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Sample records for causing cell signalling

  1. Apoptosis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells caused by homocysteine via activating JNK signal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benzhi Cai

    Full Text Available Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs are capable of homing to and repair damaged myocardial tissues. Apoptosis of BMSCs in response to various pathological stimuli leads to the attenuation of healing ability of BMSCs. Plenty of evidence has shown that elevated homocysteine level is a novel independent risk factor of cardiovascular diseases. The present study was aimed to investigate whether homocysteine may induce apoptosis of BMSCs and its underlying mechanisms. Here we uncovered that homocysteine significantly inhibited the cellular viability of BMSCs. Furthermore, TUNEL, AO/EB, Hoechst 333342 and Live/Death staining demonstrated the apoptotic morphological appearance of BMSCs after homocysteine treatment. A distinct increase of ROS level was also observed in homocysteine-treated BMSCs. The blockage of ROS by DMTU and NAC prevented the apoptosis of BMSCs induced by homocysteine, indicating ROS was involved in the apoptosis of BMSCs. Moreover, homocysteine also caused the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential of BMSCs. Furthermore, apoptotic appearance and mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization in homocysteine-treated BMSCs was significantly reversed by JNK inhibitor but not p38 MAPK and ERK inhibitors. Western blot also confirmed that p-JNK was significantly activated after exposing BMSCs to homocysteine. Homocysteine treatment caused a significant reduction of BMSCs-secreted VEGF and IGF-1 in the culture medium. Collectively, elevated homocysteine induced the apoptosis of BMSCs via ROS-induced the activation of JNK signal, which provides more insight into the molecular mechanisms of hyperhomocysteinemia-related cardiovascular diseases.

  2. Apoptosis of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Caused by Homocysteine via Activating JNK Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanju; Yang, Fan; Chen, Hongyang; Yin, Kun; Tan, Xueying; Zhu, Jiuxin; Pan, Zhenwei; Wang, Baoqiu; Lu, Yanjie

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are capable of homing to and repair damaged myocardial tissues. Apoptosis of BMSCs in response to various pathological stimuli leads to the attenuation of healing ability of BMSCs. Plenty of evidence has shown that elevated homocysteine level is a novel independent risk factor of cardiovascular diseases. The present study was aimed to investigate whether homocysteine may induce apoptosis of BMSCs and its underlying mechanisms. Here we uncovered that homocysteine significantly inhibited the cellular viability of BMSCs. Furthermore, TUNEL, AO/EB, Hoechst 333342 and Live/Death staining demonstrated the apoptotic morphological appearance of BMSCs after homocysteine treatment. A distinct increase of ROS level was also observed in homocysteine-treated BMSCs. The blockage of ROS by DMTU and NAC prevented the apoptosis of BMSCs induced by homocysteine, indicating ROS was involved in the apoptosis of BMSCs. Moreover, homocysteine also caused the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential of BMSCs. Furthermore, apoptotic appearance and mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization in homocysteine-treated BMSCs was significantly reversed by JNK inhibitor but not p38 MAPK and ERK inhibitors. Western blot also confirmed that p-JNK was significantly activated after exposing BMSCs to homocysteine. Homocysteine treatment caused a significant reduction of BMSCs-secreted VEGF and IGF-1 in the culture medium. Collectively, elevated homocysteine induced the apoptosis of BMSCs via ROS-induced the activation of JNK signal, which provides more insight into the molecular mechanisms of hyperhomocysteinemia-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23667638

  3. IL-20 activates human lymphatic endothelial cells causing cell signalling and tube formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Troels; Tritsaris, Katerina; Hübschmann, Martin V

    2009-01-01

    IL-20 is an arteriogenic cytokine that remodels collateral networks in vivo, and plays a role in cellular organization. Here, we investigate its role in lymphangiogenesis using a lymphatic endothelial cell line, hTERT-HDLEC, which expresses the lymphatic markers LYVE-1 and podoplanin. Upon...

  4. Disruption of glucagon receptor signaling causes hyperaminoacidemia exposing a possible liver - alpha-cell axis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galsgaard, Katrine D; Winther-Sørensen, Marie; Ørskov, Cathrine

    2018-01-01

    Glucagon secreted from the pancreatic alpha-cells is essential for regulation of blood glucose levels. However, glucagon may play an equally important role in the regulation of amino acid metabolism by promoting ureagenesis. We hypothesized that disruption of glucagon receptor signaling would lead...... to an increased plasma concentration of amino acids, which in a feedback manner stimulates the secretion of glucagon, eventually associated with compensatory proliferation of the pancreatic alpha-cells. To address this, we performed plasma profiling of glucagon receptor knockout (Gcgr-/-) mice and wild-type (WT...... component distinguishing the two groups of mice. Apart from their hyperaminoacidemia, Gcgr-/- mice display hyperglucagonemia, increased pancreatic content of glucagon and somatostatin (but not insulin), and alpha-cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy compared to WT littermates. Incubating cultured α-TC1.9 cells...

  5. Perturbation of Hoxb5 signaling in vagal and trunk neural crest cells causes apoptosis and neurocristopathies in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, M K M; Cheung, M C H; Zhu, J J; Cheng, W W C; Sat, E W Y; Tam, P K H; Lui, V C H

    2014-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) migrate from different regions along the anterior-posterior axis of the neural tube (NT) to form different structures. Defective NCC development causes congenital neurocristopathies affecting multiple NCC-derived tissues in human. Perturbed Hoxb5 signaling in vagal NCC causes enteric nervous system (ENS) defects. This study aims to further investigate if perturbed Hoxb5 signaling in trunk NCC contributes to defects of other NCC-derived tissues besides the ENS. We perturbed Hoxb5 signaling in NCC from the entire NT, and investigated its impact in the development of tissues derived from these cells in mice. Perturbation of Hoxb5 signaling in these NCC resulted in Sox9 downregulation, NCC apoptosis, hypoplastic sympathetic and dorsal root ganglia, hypopigmentation and ENS defects. Mutant mice with NCC-specific Sox9 deletion also displayed some of these phenotypes. In vitro and in vivo assays indicated that the Sox9 promoter was bound and trans-activated by Hoxb5. In ovo studies further revealed that Sox9 alleviated apoptosis induced by perturbed Hoxb5 signaling, and Hoxb5 induced ectopic Sox9 expression in chick NT. This study demonstrates that Hoxb5 regulates Sox9 expression in NCC and disruption of this signaling causes Sox9 downregulation, NCC apoptosis and multiple NCC-developmental defects. Phenotypes such as ENS deficiency, hypopigmentation and some of the neurological defects are reported in patients with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). Whether dysregulation of Hoxb5 signaling and early depletion of NCC contribute to ENS defect and other neurocristopathies in HSCR patients deserves further investigation.

  6. Attenuation of hedgehog acyltransferase-catalyzed sonic Hedgehog palmitoylation causes reduced signaling, proliferation and invasiveness of human carcinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konitsiotis, Antonios D; Chang, Shu-Chun; Jovanović, Biljana

    2014-01-01

    ) cell line PANC-1 and transfected HEK293a cells Hhat localized to the endoplasmic reticulum. siRNA knockdown showed that Hhat is required for Sonic hedgehog (Shh) palmitoylation, for its assembly into high molecular weight extracellular complexes and for functional activity. Hhat knockdown inhibited Hh...... autocrine and juxtacrine signaling, and inhibited PDAC cell growth and invasiveness in vitro. In addition, Hhat knockdown in a HEK293a cell line constitutively expressing Shh and A549 human non-small cell lung cancer cells inhibited their ability to signal in a juxtacrine/paracrine fashion to the reporter...

  7. Lactic acid in tumor microenvironments causes dysfunction of NKT cells by interfering with mTOR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Di; Zhu, Shasha; Bai, Li

    2016-12-01

    Cellular metabolism has been shown to regulate differentiation and function of immune cells. Tumor associated immune cells undergo phenotypic and functional alterations due to the change of cellular metabolism in tumor microenvironments. NKT cells are good candidates for immunotherapies against tumors and have been used in several clinical trials. However, the influences of tumor microenvironments on NKT cell functions remain unclear. In our studies, lactic acid in tumor microenvironments inhibited IFNγ and IL4 productions from NKT cells, and more profound influence on IFNγ was observed. By adjusting the pH of culture medium we further showed that, dysfunction of NKT cells could simply be induced by low extracellular pH. Moreover, low extracellular pH inhibited NKT cell functions by inhibiting mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling and nuclear translocation of promyelocytic leukemia zinc-finger (PLZF). Together, our results suggest that tumor acidic microenvironments could interfere with NKT cell functions through metabolic controls.

  8. Decoupling nutrient signaling from growth rate causes aerobic glycolysis and deregulation of cell size and gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Slavov, Nikolai; Botstein, David

    2013-01-01

    To survive and proliferate, cells need to coordinate their metabolism, gene expression, and cell division. To understand this coordination and the consequences of its failure, we uncoupled biomass synthesis from nutrient signaling by growing, in chemostats, yeast auxotrophs for histidine, lysine, or uracil in excess of natural nutrients (i.e., sources of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus), such that their growth rates (GRs) were regulated by the availability of their auxotrophic requir...

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and IRE-1 signaling cause apoptosis in colon cancer cells in response to andrographolide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Aditi; Ahmed, Hafiz; Yang, Peixin; Czinn, Steven J; Blanchard, Thomas G

    2016-07-05

    The plant metabolite andrographolide induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer cells. The mechanism(s) by which andrographolide induces apoptosis however, have not been elucidated. The present study was performed to determine the molecular events that promote apoptosis in andrographolide treated cells using T84, HCT116 and COLO 205 colon cancer cell lines. Andrographolide was determined to limit colony formation and Ki67 expression, alter nuclear morphology, increase cytoplasmic histone-associated-DNA-fragments, and increase cleaved caspase-3 levels. Andrographolide also induced significantly higher expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress proteins GRP-78 and IRE-1 by 48 h but not PERK or ATF6. Apoptosis signaling molecules BAX, spliced XBP-1 and CHOP were also significantly increased. Moreover, chemical inhibition of ER stress or IRE-1 depletion with siRNA in andrographolide treated cells significantly limited expression of IRE-1 and CHOP as determined by immunofluorescence staining, real time PCR, or immunobloting. This was accompanied by a decreased BAX/Bcl-2 ratio. Andrographolide significantly promotes cancer cell death compared to normal cells. These data demonstrate that andrographolide associated ER stress contributes to apoptosis through the activation of a pro-apoptotic GRP-78/IRE-1/XBP-1/CHOP signaling pathway.

  10. Increasing the endogenous NO level causes catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis signaling specifically in tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Tumor cells generate extracellular superoxide anions and are protected against intercellular apoptosis-inducing HOCl- and NO/peroxynitrite signaling through the expression of membrane-associated catalase. This enzyme decomposes H2O2 and thus prevents HOCl synthesis. It efficiently interferes with NO/peroxynitrite signaling through oxidation of NO and decomposition of peroxynitrite. The regulatory potential of catalase at the crosspoint of ROS and RNS chemical biology, as well as its high local concentration on the outside of the cell membrane of tumor cells, establish tight control of intercellular signaling and thus prevent tumor cell apoptosis. Therefore, inhibition of catalase or its inactivation by singlet oxygen reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. Nitric oxide and peroxynitrite are connected with catalase in multiple and meaningful ways, as (i) NO can be oxidated by compound I of catalase, (ii) NO can reversibly inhibit catalase, (iii) peroxynitrite can be decomposed by catalase and (iv) the interaction between peroxynitrite and H2O2 leads to the generation of singlet oxygen that inactivates catalase. Therefore, modulation of the concentration of free NO through addition of arginine, inhibition of arginase, induction of NOS expression or inhibition of NO dioxygenase triggers an autoamplificatory biochemical cascade that is based on initial formation of singlet oxygen, amplification of superoxide anion/H2O2 and NO generation through singlet oxygen dependent stimulation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8. Finally, singlet oxygen is generated at sufficiently high concentration to inactivate protective catalase and to reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. This regulatory network allows to establish several pathways for synergistic interactions, like the combination of modulators of NO metabolism with enhancers of superoxide anion generation, modulators of NO metabolism that act at different targets and between modulators of

  11. Increasing the endogenous NO level causes catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis signaling specifically in tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells generate extracellular superoxide anions and are protected against intercellular apoptosis-inducing HOCl- and NO/peroxynitrite signaling through the expression of membrane-associated catalase. This enzyme decomposes H2O2 and thus prevents HOCl synthesis. It efficiently interferes with NO/peroxynitrite signaling through oxidation of NO and decomposition of peroxynitrite. The regulatory potential of catalase at the crosspoint of ROS and RNS chemical biology, as well as its high local concentration on the outside of the cell membrane of tumor cells, establish tight control of intercellular signaling and thus prevent tumor cell apoptosis. Therefore, inhibition of catalase or its inactivation by singlet oxygen reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. Nitric oxide and peroxynitrite are connected with catalase in multiple and meaningful ways, as (i) NO can be oxidated by compound I of catalase, (ii) NO can reversibly inhibit catalase, (iii) peroxynitrite can be decomposed by catalase and (iv) the interaction between peroxynitrite and H2O2 leads to the generation of singlet oxygen that inactivates catalase. Therefore, modulation of the concentration of free NO through addition of arginine, inhibition of arginase, induction of NOS expression or inhibition of NO dioxygenase triggers an autoamplificatory biochemical cascade that is based on initial formation of singlet oxygen, amplification of superoxide anion/H2O2 and NO generation through singlet oxygen dependent stimulation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8. Finally, singlet oxygen is generated at sufficiently high concentration to inactivate protective catalase and to reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. This regulatory network allows to establish several pathways for synergistic interactions, like the combination of modulators of NO metabolism with enhancers of superoxide anion generation, modulators of NO metabolism that act at different targets and between modulators of

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and IRE-1 signaling cause apoptosis in colon cancer cells in response to andrographolide treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Aditi; Ahmed, Hafiz; Yang, Peixin; Czinn, Steven J.; Blanchard, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    The plant metabolite andrographolide induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer cells. The mechanism(s) by which andrographolide induces apoptosis however, have not been elucidated. The present study was performed to determine the molecular events that promote apoptosis in andrographolide treated cells using T84, HCT116 and COLO 205 colon cancer cell lines. Andrographolide was determined to limit colony formation and Ki67 expression, alter nuclear morphology, increase cytoplasmic histo...

  13. CD40-signalling abrogates induction of ROR gamma t(+) Treg cells by intestinal CD103(+) DCs and causes fatal colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barthels, Christian; Ogrinc, Ana; Steyer, Verena; Meier, Stefanie; Simon, Ferdinand; Wimmer, Maria; Blutke, Andreas; Straub, Tobias; Zimber-Strobl, Ursula; Lutgens, Esther; Marconi, Peggy; Ohnmacht, Caspar; Garzetti, Debora; Stecher, Bärbel; Brocker, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Immune homeostasis in intestinal tissues depends on the generation of regulatory T (Treg) cells. CD103(+) dendritic cells (DCs) acquire microbiota-derived material from the gut lumen for transport to draining lymph nodes and generation of receptor-related orphan gamma t(+) (ROR gamma t(+))

  14. Pertussis Toxin Exploits Host Cell Signaling Pathways Induced by Meningitis-Causing E. coli K1-RS218 and Enhances Adherence of Monocytic THP-1 Cells to Human Cerebral Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starost, Laura Julia; Karassek, Sascha; Sano, Yasuteru; Kanda, Takashi; Kim, Kwang Sik; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, Marcus Alexander

    2016-10-13

    Pertussis toxin (PTx), the major virulence factor of the whooping cough-causing bacterial pathogen Bordetella pertussis , permeabilizes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro and in vivo. Breaking barriers might promote translocation of meningitis-causing bacteria across the BBB, thereby facilitating infection. PTx activates several host cell signaling pathways exploited by the neonatal meningitis-causing Escherichia coli K1-RS218 for invasion and translocation across the BBB. Here, we investigated whether PTx and E. coli K1-RS218 exert similar effects on MAPK p38, NF-κB activation and transcription of downstream targets in human cerebral endothelial TY10 cells using qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and ELISA in combination with specific inhibitors. PTx and E. coli K1-RS218 activate MAPK p38, but only E. coli K1-RS218 activates the NF-κB pathway. mRNA and protein levels of p38 and NF-κB downstream targets including IL-6, IL-8, CxCL-1, CxCL-2 and ICAM-1 were increased. The p38 specific inhibitor SB203590 blocked PTx-enhanced activity, whereas E. coli K1-RS218's effects were inhibited by the NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082. Further, we found that PTx enhances the adherence of human monocytic THP-1 cells to human cerebral endothelial TY10 cells, thereby contributing to enhanced translocation. These modulations of host cell signaling pathways by PTx and meningitis-causing E. coli support their contributions to pathogen and monocytic THP-1 cells translocation across the BBB.

  15. Virus-induced non-specific signals cause cell cycle progression of primed CD8(+) T cells but do not induce cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Andreasen, Susanne; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Marker, O

    1999-01-01

    with known specificity and priming history in an environment also containing a normal heterogeneous CD8(+) population which served as an intrinsic control. Three parameters of T cell activation were analyzed: cell cycle progression, phenotypic conversion and cytolytic activity. Following injection of the IFN...

  16. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor signaling in acinar cells causes growth dependent release of pancreatic enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Nicolai Jacob Wewer; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Bremholm, l

    2016-01-01

    -like peptide 1 (GLP-1) on the exocrine pancreas. Here, we identify GLP-1 receptors on pancreatic acini and analyze the impact of receptor activation in humans, rodents, isolated acini, and cell lines from the exocrine pancreas. GLP-1 did not directly stimulate amylase or lipase release. However, we saw...

  17. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  18. TCDD causes suppression of growth and differentiation of MCF10A, human mammary epithelial cells by interfering with their insulin receptor signaling through c-Src kinase and ERK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sujin; Mazina, Olga; Kitagawa, Akira; Wong, Patrick; Matsumura, Fumio

    2004-01-01

    One of the proposed mechanisms of carcinogenic action of TCDD (=dioxin) on breast cells is that it causes significant inhibition of proper differentiation of mammary duct epithelial cells and thereby increases the number of terminal end buds, which are susceptible to other carcinogens (Fenton et al., Toxicol Sci 2002;67:63-74; Brown et al., Carcinogenesis 1998; 19:1623-1629; Lamartiniere, J Mammary Gland Biol Neoplasia 2002;7:67-76). To address this topic, we selected MCF10A, a line of immortalized normal human breast epithelial cells as an in vitro model. An initial effort was made to optimize the cultural condition of MCF10A cells to promote the cell differentiation effect of insulin. Under this condition, TCDD clearly antagonized the action of insulin only in the presence of cholera toxin that is known to promote the differentiation of normal human breast epithelial cells. To test the hypothesis that TCDD-induced c-Src kinase activation is casually related to this compound's antagonistic action against insulin, we treated MCF10A cells with two c-Src blocking agents, an anti-Src antisense oligonucleotides blocker and a known specific inhibitor of c-Src kinase, PP-2 and studied the effect of insulin and TCDD on cell proliferation. The results showed that, in cells treated with either of these two c-Src blocking agents, the antagonistic effect of TCDD disappeared. It was also found that agents which specifically block the activation of ERK could also abrogate the action of TCDD to suppress insulin signaling. Together, these results indicate that the mechanism of the antagonistic action of TCDD on insulin signaling is mainly mediated through c-Src signaling through activation of ERK.

  19. [Signaling network-based functional cell design].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jianqi; Wei, Ping

    2017-03-25

    Cellular signaling networks act as the central processor to deal with environmental signals and regulate cell function, and determine cell fate. Using synthetic biology approach to engineer cell signaling networks is crucial for ultimately constructing man-made "cell machines". Cellular signaling networks can encode sophisticated cell information by processing quantitatively signaling dynamics, which enables multi-dimensional regulation of functional sub-circuits. Here, we first review the research progresses on the signaling coding mechanisms; and then elaborate the methodologies and applications of cells signaling engineering; finally, we envision that signaling-based cell engineering are important for the increasingly-complicated next generation synthetic biology.

  20. Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress induces apoptosis by inhibiting PI3-kinase/Akt and ERK1/2 MAPK mediated signaling pathway causing downregulation of 8-oxoG-DNA glycosylase levels in glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Premranjan; Rao, G Nageswar; Pal, Bibhuti Bhusan; Pal, Arttatrana

    2014-08-01

    Glial cells are very important for normal brain function and alterations in their activity due to hyperglycemia, could contribute to diabetes-related cognitive dysfunction. Oxidative insults often cause rapid changes in almost all cells including glial cells. However, pathophysiologic mechanisms that lead to diabetic complications are not completely elucidated. Therefore, we examined whether elevated glucose levels directly or indirectly disrupt antioxidant defense mechanisms causing alterations in signaling pathways, cell cycle dysregulation, and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species-mediated apoptosis in glial cells. Findings of this study demonstrated that exposure of glial cells to high glucose markedly induces cellular and molecular injuries, as evidenced by elevated levels of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, biomolecules damage, cell cycle dysregulation, decrease in antioxidant enzymes, and decrease in cell viability. Pretreatment of cells with N-acetyl-L-cysteine reduced high glucose-induced cytotoxicity by increasing the levels of antioxidant enzymes, and decreasing the number of apoptotic cells. Further, at molecular level high glucose treatment resulted in a significant increase in phosphorylation of Akt, MAPKs, tuberin, down regulation of 8-oxoG-DNA glycosylase and increase in 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine accumulations. Pretreatment of cells with N-acetyl-L-cysteine, phosphatidylinositol3-kinase/Akt and ERK1/2 inhibitors completely abolished the apoptotic effects of high glucose. Moreover, N-acetyl-L-cysteine significantly inhibited reactive oxygen/nitrogen species generation, elevated antioxidants levels, inhibited Akt, ERK1/2, tuberin phosphorylation, decreased 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine accumulation and upregulated 8-oxoG-DNA glycosylase expression. Our results demonstrate that high glucose induces apoptosis and inhibits proliferation of glial cells, which may be mediated by the phosphorylation of tuberin, down regulation of 8-oxoG-DNA glycosylase and 8

  1. Cytoskeleton in Mast Cell Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dráber, Pavel; Sulimenko, Vadym; Dráberová, Eduarda

    2012-01-01

    Mast cell activation mediated by the high affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI) is a key event in allergic response and inflammation. Other receptors on mast cells, as c-Kit for stem cell factor and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) synergistically enhance the FcεRI-mediated release of inflammatory mediators. Activation of various signaling pathways in mast cells results in changes in cell morphology, adhesion to substrate, exocytosis, and migration. Reorganization of cytoskeleton is pivotal in all these processes. Cytoskeletal proteins also play an important role in initial stages of FcεRI and other surface receptors induced triggering. Highly dynamic microtubules formed by αβ-tubulin dimers as well as microfilaments build up from polymerized actin are affected in activated cells by kinases/phosphatases, Rho GTPases and changes in concentration of cytosolic Ca2+. Also important are nucleation proteins; the γ-tubulin complexes in case of microtubules or Arp 2/3 complex with its nucleation promoting factors and formins in case of microfilaments. The dynamic nature of microtubules and microfilaments in activated cells depends on many associated/regulatory proteins. Changes in rigidity of activated mast cells reflect changes in intermediate filaments build up from vimentin. This review offers a critical appraisal of current knowledge on the role of cytoskeleton in mast cells signaling. PMID:22654883

  2. Syndecans, signaling, and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    1996-01-01

    structures within the heparan sulfate chains, leaving the roles of chondroitin sulfate chains and extracellular portion of the core proteins to be elucidated. Evidence that syndecans are a class of receptor involved in cell adhesion is mounting, and their small cytoplasmic domains may link...... transmembrane signaling from matrix to cytoskeleton, as proposed for other classes of adhesion receptors....

  3. Calcium signaling and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Mauro Cunha Xavier; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki; Goulart, Vânia A M; Tonelli, Fernanda M P; Gomes, Katia N; Ulrich, Henning; Resende, Rodrigo R

    2015-11-01

    Cell proliferation is orchestrated through diverse proteins related to calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling inside the cell. Cellular Ca(2+) influx that occurs first by various mechanisms at the plasma membrane, is then followed by absorption of Ca(2+) ions by mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, and, finally, there is a connection of calcium stores to the nucleus. Experimental evidence indicates that the fluctuation of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum provides a pivotal and physiological role for cell proliferation. Ca(2+) depletion in the endoplasmatic reticulum triggers Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane in an phenomenon called store-operated calcium entries (SOCEs). SOCE is activated through a complex interplay between a Ca(2+) sensor, denominated STIM, localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and a Ca(2+) channel at the cell membrane, denominated Orai. The interplay between STIM and Orai proteins with cell membrane receptors and their role in cell proliferation is discussed in this review. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Distortions caused by the signal processing in analog AM modulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Njau, E.C.

    1988-08-01

    Complete analytical expressions for distortions caused by signal processing in analog AM modulators are developed. The salient features in these expressions are shown to be consistent with displays of actual spectra of AM signals. Finally suggestions are given on how the distortions may be practically minimized. (author). 6 refs, 3 figs

  5. Cytoskeleton in mast cell signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dráber, Pavel; Sulimenko, Vadym; Dráberová, Eduarda

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 3, May (2012), s. 130 ISSN 1664-3224 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP302/10/1701; GA ČR GPP302/11/P709; GA ČR GAP302/12/1673 Grant - others:ECST(XE) Action BM1007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : cytoskeleton * mast cell activation * signal transduction Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  6. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester causes p21 induction, Akt signaling reduction, and growth inhibition in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ping Lin

    Full Text Available Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE treatment suppressed proliferation, colony formation, and cell cycle progression in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. CAPE decreased protein expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, SKP2, c-Myc, Akt1, Akt2, Akt3, total Akt, mTOR, Bcl-2, Rb, as well as phosphorylation of Rb, ERK1/2, Akt, mTOR, GSK3α, GSK3β, PDK1; but increased protein expression of KLF6 and p21(Cip1. Microarray analysis indicated that pathways involved in cellular movement, cell death, proliferation, and cell cycle were affected by CAPE. Co-treatment of CAPE with chemotherapeutic drugs vinblastine, paclitaxol, and estramustine indicated synergistic suppression effect. CAPE administration may serve as a potential adjuvant therapy for prostate cancer.

  7. Subversion of cell signaling by pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alto, Neal M; Orth, Kim

    2012-09-01

    Pathogens exploit several eukaryotic signaling pathways during an infection. They have evolved specific effectors and toxins to hijack host cell machinery for their own benefit. Signaling molecules are preferentially targeted by pathogens because they globally regulate many cellular processes. Both viruses and bacteria manipulate and control pathways that regulate host cell survival and shape, including MAPK signaling, G-protein signaling, signals controlling cytoskeletal dynamics, and innate immune responses.

  8. Periapical lesions decrease insulin signal and cause insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astolphi, Rafael Dias; Curbete, Mariane Machado; Colombo, Natalia Helena; Shirakashi, Daisy Jaqueline; Chiba, Fernando Yamamoto; Prieto, Annelise Katrine Carrara; Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo; Bomfim, Suely Regina Mogami; Ervolino, Edilson; Sumida, Doris Hissako

    2013-05-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are associated with decreased insulin signal transduction. Moreover, local oral inflammation, such as that accompanying periodontal disease, is associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of periapical lesions (PLs) on insulin signaling and insulin sensitivity in rats. We hypothesized that PLs alter systemic insulin signaling and insulin sensitivity via elevated plasmatic tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Wistar rats were divided into control (CN) and PL groups. PLs were induced by exposing pulpal tissue to the oral environment. After 30 days, insulin sensitivity was measured using the insulin tolerance test. After euthanization, maxillae were processed for histopathology. Plasmatic concentrations of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) were determined via the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Insulin signal transduction was evaluated using insulin receptor substrate tyrosine phosphorylation status and serine phosphorylation status in periepididymal white adipose tissue via Western blotting. For insulin signaling and insulin tolerance tests, the analyses performed were analysis of variance followed by the Tukey post hoc test. For TNF-α analysis, the Student's t test was used. In all tests, P change in serine phosphorylation status in white adipose tissue after insulin stimulation. PLs can cause alterations to both insulin signaling and insulin sensitivity, probably because of elevation of plasmatic TNF-α. The results from this study emphasize the importance of the prevention of local inflammatory diseases, such as PLs, with regard to the prevention of insulin resistance. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Lipid rafts and B cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Neetu; DeFranco, Anthony L

    2007-10-01

    B cells comprise an essential component of the humoral immune system. They are equipped with the unique ability to synthesize and secrete pathogen-neutralizing antibodies, and share with professional antigen presenting cells the ability to internalize foreign antigens, and process them for presentation to helper T cells. Recent evidence indicates that specialized cholesterol- and glycosphingolipid-rich microdomains in the plasma membrane commonly referred to as lipid rafts, serve to compartmentalize key signaling molecules during the different stages of B cell activation including B cell antigen receptor (BCR)-initiated signal transduction, endocytosis of BCR-antigen complexes, loading of antigenic peptides onto MHC class II molecules, MHC-II associated antigen presentation to helper T cells, and receipt of helper signals via the CD40 receptor. Here we review the recent literature arguing for a role of lipid rafts in the spatial organization of B cell function.

  10. Notch signalling in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolós, V; Blanco, M; Medina, V; Aparicio, G; Díaz-Prado, S; Grande, E

    2009-01-01

    A new theory about the development of solid tumours is emerging from the idea that solid tumours, like normal adult tissues, contain stem cells (called cancer stem cells) and arise from them. Genetic mutations encoding for proteins involved in critical signalling pathways for stem cells such as BMP, Notch, Hedgehog and Wnt would allow stem cells to undergo uncontrolled proliferation and form tumours. Taking into account that cancer stem cells (CSCs) would represent the real driving force behind tumour growth and that they may be drug resistant, new agents that target the above signalling pathways could be more effective than current anti-solid tumour therapies. In the present paper we will review the molecular basis of the Notch signalling pathway. Additionally, we will pay attention to their role in adult stem cell self-renewal, and cell fate specification and differentiation, and we will also review evidence that supports their implication in cancer.

  11. Syndecans, signaling, and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    1996-01-01

    with the microfilament cytoskeleton, thereby mediating signaling events. The molecular details are unknown, but the conservation of regions of syndecan cytoplasmic domains, and a strong tendency for homotypic association, support the idea that the ligand-induced clustering may be a discrete source of specific...

  12. Wnt Signaling in Cancer Stem Cell Biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Vermeulen, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling is a common theme seen across many tumor types. Decades of research have unraveled the epigenetic and genetic alterations that result in elevated Wnt pathway activity. More recently, it has become apparent that Wnt signaling levels identify stem-like tumor cells

  13. Cell Survival Signaling in Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megison, Michael L.; Gillory, Lauren A.; Beierle, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood and is responsible for over 15% of pediatric cancer deaths. Neuroblastoma tumorigenesis and malignant transformation is driven by overexpression and dominance of cell survival pathways and a lack of normal cellular senescence or apoptosis. Therefore, manipulation of cell survival pathways may decrease the malignant potential of these tumors and provide avenues for the development of novel therapeutics. This review focuses on several facets of cell survival pathways including protein kinases (PI3K, AKT, ALK, and FAK), transcription factors (NF-κB, MYCN and p53), and growth factors (IGF, EGF, PDGF, and VEGF). Modulation of each of these factors decreases the growth or otherwise hinders the malignant potential of neuroblastoma, and many therapeutics targeting these pathways are already in the clinical trial phase of development. Continued research and discovery of effective modulators of these pathways will revolutionize the treatment of neuroblastoma. PMID:22934706

  14. Reconfigurable Analog Signal Processing by Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Daniel D; Chavez, Michael; Chiu, Kwan Lun; Tan, Cheemeng

    2018-01-19

    Living cells are known for their capacity for versatile signal processing, particularly the ability to respond differently to the same stimuli using biochemical networks that integrate environmental signals and reconfigure their dynamic responses. However, the complexity of natural biological networks confounds the discovery of fundamental mechanisms behind versatile signaling. Here, we study one specific aspect of reconfigurable signal processing in which a minimal biological network integrates two signals, using one to reconfigure the network's transfer function with respect to the other, producing an emergent switch between induction and repression. In contrast to known mechanisms, the new mechanism reconfigures transfer functions through genetic networks without extensive protein-protein interactions. These results provide a novel explanation for the versatility of genetic programs, and suggest a new mechanism of signal integration that may govern flexibility and plasticity of gene expression.

  15. Sonic hedgehog signaling in basal cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daya-Grosjean, Leela; Couvé-Privat, Sophie

    2005-07-28

    The development of basal cell carcinoma, the commonest human cancer in fair skinned populations, is clearly associated with constitutive activation of sonic hedgehog signaling. Insight into the genesis of BCC came from the identification of germline mutations of the tumor suppressor gene, PATCHED, a key regulatory component of hedgehog signaling in the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Analysis of sporadic basal cell carcinomas and those from repair deficient xeroderma pigmentosum patients has revealed mutational inactivation of PATCHED and gain of function mutations of the proto-oncogenes, SMOOTHENED and SONIC HEDGEHOG associated with solar UV exposure. The molecular mechanisms involved in alterations of the hedgehog signaling pathway that lead to the formation of basal cell carcinomas are being unraveled and has already allowed the investigation of future therapeutic strategies for treating these skin cancers.

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum calcium signaling in nerve cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEXEI VERKHRATSKY

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is an important organelle involved in various types of signaling in nerve cells. The ER serves as a dynamic Ca2+ pool being thus involved in rapid signaling events associated with cell stimulation by either electrical (action potential or chemical (neurotransmitters signals. This function is supported by Ca2+ release channels (InsP3 and ryanodine receptors and SERCA Ca2+ pumps residing in the endomembrane. In addition the ER provides a specific environment for the posttranslational protein processing and transport of various molecules towards their final destination. In parallel, the ER acts as a "calcium tunnel," which facilitates Ca2+ movements within the cell by avoiding cytoplasmic routes. Finally the ER appears as a source of numerous signals aimed at the nucleus and involved in long-lasting adaptive cellular responses. All these important functions are controlled by intra-ER free Ca2+ which integrates various signaling events and establishes a link between fast signaling, associated with ER Ca2+ release/uptake, and long-lasting adaptive responses relying primarily on the regulation of protein synthesis. Disruption of ER Ca2+ homeostasis triggers several forms of cellular stress response and is intimately involved in neurodegeneration and neuronal cell death

  17. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-12-31

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  18. Signaling pathways regulating red blood cell aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muravyov, Alexei; Tikhomirova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    The exposure of red blood cells (RBC) to some hormones (epinephrine, insulin and glucagon) and agonists of α- and β-adrenergic receptors (phenylephrine, clonidine and isoproterenol) may modify RBC aggregation (RBCA). Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) significantly decreased RBCA, and PGE2 had a similar but lesser effect. Adenylyl cyclase (AC) stimulator forskolin added to RBC suspension, caused a decrease of RBCA. More marked lowering of RBCA occurred after RBC treatment by dB-cAMP. Phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors markedly reduced RBCA. Ca2+ influx stimulated by A23187 was accompanied by an increase of RBCA. The blocking of Ca2+ entry into the RBC by verapamil or the chelation of Ca2+ by EGTA led to a significant RBCA decrease. Lesser changes of aggregation were found after RBC incubation with protein kinase C stimulator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). A significant inhibitory effect of tyrosine protein kinase (TPK) activator cisplatin on RBCA was revealed, while selective TPK inhibitor, lavendustin, eliminated the above mentioned effect. Taken together, the data demonstrate that changes in RBCA are connected with activation of different intracellular signaling pathways. We suggest that alterations in RBCA are mainly associated with the crosstalk between the adenylyl cyclase-cAMP system and Ca2+ control mechanisms.

  19. NO signaling in retinal bipolar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agurto, A; Vielma, A H; Cadiz, B; Couve, E; Schmachtenberg, O

    2017-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a neuromodulator involved in physiological and pathological processes in the retina. In the inner retina, a subgroup of amacrine cells have been shown to synthesize NO, but bipolar cells remain controversial as NO sources. This study correlates NO synthesis in dark-adapted retinas, through labeling with the NO marker DAF-FM, with neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and inducible NOS expression, and presence of the NO receptor soluble guanylate cyclase in bipolar cells. NO containing bipolar cells were morphologically identified by dialysis of DAF fluorescent cells with intracellular dyes, or by DAF labeling followed by immunohistochemistry for nNOS and other cellular markers. DAF fluorescence was observed in all types of bipolar cells that could be identified, but the most intense DAF fluorescence was observed in bipolar cells with severed processes, supporting pathological NO signaling. Among nNOS expressing bipolar cells, type 9 was confirmed unequivocally, while types 2, 3a, 3b, 4, 5, 7, 8 and the rod bipolar cell were devoid of this enzyme. These results establish specific bipolar cell types as NO sources in the inner retina, and support the involvement of NO signaling in physiological and pathological processes in the inner retina. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cytokine signalling in embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, David Møbjerg; Kalisz, Mark; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2006-01-01

    signalling pathways have been documented. In addition, gp130 activation leads to both PI3K and Src activation. The canonical Wnt pathway is sufficient to maintain self-renewal of both human ES cells and mouse ES cells. It seems quite possible that the main pathway maintaining self-renewal in ES cells...... is the Wnt pathway, while the LIF-JAK-STAT3 pathway is present in mouse cells as an adaptation for sustaining self-renewal during embryonic diapause, a condition of delayed implantation in mammals. In keeping with this scenario, the Wnt pathway has been shown to elevate the level of c-myc. Thus, the two...

  1. Designer cell signal processing circuits for biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Robert W; Wang, Baojun

    2015-12-25

    Microorganisms are able to respond effectively to diverse signals from their environment and internal metabolism owing to their inherent sophisticated information processing capacity. A central aim of synthetic biology is to control and reprogramme the signal processing pathways within living cells so as to realise repurposed, beneficial applications ranging from disease diagnosis and environmental sensing to chemical bioproduction. To date most examples of synthetic biological signal processing have been built based on digital information flow, though analogue computing is being developed to cope with more complex operations and larger sets of variables. Great progress has been made in expanding the categories of characterised biological components that can be used for cellular signal manipulation, thereby allowing synthetic biologists to more rationally programme increasingly complex behaviours into living cells. Here we present a current overview of the components and strategies that exist for designer cell signal processing and decision making, discuss how these have been implemented in prototype systems for therapeutic, environmental, and industrial biotechnological applications, and examine emerging challenges in this promising field. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Symmetry breaking signaling mechanisms during cell polarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruurs, LJM

    2017-01-01

    Breaking of cellular symmetry in order to establish an apico-basal polarity axis initiates de novo formation of cell polarity. However, symmetry breaking provides a formidable challenge from a signaling perspective, because by definition no spatial cues are present to instruct axis establishment.

  3. Sulforaphane attenuates EGFR signaling in NSCLC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Yuan; Yu, Zhu-Yun; Chuang, Yen-Shu; Huang, Rui-Mei; Wang, Tzu-Chien V

    2015-06-03

    EGFR, a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), is frequently overexpressed and mutated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been widely used in the treatment of many cancers, including NSCLC. However, intrinsic and acquired resistance to TKI remains a common obstacle. One strategy that may help overcome EGFR-TKI resistance is to target EGFR for degradation. As EGFR is a client protein of heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) and sulforaphane is known to functionally regulate HSP90, we hypothesized that sulforaphane could attenuate EGFR-related signaling and potentially be used to treat NSCLC. Our study revealed that sulforaphane displayed antitumor activity against NSCLC cells both in vitro and in vivo. The sensitivity of NSCLC cells to sulforaphane appeared to positively correlate with the inhibition of EGFR-related signaling, which was attributed to the increased proteasomal degradation of EGFR. Combined treatment of NSCLC cells with sulforaphane plus another HSP90 inhibitor (17-AAG) enhanced the inhibition of EGFR-related signaling both in vitro and in vivo. We have shown that sulforaphane is a novel inhibitory modulator of EGFR expression and is effective in inhibiting the tumor growth of EGFR-TKI-resistant NSCLC cells. Our findings suggest that sulforaphane should be further explored for its potential clinical applications against NSCLC.

  4. Foodborne cereulide causes beta-cell dysfunction and apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Vangoitsenhoven

    Full Text Available To study the effects of cereulide, a food toxin often found at low concentrations in take-away meals, on beta-cell survival and function.Cell death was quantified by Hoechst/Propidium Iodide in mouse (MIN6 and rat (INS-1E beta-cell lines, whole mouse islets and control cell lines (HepG2 and COS-1. Beta-cell function was studied by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS. Mechanisms of toxicity were evaluated in MIN6 cells by mRNA profiling, electron microscopy and mitochondrial function tests.24 h exposure to 5 ng/ml cereulide rendered almost all MIN6, INS-1E and pancreatic islets apoptotic, whereas cell death did not increase in the control cell lines. In MIN6 cells and murine islets, GSIS capacity was lost following 24 h exposure to 0.5 ng/ml cereulide (P<0.05. Cereulide exposure induced markers of mitochondrial stress including Puma (p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis, P<0.05 and general pro-apoptotic signals as Chop (CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein. Mitochondria appeared swollen upon transmission electron microscopy, basal respiration rate was reduced by 52% (P<0.05 and reactive oxygen species increased by more than twofold (P<0.05 following 24 h exposure to 0.25 and 0.50 ng/ml cereulide, respectively.Cereulide causes apoptotic beta-cell death at low concentrations and impairs beta-cell function at even lower concentrations, with mitochondrial dysfunction underlying these defects. Thus, exposure to cereulide even at concentrations too low to cause systemic effects appears deleterious to the beta-cell.

  5. A change in structural integrity of c-Kit mutant D816V causes constitutive signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghav, Pawan Kumar; Singh, Ajay Kumar; Gangenahalli, Gurudutta

    2018-02-17

    Several signaling pathways, ligands, and genes that regulate proliferative and self-renewal properties of the Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSCs) have been studied meticulously. One of the signaling pathways that play a crucial role in the process of hematopoiesis is the Stem Cell Factor (SCF) mediated c-Kit pathway. The c-Kit is a Receptor Tyrosine Kinase (RTK), which is expressed in the cells including HSCs. It undergoes dimerization upon binding with its cognate ligand SCF. As a result, phosphorylation of the Juxtamembrane (JM) domain of c-Kit takes place at Tyr568 and Tyr570 residues. These phosphorylated residues become the docking sites for protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) namely SHP-1 and SHP-2, which in turn cause dephosphorylation and negative regulation of the downstream signaling responsible for the cell proliferation. Interestingly, it has been reported that the mutation of c-Kit at D816V makes it independent of SCF stimulation and SHP-1/SHP-2 inhibition, thereby, causing its constitutive activation. The present study was commenced to elucidate the structural behavior of this mutation in the JM and A-loop region of c-Kit using Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of the wild-type and mutant c-Kit in unphosphorylated and phosphorylated states. The energy difference computed between the wild type and mutant (D816V) c-Kit, and protein-protein docking and complex analysis revealed the impact of this single residue mutation on the integrity dynamics of c-Kit that makes it independent of SHP-1/SHP-2 negative regulation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Study in Mice Links Key Signaling Molecule to Underlying Cause of Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on Research Study in Mice Links Key Signaling Molecule to Underlying Cause of Osteogenesis Imperfecta By Kirstie ... a connection between excessive activity of a signaling molecule and osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), a genetic disease characterized ...

  7. Cell to cell signalling during vertebrate limb bud development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panman, Lia

    2004-01-01

    Communication between cells is essential during embryonic development. The vertebrate limb bud provides us a model to study signalling interactions between cells during patterning of embryonic tissues and organogenesis. In chapter 1 I give an introduction about limb bud development that is focussed

  8. Signal transduction and chemotaxis in mast cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dráber, Petr; Hálová, Ivana; Polakovičová, Iva; Kawakami, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 778, jaro (2016), s. 11-23 ISSN 0014-2999 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-09807S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-00703S Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Mast cell * IgE receptor * KIT receptor * Signal transduction * Chemotaxis * Plasma membrane Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.896, year: 2016

  9. Cerebellar endocannabinoids: retrograde signaling from purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcaggi, Païkan

    2015-06-01

    The cerebellar cortex exhibits a strikingly high expression of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1), the cannabinoid binding protein responsible for the psychoactive effects of marijuana. CB1 is primarily found in presynaptic elements in the molecular layer. While the functional importance of cerebellar CB1 is supported by the effect of gene deletion or exogenous cannabinoids on animal behavior, evidence for a role of endocannabinoids in synaptic signaling is provided by in vitro experiments on superfused acute rodent cerebellar slices. These studies have demonstrated that endocannabinoids can be transiently released by Purkinje cells and signal at synapses in a direction opposite to information transfer (retrograde). Here, following a description of the reported expression pattern of the endocannabinoid system in the cerebellum, I review the accumulated in vitro data, which have addressed the mechanism of retrograde endocannabinoid signaling and identified 2-arachidonoylglycerol as the mediator of this signaling. The mechanisms leading to endocannabinoid release, the effects of CB1 activation, and the associated synaptic plasticity mechanisms are discussed and the remaining unknowns are pointed. Notably, it is argued that the spatial specificity of this signaling and the physiological conditions required for its induction need to be determined in order to understand endocannabinoid function in the cerebellar cortex.

  10. Primary Cilia, Signaling Networks and Cell Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veland, Iben Rønn

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based, sensory organelles that emerge from the centrosomal mother centriole to project from the surface of most quiescent cells in the human body. Ciliary entry is a tightly controlled process, involving diffusion barriers and gating complexes that maintain a unique...... and cytoskeletal organization. Further, cell migration and polarization in are impaired in Invs MEFs. In two-dimensional cell migration, the centrosome is positioned between the nucleus and the leading edge with the primary cilium directed towards the direction of migration. PDGFRα is activated in the primary......, which leads to uncontrolled cell movements. Together, the results obtained from my PhD studies reflect the high level of complexity within signaling systems regulated by the primary cilium that control cellular processes during embryonic development and in tissue homeostasis. As such, this dissertation...

  11. Inflammatory signals regulate hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, Megan T; King, Katherine Y; Goodell, Margaret A

    2011-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the progenitors of all blood and immune cells, yet their role in immunity is not well understood. Most studies have focused on the ability of committed lymphoid and myeloid precursors to replenish immune cells during infection. Recent studies, however, have indicated that HSCs also proliferate in response to systemic infection and replenish effector immune cells. Inflammatory signaling molecules including interferons, tumor necrosis factor-α and Toll-like receptors are essential to the HSC response. Observing the biology of HSCs through the lens of infection and inflammation has led to the discovery of an array of immune-mediators that serve crucial roles in HSC regulation and function. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Acupuncture causes serotonin release by mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Nikolay; Atanasova, Dimitrinka; Tomov, Nikola; Sivrev, Dimitar; Lazarov, Nikolai

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are important object in experimental acupuncture due to their putative involvement in local reactions to needling. In the rat, they are shown to contain in their granules, among other tissue mediators, serotonin, also called 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). The aim of this study is to examine the normal distribution of 5-HT-containing MCs in soft tissues of Zusanli (ST36) acupuncture point (acupoint) and their morphological changes caused by experimental acupuncture. We observed 5-HT-immunopositive MCs in the tissues and in the vicinity of the needle tract formed after acupuncture. As a result of acupuncture needling, the tissue integrity is disrupted and certain folds are formed in the direction of the needle tract. Connective tissue in the vicinity of the needle tract gets compressed and displaced, together with the 5-HT-immunoreactive MCs seen there. Some of those 5-HT-immunopositive MCs showed signs of degranulation with numerous discharged granules, some of them found at a considerable distance form the cell. Furthermore, 5-HT-immunopositive MCs are unevenly distributed in soft tissues of ST36 acupoint. Larger numbers of 5-HT-containing MCs were visualized in subcutis and dermis, compared to the observed in striated muscles. Placing the acupuncture needle into the rat skin caused a formation of an apparent needle tract, tissue displacement and degranulation of 5-HT-immunopositive MCs. The demonstrated serotonin release by means of MC degranulation might be involved in the local tissue response to acupuncture.

  13. Robustness of MEK-ERK Dynamics and Origins of Cell-to-Cell Variability in MAPK Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Filippi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular signaling processes can exhibit pronounced cell-to-cell variability in genetically identical cells. This affects how individual cells respond differentially to the same environmental stimulus. However, the origins of cell-to-cell variability in cellular signaling systems remain poorly understood. Here, we measure the dynamics of phosphorylated MEK and ERK across cell populations and quantify the levels of population heterogeneity over time using high-throughput image cytometry. We use a statistical modeling framework to show that extrinsic noise, particularly that from upstream MEK, is the dominant factor causing cell-to-cell variability in ERK phosphorylation, rather than stochasticity in the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of ERK. We furthermore show that without extrinsic noise in the core module, variable (including noisy signals would be faithfully reproduced downstream, but the within-module extrinsic variability distorts these signals and leads to a drastic reduction in the mutual information between incoming signal and ERK activity.

  14. Signal peptide of eosinophil cationic protein is toxic to cells lacking signal peptide peptidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.-M.; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2004-01-01

    Eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) is a toxin secreted by activated human eosinophils. The properties of mature ECP have been well studied but those of the signal peptide of ECP (ECPsp) are not clear. In this study, several chimeric proteins containing N-terminal fusion of ECPsp were generated, and introduced into Escherichia coli, Pichia pastoris, and human epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431 to study the function of ECPsp. We found that expression of ECPsp chimeric proteins inhibited the growth of E. coli and P. pastoris but not A431 cells. Primary sequence analysis and in vitro transcription/translation of ECPsp have revealed that it is a potential substrate for human signal peptide peptidase (hSPP), an intramembrane protease located in endoplasmic reticulum. In addition, knockdown of the hSPP mRNA expression in ECPsp-eGFP/A431 cells caused the growth inhibitory effect, whereas complementally expression of hSPP in P. pastoris system rescued the cell growth. Taken together, we have demonstrated that ECPsp is a toxic signal peptide, and expression of hSPP protects the cells from growth inhibition

  15. PTP1B Inhibition Causes Rac1 Activation by Enhancing Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Tsuchiya

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The present study investigated the signaling pathway underlying Rac1 activation induced by the linoleic acid derivative 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA. Methods: Activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B was assayed under cell-free conditions. Western blot was carried out to quantify phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1 and Akt in PC-12 cells. Rac1 activity was monitored in the föerster resonance energy transfer (FRET analysis using living and fixed PC-12 cells. Results: DCP-LA markedly suppressed PTP1B activity in a concentration (100 pM-100 µM-dependent manner. In the DCP-LA binding assay, fluorescein-conjugated DCP-LA produced a single fluorescent signal band at 60 kDa, corresponding to the molecule of PTP1B, and the signal was attenuated or abolished by co-treatment or pretreatment with non-conjugated DCP-LA. DCP-LA significantly enhanced nerve growth factor (NGF-stimulated phosphorylation of IRS-1 at Tyr1222 and Akt1/2 at Thr308/309 and Ser473/474 in PC-12 cells. In the FRET analysis, DCP-LA significantly enhanced NGF-stimulated Rac1 activation, which is abrogated by the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K inhibitor wortmannin, the 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1 inhibitor BX912, or the Akt inhibitor MK2206. Conclusion: The results of the present study show that DCP-LA-induced PTP1B inhibition, possibly through its direct binding, causes Rac1 activation by enhancing a pathway along a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK/IRS-1/PI3K/Akt/Rac1 axis.

  16. Endothelial cell oxidative stress and signal transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROCIO FONCEA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial dysfunction (ED is an early event in atherosclerotic disease, preceding clinical manifestations and complications. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS have been implicated as important mechanisms that contribute to ED, and ROS’s may function as intracellular messengers that modulate signaling pathways. Several intracellular signal events stimulated by ROS have been defined, including the identification of two members of the mitogen activated protein kinase family (ERK1/2 and big MAP kinase, BMK1, tyrosine kinases (Src and Syk and different isoenzymes of PKC as redox-sensitive kinases. ROS regulation of signal transduction components include the modification in the activity of transcriptional factors such as NFkB and others that result in changes in gene expression and modifications in cellular responses. In order to understand the intracellular mechanisms induced by ROS in endothelial cells (EC, we are studying the response of human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells to increased ROS generation by different pro-atherogenic stimuli. Our results show that Homocysteine (Hcy and oxidized LDL (oxLDL enhance the activity and expression of oxidative stress markers, such as NFkB and heme oxygenase 1. These results suggest that these pro-atherogenic stimuli increase oxidative stress in EC, and thus explain the loss of endothelial function associated with the atherogenic process

  17. Rpi-blb2-Mediated Hypersensitive Cell Death Caused by Phytophthora infestans AVRblb2 Requires SGT1, but not EDS1, NDR1, Salicylic Acid-, Jasmonic Acid-, or Ethylene-Mediated Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Keun Oh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Potato Rpi-blb2 encodes a protein with a coiled-coil-nucleotide binding site and leucine-rich repeat (CC-NBS-LRR motif that recognizes the Phytophthora infestans AVRblb2 effector and triggers hypersensitive cell death (HCD. To better understand the components required for Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in plants, we used virus-induced gene silencing to repress candidate genes in Rpi-blb2-transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants and assayed the plants for AVRblb2 effector. Rpi-blb2 triggers HCD through NbSGT1-mediated pathways, but not NbEDS1- or NbNDR1-mediated pathways. In addition, the role of salicylic acid (SA, jasmonic acid (JA, and ethylene (ET in Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD were analyzed by monitoring of the responses of NbICS1-, NbCOI1-, or NbEIN2-silenced or Rpi-blb2::NahG-transgenic plants. Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in response to AVRblb2 was not associated with SA accumulation. Thus, SA affects Rpi-blb2-mediated resistance against P. infestans, but not Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in response to AVRblb2. Additionally, JA and ET signaling were not required for Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in N. benthamiana. Taken together, these findings suggest that NbSGT1 is a unique positive regulator of Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in response to AVRblb2, but EDS1, NDR1, SA, JA, and ET are not required.

  18. Chronic intermittent hypoxia disturbs insulin secretion and causes pancreatic injury via the MAPK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yeying; Hai, Bing; Niu, Xiaoqun; Ai, Li; Cao, Yu; Li, Ran; Li, Yongxia

    2017-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a breathing disorder during sleep, with a most prominent character of chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), which induces the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that damages multiple tissues and causes metabolic disorders. In this study, we established a rat model of varying OSA with different grades of CIH (12.5% O 2 , 10% O 2 , 7.5% O 2 , and 5% O 2 ) for 12 weeks, and found that CIH stimulated insulin secretion, reduced the insulin:proinsulin ratio in pancreatic tissue, and caused pancreatic tissue lesions and cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, CIH promoted the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, and activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members, extracellular regulated protein kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and P38, depending on the O 2 concentration. In summary, CIH disturbed insulin secretion, and caused inflammation, lesions, and cell apoptosis in pancreatic tissue via the MAPK signaling pathway, which may be of great significance for clinical treatment of OSA and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).

  19. Uncertainty in multispectral lidar signals caused by incidence angle effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasalainen, Sanna; Åkerblom, Markku; Nevalainen, Olli; Hakala, Teemu; Kaasalainen, Mikko

    2018-04-06

    Multispectral terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) is an emerging technology. Several manufacturers already offer commercial dual or three wavelength airborne laser scanners, while multispectral TLS is still carried out mainly with research instruments. Many of these research efforts have focused on the study of vegetation. The aim of this paper is to study the uncertainty of the measurement of spectral indices of vegetation with multispectral lidar. Using two spectral indices as examples, we find that the uncertainty is due to systematic errors caused by the wavelength dependency of laser incidence angle effects. This finding is empirical, and the error cannot be removed by modelling or instrument modification. The discovery and study of these effects has been enabled by hyperspectral and multispectral TLS, and it has become a subject of active research within the past few years. We summarize the most recent studies on multi-wavelength incidence angle effects and present new results on the effect of specular reflection from the leaf surface, and the surface structure, which have been suggested to play a key role. We also discuss the consequences to the measurement of spectral indices with multispectral TLS, and a possible correction scheme using a synthetic laser footprint.

  20. Chemokines: a new dendritic cell signal for T cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph A Thaiss

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are the main inducers and regulators of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses against viruses and tumors. One checkpoint to avoid misguided CTL activation, which might damage healthy cells of the body, is the necessity for multiple activation signals, involving both antigenic as well as additional signals that reflect the presence of pathogens. DCs provide both signals when activated by ligands of pattern recognition receptors and licensed by helper lymphocytes. Recently, it has been established that such T cell licensing can be facilitated by CD4+ T helper cells (classical licensing or by NKT cells (alternative licensing. Licensing regulates the DC/CTL cross-talk at multiple layers. Direct recruitment of CTLs through chemokines released by licensed DCs has recently emerged as a common theme and has a crucial impact on the efficiency of CTL responses. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of DC licensing for cross-priming and implications for the temporal and spatial regulation underlying this process. Future vaccination strategies will benefit from a deeper insight into the mechanisms that govern CTL activation.

  1. Non-invasive Optical Biosensor for Probing Cell Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Fang

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell signaling mediated through a cellular target is encoded by spatial andtemporal dynamics of downstream signaling networks. The coupling of temporal dynamicswith spatial gradients of signaling activities guides cellular responses upon stimulation.Monitoring the integration of cell signaling in real time, if realized, would provide a newdimension for understanding cell biology and physiology. Optical biosensors includingresonant waveguide grating (RWG biosensor manifest a physiologically relevant andintegrated cellular response related to dynamic redistribution of cellular matters, thusproviding a non-invasive means for cell signaling study. This paper reviews recentprogresses in biosensor instrumentation, and theoretical considerations and potentialapplications of optical biosensors for whole cell sensing.

  2. Phantom phone signals: An investigation into the prevalence and predictors of imagined cell phone signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanis, M.A.; Beukeboom, C.J.; Hartmann, T.; Vermeulen, I.E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to elucidate the peculiar phenomenon of imagined cell phone signals, or Phantom Phone Signals (PPS), which is defined as an individual's perception of a phone signal, indicating an incoming call, message, or social media notification, when in fact no such signal was transmitted. A

  3. Non-Invasive Optical Biosensor for Probing Cell Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Ye

    2007-01-01

    Cell signaling mediated through a cellular target is encoded by spatial and temporal dynamics of downstream signaling networks. The coupling of temporal dynamics with spatial gradients of signaling activities guides cellular responses upon stimulation. Monitoring the integration of cell signaling in real time, if realized, would provide a new dimension for understanding cell biology and physiology. Optical biosensors including resonant waveguide grating (RWG) biosensor manifest a physiologica...

  4. miR-155, identified as anti-metastatic by global miRNA profiling of a metastasis model, inhibits cancer cell extravasation and colonization in vivo and causes significant signaling alterations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravgaard, Karina Hedelund; Terp, Mikkel G; Lund, Rikke R

    2015-01-01

    To gain insight into miRNA regulation in metastasis formation, we used a metastasis cell line model that allows investigation of extravasation and colonization of circulating cancer cells to lungs in mice. Using global miRNA profiling, 28 miRNAs were found to exhibit significantly altered...... in lungs when injected intravenously in immunodeficient mice. Our experiments addressing the underlying mechanism of the altered tumor burden revealed that miR-155-overexpressing CL16 cells were less invasive than CL16 control cells in vitro, while miR-155 overexpression had no effect on cancer cell...... proliferation or apoptosis in established lung tumors. To identify proteins regulated by miR-155 and thus delineate its function in our cell model, we compared the proteome of xenograft tumors derived from miR-155-overexpressing CL16 cells and CL16 control cells using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. >4...

  5. Loss of PTEN causes SHP2 activation, making lung cancer cells unresponsive to IFN-γ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chia-Ling; Chiang, Tzu-Hui; Tseng, Po-Chun; Wang, Yu-Chih; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Src homology-2 domain-containing phosphatase (SHP) 2, an oncogenic phosphatase, inhibits type II immune interferon (IFN)-γ signaling by subverting signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 tyrosine phosphorylation and activation. For cancer immunoediting, this study aimed to investigate the decrease of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), a tumor suppressor protein, leading to cellular impairment of IFN-γ signaling. In comparison with human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells, the natural PTEN loss in another human lung adenocarcinoma line, PC14PE6/AS2 cells, presents reduced responsiveness in IFN-γ-induced IFN regulatory factor 1 activation and CD54 expression. Artificially silencing PTEN expression in A549 cells also caused cells to be unresponsive to IFN-γ without affecting IFN-γ receptor expression. IFN-γ-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were demonstrated in A549 cells but were defective in PC14PE6/AS2 cells and in PTEN-deficient A549 cells. Aberrant activation of SHP2 by ROS was specifically shown in PC14PE6/AS2 cells and PTEN-deficient A549 cells. Inhibiting ROS and SHP2 rescued cellular responses to IFN-γ-induced cytotoxicity and inhibition of cell proliferation in PC14PE6/AS2 cells. These results demonstrate that a decrease in PTEN facilitates ROS/SHP2 signaling, causing lung cancer cells to become unresponsive to IFN-γ. - Highlights: • This study demonstrates that PTEN decrease causes cellular unresponsive to IFN-γ. • Lung cancer cells with PTEN deficiency show unresponsive to IFN-γ signaling. • PTEN decrease inhibits IFN-γ-induced CD54, cell proliferation inhibition, and cytotoxicity. • ROS-mediated SHP2 activation makes PTEN-deficient cells unresponsive to IFN-γ.

  6. Loss of PTEN causes SHP2 activation, making lung cancer cells unresponsive to IFN-γ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chia-Ling [Translational Research Center, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Chiang, Tzu-Hui; Tseng, Po-Chun [Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Wang, Yu-Chih [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chiou-Feng, E-mail: cflin2014@tmu.edu.tw [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China)

    2015-10-23

    Src homology-2 domain-containing phosphatase (SHP) 2, an oncogenic phosphatase, inhibits type II immune interferon (IFN)-γ signaling by subverting signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 tyrosine phosphorylation and activation. For cancer immunoediting, this study aimed to investigate the decrease of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), a tumor suppressor protein, leading to cellular impairment of IFN-γ signaling. In comparison with human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells, the natural PTEN loss in another human lung adenocarcinoma line, PC14PE6/AS2 cells, presents reduced responsiveness in IFN-γ-induced IFN regulatory factor 1 activation and CD54 expression. Artificially silencing PTEN expression in A549 cells also caused cells to be unresponsive to IFN-γ without affecting IFN-γ receptor expression. IFN-γ-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were demonstrated in A549 cells but were defective in PC14PE6/AS2 cells and in PTEN-deficient A549 cells. Aberrant activation of SHP2 by ROS was specifically shown in PC14PE6/AS2 cells and PTEN-deficient A549 cells. Inhibiting ROS and SHP2 rescued cellular responses to IFN-γ-induced cytotoxicity and inhibition of cell proliferation in PC14PE6/AS2 cells. These results demonstrate that a decrease in PTEN facilitates ROS/SHP2 signaling, causing lung cancer cells to become unresponsive to IFN-γ. - Highlights: • This study demonstrates that PTEN decrease causes cellular unresponsive to IFN-γ. • Lung cancer cells with PTEN deficiency show unresponsive to IFN-γ signaling. • PTEN decrease inhibits IFN-γ-induced CD54, cell proliferation inhibition, and cytotoxicity. • ROS-mediated SHP2 activation makes PTEN-deficient cells unresponsive to IFN-γ.

  7. Multinuclear giant cell formation is enhanced by down-regulation of Wnt signaling in gastric cancer cell line, AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Shi-Mun; Kim, Rockki; Ryu, Jae-Hyun; Jho, Eek-Hoon; Song, Ki-Joon; Jang, Shyh-Ing; Kee, Sun-Ho

    2005-01-01

    AGS cells, which were derived from malignant gastric adenocarcinoma tissue, lack E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion but have a high level of nuclear β-catenin, which suggests altered Wnt signal. In addition, approximately 5% of AGS cells form multinuclear giant cells in the routine culture conditions, while taxol treatment causes most AGS cells to become giant cells. The observation of reduced nuclear β-catenin levels in giant cells induced by taxol treatment prompted us to investigate the relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. After overnight serum starvation, the shape of AGS cells became flattened, and this morphological change was accompanied by decrease in Myc expression and an increase in the giant cell population. Lithium chloride treatment, which inhibits GSK3β activity, reversed these serum starvation effects, which suggests an inverse relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. Furthermore, the down-regulation of Wnt signaling caused by the over-expression of ICAT, E-cadherin, and Axin enhanced giant cell formation. Therefore, down-regulation of Wnt signaling may be related to giant cell formation, which is considered to be a survival mechanism against induced cell death

  8. BMP signaling regulates satellite cell-dependent postnatal muscle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantzou, Amalia; Schirwis, Elija; Swist, Sandra; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Polydorou, Ioanna; Zarrouki, Faouzi; Mouisel, Etienne; Beley, Cyriaque; Julien, Anaïs; Le Grand, Fabien; Garcia, Luis; Colnot, Céline; Birchmeier, Carmen; Braun, Thomas; Schuelke, Markus; Relaix, Frédéric; Amthor, Helge

    2017-08-01

    Postnatal growth of skeletal muscle largely depends on the expansion and differentiation of resident stem cells, the so-called satellite cells. Here, we demonstrate that postnatal satellite cells express components of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling machinery. Overexpression of noggin in postnatal mice (to antagonize BMP ligands), satellite cell-specific knockout of Alk3 (the gene encoding the BMP transmembrane receptor) or overexpression of inhibitory SMAD6 decreased satellite cell proliferation and accretion during myofiber growth, and ultimately retarded muscle growth. Moreover, reduced BMP signaling diminished the adult satellite cell pool. Abrogation of BMP signaling in satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts strongly diminished cell proliferation and upregulated the expression of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p57 In conclusion, these results show that BMP signaling defines postnatal muscle development by regulating satellite cell-dependent myofiber growth and the generation of the adult muscle stem cell pool. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Wnt signaling-mediated redox regulation maintains the germ line stem cell differentiation niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Su; Gao, Yuan; Song, Xiaoqing; Ma, Xing; Zhu, Xiujuan; Mao, Ying; Yang, Zhihao; Ni, Jianquan; Li, Hua; Malanowski, Kathryn E; Anoja, Perera; Park, Jungeun; Haug, Jeff; Xie, Ting

    2015-10-09

    Adult stem cells continuously undergo self-renewal and generate differentiated cells. In the Drosophila ovary, two separate niches control germ line stem cell (GSC) self-renewal and differentiation processes. Compared to the self-renewing niche, relatively little is known about the maintenance and function of the differentiation niche. In this study, we show that the cellular redox state regulated by Wnt signaling is critical for the maintenance and function of the differentiation niche to promote GSC progeny differentiation. Defective Wnt signaling causes the loss of the differentiation niche and the upregulated BMP signaling in differentiated GSC progeny, thereby disrupting germ cell differentiation. Mechanistically, Wnt signaling controls the expression of multiple glutathione-S-transferase family genes and the cellular redox state. Finally, Wnt2 and Wnt4 function redundantly to maintain active Wnt signaling in the differentiation niche. Therefore, this study has revealed a novel strategy for Wnt signaling in regulating the cellular redox state and maintaining the differentiation niche.

  10. Aberrant signaling pathways in medulloblastomas: a stem cell connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Oliveira Rodini

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant primary tumor of the central nervous system. It represents the most frequent type of solid tumor and the leading cause of death related to cancer in early childhood. Current treatment includes surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy which may lead to severe cognitive impairment and secondary brain tumors. New perspectives for therapeutic development have emerged with the identification of stem-like cells displaying high tumorigenic potential and increased radio- and chemo-resistance in gliomas. Under the cancer stem cell hypothesis, transformation of neural stem cells and/or granular neuron progenitors of the cerebellum are though to be involved in medulloblastoma development. Dissecting the genetic and molecular alterations associated with this process should significantly impact both basic and applied cancer research. Based on cumulative evidences in the fields of genetics and molecular biology of medulloblastomas, we discuss the possible involvement of developmental signaling pathways as critical biochemical switches determining normal neurogenesis or tumorigenesis. From the clinical viewpoint, modulation of signaling pathways such as TGFβ, regulating neural stem cell proliferation and tumor development, might be attempted as an alternative strategy for future drug development aiming at more efficient therapies and improved clinical outcome of patients with pediatric brain cancers.

  11. Probing Embryonic Stem Cell Autocrine and Paracrine Signaling Using Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyla, Laralynne; Voldman, Joel

    2012-07-01

    Although stem cell fate is traditionally manipulated by exogenously altering the cells' extracellular signaling environment, the endogenous autocrine and paracrine signals produced by the cells also contribute to their two essential processes: self-renewal and differentiation. Autocrine and/or paracrine signals are fundamental to both embryonic stem cell self-renewal and early embryonic development, but the nature and contributions of these signals are often difficult to fully define using conventional methods. Microfluidic techniques have been used to explore the effects of cell-secreted signals by controlling cell organization or by providing precise control over the spatial and temporal cellular microenvironment. Here we review how such techniques have begun to be adapted for use with embryonic stem cells, and we illustrate how many remaining questions in embryonic stem cell biology could be addressed using microfluidic technologies.

  12. Cell swelling and ion redistribution assessed with intrinsic optical signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WITTE OTTO W.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell volume changes are associated with alterations of intrinsic optical signals (IOS. In submerged brain slices in vitro, afferent stimulation induces an increase in light transmission. As assessed by measurement of the largely membrane impermeant ion tetramethylammonium (TMA in the extracellular space, these IOS correlate with the extent and time course of the change of the extracellular space size. They have a high signal to noise ratio and allow measurements of IOS changes in the order of a few percent. Under conditions of reduced net KCl uptake (low Cl solution a directed spatial buffer mechanism (K syphoning can be demonstrated in the neocortex with widening of the extracellular space in superficial layers associated with a reduced light transmission and an increase of extracellular K concentration. The nature of the IOS under pathophysiological conditions is less clear. Spreading depressions first cause an increase of light transmission, then a decrease. Such a decrease has also been observed following application of NMDA where it was associated with structural damage. Pharmacological analyses suggest that under physiological conditions changes of extracellular space size are mainly caused by astrocytic volume changes while with strong stimuli and under pathophysiological conditions also neuronal swelling occurs. With reflected light usually signals opposite to those observed with transmitted light are seen. Recording of IOS from interface slices gives very complex signals since under these conditions an increase of light transmission has been reported to be superimposed by a decrease of the signal due to mechanical lensing effects of the slice surface. Depending on the method of measurement and the exact conditions, several mechanisms may contribute to IOS. Under well defined conditions IOS are a useful supplementary tool to monitor changes of extracellular volume both in space and time.

  13. Inactivation of IL11 Signaling Causes Craniosynostosis, Delayed Tooth Eruption, and Supernumerary Teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Pekka; Morgan, Neil V.; Fenwick, Aimée L.; Parmanen, Satu; Veistinen, Lotta; Mikkola, Marja L.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Giraud, Andrew; Judd, Louise; Arte, Sirpa; Brueton, Louise A.; Wall, Steven A.; Mathijssen, Irene M.J.; Maher, Eamonn R.; Wilkie, Andrew O.M.; Kreiborg, Sven; Thesleff, Irma

    2011-01-01

    Craniosynostosis and supernumerary teeth most often occur as isolated developmental anomalies, but they are also separately manifested in several malformation syndromes. Here, we describe a human syndrome featuring craniosynostosis, maxillary hypoplasia, delayed tooth eruption, and supernumerary teeth. We performed homozygosity mapping in three unrelated consanguineous Pakistani families and localized the syndrome to a region in chromosome 9. Mutational analysis of candidate genes in the region revealed that all affected children harbored homozygous missense mutations (c.662C>G [p.Pro221Arg], c.734C>G [p.Ser245Cys], or c.886C>T [p.Arg296Trp]) in IL11RA (encoding interleukin 11 receptor, alpha) on chromosome 9p13.3. In addition, a homozygous nonsense mutation, c.475C>T (p.Gln159X), and a homozygous duplication, c.916_924dup (p.Thr306_Ser308dup), were observed in two north European families. In cell-transfection experiments, the p.Arg296Trp mutation rendered the receptor unable to mediate the IL11 signal, indicating that the mutation causes loss of IL11RA function. We also observed disturbed cranial growth and suture activity in the Il11ra null mutant mice, in which reduced size and remodeling of limb bones has been previously described. We conclude that IL11 signaling is essential for the normal development of craniofacial bones and teeth and that its function is to restrict suture fusion and tooth number. The results open up the possibility of modulation of IL11 signaling for the treatment of craniosynostosis. PMID:21741611

  14. Atypical B cell receptor signaling: straddling immune diseases and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Mary

    2013-08-01

    The B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathway plays an essential role in the survival, proliferation, differentiation and trafficking of lymphocytic. Recent findings associate aberrant BCR signaling with specific disease pathologies, including B-cell malignancies and autoimmune disorders. Inhibition of the BCR signaling pathway may therefore provide promising new strategies for the treatment of B-cell diseases. This special issue of International Reviews of Immunology focuses on atypical B-cell receptor signaling, its role in immune diseases and cancer, and its implications for potential therapeutic intervention.

  15. An Effective Feedback Loop between Cell-Cell Contact Duration and Morphogen Signaling Determines Cell Fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Vanessa; Lang, Moritz; Krens, S F Gabriel; Pradhan, Saurabh J; Shamipour, Shayan; Sako, Keisuke; Sikora, Mateusz; Guet, Călin C; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2017-10-23

    Cell-cell contact formation constitutes an essential step in evolution, leading to the differentiation of specialized cell types. However, remarkably little is known about whether and how the interplay between contact formation and fate specification affects development. Here, we identify a positive feedback loop between cell-cell contact duration, morphogen signaling, and mesendoderm cell-fate specification during zebrafish gastrulation. We show that long-lasting cell-cell contacts enhance the competence of prechordal plate (ppl) progenitor cells to respond to Nodal signaling, required for ppl cell-fate specification. We further show that Nodal signaling promotes ppl cell-cell contact duration, generating a positive feedback loop between ppl cell-cell contact duration and cell-fate specification. Finally, by combining mathematical modeling and experimentation, we show that this feedback determines whether anterior axial mesendoderm cells become ppl or, instead, turn into endoderm. Thus, the interdependent activities of cell-cell signaling and contact formation control fate diversification within the developing embryo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Decoding Signal Processing at the Single-Cell Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiley, H. Steven

    2017-12-01

    The ability of cells to detect and decode information about their extracellular environment is critical to generating an appropriate response. In multicellular organisms, cells must decode dozens of signals from their neighbors and extracellular matrix to maintain tissue homeostasis while still responding to environmental stressors. How cells detect and process information from their surroundings through a surprisingly limited number of signal transduction pathways is one of the most important question in biology. Despite many decades of research, many of the fundamental principles that underlie cell signal processing remain obscure. However, in this issue of Cell Systems, Gillies et al present compelling evidence that the early response gene circuit can act as a linear signal integrator, thus providing significant insight into how cells handle fluctuating signals and noise in their environment.

  17. Negative signaling in B cells: SHIP Grbs Shc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tridandapani, S; Kelley, T; Cooney, D; Pradhan, M; Coggeshall, K M

    1997-09-01

    Negative signaling in B cells is initiated by co-crosslinking of the antigen receptor and the Fcy receptor, resulting in cessation of B-cell signaling events and, in turn, inhibiting B-cell proliferation and antibody secretion. Here, a competitive role is proposed for SHIP in blocking the interaction of Shc with the Grb2-Sos complex of proteins that lead to Ras activation in B cells.

  18. N-wasp is essential for the negative regulation of B cell receptor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaohong Liu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Negative regulation of receptor signaling is essential for controlling cell activation and differentiation. In B-lymphocytes, the down-regulation of B-cell antigen receptor (BCR signaling is critical for suppressing the activation of self-reactive B cells; however, the mechanism underlying the negative regulation of signaling remains elusive. Using genetically manipulated mouse models and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we demonstrate that neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP, which is coexpressed with WASP in all immune cells, is a critical negative regulator of B-cell signaling. B-cell-specific N-WASP gene deletion causes enhanced and prolonged BCR signaling and elevated levels of autoantibodies in the mouse serum. The increased signaling in N-WASP knockout B cells is concurrent with increased accumulation of F-actin at the B-cell surface, enhanced B-cell spreading on the antigen-presenting membrane, delayed B-cell contraction, inhibition in the merger of signaling active BCR microclusters into signaling inactive central clusters, and a blockage of BCR internalization. Upon BCR activation, WASP is activated first, followed by N-WASP in mouse and human primary B cells. The activation of N-WASP is suppressed by Bruton's tyrosine kinase-induced WASP activation, and is restored by the activation of SH2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase that inhibits WASP activation. Our results reveal a new mechanism for the negative regulation of BCR signaling and broadly suggest an actin-mediated mechanism for signaling down-regulation.

  19. Signaling for synergistic activation of natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyung-Joon; Kim, Hun Sik

    2012-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a pivotal role in early surveillance against virus infection and cellular transformation, and are also implicated in the control of inflammatory response through their effector functions of direct lysis of target cells and cytokine secretion. NK cell activation toward target cell is determined by the net balance of signals transmitted from diverse activating and inhibitory receptors. A distinct feature of NK cell activation is that stimulation of resting NK cells with single activating receptor on its own cannot mount natural cytotoxicity. Instead, specific pairs of co-activation receptors are required to unleash NK cell activation via synergy-dependent mechanism. Because each co-activation receptor uses distinct signaling modules, NK cell synergy relies on the integration of such disparate signals. This explains why the study of the mechanism underlying NK cell synergy is important and necessary. Recent studies revealed that NK cell synergy depends on the integration of complementary signals converged at a critical checkpoint element but not on simple amplification of the individual signaling to overcome intrinsic activation threshold. This review focuses on the signaling events during NK cells activation and recent advances in the study of NK cell synergy.

  20. Diffusion wave and signal transduction in biological live cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Tian You; Fan, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Transduction of mechanical stimuli into biochemical signals is a fundamental subject for cell physics. In the experiments of FRET signal in cells a wave propagation in nanoscope was observed. We here develop a diffusion wave concept and try to give an explanation to the experimental observation. The theoretical prediction is in good agreement to result of the experiment.

  1. Cell death patterns in Arabidopsis cells subjected to four physiological stressors indicate multiple signalling pathways and cell cycle phase specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathirana, Ranjith; West, Phillip; Hedderley, Duncan; Eason, Jocelyn

    2017-03-01

    Corpse morphology, nuclear DNA fragmentation, expression of senescence-associated genes (SAG) and cysteine protease profiles were investigated to understand cell death patterns in a cell cycle-synchronised Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture treated with four physiological stressors in the late G2 phase. Within 4 h of treatment, polyethylene glycol (PEG, 20 %), mannose (100 mM) and hydrogen peroxide (2 mM) caused DNA fragmentation coinciding with cell permeability to Evans Blue (EB) and produced corpse morphology corresponding to apoptosis-like programmed cell death (AL-PCD) with cytoplasmic retraction from the cell wall. Ethylene (8 mL per 250-mL flask) caused permeability of cells to EB without concomitant nuclear DNA fragmentation and cytoplasmic retraction, suggesting necrotic cell death. Mannose inducing glycolysis block and PEG causing dehydration resulted in relatively similar patterns of upregulation of SAG suggesting similar cell death signalling pathways for these two stress factors, whereas hydrogen peroxide caused unique patterns indicating an alternate pathway for cell death induced by oxidative stress. Ethylene did not cause appreciable changes in SAG expression, confirming necrotic cell death. Expression of AtDAD, BoMT1 and AtSAG2 genes, previously shown to be associated with plant senescence, also changed rapidly during AL-PCD in cultured cells. The profiles of nine distinct cysteine protease-active bands ranging in size from ca. 21.5 to 38.5 kDa found in the control cultures were also altered after treatment with the four stressors, with mannose and PEG again producing similar patterns. Results also suggest that cysteine proteases may have a role in necrotic cell death.

  2. Hedgehog signaling acts with the temporal cascade to promote neuroblast cell cycle exit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phing Chian Chai

    Full Text Available In Drosophila postembryonic neuroblasts, transition in gene expression programs of a cascade of transcription factors (also known as the temporal series acts together with the asymmetric division machinery to generate diverse neurons with distinct identities and regulate the end of neuroblast proliferation. However, the underlying mechanism of how this "temporal series" acts during development remains unclear. Here, we show that Hh signaling in the postembryonic brain is temporally regulated; excess (earlier onset of Hh signaling causes premature neuroblast cell cycle exit and under-proliferation, whereas loss of Hh signaling causes delayed cell cycle exit and excess proliferation. Moreover, the Hh pathway functions downstream of Castor but upstream of Grainyhead, two components of the temporal series, to schedule neuroblast cell cycle exit. Interestingly, hh is likely a target of Castor. Hence, Hh signaling provides a link between the temporal series and the asymmetric division machinery in scheduling the end of neurogenesis.

  3. Human β-Cell Proliferation and Intracellular Signaling: Part 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Mehboob A.; García-Ocaña, Adolfo; Vasavada, Rupangi C.; Bhushan, Anil; Bernal-Mizrachi, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    This is the third in a series of Perspectives on intracellular signaling pathways coupled to proliferation in pancreatic β-cells. We contrast the large knowledge base in rodent β-cells with the more limited human database. With the increasing incidence of type 1 diabetes and the recognition that type 2 diabetes is also due in part to a deficiency of functioning β-cells, there is great urgency to identify therapeutic approaches to expand human β-cell numbers. Therapeutic approaches might include stem cell differentiation, transdifferentiation, or expansion of cadaver islets or residual endogenous β-cells. In these Perspectives, we focus on β-cell proliferation. Past Perspectives reviewed fundamental cell cycle regulation and its upstream regulation by insulin/IGF signaling via phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, glucose, glycogen synthase kinase-3 and liver kinase B1, protein kinase Cζ, calcium-calcineurin–nuclear factor of activated T cells, epidermal growth factor/platelet-derived growth factor family members, Wnt/β-catenin, leptin, and estrogen and progesterone. Here, we emphasize Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription, Ras/Raf/extracellular signal–related kinase, cadherins and integrins, G-protein–coupled receptors, and transforming growth factor β signaling. We hope these three Perspectives will serve to introduce these pathways to new researchers and will encourage additional investigators to focus on understanding how to harness key intracellular signaling pathways for therapeutic human β-cell regeneration for diabetes. PMID:25999530

  4. Cell-to-cell communication in bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia causing hypercortisolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herve eLefebvre

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been well established that, in the human adrenal gland, cortisol secretion is not only controlled by circulating corticotropin but is also influenced by a wide variety of bioactive signals, including conventional neurotransmitters and neuropeptides, released within the cortex by various cell types such as chromaffin cells, neurons, cells of the immune system, adipocytes and endothelial cells. These different types of cells are present in bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia, a rare etiology of primary adrenal Cushing’s syndrome, where they appear intermingled with adrenocortical cells in the hyperplastic cortex. In addition, the genetic events which cause the disease favor abnormal adrenal differenciation that results in illicit expression of paracrine regulatory factors and their receptors in adrenocortical cells. All these defects constitute the molecular basis for aberrant autocrine/paracrine regulatory mechanisms which are likely to play a role in the pathophysiology of bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia-associated hypercortisolism. The present review summarizes the current knowledge on this topic as well as the therapeutic perspectives offered by this new pathophysiological concept.

  5. Deregulation of Interferon Signaling in Malignant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonidas C. Platanias

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Interferons (IFNs are a family of cytokines with potent antiproliferative, antiviral, and immunomodulatory properties. Much has been learned about IFNs and IFN-activated signaling cascades over the last 50 years. Due to their potent antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo, recombinant IFNs have been used extensively over the years, alone or in combination with other drugs, for the treatment of various malignancies. This review summarizes the current knowledge on IFN signaling components and pathways that are deregulated in human malignancies. The relevance of deregulation of IFN signaling pathways in defective innate immune surveillance and tumorigenesis are discussed.

  6. Kaempferol induces autophagic cell death of hepatocellular carcinoma cells via activating AMPK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Yu, Yi-Qun; Yang, Qi-Lian; Shen, Chun-Ying; Wang, Xiao-Juan

    2017-10-17

    In the present study, we demonstrate that Kaempferol inhibited survival and proliferation of established human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines (HepG2, Huh-7, BEL7402, and SMMC) and primary human HCC cells. Kaempferol treatment in HCC cells induced profound AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, which led to Ulk1 phosphorylation, mTOR complex 1 inhibition and cell autophagy. Autophagy induction was reflected by Beclin-1/autophagy gene 5 upregulation and p62 degradation as well as light chain 3B (LC3B)-I to LC3B-II conversion and LC3B puncta formation. Inhibition of AMPK, via AMPKα1 shRNA or dominant negative mutation, reversed above signaling changes. AMPK inhibition also largely inhibited Kaempferol-induced cytotoxicity in HCC cells. Autophagy inhibition, by 3-methyaldenine or Beclin-1 shRNA, also protected HCC cells from Kaempferol. Kaempferol downregulated melanoma antigen 6, the AMPK ubiquitin ligase, causing AMPKα1 stabilization and accumulation. We conclude that Kaempferol inhibits human HCC cells via activating AMPK signaling.

  7. Manipulating cell signaling with subcellular spatial resolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yushchenko, Dmytro A.; Nadler, A.; Schultz, C.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 8 (2016), s. 1023-1024 ISSN 1538-4101 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : arachidonic acid * caging group * insulin secretion * photorelease * signaling lipids Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.530, year: 2016

  8. Classification of cell signalling in tissue development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Craig Charles; Nicholls, Clare; Brookes, Chris; Wood, Ian

    2011-02-01

    The traditional classification of signalling in biological systems is insufficient and outdated and novel efforts must take into account advances in systems theory, information theory and linguistics. We present some of the classification systems currently used both within and outside of the biological field and discuss some specific aspects of the nature of signalling in tissue development. The analytical methods used in understanding non-biological networks provide a valuable vocabulary, which requires integration and a system of classification to further facilitate development.

  9. Guard Cell Signal Transduction Network: Advances in Understanding Abscisic Acid, CO2, and Ca2+ Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Tae-Houn

    2010-05-04

    Stomatal pores are formed by pairs of specialized epidermal guard cells and serve as major gateways for both CO2 influx into plants from the atmosphere and transpirational water loss of plants. Because they regulate stomatal pore apertures via integration of both endogenous hormonal stimuli and environmental signals, guard cells have been highly developed as a model system to dissect the dynamics and mechanisms of plant-cell signaling. The stress hormone ABA and elevated levels of CO2 activate complex signaling pathways in guard cells that are mediated by kinases/phosphatases, secondary messengers, and ion channel regulation. Recent research in guard cells has led to a new hypothesis for how plants achieve specificity in intracellular calcium signaling: CO2 and ABA enhance (prime) the calcium sensitivity of downstream calcium-signaling mechanisms. Recent progress in identification of early stomatal signaling components are reviewed here, including ABA receptors and CO2-binding response proteins, as well as systems approaches that advance our understanding of guard cell-signaling mechanisms.

  10. Nonimmune cells equipped with T-cell-receptor-like signaling for cancer cell ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Ryosuke; Scheller, Leo; Fussenegger, Martin

    2018-01-01

    The ability to engineer custom cell-contact-sensing output devices into human nonimmune cells would be useful for extending the applicability of cell-based cancer therapies and for avoiding risks associated with engineered immune cells. Here we have developed a new class of synthetic T-cell receptor-like signal-transduction device that functions efficiently in human nonimmune cells and triggers release of output molecules specifically upon sensing contact with a target cell. This device employs an interleukin signaling cascade, whose OFF/ON switching is controlled by biophysical segregation of a transmembrane signal-inhibitory protein from the sensor cell-target cell interface. We further show that designer nonimmune cells equipped with this device driving expression of a membrane-penetrator/prodrug-activating enzyme construct could specifically kill target cells in the presence of the prodrug, indicating its potential usefulness for target-cell-specific, cell-based enzyme-prodrug cancer therapy. Our study also contributes to the advancement of synthetic biology by extending available design principles to transmit extracellular information to cells.

  11. Signaling profiling at the single-cell level identifies a distinct signaling signature in murine hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Wang, Jinyong; Kong, Guangyao; Jiang, Jing; Zhang, Jingfang; Liu, Yangang; Tong, Wei; Zhang, Jing

    2012-07-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function is tightly regulated by cytokine signaling. Although phospho-flow cytometry allows us to study signaling in defined populations of cells, there has been tremendous hurdle to carry out this study in rare HSCs due to unrecoverable critical HSC markers, low HSC number, and poor cell recovery rate. Here, we overcame these difficulties and developed a "HSC phospho-flow" method to analyze cytokine signaling in murine HSCs at the single-cell level and compare HSC signaling profile to that of multipotent progenitors (MPPs), a cell type immediately downstream of HSCs, and commonly used Lin(-) cKit(+) cells (LK cells, enriched for myeloid progenitors). We chose to study signaling evoked from three representative cytokines, stem cell factor (SCF) and thrombopoietin (TPO) that are essential for HSC function and granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) that is dispensable for HSCs. HSCs display a distinct TPO and GM-CSF signaling signature from MPPs and LK cells, which highly correlates with receptor surface expression. In contrast, although majority of LK cells express lower levels of cKit than HSCs and MPPs, SCF-evoked ERK1/2 activation in LK cells shows a significantly increased magnitude for a prolonged period. These results suggest that specific cellular context plays a more important role than receptor surface expression in SCF signaling. Our study of HSC signaling at the homeostasis stage paves the way to investigate signaling changes in HSCs under conditions of stress, aging, and hematopoietic diseases. Copyright © 2012 AlphaMed Press.

  12. Wnt signaling in the stem cell niche

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rattis, Frédérique Marie; Voermans, Carlijn; Reya, Tannishtha

    2004-01-01

    All the cells present in the blood are derived from the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC). Because mature blood cells have a limited life span, HSCs must perpetuate themselves through self-renewal to maintain a functional hematopoietic compartment for the lifetime of an organism. This review focuses on

  13. Protein kinase C signaling and cell cycle regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Black, Adrian R.; Black, Jennifer D.

    2013-01-01

    A link between T cell proliferation and the protein kinase C (PKC) family of serine/threonine kinases has been recognized for about thirty years. However, despite the wealth of information on PKC-mediated control of T cell activation, understanding of the effects of PKCs on the cell cycle machinery in this cell type remains limited. Studies in other systems have revealed important cell cycle-specific effects of PKC signaling that can either positively or negatively impact proliferation. Th...

  14. Intrinsic lens potential of neural retina inhibited by Notch signaling as the cause of lens transdifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Hideaki; Ishii, Yasuo; Kondoh, Hisato

    2017-01-15

    Embryonic neural retinas of avians produce lenses under spreading culture conditions. This phenomenon has been regarded as a paradigm of transdifferentiation due to the overt change in cell type. Here we elucidated the underlying mechanisms. Retina-to-lens transdifferentiation occurs in spreading cultures, suggesting that it is triggered by altered cell-cell interactions. Thus, we tested the involvement of Notch signaling based on its role in retinal neurogenesis. Starting from E8 retina, a small number of crystallin-expressing lens cells began to develop after 20 days in control spreading cultures. By contrast, addition of Notch signal inhibitors to cultures after day 2 strongly promoted lens development beginning at day 11, and a 10-fold increase in δ-crystallin expression level. After Notch signal inhibition, transcription factor genes that regulate the early stage of eye development, Prox1 and Pitx3, were sequentially activated. These observations indicate that the lens differentiation potential is intrinsic to the neural retina, and this potential is repressed by Notch signaling during normal embryogenesis. Therefore, Notch suppression leads to lens transdifferentiation by disinhibiting the neural retina-intrinsic program of lens development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Retinoic acid signalling in thymocytes regulates T cell development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendland, Kerstin; Sitnik, Katarzyna Maria; Kotarsky, Knut

    further enhanced in recently generated CD69+ CD4+ SP cells. To address the potential biological significance of RA signaling in developing thymocytes, we evaluated T cell development in CD4Cre-dnRAR mice, where RA signaling is blocked in thymocytes from the CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP) stage onwards due...... precursor entry and/or survival. Furthermore, CD4Cre-dnRAR mice showed a 4-fold reduction in CD4+/CD8+ SP ratio that was mainly due to enhanced accumulation of mature CD8+ SP cells, indicating that RA signaling may be directly involved in regulating thymic retention and/or post-selection expansion...

  16. Exposure to seismic air gun signals causes physiological harm and alters behavior in the scallop Pecten fumatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Ryan D; McCauley, Robert D; Fitzgibbon, Quinn P; Hartmann, Klaas; Semmens, Jayson M

    2017-10-03

    Seismic surveys map the seabed using intense, low-frequency sound signals that penetrate kilometers into the Earth's crust. Little is known regarding how invertebrates, including economically and ecologically important bivalves, are affected by exposure to seismic signals. In a series of field-based experiments, we investigate the impact of exposure to seismic surveys on scallops, using measurements of physiological and behavioral parameters to determine whether exposure may cause mass mortality or result in other sublethal effects. Exposure to seismic signals was found to significantly increase mortality, particularly over a chronic (months postexposure) time scale, though not beyond naturally occurring rates of mortality. Exposure did not elicit energetically expensive behaviors, but scallops showed significant changes in behavioral patterns during exposure, through a reduction in classic behaviors and demonstration of a nonclassic "flinch" response to air gun signals. Furthermore, scallops showed persistent alterations in recessing reflex behavior following exposure, with the rate of recessing increasing with repeated exposure. Hemolymph (blood analog) physiology showed a compromised capacity for homeostasis and potential immunodeficiency, as a range of hemolymph biochemistry parameters were altered and the density of circulating hemocytes (blood cell analog) was significantly reduced, with effects observed over acute (hours to days) and chronic (months) scales. The size of the air gun had no effect, but repeated exposure intensified responses. We postulate that the observed impacts resulted from high seabed ground accelerations driven by the air gun signal. Given the scope of physiological disruption, we conclude that seismic exposure can harm scallops.

  17. PGE2/EP4Signaling Controls the Transfer of the Mammary Stem Cell State by Lipid Rafts in Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Meng-Chieh; Chen, Shih-Yin; Tsai, Ho-Min; He, Pei-Lin; Lin, Yen-Chun; Herschman, Harvey; Li, Hua-Jung

    2017-02-01

    Prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 )-initiated signaling contributes to stem cell homeostasis and regeneration. However, it is unclear how PGE 2 signaling controls cell stemness. This study identifies a previously unknown mechanism by which PGE 2 /prostaglandin E receptor 4 (EP 4 ) signaling regulates multiple signaling pathways (e.g., PI3K/Akt signaling, TGFβ signaling, Wnt signaling, EGFR signaling) which maintain the basal mammary stem cell phenotype. A shift of basal mammary epithelial stem cells (MaSCs) from a mesenchymal/stem cell state to a non-basal-MaSC state occurs in response to prostaglandin E receptor 4 (EP 4 ) antagonism. EP 4 antagonists elicit release of signaling components, by controlling their trafficking into extracellular vesicles/exosomes in a lipid raft/caveolae-dependent manner. Consequently, EP 4 antagonism indirectly inactivates, through induced extracellular vesicle/exosome release, pathways required for mammary epithelial stem cell homeostasis, e.g. canonical/noncanonical Wnt, TGFβ and PI3K/Akt pathways. EP 4 antagonism causes signaling receptors and signaling components to shift from non-lipid raft fractions to lipid raft fractions, and to then be released in EP 4 antagonist-induced extracellular vesicles/exosomes, resulting in the loss of the stem cell state by mammary epithelial stem cells. In contrast, luminal mammary epithelial cells can acquire basal stem cell properties following ingestion of EP 4 antagonist-induced stem cell extracellular vesicles/exosomes, and can then form mammary glands. These findings demonstrate that PGE 2 /EP 4 signaling controls homeostasis of mammary epithelial stem cells through regulating extracellular vesicle/exosome release. Reprogramming of mammary epithelial cells can result from EP 4 -mediated stem cell property transfer by extracellular vesicles/exosomes containing caveolae-associated proteins, between mammary basal and luminal epithelial cells. Stem Cells 2017;35:425-444. © 2016 The Authors STEM CELLS

  18. Both canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling independently promote stem cell growth in mammospheres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M Many

    Full Text Available The characterization of mammary stem cells, and signals that regulate their behavior, is of central importance in understanding developmental changes in the mammary gland and possibly for targeting stem-like cells in breast cancer. The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway is a signaling mechanism associated with maintenance of self-renewing stem cells in many tissues, including mammary epithelium, and can be oncogenic when deregulated. Wnt1 and Wnt3a are examples of ligands that activate the canonical pathway. Other Wnt ligands, such as Wnt5a, typically signal via non-canonical, β-catenin-independent, pathways that in some cases can antagonize canonical signaling. Since the role of non-canonical Wnt signaling in stem cell regulation is not well characterized, we set out to investigate this using mammosphere formation assays that reflect and quantify stem cell properties. Ex vivo mammosphere cultures were established from both wild-type and Wnt1 transgenic mice and were analyzed in response to manipulation of both canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling. An increased level of mammosphere formation was observed in cultures derived from MMTV-Wnt1 versus wild-type animals, and this was blocked by treatment with Dkk1, a selective inhibitor of canonical Wnt signaling. Consistent with this, we found that a single dose of recombinant Wnt3a was sufficient to increase mammosphere formation in wild-type cultures. Surprisingly, we found that Wnt5a also increased mammosphere formation in these assays. We confirmed that this was not caused by an increase in canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling but was instead mediated by non-canonical Wnt signals requiring the receptor tyrosine kinase Ror2 and activity of the Jun N-terminal kinase, JNK. We conclude that both canonical and non-canonical Wnt signals have positive effects promoting stem cell activity in mammosphere assays and that they do so via independent signaling mechanisms.

  19. RHOA GTPase Controls YAP-Mediated EREG Signaling in Small Intestinal Stem Cell Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: RHOA, a founding member of the Rho GTPase family, is critical for actomyosin dynamics, polarity, and morphogenesis in response to developmental cues, mechanical stress, and inflammation. In murine small intestinal epithelium, inducible RHOA deletion causes a loss of epithelial polarity, with disrupted villi and crypt organization. In the intestinal crypts, RHOA deficiency results in reduced cell proliferation, increased apoptosis, and a loss of intestinal stem cells (ISCs that mimic effects of radiation damage. Mechanistically, RHOA loss reduces YAP signaling of the Hippo pathway and affects YAP effector epiregulin (EREG expression in the crypts. Expression of an active YAP (S112A mutant rescues ISC marker expression, ISC regeneration, and ISC-associated Wnt signaling, but not defective epithelial polarity, in RhoA knockout mice, implicating YAP in RHOA-regulated ISC function. EREG treatment or active β-catenin Catnblox(ex3 mutant expression rescues the RhoA KO ISC phenotypes. Thus, RHOA controls YAP-EREG signaling to regulate intestinal homeostasis and ISC regeneration. : In this article, Zheng and colleagues show that inducible RHOA deletion in mice causes defects in intestine epithelial polarity and deficiencies in intestinal stem cell proliferation, survival, and regeneration. They further demonstrate by genetic rescues that RHOA controls a YAP-EREG axis to mediate canonical Wnt signaling, intestinal stem cell function, and intestinal homeostasis. Keywords: mouse model, intestinal stem cell, regeneration, Rho GTPase, RhoA, Hippo signaling, YAP, Wnt signaling

  20. Cell biology symposium: Membrane trafficking and signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    In general, membrane trafficking is a broad group of processes where proteins and other large molecules are distributed throughout the cell as well as adjacent extracellular spaces. Whereas signal transduction is a process where signals are transmitted through a series of chemical or molecular event...

  1. Reduction of Nup107 attenuates the growth factor signaling in the senescent cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Young; Kang, Hyun Tae; Choi, Hae Ri [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Aging and Apoptosis Research Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Chul, E-mail: scpark@snu.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Aging and Apoptosis Research Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Decreased expression of Nup107 in aged cells and organs. {yields} Depletion of Nup107 results in impaired nuclear translocation of p-ERK. {yields} Depletion of Nup107 affects downstream effectors of ERK signaling. {yields} Depletion of Nup107 inhibits cell proliferation of oligodendroglioma cells. -- Abstract: Hypo-responsiveness to growth factors is a fundamental feature of cellular senescence. In this study, we found markedly decreased level of Nup107, a key scaffold protein in nuclear pore complex assembly, in senescent human diploid fibroblasts as well as in organs of aged mice. Depletion of Nup107 by specific siRNA in young human diploid fibroblasts prevented the effective nuclear translocation of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) following epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation, and decreased the expression of c-Fos in consequence. The disturbances in ERK signaling in Nup107 depleted cells closely mirror the similar changes in senescent cells. Knockdown of Nup107 in anaplastic oligodendroglioma cells caused cell death, rather than growth retardation, indicating a greater sensitivity to Nup107 depletion in cancer cells than in normal cells. These findings support the notion that Nup107 may contribute significantly to the regulation of cell fate in aged and transformed cells by modulating nuclear trafficking of signal molecules.

  2. Reduction of Nup107 attenuates the growth factor signaling in the senescent cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Young; Kang, Hyun Tae; Choi, Hae Ri; Park, Sang Chul

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Decreased expression of Nup107 in aged cells and organs. → Depletion of Nup107 results in impaired nuclear translocation of p-ERK. → Depletion of Nup107 affects downstream effectors of ERK signaling. → Depletion of Nup107 inhibits cell proliferation of oligodendroglioma cells. -- Abstract: Hypo-responsiveness to growth factors is a fundamental feature of cellular senescence. In this study, we found markedly decreased level of Nup107, a key scaffold protein in nuclear pore complex assembly, in senescent human diploid fibroblasts as well as in organs of aged mice. Depletion of Nup107 by specific siRNA in young human diploid fibroblasts prevented the effective nuclear translocation of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) following epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation, and decreased the expression of c-Fos in consequence. The disturbances in ERK signaling in Nup107 depleted cells closely mirror the similar changes in senescent cells. Knockdown of Nup107 in anaplastic oligodendroglioma cells caused cell death, rather than growth retardation, indicating a greater sensitivity to Nup107 depletion in cancer cells than in normal cells. These findings support the notion that Nup107 may contribute significantly to the regulation of cell fate in aged and transformed cells by modulating nuclear trafficking of signal molecules.

  3. Stem cell signaling. An integral program for tissue renewal and regeneration : Wnt signaling and stem cell control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clevers, Hans; Loh, Kyle M; Nusse, Roel

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells fuel tissue development, renewal, and regeneration, and these activities are controlled by the local stem cell microenvironment, the "niche." Wnt signals emanating from the niche can act as self-renewal factors for stem cells in multiple mammalian tissues. Wnt proteins are lipid-modified,

  4. Granular Cell Tumor Of The Esophagus: An Unusual Cause Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report an uncommon case of dysphagia caused by a granular cell tumor in a 38 year old black female. Previously documented granular cell tumors are reported as being small and treated endoscopically. This is probably the largest reported in literature and possibly the fi rst documented in the West African subregion.

  5. The effect of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 on GH signaling in beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønn, Sif G; Hansen, Johnny A; Lindberg, Karen

    2002-01-01

    GH is an important regulator of cell growth and metabolism. In the pancreas, GH stimulates mitogenesis as well as insulin production in beta-cells. The cellular effects of GH are exerted mainly through activation of the Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway...

  6. Signal reduction in choriocapillaris and segmentation errors in spectral domain OCT angiography caused by soft drusen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alten, F; Lauermann, J L; Clemens, C R; Heiduschka, P; Eter, N

    2017-12-01

    To analyze signal reduction in choriocapillaris (CC) and segmentation errors in spectral domain optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A) caused by soft drusen due to age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Twenty-four eyes of 24 patients underwent multimodal retinal imaging including central 3 × 3mm 2 OCT-A (AngioVue, Optovue). Three drusen per study eye were randomly chosen and evaluated regarding drusen height, diameter, and accuracy of OCT-A layer segmentation in lesion proximity. Structural en-face OCT CC images were graded qualitatively and quantitatively regarding signal loss underneath the individual drusen area. Those drusen that showed no distinct signal loss in structural en-face OCT CC images were further evaluated in OCT-A. CC decorrelation signal index was measured within a 30-μm OCT-A CC slab in the exact area of drusen affection. Data were compared to healthy age-matched control subjects. Accuracy of layer segmentation, OCT CC data, and OCT-A CC data were correlated to morphological drusen parameters. Mean drusen height and diameter were 91.57 ± 19.5μm and 315.17 ± 116.7μm. OCT-A layer segmentation of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) was disturbed by more than 50 μm in proximity to 26 drusen (36.1%). In these patients, drusen height was significantly higher compared to those with accurate IPL segmentation (p = 0.0126). Sixty-six out of 72 drusen (91.7%) caused a distinct signal loss in the structural en-face OCT CC image. Drusen height and drusen diameter were significantly higher in this group compared to the six drusen with a sufficient signal (p = 0.0276, p = 0.0025). CC decorrelation signal index measured in the area of these six drusen without OCT signal loss (8.3%) was reduced compared to age-matched healthy controls (73.6 vs. 100.1; p = 0.001). Signal attenuation in CC slabs and segmentation errors of the IPL depend on drusen morphology. Both are frequent artifacts in OCT-A imaging in patients with soft drusen and must

  7. Stunted Growth Caused by Blast Disease in Rice Seedlings Is Associated with Changes in Phytohormone Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Jie Jiang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In response to pathogen attack, plants prioritize defense reactions generally at the expense of plant growth. In this work, we report that changes in phytohormone signaling pathways are associated with the stunted plant growth caused by blast disease in rice seedlings. Infection of rice seedlings with blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae (race 007.0 at the four-leaf stage (three true leaves resulted in considerable inhibition of the growth of the upper uninfected distal leaves; the length of leaf blade and leaf sheath of the sixth and seventh leaf was reduced by 27 and 82%, and 88 and 72%, respectively, compared to that in the uninoculated plant control. Interestingly, cutting off the blast-infected fourth leaf blade within 2 days post inoculation (dpi significantly rescued the inhibition of leaf growth, implying that an inhibitory substance(s and/or signal was generated in the blast-infected leaves (fourth leaf and transmitted to the upper distal leaves (sixth and seventh during the 2-dpi period that induced growth inhibition. Expression analysis of marker genes for phytohormone pathways revealed acute activation of the jasmonate (JA and abscisic acid (ABA signaling pathways, and repression of auxin, gibberellic acid (GA and salicylic acid (SA signaling pathways, in the sixth leaf. The genes related to cell wall expansion were also significantly downregulated. In the blast-infected fourth leaf, JA pathway was activated within 2 dpi, followed by activation of ABA pathway 3 dpi. Further, leaf inhibition caused by blast infection was partially rescued in the rice mutant line coleoptile photomorphogenesis 2 (cpm2, which is defective in the gene encoding allene oxide cyclase (OsAOC. These results indicate that the JA signaling pathway is at least partly involved in the growth inhibition processes. Collectively, our data suggest that, upon pathogen attack, rice seedlings prioritize defense reactions against the infecting pathogen by temporarily ceasing

  8. Adoptive Transfer of Dying Cells Causes Bystander-Induced Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwulst, Steven J.; Davis, Christopher G.; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.

    2009-01-01

    The anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein has the remarkable ability to prevent cell death from several noxious stimuli. Intriguingly, Bcl-2 overexpression in one cell type has been reported to protect against cell death in neighboring non-Bcl-2 overexpressing cell types. The mechanism of this “trans” protection has been speculated to be secondary to the release of a cytoprotective factor by Bcl-2 overexpressing cells. We employed a series of adoptive transfer experiments in which lymphocytes that overexpress Bcl-2 were administered to either wild type mice or mice lacking mature T and B cells (Rag-1-/-) to detect the presence or absence of the putative protective factor. We were unable to demonstrate “trans” protection. However, adoptive transfer of apoptotic or necrotic cells exacerbated the degree of apoptotic death in neighboring non-Bcl-2 overexpressing cells (p≤0.05). Therefore, this data suggests that dying cells emit signals triggering cell death in neighboring non-Bcl-2 overexpressing cells, i.e. a “trans” destructive effect. PMID:17194455

  9. Reconstruction and signal propagation analysis of the Syk signaling network in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélien Naldi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to build in-depth cell signaling networks from vast experimental data is a key objective of computational biology. The spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk protein, a well-characterized key player in immune cell signaling, was surprisingly first shown by our group to exhibit an onco-suppressive function in mammary epithelial cells and corroborated by many other studies, but the molecular mechanisms of this function remain largely unsolved. Based on existing proteomic data, we report here the generation of an interaction-based network of signaling pathways controlled by Syk in breast cancer cells. Pathway enrichment of the Syk targets previously identified by quantitative phospho-proteomics indicated that Syk is engaged in cell adhesion, motility, growth and death. Using the components and interactions of these pathways, we bootstrapped the reconstruction of a comprehensive network covering Syk signaling in breast cancer cells. To generate in silico hypotheses on Syk signaling propagation, we developed a method allowing to rank paths between Syk and its targets. We first annotated the network according to experimental datasets. We then combined shortest path computation with random walk processes to estimate the importance of individual interactions and selected biologically relevant pathways in the network. Molecular and cell biology experiments allowed to distinguish candidate mechanisms that underlie the impact of Syk on the regulation of cortactin and ezrin, both involved in actin-mediated cell adhesion and motility. The Syk network was further completed with the results of our biological validation experiments. The resulting Syk signaling sub-networks can be explored via an online visualization platform.

  10. Lab-Attenuated Rabies Virus Causes Abortive Infection and Induces Cytokine Expression in Astrocytes by Activating Mitochondrial Antiviral-Signaling Protein Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Tian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rabies is an ancient disease but remains endemic in most parts of the world and causes approximately 59,000 deaths annually. The mechanism through which the causative agent, rabies virus (RABV, evades the host immune response and infects the host central nervous system (CNS has not been completely elucidated thus far. Our previous studies have shown that lab-attenuated, but not wild-type (wt, RABV activates the innate immune response in the mouse and dog models. In this present study, we demonstrate that lab-attenuated RABV causes abortive infection in astrocytes, the most abundant glial cells in the CNS. Furthermore, we found that lab-attenuated RABV produces more double-stranded RNA (dsRNA than wt RABV, which is recognized by retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I or melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA5. Activation of mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS, the common adaptor molecule for RIG-I and MDA5, results in the production of type I interferon (IFN and the expression of hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes, which suppress RABV replication and spread in astrocytes. Notably, lab-attenuated RABV replicates in a manner identical to that of wt RABV in MAVS−/− astrocytes. It was also found that lab-attenuated, but not wt, RABV induces the expression of inflammatory cytokines via the MAVS- p38/NF-κB signaling pathway. These inflammatory cytokines increase the blood–brain barrier permeability and thus enable immune cells and antibodies infiltrate the CNS parenchyma, resulting in RABV control and elimination. In contrast, wt RABV restricts dsRNA production and thus evades innate recognition by RIG-I/MDA5 in astrocytes, which could be one of the mechanisms by which wt RABV evades the host immune response in resident CNS cells. Our findings suggest that astrocytes play a critical role in limiting the replication of lab-attenuated RABV in the CNS.

  11. New Modeling Approaches to Investigate Cell Signaling in Radiation Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ponomarev, Artem L.

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation damages individual cells and tissues leading to harmful biological effects. Among many radiation-induced lesions, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) are considered the key precursors of most early and late effects [1] leading to direct mutation or aberrant signal transduction processes. In response to damage, a flow of information is communicated to cells not directly hit by the radiation through signal transduction pathways [2]. Non-targeted effects (NTE), which includes bystander effects and genomic instability in the progeny of irradiated cells and tissues, may be particularly important for space radiation risk assessment [1], because astronauts are exposed to a low fluence of heavy ions and only a small fraction of cells are traversed by an ion. NTE may also have important consequences clinical radiotherapy [3]. In the recent years, new simulation tools and modeling approaches have become available to study the tissue response to radiation. The simulation of signal transduction pathways require many elements such as detailed track structure calculations, a tissue or cell culture model, knowledge of biochemical pathways and Brownian Dynamics (BD) propagators of the signaling molecules in their micro-environment. Recently, the Monte-Carlo simulation code of radiation track structure RITRACKS was used for micro and nano-dosimetry calculations [4]. RITRACKS will be used to calculate the fraction of cells traversed by an ion and delta-rays and the energy deposited in cells in a tissue model. RITRACKS also simulates the formation of chemical species by the radiolysis of water [5], notably the .OH radical. This molecule is implicated in DNA damage and in the activation of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF), a signaling molecule involved in NTE. BD algorithms for a particle near a membrane comprising receptors were also developed and will be used to simulate trajectories of signaling molecules in the micro-environment and characterize autocrine

  12. Shared signaling pathways in normal and breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam K Malhotra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in our understanding of breast cancer biology have led to the identification of a subpopulation of cells within tumors that appear to be responsible for initiating and propagating the cancer. These tumor initiating cells are not only unique in their ability to generate tumors, but also share many similarities with elements of normal adult tissue stem cells, and have therefore been termed cancer stem cells (CSCs. These CSCs often inappropriately use many of the same signaling pathways utilized by their normal stem cell counterparts which may present a challenge to the development of CSC specific therapies. Here, we discuss three major stem cell signaling pathways (Notch, Wnt, and Hedgehog; with a focus on their function in normal mammary gland development and their misuse in breast cancer stem cell fate determination.

  13. Plant cell wall signalling and receptor-like kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Sebastian

    2017-02-15

    Communication between the extracellular matrix and the cell interior is essential for all organisms as intrinsic and extrinsic cues have to be integrated to co-ordinate development, growth, and behaviour. This applies in particular to plants, the growth and shape of which is governed by deposition and remodelling of the cell wall, a rigid, yet dynamic, extracellular network. It is thus generally assumed that cell wall surveillance pathways exist to monitor the state of the wall and, if needed, elicit compensatory responses such as altered expression of cell wall remodelling and biosynthesis genes. Here, I highlight recent advances in the field of cell wall signalling in plants, with emphasis on the role of plasma membrane receptor-like kinase complexes. In addition, possible roles for cell wall-mediated signalling beyond the maintenance of cell wall integrity are discussed. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  14. Experimental investigation of the cytotoxicity of medium-borne signals in human prostate cancer cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjostedt, Svetlana; Bezak, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Evidence exists that exposure of non-irradiated cells to Irradiated Cell Conditioned Medium (ICCM) can cause effects similar to those resulting from direct radiation damage. This study attempts to validate the stochastic model, relating absorbed dose to the emission and processing of cell death signals by non-irradiated cells, in vitro in PC3 human prostate cancer cell line. Methods. The recipient cell survival was measured after exposure of cells to ICMM derived from donor cells: a) exposed to radiation doses from 2 Gy to 8 Gy and b) of concentrations varying from 2 x 10 2 to 6 x 10 6 irradiated with 2 Gy. Results. Exposure to ICCM, irradiated with doses between 2-8 Gy, resulted in a significant (p 2 cells was significantly higher (p < 0.5) compared to the rest of donor cell concentrations, indicating that the toxicity of ICCM depends on the cellular concentration of donor cells. Non-linear regression data fitting provided reasonable agreement with the microdosimetric model for the induction of cell killing through medium-borne signals. Conclusion. For the given cell line and given experimental conditions, significant decreases in cell survival were observed in non-irradiated cells exposed to ICCM derived from donor cells of various concentrations and irradiated with different doses

  15. Primary Cilia, Signaling Networks and Cell Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veland, Iben Rønn

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based, sensory organelles that emerge from the centrosomal mother centriole to project from the surface of most quiescent cells in the human body. Ciliary entry is a tightly controlled process, involving diffusion barriers and gating complexes that maintain a unique...

  16. Surface code—biophysical signals for apoptotic cell clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biermann, Mona; Maueröder, Christian; Brauner, Jan M; Chaurio, Ricardo; Herrmann, Martin; Muñoz, Luis E; Janko, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death and the clearance of dying cells play an important and physiological role in embryonic development and normal tissue turnover. In contrast to necrosis, apoptosis proceeds in an anti-inflammatory manner. It is orchestrated by the timed release and/or exposure of so-called ‘find-me’, ‘eat me’ and ‘tolerate me’ signals. Mononuclear phagocytes are attracted by various ‘find-me’ signals, including proteins, nucleotides, and phospholipids released by the dying cell, whereas the involvement of granulocytes is prevented via ‘stay away’ signals. The exposure of anionic phospholipids like phosphatidylserine (PS) by apoptotic cells on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane is one of the main ‘eat me’ signals. PS is recognized by a number of innate receptors as well as by soluble bridging molecules on the surface of phagocytes. Importantly, phagocytes are able to discriminate between viable and apoptotic cells both exposing PS. Due to cytoskeleton remodeling PS has a higher lateral mobility on the surfaces of apoptotic cells thereby promoting receptor clustering on the phagocyte. PS not only plays an important role in the engulfment process, but also acts as ‘tolerate me’ signal inducing the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines by phagocytes. An efficient and fast clearance of apoptotic cells is required to prevent secondary necrosis and leakage of intracellular danger signals into the surrounding tissue. Failure or prolongation of the clearance process leads to the release of intracellular antigens into the periphery provoking inflammation and development of systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease like systemic lupus erythematosus. Here we review the current findings concerning apoptosis-inducing pathways, important players of apoptotic cell recognition and clearance as well as the role of membrane remodeling in the engulfment of apoptotic cells by phagocytes. (paper)

  17. Hydrogen peroxide as a signal controlling plant programmed cell death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gechev, Tsanko S.; Hille, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has established itself as a key player in stress and programmed cell death responses, but little is known about the signaling pathways leading from H2O2 to programmed cell death in plants. Recently, identification of key regulatory mutants and near-full genome coverage

  18. BMP signalling differentially regulates distinct haematopoietic stem cell types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Crisan (Mihaela); P. Solaimani Kartalaei (Parham); C.S. Vink (Chris); T. Yamada-Inagawa (Tomoko); K. Bollerot (Karine); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); R. Van Der Linden (Reinier); S.C. de Sousa Lopes (Susana Chuva); R. Monteiro (Rui); C.L. Mummery (Christine); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAdult haematopoiesis is the outcome of distinct haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) subtypes with self-renewable repopulating ability, but with different haematopoietic cell lineage outputs. The molecular basis for this heterogeneity is largely unknown. BMP signalling regulates HSCs as they

  19. Paracrine signals from mesenchymal cell populations govern the expansion and differentiation of human hepatic stem cells to adult liver fates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunfang; Yao, Hsin-Lei; Cui, Cai-Bin; Wauthier, Eliane; Barbier, Claire; Costello, Martin J; Moss, Nicholas; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Sricholpech, Marnisa; Gerber, David; Loboa, Elizabeth G; Reid, Lola M

    2010-10-01

    The differentiation of embryonic or determined stem cell populations into adult liver fates under known conditions yields cells with some adult-specific genes but not others, aberrant regulation of one or more genes, and variations in the results from experiment to experiment. We tested the hypothesis that sets of signals produced by freshly isolated, lineage-dependent mesenchymal cell populations would yield greater efficiency and reproducibility in driving the differentiation of human hepatic stem cells (hHpSCs) into adult liver fates. The subpopulations of liver-derived mesenchymal cells, purified by immunoselection technologies, included (1) angioblasts, (2) mature endothelia, (3) hepatic stellate cell precursors, (4) mature stellate cells (pericytes), and (5) myofibroblasts. Freshly immunoselected cells of each of these subpopulations were established in primary cultures under wholly defined (serum-free) conditions that we developed for short-term cultures and were used as feeders with hHpSCs. Feeders of angioblasts yielded self-replication, stellate cell precursors caused lineage restriction to hepatoblasts, mature endothelia produced differentiation into hepatocytes, and mature stellate cells and/or myofibroblasts resulted in differentiation into cholangiocytes. Paracrine signals produced by the different feeders were identified by biochemical, immunohistochemical, and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses, and then those signals were used to replace the feeders in monolayer and three-dimensional cultures to elicit the desired biological responses from hHpSCs. The defined paracrine signals were proved to be able to yield reproducible responses from hHpSCs and to permit differentiation into fully mature and functional parenchymal cells. Paracrine signals from defined mesenchymal cell populations are important for the regulation of stem cell populations into specific adult fates; this finding is important for basic and clinical

  20. Phosphoinositide-3-Kinase Signaling in Human Natural Killer Cells: New Insights from Primary Immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily M. Mace

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Human natural killer (NK cells play a critical role in the control of viral infections and malignancy. Their importance in human health and disease is illustrated by severe viral infections in patients with primary immunodeficiencies that affect NK cell function and/or development. The recent identification of patients with phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K-signaling pathway mutations that can cause primary immunodeficiency provides valuable insight into the role that PI3K signaling plays in human NK cell maturation and lytic function. There is a rich literature that demonstrates a requirement for PI3K in multiple key aspects of NK cell biology, including development/maturation, homing, priming, and function. Here, I briefly review these previous studies and place them in context with recent findings from the study of primary immunodeficiency patients, particularly those with hyperactivating mutations in PI3Kδ signaling.

  1. Gamma-glutamylcyclotransferase promotes the growth of human glioma cells by activating Notch-Akt signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Shang-Hang; Yu, Ning; Liu, Xi-Yao; Tan, Guo-Wei; Wang, Zhan-Xiang, E-mail: md_wzx7189@163.com

    2016-03-18

    Glioma as an aggressive type tumor is rapidly growing and has become one of the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. γ-Glutamylcyclotransferase (GGCT) has been shown as a diagnostic marker in various cancers. To reveal whether there is a correlation between GGCT and human glioma, GGCT expression in human glioma tissues and cell lines was first determined. We found that GGCT expression was up-regulated in human glioma tissues and cell lines. Further, we demonstrate that GGCT knockdown inhibits glioma cell T98G and U251 proliferation and colony formation, whereas GGCT overexpression leads to oppose effects. GGCT overexpression promotes the expression of Notch receptors and activates Akt signaling in glioma cells, and Notch-Akt signaling is activated in glioma tissues with high expression of GGCT. Finally, we show that inhibition of Notch-Akt signaling with Notch inhibitor MK-0752 blocks the effects of GGCT on glioma proliferation and colony formation. In conclusion, GGCT plays a critical role in glioma cell proliferation and may be a potential cancer therapeutic target. - Highlights: • GGCT expression is up-regulated in human glioma tissues and cell lines. • GGCT promotes glioma cell growth and colony formation. • GGCT promotes the activation of Notch-Akt signaling in glioma cells and tissues. • Notch inhibition blocks the role of GGCT in human glioma cells.

  2. Signaling thresholds and negative B cell selection in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhengshan; Shojaee, Seyedmehdi; Buchner, Maike; Geng, Huimin; Lee, Jae Woong; Klemm, Lars; Titz, Björn; Graeber, Thomas G.; Park, Eugene; Tan, Ying Xim; Satterthwaite, Anne; Paietta, Elisabeth; Hunger, Stephen P.; Willman, Cheryl L.; Melnick, Ari; Loh, Mignon L.; Jung, Jae U.; Coligan, John E.; Bolland, Silvia; Mak, Tak W.; Limnander, Andre; Jumaa, Hassan; Reth, Michael; Weiss, Arthur; Lowell, Clifford A.; Müschen, Markus

    2015-01-01

    B cells are selected for an intermediate level of B cell receptor (BCR) signaling strength: Attenuation below minimum (e.g. non-functional BCR)1 or hyperactivation above maximum (e.g. self-reactive BCR)2–3 thresholds of signaling strength causes negative selection. In ~25% of cases, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells carry the oncogenic BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase (Ph+), which mimics constitutively active pre-BCR signaling4,5. Current therapy approaches are largely focused on the development of more potent tyrosine kinase inhibitors to suppress oncogenic signaling below a minimum threshold for survival6. Here, we tested the hypothesis that targeted hyperactivation above a maximum threshold will engage a deletional checkpoint for removal of self-reactive B cells and selectively kill ALL cells. Testing various components of proximal pre-BCR signaling, we found that an incremental increase of Syk tyrosine kinase activity was required and sufficient to induce cell death. Hyperactive Syk was functionally equivalent to acute activation of a self-reactive BCR on ALL cells. Despite oncogenic transformation, this basic mechanism of negative selection was still functional in ALL cells. Unlike normal pre-B cells, patient-derived ALL cells express the inhibitory receptors PECAM1, CD300A and LAIR1 at high levels. Genetic studies revealed that Pecam1, Cd300a and Lair1 are critical to calibrate oncogenic signaling strength through recruitment of the inhibitory phosphatases Ptpn67 and Inpp5d8. Using a novel small molecule inhibitor of INPP5D9, we demonstrated that pharmacological hyperactivation of SYK and engagement of negative B cell selection represents a promising new strategy to overcome drug-resistance in human ALL. PMID:25799995

  3. Mast cell chemotaxis - chemoattractants and signaling pathways

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hálová, Ivana; Dráberová, Lubica; Dráber, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 3, May (2012), s. 119 ISSN 1664-3224 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD12073; GA ČR GA301/09/1826; GA ČR GAP302/10/1759 Grant - others:ECST(XE) BM1007; AV ČR(CZ) MC200520901 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : mast cell * IgE receptor * plasma membrane Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  4. Competing memories of mitogen and p53 signalling control cell-cycle entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hee Won; Chung, Mingyu; Kudo, Takamasa; Meyer, Tobias

    2017-09-21

    Regulation of cell proliferation is necessary for immune responses, tissue repair, and upkeep of organ function to maintain human health. When proliferating cells complete mitosis, a fraction of newly born daughter cells immediately enter the next cell cycle, while the remaining cells in the same population exit to a transient or persistent quiescent state. Whether this choice between two cell-cycle pathways is due to natural variability in mitogen signalling or other underlying causes is unknown. Here we show that human cells make this fundamental cell-cycle entry or exit decision based on competing memories of variable mitogen and stress signals. Rather than erasing their signalling history at cell-cycle checkpoints before mitosis, mother cells transmit DNA damage-induced p53 protein and mitogen-induced cyclin D1 (CCND1) mRNA to newly born daughter cells. After mitosis, the transferred CCND1 mRNA and p53 protein induce variable expression of cyclin D1 and the CDK inhibitor p21 that almost exclusively determines cell-cycle commitment in daughter cells. We find that stoichiometric inhibition of cyclin D1-CDK4 activity by p21 controls the retinoblastoma (Rb) and E2F transcription program in an ultrasensitive manner. Thus, daughter cells control the proliferation-quiescence decision by converting the memories of variable mitogen and stress signals into a competition between cyclin D1 and p21 expression. We propose a cell-cycle control principle based on natural variation, memory and competition that maximizes the health of growing cell populations.

  5. Sangivamycin induces apoptosis by suppressing Erk signaling in primary effusion lymphoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakao, Kazufumi [Department of Biotechnology, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Kofu-shi 400-8511 (Japan); Watanabe, Tadashi [Department of Cell Biology, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Misasagi-Shichonocho 1, Yamashinaku, Kyoto 607-8412 (Japan); Takadama, Tadatoshi; Ui, Sadaharu [Department of Biotechnology, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Kofu-shi 400-8511 (Japan); Shigemi, Zenpei; Kagawa, Hiroki [Department of Cell Biology, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Misasagi-Shichonocho 1, Yamashinaku, Kyoto 607-8412 (Japan); Higashi, Chizuka; Ohga, Rie; Taira, Takahiro [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Yamanashi, Chuoh-shi 409-3898 (Japan); Fujimuro, Masahiro, E-mail: fuji2@mb.kyoto-phu.ac.jp [Department of Cell Biology, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Misasagi-Shichonocho 1, Yamashinaku, Kyoto 607-8412 (Japan)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Sangivamycin induces the apoptosis of B cell lymphoma PEL cells. • Sangivamycin suppresses Erk signaling by inhibiting Erk phosphorylation in PEL cells. • The activation of Erk signaling is essential for PEL cell survival. • Sangivamycin induces the apoptosis of PEL cells without production of progeny virus. • Sangivamycin may serve as a novel drug for the treatment of PEL. - Abstract: Sangivamycin, a structural analog of adenosine and antibiotic exhibiting antitumor and antivirus activities, inhibits protein kinase C and the synthesis of both DNA and RNA. Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is an aggressive neoplasm caused by Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) in immunosuppressed patients and HIV-infected homosexual males. PEL cells are derived from post-germinal center B cells, and are infected with KSHV. Herein, we asked if sangivamycin might be useful to treat PEL. We found that sangivamycin killed PEL cells, and we explored the underlying mechanism. Sangivamycin treatment drastically decreased the viability of PEL cell lines compared to KSHV-uninfected B lymphoma cell lines. Sangivamycin induced the apoptosis of PEL cells by activating caspase-7 and -9. Further, sangivamycin suppressed the phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and Akt, thus inhibiting activation of the proteins. Inhibitors of Akt and MEK suppressed the proliferation of PEL cells compared to KSHV-uninfected cells. It is known that activation of Erk and Akt signaling inhibits apoptosis and promotes proliferation in PEL cells. Our data therefore suggest that sangivamycin induces apoptosis by inhibiting Erk and Akt signaling in such cells. We next investigated whether sangivamycin, in combination with an HSP90 inhibitor geldanamycin (GA) or valproate (valproic acid), potentiated the cytotoxic effects of the latter drugs on PEL cells. Compared to treatment with GA or valproate alone, the addition of sangivamycin enhanced cytotoxic activity. Our data thus indicate that

  6. Sangivamycin induces apoptosis by suppressing Erk signaling in primary effusion lymphoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakao, Kazufumi; Watanabe, Tadashi; Takadama, Tadatoshi; Ui, Sadaharu; Shigemi, Zenpei; Kagawa, Hiroki; Higashi, Chizuka; Ohga, Rie; Taira, Takahiro; Fujimuro, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Sangivamycin induces the apoptosis of B cell lymphoma PEL cells. • Sangivamycin suppresses Erk signaling by inhibiting Erk phosphorylation in PEL cells. • The activation of Erk signaling is essential for PEL cell survival. • Sangivamycin induces the apoptosis of PEL cells without production of progeny virus. • Sangivamycin may serve as a novel drug for the treatment of PEL. - Abstract: Sangivamycin, a structural analog of adenosine and antibiotic exhibiting antitumor and antivirus activities, inhibits protein kinase C and the synthesis of both DNA and RNA. Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is an aggressive neoplasm caused by Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) in immunosuppressed patients and HIV-infected homosexual males. PEL cells are derived from post-germinal center B cells, and are infected with KSHV. Herein, we asked if sangivamycin might be useful to treat PEL. We found that sangivamycin killed PEL cells, and we explored the underlying mechanism. Sangivamycin treatment drastically decreased the viability of PEL cell lines compared to KSHV-uninfected B lymphoma cell lines. Sangivamycin induced the apoptosis of PEL cells by activating caspase-7 and -9. Further, sangivamycin suppressed the phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and Akt, thus inhibiting activation of the proteins. Inhibitors of Akt and MEK suppressed the proliferation of PEL cells compared to KSHV-uninfected cells. It is known that activation of Erk and Akt signaling inhibits apoptosis and promotes proliferation in PEL cells. Our data therefore suggest that sangivamycin induces apoptosis by inhibiting Erk and Akt signaling in such cells. We next investigated whether sangivamycin, in combination with an HSP90 inhibitor geldanamycin (GA) or valproate (valproic acid), potentiated the cytotoxic effects of the latter drugs on PEL cells. Compared to treatment with GA or valproate alone, the addition of sangivamycin enhanced cytotoxic activity. Our data thus indicate that

  7. Cytotoxic Vibrio T3SS1 Rewires Host Gene Expression to Subvert Cell Death Signaling and Activate Cell Survival Networks

    OpenAIRE

    De Nisco, Nicole J.; Kanchwala, Mohammed; Li, Peng; Fernandez, Jessie; Xing, Chao; Orth, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial effectors are potent manipulators of host signaling pathways. The marine bacterium Vibrio parahaemolyticus (V. para), delivers effectors into host cells through two type three secretion systems (T3SS). The ubiquitous T3SS1 is vital for V. para survival in the environment, whereas T3SS2 causes acute gastroenteritis in human hosts. Although the natural host is undefined, T3SS1 effectors attack highly conserved cellular processes and pathways to orchestrate non-apoptotic cell death. Mu...

  8. Inhibition of Wnt Signaling Pathways Impairs Chlamydia trachomatis Infection in Endometrial Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, Jennifer; Moore, Cheryl G; Whittimore, Judy D; Butler, Megan; Hall, Jennifer V

    2017-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infections represent the predominant cause of bacterial sexually transmitted infections. As an obligate intracellular bacterium, C. trachomatis is dependent on the host cell for survival, propagation, and transmission. Thus, factors that affect the host cell, including nutrition, cell cycle, and environmental signals, have the potential to impact chlamydial development. Previous studies have demonstrated that activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling benefits C. trachomatis infections in fallopian tube epithelia. In cervical epithelial cells chlamydiae sequester β-catenin within the inclusion. These data indicate that chlamydiae interact with the Wnt signaling pathway in both the upper and lower female genital tract (FGT). However, hormonal activation of canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling pathways is an essential component of cyclic remodeling in another prominent area of the FGT, the endometrium. Given this information, we hypothesized that Wnt signaling would impact chlamydial infection in endometrial epithelial cells. To investigate this hypothesis, we analyzed the effect of Wnt inhibition on chlamydial inclusion development and elementary body (EB) production in two endometrial cell lines, Ishikawa (IK) and Hec-1B, in nonpolarized cell culture and in a polarized endometrial epithelial (IK)/stromal (SHT-290) cell co-culture model. Inhibition of Wnt by the small molecule inhibitor (IWP2) significantly decreased inclusion size in IK and IK/SHT-290 cultures ( p Wnt inhibition caused chlamydiae to become aberrant in morphology. EB formation was also impaired in IK, Hec-1B and IK/SHT-290 cultures regardless of whether Wnt inhibition occurred throughout, in the middle (24 hpi) or late (36 hpi) during the development cycle. Overall, these data lead us to conclude that Wnt signaling in the endometrium is a key host pathway for the proper development of C. trachomatis .

  9. Transient Oxygen/Glucose Deprivation Causes a Delayed Loss of Mitochondria and Increases Spontaneous Calcium Signaling in Astrocytic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, John C.; Jackson, Joshua G.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, mitochondria have been localized to astrocytic processes where they shape Ca2+ signaling; this relationship has not been examined in models of ischemia/reperfusion. We biolistically transfected astrocytes in rat hippocampal slice cultures to facilitate fluorescent confocal microscopy, and subjected these slices to transient oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) that causes delayed excitotoxic death of CA1 pyramidal neurons. This insult caused a delayed loss of mitochondria from astrocytic processes and increased colocalization of mitochondria with the autophagosome marker LC3B. The losses of neurons in area CA1 and mitochondria in astrocytic processes were blocked by ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) antagonists, tetrodotoxin, ziconotide (Ca2+ channel blocker), two inhibitors of reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange (KB-R7943, YM-244769), or two inhibitors of calcineurin (cyclosporin-A, FK506). The effects of OGD were mimicked by NMDA. The glutamate uptake inhibitor (3S)-3-[[3-[[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]amino]phenyl]methoxy]-l-aspartate increased neuronal loss after OGD or NMDA, and blocked the loss of astrocytic mitochondria. Exogenous glutamate in the presence of iGluR antagonists caused a loss of mitochondria without a decrease in neurons in area CA1. Using the genetic Ca2+ indicator Lck-GCaMP-6S, we observed two types of Ca2+ signals: (1) in the cytoplasm surrounding mitochondria (mitochondrially centered) and (2) traversing the space between mitochondria (extramitochondrial). The spatial spread, kinetics, and frequency of these events were different. The amplitude of both types was doubled and the spread of both types changed by ∼2-fold 24 h after OGD. Together, these data suggest that pathologic activation of glutamate transport and increased astrocytic Ca2+ through reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange triggers mitochondrial loss and dramatic increases in Ca2+ signaling in astrocytic processes. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Astrocytes, the most abundant cell type in the

  10. DCDC2 mutations cause a renal-hepatic ciliopathy by disrupting Wnt signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schueler, Markus; Braun, Daniela A; Chandrasekar, Gayathri; Gee, Heon Yung; Klasson, Timothy D.; Halbritter, Jan; Bieder, Andrea; Porath, Jonathan D; Airik, Rannar; Zhou, Weibin; LoTurco, Joseph J; Che, Alicia; Otto, Edgar A; Böckenhauer, Detlef; Sebire, Neil J; Honzik, Tomas; Harris, Peter C; Koon, Sarah J; Gunay-Aygun, Meral; Saunier, Sophie; Zerres, Klaus; Bruechle, Nadina Ortiz; Drenth, Joost P H; Pelletier, Laurence; Tapia-Páez, Isabel; Lifton, Richard P; Giles, R; Kere, Juha; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    Nephronophthisis-related ciliopathies (NPHP-RC) are recessive diseases characterized by renal dysplasia or degeneration. We here identify mutations of DCDC2 as causing a renal-hepatic ciliopathy. DCDC2 localizes to the ciliary axoneme and to mitotic spindle fibers in a cell-cycle-dependent manner.

  11. Loss of Acetylcholine Signaling Reduces Cell Clearance Deficiencies in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio M Pinto

    Full Text Available The ability to eliminate undesired cells by apoptosis is a key mechanism to maintain organismal health and homeostasis. Failure to clear apoptotic cells efficiently can cause autoimmune diseases in mammals. Genetic studies in Caenorhabditis elegans have greatly helped to decipher the regulation of apoptotic cell clearance. In this study, we show that the loss of levamisole-sensitive acetylcholine receptor, but not of a typical neuronal acetylcholine receptor causes a reduction in the number of persistent cell corpses in worms suffering from an engulfment deficiency. This reduction is not caused by impaired or delayed cell death but rather by a partial restoration of the cell clearance capacity. Mutants in acetylcholine turn-over elicit a similar phenotype, implying that acetylcholine signaling is the process responsible for these observations. Surprisingly, tissue specific RNAi suggests that UNC-38, a major component of the levamisole-sensitive receptor, functions in the dying germ cell to influence engulfment efficiency. Animals with loss of acetylcholine receptor exhibit a higher fraction of cell corpses positive for the "eat-me" signal phosphatidylserine. Our results suggest that modulation by ion channels of ion flow across plasma membrane in dying cells can influence the dynamics of phosphatidylserine exposure and thus clearance efficiency.

  12. Calcium signaling induced by angiotensin II in the pancreatic acinar cell line AR42J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, D C; Sarosi, G A; Romanchuk, G; Mulholland, M W

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the nature and mechanisms of angiotensin II-evoked calcium signaling in AR42J cells. Cytosolic calcium concentrations were determined using fura-2-based microfluorimetry. Angiotensin II causes elevations in free cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) in the rat pancreatic acinar cell line AR42J. The mechanisms of angiotensin II-evoked calcium signaling were examined using fura-2-based fluorescent digital microscopy. Angiotensin II caused dose-dependent increments in [Ca2+]i over a concentration range of 0.1-1,000 nM, with an average increment of 243 +/- 16 nM at an angiotensin II concentration of 1,000 nM. Dup753, an AT1-specific antagonist, inhibited angiotensin II-evoked signaling, whereas the AT2 antagonist PD123,319 had no effect. Preincubation with the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 reduced the response in [Ca2+]i to 25% of that of the control. Thapsigargin abolished angiotensin II-evoked calcium signaling. The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor antagonist heparin introduced by radiofrequency electroporation inhibited responses to 46 +/- 6% of controls. Angiotensin II-evoked signals were reduced in magnitude and duration by elimination of Ca2+ from the extracellular buffer. Preincubation with pertussis toxin (100 ng/ml) had no effect. Angiotensin II did not stimulate cyclic AMP or suppress vasoactive intestinal peptide stimulated cyclic AMP production over the concentration range that caused Ca2+ signaling.

  13. Single-cell analysis of G-protein signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clister, Terri; Mehta, Sohum; Zhang, Jin

    2015-03-13

    The growing use of fluorescent biosensors to directly probe the spatiotemporal dynamics of biochemical processes in living cells has revolutionized the study of intracellular signaling. In this review, we summarize recent developments in the use of biosensors to illuminate the molecular details of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathways, which have long served as the model for our understanding of signal transduction, while also offering our perspectives on the future of this exciting field. Specifically, we highlight several ways in which biosensor-based single-cell analyses are being used to unravel many of the enduring mysteries that surround these diverse signaling pathways. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Abnormal Activation of BMP Signaling Causes Myopathy in Fbn2 Null Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengle, Gerhard; Carlberg, Valerie; Tufa, Sara F.; Charbonneau, Noe L.; Smaldone, Silvia; Carlson, Eric J.; Ramirez, Francesco; Keene, Douglas R.; Sakai, Lynn Y.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillins are large extracellular macromolecules that polymerize to form the backbone structure of connective tissue microfibrils. Mutations in the gene for fibrillin-1 cause the Marfan syndrome, while mutations in the gene for fibrillin-2 cause Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly. Both are autosomal dominant disorders, and both disorders affect musculoskeletal tissues. Here we show that Fbn2 null mice (on a 129/Sv background) are born with reduced muscle mass, abnormal muscle histology, and signs of activated BMP signaling in skeletal muscle. A delay in Myosin Heavy Chain 8, a perinatal myosin, was found in Fbn2 null forelimb muscle tissue, consistent with the notion that muscle defects underlie forelimb contractures in these mice. In addition, white fat accumulated in the forelimbs during the early postnatal period. Adult Fbn2 null mice are already known to demonstrate persistent muscle weakness. Here we measured elevated creatine kinase levels in adult Fbn2 null mice, indicating ongoing cycles of muscle injury. On a C57Bl/6 background, Fbn2 null mice showed severe defects in musculature, leading to neonatal death from respiratory failure. These new findings demonstrate that loss of fibrillin-2 results in phenotypes similar to those found in congenital muscular dystrophies and that FBN2 should be considered as a candidate gene for recessive congenital muscular dystrophy. Both in vivo and in vitro evidence associated muscle abnormalities and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice with abnormally activated BMP signaling. Genetic rescue of reduced muscle mass and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice was accomplished by deleting a single allele of Bmp7. In contrast to other reports that activated BMP signaling leads to muscle hypertrophy, our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of BMP signaling to the fibrillin-2 extracellular environment during early postnatal muscle development. New evidence presented here suggests that fibrillin-2 can

  15. Abnormal Activation of BMP Signaling Causes Myopathy in Fbn2 Null Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Sengle

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fibrillins are large extracellular macromolecules that polymerize to form the backbone structure of connective tissue microfibrils. Mutations in the gene for fibrillin-1 cause the Marfan syndrome, while mutations in the gene for fibrillin-2 cause Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly. Both are autosomal dominant disorders, and both disorders affect musculoskeletal tissues. Here we show that Fbn2 null mice (on a 129/Sv background are born with reduced muscle mass, abnormal muscle histology, and signs of activated BMP signaling in skeletal muscle. A delay in Myosin Heavy Chain 8, a perinatal myosin, was found in Fbn2 null forelimb muscle tissue, consistent with the notion that muscle defects underlie forelimb contractures in these mice. In addition, white fat accumulated in the forelimbs during the early postnatal period. Adult Fbn2 null mice are already known to demonstrate persistent muscle weakness. Here we measured elevated creatine kinase levels in adult Fbn2 null mice, indicating ongoing cycles of muscle injury. On a C57Bl/6 background, Fbn2 null mice showed severe defects in musculature, leading to neonatal death from respiratory failure. These new findings demonstrate that loss of fibrillin-2 results in phenotypes similar to those found in congenital muscular dystrophies and that FBN2 should be considered as a candidate gene for recessive congenital muscular dystrophy. Both in vivo and in vitro evidence associated muscle abnormalities and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice with abnormally activated BMP signaling. Genetic rescue of reduced muscle mass and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice was accomplished by deleting a single allele of Bmp7. In contrast to other reports that activated BMP signaling leads to muscle hypertrophy, our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of BMP signaling to the fibrillin-2 extracellular environment during early postnatal muscle development. New evidence presented here suggests that

  16. Glycosynapses: microdomains controlling carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion and signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Hakomori Senitiroh

    2004-01-01

    The concept of microdomains in plasma membranes was developed over two decades, following observation of polarity of membrane based on clustering of specific membrane components. Microdomains involved in carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion with concurrent signal transduction that affect cellular phenotype are termed "glycosynapse". Three types of glycosynapse have been distinguished: "type 1" having glycosphingolipid associated with signal transducers (small G-proteins, cSrc, Src family kina...

  17. Robo signaling regulates the production of cranial neural crest cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Tan; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Guang; Chuai, Manli; Münsterberg, Andrea; Yang, Xuesong

    2017-12-01

    Slit/Robo signaling plays an important role in the guidance of developing neurons in developing embryos. However, it remains obscure whether and how Slit/Robo signaling is involved in the production of cranial neural crest cells. In this study, we examined Robo1 deficient mice to reveal developmental defects of mouse cranial frontal and parietal bones, which are derivatives of cranial neural crest cells. Therefore, we determined the production of HNK1 + cranial neural crest cells in early chick embryo development after knock-down (KD) of Robo1 expression. Detection of markers for pre-migratory and migratory neural crest cells, PAX7 and AP-2α, showed that production of both was affected by Robo1 KD. In addition, we found that the transcription factor slug is responsible for the aberrant delamination/EMT of cranial neural crest cells induced by Robo1 KD, which also led to elevated expression of E- and N-Cadherin. N-Cadherin expression was enhanced when blocking FGF signaling with dominant-negative FGFR1 in half of the neural tube. Taken together, we show that Slit/Robo signaling influences the delamination/EMT of cranial neural crest cells, which is required for cranial bone development. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. AlliedSignal solid oxide fuel cell technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minh, N.; Barr, K.; Kelly, P.; Montgomery, K. [AlliedSignal Aerospace Equipment Systems, Torrance, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    AlliedSignal has been developing high-performance, lightweight solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology for a broad spectrum of electric power generation applications. This technology is well suited for use in a variety of power systems, ranging from commercial cogeneration to military mobile power sources. The AlliedSignal SOFC is based on stacking high-performance thin-electrolyte cells with lightweight metallic interconnect assemblies to form a compact structure. The fuel cell can be operated at reduced temperatures (600{degrees} to 800{degrees}C). SOFC stacks based on this design has the potential of producing 1 kW/kg and 1 ML. This paper summarizes the technical status of the design, manufacture, and operation of AlliedSignal SOFCs.

  19. Cell wall integrity signalling in human pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichtl, Karl; Samantaray, Sweta; Wagener, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Fungi are surrounded by a rigid structure, the fungal cell wall. Its plasticity and composition depend on active regulation of the underlying biosynthesis and restructuring processes. This involves specialised signalling pathways that control gene expression and activities of biosynthetic enzymes. The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway is the central signalling cascade required for the adaptation to a wide spectrum of cell wall perturbing conditions, including heat, oxidative stress and antifungals. In the recent years, great efforts were made to analyse the CWI pathway of diverse fungi. It turned out that the CWI signalling cascade is mostly conserved in the fungal kingdom. In this review, we summarise as well as compare the current knowledge on the canonical CWI pathway in the human pathogenic fungi Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Aspergillus fumigatus and Cryptococcus neoformans. Understanding the differences and similarities in the stress responses of these organisms could become a key to improving existing or developing new antifungal therapies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Changes in insulin and insulin signaling in Alzheimer’s disease: cause or consequence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Molly; Macauley, Shannon L.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD), although the causal relationship remains poorly understood. Alterations in insulin signaling (IS) are reported in the AD brain. Moreover, oligomers/fibrils of amyloid-β (Aβ) can lead to neuronal insulin resistance and intranasal insulin is being explored as a potential therapy for AD. Conversely, elevated insulin levels (ins) are found in AD patients and high insulin has been reported to increase Aβ levels and tau phosphorylation, which could exacerbate AD pathology. Herein, we explore whether changes in ins and IS are a cause or consequence of AD. PMID:27432942

  1. Protective effect of Kit signaling for melanocyte stem cells against radiation-induced genotoxic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Hitomi; Hara, Akira; Motohashi, Tsutomu; Kunisada, Takahiro

    2011-09-01

    Radiation-induced hair graying is caused by irreversible defects in the self-renewal and/or development of follicular melanocyte stem cells in the hair follicles. Kit signaling is an essential growth and differentiation signaling pathway for various cell lineages including melanocytes, and its radioprotective effects have been shown in hematopoietic cells. However, it is uncertain whether Kit signaling exerts a radioprotective effect for melanocytes. In this study, we found that various loss-of-function mutations of Kit facilitate radiation-induced hair graying. In contrast, transgenic mice expressing the ligand for Kit (Kitl) in the epidermis have significantly reduced levels of radiation-induced hair graying. The X-ray doses used did not show a systemic lethal effect, indicating that the in vivo radiosensitivity of Kit mutants is mainly caused by the damaged melanocyte stem cell population. X-ray-damaged melanocyte stem cells seemed to take the fate of ectopically pigmented melanocytes in the bulge regions of hair follicles in vivo. Endothelin 3, another growth and differentiation factor for melanocytes, showed a lesser radioprotective effect compared with Kitl. These results indicate the prevention of radiation-induced hair graying by Kit signaling.

  2. Apoptosis and signalling in acid sphingomyelinase deficient cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sillence Dan J

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence suggests that the activation of a non-specific lipid scramblase during apoptosis induces the flipping of sphingomyelin from the cell surface to the cytoplasmic leaftet of the plasma membrane. Inner leaflet sphingomyelin is then cleaved to ceramide by a neutral sphingomyelinase. The production of this non-membrane forming lipid induces blebbing of the plasma membrane to aid rapid engulfment by professional phagocytes. However contrary evidence suggests that cells which are deficient in acid sphingomyelinase are defective in apoptosis signalling. This data has been interpreted as support for the activation of acid sphingomyelinase as an early signal in apoptosis. Hypothesis An alternative explanation is put forward whereby the accumulation of intracellular sphingomyelin in sphingomyelinase deficient cells leads to the formation of intracellular rafts which lead to the sequestration of important signalling molecules that are normally present on the cell surface where they perform their function. Testing the hypothesis It is expected that the subcellular distribution of important signalling molecules is altered in acid sphingomyelinase deficient cells, leading to their sequestration in late endosomes / lysosomes. Other sphingolipid storage diseases such as Niemann-Pick type C which have normal acid sphingomyelinase activity would also be expected to show the same phenotype. Implications of the hypothesis If true the hypothesis would provide a mechanism for the pathology of the sphingolipid storage diseases at the cellular level and also have implications for the role of ceramide in apoptosis.

  3. Discrete dynamic modeling of T cell survival signaling networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ranran

    2009-03-01

    Biochemistry-based frameworks are often not applicable for the modeling of heterogeneous regulatory systems that are sparsely documented in terms of quantitative information. As an alternative, qualitative models assuming a small set of discrete states are gaining acceptance. This talk will present a discrete dynamic model of the signaling network responsible for the survival and long-term competence of cytotoxic T cells in the blood cancer T-LGL leukemia. We integrated the signaling pathways involved in normal T cell activation and the known deregulations of survival signaling in leukemic T-LGL, and formulated the regulation of each network element as a Boolean (logic) rule. Our model suggests that the persistence of two signals is sufficient to reproduce all known deregulations in leukemic T-LGL. It also indicates the nodes whose inactivity is necessary and sufficient for the reversal of the T-LGL state. We have experimentally validated several model predictions, including: (i) Inhibiting PDGF signaling induces apoptosis in leukemic T-LGL. (ii) Sphingosine kinase 1 and NFκB are essential for the long-term survival of T cells in T-LGL leukemia. (iii) T box expressed in T cells (T-bet) is constitutively activated in the T-LGL state. The model has identified potential therapeutic targets for T-LGL leukemia and can be used for generating long-term competent CTL necessary for tumor and cancer vaccine development. The success of this model, and of other discrete dynamic models, suggests that the organization of signaling networks has an determining role in their dynamics. Reference: R. Zhang, M. V. Shah, J. Yang, S. B. Nyland, X. Liu, J. K. Yun, R. Albert, T. P. Loughran, Jr., Network Model of Survival Signaling in LGL Leukemia, PNAS 105, 16308-16313 (2008).

  4. Racial differences in B cell receptor signaling pathway activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Diane M; Louie, Brent; Mathi, Kavita; Pos, Zoltan; Wang, Ena; Hawtin, Rachael E; Marincola, Francesco M; Cesano, Alessandra

    2012-06-06

    Single-cell network profiling (SCNP) is a multi-parametric flow cytometry-based approach that simultaneously measures basal and modulated intracellular signaling activity in multiple cell subpopulations. Previously, SCNP analysis of a broad panel of immune signaling pathways in cell subsets within PBMCs from 60 healthy donors identified a race-associated difference in B cell anti-IgD-induced PI3K pathway activity. The present study extended this analysis to a broader range of signaling pathway components downstream of the B cell receptor (BCR) in European Americans and African Americans using a subset of donors from the previously analyzed cohort of 60 healthy donors. Seven BCR signaling nodes (a node is defined as a paired modulator and intracellular readout) were measured at multiple time points by SCNP in PBMCs from 10 healthy donors [5 African Americans (36-51 yrs), 5 European Americans (36-56 yrs), all males]. Analysis of BCR signaling activity in European American and African American PBMC samples revealed that, compared to the European American donors, B cells from African Americans had lower anti-IgD induced phosphorylation of multiple BCR pathway components, including the membrane proximal proteins Syk and SFK as well as proteins in the PI3K pathway (S6 and Akt), the MAPK pathways (Erk and p38), and the NF-κB pathway (NF-κB). In addition to differences in the magnitude of anti-IgD-induced pathway activation, racial differences in BCR signaling kinetic profiles were observed. Further, the frequency of IgD+ B cells differed by race and strongly correlated with BCR pathway activation. Thus, the race-related difference in BCR pathway activation appears to be attributable at least in part to a race-associated difference in IgD+ B cell frequencies. SCNP analysis enabled the identification of statistically significant race-associated differences in BCR pathway activation within PBMC samples from healthy donors. Understanding race-associated contrasts in immune

  5. Racial differences in B cell receptor signaling pathway activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longo Diane M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-cell network profiling (SCNP is a multi-parametric flow cytometry-based approach that simultaneously measures basal and modulated intracellular signaling activity in multiple cell subpopulations. Previously, SCNP analysis of a broad panel of immune signaling pathways in cell subsets within PBMCs from 60 healthy donors identified a race-associated difference in B cell anti-IgD-induced PI3K pathway activity. Methods The present study extended this analysis to a broader range of signaling pathway components downstream of the B cell receptor (BCR in European Americans and African Americans using a subset of donors from the previously analyzed cohort of 60 healthy donors. Seven BCR signaling nodes (a node is defined as a paired modulator and intracellular readout were measured at multiple time points by SCNP in PBMCs from 10 healthy donors [5 African Americans (36-51 yrs, 5 European Americans (36-56 yrs, all males]. Results Analysis of BCR signaling activity in European American and African American PBMC samples revealed that, compared to the European American donors, B cells from African Americans had lower anti-IgD induced phosphorylation of multiple BCR pathway components, including the membrane proximal proteins Syk and SFK as well as proteins in the PI3K pathway (S6 and Akt, the MAPK pathways (Erk and p38, and the NF-κB pathway (NF-κB. In addition to differences in the magnitude of anti-IgD-induced pathway activation, racial differences in BCR signaling kinetic profiles were observed. Further, the frequency of IgD+ B cells differed by race and strongly correlated with BCR pathway activation. Thus, the race-related difference in BCR pathway activation appears to be attributable at least in part to a race-associated difference in IgD+ B cell frequencies. Conclusions SCNP analysis enabled the identification of statistically significant race-associated differences in BCR pathway activation within PBMC samples from

  6. Hedgehog Signaling Promotes the Proliferation and Subsequent Hair Cell Formation of Progenitor Cells in the Neonatal Mouse Cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hair cell (HC loss is the major cause of permanent sensorineural hearing loss in mammals. Unlike lower vertebrates, mammalian cochlear HCs cannot regenerate spontaneously after damage, although the vestibular system does maintain limited HC regeneration capacity. Thus HC regeneration from the damaged sensory epithelium has been one of the main areas of research in the field of hearing restoration. Hedgehog signaling plays important roles during the embryonic development of the inner ear, and it is involved in progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation as well as the cell fate decision. In this study, we show that recombinant Sonic Hedgehog (Shh protein effectively promotes sphere formation, proliferation, and differentiation of Lgr5+ progenitor cells isolated from the neonatal mouse cochlea. To further explore this, we determined the effect of Hedgehog signaling on cell proliferation and HC regeneration in cultured cochlear explant from transgenic R26-SmoM2 mice that constitutively activate Hedgehog signaling in the supporting cells of the cochlea. Without neomycin treatment, up-regulation of Hedgehog signaling did not significantly promote cell proliferation or new HC formation. However, after injury to the sensory epithelium by neomycin treatment, the over-activation of Hedgehog signaling led to significant supporting cell proliferation and HC regeneration in the cochlear epithelium explants. RNA sequencing and real-time PCR were used to compare the transcripts of the cochleae from control mice and R26-SmoM2 mice, and multiple genes involved in the proliferation and differentiation processes were identified. This study has important implications for the treatment of sensorineural hearing loss by manipulating the Hedgehog signaling pathway.

  7. Protein kinase C signaling and cell cycle regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian R Black

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A link between T cell proliferation and the protein kinase C (PKC family of serine/threonine kinases has been recognized for about thirty years. However, despite the wealth of information on PKC-mediated control of T cell activation, understanding of the effects of PKCs on the cell cycle machinery in this cell type remains limited. Studies in other systems have revealed important cell cycle-specific effects of PKC signaling that can either positively or negatively impact proliferation. The outcome of PKC activation is highly context-dependent, with the precise cell cycle target(s and overall effects determined by the specific isozyme involved, the timing of PKC activation, the cell type, and the signaling environment. Although PKCs can regulate all stages of the cell cycle, they appear to predominantly affect G0/G1 and G2. PKCs can modulate multiple cell cycle regulatory molecules, including cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks, cdk inhibitors and cdc25 phosphatases; however, evidence points to Cip/Kip cdk inhibitors and D-type cyclins as key mediators of PKC-regulated cell cycle-specific effects. Several PKC isozymes can target Cip/Kip proteins to control G0/G1→S and/or G2→M transit, while effects on D-type cyclins regulate entry into and progression through G1. Analysis of PKC signaling in T cells has largely focused on its roles in T cell activation; thus, observed cell cycle effects are mainly positive. A prominent role is emerging for PKCθ, with non-redundant functions of other isozymes also described. Additional evidence points to PKCδ as a negative regulator of the cell cycle in these cells. As in other cell types, context-dependent effects of individual isozymes have been noted in T cells, and Cip/Kip cdk inhibitors and D-type cyclins appear to be major PKC targets. Future studies are anticipated to take advantage of the similarities between these various systems to enhance understanding of PKC-mediated cell cycle regulation in

  8. Systems biology. Conditional density-based analysis of T cell signaling in single-cell data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Smita; Spitzer, Matthew H; Mingueneau, Michael; Bendall, Sean C; Litvin, Oren; Stone, Erica; Pe'er, Dana; Nolan, Garry P

    2014-11-28

    Cellular circuits sense the environment, process signals, and compute decisions using networks of interacting proteins. To model such a system, the abundance of each activated protein species can be described as a stochastic function of the abundance of other proteins. High-dimensional single-cell technologies, such as mass cytometry, offer an opportunity to characterize signaling circuit-wide. However, the challenge of developing and applying computational approaches to interpret such complex data remains. Here, we developed computational methods, based on established statistical concepts, to characterize signaling network relationships by quantifying the strengths of network edges and deriving signaling response functions. In comparing signaling between naïve and antigen-exposed CD4(+) T lymphocytes, we find that although these two cell subtypes had similarly wired networks, naïve cells transmitted more information along a key signaling cascade than did antigen-exposed cells. We validated our characterization on mice lacking the extracellular-regulated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) ERK2, which showed stronger influence of pERK on pS6 (phosphorylated-ribosomal protein S6), in naïve cells as compared with antigen-exposed cells, as predicted. We demonstrate that by using cell-to-cell variation inherent in single-cell data, we can derive response functions underlying molecular circuits and drive the understanding of how cells process signals. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Mutations in LRP5 cause primary osteoporosis without features of OI by reducing Wnt signaling activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korvala Johanna

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary osteoporosis is a rare childhood-onset skeletal condition whose pathogenesis has been largely unknown. We have previously shown that primary osteoporosis can be caused by heterozygous missense mutations in the Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5 gene, and the role of LRP5 is further investigated here. Methods LRP5 was analyzed in 18 otherwise healthy children and adolescents who had evidence of osteoporosis (manifested as reduced bone mineral density i.e. BMD, recurrent peripheral fractures and/or vertebral compression fractures but who lacked the clinical features of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI or other known syndromes linked to low BMD. Also 51 controls were analyzed. Methods used in the genetic analyses included direct sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. In vitro studies were performed using luciferase assay and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR to examine the effect of two novel and three previously identified mutations on the activity of canonical Wnt signaling and on expression of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1 and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-Htr1b. Results Two novel LRP5 mutations (c.3446 T > A; p.L1149Q and c.3553 G > A; p.G1185R were identified in two patients and their affected family members. In vitro analyses showed that one of these novel mutations together with two previously reported mutations (p.C913fs, p.R1036Q significantly reduced the activity of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Such reductions may lead to decreased bone formation, and could explain the bone phenotype. Gut-derived Lrp5 has been shown to regulate serotonin synthesis by controlling the production of serotonin rate-limiting enzyme, Tph1. LRP5 mutations did not affect Tph1 expression, and only one mutant (p.L1149Q reduced expression of serotonin receptor 5-Htr1b (p Conclusions Our results provide additional information on the role of LRP5 mutations and their

  10. Mutations in LRP5 cause primary osteoporosis without features of OI by reducing Wnt signaling activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korvala, Johanna; Jüppner, Harald; Mäkitie, Outi; Sochett, Etienne; Schnabel, Dirk; Mora, Stefano; Bartels, Cynthia F; Warman, Matthew L; Deraska, Donald; Cole, William G; Hartikka, Heini; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Männikkö, Minna

    2012-04-10

    Primary osteoporosis is a rare childhood-onset skeletal condition whose pathogenesis has been largely unknown. We have previously shown that primary osteoporosis can be caused by heterozygous missense mutations in the Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene, and the role of LRP5 is further investigated here. LRP5 was analyzed in 18 otherwise healthy children and adolescents who had evidence of osteoporosis (manifested as reduced bone mineral density i.e. BMD, recurrent peripheral fractures and/or vertebral compression fractures) but who lacked the clinical features of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) or other known syndromes linked to low BMD. Also 51 controls were analyzed. Methods used in the genetic analyses included direct sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). In vitro studies were performed using luciferase assay and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to examine the effect of two novel and three previously identified mutations on the activity of canonical Wnt signaling and on expression of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-Htr1b). Two novel LRP5 mutations (c.3446 T > A; p.L1149Q and c.3553 G > A; p.G1185R) were identified in two patients and their affected family members. In vitro analyses showed that one of these novel mutations together with two previously reported mutations (p.C913fs, p.R1036Q) significantly reduced the activity of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Such reductions may lead to decreased bone formation, and could explain the bone phenotype. Gut-derived Lrp5 has been shown to regulate serotonin synthesis by controlling the production of serotonin rate-limiting enzyme, Tph1. LRP5 mutations did not affect Tph1 expression, and only one mutant (p.L1149Q) reduced expression of serotonin receptor 5-Htr1b (p LRP5 mutations and their effects on the development of juvenile-onset primary osteoporosis, and hence the pathogenesis of the disorder. The

  11. Compartmentalized Signaling in Neurons: From Cell Biology to Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terenzio, Marco; Schiavo, Giampietro; Fainzilber, Mike

    2017-11-01

    Neurons are the largest known cells, with complex and highly polarized morphologies. As such, neuronal signaling is highly compartmentalized, requiring sophisticated transfer mechanisms to convey and integrate information within and between sub-neuronal compartments. Here, we survey different modes of compartmentalized signaling in neurons, highlighting examples wherein the fundamental cell biological processes of protein synthesis and degradation, membrane trafficking, and organelle transport are employed to enable the encoding and integration of information, locally and globally within a neuron. Comparisons to other cell types indicate that neurons accentuate widely shared mechanisms, providing invaluable models for the compartmentalization and transfer mechanisms required and used by most eukaryotic cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. TGEV nucleocapsid protein induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through activation of p53 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Li; Huang, Yong; Du, Qian; Dong, Feng; Zhao, Xiaomin; Zhang, Wenlong; Xu, Xingang; Tong, Dewen

    2014-03-07

    Our previous studies showed that TGEV infection could induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via activation of p53 signaling in cultured host cells. However, it is unclear which viral gene causes these effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of TGEV nucleocapsid (N) protein on PK-15 cells. We found that TGEV N protein suppressed cell proliferation by causing cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases and apoptosis. Characterization of various cellular proteins that are involved in regulating cell cycle progression demonstrated that the expression of N gene resulted in an accumulation of p53 and p21, which suppressed cyclin B1, cdc2 and cdk2 expression. Moreover, the expression of TGEV N gene promoted translocation of Bax to mitochondria, which in turn caused the release of cytochrome c, followed by activation of caspase-3, resulting in cell apoptosis in the transfected PK-15 cells following cell cycle arrest. Further studies showed that p53 inhibitor attenuated TGEV N protein induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and apoptosis through reversing the expression changes of cdc2, cdk2 and cyclin B1 and the translocation changes of Bax and cytochrome c induced by TGEV N protein. Taken together, these results demonstrated that TGEV N protein might play an important role in TGEV infection-induced p53 activation and cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases and apoptosis occurrence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Oxidative Stress, Signal Transduction, Cell-Cell Communication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trosko, James

    1999-01-01

    .... The integration of intercellular communication through gap junctions and intracellular pathways plays a role in maintaining the homeostasis by controlling the expression of genes that control cell...

  14. Tuning Cell and Tissue Development by Combining Multiple Mechanical Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Ravi; Verdonschot, Nico; Koopman, Bart; Rouwkema, Jeroen

    2017-10-01

    Mechanical signals offer a promising way to control cell and tissue development. It has been established that cells constantly probe their mechanical microenvironment and employ force feedback mechanisms to modify themselves and when possible, their environment, to reach a homeostatic state. Thus, a correct mechanical microenvironment (external forces and mechanical properties and shapes of cellular surroundings) is necessary for the proper functioning of cells. In vitro or in the case of nonbiological implants in vivo, where cells are in an artificial environment, addition of the adequate mechanical signals can, therefore, enable the cells to function normally as in vivo. Hence, a wide variety of approaches have been developed to apply mechanical stimuli (such as substrate stretch, flow-induced shear stress, substrate stiffness, topography, and modulation of attachment area) to cells in vitro. These approaches have not just revealed the effects of the mechanical signals on cells but also provided ways for probing cellular molecules and structures that can provide a mechanistic understanding of the effects. However, they remain lower in complexity compared with the in vivo conditions, where the cellular mechanical microenvironment is the result of a combination of multiple mechanical signals. Therefore, combinations of mechanical stimuli have also been applied to cells in vitro. These studies have had varying focus-developing novel platforms to apply complex combinations of mechanical stimuli, observing the co-operation/competition between stimuli, combining benefits of multiple stimuli toward an application, or uncovering the underlying mechanisms of their action. In general, they provided new insights that could not have been predicted from previous knowledge. We present here a review of several such studies and the insights gained from them, thereby making a case for such studies to be continued and further developed.

  15. Probiotic Modulation of Innate Cell Pathogen Sensing and Signaling Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Llewellyn

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of evidence documenting probiotic bacteria to have a beneficial effect to the host through their ability to modulate the mucosal immune system. Many probiotic bacteria can be considered to act as either immune activators or immune suppressors, which have appreciable influence on homeostasis, inflammatory- and suppressive-immunopathology. What is becoming apparent is the ability of these probiotics to modulate innate immune responses via direct or indirect effects on the signaling pathways that drive these activatory or suppressive/tolerogenic mechanisms. This review will focus on the immunomodulatory role of probiotics on signaling pathways in innate immune cells: from positive to negative regulation associated with innate immune cells driving gut mucosal functionality. Research investigations have shown probiotics to modulate innate functionality in many ways including, receptor antagonism, receptor expression, binding to and expression of adaptor proteins, expression of negative regulatory signal molecules, induction of micro-RNAs, endotoxin tolerisation and finally, the secretion of immunomodulatory proteins, lipids and metabolites. The detailed understanding of the immunomodulatory signaling effects of probiotic strains will facilitate strain-specific selective manipulation of innate cell signal mechanisms in the modulation of mucosal adjuvanticity, immune deviation and tolerisation in both healthy subjects and patients with inflammatory and suppressive pathology.

  16. Curcumin blocks interleukin-1 signaling in chondrosarcoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kalinski

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-1 signaling plays an important role in inflammatory processes, but also in malignant processes. The essential downstream event in IL-1 signaling is the activation of nuclear factor (NF-κB, which leads to the expression of several genes that are involved in cell proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis, among them VEGF-A. As microenvironment-derived IL-1β is required for invasion and angiogenesis in malignant tumors, also in chondrosarcomas, we investigated IL-1β-induced signal transduction and VEGF-A expression in C3842 and SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells. We additionally performed in vitro angiogenesis assays and NF-κB-related gene expression analyses. Curcumin is a substance which inhibits IL-1 signaling very early by preventing the recruitment of IL-1 receptor associated kinase (IRAK to the IL-1 receptor. We demonstrate that IL-1 signaling and VEGF-A expression are blocked by Curcumin in chondrosarcoma cells. We further show that Curcumin blocks IL-1β-induced angiogenesis and NF-κB-related gene expression. We suppose that IL-1 blockade is an additional treatment option in chondrosarcoma, either by Curcumin, its derivatives or other IL-1 blocking agents.

  17. Hierarchical feedback modules and reaction hubs in cell signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianfeng; Lan, Yueheng

    2015-01-01

    Despite much effort, identification of modular structures and study of their organizing and functional roles remain a formidable challenge in molecular systems biology, which, however, is essential in reaching a systematic understanding of large-scale cell regulation networks and hence gaining capacity of exerting effective interference to cell activity. Combining graph theoretic methods with available dynamics information, we successfully retrieved multiple feedback modules of three important signaling networks. These feedbacks are structurally arranged in a hierarchical way and dynamically produce layered temporal profiles of output signals. We found that global and local feedbacks act in very different ways and on distinct features of the information flow conveyed by signal transduction but work highly coordinately to implement specific biological functions. The redundancy embodied with multiple signal-relaying channels and feedback controls bestow great robustness and the reaction hubs seated at junctions of different paths announce their paramount importance through exquisite parameter management. The current investigation reveals intriguing general features of the organization of cell signaling networks and their relevance to biological function, which may find interesting applications in analysis, design and control of bio-networks.

  18. Hierarchical feedback modules and reaction hubs in cell signaling networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Xu

    Full Text Available Despite much effort, identification of modular structures and study of their organizing and functional roles remain a formidable challenge in molecular systems biology, which, however, is essential in reaching a systematic understanding of large-scale cell regulation networks and hence gaining capacity of exerting effective interference to cell activity. Combining graph theoretic methods with available dynamics information, we successfully retrieved multiple feedback modules of three important signaling networks. These feedbacks are structurally arranged in a hierarchical way and dynamically produce layered temporal profiles of output signals. We found that global and local feedbacks act in very different ways and on distinct features of the information flow conveyed by signal transduction but work highly coordinately to implement specific biological functions. The redundancy embodied with multiple signal-relaying channels and feedback controls bestow great robustness and the reaction hubs seated at junctions of different paths announce their paramount importance through exquisite parameter management. The current investigation reveals intriguing general features of the organization of cell signaling networks and their relevance to biological function, which may find interesting applications in analysis, design and control of bio-networks.

  19. Hierarchical Feedback Modules and Reaction Hubs in Cell Signaling Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianfeng; Lan, Yueheng

    2015-01-01

    Despite much effort, identification of modular structures and study of their organizing and functional roles remain a formidable challenge in molecular systems biology, which, however, is essential in reaching a systematic understanding of large-scale cell regulation networks and hence gaining capacity of exerting effective interference to cell activity. Combining graph theoretic methods with available dynamics information, we successfully retrieved multiple feedback modules of three important signaling networks. These feedbacks are structurally arranged in a hierarchical way and dynamically produce layered temporal profiles of output signals. We found that global and local feedbacks act in very different ways and on distinct features of the information flow conveyed by signal transduction but work highly coordinately to implement specific biological functions. The redundancy embodied with multiple signal-relaying channels and feedback controls bestow great robustness and the reaction hubs seated at junctions of different paths announce their paramount importance through exquisite parameter management. The current investigation reveals intriguing general features of the organization of cell signaling networks and their relevance to biological function, which may find interesting applications in analysis, design and control of bio-networks. PMID:25951347

  20. Molecular regulation of cytoskeletal rearrangements during T cell signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stradal, Theresia E B; Pusch, Rico; Kliche, Stefanie

    2006-01-01

    Regulation of the cytoskeleton in cells of the haematopoietic system is essential for fulfilling diverse tasks such as migration towards a chemoattractant, phagocytosis or cell-cell communication. This is particularly true for the many types of T cells, which are at the foundation of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates. Deregulation of actin filament turnover is known to be involved in the development of severe immunodeficiencies or immunoproliferative diseases. Therefore, molecular dissection of signalling complexes and effector molecules, which leads to controlled cytoskeletal assembly, has been the focus of immunological research in the last decade. In the past, cytoskeletal remodelling was frequently understood as the finish line of signalling, while today it becomes increasingly evident that actin and microtubule dynamics are required for proper signal transmission in many processes such as T cell activation. Significant effort is made in many laboratories to further elucidate the contribution of cytoskeletal remodelling to immune function. The objective of this article is to summarise the current knowledge on how actin and microtubules are reorganised to support the formation of structures as diverse as the immunological synapse and peripheral protrusions during cell migration.

  1. Signal transduction events in aluminum-induced cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, some of the signal transduction events involved in AlCl3-induced cell death in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were elucidated. Cells treated with 100 ¿M AlCl3 showed typical features of programmed cell death (PCD) such as nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation.

  2. A signal processing analysis of Purkinje cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze'ev R Abrams

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar Purkinje cells in vitro fire recurrent sequences of Sodium and Calcium spikes. Here, we analyze the Purkinje cell using harmonic analysis, and our experiments reveal that its output signal is comprised of three distinct frequency bands, which are combined using Amplitude and Frequency Modulation (AM/FM. We find that the three characteristic frequencies - Sodium, Calcium and Switching – occur in various combinations in all waveforms observed using whole-cell current clamp recordings. We found that the Calcium frequency can display a frequency doubling of its frequency mode, and the Switching frequency can act as a possible generator of pauses that are typically seen in Purkinje output recordings. Using a reversibly photo-switchable kainate receptor agonist, we demonstrate the external modulation of the Calcium and Switching frequencies. These experiments and Fourier analysis suggest that the Purkinje cell can be understood as a harmonic signal oscillator, enabling a higher level of interpretation of Purkinje signaling based on modern signal processing techniques.

  3. Are Molecular Vibration Patterns of Cell Structural Elements Used for Intracellular Signalling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaross, Werner

    2016-01-01

    To date the manner in which information reaches the nucleus on that part within the three-dimensional structure where specific restorative processes of structural components of the cell are required is unknown. The soluble signalling molecules generated in the course of destructive and restorative processes communicate only as needed. All molecules show temperature-dependent molecular vibration creating a radiation in the infrared region. Each molecule species has in its turn a specific frequency pattern under given specific conditions. Changes in their structural composition result in modified frequency patterns of the molecules in question. The main structural elements of the cell membrane, of the endoplasmic reticulum, of the Golgi apparatus, and of the different microsomes representing the great variety of polar lipids show characteristic frequency patterns with peaks in the region characterised by low water absorption. These structural elements are very dynamic, mainly caused by the creation of signal molecules and transport containers. By means of the characteristic radiation, the area where repair or substitution services are needed could be identified; this spatial information complements the signalling of the soluble signal molecules. Based on their resonance properties receptors located on the outer leaflet of the nuclear envelope should be able to read typical frequencies and pass them into the nucleus. Clearly this physical signalling must be blocked by the cell membrane to obviate the flow of information into adjacent cells. If the hypothesis can be proved experimentally, it should be possible to identify and verify characteristic infrared frequency patterns. The application of these signal frequencies onto cells would open entirely new possibilities in medicine and all biological disciplines specifically to influence cell growth and metabolism. Similar to this intracellular system, an extracellular signalling system with many new therapeutic options

  4. Hyperglycemia- and hyperinsulinemia-induced insulin resistance causes alterations in cellular bioenergetics and activation of inflammatory signaling in lymphatic muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yang; Fluckey, James D; Chakraborty, Sanjukta; Muthuchamy, Mariappan

    2017-07-01

    Insulin resistance is a well-known risk factor for obesity, metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) and associated cardiovascular diseases, but its mechanisms are undefined in the lymphatics. Mesenteric lymphatic vessels from MetSyn or LPS-injected rats exhibited impaired intrinsic contractile activity and associated inflammatory changes. Hence, we hypothesized that insulin resistance in lymphatic muscle cells (LMCs) affects cell bioenergetics and signaling pathways that consequently alter contractility. LMCs were treated with different concentrations of insulin or glucose or both at various time points to determine insulin resistance. Onset of insulin resistance significantly impaired glucose uptake, mitochondrial function, oxygen consumption rates, glycolysis, lactic acid, and ATP production in LMCs. Hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia also impaired the PI3K/Akt while enhancing the ERK/p38MAPK/JNK pathways in LMCs. Increased NF-κB nuclear translocation and macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 and VCAM-1 levels in insulin-resistant LMCs indicated activation of inflammatory mechanisms. In addition, increased phosphorylation of myosin light chain-20, a key regulator of lymphatic muscle contraction, was observed in insulin-resistant LMCs. Therefore, our data elucidate the mechanisms of insulin resistance in LMCs and provide the first evidence that hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia promote insulin resistance and impair lymphatic contractile status by reducing glucose uptake, altering cellular metabolic pathways, and activating inflammatory signaling cascades.-Lee, Y., Fluckey, J. D., Chakraborty, S., Muthuchamy, M. Hyperglycemia- and hyperinsulinemia-induced insulin resistance causes alterations in cellular bioenergetics and activation of inflammatory signaling in lymphatic muscle. © FASEB.

  5. Perfluorocarbon reduces cell damage from blast injury by inhibiting signal paths of NF-κB, MAPK and Bcl-2/Bax signaling pathway in A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaorui; Liang, Zhixin; Li, Huaidong; Li, Chunsun; Yang, Zhen; Li, Yanqin; She, Danyang; Cao, Lu; Wang, Wenjie; Liu, Changlin; Chen, Liangan

    2017-01-01

    Blast lung injury is a common type of blast injury and has very high mortality. Therefore, research to identify medical therapies for blast injury is important. Perfluorocarbon (PFC) is used to improve gas exchange in diseased lungs and has anti-inflammatory functions in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this study was to determine whether PFC reduces damage to A549 cells caused by blast injury and to elucidate its possible mechanisms of action. A549 alveolar epithelial cells exposed to blast waves were treated with and without PFC. Morphological changes and apoptosis of A549 cells were recorded. PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to measure the mRNA or protein levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity levels were detected. Western blot was used to quantify the expression of NF-κB, Bax, Bcl-2, cleaved caspase-3 and MAPK cell signaling proteins. A549 cells exposed to blast wave shrank, with less cell-cell contact. The morphological change of A549 cells exposed to blast waves were alleviated by PFC. PFC significantly inhibited the apoptosis of A549 cells exposed to blast waves. IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α cytokine and mRNA expression levels were significantly inhibited by PFC. PFC significantly increased MDA levels and decreased SOD activity levels. Further studies indicated that NF-κB, Bax, caspase-3, phospho-p38, phosphor-ERK and phosphor-JNK proteins were also suppressed by PFC. The quantity of Bcl-2 protein was increased by PFC. Our research showed that PFC reduced A549 cell damage caused by blast injury. The potential mechanism may be associated with the following signaling pathways: 1) the signaling pathways of NF-κB and MAPK, which inhibit inflammation and reactive oxygen species (ROS); and 2) the signaling pathways of Bcl-2/Bax and caspase-3, which inhibit apoptosis.

  6. Quinolone signaling in the cell-to-cell communication system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesci, Everett C.; Milbank, Jared B. J.; Pearson, James P.; McKnight, Susan; Kende, Andrew S.; Greenberg, E. Peter; Iglewski, Barbara H.

    1999-01-01

    Numerous species of bacteria use an elegant regulatory mechanism known as quorum sensing to control the expression of specific genes in a cell-density dependent manner. In Gram-negative bacteria, quorum sensing systems function through a cell-to-cell signal molecule (autoinducer) that consists of a homoserine lactone with a fatty acid side chain. Such is the case in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which contains two quorum sensing systems (las and rhl) that operate via the autoinducers, N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone and N-butyryl-l-homoserine lactone. The study of these signal molecules has shown that they bind to and activate transcriptional activator proteins that specifically induce numerous P. aeruginosa virulence genes. We report here that P. aeruginosa produces another signal molecule, 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone, which has been designated as the Pseudomonas quinolone signal. It was found that this unique cell-to-cell signal controlled the expression of lasB, which encodes for the major virulence factor, LasB elastase. We also show that the synthesis and bioactivity of Pseudomonas quinolone signal were mediated by the P. aeruginosa las and rhl quorum sensing systems, respectively. The demonstration that 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone can function as an intercellular signal sheds light on the role of secondary metabolites and shows that P. aeruginosa cell-to-cell signaling is not restricted to acyl-homoserine lactones. PMID:10500159

  7. FK506 BINDING PROTEIN 12 DEFICIENCY IN ENDOTHELIAL AND HEMATOPOIETIC CELLS DECREASES REGULATORY T CELLS AND CAUSES HYPERTENSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiasson, Valorie L.; Talreja, Deepa; Young, Kristina J.; Chatterjee, Piyali; Banes-Berceli, Amy K.; Mitchell, Brett M.

    2011-01-01

    Patients treated with the immunosuppressive drug tacrolimus (FK506), which binds FK506 Binding Protein 12 (FKBP12) then inhibits the calcium-dependent phosphatase calcineurin, exhibit decreased regulatory T cells, endothelial dysfunction, and hypertension; however the mechanisms and whether altered T cell polarization play a role are unknown. Tacrolimus treatment of mice for 1 week dose-dependently decreased CD4+/FoxP3+ (regulatory T cells) and increased CD4+/IL-17+ (T helper 17) cells in the spleen, and caused endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. To determine the mechanisms, we crossed floxed FKBP12 mice with Tie2-Cre mice to generate offspring lacking FKBP12 in endothelial and hematopoietic cells only (FKBP12EC KO). Given FKBP12’s role in inhibiting TGF-β receptor activation, Tie2-Cre-mediated deletion of FKBP12 increased TGF-β receptor activation and SMAD2/3 signaling. FKBP12EC KO mice exhibited increased vascular expression of genes and proteins related to endothelial cell activation and inflammation. Serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-2, IL-6, IFNγ, IL-17a, IL-21, and IL-23 were increased significantly suggesting a Th17 cell-mediated inflammatory state. Flow cytometry studies confirmed this as splenocyte levels of CD4+/IL-17+ cells were increased significantly while CD4+/FoxP3+ cells were decreased in FKBP12EC KO mice. Furthermore, spleens from FKBP12EC KO mice showed increased STAT3 activation, involved in Th17 cell induction, and decreased STAT5 activation, involved in regulatory T cell induction. FKBP12EC KO mice also exhibited endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. These data suggest that tacrolimus, through its activation of TGF-β receptors in endothelial and hematopoietic cells, may cause endothelial dysfunction and hypertension by activating endothelial cells, reducing Tregs, and increasing Th17 cell polarization and inflammation. PMID:21518963

  8. Wolfram syndrome 1 gene negatively regulates ER stress signaling in rodent and human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Sonya G; Ishigaki, Shinsuke; Oslowski, Christine M; Lu, Simin; Lipson, Kathryn L; Ghosh, Rajarshi; Hayashi, Emiko; Ishihara, Hisamitsu; Oka, Yoshitomo; Permutt, M Alan; Urano, Fumihiko

    2010-03-01

    Wolfram syndrome is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, caused by nonautoimmune loss of beta cells, and neurological dysfunctions. We have previously shown that mutations in the Wolfram syndrome 1 (WFS1) gene cause Wolfram syndrome and that WFS1 has a protective function against ER stress. However, it remained to be determined how WFS1 mitigates ER stress. Here we have shown in rodent and human cell lines that WFS1 negatively regulates a key transcription factor involved in ER stress signaling, activating transcription factor 6alpha (ATF6alpha), through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. WFS1 suppressed expression of ATF6alpha target genes and repressed ATF6alpha-mediated activation of the ER stress response element (ERSE) promoter. Moreover, WFS1 stabilized the E3 ubiquitin ligase HRD1, brought ATF6alpha to the proteasome, and enhanced its ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation, leading to suppression of ER stress signaling. Consistent with these data, beta cells from WFS1-deficient mice and lymphocytes from patients with Wolfram syndrome exhibited dysregulated ER stress signaling through upregulation of ATF6alpha and downregulation of HRD1. These results reveal a role for WFS1 in the negative regulation of ER stress signaling and in the pathogenesis of diseases involving chronic, unresolvable ER stress, such as pancreatic beta cell death in diabetes.

  9. Cytotoxic Vibrio T3SS1 Rewires Host Gene Expression to Subvert Cell Death Signaling and Activate Cell Survival Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nisco, Nicole J.; Kanchwala, Mohammed; Li, Peng; Fernandez, Jessie; Xing, Chao; Orth, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial effectors are potent manipulators of host signaling pathways. The marine bacterium Vibrio parahaemolyticus (V. para), delivers effectors into host cells through two type three secretion systems (T3SS). The ubiquitous T3SS1 is vital for V. para survival in the environment, whereas T3SS2 causes acute gastroenteritis in human hosts. Although the natural host is undefined, T3SS1 effectors attack highly conserved cellular processes and pathways to orchestrate non-apoptotic cell death. Much is known about how T3SS1 effectors function in isolation, but we wanted to understand how their concerted action globally affects host cell signaling. To assess the host response to T3SS1, we compared gene expression changes over time in primary fibroblasts infected with V. para that have a functional T3SS1 (T3SS1+) to those in cells infected with V. para lacking T3SS1 (T3SS1−). Overall, the host transcriptional response to both T3SS1+ and T3SS1− V. para was rapid, robust, and temporally dynamic. T3SS1 re-wired host gene expression by specifically altering the expression of 398 genes. Although T3SS1 effectors target host cells at the posttranslational level to cause cytotoxicity, network analysis indicated that V. para T3SS1 also precipitates a host transcriptional response that initially activates cell survival and represses cell death networks. The increased expression of several key pro-survival transcripts mediated by T3SS1 was dependent on a host signaling pathway that is silenced later in infection by the posttranslational action of T3SS1. Taken together, our analysis reveals a complex interplay between roles of T3SS1 as both a transcriptional and posttranslational manipulator of host cell signaling. PMID:28512145

  10. Natural killer cell-intrinsic type I IFN signaling controls Klebsiella pneumoniae growth during lung infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borroni, Martina; Kavirayani, Anoop; Przybyszewska, Kornelia N.; Ingram, Rebecca J.; Lienenklaus, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a significant cause of nosocomial pneumonia and an alarming pathogen owing to the recent isolation of multidrug resistant strains. Understanding of immune responses orchestrating K. pneumoniae clearance by the host is of utmost importance. Here we show that type I interferon (IFN) signaling protects against lung infection with K. pneumoniae by launching bacterial growth-controlling interactions between alveolar macrophages and natural killer (NK) cells. Type I IFNs are important but disparate and incompletely understood regulators of defense against bacterial infections. Type I IFN receptor 1 (Ifnar1)-deficient mice infected with K. pneumoniae failed to activate NK cell-derived IFN-γ production. IFN-γ was required for bactericidal action and the production of the NK cell response-amplifying IL-12 and CXCL10 by alveolar macrophages. Bacterial clearance and NK cell IFN-γ were rescued in Ifnar1-deficient hosts by Ifnar1-proficient NK cells. Consistently, type I IFN signaling in myeloid cells including alveolar macrophages, monocytes and neutrophils was dispensable for host defense and IFN-γ activation. The failure of Ifnar1-deficient hosts to initiate a defense-promoting crosstalk between alveolar macrophages and NK cell was circumvented by administration of exogenous IFN-γ which restored endogenous IFN-γ production and restricted bacterial growth. These data identify NK cell-intrinsic type I IFN signaling as essential driver of K. pneumoniae clearance, and reveal specific targets for future therapeutic exploitations. PMID:29112952

  11. Efficient retina formation requires suppression of both Activin and BMP signaling pathways in pluripotent cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Wong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Retina formation requires the correct spatiotemporal patterning of key regulatory factors. While it is known that repression of several signaling pathways lead to specification of retinal fates, addition of only Noggin, a known BMP antagonist, can convert pluripotent Xenopus laevis animal cap cells to functional retinal cells. The aim of this study is to determine the intracellular molecular events that occur during this conversion. Surprisingly, blocking BMP signaling alone failed to mimic Noggin treatment. Overexpressing Noggin in pluripotent cells resulted in a concentration-dependent suppression of both Smad1 and Smad2 phosphorylation, which act downstream of BMP and Activin signaling, respectively. This caused a decrease in downstream targets: endothelial marker, xk81, and mesodermal marker, xbra. We treated pluripotent cells with dominant-negative receptors or the chemical inhibitors, dorsomorphin and SB431542, which each target either the BMP or Activin signaling pathway. We determined the effect of these treatments on retina formation using the Animal Cap Transplant (ACT assay; in which treated pluripotent cells were transplanted into the eye field of host embryos. We found that inhibition of Activin signaling, in the presence of BMP signaling inhibition, promotes efficient retinal specification in Xenopus tissue, mimicking the affect of adding Noggin alone. In whole embryos, we found that the eye field marker, rax, expanded when adding both dominant-negative Smad1 and Smad2, as did treating the cells with both dorsomorphin and SB431542. Future studies could translate these findings to a mammalian culture assay, in order to more efficiently produce retinal cells in culture.

  12. Ca2+ signaling in pancreatic acinar cells: physiology and pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.H. Petersen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The pancreatic acinar cell is a classical model for studies of secretion and signal transduction mechanisms. Because of the extensive endoplasmic reticulum and the large granular compartment, it has been possible - by direct measurements - to obtain considerable insights into intracellular Ca2+ handling under both normal and pathological conditions. Recent studies have also revealed important characteristics of stimulus-secretion coupling mechanisms in isolated human pancreatic acinar cells. The acinar cells are potentially dangerous because of the high intra-granular concentration of proteases, which become inappropriately activated in the human disease acute pancreatitis. This disease is due to toxic Ca2+ signals generated by excessive liberation of Ca2+ from both the endoplasmic reticulum and the secretory granules.

  13. Interactions between Trypanosoma cruzi Secreted Proteins and Host Cell Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe Costa, Renata; da Silveira, Jose F.; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is one of the prevalent neglected tropical diseases, affecting at least 6–7 million individuals in Latin America. It is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. After infection, the parasite invades and multiplies in the myocardium, leading to acute myocarditis that kills around 5% of untreated individuals. T. cruzi secretes proteins that manipulate multiple host cell signaling pathways to promote host cell invasion. The primary secreted lysosomal peptidase in T. cruzi is cruzipain, which has been shown to modulate the host immune response. Cruzipain hinders macrophage activation during the early stages of infection by interrupting the NF-kB P65 mediated signaling pathway. This allows the parasite to survive and replicate, and may contribute to the spread of infection in acute Chagas disease. Another secreted protein P21, which is expressed in all of the developmental stages of T. cruzi, has been shown to modulate host phagocytosis signaling pathways. The parasite also secretes soluble factors that exert effects on host extracellular matrix, such as proteolytic degradation of collagens. Finally, secreted phospholipase A from T. cruzi contributes to lipid modifications on host cells and concomitantly activates the PKC signaling pathway. Here, we present a brief review of the interaction between secreted proteins from T. cruzi and the host cells, emphasizing the manipulation of host signaling pathways during invasion. PMID:27065960

  14. Interactions between Trypanosoma cruzi secreted proteins and host cell signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Watanabe Costa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is one of the prevalent neglected tropical diseases, affecting at least 6-7 million individuals in Latin America. It is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi, which is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. After infection, the parasite invades and multiplies in the myocardium, leading to acute myocarditis that kills around 5% of untreated individuals. T. cruzi secretes proteins that manipulate multiple host cell signaling pathways to promote host cell invasion. The primary secreted lysosomal peptidase in T. cruzi is cruzipain, which has been shown to modulate the host immune response. Cruzipain hinders macrophage activation during the early stages of infection by interrupting the NF-kB P65 mediated signaling pathway. This allows the parasite to survive and replicate, and may contribute to the spread of infection in acute Chagas disease. Another secreted protein P21, which is expressed in all of the developmental stages of T. cruzi, has been shown to modulate host phagocytosis signaling pathways. The parasite also secretes soluble factors that exert effects on host extracellular matrix, such as proteolytic degradation of collagens. Finally, secreted phospholipase A from T. cruzi contributes to lipid modifications on host cells and concomitantly activates the PKC signaling pathway. Here we present a brief review of the interaction between secreted proteins from T. cruzi and the host cells, emphasizing the manipulation of host signaling pathways during invasion.

  15. The DSF Family of Cell-Cell Signals: An Expanding Class of Bacterial Virulence Regulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P Ryan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Many pathogenic bacteria use cell-cell signaling systems involving the synthesis and perception of diffusible signal molecules to control virulence as a response to cell density or confinement to niches. Bacteria produce signals of diverse structural classes. Signal molecules of the diffusible signal factor (DSF family are cis-2-unsaturated fatty acids. The paradigm is cis-11-methyl-2-dodecenoic acid from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc, which controls virulence in this plant pathogen. Although DSF synthesis was thought to be restricted to the xanthomonads, it is now known that structurally related molecules are produced by the unrelated bacteria Burkholderia cenocepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Furthermore, signaling involving these DSF family members contributes to bacterial virulence, formation of biofilms and antibiotic tolerance in these important human pathogens. Here we review the recent advances in understanding DSF signaling and its regulatory role in different bacteria. These advances include the description of the pathway/mechanism of DSF biosynthesis, identification of novel DSF synthases and new members of the DSF family, the demonstration of a diversity of DSF sensors to include proteins with a Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS domain and the description of some of the signal transduction mechanisms that impinge on virulence factor expression. In addition, we address the role of DSF family signals in interspecies signaling that modulates the behavior of other microorganisms. Finally, we consider a number of recently reported approaches for the control of bacterial virulence through the modulation of DSF signaling.

  16. Curcumin and emodin down-regulate TGF-β signaling pathway in human cervical cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Chandrakant Thacker

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the major cause of cancer related deaths in women, especially in developing countries and Human Papilloma Virus infection in conjunction with multiple deregulated signaling pathways leads to cervical carcinogenesis. TGF-β signaling in later stages of cancer is known to induce epithelial to mesenchymal transition promoting tumor growth. Phytochemicals, curcumin and emodin, are effective as chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic compounds against several cancers including cervical cancer. The main objective of this work was to study the effect of curcumin and emodin on TGF-β signaling pathway and its functional relevance to growth, migration and invasion in two cervical cancer cell lines, SiHa and HeLa. Since TGF-β and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways are known to cross talk having common downstream targets, we analyzed the effect of TGF-β on β-catenin (an important player in Wnt/β-catenin signaling and also studied whether curcumin and emodin modulate them. We observed that curcumin and emodin effectively down regulate TGF-β signaling pathway by decreasing the expression of TGF-β Receptor II, P-Smad3 and Smad4, and also counterbalance the tumorigenic effects of TGF-β by inhibiting the TGF-β-induced migration and invasion. Expression of downstream effectors of TGF-β signaling pathway, cyclinD1, p21 and Pin1, was inhibited along with the down regulation of key mesenchymal markers (Snail and Slug upon curcumin and emodin treatment. Curcumin and emodin were also found to synergistically inhibit cell population and migration in SiHa and HeLa cells. Moreover, we found that TGF-β activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in HeLa cells, and curcumin and emodin down regulate the pathway by inhibiting β-catenin. Taken together our data provide a mechanistic basis for the use of curcumin and emodin in the treatment of cervical cancer.

  17. A microfluidic platform for regulating signal transduction in single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Pak Kin; Yu, Fuqu; Sun, Ren; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2004-11-01

    Recent progress in micro cell culture systems has lead to new approaches in cell biology studies. Using micro devices for cell culturing possesses distinctive advantages over traditional methods. Length scale matching facilitates manipulation and detection at the single cell level. Previously, we have demonstrated generation of various stimulations such as spatial chemical gradient, electric field, and shear stress to study the dynamic responses of individual cells. Dynamic stimulations and continuous monitoring in a microfluidic system can be useful in studying different aspects of cellular process. In this work, we present a microfluidic platform for regulating nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) signal transduction in human embryonic kidney 293T cells. Time-varying bio-chemical stimulants, such as interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor, are introduced into the microchannel to activate the NF-kB signaling pathway. The dynamic responses of individual cells are monitored with the expression of reporter gene, green fluorescent protein. Regulation of the NF-kB activity is successfully demonstrated. This work is supported by CMISE through NASA URETI program.

  18. 14-3-3 proteins in guard cell signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie eCotelle

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Guard cells are specialized cells located at the leaf surface delimiting pores which control gas exchanges between the plant and the atmosphere. To optimize the CO2 uptake necessary for photosynthesis while minimizing water loss, guard cells integrate environmental signals to adjust stomatal aperture. The size of the stomatal pore is regulated by movements of the guard cells driven by variations in their volume and turgor. As guard cells perceive and transduce a wide array of environmental cues, they provide an ideal system to elucidate early events of plant signaling. Reversible protein phosphorylation events are known to play a crucial role in the regulation of stomatal movements. However, in some cases, phosphorylation alone is not sufficient to achieve complete protein regulation, but is necessary to mediate the binding of interactors that modulate protein function. Among the phosphopeptide-binding proteins, the 14-3-3 proteins are the best characterized in plants. The 14-3-3s are found as multiple isoforms in eukaryotes and have been shown to be involved in the regulation of stomatal movements. In this review, we describe the current knowledge about 14-3-3 roles in the regulation of their binding partners in guard cells: receptors, ion pumps, channels, protein kinases and some of their substrates. Regulation of these targets by 14-3-3 proteins is discussed and related to their function in guard cells during stomatal movements in response to abiotic or biotic stresses.

  19. Romidepsin targets multiple survival signaling pathways in malignant T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdez, B C; Brammer, J E; Li, Y; Murray, D; Liu, Y; Hosing, C; Nieto, Y; Champlin, R E; Andersson, B S

    2015-01-01

    Romidepsin is a cyclic molecule that inhibits histone deacetylases. It is Food and Drug Administration-approved for treatment of cutaneous and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, but its precise mechanism of action against malignant T cells is unknown. To better understand the biological effects of romidepsin in these cells, we exposed PEER and SUPT1 T-cell lines, and a primary sample from T-cell lymphoma patient (Patient J) to romidepsin. We then examined the consequences in some key oncogenic signaling pathways. Romidepsin displayed IC 50 values of 10.8, 7.9 and 7.0 nm in PEER, SUPT1 and Patient J cells, respectively. Strong inhibition of histone deacetylases and demethylases, increased production of reactive oxygen species and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential were observed, which may contribute to the observed DNA-damage response and apoptosis. The stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway and unfolded protein response in the endoplasmic reticulum were activated, whereas the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) and β-catenin pro-survival pathways were inhibited. The decreased level of β-catenin correlated with the upregulation of its inhibitor SFRP1 through romidepsin-mediated hypomethylation of its gene promoter. Our results provide new insights into how romidepsin invokes malignant T-cell killing, show evidence of its associated DNA hypomethylating activity and offer a rationale for the development of romidepsin-containing combination therapies

  20. Rescue effects in radiobiology: Unirradiated bystander cells assist irradiated cells through intercellular signal feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhao, Y. [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Han, W. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Chiu, S.K. [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Zhu, L. [Office of Admission and Careers Advisory Service, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Wu, L. [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2011-01-10

    Mammalian cells respond to ionization radiation by sending out extracellular signals to affect non-irradiated neighboring cells, which is referred to as radiation induced bystander effect. In the present paper, we described a phenomenon entitled the 'rescue effects', where the bystander cells rescued the irradiated cells through intercellular signal feedback. The effect was observed in both human primary fibroblast (NHLF) and cancer cells (HeLa) using two-cell co-culture systems. After co-culturing irradiated cells with unirradiated bystander cells for 24 h, the numbers of 53BP1 foci, corresponding to the number of DNA double-strand breaks in the irradiated cells were less than those in the irradiated cells that were not co-cultured with the bystander cells (0.78 {+-} 0.04 foci/cell vs. 0.90 {+-} 0.04 foci/cell) at a statistically significant level. Similarly, both micronucleus formation and extent of apoptosis in the irradiated cells were different at statistically significant levels if they were co-cultured with the bystander cells. Furthermore, it was found that unirradiated normal cells would also reduce the micronucleus formation in irradiated cancer cells. These results suggested that the rescue effects could participate in repairing the radiation-induced DNA damages through a media-mediated signaling feedback, thereby mitigating the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of ionizing radiation.

  1. Oxidative stress impairs insulin signal in skeletal muscle and causes insulin resistance in postinfarct heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yukihiro; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Matsushima, Shouji; Ono, Taisuke; Sobirin, Mochamad A; Inoue, Naoki; Yokota, Takashi; Hirabayashi, Kagami; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2011-05-01

    Insulin resistance has been shown to occur as a consequence of heart failure. However, its exact mechanisms in this setting remain unknown. We have previously reported that oxidative stress is enhanced in the skeletal muscle from mice with heart failure after myocardial infarction (MI) (30). This study is aimed to investigate whether insulin resistance in postinfarct heart failure is due to the impairment of insulin signaling in the skeletal muscle caused by oxidative stress. Mice were divided into four groups: sham operated (sham); sham treated with apocynin, an inhibitor of NAD(P)H oxidase activation (10 mmol/l in drinking water); MI; and MI treated with apocynin. After 4 wk, intraperitoneal insulin tolerance tests were performed, and skeletal muscle samples were obtained for insulin signaling measurements. MI mice showed left ventricular dilation and dysfunction by echocardiography and increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and lung weight. The decrease in glucose level after insulin load significantly attenuated in MI compared with sham. Insulin-stimulated serine phosphorylation of Akt and glucose transporter-4 translocation were decreased in MI mice by 61 and 23%, respectively. Apocynin ameliorated the increase in oxidative stress and NAD(P)H oxidase activities measured by the lucigenin assay in the skeletal muscle after MI. It also improved insulin resistance and inhibited the decrease of Akt phosphorylation and glucose transporter-4 translocation. Insulin resistance was induced by the direct impairment of insulin signaling in the skeletal muscle from postinfarct heart failure, which was associated with the enhanced oxidative stress via NAD(P)H oxidase.

  2. The signalling pathway which causes contraction via P2-purinoceptors in rat urinary bladder smooth muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Naramatsu, Masahiro; Yamashita, Toshikazu; Kokubun, Shinichiro

    1997-01-01

    The signalling pathway which causes contractions to adenosine 5′-O-2-thiodiphosphate (ADPβS) and α,β-methylene adenosine 5′-diphosphate (α,β-Me ADP) was investigated in rat urinary bladder smooth muscle by measuring isotonic tension.The responses to 10 μM α,β-methylene adenosine 5′-triphosphate (α,β-Me ATP) in 0 and 3.6 mM Ca2+ were 5.9±1.3 (n=10) and 122.2±6.4 (n=8) % respectively of those obtained in 1.8 mM Ca2+, whereas those to 100 μM ADPβS were 34.6±3.3 (n=8) and 96.8±7.2 (n=8) %, in 0 a...

  3. Slit/Robo1 signaling regulates neural tube development by balancing neuroepithelial cell proliferation and differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Guang; Li, Yan; Wang, Xiao-yu; Han, Zhe; Chuai, Manli; Wang, Li-jing; Ho Lee, Kenneth Ka; Geng, Jian-guo; Yang, Xuesong

    2013-01-01

    Formation of the neural tube is the morphological hallmark for development of the embryonic central nervous system (CNS). Therefore, neural tube development is a crucial step in the neurulation process. Slit/Robo signaling was initially identified as a chemo-repellent that regulated axon growth cone elongation, but its role in controlling neural tube development is currently unknown. To address this issue, we investigated Slit/Robo1 signaling in the development of chick neCollege of Life Sciences Biocentre, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, UKural tube and transgenic mice over-expressing Slit2. We disrupted Slit/Robo1 signaling by injecting R5 monoclonal antibodies into HH10 neural tubes to block the Robo1 receptor. This inhibited the normal development of the ventral body curvature and caused the spinal cord to curl up into a S-shape. Next, Slit/Robo1 signaling on one half-side of the chick embryo neural tube was disturbed by electroporation in ovo. We found that the morphology of the neural tube was dramatically abnormal after we interfered with Slit/Robo1 signaling. Furthermore, we established that silencing Robo1 inhibited cell proliferation while over-expressing Robo1 enhanced cell proliferation. We also investigated the effects of altering Slit/Robo1 expression on Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and Pax7 expression in the developing neural tube. We demonstrated that over-expressing Robo1 down-regulated Shh expression in the ventral neural tube and resulted in the production of fewer HNK-1 + migrating neural crest cells (NCCs). In addition, Robo1 over-expression enhanced Pax7 expression in the dorsal neural tube and increased the number of Slug + pre-migratory NCCs. Conversely, silencing Robo1 expression resulted in an enhanced Shh expression and more HNK-1 + migrating NCCs but reduced Pax7 expression and fewer Slug + pre-migratory NCCs were observed. In conclusion, we propose that Slit/Robo1 signaling is involved in regulating neural tube development by tightly

  4. Slit/Robo1 signaling regulates neural tube development by balancing neuroepithelial cell proliferation and differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guang; Li, Yan; Wang, Xiao-yu [Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine of The Ministry of Education, Department of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Han, Zhe [Institute of Vascular Biological Sciences, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510224 (China); Chuai, Manli [College of Life Sciences Biocentre, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH (United Kingdom); Wang, Li-jing [Institute of Vascular Biological Sciences, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510224 (China); Ho Lee, Kenneth Ka [Stem Cell and Regeneration Thematic Research Programme, School of Biomedical Sciences, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin (Hong Kong); Geng, Jian-guo, E-mail: jgeng@umich.edu [Institute of Vascular Biological Sciences, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510224 (China); Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Yang, Xuesong, E-mail: yang_xuesong@126.com [Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine of The Ministry of Education, Department of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2013-05-01

    Formation of the neural tube is the morphological hallmark for development of the embryonic central nervous system (CNS). Therefore, neural tube development is a crucial step in the neurulation process. Slit/Robo signaling was initially identified as a chemo-repellent that regulated axon growth cone elongation, but its role in controlling neural tube development is currently unknown. To address this issue, we investigated Slit/Robo1 signaling in the development of chick neCollege of Life Sciences Biocentre, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, UKural tube and transgenic mice over-expressing Slit2. We disrupted Slit/Robo1 signaling by injecting R5 monoclonal antibodies into HH10 neural tubes to block the Robo1 receptor. This inhibited the normal development of the ventral body curvature and caused the spinal cord to curl up into a S-shape. Next, Slit/Robo1 signaling on one half-side of the chick embryo neural tube was disturbed by electroporation in ovo. We found that the morphology of the neural tube was dramatically abnormal after we interfered with Slit/Robo1 signaling. Furthermore, we established that silencing Robo1 inhibited cell proliferation while over-expressing Robo1 enhanced cell proliferation. We also investigated the effects of altering Slit/Robo1 expression on Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and Pax7 expression in the developing neural tube. We demonstrated that over-expressing Robo1 down-regulated Shh expression in the ventral neural tube and resulted in the production of fewer HNK-1{sup +} migrating neural crest cells (NCCs). In addition, Robo1 over-expression enhanced Pax7 expression in the dorsal neural tube and increased the number of Slug{sup +} pre-migratory NCCs. Conversely, silencing Robo1 expression resulted in an enhanced Shh expression and more HNK-1{sup +} migrating NCCs but reduced Pax7 expression and fewer Slug{sup +} pre-migratory NCCs were observed. In conclusion, we propose that Slit/Robo1 signaling is involved in regulating neural tube

  5. Phosphorylation site dynamics of early T-cell receptor signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chylek, Lily A; Akimov, Vyacheslav; Dengjel, Jörn

    2014-01-01

    a systems-level understanding of how these components cooperate to control signaling dynamics, especially during the crucial first seconds of stimulation. Here, we used quantitative proteomics to characterize reshaping of the T-cell phosphoproteome in response to TCR/CD28 co-stimulation, and found...... that diverse dynamic patterns emerge within seconds. We detected phosphorylation dynamics as early as 5 s and observed widespread regulation of key TCR signaling proteins by 30 s. Development of a computational model pointed to the presence of novel regulatory mechanisms controlling phosphorylation of sites...

  6. Signaling through EAAT-1/GLAST in cultured Bergmann glia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Lozada, Zila; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; Aguilera, José; López-Bayghen, Esther; Ortega, Arturo

    2011-11-01

    Glutamate, the major excitatory amino acid, activates a wide variety of signal transduction cascades. Synaptic plasticity relies on activity-dependent differential protein expression. Ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors have been critically involved in long-term synaptic changes, although recent findings suggest that the electrogenic Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters, responsible of its removal from the synaptic cleft, participate in glutamate-induced signaling. Transporter proteins are expressed in neurons and glia cells albeit most of the glutamate uptake occurs in the glial compartment. Within the cerebellum, Bergmann glial cells are close to glutamatergic synapses and participate actively in the recycling of glutamate through the glutamate/glutamine shuttle. In this context, we decided to investigate a plausible role of Bergmann glia glutamate transporters as signaling entities. To this end, primary cultures of chick cerebellar Bergmann glial cells were exposed to d-aspartate (D-Asp) and other transporter ligands and the serine 2448 phosphorylation pattern of the master regulator of protein synthesis, namely the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), determined. An increase in mTOR phosphorylation and activity was detected. The signaling cascade included Ca(2+) influx, activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and protein kinase B. Furthermore, transporter signaling resulted also in an increase in activator protein-1 (AP-1) binding to DNA and the up-regulation of the transcription of an AP-1 driven gene construct. These results add a novel mediator of the glutamate effects at the translational and transcriptional levels and further strengthen the notion of the critical involvement of glia cells in synaptic function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Neuronal signaling modulates protein homeostasis in Caenorhabditis elegans post-synaptic muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Susana M; Casanueva, M Olivia; Silva, M Catarina; Amaral, Margarida D; Morimoto, Richard I

    2007-11-15

    Protein homeostasis maintains proper intracellular balance by promoting protein folding and clearance mechanisms while minimizing the stress caused by the accumulation of misfolded and damaged proteins. Chronic expression of aggregation-prone proteins is deleterious to the cell and has been linked to a wide range of conformational disorders. The molecular response to misfolded proteins is highly conserved and generally studied as a cell-autonomous process. Here, we provide evidence that neuronal signaling is an important modulator of protein homeostasis in post-synaptic muscle cells. In a forward genetic screen in Caenorhabditis elegans for enhancers of polyglutamine aggregation in muscle cells, we identified unc-30, a neuron-specific transcription factor that regulates the synthesis of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). We used additional sensors of protein conformational states to show that defective GABA signaling or increased acetylcholine (ACh) signaling causes a general imbalance in protein homeostasis in post-synaptic muscle cells. Moreover, exposure to GABA antagonists or ACh agonists has a similar effect, which reveals that toxins that act at the neuromuscular junction are potent modifiers of protein conformational disorders. These results demonstrate the importance of intercellular communication in intracellular homeostasis.

  8. An alternative pathway for signal flow from rod photoreceptors to ganglion cells in mammalian retina.

    OpenAIRE

    DeVries, S H; Baylor, D A

    1995-01-01

    Rod signals in the mammalian retina are thought to reach ganglion cells over the circuit rod-->rod depolarizing bipolar cell-->AII amacrine cell-->cone bipolar cells-->ganglion cells. A possible alternative pathway involves gap junctions linking the rods and cones, the circuit being rod-->cone-->cone bipolar cells-->ganglion cells. It is not clear whether this second pathway indeed relays rod signals to ganglion cells. We studied signal flow in the isolated rabbit retina with a multielectrode...

  9. TGFβ/Activin signalling is required for ribosome biogenesis and cell growth in Drosophila salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Torcato; Eusebio, Nadia; Correia, Andreia; Marinho, Joana; Casares, Fernando; Pereira, Paulo S

    2017-01-01

    Signalling by TGFβ superfamily factors plays an important role in tissue growth and cell proliferation. In Drosophila, the activity of the TGFβ/Activin signalling branch has been linked to the regulation of cell growth and proliferation, but the cellular and molecular basis for these functions are not fully understood. In this study, we show that both the RII receptor Punt (Put) and the R-Smad Smad2 are strongly required for cell and tissue growth. Knocking down the expression of Put or Smad2 in salivary glands causes alterations in nucleolar structure and functions. Cells with decreased TGFβ/Activin signalling accumulate intermediate pre-rRNA transcripts containing internal transcribed spacer 1 regions accompanied by the nucleolar retention of ribosomal proteins. Thus, our results show that TGFβ/Activin signalling is required for ribosomal biogenesis, a key aspect of cellular growth control. Importantly, overexpression of Put enhanced cell growth induced by Drosophila Myc, a well-characterized inducer of nucleolar hypertrophy and ribosome biogenesis. © 2017 The Authors.

  10. Vitamin D controls T cell antigen receptor signaling and activation of human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina Rode; Kongsbak-Wismann, Martin; Schjerling, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes are key signaling proteins downstream of many extracellular stimuli. Here we show that naive human T cells had very low expression of PLC-gamma1 and that this correlated with low T cell antigen receptor (TCR) responsiveness in naive T cells. However, TCR triggering...... led to an upregulation of approximately 75-fold in PLC-gamma1 expression, which correlated with greater TCR responsiveness. Induction of PLC-gamma1 was dependent on vitamin D and expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Naive T cells did not express VDR, but VDR expression was induced by TCR...... signaling via the alternative mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 pathway. Thus, initial TCR signaling via p38 leads to successive induction of VDR and PLC-gamma1, which are required for subsequent classical TCR signaling and T cell activation....

  11. Tissue-Specific Gain of RTK Signalling Uncovers Selective Cell Vulnerability during Embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannan Fan

    Full Text Available The successive events that cells experience throughout development shape their intrinsic capacity to respond and integrate RTK inputs. Cellular responses to RTKs rely on different mechanisms of regulation that establish proper levels of RTK activation, define duration of RTK action, and exert quantitative/qualitative signalling outcomes. The extent to which cells are competent to deal with fluctuations in RTK signalling is incompletely understood. Here, we employ a genetic system to enhance RTK signalling in a tissue-specific manner. The chosen RTK is the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF receptor Met, an appropriate model due to its pleiotropic requirement in distinct developmental events. Ubiquitously enhanced Met in Cre/loxP-based Rosa26(stopMet knock-in context (Del-R26(Met reveals that most tissues are capable of buffering enhanced Met-RTK signalling thus avoiding perturbation of developmental programs. Nevertheless, this ubiquitous increase of Met does compromise selected programs such as myoblast migration. Using cell-type specific Cre drivers, we genetically showed that altered myoblast migration results from ectopic Met expression in limb mesenchyme rather than in migrating myoblasts themselves. qRT-PCR analyses show that ectopic Met in limbs causes molecular changes such as downregulation in the expression levels of Notum and Syndecan4, two known regulators of morphogen gradients. Molecular and functional studies revealed that ectopic Met expression in limb mesenchyme does not alter HGF expression patterns and levels, but impairs HGF bioavailability. Together, our findings show that myoblasts, in which Met is endogenously expressed, are capable of buffering increased RTK levels, and identify mesenchymal cells as a cell type vulnerable to ectopic Met-RTK signalling. These results illustrate that embryonic cells are sensitive to alterations in the spatial distribution of RTK action, yet resilient to fluctuations in signalling levels of an

  12. A logical model provides insights into T cell receptor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Saez-Rodriguez

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Cellular decisions are determined by complex molecular interaction networks. Large-scale signaling networks are currently being reconstructed, but the kinetic parameters and quantitative data that would allow for dynamic modeling are still scarce. Therefore, computational studies based upon the structure of these networks are of great interest. Here, a methodology relying on a logical formalism is applied to the functional analysis of the complex signaling network governing the activation of T cells via the T cell receptor, the CD4/CD8 co-receptors, and the accessory signaling receptor CD28. Our large-scale Boolean model, which comprises 94 nodes and 123 interactions and is based upon well-established qualitative knowledge from primary T cells, reveals important structural features (e.g., feedback loops and network-wide dependencies and recapitulates the global behavior of this network for an array of published data on T cell activation in wild-type and knock-out conditions. More importantly, the model predicted unexpected signaling events after antibody-mediated perturbation of CD28 and after genetic knockout of the kinase Fyn that were subsequently experimentally validated. Finally, we show that the logical model reveals key elements and potential failure modes in network functioning and provides candidates for missing links. In summary, our large-scale logical model for T cell activation proved to be a promising in silico tool, and it inspires immunologists to ask new questions. We think that it holds valuable potential in foreseeing the effects of drugs and network modifications.

  13. Oxidized Extracellular DNA as a Stress Signal in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksei V. Ermakov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The term “cell-free DNA” (cfDNA was recently coined for DNA fragments from plasma/serum, while DNA present in in vitro cell culture media is known as extracellular DNA (ecDNA. Under oxidative stress conditions, the levels of oxidative modification of cellular DNA and the rate of cell death increase. Dying cells release their damaged DNA, thus, contributing oxidized DNA fragments to the pool of cfDNA/ecDNA. Oxidized cell-free DNA could serve as a stress signal that promotes irradiation-induced bystander effect. Evidence points to TLR9 as a possible candidate for oxidized DNA sensor. An exposure to oxidized ecDNA stimulates a synthesis of reactive oxygen species (ROS that evokes an adaptive response that includes transposition of the homologous loci within the nucleus, polymerization and the formation of the stress fibers of the actin, as well as activation of the ribosomal gene expression, and nuclear translocation of NF-E2 related factor-2 (NRF2 that, in turn, mediates induction of phase II detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes. In conclusion, the oxidized DNA is a stress signal released in response to oxidative stress in the cultured cells and, possibly, in the human body; in particular, it might contribute to systemic abscopal effects of localized irradiation treatments.

  14. Astrocytic Calcium Waves Signal Brain Injury to Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Kraft; Eduardo Rosales Jubal; Ruth von Laer; Claudia Döring; Adriana Rocha; Moyo Grebbin; Martin Zenke; Helmut Kettenmann; Albrecht Stroh; Stefan Momma

    2017-01-01

    Summary Brain injuries, such as stroke or trauma, induce neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) to a neurogenic response. Very little is known about the molecular cues that signal tissue damage, even over large distances, to the SVZ. Based on our analysis of gene expression patterns in the SVZ, 48?hr after an ischemic lesion caused by middle cerebral artery occlusion, we hypothesized that the presence of an injury might be transmitted by an astrocytic traveling calcium wave rather...

  15. Pi sensing and signalling: from prokaryotic to eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wanjun; Baldwin, Stephen A; Muench, Stephen P; Baker, Alison

    2016-06-15

    Phosphorus is one of the most important macronutrients and is indispensable for all organisms as a critical structural component as well as participating in intracellular signalling and energy metabolism. Sensing and signalling of phosphate (Pi) has been extensively studied and is well understood in single-cellular organisms like bacteria (Escherichia coli) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae In comparison, the mechanism of Pi regulation in plants is less well understood despite recent advances in this area. In most soils the available Pi limits crop yield, therefore a clearer understanding of the molecular basis underlying Pi sensing and signalling is of great importance for the development of plants with improved Pi use efficiency. This mini-review compares some of the main Pi regulation pathways in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and identifies similarities and differences among different organisms, as well as providing some insight into future research. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  16. Nrf2 regulates cellular behaviors and Notch signaling in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hong; Paiboonrungruan, Chorlada; Zhang, Xinyan; Prigge, Justin R; Schmidt, Edward E; Sun, Zheng; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2017-11-04

    Oxidative stress is known to play a pivotal role in the development of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We have demonstrated that activation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling pathway has chemopreventive effects against oxidative stress-associated OSCC. However, Nrf2 have dual roles in cancer development; while it prevents carcinogenesis of normal cells, hyperactive Nrf2 also promotes the survival of cancer cells. This study is aimed to understand the function of Nrf2 in regulating cellular behaviors of OSCC cells, and the potential mechanisms through which Nrf2 facilitates OSCC. We established the Nrf2-overexpressing and Nrf2-knockdown OSCC cell lines, and examined the function of Nrf2 in regulating cell proliferation, migration, invasion, cell cycle and colony formation. Our data showed that Nrf2 overexpression promoted cancer phenotypes in OSCC cells, whereas Nrf2 silencing inhibited these phenotypes. In addition, Nrf2 positively regulated Notch signaling pathway in OSCC cells in vitro. Consistent with this observation, Nrf2 activation in Keap1 -/- mice resulted in not only hyperproliferation of squamous epithelial cells in mouse tongue as evidenced by increased expression of PCNA, but also activation of Notch signaling in these cells as evidenced by increased expression of NICD1 and Hes1. In conclusion, Nrf2 regulates cancer behaviors and Notch signaling in OSCC cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hedgehog signaling establishes precursors for germline stem cell niches by regulating cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chun-Ming; Lin, Kun-Yang; Kao, Shih-Han; Chen, Yi-Ning; Huang, Fu; Hsu, Hwei-Jan

    2017-05-01

    Stem cells require different types of supporting cells, or niches, to control stem cell maintenance and differentiation. However, little is known about how those niches are formed. We report that in the development of the Drosophila melanogaster ovary, the Hedgehog (Hh) gradient sets differential cell affinity for somatic gonadal precursors to specify stromal intermingled cells, which contributes to both germline stem cell maintenance and differentiation niches in the adult. We also report that Traffic Jam (an orthologue of a large Maf transcription factor in mammals) is a novel transcriptional target of Hh signaling to control cell-cell adhesion by negative regulation of E-cadherin expression. Our results demonstrate the role of Hh signaling in niche establishment by segregating somatic cell lineages for differentiation. © 2017 Lai et al.

  18. Ikaros limits follicular B cell activation by regulating B cell receptor signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heizmann, Beate [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); Sellars, MacLean [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Macias-Garcia, Alejandra [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); Institute for Medical Engineering and Science at MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Chan, Susan, E-mail: scpk@igbmc.fr [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); Kastner, Philippe, E-mail: scpk@igbmc.fr [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); Faculté de Médecine, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France)

    2016-02-12

    The Ikaros transcription factor is essential for early B cell development, but its effect on mature B cells is debated. We show that Ikaros is required to limit the response of naive splenic B cells to B cell receptor signals. Ikaros deficient follicular B cells grow larger and enter cell cycle faster after anti-IgM stimulation. Unstimulated mutant B cells show deregulation of positive and negative regulators of signal transduction at the mRNA level, and constitutive phosphorylation of ERK, p38, SYK, BTK, AKT and LYN. Stimulation results in enhanced and prolonged ERK and p38 phosphorylation, followed by hyper-proliferation. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK and p38 abrogates the increased proliferative response of Ikaros deficient cells. These results suggest that Ikaros functions as a negative regulator of follicular B cell activation.

  19. Ikaros limits follicular B cell activation by regulating B cell receptor signaling pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heizmann, Beate; Sellars, MacLean; Macias-Garcia, Alejandra; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The Ikaros transcription factor is essential for early B cell development, but its effect on mature B cells is debated. We show that Ikaros is required to limit the response of naive splenic B cells to B cell receptor signals. Ikaros deficient follicular B cells grow larger and enter cell cycle faster after anti-IgM stimulation. Unstimulated mutant B cells show deregulation of positive and negative regulators of signal transduction at the mRNA level, and constitutive phosphorylation of ERK, p38, SYK, BTK, AKT and LYN. Stimulation results in enhanced and prolonged ERK and p38 phosphorylation, followed by hyper-proliferation. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK and p38 abrogates the increased proliferative response of Ikaros deficient cells. These results suggest that Ikaros functions as a negative regulator of follicular B cell activation.

  20. Sonic hedgehog signaling in Basal cell nevus syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athar, Mohammad; Li, Changzhao; Kim, Arianna L; Spiegelman, Vladimir S; Bickers, David R

    2014-09-15

    The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is considered to be a major signal transduction pathway during embryonic development, but it usually shuts down after birth. Aberrant Sonic hedgehog (Shh) activation during adulthood leads to neoplastic growth. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin is driven by this pathway. Here, we summarize information related to the pathogenesis of this neoplasm, discuss pathways that crosstalk with Shh signaling, and the importance of the primary cilium in this neoplastic process. The identification of the basic/translational components of Shh signaling has led to the discovery of potential mechanism-driven druggable targets and subsequent clinical trials have confirmed their remarkable efficacy in treating BCCs, particularly in patients with nevoid BCC syndrome (NBCCS), an autosomal dominant disorder in which patients inherit a germline mutation in the tumor-suppressor gene Patched (Ptch). Patients with NBCCS develop dozens to hundreds of BCCs due to derepression of the downstream G-protein-coupled receptor Smoothened (SMO). Ptch mutations permit transposition of SMO to the primary cilium followed by enhanced expression of transcription factors Glis that drive cell proliferation and tumor growth. Clinical trials with the SMO inhibitor, vismodegib, showed remarkable efficacy in patients with NBCCS, which finally led to its FDA approval in 2012. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Role of Notch signaling in cell-fate determination of human mammary stem/progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dontu, Gabriela; Jackson, Kyle W; McNicholas, Erin; Kawamura, Mari J; Abdallah, Wissam M; Wicha, Max S

    2004-01-01

    Notch signaling has been implicated in the regulation of cell-fate decisions such as self-renewal of adult stem cells and differentiation of progenitor cells along a particular lineage. Moreover, depending on the cellular and developmental context, the Notch pathway acts as a regulator of cell survival and cell proliferation. Abnormal expression of Notch receptors has been found in different types of epithelial metaplastic lesions and neoplastic lesions, suggesting that Notch may act as a proto-oncogene. The vertebrate Notch1 and Notch4 homologs are involved in normal development of the mammary gland, and mutated forms of these genes are associated with development of mouse mammary tumors. In order to determine the role of Notch signaling in mammary cell-fate determination, we have utilized a newly described in vitro system in which mammary stem/progenitor cells can be cultured in suspension as nonadherent 'mammospheres'. Notch signaling was activated using exogenous ligands, or was inhibited using previously characterized Notch signaling antagonists. Utilizing this system, we demonstrate that Notch signaling can act on mammary stem cells to promote self-renewal and on early progenitor cells to promote their proliferation, as demonstrated by a 10-fold increase in secondary mammosphere formation upon addition of a Notch-activating DSL peptide. In addition to acting on stem cells, Notch signaling is also able to act on multipotent progenitor cells, facilitating myoepithelial lineage-specific commitment and proliferation. Stimulation of this pathway also promotes branching morphogenesis in three-dimensional Matrigel cultures. These effects are completely inhibited by a Notch4 blocking antibody or a gamma secretase inhibitor that blocks Notch processing. In contrast to the effects of Notch signaling on mammary stem/progenitor cells, modulation of this pathway has no discernable effect on fully committed, differentiated, mammary epithelial cells. These studies

  2. Interferon-γ affects leukemia cell apoptosis through regulating Fas/FasL signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, H-L; Li, C-J; Hou, X-F; Zhang, H; Wu, Z-H; Wang, J

    2017-05-01

    Imbalance of hematopoietic cell proliferation and apoptosis is one of the major causes of leukemia. Enhanced cell proliferation and reduced apoptosis lead to hemocytes accumulation. Fas/FasL signaling pathway promotes cell apoptosis. This study investigated the impact of interferon γ (IFN-γ) on chronic myelogenous leukemia cell proliferation and apoptosis to elucidate its interaction with Fas/FasL signaling pathway. Leukemia K562 cells were routinely cultivated and treated with 10 U/ml, 100 U/ml, and 1000 U/ml interferon for 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h, respectively. MTT assay was applied to test cell proliferation. TUNEL assay was adopted to determine cell apoptosis. Western blot was selected to detect Fas/FasL expression. Different concentrations of IFN-γ inhibited cell proliferation at various time points. IFN-γ at 1000 U/ml treatment for 48 h exhibited the strongest suppressive effect on cell proliferation (p facilitating Fas and FasL proteins expressions.

  3. Lipid-Induced Signaling Causes Release of Inflammatory Extracellular Vesicles From Hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsova, Petra; Ibrahim, Samar H; Krishnan, Anuradha; Verma, Vikas K; Bronk, Steven F; Werneburg, Nathan W; Charlton, Michael R; Shah, Vijay H; Malhi, Harmeet; Gores, Gregory J

    2016-04-01

    Hepatocyte cellular dysfunction and death induced by lipids and macrophage-associated inflammation are characteristics of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The fatty acid palmitate can activate death receptor 5 (DR5) on hepatocytes, leading to their death, but little is known about how this process contributes to macrophage-associated inflammation. We investigated whether lipid-induced DR5 signaling results in the release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) from hepatocytes, and whether these can induce an inflammatory macrophage phenotype. Primary mouse and human hepatocytes and Huh7 cells were incubated with palmitate, its metabolite lysophosphatidylcholine, or diluent (control). The released EV were isolated, characterized, quantified, and applied to macrophages. C57BL/6 mice were placed on chow or a diet high in fat, fructose, and cholesterol to induce NASH. Some mice also were given the ROCK1 inhibitor fasudil; 2 weeks later, serum EVs were isolated and characterized by immunoblot and nanoparticle-tracking analyses. Livers were collected and analyzed by histology, immunohistochemistry, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Incubation of primary hepatocytes and Huh7 cells with palmitate or lysophosphatidylcholine increased their release of EVs, compared with control cells. This release was reduced by inactivating mediators of the DR5 signaling pathway or rho-associated, coiled-coil-containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1) inhibition. Hepatocyte-derived EVs contained tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand and induced expression of interleukin 1β and interleukin 6 messenger RNAs in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. Activation of macrophages required DR5 and receptor-interacting protein kinase 1. Administration of the ROCK1 inhibitor fasudil to mice with NASH reduced serum levels of EVs; this reduction was associated with decreased liver injury, inflammation, and fibrosis. Lipids, which stimulate DR5, induce release of hepatocyte EVs, which

  4. Sensors and signal transduction pathways in vertebrate cell volume regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else K; Pedersen, Stine F

    2006-01-01

    to the identification of transporter binding partners such as protein kinases and phosphatases, cytoskeletal elements and lipids. Considerable progress has also been made recently in understanding the upstream elements in volume sensing and volume-sensitive signal transduction, and salient features of these systems...... will be discussed. In contrast to the simple pathway of osmosensing in yeast, cells from vertebrate organisms appear to exhibit multiple volume sensing systems, the specific mechanism(s) activated being cell type- and stimulus-dependent. Candidate sensors include integrins and growth factor receptors, while other...

  5. Cell volume homeostatic mechanisms: effectors and signalling pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, E K; Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig

    2011-01-01

    Cell volume homeostasis and its fine-tuning to the specific physiological context at any given moment are processes fundamental to normal cell function. The understanding of cell volume regulation owes much to August Krogh, yet has advanced greatly over the last decades. In this review, we outline...... the historical context of studies of cell volume regulation, focusing on the lineage started by Krogh, Bodil Schmidt-Nielsen, Hans-Henrik Ussing, and their students. The early work was focused on understanding the functional behaviour, kinetics and thermodynamics of the volume-regulatory ion transport mechanisms....... Later work addressed the mechanisms through which cellular signalling pathways regulate the volume regulatory effectors or flux pathways. These studies were facilitated by the molecular identification of most of the relevant channels and transporters, and more recently also by the increased...

  6. Retinoic acid signalling in thymocytes regulates T cell development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendland, Kerstin; Sitnik, Katarzyna Maria; Kotarsky, Knut

    The Vitamin A derivative retinoic acid (RA) works as a ligand for a family of nuclearRA receptors (RARα, RARβ and RARγ) which form heterodimers with retinoid Xreceptors (RXR). These complexes function as ligand-activated transcription factors,recognizing specific RA responsive elements in the reg......The Vitamin A derivative retinoic acid (RA) works as a ligand for a family of nuclearRA receptors (RARα, RARβ and RARγ) which form heterodimers with retinoid Xreceptors (RXR). These complexes function as ligand-activated transcription factors,recognizing specific RA responsive elements...... in the regulatory regions of targetgenes. RA has been reported to play a direct role in regulating multiple aspects of peripheralT cell responses1, but whether endogenous RA signalling occurs in developingthymocytes and the potential impact of such signals in regulating T cell developmentremains unclear. To address......RARα. This blocks RA signalling in developing thymocytes from the DN3/4 stageonwards and thus allows us to study the role of RA in T cell development...

  7. Sprouty2 controls proliferation of palate mesenchymal cells via fibroblast growth factor signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Kaori [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Taketomi, Takaharu, E-mail: taketomi@dent.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yoshizaki, Keigo [Section of Orthodontics, Division of Oral Health, Growth and Development, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Arai, Shinsaku [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Sanui, Terukazu [Section of Periodontology, Division of Oral Rehabilitation, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yoshiga, Daigo [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yoshimura, Akihiko [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), CREST, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Nakamura, Seiji [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: {yields} Sprouty2-deficient mice exhibit cleft palate as a result of failure of palatal shelf elevation. {yields} We examined palate cell proliferation in Sprouty2-deficient mice. {yields} Palate mesenchymal cell proliferation was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice. {yields} Sprouty2 plays roles in murine palatogenesis by regulating cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Cleft palate is one of the most common craniofacial deformities. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) plays a central role in reciprocal interactions between adjacent tissues during palatal development, and the FGF signaling pathway has been shown to be inhibited by members of the Sprouty protein family. In this study, we report the incidence of cleft palate, possibly caused by failure of palatal shelf elevation, in Sprouty2-deficient (KO) mice. Sprouty2-deficient palates fused completely in palatal organ culture. However, palate mesenchymal cell proliferation estimated by Ki-67 staining was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice compared with WT mice. Sprouty2-null palates expressed higher levels of FGF target genes, such as Msx1, Etv5, and Ptx1 than WT controls. Furthermore, proliferation and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activation in response to FGF was enhanced in palate mesenchymal cells transfected with Sprouty2 small interfering RNA. These results suggest that Sprouty2 regulates palate mesenchymal cell proliferation via FGF signaling and is involved in palatal shelf elevation.

  8. Sprouty2 controls proliferation of palate mesenchymal cells via fibroblast growth factor signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Kaori; Taketomi, Takaharu; Yoshizaki, Keigo; Arai, Shinsaku; Sanui, Terukazu; Yoshiga, Daigo; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Nakamura, Seiji

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Sprouty2-deficient mice exhibit cleft palate as a result of failure of palatal shelf elevation. → We examined palate cell proliferation in Sprouty2-deficient mice. → Palate mesenchymal cell proliferation was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice. → Sprouty2 plays roles in murine palatogenesis by regulating cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Cleft palate is one of the most common craniofacial deformities. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) plays a central role in reciprocal interactions between adjacent tissues during palatal development, and the FGF signaling pathway has been shown to be inhibited by members of the Sprouty protein family. In this study, we report the incidence of cleft palate, possibly caused by failure of palatal shelf elevation, in Sprouty2-deficient (KO) mice. Sprouty2-deficient palates fused completely in palatal organ culture. However, palate mesenchymal cell proliferation estimated by Ki-67 staining was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice compared with WT mice. Sprouty2-null palates expressed higher levels of FGF target genes, such as Msx1, Etv5, and Ptx1 than WT controls. Furthermore, proliferation and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activation in response to FGF was enhanced in palate mesenchymal cells transfected with Sprouty2 small interfering RNA. These results suggest that Sprouty2 regulates palate mesenchymal cell proliferation via FGF signaling and is involved in palatal shelf elevation.

  9. Constitutive activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase predisposes diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines to CD40-mediated cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollmann, C Annette; Owens, Trevor; Nalbantoglu, Josephine

    2006-01-01

    , including LCK and VAV. In addition, CD40-sensitive DLBCL cell lines also displayed constitutive activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and failed to undergo apoptosis when ERK phosphorylation was inhibited. In contrast, CD40-resistant lines showed no constitutive activation of ERK......CD40 promotes survival, proliferation, and differentiation of normal B cells but can cause activation-induced cell death in malignant B lymphocytes. CD40 ligand and anti-CD40 antibodies have been used successfully to induce apoptosis in lymphoma lines both in vitro and in xenograft tumor models....... Although this makes CD40 an attractive target for antitumor therapies, the response of malignant B cells to CD40 signaling is variable, and CD40 stimulation can enhance proliferation and can increase chemoresistance in some cell lines. It would therefore be useful to identify markers that predict whether...

  10. Direct Cytoskeleton Forces Cause Membrane Softening in Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-García, Ruddi; López-Montero, Iván; Mell, Michael; Egea, Gustavo; Gov, Nir S.; Monroy, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Erythrocytes are flexible cells specialized in the systemic transport of oxygen in vertebrates. This physiological function is connected to their outstanding ability to deform in passing through narrow capillaries. In recent years, there has been an influx of experimental evidence of enhanced cell-shape fluctuations related to metabolically driven activity of the erythroid membrane skeleton. However, no direct observation of the active cytoskeleton forces has yet been reported to our knowledge. Here, we show experimental evidence of the presence of temporally correlated forces superposed over the thermal fluctuations of the erythrocyte membrane. These forces are ATP-dependent and drive enhanced flickering motions in human erythrocytes. Theoretical analyses provide support for a direct force exerted on the membrane by the cytoskeleton nodes as pulses of well-defined average duration. In addition, such metabolically regulated active forces cause global membrane softening, a mechanical attribute related to the functional erythroid deformability. PMID:26083919

  11. Induction of primordial germ cell-like cells from mouse embryonic stem cells by ERK signal inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Tohru; Kaga, Yoshiaki; Ohta, Hiroshi; Odamoto, Mika; Sekita, Yoichi; Li, Kunpeng; Yamano, Noriko; Fujikawa, Keita; Isotani, Ayako; Sasaki, Norihiko; Toyoda, Masashi; Hayashi, Katsuhiko; Okabe, Masaru; Shinohara, Takashi; Saitou, Mitinori; Nakano, Toru

    2014-10-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are embryonic germ cell precursors. Specification of PGCs occurs under the influence of mesodermal induction signaling during in vivo gastrulation. Although bone morphogenetic proteins and Wnt signaling play pivotal roles in both mesodermal and PGC specification, the signal regulating PGC specification remains unknown. Coculture of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) with OP9 feeder cells induces mesodermal differentiation in vitro. Using this mesodermal differentiation system, we demonstrated that PGC-like cells were efficiently induced from mouse ESCs by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling inhibition. Inhibition of ERK signaling by a MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor upregulated germ cell marker genes but downregulated mesodermal genes. In addition, the PGC-like cells showed downregulation of DNA methylation and formed pluripotent stem cell colonies upon treatment with retinoic acid. These results show that inhibition of ERK signaling suppresses mesodermal differentiation but activates germline differentiation program in this mesodermal differentiation system. Our findings provide a new insight into the signaling networks regulating PGC specification. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  12. Selective killing of cancer cells by Ashwagandha leaf extract and its component Withanone involves ROS signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nashi Widodo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Ashwagandha is a popular Ayurvedic herb used in Indian traditional home medicine. It has been assigned a variety of health-promoting effects of which the mechanisms remain unknown. We previously reported the selective killing of cancer cells by leaf extract of Ashwagandha (i-Extract and its purified component Withanone. In the present study, we investigated its mechanism by loss-of-function screening (abrogation of i-Extract induced cancer cell killing of the cellular targets and gene pathways. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Randomized ribozyme library was introduced into cancer cells prior to the treatment with i-Extract. Ribozymes were recovered from cells that survived the i-Extract treatment. Gene targets of the selected ribozymes (as predicted by database search were analyzed by bioinformatics and pathway analyses. The targets were validated for their role in i-Extract induced selective killing of cancer cells by biochemical and molecular assays. Fifteen gene-targets were identified and were investigated for their role in specific cancer cell killing activity of i-Extract and its two major components (Withaferin A and Withanone by undertaking the shRNA-mediated gene silencing approach. Bioinformatics on the selected gene-targets revealed the involvement of p53, apoptosis and insulin/IGF signaling pathways linked to the ROS signaling. We examined the involvement of ROS-signaling components (ROS levels, DNA damage, mitochondrial structure and membrane potential and demonstrate that the selective killing of cancer cells is mediated by induction of oxidative stress. CONCLUSION: Ashwagandha leaf extract and Withanone cause selective killing of cancer cells by induction of ROS-signaling and hence are potential reagents that could be recruited for ROS-mediated cancer chemotherapy.

  13. Alteration of canonical and non-canonical WNT-signaling by crystalline silica in human lung epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, Timothy N.; Dentener, Mieke A.; Stassen, Frank R.; Rohde, Gernot G.; Mossman, Brooke T.; Wouters, Emiel F.M.; Reynaert, Niki L.

    2016-01-01

    Growth and development of the mature lung is a complex process orchestrated by a number of intricate developmental signaling pathways. Wingless-type MMTV-integration site (WNT) signaling plays critical roles in controlling branching morphogenesis cell differentiation, and formation of the conducting and respiratory airways. In addition, WNT pathways are often re-activated in mature lungs during repair and regeneration. WNT- signaling has been elucidated as a crucial contributor to the development of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis as well as other hyper-proliferative lung diseases. Silicosis, a detrimental occupational lung disease caused by excessive inhalation of crystalline silica dust, is hallmarked by repeated cycles of damaging inflammation, epithelial hyperplasia, and formation of dense, hyalinized nodules of whorled collagen. However, mechanisms of epithelial cell hyperplasia and matrix deposition are not well understood, as most research efforts have focused on the pronounced inflammatory response. Microarray data from our previous studies has revealed a number of WNT-signaling and WNT-target genes altered by crystalline silica in human lung epithelial cells. In the present study, we utilize pathway analysis to designate connections between genes altered by silica in WNT-signaling networks. Furthermore, we confirm microarray findings by QRT-PCR and demonstrate both activation of canonical (β-catenin) and down-regulation of non-canonical (WNT5A) signaling in immortalized (BEAS-2B) and primary (PBEC) human bronchial epithelial cells. These findings suggest that WNT-signaling and cross-talk with other pathways (e.g. Notch), may contribute to proliferative, fibrogenic and inflammatory responses to silica in lung epithelial cells. - Highlights: • Pathway analysis reveals silica-induced WNT-signaling in lung epithelial cells. • Silica-induced canonical WNT-signaling is mediated by autocrine/paracrine signals. • Crystalline silica decreases non-canonical WNT

  14. Low Expression of CAPON in Glioma Contributes to Cell Proliferation via the Akt Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangfeng Gao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available CAPON is an adapter protein for nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1. CAPON has two isoforms in the human brain: CAPON-L (long form of CAPON and CAPON-S (short form of CAPON. Recent studies have indicated the involvement of CAPON in tumorigenesis beyond its classical role in NOS1 activity regulation. In this study, we found that the protein levels of CAPON-S, but not than CAPON-L, were significantly decreased in glioma tissues. Therefore, we established lentivirus-mediated stable cell lines with CAPON-S overexpression or down-regulation, and investigated the role of CAPON-S in the proliferation of glioma cells by using CCK8, EdU, and flow cytometry assays. Overexpression of CAPON-S reduced the cell variability and the percentage of EdU-positive cells, and arrested the cells in the G1 phase in glioma cells. Silencing of CAPON by short-hairpin RNA showed the opposite effects. Furthermore, an intracellular signaling array revealed that overexpression of CAPON-S resulted in a remarkable reduction in the phosphorylation of Akt and S6 ribosomal protein in glioma cells, which was further confirmed by Western blot. These findings suggest that CAPON may function as a tumor suppressor in human brain glioma and that the inactivation of the Akt signaling pathway caused by CAPON-S overexpression may provide insight into the underlying mechanism of CAPON in glioma cell proliferation.

  15. UV light blocks EGFR signalling in human cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, BB; Neves-Petersen, M T; Klitgaard, S

    2007-01-01

    antibodies. There was a threshold level, below which the receptor could not be blocked. In addition, illumination caused the cells to upregulate the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1, irrespective of the p53 status. Since the EGF receptor is often overexpressed in cancers and other proliferative skin...

  16. Purinergic Signaling in Mast Cell Degranulation and Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan-Guo Gao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are responsible for the majority of allergic conditions. It was originally thought that almost all allergic events were mediated directly only via the high-affinity immunoglobulin E receptors. However, recent evidence showed that many other receptors, such as G protein-coupled receptors and ligand-gated ion channels, are also directly involved in mast cell degranulation, the release of inflammatory mediators such as histamine, serine proteases, leukotrienes, heparin, and serotonin. These mediators are responsible for the symptoms in allergic conditions such as allergic asthma. In recent years, it has been realized that purinergic signaling, induced via the activation of G protein-coupled adenosine receptors and P2Y nucleotide receptors, as well as by ATP-gated P2X receptors, plays a significant role in mast cell degranulation. Both adenosine and ATP can induce degranulation and bronchoconstriction on their own and synergistically with allergens. All three classes of receptors, adenosine, P2X and P2Y are involved in tracheal mucus secretion. This review will summarize the currently available knowledge on the role of purinergic signaling in mast cell degranulation and its most relevant disease, asthma.

  17. Endothelial juxtaposition of distinct adult stem cells activates angiogenesis signaling molecules in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Elham; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Siavashi, Vahid; Araghi, Atefeh

    2015-12-01

    Efficacy of therapeutic angiogenesis needs a comprehensive understanding of endothelial cell (EC) function and biological factors and cells that interplay with ECs. Stem cells are considered the key components of pro- and anti-angiogenic milieu in a wide variety of physiopathological states, and interactions of EC-stem cells have been the subject of controversy in recent years. In this study, the potential effects of three tissue-specific adult stem cells, namely rat marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs), rat adipose-derived stem cells (rADSCs) and rat muscle-derived satellite cells (rSCs), on the endothelial activation of key angiogenic signaling molecules, including VEGF, Ang-2, VEGFR-2, Tie-2, and Tie2-pho, were investigated. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and rat lung microvascular endothelial cells (RLMECs) were cocultured with the stem cells or incubated with the stem cell-derived conditioned media on Matrigel. Following HUVEC-stem cell coculture, CD31-positive ECs were flow sorted and subjected to western blotting to analyze potential changes in the expression of the pro-angiogenic signaling molecules. Elongation and co-alignment of the stem cells were seen along the EC tubes in the EC-stem cell cocultures on Matrigel, with cell-to-cell dye communication in the EC-rBMSC cocultures. Moreover, rBMSCs and rADSCs significantly improved endothelial tubulogenesis in both juxtacrine and paracrine manners. These two latter stem cells dynamically up-regulated VEGF, Ang-2, VREGR-2, and Tie-2 but down-regulated Tie2-pho and the Tie2-pho/Tie-2 ratio in HUVECs. Induction of pro-angiogenic signaling in ECs by marrow- and adipose-derived MSCs further indicates the significance of stem cell milieu in angiogenesis dynamics.

  18. Role of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on TGF-?1 signaling pathway in epithelial ovarian cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kohan-Ivani, Karla; Gabler, Fernando; Selman, Alberto; Vega, Margarita; Romero, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose One of the hypotheses regarding the genesis of epithelial ovarian cancer involves the action of androgens on the proliferation of epithelial ovarian cells, as well as inclusion cysts. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether DHT causes changes in the TGF-?1 pathway that might modify the anti-proliferative effect of the latter. Methods The levels of TGF-?1 protein, of its receptors (TGFBR1 and TGFBR2), of Smad2/3 (canonical signaling pathway protein) and of p21 (cell cy...

  19. A Mutant Isoform of ObgE Causes Cell Death by Interfering with Cell Division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liselot Dewachter

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell division is a vital part of the cell cycle that is fundamental to all life. Despite decades of intense investigation, this process is still incompletely understood. Previously, the essential GTPase ObgE, which plays a role in a myriad of basic cellular processes (such as initiation of DNA replication, chromosome segregation, and ribosome assembly, was proposed to act as a cell cycle checkpoint in Escherichia coli by licensing chromosome segregation. We here describe the effect of a mutant isoform of ObgE (ObgE∗ that causes cell death by irreversible arrest of the cell cycle at the stage of cell division. Notably, chromosome segregation is allowed to proceed normally in the presence of ObgE∗, after which cell division is blocked. Under conditions of rapid growth, ongoing cell cycles are completed before cell cycle arrest by ObgE∗ becomes effective. However, cell division defects caused by ObgE∗ then elicit lysis through formation of membrane blebs at aberrant division sites. Based on our results, and because ObgE was previously implicated in cell cycle regulation, we hypothesize that the mutation in ObgE∗ disrupts the normal role of ObgE in cell division. We discuss how ObgE∗ could reveal more about the intricate role of wild-type ObgE in division and cell cycle control. Moreover, since Obg is widely conserved and essential for viability, also in eukaryotes, our findings might be applicable to other organisms as well.

  20. PARP inhibition causes premature loss of cohesion in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukolj, Eva; Kaufmann, Tanja; Dick, Amalie E; Zeillinger, Robert; Gerlich, Daniel W; Slade, Dea

    2017-11-28

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) regulate various aspects of cellular function including mitotic progression. Although PARP inhibitors have been undergoing various clinical trials and the PARP1/2 inhibitor olaparib was approved as monotherapy for BRCA-mutated ovarian cancer, their mode of action in killing tumour cells is not fully understood. We investigated the effect of PARP inhibition on mitosis in cancerous (cervical, ovary, breast and osteosarcoma) and non-cancerous cells by live-cell imaging. The clinically relevant inhibitor olaparib induced strong perturbations in mitosis, including problems with chromosome alignment at the metaphase plate, anaphase delay, and premature loss of cohesion (cohesion fatigue) after a prolonged metaphase arrest, resulting in sister chromatid scattering. PARP1 and PARP2 depletion suppressed the phenotype while PARP2 overexpression enhanced it, suggesting that olaparib-bound PARP1 and PARP2 rather than the lack of catalytic activity causes this phenotype. Olaparib-induced mitotic chromatid scattering was observed in various cancer cell lines with increased protein levels of PARP1 and PARP2, but not in non-cancer or cancer cell lines that expressed lower levels of PARP1 or PARP2. Interestingly, the sister chromatid scattering phenotype occurred only when olaparib was added during the S-phase preceding mitosis, suggesting that PARP1 and PARP2 entrapment at replication forks impairs sister chromatid cohesion. Clinically relevant DNA-damaging agents that impair replication progression such as topoisomerase inhibitors and cisplatin were also found to induce sister chromatid scattering and metaphase plate alignment problems, suggesting that these mitotic phenotypes are a common outcome of replication perturbation.

  1. Interleukin 4: signalling mechanisms and control of T cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, W E

    1997-01-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4) is a pleiotropic type I cytokine that controls both growth and differentiation among haemopoietic and non-haemopoietic cells. Its receptor is a heterodimer. One chain, the IL-4R alpha chain, binds IL-4 with high affinity and determines the nature of the biochemical signals that are induced. The second chain, gamma c, is required for the induction of such signals. IL-4-mediated growth depends upon activation events that involve phosphorylation of Y497 of IL-4R alpha, leading to the binding and phosphorylation of 4PS/IRS-2 in haemopoietic cells and of IRS-1 in non-haemopoietic cells. By contrast, IL-4-mediated differentiation events depend upon more distal regions of the IL-4R alpha chain that include a series of STAT-6 binding sites. The distinctive roles of these receptor domains was verified by receptor-reconstruction experiments. The 'growth' and 'differentiation' domains of the IL-4R alpha chain, independently expressed as chimeric structures with a truncated version of the IL-2R beta chain, were shown to convey their functions to the hybrid receptor. The critical role of STAT-6 in IL-4-mediated gene activation and differentiation was made clear by the finding that lymphocytes from STAT-6 knockout mice are strikingly deficient in these functions but have retained the capacity to grow, at least partially, in response to IL-4. IL-4 plays a central role in determining the phenotype of naive CD4+ T cells. In the presence of IL-4, newly primed naive T cells develop into IL-4 producers while in its absence they preferentially become gamma-interferon (IFN-gamma) producers. Recently, a specialized subpopulation of T cells, CD4+/NK1.1+ cells, has been shown to produce large amounts of IL-4 upon stimulation. Two examples of mice with deficiencies in these cells are described--beta 2-microglobulin knockout mice and SJL mice. Both show defects in the development of IL-4-producing cells and in the increase in serum IgE in response to stimulation with the

  2. Arsenic inhibits hedgehog signaling during P19 cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jui Tung [Environmental Toxicology Program, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Bain, Lisa J., E-mail: lbain@clemson.edu [Environmental Toxicology Program, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Arsenic is a toxicant found in ground water around the world, and human exposure mainly comes from drinking water or from crops grown in areas containing arsenic in soils or water. Epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic exposure during development decreased intellectual function, reduced birth weight, and altered locomotor activity, while in vitro studies have shown that arsenite decreased muscle and neuronal cell differentiation. The sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway plays an important role during the differentiation of both neurons and skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether arsenic can disrupt Shh signaling in P19 mouse embryonic stem cells, leading to changes muscle and neuronal cell differentiation. P19 embryonic stem cells were exposed to 0, 0.25, or 0.5 μM of sodium arsenite for up to 9 days during cell differentiation. We found that arsenite exposure significantly reduced transcript levels of genes in the Shh pathway in both a time and dose-dependent manner. This included the Shh ligand, which was decreased 2- to 3-fold, the Gli2 transcription factor, which was decreased 2- to 3-fold, and its downstream target gene Ascl1, which was decreased 5-fold. GLI2 protein levels and transcriptional activity were also reduced. However, arsenic did not alter GLI2 primary cilium accumulation or nuclear translocation. Moreover, additional extracellular SHH rescued the inhibitory effects of arsenic on cellular differentiation due to an increase in GLI binding activity. Taken together, we conclude that arsenic exposure affected Shh signaling, ultimately decreasing the expression of the Gli2 transcription factor. These results suggest a mechanism by which arsenic disrupts cell differentiation. - Highlights: • Arsenic exposure decreases sonic hedgehog pathway-related gene expression. • Arsenic decreases GLI2 protein levels and transcriptional activity in P19 cells. • Arsenic exposure does not alter the levels of SHH

  3. Cell-geometry-dependent changes in plasma membrane order direct stem cell signalling and fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Erlach, Thomas C; Bertazzo, Sergio; Wozniak, Michele A; Horejs, Christine-Maria; Maynard, Stephanie A; Attwood, Simon; Robinson, Benjamin K; Autefage, Hélène; Kallepitis, Charalambos; Del Río Hernández, Armando; Chen, Christopher S; Goldoni, Silvia; Stevens, Molly M

    2018-03-01

    Cell size and shape affect cellular processes such as cell survival, growth and differentiation 1-4 , thus establishing cell geometry as a fundamental regulator of cell physiology. The contributions of the cytoskeleton, specifically actomyosin tension, to these effects have been described, but the exact biophysical mechanisms that translate changes in cell geometry to changes in cell behaviour remain mostly unresolved. Using a variety of innovative materials techniques, we demonstrate that the nanostructure and lipid assembly within the cell plasma membrane are regulated by cell geometry in a ligand-independent manner. These biophysical changes trigger signalling events involving the serine/threonine kinase Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) that direct cell-geometry-dependent mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. Our study defines a central regulatory role by plasma membrane ordered lipid raft microdomains in modulating stem cell differentiation with potential translational applications.

  4. Disruption of canonical TGFβ-signaling in murine coronary progenitor cells by low level arsenic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, Patrick; Huang, Tianfang; Broka, Derrick; Parker, Patti [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology College of Pharmacy, Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center, Steele Children' s Research Center and Bio5 Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Barnett, Joey V. [Department of Pharmacology, Vanderbilt Medical University, Nashville, TN (United States); Camenisch, Todd D., E-mail: camenisch@pharmacy.arizona.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology College of Pharmacy, Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center, Steele Children' s Research Center and Bio5 Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Exposure to arsenic results in several types of cancers as well as heart disease. A major contributor to ischemic heart pathologies is coronary artery disease, however the influences by environmental arsenic in this disease process are not known. Similarly, the impact of toxicants on blood vessel formation and function during development has not been studied. During embryogenesis, the epicardium undergoes proliferation, migration, and differentiation into several cardiac cell types including smooth muscle cells which contribute to the coronary vessels. The TGFβ family of ligands and receptors is essential for developmental cardiac epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and differentiation into coronary smooth muscle cells. In this in vitro study, 18 hour exposure to 1.34 μM arsenite disrupted developmental EMT programming in murine epicardial cells causing a deficit in cardiac mesenchyme. The expression of EMT genes including TGFβ2, TGFβ receptor-3, Snail, and Has-2 are decreased in a dose-dependent manner following exposure to arsenite. TGFβ2 cell signaling is abrogated as detected by decreases in phosphorylated Smad2/3 when cells are exposed to 1.34 μM arsenite. There is also loss of nuclear accumulation pSmad due to arsenite exposure. These observations coincide with a decrease in vimentin positive mesenchymal cells invading three-dimensional collagen gels. However, arsenite does not block TGFβ2 mediated smooth muscle cell differentiation by epicardial cells. Overall these results show that arsenic exposure blocks developmental EMT gene programming in murine coronary progenitor cells by disrupting TGFβ2 signals and Smad activation, and that smooth muscle cell differentiation is refractory to this arsenic toxicity. - Highlights: • Arsenic blocks TGFβ2 induced expression of EMT genes. • Arsenic blocks TGFβ2 triggered Smad2/3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. • Arsenic blocks epicardial cell differentiation into cardiac mesenchyme.

  5. UV light blocks EGFR signalling in human cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, BB; Neves-Petersen, M T; Klitgaard, S

    2007-01-01

    UV light excites aromatic residues, causing these to disrupt nearby disulphide bridges. The EGF receptor is rich in aromatic residues near the disulphide bridges. Herein we show that laser-pulsed UV illumination of two different skin-derived cancer cell lines i.e. Cal-39 and A431, which both...... antibodies. There was a threshold level, below which the receptor could not be blocked. In addition, illumination caused the cells to upregulate the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1, irrespective of the p53 status. Since the EGF receptor is often overexpressed in cancers and other proliferative skin...... disorders, it might be possible to significantly reduce the proliferative potential of these cells making them good targets for laser-pulsed UV light treatment....

  6. Bactericidal Antibiotics Increase Hydroxyphenyl Fluorescein Signal by Altering Cell Morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulander, Wilhelm; Wang, Ying; Folkesson, Sven Anders

    2014-01-01

    It was recently proposed that for bactericidal antibiotics a common killing mechanism contributes to lethality involving indirect stimulation of hydroxyl radical (OH center dot) formation. Flow cytometric detection of OH center dot by hydroxyphenyl fluorescein (HPF) probe oxidation was used...... to support this hypothesis. Here we show that increased HPF signals in antibiotics-exposed bacterial cells are explained by fluorescence associated with increased cell size, and do not reflect reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration. Independently of antibiotics, increased fluorescence was seen...... for elongated cells expressing the oxidative insensitive green fluorescent protein (GFP). Although our data question the role of ROS in lethality of antibiotics other research approaches point to important interplays between basic bacterial metabolism and antibiotic susceptibility. To underpin...

  7. Bactericidal antibiotics increase hydroxyphenyl fluorescein signal by altering cell morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelm Paulander

    Full Text Available It was recently proposed that for bactericidal antibiotics a common killing mechanism contributes to lethality involving indirect stimulation of hydroxyl radical (OH• formation. Flow cytometric detection of OH• by hydroxyphenyl fluorescein (HPF probe oxidation was used to support this hypothesis. Here we show that increased HPF signals in antibiotics-exposed bacterial cells are explained by fluorescence associated with increased cell size, and do not reflect reactive oxygen species (ROS concentration. Independently of antibiotics, increased fluorescence was seen for elongated cells expressing the oxidative insensitive green fluorescent protein (GFP. Although our data question the role of ROS in lethality of antibiotics other research approaches point to important interplays between basic bacterial metabolism and antibiotic susceptibility. To underpin such relationships, methods for detecting bacterial metabolites at a cellular level are needed.

  8. Bactericidal Antibiotics Increase Hydroxyphenyl Fluorescein Signal by Altering Cell Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkesson, Anders; Charbon, Godefroid; Løbner-Olesen, Anders; Ingmer, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    It was recently proposed that for bactericidal antibiotics a common killing mechanism contributes to lethality involving indirect stimulation of hydroxyl radical (OH•) formation. Flow cytometric detection of OH• by hydroxyphenyl fluorescein (HPF) probe oxidation was used to support this hypothesis. Here we show that increased HPF signals in antibiotics-exposed bacterial cells are explained by fluorescence associated with increased cell size, and do not reflect reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration. Independently of antibiotics, increased fluorescence was seen for elongated cells expressing the oxidative insensitive green fluorescent protein (GFP). Although our data question the role of ROS in lethality of antibiotics other research approaches point to important interplays between basic bacterial metabolism and antibiotic susceptibility. To underpin such relationships, methods for detecting bacterial metabolites at a cellular level are needed. PMID:24647480

  9. Protein and signaling networks in vertebrate photoreceptor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-Wilhelm eKoch

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate photoreceptor cells are exquisite light detectors operating under very dim and bright illumination. The photoexcitation and adaptation machinery in photoreceptor cells consists of protein complexes that can form highly ordered supramolecular structures and control the homeostasis and mutual dependence of the secondary messengers cGMP and Ca2+. The visual pigment in rod photoreceptors, the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin is organized in tracks of dimers thereby providing a signaling platform for the dynamic scaffolding of the G protein transducin. Illuminated rhodopsin is turned off by phosphorylation catalyzed by rhodopsin kinase GRK1 under control of Ca2+-recoverin. The GRK1 protein complex partly assembles in lipid raft structures, where shutting off rhodopsin seems to be more effective. Re-synthesis of cGMP is another crucial step in the recovery of the photoresponse after illumination. It is catalyzed by membrane bound sensory guanylate cyclases and is regulated by specific neuronal Ca2+-sensor proteins called GCAPs. At least one guanylate cyclase (ROS-GC1 was shown to be part of a multiprotein complex having strong interactions with the cytoskeleton and being controlled in a multimodal Ca2+-dependent fashion. The final target of the cGMP signaling cascade is a cyclic nucleotide-gated channel that is a hetero-oligomeric protein located in the plasma membrane and interacting with accessory proteins in highly organized microdomains. We summarize results and interpretations of findings related to the inhomogeneous organization of signaling units in photoreceptor outer segments.

  10. Activation of Apoptotic Signal in Endothelial Cells through Intracellular Signaling Molecules Blockade in Tumor-Induced Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Bazmara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-induced angiogenesis is the bridge between avascular and vascular tumor growth phases. In tumor-induced angiogenesis, endothelial cells start to migrate and proliferate toward the tumor and build new capillaries toward the tumor. There are two stages for sprout extension during angiogenesis. The first stage is prior to anastomosis, when single sprouts extend. The second stage is after anastomosis when closed flow pathways or loops are formed and blood flows in the closed loops. Prior to anastomosis, biochemical and biomechanical signals from extracellular matrix regulate endothelial cell phenotype; however, after anastomosis, blood flow is the main regulator of endothelial cell phenotype. In this study, the critical signaling pathways of each stage are introduced. A Boolean network model is used to map environmental and flow induced signals to endothelial cell phenotype (proliferation, migration, apoptosis, and lumen formation. Using the Boolean network model, blockade of intracellular signaling molecules of endothelial cell is investigated prior to and after anastomosis and the cell fate is obtained in each case. Activation of apoptotic signal in endothelial cell can prevent the extension of new vessels and may inhibit angiogenesis. It is shown that blockade of a few signaling molecules in endothelial cell activates apoptotic signal that are proposed as antiangiogenic strategies.

  11. Regulation of muscle stem cell functions: a focus on the p38 MAPK signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Segales

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Formation of skeletal muscle fibers (myogenesis during development and after tissue injury in the adult constitutes an excellent paradigm to investigate the mechanisms whereby environmental cues control gene expression programs in muscle stem cells (satellite cells by acting on transcriptional and epigenetic effectors. Here we will review the molecular mechanisms implicated in the transition of satellite cells throughout the distinct myogenic stages (i.e., activation from quiescence, proliferation, differentiation and self-renewal. We will also discuss recent findings on the causes underlying satellite cell functional decline with aging. In particular, our review will focus on the epigenetic changes underlying fate decisions and on how the p38 MAPK signaling pathway integrates the environmental signals at the chromatin to build up satellite cell adaptive responses during the process of muscle regeneration, and how these responses are altered in aging. A better comprehension of the signaling pathways connecting external and intrinsic factors will illuminate the path for improving muscle regeneration in the aged.

  12. The histidine kinase AHK5 integrates endogenous and environmental signals in Arabidopsis guard cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Desikan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Stomatal guard cells monitor and respond to environmental and endogenous signals such that the stomatal aperture is continually optimised for water use efficiency. A key signalling molecule produced in guard cells in response to plant hormones, light, carbon dioxide and pathogen-derived signals is hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2. The mechanisms by which H(2O(2 integrates multiple signals via specific signalling pathways leading to stomatal closure is not known.Here, we identify a pathway by which H(2O(2, derived from endogenous and environmental stimuli, is sensed and transduced to effect stomatal closure. Histidine kinases (HK are part of two-component signal transduction systems that act to integrate environmental stimuli into a cellular response via a phosphotransfer relay mechanism. There is little known about the function of the HK AHK5 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we report that in addition to the predicted cytoplasmic localisation of this protein, AHK5 also appears to co-localise to the plasma membrane. Although AHK5 is expressed at low levels in guard cells, we identify a unique role for AHK5 in stomatal signalling. Arabidopsis mutants lacking AHK5 show reduced stomatal closure in response to H(2O(2, which is reversed by complementation with the wild type gene. Over-expression of AHK5 results in constitutively less stomatal closure. Abiotic stimuli that generate endogenous H(2O(2, such as darkness, nitric oxide and the phytohormone ethylene, also show reduced stomatal closure in the ahk5 mutants. However, ABA caused closure, dark adaptation induced H(2O(2 production and H(2O(2 induced NO synthesis in mutants. Treatment with the bacterial pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP flagellin, but not elf peptide, also exhibited reduced stomatal closure and H(2O(2 generation in ahk5 mutants.Our findings identify an integral signalling function for AHK5 that acts to integrate multiple signals via H(2O(2 homeostasis and is independent of ABA

  13. Mast cell chemotaxis – Chemoattractants and signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana eHalova

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Migration of mast cells is essential for their recruitment within target tissues where they play an important role in innate and adaptive immune responses. These processes rely on the ability of mast cells to recognize appropriate chemotactic stimuli and react to them by a chemotactic response. Another level of intercellular communication is attained by production of chemoattractants by activated mast cells, which results in accumulation of mast cells and other hematopoietic cells at the sites of inflammation. Mast cells express numerous surface receptors for various ligands with properties of potent chemoattractants. They include the stem cell factor recognized by c-Kit, antigen, which binds to immunoglobulin E (IgE anchored to the high affinity IgE receptor (FcRI, highly cytokinergic IgE recognized by FcRI, lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, which binds to G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. Other large groups of chemoattractants are eicosanoids [prostaglandin E2 and D2, leukotriene (LT B4, LTD4 and LTC4, and others] and chemokines (CC, CXC, C and CX3X, which also bind to various GPCRs. Further noteworthy chemoattractants are isoforms of transforming growth factor (TGF , which are sensitively recognized by TGF- serine/threonine type I and II  receptors, adenosine, C1q, C3a, and C5a components of the complement, 5-hydroxytryptamine, neuroendocrine peptide catestatin, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor- and others. Here we discuss the major types of chemoattractants recognized by mast cells, their target receptors, as well as signaling pathways they utilize. We also briefly deal with methods used for studies of mast cell chemotaxis and with ways of how these studies profited from the results obtained in other cellular systems.

  14. Neuronal Regulation of Schwann Cell Mitochondrial Ca2+ Signaling during Myelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Ino

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Schwann cells (SCs myelinate peripheral neurons to promote the rapid conduction of action potentials, and the process of myelination is known to be regulated by signals from axons to SCs. Given that SC mitochondria are one of the potential regulators of myelination, we investigated whether SC mitochondria are regulated by axonal signaling. Here, we show a purinergic mechanism that sends information from neurons to SC mitochondria during myelination. Our results show that electrical stimulation of rat sciatic nerve increases extracellular ATP levels enough to activate purinergic receptors. Indeed, electrical stimulation of sciatic nerves induces Ca2+ increases in the cytosol and the mitochondrial matrix of surrounding SCs via purinergic receptor activation. Chronic suppression of this pathway during active myelination suppressed the longitudinal and radial development of myelinating SCs and caused hypomyelination. These results demonstrate a neuron-to-SC mitochondria signaling, which is likely to have an important role in proper myelination.

  15. IPI-145 antagonizes intrinsic and extrinsic survival signals in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shuai; Guinn, Daphne; Dubovsky, Jason A; Zhong, Yiming; Lehman, Amy; Kutok, Jeffery; Woyach, Jennifer A; Byrd, John C; Johnson, Amy J

    2014-12-04

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) displays constitutive phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activation resulting from aberrant regulation of B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling. Previous studies have shown that an oral PI3K p110δ inhibitor idelalisib exhibits promising activity in CLL. Here, we demonstrate that a dual PI3K p110δ and p110γ inhibitor, IPI-145, antagonizes BCR crosslinking activated prosurvival signals in primary CLL cells. IPI-145 causes direct killing in primary CLL cells in a dose- and time-dependent fashion, but does not generate direct cytotoxicity to normal B cells. However, IPI-145 does reduce the viability of normal T and natural killer cells and decrease activated T-cell production of various inflammatory and antiapoptotic cytokines. Furthermore, IPI-145 overcomes the ibrutinib resistance resulting from treatment-induced BTK C481S mutation. Collectively, these studies provide rationale for ongoing clinical evaluation of IPI-145 as a targeted therapy for CLL and related B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  16. BMP9 signaling in stem cell differentiation and osteogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamplot, Joseph D; Qin, Jiaqiang; Nan, Guoxin; Wang, Jinhua; Liu, Xing; Yin, Liangjun; Tomal, Justin; Li, Ruidong; Shui, Wei; Zhang, Hongyu; Kim, Stephanie H; Zhang, Wenwen; Zhang, Jiye; Kong, Yuhan; Denduluri, Sahitya; Rogers, Mary Rose; Pratt, Abdullah; Haydon, Rex C; Luu, Hue H; Angeles, Jovito; Shi, Lewis L; He, Tong-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are members of the TGF-β superfamily and play a critical role in skeletal development, bone formation and stem cell differentiation. Disruptions in BMP signaling result in a variety of skeletal and extraskeletal anomalies. BMP9 is a poorly characterized member of the BMP family and is among the most osteogenic BMPs, promoting osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) both in vitro and in vivo. Recent findings from various in vivo and molecular studies strongly suggest that the mechanisms governing BMP9-mediated osteoinduction differ from other osteogenic BMPs. Many signaling pathways with diverse functions have been found to play a role in BMP9-mediated osteogenesis. Several of these pathways are also critical in the differentiation of other cell lineages, including adipocytes and chondrocytes. While BMP9 is known to be a potent osteogenic factor, it also influences several other pathways including cancer development, angiogenesis and myogenesis. Although BMP9 has been demonstrated as one of the most osteogenic BMPs, relatively little is known about the specific mechanisms responsible for these effects. BMP9 has demonstrated efficacy in promoting spinal fusion and bony non-union repair in animal models, demonstrating great translational promise. This review aims to summarize our current knowledge of BMP9-mediated osteogenesis by presenting recently completed work which may help us to further elucidate these pathways. PMID:23671813

  17. Curcumin mediates anticancer effects by modulating multiple cell signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnumakkara, Ajaikumar B; Bordoloi, Devivasha; Harsha, Choudhary; Banik, Kishore; Gupta, Subash C; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2017-08-01

    Curcumin, a component of a spice native to India, was first isolated in 1815 by Vogel and Pelletier from the rhizomes of Curcuma longa (turmeric) and, subsequently, the chemical structure of curcumin as diferuloylmethane was reported by Milobedzka et al. [(1910) 43., 2163-2170]. Since then, this polyphenol has been shown to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antiviral, antibacterial, and antifungal activities. The current review primarily focuses on the anticancer potential of curcumin through the modulation of multiple cell signaling pathways. Curcumin modulates diverse transcription factors, inflammatory cytokines, enzymes, kinases, growth factors, receptors, and various other proteins with an affinity ranging from the pM to the mM range. Furthermore, curcumin effectively regulates tumor cell growth via modulation of numerous cell signaling pathways and potentiates the effect of chemotherapeutic agents and radiation against cancer. Curcumin can interact with most of the targets that are modulated by FDA-approved drugs for cancer therapy. The focus of this review is to discuss the molecular basis for the anticancer activities of curcumin based on preclinical and clinical findings. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  18. Apical trafficking in epithelial cells: signals, clusters and motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, Ora A; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique

    2009-12-01

    In the early days of epithelial cell biology, researchers working with kidney and/or intestinal epithelial cell lines and with hepatocytes described the biosynthetic and recycling routes followed by apical and basolateral plasma membrane (PM) proteins. They identified the trans-Golgi network and recycling endosomes as the compartments that carried out apical-basolateral sorting. They described complex apical sorting signals that promoted association with lipid rafts, and simpler basolateral sorting signals resembling clathrin-coated-pit endocytic motifs. They also noticed that different epithelial cell types routed their apical PM proteins very differently, using either a vectorial (direct) route or a transcytotic (indirect) route. Although these original observations have generally held up, recent studies have revealed interesting complexities in the routes taken by apically destined proteins and have extended our understanding of the machinery required to sustain these elaborate sorting pathways. Here, we critically review the current status of apical trafficking mechanisms and discuss a model in which clustering is required to recruit apical trafficking machineries. Uncovering the mechanisms responsible for polarized trafficking and their epithelial-specific variations will help understand how epithelial functional diversity is generated and the pathogenesis of many human diseases.

  19. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 mediates denbinobin-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Shiow-Lin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the present study, we explore the role of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1 in denbinobin-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549 cells. Denbinobin-induced cell apoptosis was attenuated by an ASK1 dominant-negative mutant (ASK1DN, two antioxidants (N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC and glutathione (GSH, a c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK inhibitor (SP600125, and an activator protein-1 (AP-1 inhibitor (curcumin. Treatment of A549 cells with denbinobin caused increases in ASK1 activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS production, and these effects were inhibited by NAC and GSH. Stimulation of A549 cells with denbinobin caused JNK activation; this effect was markedly inhibited by NAC, GSH, and ASK1DN. Denbinobin induced c-Jun phosphorylation, the formation of an AP-1-specific DNA-protein complex, and Bim expression. Bim knockdown using a bim short interfering RNA strategy also reduced denbinobin-induced A549 cell apoptosis. The denbinobin-mediated increases in c-Jun phosphorylation and Bim expression were inhibited by NAC, GSH, SP600125, ASK1DN, JNK1DN, and JNK2DN. These results suggest that denbinobin might activate ASK1 through ROS production to cause JNK/AP-1 activation, which in turn induces Bim expression, and ultimately results in A549 cell apoptosis.

  20. DMPD: Lipopolysaccharide signaling in endothelial cells. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16357866 Lipopolysaccharide signaling in endothelial cells. Dauphinee SM, Karsan A.... Lab Invest. 2006 Jan;86(1):9-22. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Lipopolysaccharide signaling in endothe...lial cells. PubmedID 16357866 Title Lipopolysaccharide signaling in endothelial cells. Authors Dauphinee SM,

  1. Signaling by Small GTPases at Cell-Cell junctions: Protein Interactions Building Control and Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Vania

    2017-09-11

    A number of interesting reports highlight the intricate network of signaling proteins that coordinate formation and maintenance of cell-cell contacts. We have much yet to learn about how the in vitro binding data is translated into protein association inside the cells and whether such interaction modulates the signaling properties of the protein. What emerges from recent studies is the importance to carefully consider small GTPase activation in the context of where its activation occurs, which upstream regulators are involved in the activation/inactivation cycle and the GTPase interacting partners that determine the intracellular niche and extent of signaling. Data discussed here unravel unparalleled cooperation and coordination of functions among GTPases and their regulators in supporting strong adhesion between cells. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  2. Ras and Rheb Signaling in Survival and Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrkamp, Anja [Molecular Neurobiochemistry, Ruhr University of Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Herrmann, Christian [Department of Physical Chemistry1, Protein Interaction, Ruhr University of Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Stoll, Raphael [Biomolecular NMR, Ruhr University of Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Heumann, Rolf, E-mail: rolf.heumann@rub.de [Molecular Neurobiochemistry, Ruhr University of Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2013-05-28

    One of the most obvious hallmarks of cancer is uncontrolled proliferation of cells partly due to independence of growth factor supply. A major component of mitogenic signaling is Ras, a small GTPase. It was the first identified human protooncogene and is known since more than three decades to promote cellular proliferation and growth. Ras was shown to support growth factor-independent survival during development and to protect from chemical or mechanical lesion-induced neuronal degeneration in postmitotic neurons. In contrast, for specific patho-physiological cases and cellular systems it has been shown that Ras may also promote cell death. Proteins from the Ras association family (Rassf, especially Rassf1 and Rassf5) are tumor suppressors that are activated by Ras-GTP, triggering apoptosis via e.g., activation of mammalian sterile 20-like (MST1) kinase. In contrast to Ras, their expression is suppressed in many types of tumours, which makes Rassf proteins an exciting model for understanding the divergent effects of Ras activity. It seems likely that the outcome of Ras signaling depends on the balance between the activation of its various downstream effectors, thus determining cellular fate towards either proliferation or apoptosis. Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb) is a protein from the Ras superfamily that is also known to promote proliferation, growth, and regeneration through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) pathway. However, recent evidences indicate that the Rheb-mTor pathway may switch its function from a pro-growth into a cell death pathway, depending on the cellular situation. In contrast to Ras signaling, for Rheb, the cellular context is likely to modulate the whole Rheb-mTor pathway towards cellular death or survival, respectively.

  3. Ras and Rheb Signaling in Survival and Cell Death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrkamp, Anja; Herrmann, Christian; Stoll, Raphael; Heumann, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    One of the most obvious hallmarks of cancer is uncontrolled proliferation of cells partly due to independence of growth factor supply. A major component of mitogenic signaling is Ras, a small GTPase. It was the first identified human protooncogene and is known since more than three decades to promote cellular proliferation and growth. Ras was shown to support growth factor-independent survival during development and to protect from chemical or mechanical lesion-induced neuronal degeneration in postmitotic neurons. In contrast, for specific patho-physiological cases and cellular systems it has been shown that Ras may also promote cell death. Proteins from the Ras association family (Rassf, especially Rassf1 and Rassf5) are tumor suppressors that are activated by Ras-GTP, triggering apoptosis via e.g., activation of mammalian sterile 20-like (MST1) kinase. In contrast to Ras, their expression is suppressed in many types of tumours, which makes Rassf proteins an exciting model for understanding the divergent effects of Ras activity. It seems likely that the outcome of Ras signaling depends on the balance between the activation of its various downstream effectors, thus determining cellular fate towards either proliferation or apoptosis. Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb) is a protein from the Ras superfamily that is also known to promote proliferation, growth, and regeneration through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) pathway. However, recent evidences indicate that the Rheb-mTor pathway may switch its function from a pro-growth into a cell death pathway, depending on the cellular situation. In contrast to Ras signaling, for Rheb, the cellular context is likely to modulate the whole Rheb-mTor pathway towards cellular death or survival, respectively

  4. Lipopolysaccharide-induced multinuclear cells: Increased internalization of polystyrene beads and possible signals for cell fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi-Matsui, Mayumi, E-mail: nakanim@iwate-med.ac.jp; Yano, Shio; Futai, Masamitsu

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •LPS induces multinuclear cells from murine macrophage-derived RAW264.7 cells. •Large beads are internalized by cells actively fusing to become multinuclear. •The multinuclear cell formation is inhibited by anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL10. •Signal transduction for cell fusion is different from that for inflammation. -- Abstract: A murine macrophage-derived line, RAW264.7, becomes multinuclear on stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an outer membrane component of Gram-negative bacteria. These multinuclear cells internalized more polystyrene beads than mononuclear cells or osteoclasts (Nakanishi-Matsui, M., Yano, S., Matsumoto, N., and Futai, M., 2012). In this study, we analyzed the time courses of cell fusion in the presence of large beads. They were internalized into cells actively fusing to become multinuclear. However, the multinuclear cells once formed showed only low phagocytosis activity. These results suggest that formation of the multinuclear cells and bead internalization took place simultaneously. The formation of multinuclear cells was blocked by inhibitors for phosphoinositide 3-kinase, phospholipase C, calcineurin, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. In addition, interleukin 6 and 10 also exhibited inhibitory effects. These signaling molecules and cytokines may play a crucial role in the LPS-induced multinuclear cell formation.

  5. Porcine pluripotency cell signaling develops from the inner cell mass to the epiblast during early development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane; Christensen, Josef; Gao, Yu

    2009-01-01

    (LIF, LIFR, GP130), FGF pathway (bFGF, FGFR1, FGFR2), BMP pathway (BMP4), and downstream-activated genes (STAT3, c-Myc, c-Fos, and SMAD4). We discovered two different expression profiles exist in the developing porcine embryo. The D6 porcine blastocyst (inner cell mass stage) is devoid......  The signaling mechanisms regulating pluripotency in porcine embryonic stem cells and embryos are unknown. In this study, we characterize cell signaling in the in-vivo porcine inner cell mass and later-stage epiblast. We evaluate expression of OCT4, NANOG, SOX2, genes within the JAK/STAT pathway...... pluripotency in human embryonic stem cells is detectable in the porcine epiblast, but not in the inner cell mass. Copyright (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc....

  6. Resistance of Cancer Cells to Targeted Therapies Through the Activation of Compensating Signaling Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Manstein, Viktoria; Yang, Chul Min; Richter, Diane; Delis, Natalia; Vafaizadeh, Vida; Groner, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of low molecular weight kinase inhibitors as “targeted” drugs has led to remarkable advances in the treatment of cancer patients. The clinical benefits of these tumor therapies, however, vary widely in patient populations and with duration of treatment. Intrinsic and acquired resistance against such drugs limits their efficacy. In addition to the well studied mechanisms of resistance based upon drug transport and metabolism, genetic alterations in drug target structures and the activation of compensatory cell signaling have received recent attention. Adaptive responses can be triggered which counteract the initial dependence of tumor cells upon a particular signaling molecule and allow only a transient inhibition of tumor cell growth. These compensating signaling mechanisms are often based upon the relief of repression of regulatory feedback loops. They might involve cell autonomous, intracellular events or they can be mediated via the secretion of growth factor receptor ligands into the tumor microenvironment and signal induction in an auto- or paracrine fashion. The transcription factors Stat3 and Stat5 mediate the biological functions of cytokines, interleukins and growth factors and can be considered as endpoints of multiple signaling pathways. In normal cells this activation is transient and the Stat molecules return to their non-phosphorylated state within a short time period. In tumor cells the balance between activating and de-activating signals is disturbed resulting in the persistent activation of Stat3 or Stat5. The constant activation of Stat3 induces the expression of target genes, which cause the proliferation and survival of cancer cells, as well as their migration and invasive behavior. Activating components of the Jak-Stat pathway have been recognized as potentially valuable drug targets and important principles of compensatory signaling circuit induction during targeted drug treatment have been discovered in the context of kinase

  7. Causes and consequences of protein folding stress in aneuploid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Neysan; Storchová, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    Imbalanced chromosomal content, or aneuploidy, strongly affects the physiology of eukaryotic cells. The consequences of these effects are frequently detrimental, in particular in Metazoans. In humans, aneuploidy has been causatively linked to pathological conditions such as spontaneous abortions, trisomy syndromes and cancer. However, only in recent years have we witnessed an unraveling of the complex phenotypes that are caused by aneuploidy. Importantly, it has become apparent that aneuploidy evokes global and uniform changes that cannot be explained by the altered expression of the specific genes located on aneuploid chromosomes. Recent discoveries show that aneuploidy negatively affects protein folding; in particular, the functions of the molecular chaperone Heat Shock Protein 90 (HSP90) and the upstream regulator of heat shock-induced transcription, Heat Shock Factor 1 (HSF1), are impaired. Here we discuss the possible causes and consequences of this impairment and propose that the protein folding stress instigated by aneuploidy may be a common feature of conditions as variable as cancer and trisomy syndromes.

  8. Disruption of Adipose Rab10-Dependent Insulin Signaling Causes Hepatic Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazirani, Reema P; Verma, Akanksha; Sadacca, L Amanda; Buckman, Melanie S; Picatoste, Belen; Beg, Muheeb; Torsitano, Christopher; Bruno, Joanne H; Patel, Rajesh T; Simonyte, Kotryna; Camporez, Joao P; Moreira, Gabriela; Falcone, Domenick J; Accili, Domenico; Elemento, Olivier; Shulman, Gerald I; Kahn, Barbara B; McGraw, Timothy E

    2016-06-01

    Insulin controls glucose uptake into adipose and muscle cells by regulating the amount of GLUT4 in the plasma membrane. The effect of insulin is to promote the translocation of intracellular GLUT4 to the plasma membrane. The small Rab GTPase, Rab10, is required for insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation in cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Here we demonstrate that both insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane are reduced by about half in adipocytes from adipose-specific Rab10 knockout (KO) mice. These data demonstrate that the full effect of insulin on adipose glucose uptake is the integrated effect of Rab10-dependent and Rab10-independent pathways, establishing a divergence in insulin signal transduction to the regulation of GLUT4 trafficking. In adipose-specific Rab10 KO female mice, the partial inhibition of stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes induces insulin resistance independent of diet challenge. During euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp, there is no suppression of hepatic glucose production despite normal insulin suppression of plasma free fatty acids. The impact of incomplete disruption of stimulated adipocyte GLUT4 translocation on whole-body glucose homeostasis is driven by a near complete failure of insulin to suppress hepatic glucose production rather than a significant inhibition in muscle glucose uptake. These data underscore the physiological significance of the precise control of insulin-regulated trafficking in adipocytes. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  9. Wnt/β-catenin signaling regulates cancer stem cells in lung cancer A549 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, Ying; Wang, Xiuwen; Wang, Yawei; Ma, Daoxin

    2010-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays an important role not only in cancer, but also in cancer stem cells. In this study, we found that β-catenin and OCT-4 was highly expressed in cisplatin (DDP) selected A549 cells. Stimulating A549 cells with lithium chloride (LiCl) resulted in accumulation of β-catenin and up-regulation of a typical Wnt target gene cyclin D1. This stimulation also significantly enhanced proliferation, clone formation, migration and drug resistance abilities in A549 cells. Moreover, the up-regulation of OCT-4, a stem cell marker, was observed through real-time PCR and Western blotting. In a reverse approach, we inhibited Wnt signaling by knocking down the expression of β-catenin using RNA interference technology. This inhibition resulted in down-regulation of the Wnt target gene cyclin D1 as well as the proliferation, clone formation, migration and drug resistance abilities. Meanwhile, the expression of OCT-4 was reduced after the inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Taken together, our study provides strong evidence that canonical Wnt signaling plays an important role in lung cancer stem cell properties, and it also regulates OCT-4, a lung cancer stem cell marker.

  10. Mathematical modeling of planar cell polarity signaling in the Drosophila melanogaster wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amonlirdviman, Keith

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling refers to the coordinated polarization of cells within the plane of various epithelial tissues to generate sub-cellular asymmetry along an axis orthogonal to their apical-basal axes. For example, in the Drosophila wing, PCP is seen in the parallel orientation of hairs that protrude from each of the approximately 30,000 epithelial cells to robustly point toward the wing tip. Through a poorly understood mechanism, cell clones mutant for some PCP signaling components, including some, but not all alleles of the receptor frizzled, cause polarity disruptions of neighboring, wild-type cells, a phenomenon referred to as domineering nonautonomy. Previous models have proposed diffusible factors to explain nonautonomy, but no such factors have yet been found. This dissertation describes the mathematical modeling of PCP in the Drosophila wing, based on a contact dependent signaling hypothesis derived from experimental results. Intuition alone is insufficient to deduce that this hypothesis, which relies on a local feedback loop acting at the cell membrane, underlies the complex patterns observed in large fields of cells containing mutant clones, and others have argued that it cannot account for observed phenotypes. Through reaction-diffusion, partial differential equation modeling and simulation, the feedback loop is shown to fully reproduce PCP phenotypes, including domineering nonautonomy. The sufficiency of this model and the experimental validation of model predictions argue that previously proposed diffusible factors need not be invoked to explain PCP signaling and reveal how specific protein-protein interactions lead to autonomy or domineering nonautonomy. Based on these results, an ordinary differential equation model is derived to study the relationship of the feedback loop with upstream signaling components. The cadherin Fat transduces a cue to the local feedback loop, biasing the polarity direction of each cell toward the wing tip

  11. Bacterial Signaling Nucleotides Inhibit Yeast Cell Growth by Impacting Mitochondrial and Other Specifically Eukaryotic Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesketh, Andy; Vergnano, Marta; Wan, Chris; Oliver, Stephen G

    2017-07-25

    We have engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae to inducibly synthesize the prokaryotic signaling nucleotides cyclic di-GMP (cdiGMP), cdiAMP, and ppGpp in order to characterize the range of effects these nucleotides exert on eukaryotic cell function during bacterial pathogenesis. Synthetic genetic array (SGA) and transcriptome analyses indicated that, while these compounds elicit some common reactions in yeast, there are also complex and distinctive responses to each of the three nucleotides. All three are capable of inhibiting eukaryotic cell growth, with the guanine nucleotides exhibiting stronger effects than cdiAMP. Mutations compromising mitochondrial function and chromatin remodeling show negative epistatic interactions with all three nucleotides. In contrast, certain mutations that cause defects in chromatin modification and ribosomal protein function show positive epistasis, alleviating growth inhibition by at least two of the three nucleotides. Uniquely, cdiGMP is lethal both to cells growing by respiration on acetate and to obligately fermentative petite mutants. cdiGMP is also synthetically lethal with the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) inhibitor hydroxyurea. Heterologous expression of the human ppGpp hydrolase Mesh1p prevented the accumulation of ppGpp in the engineered yeast and restored cell growth. Extensive in vivo interactions between bacterial signaling molecules and eukaryotic gene function occur, resulting in outcomes ranging from growth inhibition to death. cdiGMP functions through a mechanism that must be compensated by unhindered RNR activity or by functionally competent mitochondria. Mesh1p may be required for abrogating the damaging effects of ppGpp in human cells subjected to bacterial infection. IMPORTANCE During infections, pathogenic bacteria can release nucleotides into the cells of their eukaryotic hosts. These nucleotides are recognized as signals that contribute to the initiation of defensive immune responses that help the infected

  12. Disease-causing mutations in the XIAP BIR2 domain impair NOD2-dependent immune signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Rune Busk; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Speckmann, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    that the RIPK2 binding site in XIAP overlaps with the BIR2 IBM-binding pocket and find that a bivalent Smac mimetic compound (SMC) potently antagonises XIAP function downstream of NOD2 to limit signalling. These findings suggest that impaired immune signalling in response to NOD1/2 stimulation is a general...

  13. Transcription factor-mediated cell-to-cell signalling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao; Kumar, Dhinesh; Chen, Huan; Wu, Shuwei; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2014-04-01

    Plant cells utilize mobile transcription factors to transmit intercellular signals when they perceive environmental stimuli or initiate developmental programmes. Studies on these novel cell-to-cell signals have accumulated multiple pieces of evidence showing that non-cell-autonomous transcription factors play pivotal roles in most processes related to the formation and development of plant organs. Recent studies have explored the evolution of mobile transcription factors and proposed mechanisms for their trafficking through plasmodesmata, where a selective system exists to facilitate this process. Mobile transcription factors contribute to the diversity of the intercellular signalling network, which is also established by peptides, hormones, and RNAs. Crosstalk between mobile transcription factors and other intercellular molecules leads to the development of complex biological signalling networks in plants. The regulation of plasmodesmata appears to have been another major step in controlling the intercellular trafficking of transcription factors based on studies of many plasmodesmal components. Furthermore, diverse omics approaches are being successfully applied to explore a large number of candidate transcription factors as mobile signals in plants. Here, we review these fascinating discoveries to integrate current knowledge of non-cell-autonomous transcription factors.

  14. Anthocyanins: targeting of signaling networks in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehitoglu, Muserref Hilal; Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Qureshi, Muhammad Zahid; Butt, Ghazala; Aras, Aliye

    2014-01-01

    It is becoming progressively more understandable that phytochemicals derived from edible plants have shown potential in modelling their interactions with their target proteins. Rapidly accumulating in-vitro and in- vivo evidence indicates that anthocyanins have anticancer activity in rodent models of cancer. More intriguingly, evaluation of bilberry anthocyanins as chemopreventive agents in twenty-five colorectal cancer patients has opened new window of opportunity in translating the findings from laboratory to clinic. Confluence of information suggests that anthocyanins treated cancer cells reveal up-regulation of tumor suppressor genes. There is a successive increase in the research-work in nutrigenomics and evidence has started to shed light on intracellular-signaling cascades as common molecular targets for anthocyanins. In this review we bring to limelight how anthocyanins induced apoptosis in cancer cells via activation of extrinsic and intrinsic pathways.

  15. Syndecans – key regulators of cell signaling and biological functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afratis, Nikolaos A.; Nikitovic, Dragana; Multhaupt, Hinke A.B.

    2017-01-01

    molecules during cancer initiation and progression. Particularly syndecans interact with other cell surface receptors, such as growth factor receptors and integrins, which lead to activation of downstream signaling pathways, which are critical for the cellular behavior. Moreover, this review describes...... has been established, which has consequences for the regulation of cell adhesion and migration. Specifically, ecto- and cytoplasmic domains are responsible for the interaction with extracellular matrix molecules and intracellular kinases, respectively. These interactions indicate syndecans as key...... the key role of syndecans in intracellular calcium regulation and homeostasis. The syndecan-mediated regulation of calcium metabolism is highly correlated with cells’ adhesion phenotype through the actin cytoskeleton and formation of junctions, with implications during differentiation and disease...

  16. Apoptotic Cells Induced Signaling for Immune Homeostasis in Macrophages and Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uriel Trahtemberg

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Inefficient and abnormal clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis contributes to systemic autoimmune disease in humans and mice, and inefficient chromosomal DNA degradation by DNAse II leads to systemic polyarthritis and a cytokine storm. By contrast, efficient clearance allows immune homeostasis, generally leads to a non-inflammatory state for both macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs, and contributes to maintenance of peripheral tolerance. As many as 3 × 108 cells undergo apoptosis every hour in our bodies, and one of the primary “eat me” signals expressed by apoptotic cells is phosphatidylserine (PtdSer. Apoptotic cells themselves are major contributors to the “anti-inflammatory” nature of the engulfment process, some by secreting thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1 or adenosine monophosphate and possibly other immune modulating “calm-down” signals that interact with macrophages and DCs. Apoptotic cells also produce “find me” and “tolerate me” signals to attract and immune modulate macrophages and DCs that express specific receptors for some of these signals. Neither macrophages nor DCs are uniform, and each cell type may variably express membrane proteins that function as receptors for PtdSer or for opsonins like complement or opsonins that bind to PtdSer, such as protein S and growth arrest-specific 6. Macrophages and DCs also express scavenger receptors, CD36, and integrins that function via bridging molecules such as TSP-1 or milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 protein and that differentially engage in various multi-ligand interactions between apoptotic cells and phagocytes. In this review, we describe the anti-inflammatory and pro-homeostatic nature of apoptotic cell interaction with the immune system. We do not review some forms of immunogenic cell death. We summarize the known apoptotic cell signaling events in macrophages and DCs that are related to toll-like receptors, nuclear factor kappa B, inflammasome, the lipid

  17. Constitutive activation of BMP signalling abrogates experimental metastasis of OVCA429 cells via reduced cell adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shepherd Trevor G

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP4 signalling in human ovarian cancer cells induces a number of phenotypic changes in vitro, including altered cell morphology, adhesion, motility and invasion, relative to normal human ovarian surface epithelial cells. From these in vitro analyses, we had hypothesized that active BMP signalling promotes the metastatic potential of ovarian cancer. Methods To test this directly, we engineered OVCA429 human ovarian cancer cells possessing doxycycline-inducible expression of a constitutively-active mutant BMP receptor, ALK3QD, and administered these cells to immunocompromised mice. Further characterization was performed in vitro to address the role of activated BMP signalling on the EOC phenotype, with particular emphasis on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and cell adhesion. Results Unexpectedly, doxycycline-induced ALK3QD expression in OVCA429 cells reduced tumour implantation on peritoneal surfaces and ascites formation when xenografted into immunocompromised mice by intraperitoneal injection. To determine the potential mechanisms controlling this in vivo observation, we followed with several cell culture experiments. Doxycycline-induced ALK3QD expression enhanced the refractile, spindle-shaped morphology of cultured OVCA429 cells eliciting an EMT-like response. Using in vitro wound healing assays, we observed that ALK3QD-expressing cells migrated with long, cytoplasmic projections extending into the wound space. The phenotypic alterations of ALK3QD-expressing cells correlated with changes in specific gene expression patterns of EMT, including increased Snail and Slug and reduced E-cadherin mRNA expression. In addition, ALK3QD signalling reduced β1- and β3-integrin expression, critical molecules involved in ovarian cancer cell adhesion. The combination of reduced E-cadherin and β-integrin expression correlates directly with the reduced EOC cell cohesion in spheroids and

  18. Cell signaling by reactive nitrogen and oxygen species in atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R. P.; Moellering, D.; Murphy-Ullrich, J.; Jo, H.; Beckman, J. S.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2000-01-01

    The production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species has been implicated in atherosclerosis principally as means of damaging low-density lipoprotein that in turn initiates the accumulation of cholesterol in macrophages. The diversity of novel oxidative modifications to lipids and proteins recently identified in atherosclerotic lesions has revealed surprising complexity in the mechanisms of oxidative damage and their potential role in atherosclerosis. Oxidative or nitrosative stress does not completely consume intracellular antioxidants leading to cell death as previously thought. Rather, oxidative and nitrosative stress have a more subtle impact on the atherogenic process by modulating intracellular signaling pathways in vascular tissues to affect inflammatory cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Furthermore, cellular responses can affect the production of nitric oxide, which in turn can strongly influence the nature of oxidative modifications occurring in atherosclerosis. The dynamic interactions between endogenous low concentrations of oxidants or reactive nitrogen species with intracellular signaling pathways may have a general role in processes affecting wound healing to apoptosis, which can provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  19. CD70 reverse signaling enhances NK cell function and immunosurveillance in CD27-expressing B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Sayed, Mohamad F; Ruckstuhl, Carla A; Hilmenyuk, Tamara; Claus, Christina; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Bornhauser, Beat C; Radpour, Ramin; Riether, Carsten; Ochsenbein, Adrian F

    2017-07-20

    The interaction of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) CD27 with its ligand CD70 is an emerging target to treat cancer. CD27 signaling provides costimulatory signals to cytotoxic T cells but also increases the frequency of regulatory T cells. Similar to other TNFR ligands, CD70 has been shown to initiate intracellular signaling pathways (CD70 reverse signaling). CD27 is expressed on a majority of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, but its role in the immune control of lymphoma and leukemia is unknown. We therefore generated a cytoplasmic deletion mutant of CD27 (CD27-trunc) to study the role of CD70 reverse signaling in the immunosurveillance of B-cell malignancies in vivo. Expression of CD27-trunc on malignant cells increased the number of tumor-infiltrating interferon γ-producing natural killer (NK) cells. In contrast, the antitumoral T-cell response remained largely unchanged. CD70 reverse signaling in NK cells was mediated via the AKT signaling pathway and increased NK cell survival and effector function. The improved immune control by activated NK cells prolonged survival of CD27-trunc-expressing lymphoma-bearing mice. Finally, CD70 reverse signaling enhanced survival and effector function of human NK cells in a B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenotransplants model. Therefore, CD70 reverse signaling in NK cells contributes to the immune control of CD27-expressing B-cell lymphoma and leukemia. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  20. Signal transduction in cells of the immune system in microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Kathrin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Life on Earth developed in the presence and under the constant influence of gravity. Gravity has been present during the entire evolution, from the first organic molecule to mammals and humans. Modern research revealed clearly that gravity is important, probably indispensable for the function of living systems, from unicellular organisms to men. Thus, gravity research is no more or less a fundamental question about the conditions of life on Earth. Since the first space missions and supported thereafter by a multitude of space and ground-based experiments, it is well known that immune cell function is severely suppressed in microgravity, which renders the cells of the immune system an ideal model organism to investigate the influence of gravity on the cellular and molecular level. Here we review the current knowledge about the question, if and how cellular signal transduction depends on the existence of gravity, with special focus on cells of the immune system. Since immune cell function is fundamental to keep the organism under imnological surveillance during the defence against pathogens, to investigate the effects and possible molecular mechanisms of altered gravity is indispensable for long-term space flights to Earth Moon or Mars. Thus, understanding the impact of gravity on cellular functions on Earth will provide not only important informations about the development of life on Earth, but also for therapeutic and preventive strategies to cope successfully with medical problems during space exploration.

  1. Itraconazole induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest via inhibiting Hedgehog signaling in gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qiang; Hou, Yi-Chao; Huang, Jiao; Fang, Jing-Yuan; Xiong, Hua

    2017-04-11

    Itraconazole has been proved therapeutically effective against a variety of human cancers. This study assessed the effect of itraconazole on the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway and proliferation of human gastric cancer cells. CCK-8 assay and colony formation assay were used to assess the effects of itraconazole on proliferation of gastric cancer cells. The expression of Hh signaling components in gastric cancer cells treated with itraconazole was evaluated by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting and dual luciferase assay. Tumor xenograft models were used to assess the inhibitory effect of itraconazole on the proliferation of gastric cancer cells in vivo. Itraconazole could remarkably inhibit the proliferation of gastric cancer cells. When in combination with 5-FU, itraconazole significantly reduced the proliferation rate of cancer cells. Furthermore, itraconazole could regulate the G 1 -S transition and induce apoptosis of gastric cancer cells. Hh signaling was abnormally activated in human gastric cancer samples. In vitro, studies showed that the expression of glioma-associated zinc finger transcription factor 1 (Gli1) was decreased at both transcriptional and translational levels after treatment with itraconazole. Dual luciferase assay also indicated that itraconazole could inhibit the transcription of Gli1. In vivo studies demonstrated that monotherapy with itraconazole by oral administration could inhibit the growth of xenografts, and that itraconazole could significantly enhance the antitumor efficacy of the chemotherapeutic agent 5-FU. Hh signaling is activated in gastric tumor and itraconazole can inhibit the growth of gastric cancer cells by inhibiting Gli1 expression.

  2. Echovirus 30 induced neuronal cell death through TRIO-RhoA signaling activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June-Woo Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Echovirus 30 (Echo30 is one of the most frequently identified human enteroviruses (EVs causing aseptic meningitis and encephalitis. However the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of Echo30 infection with significant clinical outcomes is not completely understood. The aim of this investigation is to illustrate molecular pathologic alteration in neuronal cells induced by Echo30 infection using clinical isolate from young patient with neurologic involvement. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To characterize the neuronal cellular response to Echo30 infection, we performed a proteomic analysis based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE and MALDI-TOF/TOF Mass Spectrophotometric (MS analysis. We identified significant alteration of several protein expression levels in Echo30-infected SK-N-SH cells. Among these proteins, we focused on an outstanding up-regulation of Triple functional domain (TRIO in Echo30-infected SK-N-SH cells. Generally, TRIO acts as a key component in the regulation of axon guidance and cell migration. In this study, we determined that TRIO plays a role in the novel pathways in Echo30 induced neuronal cell death. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our finding shows that TRIO plays a critical role in neuronal cell death by Echo30 infection. Echo30 infection activates TRIO-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF domains (GEFD2 and RhoA signaling in turn. These results suggest that Echo30 infection induced neuronal cell death by activation of the TRIO-RhoA signaling. We expect the regulation of TRIO-RhoA signaling may represent a new therapeutic approach in treating aseptic meningitis and encephalitis induced by Echo30.

  3. 3-Nitrobenzanthrone and 3-aminobenzanthrone induce DNA damage and cell signalling in Hepa1c1c7 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landvik, N.E. [Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 404 Torshov N-4303 Oslo (Norway); Arlt, V.M.; Nagy, E. [Section of Molecular Carcinogenesis, Institute of Cancer Research, Brookes Lawley Building, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Solhaug, A. [Section for Toxicology, Department of Feed and Food Safety, National Veterinary Institute Pb 750 Sentrum, N-0106 Oslo (Norway); Tekpli, X. [EA SeRAIC, Equipe labellisee Ligue contre le Cancer, IFR 140, Universite de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Schmeiser, H.H. [Research Group Genetic Alteration in Carcinogenesis, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Refsnes, M. [Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 404 Torshov N-4303 Oslo (Norway); Phillips, D.H. [Section of Molecular Carcinogenesis, Institute of Cancer Research, Brookes Lawley Building, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Lagadic-Gossmann, D. [EA SeRAIC, Equipe labellisee Ligue contre le Cancer, IFR 140, Universite de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Holme, J.A., E-mail: jorn.holme@fhi.no [Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 404 Torshov N-4303 Oslo (Norway)

    2010-02-03

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is a mutagenic and carcinogenic environmental pollutant found in diesel exhaust and urban air pollution. In the present work we have characterised the effects of 3-NBA and its metabolite 3-aminobenzanthrone (3-ABA) on cell death and cytokine release in mouse hepatoma Hepa1c1c7 cells. These effects were related to induced DNA damage and changes in cell signalling pathways. 3-NBA resulted in cell death and caused most DNA damage as judged by the amount of DNA adducts ({sup 32}P-postlabelling assay), single strand (ss)DNA breaks and oxidative DNA lesions (comet assay) detected. An increased phosphorylation of H2AX, chk1, chk2 and partly ATM was observed using flow cytometry and/or Western blotting. Both compounds increased phosphorylation of p53 and MAPKs (ERK, p38 and JNK). However, only 3-NBA caused an accumulation of p53 in the nucleus and a translocation of Bax to the mitochondria. The p53 inhibitor pifithrin-alpha inhibited 3-NBA-induced apoptosis, indicating that cell death was a result of the triggering of DNA signalling pathways. The highest phosphorylation of Akt and degradation of I{kappa}B-{alpha} (suggesting activation of NF-{kappa}B) were also seen after treatment with 3-NBA. In contrast 3-ABA increased IL-6 release, but caused little or no toxicity. Cytokine release was inhibited by PD98059 and curcumin, suggesting that ERK and NF-{kappa}B play a role in this process. In conclusion, 3-NBA seems to have a higher potency to induce DNA damage compatible with its cytotoxic effects, while 3-ABA seems to have a greater effect on the immune system.

  4. 3-Nitrobenzanthrone and 3-aminobenzanthrone induce DNA damage and cell signalling in Hepa1c1c7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landvik, N E; Arlt, V M; Nagy, E; Solhaug, A; Tekpli, X; Schmeiser, H H; Refsnes, M; Phillips, D H; Lagadic-Gossmann, D; Holme, J A

    2010-02-03

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is a mutagenic and carcinogenic environmental pollutant found in diesel exhaust and urban air pollution. In the present work we have characterised the effects of 3-NBA and its metabolite 3-aminobenzanthrone (3-ABA) on cell death and cytokine release in mouse hepatoma Hepa1c1c7 cells. These effects were related to induced DNA damage and changes in cell signalling pathways. 3-NBA resulted in cell death and caused most DNA damage as judged by the amount of DNA adducts ((32)P-postlabelling assay), single strand (ss)DNA breaks and oxidative DNA lesions (comet assay) detected. An increased phosphorylation of H2AX, chk1, chk2 and partly ATM was observed using flow cytometry and/or Western blotting. Both compounds increased phosphorylation of p53 and MAPKs (ERK, p38 and JNK). However, only 3-NBA caused an accumulation of p53 in the nucleus and a translocation of Bax to the mitochondria. The p53 inhibitor pifithrin-alpha inhibited 3-NBA-induced apoptosis, indicating that cell death was a result of the triggering of DNA signalling pathways. The highest phosphorylation of Akt and degradation of IkappaB-alpha (suggesting activation of NF-kappaB) were also seen after treatment with 3-NBA. In contrast 3-ABA increased IL-6 release, but caused little or no toxicity. Cytokine release was inhibited by PD98059 and curcumin, suggesting that ERK and NF-kappaB play a role in this process. In conclusion, 3-NBA seems to have a higher potency to induce DNA damage compatible with its cytotoxic effects, while 3-ABA seems to have a greater effect on the immune system. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Increased reactive oxygen species levels cause ER stress and cytotoxicity in andrographolide treated colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Aditi; Banerjee, Vivekjyoti; Czinn, Steven; Blanchard, Thomas

    2017-04-18

    Chemotherapy continues to play an essential role in the management of many cancers including colon cancer, the third leading cause of death due to cancer in the United States. Many naturally occurring plant compounds have been demonstrated to possess anti-cancer cell activity and have the potential to supplement existing chemotherapy strategies. The plant metabolite andrographolide induces cell death in cancer cells and apoptosis is dependent upon the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress) leading to the unfolded protein response (UPR). The goal of the present study was to determine the mechanism by which andrographolide induces ER stress and to further evaluate its role in promoting cell death pathways. The T84 and COLO 205 cancer cell lines were used to demonstrate that andrographolide induces increased ROS levels, corresponding anti-oxidant response molecules, and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. No increases in ROS levels were detected in control colon fibroblast cells. Andrographolide-induced cell death, UPR signaling, and CHOP, Bax, and caspase 3 apoptosis elements were all inhibited in the presence of the ROS scavenger NAC. Additionally, andrographolide-induced suppression of cyclins B1 and D1 were also reversed in the presence of NAC. Finally, Akt phosphorylation and phospho-mTOR levels that are normally suppressed by andrographolide were also expressed at normal levels in the absence of ROS. These data demonstrate that andrographolide induces ER stress leading to apoptosis through the induction of ROS and that elevated ROS also play an important role in down-regulating cell cycle progression and cell survival pathways as well.

  6. Dissection of SAP-dependent and SAP-independent SLAM family signaling in NKT cell development and humoral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shasha; Cai, Chenxu; Li, Zehua; Liu, Guangao; Wang, Yuande; Blonska, Marzenna; Li, Dan; Du, Juan; Lin, Xin; Yang, Meixiang; Dong, Zhongjun

    2017-02-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) mutations in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) lead to defective NKT cell development and impaired humoral immunity. Because of the redundancy of SLAM family receptors (SFRs) and the complexity of SAP actions, how SFRs and SAP mediate these processes remains elusive. Here, we examined NKT cell development and humoral immunity in mice completely deficient in SFR. We found that SFR deficiency severely impaired NKT cell development. In contrast to SAP deficiency, SFR deficiency caused no apparent defect in follicular helper T (T FH ) cell differentiation. Intriguingly, the deletion of SFRs completely rescued the severe defect in T FH cell generation caused by SAP deficiency, whereas SFR deletion had a minimal effect on the defective NKT cell development in SAP-deficient mice. These findings suggest that SAP-dependent activating SFR signaling is essential for NKT cell selection; however, SFR signaling is inhibitory in SAP-deficient T FH cells. Thus, our current study revises our understanding of the mechanisms underlying T cell defects in patients with XLP. © 2017 Chen et al.

  7. Dissection of SAP-dependent and SAP-independent SLAM family signaling in NKT cell development and humoral immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chenxu; Liu, Guangao; Wang, Yuande; Du, Juan; Lin, Xin; Yang, Meixiang

    2017-01-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)–associated protein (SAP) mutations in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) lead to defective NKT cell development and impaired humoral immunity. Because of the redundancy of SLAM family receptors (SFRs) and the complexity of SAP actions, how SFRs and SAP mediate these processes remains elusive. Here, we examined NKT cell development and humoral immunity in mice completely deficient in SFR. We found that SFR deficiency severely impaired NKT cell development. In contrast to SAP deficiency, SFR deficiency caused no apparent defect in follicular helper T (TFH) cell differentiation. Intriguingly, the deletion of SFRs completely rescued the severe defect in TFH cell generation caused by SAP deficiency, whereas SFR deletion had a minimal effect on the defective NKT cell development in SAP-deficient mice. These findings suggest that SAP-dependent activating SFR signaling is essential for NKT cell selection; however, SFR signaling is inhibitory in SAP-deficient TFH cells. Thus, our current study revises our understanding of the mechanisms underlying T cell defects in patients with XLP. PMID:28049627

  8. NO2inhalation causes tauopathy by disturbing the insulin signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; Ku, Tingting; Yue, Huifeng; Li, Guangke; Sang, Nan

    2016-12-01

    Air pollution has been evidenced as a risk factor for neurodegenerative tauopathies. NO 2 , a primary component of air pollution, is negatively linked to neurodegenerative disorders, but its independent and direct association with tau lesion remains to be elucidated. Considering the fact that the insulin signaling pathway can be targeted by air pollutants and regulate tau function, this study focused on the role of insulin signaling in this NO 2 -induced tauopathy. Using a dynamic inhalation treatment, we demonstrated that exposure to NO 2 induced a disruption of insulin signaling in skeletal muscle, liver, and brain, with associated p38 MAPK and/or JNK activation. We also found that in parallel with these kinase signaling cascades, the compensatory hyperinsulinemia triggered by whole-body insulin resistance (IR) further attenuated the IRS-1/AKT/GSK-3β signaling pathway in the central nervous system, which consequently increased the phosphorylation of tau and reduced the expression of synaptic proteins that contributed to the development of the tau pathology. These findings provide new insight into the possible mechanisms involved in the etiopathogenesis of NO 2 -induced tauopathy, suggesting that the targeting of insulin signaling may be a promising therapeutic strategy to prevent this disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cellular Plasticity of Epithelial Cells-Cause of Metastasis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sukumar, Saraswati

    2005-01-01

    .... We present a novel concept that cancer epithelial cells, possibly of stem cell origin, have inherent cellular plasticity and can differentiate into endothelial cells and form microvessels that serve...

  10. Glycosynapses: microdomains controlling carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion and signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senitiroh Hakomori

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The concept of microdomains in plasma membranes was developed over two decades, following observation of polarity of membrane based on clustering of specific membrane components. Microdomains involved in carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion with concurrent signal transduction that affect cellular phenotype are termed "glycosynapse". Three types of glycosynapse have been distinguished: "type 1" having glycosphingolipid associated with signal transducers (small G-proteins, cSrc, Src family kinases and proteolipids; "type 2" having O-linked mucin-type glycoprotein associated with Src family kinases; and "type 3" having N-linked integrin receptor complexed with tetraspanin and ganglioside. Different cell types are characterized by presence of specific types of glycosynapse or their combinations, whose adhesion induces signal transduction to either facilitate or inhibit signaling. E.g., signaling through type 3 glycosynapse inhibits cell motility and differentiation. Glycosynapses are distinct from classically-known microdomains termed "caveolae", "caveolar membrane", or more recently "lipid raft", which are not involved in carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion. Type 1 and type 3 glycosynapses are resistant to cholesterol-binding reagents, whereas structure and function of "caveolar membrane" or "lipid raft" are disrupted by these reagents. Various data indicate a functional role of glycosynapses during differentiation, development, and oncogenic transformation.O conceito de microdomínios em membrana plasmática foi desenvolvido há mais de duas décadas, após a observação da polaridade da membrana baseada no agrupamento de componentes específicos da membrana. Microdomínios envolvidos na adesão celular dependente de carboidrato, com transdução de sinal que afeta o fenótipo celular são denominados ''glicosinapses''. Três tipos de glicosinapse foram observados: ''tipo 1'' que possue glicoesfingolipídio associado com transdutores de sinal

  11. Notch signaling is significantly suppressed in basal cell carcinomas and activation induces basal cell carcinoma cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Feng-Tao; Yu, Mei; Zloty, David; Bell, Robert H; Wang, Eddy; Akhoundsadegh, Noushin; Leung, Gigi; Haegert, Anne; Carr, Nicholas; Shapiro, Jerry; McElwee, Kevin J

    2017-04-01

    A subset of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are directly derived from hair follicles (HFs). In some respects, HFs can be defined as 'ordered' skin appendage growths, while BCCs can be regarded as 'disordered' skin appendage growths. The aim of the present study was to examine HFs and BCCs to define the expression of common and unique signaling pathways in each skin appendage. Human nodular BCCs, along with HFs and non‑follicular skin epithelium from normal individuals, were examined using microarrays, qPCR, and immunohistochemistry. Subsequently, BCC cells and root sheath keratinocyte cells from HFs were cultured and treated with Notch signaling peptide Jagged1 (JAG1). Gene expression, protein levels, and cell apoptosis susceptibility were assessed using qPCR, immunoblotting, and flow cytometry, respectively. Specific molecular mechanisms were found to be involved in the process of cell self‑renewal in the HFs and BCCs, including Notch and Hedgehog signaling pathways. However, several key Notch signaling factors showed significant differential expression in BCCs compared with HFs. Stimulating Notch signaling with JAG1 induced apoptosis of BCC cells by increasing Fas ligand expression and downstream caspase-8 activation. The present study showed that Notch signaling pathway activity is suppressed in BCCs, and is highly expressed in HFs. Elements of the Notch pathway could, therefore, represent targets for the treatment of BCCs and potentially in hair follicle engineering.

  12. Cancer cells increase endothelial cell tube formation and survival by activating the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hao-Wei; Chen, Yi-Fang; Wong, Jau-Min; Weng, Chia-Wei; Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Yu, Sung-Liang; Chen, Huei-Wen; Yuan, Ang; Chen, Jeremy J W

    2017-02-07

    Angiogenesis is a hallmark of cancer and plays a critical role in lung cancer progression, which involves interactions between cancer cells, endothelial cells and the surrounding microenvironment. However, the gene expression profiles and the changes in the biological phenotype of vascular endothelial cells after interactions with lung cancer cells remain unclear. An indirect transwell co-culture system was used to survey the interaction between human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human lung adenocarcinoma CL1-5 cells, as well as to investigate the morphological and molecular changes of HUVECs. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in HUVECs after co-culture with cancer cells were identified by microarray. Moreover, a publicly available microarray dataset of 293 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients was employed to evaluate the prognostic power of the gene signatures derived from HUVECs. The interaction between HUVECs and lung cancer cells changes the morphology of HUVECs, causing them to have a mesenchymal-like morphology and alter their cytoskeleton organization. Furthermore, after co-culture with lung cancer cells, HUVECs showed increased cell motility and microvessel tube formation ability and a decreased apoptotic percentage. Transcriptomic profiling of HUVECs revealed that many survival-, apoptosis- and angiogenesis-related genes were differentially expressed after interactions with lung cancer cells. Further investigations showed that the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway and COX-2 are involved in endothelial tube formation under the stimulation of lung cancer cells. Moreover, Rac-1 activation might promote endothelial cell motility through the increased formation of lamellipodia and filopodia. The inhibitors of PI3K and COX-2 could reverse the increased tube formation and induce the apoptosis of HUVECs. In addition, the gene signatures derived from the DEGs in HUVECs could predict overall survival and disease-free survival in NSCLC

  13. Huaier Aqueous Extract Induces Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells Arrest in S Phase via JNK Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengshuo Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Huaier aqueous extract, the main active constituent of Huaier proteoglycan, has antihepatocarcinoma activity in experimental and clinical settings. However, the potential and associated antihepatoma mechanisms of Huaier extract are not yet fully understood. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to elucidate the inhibitory proliferation effect of Huaier extract on apoptosis and cycle of HepG2 and Bel-7402 cells. Our data demonstrated that incubation with Huaier extract resulted in a marked decrease in cell viability dose-dependently. Flow cytometric analysis showed that a 48 h treatment of Huaier extract caused cell apoptosis. Typical apoptotic nucleus alterations were observed with fluorescence microscope after Hoechst staining. Immunoblot analysis further demonstrated that Huaier extract activated caspase 3 and PARP. Additionally, Huaier extract inhibited the activity of p-ERK, p-p38, and p-JNK in terms of MAPK. Furthermore, Huaier extract induced HCC cells arrest in S phase and decreased the cycle related protein expression of β-catenin and cyclin D1. Studies with JNK specific inhibitor, SP600125, showed that Huaier extract induced S phase arrest and decreased β-catenin and cyclin D1 expression via JNK signaling pathway. In conclusion, we verify that Huaier extract causes cell apoptosis and induces hepatocellular carcinoma cells arrest in S phase via JNK pathway, which advances our understanding on the molecular mechanisms of Huaier extract in hepatocarcinoma management.

  14. Ectopic cerebellar cell migration causes maldevelopment of Purkinje cells and abnormal motor behaviour in Cxcr4 null mice.

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    Guo-Jen Huang

    Full Text Available SDF-1/CXCR4 signalling plays an important role in neuronal cell migration and brain development. However, the impact of CXCR4 deficiency in the postnatal mouse brain is still poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the importance of CXCR4 on cerebellar development and motor behaviour by conditional inactivation of Cxcr4 in the central nervous system. We found CXCR4 plays a key role in cerebellar development. Its loss leads to defects in Purkinje cell dentritogenesis and axonal projection in vivo but not in cell culture. Transcriptome analysis revealed the most significantly affected pathways in the Cxcr4 deficient developing cerebellum are involved in extra cellular matrix receptor interactions and focal adhesion. Consistent with functional impairment of the cerebellum, Cxcr4 knockout mice have poor coordination and balance performance in skilled motor tests. Together, these results suggest ectopic the migration of granule cells impairs development of Purkinje cells, causes gross cerebellar anatomical disruption and leads to behavioural motor defects in Cxcr4 null mice.

  15. Death Receptor-Mediated Cell Death and Proinflammatory Signaling in Nonalcoholic SteatohepatitisSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Hirsova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is becoming a public health problem worldwide. A subset of patients develop an inflammatory disease, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, characterized by steatosis, hepatocellular death, macrophage and neutrophil accumulation, and varying stages of fibrosis. Hepatocyte cell death triggers the cellular inflammatory response, therefore reducing cell death may be salutary in the steatohepatitis disease process. Recently, a better understanding of hepatocyte apoptosis in NASH has been obtained and new information regarding other cell death modes such as necroptosis and pyroptosis has been reported. Hepatocyte lipotoxicity is often triggered by death receptors. In addition to causing apoptosis, death receptors have been shown to mediate proinflammatory signaling, suggesting that apoptosis in this context is not an immunologically silent process. Here, we review recent developments in our understanding of hepatocyte cell death by death receptors and its mechanistic link to inflammation in NASH. We emphasize how proapoptotic signaling by death receptors may induce the release of proinflammatory extracellular vesicles, thereby recruiting and activating macrophages and promoting the steatohepatitis process. Potential therapeutic strategies are discussed based on this evolving information. Keywords: Apoptosis, Caspase Inhibitor, Cell Death, Death Receptors, Exosomes, Extracellular Vesicles, Fibrosis, Inflammation, Inflammasome, Microvesicles, Necroptosis, Pyroptosis

  16. A deficiency of ceramide biosynthesis causes cerebellar purkinje cell neurodegeneration and lipofuscin accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihong Zhao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids, lipids with a common sphingoid base (also termed long chain base backbone, play essential cellular structural and signaling functions. Alterations of sphingolipid levels have been implicated in many diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. However, it remains largely unclear whether sphingolipid changes in these diseases are pathological events or homeostatic responses. Furthermore, how changes in sphingolipid homeostasis shape the progression of aging and neurodegeneration remains to be clarified. We identified two mouse strains, flincher (fln and toppler (to, with spontaneous recessive mutations that cause cerebellar ataxia and Purkinje cell degeneration. Positional cloning demonstrated that these mutations reside in the Lass1 gene. Lass1 encodes (dihydroceramide synthase 1 (CerS1, which is highly expressed in neurons. Both fln and to mutations caused complete loss of CerS1 catalytic activity, which resulted in a reduction in sphingolipid biosynthesis in the brain and dramatic changes in steady-state levels of sphingolipids and sphingoid bases. In addition to Purkinje cell death, deficiency of CerS1 function also induced accumulation of lipofuscin with ubiquitylated proteins in many brain regions. Our results demonstrate clearly that ceramide biosynthesis deficiency can cause neurodegeneration and suggest a novel mechanism of lipofuscin formation, a common phenomenon that occurs during normal aging and in some neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Autocrine prostaglandin E2 signaling promotes tumor cell survival and proliferation in childhood neuroblastoma.

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    Agnes Rasmuson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostaglandin E(2 (PGE(2 is an important mediator in tumor-promoting inflammation. High expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 has been detected in the embryonic childhood tumor neuroblastoma, and treatment with COX inhibitors significantly reduces tumor growth. Here, we have investigated the significance of a high COX-2 expression in neuroblastoma by analysis of PGE(2 production, the expression pattern and localization of PGE(2 receptors and intracellular signal transduction pathways activated by PGE(2. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A high expression of the PGE(2 receptors, EP1, EP2, EP3 and EP4 in primary neuroblastomas, independent of biological and clinical characteristics, was detected using immunohistochemistry. In addition, mRNA and protein corresponding to each of the receptors were detected in neuroblastoma cell lines. Immunofluorescent staining revealed localization of the receptors to the cellular membrane, in the cytoplasm, and in the nuclear compartment. Neuroblastoma cells produced PGE(2 and stimulation of serum-starved neuroblastoma cells with PGE(2 increased the intracellular concentration of calcium and cyclic AMP with subsequent phosphorylation of Akt. Addition of 16,16-dimethyl PGE(2 (dmPGE(2 increased cell viability in a time, dose- and cell line-dependent manner. Treatment of neuroblastoma cells with a COX-2 inhibitor resulted in a diminished cell growth and viability that was reversed by the addition of dmPGE(2. Similarly, PGE(2 receptor antagonists caused a decrease in neuroblastoma cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate that PGE(2 acts as an autocrine and/or paracrine survival factor for neuroblastoma cells. Hence, specific targeting of PGE(2 signaling provides a novel strategy for the treatment of childhood neuroblastoma through the inhibition of important mediators of tumor-promoting inflammation.

  18. Eosinophil peroxidase signals via epidermal growth factor-2 to induce cell proliferation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Marie-Therese

    2011-11-01

    Eosinophils exert many of their inflammatory effects in allergic disorders through the degranulation and release of intracellular mediators, including a set of cationic granule proteins that include eosinophil peroxidase. Studies suggest that eosinophils are involved in remodeling. In previous studies, we showed that eosinophil granule proteins activate mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. In this study, we investigated the receptor mediating eosinophil peroxidase-induced signaling and downstream effects. Human cholinergic neuroblastoma IMR32 and murine melanoma B16.F10 cultures, real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunoprecipitations, and Western blotting were used in the study. We showed that eosinophil peroxidase caused a sustained increase in both the expression of epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2) and its phosphorylation at tyrosine 1248, with the consequent activation of extracellular-regulated kinase 1\\/2. This, in turn, promoted a focal adhesion kinase-dependent egress of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(kip) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Eosinophil peroxidase induced a HER2-dependent up-regulation of cell proliferation, indicated by an up-regulation of the nuclear proliferation marker Ki67. This study identifies HER2 as a novel mediator of eosinophil peroxidase signaling. The results show that eosinophil peroxidase, at noncytotoxic levels, can drive cell-cycle progression and proliferation, and contribute to tissue remodeling and cell turnover in airway disease. Because eosinophils are a feature of many cancers, these findings also suggest a role for eosinophils in tumorigenesis.

  19. Nobiletin induces inhibitions of Ras activity and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling to suppress cell proliferation in C6 rat glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Koichi; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Fukunaga, Kohji; Yamakuni, Tohru

    2013-01-01

    Ras, a small G-protein, physiologically directs cell proliferation and cell cycle via regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling cascade. Dysregulation of Ras/MEK/ERK signaling has been reported to cause tumorigenesis and gliomas. Nobiletin, a citrus flavonoid, has been shown to have anti-tumor cells action. However, it remains elusive whether nobiletin could affect Ras activity. In this study, we provide the first evidence that nobiletin suppresses the proliferation by inhibiting Ras activity in C6 glioma cells, a rat glioma cell line. First, Ras pull-down assay showed that nobiletin inhibits Ras activity in a concentration-dependent manner in C6 cells. Second, farnesyltransferase inhibitor I, a Ras inhibitor, and U0126, a MEK inhibitor, induced an inhibition of the cell proliferation in C6 cells, while the cell proliferation was inhibited by nobiletin as well. Third, western blotting revealed that nobiletin showed inhibitory effects on MEK and ERK phopsphorylation levels in a concentration-dependent manner. Finally, such an inhibitory effect on the level of ERK phosphorylation by nobiletin was appreciably prevented by Gö6976, a selective inhibitor of conventional protein kinase Cs (PKCs) showing Ca(2+)-sensitivity, while GF109203X, a general inhibitor for PKCs, and BAPTA, a cell-permeable Ca(2+) chelator, to a lesser extent, suppressed a reduction of the phosphorylation. These findings suggest that the proliferation of C6 cells is Ras- and MEK/ERK signaling-dependent, and that nobiletin suppresses the cell proliferation by inhibiting Ras activity and MEK/ERK signaling cascade probably via a Ca(2+)-sensitive PKC-dependent mechanism. Thus, the natural compound has potential to be a therapeutic agent for glioma.

  20. Autophagy protects intestinal epithelial cells against deoxynivalenol toxicity by alleviating oxidative stress via IKK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yulong; Li, Jianjun; Li, Fengna; Hu, Chien-An A; Liao, Peng; Tan, Kunrong; Tan, Bie; Xiong, Xia; Liu, Gang; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2015-12-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular process of homeostatic degradation that promotes cell survival under various stressors. Deoxynivalenol (DON), a fungal toxin, often causes diarrhea and disturbs the homeostasis of the intestinal system. To investigate the function of intestinal autophagy in response to DON and associated mechanisms, we firstly knocked out ATG5 (autophagy-related gene 5) in porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) using CRISPR-Cas9 technology. When treated with DON, autophagy was induced in IPEC-J2 cells but not in IPEC-J2.Atg5ko cells. The deficiency in autophagy increased DON-induced apoptosis in IPEC-J2.atg5ko cells, in part, through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The cellular stress response can be restored in IPEC-J2.atg5ko cells by overexpressing proteins involved in protein folding. Interestingly, we found that autophagy deficiency downregulated the expression of endoplasmic reticulum folding proteins BiP and PDI when IPEC-J2.atg5ko cells were treated with DON. In addition, we investigated the molecular mechanism of autophagy involved in the IKK, AMPK, and mTOR signaling pathway and found that Bay-117082 and Compound C, specific inhibitors for IKK and AMPK, respectively, inhibited the induction of autophagy. Taken together, our results suggest that autophagy is pivotal for protection against DON in pig intestinal cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Feedback inhibition of CREB signaling promotes beta cell dysfunction in insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Emilie; Van de Velde, Sam; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Hao, Ergeng; LeLay, John; Kaestner, Klaus; Montminy, Marc

    2015-02-24

    Although persistent elevations in circulating glucose concentrations promote compensatory increases in pancreatic islet mass, unremitting insulin resistance causes deterioration in beta cell function that leads to the progression to diabetes. Here, we show that mice with a knockout of the CREB coactivator CRTC2 in beta cells have impaired oral glucose tolerance due to decreases in circulating insulin concentrations. CRTC2 was found to promote beta cell function in part by stimulating the expression of the transcription factor MafA. Chronic hyperglycemia disrupted cAMP signaling in pancreatic islets by activating the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF1)-dependent induction of the protein kinase A inhibitor beta (PKIB), a potent inhibitor of PKA catalytic activity. Indeed, disruption of the PKIB gene improved islet function in the setting of obesity. These results demonstrate how crosstalk between nutrient and hormonal pathways contributes to loss of pancreatic islet function. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mechanism underlying the inner membrane retention of Escherichia coli lipoproteins caused by Lol avoidance signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Takashi; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Tokuda, Hajime

    2003-10-10

    Escherichia coli lipoproteins are localized to either the inner or outer membrane depending on the residue at position 2. The inner membrane retention signal, Asp at position 2 in combination with certain residues at position 3, functions as a Lol avoidance signal, i.e. the signal inhibits the recognition of lipoproteins by LolCDE that releases lipoproteins from the inner membrane. To understand the role of the residue at position 2, outer membrane-specific lipoproteins with Cys at position 2 were subjected to chemical modification followed by the release reaction in reconstituted proteoliposomes. Sulfhydryl-specific introduction of nonprotein molecules or a negative charge to Cys did not inhibit the LolCDE-dependent release. In contrast, oxidation of Cys to cysteic acid resulted in generation of the Lol avoidance signal, indicating that the Lol avoidance signal requires a critical length of negative charge at the second residue. Furthermore, not only modification of the carboxylic acid of Asp at position 2 but also that of the amine of phosphatidylethanolamine abolished the Lol avoidance function. Based on these results, the Lol avoidance mechanism is discussed.

  3. DMPD: Signals and receptors involved in recruitment of inflammatory cells. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7744810 Signals and receptors involved in recruitment of inflammatory cells. Ben-Ba...ruch A, Michiel DF, Oppenheim JJ. J Biol Chem. 1995 May 19;270(20):11703-6. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Signals... and receptors involved in recruitment of inflammatory cells. PubmedID 7744810 Title Signals and r

  4. Cell fate decisions: emerging roles for metabolic signals and cell morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatapudy, Sumitra; Aloisio, Francesca; Barber, Diane; Nystul, Todd

    2017-12-01

    Understanding how cell fate decisions are regulated is a fundamental goal of developmental and stem cell biology. Most studies on the control of cell fate decisions address the contributions of changes in transcriptional programming, epigenetic modifications, and biochemical differentiation cues. However, recent studies have found that other aspects of cell biology also make important contributions to regulating cell fate decisions. These cues can have a permissive or instructive role and are integrated into the larger network of signaling, functioning both upstream and downstream of developmental signaling pathways. Here, we summarize recent insights into how cell fate decisions are influenced by four aspects of cell biology: metabolism, reactive oxygen species (ROS), intracellular pH (pHi), and cell morphology. For each topic, we discuss how these cell biological cues interact with each other and with protein-based mechanisms for changing gene transcription. In addition, we highlight several questions that remain unanswered in these exciting and relatively new areas of the field. © 2017 The Authors.

  5. Cell type specificity of signaling: view from membrane receptors distribution and their downstream transduction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ying; Yu, Zhonghao; Ge, Dongya; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Thiesen, Hans-Jürgen; Xie, Lu; Li, Yixue

    2012-09-01

    Studies on cell signaling pay more attention to spatial dynamics and how such diverse organization can relate to high order of cellular capabilities. To overview the specificity of cell signaling, we integrated human receptome data with proteome spatial expression profiles to systematically investigate the specificity of receptors and receptor-triggered transduction networks across 62 normal cell types and 14 cancer types. Six percent receptors showed cell-type-specific expression, and 4% signaling networks presented enriched cell-specific proteins induced by the receptors. We introduced a concept of "response context" to annotate the cell-type dependent signaling networks. We found that most cells respond similarly to the same stimulus, as the "response contexts" presented high functional similarity. Despite this, the subtle spatial diversity can be observed from the difference in network architectures. The architecture of the signaling networks in nerve cells displayed less completeness than that in glandular cells, which indicated cellular-context dependent signaling patterns are elaborately spatially organized. Likewise, in cancer cells most signaling networks were generally dysfunctional and less complete than that in normal cells. However, glioma emerged hyper-activated transduction mechanism in malignant state. Receptor ATP6AP2 and TNFRSF21 induced rennin-angiotensin and apoptosis signaling were found likely to explain the glioma-specific mechanism. This work represents an effort to decipher context-specific signaling network from spatial dimension. Our results indicated that although a majority of cells engage general signaling response with subtle differences, the spatial dynamics of cell signaling can not only deepen our insights into different signaling mechanisms, but also help understand cell signaling in disease.

  6. Hydrostatic pressure does not cause detectable changes in survival of human retinal ganglion cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Osborne

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP is a major risk factor for glaucoma. One consequence of raised IOP is that ocular tissues are subjected to increased hydrostatic pressure (HP. The effect of raised HP on stress pathway signaling and retinal ganglion cell (RGC survival in the human retina was investigated. METHODS: A chamber was designed to expose cells to increased HP (constant and fluctuating. Accurate pressure control (10-100 mmHg was achieved using mass flow controllers. Human organotypic retinal cultures (HORCs from donor eyes (<24 h post mortem were cultured in serum-free DMEM/HamF12. Increased HP was compared to simulated ischemia (oxygen glucose deprivation, OGD. Cell death and apoptosis were measured by LDH and TUNEL assays, RGC marker expression by qRT-PCR (THY-1 and RGC number by immunohistochemistry (NeuN. Activated p38 and JNK were detected by Western blot. RESULTS: Exposure of HORCs to constant (60 mmHg or fluctuating (10-100 mmHg; 1 cycle/min pressure for 24 or 48 h caused no loss of structural integrity, LDH release, decrease in RGC marker expression (THY-1 or loss of RGCs compared with controls. In addition, there was no increase in TUNEL-positive NeuN-labelled cells at either time-point indicating no increase in apoptosis of RGCs. OGD increased apoptosis, reduced RGC marker expression and RGC number and caused elevated LDH release at 24 h. p38 and JNK phosphorylation remained unchanged in HORCs exposed to fluctuating pressure (10-100 mmHg; 1 cycle/min for 15, 30, 60 and 90 min durations, whereas OGD (3 h increased activation of p38 and JNK, remaining elevated for 90 min post-OGD. CONCLUSIONS: Directly applied HP had no detectable impact on RGC survival and stress-signalling in HORCs. Simulated ischemia, however, activated stress pathways and caused RGC death. These results show that direct HP does not cause degeneration of RGCs in the ex vivo human retina.

  7. Initiation of Antiviral B Cell Immunity Relies on Innate Signals from Spatially Positioned NKT Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaya, Mauro; Barral, Patricia; Burbage, Marianne; Aggarwal, Shweta; Montaner, Beatriz; Warren Navia, Andrew; Aid, Malika; Tsui, Carlson; Maldonado, Paula; Nair, Usha; Ghneim, Khader; Fallon, Padraic G; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Barouch, Dan H; Shalek, Alex K; Bruckbauer, Andreas; Strid, Jessica; Batista, Facundo D

    2018-01-25

    B cells constitute an essential line of defense from pathogenic infections through the generation of class-switched antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) in germinal centers. Although this process is known to be regulated by follicular helper T (TfH) cells, the mechanism by which B cells initially seed germinal center reactions remains elusive. We found that NKT cells, a population of innate-like T lymphocytes, are critical for the induction of B cell immunity upon viral infection. The positioning of NKT cells at the interfollicular areas of lymph nodes facilitates both their direct priming by resident macrophages and the localized delivery of innate signals to antigen-experienced B cells. Indeed, NKT cells secrete an early wave of IL-4 and constitute up to 70% of the total IL-4-producing cells during the initial stages of infection. Importantly, the requirement of this innate immunity arm appears to be evolutionarily conserved because early NKT and IL-4 gene signatures also positively correlate with the levels of neutralizing antibodies in Zika-virus-infected macaques. In conclusion, our data support a model wherein a pre-TfH wave of IL-4 secreted by interfollicular NKT cells triggers the seeding of germinal center cells and serves as an innate link between viral infection and B cell immunity. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Cascade of Wnt, Eda, and Shh Signaling Is Essential for Touch Dome Merkel Cell Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Xiao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling pathway regulates developmental, homeostatic, and repair processes throughout the body. In the skin, touch domes develop in tandem with primary hair follicles and contain sensory Merkel cells. The developmental signaling requirements for touch dome specification are largely unknown. We found dermal Wnt signaling and subsequent epidermal Eda/Edar signaling promoted Merkel cell morphogenesis by inducing Shh expression in early follicles. Lineage-specific gene deletions revealed intraepithelial Shh signaling was necessary for Merkel cell specification. Additionally, a Shh signaling agonist was sufficient to rescue Merkel cell differentiation in Edar-deficient skin. Moreover, Merkel cells formed in Fgf20 mutant skin where primary hair formation was defective but Shh production was preserved. Although developmentally associated with hair follicles, fate mapping demonstrated Merkel cells primarily originated outside the hair follicle lineage. These findings suggest that touch dome development requires Wnt-dependent mesenchymal signals to establish reciprocal signaling within the developing ectoderm, including Eda signaling to primary hair placodes and ultimately Shh signaling from primary follicles to extrafollicular Merkel cell progenitors. Shh signaling often demonstrates pleiotropic effects within a structure over time. In postnatal skin, Shh is known to regulate the self-renewal, but not the differentiation, of touch dome stem cells. Our findings relate the varied effects of Shh in the touch dome to the ligand source, with locally produced Shh acting as a morphogen essential for lineage specification during development and neural Shh regulating postnatal touch dome stem cell maintenance.

  9. Resistant Starch Regulates Gut Microbiota: Structure, Biochemistry and Cell Signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoping; Darko, Kwame Oteng; Huang, Yanjun; He, Caimei; Yang, Huansheng; He, Shanping; Li, Jianzhong; Li, Jian; Hocher, Berthold; Yin, Yulong

    2017-01-01

    Starch is one of the most popular nutritional sources for both human and animals. Due to the variation of its nutritional traits and biochemical specificities, starch has been classified into rapidly digestible, slowly digestible and resistant starch. Resistant starch has its own unique chemical structure, and various forms of resistant starch are commercially available. It has been found being a multiple-functional regulator for treating metabolic dysfunction. Different functions of resistant starch such as modulation of the gut microbiota, gut peptides, circulating growth factors, circulating inflammatory mediators have been characterized by animal studies and clinical trials. In this mini-review, recent remarkable progress in resistant starch on gut microbiota, particularly the effect of structure, biochemistry and cell signaling on nutrition has been summarized, with highlights on its regulatory effect on gut microbiota. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis through suppressing cellular signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Wenhao; Xu, Chan; Hong, Zongguo; Mei, Zhinan; Yang, Xinzhou, E-mail: xinzhou_yang@hotmail.com

    2014-12-01

    Kurarinol is a flavonoid isolated from roots of the medical plant Sophora flavescens. However, its cytotoxic activity against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and toxic effects on mammalians remain largely unexplored. Here, the pro-apoptotic activities of kurarinol on HCC cells and its toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice were evaluated. The molecular mechanisms underlying kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis were also investigated. We found that kurarinol dose-dependently provoked HepG2, Huh-7 and H22 HCC cell apoptosis. In addition, kurarinol gave rise to a considerable decrease in the transcriptional activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in HCC cells. Suppression of STAT3 signaling is involved in kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis. In vivo studies showed that kurarinol injection substantially induced transplanted H22 cell apoptosis with low toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice. Similarly, the transcriptional activity of STAT3 in transplanted tumor tissues was significantly suppressed after kurarinol treatment. Collectively, our current research demonstrated that kurarinol has the capacity of inducing HCC cell apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo with undetectable toxic impacts on the host. Suppressing STAT3 signaling is implicated in kurarinol-mediated HCC cell apoptosis. - Highlights: • Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell apoptosis. • Kurarinol induces HCC cell apoptosis via inhibiting STAT3. • Kurarinol exhibits low toxic effects on tumor-bearing animals.

  11. Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis through suppressing cellular signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Wenhao; Xu, Chan; Hong, Zongguo; Mei, Zhinan; Yang, Xinzhou

    2014-01-01

    Kurarinol is a flavonoid isolated from roots of the medical plant Sophora flavescens. However, its cytotoxic activity against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and toxic effects on mammalians remain largely unexplored. Here, the pro-apoptotic activities of kurarinol on HCC cells and its toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice were evaluated. The molecular mechanisms underlying kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis were also investigated. We found that kurarinol dose-dependently provoked HepG2, Huh-7 and H22 HCC cell apoptosis. In addition, kurarinol gave rise to a considerable decrease in the transcriptional activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in HCC cells. Suppression of STAT3 signaling is involved in kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis. In vivo studies showed that kurarinol injection substantially induced transplanted H22 cell apoptosis with low toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice. Similarly, the transcriptional activity of STAT3 in transplanted tumor tissues was significantly suppressed after kurarinol treatment. Collectively, our current research demonstrated that kurarinol has the capacity of inducing HCC cell apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo with undetectable toxic impacts on the host. Suppressing STAT3 signaling is implicated in kurarinol-mediated HCC cell apoptosis. - Highlights: • Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell apoptosis. • Kurarinol induces HCC cell apoptosis via inhibiting STAT3. • Kurarinol exhibits low toxic effects on tumor-bearing animals

  12. Inactivation of IL11 signaling causes craniosynostosis, delayed tooth eruption, and supernumerary teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieminen, Pekka; Morgan, Neil V; Fenwick, Aimée L

    2011-01-01

    Craniosynostosis and supernumerary teeth most often occur as isolated developmental anomalies, but they are also separately manifested in several malformation syndromes. Here, we describe a human syndrome featuring craniosynostosis, maxillary hypoplasia, delayed tooth eruption, and supernumerary...... and remodeling of limb bones has been previously described. We conclude that IL11 signaling is essential for the normal development of craniofacial bones and teeth and that its function is to restrict suture fusion and tooth number. The results open up the possibility of modulation of IL11 signaling...

  13. Notch signalling inhibits CD4 expression during initiation and differentiation of human T cell lineage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Carlin

    Full Text Available The Delta/Notch signal transduction pathway is central to T cell differentiation from haemopoietic stem cells (HSCs. Although T cell development is well characterized using expression of cell surface markers, the detailed mechanisms driving differentiation have not been established. This issue becomes central with observations that adult HSCs exhibit poor differentiation towards the T cell lineage relative to neonatal or embryonic precursors. This study investigates the contribution of Notch signalling and stromal support cells to differentiation of adult and Cord Blood (CB human HSCs, using the Notch signalling OP9Delta co-culture system. Co-cultured cells were assayed at weekly intervals during development for phenotype markers using flow cytometry. Cells were also assayed for mRNA expression at critical developmental stages. Expression of the central thymocyte marker CD4 was initiated independently of Notch signalling, while cells grown with Notch signalling had reduced expression of CD4 mRNA and protein. Interruption of Notch signalling in partially differentiated cells increased CD4 mRNA and protein expression, and promoted differentiation to CD4(+ CD8(+ T cells. We identified a set of genes related to T cell development that were initiated by Notch signalling, and also a set of genes subsequently altered by Notch signal interruption. These results demonstrate that while Notch signalling is essential for establishment of the T cell lineage, at later stages of differentiation, its removal late in differentiation promotes more efficient DP cell generation. Notch signalling adds to signals provided by stromal cells to allow HSCs to differentiate to T cells via initiation of transcription factors such as HES1, GATA3 and TCF7. We also identify gene expression profile differences that may account for low generation of T cells from adult HSCs.

  14. Rapid estrogen signaling negatively regulates PTEN activity through phosphorylation in endometrial cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Melanie M.; Palacios-Helgeson, Leslie K.; Wah, Lah S.; Jackson, Twila A.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperestrogenicity is a risk factor for endometrial cancer. 17β-estradiol (E2) is known to stimulate both genomic and nongenomic estrogen receptor-α (ERα) actions in a number of reproductive tissues. However, the contributions of transcription-independent ERα signaling on normal and malignant endometrium are not fully understood. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a tumor suppressor that decreases cellular mitosis primarily through negative regulation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT signaling axis. PTEN levels are elevated during the E2 dominated, mitotically active, proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle, indicating possible hormonal regulation of PTEN in the uterus. In order to determine if rapid E2 signaling regulates PTEN, we used ERα positive, PTEN positive, endometrial cells. We show that cytosolic E2/ERα signaling leads to increased phosphorylation of PTEN at key regulatory residues. Importantly, E2 stimulation decreased PTEN lipid phosphatase activity and caused consequent increases in phospho-AKT. We further demonstrate that cytosolic ERα forms a complex with PTEN in an E2-dependent manner, and that ERα constitutively complexes with protein kinase2-α (CK2α), a kinase previously shown to phosphorylate the C-terminal tail of PTEN. These results provide mechanistic support for an E2-dependent, ERα cytosolic signaling complex that negatively regulates PTEN activity through carboxy terminus phosphorylation. Using an animal model, we show that sustained E2 signaling results in increased phospho-PTEN (S380, T382, T383), total PTEN and phospho-AKT (S473). Taken together, we provide a novel mechanism in which transcription-independent E2/ERα signaling may promote a pro-tumorigenic environment in the endometrium. PMID:24844349

  15. TCDD induces cell migration via NFATc1/ATX-signaling in MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Anja; Rau, Steffi; Küllertz, Gerhard; Fischer, Bernd; Santos, Anne Navarrete

    2009-01-10

    Breast cancer is characterized, among others, by the concurrence of lipophilic xenobiotica such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-para-dioxin (TCDD) with hypoxic tissue conditions. This condition activates the transcription factors hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) that are known to promote tumor progression. An interrelation between these transcription factors and nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) was implied by gene array analysis. In the present study, the interplay of the three transcription factors was studied and correlated with the migration of MCF-7 cells in response to TCDD and/or hypoxia. An AhR-activation by 10nM TCDD and HIF-1alpha activation by 5% oxygen induced activation of NFATc1. The effects were inhibited by cyclosporine A (CsA), suggesting that the activation of NFAT by AhR or HIF-1alpha signaling is calcineurin-dependent. The expression/activity of the NFAT target gene autotaxin (ATX) was increased. ATX is known to stimulate migration of tumor cells. The hydrolysis product of ATX, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), increased the migration of MCF-7 cells under normoxia but not under hypoxia. This effect correlated with increased migration observed after TCDD treatment. Hypoxia did not promote migration of MCF-7 cells, suggesting that ATX down-stream signaling was inhibited by hypoxia. In conclusion, the TCDD-mediated activation of NFATc1 is suggested to promote cell migration via ATX/LPA-signaling.

  16. Identification of T cell-signaling pathways that stimulate latent HIV in primary cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, David G.; Arlen, Philip A.; Gao, Lianying; Kitchen, Christina M. R.; Zack, Jerome A.

    2003-01-01

    Eradication of HIV infection depends on the elimination of a small, but stable population of latently infected T cells. After the discontinuation of therapy, activation of latent virus can rekindle infection. To purge this reservoir, it is necessary to define cellular signaling pathways that lead to activation of latent HIV. We used the SCID-hu (Thy/Liv) mouse model of HIV latency to analyze a broad array of T cell-signaling pathways and show in primary, quiescent cells that viral induction depends on the activation of two primary intracellular signaling pathways, protein kinase C or nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT). In contrast, inhibition or activation of other important T cell stimulatory pathways (such as mitogen-activated protein kinase, calcium flux, or histone deacetylation) do not significantly induce virus expression. We found that the activation of NF-κB is critical to viral reactivation; however, all pathways that stimulate NF-κBdonot reactivate latent virus. Our studies further show that inhibition of NF-κB does not prevent activation of HIV by NF-AT, indicating that these pathways can function independently to activate the HIV LTR. Thus, we define several molecular pathways that trigger HIV reactivation from latency and provide evidence that latent HIV infection is maintained by the functional lack of particular transcription factors in quiescent cells. PMID:14569007

  17. RAG-mediated DNA double-strand breaks activate a cell type–specific checkpoint to inhibit pre–B cell receptor signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarski, Jeffrey J.; Pandey, Ruchi; Schulte, Emily; White, Lynn S.; Chen, Bo-Ruei; Sandoval, Gabriel J.; Kohyama, Masako; Haldar, Malay; Nickless, Andrew; Trott, Amanda; Cheng, Genhong; Murphy, Kenneth M.; Bassing, Craig H.; Payton, Jacqueline E.

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) activate a canonical DNA damage response, including highly conserved cell cycle checkpoint pathways that prevent cells with DSBs from progressing through the cell cycle. In developing B cells, pre–B cell receptor (pre–BCR) signals initiate immunoglobulin light (Igl) chain gene assembly, leading to RAG-mediated DNA DSBs. The pre–BCR also promotes cell cycle entry, which could cause aberrant DSB repair and genome instability in pre–B cells. Here, we show that RAG DSBs inhibit pre–BCR signals through the ATM- and NF-κB2–dependent induction of SPIC, a hematopoietic-specific transcriptional repressor. SPIC inhibits expression of the SYK tyrosine kinase and BLNK adaptor, resulting in suppression of pre–BCR signaling. This regulatory circuit prevents the pre–BCR from inducing additional Igl chain gene rearrangements and driving pre–B cells with RAG DSBs into cycle. We propose that pre–B cells toggle between pre–BCR signals and a RAG DSB-dependent checkpoint to maintain genome stability while iteratively assembling Igl chain genes. PMID:26834154

  18. 7-Dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC), But Not Cholesterol, Causes Suppression of Canonical TGF-β Signaling and Is Likely Involved in the Development of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease (ASCVD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuan Shian; Liu, I-Hua; Chen, Chun-Lin; Chang, Jia-Ming; Johnson, Frank E; Huang, Jung San

    2017-06-01

    For several decades, cholesterol has been thought to cause ASCVD. Limiting dietary cholesterol intake has been recommended to reduce the risk of the disease. However, several recent epidemiological studies do not support a relationship between dietary cholesterol and/or blood cholesterol and ASCVD. Consequently, the role of cholesterol in atherogenesis is now uncertain. Much evidence indicates that TGF-β, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, protects against ASCVD and that suppression of canonical TGF-β signaling (Smad2-dependent) is involved in atherogenesis. We had hypothesized that cholesterol causes ASCVD by suppressing canonical TGF-β signaling in vascular endothelium. To test this hypothesis, we determine the effects of cholesterol, 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC; the biosynthetic precursor of cholesterol), and other sterols on canonical TGF-β signaling. We use Mv1Lu cells (a model cell system for studying TGF-β activity) stably expressing the Smad2-dependent luciferase reporter gene. We demonstrate that 7-DHC (but not cholesterol or other sterols) effectively suppresses the TGF-β-stimulated luciferase activity. We also demonstrate that 7-DHC suppresses TGF-β-stimulated luciferase activity by promoting lipid raft/caveolae formation and subsequently recruiting cell-surface TGF-β receptors from non-lipid raft microdomains to lipid rafts/caveolae where TGF-β receptors become inactive in transducing canonical signaling and undergo rapid degradation upon TGF-β binding. We determine this by cell-surface 125 I-TGF-β-cross-linking and sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation. We further demonstrate that methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), a sterol-chelating agent, reverses 7-DHC-induced suppression of TGF-β-stimulated luciferase activity by extrusion of 7-DHC from resident lipid rafts/caveolae. These results suggest that 7-DHC, but not cholesterol, promotes lipid raft/caveolae formation, leading to suppression of canonical TGF-β signaling and atherogenesis. J

  19. Atg9 antagonizes TOR signaling to regulate intestinal cell growth and epithelial homeostasis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jung-Kun; Wang, Yi-Ting; Chan, Chih-Chiang; Hsieh, Cheng-Wen; Liao, Hsiao-Man; Hung, Chin-Chun; Chen, Guang-Chao

    2017-11-16

    Autophagy is essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and survival under various stress conditions. Autophagy-related gene 9 (Atg9) encodes a multipass transmembrane protein thought to act as a membrane carrier for forming autophagosomes. However, the molecular regulation and physiological importance of Atg9 in animal development remain largely unclear. Here, we generated Atg9 null mutant flies and found that loss of Atg9 led to shortened lifespan, locomotor defects, and increased susceptibility to stress. Atg9 loss also resulted in aberrant adult midgut morphology with dramatically enlarged enterocytes. Interestingly, inhibiting the TOR signaling pathway rescued the midgut defects of the Atg9 mutants. In addition, Atg9 interacted with PALS1-associated tight junction protein (Patj), which associates with TSC2 to regulate TOR activity. Depletion of Atg9 caused a marked decrease in TSC2 levels. Our findings revealed an antagonistic relationship between Atg9 and TOR signaling in the regulation of cell growth and tissue homeostasis.

  20. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans: structure, protein interactions and cell signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana L. Dreyfuss

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Heparan sulfate proteoglycans are ubiquitously found at the cell surface and extracellular matrix in all the animal species. This review will focus on the structural characteristics of the heparan sulfate proteoglycans related to protein interactions leading to cell signaling. The heparan sulfate chains due to their vast structural diversity are able to bind and interact with a wide variety of proteins, such as growth factors, chemokines, morphogens, extracellular matrix components, enzymes, among others. There is a specificity directing the interactions of heparan sulfates and target proteins, regarding both the fine structure of the polysaccharide chain as well precise protein motifs. Heparan sulfates play a role in cellular signaling either as receptor or co-receptor for different ligands, and the activation of downstream pathways is related to phosphorylation of different cytosolic proteins either directly or involving cytoskeleton interactions leading to gene regulation. The role of the heparan sulfate proteoglycans in cellular signaling and endocytic uptake pathways is also discussed.Proteoglicanos de heparam sulfato são encontrados tanto superfície celular quanto na matriz extracelular em todas as espécies animais. Esta revisão tem enfoque nas características estruturais dos proteoglicanos de heparam sulfato e nas interações destes proteoglicanos com proteínas que levam à sinalização celular. As cadeias de heparam sulfato, devido a sua variedade estrutural, são capazes de se ligar e interagir com ampla gama de proteínas, como fatores de crescimento, quimiocinas, morfógenos, componentes da matriz extracelular, enzimas, entreoutros. Existe uma especificidade estrutural que direciona as interações dos heparam sulfatos e proteínas alvo. Esta especificidade está relacionada com a estrutura da cadeia do polissacarídeo e os motivos conservados da cadeia polipeptídica das proteínas envolvidas nesta interação. Os heparam

  1. Glucose-ABL1-TOR Signaling Modulates Cell Cycle Tuning to Control Terminal Appressorial Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroquin-Guzman, Margarita; Sun, Guangchao; Wilson, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    The conserved target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway integrates growth and development with available nutrients, but how cellular glucose controls TOR function and signaling is poorly understood. Here, we provide functional evidence from the devastating rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae that glucose can mediate TOR activity via the product of a novel carbon-responsive gene, ABL1, in order to tune cell cycle progression during infection-related development. Under nutrient-free conditions, wild type (WT) M. oryzae strains form terminal plant-infecting cells (appressoria) at the tips of germ tubes emerging from three-celled spores (conidia). WT appressorial development is accompanied by one round of mitosis followed by autophagic cell death of the conidium. In contrast, Δabl1 mutant strains undergo multiple rounds of accelerated mitosis in elongated germ tubes, produce few appressoria, and are abolished for autophagy. Treating WT spores with glucose or 2-deoxyglucose phenocopied Δabl1. Inactivating TOR in Δabl1 mutants or glucose-treated WT strains restored appressorium formation by promoting mitotic arrest at G1/G0 via an appressorium- and autophagy-inducing cell cycle delay at G2/M. Collectively, this work uncovers a novel glucose-ABL1-TOR signaling axis and shows it engages two metabolic checkpoints in order to modulate cell cycle tuning and mediate terminal appressorial cell differentiation. We thus provide new molecular insights into TOR regulation and cell development in response to glucose.

  2. Evolution and cell physiology. 2. The evolution of cell signaling: from mitochondria to Metazoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, Neil W

    2013-11-01

    The history of life is a history of levels-of-selection transitions. Each transition requires mechanisms that mediate conflict among the lower-level units. In the origins of multicellular eukaryotes, cell signaling is one such mechanism. The roots of cell signaling, however, may extend to the previous major transition, the origin of eukaryotes. Energy-converting protomitochondria within a larger cell allowed eukaryotes to transcend the surface-to-volume constraints inherent in the design of prokaryotes. At the same time, however, protomitochondria can selfishly allocate energy to their own replication. Metabolic signaling may have mediated this principal conflict in several ways. Variation of the protomitochondria was constrained by stoichiometry and strong metabolic demand (state 3) exerted by the protoeukaryote. Variation among protoeukaryotes was increased by the sexual stage of the life cycle, triggered by weak metabolic demand (state 4), resulting in stochastic allocation of protomitochondria to daughter cells. Coupled with selection, many selfish protomitochondria could thus be removed from the population. Hence, regulation of states 3 and 4, as, for instance, provided by the CO2/soluble adenylyl cyclase/cAMP pathway in mitochondria, was critical for conflict mediation. Subsequently, as multicellular eukaryotes evolved, metabolic signaling pathways employed by eukaryotes to mediate conflict within cells could now be co-opted into conflict mediation between cells. For example, in some fungi, the CO2/soluble adenylyl cyclase/cAMP pathway regulates the transition from yeast to forms with hyphae. In animals, this pathway regulates the maturation of sperm. While the particular features (sperm and hyphae) are distinct, both may involve between-cell conflicts that required mediation.

  3. Purinergic signaling mediates oxidative stress in UVA-exposed THP-1 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayumi Kawano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet A (UVA radiation, the major UV component of solar radiation, can penetrate easily to the dermis, where it causes significant damage to cellular components by inducing formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. On the other hand, extracellular ATP is released in response to various stimuli, and activates purinergic P2X7 receptor, triggering ROS production and cell death. Here, we examined the hypothesis that ATP release followed by activation of P2X7 receptor plays a role in UVA-induced oxidative cell damage, using human acute monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1. Indeed, UVA irradiation of THP-1 cells induced ATP release and activation of P2X7 receptor. Irradiated cells showed a rapid increase of both p67phox in membrane fraction and intracellular ROS. Pretreatment with ecto-nucleotidase or P2X7 receptor antagonist blocked the UVA-initiated membrane translocation of p67phox and ROS production. Furthermore, pretreatment with antioxidant or P2X7 receptor antagonist efficiently protected UVA-irradiated cells from caspase-dependent cell death. These findings show that autocrine signaling through release of ATP and activation of P2X7 receptor is required for UVA-induced stimulation of oxidative stress in monocytes.

  4. Targeting cancer stem cells and signaling pathways by phytochemicals: Novel approach for breast cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandawate, Prasad R; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Jensen, Roy A; Anant, Shrikant

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer diagnosed in women worldwide and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the USA. Despite the development of newer diagnostic methods, selective as well as targeted chemotherapies and their combinations, surgery, hormonal therapy, radiotherapy, breast cancer recurrence, metastasis and drug resistance are still the major problems for breast cancer. Emerging evidence suggest the existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a population of cells with the capacity to self-renew, differentiate and be capable of initiating and sustaining tumor growth. In addition, CSCs are believed to be responsible for cancer recurrence, anticancer drug resistance, and metastasis. Hence, compounds targeting breast CSCs may be better therapeutic agents for treating breast cancer and control recurrence and metastasis. Naturally occurring compounds, mainly phytochemicals have gained immense attention in recent times because of their wide safety profile, ability to target heterogeneous populations of cancer cells as well as CSCs, and their key signaling pathways. Therefore, in the present review article, we summarize our current understanding of breast CSCs and their signaling pathways, and the phytochemicals that affect these cells including curcumin, resveratrol, tea polyphenols (epigallocatechin-3-gallate, epigallocatechin), sulforaphane, genistein, indole-3-carbinol, 3, 3'-di-indolylmethane, vitamin E, retinoic acid, quercetin, parthenolide, triptolide, 6-shogaol, pterostilbene, isoliquiritigenin, celastrol, and koenimbin. These phytochemicals may serve as novel therapeutic agents for breast cancer treatment and future leads for drug development. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Dung biomass smoke activates inflammatory signaling pathways in human small airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Claire E; Duffney, Parker F; Gelein, Robert; Thatcher, Thomas H; Elder, Alison; Phipps, Richard P; Sime, Patricia J

    2016-12-01

    Animal dung is a biomass fuel burned by vulnerable populations who cannot afford cleaner sources of energy, such as wood and gas, for cooking and heating their homes. Exposure to biomass smoke is the leading environmental risk for mortality, with over 4,000,000 deaths each year worldwide attributed to indoor air pollution from biomass smoke. Biomass smoke inhalation is epidemiologically associated with pulmonary diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung cancer, and respiratory infections, especially in low and middle-income countries. Yet, few studies have examined the mechanisms of dung biomass smoke-induced inflammatory responses in human lung cells. Here, we tested the hypothesis that dung biomass smoke causes inflammatory responses in human lung cells through signaling pathways involved in acute and chronic lung inflammation. Primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAECs) were exposed to dung smoke at the air-liquid interface using a newly developed, automated, and reproducible dung biomass smoke generation system. The examination of inflammatory signaling showed that dung biomass smoke increased the production of several proinflammatory cytokines and enzymes in SAECs through activation of the activator protein (AP)-1 and arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) but not nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathways. We propose that the inflammatory responses of lung cells exposed to dung biomass smoke contribute to the development of respiratory diseases. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Signal loss in magnetic resonance imaging caused by intraoral anchored dental magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankenstein, F.H.; Naumann, M.; Truong, B.; Thomas, A.; Schroeder, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: to measure the maximum extent of the signal loss areas in the center of the susceptibility artifacts generated by ferromagnetic dental magnet attachments using three different sequences in the 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla MRI. Materials and methods: five different pieces of standard dental magnet attachments with volumes of 6.5 to 31.4 mm 3 were used: a NdFeB magnet with an open magnetic field, a NdFeB magnet with a closed magnetic field, a SmCo magnet with an open magnetic field, a stainless steel keeper (AUM-20) and a PdCo piece. The attachments were placed between two cylindrical phantoms and examined in 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla MRI using gradient echo and T1- and T2-weighted spin echoes. We measured the maximum extent of the generated signal loss areas parallel and perpendicular to the direction of B O . Results: in gradient echoes the artifacts were substantially larger and symmetrically adjusted around the object. The areas with total signal loss were mushroom-like with a maximum extent of 7.4 to 9.7 cm parallel to the direction of B O and 6.7 to 7.4 cm perpendicular to B O . In spin echoes the signal loss areas were obviously smaller, but not centered. The maximum values ranged between 4.9 and 7.2 cm (parallel B O ) and 3.6 and 7.0 cm (perpendicular B O ). The different ferromagnetic attachments had no clinically relevant influence on the signal loss neither in 1.5 T nor 3.0 T MRI. Conclusions: ferromagnetic materials used in dentistry are not intraorally standardized. To ensure, that the area of interest is not affected by the described artifacts, the maximum extent of the signal loss area should be assumed: a radius of up to 7 cm in 1.5 and 3.0 T MRI by T1 and T2 sequences, and a radius of up to 10 cm in T2* sequences. To decide whether magnet attachments have to be removed before MR imaging, physicians should consider both the intact retention of the keepers and the safety distance between the ferromagnetic objects and the area of interest. (orig.)

  7. [Signal loss in magnetic resonance imaging caused by intraoral anchored dental magnetic materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenstein, F H; Truong, B; Thomas, A; Schröder, R J; Naumann, M

    2006-08-01

    To measure the maximum extent of the signal loss areas in the center of the susceptibility artifacts generated by ferromagnetic dental magnet attachments using three different sequences in the 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla MRI. Five different pieces of standard dental magnet attachments with volumes of 6.5 to 31.4 mm(3) were used: a NdFeB magnet with an open magnetic field, a NdFeB magnet with a closed magnetic field, a SmCo magnet with an open magnetic field, a stainless steel keeper (AUM-20) and a PdCo piece. The attachments were placed between two cylindrical phantoms and examined in 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla MRI using gradient echo and T1- and T2-weighted spin echoes. We measured the maximum extent of the generated signal loss areas parallel and perpendicular to the direction of B (O). In gradient echoes the artifacts were substantially larger and symmetrically adjusted around the object. The areas with total signal loss were mushroom-like with a maximum extent of 7.4 to 9.7 cm parallel to the direction of B (O) and 6.7 to 7.4 cm perpendicular to B (O). In spin echoes the signal loss areas were obviously smaller, but not centered. The maximum values ranged between 4.9 and 7.2 cm (parallel B (O)) and 3.6 and 7.0 cm (perpendicular B (O)). The different ferromagnetic attachments had no clinically relevant influence on the signal loss neither in 1.5 T nor 3.0 T MRI. Ferromagnetic materials used in dentistry are not intraorally standardized. To ensure, that the area of interest is not affected by the described artifacts, the maximum extent of the signal loss area should be assumed: a radius of up to 7 cm in 1.5 and 3.0 T MRI by T1 and T2 sequences, and a radius of up to 10 cm in T2* sequences. To decide whether magnet attachments have to be removed before MR imaging, physicians should consider both the intact retention of the keepers and the safety distance between the ferromagnetic objects and the area of interest.

  8. Cell-Nonautonomous Signaling of FOXO/DAF-16 to the Stem Cells of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wenjing; Huang, Xu; Neumann-Haefelin, Elke; Schulze, Ekkehard; Baumeister, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), the promotion of longevity by the transcription factor DAF-16 requires reduced insulin/IGF receptor (IIR) signaling or the ablation of the germline, although the reason for the negative impact of germ cells is unknown. FOXO/DAF-16 activity inhibits germline proliferation in both daf-2 mutants and gld-1 tumors. In contrast to its function as a germline tumor suppressor, we now provide evidence that somatic DAF-16 in the presence of IIR signaling can also result in tumorigenic activity, which counteracts robust lifespan extension. In contrast to the cell-autonomous IIR signaling, which is required for larval germline proliferation, activation of DAF-16 in the hypodermis results in hyperplasia of the germline and disruption of the surrounding basement membrane. SHC-1 adaptor protein and AKT-1 kinase antagonize, whereas AKT-2 and SGK-1 kinases promote, this cell-nonautonomous DAF-16 function. Our data suggest that a functional balance of DAF-16 activities in different tissues determines longevity and reveals a novel, cell-nonautonomous role of FOXO/DAF-16 to affect stem cells. PMID:22916022

  9. Cell-nonautonomous signaling of FOXO/DAF-16 to the stem cells of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Qi

    Full Text Available In Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans, the promotion of longevity by the transcription factor DAF-16 requires reduced insulin/IGF receptor (IIR signaling or the ablation of the germline, although the reason for the negative impact of germ cells is unknown. FOXO/DAF-16 activity inhibits germline proliferation in both daf-2 mutants and gld-1 tumors. In contrast to its function as a germline tumor suppressor, we now provide evidence that somatic DAF-16 in the presence of IIR signaling can also result in tumorigenic activity, which counteracts robust lifespan extension. In contrast to the cell-autonomous IIR signaling, which is required for larval germline proliferation, activation of DAF-16 in the hypodermis results in hyperplasia of the germline and disruption of the surrounding basement membrane. SHC-1 adaptor protein and AKT-1 kinase antagonize, whereas AKT-2 and SGK-1 kinases promote, this cell-nonautonomous DAF-16 function. Our data suggest that a functional balance of DAF-16 activities in different tissues determines longevity and reveals a novel, cell-nonautonomous role of FOXO/DAF-16 to affect stem cells.

  10. Impact of laminitis on the canonical Wnt signaling pathway in basal epithelial cells of the equine digital laminae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le; Pawlak, Erica A; Johnson, Philip J; Belknap, James K; Eades, Susan; Stack, Sharon; Cousin, Helene; Black, Samuel J

    2013-01-01

    The digital laminae is a two layer tissue that attaches the distal phalanx to the inner hoof wall, thus suspending the horse's axial skeleton in the hoof capsule. This tissue fails at the epidermal:dermal junction in laminitic horses, causing crippling disease. Basal epithelial cells line the laminar epidermal:dermal junction, undergo physiological change in laminitic horses, and lose versican gene expression. Versican gene expression is purportedly under control of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and is a trigger for mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition; thus, its repression in laminar epithelial cells of laminitic horses may be associated with suppression of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and loss of the epithelial cell phenotype. In support of the former contention, we show, using laminae from healthy horses and horses with carbohydrate overload-induced laminitis, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting after sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and immunofluorescent tissue staining, that positive and negative regulatory components of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway are expressed in laminar basal epithelial cells of healthy horses. Furthermore, expression of positive regulators is suppressed and negative regulators elevated in laminae of laminitic compared to healthy horses. We also show that versican gene expression in the epithelial cells correlates positively with that of β-catenin and T-cell Factor 4, consistent with regulation by the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. In addition, gene and protein expression of β-catenin correlates positively with that of integrin β4 and both are strongly suppressed in laminar basal epithelial cells of laminitic horses, which remain E-cadherin(+)/vimentin(-), excluding mesenchymal transition as contributing to loss of the adherens junction and hemidesmosome components. We propose that suppression of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, and accompanying reduced

  11. Impact of laminitis on the canonical Wnt signaling pathway in basal epithelial cells of the equine digital laminae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Wang

    Full Text Available The digital laminae is a two layer tissue that attaches the distal phalanx to the inner hoof wall, thus suspending the horse's axial skeleton in the hoof capsule. This tissue fails at the epidermal:dermal junction in laminitic horses, causing crippling disease. Basal epithelial cells line the laminar epidermal:dermal junction, undergo physiological change in laminitic horses, and lose versican gene expression. Versican gene expression is purportedly under control of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and is a trigger for mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition; thus, its repression in laminar epithelial cells of laminitic horses may be associated with suppression of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and loss of the epithelial cell phenotype. In support of the former contention, we show, using laminae from healthy horses and horses with carbohydrate overload-induced laminitis, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting after sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and immunofluorescent tissue staining, that positive and negative regulatory components of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway are expressed in laminar basal epithelial cells of healthy horses. Furthermore, expression of positive regulators is suppressed and negative regulators elevated in laminae of laminitic compared to healthy horses. We also show that versican gene expression in the epithelial cells correlates positively with that of β-catenin and T-cell Factor 4, consistent with regulation by the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. In addition, gene and protein expression of β-catenin correlates positively with that of integrin β4 and both are strongly suppressed in laminar basal epithelial cells of laminitic horses, which remain E-cadherin(+/vimentin(-, excluding mesenchymal transition as contributing to loss of the adherens junction and hemidesmosome components. We propose that suppression of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, and

  12. Regulation of promyogenic signal transduction by cell-cell contact and adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Robert S., E-mail: Robert.Krauss@mssm.edu [Department of Developmental and Regenerative Biology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Skeletal myoblast differentiation involves acquisition of the muscle-specific transcriptional program and morphological changes, including fusion into multinucleated myofibers. Differentiation is regulated by extracellular signaling cues, including cell-cell contact and adhesion. Cadherin and Ig adhesion receptors have been implicated in distinct but overlapping stages of myogenesis. N-cadherin signals through the Ig receptor Cdo to activate p38 MAP kinase, while the Ig receptor neogenin signals to activate FAK; both processes promote muscle-specific gene expression and myoblast fusion. M-cadherin activates Rac1 to enhance fusion. Specific Ig receptors (Kirre and Sns) are essential for myoblast fusion in Drosophila, also signaling through Rac, and vertebrate orthologs of Kirre and Sns have partially conserved function. Mice lacking specific cytoplasmic signaling factors activated by multiple receptors (e.g., Rac1) have strong muscle phenotypes in vivo. In contrast, mice lacking individual adhesion receptors that lie upstream of these factors have modest phenotypes. Redundancy among receptors may account for this. Many of the mammalian Ig receptors and cadherins associate with each other, and multivalent interactions within these complexes may require removal of multiple components to reveal dramatic defects in vivo. Nevertheless, it is possible that the murine adhesion receptors rate-limiting in vivo have not yet been identified or fully assessed.

  13. Regulation of promyogenic signal transduction by cell-cell contact and adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal myoblast differentiation involves acquisition of the muscle-specific transcriptional program and morphological changes, including fusion into multinucleated myofibers. Differentiation is regulated by extracellular signaling cues, including cell-cell contact and adhesion. Cadherin and Ig adhesion receptors have been implicated in distinct but overlapping stages of myogenesis. N-cadherin signals through the Ig receptor Cdo to activate p38 MAP kinase, while the Ig receptor neogenin signals to activate FAK; both processes promote muscle-specific gene expression and myoblast fusion. M-cadherin activates Rac1 to enhance fusion. Specific Ig receptors (Kirre and Sns) are essential for myoblast fusion in Drosophila, also signaling through Rac, and vertebrate orthologs of Kirre and Sns have partially conserved function. Mice lacking specific cytoplasmic signaling factors activated by multiple receptors (e.g., Rac1) have strong muscle phenotypes in vivo. In contrast, mice lacking individual adhesion receptors that lie upstream of these factors have modest phenotypes. Redundancy among receptors may account for this. Many of the mammalian Ig receptors and cadherins associate with each other, and multivalent interactions within these complexes may require removal of multiple components to reveal dramatic defects in vivo. Nevertheless, it is possible that the murine adhesion receptors rate-limiting in vivo have not yet been identified or fully assessed.

  14. Peroxidized unsaturated fatty acids stimulate Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutoh, Akiko; Ueda, Shinichiro

    2013-05-30

    Although unsaturated fatty acids are assumed to be protective against inflammatory disorders that include a pathway involving Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation, they might actually be toxic because of their high susceptibility to lipid peroxidation. Here we studied the effects of peroxidized unsaturated fatty acids on the TLR4-nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathway in endothelial cells. Confluent cultured endothelial cells from bovine aorta were incubated for 1h with fatty acids integrated into phosphatidylcholine vesicles. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or phosphatidylcholine vesicles without fatty acids were also applied as a positive control or a control for fatty acid groups, respectively. Activation of TLR4 and downstream signaling was assessed by membrane fractionation and Western blotting or immunofluorescent staining. In the same way as LPS, application of sufficiently peroxidized unsaturated fatty acids like oleic acid or docosahexaenoic acid, acutely caused TLR4 translocation to caveolae/raft membranes, leading to activation of NF-κB signaling in endothelial cells. In contrast, saturated fatty acids did not show such effects. Applying well-peroxidized unsaturated fatty acids, but not saturated fatty acids, acutely activates the TLR4/NF-κB pathway. Peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acid is essential for the acute activation of TLR4 by the fatty acids that follow the same pathway as the activation by LPS. Unsaturated fatty acids have been assumed to be protective against inflammatory disorders, and drugs containing unsaturated fatty acids are now developed and provided. Our result suggests that, for inflammatory disorders involving TLR4 signaling, using unsaturated fatty acids as anti-inflammatory drugs may cause contrary effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Eavesdropping parasitoids do not cause the evolution of less conspicuous signalling behaviour in a field cricket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Oliver M; Wagner, William E

    2012-12-01

    Males of many species produce conspicuous mating signals to attract females, but these signals can also attract eavesdropping predators and parasites. Males are thus expected to evolve signalling behaviours that balance the sexual selection benefits and the natural selection costs. In the variable field cricket, Gryllus lineaticeps , males sing to attract females, but these songs also attract the lethal parasitoid fly Ormia ochracea . The flies use male crickets as hosts for their larvae, primarily search for hosts during a 2 h period following sunset and prefer the same song types as female crickets. We tested whether males from high-risk populations reduce the risk of parasitism by singing less frequently or by shifting their singing activity to a time of the night when the risk of parasitism is low. We compared male singing activity and its temporal pattern between six high-risk and six low-risk populations that were reared in a common environment. There was no effect of parasitism risk on either total male singing activity or the temporal pattern of male singing activity. Males from high-risk populations thus sang as frequently as males from low-risk populations. These results suggest that sexual selection on male singing behaviour may be substantially stronger in high-risk populations than in low-risk populations. It is possible that other traits may have evolved to reduce parasitism risk without compromising mate attraction.

  16. Lrp4 modulates extracellular integration of cell signaling pathways in development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Ohazama

    Full Text Available The extent to which cell signaling is integrated outside the cell is not currently appreciated. We show that a member of the low-density receptor-related protein family, Lrp4 modulates and integrates Bmp and canonical Wnt signalling during tooth morphogenesis by binding the secreted Bmp antagonist protein Wise. Mouse mutants of Lrp4 and Wise exhibit identical tooth phenotypes that include supernumerary incisors and molars, and fused molars. We propose that the Lrp4/Wise interaction acts as an extracellular integrator of epithelial-mesenchymal cell signaling. Wise, secreted from mesenchyme cells binds to BMP's and also to Lrp4 that is expressed on epithelial cells. This binding then results in the modulation of Wnt activity in the epithelial cells. Thus in this context Wise acts as an extracellular signaling molecule linking two signaling pathways. We further show that a downstream mediator of this integration is the Shh signaling pathway.

  17. Silymarin protects against acrylamide-induced neurotoxicity via Nrf2 signalling in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Sun, Hong-Yang; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Hong-Yu; Shao, Mei-Li

    2017-04-01

    Silymarin (SM) is a well-known antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer compound extracted from the milk thistle. Here, we investigated the protective effect of SM against acrylamide (AA)-induced neurotoxicity, mainly caused by oxidative stress, via activation of the nuclear transcription factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signalling pathway in PC12 cells. The MTT reduction assay was used to measure cell viability in various drug-treated groups and demonstrated that SM could increase cell viability in AA-treated PC12 cells. We then measured the reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels by the peroxide-sensitive fluorescent probe DCFH-DA and intracellular glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels by absorption spectrophotometry. Our data revealed that SM could reduce ROS and MDA levels and increase GSH levels in AA-induced PC12 cells. To identify a potential mechanism for SM-induced protection, we measured the mRNA and protein expression levels of Nrf2 and its downstream target antioxidants glutathione peroxidase (Gpx), glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC) and glutamate cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM) by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. The results suggested that SM could activate Nrf2 signalling and increase the expression of Nrf2, Gpx, GCLC and GCLM in AA-treated PC12 cells. In conclusion, SM can effectively alleviate AA-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Linking the environment, DAF-7/TGFβ signaling and LAG-2/DSL ligand expression in the germline stem cell niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekar, Olga; Ow, Maria C; Hui, Kailyn Y; Noyes, Marcus B; Hall, Sarah E; Hubbard, E Jane Albert

    2017-08-15

    The developmental accumulation of proliferative germ cells in the C. elegans hermaphrodite is sensitive to the organismal environment. Previously, we found that the TGFβ signaling pathway links the environment and proliferative germ cell accumulation. Neuronal DAF-7/TGFβ causes a DAF-1/TGFβR signaling cascade in the gonadal distal tip cell (DTC), the germline stem cell niche, where it negatively regulates a DAF-3 SMAD and DAF-5 Sno-Ski. LAG-2, a founding DSL ligand family member, is produced in the DTC and activates the GLP-1/Notch receptor on adjacent germ cells to maintain germline stem cell fate. Here, we show that DAF-7/TGFβ signaling promotes expression of lag-2 in the DTC in a daf-3- dependent manner. Using ChIP and one-hybrid assays, we find evidence for direct interaction between DAF-3 and the lag-2 promoter. We further identify a 25 bp DAF-3 binding element required for the DTC lag-2 reporter response to the environment and to DAF-7/TGFβ signaling. Our results implicate DAF-3 repressor complex activity as a key molecular mechanism whereby the environment influences DSL ligand expression in the niche to modulate developmental expansion of the germline stem cell pool. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Inhibitors of BCR signalling interrupt the survival signal mediated by the micro-environment in mantle cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Sophie; Danglade, Damien; Gardano, Laura; Laguillier, Christelle; Lazarian, Gregory; Roger, Claudine; Thieblemont, Catherine; Marzec, Jacek; Gribben, John; Cymbalista, Florence; Varin-Blank, Nadine; Ledoux, Dominique; Baran-Marszak, Fanny

    2015-06-15

    Several studies provide evidences for mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cell survival relying on B-cell receptor (BCR)-mediated signalling pathways, whereas the nature of this activation is unknown. Significant progress in MCL treatment is achieved through therapies targeting BCR-associated kinases, i.e., Ibrutinib and Fostamatinib, inhibitors of BTK and SYK, respectively. Our study addresses survival signals emanating from the BCR or the tumour environment and how inhibiting BCR signalling effectors might impact these survival signals. We found that BTK was constitutively activated and that SYK phosphorylation was highly increased and sustained upon BCR activation of primary MCL cells. Moreover, MCL cells from leukaemic patients secreted high amount of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and CCL5. Activation of the BCR induced (i) cell survival, (ii) STAT3 activation and (iii) increased autocrine secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, CCL5, IL-10, TNFα and VEGF. Specific inhibition of BTK by Ibrutinib or SYK by Fostamatinib (R406) reversed these protective effects and decreased both basal and BCR-induced autocrine cytokine secretions associated with STAT3 phosphorylation. Interestingly, targeting BTK and SYK prevented and inhibited BCR-induced MCL cell adhesion to human bone marrow stromal cells (HMSCs) in short- and long-term co-culture. We demonstrated that BCR-induced survival relies on autocrine secretion of IL-1β, TNFα and CCL5 that might facilitate adhesion of MCL cells to HMSC. Treatment with Ibrutinib or Fostamatinib blocked the chemotactic signal thus increasing apoptosis. © 2014 UICC.

  20. Targeting Wnt signaling in colorectal cancer. A Review in the Theme: Cell Signaling: Proteins, Pathways and Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novellasdemunt, Laura; Antas, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Wnt signaling pathway plays essential roles during embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. Notably, comprehensive genetic studies in Drosophila and mice in the past decades have demonstrated the crucial role of Wnt signaling in intestinal stem cell maintenance by regulating proliferation, differentiation, and cell-fate decisions. Wnt signaling has also been implicated in a variety of cancers and other diseases. Loss of the Wnt pathway negative regulator adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is the hallmark of human colorectal cancers (CRC). Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing further reveal many novel recurrent Wnt pathway mutations in addition to the well-characterized APC and β-catenin mutations in CRC. Despite attractive strategies to develop drugs for Wnt signaling, major hurdles in therapeutic intervention of the pathway persist. Here we discuss the Wnt-activating mechanisms in CRC and review the current advances and challenges in drug discovery. PMID:26289750

  1. SPARC expression induces cell cycle arrest via STAT3 signaling pathway in medulloblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetty, Chandramu [Department of Cancer Biology and Pharmacology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, One Illini Drive, Peoria, IL-61605 (United States); Dontula, Ranadheer [Section of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago, 840 South Wood Street, Suite 820-E, Chicago, IL-60612 (United States); Ganji, Purnachandra Nagaraju [Department of Cancer Biology and Pharmacology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, One Illini Drive, Peoria, IL-61605 (United States); Gujrati, Meena [Department of Pathology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, One Illini Drive, Peoria, IL-61605 (United States); Lakka, Sajani S., E-mail: slakka@uic.edu [Section of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago, 840 South Wood Street, Suite 820-E, Chicago, IL-60612 (United States)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ectopic expression of SPARC impaired cell proliferation in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression induces STAT3 mediated cell cycle arrest in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression significantly inhibited pre-established tumor growth in nude-mice. -- Abstract: Dynamic cell interaction with ECM components has profound influence in cancer progression. SPARC is a component of the ECM, impairs the proliferation of different cell types and modulates tumor cell aggressive features. We previously reported that SPARC expression significantly impairs medulloblastoma tumor growth in vivo. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of SPARC inhibits medulloblastoma cell proliferation. MTT assay indicated a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation in adenoviral mediated expression of SPARC full length cDNA (Ad-DsRed-SP) in D425 and UW228 cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed that Ad-DsRed-SP-infected cells accumulate in the G2/M phase of cell cycle. Further, immunoblot and immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that SPARC induced G2/M cell cycle arrest was mediated through inhibition of the Cyclin-B-regulated signaling pathway involving p21 and Cdc2 expression. Additionally, expression of SPARC decreased STAT3 phosphorylation at Tyr-705; constitutively active STAT3 expression reversed SPARC induced G2/M arrest. Ad-DsRed-SP significantly inhibited the pre-established orthotopic tumor growth and tumor volume in nude-mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor sections from mice treated with Ad-DsRed-SP showed decreased immunoreactivity for pSTAT3 and increased immunoreactivity for p21 compared to tumor section from mice treated with mock and Ad-DsRed. Taken together our studies further reveal that STAT3 plays a key role in SPARC induced G2/M arrest in medulloblastoma cells. These new findings provide a molecular basis for the mechanistic understanding of the

  2. SDF-1/CXCR4 Signaling Maintains Stemness Signature in Mouse Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Shih-Yin; Ling, Thai-Yen; Lin, Hsing-Yu; Liou, Jeffrey Tsai-Jui; Liu, Fei-Chih; Chen, I-Chun; Lee, Sue-Wei; Hsu, Yu; Lai, Dar-Ming; Liou, Horng-Huei

    2017-01-01

    SDF-1 and its primary receptor, CXCR4, are highly expressed in the embryonic central nervous system (CNS) and play a crucial role in brain architecture. Loss of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling causes abnormal development of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs) in the cerebellum, hippocampus, and cortex. However, the mechanism of SDF-1/CXCR4 axis in NSCs/NPCs regulation remains unknown. In this study, we found that elimination of SDF-1/CXCR4 transduction caused NSCs/NPCs to lose their stemness characteristics and to encounter neurogenic differentiation. Moreover, Notch and RE1 silencing transcription factor (REST) both play an essential role in NSCs/NPCs maintenance and neuronal differentiation and were dramatically downregulated following SDF-1/CXCR4 cascade inhibition. Finally, we demonstrated that the expression of achaete-scute homolog 1 (Ascl1), a proneural gene, and p27, an antiproliferative gene, were significantly increased after genetic elimination of SDF-1 alleles. Our results support that the loss of functional SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling pathway in NSCs/NPCs induces exit of cell cycle and promotes premature neural differentiation.

  3. SDF-1/CXCR4 Signaling Maintains Stemness Signature in Mouse Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Yin Ho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available SDF-1 and its primary receptor, CXCR4, are highly expressed in the embryonic central nervous system (CNS and play a crucial role in brain architecture. Loss of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling causes abnormal development of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs in the cerebellum, hippocampus, and cortex. However, the mechanism of SDF-1/CXCR4 axis in NSCs/NPCs regulation remains unknown. In this study, we found that elimination of SDF-1/CXCR4 transduction caused NSCs/NPCs to lose their stemness characteristics and to encounter neurogenic differentiation. Moreover, Notch and RE1 silencing transcription factor (REST both play an essential role in NSCs/NPCs maintenance and neuronal differentiation and were dramatically downregulated following SDF-1/CXCR4 cascade inhibition. Finally, we demonstrated that the expression of achaete-scute homolog 1 (Ascl1, a proneural gene, and p27, an antiproliferative gene, were significantly increased after genetic elimination of SDF-1 alleles. Our results support that the loss of functional SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling pathway in NSCs/NPCs induces exit of cell cycle and promotes premature neural differentiation.

  4. Shifts in bone marrow cell phenotypes caused by spaceflight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, M Teresa; Pecaut, Michael J; Gridley, Daila S; Stodieck, Louis S; Ferguson, Virginia; Chapes, Stephen K

    2009-02-01

    Bone marrow cells were isolated from the humeri of C57BL/6 mice after a 13-day flight on the space shuttle Space Transportation System (STS)-118 to determine how spaceflight affects differentiation of cells in the granulocytic lineage. We used flow cytometry to assess the expression of molecules that define the maturation/activation state of cells in the granulocytic lineage on three bone marrow cell subpopulations. These molecules included Ly6C, CD11b, CD31 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1), Ly6G (Gr-1), F4/80, CD44, and c-Fos. The three subpopulations were small agranular cells [region (R)1], larger granular cells (R2), which were mostly neutrophils, and very large, very granular cells (R3), which had properties of macrophages. Although there were no composite phenotypic differences between total bone marrow cells isolated from spaceflight and ground-control mice, there were subpopulation differences in Ly6C (R1 and R3), CD11b (R2), CD31 (R1, R2, and R3), Ly6G (R3), F4/80 (R3), CD44(high) (R3), and c-Fos (R1, R2, and R3). In particular, the elevation of CD11b in the R2 subpopulation suggests neutrophil activation in response to landing. In addition, decreases in Ly6C, c-Fos, CD44(high), and Ly6G and an increase in F4/80 suggest that the cells in the bone marrow R3 subpopulation of spaceflight mice were more differentiated compared with ground-control mice. The presence of more differentiated cells may not pose an immediate risk to immune resistance. However, the reduction in less differentiated cells may forebode future consequences for macrophage production and host defenses. This is of particular importance to considerations of future long-term spaceflights.

  5. DNA Damage, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis Induction Caused by Lead in Human Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement G. Yedjou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the industrial use of lead has been significantly reduced from paints and ceramic products, caulking, and pipe solder. Despite this progress, lead exposure continues to be a significant public health concern. The main goal of this research was to determine the in vitro mechanisms of lead nitrate [Pb(NO32] to induce DNA damage, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in human leukemia (HL-60 cells. To reach our goal, HL-60 cells were treated with different concentrations of Pb(NO32 for 24 h. Live cells and necrotic death cells were measured by the propidium idiode (PI assay using the cellometer vision. Cell apoptosis was measured by the flow cytometry and DNA laddering. Cell cycle analysis was evaluated by the flow cytometry. The result of the PI demonstrated a significant (p < 0.05 increase of necrotic cell death in Pb(NO32-treated cells, indicative of membrane rupture by Pb(NO32 compared to the control. Data generated from the comet assay indicated a concentration-dependent increase in DNA damage, showing a significant increase (p < 0.05 in comet tail-length and percentages of DNA cleavage. Data generated from the flow cytometry assessment indicated that Pb(NO32 exposure significantly (p < 0.05 increased the proportion of caspase-3 positive cells (apoptotic cells compared to the control. The flow cytometry assessment also indicated Pb(NO32 exposure caused cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 checkpoint. The result of DNA laddering assay showed presence of DNA smear in the agarose gel with little presence of DNA fragments in the treated cells compared to the control. In summary, Pb(NO32 inhibits HL-60 cells proliferation by not only inducing DNA damage and cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 checkpoint but also triggering the apoptosis through caspase-3 activation and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation accompanied by secondary necrosis. We believe that our study provides a new insight into the mechanisms of Pb(NO32 exposure and its associated adverse

  6. Kaempferol inhibits cell proliferation and glycolysis in esophagus squamous cell carcinoma via targeting EGFR signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shihua; Wang, Xiaowei; Li, Chunguang; Zhao, Tiejun; Jin, Hai; Fang, Wentao

    2016-08-01

    Antitumor activity of kaempferol has been studied in various tumor types, but its potency in esophagus squamous cell carcinoma is rarely known. Here, we reported the activity of kaempferol against esophagus squamous cell carcinoma as well as its antitumor mechanisms. Results of cell proliferation and colony formation assay showed that kaempferol substantially inhibited tumor cell proliferation and clone formation in vitro. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that tumor cells were induced G0/G1 phase arrest after kaempferol treatment, and the expression of protein involved in cell cycle regulation was dramatically changed. Except the potency on cell proliferation, we also discovered that kaempferol had a significant inhibitory effect against tumor glycolysis. With the downregulation of hexokinase-2, glucose uptake and lactate production in tumor cells were dramatically declined. Mechanism studies revealed kaempferol had a direct effect on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activity, and along with the inhibition of EGFR, its downstream signaling pathways were also markedly suppressed. Further investigations found that exogenous overexpression of EGFR in tumor cells substantially attenuated glycolysis suppression induced by kaempferol, which implied that EGFR also played an important role in kaempferol-mediated glycolysis inhibition. Finally, the antitumor activity of kaempferol was validated in xenograft model and kaempferol prominently restrained tumor growth in vivo. Meanwhile, dramatic decrease of EGFR activity and hexokinase-2 expression were observed in kaempferol-treated tumor tissue, which confirmed these findings in vitro. Briefly, these studies suggested that kaempferol, or its analogues, may serve as effective candidates for esophagus squamous cell carcinoma management.

  7. Homologous desensitization of histamine-mediated signal transduction system in C6 glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chin-Lu; Wei, Jiann-Wu

    2013-04-30

    Molecular events involved in the homologous desensitization of histamine-mediated signal transduction system in glioma cells are not well understood. The aim of this study was designed to gain further insight into possible events in the process using the C6 glioma cells. Incubation of histamine caused increases in inositol phosphate (IP1) formation and intracellular free-calcium concentration [Ca2+]i in C6 glioma cells via the activation of a G-protein-coupled phospholipase C (PI-PLC). Histamine also caused an increase in extracellular release of arachidonic acid (AA) and formation of glycerophosphoinositol (GPI). These effects are likely to be mediated through the activation of receptor-coupled phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Pretreatment of C6 cells with histamine, from 0.1 microM to 1 mM concentrations, for 10 to 60 min significantly reduced the histamine-induced IP1 production, [Ca2+]i accumulation, AA release and GPI formation, despite repeated wash of the cells with buffer solution. Staurosporine (10 nM), a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, reversed almost completely IP1 production, or partially for [Ca2+]i, GPI formation and AA release of this homologous desensitization effect of histamine. Pretreatment of C6 cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a PKC activator, at 0.1 nM to 0.1 microM for 2 to 15 min caused a reduction of histamine-induced IP1 formation and [Ca2+] accumulation, but enhanced histamine-induced AA release and GPI formation. Ten nM staurosporine completely reversed the effect of PMA on histamine-induced IP1 formation and partially on [Ca2+]i accumulation. However, staurosporine potentiated the effect of PMA on histamine-induced AA release and GPI formation, but the effect could be blocked by H7, a calcium-dependent PKC inhibitor. Our results indicate that activation of PKC by histamine in the signal transduction system is involved in the histamine-induced homologous desensitization event. Since PMA pretreatment could not mimic histamine

  8. Causes and evolutionary consequences of primordial germ-cell specification mode in metazoans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittle, Carrie A; Extavour, Cassandra G

    2017-06-06

    In animals, primordial germ cells (PGCs) give rise to the germ lines, the cell lineages that produce sperm and eggs. PGCs form in embryogenesis, typically by one of two modes: a likely ancestral mode wherein germ cells are induced during embryogenesis by cell-cell signaling (induction) or a derived mechanism whereby germ cells are specified by using germ plasm-that is, maternally specified germ-line determinants (inheritance). The causes of the shift to germ plasm for PGC specification in some animal clades remain largely unknown, but its repeated convergent evolution raises the question of whether it may result from or confer an innate selective advantage. It has been hypothesized that the acquisition of germ plasm confers enhanced evolvability, resulting from the release of selective constraint on somatic gene networks in embryogenesis, thus leading to acceleration of an organism's protein-sequence evolution, particularly for genes expressed at early developmental stages, and resulting in high speciation rates in germ plasm-containing lineages (denoted herein as the "PGC-specification hypothesis"). Although that hypothesis, if supported, could have major implications for animal evolution, our recent large-scale coding-sequence analyses from vertebrates and invertebrates provided important examples of genera that do not support the hypothesis of liberated constraint under germ plasm. Here, we consider reasons why germ plasm might be neither a direct target of selection nor causally linked to accelerated animal evolution. We explore alternate scenarios that could explain the repeated evolution of germ plasm and propose potential consequences of the inheritance and induction modes to animal evolutionary biology.

  9. Membrane mechanisms and intracellular signalling in cell volume regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay; Dunham, Philip B.

    1995-01-01

    Volume regulation, Signal transduction, Calcium-calmodulin, Stretch-activated channels, Eicosanoids, Macromolecular crowding, Cytoskeleton, Protein phosphorylation, dephosphorylation.......Volume regulation, Signal transduction, Calcium-calmodulin, Stretch-activated channels, Eicosanoids, Macromolecular crowding, Cytoskeleton, Protein phosphorylation, dephosphorylation....

  10. Oncogenic STAT5 signaling promotes oxidative stress in chronic myeloid leukemia cells by repressing antioxidant defenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeais, Jerome; Ishac, Nicole; Medrzycki, Magdalena; Brachet-Botineau, Marie; Desbourdes, Laura; Gouilleux-Gruart, Valerie; Pecnard, Emmanuel; Rouleux-Bonnin, Florence; Gyan, Emmanuel; Domenech, Jorge; Mazurier, Frederic; Moriggl, Richard; Bunting, Kevin D; Herault, Olivier; Gouilleux, Fabrice

    2017-06-27

    STAT5 transcription factors are frequently activated in hematopoietic neoplasms and are targets of various tyrosine kinase oncogenes. Evidences for a crosstalk between STAT5 and reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism have recently emerged but mechanisms involved in STAT5-mediated regulation of ROS still remain elusive. We demonstrate that sustained activation of STAT5 induced by Bcr-Abl in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells promotes ROS production by repressing expression of two antioxidant enzymes, catalase and glutaredoxin-1(Glrx1). Downregulation of catalase and Glrx1 expression was also observed in primary cells from CML patients. Catalase was shown not only to reduce ROS levels but also, to induce quiescence in Bcr-Abl-positive leukemia cells. Furthermore, reduction of STAT5 phosphorylation and upregulation of catalase and Glrx1 were also evidenced in leukemia cells co-cultured with bone marrow stromal cells to mimic a leukemic niche. This caused downregulation of ROS levels and enhancement of leukemic cell quiescence. These data support a role of persistent STAT5 signaling in the regulation of ROS production in myeloid leukemias and highlight the repression of antioxidant defenses as an important regulatory mechanism.

  11. Distinguishing autocrine and paracrine signals in hematopoietic stem cell culture using a biofunctional microcavity platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Eike; Wang, Weijia; Qiao, Wenlian; Bornhäuser, Martin; Zandstra, Peter W.; Werner, Carsten; Pompe, Tilo

    2016-08-01

    Homeostasis of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in the mammalian bone marrow stem cell niche is regulated by signals of the local microenvironment. Besides juxtacrine, endocrine and metabolic cues, paracrine and autocrine signals are involved in controlling quiescence, proliferation and differentiation of HSC with strong implications on expansion and differentiation ex vivo as well as in vivo transplantation. Towards this aim, a cell culture analysis on a polymer microcavity carrier platform was combined with a partial least square analysis of a mechanistic model of cell proliferation. We could demonstrate the discrimination of specific autocrine and paracrine signals from soluble factors as stimulating and inhibitory effectors in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell culture. From that we hypothesize autocrine signals to be predominantly involved in maintaining the quiescent state of HSC in single-cell niches and advocate our analysis platform as an unprecedented option for untangling convoluted signaling mechanisms in complex cell systems being it of juxtacrine, paracrine or autocrine origin.

  12. Inorganic mercury causes pancreatic β-cell death via the oxidative stress-induced apoptotic and necrotic pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yawen; Huang Chunfa; Yang Chingyao; Yen Chengchieh; Tsai Kehsung; Liu Shinghwa

    2010-01-01

    Mercury is a well-known highly toxic metal. In this study, we characterize and investigate the cytotoxicity and its possible mechanisms of inorganic mercury in pancreatic β-cells. Mercury chloride (HgCl 2 ) dose-dependently decreased the function of insulin secretion and cell viability in pancreatic β-cell-derived HIT-T15 cells and isolated mouse pancreatic islets. HgCl 2 significantly increased ROS formation in HIT-T15 cells. Antioxidant N-acetylcysteine effectively reversed HgCl 2 -induced insulin secretion dysfunction in HIT-T15 cells and isolated mouse pancreatic islets. Moreover, HgCl 2 increased sub-G1 hypodiploids and annexin-V binding in HIT-T15 cells, indicating that HgCl 2 possessed ability in apoptosis induction. HgCl 2 also displayed several features of mitochondria-dependent apoptotic signals including disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, increase of mitochondrial cytochrome c release and activations of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and caspase 3. Exposure of HIT-T15 cells to HgCl 2 could significantly increase both apoptotic and necrotic cell populations by acridine orange/ethidium bromide dual staining. Meanwhile, HgCl 2 could also trigger the depletion of intracellular ATP levels and increase the LDH release from HIT-T15 cells. These HgCl 2 -induced cell death-related signals could be significantly reversed by N-acetylcysteine. The intracellular mercury levels were markedly elevated in HgCl 2 -treated HIT-T15 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that HgCl 2 -induced oxidative stress causes pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and cytotoxicity involved the co-existence of apoptotic and necrotic cell death.

  13. Monomethylarsonous acid (MMA+3) Inhibits IL-7 Signaling in Mouse Pre-B Cells.

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    Ezeh, Peace C; Xu, Huan; Lauer, Fredine T; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G; Burchiel, Scott W

    2016-02-01

    Our previously published data show that As(+3) in vivo and in vitro, at very low concentrations, inhibits lymphoid, but not myeloid stem cell development in mouse bone marrow. We also showed that the As(+3) metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(+3)), was responsible for the observed pre-B cell toxicity caused by As(+3). Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is the primary growth factor responsible for pre-lymphoid development in mouse and human bone marrow, and Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 (STAT5) is a transcriptional factor in the IL-7 signaling pathway. We found that MMA(+3) inhibited STAT5 phosphorylation at a concentration as low as 50 nM in mouse bone marrow pre-B cells. Inhibition of STAT5 phosphorylation by As(+3) occurred only at a concentration of 500 nM. In the IL-7 dependent mouse pre-B 2E8 cell line, we also found selective inhibition of STAT5 phosphorylation by MMA(+3), and this inhibition was dependent on effects on JAK3 phosphorylation. IL-7 receptor expression on 2E8 cell surface was also suppressed by 50 nM MMA(+3) at 18 h. As further evidence for the inhibition of STAT5, we found that the induction of several genes required in B cell development, cyclin D1, E2A, EBF1, and PAX5, were selectively inhibited by MMA(+3). Since 2E8 cells lack the enzymes responsible for the conversion of As(+3) to MMA(+3) in vitro, the results of these studies suggest that As(+3) induced inhibition of pre-B cell formation in vivo is likely dependent on the formation of MMA(+3) which in turn inhibits IL-7 signaling at several steps in mouse pre-B cells. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Role of CSL-dependent and independent Notch signaling pathways in cell apoptosis.

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    Zeng, Chong; Xing, Rui; Liu, Jing; Xing, Feiyue

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is a normally biological phenomenon in various organisms, involving complexly molecular mechanisms with a series of signaling processes. Notch signaling is found evolutionarily conserved in many species, playing a critical role in embryonic development, normal tissue homeostasis, angiogenesis and immunoregulation. The focus of this review is on currently novel advances about roles of CSL-dependent and independent Notch signaling pathways in cell apoptosis. The CSL can bind Notch intracellular domain (NIC) to act as a switch in mediating transcriptional activation or inactivation of the Notch signaling pathway downstream genes in the nucleus. It shows that CSL-dependent signaling regulates the cell apoptosis through Hes-1-PTEN-AKT-mTOR signaling, but rather the CSL-independent signaling mediates the cell apoptosis possibly via NIC-mTORC2-AKT-mTOR signaling, providing a new insight into apoptotic mechanisms.

  15. Activation of the Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling Is Critical for Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenic Differentiation

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    Chen-Shuang Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs are recognized as candidate progenitor cells for bone regeneration. However, the mechanism of hUCMSC osteogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs signaling is involved in hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation in vitro. Particularly, the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK and p38 signaling pathways maintained a consistent level in hUCMSCs through the entire 21-day osteogenic differentiation period. At the same time, the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK signaling significantly increased from day 5, peaked at day 9, and declined thereafter. Moreover, gene profiling of osteogenic markers, alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity measurement, and alizarin red staining demonstrated that the application of U0126, a specific inhibitor for ERK activation, completely prohibited hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation. However, when U0126 was removed from the culture at day 9, ERK activation and osteogenic differentiation of hUCMSCs were partially recovered. Together, these findings demonstrate that the activation of ERK signaling is essential for hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation, which points out the significance of ERK signaling pathway to regulate the osteogenic differentiation of hUCMSCs as an alternative cell source for bone tissue engineering.

  16. Overexpression of Robo2 causes defects in the recruitment of metanephric mesenchymal cells and ureteric bud branching morphogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Jiayao; Li, Qinggang; Xie, Yuansheng; Zhang, Xueguang; Cui, Shaoyuan; Shi, Suozhu; Chen, Xiangmei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Overexpression of Robo2 caused reduced UB branching and glomerular number. ► Fewer MM cells surrounding the UB after overexpression of Robo2 in vitro. ► No abnormal Epithelial Morphology of UB or apoptosis of mm cells in the kidney. ► Overexpression of Robo2 affected MM cells migration and caused UB deficit. ► The reduced glomerular number can also be caused by fewer MM cells. -- Abstract: Roundabout 2 (Robo2) is a member of the membrane protein receptor family. The chemorepulsive effect of Slit2–Robo2 signaling plays vital roles in nervous system development and neuron migration. Slit2–Robo2 signaling is also important for maintaining the normal morphogenesis of the kidney and urinary collecting system, especially for the branching of the ureteric bud (UB) at the proper site. Slit2 or Robo2 mouse mutants exhibit multilobular kidneys, multiple ureters, and dilatation of the ureter, renal pelvis, and collecting duct system, which lead to vesicoureteral reflux. To understand the effect of Robo2 on kidney development, we used microinjection and electroporation to overexpress GFP-Robo2 in an in vitro embryonic kidney model. Our results show reduced UB branching and decreased glomerular number after in vitro Robo2 overexpression in the embryonic kidneys. We found fewer metanephric mesenchymal (MM) cells surrounding the UB but no abnormal morphology in the branching epithelial UB. Meanwhile, no significant change in MM proliferation or apoptosis was observed. These findings indicate that Robo2 is involved in the development of embryonic kidneys and that the normal expression of Robo2 can help maintain proper UB branching and glomerular morphogenesis. Overexpression of Robo2 leads to reduced UB branching caused by fewer surrounding MM cells, but MM cell apoptosis is not involved in this effect. Our study demonstrates that overexpression of Robo2 by microinjection in embryonic kidneys is an effective approach to study the function of Robo2.

  17. Glucose Signaling-Mediated Coordination of Cell Growth and Cell Cycle in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

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    Stefano Busti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Besides being the favorite carbon and energy source for the budding yeast Sacchromyces cerevisiae, glucose can act as a signaling molecule to regulate multiple aspects of yeast physiology. Yeast cells have evolved several mechanisms for monitoring the level of glucose in their habitat and respond quickly to frequent changes in the sugar availability in the environment: the cAMP/PKA pathways (with its two branches comprising Ras and the Gpr1/Gpa2 module, the Rgt2/Snf3-Rgt1 pathway and the main repression pathway involving the kinase Snf1. The cAMP/PKA pathway plays the prominent role in responding to changes in glucose availability and initiating the signaling processes that promote cell growth and division. Snf1 (the yeast homologous to mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase is primarily required for the adaptation of yeast cell to glucose limitation and for growth on alternative carbon source, but it is also involved in the cellular response to various environmental stresses. The Rgt2/Snf3-Rgt1 pathway regulates the expression of genes required for glucose uptake. Many interconnections exist between the diverse glucose sensing systems, which enables yeast cells to fine tune cell growth, cell cycle and their coordination in response to nutritional changes.

  18. β1 integrins regulate chondrogenesis and rock signaling in adipose stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Z.F.; Doulabi, B.Z.; Huang, C.L.; Bank, R.A.; Helder, M.N.

    2008-01-01

    β1 integrins play a controversial role during chondrogenesis. Since the maturation of chondrocytes relies on a signaling switch from cell-cell to cell-matrix interactions, we hypothesized that β1 integrins play a different role at the earlier (mainly cell-cell interaction) from the later stage

  19. Pathogenesis of RON receptor tyrosine kinase in cancer cells: activation mechanism, functional crosstalk, and signaling addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Hai; Zhang, Ruiwen; Zhou, Yong-Qing; Yao, Hang-Ping

    2013-09-01

    The RON receptor tyrosine kinase, a member of the MET proto-oncogene family, is a pathogenic factor implicated in tumor malignancy. Specifically, aberrations in RON signaling result in increased cancer cell growth, survival, invasion, angiogenesis, and drug resistance. Biochemical events such as ligand binding, receptor overexpression, generation of structure-defected variants, and point mutations in the kinase domain contribute to RON signaling activation. Recently, functional crosstalk between RON and signaling proteins such as MET and EFGR has emerged as an additional mechanism for RON activation, which is critical for tumorigenic development. The RON signaling crosstalk acts either as a regulatory feedback loop that strengthens or enhances tumorigenic phenotype of cancer cells or serves as a signaling compensatory pathway providing a growth/survival advantage for cancer cells to escape targeted therapy. Moreover, viral oncoproteins derived from Friend leukemia or Epstein-Barr viruses interact with RON to drive viral oncogenesis. In cancer cells, RON signaling is integrated into cellular signaling network essential for cancer cell growth and survival. These activities provide the molecular basis of targeting RON for cancer treatment. In this review, we will discuss recent data that uncover the mechanisms of RON activation in cancer cells, review evidence of RON signaling crosstalk relevant to cancer malignancy, and emphasize the significance of the RON signaling addiction by cancer cells for tumor therapy. Understanding aberrant RON signaling will not only provide insight into the mechanisms of tumor pathogenesis, but also lead to the development of novel strategies for molecularly targeted cancer treatment.

  20. Plasmalogens rescue neuronal cell death through an activation of AKT and ERK survival signaling.

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    Md Shamim Hossain

    Full Text Available Neuronal cells are susceptible to many stresses, which will cause the apoptosis and neurodegenerative diseases. The precise molecular mechanism behind the neuronal protection against these apoptotic stimuli is necessary for drug discovery. In the present study, we have found that plasmalogens (Pls, which are glycerophospholipids containing vinyl ether linkage at sn-1 position, can protect the neuronal cell death upon serum deprivation. Interestingly, caspse-9, but not caspase-8 and caspase-12, was cleaved upon the serum starvation in Neuro-2A cells. Pls treatments effectively reduced the activation of caspase-9. Furthermore, cellular signaling experiments showed that Pls enhanced phosphorylation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K-dependent serine/threonine-specific protein kinase AKT and extracellular-signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2. PI3K/AKT inhibitor LY294002 and MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK inhibitor U0126 treatments study clearly indicated that Pls-mediated cell survival was dependent on the activation of these kinases. In addition, Pls also inhibited primary mouse hippocampal neuronal cell death induced by nutrient deprivation, which was associated with the inhibition of caspase-9 and caspase-3 cleavages. It was reported that Pls content decreased in the brain of the Alzheimer's patients, which indicated that the reduction of Pls content could endanger neurons. The present findings, taken together, suggest that Pls have an anti-apoptotic action in the brain. Further studies on precise mechanisms of Pls-mediated protection against cell death may lead us to establish a novel therapeutic approach to cure neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. Acute adrenergic stress inhibits proliferation of murine hematopoietic progenitor cells via p38/MAPK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraml, Elisabeth; Fuchs, Robert; Kotzbeck, Petra; Grillari, Johannes; Schauenstein, Konrad

    2009-03-01

    Acute adrenergic stress is a cause of hematopoietic failure that accompanies severe injury. Although the communication between neuronal and immune system is well documented and catecholamines are known as important regulators of homeostasis, the molecular mechanisms of hematopoietic failure are not well understood. To study the influence of adrenergic stress on hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs), which recently have been found to express adrenergic receptors, Lin(-),Sca(+), cells were isolated and treated with alpha- and beta-adrenergic agonists in vitro. Indeed, this stimulation resulted in significantly decreased colony formation capacity using granulocyte/macrophage colony-forming unit assays. This decline was dependent on the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of the p38/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, since the addition of antioxidants or a p38 inhibitor restored CFU formation. DNA damage by adrenergically induced ROS, however, does not seem to account for the reduction of colonies. Thus, catecholamine/p38/MAPK is identified as a key signal transduction pathway in HPCs besides those dependent on Wnt, Notch, and sonic hedgehog. Furthermore, a well-known target of p38 signaling, p16 is transcriptionally activated after adrenergic stimulation, suggesting that cell cycle arrest might importantly contribute to hematopoietic failure and immune dysfunctions after severe injury. Since increased levels of catecholamines are also observed in other conditions, such as during aging which is linked with decline of immune functions, adrenergic stress might as well contribute to the lowered immune defence in the elderly.

  2. Triiodothyronine Potentiates Vasorelaxation via PKG/VASP Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

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    Sherin Samuel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Vascular relaxation caused by Triiodothyronine (T3 involves direct activation of endothelial cells (EC and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC. Activation of protein kinase G (PKG has risen as a novel contributor to the vasorelaxation mechanism triggered by numerous stimuli. We hypothesize that T3-induced vasorelaxation involves PKG/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP signaling pathway in VSMC. Methods: Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC and VSMC were treated with T3 for short (2 to 60 minutes and long term (24 hours. Nitric oxide (NO production was measured using DAF-FM. Expression of protein targets was determined using western blot. For functional studies, rat aortas were isolated and treated with T3 for 20 minutes and mounted in a wire myograph. Relaxation was measured by a concentration-dependent response to acetylcholine (ACh and sodium nitroprusside (SNP. Results: Aortas stimulated with T3 exhibited augmented sensitivity to ACh and SNP-induced relaxation, endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent responses, respectively. T3 directly increased vasorelaxation, which was abolished in the presence of a PKG inhibitor. T3 markedly induced phosphorylation of Akt, eNOS and consequently increased NO production in EC. Likewise, T3 induced phosphorylation of VASP at serine 239 via the PKG pathway in VSMC. Conclusion: Our findings have uncovered a PKG/VASP signaling pathway in VSMC as a key molecular mechanism underlying T3-induced vascular relaxation.

  3. Furanodienone induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by suppressing EGFR/HER2 signaling in HER2-overexpressing human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying-Wei; Zhu, Guo-Yuan; Shen, Xiao-Ling; Chu, Jian-Hong; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Fong, Wang-Fun

    2011-11-01

    Overexpression of EGFR and HER2 is seen in breast cancers and results in poor prognosis and decreased patient survival. Clinically, EGFR and HER2 are effective therapeutic targets. The objective of this study is to investigate the in vitro effects of furanodienone, an active chemical component isolated from Rhizoma Curcumae, on the activation of EGFR/HER2 signaling, cell cycle, and apoptosis in HER2-overexpressing BT474 and SKBR3 cells. Cell growth was assessed by SRB protein assay. Cell cycle analysis was carried out by flow cytometry, and apoptosis was observed by Annexin V and DAPI staining. Effects of furanodienone on the activation of EGFR/HER2 signaling-related proteins were analyzed by western blotting. Furanodienone inhibited cell growth in BT474 and SKBR3 cells. Furanodienone caused G1 arrest in BT474 cells and induced apoptosis in SKBR3 cells. Furanodienone interfered with EGFR/HER2 signaling in treated cells as shown by decreases in phosphorylated EGFR, HER2, Akt, Gsk3β and an increase in p27(kip1) protein. Accordingly, furanodienone inhibited EGF-induced phosphorylation of EGFR, HER2, Akt, and Gsk3β. EGFR-specific siRNA knockdown did not affect the cell growth inhibitory effect of furanodienone. On the contrary, specific siRNA knockdown of HER2 increased cellular resistance to furanodienone toxicity. In HER-2-deficient MDA-MB-231 cells, the transfection and expression of HER2 increased the sensitivity of cells to furanodienone toxicity. Furanodienone inhibited EGFR/HER2 signaling pathway in BT474 and SKBR3 cells. More importantly, the effect of furanodienone was specifically dependent on HER2, but not EGFR, expression.

  4. Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) suppresses proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells via inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu

    2017-07-08

    The medical mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi), a traditional Chinese medicine, has exhibited a promising anti-cancer effect. However, the molecular mechanism of its action on cancer cells remains unclear. Aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is the cause of many types of cancer, including breast cancer. Here we investigated the effect of Reishi on Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and elucidated the molecular mechanism of its function in inhibiting breast cancer cells. We found that Reishi blocked Wnt/β-catenin signaling through inhibiting the phosphorylation of Wnt co-receptor LRP6. In human (MDA-MB-231) and mouse (4T1) breast cancer cell lines, Reishi significantly decreased the phosphorylation of LRP6 and suppressed Wnt3a-activated Wnt target gene Axin2 expression. Administration of Reishi inhibited Wnt-induced hyper-proliferation of breast cancer cells and MDA-MB-231 cell migration. Our results provide evidence that Reishi suppresses breast cancer cell growth and migration through inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling, indicating that Reishi may be a potential natural inhibitor for breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Measurement error causes scale-dependent threshold erosion of biological signals in animal movement data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Corey J A; Sims, David W; Hays, Graeme C

    2007-03-01

    Recent advances in telemetry technology have created a wealth of tracking data available for many animal species moving over spatial scales from tens of meters to tens of thousands of kilometers. Increasingly, such data sets are being used for quantitative movement analyses aimed at extracting fundamental biological signals such as optimal searching behavior and scale-dependent foraging decisions. We show here that the location error inherent in various tracking technologies reduces the ability to detect patterns of behavior within movements. Our analyses endeavored to set out a series of initial ground rules for ecologists to help ensure that sampling noise is not misinterpreted as a real biological signal. We simulated animal movement tracks using specialized random walks known as Lévy flights at three spatial scales of investigation: 100-km, 10-km, and 1-km maximum daily step lengths. The locations generated in the simulations were then blurred using known error distributions associated with commonly applied tracking methods: the Global Positioning System (GPS), Argos polar-orbiting satellites, and light-level geolocation. Deviations from the idealized Lévy flight pattern were assessed for each track after incrementing levels of location error were applied at each spatial scale, with additional assessments of the effect of error on scale-dependent movement patterns measured using fractal mean dimension and first-passage time (FPT) analyses. The accuracy of parameter estimation (Lévy mu, fractal mean D, and variance in FPT) declined precipitously at threshold errors relative to each spatial scale. At 100-km maximum daily step lengths, error standard deviations of > or = 10 km seriously eroded the biological patterns evident in the simulated tracks, with analogous thresholds at the 10-km and 1-km scales (error SD > or = 1.3 km and 0.07 km, respectively). Temporal subsampling of the simulated tracks maintained some elements of the biological signals depending on

  6. Effects of activated fibroblasts on phenotype modulation, EGFR signalling and cell cycle regulation in OSCC cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berndt, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.berndt@med.uni-jena.de [Center for Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Pathology, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany); Büttner, Robert, E-mail: Robert-Buettner@gmx.net [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, 07740 Jena (Germany); Gühne, Stefanie, E-mail: stefanie_guehne@gmx.net [Center for Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Pathology, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany); Gleinig, Anna, E-mail: annagleinig@yahoo.com [Center for Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Pathology, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany); Richter, Petra, E-mail: P.Richter@med.uni-jena.de [Center for Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Pathology, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany); Chen, Yuan, E-mail: Yuan.Chen@med.uni-jena.de [Center for Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Pathology, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany); Franz, Marcus, E-mail: Marcus.Franz@med.uni-jena.de [Clinic of Internal Medicine I, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany); Liebmann, Claus, E-mail: Claus.Liebmann@uni-jena.de [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, 07740 Jena (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Crosstalk between carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells is suggested to mediate phenotype transition of cancer cells as a prerequisite for tumour progression, to predict patients’ outcome, and to influence the efficacy of EGFR inhibitor therapies. Here we investigate the influence of activated fibroblasts as a model for CAFs on phenotype and EGFR signalling in OSCC cells in vitro. For this, immortalised hTERT-BJ1 fibroblasts were activated with TGFβ1 and PDGFAB to generate a myofibroblast or proliferative phenotype, respectively. Conditioned media (FCM{sub TGF}, FCM{sub PDGF}) were used to stimulate PE/CA-PJ15 OSCC cells. Results were compared to the effect of conditioned media of non-stimulated fibroblasts (FCM{sub B}). FCM{sub TGF} stimulation leads to an up-regulation of vimentin in the OSCC cells and an enhancement of invasive behaviour, indicating EMT-like effects. Similarly, FCM{sub TGF}≫FCM{sub PDGF} induced up-regulation of EGFR, but not of ErbB2/ErbB3. In addition, we detected an increase in basal activities of ERK, PI3K/Akt and Stat3 (FCM{sub TGF}>FCM{sub PDGF}) accompanied by protein interaction of vimentin with pERK. These effects are correlated with an increased proliferation. In summary, our results suggest that the activated myofibroblast phenotype provides soluble factors which are able to induce EMT-like phenomena and to increase EGFR signalling as well as cell proliferation in OSCC cells. Our results indicate a possible influence of activated myofibroblasts on EGFR-inhibitor therapy. Therefore, CAFs may serve as promising novel targets for combined therapy strategies. - Highlights: • A cell culture model for cancer associated fibroblasts is described. • The mutual interaction with OSCC cells leads to up-regulation of EGFR in tumour cells. • mCAF induces EGFR downstream signalling with increased proliferation in OSCC. • Erk activation is associated with protein interaction with vimentin

  7. Computational cell model based on autonomous cell movement regulated by cell-cell signalling successfully recapitulates the "inside and outside" pattern of cell sorting

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    Ajioka Itsuki

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of multicellular organisms proceeds from a single fertilized egg as the combined effect of countless numbers of cellular interactions among highly dynamic cells. Since at least a reminiscent pattern of morphogenesis can be recapitulated in a reproducible manner in reaggregation cultures of dissociated embryonic cells, which is known as cell sorting, the cells themselves must possess some autonomous cell behaviors that assure specific and reproducible self-organization. Understanding of this self-organized dynamics of heterogeneous cell population seems to require some novel approaches so that the approaches bridge a gap between molecular events and morphogenesis in developmental and cell biology. A conceptual cell model in a computer may answer that purpose. We constructed a dynamical cell model based on autonomous cell behaviors, including cell shape, growth, division, adhesion, transformation, and motility as well as cell-cell signaling. The model gives some insights about what cellular behaviors make an appropriate global pattern of the cell population. Results We applied the model to "inside and outside" pattern of cell-sorting, in which two different embryonic cell types within a randomly mixed aggregate are sorted so that one cell type tends to gather in the central region of the aggregate and the other cell type surrounds the first cell type. Our model can modify the above cell behaviors by varying parameters related to them. We explored various parameter sets with which the "inside and outside" pattern could be achieved. The simulation results suggested that direction of cell movement responding to its neighborhood and the cell's mobility are important for this specific rearrangement. Conclusion We constructed an in silico cell model that mimics autonomous cell behaviors and applied it to cell sorting, which is a simple and appropriate phenomenon exhibiting self-organization of cell population. The model

  8. A Rare Cause of Prepubertal Gynecomastia: Sertoli Cell Tumor

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    Fatma Dursun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prepubertal gynecomastia due to testis tumors is a very rare condition. Nearly 5% of the patients with testicular mass present with gynecomastia. Sertoli cell tumors are sporadic in 60% of the reported cases, while the remaining is a component of multiple neoplasia syndromes such as Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and Carney complex. We present a 4-year-old boy with gynecomastia due to Sertoli cell tumor with no evidence of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome or Carney complex.

  9. PARP inhibition causes premature loss of cohesion in cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kukolj, Eva; Kaufmann, Tanja; Dick, Amalie E.; Zeillinger, Robert; Gerlich, Daniel W.; Slade, Dea

    2017-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) regulate various aspects of cellular function including mitotic progression. Although PARP inhibitors have been undergoing various clinical trials and the PARP1/2 inhibitor olaparib was approved as monotherapy for BRCA-mutated ovarian cancer, their mode of action in killing tumour cells is not fully understood. We investigated the effect of PARP inhibition on mitosis in cancerous (cervical, ovary, breast and osteosarcoma) and non-cancerous cells by live-ce...

  10. Mantle cell leukemia as a cause of leukostasis

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    Rappaport E

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Smith1, Christian Cable2, Cary Chisholm1, Walter Linz1, William Koss1, Sheila Dobin1, Edward Rappaport11Department of Pathology, 2Internal Medicine, Scott and White Healthcare/Texas A & M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Temple, TX, USAAbstract: A 72-year-old man was admitted with hypoxemic respiratory distress. Given a white blood cell count of 600 × 109/L and symptoms of leukostasis, emergency leukapheresis was initiated. The white blood cell count immediately after the first leukapheresis was paradoxically increased to over 700 × 109/L. Peripheral blood smear findings showed morphologically immature mononuclear cells and numerous circulating mitotic figures. Initial flow cytometry results showed a lambda light chain-restricted B lymphoid population positive for CD20, CD19, CD5, and FMC-7, and negative for TdT, CD10, CD23, CD34, CD117, and myeloid markers, suggesting classification as a blastoid variant of mantle cell lymphoma in a leukemic phase. Subsequent testing using DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization was positive for t(11;14, confirming the diagnosis of mantle cell leukemia. Although mantle cell lymphoma occasionally transforms or can even present as leukemia (leukocytes >40 × 109/L, it is rare for it to present with such profound leukocytosis and an overwhelming number of pleomorphic/blastoid forms. Although morphology suggested acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a more specific diagnosis of blastoid variant mantle cell lymphoma was obtained in 12 hours by applying complementary techniques of flow cytometry and rapid cytogenetics.Keywords: mantle cell lymphoma, chemotherapy, leukapheresis, lymphocytic leukemia

  11. Singapore grouper iridovirus, a large DNA virus, induces nonapoptotic cell death by a cell type dependent fashion and evokes ERK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaohong; Huang, Youhua; Ouyang, Zhengliang; Xu, Lixiao; Yan, Yang; Cui, Huachun; Han, Xin; Qin, Qiwei

    2011-08-01

    Virus induced cell death, including apoptosis and nonapoptotic cell death, plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of viral diseases. Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV), a novel iridovirus of genus Ranavirus, causes high mortality and heavy economic losses in grouper aquaculture. Here, using fluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy and biochemical assays, we found that SGIV infection in host (grouper spleen, EAGS) cells evoked nonapoptotic programmed cell death (PCD), characterized by appearance of cytoplasmic vacuoles and distended endoplasmic reticulum, in the absence of DNA fragmentation, apoptotic bodies and caspase activation. In contrast, SGIV induced typical apoptosis in non-host (fathead minnow, FHM) cells, as evidenced by caspase activation and DNA fragmentation, suggesting that SGIV infection induced nonapoptotic cell death by a cell type dependent fashion. Furthermore, viral replication was essential for SGIV induced nonapoptotic cell death, but not for apoptosis. Notably, the disruption of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) and externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) were not detected in EAGS cells but in FHM cells after SGIV infection. Moreover, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling was involved in SGIV infection induced nonapoptotic cell death and viral replication. This is a first demonstration of ERK-mediated nonapoptotic cell death induced by a DNA virus. These findings contribute to understanding the mechanisms of iridovirus pathogenesis.

  12. Functionalization of DNA Nanostructures for Cell Signaling Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Ronnie O.

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is an important cytokine responsible for a wide range of different cellular functions including extracellular matrix formation, angiogenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. We have sought to use self-assembling DNA nanostructures to influence TGF-beta signaling. The predictable Watson Crick base pairing allows for designing self-assembling nanoscale structures using oligonucleotides. We have used the method of DNA origami to assemble structures functionalized with multiple peptides that bind TGF-beta receptors outside the ligand binding domain. This allows the nanostructures to cluster TGF-beta receptors and lower the energy barrier of ligand binding thus sensitizing the cells to TGF-beta stimulation. To prove efficacy of our nanostructures we have utilized immunofluorescent staining of Smad2/4 in order to monitor TGF-beta mediated translocation of Smad2/4 to the cell nucleus. We have also utilized Smad2/4 responsive luminescence constructs that allows us to quantify TGF-beta stimulation with and without nanostructures. To functionalize our nanostructures we relied on biotin-streptavidin linkages. This introduces a multivalency that is not necessarily desirable in all designs. Therefore we have investigated alternative means of functionalization. The first approach is based on targeting DNA nanostructure by using zinc finger binding proteins. Efficacy of zinc finger binding proteins was assayed by the use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) assay and atomic force microscopy (AFM). While ELISA indicated a relative specificity of zinc finger proteins for target DNA sequences AFM showed a high degree of non-specific binding and insufficient affinity. The second approach is based on using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) incorporated in the nanostructure through base pairing. PNA is a synthetic DNA analog consisting of a backbone of repeating N-(2-aminoethyl)-glycine units to which purine and pyrimidine bases are linked by

  13. Exposure to cobalt causes transcriptomic and proteomic changes in two rat liver derived cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew G Permenter

    Full Text Available Cobalt is a transition group metal present in trace amounts in the human diet, but in larger doses it can be acutely toxic or cause adverse health effects in chronic exposures. Its use in many industrial processes and alloys worldwide presents opportunities for occupational exposures, including military personnel. While the toxic effects of cobalt have been widely studied, the exact mechanisms of toxicity remain unclear. In order to further elucidate these mechanisms and identify potential biomarkers of exposure or effect, we exposed two rat liver-derived cell lines, H4-II-E-C3 and MH1C1, to two concentrations of cobalt chloride. We examined changes in gene expression using DNA microarrays in both cell lines and examined changes in cytoplasmic protein abundance in MH1C1 cells using mass spectrometry. We chose to closely examine differentially expressed genes and proteins changing in abundance in both cell lines in order to remove cell line specific effects. We identified enriched pathways, networks, and biological functions using commercial bioinformatic tools and manual annotation. Many of the genes, proteins, and pathways modulated by exposure to cobalt appear to be due to an induction of a hypoxic-like response and oxidative stress. Genes that may be differentially expressed due to a hypoxic-like response are involved in Hif-1α signaling, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and other energy metabolism related processes. Gene expression changes linked to oxidative stress are also known to be involved in the NRF2-mediated response, protein degradation, and glutathione production. Using microarray and mass spectrometry analysis, we were able to identify modulated genes and proteins, further elucidate the mechanisms of toxicity of cobalt, and identify biomarkers of exposure and effect in vitro, thus providing targets for focused in vivo studies.

  14. Exposure to Cobalt Causes Transcriptomic and Proteomic Changes in Two Rat Liver Derived Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permenter, Matthew G.; Dennis, William E.; Sutto, Thomas E.; Jackson, David A.; Lewis, John A.; Stallings, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt is a transition group metal present in trace amounts in the human diet, but in larger doses it can be acutely toxic or cause adverse health effects in chronic exposures. Its use in many industrial processes and alloys worldwide presents opportunities for occupational exposures, including military personnel. While the toxic effects of cobalt have been widely studied, the exact mechanisms of toxicity remain unclear. In order to further elucidate these mechanisms and identify potential biomarkers of exposure or effect, we exposed two rat liver-derived cell lines, H4-II-E-C3 and MH1C1, to two concentrations of cobalt chloride. We examined changes in gene expression using DNA microarrays in both cell lines and examined changes in cytoplasmic protein abundance in MH1C1 cells using mass spectrometry. We chose to closely examine differentially expressed genes and proteins changing in abundance in both cell lines in order to remove cell line specific effects. We identified enriched pathways, networks, and biological functions using commercial bioinformatic tools and manual annotation. Many of the genes, proteins, and pathways modulated by exposure to cobalt appear to be due to an induction of a hypoxic-like response and oxidative stress. Genes that may be differentially expressed due to a hypoxic-like response are involved in Hif-1α signaling, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and other energy metabolism related processes. Gene expression changes linked to oxidative stress are also known to be involved in the NRF2-mediated response, protein degradation, and glutathione production. Using microarray and mass spectrometry analysis, we were able to identify modulated genes and proteins, further elucidate the mechanisms of toxicity of cobalt, and identify biomarkers of exposure and effect in vitro, thus providing targets for focused in vivo studies. PMID:24386269

  15. Deficiency of leptin receptor in myeloid cells disrupts hypothalamic metabolic circuits and causes body weight increase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanqing Gao

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Myeloid cell leptin receptor deficient mice partially replicate the db/db phenotype. Leptin signaling in hypothalamic microglia is important for microglial function and a correct formation of the hypothalamic neuronal circuit regulating metabolism.

  16. TrkB-T1 regulates the RhoA signaling and actin cytoskeleton in glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohira, Koji; Homma, Koichi J.; Hirai, Hirohisa; Nakamura, Shun; Hayashi, Motoharu

    2006-01-01

    Recently, the truncated TrkB receptor, T1, has been reported to be involved in the control of cell morphology via the regulation of Rho proteins, through which T1 binds Rho guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (Rho GDI) 1 and dissociates it in a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-dependent manner. However, it is unclear whether T1 signaling regulates the downstream of Rho signaling and the actin cytoskeleton. In this study, we investigated this question using C6 rat glioma cells, which express T1 endogenously. Rho GDI1 was dissociated from T1 in a BDNF-dependent manner, which also causes decreases in the activities of Rho-signaling molecules such as RhoA, Rho-associated kinase, p21-activated kinase, and extracellular-signal regulated kinase1/2. Moreover, BDNF treatment resulted in the disappearance of stress fibers in the cells treated with lysophosphatidic acid, an activator of RhoA, and in morphological changes in cells. Furthermore, a competitive assay with cyan fluorescent protein fusion proteins of T1-specific sequences reduced the effects of BDNF. These results suggest that T1 regulates the Rho-signaling pathways and the actin cytoskeleton

  17. Inactivation of Tsc2 in Mesoderm-Derived Cells Causes Polycystic Kidney Lesions and Impairs Lung Alveolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Siying; Luo, Yongfeng; Chen, Hui; Warburton, David; Lam, Hilaire C; Wang, Larry L; Chen, Ping; Henske, Elizabeth P; Shi, Wei

    2016-12-01

    The tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) proteins are critical negative regulators of the mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 pathway. Germline mutations of TSC1 or TSC2 cause TSC, affecting multiple organs, including the kidney and lung, and causing substantial morbidity and mortality. The mechanisms of organ-specific disease in TSC remain incompletely understood, and the impact of TSC inactivation on mesenchymal lineage cells has not been specifically studied. We deleted Tsc2 specifically in mesoderm-derived mesenchymal cells of multiple organs in mice using the Dermo1-Cre driver. The Dermo1-Cre-driven Tsc2 conditional knockout mice had body growth retardation and died approximately 3 weeks after birth. Significant phenotypes were observed in the postnatal kidney and lung. Inactivation of Tsc2 in kidney mesenchyme caused polycystic lesions starting from the second week of age, with increased cell proliferation, tubular epithelial hyperplasia, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In contrast, Tsc2 deletion in lung mesenchyme led to decreased cell proliferation, reduced postnatal alveolarization, and decreased differentiation with reduced numbers of alveolar myofibroblast and type II alveolar epithelial cells. Two major findings thus result from this model: inactivation of Tsc2 in mesoderm-derived cells causes increased cell proliferation in the kidneys but reduced proliferation in the lungs, and inactivation of Tsc2 in mesoderm-derived cells causes epithelial-lined renal cysts. Therefore, Tsc2-mTOR signaling in mesenchyme is essential for the maintenance of renal structure and for lung alveolarization. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cytomegalovirus Infection Drives Adaptive Epigenetic Diversification of NK Cells with Altered Signaling and Effector Function

    OpenAIRE

    Schlums, Heinrich; Cichocki, Frank; Tesi, Bianca; Theorell, Jakob; Beziat, Vivien; Holmes, Tim D.; Han, Hongya; Chiang, Samuel C.C.; Foley, Bree; Mattsson, Kristin; Larsson, Stella; Schaffer, Marie; Malmberg, Karl-Johan; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Miller, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying human natural killer (NK) cell phenotypic and functional heterogeneity are unknown. Here, we describe the emergence of diverse subsets of human NK cells selectively lacking expression of signaling proteins after human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. The absence of B and myeloid cell-related signaling protein expression in these NK cell subsets correlated with promoter DNA hyperme-thylation. Genome-wide DNA methylation patterns were strikingly similar between HCMV-a...

  19. Small molecule inhibitor regorafenib inhibits RET signaling in neuroblastoma cells and effectively suppresses tumor growthin vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenghu; Zhao, Yanling; Yu, Yang; Pang, Jonathan C; Woodfield, Sarah E; Tao, Ling; Guan, Shan; Zhang, Huiyuan; Bieerkehazhi, Shayahati; Shi, Yan; Patel, Roma; Vasudevan, Sanjeev A; Yi, Joanna S; Muscal, Jodi A; Xu, Guo-Tong; Yang, Jianhua

    2017-11-28

    Neuroblastoma (NB), the most common extracranial pediatric solid tumor, continues to cause significant cancer-related morbidity and mortality in children. Dysregulation of oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) has been shown to contribute to tumorigenesis in various human cancers and targeting these RTKs has had therapeutic benefit. RET is an RTK which is commonly expressed in NB, and high expression of RET correlates with poor outcomes in patients with NB. Herein we report that RET is required for NB cell proliferation and that the small molecule inhibitor regorafenib (BAY 73-4506) blocks glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)-induced RET signaling in NB cells and inhibits NB growth both in vitro and in vivo . We found that regorafenib significantly inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation ability of NB cells. Moreover, regorafenib suppressed tumor growth in both an orthotopic xenograft NB mouse model and a TH-MYCN transgenic NB mouse model. Finally, regorafenib markedly improved the overall survival of TH-MYCN transgenic tumor-bearing mice. In summary, our study suggests that RET is a potential therapeutic target in NB, and that using a novel RET inhibitor, like regorafenib, should be investigated as a therapeutic treatment option for children with NB.

  20. TLR4 signalling in pulmonary stromal cells is critical for inflammation and immunity in the airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perros, Frederic; Lambrecht, Bart N; Hammad, Hamida

    2011-09-24

    Inflammation of the airways, which is often associated with life-threatening infection by Gram-negative bacteria or presence of endotoxin in the bioaerosol, is still a major cause of severe airway diseases. Moreover, inhaled endotoxin may play an important role in the development and progression of airway inflammation in asthma. Pathologic changes induced by endotoxin inhalation include bronchospasm, airflow obstruction, recruitment of inflammatory cells, injury of the alveolar epithelium, and disruption of pulmonary capillary integrity leading to protein rich fluid leak in the alveolar space. Mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important signalling receptors in innate host defense. Among these receptors, TLR4 plays a critical role in the response to endotoxin. Lungs are a complex compartmentalized organ with separate barriers, namely the alveolar-capillary barrier, the microvascular endothelium, and the alveolar epithelium. An emerging theme in the field of lung immunology is that structural cells (SCs) of the airways such as epithelial cells (ECs), endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other stromal cells produce activating cytokines that determine the quantity and quality of the lung immune response. This review focuses on the role of TLR4 in the innate and adaptive immune functions of the pulmonary SCs.

  1. Morphogen and community effects determine cell fates in response to BMP4 signaling in human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemashkalo, Anastasiia; Ruzo, Albert; Heemskerk, Idse; Warmflash, Aryeh

    2017-09-01

    Paracrine signals maintain developmental states and create cell fate patterns in vivo and influence differentiation outcomes in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in vitro Systematic investigation of morphogen signaling is hampered by the difficulty of disentangling endogenous signaling from experimentally applied ligands. Here, we grow hESCs in micropatterned colonies of 1-8 cells ('µColonies') to quantitatively investigate paracrine signaling and the response to external stimuli. We examine BMP4-mediated differentiation in µColonies and standard culture conditions and find that in µColonies, above a threshold concentration, BMP4 gives rise to only a single cell fate, contrary to its role as a morphogen in other developmental systems. Under standard culture conditions BMP4 acts as a morphogen but this requires secondary signals and particular cell densities. We find that a 'community effect' enforces a common fate within µColonies, both in the state of pluripotency and when cells are differentiated, and that this effect allows a more precise response to external signals. Using live cell imaging to correlate signaling histories with cell fates, we demonstrate that interactions between neighbors result in sustained, homogenous signaling necessary for differentiation. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Nitric oxide from inflammatory origin impairs neural stem cell proliferation by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Pereira Carreira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuroinflammation is characterized by activation of microglial cells, followed by production of nitric oxide (NO, which may have different outcomes on neurogenesis, favoring or inhibiting this process. In the present study, we investigated how the inflammatory mediator NO can affect proliferation of neural stem cells (NSC, and explored possible mechanisms underlying this effect. We investigated which mechanisms are involved in the regulation of NSC proliferation following treatment with an inflammatory stimulus (LPS plus IFN-γ, using a culture system of subventricular zone (SVZ-derived NSC mixed with microglia cells obtained from wild-type mice (iNOS+/+ or from iNOS knockout mice (iNOS-/-. We found an impairment of NSC cell proliferation in iNOS+/+ mixed cultures, which was not observed in iNOS-/- mixed cultures. Furthermore, the increased release of NO by activated iNOS+/+ microglial cells decreased the activation of the ERK/MAPK signaling pathway, which was concomitant with an enhanced nitration of the EGF receptor. Preventing nitrogen reactive species formation with MnTBAP, a scavenger of peroxynitrite, or using the peroxynitrite degradation catalyst FeTMPyP, cell proliferation and ERK signaling were restored to basal levels in iNOS+/+ mixed cultures. Moreover, exposure to the NO donor NOC-18 (100 µM, for 48 h, inhibited SVZ-derived NSC proliferation. Regarding the antiproliferative effect of NO, we found that NOC-18 caused the impairment of signaling through the ERK/MAPK pathway, which may be related to increased nitration of the EGF receptor in NSC. Using MnTBAP nitration was prevented, maintaining ERK signaling, rescuing NSC proliferation. We show that NO from inflammatory origin leads to a decreased function of the EGF receptor, which compromised proliferation of NSC. We also demonstrated that NO-mediated nitration of the EGF receptor caused a decrease in its phosphorylation, thus preventing regular proliferation signaling through the

  3. Inhibition of root growth by narciclasine is caused by DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest in lettuce seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanfeng; Li, Jiaolong; Yang, Lijing; Nan, Wenbin; Cao, Xiaoping; Bi, Yurong

    2014-09-01

    Narciclasine (NCS) is an Amaryllidaceae alkaloid isolated from Narcissus tazetta bulbs. Its phytotoxic effects on plant growth were examined in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seedlings. Results showed that high concentrations (0.5-5 μM) of NCS restricted the growth of lettuce roots in a dose-dependent manner. In NCS-treated lettuce seedlings, the following changes were detected: reduction of mitotic cells and cell elongation in the mature region, inhibition of proliferation of meristematic cells, and cell cycle. Moreover, comet assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay indicated that higher levels NCS (0.5-5 μM) induced DNA damage in root cells of lettuce. The decrease in meristematic cells and increase in DNA damage signals in lettuce roots in responses to NCS are in a dose-dependent manner. NCS-induced reactive oxygen species accumulation may explain an increase in DNA damage in lettuce roots. Thus, the restraint of root growth is due to cell cycle arrest which is caused by NCS-induced DNA damage. In addition, it was also found that NCS (0.5-5 μM) inhibited the root hair development of lettuce seedlings. Further investigations on the underlying mechanism revealed that both auxin and ethylene signaling pathways are involved in the response of root hairs to NCS.

  4. Bacterial Signaling Nucleotides Inhibit Yeast Cell Growth by Impacting Mitochondrial and Other Specifically Eukaryotic Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Hesketh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We have engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae to inducibly synthesize the prokaryotic signaling nucleotides cyclic di-GMP (cdiGMP, cdiAMP, and ppGpp in order to characterize the range of effects these nucleotides exert on eukaryotic cell function during bacterial pathogenesis. Synthetic genetic array (SGA and transcriptome analyses indicated that, while these compounds elicit some common reactions in yeast, there are also complex and distinctive responses to each of the three nucleotides. All three are capable of inhibiting eukaryotic cell growth, with the guanine nucleotides exhibiting stronger effects than cdiAMP. Mutations compromising mitochondrial function and chromatin remodeling show negative epistatic interactions with all three nucleotides. In contrast, certain mutations that cause defects in chromatin modification and ribosomal protein function show positive epistasis, alleviating growth inhibition by at least two of the three nucleotides. Uniquely, cdiGMP is lethal both to cells growing by respiration on acetate and to obligately fermentative petite mutants. cdiGMP is also synthetically lethal with the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR inhibitor hydroxyurea. Heterologous expression of the human ppGpp hydrolase Mesh1p prevented the accumulation of ppGpp in the engineered yeast and restored cell growth. Extensive in vivo interactions between bacterial signaling molecules and eukaryotic gene function occur, resulting in outcomes ranging from growth inhibition to death. cdiGMP functions through a mechanism that must be compensated by unhindered RNR activity or by functionally competent mitochondria. Mesh1p may be required for abrogating the damaging effects of ppGpp in human cells subjected to bacterial infection.

  5. Self-potential signals caused by eruptions of the Galeras volcano – Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greinwald S.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The National Institute of Geology and Mining, INGEOMINAS - Colombia, and the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources, BGR - Germany, perform since 1997 as a joint venture
    multi-parameter measurements at the Galeras volcano, in the southwest of Colombia. Since the end of 1998 the Multi-parameter Station at Galeras (Estación Multiparámetro del Galeras - EMG includes the continuous monitoring of electromagnetic variations. The electromagnetic (EM station is located at the north-eastern foot walls of the central cone inside the caldera.
    During almost six years of electromagnetic monitoring, the data did not show significant variations of the electromagnetic field, which could be related to the volcanic activity. In July 2004 a new active period of Galeras began with two strong ash emissions. During both emissions strong self potential- (SP signals were recorded lasting for several hours. The present paper will present the data which could give some indications on the movements of liquids during ash emissions.

  6. Lunar ground penetrating radar: Minimizing potential data artifacts caused by signal interaction with a rover body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelopoulos, Michael; Redman, David; Pollard, Wayne H.; Haltigin, Timothy W.; Dietrich, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is the leading geophysical candidate technology for future lunar missions aimed at mapping shallow stratigraphy (lunar materials, as well as its small size and lightweight components, make it a very attractive option from both a scientific and engineering perspective. However, the interaction between a GPR signal and the rover body is poorly understood and must be investigated prior to a space mission. In doing so, engineering and survey design strategies should be developed to enhance GPR performance in the context of the scientific question being asked. This paper explores the effects of a rover (simulated with a vertical metal plate) on GPR results for a range of heights above the surface and antenna configurations at two sites: (i) a standard GPR testing site with targets of known position, size, and material properties, and; (ii) a frozen lake for surface reflectivity experiments. Our results demonstrate that the GPR antenna configuration is a key variable dictating instrument design, with the XX polarization considered optimal for minimizing data artifact generation. These findings could thus be used to help guide design requirements for an eventual flight instrument.

  7. Distinct transcriptional programs in thymocytes responding to T cell receptor, Notch, and positive selection signals

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yina H.; Li, Dongling; Winoto, Astar; Robey, Ellen A.

    2004-01-01

    T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signaling is necessary but not sufficient to promote the positive selection of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes into CD4+ or CD8+ mature T cells. Notch signaling has also been implicated as a potential regulator of both CD4/CD8 T cell development and TCR signaling. However, the relationship between positive selection, TCR signaling, and Notch remains unclear. Here we use DNA microarray analysis to compare gene expression changes in CD4+CD8+ double-positive thymocytes undergoi...

  8. Mammary-Stem-Cell-Based Somatic Mouse Models Reveal Breast Cancer Drivers Causing Cell Fate Dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer genomics has provided an unprecedented opportunity for understanding genetic causes of human cancer. However, distinguishing which mutations are functionally relevant to cancer pathogenesis remains a major challenge. We describe here a mammary stem cell (MaSC organoid-based approach for rapid generation of somatic genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs. By using RNAi and CRISPR-mediated genome engineering in MaSC-GEMMs, we have discovered that inactivation of Ptpn22 or Mll3, two genes mutated in human breast cancer, greatly accelerated PI3K-driven mammary tumorigenesis. Using these tumor models, we have also identified genetic alterations promoting tumor metastasis and causing resistance to PI3K-targeted therapy. Both Ptpn22 and Mll3 inactivation resulted in disruption of mammary gland differentiation and an increase in stem cell activity. Mechanistically, Mll3 deletion enhanced stem cell activity through activation of the HIF pathway. Thus, our study has established a robust in vivo platform for functional cancer genomics and has discovered functional breast cancer mutations.

  9. Wingless signaling regulates winner/loser status in Minute cell competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akai, Nanami; Igaki, Tatsushi; Ohsawa, Shizue

    2018-03-01

    Cells heterozygously mutant for a ribosomal protein gene, called Minute/+ mutants, are eliminated from epithelium by cell competition when surrounded by wild-type cells. Whereas several factors that regulate Minute cell competition have been identified, the mechanisms how winner/loser status is determined and thereby triggers cell competition are still elusive. To address this, we established two assay systems for Minute cell competition, namely (i) the CORE (competitive elimination of RpS3-RNAi-expressing cells) system in which RpS3-RNAi-expressing wing pouch cells are eliminated from wild-type wing disc and (ii) the SURE (supercompetition of RpS3-expressing clones in RpS3/+ tissue) system in which RpS3-over-expressing clones generated in RpS3/+ wing disc outcompete surrounding RpS3/+ cells. An ectopic over-expression screen using the CORE system identified Wg signaling as a critical regulator of Minute cell competition. Activation of Wg signaling in loser cells suppressed their elimination, whereas down-regulation of Wg signaling in loser cells enhanced their elimination. Furthermore, using the SURE system, we found that down-regulation of Wg signaling in winner cells suppressed elimination of neighboring losers. Our observations suggest that cellular Wg signaling activity is crucial for determining winner/loser status and thereby triggering Minute cell competition. © 2018 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Association of expression of the hedgehog signal with Merkel cell polyomavirus infection and prognosis of Merkel cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuromi, Teruyuki; Matsushita, Michiko; Iwasaki, Takeshi; Nonaka, Daisuke; Kuwamoto, Satoshi; Nagata, Keiko; Kato, Masako; Akizuki, Gen; Kitamura, Yukisato; Hayashi, Kazuhiko

    2017-11-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer that mostly occurs in the elderly. Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is detected in approximately 80% of MCCs and is associated with carcinogenesis. Hedgehog signaling pathway plays a role in human embryogenesis and organogenesis. In addition, reactivation of this pathway later in life can cause tumors. Twenty-nineMCPyV-positive and 21 MCPyV-negative MCCs were immunohistochemically stained with primary antibodies for hedgehog signaling (SHH, IHH, PTCH1, SMO, GLI1, GLI2, and GLI3) and evaluated using H-score. Polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis for SHH and GLI1 exons were also performed. Expression of SHH was higher in MCPyV-positive MCCs than in MCPyV-negative MCCs (PA. Only 2 mutations with amino acid changes were detected in MCPyV-negative MCCs only: 1 missense mutation in GLI1 exon 4 and 1 nonsense mutation in SHH-3B. Expression of SHH and GLI1 may be useful prognostic markers of MCC because increased expression was associated with better prognosis. The high rate of c.576G>A silent mutation in GLI1 exon 5 was a feature of MCC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Xenoestrogens Ethinyl Estradiol and Zearalenone Cause Precocious Puberty in Female Rats via Central Kisspeptin Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriszt, Rókus; Winkler, Zsuzsanna; Polyák, Ágnes; Kuti, Dániel; Molnár, Csilla; Hrabovszky, Erik; Kalló, Imre; Szőke, Zsuzsanna; Ferenczi, Szilamér; Kovács, Krisztina J

    2015-11-01

    Xenoestrogens from synthetic or natural origin represent an increasing risk of disrupted endocrine functions including the physiological activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonad axis. Ethinyl estradiol (EE2) is a synthetic estrogen used in contraceptive pills, whereas zearalenone (ZEA) is a natural mycoestrogen found with increasing prevalence in various cereal crops. Both EE2 and ZEA are agonists of estrogen receptor-α and accelerate puberty. However, the neuroendocrine mechanisms that are responsible for this effect remain unknown. Immature female Wistar rats were treated with EE2 (10 μg/kg), ZEA (10 mg/kg), or vehicle for 10 days starting from postnatal day 18. As a marker of puberty, the vaginal opening was recorded and neuropeptide and related transcription factor mRNA levels were measured by quantitative real time PCR and in situ hybridization histochemistry. Both ZEA and EE2 accelerated the vaginal opening, increased the uterine weight and the number of antral follicles in the ovary, and resulted in the increased central expression of gnrh. These changes occurred in parallel with an earlier increase of kiss1 mRNA in the anteroventral and rostral periventricular hypothalamus and an increased kisspeptin (KP) fiber density and KP-GnRH appositions in the preoptic area. These changes are compatible with a mechanism in which xenoestrogens overstimulate the developmentally unprepared reproductive system, which results in an advanced vaginal opening and an enlargement of the uterus at the periphery. Within the hypothalamus, ZEA and EE2 directly activate anteroventral and periventricular KP neurons to stimulate GnRH mRNA. However, GnRH and gonadotropin release and ovulation are disrupted due to xenoestrogen-mediated inhibitory KP signaling in the arcuate nucleus.

  12. Chlorine gas exposure causes systemic endothelial dysfunction by inhibiting endothelial nitric oxide synthase-dependent signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honavar, Jaideep; Samal, Andrey A; Bradley, Kelley M; Brandon, Angela; Balanay, Joann; Squadrito, Giuseppe L; MohanKumar, Krishnan; Maheshwari, Akhil; Postlethwait, Edward M; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P

    2011-08-01

    Chlorine gas (Cl(2)) exposure during accidents or in the military setting results primarily in injury to the lungs. However, the potential for Cl(2) exposure to promote injury to the systemic vasculature leading to compromised vascular function has not been studied. We hypothesized that Cl(2) promotes extrapulmonary endothelial dysfunction characterized by a loss of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-derived signaling. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to Cl(2) for 30 minutes, and eNOS-dependent vasodilation of aorta as a function of Cl(2) dose (0-400 ppm) and time after exposure (0-48 h) were determined. Exposure to Cl(2) (250-400 ppm) significantly inhibited eNOS-dependent vasodilation (stimulated by acetycholine) at 24 to 48 hours after exposure without affecting constriction responses to phenylephrine or vasodilation responses to an NO donor, suggesting decreased NO formation. Consistent with this hypothesis, eNOS protein expression was significantly decreased (∼ 60%) in aorta isolated from Cl(2)-exposed versus air-exposed rats. Moreover, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA was up-regulated in circulating leukocytes and aorta isolated 24 hours after Cl(2) exposure, suggesting stimulation of inflammation in the systemic vasculature. Despite decreased eNOS expression and activity, no changes in mean arterial blood pressure were observed. However, injection of 1400W, a selective inhibitor of iNOS, increased mean arterial blood pressure only in Cl(2)-exposed animals, suggesting that iNOS-derived NO compensates for decreased eNOS-derived NO. These results highlight the potential for Cl(2) exposure to promote postexposure systemic endothelial dysfunction via disruption of vascular NO homeostasis mechanisms.

  13. Chlorine Gas Exposure Causes Systemic Endothelial Dysfunction by Inhibiting Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase–Dependent Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honavar, Jaideep; Samal, Andrey A.; Bradley, Kelley M.; Brandon, Angela; Balanay, Joann; Squadrito, Giuseppe L.; MohanKumar, Krishnan; Maheshwari, Akhil; Postlethwait, Edward M.; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2011-01-01

    Chlorine gas (Cl2) exposure during accidents or in the military setting results primarily in injury to the lungs. However, the potential for Cl2 exposure to promote injury to the systemic vasculature leading to compromised vascular function has not been studied. We hypothesized that Cl2 promotes extrapulmonary endothelial dysfunction characterized by a loss of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-derived signaling. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to Cl2 for 30 minutes, and eNOS-dependent vasodilation of aorta as a function of Cl2 dose (0–400 ppm) and time after exposure (0–48 h) were determined. Exposure to Cl2 (250–400 ppm) significantly inhibited eNOS-dependent vasodilation (stimulated by acetycholine) at 24 to 48 hours after exposure without affecting constriction responses to phenylephrine or vasodilation responses to an NO donor, suggesting decreased NO formation. Consistent with this hypothesis, eNOS protein expression was significantly decreased (∼ 60%) in aorta isolated from Cl2–exposed versus air-exposed rats. Moreover, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA was up-regulated in circulating leukocytes and aorta isolated 24 hours after Cl2 exposure, suggesting stimulation of inflammation in the systemic vasculature. Despite decreased eNOS expression and activity, no changes in mean arterial blood pressure were observed. However, injection of 1400W, a selective inhibitor of iNOS, increased mean arterial blood pressure only in Cl2–exposed animals, suggesting that iNOS-derived NO compensates for decreased eNOS-derived NO. These results highlight the potential for Cl2 exposure to promote postexposure systemic endothelial dysfunction via disruption of vascular NO homeostasis mechanisms. PMID:21131444

  14. Neuronal Regulation of Schwann Cell Mitochondrial Ca(2+) Signaling during Myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ino, Daisuke; Sagara, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Junji; Kanemaru, Kazunori; Okubo, Yohei; Iino, Masamitsu

    2015-09-29

    Schwann cells (SCs) myelinate peripheral neurons to promote the rapid conduction of action potentials, and the process of myelination is known to be regulated by signals from axons to SCs. Given that SC mitochondria are one of the potential regulators of myelination, we investigated whether SC mitochondria are regulated by axonal signaling. Here, we show a purinergic mechanism that sends information from neurons to SC mitochondria during myelination. Our results show that electrical stimulation of rat sciatic nerve increases extracellular ATP levels enough to activate purinergic receptors. Indeed, electrical stimulation of sciatic nerves induces Ca(2+) increases in the cytosol and the mitochondrial matrix of surrounding SCs via purinergic receptor activation. Chronic suppression of this pathway during active myelination suppressed the longitudinal and radial development of myelinating SCs and caused hypomyelination. These results demonstrate a neuron-to-SC mitochondria signaling, which is likely to have an important role in proper myelination. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of ERK/MAPK in endothelin receptor signaling in human aortic smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Qing-wen; Edvinsson, Lars; Xu, Cang-Bao

    2009-01-01

    muscle cells (VSMCs) through activation of endothelin type A (ETA) and type B (ETB) receptors. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are involved in ET-1-induced VSMC contraction and proliferation. This study was designed to investigate...... the ETA and ETB receptor intracellular signaling in human VSMCs and used phosphorylation (activation) of ERK1/2 as a functional signal molecule for endothelin receptor activity. RESULTS: Subconfluent human VSMCs were stimulated by ET-1 at different concentrations (1 nM-1 microM). The activation of ERK1...... agonist, Sarafotoxin 6c (S6c) caused a time-dependent ERK1/2 activation with a maximal effect by less than 20% of the ET-1-induced activation of ERK1/2. Increase in bosentan concentration up to 10 microM further inhibited ET-1-induced activation of ERK1/2 and had a stronger inhibitory effect than BQ123...

  16. Phosphorelays provide tunable signal processing capabilities for the cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothamachu, Varun B; Feliu, Elisenda; Wiuf, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    present here this relation for four-layered phosphorelays, which are signaling systems that are ubiquitous in prokaryotes and also found in lower eukaryotes and plants. We derive an analytical expression that relates the shape of the signal-response relationship in a relay to the kinetic rates of forward...

  17. The inhibitory effect of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (Ferucarbotran) on osteogenic differentiation and its signaling mechanism in human mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ying-Chun; Hsiao, Jong-Kai; Liu, Hon-Man; Lai, I-Yin; Yao, Ming; Hsu, Szu-Chun; Ko, Bor-Sheng; Chen, Yao-Chang; Yang, Chung-Shi; Huang, Dong-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles are very useful for monitoring cell trafficking in vivo and distinguish whether cellular regeneration originated from an exogenous cell source, which is a key issue for developing successful stem cell therapies. However, the impact of SPIO labeling on stem cell behavior remains uncertain. Here, we show the inhibitory effect of Ferucarbotran, an ionic SPIO, on osteogenic differentiation and its signaling mechanism in human mesenchymal stem cells. Ferucarbotran caused a dose-dependent inhibition of osteogenic differentiation, abolished the differentiation at high concentration, promoted cell migration, and activated the signaling molecules, β-catenin, a cancer/testis antigen, SSX, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2). An iron chelator, desferrioxamine, suppressed all the above Ferucarbotran-induced actions, demonstrating an important role of free iron in the inhibition of osteogenic differentiation that is mediated by the promotion of cell mobilization, involving the activation of a specific signaling pathway.

  18. Signaling pathways and cell mechanics involved in wound closure by epithelial cell sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenteany, G; Janmey, P A; Stossel, T P

    2000-07-13

    Sheets of cells move together as a unit during wound healing and embryonic tissue movements, such as those occurring during gastrulation and neurulation. We have used epithelial wound closure as a model system for such movements and examined the mechanisms of closure and the importance of the Rho family of Ras-related small GTPases in this process. Wounds induced in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cell monolayers close by Rac- and phosphoinositide-dependent cell crawling, with formation of lamellipodia at the wound margin, and not by contraction of a perimarginal actomyosin purse-string. Although Rho-dependent actin bundles usually form at the margin, neither Rho activity nor formation of these structures is required for wound closure to occur at a normal rate. Cdc42 activity is also not required for closure. Inhibition of Rho or Cdc42 results, however, in statistically significant decreases in the regularity of wound closure, as determined by the ratio of wound margin perimeter over the remaining denuded area at different times. The Rac-dependent force generation for closure is distributed over several rows of cells from the wound margin, as inhibition of motility in the first row of cells alone does not inhibit closure and can be compensated for by generation of motile force in cells behind the margin. Furthermore, we observed high levels of Rac-dependent actin assembly in the first few rows of cells from the wound margin. Wounds in MDCK cell sheets do not close by purse-string contraction but by a crawling behavior involving Rac, phosphoinositides and active movement of multiple rows of cells. This finding suggests a new distributed mode of signaling and movement that, nevertheless, resembles individual cell motility. Although Rho and Cdc42 activities are not required for closure, they have a role in determining the regularity of closure.

  19. Cytomegalovirus Infection Drives Adaptive Epigenetic Diversification of NK Cells with Altered Signaling and Effector Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlums, Heinrich; Cichocki, Frank; Tesi, Bianca; Theorell, Jakob; Beziat, Vivien; Holmes, Tim D.; Han, Hongya; Chiang, Samuel C.C.; Foley, Bree; Mattsson, Kristin; Larsson, Stella; Schaffer, Marie; Malmberg, Karl-Johan; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Bryceson, Yenan T.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The mechanisms underlying human natural killer (NK) cell phenotypic and functional heterogeneity are unknown. Here, we describe the emergence of diverse subsets of human NK cells selectively lacking expression of signaling proteins after human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. The absence of B and myeloid cell-related signaling protein expression in these NK cell subsets correlated with promoter DNA hyperme-thylation. Genome-wide DNA methylation patterns were strikingly similar between HCMV-associated adaptive NK cells and cytotoxic effector T cells but differed from those of canonical NK cells. Functional interrogation demonstrated altered cytokine responsiveness in adaptive NK cells that was linked to reduced expression of the transcription factor PLZF. Furthermore, subsets of adaptive NK cells demonstrated significantly reduced functional responses to activated autologous T cells. The present results uncover a spectrum of epigenetically unique adaptive NK cell subsets that diversify in response to viral infection and have distinct functional capabilities compared to canonical NK cell subsets. PMID:25786176

  20. Blockage of spontaneous Ca2+ oscillation causes cell death in intraerythrocitic Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Enomoto

    Full Text Available Malaria remains one of the world's most important infectious diseases and is responsible for enormous mortality and morbidity. Resistance to antimalarial drugs is a challenging problem in malaria control. Clinical malaria is associated with the proliferation and development of Plasmodium parasites in human erythrocytes. Especially, the development into the mature forms (trophozoite and schizont of Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum causes severe malaria symptoms due to a distinctive property, sequestration which is not shared by any other human malaria. Ca(2+ is well known to be a highly versatile intracellular messenger that regulates many different cellular processes. Cytosolic Ca(2+ increases evoked by extracellular stimuli are often observed in the form of oscillating Ca(2+ spikes (Ca(2+ oscillation in eukaryotic cells. However, in lower eukaryotic and plant cells the physiological roles and the molecular mechanisms of Ca(2+ oscillation are poorly understood. Here, we showed the observation of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphospate (IP(3-dependent spontaneous Ca(2+ oscillation in P. falciparum without any exogenous extracellular stimulation by using live cell fluorescence Ca(2+ imaging. Intraerythrocytic P. falciparum exhibited stage-specific Ca(2+ oscillations in ring form and trophozoite stages which were blocked by IP(3 receptor inhibitor, 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate (2-APB. Analyses of parasitaemia and parasite size and electron micrograph of 2-APB-treated P. falciparum revealed that 2-APB severely obstructed the intraerythrocytic maturation, resulting in cell death of the parasites. Furthermore, we confirmed the similar lethal effect of 2-APB on the chloroquine-resistant strain of P. falciparum. To our best knowledge, we for the first time showed the existence of the spontaneous Ca(2+ oscillation in Plasmodium species and clearly demonstrated that IP(3-dependent spontaneous Ca(2+ oscillation in P. falciparum is critical for the development

  1. Leptospira interrogans causes quantitative and morphological disturbances in adherens junctions and other biological groups of proteins in human endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi Sato

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic Leptospira transmits from animals to humans, causing the zoonotic life-threatening infection called leptospirosis. This infection is reported worldwide with higher risk in tropical regions. Symptoms of leptospirosis range from mild illness to severe illness such as liver damage, kidney failure, respiratory distress, meningitis, and fatal hemorrhagic disease. Invasive species of Leptospira rapidly disseminate to multiple tissues where this bacterium damages host endothelial cells, increasing vascular permeability. Despite the burden in humans and animals, the pathogenic mechanisms of Leptospira infection remain to be elucidated. The pathogenic leptospires adhere to endothelial cells and permeabilize endothelial barriers in vivo and in vitro. In this study, human endothelial cells were infected with the pathogenic L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni or the saprophyte L. biflexa serovar Patoc to investigate morphological changes and other distinctive phenotypes of host cell proteins by fluorescence microscopy. Among those analyzed, 17 proteins from five biological classes demonstrated distinctive phenotypes in morphology and/or signal intensity upon infection with Leptospira. The affected biological groups include: 1 extracellular matrix, 2 intercellular adhesion molecules and cell surface receptors, 3 intracellular proteins, 4 cell-cell junction proteins, and 5 a cytoskeletal protein. Infection with the pathogenic strain most profoundly disturbed the biological structures of adherens junctions (VE-cadherin and catenins and actin filaments. Our data illuminate morphological disruptions and reduced signals of cell-cell junction proteins and filamentous actin in L. interrogans-infected endothelial cells. In addition, Leptospira infection, regardless of pathogenic status, influenced other host proteins belonging to multiple biological classes. Our data suggest that this zoonotic agent may damage endothelial cells via multiple cascades or

  2. Leptospira interrogans causes quantitative and morphological disturbances in adherens junctions and other biological groups of proteins in human endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiromi

    2017-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira transmits from animals to humans, causing the zoonotic life-threatening infection called leptospirosis. This infection is reported worldwide with higher risk in tropical regions. Symptoms of leptospirosis range from mild illness to severe illness such as liver damage, kidney failure, respiratory distress, meningitis, and fatal hemorrhagic disease. Invasive species of Leptospira rapidly disseminate to multiple tissues where this bacterium damages host endothelial cells, increasing vascular permeability. Despite the burden in humans and animals, the pathogenic mechanisms of Leptospira infection remain to be elucidated. The pathogenic leptospires adhere to endothelial cells and permeabilize endothelial barriers in vivo and in vitro. In this study, human endothelial cells were infected with the pathogenic L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni or the saprophyte L. biflexa serovar Patoc to investigate morphological changes and other distinctive phenotypes of host cell proteins by fluorescence microscopy. Among those analyzed, 17 proteins from five biological classes demonstrated distinctive phenotypes in morphology and/or signal intensity upon infection with Leptospira. The affected biological groups include: 1) extracellular matrix, 2) intercellular adhesion molecules and cell surface receptors, 3) intracellular proteins, 4) cell-cell junction proteins, and 5) a cytoskeletal protein. Infection with the pathogenic strain most profoundly disturbed the biological structures of adherens junctions (VE-cadherin and catenins) and actin filaments. Our data illuminate morphological disruptions and reduced signals of cell-cell junction proteins and filamentous actin in L. interrogans-infected endothelial cells. In addition, Leptospira infection, regardless of pathogenic status, influenced other host proteins belonging to multiple biological classes. Our data suggest that this zoonotic agent may damage endothelial cells via multiple cascades or pathways

  3. Proteome Alterations of Hippocampal Cells Caused by Clostridium botulinum C3 Exoenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Anke; Rohrbeck, Astrid; Just, Ingo; Pich, Andreas

    2015-11-06

    C3bot from Clostridium botulinum is a bacterial mono-ADP-ribosylating enzyme, which transfers an ADP-ribose moiety onto the small GTPases Rho A/B/C. C3bot and the catalytic inactive mutant (C3E174Q) cause axonal and dendritic growth as well as branching in primary hippocampal neurons. In cultured murine hippocampal HT22 cells, protein abundances were analyzed in response to C3bot or C3E174Q treatment using a shotgun proteomics approach. Proteome analyses were performed at four time points over 6 days. More than 4000 protein groups were identified at each time point and quantified in triplicate analyses. On day one, 46 proteins showed an altered abundance, and after 6 days, more than 700 proteins responded to C3bot with an up- or down-regulation. In contrast, C3E174Q had no provable impact on protein abundance. Protein quantification was verified for several proteins by multiple reaction monitoring. Data analysis of altered proteins revealed different cellular processes that were affected by C3bot. They are particularly involved in mitochondrial and lysosomal processes, adhesion, carbohydrate and glucose metabolism, signal transduction, and nuclear proteins of translation and ribosome biogenesis. The results of this study gain novel insights into the function of C3bot in hippocampal cells.

  4. MC1R and cAMP signaling inhibit cdc25B activity and delay cell cycle progression in melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jesse; Bastian, Boris C; McCormick, Frank

    2013-08-20

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) mediates the tanning response through induction of cAMP and downstream pigmentary enzymes. Diminished function alleles of MC1R are associated with decreased tanning and increased melanoma risk, which has been attributed to increased rates of mutation. We have found that MC1R or cAMP signaling also directly decreases proliferation in melanoma cell lines. MC1R overexpression, treatment with the MC1R ligand, or treatment with small-molecule activators of cAMP signaling causes delayed progression from G2 into mitosis. This delay is caused by phosphorylation and inhibition of cdc25B, a cyclin dependent kinase 1-activating phosphatase, and is rescued by expression of a cdc25B mutant that cannot be phosphorylated at the serine 323 residue. These results show that MC1R and cAMP signaling can directly inhibit melanoma growth through regulation of the G2/M checkpoint.

  5. Signal processing methods for reducing artifacts in microelectrode brain recordings caused by functional electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D; Willett, F; Memberg, W D; Murphy, B; Walter, B; Sweet, J; Miller, J; Hochberg, L R; Kirsch, R F; Ajiboye, A B

    2018-04-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is a promising technology for restoring movement to paralyzed limbs. Intracortical brain-computer interfaces (iBCIs) have enabled intuitive control over virtual and robotic movements, and more recently over upper extremity FES neuroprostheses. However, electrical stimulation of muscles creates artifacts in intracortical microelectrode recordings that could degrade iBCI performance. Here, we investigate methods for reducing the cortically recorded artifacts that result from peripheral electrical stimulation. One participant in the BrainGate2 pilot clinical trial had two intracortical microelectrode arrays placed in the motor cortex, and thirty-six stimulating intramuscular electrodes placed in the muscles of the contralateral limb. We characterized intracortically recorded electrical artifacts during both intramuscular and surface stimulation. We compared the performance of three artifact reduction methods: blanking, common average reference (CAR) and linear regression reference (LRR), which creates channel-specific reference signals, composed of weighted sums of other channels. Electrical artifacts resulting from surface stimulation were 175  ×  larger than baseline neural recordings (which were 110 µV peak-to-peak), while intramuscular stimulation artifacts were only 4  ×  larger. The artifact waveforms were highly consistent across electrodes within each array. Application of LRR reduced artifact magnitudes to less than 10 µV and largely preserved the original neural feature values used for decoding. Unmitigated stimulation artifacts decreased iBCI decoding performance, but performance was almost completely recovered using LRR, which outperformed CAR and blanking and extracted useful neural information during stimulation artifact periods. The LRR method was effective at reducing electrical artifacts resulting from both intramuscular and surface FES, and almost completely restored iBCI decoding

  6. [Modeling the occurrence of shellfish poisoning outbreaks caused by Gymnodinium catenatum (Dinophyceae) through electromagnetic signal triggering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Pulo

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins (PSTs) in bivalves attributed to Gymnodinium catenatum blooms at the NW Portuguese coast was previously associated with periods of low solar activity (measured by the radio flux [R]), or low geomagnetic A(a) index. It was also observed that reduction of R preceded the occurrence of toxin accumulation, while A(a) index increase could be related to its absence during periods of low activity. For modeling toxin accumulation, the monthly decrease in R was studied along the decade 2003-2012. A match that helped explaining the highly toxic years of 2007 and 2008 was obtained by plotting the formula: ΔR = (R(n-1) - R(n))/(R(n) - 65)2, where 65 represented the lowest radio activity known to date. The complex denominator was required to take into account the sunspot cycle. A 1-2 month lag was observed between maximal relative decline and maximal PSTs accumulation. PSTs in bivalves from the Portuguese south coast were related with natural electromagnetic cycles for the first time, and were not statistically associated with low R. A statistically significant association with low A(a) index also was not achieved, due to the low number of occurrences, although the 25-75 percentile was restricted to low Aa indexes in a similar way to that found for the NW coast. PSTs accumulation outside solar minima could be triggered by a steep decline in the A(a) index (ΔA), but no lag was observed in this case. While ΔR amplitude helped explaining the highly toxic years of 2007 and 2008 at the NW coast, the amplitude of ΔA was not related to the severity of the accumulation. Other kind of local electromagnetic signaling was investigated resorting to the occurrence of seismologic phenomena, because these events can trigger electric activities. No statistical association was found between seism number or magnitude and PSTs at the south coast, located near the boundary between the African and Eurasian plates, and marked by moderate

  7. Signal processing methods for reducing artifacts in microelectrode brain recordings caused by functional electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D.; Willett, F.; Memberg, W. D.; Murphy, B.; Walter, B.; Sweet, J.; Miller, J.; Hochberg, L. R.; Kirsch, R. F.; Ajiboye, A. B.

    2018-04-01

    Objective. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is a promising technology for restoring movement to paralyzed limbs. Intracortical brain-computer interfaces (iBCIs) have enabled intuitive control over virtual and robotic movements, and more recently over upper extremity FES neuroprostheses. However, electrical stimulation of muscles creates artifacts in intracortical microelectrode recordings that could degrade iBCI performance. Here, we investigate methods for reducing the cortically recorded artifacts that result from peripheral electrical stimulation. Approach. One participant in the BrainGate2 pilot clinical trial had two intracortical microelectrode arrays placed in the motor cortex, and thirty-six stimulating intramuscular electrodes placed in the muscles of the contralateral limb. We characterized intracortically recorded electrical artifacts during both intramuscular and surface stimulation. We compared the performance of three artifact reduction methods: blanking, common average reference (CAR) and linear regression reference (LRR), which creates channel-specific reference signals, composed of weighted sums of other channels. Main results. Electrical artifacts resulting from surface stimulation were 175  ×  larger than baseline neural recordings (which were 110 µV peak-to-peak), while intramuscular stimulation artifacts were only 4  ×  larger. The artifact waveforms were highly consistent across electrodes within each array. Application of LRR reduced artifact magnitudes to less than 10 µV and largely preserved the original neural feature values used for decoding. Unmitigated stimulation artifacts decreased iBCI decoding performance, but performance was almost completely recovered using LRR, which outperformed CAR and blanking and extracted useful neural information during stimulation artifact periods. Significance. The LRR method was effective at reducing electrical artifacts resulting from both intramuscular and surface FES, and

  8. DNA Damage in Embryonic Stem Cells Caused by Nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    carbon nanomaterials that have the diamond-like struc- ture at a nanometer scale. Like carbon nanotubes and fullerene C60 , NDs also pos- sess unique...optoelectronic, mechanical, thermal , and biological properties attractive for a variety of important applications, in- cluding nanomedicine.1 Of...fluorescence intensity7,8 are particularly useful for fluo- rescence imaging inside living cells. Besides, the N-V defect centers also impart magnetic properties

  9. Autophagy protects gastric mucosal epithelial cells from ethanol-induced oxidative damage via mTOR signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Weilong; Bai, Jie; Tian, Shaobo; Ma, Muyuan; Li, Wei; Yin, Yuping; Deng, Rui; Cui, Jinyuan; Li, Jinjin; Wang, Guobin; Zhang, Peng; Tao, Kaixiong

    2017-05-01

    Alcohol abuse is an important cause of gastric mucosal epithelial cell injury and gastric ulcers. A number of studies have demonstrated that autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved cellular mechanism, has a protective effect on cell survival. However, it is not known whether autophagy can protect gastric mucosal epithelial cells against the toxic effects of ethanol. In the present study, gastric mucosal epithelial cells (GES-1 cells) and Wistar rats were treated with ethanol to detect the adaptive response of autophagy. Our results demonstrated that ethanol exposure induced gastric mucosal epithelial cell damage, which was accompanied by the downregulation of mTOR signaling pathway and activation of autophagy. Suppression of autophagy with pharmacological agents resulted in a significant increase of GES-1 cell apoptosis and gastric mucosa injury, suggesting that autophagy could protect cells from ethanol toxicity. Furthermore, we evaluated the cellular oxidative stress response following ethanol treatment and found that autophagy induced by ethanol inhibited generation of reactive oxygen species and degradation of antioxidant and lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, these findings provide evidence that ethanol can activate autophagy via downregulation of the mTOR signaling pathway, serving as an adaptive mechanism to ameliorate oxidative damage induced by ethanol in gastric mucosal epithelial cells. Therefore, modifying autophagy may provide a therapeutic strategy against alcoholic gastric mucosa injury. Impact statement The effect and mechanism of autophagy on ethanol-induced cell damage remain controversial. In this manuscript, we report the results of our study demonstrating that autophagy can protect gastric mucosal epithelial cells against ethanol toxicity in vitro and in vivo. We have shown that ethanol can activate autophagy via downregulation of the mTOR signaling pathway, serving as an adaptive mechanism to ameliorate ethanol-induced oxidative damage in

  10. Light acclimation, retrograde signalling, cell death and immune defences in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpiński, Stanisław; Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Wituszyńska, Weronika; Burdiak, Paweł

    2013-04-01

    This review confronts the classical view of plant immune defence and light acclimation with recently published data. Earlier findings have linked plant immune defences to nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR)-dependent recognition of pathogen effectors and to the role of plasma membrane-localized NADPH-dependent oxidoreductase (AtRbohD), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and salicylic acid (SA). However, recent results suggest that plant immune defence also depends on the absorption of excessive light energy and photorespiration. Rapid changes in light intensity and quality often cause the absorption of energy, which is in excess of that required for photosynthesis. Such excessive light energy is considered to be a factor triggering photoinhibition and disturbance in ROS/hormonal homeostasis, which leads to cell death in foliar tissues. We highlight here the tight crosstalk between ROS- and SA-dependent pathways leading to light acclimation, and defence responses leading to pathogen resistance. We also show that LESION SIMULATING DISEASE 1 (LSD1) regulates and integrates these processes. Moreover, we discuss the role of plastid-nucleus signal transduction, photorespiration, photoelectrochemical signalling and 'light memory' in the regulation of acclimation and immune defence responses. All of these results suggest that plants have evolved a genetic system that simultaneously regulates systemic acquired resistance (SAR), cell death and systemic acquired acclimation (SAA). © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Phospho-specific flow cytometry identifies aberrant signaling in indolent B-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blix Egil S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about signaling pathways in malignant cells may provide prognostic and diagnostic information in addition to identify potential molecular targets for therapy. B-cell receptor (BCR and co-receptor CD40 signaling is essential for normal B cells, and there is increasing evidence that signaling via BCR and CD40 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of B-cell lymphoma. The aim of this study was to investigate basal and induced signaling in lymphoma B cells and infiltrating T cells in single-cell suspensions of biopsies from small cell lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia (SLL/CLL and marginal zone lymphoma (MZL patients. Methods Samples from untreated SLL/CLL and MZL patients were examined for basal and activation induced signaling by phospho-specific flow cytometry. A panel of 9 stimulation conditions targeting B and T cells, including crosslinking of the B cell receptor (BCR, CD40 ligand and interleukins in combination with 12 matching phospho-protein readouts was used to study signaling. Results Malignant B cells from SLL/CLL patients had higher basal levels of phosphorylated (p-SFKs, p-PLCγ, p-ERK, p-p38, p-p65 (NF-κB, p-STAT5 and p-STAT6, compared to healthy donor B cells. In contrast, anti-BCR induced signaling was highly impaired in SLL/CLL and MZL B cells as determined by low p-SFK, p-SYK and p-PLCγ levels. Impaired anti-BCR-induced p-PLCγ was associated with reduced surface expression of IgM and CD79b. Similarly, CD40L-induced p-ERK and p-p38 were also significantly reduced in lymphoma B cells, whereas p-p65 (NF-κB was equal to that of normal B cells. In contrast, IL-2, IL-7 and IL-15 induced p-STAT5 in tumor-infiltrating T cells were not different from normal T cells. Conclusions BCR signaling and CD40L-induced p-p38 was suppressed in malignant B cells from SLL/CLL and MZL patients. Single-cell phospho-specific flow cytometry for detection of basal as well as activation

  12. Early signals of environmental and health impacts caused by uranium mining in Caetite, Bahia, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, Adelson S. de; Rego, Rita de Cassia Franco; Zucchi, Maria do Rosario; Navarro, Marcus V. Teixeira

    2011-01-01

    Uranium mining and processing at Lagoa Real (Bahia, Brazil) in the southwest of Bahia state started in the year 2000.The processing of uranium ore for obtaining U3O8 (yellowcake) is done today in the processing unit of the Brazilian Nuclear Industries INB located in the area of the same municipality above mentioned. The production capacity is 400 tons / year of U3O8, and the reserves in this region are estimated at 100.000 tons of uranium without any other associated minerals, enough to supply the demand for nuclear power plants Angra I and II for over 100 years. Since the granting of AOP (Permanent Operation Authorization) by CNEN (National Commission on Nuclear Energy) in the year 2009, there were some incidents at the facility, such as: solvents and liquid containing uranium overflow; pipes rupture, causing indiscriminate dispersion of toxic acids and other chemical agents; collapse of parts of the slope of the open pit. CNEN admitted in an official press release on April 1, 2011 that 'INB has no capacity to produce annual reports on environmental monitoring (unable to perform radiometric measurements, etc.). The last time a report was released happened in the year 2008. These reports are vital to the environmental impact assessment of the facility'. Another potential source of environmental and health negative impacts on the local population could be linked to radon emission. What are the levels of this important pollutant in the affected areas? (author)

  13. Early signals of environmental and health impacts caused by uranium mining in Caetite, Bahia, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, Adelson S. de; Rego, Rita de Cassia Franco [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Medicina Preventiva. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Saude, Ambiente e Trabalho; Zucchi, Maria do Rosario [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica da Terra. Lab. de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada; Navarro, Marcus V. Teixeira, E-mail: mvtn@ifba.edu.b [Instituto Federal da Bahia (LAFIR/NTS/IFBA) Salvador, BA (Brazil). Nucleo de Tecnologia em Saude. Lab. de Fisica Radiologica

    2011-07-01

    Uranium mining and processing at Lagoa Real (Bahia, Brazil) in the southwest of Bahia state started in the year 2000.The processing of uranium ore for obtaining U3O8 (yellowcake) is done today in the processing unit of the Brazilian Nuclear Industries INB located in the area of the same municipality above mentioned. The production capacity is 400 tons / year of U3O8, and the reserves in this region are estimated at 100.000 tons of uranium without any other associated minerals, enough to supply the demand for nuclear power plants Angra I and II for over 100 years. Since the granting of AOP (Permanent Operation Authorization) by CNEN (National Commission on Nuclear Energy) in the year 2009, there were some incidents at the facility, such as: solvents and liquid containing uranium overflow; pipes rupture, causing indiscriminate dispersion of toxic acids and other chemical agents; collapse of parts of the slope of the open pit. CNEN admitted in an official press release on April 1, 2011 that 'INB has no capacity to produce annual reports on environmental monitoring (unable to perform radiometric measurements, etc.). The last time a report was released happened in the year 2008. These reports are vital to the environmental impact assessment of the facility'. Another potential source of environmental and health negative impacts on the local population could be linked to radon emission. What are the levels of this important pollutant in the affected areas? (author)

  14. PAF-Wnt signaling-induced cell plasticity is required for maintenance of breast cancer cell stemness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Jung, Youn-Sang; Jun, Sohee; Lee, Sunhye; Wang, Wenqi; Schneider, Andrea; Sun Oh, Young; Lin, Steven H; Park, Bum-Joon; Chen, Junjie; Keyomarsi, Khandan; Park, Jae-Il

    2016-02-04

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) contribute to tumour heterogeneity, therapy resistance and metastasis. However, the regulatory mechanisms of cancer cell stemness remain elusive. Here we identify PCNA-associated factor (PAF) as a key molecule that controls cancer cell stemness. PAF is highly expressed in breast cancer cells but not in mammary epithelial cells (MECs). In MECs, ectopic expression of PAF induces anchorage-independent cell growth and breast CSC marker expression. In mouse models, conditional PAF expression induces mammary ductal hyperplasia. Moreover, PAF expression endows MECs with a self-renewing capacity and cell heterogeneity generation via Wnt signalling. Conversely, ablation of endogenous PAF induces the loss of breast cancer cell stemness. Further cancer drug repurposing approaches reveal that NVP-AUY922 downregulates PAF and decreases breast cancer cell stemness. Our results unveil an unsuspected role of the PAF-Wnt signalling axis in modulating cell plasticity, which is required for the maintenance of breast cancer cell stemness.

  15. The role of Ca 2+-related signaling in photodynamic injury of nerve and glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, A. V.; Petin, Y. O.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2007-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) inhibited and irreversibly abolished firing, caused necrosis of neurons, necrosis, apoptosis and proliferation of glial cells in the isolated crayfish stretch receptor. The role in these processes of the central components of Ca 2+-mediated signaling pathway: phospholipase C, calmodulin, calmodulin-dependent kinase II, and protein kinase C was studied using their inhibitors: ET-18, fluphenazine, KN-93, or staurosporine, respectively. ET-18 reduced functional inactivation of neurons, necrosis and apoptosis of glial cells. Fluphenazine and KN-93 reduced PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells. Staurosporine enhanced PDT-induced glial apoptosis. PDTinduced gliosis was prevented by KN-93 and staurosporine. Therefore, phospholipase C participated in neuron inactivation and glial necrosis and apoptosis. Calmodulin and calmodulin-dependent kinase II were involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells but not in glial apoptosis. Protein kinase C protected glia from apoptosis and participated in PDT-induced gliosis and loss of neuronal activity. These data may be used for modulation of PDT of brain tumors.

  16. Single molecule analysis of B cell receptor motion during signaling activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey Suarez, Ivan; Koo, Peter; Zhou, Shu; Wheatley, Brittany; Song, Wenxia; Mochrie, Simon; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    B cells are an essential part of the adaptive immune system. They patrol the body for signs of infection in the form of antigen on the surface of antigen presenting cells. B cell receptor (BCR) binding to antigen induces a signaling cascade that leads to B cell activation and spreading. During activation, BCR form signaling microclusters that later coalesce as the cell contracts. We have studied the dynamics of BCRs on activated murine primary B cells using single particle tracking. The tracks are analyzed using perturbation expectation-maximization (pEM), a systems-level analysis, which allows identification of different short-time diffusive states from single molecule tracks. We identified four dominant diffusive states, two of which correspond to BCRs interacting with signaling molecules. For wild-type cells, the number of BCR in signaling states increases as the cell spreads and then decreases during cell contraction. In contrast, cells lacking the actin regulatory protein, N-WASP, are unable to contract and BCRs remain in the signaling states for longer times. These observations indicate that actin cytoskeleton dynamics modulate BCR diffusion and clustering. Our results provide novel information regarding the timescale of interaction between BCR and signaling molecules.

  17. Modulation of B-cell receptor and microenvironment signaling by a guanine exchange factor in B-cell malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Wei; Sharma, Sanjai

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells over-express a guanine exchange factor (GEF), Rasgrf-1. This GEF increases active Ras as it catalyzes the removal of GDP from Ras so that GTP can bind and activate Ras. This study aims to study the mechanism of action of Rasgrf-1 in B-cell malignancies. Methods: N-terminus truncated Rasgrf-1 variants have a higher GEF activity as compared to the full-length transcript therefore a MCL cell line with stable over-expression of truncated Rasgrf-1 was established. The B-cell receptor (BCR) and chemokine signaling pathways were compared in the Rasgrf-1 over-expressing and a control transfected cell line. Results: Cells over-expressing truncated form of Rasgrf-1 have a higher proliferative rate as compared to control transfected cells. BCR was activated by lower concentrations of anti-IgM antibody in Rasgrf-1 over-expressing cells as compared to control cells indicating that these cells are more sensitive to BCR signaling. BCR signaling also phosphorylates Rasgrf-1 that further increases its GEF function and amplifies BCR signaling. This activation of Rasgrf-1 in over-expressing cells resulted in a higher expression of phospho-ERK, AKT, BTK and PKC-alpha as compared to control cells. Besides BCR, Rasgrf-1 over-expressing cells were also more sensitive to microenvironment stimuli as determined by resistance to apoptosis, chemotaxis and ERK pathway activation. Conclusions: This GEF protein sensitizes B-cells to BCR and chemokine mediated signaling and also upregulates a number of other signaling pathways which promotes growth and survival of these cells

  18. Inter-donor variation in cell subset specific immune signaling responses in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Diane M; Louie, Brent; Wang, Ena; Pos, Zoltan; Marincola, Francesco M; Hawtin, Rachael E; Cesano, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    Single cell network profiling (SCNP) is a multi-parameter flow cytometry based approach that allows for the simultaneous interrogation of intracellular signaling pathways in multiple cell subpopulations within heterogeneous tissues, without the need for individual cell subset isolation. Thus, the technology is extremely well-suited for characterizing the multitude of interconnected signaling pathways and immune cell subpopulations that regulate the function of the immune system. Recently, SCNP was applied to generate a functional map of the healthy human immune cell signaling network by profiling immune signaling pathways downstream of 12 immunomodulators in 7 distinct immune cell subsets within peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 60 healthy donors. In the study reported here, the degree of inter-donor variation in the magnitude of the immune signaling responses was analyzed. The highest inter-donor differences in immune signaling pathway activity occurred following perturbation of the immune signaling network, rather than in basal signaling. When examining the full panel of immune signaling responses, as one may expect, the overall degree of inter-donor variation was positively correlated (r = 0.727) with the magnitude of node response (i.e. a larger median signaling response was associated with greater inter-donor variation). However, when examining the degree of heterogeneity across cell subpopulations for individual signaling nodes, cell subset specificity in the degree of inter-donor variation was observed for several nodes. For such nodes, relatively weak correlations between inter-donor variation and the magnitude of the response were observed. Further, within the phenotypically distinct subpopulations, a fraction of the immune signaling responses had bimodal response profiles in which (a) only a portion of the cells had elevated phospho-protein levels following modulation and (b) the proportion of responsive cells varied by donor. These data

  19. Cross Talk between Cell Cell and Cell Matrix Adhesion Signaling Pathways during Heart Organogenesis: Implications for Cardiac Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linask, Kersti K.; Manisastry, Shyam; Han, Mingda

    2005-06-01

    The anterior posterior and dorsal ventral progression of heart organogenesis is well illustrated by the patterning and activity of two members of different families of cell adhesion molecules: the calcium-dependent cadherins, specifically N-cadherin, and the extracellular matrix glycoproteins, fibronectin. N-cadherin by its binding to the intracellular molecule [beta]-catenin and fibronectin by its binding to integrins at focal adhesion sites, are involved in regulation of gene expression by their association with the cytoskeleton and through signal transduction pathways. The ventral precardiac mesoderm cells epithelialize and become stably committed by the activation of these cell matrix and intracellular signaling transduction pathways. Cross talk between the adhesion signaling pathways initiates the characteristic phenotypic changes associated with cardiomyocyte differentiation: electrical activity and organization of myofibrils. The development of both organ form and function occurs within a short interval thereafter. Mutations in any of the interacting molecules, or environmental insults affecting either of these signaling pathways, can result in embryonic lethality or fetuses born with severe heart defects. As an example, we have defined that exposure of the embryo temporally to lithium during an early sensitive developmental period affects a canonical Wnt pathway leading to [beta]-catenin stabilization. Lithium exposure results in an anterior posterior progression of severe cardiac defects.

  20. Increasing RpoS expression causes cell death in Borrelia burgdorferi.

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    Linxu Chen

    Full Text Available RpoS, one of the two alternative σ factors in Borrelia burgdorferi, is tightly controlled by multiple regulators and, in turn, determines expression of many critical virulence factors. Here we show that increasing RpoS expression causes cell death. The immediate effect of increasing RpoS expression was to promote bacterial division and as a consequence result in a rapid increase in cell number before causing bacterial death. No DNA fragmentation or degradation was observed during this induced cell death. Cryo-electron microscopy showed induced cells first formed blebs, which were eventually released from dying cells. Apparently blebbing initiated cell disintegration leading to cell death. These findings led us to hypothesize that increasing RpoS expression triggers intracellular programs and/or pathways that cause spirochete death. The potential biological significance of induced cell death may help B. burgdorferi regulate its population to maintain its life cycle in nature.

  1. Stem cell maintenance by manipulating signaling pathways: past, current and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Ye, Shoudong; Ying, Qi-Long

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells only exist in a narrow window during early embryonic development, whereas multipotent stem cells are abundant throughout embryonic development and are retainedin various adult tissues and organs. While pluripotent stem cell lines have been established from several species, including mouse, rat, and human, it is still challenging to establish stable multipotent stem cell lines from embryonic or adult tissues. Based on current knowledge, we anticipate that by manipulating extrinsic and intrinsic signaling pathways, most if not all types of stem cells can be maintained in a long-term culture. In this article, we summarize current culture conditions established for the long-term maintenance of authentic pluripotent and multipotent stem cells and the signaling pathways involved. We also discuss the general principles of stem cell maintenance and propose several strategies on the establishment of novel stem cell lines through manipulation of signaling pathways. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(12): 668-676] PMID:26497581

  2. Roles of Notch1 Signaling in Regulating Satellite Cell Fates Choices and Postnatal Skeletal Myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Tizhong; Xu, Ziye; Wu, Weiche; Liu, Jiaqi; Wang, Yizhen

    2017-11-01

    Adult skeletal muscle stem cells, also called satellite cells, are indispensable for the growth, maintenance, and regeneration of the postnatal skeletal muscle. Satellite cells, predominantly quiescent in mature resting muscles, are activated after skeletal muscle injury or degeneration. Notch1 signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that plays crucial roles in satellite cells homeostasis and postnatal skeletal myogenesis and regeneration. Activation of Notch1 signaling promotes the muscle satellite cells quiescence and proliferation, but inhibits differentiation of muscle satellite cells. Notably, the new roles of Notch1 signaling during late-stage of skeletal myogenesis including in post-differentiation myocytes and post-fusion myotubes have been recently reported. Here, we mainly review and discuss the regulatory roles of Notch1 in regulating satellite cell fates choices and skeletal myogenesis. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 2964-2967, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Estrogen expands breast cancer stem-like cells through paracrine FGF/Tbx3 signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Fillmore, Christine M.; Gupta, Piyush B.; Rudnick, Jenny A.; Caballero, Silvia; Keller, Patricia J.; Lander, Eric S.; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Many tumors contain heterogeneous populations of cells, only some of which exhibit increased tumorigenicity and resistance to anticancer therapies. Evidence suggests that these aggressive cancer cells, often termed “cancer stem cells” or “cancer stem-like cells” (CSCs), rely upon developmental signaling pathways that are important for survival and expansion of normal stem cells. Here we report that, in analogy to embryonic mammary epithelial biology, estrogen signaling expands the pool of fun...

  4. TRPM5, a taste-signaling transient receptor potential ion-channel, is a ubiquitous signaling component in chemosensory cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofmann Thomas

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing number of TRP channels have been identified as key players in the sensation of smell, temperature, mechanical forces and taste. TRPM5 is known to be abundantly expressed in taste receptor cells where it participates in sweet, amino acid and bitter perception. A role of TRPM5 in other sensory systems, however, has not been studied so far. Results Here, we systematically investigated the expression of TRPM5 in rat and mouse tissues. Apart from taste buds, where we found TRPM5 to be predominantly localized on the basolateral surface of taste receptor cells, TRPM5 immunoreactivity was seen in other chemosensory organs – the main olfactory epithelium and the vomeronasal organ. Most strikingly, we found solitary TRPM5-enriched epithelial cells in all parts of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract. Based on their tissue distribution, the low cell density, morphological features and co-immunostaining with different epithelial markers, we identified these cells as brush cells (also known as tuft, fibrillovesicular, multivesicular or caveolated cells. In terms of morphological characteristics, brush cells resemble taste receptor cells, while their origin and biological role are still under intensive debate. Conclusion We consider TRPM5 to be an intrinsic signaling component of mammalian chemosensory organs, and provide evidence for brush cells being an important cellular correlate in the periphery.

  5. TRPM5, a taste-signaling transient receptor potential ion-channel, is a ubiquitous signaling component in chemosensory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaske, Silke; Krasteva, Gabriele; König, Peter; Kummer, Wolfgang; Hofmann, Thomas; Gudermann, Thomas; Chubanov, Vladimir

    2007-07-04

    A growing number of TRP channels have been identified as key players in the sensation of smell, temperature, mechanical forces and taste. TRPM5 is known to be abundantly expressed in taste receptor cells where it participates in sweet, amino acid and bitter perception. A role of TRPM5 in other sensory systems, however, has not been studied so far. Here, we systematically investigated the expression of TRPM5 in rat and mouse tissues. Apart from taste buds, where we found TRPM5 to be predominantly localized on the basolateral surface of taste receptor cells, TRPM5 immunoreactivity was seen in other chemosensory organs - the main olfactory epithelium and the vomeronasal organ. Most strikingly, we found solitary TRPM5-enriched epithelial cells in all parts of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract. Based on their tissue distribution, the low cell density, morphological features and co-immunostaining with different epithelial markers, we identified these cells as brush cells (also known as tuft, fibrillovesicular, multivesicular or caveolated cells). In terms of morphological characteristics, brush cells resemble taste receptor cells, while their origin and biological role are still under intensive debate. We consider TRPM5 to be an intrinsic signaling component of mammalian chemosensory organs, and provide evidence for brush cells being an important cellular correlate in the periphery.

  6. Integration of AI-2 Based Cell-Cell Signaling with Metabolic Cues in Escherichia coli.

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    Arindam Mitra

    Full Text Available The quorum sensing molecule Autoinducer-2 (AI-2 is generated as a byproduct of activated methyl cycle by the action of LuxS in Escherichia coli. AI-2 is synthesized, released and later internalized in a cell-density dependent manner. Here, by mutational analysis of the genes, uvrY and csrA, we describe a regulatory circuit of accumulation and uptake of AI-2. We constructed a single-copy chromosomal luxS-lacZ fusion in a luxS + merodiploid strain and evaluated its relative expression in uvrY and csrA mutants. At the entry of stationary phase, the expression of the fusion and AI-2 accumulation was positively regulated by uvrY and negatively regulated by csrA respectively. A deletion of csrA altered message stability of the luxS transcript and CsrA protein exhibited weak binding to 5' luxS regulatory region. DNA protein interaction and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed direct interaction of UvrY with the luxS promoter. Additionally, reduced expression of the fusion in hfq deletion mutant suggested involvement of small RNA interactions in luxS regulation. In contrast, the expression of lsrA operon involved in AI-2 uptake, is negatively regulated by uvrY and positively by csrA in a cell-density dependent manner. The dual role of csrA in AI-2 synthesis and uptake suggested a regulatory crosstalk of cell signaling with carbon regulation in Escherichia coli. We found that the cAMP-CRP mediated catabolite repression of luxS expression was uvrY dependent. This study suggests that luxS expression is complex and regulated at the level of transcription and translation. The multifactorial regulation supports the notion that cell-cell communication requires interaction and integration of multiple metabolic signals.

  7. Prolactin modulates phosphorylation, signaling and trafficking of epidermal growth factor receptor in human T47D breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y; Li, X; Jiang, J; Frank, S J

    2006-12-07

    Prolactin (PRL) is a polypeptide hormone produced by the anterior pituitary gland and other sites that acts both systemically and locally to cause lactation and other biological effects by interacting with the PRL receptor, a Janus kinase (JAK)2-coupled cytokine receptor family member, and activating downstream signal pathways. Recent evidence suggests PRL is a player in the pathogenesis and progression of breast cancer. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) also has effects on breast tissue, working through its receptors, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and ErbB-2 (c-neu, HER2), both intrinsic tyrosine kinase growth factor receptors. EGFR promotes pubertal breast ductal morphogenesis in mice, and both EGFR and ErbB-2 are relevant in pathogenesis and behavior of breast and other human cancers. Previous studies showed that PRL and EGF synergize to enhance motility in the human breast cancer cell line, T47D. In this study, we explored crosstalk between the PRL and EGF signaling pathways in T47D cells, with an ultimate aim of understanding how these two important factors might work together in vivo to affect breast cancer behavior. Both PRL and EGF caused robust signaling in T47D cells; PRL acutely activated JAK2, signal transducer and activator of transcription-5 (STAT5), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 and -2 (ERK1 and ERK2), whereas EGF caused EGFR activation and consequent src homology collagen (SHC) activation and ERK activation. Notably, PRL also caused phosphorylation of the EGFR and ErbB-2 at sites detected by PTP101, an antibody that recognizes threonine phosphorylation at consensus motifs for ERK-induced phosphorylation. PRL-induced PTP101-reactive phosphorylation was prevented by pretreatment with PD98059, an ERK pathway inhibitor. Furthermore, PRL synergized with EGF in activating SHC and ERK and transactivating a luciferase reporter driven by c-fos gene enhancer elements, suggesting that PRL allowed markedly enhanced EGF signaling. This was

  8. An electrically resistive sheet of glial cells for amplifying signals of neuronal extracellular recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Niwano, M.; Hirano-Iwata, A.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical signals of neuronal cells can be recorded non-invasively and with a high degree of temporal resolution using multielectrode arrays (MEAs). However, signals that are recorded with these devices are small, usually 0.01%-0.1% of intracellular recordings. Here, we show that the amplitude of neuronal signals recorded with MEA devices can be amplified by covering neuronal networks with an electrically resistive sheet. The resistive sheet used in this study is a monolayer of glial cells, supportive cells in the brain. The glial cells were grown on a collagen-gel film that is permeable to oxygen and other nutrients. The impedance of the glial sheet was measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and equivalent circuit simulations were performed to theoretically investigate the effect of covering the neurons with such a resistive sheet. Finally, the effect of the resistive glial sheet was confirmed experimentally, showing a 6-fold increase in neuronal signals. This technique feasibly amplifies signals of MEA recordings.

  9. Chemical UV Filters Mimic the Effect of Progesterone on Ca(2+) Signaling in Human Sperm Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, A; Dissing, S; Skakkebæk, N E

    2016-01-01

    Progesterone released by cumulus cells surrounding the egg induces a Ca(2+) influx into human sperm cells via the cationic channel of sperm (CatSper) Ca(2+) channel and controls multiple Ca(2+)-dependent responses essential for fertilization. We hypothesized that chemical UV filters may mimic...... the physiological action of progesterone on CatSper, thus affecting Ca(2+) signaling in human sperm cells. We examined 29 UV filters allowed in sunscreens in the United States and/or the European Union for their ability to induce Ca(2+) signals in human sperm by applying measurements of the intracellular free Ca(2......+) signals. Dose-response relations for the UV filters showed that the Ca(2+) signal-inducing effects began in the nanomolar-micromolar range. Single-cell Ca(2+) measurements showed a Ca(2+) signal-inducing effect of the most potent UV filter, 3-BC, at 10 nM. Finally, we demonstrated that the 13 UV filters...

  10. Chemoattractant signaling between tumor cells and macrophages regulates cancer cell migration, metastasis and neovascularization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad E Green

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages are known to influence cancer progression by modulation of immune function, angiogenesis, and cell metastasis, however, little is known about the chemokine signaling networks that regulate this process. Utilizing CT26 colon cancer cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages as a model cellular system, we demonstrate that treatment of CT26 cells with RAW 264.7 conditioned medium induces cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Inflammatory gene microarray analysis indicated CT26-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages upregulate SDF-1alpha and VEGF, and that these cytokines contribute to CT26 migration in vitro. RAW 264.7 macrophages also showed a robust chemotactic response towards CT26-derived chemokines. In particular, microarray analysis and functional testing revealed CSF-1 as the major chemoattractant for RAW 264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, in the chick CAM model of cancer progression, RAW 264.7 macrophages localized specifically to the tumor periphery where they were found to increase CT26 tumor growth, microvascular density, vascular disruption, and lung metastasis, suggesting these cells home to actively invading areas of the tumor, but not the hypoxic core of the tumor mass. In support of these findings, hypoxic conditions down regulated CSF-1 production in several tumor cell lines and decreased RAW 264.7 macrophage migration in vitro. Together our findings suggest a model where normoxic tumor cells release CSF-1 to recruit macrophages to the tumor periphery where they secrete motility and angiogenic factors that facilitate tumor cell invasion and metastasis.

  11. Immune responses of dendritic cells after acquiring antigen from apoptotic hepatocholangioma cells caused by γ-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Gang; Gu Hongguang; Han Benli; Pei Xuetao

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in antitumor responsiveness and therapeutic effects after dendritic cells (DCs) acquired antigen from apoptotic hepatocholangioma cells. Methods: DCs from blood mononuclear cells that maintain the characteristics of immaturity-anti-gen-capturing and-processing capacity were established in vitro by using granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4. Then, apoptosis in hepatocholangioma cells was induced with γ-radiation. The experimental groups included (1) co-culture of DCs, and apoptotic cancer cells and T cells; (2) co-culture of DCs necrotic cancer cells and T cells; (3) co-culture of DCs-cultured cancer cell and T cells. These cells were co-cultured for 7 days. DCs and T cell were enriched separately. Finally, antitumor response test was carried out. Results: These cells had typical dendritic morphology, expressed high levels of CD1a, B7 and acquired antigen from apoptotic cells caused by γ-rays and induced an increased T cell-stimulatory capacity in MLR. Conclusions: DCs obtained from blood mononuclear cells using GM-CSF and IL-4 and DCs can efficiently present antigen driven from apoptotic cells caused by γ-rays and induce T cells increasing obviously. It can probably become an effective approach of DC transduction with antigen

  12. Data-driven quantification of the robustness and sensitivity of cell signaling networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, Sayak; Seok, Sang-Cheol; Vieland, Veronica J; Das, Jayajit

    2013-01-01

    Robustness and sensitivity of responses generated by cell signaling networks has been associated with survival and evolvability of organisms. However, existing methods analyzing robustness and sensitivity of signaling networks ignore the experimentally observed cell-to-cell variations of protein abundances and cell functions or contain ad hoc assumptions. We propose and apply a data-driven maximum entropy based method to quantify robustness and sensitivity of Escherichia coli (E. coli) chemotaxis signaling network. Our analysis correctly rank orders different models of E. coli chemotaxis based on their robustness and suggests that parameters regulating cell signaling are evolutionary selected to vary in individual cells according to their abilities to perturb cell functions. Furthermore, predictions from our approach regarding distribution of protein abundances and properties of chemotactic responses in individual cells based on cell population averaged data are in excellent agreement with their experimental counterparts. Our approach is general and can be used to evaluate robustness as well as generate predictions of single cell properties based on population averaged experimental data in a wide range of cell signaling systems. (paper)

  13. The first successful observation of in-cell NMR signals of DNA and RNA in living human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoki, Yudai; Kiyoishi, Ayaka; Miyake, Masayuki; Kano, Fumi; Murata, Masayuki; Nagata, Takashi; Katahira, Masato

    2018-01-31

    In order to understand intracellular biological events, information on the structure, dynamics and interaction of proteins and nucleic acids in living cells is of crucial importance. In-cell NMR is a promising method to obtain this information. Although NMR signals of proteins in human cells have been reported, those of nucleic acids were reported only in Xenopus laevis oocytes, i.e., not in human cells. Here, DNA and RNA were introduced into human cells by means of pore formation by bacterial toxin streptolysin O and subsequent resealing. Then, NMR signals of DNA and RNA were successfully observed for the first time in living human cells. The observed signals directly suggested the formation of DNA and RNA hairpin structures in living human cells.

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms Biofilms in Acute InfectionIndependent of Cell-to-Cell Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaber, J. Andy; Triffo, W.J.; Suh, Sang J.; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Hastert, Mary C.; Griswold, John A.; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2006-09-20

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 hours of infection in thermally-injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections. P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burned tissue surrounding blood vessels and adipose cells. Although quorum sensing (QS), a bacterial signaling mechanism, coordinates differentiation of biofilms in vitro, wild type and QS-deficient P. aeruginosa formed similar biofilms in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on specific host tissues independent of QS.

  15. Activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling in EGFR mutant non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codony-Servat, Carles; Codony-Servat, Jordi; Karachaliou, Niki; Molina, Miguel Angel; Chaib, Imane; Ramirez, Jose Luis; de Los Llanos Gil, Maria; Solca, Flavio; Bivona, Trever G; Rosell, Rafael

    2017-07-18

    Gefitinib, erlotinib or afatinib are the current treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring an activating mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), but less than 5% of patients achieve a complete response and the median progression-free survival is no longer than 12 months. Early adaptive resistance can occur as soon as two hours after starting treatment by activating signal transducer and activation of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling. We investigated the activation of STAT3 in a panel of gefitinib-sensitive EGFR mutant cell lines, and gefitinib-resistant PC9 cell lines developed in our laboratory. Afatinib has great activity in gefitinib-sensitive as well as in gefitinib-resistant EGFR mutant NSCLC cell lines. However, afatinib therapy causes phosphorylation of STAT3 tyrosine 705 (pSTAT3Tyr705) and elevation of STAT3 and RANTES mRNA levels. The combination of afatinib with TPCA-1 (a STAT3 inhibitor) ablated pSTAT3Tyr705 and down-regulated STAT3 and RANTES mRNA levels with significant growth inhibitory effect in both gefitinib-sensitive and gefitinib-resistant EGFR mutant NSCLC cell lines. Aldehyde dehydrogenase positive (ALDH+) cells were still observed with the combination at the time that Hairy and Enhancer of Split 1 (HES1) mRNA expression was elevated following therapy. Although the combination of afatinib with STAT3 inhibition cannot eliminate the potential problem of a remnant cancer stem cell population, it represents a substantial advantage and opportunity to further prolong progression free survival and probably could increase the response rate in comparison to the current standard of single therapy.

  16. SDN-1/syndecan regulates growth factor signaling in distal tip cell migrations in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabiuk, Megan; Coudiere, Ludivine; Merz, David C

    2009-10-01

    Mutations in the sdn-1/syndecan gene act as genetic enhancers of the ventral-to-dorsal distal tip cell (DTC) migration defects caused by a weak allele of the netrin receptor gene unc-5. The sdn-1(ev697) allele was identified in a genetic screen for enhancers of unc-5 DTC migration defects, and carried a nonsense mutation predicted to truncate the SDN-1 protein prior to the transmembrane domain. The enhancement of unc-5 caused by an sdn-1 mutation was rescued by expression of wild-type sdn-1 in the hypodermis or nervous system rather than the DTCs, indicating a cell non-autonomous function of sdn-1. The enhancement was also partially reversed by mutations in the egl-17/FGF or egl-20/Wnt genes, suggesting that sdn-1 affects UNC-5 function through a mis-regulation of signaling in growth factor pathways. egl-20 reporter constructs exhibited increased and mis-localized EGL-20 distribution in sdn-1 mutants compared to wild-type animals. Finally, using loss of function mutations, we show that egl-17/Fgf and egl-20/Wnt are partially redundant in regulating the migration pattern of the posterior DTC, as double mutants exhibit significant frequencies of defects in migration phases along both the anteroposterior and dorsoventral axes. Together these results suggest that SDN-1 affects UNC-5 function by regulating the proper extracellular distribution of growth factors.

  17. The necrotic signal induced by mycophenolic acid overcomes apoptosis-resistance in tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwendaline Guidicelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The amount of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH, a pivotal enzyme for the biosynthesis of the guanosine tri-phosphate (GTP, is frequently increased in tumor cells. The anti-viral agent ribavirin and the immunosuppressant mycophenolic acid (MPA are potent inhibitors of IMPDH. We recently showed that IMPDH inhibition led to a necrotic signal requiring the activation of Cdc42. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein, we strengthened the essential role played by this small GTPase in the necrotic signal by silencing Cdc42 and by the ectopic expression of a constitutive active mutant of Cdc42. Since resistance to apoptosis is an essential step for the tumorigenesis process, we next examined the effect of the MPA-mediated necrotic signal on different tumor cells demonstrating various mechanisms of resistance to apoptosis (Bcl2-, HSP70-, Lyn-, BCR-ABL-overexpressing cells. All tested cells remained sensitive to MPA-mediated necrotic signal. Furthermore, inhibition of IMPDH activity in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia cells was significantly more efficient at eliminating malignant cells than apoptotic inducers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings indicate that necrosis and apoptosis are split signals that share few if any common hub of signaling. In addition, the necrotic signaling pathway induced by depletion of the cellular amount of GTP/GDP would be of great interest to eliminate apoptotic-resistant tumor cells.

  18. 1Restoration of ATM expression in DNA-PKcs deficient cells inhibits signal end joining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Jessica A.; Xu, Yao; Abe, Masumi; Hendrickson, Eric; Meek, Katheryn

    2016-01-01

    Unlike most DNA-PKcs deficient mouse cell strains, we show here that targeted deletion of DNA-PKcs in two different human cell lines abrogates VDJ signal end joining in episomal assays. Although the mechanism is not well defined, DNA-PKcs deficiency results in spontaneous reduction of ATM expression in many cultured cell lines (including those studied here) and in DNA-PKcs deficient mice. We considered that varying loss of ATM expression might explain differences in signal end joining in different cell strains and animal models, and we investigated the impact of ATM and/or DNA-PKcs loss on VDJ recombination in cultured human and rodent cell strains. To our surprise, in DNA-PKcs deficient mouse cell strains that are proficient in signal end joining, restoration of ATM expression markedly inhibits signal end joining. In contrast, in DNA-PKcs deficient cells that are deficient in signal end joining, complete loss of ATM enhances signal (but not coding) joint formation. We propose that ATM facilitates restriction of signal ends to the “classical” non-homologous end-joining pathway. PMID:26921311

  19. Consciousness can reduce the voltage of the output signal of solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dayong

    2010-10-01

    When the sun's light radiate on the solar cell, the solar cell can produce the output signal as the photocurrent. We use the Data Acquisition Modules to record the voltage of the output signals. The v1 is voltage of the output signal of solar cell1; The v2 is the one of solar cell2. And these two solar cells stay side by side. When we record the voltage of the output signal from the morning to the noon, the voltage of the output signals will go up, and the v1 is bigger than the v2 during this time. But when the experimenter use consciousness to reduce the voltage of the output signals. That is to say: not only natural light ratiade on two solar cells, but also consciousness act on two solar cells. Not only I can use consciousness to reduce the growth voltage of the output signals, but also can change the v1 to be littler than the v2. The experiment was conducted on Sep. 2010. There is the physical system of the mass, energy, space and time-MEST; There is the spirited system of the mind, consciousness, emotion and desire-MECD; the information system is the code system. We can use them to develop photoelectric principle, life technology and Nanotech of semiconductor for consciousness effect.

  20. Estrogen enhanced cell-cell signalling in breast cancer cells exposed to targeted irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, Chunlin; Folkard, Melvyn; Held, Kathryn D; Prise, Kevin M

    2008-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander responses, where cells respond to their neighbours being irradiated are being extensively studied. Although evidence shows that bystander responses can be induced in many types of cells, it is not known whether there is a radiation-induced bystander effect in breast cancer cells, where the radiosensitivity may be dependent on the role of the cellular estrogen receptor (ER). This study investigated radiation-induced bystander responses in estrogen receptor-positive MCF-7 and estrogen receptor-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The influence of estrogen and anti-estrogen treatments on the bystander response was determined by individually irradiating a fraction of cells within the population with a precise number of helium-3 using a charged particle microbeam. Damage was scored as chromosomal damage measured as micronucleus formation. A bystander response measured as increased yield of micronucleated cells was triggered in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. The contribution of the bystander response to total cell damage in MCF-7 cells was higher than that in MDA-MB-231 cells although the radiosensitivity of MDA-MB-231 was higher than MCF-7. Treatment of cells with 17β-estradiol (E2) increased the radiosensitivity and the bystander response in MCF-7 cells, and the effect was diminished by anti-estrogen tamoxifen (TAM). E2 also increased the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in MCF-7 cells in the absence of radiation. In contrast, E2 and TAM had no influence on the bystander response and ROS levels in MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, the treatment of MCF-7 cells with antioxidants eliminated both the E2-induced ROS increase and E2-enhanced bystander response triggered by the microbeam irradiation, which indicates that ROS are involved in the E2-enhanced bystander micronuclei formation after microbeam irradiation. The observation of bystander responses in breast tumour cells may offer new potential targets for radiation

  1. SIGNALING PATHWAYS ASSOCIATED WITH VX EXPOSURE IN MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    administrative support. iv  Blank v  CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION...M.J.; Cheng, A.; Genever, P.G. Functional Nicotinic and Muscarinic Receptors on Mesenchymal Stem Cells. Stem Cells Dev. 2009, 18, 103–112. 12

  2. Dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans, gomisins J and N inhibit the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in HCT116 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kyungsu; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Yoo, Ji-Hye; Lee, Hee Ju; Kim, Chul Young; Nho, Chu Won

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Schematic diagram of the possible molecular mechanism underlying the inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and the induction of G0/G1-phase arrest by gomisins J and N, derived from the fruits of S. chinensis, in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. Highlights: ► Gomisins J and N inhibited Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in HCT116 cells. ► Gomisins J and N disrupted the binding of β-catenin to specific DNA sequences, TBE. ► Gomisins J and N inhibited the HCT116 cell proliferation through G0/G1 phase arrest. ► Gomisins J and N inhibited the expression of Cyc D1, a Wnt/β-catenin target gene. -- Abstract: Here, we report that gomisin J and gomisin N, dibenzocyclooctadiene type lignans isolated from Schisandra chinensis, inhibit Wnt/β-catenin signaling in HCT116 cells. Gomisins J and N appear to inhibit Wnt/β-catenin signaling by disrupting the interaction between β-catenin and its specific target DNA sequences (TCF binding elements, TBE) rather than by altering the expression of the β-catenin protein. Gomisins J and N inhibit HCT116 cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. The G0/G1 phase arrest induced by gomisins J and N appears to be caused by a decrease in the expression of Cyclin D1, a representative target gene of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, as well as Cdk2, Cdk4, and E2F-1. Therefore, gomisins J and N, the novel Wnt/β-catenin inhibitors discovered in this study, may serve as potential agents for the prevention and treatment of human colorectal cancers.

  3. Dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans, gomisins J and N inhibit the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway in HCT116 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kyungsu; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Yoo, Ji-Hye; Lee, Hee Ju [Functional Food Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chul Young [Functional Food Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of); College of Pharmacy, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Nho, Chu Won, E-mail: cwnho@kist.re.kr [Functional Food Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-16

    Graphical abstract: Schematic diagram of the possible molecular mechanism underlying the inhibition of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway and the induction of G0/G1-phase arrest by gomisins J and N, derived from the fruits of S. chinensis, in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N inhibited Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway in HCT116 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N disrupted the binding of {beta}-catenin to specific DNA sequences, TBE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N inhibited the HCT116 cell proliferation through G0/G1 phase arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N inhibited the expression of Cyc D1, a Wnt/{beta}-catenin target gene. -- Abstract: Here, we report that gomisin J and gomisin N, dibenzocyclooctadiene type lignans isolated from Schisandra chinensis, inhibit Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling in HCT116 cells. Gomisins J and N appear to inhibit Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling by disrupting the interaction between {beta}-catenin and its specific target DNA sequences (TCF binding elements, TBE) rather than by altering the expression of the {beta}-catenin protein. Gomisins J and N inhibit HCT116 cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. The G0/G1 phase arrest induced by gomisins J and N appears to be caused by a decrease in the expression of Cyclin D1, a representative target gene of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway, as well as Cdk2, Cdk4, and E2F-1. Therefore, gomisins J and N, the novel Wnt/{beta}-catenin inhibitors discovered in this study, may serve as potential agents for the prevention and treatment of human colorectal cancers.

  4. Wnt and BMP Signaling Crosstalk in Regulating Dental Stem Cells: Implications in Dental Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fugui; Song, Jinglin; Zhang, Hongmei; Huang, Enyi; Song, Dongzhe; Tollemar, Viktor; Wang, Jing; Wang, Jinhua; Mohammed, Maryam; Wei, Qiang; Fan, Jiaming; Liao, Junyi; Zou, Yulong; Liu, Feng; Hu, Xue; Qu, Xiangyang; Chen, Liqun; Yu, Xinyi; Luu, Hue H; Lee, Michael J; He, Tong-Chuan; Ji, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Tooth is a complex hard tissue organ and consists of multiple cell types that are regulated by important signaling pathways such as Wnt and BMP signaling. Serious injuries and/or loss of tooth or periodontal tissues may significantly impact aesthetic appearance, essential oral functions and the quality of life. Regenerative dentistry holds great promise in treating oral/dental disorders. The past decade has witnessed a rapid expansion of our understanding of the biological features of dental stem cells, along with the signaling mechanisms governing stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. In this review, we first summarize the biological characteristics of seven types of dental stem cells, including dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from apical papilla, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth, dental follicle precursor cells, periodontal ligament stem cells, alveolar bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and MSCs from gingiva. We then focus on how these stem cells are regulated by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and/or Wnt signaling by examining the interplays between these pathways. Lastly, we analyze the current status of dental tissue engineering strategies that utilize oral/dental stem cells by harnessing the interplays between BMP and Wnt pathways. We also highlight the challenges that must be addressed before the dental stem cells may reach any clinical applications. Thus, we can expect to witness significant progresses to be made in regenerative dentistry in the coming decade.

  5. Wnt and BMP signaling crosstalk in regulating dental stem cells: Implications in dental tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fugui Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tooth is a complex hard tissue organ and consists of multiple cell types that are regulated by important signaling pathways such as Wnt and BMP signaling. Serious injuries and/or loss of tooth or periodontal tissues may significantly impact aesthetic appearance, essential oral functions and the quality of life. Regenerative dentistry holds great promise in treating oral/dental disorders. The past decade has witnessed a rapid expansion of our understanding of the biological features of dental stem cells, along with the signaling mechanisms governing stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. In this review, we first summarize the biological characteristics of seven types of dental stem cells, including dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from apical papilla, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth, dental follicle precursor cells, periodontal ligament stem cells, alveolar bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, and MSCs from gingiva. We then focus on how these stem cells are regulated by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP and/or Wnt signaling by examining the interplays between these pathways. Lastly, we analyze the current status of dental tissue engineering strategies that utilize oral/dental stem cells by harnessing the interplays between BMP and Wnt pathways. We also highlight the challenges that must be addressed before the dental stem cells may reach any clinical applications. Thus, we can expect to witness significant progresses to be made in regenerative dentistry in the coming decade.

  6. Diverse phosphorylation patterns of B cell receptor-associated signaling in naïve and memory human B cells revealed by phosphoflow, a powerful technique to study signaling at the single cell level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin R Toapanta

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Following interaction with cognate antigens, B cells undergo cell activation, proliferation and differentiation. Ligation of the B cell receptor (BCR leads to the phosphorylation of BCR-associated signaling proteins within minutes of antigen binding, a process with profound consequences for the fate of the cells and development of effector immunity. Phosphoflow allows a rapid evaluation of various signaling pathways in complex heterogenous cell subsets. This novel technique was used in combination with multi-chromatic flow cytometry and fluorescent-cell barcoding to study phosphorylation of BCR-associated signaling pathways in naïve and memory human B cell subsets. Proteins of the initiation (Syk, propagation (Btk, Akt and integration (p38MAPK and Erk1/2 signaling units were studied. Switched memory (Sm CD27+ and Sm CD27- phosphorylation patterns were similar when stimulated with anti-IgA or -IgG. In contrast, naïve and unswitched memory (Um cells showed significant differences following IgM stimulation. Enhanced phosphorylation of Syk was observed in Um cells, suggesting a lower activation threshold. This is likely the result of higher amounts of IgM on the cell surface, higher pan-Syk levels and enhanced susceptibility to phosphatase inhibition. All other signaling proteins evaluated also showed some degree of enhanced phosphorylation in Um cells. Furthermore, both the PLC-γ2 and PI3K pathways were activated in Um cells, while only the PI3K pathway was activated on naïve cells. Um cells were the only ones that activated signaling pathways when stimulated with fluorescently-labeled S. Typhi and S. pneumoniae. Finally, simultaneous evaluation of signaling proteins at the single cell level (multi-phosphorylated cells revealed that interaction with gram positive and negative bacteria resulted in complex and diverse signaling patterns. Phosphoflow holds great potential to accelerate vaccine development by identifying signaling profiles in good

  7. Overexpression of catalase in myeloid cells causes impaired postischemic neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodara, Roberto; Weiss, Daiana; Joseph, Giji; Velasquez-Castano, Juan C; Landázuri, Natalia; Han, Ji Woong; Yoon, Young-sup; Taylor, W Robert

    2011-10-01

    Myeloid lineage cells (MLCs) such as macrophages are known to play a key role in postischemic neovascularization. However, the role of MLC-derived reactive oxygen species in this process and their specific chemical identity remain unknown. Transgenic mice with MLC-specific overexpression of catalase (Tg(Cat-MLC) mice) were created on a C57BL/6 background. Macrophage catalase activity was increased 3.4-fold compared with wild-type mice. After femoral artery ligation, laser Doppler perfusion imaging revealed impaired perfusion recovery in Tg(Cat-MLC) mice. This was associated with fewer collateral vessels, as assessed by microcomputed tomography angiography, and decreased capillary density. Impaired functional recovery of the ischemic limb was also evidenced by a 50% reduction in spontaneous running activity. The deficient neovascularization was associated with a blunted inflammatory response, characterized by decreased macrophage infiltration of ischemic tissues, and lower mRNA levels of inflammatory markers, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, osteopontin, and matrix mettaloproteinase-9. In vitro macrophage migration was impaired in Tg(Cat-MLC) mice, suggesting a role for H(2)O(2) in regulating the ability of macrophages to infiltrate ischemic tissues. MLC-derived H(2)O(2) plays a key role in promoting neovascularization in response to ischemia and is a necessary factor for the development of ischemia-induced inflammation.

  8. Two types of albino mutants in desert and migratory locusts are caused by gene defects in the same signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugahara, Ryohei; Tanaka, Seiji; Jouraku, Akiya; Shiotsuki, Takahiro

    2017-04-15

    Albinism is caused by mutations in the genes involved in melanin production. Albino nymphs of Locusta migratoria and Schistocerca gregaria reared under crowded conditions are uniformly creamy-white in color. However, nothing is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon in locusts. The albino strain of L. migratoria is known to lack the dark-color-inducing neuropeptide corazonin (Crz). In this study, we report that this albino strain has a 10-base-pair deletion in the gene LmCRZ, which encodes Crz. This mutation was found to cause a frame-shift, resulting in a null mutation in Crz. On the other hand, the albino strain of S. gregaria is known to have an intact Crz. This strain was found to possess a single-nucleotide substitution in the middle of the Crz receptor-encoding gene, SgCRZR, which caused a nonsense mutation, resulting in a truncated receptor. Silencing of SgCRZR in wild-type S. gregaria nymphs greatly reduced the area and intensity of their black patterning, suggesting that the functional defect of SgCRZR likely causes the albinism. The expression level of SgCRZR in the albino S. gregaria was comparable to that in the wild type. Unlike the wild type, the albino strain of this locust did not show a phase-dependent shift in a morphometric trait controlled by Crz. From these results, we conclude that the mutations in LmCRZ and SgCRZR are responsible for the albinism in L. migratoria and S. gregaria, respectively, indicating that the two types of albinism are caused by different genetic defects in the same Crz signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. DMPD: Activation of lymphokine genes in T cells: role of cis-acting DNA elements thatrespond to T cell activation signals. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available thatrespond to T cell activation signals. Arai N, Naito Y, Watanabe M, Masuda ES, Yamaguchi-Iwai Y, Tsuboi A...DNA elements thatrespond to T cell activation signals. PubmedID 1492121 Title Activation of lymphokine genes... in T cells: role of cis-acting DNA elements thatrespond to T cell activation signals. Authors Arai N, Naito

  10. Hedgehog signaling maintains a tumor stem cell compartment in multiple myeloma

    OpenAIRE

    Peacock, Craig D.; Wang, Qiuju; Gesell, Gregory S.; Corcoran-Schwartz, Ian M.; Jones, Evan; Kim, Jynho; Devereux, Wendy L.; Rhodes, Jonathan T.; Huff, Carol A.; Beachy, Philip A.; Watkins, D. Neil; Matsui, William

    2007-01-01

    The cancer stem cell hypothesis suggests that malignant growth depends on a subset of tumor cells with stem cell-like properties of self-renewal. Because hedgehog (Hh) signaling regulates progenitor cell fate in normal development and homeostasis, aberrant pathway activation might be involved in the maintenance of such a population in cancer. Indeed, mutational activation of the Hh pathway is associated with medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma; pathway activity is also critical for growt...

  11. The essential role of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in regulating T cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dashan

    2018-02-12

    The aim of this paper is to clarify the critical role of GPCR signaling in T cell immunity. The G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most common targets in current pharmaceutical industry, and represent the largest and most versatile family of cell surface communicating molecules. GPCRs can be activated by a diverse array of ligands including neurotransmitters, chemokines as well as sensory stimuli. Therefore, GPCRs are involved in many key cellular and physiological processes, such as sense of light, taste and smell, neurotransmission, metabolism, endocrine and exocrine secretion. In recent years, GPCRs have been found to play an important role in immune system. T cell is an important type of immune cell, which plays a central role in cell-mediated immunity. A variety of GPCRs and their signaling mediators (RGS proteins, GRKs and β-arrestin) have been found to express in T cells and involved T cell-mediated immunity. We will summarize the role of GPCR signaling and their regulatory molecules in T cell activation, homeostasis and function in this article. GPCR signaling plays an important role in T cell activation, homeostasis and function. GPCR signaling is critical in regulating T cell immunity.

  12. Making sense of Wnt signaling – linking hair cell regeneration to development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina eJansson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Wnt signaling is a highly conserved pathway crucial for development and homeostasis of multicellular organisms. Secreted Wnt ligands bind Frizzled receptors to regulate diverse processes such as axis patterning, cell division, and cell fate specification. They also serve to govern self-renewal of somatic stem cells in several adult tissues. The complexity of the pathway can be attributed to the myriad of Wnt and Frizzled combinations as well as its diverse context-dependent functions. In the developing mouse inner ear, Wnt signaling plays diverse roles, including specification of the otic placode and patterning of the otic vesicle. At later stages, its activity governs sensory hair cell specification, cell cycle regulation, and hair cell orientation. In regenerating sensory organs from non-mammalian species, Wnt signaling can also regulate the extent of proliferative hair cell regeneration. This review describes the current knowledge of the roles of Wnt signaling and Wnt-responsive cells in hair cell development and regeneration. We also discuss possible future directions and the potential application and limitation of Wnt signaling in augmenting hair cell regeneration.

  13. An experimental and theoretical approach to the study of the photoacoustic signal produced by cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Rafael Pérez; Ramirez-Perez, Francisco I.; Castorena-Gonzalez, Jorge A.; Anell, Edgar Alvarado; Gutiérrez-Juárez, Gerardo; Polo-Parada, Luis

    2012-03-01

    The distinctive spectral absorption characteristics of cancer cells make photoacoustic techniques useful for detection in vitro and in vivo. Here we report on our evaluation of the photoacoustic signal produced by a series of monolayers of different cell lines in vitro. Only the melanoma cell line HS936 produced a detectable photoacoustic signal in which amplitude was dependent on the number of cells. This finding appears to be related to the amount of melanin available in these cells. Other cell lines (i.e. HL60, SK-Mel-1, T47D, Hela, HT29 and PC12) exhibited values similar to a precursor of melanin (tyrosinase), but failed to produce sufficient melanin to generate a photoacoustic signal that could be distinguished from background noise. To better understand this phenomenon, we determined a formula for the time-domain photoacoustic wave equation for a monolayer of cells in a non-viscous fluid on the thermoelastic regime. The theoretical results showed that the amplitude and profile of the photoacoustic signal generated by a cell monolayer depended upon the number and distribution of the cells and the location of the point of detection. These findings help to provide a better understanding of the factors involved in the generation of a photoacoustic signal produced by different cells in vitro and in vivo.

  14. An experimental and theoretical approach to the study of the photoacoustic signal produced by cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Pérez Solano

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The distinctive spectral absorption characteristics of cancer cells make photoacoustic techniques useful for detection in vitro and in vivo. Here we report on our evaluation of the photoacoustic signal produced by a series of monolayers of different cell lines in vitro. Only the melanoma cell line HS936 produced a detectable photoacoustic signal in which amplitude was dependent on the number of cells. This finding appears to be related to the amount of melanin available in these cells. Other cell lines (i.e. HL60, SK-Mel-1, T47D, Hela, HT29 and PC12 exhibited values similar to a precursor of melanin (tyrosinase, but failed to produce sufficient melanin to generate a photoacoustic signal that could be distinguished from background noise. To better understand this phenomenon, we determined a formula for the time-domain photoacoustic wave equation for a monolayer of cells in a non-viscous fluid on the thermoelastic regime. The theoretical results showed that the amplitude and profile of the photoacoustic signal generated by a cell monolayer depended upon the number and distribution of the cells and the location of the point of detection. These findings help to provide a better understanding of the factors involved in the generation of a photoacoustic signal produced by different cells in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Hepatitis C virus E2 protein promotes human hepatoma cell proliferation through the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway via cellular receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Lanjuan; Wang Lu; Ren Hao; Cao Jie; Li Li; Ke Jinshan; Qi Zhongtian

    2005-01-01

    Dysregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways by various viruses has been shown to be responsible for viral pathogenicity. The molecular mechanism by which hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection caused human liver diseases has been investigated on the basis of abnormal intracellular signal events. Current data are very limited involved in transmembrane signal transduction triggered by HCV E2 protein. Here we explored regulation of the MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathway by E2 expressed in Chinese hamster oval cells. In human hepatoma Huh-7 cells, E2 specifically activated the MAPK/ERK pathway including downstream transcription factor ATF-2 and greatly promoted cell proliferation. CD81 and low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) on the cell surface mediated binding of E2 to Huh-7 cells. The MAPK/ERK activation and cell proliferation driven by E2 were suppressed by blockage of CD81 as well as LDLR. Furthermore, pretreatment with an upstream kinase MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 also impaired the MAPK/ERK activation and cell proliferation induced by E2. Our results suggest that the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway triggered by HCV E2 via its receptors maintains survival and growth of target cells

  16. Regulation of pancreatic islet beta-cell mass by growth factor and hormone signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yao; Chang, Yongchang

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunction and destruction of pancreatic islet beta cells is a hallmark of diabetes. Better understanding of cellular signals in beta cells will allow development of therapeutic strategies for diabetes, such as preservation and expansion of beta-cell mass and improvement of beta-cell function. During the past several decades, the number of studies analyzing the molecular mechanisms, including growth factor/hormone signaling pathways that impact islet beta-cell mass and function, has increased exponentially. Notably, somat