. Diagnosing PIDs in such patients is of high relevance to survivors and affected families. We propose that unusually severe and fatal sepsis cases in previously healthy children should be considered for exome/genome sequencing to search for underlying PIDs.

  1. Necrotizing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Maharaj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cavities are not typically associated with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. CAP due to P. aeruginosa is rare and even less commonly causes necrotizing pneumonia. We report a case of P. aeruginosa CAP that progressed to necrotizing pneumonia and was eventually fatal. Procalcitonin (PCT has been well investigated in guiding antibiotic therapy (especially CAP in adults. In this case, PCT at presentation and sequentially was negative. We discuss this caveat and present hypotheses as to the sensitivity and specificity of PCT and C-reactive protein (CRP in these patients. To better characterize P. aeruginosa CAP, we undertook a review of cases indexed in PubMed from 2001 to 2016 (n=9. The data reveal that risk factors for P. aeruginosa CAP include smoking, alcohol use, obstructive lung disease, sinusitis, and hot tub use. The route of infection for P. aeruginosa CAP remains unknown. One of the most interesting findings on reviewing cases was that P. aeruginosa CAP involves the right upper lobe in the vast majority. We suggest that when physicians in the community see patients with distinctly upper lobe necrotizing or cavitary pneumonia, they should consider P. aeruginosa in their differential diagnosis. Further studies are needed to clarify route of infection, role of PCT and CRP, and optimal therapy including drug and duration.

  2. [Antibiotic therapy for community acquired Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia: clinical relevance of antibiotic resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédos, J-P; Bruneel, F

    2006-01-01

    The emergence of Streptococcus pneumoniae strains with reduced susceptibility to beta-lactams and with multiple drug resistance has not led to major changes in recommendations for antibiotic therapy in patients with acute community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia. Numerous factors explain the limited clinical impact of this major microbiological change. The frequency of intermediate strains is high but the frequency of resistant strains to beta-lactams is very low. There is a complex relation between the acquisition of resistance to beta-lactams and the decreased virulence of S. pneumoniae strains. The only finding in studies of humanized experimental animal models of lethal bacteremic pneumonia caused by resistance and tolerant strains was a slowing in the kinetics of beta-lactams bactericidal activity, especially for amoxicillin. Taken together, this preclinical data shows that microbiological resistance of pneumococci to beta-lactams has very little influence on a possible failure of recommanded treatment regimens for pneumococcal pneumonia. The high rate of multiple drug resistance, particularly among beta-lactam resistant strains, rules out the probabilistic use of macrolides. Conversely, fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance remains low, inferior to 3%, and the same is true for ketolides (management in the use of these new drugs could ensure their long-term activity. The high mortality rate of hospitalized S. pneumoniae pneumonia will only be improved with a better understanding of the complex host-bacteria interactions.

  3. Diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of clinical and laboratory parameters in community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusbaumer Charly

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is the most frequent infection-related cause of death. The reference standard to diagnose CAP is a new infiltrate on chest radiograph in the presence of recently acquired respiratory signs and symptoms. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of clinical signs and symptoms and laboratory biomarkers for CAP. Methods 545 patients with suspected lower respiratory tract infection, admitted to the emergency department of a university hospital were included in a pre-planned post-hoc analysis of two controlled intervention trials. Baseline assessment included history, clinical examination, radiography and measurements of procalcitonin (PCT, highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP and leukocyte count. Results Of the 545 patients, 373 had CAP, 132 other respiratory tract infections, and 40 other final diagnoses. The AUC of a clinical model including standard clinical signs and symptoms (i.e. fever, cough, sputum production, abnormal chest auscultation and dyspnea to diagnose CAP was 0.79 [95% CI, 0.75–0.83]. This AUC was significantly improved by including PCT and hsCRP (0.92 [0.89–0.94]; p Conclusion PCT, and to a lesser degree hsCRP, improve the accuracy of currently recommended approaches for the diagnosis of CAP, thereby complementing clinical signs and symptoms. PCT is useful in the severity assessment of CAP.

  4. A review of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus for primary care physicians

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    Huda A Bukharie

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA infections among young people without healthcare-associated risk factors have emerged during the past decade. Reported prevalence rates of CA-MRSA vary widely among studies, largely because of the different definitions employed and different settings in which the studies have been performed. Although the majority of CA-MRSA infections are mild skin and soft tissue infections, severe life-threatening cases have been reported. CA-MRSA infections have mostly been associated with staphylococcal strains bearing the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type IV element and Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes. These strains are more frequently susceptible to a variety of non-beta-lactam antibiotics. Clinicians must be aware of the wide spectrum of disease caused by CA-MRSA. Continued emergence of MRSA in the community is a public health problem, and therefore warrants increased vigilance in the diagnosis and management of suspected and confirmed staphylococcal infections.

  5. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia spp. infection in community-acquired pneumonia, Germany, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumke, Roger; Schnee, Christiane; Pletz, Mathias W; Rupp, Jan; Jacobs, Enno; Sachse, Konrad; Rohde, Gernot

    2015-03-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia spp., which are associated with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), are difficult to propagate, and can cause clinically indistinguishable disease patterns. During 2011-2012, we used molecular methods to test adult patients in Germany with confirmed CAP for infection with these 2 pathogens. Overall, 12.3% (96/783) of samples were positive for M. pneumoniae and 3.9% (31/794) were positive for Chlamydia spp.; C. psittaci (2.1%) was detected more frequently than C. pneumoniae (1.4%). M. pneumoniae P1 type 1 predominated, and levels of macrolide resistance were low (3.1%). Quarterly rates of M. pneumoniae-positive samples ranged from 1.5% to 27.3%, showing a strong epidemic peak for these infections, but of Chlamydia spp. detection was consistent throughout the year. M. pneumoniae-positive patients were younger and more frequently female, had fewer co-occurring conditions, and experienced milder disease than did patients who tested negative. Clinicians should be aware of the epidemiology of these pathogens in CAP.

  6. Efficacy and safety of glucocorticoids in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Ping; Chen, Jun-Hui; Chen, Ying; Wu, Chao; Yang, Xiao-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is pneumonia acquired infectiously from normal social contact as opposed to being acquired during hospitalization. CAP is a leading cause of illness and death. This review aims to determine the efficacy and safety of glucocorticoids in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We searched randomized controlled trials (RCTs) from Pubmed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Chinese Journal Full-text Database, and Chinese Biomedical Literature Database to obtain the information by using steroids, glucocorticoids, cortisol, corticosteroids, community-acquired pneumonia and CAP as key words. The quality of RCTs was evaluated. A Meta-analysis was made using RevMan 5.0 provided by the Cochrance Collaboration. Seven RCTs involving 944 patients were included in the meta-analysis. The mean length of hospital stay in glucocorticoids treatment group was significantly shorter than that in standard treatment group (WMD=-1.70, 95%CI 2.01-1.39, Z=10.81, Pupper gastrointestinal bleeding (RR=1.98, 95%CI 0.37-10.59, Z=0.80, P=0.42) between the standard treatment group and the glucocorticoids treatment group. The use of glucocorticoids in patients with community-acquired pneumonia can significantly shorten the duration of illness and have a favorable safety profile. However, it could not reduce the overall mortality.

  7. A Rare Presentation of Community Acquired Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Docekal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostatic abscess is a rarely described condition and is commonly caused by gram-negative organisms such as enterobacteria. However, as the prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA increases in the community, unusual infections due to this organism have been recently published. In this report, we describe a patient with diabetes mellitus type 2, who presents with diabetic ketoacidosis—later found to be due to a prostatic abscess from which MRSA was cultured.

  8. [Ability of procalcitonin to predict bacteremia in patients with community acquired pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; Timón Zapata, Jesús; Laserna Mendieta, Emilio José; Parejo Miguez, Raquel; Flores Chacartegui, Manuel; Gallardo Schall, Pablo

    2014-04-07

    To analyze the usefulness and ability of procalcitonin (PCT) to predict the presence of bacteremia in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) or other bacteria. This is an observational, prospective and descriptive study involving patients who were diagnosed with CAP in our Emergency Department. Data collected included socio-demographic and comorbidity variables, Charlson index, stage in the Pneumonia Severity Index and criteria of severe NAC, microbiologic studies and biomarker determinations (PCT and C reactive protein). The follow-up was carried out during 30 days to calculate the predictive power and the diagnostic performance for bacteremia caused or not by S. pneumoniae. Four hundred and seventy-four patients were finally included in the study. Blood cultures were positive in 85 individuals (17.9%) and S. pneumoniae was identified as the responsible pathogen in 75 of them (88.4%) (in 5 cases together with another agent). The area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve for PCT to predict bacteremia (caused by S. pneumoniae or not) was 0.988 (95% confidence interval 0.908-0.995; P98% and>10, respectively. The most frequently isolated serotypes of S. pneumoniae were 19A, 7F, 1 and 3. The highest mean levels of PCT were found in serotypes 7F, 19A, 3 and 1, which showed statistically significant differences with regard to the others serotypes considered (P=.008). Serotypes associated with the highest percentage of severe sepsis-septic shock, 30-days mortality and multi-lobe or bilateral affection were 3, 1 and 19A; 1, 3 and 19A; and 3, 19A and 6A, respectively. PCT had a remarkable diagnostic ability to discard or suspect bacteremia and to guide the etiology of CAP caused by S. pneumoniae. Serotypes 1, 3, 19A and 7F showed greater frequency, systemic inflammatory response and clinical severity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: an update for outpatients management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Noémie; Gehri, Mario; Gervaix, Alain; Guinan, Stéphane; Barazzone-Argiroffo, Constance

    2016-02-17

    Pneumonia should be considered in febrile children with tachypnea and/or chest recession. Virus are the most common cause of pneumonia in children under 5 years old. Streptococcus pneumonia can be found at any age. Mycoplasma pneumonia is more frequent in older children. Systematic chest radiograph is not necessary but must be obtained in patients with hypoventilation and in those with failed initial antibiotic therapy. Mycoplasma pneumonia should be tested according to patient age and response to initial antibiotic. First line antibiotherapy is amoxicilline. Antibiotic treatment is frequently not necessary in children under 5 but should be considered depending on clinical presentation and C reactive protein value.

  10. Risk factors for community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbo, Lene Fogt; Benfield, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    of these are pathogen-specific, while some are shared between different bacteria. METHODS: We searched the database PubMed to identify host risk factors for bacterial meningitis caused by the pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae type b, because they are three most common....... CONCLUSIONS: As conjugated vaccines are available for these infections, it is of utmost importance to identify high risk patients to be able to prevent invasive disease....... causative bacteria beyond the neonatal period. RESULTS: We describe a number of risk factors; including socioeconomic factors, age, genetic variation of the host and underlying medical conditions associated with increased susceptibility to invasive bacterial infections in both children and adults...

  11. How well do discharge diagnoses identify hospitalised patients with community-acquired infections? - a validation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Nielsen, Stig Lønberg; Laursen, Christian Borbjerg

    2014-01-01

    in general is sparse. The aim of the study was to determine how well ICD-10 discharge diagnoses identify patients with community-acquired infections in a medical emergency department (ED), overall and related to sites of infection and patient characteristics. METHODS: We manually reviewed 5977 patients...... admitted to a medical ED in a one-year period (September 2010-August 2011), to establish if they were hospitalised with community-acquired infection. Using the manual review as gold standard, we calculated the sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratios of discharge diagnoses...... indicating infection. RESULTS: Two thousand five hundred eleven patients were identified with community-acquired infection according to chart review (42.0%, 95% confidence interval [95%CI]: 40.8-43.3%) compared to 2550 patients identified by ICD-10 diagnoses (42.8%, 95%CI: 41.6-44.1%). Sensitivity of the ICD...

  12. Community-acquired intracranial suppurative infections: A 15-year report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taner Yildirmak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the characteristics, treatment, and prognosis of patients with intracranial suppurative infection (ISI by review of clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings. Methods: The data collected from all patients who had been diagnosed with ISI and followed up at the Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology Department of the study site between 1998 and 2013 were reviewed. Results: Of the 23 ISI patients identified, the mean age was 38.21 ± 12.61 years (range: 19-67 years, median: 34 and mean symptom duration was 22.25 ± 20.22 days. Headache was the most common symptom, the frontal lobe the most common localization of ISI, and mastoiditis due to chronic suppurative otitis media the most common source of infection causing ISI. Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas spp., Peptostreptococcus spp., Enterococcus avium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, and Toxoplasma gondii were isolated from the specimens collected from 6 (37.5% of the 16 patients who underwent invasive procedures. Of these 16 patients, 2 underwent craniotomy, 12 burr hole aspiration, and 2 stereotactic biopsy. The rate of recurrence was 0% and the rates of sequelae and fatality were both 8%. Conclusions: ISI should be considered in male patients presenting with headache and neurological signs and symptoms, whether with or without fever, on admission for early diagnosis and provision of timely, adequate therapy and, if required, surgical intervention to reduce mortality and sequelae rates.

  13. Application of serology and nested polymerase chain reaction for identifying Chlamydophila pneumoniae in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections in children

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    Surinder Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Chlamydophila pneumoniae is a common cause of community-acquired respiratory infections, including pneumonia, bronchitis, and upper respiratory tract infections. Since it is difficult to detect C. pneumoniae in clinical practice, specific etiological diagnosis is established only in a minority of cases. Aims: To investigate the role of C. pneumoniae in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs in children, with the use of serological tests and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR analysis. Settings and Design: One hundred children, age of 2 months to 12 years, hospitalized for community-acquired LRTIs were investigated for C. pneumoniae etiology. Materials and Methods: We investigated 100 children hospitalized for community-acquired LRTIs, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detecting anti-C. pneumoniae immunoglobulin M, and immunoglobulin G antibodies and nasopharyngeal aspirates for analysis of C. pneumoniae PCR. The demographic, clinical, and radiological findings for C. pneumoniae antibody positive and C. pneumoniae antibody negative cases were compared. Statistical Analysis Used: Data analysis was performed by Chi-square test and Fisher′s exact tests using Epi Info (2002. Results: Clinical and radiological findings in both the groups were comparable. A relatively higher rate of C. pneumoniae infection in children was observed below 5 years of age. Serological evidence of C. pneumoniae infection was observed in 12 (12% patients and nested PCR was positive in 5 (5% children. Thirteen (13% patients were diagnosed with C. pneumoniae infection by serology and/or nested PCR. Conclusions: Our study confirms that C. pneumoniae plays a significant role in community-acquired LRTIs in children of all ages, even in children aged <5 years.

  14. [CAPNETZ. The competence network for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP)]. [Article in German

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Plessen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    CAPNETZ is a medical competence network for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), which was funded by the German Ministry for Education and Research. It has accomplished seminal work on pneumonia over the last 15 years. A unique infrastructure was established which has so far allowed us to recruit...... Sepsis) (PROGRESS), the Systems Medicine of Community Acquired Pneumonia Network (CAPSyS) and SFB-TR84 (Sonderforschungsbereich - Transregio 84). The main recipients (Charité Berlin, University Clinic Ulm and the Hannover Medical School) founded the CAPNETZ foundation and transferred all data...

  15. Phylogenetic Analysis of Stenotrophomonas spp. Isolates Contributes to the Identification of Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Infections

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    Vinicius Godoy Cerezer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas ssp. has a wide environmental distribution and is also found as an opportunistic pathogen, causing nosocomial or community-acquired infections. One species, S. maltophilia, presents multidrug resistance and has been associated with serious infections in pediatric and immunocompromised patients. Therefore, it is relevant to conduct resistance profile and phylogenetic studies in clinical isolates for identifying infection origins and isolates with augmented pathogenic potential. Here, multilocus sequence typing was performed for phylogenetic analysis of nosocomial isolates of Stenotrophomonas spp. and, environmental and clinical strains of S. maltophilia. Biochemical and multidrug resistance profiles of nosocomial and clinical strains were determined. The inferred phylogenetic profile showed high clonal variability, what correlates with the adaptability process of Stenotrophomonas to different habitats. Two clinical isolates subgroups of S. maltophilia sharing high phylogenetic homogeneity presented intergroup recombination, thus indicating the high permittivity to horizontal gene transfer, a mechanism involved in the acquisition of antibiotic resistance and expression of virulence factors. For most of the clinical strains, phylogenetic inference was made using only partial ppsA gene sequence. Therefore, the sequencing of just one specific fragment of this gene would allow, in many cases, determining whether the infection with S. maltophilia was nosocomial or community-acquired.

  16. A brief review of moxifloxacin in the treatment of elderly patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M Ferrara

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Anna M FerraraDepartment of Haematological, Pneumological, Cardiovascular and Surgical Sciences, University of Pavia, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, Pavia, ItalyAbstract: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP remains a common cause of morbidity and a potentially life-threatening illness throughout the world mainly in elderly patients. Initial antibacterial treatment, usually empirical, should be as effective as possible in order to assure rapid clinical resolution and reduce high rates of hospitalization and mortality especially affecting aged patients. New fluoroquinolones with potent activity against the most important respiratory pathogens including Streptococcus pneumoniae, a key pathogen mainly in old patients with CAP, have been recently suggested by several international guidelines as monotherapy for the treatment of most CAP patient categories. Among newer derivatives, moxifloxacin, an advanced generation 8-methoxy quinolone, has demonstrated good clinical and bacteriological efficacy in large, well designed clinical trials both in adults and old patients with CAP, achieving also in aged people efficacy comparable with that of standard treatments. Good pharmacokinetic characteristics such as excellent penetration into respiratory tract tissues and fluids, optimal bioavailability, simplicity of once-daily dosing, and good tolerability, represent potential advantages of moxifloxacin over other therapies. In addition, primarily due to a shorter length of hospital stay, moxifloxacin has been shown to save costs compared with standard therapy.Keywords: moxifloxacin, community-acquired pneumonia, elderly patients

  17. [Case report: Löffler's syndrome due to Ascaris lumbricoides mimicking acute bacterial community--acquired pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Ali; Oncül, Oral; Cavuşlu, Saban; Okutan, Oğuzhan; Kartaloğlu, Zafer

    2009-01-01

    In this study we present a patient with Loeffler's syndrome caused by Ascaris lumbricoides who presented with the clinical findings of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Our patient, who was twenty-five years old, and who had had symptoms such as coughing, expectorating, dyspnea and fever for approximately ten days, was hospitalized. We auscultated polyphonic rhonchuses at the both hemithoraxes. A chest X-ray revealed bilateral lower zone patch consolidation. Acute bacterial community acquired pneumonia (CAP) was diagnosed due to these findings and empirical antibiotic treatment was begun. Repeated sputum Gram stains were negative, and both sputum and blood cultures were sterile. A sputum smear was negative for acid-fast bacilli. The patient's fever and respiratory complaint did not respond to the empirical antibiotics therapy. During the course of advanced investigations, we measured peripheric eosinophilia, and high levels of total Eo and total IgE, and observed Ascaris lumbricoides eggs during stool examination. The patient was given a diagnosis of Loeffler's syndrome. Thereupon the patient was treated successfully with one dose of albendazol 400 mg. In conclusion, we suggest that Loeffler's syndrome must be considered early in the differential diagnosis for CAP when peripheric eosinophilia is seen in patients if they live in an endemic area for parasitic disease.

  18. Linezolid has unique immunomodulatory effects in post-influenza community acquired MRSA pneumonia.

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    Urvashi Bhan

    Full Text Available Post influenza pneumonia is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity, with mortality rates approaching 60% when bacterial infections are secondary to multi-drug resistant (MDR pathogens. Staphylococcus aureus, in particular community acquired MRSA (cMRSA, has emerged as a leading cause of post influenza pneumonia.Linezolid (LZD prevents acute lung injury in murine model of post influenza bacterial pneumonia.Mice were infected with HINI strain of influenza and then challenged with cMRSA at day 7, treated with antibiotics (LZD or Vanco or vehicle 6 hours post bacterial challenge and lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL harvested at 24 hours for bacterial clearance, inflammatory cell influx, cytokine/chemokine analysis and assessment of lung injury.Mice treated with LZD or Vanco had lower bacterial burden in the lung and no systemic dissemination, as compared to the control (no antibiotic group at 24 hours post bacterial challenge. As compared to animals receiving Vanco, LZD group had significantly lower numbers of neutrophils in the BAL (9×10(3 vs. 2.3×10(4, p < 0.01, which was associated with reduced levels of chemotactic chemokines and inflammatory cytokines KC, MIP-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-1β in the BAL. Interestingly, LZD treatment also protected mice from lung injury, as assessed by albumin concentration in the BAL post treatment with H1N1 and cMRSA when compared to vanco treatment. Moreover, treatment with LZD was associated with significantly lower levels of PVL toxin in lungs.Linezolid has unique immunomodulatory effects on host inflammatory response and lung injury in a murine model of post-viral cMRSA pneumonia.

  19. Obesity paradox in patients with community-acquired pneumonia: Is inflammation the missing link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Nina; Hoess, Claus; Kutz, Alexander; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Thomann, Robert; Henzen, Christoph; Zimmerli, Werner; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Positive associations between body mass index (BMI) and clinical outcomes have been found and are called "the obesity survival paradox." However, whether obesity has protective effects or if this paradox is because of confounding remains unclear. Herein, we analyzed the effects of weight on long-term mortality in a large cohort of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and investigated whether the differential effects of obesity on inflammation pathways accounted for mortality differences. For this secondary analysis, we followed prospectively for 6 y 763 CAP patients who were previously included in a multicenter trial (the ProHOSP Trial). To assess associations of BMI with mortality and with several inflammatory biomarker levels, we calculated three regression models adjusted for severity: the pneumonia severity index (PSI); fully adjusted for PSI, age, sex, metabolic factors, cardiovascular diseases, and other comorbidities; and fully adjusted including biomarker levels. Within the 763 patients studied, all-cause 6-y mortality was significantly lower in obese patients (BMI >30 kg/m(2)) compared with normal-weight patients (BMI 18.5-25 kg/m(2)), with a severity-adjusted hazard ratio of 0.641 (95% confidence interval 0.462-0.889) and robust results in fully adjusted and fully adjusted plus biomarker models. No associations of increased BMI and C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, or white blood cell count were found, but BMI > 30 kg/m(2) was associated with higher proadrenomedullin levels. Over a 6-y long-term follow-up, we found obesity to be associated with lower all-cause mortality in CAP patients, confirming the obesity paradox in this population. However, differences in inflammatory pathways did not explain these findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Etiology of childhood community acquired pneumonia and its implications for vaccination

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    Nascimento-Carvalho Cristiana M.C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among children throughout the world. Vaccines are available for some organisms, but they are underutilized and/or still in development. To evaluate the potential impact of vaccines, we review studies in which the etiology of childhood community-acquired pneumonia was recorded. In North America and Europe (9 studies, the etiology of pneumonia was established in 62% of studied children (range 43%-88% by use of noninvasive specific methods for microbiologic diagnosis. The most often identified agents were S. pneumoniae (22%, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV (20%, Haemophilus influenzae (7%, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (15%. In Africa and South America (8 studies, bacteria were recovered from 56% (range 32%-68% of severely ill children studied by lung aspirate. The most often isolated bacteria were Streptococcus pneumoniae (33% and Haemophilus influenzae (21%. A high percentage of H. influenzae strains were not serotype b. Throughout the world, children requiring hospitalization were most likely to have infection caused by pneumococcus H. influenzae or RSV. Out patients also had Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Countries in Africa and Asia recorded 2 to 10 times more children with pneumonia (7 to 40/100 annually than in the USA. Widespread use of pneumococcal and H. influenzae type b conjugate vaccines could reduce the frequency of childhood pneumonia by one-third. Further reduction will require development of non-type b H. influenzae, RSV and M. pneumoniae vaccines. This could result in a > 50% reduction of pneumonia in children. This goal should be sought and achieved as soon as possible.

  1. Macrolides vs. quinolones for community-acquired pneumonia: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalsky, K; Yahav, D; Lador, A; Eliakim-Raz, N; Leibovici, L; Paul, M

    2013-04-01

    The relative efficacy, safety and ecological implications of macrolides vs. quinolones in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are debatable. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing any macrolide vs. any quinolone for the treatment of CAP among adult inpatients or outpatients, as monotherapy or both in combination with a beta-lactam. We did not limit inclusion by pneumonia severity, publication status, language or date of publication. The primary outcomes assessed were 30-day all-cause mortality and treatment failure. Two authors independently extracted the data. Fixed effect meta-analysis of risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals was performed. Sixteen trials (4989 patients) fulfilling inclusion criteria were identified, mostly assessing outpatients with mild to moderate CAP. All-cause mortality was not significantly different for macrolides vs. quinolones, RR 1.03 (0.63-1.68, seven trials), with a low event rate (2%). Treatment failure was significantly lower with quinolones, RR 0.78 (0.67-0.91, 16 trials). The definition of failure used in the primary studies was not clearly representative of patients' benefit. Microbiological failure was lower with quinolones, RR 0.63 (0.49-0.81, 13 trials). All adverse events, adverse events requiring discontinuation and any premature antibiotic discontinuation were significantly more frequent with macrolides, mainly on account of gastrointestinal adverse events. Resistance development was not assessed in the trials. Randomized controlled trials show an advantage of quinolones in the treatment of CAP with regard to clinical cure without need for antibiotic modification at end of treatment and gastrointestinal adverse events. The clinical significance of this advantage is unclear.

  2. [Male genito-urinary tract infection caused by Chlamydia trachomatis and seminal characteristics: use of minocycline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, F; Gandini, L; Alfano, P; Anticoli-Borza, L; Basile, A; Fabbri, G; Lenzi, A

    1990-03-01

    The authors evaluated the activity of Minocycline in 30 male patients with urinary tract infection caused by Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) and alterations of the seminal parameters using three different dosage schedules (100 mg/day for 10 days, 200 mg/day for 10 days and 200 mg/day for 20 days). At baseline, at the end of therapy and one month after clinical and bacteriological parameters and seminal characteristics, including some sperm function tests (acridine orange test to study chromatin heterogeneity; triple staining technique, to study acrosome; swim-up technique, to study the sperm kinetics) were verified. The seminal characteristics were checked again three and six months after the end of the therapy. All the results show that Minocycline is an excellent drug for the treatment of urinary tract infection caused by Chlamydia trachomatis both for its therapeutic efficacy and for the absence of side effects. Although 10 days cycles using 1 cap/day are sufficient to eliminate inflammation and infection, in order to obtain more valid results it is preferable to use the following dosage schedule: 200 mg/day of antibiotic (100 mg twice daily) for 10 days. The results of our trial show that in cases of Chlamydia trachomatis infection associated with dispermia (reduced nemaspermic concentration, hypomotility, teratozoospermia, increased number of leucocytes), if the parameters of sperm function are within normal limits, the resolution of the infection is usually followed by a recovery of normozoospermia. Follow-up performed 3 and 6 months after the end of treatment showed an increase in the number of spermatozoa, a percentage increase in their motility, mostly in the progressive motility, and a reduction of the atypical forms.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Enterovirus D68-associated community-acquired pneumonia in children living in Milan, Italy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, Susanna; Zampiero, Alberto; Ruggiero, Luca; Madini, Barbara; Niesters, Hubert; Principi, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of children infected by enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) and affected by severe respiratory illness, muscle weakness and paralysis were described in the USA and Canada in 2014 Objectives: To investigate the potential involvement of EV-D68 in determining community-acquired pn

  4. The burden and epidemiology of community-acquired central nervous system infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdem, H; Inan, A; Guven, E

    2017-01-01

    Risk assessment of central nervous system (CNS) infection patients is of key importance in predicting likely pathogens. However, data are lacking on the epidemiology globally. We performed a multicenter study to understand the burden of community-acquired CNS (CA-CNS) infections between 2012...

  5. Arthritis in adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis: a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weisfelt, M.; van de Beek, D.; Spanjaard, L.; de Gans, J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Although the coexistence of bacterial meningitis and arthritis has been noted in several studies, it remains unclear how often both conditions occur simultaneously. Methods: We evaluated the presence of arthritis in a prospective nationwide cohort of 696 episodes of community-acquired

  6. Severe Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infection with Acinetobacter ursingii in Person who Injects Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Helmut J F; Rolling, Thierry; Schmiedel, Stefan; Klupp, Eva-Maria; Lange, Christoph; Seifert, Harald

    2016-01-01

    We report a community-acquired bloodstream infection with Acinteobacter ursingii in an HIV-negative woman who injected drugs. The infection was successfully treated with meropenem. Species identification was performed by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Improved identification of Acinetobacter spp. by using this method will help identify clinical effects of this underdiagnosed pathogen.

  7. Gender differences in the outcome of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smit, Jesper; López-Cortés, Luis Eduardo; Kaasch, Achim J;

    2017-01-01

    Female gender has been suggested to be associated with poor outcome in patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB), but existing data remain sparse and conflicting. We investigated clinical outcomes in female and male patients with community-acquired (CA-) SAB. Population-based medical...

  8. Usefulness of C-reactive protein in monitoring the severe community-acquired pneumonia clinical course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Luís; Póvoa, Pedro; Almeida, Eduardo; Fernandes, Antero; Mealha, Rui; Moreira, Pedro; Sabino, Henrique

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the C-reactive protein level, the body temperature and the white cell count in patients after prescription of antibiotics in order to describe the clinical resolution of severe community-acquired pneumonia. A cohort of 53 consecutive patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia was studied. The C-reactive protein levels, body temperature and white cell count were monitored daily. By day 3 a C-reactive protein level 0.5 times the initial level was a marker of poor outcome (sensitivity, 0.91; specificity, 0.59). Patients were divided according to their C-reactive protein patterns of response to antibiotics, into fast response, slow response, nonresponse, and biphasic response. About 96% of patients with a C-reactive protein pattern of fast response and 74% of patients with a slow response pattern survived, whereas those patients with the patterns of nonresponse and of biphasic response had a mortality rate of 100% and 33%, respectively (P prescription is useful in identification, as early as day 3, of severe community-acquired pneumonia patients with poor outcome. The identification of the C-reactive protein pattern of response to antibiotic therapy was useful in the recognition of the individual clinical course, either improving or worsening, as well as the rate of improvement, in patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia.

  9. Revised SWAB guidelines for antimicrobial therapy of community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, JA; Prins, JM; Bonten, MJ; Degener, J; Janknegt, RE; Hollander, JMR; Jonkers, RE; Wijnands, WJ; Verheij, TJ; Sachs, APE; Kullberg, BJ

    2005-01-01

    The Dutch Working Party on Antibiotic Policy (SWAB) develops evidence-based guidelines, aimed at optimalisation of antibiotic use and limitation of the spread of antimicrobial resistance. A revision of the SWAB guideline for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), published in 1998, was

  10. Penicillin as empirical therapy for patients hospitalised with community acquired pneumonia at a Danish hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, O; Glenthøj, Jonathan Peter; Dragsted, Ulrik Bak;

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We report on the outcome of a study of patients hospitalised with community acquired pneumonia (HCAP) at a Danish university hospital. METHODOLOGY: In a retrospective study of 243 consecutive patients with radiographically verified HCAP, data on clinical and laboratory findings...

  11. Use of Glucocorticoids and Risk of Community-Acquired Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smit, Jesper; Kaasch, Achim J; Søgaard, Mette;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the use of systemic glucocorticoids is a risk factor for community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (CA-SAB). PATIENTS AND METHODS: We used population-based medical registries in Northern Denmark to conduct a case-control study including all adults...

  12. Study on epidemic characteristics and etiology of community acquired pneumonia in Guangzhou from 2009 to 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘慧

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the epidemic characteristics and pathogenic spectrum of community acquired pneumonia(CAP)in Guangzhou from 2009 to 2012.Method 14 major comprehensive hospitals were selected from 11 districts as sentinel hospitals for CAP cases surveillance,including 18 982 223 in total during the 4years.The

  13. Prognostic factors for early clinical failure in patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogewerf, M; Oosterheert, J J; Hak, E; Hoepelman, I M; Bonten, M J M

    2006-01-01

    For patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), clinical response during the first days of treatment is predictive of clinical outcome. As risk assessments can improve the efficiency of pneumonia management, a prospective cohort study to assess clinical, biochemical and microbiological predict

  14. Enterovirus D68-associated community-acquired pneumonia in children living in Milan, Italy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, Susanna; Zampiero, Alberto; Ruggiero, Luca; Madini, Barbara; Niesters, Hubert; Principi, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of children infected by enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) and affected by severe respiratory illness, muscle weakness and paralysis were described in the USA and Canada in 2014 Objectives: To investigate the potential involvement of EV-D68 in determining community-acquired pn

  15. Arthritis in adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis: a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weisfelt, M.; van de Beek, D.; Spanjaard, L.; de Gans, J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Although the coexistence of bacterial meningitis and arthritis has been noted in several studies, it remains unclear how often both conditions occur simultaneously. Methods: We evaluated the presence of arthritis in a prospective nationwide cohort of 696 episodes of community-acquired ba

  16. Clinical characteristics and innate immunity in patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endeman, H.

    2009-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the most common infectious disease requiring hospitalisation in the Western world. In spite of improving antibiotic regiments, CAP still has significant mortality. In non-immune compromised patients, Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequently isolated micro

  17. Aetiology and resistance patterns of community-acquired pneumonia in León, Nicaragua

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matute, A J; Brouwer, W P; Hak, E; Delgado, E; Alonso, E; Hoepelman, I M

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a prevalence study to gain greater insight into the aetiology, bacterial resistance and risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in the region of León, Nicaragua. During the period from July 2002 to January 2005, all consecutive patients with signs and symptoms suggestive of

  18. Markers of infectious disease emergencies: Focus on patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, C.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we explore the potential of several biomarkers of infection in infectious disease emergencies in general with a specific focus on community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), risk factors in the development of CAP and markers of infection in CAP as well as in specific etiologic forms of CAP, l

  19. DIAGNOSTIC BEHAVIOR OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA: SURVEY CONDUCTED IN SOME REGIONS OF CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Wei; DENG Wei-wu

    2006-01-01

    Objective To analyze the spectrum of microbiological agents causing community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in recent years. We also investigated the procedure of diagnosis as well as the empirical treatment for this disease in OPD (outpatient department) of pulmonary disease. Methods A total of 7097 patients from 150 hospitals in 24 provinces in China were enrolled in the study from Nov. 2002 to Mar. 2003. Every patient was diagnosed, treated and registered at the same time. Diagnostic behavior for doctors include chest radiograph and/or CT examination of the lung, as well as collecting sputum samples at the time of diagnosis for bacteria culture to identify the pathogen. Appointed staff fulfilled the questionnaires and information sheets in each center. After that,data were computerized and analyzed. Results There were 7404 valid information sheets and 7097 questionnaires taken into count. The majority CAP patients were from cities ( 77.3% ), most of those who had medical insurance. Most CAP patients had productive cough (81.1% ), and 76.7% and 18.2% CAP patients received chest film and CT examination respectively for diagnosis. Only 24% patients received sputum sample tested and with 36% got positive results. Streptococcus pneumoniae remained the main pathogen of CAP (43. 2% ). Most doctors used to prescribe β-lactam antibiotics as the first line of empirical therapy of CAP (51.1%) with oral taken as the main method for drug using (66.3% ). Conclusion This survey provides a key point of empirical therapy in China.The procedure for diagnosing as well as the empirical treatment of CAP in OPD of pulmonary disease in China still to be improved, especially in accessing the pathogen. Guidelines developed to recognize and evaluate CAP should base on epidemiological information of the pathogen prevalence, then could offer a rational approach to the initial management of the CAP patients.

  20. Early non-invasive ventilation treatment for respiratory failure due to severe community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Antonello; Ferraioli, Gianluca; Ferrari-Bravo, Maura; Barlascini, Cornelius; Santo, Mario; Ferrera, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Severe community-acquired pneumonia (sCAP) have been as defined pneumonia requiring admission to the intensive care unit or carrying a high risk of death. Currently, the treatment of sCAP consists of antibiotic therapy and ventilator support. The use of invasive ventilation causes several complications as does admission to ICU. For this reason, non-invasive ventilation (NIV) has been used for acute respiratory failure to avoid endotracheal intubation. However, few studies have currently assessed the usefulness of NIV in sCAP. We prospectively assessed 127 patients with sCAP and severe acute respiratory failure [oxygen arterial pressure/oxygen inspiratory fraction ratio (PaO2/FiO2) intubation and the achievement of PaO2/FiO2 >250 with spontaneous breathing. We assessed predictors of NIV failure and hospital mortality using univariate and multivariate analyses. NIV failed in 32 patients (25.1%). Higher chest X-ray score at admission, chest X-ray worsening, and a lower PaO2/FiO2 and higher alveolar-arteriolar gradient (A-aDO2) after 1 h of NIV all independently predicted NIV failure. Higher lactate dehydrogenase and confusion, elevated blood urea, respiratory rate, blood pressure plus age ≥65 years at admission, higher A-aDO2, respiratory rate and lower PaO2/FiO2 after 1 h of NIV and intubation rate were directly related to hospital mortality. Successful treatment is strongly related to less severe illness as well as to a good initial and sustained response to medical therapy and NIV treatment. Constant monitoring of these patients is mandatory. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Variability in pediatric infectious disease consultants' recommendations for management of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L Hersh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is a common childhood infection. CAP complications, such as parapneumonic empyema (PPE, are increasing and are frequently caused by antibiotic-resistant organisms. No clinical guidelines currently exist for management of pediatric CAP and no published data exist about variations in antibiotic prescribing patterns. Our objectives were to describe variation in CAP clinical management for hospitalized children by pediatric infectious disease consultants and to examine associations between recommended antibiotic regimens and local antibiotic resistance levels. METHODS: We surveyed pediatric members of the Emerging Infections Network, which consists of 259 pediatric infectious disease physicians. Participants responded regarding their recommended empiric antibiotic regimens for hospitalized children with CAP with and without PPE and their recommendations for duration of therapy. Participants also provided information about the prevalence of penicillin non-susceptible S. pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA in their community. RESULTS: We received 148 responses (57%. For uncomplicated CAP, respondents were divided between recommending beta-lactams alone (55% versus beta-lactams in combination with another class (40%. For PPE, most recommended a combination of a beta-lactam plus an anti-MRSA agent, however, they were divided between clindamycin (44% and vancomycin (57%. The relationship between reported antibiotic resistance and empiric regimen was mixed. We found no relationship between aminopenicillin use and prevalence of penicillin non-suscepetible S. pneumoniae or clindamycin use and clindamycin resistance, however, respondents were more likely to recommend an anti-MRSA agent when MRSA prevalence increased. CONCLUSIONS: Substantial variability exists in recommendations for CAP management. Development of clinical guidelines via antimicrobial stewardship programs and dissemination of data

  2. Ceftaroline fosamil for community-acquired pneumonia and skin and skin structure infections: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hajj, Maguy Saffouh; Turgeon, Ricky D; Wilby, Kyle John

    2017-02-01

    Background Ceftaroline is a parentally administered cephalosporin that has an in vitro expanded spectrum of activity compared with other cephalosporins yet data is conflicting regarding its place in therapy. Aim of the Review To compare the efficacy and safety of ceftaroline against standard antibiotic regimens for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSIs). Method The databases of MEDLINE, EBSCO, and Embase were searched up to June 2016. Manual review of references was completed and experts in the field were contacted for unpublished data. Randomized controlled trials of ceftaroline in CAP or cSSSI populations were included. Outcomes included clinical cure, mortality, adverse events, serious adverse events, and discontinuation due to adverse events. Meta-analysis was used to pool results for these outcomes. We performed subgroup analyses for gram positive infections in CAP and infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in cSSSIs. Risk of bias was assessed for all studies. Results Six trials (three for each indication) were included, each of which had an unclear or high risk of bias in at least one domain. For CAP, ceftaroline was significantly more efficacious in achieving clinical cure than ceftriaxone [risk ratio (RR) 1.11, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-1.19; I(2) = 47%]. For cSSSIs, there was no significant difference in clinical cure between ceftaroline and vancomycin plus aztreonam (RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.97-1.05; I(2) = 0%). No differences were found for overall mortality, serious adverse events, discontinuation due to adverse events, and overall adverse events. Conclusion Ceftaroline is a viable therapeutic alternative for patients with CAP and cSSSIs, yet identified risks of bias and poor external validity preclude it from being recommended as a first-line agent.

  3. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA: molecular background, virulence, and relevance for public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MF Bonesso

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS are frequently found in nosocomial environments as the main pathogen in several infections. In 1961, reports of nosocomial S. aureus resistant to methicillin, the drug of choice against penicillin-resistant strains, required new alternatives and vancomycin started being used to treat infections caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA was first reported in 1990 affecting patients without risk factors for infection with MRSA of hospital origin. MRSA of community origin harbor the genes responsible for the synthesis of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL, a toxin associated with skin and soft tissue infections and that carries the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec type IV. CA-MRSA emergence has caused great impact on the worldwide medical community since the presence of this pathogen in patients without risk factors represents a high risk to public health.

  4. Community-acquired diarrhea associated with Clostridium difficile in an HIV-positive cancer patient: first case report in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília L. Costa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is the most important cause of nosocomial diarrhea, mainly associated with antibiotic use and immunodeficiency. Although, an increased incidence of community-acquired C. difficile infection (CA-CDI has been reported worldwide, this infection has been under-diagnosed in Latin America. This is the first report of a CA-CDI case in Latin America, in an HIV-positive patient with cancer.

  5. Community-Acquired Pneumonia: a Comparison between elderly and nonelderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jafari

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community-acquired pneumonia could be a life-threatening condition especially in elderly patients. The factors influencing the outcome in elderly patients are thought to be different from those in young adults. We compared the clinical and paraclinical profiles in elderly and nonelderly patients with community-acquired pneumonias. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, seventy nine patients who were hospitalized with community acquired pneumonia over a period of one year were included. Patients' medical records were reviewed; and data related to comorbid conditions, signs and symptoms, laboratory and radiographic findings were gathered using a checklist. Results: The clinical features, laboratory parameters and complications from pneumonia were almost similar in 41 elderly (group I, age ≥65years and 38 young (group II, age<65years subjects. Delirium was seen more in elderly group (p=0.05. The average body temperature and pulse rate were significantly higher in nonelderly group. Sixty one percent of elderly patients and 21% of young patients have Po2 less than 60 (p=0.02. Smoking (29.1%, neurological disturbances (19%, congestive heart failure (15.2%, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and diabetes mellitus (13.9% were associated comorbidities in both groups. In non elderly group, immune compromise and IV drug use were more common as underlying comorbid conditions. Two of three mortalities were due to elder patients. Conclusion: Community acquired pneumonia could have more serious clinical and abnormal laboratory features in the elderly than younger patients. Mortality rate may be higher in older patients. Comorbid conditions are frequently seen in both elderly and nonelderly patients with community acquired pneumonia, but IV drug use and immune compromise are more frequent in nonelderly patients.

  6. INFECTION WITH HHV-6 OF MILITARY MEN AFFECTED BY COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

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    Brusnik SV

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus, 6 type (HHV-6 was isolated at the end of the 20th century from the blood leukocytes of patients with lymphoproliferative diseases. Serological studies conducted in different countries, indicate ubiquitylation of the HHV-6 and the existence of two antigenic variants - HHV-6A and HHV-6B. Their high tropism is determined in vitro to lymphocytic, nervous and dendritic cells of the CNS. Virus replicates in many cell, primary and passaged cultures of different origins. The reproduction cycle of HHV-6 continues on average 4-5 days forming syncytiums and intracytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions. Significant destruction and lysis almost 90 % of infected cells is reported after 5-10 day of monitoring. The utility of experimentation investigating the role of HHV-6 in the development of acute and chronic diseases in respiratory tract is caused by the fact that many patients, particularly those with chronic diseases, have complaints to chronic fatigue, decreased performance and low-grade temperature more than 3-6 months. Several studies demonstrate the presence of HHV-6 in saliva, salivary and bronchiolar glands, in swabs from pharyngonasal cavity and gorge. Tropism of HHV-6 to oropharyngeal epithelium with the possibility of finding the virus in the saliva and swabs from pharyngonasal cavity and gorge was found at the end of 20th century. This fact gave the basis for work determining the level of infection by this pathogen in patients with infectious and inflammatory pathology of the respiratory tract. Materials and methods. Serological studies were conducted with 38 soldiers affected by community-acquired pneumonia. Most of the surveyed patients were ranged in age from 20 to 45 years old, middle age (32,5±1,5 years. Patients were in stationary treatment in the Kharkov military hospital. The criteria for inclusion in the study on the infection of HHV-6 were soldiers affected by community-acquired pneumonia with atypical course of

  7. Lemierre's syndrome due to community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection and presenting with orbital cellulitis: a case report

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    Kadhiravan Tamilarasu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Lemierre's syndrome is septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein leading to metastatic septic complications following an oropharyngeal infection. It is usually caused by the anaerobe, Fusobacterium necrophorum. Of late, meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is increasingly being recognised as a cause of community-acquired skin and soft tissue infections. We report a rare case of Lemierre's syndrome caused by community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. Case presentation A previously healthy 16-year-old girl presented with fever of 13 days duration, painful swelling around the right eye and diplopia followed by the appearance of pulmonary infiltrates. Imaging studies confirmed the clinical suspicion of bilateral jugular venous thrombosis with septic pulmonary embolism. Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was isolated on blood cultures. The hospital course was complicated by massive haemoptysis and pulmonary aspiration necessitating mechanical ventilation. The patient subsequently made a complete recovery. Conclusion Lemierre's syndrome, although rare, is a potentially lethal but treatable complication of head and neck sepsis. Early clinical recognition of Lemierre's syndrome and appropriate antibiotic treatment can be life-saving. One should consider the possibility of community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in patients with suspected Lemierre's syndrome.

  8. Green tea as an effective antimicrobial for urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli

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    Wanda eReygaert

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs are a very most common type of infection worldwide, and result in billions of dollars in medical care costs. Escherichia coli is the infective agent for 80%-90% of all UTIs. Green tea, derived from leaves of the Camellia sinensis plant has been shown to have various potential health benefits (e.g. cardiovascular disease and cancer. The major beneficial components of green tea have been characterized, and are now known to be polyphenolic catechins. The main catechins in green tea are (--epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG, (--epigallocatechin (EGC, (--epicatechin (EC, and (--epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG. EGCG and EGC have been shown to have antimicrobial effects, but only EGC has been shown to be excreted in urine. Isolates of E. coli from urinary tract infections collected between 2007-2008 were characterized for antimicrobial resistance to standard drugs. Then 80 of these isolates, representing a wide spectrum of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, were selected for testing using an extract of green tea.Results: The concentrations of green tea extract tested were 0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0 mg/ml. All of the strains tested, except one, had MICs of ≤4.0 mg/ml, with 40% of the isolates having an MIC of ≤2.5 mg/ml, 36% of the isolates having an MIC of ≤3.0 mg/ml, 18% of the isolates having an MIC of ≤3.5 mg/ml, and 5% of the isolates having an MIC of ≤4.0 mg/ml. Two control strains varied in susceptibility, one having an MIC of ≤2.5 mg/ml, another having an MIC of ≤3.5 mg/ml, and the third having an MIC of ≤4.0 mg/ml.Conclusion: Since EGC has been shown to have antimicrobial effects on E. coli, and EGC has been shown to be excreted in the urine in a high enough concentration to potentially be effective as an antimicrobial; these MIC results suggest that ingesting green tea could have potential antimicrobial effects on urinary tract infections caused by E. coli.

  9. Agalactiae in uncomplicated urinary tract infections

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    Katarzyna Jermakow

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background . Urinary tract infections (UTIs represent 10-20% of all community-acquired infections. Escherichia coli remains the most commonly isolated microorganism. Because of the dominance of these bacteria, routine laboratory tests are not recommended in making the first UTI diagnosis. However, careful monitoring of all etiological agents of ncomplicated UTIs should be an important strategy for empirical therapy. Objectives . A determination of the incidence of UTI bacterial etiological agents in outpatients. Material and methods. The results of urine cultures were analyzed. The samples were obtained in the period from 01.2011 to 03.2013 from outpatients of all age groups. Results . The rods of Escherichia coli were the most frequently identified microorganisms responsible for uncomplicated UTIs. They were isolated from 52% of infected patients. Every fourth case of UTI indicated the participation of Enterococcus spp. And Streptococcus agalactiae . The next 21% of infections were caused by Gram-negative bacteria other than E. coli . The role of coagulase-negative staphylococci was insignificant and equaled less than 2%. Conclusions . Despite the dominant role of E. coli in urinary tract infections, there has been a decrease in the frequency of its isolation. However, the natural resistance of Enterococcus spp. to antibiotics increases the number of urinary tract infections caused by these bacteria. Streptococcus agalactiae is a UTI cause with similar frequency in women of reproductive age and postmenopausal women. Monitoring of the incidence of uncomplicated infections facilitates empirical treatment and prevents UTI recurrence.

  10. Clinical and economic burden of community-acquired pneumonia amongst adults in the Asia-Pacific region.

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    Song, Jae-Hoon; Thamlikitkul, Visanu; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2011-08-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an important cause of mortality and morbidity amongst adults in the Asia-Pacific region. Literature published between 1990 and May 2010 on the clinical and economic burden of CAP amongst adults in this region was reviewed. CAP is a significant health burden with significant economic impact in this region. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus and advanced age were risk factors for CAP. Aetiological agents included Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Gram-negative bacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Staphylococcus aureus and atypical pathogens (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Legionella spp.), with important differences in the prevalence of these pathogens within the region. Antibiotic resistance was significant but was not linked to excess mortality. Aetiological pathogens remained susceptible to newer antimicrobial agents. Rational antibiotic use is essential for preventing resistance, and increased surveillance is required to identify future trends in incidence and aetiology and to drive treatment and prevention strategies.

  11. Urinary reducing substances in neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency

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    Ajmal Kader

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal cholestasis due to citrin deficiency is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by mutations in SLC25A13 gene. Mutations in this gene have a relatively high prevalence in East-Asian races compared to European or Afro-Caribbean races. Mutations in both sets of chromosomes often lead to self-limiting early onset cholestasis and growth retardation referred as neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency (NICCD. It is associated with a wide range of metabolic derangements including galactosemia and aminoacidemia, which can be detected on the newborn blood spot screening. Galactose, being a reducing sugar, can also be detected using Clinitest® (Clinitest® Reagent Tablets, Bayer Corporation, Diagnostics Division, Elkhart, IN, USA, a common screening test used in the work up of metabolic and hepatic diseases. In the western population classical galactosemia is often suspected when non glucose reducing substances are detected in the urine of infants with cholestasis. However in East-Asian races the prevalence of classical galactosemia is very low whilst galactosemia due to altered uridine diphosphate-galactose epimerase activity in NICCD is more common. We present a case of NICCD in an East-Asian infant with cholestasis and persistently positive urine reducing substance. Conclusion: NICCD deficiency should be considered as a differential diagnosis in any infant with cholestasis and persistently positive urinary reducing substances.

  12. Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Staphylococcus Aureus Bacterimias from 1980 to 1993: Impact of Intravascular Devices and Methicillin Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Steinberg; C.C. Clarke; B.O. Hackman

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe rate of nosocomial bacteremia due to Staphylococcus aureus has increased over the past decade, but trends in community-acquired S. aureus bacteremia are less certain. This hospital-based observational study compares nosocomial and community-acquired S. aureus bacteremias during

  13. Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Staphylococcus Aureus Bacterimias from 1980 to 1993: Impact of Intravascular Devices and Methicillin Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Steinberg; C.C. Clarke; B.O. Hackman

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe rate of nosocomial bacteremia due to Staphylococcus aureus has increased over the past decade, but trends in community-acquired S. aureus bacteremia are less certain. This hospital-based observational study compares nosocomial and community-acquired S. aureus bacteremias during 1980-

  14. Choosing the right combination therapy in severe community-acquired pneumonia

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    Waterer, Grant W.; Rello, Jordi

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that combination antibiotic therapy is preferable to monotherapy for severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). In this issue Mortensen and colleagues present retrospective data suggesting that combination therapy with a cephalosporin and a fluoroquinolone is inferior to combination therapy with a cephalosporin and a macrolide. Several mechanisms exist by which quinolones could be inferior to macrolides in combination therapy, so if these findings are confirmed b...

  15. Biomarkers in community-acquired pneumonia: A state-of-the-art review

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    Renato Seligman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP exhibits mortality rates, between 20% and 50% in severe cases. Biomarkers are useful tools for searching for antibiotic therapy modifications and for CAP diagnosis, prognosis and follow-up treatment. This non-systematic state-of-the-art review presents the biological and clinical features of biomarkers in CAP patients, including procalcitonin, C-reactive protein, copeptin, pro-ANP (atrial natriuretic peptide, adrenomedullin, cortisol and D-dimers.

  16. Community-acquired necrotizing fasciitis caused by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus: a case report and literature review.

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    Nonaka, Yuko; Nagae, Masaaki; Omae, Takahito; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Horitani, Ryosuke; Maeda, Daigen; Yoshinaga, Takayuki

    2014-05-01

    A 61-year-old man presented with pain in the abdomen and right lower limb. He had a history of hepatitis B virus-induced liver cirrhosis, but had not been visiting the outpatient clinic and did not receive any medication. Cutaneous necrosis and bulla were observed on his abdomen and right lower limb. The necrotic skin was incised, and he was diagnosed with necrotizing fasciitis. A nonfermentative Gram-negative bacillus infection was confirmed from aspirated fluid and blood cultures. Therefore, meropenem and immunoglobulins were administered. Because necrosis was widespread, surgical debridement was performed. Thereafter, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus infection was confirmed by semi-quantitative PCR using the bullous fluid and blood cultures. Meropenem was administered for 3 weeks, followed by levofloxacin alone for 1 week. The patient's condition improved; therefore, skin grafting was performed as planned and yielded a favorable response. After rehabilitation, the patient could walk without support and infection did not recur. However, he had severe liver cirrhosis and large esophageal varices, and he eventually died from sudden varix rupture. Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon soft tissue infection, associated with high morbidity and mortality, and early recognition and treatment are crucial for survival. Acinetobacter is rarely associated with necrotizing fasciitis. Although this is a very rare case of the occurrence of necrotizing fasciitis due to A. calcoaceticus infection, we believe that this organism can be pathogenic in immunocompromised patients such as those with liver cirrhosis by reporting this case.

  17. Use of proton pump inhibitors and the risk of community-acquired pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulmez, Sinem Ezgi; Holm, Anette; Frederiksen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    . Cases (n=7642) were defined as all patients with a first-discharge diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia from a hospital during 2000 through 2004. We also selected 34 176 control subjects, who were frequency matched to the cases by age and sex. Data on the use of PPIs and other drugs......, on microbiological samples, on x-ray examination findings, and on comorbid conditions were extracted from local registries. Confounders were controlled by logistic regression. RESULTS: The adjusted odds ratio (OR) associating current use of PPIs with community-acquired pneumonia was 1.5 (95% confidence interval [CI......], 1.3-1.7). No association was found with histamine(2)-receptor antagonists (OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.8-1.3) or with past use of PPIs (OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.9-1.6). Recent initiation of treatment with PPIs (0-7 days before index date) showed a particularly strong association with community-acquired pneumonia...

  18. Chest radiographic characteristics of community-acquired Legionella pneumonia in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zhigang; Liu Xinmin; Chen Luzeng; Qiu Jianxing

    2014-01-01

    Background Legionella is an important community-acquired pneumonia pathogen.Although the elderly are especially susceptible to Legionella,few studies have looked at comparative radiographic features of Legionella pneumonia in this population.The aim of this study was to explore the chest radiographic characteristics of community-acquired Legionella pneumonia in the elderly.Methods Serial chest radiographs obtained in 34 patients hospitalized with serologically proven Legionella pneumonia were retrospectively reviewed.Chest x-ray features of an aged group of ≥65 years were assessed and compared with a non-aged group of <65 years old with regard to initial patterns and distributions of pulmonary abnormalities,accompanying signs,and progression.Results The most common initial presentation was a patchy alveolar infiltrate involving a single lobe,most often the lower lobe.There was no middle or lingular lobe involvement in the aged group patients,but bilateral pleural effusion was significantly more common in this group.In the aged group patients,radiographic progression following adequate therapy,despite a clinical response,was more often noted and the radiographs were less likely to have returned to the premorbid state at discharge,but the differences were not significant between the two groups.Conclusion The discrepancy between imaging findings and clinical symptoms seems more prominent in community-acquired Legionella pneumonia in the elderly.

  19. Hydrocephalus is a rare outcome in community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults

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    Bodilsen, Jacob; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Nielsen, Henrik I

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Community-acquired bacterial meningitis (CABM) continues to have a high mortality rate and often results in severe sequelae among survivors. Lately, an increased effort has been focused on describing the neurological complications of meningitis including hydrocephalus. To aid in this ......BACKGROUND: Community-acquired bacterial meningitis (CABM) continues to have a high mortality rate and often results in severe sequelae among survivors. Lately, an increased effort has been focused on describing the neurological complications of meningitis including hydrocephalus. To aid...... in this field of research we set out to ascertain the risk and outcome of hydrocephalus in patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis (CABM) in North Denmark Region. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective population-based cohort study of CABM cases above 14 years of age. Cases diagnosed during a 13......-year period, 1998 through 2010, were identified in a laboratory register and data were acquired through patient records. Cases not confirmed by culture met other strict inclusion criteria. The diagnosis of hydrocephalus relied upon the radiologists' reports on cranial imaging. Outcome was graded...

  20. Methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus infection among children

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    Renata Tavares Gomes

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has emerged as a pathogen associated with community-acquired infections worldwide. We report the spectrum of community-acquired S. aureus infections and compare the patients infected with methicillin-susceptible or methicillin-resistant strains among patients aged <20 years. Overall, 90 cases of community acquired S. aureus were detected in an 11-year period. Clinical and microbiological data were registered. Fifty-nine (66% patients were male and the median age was two years. The majority (87% of the patients were hospitalized and chronic underlying illnesses were detected in 27 (30% cases. Overall, 34 (37.8% patients had skin/soft tissue infections and 56 (62.2% patients had deep-seated infection. Four (5.1% patients were transferred to the intensive care unit and two (2.6% died. Complications were detected in 17 (18.9% cases, such as pleural effusion (41.2%, osteomyelitis (23.5%, and sepsis (17.6%. Six (6.7% methicillin-resistant strains were detected. Patients infected with methicillin-susceptible or methicillin-resistant strains had similar baseline characteristics and treatment outcomes. Approximately 93% of the cases received systemic antibiotics, out of which 59 (65.5% used oxacillin or cefalotin. Both methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains resulted in morbidity and death among children in this setting where methicillin-resistant strains are infrequent.

  1. Quantitative Analysis of Lung Ultrasonography for the Detection of Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A Pilot Study

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    Francesco Corradi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. Chest X-ray is recommended for routine use in patients with suspected pneumonia, but its use in emergency settings is limited. In this study, the diagnostic performance of a new method for quantitative analysis of lung ultrasonography was compared with bedside chest X-ray and visual lung ultrasonography for detection of community-acquired pneumonia, using thoracic computed tomography as a gold standard. Methods. Thirty-two spontaneously breathing patients with suspected community-acquired pneumonia, undergoing computed tomography examination, were consecutively enrolled. Each hemithorax was evaluated for the presence or absence of abnormalities by chest X-ray and quantitative or visual ultrasonography. Results. Quantitative ultrasonography showed higher sensitivity (93%, specificity (95%, and diagnostic accuracy (94% than chest X-ray (64%, 80%, and 69%, resp., visual ultrasonography (68%, 95%, and 77%, resp., or their combination (77%, 75%, and 77%, resp.. Conclusions. Quantitative lung ultrasonography was considerably more accurate than either chest X-ray or visual ultrasonography in the diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia and it may represent a useful first-line approach for confirmation of clinical diagnosis in emergency settings.

  2. Prospective etiological investigation of community-acquired pulmonary infections in hospitalized people living with HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo-Mello, Claudia; Naucler, Pontus; Negra, Marinella D.; Levin, Anna S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The study of the etiological agents of community-acquired pulmonary infections is important to guide empirical therapy, requires constant updating, and has a substantial impact on the prognosis of patients. The objective of this study is to determine prospectively the etiology of community-acquired pulmonary infections in hospitalized adults living with HIV. Patients were submitted to an extended microbiological investigation that included molecular methods. The microbiological findings were evaluated according to severity of the disease and pneumococcal vaccine status. Two hundred twenty-four patients underwent the extended microbiological investigation of whom 143 (64%) had an etiology determined. Among the 143 patients with a determined etiology, Pneumocystis jirovecii was the main agent, detected in 52 (36%) cases and followed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis accounting for 28 (20%) cases. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Rhinovirus were diagnosed in 22 (15%) cases each and influenza in 15 (10%) cases. Among atypical bacteria, Mycoplasma pneumoniae was responsible for 12 (8%) and Chlamydophila pneumoniae for 7 (5%) cases. Mixed infections occurred in 48 cases (34%). S pneumoniae was associated with higher severity scores and not associated with vaccine status. By using extended diagnostics, a microbiological agent could be determined in the majority of patients living with HIV affected by community-acquired pulmonary infections. Our findings can guide clinicians in the choice of empirical therapy for hospitalized pulmonary disease. PMID:28121925

  3. Clinical data analysis of 19 cases of community-acquired adenovirus pneumonia in immunocompetent adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong-Xia; Zhao, Mao-Mao; Pu, Zeng-Hui; Wang, Yun-Qiang; Liu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of clinical manifestations, laboratory tests and imaging changes of community-acquired adenovirus pneumonia in immunocompetent adults. A retrospective study was performed on 19 adult community-acquired adenovirus pneumonia cases in Yantai, whereby the clinical data were collected and analyzed. Of 19 cases, 14 (73.68%) had fever and 17 (89.47%) had cough symptoms. Moreover, 14 cases (73.68%) had normal white blood cell counts, while 11 cases (57.89%) exhibited a reduction in lymphocyte proportion. Among the 19 cases, 17 cases exhibited lesions in a single lung, while 2 cases involved bilateral lungs. The lesions predominantly exhibited ground glass-like changes. The clinical manifestations of adult community-acquired adenovirus pneumonia patients with normal immune functions were mild, with such presenting symptoms as fever, cough, and sputum; most patients did not exhibit high levels of white blood cells or low lymphocyte counts, and the imaging features (ground glass-like effusion) were indicative of single-lung involvement.

  4. The complete genome and phenome of a community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Daniel N; Elbourne, Liam D H; Hassan, Karl A; Eijkelkamp, Bart A; Tetu, Sasha G; Brown, Melissa H; Shah, Bhumika S; Peleg, Anton Y; Mabbutt, Bridget C; Paulsen, Ian T

    2013-01-01

    Many sequenced strains of Acinetobacter baumannii are established nosocomial pathogens capable of resistance to multiple antimicrobials. Community-acquired A. baumannii in contrast, comprise a minor proportion of all A. baumannii infections and are highly susceptible to antimicrobial treatment. However, these infections also present acute clinical manifestations associated with high reported rates of mortality. We report the complete 3.70 Mbp genome of A. baumannii D1279779, previously isolated from the bacteraemic infection of an Indigenous Australian; this strain represents the first community-acquired A. baumannii to be sequenced. Comparative analysis of currently published A. baumannii genomes identified twenty-four accessory gene clusters present in D1279779. These accessory elements were predicted to encode a range of functions including polysaccharide biosynthesis, type I DNA restriction-modification, and the metabolism of novel carbonaceous and nitrogenous compounds. Conversely, twenty genomic regions present in previously sequenced A. baumannii strains were absent in D1279779, including gene clusters involved in the catabolism of 4-hydroxybenzoate and glucarate, and the A. baumannii antibiotic resistance island, known to bestow resistance to multiple antimicrobials in nosocomial strains. Phenomic analysis utilising the Biolog Phenotype Microarray system indicated that A. baumannii D1279779 can utilise a broader range of carbon and nitrogen sources than international clone I and clone II nosocomial isolates. However, D1279779 was more sensitive to antimicrobial compounds, particularly beta-lactams, tetracyclines and sulphonamides. The combined genomic and phenomic analyses have provided insight into the features distinguishing A. baumannii isolated from community-acquired and nosocomial infections.

  5. Understanding the Patterns of Antibiotic Susceptibility of Bacteria Causing Urinary Tract Infection in West Bengal, India

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    Sunayana eSaha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is one of the most common infectious diseases at the community level. In order to assess the adequacy of empirical therapy, the susceptibility of antibiotics and resistance pattern of bacteria responsible for UTI in West Bengal, India, were evaluated throughout the period of 2008-2013. The infection reports belonging to all age groups and both sexes were considered. E. coli was the most abundant uropathogen with a prevalence rate of 67.1%, followed by Klebsiella spp. (22% and Pseudomonas spp. (6%. Penicillin was least effective against UTI-causing E. coli and maximum susceptibility was recorded for the drugs belonging to fourth generation cephalosporins. Other abundant uropathogens, Klebsiella spp., were maximally resistant to broad-spectrum penicillin, followed by aminoglycosides and third generation cephalosporin. The antibiotic resistance pattern of two principal UTI pathogens, E. coli and Klebsiella spp. in West Bengal, appears in general to be similar to that found in other parts of the Globe. Higher than 50% resistance were observed for broad-spectrum penicillin. Fourth generation cephalosporin and macrolides seems to be the choice of drug in treating UTIs in Eastern India. Furthermore, improved maintenance of infection incident logs is needed in Eastern Indian hospitals in order to facilitate regular surveillance of the occurrence of antibiotic resistance patterns, since such levels continue to change.

  6. Emergency Medicine Evaluation of Community-Acquired Pneumonia: History, Examination, Imaging and Laboratory Assessment, and Risk Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Brit; Long, Drew; Koyfman, Alex

    2017-09-20

    Pneumonia is a common infection, accounting for approximately one million hospitalizations in the United States annually. This potentially life-threatening disease is commonly diagnosed based on history, physical examination, and chest radiograph. To investigate emergency medicine evaluation of community-acquired pneumonia including history, physical examination, imaging, and the use of risk scores in patient assessment. Pneumonia is the number one cause of death from infectious disease. The condition is broken into several categories, the most common being community-acquired pneumonia. Diagnosis centers on history, physical examination, and chest radiograph. However, all are unreliable when used alone, and misdiagnosis occurs in up to one-third of patients. Chest radiograph has a sensitivity of 46-77%, and biomarkers including white blood cell count, procalcitonin, and C-reactive protein provide little benefit in diagnosis. Biomarkers may assist admitting teams, but require further study for use in the emergency department. Ultrasound has shown utility in correctly identifying pneumonia. Clinical gestalt demonstrates greater ability to diagnose pneumonia. Clinical scores including Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI); Confusion, blood Urea nitrogen, Respiratory rate, Blood pressure, age 65 score (CURB-65); and several others may be helpful for disposition, but should supplement, not replace, clinical judgment. Patient socioeconomic status must be considered in disposition decisions. The diagnosis of pneumonia requires clinical gestalt using a combination of history and physical examination. Chest radiograph may be negative, particularly in patients presenting early in disease course and elderly patients. Clinical scores can supplement clinical gestalt and assist in disposition when used appropriately. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. CHANGING TRENDS OF ANTIBIOGRAM PROFILE IN PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY ACQUIRED CHRONIC OTITIS MEDIA IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

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    Bipasa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available : INTRODUCTION: Chronic otitis media (COM is one among the commonest otological diseases encountered in otorhinolaryngological practice and attending ENT OPD especially among the lower socio-economic strata of society. AIMS: This study was carried out to know about the aerobic bacterial flora causing COM and in-vitro antibiotic susceptibility pattern in order to scientifically guide patient management instead of relying on empirical therapy alone. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study included 100 patients of community acquired COM attending ENT OPD of a tertiary care level hospital. After proper sample collection by sterile aural swabs, they were immediately sent to the microbiology laboratory for processing by aerobic culture, isolation and identification following standard recommended methods and antibiotic susceptibility tests were done by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion methods as per Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. RESULTS: Out of 100 cases of COM, microbiological culture yielded 101 bacterial isolates from 90 patients and 4 fungal isolates (3 isolates of Candida albicans and 1 isolate of Aspergillusfumigatus from 4 patients. Polymicrobial infections were seen in 11.11% patients. In this study Staphylococcus aureus (31.68% was the commonest isolate followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (23.76%. Other common bacterial isolates were E.coli, Klebsiellapneumoniae, coagulase negative Staphylococcus (CONS, Proteus mirabilis in descending order. Piperacillin-tazobactum was the most sensitive drug (85.45% among the gram-negative bacteria followed by meropenem (81.81%, amikacin (76.36% and levofloxacin (74.54%. Gram positive bacteria showed 100% sensitivity to vancomycin and 93.47% sensitivity to linezolid. For Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA isolates ciprofloxacin, cotrimoxazole, tetracycline, linezolid and vancomycin were found to have good activity. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that the common etiological

  8. Surveillance of Antibiotic Resistance among Hospital- and Community-Acquired Toxigenic Clostridium difficile Isolates over 5-Year Period in Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Wafaa Y.; Rotimi, Vincent O.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a leading and an important cause of diarrhea in a healthcare setting especially in industrialized countries. Community-associated CDI appears to add to the burden on healthcare setting problems. The aim of the study was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance of healthcare-associated and community-acquired C. difficile infection over 5 years (2008–2012) in Kuwait. A total of 111 hospital-acquired (HA-CD) and 35 community-acquired Clostridium difficile (CA-CD) clinical isolates from stool of patients with diarrhoea were studied. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of 15 antimicrobial agents against these pathogens was performed using E test method. There was no evidence of resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, daptomycin, linezolid, piperacillin-tazobactam, teicoplanin and vancomycin by both HA-CD and CA-CD isolates. Metronidazole had excellent activity against CA-CD but there was a 2.9% resistance rate against HA-CD isolates. Ampicillin, clindamycin, levofloxacin and imipenem resistance rates among the HC-CD vs. CA-CD isolates were 100 vs. 47.4%; 43 vs. 47.4%; 100 vs. 100% and 100 vs. 89%, respectively. An unexpected high rifampicin resistance rate of 15.7% emerged amongst the HA-CD isolates. In conclusion, vancomycin resistance amongst the HA-CD and CA-CD isolates was not encountered in this series but few metronidazole resistant hospital isolates were isolated. High resistance rates of ampicillin, clindamycin, levofloxacin, and imipenem resistance were evident among both CA-CD and HA-CD isolates. Rifampicin resistance is emerging among the HA-CD isolates. PMID:27536994

  9. Soluble RAGE as a severity marker in community acquired pneumonia associated sepsis

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    Narvaez-Rivera Rodrigo M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is considered the most important cause of death from infectious disease in developed countries. Severity assessment scores partially address the difficulties in identifying high-risk patients. A lack of specific and valid pathophysiologic severity markers affect early and effective sepsis therapy. HMGB-1, sRAGE and RAGE have been involved in sepsis and their potential as severity markers has been proposed. The aim of this study was to evaluate HMGB-1, RAGE and sRAGE levels in patients with CAP-associated sepsis and determine their possible association with clinical outcome. Method We evaluated 33 patients with CAP-associated sepsis admitted to the emergency room and followed in the medical wards. Severity assessment scores (CURB-65, PSI, APACHE II, SOFA and serologic markers (HMGB-1, RAGE, sRAGE were evaluated on admission. Results Thirty patients with a diagnosis of CAP-associated sepsis were enrolled in the study within 24 hours after admission. Fourteen (46.6% had pandemic (H1N1 influenza A virus, 2 (6.6% had seasonal influenza A and 14 other diagnoses. Of the patients in the study group, 16 (53.3% had a fatal outcome. ARDS was observed in 17 (56.6% and a total of 22 patients had severe sepsis on admission (73%. The SOFA score showed the greatest difference between surviving and non-surviving groups (P = .003 with similar results in ARDS patients (P = .005. sRAGE levels tended to be higher in non-surviving (P = .058 and ARDS patients (P = .058. Logistic regression modeling demonstrated that SOFA (P = .013 and sRAGE (P = .05 were the only variables that modified the probability of a fatal outcome. Conclusion The association of elevated sRAGE with a fatal outcome suggests that it may have an independent causal effect in CAP. SOFA scores were the only clinical factor with the ability to identify surviving and ARDS patients.

  10. A case of urinary tract infection caused by Raoultella planticola after a urodynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuğcu, Murat; Ruhi, Caglar; Gokce, Ali M; Kara, Melih; Aksaray, Sebahat

    Here we report the case of a patient who developed urinary tract infection after a urodynamic study. The causative agent was Raoultella planticola, a rare opportunistic pathogen that usually invades immunocompromised patients. While a urinary tract infection with R. planticola has been previously described, this is the first report in which an R. planticola infection developed after a urodynamic study. We postulate that the mechanism of infection was direct invasion of the urinary tract from contaminated urodynamic study equipment. Here, we discuss the role played by isotonic solutions in facilitating bacterial reproduction.

  11. ANTIBIOTIC SUSCEPTIBILITY OF ORGANISMS CAUSING URINARY TRACT INFECTION IN PATIENTS PRESENTING AT KENYATTA NATIONAL HOSPITAL, NAIROBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magale, H. I.; Kassim, I. A.; Odera, S. A.; Omolo, M. J.; Jaoko, W. G.; Jolly, P. E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Changes in susceptibility patterns of bacterial pathogens isolated from urinary tract infections emphasize the need for regional surveillance to generate information that can be used in management of patients. Knowledge on the current status of antimicrobial resistance in uropathogens, and the prevalence of expanding spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) in the isolates will guide policy formulations and encourage prudent use of antimicrobials. Objective Identify bacterial pathogens causing UTI and determine the association between the pathogens isolated from patients attending KNH. Determine antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the UTI pathogens and the prevalence of ESBL in the isolated pathogens. Design Laboratory-based study. Setting Department of Medical Microbiology University of Nairobi and Kenyatta National Hospital microbiology laboratory, Nairobi, Kenya. Subjects Nine hundred and forty eight patients presenting directly to the Kenyatta National Hospital’s diagnostic lab. Patients were only classified as in-patients if at the time of specimen collection they were being admitted to one of KNH wards. Results Out of the 948 urine samples processed, 189 in-patients and 37 out-patients samples had significant bacterial growth. The uropathogens identified from in-patient specimens were Escherichia coli (56), Klebsiellapneumoniae (33), Enterococcus spp. (34) and Entrobacter (16) making up 30%, 18%, 18% and 9% respectively. ESBL isolates were found to be resistant to the locally administered antibiotics; Augmentin (37%), Levofloxacin (37%), Cefoperazone (37%), Ampicillin (39%), Doxycyline (41%), Gentamicin (30%) and Nalidixic Acid (38%). Conclusion The increased prevalence of multidrug resistant ESBL pathogens poses challenges for health care providers at KNH and signifies the need for new approach to treat UTI. It would be prudent for laboratories to include specialized tests for detection of ESBL producing pathogens from isolates obtained from in

  12. Isolation of bacteria causing urinary tract infection and their antibiotic resistance profile

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    Leandro Antonio Soares

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is among the most frequent causes bringing male and female patients to the municipal health units in search of treatment. This paper aims at identifying the microorganisms responsible for this infection and at establishing their resistance profile against the antibiotics most commonly used in the municipal network. One hundred and twenty samples from patients clinically suspect to have UTI were collected and differentiated in CLED, MacConkey e chromogenic EC culture media in the Microbiology Laboratory I of the “Centro Universitário Positivo-UNICEP”. Positive samples were identified and characterized by antibiogram. 63,64% of the infections were caused by Escherichia coli and 18,18% by Staphylococcus aureus. More than 60% of the infections occurred in the age range from 12 to 33 years. The high number of samples found contaminated is an indicator for a certain difficulty in following the instructions for sample collection. Another relevant data is that 35,8% of the analyzed samples came from pregnant women. The antibiotics to which the bacteria responsible for UTI are sensitive are in great part not available at the Unified Health System but most of the isolated E.coli bacteria and 100% of Saureus showed sensitivity to the drugs Nitrofurantoin and Sulfametoxazole-trimetropim, which are available in the health units. With a compatible clinical picture, an empirical treatment with the referred drugs can be considered adequate, however post-therapy control examinations would be ideal for avoiding the appearance of resistant strains in the community.

  13. The role of haloaerosolotherapy in immunorehabilitation of convalescents after community acquired pneumonia

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    Olha Lemko

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Investigation of the peculiarities of different haloaerosoltherapy regimes influence (treatment with different intensity of haloaerosol load upon non-specific defense and cellular immunity at convalescents after community acquired pneumonia. Objectives: patients with community acquired pneumonia in the early convalescence period (after completing antibiotic therapy, who received treatment in conditions of artificial rock salt aerosol medium (haloaerosoltherapy. Material and Methods. 42 patients with non-severe community acquired pneumonia were examined in the early convalescence period before and after the course of haloaerosoltherapy, which was prescribed after antibacterial therapy. Immunological studies included: evaluation of phagocytic activity of neutrophils (PhAN - the percentage of phagocytic neutrophils, phagocytic number (PhN - average number of latex particles absorbed by a neutrophil; metabolism of neutrophils in the test with nitroblue tetrasolium (NBT-test spontaneous and induced, which allowed to assess the functional reserve of neutrophils (FR; calculation of cytochemical coefficient (CCC for lysosomal cationic proteins (LCP and for myeloperoxidase (MPO of neutrophils; number of T- and B-lymphocytes and their subpopulations (CD3+ -, CD4+ -, CD8+ -, CD22+ - lymphocytes, calculation the number of 0- lymphocytes and the ratio of CD4+ /CD8+ lymphocytes. Laboratory examinations were also conducted in 21 practically healthy individuals (control group. Two regimes of haloaerosoltherapy were used in recovery treatment of patients with community acquired pneumonia: treating complex №1 (TC-1 with standard haloaerosol load and with increased haloaerosol load (TC-2. Results. After completion the antibiotic therapy at patients with community acquired pneumonia the moderate inhibition of phagocytic activity of neutrophils (47,6±0,58% to 55,5±1,14% in control group remained and was accompanied with a decrease in neutrophil bactericidal

  14. Invasive Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Japanese Girl with Disseminating Multiple Organ Infection: A Case Report and Review of Japanese Pediatric Cases

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    Ryuta Yonezawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric invasive community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA infection is very serious and occasionally fatal. This infectious disease is still a relatively rare and unfamiliar infectious disease in Japan. We report a positive outcome in a 23-month-old Japanese girl with meningitis, osteomyelitis, fasciitis, necrotizing pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and bacteremia due to CA-MRSA treated with linezolid. PCR testing of the CA-MRSA strain was positive for PVL and staphylococcal enterotoxin b and negative for ACME. SCC mec was type IVa. This case underscores the selection of effective combinations of antimicrobial agents for its treatment. We need to be aware of invasive CA-MRSA infection, which rapidly progresses with a serious clinical course, because the incidence of the disease may be increasing in Japan.

  15. Clinical significance of nosocomial acquisition in urinary tract-related bacteremia caused by gram-negative bacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Cheol-In; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Son, Jun Seong; Ko, Kwan Soo; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2011-03-01

    Although hospital-acquired infections presumably may have a poorer prognosis than community-onset infections because of unanticipated antimicrobial resistance, little data are available on the clinical and microbiological characteristics of hospital-acquired versus community-onset urinary tract-related bacteremia cases. Data were collected from a nationwide database of surveillance for bacteremia. Data from patients with hospital-acquired urinary tract-related bacteremia were compared with those with community-onset bacteremia. Of 398 patients with urinary tract-related bacteremia, 71 (17.8%) had hospital-acquired infection, and the remaining 327 (82.2%) had community-onset infection. Although Escherichia coli was the most common isolate identified, pathogens other than E coli were more frequently isolated in hospital-acquired infections than in community-onset infections (46.5% vs 19.3%). Among E coli isolates causing hospital-acquired infections, 26.3% (10 of 38) were resistant to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs), whereas among E coli isolates causing community-onset infections, only 6.1% (16 of 264) were ESC-resistant. Hospital-acquired infection had a significantly higher mortality rate than community-onset infection (21.1% [15 of 71] vs 8.3% [27 of 327]; P = .004). Multivariate analysis identified nosocomial acquisition as a significant independent risk factor for mortality, along with severe sepsis, underlying solid tumor, ESC resistance, and high Pitt bacteremia score (all P urinary tract-related bacteremia has a poorer prognosis than community-onset bacteremia. The ESC-resistant nature of gram-negative bacilli, which may be more common in nosocomial isolates than in community isolates, adversely affects the outcome of urinary tract-related bacteremia. Copyright © 2011 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. DIFFERENTIAL BANDING PATTERN BASED IDENTIFICATION OF URINARY TRACT INFECTION CAUSING BACTERIA

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    Poulomi Nandy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary Tract Infection (UTI affects all age groups, but women are more susceptible than men. These infections are typically caused by E coli, Proteus mirabilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus fecalis and so on. Since uncultivable microbes are numerically abundant in urine samples, culture independent detection seems to be the method of choice for diagnosing UTI. This study was an attempt to design a database of banding pattern of microbial variety inhabiting normal and infected subjects. The 16S rDNA Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR product was digested with 14 different restriction enzymes and run on a 2% agarose gel. From the restriction digestion images, their banding pattern and dendogram analysis, it was possible to differentiate and distinguish between E.coli, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Staphylococcus and Enterococci genus. Most of the enzymes like XbaI, ApaI, KpnI, PstI gave similar banding patterns for Klebsiella, E.coli and Pseudomonas, which could be differentiated from the Staphylococcus members. BgII and SmaI gave similar patterns for Klebsiella and E.coli, which was in turn different from that of Pseudomonas and Staphylococcus. Enzyme BamHI not only differentiated among Staphylococcus and the other three groups but was also able to show a distinct variation in banding pattern among Staphylococcus members. The database generated was used to identify pathogens from unknown patient samples without cultivating them. HindIII and HinfI can be used as two separate potential enzymes to differentiate and distinguish between the various microbes.

  17. Evaluation of the antibacterial potential of Petroselinum crispum and Rosmarinus officinalis against bacteria that cause urinary tract infections

    OpenAIRE

    Fernanda Villas Boas Petrolini; Rodrigo Lucarini; Maria Gorete Mendes de Souza; Regina Helena Pires; Wilson Roberto Cunha; Carlos Henrique Gomes Martins

    2013-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the antibacterial activity of the crude hydroalcoholic extracts, fractions, and compounds of two plant species, namely Rosmarinus officinalis and Petroselinum crispum, against the bacteria that cause urinary tract infection. The microdilution method was used for determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). The crude hydroalcoholic extract of R. officinalis displayed in vitro activity against Gram-positive ...

  18. Adherence to clinical practice guidelines on community acquired pneumonia and its relation to mortality rates.

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    María Caridad Fragoso Marchante

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community acquired pneumonia is a common disease that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality rates. In the General University Hospital ´´Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima¨ in Cienfuegos, there are guidelines for the management of patients with community-acquired pneumonia, but no studies have been conducted as to the relation between their compliance and the mortality rate. Objective: To assess the adherence to guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and its relation to mortality in hospitalized patients. Methods: A descriptive, observational and prospective case series study was conducted in all patients with a diagnosis of pneumonia or bronchopneumonia at the moment of admission and discharge from June 2006 to May 31, 2007. The relation between the different variables and the mortality rate was analyzed as to the different types of risks and the overall compliance with the guidelines for each risk with mortality. A multivariate analysis (logistic regression was performed, with a 95% confidence interval. Results: The results are presented in tables of numbers and percent. Variables independently associated with mortality were: age (over 65 years old people, radiological lesions in more than one lobe or bilateral, atypical pneumonia debut, negative assessments as to the adherence to guidelines and inadequate treatments. Conclusion: The variables included in the study were enough to explain the final outcome of the patients, so it could be determined, for the first time in Cienfuegos, that the non-compliance with the guidelines of good clinical practice is related to mortality rates.

  19. The complete genome and phenome of a community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii.

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    Daniel N Farrugia

    Full Text Available Many sequenced strains of Acinetobacter baumannii are established nosocomial pathogens capable of resistance to multiple antimicrobials. Community-acquired A. baumannii in contrast, comprise a minor proportion of all A. baumannii infections and are highly susceptible to antimicrobial treatment. However, these infections also present acute clinical manifestations associated with high reported rates of mortality. We report the complete 3.70 Mbp genome of A. baumannii D1279779, previously isolated from the bacteraemic infection of an Indigenous Australian; this strain represents the first community-acquired A. baumannii to be sequenced. Comparative analysis of currently published A. baumannii genomes identified twenty-four accessory gene clusters present in D1279779. These accessory elements were predicted to encode a range of functions including polysaccharide biosynthesis, type I DNA restriction-modification, and the metabolism of novel carbonaceous and nitrogenous compounds. Conversely, twenty genomic regions present in previously sequenced A. baumannii strains were absent in D1279779, including gene clusters involved in the catabolism of 4-hydroxybenzoate and glucarate, and the A. baumannii antibiotic resistance island, known to bestow resistance to multiple antimicrobials in nosocomial strains. Phenomic analysis utilising the Biolog Phenotype Microarray system indicated that A. baumannii D1279779 can utilise a broader range of carbon and nitrogen sources than international clone I and clone II nosocomial isolates. However, D1279779 was more sensitive to antimicrobial compounds, particularly beta-lactams, tetracyclines and sulphonamides. The combined genomic and phenomic analyses have provided insight into the features distinguishing A. baumannii isolated from community-acquired and nosocomial infections.

  20. Caracterización etiológica y de sensibilidad a antimicrobianos en pacientes pediátricos con infección urinaria adquirida en la comunidad. Fundación Clínica Noel, Medellín, 2009;Aetiological characterization and antibiotic sensitivity patterns in paediatric patients with community-acquired urinary tract infection. Fundación Clínica Noel, Medellín, 2009

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    Jon Kepa Balparda Arias, MD*

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes: La infección del tracto urinario (ITU es una patología sumamente importante en la práctica diaria del pediatra y del médico general que atiende niños. Regularmente en su manejo se requiere la aplicación empírica de un antibiótico 48 a 72 horas antes de contar el patrón de sensibilidad antimicrobiana de la bacteria implicada. Así, es importante que el médico conozca la sensibilidad antimicrobiana de las cepas circundantes para administrar los medicamentos que maximicen el éxito en la atención de los pacientes. Metodología: Estudio descriptivo retrospectivo, a partir de registros de exámenes de orina y urocultivos realizados en el laboratorio clínico de la Fundación Clínica Noel, Medellín, para identificar los niños y niñas con ITU. Luego se analizó la información concerniente a patrones etiológicos y de sensibilidad antimicrobiana. Resultados: El microorganismo preponderante fue Escherichia coli (72.5% de los casos; otros agentes encontrados fueron Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae y Enterococcus faecalis. Los medicamentos con mayor sensibilidad fueron ceftriaxona, gentamicina y amikacina. Conclusiones: Parece razonable que el manejo empírico de la ITU no complicada en los pacientes pediátricos sea con gentamicina, excepto en los lactantes, en los cuales podría usarse ésta o amikacina indistintamente. La ceftriaxona debería ser guardada para casos complicados o por cepas resistentes.______________________________________________________________________Background: Urinary tract infections (UTI are a quite important disease process for paediatricians and for general physicians who attend children. On most cases, managing these infections includes prescribing an antibiotic agent 48 to 72 hours prior to having a urine culture result with antibiotic sensibility patters for the said strain. Therefore, it is of paramount importance for the physician to be aware of the general antibiotic resistance

  1. Persistent pathogens as risk factors of community-acquired pneumonia and acute bronchitis in children

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    O. V. Zhukova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between infection with “persistent” agents of children and the possibility of the development of inflammatory diseases of the respiratory tract such as community-acquired pneumonia and acute bronchitis on the basis of risk management concepts.Materials and methods. 701 children in age from 15 days to 16 years were examined in Nizhny Novgorod and the Nizhny Novgorod region with clinically and radiologically confirmed diagnosis: community-acquired pneumonia, acute bronchitis. This study was performed in the period from 2005 to 2014. The control group consisted of 127 healthy children of different ages. The detection of M. pneumoniae, Сytomegalovirus, Herpes simplex I/II C. pneumoniae was performed by PCR. The concept of risk determination was based on the determination of the absolute risk in the exposed and the no exposed groups, attributable risk, relative risk, the population attributable risk, as well as determining the standard errors for each type of risk and confidence interval.Results. Attributable risk, relative risk, population-attributable risk are statistically significant figures. Attributable risk of development of community-acquired pneumonia was 29,26%; 27,37%; 25,70%; 20,21% for the M. pneumoniae, C. pneumoniae, CMV, HSV I / II respectively. The relative risk was 1,43 for the M. pneumoniae; 1,38 – for C. pneumoniae and CMV; 1,28- for HSV I / II. The presence of persistent pathogens is resulting in increased incidence of communityacquired pneumonia throughout the population (population attributable risk: 4,75% for M. pneumoniae, 0,23% for C. pneumoniae, 5,59% for the CMV and 1,08% for the HSV I/II. Similar calculations were performed for patients with acute bronchitis. The statistical analysis allowed to exclude C. pneumoniae and HSV I / II of the risk factors for communityacquired pneumonia and acute bronchitis.Conclusion. The findings suggest the influence of M

  2. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Case Validation in an Anonymized Electronic Medical Record-Linked Expert System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Amartya; Maliapen, Mahendran; Ong, Venetia; Jakes, Rupert W; Mundy, Linda M; Jialiang, Li; Tambyah, Paul A

    2017-05-15

    An electronic anonymized patient portal analysis using radiographic reports and admission and discharge diagnoses had sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 84.7%, 78.2%, 75%, and 87%, respectively, for community-acquired pneumonia validated against a blinded expert medical review. This approach can help to track antimicrobial use and resistance. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Penicillin as empirical therapy for patients hospitalised with community acquired pneumonia at a Danish hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, O; Glenthøj, Jonathan Peter; Dragsted, Ulrik Bak;

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We report on the outcome of a study of patients hospitalised with community acquired pneumonia (HCAP) at a Danish university hospital. METHODOLOGY: In a retrospective study of 243 consecutive patients with radiographically verified HCAP, data on clinical and laboratory findings...... and outcome parameters were collected. Three groups were established according to the initial choice of antibiotic(s): penicillin only (n = 160); non-allergic patients starting broader spectrum therapy (n = 54); and patients with suspected penicillin allergy (n = 29). RESULTS: The overall mortality within...... with similar patterns of microbial pathogens and resistance....

  4. Community-acquired adenovirus pneumonia in a patient with chronic lymphatic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, I K; Nielsen, H

    2005-03-01

    Described here is a severe case of community-acquired adenovirus pneumonia that occurred in a previously healthy 54-year-old male who was later determined to have stage A chronic lymphatic leukemia. The clinical presentation was consistent with that of atypical pneumonia. Testing with PCR revealed adenovirus in a bronchoalveolar lavage sample, while all other tests to determine a bacterial or virological etiology were negative. Further examination of the patient revealed the previously undiagnosed chronic lymphatic leukemia. Following treatment with human immunoglobulin and oxygen therapy with continuous positive airway pressure support the patient recovered from the pneumonia completely.

  5. Impacted calculus within a urethral stent: A rare cause of urinary retention

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    Shanmugasundaram Rajaian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An elderly male presented to the emergency department with acute urinary retention. He had poor flow of urine associated with serosanguinous discharge per urethra for 3 days duration. Earlier he underwent permanent metallic urethral stenting for post TURP bulbar urethral stricture. Plain X-ray of Pelvis showed an impacted calculus within the urethral stent in bulbar urethra. Urethrolitholapaxy was done with semirigid ureteroscope. Urethral stent was patent and well covered. Subsequently he had an uneventful recovery. We describe a unique case of acute urinary retention due to calculus impaction within a urethral stent.

  6. Anterior Prostatic Cyst Causing Acute Urinary Retansion in a Young Patient

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    Huseyin Celik

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prostatic cysts are rare entities. Mostly, they originate from the posterior area of the prostate and asymptomatic. Anterior location of the prostatic cyst is rarer than posterior. The prostatic cyst in a 41 year-old man presenting with acute urinary retansion. Transurethral resection (TUR of the cyst was performed, which revealed a benign cyst lined with columnar epithelium and proliferative urothelial lining on histopathological evaluation. Prostatic cysts particularly in young men with obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms are rarely seen. Management of the prostatic cyst with TUR seems to be a minimally invasive approach with successful outcomes.

  7. Analysis of the effectiveness of physical rehabilitation according spirographic indicators in community-acquired pneumonia during convalescence

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    Kalmykova Y.S.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to make a program of physical rehabilitation for convalescents after community-acquired pneumonia, promotes normalization of respiratory function. The objectives of the study was to evaluate the dynamics spirographic indicators during convalescence community-acquired pneumonia. Material: the study involved 28 women aged 19 to 24 years with a diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia after convalescent. Results: the positive influence of physiotherapy based dance aerobics; morning hygienic gymnastics; therapeutic massage and physical therapy on indicators of lung volumes, ventilation and bronchial patency according spirographic research. Conclusion: in community-acquired pneumonia during the convalescence period recommended physical rehabilitation, which includes curative gymnastics based on dance aerobics, morning hygienic gymnastics, massage therapy, physiotherapy. It improves the functionality of the cardiorespiratory system, nonspecific immunity and overall physical performance level.

  8. Global prevalence of antibiotic resistance in paediatric urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli and association with routine use of antibiotics in primary care: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Ashley; Hay, Alastair D; Lane, Isabel F; Thornton, Hannah V; Wootton, Mandy; Costelloe, Céire

    2016-03-15

    To systematically review studies investigating the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli in children and, when appropriate, to meta-analyse the relation between previous antibiotics prescribed in primary care and resistance. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Pooled percentage prevalence of resistance to the most commonly used antibiotics in children in primary care, stratified by the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) status of the study country. Random effects meta-analysis was used to quantify the association between previous exposure to antibiotics in primary care and resistance. Observational and experimental studies identified through Medline, Embase, Cochrane, and ISI Web of Knowledge databases, searched for articles published up to October 2015. Studies were eligible if they investigated and reported resistance in community acquired urinary tract infection in children and young people aged 0-17. Electronic searches with MeSH terms and text words identified 3115 papers. Two independent reviewers assessed study quality and performed data extraction. 58 observational studies investigated 77,783 E coli isolates in urine. In studies from OECD countries, the pooled prevalence of resistance was 53.4% (95% confidence interval 46.0% to 60.8%) for ampicillin, 23.6% (13.9% to 32.3%) for trimethoprim, 8.2% (7.9% to 9.6%) for co-amoxiclav, and 2.1% (0.8 to 4.4%) for ciprofloxacin; nitrofurantoin was the lowest at 1.3% (0.8% to 1.7%). Resistance in studies in countries outside the OECD was significantly higher: 79.8% (73.0% to 87.7%) for ampicillin, 60.3% (40.9% to 79.0%) for co-amoxiclav, 26.8% (11.1% to 43.0%) for ciprofloxacin, and 17.0% (9.8% to 24.2%) for nitrofurantoin. There was evidence that bacterial isolates from the urinary tract from individual children who had received previous prescriptions for antibiotics in primary care were more likely to be resistant to antibiotics, and

  9. Global prevalence of antibiotic resistance in paediatric urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli and association with routine use of antibiotics in primary care: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Alastair D; Lane, Isabel F; Thornton, Hannah V; Wootton, Mandy; Costelloe, Céire

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To systematically review studies investigating the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli in children and, when appropriate, to meta-analyse the relation between previous antibiotics prescribed in primary care and resistance. Design and data analysis Systematic review and meta-analysis. Pooled percentage prevalence of resistance to the most commonly used antibiotics in children in primary care, stratified by the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) status of the study country. Random effects meta-analysis was used to quantify the association between previous exposure to antibiotics in primary care and resistance. Data sources Observational and experimental studies identified through Medline, Embase, Cochrane, and ISI Web of Knowledge databases, searched for articles published up to October 2015. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Studies were eligible if they investigated and reported resistance in community acquired urinary tract infection in children and young people aged 0-17. Electronic searches with MeSH terms and text words identified 3115 papers. Two independent reviewers assessed study quality and performed data extraction. Results 58 observational studies investigated 77 783 E coli isolates in urine. In studies from OECD countries, the pooled prevalence of resistance was 53.4% (95% confidence interval 46.0% to 60.8%) for ampicillin, 23.6% (13.9% to 32.3%) for trimethoprim, 8.2% (7.9% to 9.6%) for co-amoxiclav, and 2.1% (0.8 to 4.4%) for ciprofloxacin; nitrofurantoin was the lowest at 1.3% (0.8% to 1.7%). Resistance in studies in countries outside the OECD was significantly higher: 79.8% (73.0% to 87.7%) for ampicillin, 60.3% (40.9% to 79.0%) for co-amoxiclav, 26.8% (11.1% to 43.0%) for ciprofloxacin, and 17.0% (9.8% to 24.2%) for nitrofurantoin. There was evidence that bacterial isolates from the urinary tract from individual children who had received

  10. A Rare Cause of Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections, Female Urethral Diverticulum: A Case Report

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    Taha Numan Yikilmaz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A female urethral diverticulum is an uncommon pathologic entity. The most presentation of urethral diverticule has been described as lower urinary tract symptoms and dyspareunia. The case of female is presented, who consult with a vaginal mass and dyspareunia and current literature was reviewed.

  11. Labial fusion: A rare cause of urinary retention in reproductive age woman and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdoğdu, Emre; Demirel, Cem; Tahaoğlu, Ali Emre; Özdemir, Arzu

    2017-01-01

    Labial fusion usually affects prepubertal girls and postmenopausal women, it may rarely occurs in reproductive years in the absence of predisposing factors such as vulvar infections, dermatitis, trauma, female circumcision and lichen sclerosis. Should be considered in differential diagnosis in the differential diagnosis of urinary retention even if the patient doesn’t have history of sexual intercourse. PMID:28270959

  12. Hemangioma of the prostate--an unusual cause of lower urinary tract symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serizawa, Reza R; Nørgaard, Nis; Horn, Thomas;

    2011-01-01

    Hemangioma of the prostate gland is extremely rare and only a few cases have been reported. There have been several cases of hemangioma of posterior urethra, urinary bladder and periprostatic plexus in the literature, all presenting with hematuria or hematospermia. Diagnosis of prostatic hemangioma...

  13. Urinary catheterization diary – A useful tool in tracking causes of non-deflating Foley catheter

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    C.O. Okorie

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: Most urinary catheters marketed in developing countries are unidentifiable after unpacking. A catheterization diary is a useful tool for solving catheter-related problems, and its application in health-care facilities should be encouraged. Companies marketing Foley catheters should print the catheter name on both the catheter packaging and on the catheter itself.

  14. Hemangioma of the prostate--an unusual cause of lower urinary tract symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serizawa, Reza R; Nørgaard, Nis; Horn, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hemangioma of the prostate gland is extremely rare and only a few cases have been reported. There have been several cases of hemangioma of posterior urethra, urinary bladder and periprostatic plexus in the literature, all presenting with hematuria or hematospermia. Diagnosis of prostatic hemangioma...

  15. Hemangioma of the prostate - an unusual cause of lower urinary tract symptoms: Case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Hemangioma of the prostate gland is extremely rare and only a few cases have been reported. There have been several cases of hemangioma of posterior urethra, urinary bladder and periprostatic plexus in the literature, all presenting with hematuria or hematospermia. Diagnosis of prostatic hemangioma is difficult due to its rarity and unspecific symptoms such as hematuria, hematospermia or lower urinary tract symptoms. It cannot be detected by conventional examinations such as cystoscopy or standard rectal ultrasonography. Case presentation We present a case of prostatic hemangioma in an 84-year old male presenting with lower urinary tract symptoms. Bleeding has not been a feature in our case and diagnosis was not made until after operation. The patient was treated as a case of bladder neck outflow obstruction with transurethral resection of prostate gland and simultaneous bladder neck incisions. A period of self-catheterization was instituted due to postoperative urinary retention as the result of detrusor insufficiency. Conclusion Hemangioma of prostate gland is extremely rare and symptomatic prostatic hemangioma should be treated either by transurethral resection of prostate or laser evaporation. PMID:21486499

  16. Evaluation of the antibacterial potential of Petroselinum crispum and Rosmarinus officinalis against bacteria that cause urinary tract infections

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    Fernanda Villas Boas Petrolini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study we evaluated the antibacterial activity of the crude hydroalcoholic extracts, fractions, and compounds of two plant species, namely Rosmarinus officinalis and Petroselinum crispum, against the bacteria that cause urinary tract infection. The microdilution method was used for determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC. The crude hydroalcoholic extract of R. officinalis displayed in vitro activity against Gram-positive bacteria, with satisfactory MBC for the clinical isolate S. saprophyticus. The fractions and the pure compound rosmarinic acid did not furnish promising results for Gram-negative bacteria, whereas fractions 2, 3, and 4 gave encouraging results for Gram-positive bacteria and acted as bactericide against S. epidermidis as well as E. faecalis (ATCC 29212 and its clinical isolate. R. officinalis led to promising results in the case of Gram-positive bacteria, resulting in a considerable interest in the development of reliable alternatives for the treatment of urinary infections.

  17. Antimicrobial resistance among enterobacteriaceae causing uncomplicated urinary tract infections in Mauritius: consequences of past misuse of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issack, M I; Yee Kin Tet, H Y; Morlat, P

    2007-04-01

    A study was conducted to determine the nature and antimicrobial susceptibility of uropathogens in Mauritius in order to provide guidance on the empirical treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infections. The study was based on urine samples sent for bacteriological investigation at the Central Health Laboratory from unhospitalized patients over a 3-month period. Information on organisms isolated in pure growth and their antibiotic susceptibility was collected and analyzed. Entero - bacteriaceae accounted for over 80% of the 260 isolates obtained during the study period, and showed high rates of resistance to ampicillin (80%), co-trimoxazole (50%), nalidixic acid (34%) and ciprofloxacin (26%). Resistance to mecillinam and fosfomycin were only 2% and 0% respectively. The high rate of antimicrobial resistance in Enterobacteriaceae in urine is cause for concern. Fluoroquinolones may not be very reliable for empirical treatment of urinary tract infections in Mauritius. Alternatives such as pivmecillinam and fosfomycin should be considered.

  18. Evaluation of the antibacterial potential of Petroselinum crispum and Rosmarinus officinalis against bacteria that cause urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrolini, Fernanda Villas Boas; Lucarini, Rodrigo; de Souza, Maria Gorete Mendes; Pires, Regina Helena; Cunha, Wilson Roberto; Martins, Carlos Henrique Gomes

    2013-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the antibacterial activity of the crude hydroalcoholic extracts, fractions, and compounds of two plant species, namely Rosmarinus officinalis and Petroselinum crispum, against the bacteria that cause urinary tract infection. The microdilution method was used for determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). The crude hydroalcoholic extract of R. officinalis displayed in vitro activity against Gram-positive bacteria, with satisfactory MBC for the clinical isolate S. saprophyticus. The fractions and the pure compound rosmarinic acid did not furnish promising results for Gram-negative bacteria, whereas fractions 2, 3, and 4 gave encouraging results for Gram-positive bacteria and acted as bactericide against S. epidermidis as well as E. faecalis (ATCC 29212) and its clinical isolate. R. officinalis led to promising results in the case of Gram-positive bacteria, resulting in a considerable interest in the development of reliable alternatives for the treatment of urinary infections.

  19. Clinical evaluation of the role of ceftaroline in the management of community acquired bacterial pneumonia

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    Maselli DJ

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Diego J Maselli1, Juan F Fernandez1, Christine Y Whong2, Kelly Echevarria1,3, Anoop M Nambiar1,3, Antonio Anzueto1,3, Marcos I Restrepo1,3,41University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas, 2Memorial Hermann – Texas Medical Center, Houston, TX, 3South Texas Veterans Health Care System Audie l Murphy Division, San Antonio, TX, 4Veterans Evidence Research Dissemination and Implementation Center (VERDICT, San Antonio, TX, USAAbstract: Ceftaroline fosamil (ceftaroline was recently approved for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and complicated skin infections. This newly developed cephalosporin possesses a broad spectrum of activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Most importantly, ceftaroline demonstrates potent in vitro antimicrobial activity against multi-drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. In two Phase III, double-blinded, randomized, prospective trials (FOCUS 1 and FOCUS 2, ceftaroline was shown to be non-inferior to ceftriaxone for the treatment of CAP in hospitalized patients. Ceftaroline exhibits low resistance rates and a safety profile similar to that of other cephalosporins. In this review, we will evaluate the pharmacological characteristics, safety, antimicrobial properties, and efficacy of ceftaroline and its applications in the treatment of CAP.Keywords: s. pneumoniae, s. aureus, cephalosporins, pneumonia, ceftaroline, community acquired pneumonia

  20. C reactive protein, calcitonin and D-dimer in patients of community acquired pneumonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Lin Zhang; Zhen Wang; Shu-Hui Lv; Hai-Jun Jing; Jian-Yun Kang; Jian-Qing Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the clinical significance of C- reactive protein (CRP), calcitonin (PCT) and D- two (D-D) in community acquired pneumonia.Methods:A total of 102 patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) admitted from March 2015- March 2016 as the research objects. A total of 5 mL peripheral venous blood of CAP patients (within 24 h of admission, before antibiotic therapy) were collected, and centrifuged to obtain serum. Immune turbidimetric method was used in determination of CRP and DD, immune fluorescence method was used for determination of PCT.Results:As grade increasing, the levels of CRP, PCT, D-D were increased gradually, with significant difference among different levels (P<0.05); CRP, PCT and D-D levels of severe group were significantly higher than those of non severe group (P<0.05); death group, CRP, PCT and D-D levels of death group were significantly higher than those of the survival group (P< 0.05).Conclusions:CRP, PCT, D-D levels have certain correlation with degree of severity. They can be used as important indicators to judge the severity of the disease, and predict the prognosis. High levels of CRP, PCT, D-D indicate severity of the disease and poor prognosis.

  1. Antimicrobial Resistance Trends among Community-Acquired Respiratory Tract Pathogens in Greece, 2009–2012

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    Sofia Maraki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance trends of respiratory tract pathogens isolated from patients with community-acquired respiratory tract infections (CARTIs in Crete, Greece, over a 4-year period (2009–2012. A total of 588 community-acquired respiratory pathogens were isolated during the study period. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common organism responsible for 44.4% of CARTIs, followed by Haemophilus influenzae (44.2% and Moraxella catarrhalis (11.4%. Among S. pneumoniae, the prevalence of isolates with intermediate- and high-level resistance to penicillin was 27.2% and 12.3%, respectively. Macrolide resistance slightly decreased from 29.4% over the period 2009-2010 to 28.8% over the period 2011-2012. Multiresistance was observed among 56 (54.4% penicillin nonsusceptible isolates. A nonsignificant increase in resistance of H. influenzae isolates was noted for β-lactams, cotrimoxazole, and tetracycline. Among the 67 M. catarrhalis tested, 32 produced beta-lactamase and were resistant to ampicillin. Macrolide resistance decreased over the study period. All isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin + clavulanic acid, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, and the fluoroquinolones. Although a decreasing trend in the prevalence of resistance of the three most common pathogens involved in CARTIs was noted, continuous surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility at the local and national level remains important, in order to guide appropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy.

  2. [Consensus guidelines for the management of community acquired pneumonia in the elderly patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Del Castillo, Juan; Martín-Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Llinares, Pedro; Menéndez, Rosario; Mujal, Abel; Navas, Enrique; Barberán, José

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia increases with age and is associated with an elevated morbidity and mortality due to the physiological changes associated with aging and a greater presence of chronic disease. Taking into account the importance of this disease from an epidemiological and prognostic point of view, and the enormous heterogeneity described in the clinical management of the elderly, we believe a specific consensus document regarding this patient profile is necessary. The purpose of the present work was to perform a review of the evidence related to the risk factors for the etiology, the clinical presentation, the management and the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia in elderly patients with the aim of producing a series of specific recommendations based on critical analysis of the literature. This document is the result of the collaboration of different specialists representing the Spanish Society of Emergency Medicine and Emergency Care (SEMES), the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology (SEGG), the Spanish Society of Chemotherapy (SEQ), the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI), the Spanish Society of Respiratory Medicine and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR), Spanish Society of Home Hospitalization (SEHAD) and the Spanish Society of Infectious Disease and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC).

  3. Bacteriology and changes in antibiotic susceptibility in adults with community-acquired perforated appendicitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Gil Jeon

    Full Text Available This study evaluated bacterial etiology and antibiotic susceptibility in patients diagnosed with community-acquired perforated appendicitis over a 12-year-period. We retrospectively reviewed records of adult patients diagnosed with perforated appendicitis at an 800-bed teaching hospital between January 2000 and December 2011. In total, 415 culture-positive perforated appendicitis cases were analyzed. Escherichia coli was the most common pathogen (277/415, 66.7%, followed by Streptococcus species (61/415, 14.7%. The susceptibility of E. coli to ampicillin, piperacillin/tazobactam, ceftriaxone, cefepime, amikacin, gentamicin, and imipenem was 35.1%, 97.1%, 97.0%, 98.2%, 98.9%, 81.8%, and 100%, respectively. The overall susceptibility of E. coli to quinolones (ciprofloxacin or levofloxacin was 78.7%. During the study period, univariate logistic regression analysis showed a significant decrease in E. coli susceptibility to quinolones (OR = 0.91, 95% CI 0.84-0.99, P = 0.040. We therefore do not recommend quinolones as empirical therapy for community-acquired perforated appendicitis.

  4. Cytokines and Chemokines as Biomarkers of Community-Acquired Bacterial Infection

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    Michal Holub

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Routinely used biomarkers of bacterial etiology of infection, such as C-reactive protein and procalcitonin, have limited usefulness for evaluation of infections since their expression is enhanced by a number of different conditions. Therefore, several inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were analyzed with sera from patients hospitalized for moderate bacterial and viral infectious diseases. In total, 57 subjects were enrolled: 21 patients with community-acquired bacterial infections, 26 patients with viral infections, and 10 healthy subjects (control cohorts. The laboratory analyses were performed using Luminex technology, and the following molecules were examined: IL-1Ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, INF-γ, MIP-1β, and MCP-1. Bacterial etiology of infection was associated with significantly (P<0.001 elevated serum concentrations of IL-1Ra, IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α in comparison to levels observed in the sera of patients with viral infections. In the patients with bacterial infections, IL-1Ra and IL-8 demonstrated positive correlation with C-reactive protein, whereas, IL-1Ra, TNF-α, and MCP-1 correlated with procalcitonin. Furthermore, elevated levels of IL-1Ra, IL-6, and TNF-α decreased within 3 days of antibiotic therapy to levels observed in control subjects. The results show IL-1Ra as a potential useful biomarker of community-acquired bacterial infection.

  5. Focal parenchymal lesions in community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults: a clinico-radiological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katchanov, Juri [Campus Charite Mitte, Charite, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); University Hospital Charite, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Siebert, Eberhard; Klingebiel, Randolf [Campus Charite Mitte, Charite, Department of Neuroradiology, Berlin (Germany); Endres, Matthias [Campus Charite Mitte, Charite, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Center for Stroke Research Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Here, we analyzed the frequency, morphological pattern, and imaging characteristics of focal lesions as a consequence of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. We hypothesized that diffusion-weighted imaging combined with contrast-enhanced imaging, serial scanning, and multimodal vascular studies would provide further insight into the pathological basis of such parenchymal lesions in bacterial meningitis. We reviewed clinical and imaging data (i.e., magnetic resonance tomography, magnetic resonance angiography, computed tomography angiography, digital subtraction angiography) of 68 adult patients admitted to our neurological intensive care unit between March 1998 and February 2009 with the diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. We identified seven patients with parenchymal lesions. These lesions could be attributed to four morphological patterns: (1) territorial cerebral ischemia, (2) perforating vessels ischemia, (3) ischemia of presumed cardiac origin, and (4) isolated cortical lesions. Whereas the patterns (1) and (2) were associated with vasculopathy of large- and medium-sized vessels (as shown by cerebral vascular imaging), vessel imaging in (3) and (4) did not show abnormal findings. Our study implies that parenchymal lesions in acute bacterial meningitis are mainly ischemic and due to involvement of large-, medium-, and small-sized arteries of the brain. Diffusion-weighted imaging combined with conventional, CT-, or MR-based cerebral angiography revealed the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in the majority of patients. Furthermore, we detected two patients with isolated bilateral cortical involvement and normal vessel imaging. These lesions might represent ischemia due to the involvement of small pial and intracortical arteries. (orig.)

  6. A case of familial transmission of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carrying the Inu(A) gene in Santa Fe city, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Emilce de Los A; Roldán, María L; Baroni, María R; Mendosa, María A; Cristóbal, Sabrina A; Virgolini, Stella M; Faccone, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is increasingly recognized as an important pathogen causing skin and soft tissue infections as well as necrotizing pneumonia. We describe a case of familial transmission of CA-MRSA between a 6-month-old boy and his mother in Santa Fe City, Argentina. Both isolates showed an identical antimicrobial susceptibility profile, carried type IV SCCmec and harboured the pvl and the lnu(A) genes. Isolates showed indistinguishable SmaI-PFGE patterns confirming their genetic relationship. These results corroborate the intrafamilial transmission of CA-MRSA and might associate this strain with the repetitive events of furunculosis within the family.

  7. Hypertension and hyperglycemia synergize to cause incipient renal tubular alterations resulting in increased NGAL urinary excretion in rats.

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    Ana M Blázquez-Medela

    Full Text Available Hypertension and diabetes are the two leading causes of chronic kidney disease (CKD eventually leading to end stage renal disease (ESRD and the need of renal replacement therapy. Mortality among CKD and ESRD patients is high, mostly due to cardiovascular events. New early markers of risk are necessary to better anticipate the course of the disease, to detect the renal affection of additive risk factors, and to appropriately handle patients in a pre-emptive and personalized manner.Renal function and NGAL urinary excretion was monitored in rats with spontaneous (SHR or L-NAME induced hypertension rendered hyperglycemic (or not as controls.Combination of hypertension and hyperglycemia (but not each of these factors independently causes an increased urinary excretion of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL in the rat, in the absence of signs of renal damage. Increased NGAL excretion is observed in diabetic animals with two independent models of hypertension. Elevated urinary NGAL results from a specific alteration in its tubular handling, rather than from an increase in its renal expression. In fact, when kidneys of hyperglycaemic-hypertensive rats are perfused in situ with Krebs-dextran solution containing exogenous NGAL, they excrete more NGAL in the urine than hypertensive rats. We also show that albuminuria is not capable of detecting the additive effect posed by the coexistence of these two risk factors.Our results suggest that accumulation of hypertension and hyperglycemia induces an incipient and quite specific alteration in the tubular handling of NGAL resulting in its increased urinary excretion.

  8. The role of Streptococcus pneumoniae in community-acquired pneumonia among adults in Europe: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenbaum, M H; Pechlivanoglou, P; van der Werf, T S; Lo-Ten-Foe, J R; Postma, M J; Hak, E

    2013-03-01

    The primary objective of this meta-analysis was to estimate the prevalence of adult community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in Europe, adjusted for possible independent covariates. Two reviewers conducted a systematic literature search using PubMed on English-language articles that involved human subjects with CAP during the period from January 1990 to November 2011 across European countries. A mixed-effects meta-regression model was developed and populated with 24,410 patients obtained from 77 articles that met the inclusion criteria. The model showed that the observed prevalence of S. pneumoniae in CAP significantly varies between European regions, even after adjusting for explanatory covariates, including patient characteristics, diagnostic tests, antibiotic resistance, and health-care setting. The probability of detecting S. pneumoniae was substantially higher in studies that performed more frequently a diagnostic polymerase chain reaction assay compared to all the other diagnostic tests included. Furthermore, S. pneumoniae was more likely to be confirmed as the cause of a CAP in studies with intensive care unit patients as compared to those with hospital- or community-treated patients. This study provides estimates of the average observed prevalence of S. pneumoniae, which could be used for projecting the health and economic benefits of pneumococcal immunization.

  9. Atualização em pneumonia comunitária viral Update on viral community-acquired pneumonia

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    Ozéas Galeno da Rocha Neto

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A pneumonia de origem viral é uma causa prevalente de infecção respiratória em adultos imunocompetentes. Tem apresentação variada, ocasionando desde formas leves a quadros graves de insuficiência respiratória com necessidade de ventilação mecânica. Contudo, em nosso país, há poucos estudos a respeito da apresentação clínica e diagnóstico dessa infecção. Dessa forma, os autores do presente artigo têm por objetivo revisar os principais agentes virais causadores de pneumonia na comunidade e discutir as modalidades diagnósticas e terapêuticas disponíveis atualmente.Viral pneumonia is a prevalent cause of respiratory infection in immunocompetent adults. It has varied presentation, from mild to severe respiratory failure, requiring mechanical ventilation. However, in Brazil, there have been few studies on the clinical presentation and diagnosis of this infection. Thus, the authors of the present article intend to review the main viral agents that cause community-acquired pneumonia and to discuss the currently available diagnostic and therapeutic methods.

  10. Prevalence and clinical features of respiratory syncytial virus in children hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia in northern Brazil

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    Lamarão Letícia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood pneumonia and bronchiolitis is a leading cause of illness and death in young children worldwide with Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV as the main viral cause. RSV has been associated with annual respiratory disease outbreaks and bacterial co-infection has also been reported. This study is the first RSV epidemiological study in young children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP in Belém city, Pará (Northern Brazil. Methods With the objective of determining the prevalence of RSV infection and evaluating the patients’ clinical and epidemiological features, we conducted a prospective study across eight hospitals from November 2006 to October 2007. In this study, 1,050 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples were obtained from hospitalized children up to the age of three years with CAP, and tested for RSV antigen by direct immunofluorescence assay and by Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR for RSV Group identification. Results RSV infection was detected in 243 (23.1% children. The mean age of the RSV-positive group was lower than the RSV-negative group (12.1 months vs 15.5 months, pppppp Conclusion The present study highlights the relevance of RSV infection in hospitalized cases of CAP in our region; our findings warrant the conduct of further investigations which can help design strategies for controlling the disease.

  11. Postrenal transplant urinary leakage caused by segmental infarction of a renal allograft treated by partial nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehipour, Mehdi; Roozbeh, Jamshid; Eshraghian, Ahad; Nikeghbalian, Saman; Salahi, Heshmatollah; Bahador, Ali; Malek-hosseini, Seyed Ali

    2011-04-01

    Kidney transplant is the final treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease. Urinary leakage is the most-common surgical complication early after transplant. Another complication in the early posttransplant period is segmental allograft infarction. We report a kidney recipient who developed urinary leakage secondary to a segmental infarction of the upper pole of the transplanted kidney 2 months after transplant. The patient was treated successfully by a partial nephrectomy of the infracted upper lobe of the kidney. Three months after the partial nephrectomy of the allograft, serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine were normal, and the patient was able to partake in her daily activities. Partial nephrectomy in the context of infarction of a kidney allograft is safe and can be used in similar cases.

  12. Acute haematogenous community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis in an adult: Case report and review of literature

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    Dhanoa Amreeta

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has of late emerged as a cause of community-acquired infections among immunocompetent adults without risk factors. Skin and soft tissue infections represent the majority of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA clinical presentations, whilst invasive and life-threatening illness like necrotizing pneumonia, necrotizing fasciitis, pyomyositis, osteomyelitis and sepsis syndrome are less common. Although more widely described in the pediatric age group, the occurrence of CA-MRSA osteomyelitis in adults is an uncommonly reported entity. Case presentation We describe an invasive CA-MRSA infection in a 28 year-old previously healthy male, manifesting with bacteraemia, osteomyelitis of femur, pyomyositis and septic arthritis of the knee. Initially a preliminary diagnosis of osteosarcoma was suggested by imaging studies and patient underwent a bone biopsy. MRSA was subsequently isolated from blood cultures taken on day of admission, bone, tissue and pus cultures. Incision and drainage of abscess was performed and patient was treated with vancomycin, with fusidic acid added later. It took 6 months for the inflammatory markers to normalize, warranting 6-months of anti-MRSA therapy. Patient was a fervent deer hunter and we speculate that he acquired this infection from extensive direct contact with deer. Molecular characterization of this isolate showed that it belonged to multilocus sequence type (MLST ST30 and exhibited the staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec type IV, staphylococcus protein A (spa type t019, accessory gene regulator (agr type III and dru type dt10m. This strain harbored Panton-Valentine leukocidin (pvl genes together with 3 other virulent genes; sei (enterotoxin, hlg (hemolysin and fnbA (fibronectin binding protein. Conclusion This case study alerts physicians that beyond the most commonly encountered skin and soft tissue

  13. Association between Hypoalbuminaemia and Mortality in Patients with Community-Acquired Bacteraemia Is Primarily Related to Acute Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnussen, Bjarne; Oren Gradel, Kim; Gorm Jensen, Thøger; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Pedersen, Court; Just Vinholt, Pernille; Touborg Lassen, Annmarie

    2016-01-01

    We sought to investigate whether hypoalbuminaemia was mainly caused by acute or chronic factors in patients with community-acquired bacteraemia. In this population-based study, we considered 1844 adult cases of community-acquired bacteraemia that occurred in Funen, Denmark between 2000 and 2008. We used a stepwise prognostic predisposition-insult-response-organ dysfunction (PIRO) logistic regression model by initially including age and comorbidity, then added bacterial species, and finally sepsis severity. The models were furthermore analysed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Outcomes comprised mortality incidence on days 0–30 and 31–365 after the bacteraemia episode. Each step was performed with and without baseline albumin level measured on the date of bacteraemia. In 422 patients, their latest albumin measurement taken 8–30 days before the date of bacteraemia was also used in the analysis together with the baseline albumin level. For each decrease of 1g/L in plasma albumin level, the odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of mortality in the period of 0–30 days after bacteraemia were 0.86 (0.84–0.88) in both predisposition (P) and predisposition-insult (PI) models and 0.87 (0.85–0.89) in the full PIRO-model. The AUC values were 0.78 and 0.66 for mortality in the period of 0–30 days in the model comprising only predisposition factors with and without albumin levels added as a factor, respectively. The AUC values in the full PIRO-model were 0.81 and 0.73 with and without consideration of albumin levels, respectively. A higher proportion of patients died within 30 days if there was a decrease in the albumin level between days 8 and 30 before bacteraemia and the actual bacteraemia date. A single plasma albumin measurement on the bacteraemia date was a better prognostic predictor of short-term mortality than the sepsis severity score. PMID:27611431

  14. Urinary biomarkers are associated with incident cardiovascular disease, all-cause mortality and deterioration of kidney function in type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Scholten, Bernt Johan; Reinhard, Henrik; Hansen, Tine W;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We evaluated two urinary biomarkers reflecting different aspects of renal pathophysiology as potential determinants of incident cardiovascular disease (CVD), all-cause mortality and a reduced estimated GFR (eGFR) in patients with type 2 diabetes and microalbuminuria but without...... diabetes and microalbuminuria receiving multifactorial treatment, higher urinary HGF was associated with incident CVD and all-cause mortality, and higher adiponectin was associated with CVD and deterioration in renal function....

  15. Empyema and Respiratory Failure Secondary to Nephropleural Fistula Caused by Chronic Urinary Tract Infection: A Case Report

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    G. H. Jones

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of nephropleural fistula causing empyema and respiratory failure in a 68-year-old gentleman with a long history of urological problems including recurrent nephrolithiasis and urinary tract infections. He was admitted with sepsis, a productive cough, pyuria, and reduced breath sounds over the left hemithorax. Radiological imaging revealed a fistulous connection between a left-sided perinephric abscess and the pleural space. He was commenced on broad spectrum intravenous antibiotics but developed progressive respiratory failure requiring intensive care admission. Urinary and pleural aspirates cultured facultative anaerobic pathogens with identical resistance patterns. Drainage of thoracic and perinephric collections was carried out, allowing him to be extubated after 24 hours and discharged home after 18 days on an extended course of oral antibiotics. Left nephrectomy is now planned after a period of convalescence. Empyema developing in patients with known urolithiasis should alert the treating physician to the possibility that a pathological communication has formed especially if typical urinary tract pathogens are cultured from respiratory sampling.

  16. Urinary tract infection in children after cardiac surgery: Incidence, causes, risk factors and outcomes in a single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbani, Mohamed S; Ismail, Sameh R; Fatima, Anis; Shafi, Rehana; Idris, Julinar A; Mehmood, Akhter; Singh, Reetam K; Elbarabry, Mahmoud; Hijazi, Omar; Hussein, Mohamed A

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial urinary tract infection (UTI) increases hospitalization, cost and morbidity. In this cohort study, we aimed to determine the incidence, risk factors, etiology and outcomes of UTIs in post-operative cardiac children. To this end, we studied all post-operative patients admitted to the Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (PCICU) in 2012, and we divided the patients into two groups: the UTI (UTI group) and the non-UTI (control group). We compared both groups for multiple peri-operative risk factors. We included 413 children in this study. Of these, 29 (7%) had UTIs after cardiac surgery (UTI group), and 384 (93%) were free from UTIs (control group). All UTI cases were catheter-associated UTIs (CAUTIs). A total of 1578 urinary catheter days were assessed in this study, with a CAUTI density rate of 18 per 1000 catheter days. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated the following risk factors for CAUTI development: duration of urinary catheter placement (purinary tract (CAKUT) (purinary catheter, the presence of CAKUT, and the presence of syndromes comprised the main risk factors for CAUTI. Gram-negative organisms were the main causes for CAUTI, and one-third of them found to be resistant in this single-center study. Copyright © 2016 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 社区获得性地方性真菌感染研究进展%Research progress on community-acquired endemic fungal infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建华; 张力燕

    2015-01-01

    Local fungal infection is an important cause of community-acquired pneumonia,has distinct geographical distributions in epidemiology,but often occurs in the region outside epidemic areas.This paper reviews the recent literatures,focuses on the epidemiology,clinical manifestations,imaging features,diagnosis and treatment methods of the three major local fungal diseases currently occurred in North America area causing community-acquired pneumonia,including coccidioidomycosis,histoplasmosis,and blastomycosis,in order to cause clinical attention,prevent misdiagnosis and missed diagnosis.%地方性真菌感染是社区获得性肺炎的重要原因,流行病学有明显的地域分布,但经常发生在流行区以外的地区.本文综述近年相关文献,着重论述目前在北美地区发生的引起社区获得性肺炎的3个主要地方性真菌病,即球孢子菌病、组织胞浆菌病和芽生菌病的流行病学、临床表现、影像学特征、诊断方法和当前的治疗策略.以期引起临床重视,防止误诊、漏诊发生.

  18. Viruses and Gram-negative bacilli dominate the etiology of community-acquired pneumonia in Indonesia, a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farida, Helmia; Gasem, M Hussein; Suryanto, Agus; Keuter, Monique; Zulkarnain, Nasirun; Satoto, Bambang; van der Eijk, Annemiek A; Djokomoeljanto, R; Wahyono, Hendro; Verbrugh, Henri A; Severin, Juliëtte A; van den Broek, Peterhans J

    2015-09-01

    Knowledge about the etiology of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is essential for adequate management. Presently, few studies about CAP are available from Southeast Asia. This study aimed to investigate the etiology, severity, and outcome of CAP in the most populous Southeast Asia country, Indonesia. From October 2007 to April 2009, adult patients admitted with CAP to two hospitals in Semarang, Indonesia, were included to detect the etiology of CAP using a full range of diagnostic methods. The severity of disease was classified according to the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). The outcome was assessed as 30-day mortality. In total, 148 consecutive patients with CAP were included. Influenza virus (18%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (14%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (13%) were the most common agents identified. Other Gram-negative bacilli, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Chlamydia pneumoniae each accounted for 5%. The bacteria presented wild type antibiotic susceptibility profiles. Forty-four percent of subjects were high-risk patients (PSI class IV-V). The mortality rate (30%) was significantly associated with disease severity score (PGram-negative bacilli are dominant causes of CAP in this region, more so than S. pneumoniae. Most of the bacteria have wild type susceptibility to antimicrobial agents. Patients with severe disease and those with unknown etiology have a higher mortality risk. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Factors That Negatively Affect the Prognosis of Pediatric Community-Acquired Pneumonia in District Hospital in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caggiano, Serena; Ullmann, Nicola; De Vitis, Elisa; Trivelli, Marzia; Mariani, Chiara; Podagrosi, Maria; Ursitti, Fabiana; Bertolaso, Chiara; Putotto, Carolina; Unolt, Marta; Pietravalle, Andrea; Pansa, Paola; Mphayokulela, Kajoro; Lemmo, Maria Incoronata; Mkwambe, Michael; Kazaura, Joseph; Duse, Marzia; Nieddu, Francesco; Azzari, Chiara; Cutrera, Renato

    2017-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is still the most important cause of death in countries with scarce resources. All children (33 months ± 35 DS) discharged from the Pediatric Unit of Itigi Hospital, Tanzania, with a diagnosis of CAP from August 2014 to April 2015 were enrolled. Clinical data were gathered. Dried blood spot (DBS) samples for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for bacterial detection were collected in all 100 children included. Twenty-four percent of patients were identified with severe CAP and 11% died. Surprisingly, 54% of patients were admitted with a wrong diagnosis, which increased complications, the need for antibiotics and chest X-rays, and the length of hospitalization. Comorbidity, found in 32% of children, significantly increased severity, complications, deaths, need for chest X-rays, and oxygen therapy. Malnourished children (29%) required more antibiotics. Microbiologically, Streptococcus pneumonia (S. p.), Haemophilus influenza type b (Hib) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. a.) were the bacteria more frequently isolated. Seventy-five percent of patients had mono-infection. Etiology was not correlated with severity, complications, deaths, oxygen demand, or duration of hospitalization. Our study highlights that difficult diagnoses and comorbidities negatively affect clinical evolution. S. p. and Hib still play a large role; thus, implementation of current vaccine strategies is needed. DBS is a simple and efficient diagnostic method for bacterial identification in countries with scarce resources. PMID:28335406

  20. [Vaccination against community acquired pneumonia in adult patients. A position paper by Neumoexpertos en Prevención].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, E; Rivero, I; Vargas, D A; Mascarós, E; Díaz-Maroto, J L; Linares, M; Valdepérez, J; Gil, A; Molina, J; Jimeno, I; Ocaña, D; Martinón-Torres, F

    2016-10-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in adults. The annual incidence of CAP in adults in Spain ranges from 3 to 14 cases per 1,000 inhabitants. Current clinical guidelines primarily focus on the therapeutic approach to CAP rather than its prevention. The aim of this study is to develop and propose a practical guide for CAP prevention through vaccination in Spain according to available vaccines and evidence. A literature review and expert opinion. Pneumococcal and influenza vaccines are the main preventive tools available against CAP. Age, chronic diseases, and immunosuppression are risk factors for pneumonia, so these populations should be a priority for vaccination. In addition, influenza and pneumococcal vaccination is considered advisable in healthy adults under 60 years of age, and anyone with risk condition for CAP, irrespective of age. The influenza vaccine will be administered seasonally, while pneumococcal vaccination can be administered at any time of the year. Vaccination against pneumococcus and influenza in adults can help to reduce the burden of CAP and its associated complications. The available evidence supports the priority indications set out in this guide, and it would be advisable to try to achieve a wide circulation and practical implementation of these recommendations. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Usefulness and prognostic value of biomarkers in patients with community-acquired pneumonia in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; González Del Castillo, Juan; Candel, Francisco Javier

    2017-06-07

    Between all patients treated in the Emergency Department (ED), 1.35% are diagnosed with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). CAP is the main cause of death due to infectious disease (10-14%) and the most frequent reason of sepsis-septic shock in the ED. In the last decade, the search for objective tools to help establishing an early diagnosis, bacterial aetiology, severity, suspicion of bacteremia and the prognosis of mortality has increased. Biomarkers have shown their usefulness in this matter. Procalcitonin (obtains the highest accuracy for CAP diagnosis, bacterial aetiology and the presence of bacteremia), lactate (biomarker of hypoxia and tissue hypoperfusion) and proadrenomedullin (which has the greatest accuracy to predict mortality which in combination with the prognostic severity scales obtains even better results). The aim of this review is to highlight recently published scientific evidence and to compare the utility and prognostic accuracy of the biomarkers in CAP patients treated in the ED. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Garenoxacin activity against isolates form patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia and multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ronald N; Sader, Helio S; Stilwell, Matthew G; Fritsche, Thomas R

    2007-05-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) continues to cause significant morbidity worldwide, and the principal bacterial pathogens (Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae) have acquired numerous resistance mechanisms over the last few decades. CAP treatment guidelines have suggested the use of broader spectrum agents, such as antipneumococcal fluoroquinolones as the therapy for at-risk patient population. In this report, we studied 3087 CAP isolates from the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program (1999-2005) worldwide and all respiratory tract infection (RTI) isolate population of pneumococci (14665 strains) grouped by antibiogram patterns against a new des-F(6)-quinolone, garenoxacin. Results indicated that garenoxacin was highly active against CAP isolates of S. pneumoniae (MIC(90), 0.06 microg/mL) and H. influenzae (MIC(90), 99.9% of strains were inhibited at pneumoniae strains to penicillin or erythromycin; however, coresistances were high among the beta-lactams (penicillins and cephalosporins), macrolides, tetracyclines, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Analysis of S. pneumoniae isolates with various antimicrobial resistance patterns to 6 drug classes demonstrated that garenoxacin was active against >99.9% (MIC, pneumoniae that have created therapeutic dilemmas for all RTI presentations. Garenoxacin appears to be a welcome addition to the CAP treatment options, particularly for the emerging MDR pneumococci strains.

  3. CHANGING BACTERIAL ORGANISMS AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE PATTERN AMONG HOSPITALIZED COMMUNITY ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA PATIENTS IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raveendra Kodur

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Most of the times a Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP patient is being treated with empirical antibiotics by best guess method by the clinician.MDR strains are being reported from c/s reports and Gram negative rods are fast increasing both in the etiolog y and mortality of CAP patients AIM OF STUDY: 1. To find out the profile of different bacteria causing CAP at a tertiary hospital. 2. To know the treatment outcome & drug resistance pattern among culture positive CAP patients. MATERIALS & METHODS: 450 CAP patients admitted & treated between Jan. to Dec.2012 at Victoria Hospital, Bangalore were included in this hospitalized cross sectional study. All relevant investigations including sputum c/s were done. RESULTS: Positive culture reports were obtained in 165(36.33% out of 450 patients Following are the isolates - Strept.pnemoniae 32.7%, Klebsiella 18.2%, Staph.aureas 10.9%, Psedomonas 10.9%, E.coli 5.4%, Acinetobacter 7.3%, H.influenza 5.4%, Mixed growth 10%. 76% of patients recovered from CAP, 6% went a gainst medical advice, 6.6% showed unresolved pneumonia & deaths in 5.33% of patients. High degree of resistance was noted to many antibiotics including to latest cephalosporins. CONCLUSION: This study highlights the importance of culture tests and selection of proper antibiotics and to avoid misuse & abuse of higher antibiotics to prevent the emergence of MDR strains. An antibiotic policy at every level may help.

  4. Community-acquired pneumonia in Chile: the clinical relevance in the detection of viruses and atypical bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchsinger, Vivian; Ruiz, Mauricio; Zunino, Enna; Martínez, María Angélica; Machado, Clarisse; Piedra, Pedro A; Fasce, Rodrigo; Ulloa, María Teresa; Fink, Maria Cristina; Lara, Pamela; Gebauer, Mónica; Chávez, Fernando; Avendaño, Luis F

    2013-11-01

    Adult community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a relevant worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality, however the aetiology often remains uncertain and the therapy is empirical. We applied conventional and molecular diagnostics to identify viruses and atypical bacteria associated with CAP in Chile. We used sputum and blood cultures, IgG/IgM serology and molecular diagnostic techniques (PCR, reverse transcriptase PCR) for detection of classical and atypical bacteria (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumoniae) and respiratory viruses (adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus, influenza virus, parainfluenzavirus, rhinovirus, coronavirus) in adults >18 years old presenting with CAP in Santiago from February 2005 to September 2007. Severity was qualified at admission by Fine's pneumonia severity index. Overall detection in 356 enrolled adults were 92 (26%) cases of a single bacterial pathogen, 80 (22%) cases of a single viral pathogen, 60 (17%) cases with mixed bacterial and viral infection and 124 (35%) cases with no identified pathogen. Streptococcus pneumoniae and RSV were the most common bacterial and viral pathogens identified. Infectious agent detection by PCR provided greater sensitivity than conventional techniques. To our surprise, no relationship was observed between clinical severity and sole or coinfections. The use of molecular diagnostics expanded the detection of viruses and atypical bacteria in adults with CAP, as unique or coinfections. Clinical severity and outcome were independent of the aetiological agents detected.

  5. Community acquired acute bacterial meningitis in children and adults: an 11-year survey in a community hospital in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishal, J; Embon, A; Darawshe, A; Kidon, M; Magen, E

    2008-10-01

    We aimed to investigate the association between the presenting clinical manifestations of bacterial meningitis and the duration of time elapsed before lumbar puncture and start of antibiotic treatment. Retrospective epidemiologic study using the clinical records in Barzilai Medical Center Emergency Department between 1988 and 1999. 97 patients, 72 children and 25 adults with ABM were identified. 30 of 97 (31%) were diagnosed by the primary physicians at primary care units. Acute meningitis was suspected by emergency department (ED) physicians in 51% of the referred patients. Patients with a scarce clinical picture at hospital arrival (those without fever, headache or nuchal rigidity) showed a trend toward a longer median delay until a diagnostic lumbar puncture was performed and antibiotic therapy was started (median of 14.7 h compared with 2.1 h for those with severe clinical picture) (ptreatment initiation (p>0.3). The interval before diagnosis of community acquired ABM in both children and adults is longer for those patients who present to the emergency department with an atypical clinical picture, mostly, without fever and without nuchal rigidity. Until bacterial meningitis can be effectively prevented, we can expect this life-threatening infection to continue to cause diagnostic and medical difficulties.

  6. TREATMENT OUTCOME PROFILE OF NON RESOLVING PNEUMONIA AMONG HOSPITALIZED COMMUNITY ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA PATIENTS IN TERTIARY CARE CENTRE: AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raveendra

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available : BACKGROUND: Most of the times, a Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP patient is being treated with empirical antibiotics by best guess method by the clinician. Patient who did not show expected clinical improvement or resolution on chest x- ray after 2 weeks of antibiotics is considered as unresolved or non-resolving pneumonia and is a major problem, contributing to increased mortality and morbidity in the medical wards. AIM OF STUDY: 1.Tostudy the clinical profile of unresolved pneumonia among CAP. 2. To know the treatment outcome in these cases. MATERIALS & METHODS: 80 hospitalized CAP patients who did not improve either clinically or radiologically after 2 weeks of broad spectrum antibiotics were included in the study. Details of these patients including investigations done at other higher centers were recorded and patients were followed up for 6 months or till death. RESULTS: Unresolved pneumonia was commonly observed in patients more than 50 years. Pulmonary tuberculosis was the commonest cause, followed by MDR varieties of CAP, Bronchogenic carcinoma. Multiple risk factors were noted, which includes cigarette smoking, alcohol, COPD, Diabetes, HIV positive status. Elderly age, multiple risk factors, antibiotic abuse and resistance resulted in majority of the cases. CONCLUSION: This study highlights the importance of early recognition and appropriate treatment of CAP to prevent unresolved pneumonia and use of invasive and latest investigations to recognize unresolved pneumonia, to decrease mortality and morbidity.

  7. Community-acquired neonatal and infant sepsis in developing countries: efficacy of WHO's currently recommended antibiotics--systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, Lilian; Armiento, Raffaela; Subhi, Rami; Kelly, Julian; Clifford, Vanessa; Duke, Trevor

    2013-02-01

    To review the aetiology and antibiotic resistance patterns of community-acquired sepsis in developing countries in infants where no clear focus of infection is clinically identified. To estimate the likely efficacy of WHO's recommended treatment for infant sepsis. A systematic review of the literature describing the aetiology of community-acquired neonatal and infant sepsis in developing countries. Using meta-analytical methods, susceptibility was determined to the antibiotic combinations recommended by WHO: (1) benzylpenicillin/ampicillin and gentamicin, (2) chloramphenicol and benzylpenicillin, and (3) third-generation cephalosporins. 19 studies were identified from 13 countries, with over 4000 blood culture isolates. Among neonates, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella spp. and Escherichia coli accounted for 55% (39-70%) of culture positive sepsis on weighted prevalence. In infants outside the neonatal period, the most prevalent pathogens were S aureus, E coli, Klebsiella spp., Streptococcus pneumoniae and Salmonella spp., which accounted for 59% (26-92%) of culture positive sepsis. For neonates, penicillin/gentamicin had comparable in vitro coverage to third-generation cephalosporins (57% vs. 56%). In older infants (1-12 months), in vitro susceptibility to penicillin/gentamicin, chloramphenicol/penicillin and third-generation cephalosporins was 63%, 47% and 64%, respectively. The high rate of community-acquired resistant sepsis-especially that caused by Klebsiella spp. and S aureus-is a serious global public health concern. In vitro susceptibility data suggest that third-generation cephalosporins are not more effective in treating sepsis than the currently recommended antibiotics, benzylpenicillin and gentamicin; however, with either regimen a significant proportion of bacteraemia is not covered. Revised recommendations for effective second-line antibiotics in neonatal and infant sepsis in developing countries are urgently needed.

  8. The Impact of Patient Profiles and Procedures on Hospitalization Costs through Length of Stay in Community-Acquired Pneumonia Patients Based on a Japanese Administrative Database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori Uematsu

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia is a common cause of patient hospitalization, and its burden on health care systems is increasing in aging societies. In this study, we aimed to investigate the factors that affect hospitalization costs in community-acquired pneumonia patients while considering the intermediate influence of patient length of stay.Using a multi-institutional administrative claims database, we analyzed 30,041 patients hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia who had been discharged between April 1, 2012 and September 30, 2013 from 289 acute care hospitals in Japan. Possible factors associated with hospitalization costs were investigated using structural equation modeling with length of stay as an intermediate variable. We calculated the direct, indirect (through length of stay, and total effects of the candidate factors on hospitalization costs in the model. Lastly, we calculated the ratio of indirect effects to direct effects for each factor.The structural equation model showed that higher disease severities (using A-DROP, Barthel Index, and Charlson Comorbidity Index scores, use of mechanical ventilation, and tube feeding were associated with higher hospitalization costs, regardless of the intermediate influence of length of stay. The severity factors were also associated with longer length of stay durations. The ratio of indirect effects to direct effects on total hospitalization costs showed that the former was greater than the latter in the factors, except in the use of mechanical ventilation.Our structural equation modeling analysis indicated that patient profiles and procedures impacted on hospitalization costs both directly and indirectly. Furthermore, the profiles were generally shown to have greater indirect effects (through length of stay on hospitalization costs than direct effects. These findings may be useful in supporting the more appropriate distribution of health care resources.

  9. Long-term mortality after community-acquired pneumonia--impacts of diabetes and newly discovered hyperglycaemia: a prospective, observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, Heikki O; Salonen, Päivi H; Romppanen, Jarkko; Niskanen, Leo

    2014-08-21

    Community-acquired pneumonia is associated with a significant long-term mortality after initial recovery. It has been acknowledged that additional research is urgently needed to examine the contributors to this long-term mortality. The objective of the present study was to assess whether diabetes or newly discovered hyperglycaemia during pneumonia affects long-term mortality. A prospective, observational cohort study. A single secondary centre in eastern Finland. 153 consecutive hospitalised patients who survived at least 30 days after mild-to-moderate community-acquired pneumonia. Plasma glucose levels were recorded seven times during the first day on the ward. Several possible confounders were also recorded. The surveillance status and causes of death were recorded after median of 5 years and 11 months. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, a previous diagnosis of diabetes among the whole population (adjusted HR 2.84 (1.35-5.99)) and new postprandial hyperglycaemia among the non-diabetic population (adjusted HR 2.56 (1.04-6.32)) showed independent associations with late mortality. New fasting hyperglycaemia was not an independent predictor. The mortality rates at the end of follow-up were 54%, 37% and 10% among patients with diabetes, patients without diabetes with new postprandial hyperglycaemia and patients without diabetes without postprandial hyperglycaemia, respectively (pdiabetes and newly discovered postprandial hyperglycaemia increase the risk of death for several years after community-acquired pneumonia. As the knowledge about patient subgroups with an increased late mortality risk is gradually gathering, more studies are needed to evaluate the possible postpneumonia interventions to reduce late mortality. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. "I really should've gone to the doctor": older adults and family caregivers describe their experiences with community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohfeld Lynne

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Responding to acute illness symptoms can often be challenging for older adults. The primary objective of this study was to describe how community-dwelling older adults and their family members responded to symptoms of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. Methods A qualitative study that used face-to-face semi-structured interviews to collect data from a purposeful sample of seniors aged 60+ and their family members living in a mid-sized Canadian city. Data analysis began with descriptive and interpretive coding, then advanced as the research team repeatedly compared emerging thematic categories to the raw data. Searches for disconfirming evidence and member checking through focus groups provided additional data and helped ensure rigour. Results Community-acquired pneumonia symptoms varied greatly among older adults, making decisions to seek care difficult for them and their family members. Both groups took varying amounts of time as they attempted to sort out what was wrong and then determine how best to respond. Even after they concluded something was wrong, older adults with confirmed pneumonia continued to wait for days, to over a week, before seeking medical care. Participants provided diverse reasons for this delay, including fear, social obligations (work, family, leisure, and accessibility barriers (time, place, systemic. Several older adults and family members regretted their delays in seeking help. Conclusion Treatment-seeking delay is a variable, multi-phased decision-making process that incorporates symptom assessment plus psychosocial and situational factors. Public health and health care professionals need to educate older adults about the potential causes and consequences of unnecessary waits. Such efforts may reduce the severity of community-acquired pneumonia upon presentation at clinics and hospitals, and that, in turn, could potentially improve health outcomes.

  11. Evolving trends in Streptococcus pneumoniae resistance: implications for therapy of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ronald N; Jacobs, Michael R; Sader, Helio S

    2010-09-01

    Pneumonia is a major infectious disease associated with significant morbidity, mortality and utilisation of healthcare resources. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the predominant pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), accounting for 20-60% of bacterial cases. Emergence of multidrug-resistant S. pneumoniae has become a significant problem in the management of CAP. Although pneumococcal conjugate vaccine usage in children has led to significant decreases in morbidity and mortality due to S. pneumoniae in all age groups, disease management has been further complicated by the unexpected increase in resistant serotypes, such as 19A, in some regions. Until rapid and accurate diagnostic tests become available, initial treatment of CAP will remain empirical. Thus, selection of appropriate antimicrobial therapy for CAP must be based on prediction of the most likely pathogens and their local antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. This article reviews information on antimicrobial resistance patterns amongst S. pneumoniae and implications for managing CAP.

  12. Moxifloxacin pharmacokinetic profile and efficacy evaluation in empiric treatment of community-acquired pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öbrink-Hansen, Kristina; Hardlei, Tore Forsingdal; Brock, Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    for each patient were evaluated against epidemiological cutoff MIC values for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Legionella pneumophila. PK-PD targets adopted were a Cmax/MIC of ≥12.2 for all pathogens, an fAUC0-24/MIC of >34 for S. pneumoniae, and an fAUC0-24/MIC of >75 for H...... the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of moxifloxacin at 400 mg/day in 18 patients treated empirically for community-acquired pneumonia. We developed a population pharmacokinetic model to assess the potential efficacy of moxifloxacin and to simulate the maximal MICs for which recommended pharmacokinetic....... influenzae and L. pneumophila. Individual predicted estimates for Cmax/MIC and fAUC0-24/MIC as well as simulated maximal MICs resulting in target attainment for oral and intravenous administration of the drug were suitable for S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae but not for L. pneumophila. These results indicate...

  13. Predictors of failure of noninvasive ventilation in patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carron, Michele; Freo, Ulderico; Zorzi, Manuel; Ori, Carlo

    2010-09-01

    The study aimed to investigate cardiorespiratory parameters potentially predictive of failure of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Sixty-four consecutive patients with severe CAP entered the study and underwent NIV with a helmet. Arterial blood gases, Pao(2)/FIo(2), and oxygenation index (OI; mean airway pressure × FIo(2) × 100/Pao(2)) were determined before and after a 1-hour trial of NIV. Noninvasive ventilation succeeded in 28 patients (43%) and failed in 36 patients (56%). Patients who avoided intubation had significantly (P intubation failed to improve or worsened arterial blood gases during NIV trial and, by the end of the trial, had lower (P predictors of NIV failure, with OI delta being significantly more accurate. Noninvasive ventilation failed in approximately half patients with severe CAP. Posttrial to pretrial deltas of Pao(2)/FiO(2) and OI may help to guide decision about endotracheal intubation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Single versus combination antibiotic therapy in adults hospitalised with community acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Chamira; Mckeever, Tricia M; Woodhead, Mark; Lim, Wei Shen

    2013-05-01

    The benefits of β-lactam/macrolide combination therapy over β-lactam therapy alone for the treatment of hospitalised community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in relation to pneumonia severity are uncertain. We studied 5240 adults hospitalised with CAP from 72 secondary care trusts across England and Wales. The overall 30-day inpatient (IP) death rate was 24.4%. Combination therapy was prescribed in 3239 (61.8%) patients. In a multivariable model, combination therapy was significantly associated with lower 30-day IP death rate in patients with moderate-severity CAP (adjusted OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.72) and high-severity CAP (adjusted OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.96) but not low-severity CAP.

  15. Fluoroquinolones in the management of community-acquired pneumonia in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wispelwey, Brian; Schafer, Katherine R

    2010-11-01

    A literature search was conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of the respiratory fluoroquinolones (gemifloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin) and their efficacy and safety in the management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Data show that CAP is a common presentation in primary care practice, and is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the elderly. Although the causative pathogens differ depending on treatment setting and patient factors, Streptococcus pneumoniae is the primary pathogen in all treatment settings. As a class, the respiratory fluoroquinolones have a very favorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile. Pharmacodynamic criteria suggest that moxifloxacin and gemifloxacin are more potent against S. pneumoniae, which may have the added benefit of reducing resistance selection and enhancing bacterial eradication. The respiratory fluoroquinolones are also generally well tolerated, and are first-line options for outpatient treatment of CAP in patients with comorbidities or previous antibiotic use.

  16. Lung scintigraphy in differential diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer and community-acquired pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivonogov, Nikolay G., E-mail: kng@cardio-tomsk.ru [Research Institute of Cardiology, Kievskaya Street 111a, Tomsk, 634012 (Russian Federation); Efimova, Nataliya Y., E-mail: efimova@cardio-tomsk.ru; Zavadovsky, Konstantin W.; Lishmanov, Yuri B. [Research Institute of Cardiology, Kievskaya Street 111a, Tomsk, 634012 (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Avenue 30, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-02

    Ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy was performed in 39 patients with verified diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in 14 patients with peripheral lung cancer. Ventilation/perfusion ratio, apical-basal gradients of ventilation (U/L(V)) and lung perfusion (U/L(P)), and alveolar capillary permeability of radionuclide aerosol were determined based on scintigraphy data. The study demonstrated that main signs of CAP were increases in ventilation/perfusion ratio, perfusion and ventilation gradient on a side of the diseased lung, and two-side increase in alveolar capillary permeability rate for radionuclide aerosol. Unlike this, scintigraphic signs of peripheral lung cancer comprise an increase in ventilation/perfusion ratio over 1.0 on a side of the diseased lung with its simultaneous decrease on a contralateral side, normal values of perfusion and ventilation gradients of both lungs, and delayed alveolar capillary clearance in the diseased lung compared with the intact lung.

  17. Molecular characteristics of serotype 3 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates among community-acquired pneumonia patients in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isozumi, Rie; Ito, Yutaka; Ishida, Tadashi; Hirai, Toyohiro; Ito, Isao; Maniwa, Ko; Hayashi, Michio; Kagioka, Hitoshi; Hirabayashi, Masataka; Onaru, Koichi; Tomioka, Hiromi; Tomii, Keisuke; Gohma, Iwao; Osawa, Makoto; Imai, Seiichiro; Takakura, Shunji; Iinuma, Yoshitsugu; Chin, Kazuo; Ichiyama, Satoshi; Mishima, Michiaki

    2008-06-01

    In order to understand the spread of the erythromycin-resistant serotype 3 Streptococcus pneumoniae clone in Japan, we have assessed the molecular characteristics of this clone. Among 156 S. pneumoniae isolates recovered from adults with community-acquired pneumonia between 2003 and 2005, 42 were serotype 3 and 40 were sequence type (ST) 180/Netherlands(3)-31 by multilocus sequence typing. Thirty-eight of the 40 ST 180 isolates had acquired resistance to erythromycin via the ermB gene. Although the ermB-positive ST180 clone isolates were more susceptible to penicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole than ermB-positive non-ST180 isolates and contained a less mutated pbp1a or pbp2b gene, without a mefA gene, the ST180 clone was highly prevalent among ermB-positive isolates. Routine surveillance for the ST180 S. pneumoniae clone may soon become necessary.

  18. Optimal treatment strategies for community-acquired pneumonia: high-risk patients (geriatric and with comorbidity).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, C

    2001-01-01

    The four major factors predisposing individuals to community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, diabetes, and a high alcohol intake. The elderly are also at increased risk of severe infection. The introduction of fluoroquinolones with increased activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae and other CAP pathogens has been an important development, with recent guidelines recommending the use of respiratory fluoroquinolones as a first-line choice in outpatients with modifying factors, nursing home residents, and hospitalised patients in medical wards. Of the fluoroquinolones currently available that have antipneumococcal activity, levofloxacin is well tolerated and effective. It has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of CAP and widespread use has shown it to be very safe.

  19. Community-Acquired MRSA Pyomyositis: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas P. Olson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA is responsible for a broad range of infections. We report the case of a 46-year-old gentleman with a history of untreated, uncomplicated Hepatitis C who presented with a 2-month history of back pain and was found to have abscesses in his psoas and right paraspinal muscles with subsequent lumbar spine osteomyelitis. Despite drainage and appropriate antibiotic management the patient's clinical condition deteriorated and he developed new upper extremity weakness and sensory deficits on physical exam. Repeat imaging showed new, severe compression of the spinal cord and cauda equina from C1 to the sacrum by a spinal epidural abscess. After surgical intervention and continued medical therapy, the patient recovered completely. This case illustrates a case of CA-MRSA pyomyositis that progressed to lumbar osteomyelitis and a spinal epidural abscess extending the entire length of the spinal canal.

  20. Association of sputum microbiota profiles with severity of community-acquired pneumonia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Melinda M; Gent, Janneane F; Kong, Yong; Wade, Martina; Gansebom, Shane; Bramley, Anna M; Jain, Seema; Arnold, Sandra L R; McCullers, Jonathan A

    2016-07-08

    Competitive interactions among bacteria in the respiratory tract microbiota influence which species can colonize and potentially contribute to pathogenesis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, understanding of the role of respiratory tract microbiota in the clinical course of pediatric CAP is limited. We sought to compare microbiota profiles in induced sputum and nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal (NP/OP) samples from children and to identify microbiota profiles associated with CAP severity. We used 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing and several measures of microbiota profiles, including principal component analysis (PCA), to describe the respiratory microbiota in 383 children, 6 months to microbiota profiles and CAP severity (hospital length of stay and intensive care unit admission) using logistic regression. Relative abundance of bacterial taxa differed in induced sputum and NP/OP samples. In children 6 months to microbiota, which were detected in induced sputum samples, are associated with the clinical course of CAP.

  1. Lung scintigraphy in differential diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer and community-acquired pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivonogov, Nikolay G.; Efimova, Nataliya Y.; Zavadovsky, Konstantin W.; Lishmanov, Yuri B.

    2016-08-01

    Ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy was performed in 39 patients with verified diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in 14 patients with peripheral lung cancer. Ventilation/perfusion ratio, apical-basal gradients of ventilation (U/L(V)) and lung perfusion (U/L(P)), and alveolar capillary permeability of radionuclide aerosol were determined based on scintigraphy data. The study demonstrated that main signs of CAP were increases in ventilation/perfusion ratio, perfusion and ventilation gradient on a side of the diseased lung, and two-side increase in alveolar capillary permeability rate for radionuclide aerosol. Unlike this, scintigraphic signs of peripheral lung cancer comprise an increase in ventilation/perfusion ratio over 1.0 on a side of the diseased lung with its simultaneous decrease on a contralateral side, normal values of perfusion and ventilation gradients of both lungs, and delayed alveolar capillary clearance in the diseased lung compared with the intact lung.

  2. An audit of empiric antibiotic choice in the inpatient management of community-acquired pneumonia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Delaney, F

    2017-04-01

    Adherence to antimicrobial guidelines for empiric antibiotic prescribing in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has been reported to be worryingly low. We conducted a review of empiric antibiotic prescribing for sixty consecutive adult patients admitted to the Mercy University Hospital with a diagnosis of CAP. When analysed against local antimicrobial guidelines, guideline concordant empiric antibiotics were given in only 48% of cases, lower than the average rate in comparable studies. Concordance was 100% in cases where the CURB-65 pneumonia severity assessment score, on which the guidelines are based, was documented in the medical notes. The use of excessively broad spectrum and inappropriate antibiotics is a notable problem. This study supports the theory that lack of knowledge regarding pneumonia severity assessment tools and unfamiliarity with therapeutic guidelines are key barriers to guideline adherence, which remains a significant problem despite increased focus on antimicrobial stewardship programs in Ireland

  3. Cumulative clinical experience from over a decade of use of levofloxacin in community-acquired pneumonia: critical appraisal and role in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noreddin AM

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Ayman M Noreddin1, Walid F Elkhatib2, Kenji M Cunnion3, George G Zhanel41Department of Pharmacy Practice, Hampton University, Hampton, VA, USA; 2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Ain-Shams University, Cairo, Egypt; 3Department of Pediatrics, East Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USA; 4Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada Abstract: Levofloxacin is the synthetic L-isomer of the racemic fluoroquinolone, ofloxacin. It interferes with critical processes in the bacterial cell such as DNA replication, transcription, repair, and recombination by inhibiting bacterial topoisomerases. Levofloxacin has broad spectrum activity against several causative bacterial pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. Oral levofloxacin is rapidly absorbed and is bioequivalent to the intravenous formulation such that patients can be conveniently transitioned between these formulations when moving from the inpatient to the outpatient setting. Furthermore, levofloxacin demonstrates excellent safety, and has good tissue penetration maintaining adequate concentrations at the site of infection. The efficacy and tolerability of levofloxacin 500 mg once daily for 10 days in patients with CAP are well established. Furthermore, a high-dose (750 mg and short-course (5 days of once-daily levofloxacin has been approved for use in the US in the treatment of CAP, acute bacterial sinusitis, acute pyelonephritis, and complicated urinary tract infections. The high-dose, short-course levofloxacin regimen maximizes its concentration-dependent antibacterial activity, decreases the potential for drug resistance, and has better patient compliance.Keywords: levofloxacin, community-acquired pneumonia, pharmacodynamics, resistance, pharmacokinetics, clinical use

  4. Aerococcus urinae: An Emerging Cause of Urinary Tract Infection in Older Adults with Multimorbidity and Urologic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Higgins

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aerococcus urinae is a rare organism isolated from urine cultures. We present a case of an 80 year-old male with bladder cancer and multimorbidity who developed A. urinae infection. A. urinae may cause simple and complicated UTIs, bacteremia, and endocarditis in older adults with multimorbidity, chronic urinary retention, or indwelling catheters. A. urinae treatment should employ penicillin, amoxicillin, and nitrofurantoin. Due to increasing antibiotic resistance, urine culture should include antibiotic susceptibility testing. Prompt and culture-specific treatment is critical to avoid clinical progression of the infection.

  5. Characterization of Escherichia coli isolates from hospital inpatients or outpatients with urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toval, Francisco; Köhler, Christian-Daniel; Vogel, Ulrich; Wagenlehner, Florian; Mellmann, Alexander; Fruth, Angelika; Schmidt, M Alexander; Karch, Helge; Bielaszewska, Martina; Dobrindt, Ulrich

    2014-02-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the most common cause of community- and hospital-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs). Isolates from uncomplicated community-acquired UTIs express a variety of virulence traits that promote the efficient colonization of the urinary tract. In contrast, nosocomial UTIs can be caused by E. coli strains that differ in their virulence traits from the community-acquired UTI isolates. UPEC virulence markers are used to distinguish these facultative extraintestinal pathogens, which belong to the intestinal flora of many healthy individuals, from intestinal pathogenic E. coli (IPEC). IPEC is a diarrheagenic pathogen with a characteristic virulence gene set that is absent in UPEC. Here, we characterized 265 isolates from patients with UTIs during inpatient or outpatient treatment at a hospital regarding their phylogenies and IPEC or UPEC virulence traits. Interestingly, 28 of these isolates (10.6%) carried typical IPEC virulence genes that are characteristic of enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), and atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (aEPEC), although IPEC is not considered a uropathogen. Twenty-three isolates harbored the astA gene coding for the EAEC heat-stable enterotoxin 1 (EAST1), and most of them carried virulence genes that are characteristic of UPEC and/or EAEC. Our results indicate that UPEC isolates from hospital patients differ from archetypal community-acquired isolates from uncomplicated UTIs by their spectrum of virulence traits. They represent a diverse group, including EAEC, as well as other IPEC pathotypes, which in addition contain typical UPEC virulence genes. The combination of typical extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) and IPEC virulence determinants in some isolates demonstrates the marked genome plasticity of E. coli and calls for a reevaluation of the strict pathotype classification of EAEC.

  6. Cefditoren in upper and lower community-acquired respiratory tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Soriano

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Francisco Soriano1, María-José Giménez1,2, Lorenzo Aguilar1,21PRISM-AG, Madrid, Spain; 2Microbiology Department, School of Medicine, University Complutense, Madrid, SpainAbstract: This article reviews and updates published data on cefditoren in the evolving scenario of resistance among the most prevalent isolates from respiratory tract infections in the community (Streptococcus pyogenes, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. By relating the in vitro activity of cefditoren (in national and multinational surveillance and against isolates with emerging resistant genotypes/phenotypes to its pharmacokinetics, the cefditoren pharmacodynamic activity predicting efficacy (in humans, animal models, and in vitro simulations is analyzed prior to reviewing clinical studies (tonsillopharyngitis, sinusitis, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, and community-acquired pneumonia and the relationship between bacterial eradication and clinical efficacy. The high in vitro activity of cefditoren against the most prevalent respiratory isolates in the community, together with its pharmacokinetics (enabling a twice daily regimen leading to adequate pharmacodynamic indexes covering all S. pyogenes, H. influenzae, and at least 95% S. pneumoniae isolates, makes cefditoren an antibiotic that will play a significant role in the treatment of respiratory tract infections in the community. In the clinical setting, studies carried out with cefditoren showed that treatments with the 400 mg twice daily regimen were associated with high rates of bacteriological response, even against penicillin-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae, with good correlation between bacteriological efficacy/response and clinical outcome.Keywords: cefditoren, Streptococcus pyogenes, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, community-acquired respiratory tract infections

  7. Outcome of children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia treated with aqueous penicillin G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Simbalista

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the evolution and outcome of children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia receiving penicillin. METHODS: A search was carried out for all hospitalized community-acquired pneumonia cases in a 37-month period. Inclusion criteria comprised age >2 months, intravenous penicillin G use at 200,000 IU/kg/day for >48 h and chest x-ray results. Confounders leading to exclusion included underlying debilitating or chronic pulmonary illnesses, nosocomial pneumonia or transference to another hospital. Pneumonia was confirmed if a pulmonary infiltrate or pleural effusion was described by an independent radiologist blind to the clinical information. Data on admission and evolution were entered on a standardized form. RESULTS: Of 154 studied cases, 123 (80% and 40 (26% had pulmonary infiltrate or pleural effusion, respectively. Penicilli was substituted by other antibiotics in 28 (18% patients, in whom the sole significant decrease was in the frequency of tachypnea from the first to the second day of treatment (86% vs. 50%, p = 0.008. Among patients treated exclusively with penicillin G, fever (46% vs. 26%, p = 0.002, tachypnea (74% vs. 59%, p = 0.003, chest indrawing (29% vs. 13%, p<0.001 and nasal flaring (10% vs. 1.6%, p = 0.001 frequencies significantly decreased from admission to the first day of treatment. Patients treated with other antimicrobial agents stayed longer in the hospital than those treated solely with penicillin G (16±6 vs. 8±4 days, p<0.001, mean difference (95% confidence interval 8 (6-10. None of the studied patients died. CONCLUSION: Penicillin G successfully treated 82% (126/154 of the study group and improvement was marked on the first day of treatment.

  8. Prognostic scores and biomarkers for pediatric community-acquired pneumonia: how far have we come?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwaezuoke SN

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Samuel N Uwaezuoke,1 Adaeze C Ayuk2 1Pediatric Nephrology Firm, 2Pediatric Pulmonology Firm, Department of Pediatrics, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku-Ozalla, Enugu, Nigeria Abstract: This article aimed to review the current prognostic and diagnostic tools used for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and highlight those potentially applicable in children with CAP. Several scoring systems have been developed to predict CAP mortality risk and serve as guides for admission into the intensive care unit. Over the years, clinicians have adopted these tools for improving site-of-care decisions because of high mortality rates in the extremes of age. The major scoring systems designed for geriatric patients include the Pneumonia Severity Index and the confusion, uremia, respiratory rate, blood pressure, age >65 years (CURB-65 rule, as well as better predictors of intensive care unit admission, such as the systolic blood pressure, multilobar chest radiography involvement, albumin level, respiratory rate, tachycardia, confusion, oxygenation and arterial pH (SMART-COP score, the Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines, the criteria developed by España et al as well as the systolic blood pressure, oxygenation, age and respiratory rate (SOAR criteria. Only the modified predisposition, insult, response and organ dysfunction (PIRO score has so far been applied to children with CAP. Because none of the tools is without its limitations, there has been a paradigm shift to incorporate biomarkers because they are reliable diagnostic tools and good predictors of disease severity and outcome, irrespective of age group. Despite the initial preponderance of reports on their utility in geriatric CAP, much progress has now been made in demonstrating their usefulness in pediatric CAP. Keywords: community-acquired pneumonia, children, scoring systems, biomarkers 

  9. Oral versus intravenous clarithromycin in moderate to severe community-acquired pneumonia: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Nikolas; Singanayagam, Aran; Schembri, Stuart; Chalmers, James D

    2017-01-01

    British Thoracic Society guidelines recommend clarithromycin in addition to beta-lactam antibiotics for patients with community-acquired pneumonia and CURB-65 score 2-5. Intravenous therapy is commonly used but there are few data on whether oral therapy is equally effective. This observational study used propensity matching to compare two groups of patients with moderate to severe community-acquired pneumonia (CURB-65 score 2-5) treated with oral (n = 226) or intravenous (n = 226) clarithromycin on admission. Outcomes were 30-day mortality, intensive care unit admission, time to clinical stability, and length of hospital stay. There was no significant difference in 30-day mortality (16.8% for intravenous [IV] group vs. 14.6% for oral group, hazard ratio for IV group 1.11 95% CI 0.70-1.78), ICU admission (10.6% in both groups) or complications (10.6% for IV group and 9.3% for oral group) between the groups. The time to clinical stability in both cohorts was a median of 5 days (interquartile range 3-7 days, p = 0.3). The median length of hospital stay was 8 days in the IV group (interquartile range 4-14 days) and 7 days in the oral group (interquartile range 4-13 days), p = 0.5. No other differences were observed between oral and IV groups. Where the oral route is not compromised, oral macrolides appear to be equivalent to IV in treating moderate to severe CAP.

  10. "Population structure of drug-susceptible,-resistant and ESBL-producing Escherichia coli from community-acquired urinary tract"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Frederik Boëtius; Nielsen, Jesper Boye; Schønning, Kristian;

    2016-01-01

    , from non-hospitalized patients to describe the genetic kinship between resistant and susceptible isolates. We studied the populations by use of multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and abbreviated-multi locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (a-MLVA). Urine samples submitted for testing...

  11. Reservoirs of Acinetobacter baumannii outside the hospital and potential involvement in emerging human community-acquired infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eveillard, Matthieu; Kempf, Marie; Belmonte, Olivier; Pailhoriès, Hélène; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the present report was to review briefly the potentially community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii infections, to update information on the reservoirs of A. baumannii outside the hospital, and to consider their potential interactions with human infections. Most reports on potentially community-acquired A. baumannii have been published during the last 15 years. They concern community-acquired pneumonia, infections in survivors from natural disasters, and infected war wounds in troops from Iraq and Afghanistan. Although the existence of extra-hospital reservoirs of A. baumannii has long been disputed, the recent implementation of molecular methods has allowed the demonstration of the actual presence of this organism in various environmental locations, in human carriage, in pets, slaughter animals, and human lice. Although the origin of the A. baumannii infections in soldiers injured in Southwestern Asia is difficult to determine, there are some arguments to support the involvement of extra-hospital reservoirs in the occurrence of community-acquired infections. Overall, the emergence of community-acquired A. baumannii infections could be associated with interactions between animals, environment, and humans that are considered to be potentially involved in the emergence or re-emergence of some infectious diseases.

  12. Impact of the pneumococcal 10-valent vaccine on reducing hospitalization for community-acquired pneumonia in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Sandra Rodrigues; de Mello, Luane Marques; da Silva, Anderson Soares; Nunes, Altacílio Aparecido

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To describe and analyze the occurrence of hospitalizations for community-acquired pneumonia in children before and after the pneumococcal 10-valent conjugate vaccine implementation into the National Immunization Program. Methods: This is an ecological study that includes records of children younger than one year old, vaccinated and not vaccinated with the pneumococcal 10-valent conjugate vaccine in the periods pre- and post-inclusion of the vaccine in the National Immunization Program in the area covered by the Regional Health Superintendence of Alfenas, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Vaccination was considered as the exposure factor and hospitalization for community-acquired pneumonia as the endpoint, using secondary annual data by municipality. The prevalence ratio and its 95% confidence interval (95%CI) were used to verify the association between variables. The Z test was used to calculate the difference between proportions. Results: Considering the 26 municipalities of the Regional Health Superintendence of Alfenas, there was a significant reduction in hospitalizations for community-acquired pneumonia in children younger than one year of age, with prevalence ratio (PR)=0.81 (95%CI: 0.74-0.89; p<0.05), indicating a 19% lower prevalence of hospitalization for community-acquired pneumonia in the post-vaccination period. Conclusions: The results suggest the effectiveness of the pneumococcal 10-valent conjugate vaccine in preventing severe cases of community-acquired pneumonia in children younger than one year of age. PMID:27108092

  13. FREQUENCY, URINALYSIS AND SUSCEPTIBILITY PROFILE OF PATHOGENS CAUSING URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS IN ENUGU STATE, SOUTHEAST NIGERIA

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    Uju M.E. Dibua

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was designed to determine the frequency and causative agent(s of urinary tract infections (UTIs in individuals with symptoms of urinary tract infections in Enugu State of Southeast Nigeria, and to determine the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of microbial agents isolated from urine culture. Methods: The study involved 211 individuals (149 females and 62 males clinically suspected for UTI. Urine samples were collected by the mid-stream ‘clean catch' method and tested using standard procedures. Antibiotic susceptibility of the isolated pathogens was tested using the Kirby-Bauer technique according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. Results: Microscopy of centrifuged urine samples showed 16 patients had pyuria while 54 had pus cells. Calcium oxalate crystals were found in 14 samples. Urinalysis performed with urine samples showed 17 had protein; seven were nitrite positive and three had moderate to high glucose concentration. Fifty-four urine samples (36.2% from females and 12 (19.4% from males showed significant growth upon culture. Gram stain and biochemical tests identified nine different organisms with Escherichia coli as the most common isolated species. Forty three randomly selected strains were further tested for their susceptibility against a panel of antibiotics. Thirty isolates (81.08% were resistant to four or more antibiotics with the highest resistance shown by E. coli (76.67%. All the Gram- negative isolates were resistant to Ampicilox, Cefuroxime and Amoxicillin. Conclusion: Urinary tract infections were found more in females in the area under study. As found in other studies, E. coli was the most predominant isolate, although other organisms seem to be on the increase.

  14. In vitro studies of epithelium-associated crystallization caused by uropathogens during urinary calculi development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torzewska, Agnieszka; Budzyńska, Aleksandra; Białczak-Kokot, Magdalena; Różalski, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Infectious urinary stones account for about 10% of all urinary stones. In 50% of cases urolithiasis is a recurrent illness, which can lead to the loss of a kidney if not properly treated. One of the reasons for recurrence of the disease may be the ability of bacteria to invade urothelial cells, persist in the host cells and serve as potential reservoirs for infection. Various uropathogens are associated with the formation of bacteria-induced urinary stones but Proteus mirabilis is the most commonly isolated (70%). An in vitro model was used in this study to analyze intracellular growth and crystallization in the presence of P. mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Human ureter (Hu 609) and bladder (HCV 29) epithelial cell lines were infected with bacteria and incubated (3-72 h) in the presence of synthetic urine and amikacin to prevent extracellular bacterial growth. During the incubation the number of bacteria (CFU/ml) inside epithelial cells and the intensity of crystallization were established. Crystallization was determined as an amount of a calcium radioisotope. The chosen strains of uropathogens were able to invade both types of epithelial cells but the Hu 609 cells were invaded to a higher extent. However, crystallization occurred only in the presence of P. mirabilis strains which were invasive and urease-positive. The highest intensity of cell-associated crystallization was observed when the number of bacteria within the urothelium remained stable during the time of incubation. These results show that P. mirabilis has an ability to form crystals inside the host cells. Under these conditions bacteria are protected from antibiotic killing, which leads to persistent and recurrent infections. We also suspect that this phenomenon may be an important stage of kidney stones formation.

  15. Brucella melitensis: a rarely suspected cause of infections of genitalia and the lower urinary tract

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    K. Stamatiou

    Full Text Available We examined the clinical presentation and outcome of Brucellar infections of genitalia and the lower urinary tract through a review of the medical records of 10 cases of male patients with brucellar infections of the genitalia and lower urinary tract. The mean age of the patients with brucellosis was 49.2, (median 52, range 15-77 years. Eleven out of 17 patients were rural residents, 15 reported that they might have consumed unpasteurized dairy products and four reported occupational exposure. Symptoms onset was acute in almost all cases. Scrotal pain, epidedimal swelling and fever were the most common symptoms. The Wright test was positive in 13 patients, while Brucella sp. was isolated from blood cultures in six cases. Only two patients were found with abnormal liver ultrasonography. All patients underwent treatment with doxycycline and aminoglycoside for seven days and doxycycline alone for two months. Most of them responded to antibiotic therapy with rapid regression of symptoms. One patient failed to respond to therapy and presented necrotizing orchitis, as well as abscesses, which required orchectomy. Brucellar infections of the genitalia and lower urinary tract have no specific clinical presentation; the usual laboratory examination is not sufficient to diagnose this kind of infection, therefore it could easily be misdiagnosed. An analytical medical history (including overall dietary habits and recent consumption of non-pasteurized dairy products could indicate Brucelosis as would the persistence of symptoms despite a one-week antibiotic treatment. In general, patients afflicted by brucellar epididymoorchitis respond to Brucellosis antibiotic therapy, except for some rare cases that present necrotizing orchitis and require surgical treatment.

  16. Brucella melitensis: a rarely suspected cause of infections of genitalia and the lower urinary tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Stamatiou

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We examined the clinical presentation and outcome of Brucellar infections of genitalia and the lower urinary tract through a review of the medical records of 10 cases of male patients with brucellar infections of the genitalia and lower urinary tract. The mean age of the patients with brucellosis was 49.2, (median 52, range 15-77 years. Eleven out of 17 patients were rural residents, 15 reported that they might have consumed unpasteurized dairy products and four reported occupational exposure. Symptoms onset was acute in almost all cases. Scrotal pain, epidedimal swelling and fever were the most common symptoms. The Wright test was positive in 13 patients, while Brucella sp. was isolated from blood cultures in six cases. Only two patients were found with abnormal liver ultrasonography. All patients underwent treatment with doxycycline and aminoglycoside for seven days and doxycycline alone for two months. Most of them responded to antibiotic therapy with rapid regression of symptoms. One patient failed to respond to therapy and presented necrotizing orchitis, as well as abscesses, which required orchectomy. Brucellar infections of the genitalia and lower urinary tract have no specific clinical presentation; the usual laboratory examination is not sufficient to diagnose this kind of infection, therefore it could easily be misdiagnosed. An analytical medical history (including overall dietary habits and recent consumption of non-pasteurized dairy products could indicate Brucelosis as would the persistence of symptoms despite a one-week antibiotic treatment. In general, patients afflicted by brucellar epididymoorchitis respond to Brucellosis antibiotic therapy, except for some rare cases that present necrotizing orchitis and require surgical treatment.

  17. Uterine Incarceration: Rare Cause of Urinary Retention in Healthy Pregnant Patients

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    Richard Slama

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Gravid uterine incarceration (GUI is a condition that is well discussed in literature; however, there are few acute diagnoses in the emergency department (ED. We present a case series where three multiparous females presented to the ED with non-specific urinary symptoms. On bedside ultrasound, each patient was noted to have a retroverted uterus and inferior bladder entrapment under the sacral promontory. GUI is a rare condition that can lead to uremia, sepsis, peritonitis, and ultimately maternal death. Emergency physicians should include GUI in their differential diagnosis in this patient population and use bedside ultrasound as an adjunct to diagnosis.

  18. Varicella zoster virus infection causing urinary retention in a child with HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G S Wessels

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available An 11-year-old boy receiving antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection and antibacterial therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis presented with urinary retention due to varicella zoster virus infection involving the sacral nerves, confirmed on serological testing. The perineum over dermatomes S2 - S4 on the left was involved with a vesicular and superficially erosive rash. A transurethral catheter was inserted and the patient was treated with acyclovir (300 mg 6-hourly for 5 days. At follow-up 4 weeks later, the perineal skin lesions had healed, the catheter was removed and the patient was able to pass urine.

  19. Sepse por Staphylococus aureus resistente à meticilina adquirida na comunidade no sul do Brasil Sepsis due to community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Cristina Gelatti

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus resistente à meticilina foi inicialmente descrito como um típico microrganismo adquirido em infecções nosocomiais. No entanto, nos últimos anos Staphylococcus aureus resistente à meticilina adquirido na comunidade é causa de infecções de pele e tecidos moles, mas infecções graves como pneumonia e sepse podem ocorrer. Este relato descreve um caso de sepse em criança, complicado com pneumonia secundária a lesão em partes moles por Staphylococcus aureus resistente à meticilina adquirido na comunidade no Sul do Brasil. O paciente foi atendido em Unidade de Emergência com história de ferimento provocado por trauma em membro inferior que evoluiu para celulite, pneumonia e sepse.Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was initially described as a typical microorganism acquired in nosocomial infections. However, over recent years, community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has been a cause of skin and soft-tissue infections. Serious infections such as pneumonia and sepsis can also occur. This report describes a case of sepsis in a child that was complicated by pneumonia secondary to soft tissue lesions that were due to community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in southern Brazil. The patient was attended at the Emergency Unit with a history of injury caused by lower-limb trauma that evolved to cellulitis, pneumonia and sepsis.

  20. Epidemiology, microbiology and mortality associated with community-acquired bacteremia in northeast Thailand: a multicenter surveillance study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manas Kanoksil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: National statistics in developing countries are likely to underestimate deaths due to bacterial infections. Here, we calculated mortality associated with community-acquired bacteremia (CAB in a developing country using routinely available databases. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Information was obtained from the microbiology and hospital database of 10 provincial hospitals in northeast Thailand, and compared with the national death registry from the Ministry of Interior, Thailand for the period between 2004 and 2010. CAB was defined in patients who had pathogenic organisms isolated from blood taken within 2 days of hospital admission without a prior inpatient episode in the preceding 30 days. A total of 15,251 CAB patients identified, of which 5,722 (37.5% died within 30 days of admission. The incidence rate of CAB between 2004 and 2010 increased from 16.7 to 38.1 per 100,000 people per year, and the mortality rate associated with CAB increased from 6.9 to 13.7 per 100,000 people per year. In 2010, the mortality rate associated with CAB was lower than that from respiratory tract infection, but higher than HIV disease or tuberculosis. The most common causes of CAB were Escherichia coli (23.1%, Burkholderia pseudomallei (19.3%, and Staphylococcus aureus (8.2%. There was an increase in the proportion of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases (ESBL producing E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae over time. CONCLUSIONS: This study has demonstrated that national statistics on causes of death in developing countries could be improved by integrating information from readily available databases. CAB is neglected as an important cause of death, and specific prevention and intervention is urgently required to reduce its incidence and mortality.

  1. [Septic shock due to a community acquired Clostridium difficile infection. A case study and a review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, C; Maseda, E; Salgado, P; Gabilondo, G; Gilsanz, F

    2014-04-01

    The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection has changed in the past decade. The incidence rate of community acquired cases has increased in patients with no typical risk factors. We present a patient who was diagnosed with community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection who presented with acute abdominal pain, and subsequently developed acute renal failure and septic shock. We describe the diagnosis, treatment and outcome and brief review of the literature. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pyomyositis with myelitis: A rare occurrence with diverse presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni Girish

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is the most common bacterial pathogen implicated in pyomyositis. There are increasing reports of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA infections. The present case report brings out the diverse clinical manifestations of MRSA infection in the form of paraspinal pyomyositis, myelitis, spinal osteomyelitis, and pneumonia. Molecular typing of the organism confirmed the diagnosis. Patient was successfully treated with vancomycin and surgical drainage. Consideration of the possibility of methicillin-resistance and appropriate antibiotic selection is vital in the treatment of serious community-acquired staphylococcal infections.

  3. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli metabolite-dependent quiescence and persistence may explain antibiotic tolerance during urinary tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leatham-Jensen, Mary P.; Mokszycki, Matthew E.; Rowley, David C.

    2016-01-01

    infections by interfering with quiescence and persistence. IMPORTANCE Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) affect 10 to 40% of women. In up to 77% of those cases, the recurrent infections are caused by the same uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strain that caused the initial infection. Upon infection...... that can be prevented by various combinations of lysine, methionine, and tyrosine. Moreover, the quiescent state is characteristic of ~80% of E. coli phylogenetic group B2 multilocus sequence type 73 strains, as well as 22.5% of randomly selected UPEC strains isolated from community-acquired urinary tract...... infections in Denmark. In addition, E. coli CFT073 quiescence is not limited to glucose but occurs on agar plates containing a number of other sugars and acetate as sole carbon sources. It is also shown that a number of E. coli CFT073 mini-Tn5 metabolic mutants (gnd, gdhA, pykF, sdhA, and zwf...

  4. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli metabolite-dependent quiescence and persistence may explain antibiotic tolerance during urinary tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leatham-Jensen, Mary P.; Mokszycki, Matthew E.; Rowley, David C.

    2016-01-01

    infections by interfering with quiescence and persistence. IMPORTANCE Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) affect 10 to 40% of women. In up to 77% of those cases, the recurrent infections are caused by the same uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strain that caused the initial infection. Upon infection...... that can be prevented by various combinations of lysine, methionine, and tyrosine. Moreover, the quiescent state is characteristic of ~80% of E. coli phylogenetic group B2 multilocus sequence type 73 strains, as well as 22.5% of randomly selected UPEC strains isolated from community-acquired urinary tract...... infections in Denmark. In addition, E. coli CFT073 quiescence is not limited to glucose but occurs on agar plates containing a number of other sugars and acetate as sole carbon sources. It is also shown that a number of E. coli CFT073 mini-Tn5 metabolic mutants (gnd, gdhA, pykF, sdhA, and zwf...

  5. Impact and indication of early systemic corticosteroids for very severe community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugajin M

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Motoi Ugajin, Kenichi Yamaki, Natsuko Hirasawa, Takanori Kobayashi, Takeo YagiDepartment of Respiratory Medicine, Ichinomiya-Nishi Hospital, Ichinomiya City, Aichi Prefecture, JapanBackground: The efficacy of systemic corticosteroids in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP has not yet been confirmed. We prospectively investigated the clinical features of patients treated with early adjunctive systemic corticosteroids and its clinical impact in very severe CAP.Methods: One hundred and one consecutive CAP patients having a pneumonia severity index of >130 points were enrolled from August 2010 through February 2013. Early adjunctive systemic corticosteroids were defined as administration of systemic corticosteroids equivalent to prednisone of ≥20 mg/day added to initial antibiotics. The multivariate analysis was performed to evaluate the independent factors associated with mortality.Results: Thirty-two patients (31.7% died within 28 days of admission. Early adjunctive systemic corticosteroids were administered in 30 patients (29.7%, who more frequently had alteration of mental status, serious respiratory failure, or underlying lung diseases and received fluoroquinolones as initial antibiotics. In most patients treated with early adjunctive systemic corticosteroids, the dosage was less than 60 mg/day of an equivalent to prednisone by bolus intravenous infusion for a period shorter than 8 days. The occurrence of adverse events did not differ between the groups. Factors independently associated with mortality were blood urea nitrogen (hazard ratio [HR] 1.02, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00–1.04, serum albumin (HR 0.44, 95% CI 0.22–0.86, a requirement for intensive care (HR 4.93, 95% CI 1.75–13.87, and the therapy with early adjunctive systemic corticosteroids (HR 0.29, 95% CI 0.11–0.81.Conclusion: Early adjunctive systemic corticosteroids may have an effect to reduce the mortality in very severe CAP, although a larger-scale study is necessary

  6. An unprecedented outbreak investigation for nosocomial and community-acquired legionellosis in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Vincent Chi-Chung; Wong, Samson Sai-Yin; Chen, Jonathan Hon-Kwan; Chan, Jasper Fuk-Woo; To, Kelvin Kai-Wang; Poon, Rosana Wing-Shan; Wong, Sally Cheuk-Ying; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Tai, Josepha Wai-Ming; Ho, Pak-Leung; Tsang, Thomas Ho-Fai; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2012-12-01

    The environmental sources associated with community-acquired or nosocomial legionellosis were not always detectable in the mainland of China and Hong Kong, China. The objective of this study was to illustrate the control measures implemented for nosocomial and community outbreaks of legionellosis, and to understand the environmental distribution of legionella in the water system in Hong Kong, China. We investigated the environmental sources of two cases of legionellosis acquired in the hospital and the community by extensive outbreak investigation and sampling of the potable water system using culture and genetic testing at the respective premises. The diagnosis of nosocomial legionellosis was suspected in a patient presenting with nosocomial pneumonia not responsive to multiple beta-lactam antibiotics with subsequent confirmation by Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 antigenuria. High counts of Legionella pneumophila were detected in the potable water supply of the 70-year-old hospital building. Another patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis presenting with acute community-acquired pneumonia and severe diarrhoea was positive for Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing on both sputum and nasopharyngeal aspirate despite negative antigenuria. Paradoxically the source of the second case was traced to the water system of a newly commissioned office building complex. No further cases were detected after shock hyperchlorination with or without superheating of the water systems. Subsequent legionella counts were drastically reduced. Point-of-care infection control by off-boiled or sterile water for mouth care and installation of water filter for showers in the hospital wards for immunocompromised patients was instituted. Territory wide investigation of the community potable water supply showed that 22.1% of the household water supply was positive at a mean legionella count of 108.56 CFU/ml (range 0.10 to 639.30 CFU

  7. High creatinine clearance in critically ill patients with community-acquired acute infectious meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lautrette Alexandre

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A high dose of anti-infective agents is recommended when treating infectious meningitis. High creatinine clearance (CrCl may affect the pharmacokinetic / pharmacodynamic relationships of anti-infective drugs eliminated by the kidneys. We recorded the incidence of high CrCl in intensive care unit (ICU patients admitted with meningitis and assessed the diagnostic accuracy of two common methods used to identify high CrCl. Methods Observational study performed in consecutive patients admitted with community-acquired acute infectious meningitis (defined by >7 white blood cells/mm3 in cerebral spinal fluid between January 2006 and December 2009 to one medical ICU. During the first 7 days following ICU admission, CrCl was measured from 24-hr urine samples (24-hr-UV/P creatinine and estimated according to Cockcroft-Gault formula and the simplified Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD equation. High CrCl was defined as CrCl >140 ml/min/1.73 m2 by 24-hr-UV/P creatinine. Diagnostic accuracy was performed with ROC curves analysis. Results Thirty two patients were included. High CrCl was present in 8 patients (25% on ICU admission and in 15 patients (47% during the first 7 ICU days for a median duration of 3 (1-4 days. For the Cockcroft-Gault formula, the best threshold to predict high CrCl was 101 ml/min/1.73 m2 (sensitivity: 0.96, specificity: 0.75, AUC = 0.90 ± 0.03 with a negative likelihood ratio of 0.06. For the simplified MDRD equation, the best threshold to predict high CrCl was 108 ml/min/1.73 m2 (sensitivity: 0.91, specificity: 0.80, AUC = 0.88 ± 0.03 with a negative likelihood ratio of 0.11. There was no difference between the estimated methods in the diagnostic accuracy of identifying high CrCl (p = 0.30. Conclusions High CrCl is frequently observed in ICU patients admitted with community-acquired acute infectious meningitis. The estimated methods of CrCl could be used as a screening tool to

  8. An unprecedented outbreak investigation for nosocomial and community-acquired legionellosis in Hong Kong

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Vincent Chi-chung; HO Pak-leung; TSANG Thomas Ho-fai; YUEN Kwok-yung; WONG Samson Sai-yin; CHEN Jonathan Hon-kwan; CHAN Jasper Fuk-woo; TO Kelvin Kai-wang; POON Rosana Wing-shan; WONG Sally Cheuk-ying; CHAN Kwok-hung; TAI Josepha Wai-ming

    2012-01-01

    Background The environmental sources associated with community-acquired or nosocomial legionellosis were not always detectable in the mainland of China and Hong Kong,China.The objective of this study was to illustrate the control measures implemented for nosocomial and community outbreaks of legionellosis,and to understand the environmental distribution of legionella in the water system in Hong Kong,China.Methods We investigated the environmental sources of two cases of legionellosis acquired in the hospital and the community by extensive outbreak investigation and sampling of the potable water system using culture and genetic testing at the respective premises.Results The diagnosis of nosocomial legionellosis was suspected in a patient presenting with nosocomial pneumonia not responsive to multiple beta-lactam antibiotics with subsequent confirmation by Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 antigenuria.High counts of Legionella pneumophila were detected in the potable water supply of the 70-year-old hospital building.Another patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis presenting with acute community-acquired pneumonia and severe diarrhoea was positive for Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing on both sputum and nasopharyngeal aspirate despite negative antigenuria.Paradoxically the source of the second case was traced to the water system of a newly commissioned office building complex.No further cases were detected after shock hyperchlorination with or without superheating of the water systems.Subsequent legionella counts were drastically reduced.Point-of-care infection control by off-boiled or sterile water for mouth care and installation of water filter for showers in the hospital wards for immunocompromised patients was instituted.Territory wide investigation of the community potable water supply showed that 22.1% of the household water supply was positive at a mean legionella count of 108.56 CFU/ml (range 0.10 to

  9. Reduction of Urinary Tract Infections Caused By Urethral Catheter through the Implementation of Hydrophobic Coating and Geometrical Modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gare, Aya

    2013-11-01

    Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection (CAUTI) is the most common nosocomial infection in the U.S. healthcare system. The obstruction of urine caused by confined air bubbles result in the development of urinary back-flow and stagnation, wherein microbial pathogens could multiply rapidly and colonization within catheters become commonplace. Infections can be prevented by aseptic insertion and the maintenance of a closed drainage system, keeping high infection control standards, and preventing back-flow from the catheter bag. The goal of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a simple, low cost, modification that may be implemented into current catheter designs to reduce the incidence of CAUTI. Using the principle of transmission of fluid-pressure and the Young-Laplace equation for capillary pressure difference, this research focuses on improving the liquid flow in the presence of confined bubbles to prevent stagnation and reflux of bacteria-ridden urine into the body. Preliminary experiments are performed on a variety of tubes with hydrophobic-coating the interior, as well as geometrically modifying the tubes. Proof-of-Concept Prototype tubes are used to represent the drainage system of the catheter structure.

  10. Antibacterial activity of Valeriana jatamansi against extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing Gramnegative bacteria causing urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babar Habib

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To find out the antibacterial activity of Valeriana jatamansi (V. jatamansi rhizomes against the extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs producing isolates of Enterobacteriaceae family. Methods: Confirmation of ESBLs producing Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Hafnia alvei isolated from urinary tract infections was performed by double disc diffusion assay. Antimicrobial susceptibility of all ESBLs producing isolates was determined by disc diffusion method following guidelines of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Successive extraction of rhizomes of V. jatamansi was performed with hexane, chloroform and methanol using Soxhelt apparatus. These extracts were tested against the ESBLs producing isolates using well diffusion method. Results: Hexane extract showed significant results as compared to chloroform and methanol extracts with the maximum zone of inhibition (21 mm while ciprofloxacin and amikacin were used as standard drugs. Conclusions: Findings of the study suggested that hexane extract of V. jatamansi can be used in combination with other antibiotics as alternative treatment for urinary tract infections caused by ESBLs producing strains of Enterobacteriaceae.

  11. Successful treatment of a colonic ulcer penetrating the urinary bladder caused by the administration of calcium polystyrene sulfonate and sorbitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shioya, Takeshi; Yoshino, Masanori; Ogata, Masao; Shibuya, Tetsuo; Tokunaga, Akira; Matsumoto, Koshi; Tajiri, Takashi

    2007-10-01

    A 77-year-old woman was urgently admitted for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis and a duodenal ulcer hemorrhage in March 1999. She had a history of diabetes and angina pectoris. After admission, she received oral calcium polystyrene sulfonate and sorbitol to treat hyperkalemia. Nine days later, severe abdominal pain developed. A colonoscopic examination revealed a sigmoid colonic ulcer and stenosis; the patient was treated conservatively. At a 1-year follow-up examination, the colonic stenosis was found have worsened; pneumaturia developed in January 2001. The patient was found to have a sigmoidovesical fistula and underwent sigmoidectomy and partial resection of the ileum and urinary bladder. The histological findings were a benign colonic ulcer with the infiltration of inflammatory cells, mainly lymphocytes. Rhomboidal, dark violet Kayexalate crystals were observed on microscope examination in the submucosa in both the first and second colonic biopsy specimens. We concluded that the colonic ulcer and the sigmoidovesical fistula had been caused by the administration of calcium polystyrene sulfonate and sorbitol. Reports of colonic perforation as a result of the administration of calcium polystyrene sulfonate and sorbitol are rare. Here, we report the successful treatment of a colonic ulcer that had penetrated the urinary bladder.

  12. Viruses and bacteria in sputum samples of children with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkinen, M; Lahti, E; Österback, R; Ruuskanen, O; Waris, M

    2012-03-01

    Few comprehensive studies have searched for viruses and bacteria in children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We identified 76 children hospitalized for pneumonia. Induced sputum samples were analysed for 18 viruses by antigen detection and PCR, and for six bacteria by culture and PCR. Viruses were found in 72% of samples, bacteria in 91%, and both in 66%. Rhinovirus (30%), human bocavirus (18%) and human metapneumovirus (14%) were the most commonly detected viruses. Two viruses were found in 22% of samples and three in 8%. The most common bacteria found were Streptococcus pneumoniae (50%), Haemophilus influenzae (38%), and Moraxella catarrhalis (28%). Rhinovirus-S. pneumoniae was the most commonly found combination of virus and bacterium (16%). All six children with treatment failure had both viruses and bacteria detected in the sputum. Otherwise, we found no special clinical characteristics in those with mixed viral-bacterial detections. With modern molecular diagnostic techniques, there are high rates of both viral and bacterial identification in childhood CAP. The clinical significance of mixed viral-bacterial infections remains unclear, although we found a potential association between them and treatment failure.

  13. Potential role of tigecycline in the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Mary L; Pound, Melanie W; Drew, Richard H

    2011-01-01

    Tigecycline is a member of the glycylcycline class of antimicrobials, which is structurally similar to the tetracycline class. It demonstrates potent in vitro activity against causative pathogens that are most frequently isolated in patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP), including (but not limited to) Streptococcus pneumoniae (both penicillin-sensitive and -resistant strains), Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis (including β-lactamase-producing strains), Klebsiella pneumoniae, and ‘atypical organisms’ (namely Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Legionella pneumophila). Comparative randomized clinical trials to date performed in hospitalized patients receiving tigecycline 100 mg intravenous (IV) × 1 and then 50 mg IV twice daily thereafter have demonstrated efficacy and safety comparable to the comparator agent. Major adverse effects were primarily gastrointestinal in nature. Tigecycline represents a parenteral monotherapy option in hospitalized patients with CABP (especially in patients unable to receive respiratory fluoroquinolones). However, alternate and/or additional therapies should be considered in patients with more severe forms of CABP in light of recent data of increased mortality in patients receiving tigecycline for other types of severe infection. PMID:21694911

  14. Vitamin D Level and Risk of Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna J. Jovanovich

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has reported reduced serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD levels is associated with acute infectious illness. The relationship between vitamin D status, measured prior to acute infectious illness, with risk of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and sepsis has not been examined. Community-living individuals hospitalized with CAP or sepsis were age-, sex-, race-, and season-matched with controls. ICD-9 codes identified CAP and sepsis; chest radiograph confirmed CAP. Serum 25(OHD levels were measured up to 15 months prior to hospitalization. Regression models adjusted for diabetes, renal disease, and peripheral vascular disease evaluated the association of 25(OHD levels with CAP or sepsis risk. A total of 132 CAP patients and controls were 60 ± 17 years, 71% female, and 86% Caucasian. The 25(OHD levels <37 nmol/L (adjusted odds ratio (OR 2.57, 95% CI 1.08–6.08 were strongly associated with increased odds of CAP hospitalization. A total of 422 sepsis patients and controls were 65 ± 14 years, 59% female, and 91% Caucasian. The 25(OHD levels <37 nmol/L (adjusted OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.11–2.77 were associated with increased odds of sepsis hospitalization. Vitamin D status was inversely associated with risk of CAP and sepsis hospitalization in a community-living adult population. Further clinical trials are needed to evaluate whether vitamin D supplementation can reduce risk of infections, including CAP and sepsis.

  15. Predictors of non-invasive ventilation failure in severe respiratory failure due to community acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Antonello; Piroddi, Ines Maria Grazia; Barlascini, Cornelius; Senarega, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) has been used for acute respiratory failure to avoid endotracheal intubation and intensive care admission. Few studies have assessed the usefulness of NIV in patients with severe community acquired pneumonia (CAP). The use of NIV in severe CAP is controversial because there is a greater variability in success compared to other pulmonary conditions. We retrospectively followed 130 patients with CAP and severe acute respiratory failure (PaO2/FiO2 predictors of NIV failure and hospital mortality using univariate and multivariate analyses. NIV failed in 26 patients (20.0%). Higher chest X-ray score at admission, higher heart rate after 1 hour of NIV, and a higher alveolar-arteriolar gradient (A-aDO2) after 24 hours of NIV each independently predicted NIV failure. Higher chest X ray score, higher LDH at admission, higher heart rate after 24 hours of NIV and higher A-aDO2 after 24 hours of NIV were directly related to hospital mortality. NIV treatment had high rate of success. Successful treatment is related to less lung involvement and to early good response to NIV and continuous improvement in clinical response.

  16. Usefulness of Plasma YKL-40 in Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Severity in Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Ling Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasma YKL-40 level has been reported as playing a significant role in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. However, the correlation between plasma level of YKL-40 and the severity of CAP has not been reported. This study identifies the relationship between plasma level changes of the YKL-40 gene in adult patients hospitalized with CAP. The ELISA was used to measure the plasma YKL-40 level from 61 adult CAP patients before and after antibiotic treatment and from 60 healthy controls. The plasma YKL-40 levels were significantly increased in patients with CAP compared to normal controls. Moreover, the plasma concentration of YKL-40 correlated with the severity of CAP based on the pneumonia severity index (PSI score (r = 0.630, p < 0.001, the CURB-65 (confusion, uremia, respiratory rate, BP, age 65 years score (r = 0.640, p < 0.001, the Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II score (r = 0.539, p < 0.001 and length of hospital stay (r = 0.321, p = 0.011, respectively. In conclusion, plasma YKL-40 may play a role in the diagnosis and clinical assessment of CAP severity, which could potentially guide the development of treatment strategies.

  17. Biomarkers of Delirium in a Low-Risk Community-Acquired Pneumonia-Induced Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, Cristiane Damiani; Vuolo, Francieli; Generoso, Jaqueline; Soares, Márcio; Barichello, Tatiana; Quevedo, João; Ritter, Cristiane; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    There are different theories about the pathophysiology of sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE), and the majority of our knowledge was derived from critically ill patients. 7In less severe sepsis, it is probable that neuroinflammation can be a major aspect of SAE development. We hypothesized that in non-severe septic patients, blood biomarkers of inflammation, endothelial activation, coagulation, and brain function would be different when compared to patients with and without brain dysfunction. A total of 30 patients presenting with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP)-induced sepsis were included of which 10 (33 %) developed SAE. Eight medical patients admitted to the general ward, except due to sepsis or infection, which developed delirium were included as delirium, non-sepsis group. From all measured biomarkers, only brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed, and presumably secreted (RANTES), and interleukin (IL)-10 where significantly different when compared to SAE and sepsis groups. In addition, SAE patients presented higher levels of BDNF, vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB/BB and RANTES when compared to delirium patients. In conclusion, the profile of biomarkers differs between SAE, sepsis, and delirium patients, suggesting that pathways related to SAE are different from delirium and from sepsis itself.

  18. Fluoroquinolones in community-acquired pneumonia: guide to selection and appropriate use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Christopher R; Labreche, Matthew J; Attridge, Russell T

    2011-04-16

    Fluoroquinolone use has dramatically increased since the introduction of the first respiratory fluoroquinolone in the late 1990s. Over a relatively brief period of time, the respiratory fluoroquinolones have supplanted other first-line options as the predominant community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) therapy in hospitals. This article discusses the rise of the fluoroquinolone era, debates the comparative effectiveness of fluoroquinolones for CAP therapy, examines fluoroquinolone resistance and adverse drug reactions, and discusses new trends in pneumonia epidemiology and outcomes assessment. Overall, published data suggest that fluoroquinolone monotherapy is associated with improved patient survival compared with β-lactam monotherapy and similar survival to β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy. Fluoroquinolone monotherapy may be associated with shorter hospital length of stay compared with β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy, particularly in severe pneumonia or with high-dose therapy. There is insufficient evidence to conclude that any individual fluoroquinolone therapy is better than another with regards to patient mortality. Fluoroquinolones are generally well tolerated and Streptococcus pneumoniae resistance remains low; however, rare but serious adverse effects have been reported. Some members of the fluoroquinolone class have been removed from the market amidst safety concerns. Pneumonia classifications have changed and antipseudomonal fluoroquinolones may have a role in healthcare-associated pneumonia when administered in combination with other antipseudomonal and anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus therapies.

  19. Acute myocardial infarction versus other cardiovascular events in community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Aliberti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to define the prevalence, characteristics, risk factors and impact on clinical outcomes of acute myocardial infarction (AMI versus other cardiovascular events (CVEs in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. This was an international, multicentre, observational, prospective study of CAP patients hospitalised in eight hospitals in Italy and Switzerland. Three groups were identified: those without CVEs, those with AMI and those with other CVEs. Among 905 patients, 21 (2.3% patients experienced at least one AMI, while 107 (11.7% patients experienced at least one other CVE. Patients with CAP and either AMI or other CVEs showed a higher severity of the disease than patients with CAP alone. Female sex, liver disease and the presence of severe sepsis were independent predictors for the occurrence of AMI, while female sex, age >65 years, neurological disease and the presence of pleural effusion predicted other CVEs. In-hospital mortality was significantly higher among those who experienced AMI in comparison to those experiencing other CVEs (43% versus 21%, p=0.039. The presence of AMI showed an adjusted odds ratio for in-hospital mortality of 3.57 (p=0.012 and for other CVEs of 2.63 (p=0.002. These findings on AMI versus other CVEs as complications of CAP may be important when planning interventional studies on cardioprotective medications.

  20. Clinical Pathway and Monthly Feedback Improve Adherence to Antibiotic Guideline Recommendations for Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Almatar

    Full Text Available Compliance with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP guidelines remains poor despite a substantial body of evidence indicating that guideline-concordant care improves patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to compare the relative effectiveness of a general educational and a targeted emergency department intervention on improving physicians' concordance with CAP guidelines.Two distinct interventions were implemented over specific time periods. The first intervention was educational, focusing on the development of local CAP guidelines and their dissemination through hospital-wide educational programmes. The second intervention was a targeted one for the emergency department, where a clinical pathway for the initial management of CAP patients was introduced, followed by monthly feedback to the emergency department (ED physicians about concordance rates with the guidelines. Data on the concordance rate to CAP guidelines was collected from a retrospective chart review.A total of 398 eligible patient records were reviewed to measure concordance to CAP guidelines over the study period. Concordance rates during the baseline and educational intervention periods were similar (28.1% vs. 31.2%; p > 0.05. Significantly more patients were treated in accordance with the CAP guidelines after the ED focused intervention when compared to the baseline (61.5% vs. 28.1%; p < 0.05 or educational period (61.5% vs. 31.2%; p < 0.05.A targeted intervention with a CAP clinical pathway and monthly feedback was a successful strategy to increase adherence to empirical antibiotic recommendations in CAP guidelines.

  1. Predictors of Severe Sepsis among Patients Hospitalized for Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

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    Beatriz Montull

    Full Text Available Severe sepsis, may be present on hospital arrival in approximately one-third of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP.To determine the host characteristics and micro-organisms associated with severe sepsis in patients hospitalized with CAP.We performed a prospective multicenter cohort study in 13 Spanish hospital, on 4070 hospitalized CAP patients, 1529 of whom (37.6% presented with severe sepsis. Severe sepsis CAP was independently associated with older age (>65 years, alcohol abuse (OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.07-1.61, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.50-2.04 and renal disease (OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.21-2.03, whereas prior antibiotic treatment was a protective factor (OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.52-0.73. Bacteremia (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.05-1.79, S pneumoniae (OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.31-1.95 and mixed microbial etiology (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.10-2.49 were associated with severe sepsis CAP.CAP patients with COPD, renal disease and alcohol abuse, as well as those with CAP due to S pneumonia or mixed micro-organisms are more likely to present to the hospital with severe sepsis.

  2. Evaluation of empirical antibiotherapy for acute community-acquired pneumonia prescribed in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraisse, T; Fayad, G; Jardy, C; Sotto, A

    2012-01-01

    The authors assessed the management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and empirical antibiotic prescription in a primary care center. A retrospective study was made on medical charts of patients admitted to the emergency department for CAP. Seventy-six patients were included. Their mean age was 65years for a sex ratio of 1.81. Fever (83%) and cough (72%) were the most common symptoms. Chest X-ray was abnormal in 86%. The median CRP value was 138mg/L (58-235). The median Fine's score was 85.5 (60-127). Blood cultures were sterile for 82.5% of samples. Pneumococcal and legionella antigenuria were performed for 70% of patients, only one was positive for legionella. Antibiotherapy was prescribed to 18 patients before hospitalization. Amoxicillin-clavulanic acid was the most frequently prescribed empirical treatment (48.5%), followed by ceftriaxone (15%). The therapeutic adequation index was calculated at a median of 1.7 by three investigators (0-3.7). Kendall's concordance coefficient for the three investigators was good at 0.86 (P<0.0001). Close to 39% of antibiotic prescription had a bad therapeutic adequation index more than three. Our clinical, radiological, and microbiological data was quite similar to reported data from teaching hospital series except for severity that seemed lower in primary care centers. The therapeutic adequation index is a useful tool to assess the adequacy of antibiotic prescription. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. THE OUTCOME OF ANTIBIOTIC THERAPY AMONG CHILDREN WITH SEVERE COMMUNITY ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Usman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV status on the evolution of community acquired pneumonia (CAP is still controversial. There are controversies regarding antibiotic treatment outcome of CAP in HIV infected children. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate possible differences in hospital outcomes, with compared the outcome of the treatment in severe CAP among HIV infected and HIV uninfected children which had an empiric antibiotic therapy. Methods: A case control study of 80 patients with severe CAP in Department of Child Health, Sanglah General Hospital, Bali-Indonesia. We evaluated clinical features for seeing the effectiveness of the antibiotic therapy according to Department of Child Health, Sanglah General Hospital’s clinical pathway for severe pneumonia between HIV infected and HIV uninfected patients. Results: 58% patients in failure treatment and 45% patients in favorable treatment were HIV infected. There were similar characteristics from both groups, except malnutrition condition was statistically significant contribute the outcome (OR 2.87 (95% CI 1.098 to 7.500, p= 0.031. There was no significantly statistic difference of the outcome in HIV infected as compared to HIV uninfected patients with severe CAP (OR 1.65 (95% CI 0.683 to 4.002, p= 0.263. Conclusion: HIV infection was not gave an effect on the outcome of severe CAP patients which had an antibiotic therapy based on Department of Child Health, Sanglah General Hospital’s clinical pathway for severe pneumonia.

  4. CSF lactate for accurate diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulieri, S; Chapuis-Taillard, C; Jaton, K; Cometta, A; Chuard, C; Hugli, O; Du Pasquier, R; Bille, J; Meylan, P; Manuel, O; Marchetti, O

    2015-10-01

    CSF lactate measurement is recommended when nosocomial meningitis is suspected, but its value in community-acquired bacterial meningitis is controversial. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of lactate and other CSF parameters in a prospective cohort of adult patients with acute meningitis. Diagnostic accuracy of lactate and other CSF parameters in patients with microbiologically documented episodes was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The cut-offs with the best diagnostic performance were determined. Forty-five of 61 patients (74%) had a documented bacterial (n = 18; S. pneumoniae, 11; N. meningitidis, 5; other, 2) or viral (n = 27 enterovirus, 21; VZV, 3; other, 3) etiology. CSF parameters were significantly different in bacterial vs. viral meningitis, respectively (p viral meningitis, with a cutoff set at 3.5 mmol/l providing 100% sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and efficiency. CSF lactate had the best accuracy for discriminating bacterial from viral meningitis and should be included in the initial diagnostic workup of this condition.

  5. Viral infection in community-acquired pneumonia: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Burk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The advent of PCR has improved the identification of viruses in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. Several studies have used PCR to establish the importance of viruses in the aetiology of CAP. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the studies that reported the proportion of viral infection detected via PCR in patients with CAP. We excluded studies with paediatric populations. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with viral infection. The secondary outcome was short-term mortality. Our review included 31 studies. Most obtained PCR via nasopharyngeal or oropharyngeal swab. The pooled proportion of patients with viral infection was 24.5% (95% CI 21.5–27.5%. In studies that obtained lower respiratory samples in >50% of patients, the proportion was 44.2% (95% CI 35.1–53.3%. The odds of death were higher in patients with dual bacterial and viral infection (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.32–3.31. Viral infection is present in a high proportion of patients with CAP. The true proportion of viral infection is probably underestimated because of negative test results from nasopharyngeal or oropharyngeal swab PCR. There is increased mortality in patients with dual bacterial and viral infection.

  6. An appraisal of the evidence underlying performance measures for community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kevin C; Schünemann, Holger J

    2011-06-01

    Numerous organizations use performance measures to monitor the quality of care provided for a variety of clinical conditions. An appraisal of the evidence underlying such performance measures has never been reported. Our objective was to estimate the effects of interventions recommended by performance measures and to determine the quality of evidence from which those estimates derive, using the Joint Commission and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' performance measures for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) as examples. We performed systematic reviews of the literature to identify evidence related to the performance measures for CAP. Metaanalyses were then performed to estimate the absolute and relative effects of the interventions recommended by the performance measures. The Grading Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system was used to determine the quality of evidence. The estimated effects favored the interventions recommended by five of the six performance measures. These included pneumococcal vaccination (incidence of pneumococcal pneumonia: relative risk [RR], 0.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.24-0.75), blood cultures, antibiotic administration within 6 hours, use of a guideline-compliant antibiotic regimen, and influenza vaccination (incidence of symptomatic influenza: RR, 0.30; 95% CI, 0.22-0.40). However, among these performance measures, only influenza vaccination was supported by high-quality evidence. One-step smoking cessation counseling was contradicted by moderate-quality evidence (smoking quit rate: RR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.90-1.22). The evidence supporting performance measures is frequently not of high quality and occasionally contradictory.

  7. Community-acquired pneumonia in patients with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinos, L; Clemente, M G; Miranda, B; Alvarez, C; del Busto, B; Cocina, B R; Alvarez, F; Gorostidi, J; Orejas, C

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the possible differences, especially those regarding mortality, between patients hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and the risk factors related to mortality in the COPD group. 710 patients with CAP were included in a prospective multicenter observational study. 244 of the patients had COPD confirmed by spirometry. COPD was associated with mortality in patients with CAP (OR=2.62 CI: 1.08-6.39). Patients with COPD and CAP had a significantly higher 30-day mortality rate as compared to patients without COPD. Multivariate analysis showed that PaO(2) or =45 mmHg (OR=4.6; CI: 2.3-15.1); respiratory rate > or =30/min (OR=12.25; CI: 3.45-35.57), pleural effusion (OR=8.6; 95% CI: 2.01-24.7), septic shock (OR=12.6; 95% CI: 3.4-45.66) and renal failure (OR=13.4; 95% CI: 3.2-37.8) were significantly related to mortality. Purulent sputum and fever were considered as protective factors. COPD was an independent risk factor for mortality in patients with CAP. Hypoxemia and hypercapnia are associated with mortality in patients with CAP with and without COPD. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and PaCO(2) value could be useful prognostic factors and should be incorporated in risk stratification in patients with CAP.

  8. Optimal imaging strategy for community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus musculoskeletal infections in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browne, Lorna P.; Cassady, Christopher I.; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh; Guillerman, R.P. [Texas Children' s Hospital, Edward B. Singleton Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States); Mason, Edward O.; Kaplan, Sheldon L. [Texas Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Infectious Disease Service, Houston, TX (United States)

    2008-08-15

    Invasive musculoskeletal infections from community-acquired methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (CA-SA) are increasingly encountered in children. Imaging is frequently requested in these children for diagnosis and planning of therapeutic interventions. To appraise the diagnostic efficacy of imaging practices performed for CA-SA osteomyelitis and its complications. A retrospective review was conducted of the clinical charts and imaging studies of CA-SA osteomyelitis cases since 2001 at a large children's hospital. Of 199 children diagnosed with CA-SA osteomyelitis, 160 underwent MRI examination and 35 underwent bone scintigraphy. The sensitivity of MRI and bone scintigraphy for CA-SA osteomyelitis was 98% and 53%, respectively. In all discordant cases, MRI was correct compared to bone scintigraphy. Extraosseous complications of CA-SA osteomyelitis detected only by MRI included subperiosteal abscesses (n = 77), pyomyositis (n = 43), septic arthritis (n = 31), and deep venous thrombosis (n = 12). MRI is the preferred imaging modality for the investigation of pediatric CA-SA musculoskeletal infection because it offers superior sensitivity for osteomyelitis compared to bone scintigraphy and detects extraosseous complications that occur in a substantial proportion of patients. (orig.)

  9. Using data-driven rules to predict mortality in severe community acquired pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang Wu

    Full Text Available Prediction of patient-centered outcomes in hospitals is useful for performance benchmarking, resource allocation, and guidance regarding active treatment and withdrawal of care. Yet, their use by clinicians is limited by the complexity of available tools and amount of data required. We propose to use Disjunctive Normal Forms as a novel approach to predict hospital and 90-day mortality from instance-based patient data, comprising demographic, genetic, and physiologic information in a large cohort of patients admitted with severe community acquired pneumonia. We develop two algorithms to efficiently learn Disjunctive Normal Forms, which yield easy-to-interpret rules that explicitly map data to the outcome of interest. Disjunctive Normal Forms achieve higher prediction performance quality compared to a set of state-of-the-art machine learning models, and unveils insights unavailable with standard methods. Disjunctive Normal Forms constitute an intuitive set of prediction rules that could be easily implemented to predict outcomes and guide criteria-based clinical decision making and clinical trial execution, and thus of greater practical usefulness than currently available prediction tools. The Java implementation of the tool JavaDNF will be publicly available.

  10. Viruses and Gram-negative bacilli dominate the etiology of community-acquired pneumonia in Indonesia, a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farida, H.; Gasem, M.H.; Suryanto, A.; Keuter, M.; Zulkarnain, N.; Satoto, B.; Eijk, A.A. van der; Djokomoeljanto, R.; Wahyono, H.; Verbrugh, H.A.; Severin, J.A.; Broek, P.J. van den

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Knowledge about the etiology of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is essential for adequate management. Presently, few studies about CAP are available from Southeast Asia. This study aimed to investigate the etiology, severity, and outcome of CAP in the most populous Southeast Asia

  11. Pharmacokinetics and Dosing of Ceftobiprole Medocaril for the Treatment of Hospital- and Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Different Patient Populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Torres; J.W. Mouton (Johan); Pea, F. (Federico)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractHospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are among the most common infections treated in the hospital setting, and together they place a significant burden on healthcare systems. Successful management of HAP and CAP depends on rapid initiation of empirical

  12. Understanding variation in quality of antibiotic use for community-acquired pneumonia: effect of patient, professional and hospital factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, J.A.; Hulscher, M.E.J.L.; Kullberg, B.J.; Cox, A.; Gyssens, I.C.J.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop effective and targeted interventions to improve care for patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), insight is needed into the factors that influence the quality of antibiotic use. Therefore, we measured the performance of nine quality indicators and studied

  13. Understanding variation in quality of antibiotic use for community-acquired pneumonia: Effect of patient, professional and hospital factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Schouten (Jeroen); M.E.J.L. Hulscher (Marlies); B.J. Kullberg (Bart Jan); A. Cox (Angela); I.C. Gyssens (Inge); J.W.M. van der Meer (Jos); R.P.T.M. Grol (Richard)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To develop effective and targeted interventions to improve care for patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), insight is needed into the factors that influence the quality of antibiotic use. Therefore, we measured the performance of nine quality indicators and studied

  14. Are pathogenic leptospira species agents of community-acquired pneumonia? case reports of leptospirosis presenting as pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H. Gasem; H. Farida (Helmia); A. Ahmed (Ahmed); J.A. Severin (Julitte A.); A. Suryanto (Agus); B. Isbandrio; H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); R.A. Hartskeerl (Rudy); P.J. Van Den Broek (Peterhans J.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe report four Indonesian cases meeting the clinical and radiological criteria for community-acquired pneumonia and other findings suggestive of leptospirosis. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses of serum and urine samples and serology confirmed the diagnosis of leptospirosis in each. Resul

  15. Incidence and risk factors for community-acquired acute gastroenteritis in north-west Germany in 2004

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsten, C; Baumgarte, S; Friedrich, A W; von Eiff, C; Becker, K; Wosniok, W; Ammon, A; Bockemühl, J; Karch, H; Huppertz, H-I

    2009-01-01

    In developed countries, acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a major source of morbidity. However, only a few studies have estimated its incidence and the associated medical burden. This population-based study determined the incidence of community-acquired AGE patients seeking medical care and the relativ

  16. Streptococcus pneumoniae DNA Load in Blood as a Marker of Infection in Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, R.P.H.; Boer, de R.F.; Schuurman, T.; Gierveld, S.; Kooistra-Smid, M.; Agtmael, van M.A.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C.M.J.E.; Persoons, M.C.J.; Savelkoul, P.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    Direct detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae DNA in blood adds to culture results in the etiological diagnosis of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Quantification of the amount of DNA, the bacterial DNA load (BDL), provides a measurement of DNAemia that may increase the understanding

  17. Development of quality indicators to evaluate antibiotic treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farida, H.; Rondags, A.; Gasem, M.H.; Leong, K.; Adityana, A.; Broek, P.J. van den; Keuter, M.; Natsch, S.S.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop an instrument for evaluating the quality of antibiotic management of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) applicable in a middle-income developing country. METHOD: A previous study and Indonesian guidelines were reviewed to derive potential quality of care indicator

  18. Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis in patients with liver cirrhosis in China: Comparative Microbiology and Therapeutic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Wu, Dan; Wei, Lei; Liu, Suxia; Zhao, Peng; Tu, Bo; Xie, Yangxin; Liu, Yanan; Wang, Xinhua; Liu, Liying; Zhang, Xin; Xu, Zhe; Wang, Fusheng; Qin, Enqiang

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is a common complication of liver cirrhosis. This study was performed to compare the microbiological characteristics of nosocomial and community-acquired episodes of bacterial peritonitis in China. Five hundred and seventy-five strains were isolated from the ascitic fluid of cirrhotic patients from the Beijing 302 Hospital from January 2014 to December 2014. The patients in the community-acquired SBP (n = 311) and the nosocomial SBP (n = 264) groups exhibited significant differences in clinical symptoms (P < 0.01). In both groups, most of the bacteria were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, coagulase-negative staphylococcus and Enterococcus. There were more frequent gram-positive cocci (G+ C) in the nosocomial group (n = 170). Compared with the community-acquired group, the proportion of Enterococcus was significantly increased in the nosocomial group (9.0% vs. 16.6%, P < 0.05). The resistance rate of the main pathogenic bacteria to the recommended first-line drug in the guideline was very high. Community-acquired and nosocomial SBP groups exhibited differences in clinical symptoms and antibiotic susceptibility tests. Optimal treatments should be provided for these patients. We recommend that cefoperazone/sulbactam or piperacillin/tazobactam should be used for the empirical treatment of SBP. PMID:28382951

  19. Does C-reactive protein independently predict mortality in adult community-acquired bacteremia patients with known sepsis severity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gradel, Kim O; Jensen, Thøger G; Kolmos, Hans J

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated whether sepsis severity and C-reactive protein (CRP) level on admission prognostically corroborated or annulled each other in adult patients with incident community-acquired bacteremia (Funen, Denmark, 2000-2008). We used logistic regression and area under the receiver operating...

  20. Outcomes in elderly Danish citizens admitted with community-acquired pneumonia. Regional differences, in a public healthcare system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard Klausen, Henrik; Petersen, J; Lindhardt, T

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate regional differences in and risk factors for admission, length of stay, mortality, and readmission for community-acquired pneumonia in elderly Danish patients. METHODS: National registry study on elderly Danish citizens with an acute admission in 2009 owing to community-ac...

  1. Characterization and antibiotic susceptibility of Streptococcus agalactiae isolates causing urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinelli, Giorgio; Biscaro, Valeria; Gargiulo, Franco; Caruso, Arnaldo; De Francesco, Maria Antonia

    2015-08-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS) has been implicated in urinary tract infections but the microbiological characteristics and antimicrobial susceptibility of these strains are poorly investigated. In this study, 87 isolates recovered from urine samples of patients who had attended the Spedali Civili of Brescia (Italy) and had single organism GBS cultured were submitted to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, molecular characterization of macrolide and levofloxacin resistance, PCR-based capsular typing and analysis of surface protein genes. By automated broth microdilution method, all isolates were susceptible to penicillin, cefuroxime, cefaclor, and ceftriaxone; 80%, 19.5% and 3.4% of isolates were non-susceptible to tetracycline, erythromycin, and levofloxacin, respectively. Macrolide resistance determinants were iMLS(B) (n=1), cMLS(B) (n=10) and M (n=5), associated with ermTR, ermB and mefA/E. Levofloxacin resistance was linked to mutations in gyrA and parC genes. Predominant capsular types were III, Ia, V, Ib and IX. Type III was associated with tetracycline resistance, while type Ib was associated with levofloxacin resistance. Different capsular type-surface protein gene combinations (serotype V-alp2, 3; serotype III-rib; serotype Ia-epsilon) were detected. A variety of capsular types are involved in significant bacteriuria. The emergence of multidrug resistant GBS may become a significant public health concern and highlights the importance of careful surveillance to prevent the emergence of these virulent GBS.

  2. Microfluidic system for the identification of bacterial pathogens causing urinary tract infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Holger; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Haraldsson, Tommy; van der Wijngaart, Wouter; Lind, Anders; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbi; Turlej-Rogacka, Agata; Goossens, Herman

    2015-03-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections and pose a significant healthcare burden. The growing trend in antibiotic resistance makes it mandatory to develop diagnostic kits which allow not only the determination of a pathogen but also the antibiotic resistances. We have developed a microfluidic cartridge which takes a direct urine sample, extracts the DNA, performs an amplification using batch-PCR and flows the sample over a microarray which is printed into a microchannel for fluorescence detection. The cartridge is injection-molded out of COP and contains a set of two-component injection-molded rotary valves to switch between input and to isolate the PCR chamber during thermocycling. The hybridization probes were spotted directly onto a functionalized section of the outlet microchannel. We have been able to successfully perform PCR of E.coli in urine in this chip and perform a fluorescence detection of PCR products. An upgraded design of the cartridge contains the buffers and reagents in blisters stored on the chip.

  3. Giant pseudomeningocele causing urinary obstruction in a patient with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Jeremy G; Bergmann, Liisa L; Takamori, Ryan; Donovan, Daniel J

    2015-07-01

    Defective collagen biosynthesis in Marfan syndrome predisposes to dural defects such as dural ectasia, meningocele, and pseudomeningocele; thus, an increased index of suspicion for these conditions should be present in the clinical setting of Marfan syndrome. The authors describe a young woman with Marfan syndrome who was being treated with anticoagulants for a prosthetic heart valve and who presented with a spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage requiring surgical evacuation. No CSF leak was encountered at surgery, but she developed progressively more severe positional headaches over the following year. She then experienced the sudden onset of acute urinary obstruction, at which time CT revealed a 17 × 15 × 13-cm presacral pseudomeningocele communicating with the thecal sac through a sacral bone defect. An anterior surgical approach was used for drainage of the pseudomeningocele as well as for primary closure of the dural defect with a bovine pericardial patch and autologous subcutaneous fat graft. After a short period of lumbar subarachnoid drainage of the CSF, the patient was able to resume normal activity without recurrent symptoms. To the authors' knowledge, such a pseudomeningocele in a patient with Marfan syndrome has been reported only twice, and this case features the largest pseudomeningocele to date. They also review the pertinent literature regarding presentation, diagnosis, and management of these lesions.

  4. Clinical evaluation of the need for carbapenems to treat community-acquired and healthcare-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Kanemoto, Koji; Tokuda, Yasuharu; Shiotani, Seiji; Hirose, Yumi; Suzuki, Masatsune; Ishikawa, Hiroichi

    2015-08-01

    Carbapenems have an overall broad antibacterial spectrum and should be protected against from the acquisition of drug resistance. The clinical advantages of carbapenem in cases of pneumonia have not been certified and the need for antipseudomonal antimicrobial agents to treat healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) remains controversial. We introduced an antimicrobial stewardship program for carbapenem and tazobactam/piperacillin use and investigated the effects of this program on the clinical outcomes of 591 pneumonia cases that did not require intensive care unit management, mechanical ventilation or treatment with vasopressor agents [221 patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and 370 patients with HCAP]. Compared with the pre-intervention period, age, comorbidities and the severity and etiology of pneumonia did not differ during the intervention period. Carbapenems were rarely used during the intervention period in cases of pneumonia (CAP: 12% vs. 1%, HCAP: 13% vs. 1%), while antipseudomonal beta-lactam use was reduced from 33% to 8% among cases with HCAP. This reduction in the rate of carbapenem administration did not have an impact on the prognosis in the cases of CAP, and the in-hospital mortality was lower among the patients with HCAP during the intervention period (15% vs. 5%, p = 0.013). The causes of death in the cases of HCAP were not directly related to pneumonia during the intervention period. The current study shows that carbapenem use can be avoided in cases of CAP or HCAP that are not in a critical condition. The frequent use of antipseudomonal beta-lactams does not improve the clinical outcomes of HCAP.

  5. The Most Common Detected Bacteria in Sputum of Patients with Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) Treated In Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukic, Vesna; Hadzic, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the most common infective pulmonary disease. Objective: To show the most common detected bacteria in bacterial culture of sputum in patients with CAP hospitalized in Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” in four-year period: from 2012 to 2015. Material and methods: This is the retrospective analysis. Each patient gave sputum 3 days in a row when admitted to hospital. Sputum has been examined: bacterial culture with antibiotics sensitivity, Gram stain, Mycobacterium tuberculosis; in cases with high temperature blood cultures were done; when we were suspicious about bronchial carcinoma bronchoscopy with BAL (bronchoalveolar lavage) was done. We show analyzed patients according to age, sex, whether they had pneumonia or bronchopneumonia, bacteria isolated in sputum and in BAL. Results: 360 patients with CAP were treated in four-year period (247 males and 113 females). 167 or 43, 39 % had pneumonia (119 males and 48 females). Number of males was significantly bigger (χ2 = 30,186; p<0,001). 193 or 53, 61 % had bronchopneumonia (128 males and 65 females). Number of males was significantly bigger (χ2 = 20,556; p<0,001). Number of patients with negative bacterial culture of sputum (131–78, 44%) was significantly bigger than number of patients with positive culture (36–21, 56%) (χ2 = 50,042; p<0,001) in pneumonia. Number of patients with negative bacterial culture of sputum (154- 79, 79%) was significantly bigger than number of patients with positive culture (39- 20, 21%) (χ2 = 68,523; p<0,001) in bronchopneumonia. Streptococcus pneumoniae was significantly most common detected bacterium compared with the number of other isolated bacteria; in pneumonia (χ2 =33,222; p<0,001) and in bronchopneumonia (χ2 =51,231; p<0,001). Conclusion: It is very important to detect the bacterial cause of CAP to administrate the targeted antibiotic therapy. PMID:27994296

  6. IL-6 and TNF-α serum levels are associated with early death in community-acquired pneumonia patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacci, M.R.; Leme, R.C.P.; Zing, N.P.C. [Departamento de Cliníca Médica, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Murad, N. [Departamento de Cardiologia, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Adami, F.; Hinnig, P.F. [Departamento de Cliníca Médica, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Feder, D. [Departamento de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Chagas, A.C.P. [Departamento de Cardiologia, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, F.L.A. [Departamento de Cliníca Médica, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil)

    2015-02-24

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is amongst the leading causes of death worldwide. As inflammatory markers, cytokines can predict outcomes, if interpreted together with clinical data and scoring systems such as CURB-65, CRB, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II). The aim of this study was to determine the impact of inflammatory biomarkers on the early mortality of hospitalized CAP patients. Twenty-seven CAP patients needing hospitalization were enrolled for the study and samples of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), C-reactive protein (CRP), and homocystein were collected at the time of admission (day 1) as well as on the seventh day of the treatment. There was a significant reduction in the levels of IL-6 between the first and the second collections. Median IL-6 values decreased from 24 pg/mL (day 1) to 8 pg/mL (day 7) (P=0.016). The median levels of TNF-α were higher in patients: i) with acute kidney injury (AKI) (P=0.045), ii) requiring mechanical ventilation (P=0.040), iii) with short hospital stays (P=0.009), iv) admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) (P=0.040), v) who died early (P=0.003), and vi) with worse CRB scores (P=0.013). In summary, IL-6 and TNF-α levels were associated with early mortality of CAP patients. Longer admission levels demonstrated greater likelihood of early death and overall mortality, necessity of mechanical ventilation, and AKI.

  7. Comparative antimicrobial susceptibility of aerobic and facultative bacteria from community-acquired bacteremia to ertapenem in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fung Chang-Phone

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ertapenem is a once-a-day carbapenem and has excellent activity against many gram-positive and gram-negative aerobic, facultative, and anaerobic bacteria. The susceptibility of isolates of community-acquired bacteremia to ertapenem has not been reported yet. The present study assesses the in vitro activity of ertapenem against aerobic and facultative bacterial pathogens isolated from patients with community-acquired bacteremia by determining and comparing the MICs of cefepime, cefoxitin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ertapenem, piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin, amikacin and gentamicin. The prevalence of extended broad spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL producing strains of community-acquired bacteremia and their susceptibility to these antibiotics are investigated. Methods Aerobic and facultative bacteria isolated from blood obtained from hospitalized patients with community-acquired bacteremia within 48 hours of admission between August 1, 2004 and September 30, 2004 in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Keelung, Taiwan, were identified using standard procedures. Antimicrobial susceptibility was evaluated by Etest according to the standard guidelines provided by the manufacturer and document M100-S16 Performance Standards of the Clinical Laboratory of Standard Institute. Antimicrobial agents including cefepime, cefoxitin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ertapenem, piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin, amikacin and gentamicin were used against the bacterial isolates to test their MICs as determined by Etest. For Staphylococcus aureus isolates, MICs of oxacillin were also tested by Etest to differentiate oxacillin-sensitive and oxacillin-resistant S. aureus. Results Ertapenem was highly active in vitro against many aerobic and facultative bacterial pathogens commonly recovered from patients with community-acquired bacteremia (128/159, 80.5 %. Ertapenem had more potent activity than ceftriaxone, piperacillin

  8. Clinical efficacy and safety of moxifloxacin versus levofloxacin plus metronidazole for community-acquired pneumonia with aspiration factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Tieying; Sun Li; Wang Rongmei; Ren Xiaoping; Sui Dong-jiang; Pu Chun; Ren Yajuan

    2014-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common infectious disease throughout the world and the incidence continues to grow as the population ages.Aspiration is an important pathogenic mechanism for pneumonia in the elderly and the management of patients with community-acquired pneumonia with aspiration factors is a major medical problem.Our study aimed to assess whether moxifloxacin in comparison to levofloxacin plus metronidazole are effective and safe in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia with aspiration factors.Methods In this prospective,multicenter,open-label,randomized controlled trial,77 patients with mild-to-moderate community-acquired pneumonia with aspiration factors were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive moxifloxacin or levofloxacin plus metronidazole.The primary efficacy variables were clinical outcomes in evaluable patients at a follow-up visit 7 to 14 days after the end of therapy.Results Seven days after the end of therapy a clinical cure was achieved for 76.7% (23 of 37) of efficacy-evaluable patients in the moxifloxacin group and 51.7% (15 of 40) of patients in the levofloxacin plus metronidazole group.There was a significant difference between the two groups (x2=4.002,P <0.05).Bacteriological success rates were similar in the moxifloxacin group (93.3%) and levofloxacin plus metronidazole group (96.4%),there was no significant difference between the two groups (P >0.05).The overall adverse event rate was 10.8% (4/37) in the moxifloxacin group versus 17.5% (7/40) in the levofloxacin plus metronidazole group,there was no significant difference between the two groups (P>0.05).No serious adverse events were observed.Conclusions Moxifloxacin is effective and safe for treatment of community-acquired pneumonia with aspiration factors.And the regimen of moxifloxacin monotherapy is more convenient compared with levofloxacin plus metronidazole.

  9. Amikacin therapy for urinary tract infections caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Yeon; Choi, Su-Mi; Park, Sun Hee; Lee, Dong-Gun; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The number of urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC) is increasing. In an outpatient setting, there are limited therapeutic options to treat ESBL-producing pathogens. We evaluated the outcomes of amikacin outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) for UTIs caused by ESBL-EC in patients not pre-treated with carbapenem. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the outcomes of amikacin OPAT for UTIs caused by ESBL-EC. Results: From November 2011 to October 2012, eight females, who could not be hospitalized for carbapenem treatment, were treated with amikacin OPAT for nine episodes of non-bacteremic ESBL-EC UTIs. Seven of the eight patients had one or more comorbidities. Of the nine UTI cases, three had symptomatic lower UTIs and six had non-bacteremic upper UTIs. In all of the cases, symptomatic and laboratory improvements were observed following amikacin OPAT. One patient showed a delayed relapse with bilateral microabscesses 3 weeks after treatment cessation; however, a clinical and microbiological cure was eventually reached. All of the patients were able to tolerate amikacin OPAT without any significant nephrotoxicity or ototoxicity. Conclusions: Amikacin OPAT represents a feasible therapeutic option for non-bacteremic UTIs caused by ESBL-EC in settings with limited resources. PMID:26767869

  10. Amikacin therapy for urinary tract infections caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Yeon; Choi, Su-Mi; Park, Sun Hee; Lee, Dong-Gun; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong

    2016-01-01

    The number of urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC) is increasing. In an outpatient setting, there are limited therapeutic options to treat ESBL-producing pathogens. We evaluated the outcomes of amikacin outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) for UTIs caused by ESBL-EC in patients not pre-treated with carbapenem. We retrospectively evaluated the outcomes of amikacin OPAT for UTIs caused by ESBL-EC. From November 2011 to October 2012, eight females, who could not be hospitalized for carbapenem treatment, were treated with amikacin OPAT for nine episodes of non-bacteremic ESBL-EC UTIs. Seven of the eight patients had one or more comorbidities. Of the nine UTI cases, three had symptomatic lower UTIs and six had non-bacteremic upper UTIs. In all of the cases, symptomatic and laboratory improvements were observed following amikacin OPAT. One patient showed a delayed relapse with bilateral microabscesses 3 weeks after treatment cessation; however, a clinical and microbiological cure was eventually reached. All of the patients were able to tolerate amikacin OPAT without any significant nephrotoxicity or ototoxicity. Amikacin OPAT represents a feasible therapeutic option for non-bacteremic UTIs caused by ESBL-EC in settings with limited resources.

  11. Periurethral fibrosis secondary to prostatic inflammation causing lower urinary tract symptoms: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantiello, Francesco; Cicione, Antonio; Salonia, Andrea; Autorino, Riccardo; Tucci, Luigi; Madeo, Immacolata; Damiano, Rocco

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the role periurethral fibrosis secondary to chronic prostatic inflammation as a potential contributing factor to the etiology of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in male patients. Periurethral prostate tissue from 30 consecutive patients who underwent retropubic radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer was analyzed. We circumferentially performed 16 periurethral core bench biopsies on each radical prostatectomy specimen to evaluate the extent of periurethral inflammatory infiltrate and collagen and elastin amount. The clinical and urodynamic findings and the collagen and elastin periurethral amount in patients with or without inflammation were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test and the Pearson χ(2) test. Spearman correlation analysis tested the association between variables. Of the 30 patients, 21 (70%) presented with inflammatory infiltration and 9 (30%) had no inflammation. A significant difference was found between the 2 groups in International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS; P = .03) and in urodynamics findings by Schafer class (P = .01) and Abrams Griffiths number (P = .002). The histologic evaluation showed a higher collagen quantity (P = .04) and lower, albeit not statistically significant, elastin amount (P = .19) in the inflammation group. A positive association was observed between IPSS with inflammation grading (r = 0.507; P = .004) and collagen content (r = 0.649; P Prostate inflammation may induce fibrotic changes in periurethral prostatic tissues, and this may eventually promote urethral stiffness and LUTS. Patients experiencing prostate-related LUTS could benefit from anti-inflammatory therapies, used alone or combined with the currently prescribed regimen. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. TGF-β Blood Levels Distinguish Between Influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 Virus Sepsis and Sepsis due to Other Forms of Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendón-Ramirez, Erick J; Ortiz-Stern, Alejandro; Martinez-Mejia, Corazon; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C; Rendon, Adrian; Mata-Tijerina, Viviana L; Rosas-Taraco, Adrian G

    2015-06-01

    There is a strong interest in finding adequate biomarkers to aid in the diagnosis and prognosis of influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 virus infection. In this study, serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and laboratory markers were evaluated to assess their usefulness as biomarkers of influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 and their association with fatal cases. Serum samples of consecutive patients with a clinical presentation suggestive of influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 and progression to sepsis were evaluated. Serum inflammatory cytokines and routine laboratory tests were performed and correlated with positivity for influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 influenza by real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and the results of three clinical severity scores (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment [SOFA], CURB-65, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II [APACHE II]). High SOFA scores and some of its individual components, but not CURB-65 or APACHE II scores, correlate with fatal cases regardless of etiology. Total and unconjugated bilirubin, Ca(++), Cl(-), prothrombin times, and partial thromboplastin times discriminate influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 from other causes of community-acquired pneumonia. High levels of IL-8, IL-10, and IL-17 were increased in influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 patients when compared with controls (pH1N1)pdm09 patients and non-(H1N1)pdm09 patients when compared with controls (pH1N1)pdm09 patients, and patients with other causes of community-acquired pneumonia. TGF-β levels were negatively correlated with SOFA on admission in influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 patients. TGF-β levels are a useful tool for differentiating influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 from other causes of pneumonia progressing to sepsis.

  13. Increased risk of community-acquired pneumonia in COPD patients with comorbid cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin SH

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sheng-Hao Lin,1,2 Diahn-Warng Perng,3,4 Ching-Pei Chen,5,6 Woei-Horng Chai,1 Chin-Shui Yeh,1 Chew-Teng Kor,7 Shih-Lung Cheng,8,9 Jeremy JW Chen,2,* Ching-Hsiung Lin1,10,11,* 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Chest Medicine, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, 2Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, 3Department of Chest Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, 4School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, 5Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Changhua Christian Hospital, 6Department of Beauty Science and Graduate Institute of Beauty Science Technology, Chien-Kuo Technology University, 7Department of Internal Medicine, Internal Medicine Research Center, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, 8Department of Internal Medicine, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, 9Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Zhongli City, Taoyuan, 10Department of Respiratory Care, College of Health Sciences, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan, 11School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background and objective: COPD patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP have worse clinical outcomes, as compared to those without COPD. Cardiovascular disease (CVD is a common comorbidity for COPD patients. Whether COPD with comorbid CVD will increase the risk of CAP is not well investigated. The incidence and factors associated with CAP in COPD patients with and without CVD were analyzed. Methods: The medical records of patients with newly diagnosed COPD between 2007 and 2010 were reviewed. The patients’ characteristics, medical history of CVD, occurrence of CAP, and type of medication were recorded. Kaplan–Meier curves were used to assess the differences in cumulative incidence of CAP. Cox’s proportional hazards regression model was used to determine the

  14. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Central Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Claire L; Ralph, Anna; McLeod, James E T; McDonald, Malcolm I

    2006-01-01

    To date, there has been scant information about the burden of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in Central Australia. Our aims were to determine the proportion of Staphylococcus aureus infections due to methicillin-resistant strains in Central Australia, to characterise resistance to non-beta lactam antibiotics and to correlate findings with available demographic information. We retrospectively reviewed S. aureus isolates identified by the Microbiology Laboratory of the Pathology Department, Alice Springs Hospital between September 2005 and February 2006. Multi-resistance was defined as resistance to three or more non-beta lactam antibiotics. We identified the recovery site and extended antibiotic resistance profile of each isolate. Demographic data included place of residence, discharge diagnosis and ethnicity. There were 524 S. aureus isolates: 417 (79.6%) methicillin-sensitive S. aureus, 104 (19.7%) non-multi-resistant MRSA (nmrMRSA) and 3 (0.7%) multi-resistant MRSA (mrMRSA). MRSA accounted for 7/22 (32%) invasive infections and 91/474 (19.2%) cases of staphylococcal skin infections. Aboriginal people comprised 89 per cent (93/104) of patients with nmrMRSA; 57 per cent lived in remote communities, 21 per cent in suburban Alice Springs, and 18 per cent in Alice Springs Town Camps. Six per cent (6/104) of nmrMRSA were hospital-acquired. Of the nmrMRSA isolates, 57 per cent (59/104) were resistant to erythromycin and 7 per cent (7/104) to fusidic acid. All MRSA isolates were susceptible to co-trimoxazole. In conclusion, Central Australia has high rates of community-acquired nmrMRSA and low rates of multi-resistant MRSA. Erythromycin resistance in S. aureus is also common. These findings should prompt the review of antimicrobial prescribing guidelines for the region, especially for treatment of skin and soft tissue infections.

  15. Oxidative stress in immunocompetent patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trefler, S; Rodríguez, A; Martín-Loeches, I; Sanchez, V; Marín, J; Llauradó, M; Romeu, M; Díaz, E; Nogués, R; Giralt, M

    2014-03-01

    A comparison was made of the oxidative stress (OS) levels of patients with either viral or bacterial severe community-acquired pneumonia (sCAP) and of patients without infection (healthy volunteers (HV) and patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI)). A prospective observational study was made. Critically ill patients with sCAP. The TBARS level was measured as an index of oxidative injury. SOD, CAT and redox glutathione system (GSH, GSSG, GR, GPx) activities were measured as reflecting antioxidant capacity. Severity of illness was assessed by the APACHE II, SOFA and SIRS scores. Thirty-seven subjects were included: 15 patients with CAP (12 of bacterial origin [BCAP] and 3 due to 2009 A/H1N1 virus [VCAP]), 10 HV and 12 AMI patients. Intensive care CAP mortality was 26.7% (n=4). Plasmatic TBARS levels were higher in CAP patients than in HV, but similar to those recorded in AMI patients. In contrast, VCAP was associated with lower TBARS levels, and some components of the glutathione redox system were higher in BCAP patients and HV. The OS levels did not differ between survivors and non-survivors. Our results suggest the occurrence of higher OS in sCAP patients compared with HV. In contrast, lower TBARS levels were observed in VCAP patients, suggesting an increase of antioxidant activity related to the redox glutathione system. However, further research involving a larger cohort is needed in order to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  16. Etiology and antimicrobial resistance of community-acquired pneumonia in adult patients in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Li-li; DENG Wei-wu; HU Bi-jie; HE Li-xian; WEI Li; XIE Hong-mei; WANG Bao-qing; LI Hua-ying; CHEN Xue-hua; ZHOU Chun-mei

    2012-01-01

    Background Appropriate antimicrobial therapy of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is mainly based on the distribution of etiology and antimicrobial resistance of major pathogens.We performed a prospective observational study of adult with CAP in 36 hospitals in China.Methods Etiological pathogens were isolated in each of the centers,and all of the isolated pathogens were sent to Zhongshan Hospital for antimicrobial susceptibility tests using agar dilution.Results A total of 593 patients were enrolled in this study,and 242 strains of bacteria were isolated from 225 patients.Streptococcus pneumoniae (79/242,32.6%) was the most frequently isolated pathogen,followed by Haemophilus influenzae (55/242,22.7%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (25/242,10.3%).Totally 527 patients underwent serological tests for atypical pathogens; Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae infections were identified in 205 (38.9%)and 60 (11.4%) patients respectively.Legionella pneumophila infections were identified in 4.0% (13/324) of patients.The non-susceptibility rate of isolated Streptococcus pneumoniae to erythromycin and penicillin was 63.2% and 19.1%respectively.Six patients died from the disease,the 30-day mortality rate was 1.1% (6/533).Conclusions The top three bacteria responsible for CAP in Chinese adults were Streptococcus pneumonia,Haemophitus influenza and Klebsiella pneumonia.There was also a high prevalence of atypical pathogens and mixed pathogens.The resistance rates of the major isolated pathogens were relatively low except for the high prevalence of macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

  17. Ceftaroline in the management of complicated skin and soft tissue infections and community acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpenge MA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mbiye A Mpenge,1 Alasdair P MacGowan2 1Department of Medical Microbiology, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol, England; 2Department of Medical Microbiology, North Bristol NHS Trust, Southmead Hospital, Bristol, England Abstract: Ceftaroline is a new parenteral cephalosporin approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the treatment of complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTIs including those due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. Ceftaroline has broad-spectrum activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and exerts its bactericidal effects by binding to penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs, resulting in inhibition of bacterial cell wall synthesis. It binds to PBP 2a of MRSA with high affinity and also binds to all six PBPs in Streptococcus pneumoniae. In in vitro studies, ceftaroline demonstrated potent activity against Staphylococcus aureus (including MRSA and vancomycin-intermediate isolates, Streptococcus pneumoniae (including multidrug resistant isolates, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and many common gram-negative pathogens, excluding extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In Phase II and Phase III clinical trials, ceftaroline was noninferior to its comparator agents and demonstrated high clinical cure rates in the treatment of cSSTIs and CAP. It demonstrated favorable outcomes in patients treated for both regulatory-approved indications and unlicensed indications in a retrospective analysis. Ceftaroline is a safe and effective option for treatment in specific patient populations in which its efficacy and safety have been proven. This article reviews the challenges in the treatment of cSSTI and CAP, ceftaroline and its microbiology, pharmacology, efficacy, and safety data which support its use in

  18. [Clinical and bacteriological effects of cefetamet pivoxil against community-acquired respiratory tract infections. Part III].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, R; Suzuki, Y; Nishinari, C; Ishii, Y; Matsumoto, Y; Kaku, M; Shimada, J

    1999-06-01

    We investigated clinical and bacteriological effects of cefetamet pivoxil (CEMT-PI) on community-acquired respiratory tract infection and obtained the following results: This method of investigation was almost the same to those adopted in 1994 and 1996. 1. 512 cases of respiratory tract infection were treated with CEMT-PI under the same protocol at a total of 53 institutions in Tokyo, Kanagawa, Saitama, Chiba and Yamanashi prefectures from January, 1, 1998 over March, 31, 1998. Outpatients accounted for 99.7% of all subjects. Diagnoses given to these patients included pharyngolaryngitis (51.4%), tonsillitis (37.7%), and acute bronchitis (10.1%). 2. For the bacteriological study, a manual detailing the method of collecting specimens, storage and transport was distributed to the above-mentioned institutions. The isolation and identification of suspected causative bacteria, determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), and investigation of beta-lactamase production were conducted all together at Section of Studies, Tokyo Clinical Research Center. Suspected causative bacteria were detected in 144 (37.2%) out of 387 cases that were the analytical subjects of the clinical efficacy. The major bacteria identified were 32 strains of Streptococcus pyogenes and 19 strains of Haemophilus influenzae. The clinical efficacy (the ratio of improvement) of CEMT by suspected causative bacterium was 84.4% against CEMT-indicated organisms and 81.2% against CEMT-non-indicated organisms. 3. We investigated clinical efficacy rates (the ratio of "markedly improved" + "improved") by disease. The improvement rate was 78.4% in pharyngolaryngitis, 87.0% in tonsillitis, and 79.5% in acute bronchitis. The clinical efficacy rate was an average of 81.9% in all CEMT-PI indicated diseases.

  19. Community-acquired pneumonia: why aren't national antibiotic guidelines followed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almatar, M A; Peterson, G M; Thompson, A; McKenzie, D S; Anderson, T L

    2015-02-01

    Adherence to guidelines for the management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has been shown to improve patients' clinical outcomes. This study aimed to assess adherence to the Australian Therapeutic Guidelines (TG14) for the empirical management of CAP, and explore the potential barriers affecting adherence to these guidelines. Medical records were reviewed for all patients who were diagnosed with CAP within 24 h of presentation at the Royal Hobart Hospital, the main teaching hospital in Tasmania, Australia, between July 2010 and March 2011. A survey of emergency department and medical team prescribers was also undertaken to identify potential barriers to adhere with the guidelines. χ(2) and Fisher's exact tests were used to test the significance between categorical data. To compare categorical and scale data, the Mann-Whitney U-test was used. A total of 193 patient records were assessed. The overall adherence to TG14 for the empirical antibiotic management of CAP was 16.1% (3.1%, 20.7% and 25.4% for patients with mild, moderate and severe CAP, respectively). Ceftriaxone was prescribed to 34.4%, 26.8% and 57.4% of patients with mild, moderate and severe CAP, respectively. The response rate to the barrier survey was 43.1%; of those who responded, 46.4% thought the influence of senior doctors on junior doctors could be a factor affecting adherence to the guidelines. Other barriers noted were a lack of guideline awareness (39.3%), the requirement to calculate the severity of CAP (35.7%), and the existence of other guidelines that conflict with TG14 (28.6%). Adherence to CAP treatment guidelines was poor, especially in patients with mild disease. Prescribing was mainly influenced by senior doctors. Efforts to improve compliance with CAP treatment guidelines should consider the potential barriers that hinder adherence. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. [Efficacy and safety of azithromycin infusion in patients with mild or moderate community-acquired pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Shingo; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Kawanami, Toshinori; Yamasaki, Kei; Uchimura, Keigo; Hata, Ryosuke; Tachiwada, Takashi; Oda, Keishi; Hara, Kanako; Suzuki, Yu; Akata, Kentarou; Ogoshi, Takaaki; Tokuyama, Susumu; Inoue, Naoyuki; Nishida, Chinatsu; Orihashi, Takeshi; Yoshida, Yugo; Kawanami, Yukiko; Taura, Yusuke; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Obata, Hideto; Tsuda, Toru; Yoshii, Chiharu; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    Azithromycin (AZM) is one of 15-membered rings macrolide antibiotics with wide spectrum of antimicrobial efficacy for Gram-positive and -negative bacteria and also atypical bacteria. So far, there had been no reports of the prospective studies evaluating efficacy and safety of AZM infusion in patients with mild or moderate community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). This study was conducted to evaluate prospectively the efficacy and safety of AZM in patients with mild or moderate CAP. AZM 500 mg was intravenously administered once daily, and the clinical efficacy were evaluated by clinical symptoms, peripheral blood laboratory findings and chest X-rays. Sixty-four patients were firstly registered, and eventually 61 and 62 patients were enrolled for the evaluation of clinical efficacy and s