WorldWideScience

Sample records for causeways

  1. 78 FR 25577 - Safety Zone, Figure Eight Causeway Channel; Figure Eight Island, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    ... a private wedding. This action is necessary to protect the life and property of the maritime public... support of a private wedding over the waters of the Figure Eight Causeway Channel. The fireworks will be...

  2. Effects of causeway construction on vegetation and sedimentation in North Carolina tidal marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, A.; Leonard, L.; Pricope, N. G.; Eulie, D.

    2017-12-01

    Causeways, especially those constructed to facilitate transportation across low lying tidal marshes, are known to affect tidal exchanges and thereby potentially influence geological and biological processes in these ecosystems. While these impacts have been documented in several expansive marsh systems with large tidal ranges, the extent of these impacts in smaller tidal creek watersheds is less understood. This study examined how the presence, absence, and removal of small causeways affected sedimentological processes and vegetation characteristics in two small tidal creek watersheds in Wilmington, NC. Surficial deposition rates, determined using petri-dish sediment traps, indicate that mean deposition landward of a small causeway (1.64 mg cm-2day-1) is significantly lower (pexchange, spectroradiometer data and aerial imagery available in 2006 and 2016 will be used to quantify changes in canopy coverage subsequent to causeway removal. Although this study is ongoing, the preliminary results indicate that small causeways, similar to their larger counterparts, significantly affect the rate and characteristics of sediment delivered to landward marshes and also affect tidal exchanges that lead to changes in vegetation characteristics.

  3. Effects of causeway construction on environment and biota of subtropical tidal flats in Okinawa, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, James Davis; Yang, Sung-Yin; White, Kristine N; Asami, Ryuji; Fujita, Kazuhiko; Hongo, Chuki; Ito, Shingo; Kawamura, Iori; Maeda, Isshu; Mizuyama, Masaru; Obuchi, Masami; Sakamaki, Takashi; Tachihara, Katsunori; Tamura, Maiko; Tanahara, Akira; Yamaguchi, Aika; Jenke-Kodama, Holger

    2015-05-15

    Okinawa, Japan is known for its high marine biodiversity, yet little work has been performed on examining impacts of numerous large-scale coastal development projects on its marine ecosystems. Here, we examine apparent impacts of the construction of the Kaichu-Doro causeway, which was built over 40 years ago. The causeway is a 4.75 km long embankment that divides a large tidal flat and has only two points of water exchange along its entire length. We employed quadrats, transects, sampling, visual surveys, and microbial community analyses combined with environmental, water quality data, and 1m cores, at five stations of two paired sites each (one on each side of Kaichu-Doro) to investigate how the environment and biota have changed since the Kaichu-Doro was built. Results indicate reduction in water flow, and site S1 was particularly heavily impacted by poor water quality, with low diversity and disturbed biotic communities. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Water and salt balance of Great Salt Lake, Utah, and simulation of water and salt movement through the causeway, 1987-98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loving, Brian L.; Miller, Craig W.; Waddell, Kidd M.

    2000-01-01

    The Southern Pacific Transportation Company completed a rock-fill causeway across Great Salt Lake in 1959. The effect of the causeway was to change the water and salt balance of Great Salt Lake by creating two separate but interconnected parts of the lake, with more than 95 percent of freshwater surface inflow entering the lake south of the causeway.The water and salt balance of Great Salt Lake primarily depends on the amount of inflow from tributary streams and the conveyance properties of the causeway that divides the lake into south and north parts. The conveyance properties of the causeway consist of two 15-foot-wide culverts, a 290-foot-wide breach, and permeable rock-fill material.

  5. Inputs and internal cycling of nitrogen to a causeway influenced, hypersaline lake, Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftz, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen inputs to Great Salt Lake (GSL), located in the western USA, were quantified relative to the resident nitrogen mass in order to better determine numeric nutrient criteria that may be considered at some point in the future. Total dissolved nitrogen inputs from four surface-water sources entering GSL were modeled during the 5-year study period (2010–2014) and ranged from 1.90 × 106 to 5.56 × 106 kg/year. The railroad causeway breach was a significant conduit for the export of dissolved nitrogen from Gilbert to Gunnison Bay, and in 2011 and 2012, net losses of total nitrogen mass from Gilbert Bay via the Causeway breach were 9.59 × 105 and 1.51 × 106 kg. Atmospheric deposition (wet + dry) was a significant source of nitrogen to Gilbert Bay, exceeding the dissolved nitrogen load contributed via the Farmington Bay causeway surface-water input by >100,000 kg during 2 years of the study. Closure of two railroad causeway culverts in 2012 and 2013 likely initiated a decreasing trend in the volume of the higher density Deep Brine Layer and associated declines in total dissolved nitrogen mass contained in this layer. The large dissolved nitrogen pool in Gilbert Bay relative to the amount of nitrogen contributed by surface-water inflow sources is consistent with the terminal nature of GSL and the predominance of internal nutrient cycling. The opening of the new railroad causeway breach in 2016 will likely facilitate more efficient bidirectional flow between Gilbert and Gunnison Bays, resulting in potentially substantial changes in nutrient pools within GSL.

  6. Diversity of Microbial Communities and Quantitative Chemodiversity in Layers of Marine Sediment Cores from a Causeway (Kaichu-Doro in Okinawa Island, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Soliman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial community diversity and chemodiversity were investigated in marine sediments adjacent to the Okinawan “Kaichu-Doro” Causeway, which was constructed 46 years ago to connect a group of four islands (Henza-jima, Miyagi-jima, Ikei-jima, Hamahiga-jima to the Okinawan main island. This causeway was not built on pilings, but by land reclamation; hence, it now acts as a long, thin peninsula. The construction of this causeway was previously shown to have influenced the surrounding marine ecosystem, causing ecosystem fragmentation and loss of water circulation. In this study, we collected sediment cores (n = 10 from five paired sites in 1 m water depths. Each pair of sites consisted of one site each on the immediate north and south sides of the causeway. Originally the members of each pair were much closer to each other (<150 m than to other pairs, but now the members of each pair are isolated by the causeway. Each core was 60–80 cm long and was divided into 15-cm layers. We examined the vertical diversity of microbial communities and chemical compounds to determine the correlation between chemodiversity and microbial communities among marine sediment cores and layers. Principal coordinate analyses (PCoA of detected compounds and of bacterial and archaeal operational taxonomic units (OTUs revealed that the north and south sides of the causeway are relatively isolated, with each side having unique microbial OTUs. Additionally, some bacterial families (e.g., Acidaminobacteraceae, Rhizobiaceae, and Xanthomonadaceae were found only on the south side of Kaichu-Doro. Interestingly, we found that the relative abundance of OTUs for some microbial families increased from top to bottom, but this was reversed in some other families. We conclude that the causeway has altered microbial community composition and metabolite profiles in marine sediments.

  7. Diversity of Microbial Communities and Quantitative Chemodiversity in Layers of Marine Sediment Cores from a Causeway (Kaichu-Doro) in Okinawa Island, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Taha; Reimer, James D; Yang, Sung-Yin; Villar-Briones, Alejandro; Roy, Michael C; Jenke-Kodama, Holger

    2017-01-01

    Microbial community diversity and chemodiversity were investigated in marine sediments adjacent to the Okinawan "Kaichu-Doro" Causeway, which was constructed 46 years ago to connect a group of four islands (Henza-jima, Miyagi-jima, Ikei-jima, Hamahiga-jima) to the Okinawan main island. This causeway was not built on pilings, but by land reclamation; hence, it now acts as a long, thin peninsula. The construction of this causeway was previously shown to have influenced the surrounding marine ecosystem, causing ecosystem fragmentation and loss of water circulation. In this study, we collected sediment cores ( n = 10) from five paired sites in 1 m water depths. Each pair of sites consisted of one site each on the immediate north and south sides of the causeway. Originally the members of each pair were much closer to each other (<150 m) than to other pairs, but now the members of each pair are isolated by the causeway. Each core was 60-80 cm long and was divided into 15-cm layers. We examined the vertical diversity of microbial communities and chemical compounds to determine the correlation between chemodiversity and microbial communities among marine sediment cores and layers. Principal coordinate analyses (PCoA) of detected compounds and of bacterial and archaeal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) revealed that the north and south sides of the causeway are relatively isolated, with each side having unique microbial OTUs. Additionally, some bacterial families (e.g., Acidaminobacteraceae, Rhizobiaceae, and Xanthomonadaceae) were found only on the south side of Kaichu-Doro. Interestingly, we found that the relative abundance of OTUs for some microbial families increased from top to bottom, but this was reversed in some other families. We conclude that the causeway has altered microbial community composition and metabolite profiles in marine sediments.

  8. How Do Changes to the Railroad Causeway in Utah's Great Salt Lake Affect Water and Salt Flow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S White

    Full Text Available Managing terminal lake elevation and salinity are emerging problems worldwide. We contribute to terminal lake management research by quantitatively assessing water and salt flow for Utah's Great Salt Lake. In 1959, Union Pacific Railroad constructed a rock-filled causeway across the Great Salt Lake, separating the lake into a north and south arm. Flow between the two arms was limited to two 4.6 meter wide rectangular culverts installed during construction, an 88 meter opening (referred to locally as a breach installed in 1984, and the semi porous material of the causeway. A salinity gradient developed between the two arms of the lake over time because the south arm receives approximately 95% of the incoming streamflow entering Great Salt Lake. The north arm is often at, or near, salinity saturation, averaging 317 g/L since 1966, while the south is considerably less saline, averaging 142 g/L since 1966. Ecological and industrial uses of the lake are dependent on long-term salinity remaining within physiological and economic thresholds, although optimal salinity varies for the ecosystem and between diverse stakeholders. In 2013, Union Pacific Railroad closed causeway culverts amid structural safety concerns and proposed to replace them with a bridge, offering four different bridge designs. As of summer 2015, no bridge design has been decided upon. We investigated the effect that each of the proposed bridge designs would have on north and south arm Great Salt Lake elevation and salinity by updating and applying US Geological Survey's Great Salt Lake Fortran Model. Overall, we found that salinity is sensitive to bridge size and depth, with larger designs increasing salinity in the south arm and decreasing salinity in the north arm. This research illustrates that flow modifications within terminal lakes cannot be separated from lake salinity, ecology, management, and economic uses.

  9. Water and salt balance of Great Salt Lake, Utah, and simulation of water and salt movement through the causeway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wold, Steven R.; Thomas, Blakemore E.; Waddell, Kidd M.

    1997-01-01

    The water and salt balance of Great Salt Lake primarily depends on the amount of inflow from tributary streams and the conveyance properties of a causeway constructed during 1957-59 that divides the lake into the south and north parts. The conveyance properties of the causeway originally included two culverts, each 15 feet wide, and the permeable rock-fill material.During 1980-86, the salt balance changed as a result of record high inflow that averaged 4,627,000 acre-feet annually and modifications made to the conveyance properties of the causeway that included opening a 300-foot-wide breach. In this study, a model developed in 1973 by Waddell and Bolke to simulate the water and salt balance of the lake was revised to accommodate the high water-surface altitude and modifications made to the causeway. This study, done by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of State Lands and Forestry, updates the model with monitoring data collected during 1980-86. This report describes the calibration of the model and presents the results of simulations for three hypothetical 10-year periods.During January 1, 1980, to July 31, 1984, a net load of 0.5 billion tons of dissolved salt flowed from the south to the north part of the lake primarily as a result of record inflows. From August 1, 1984, when the breach was opened, to December 31,1986, a net load of 0.3 billion tons of dissolved salt flowed from the north to the south part of the lake primarily as a result of the breach.For simulated inflow rates during a hypothetical 10-year period resulting in the water-surface altitude decreasing from about 4,200 to 4,192 feet, there was a net movement of about 1.0 billion tons of dissolved salt from the south to the north part, and about 1.7 billion tons of salt precipitated in the north part. For simulated inflow rates during a hypothetical 10-year period resulting in a rise in water-surface altitude from about 4,200 to 4

  10. Data collection and development of a hydrodynamic and temperature model to evaluate causeway modifications at the mouth of the Yakima River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Baquero, G. F.; Furnans, J.; Hudson, C.; Magan, C.

    2012-12-01

    Management decisions on rivers and associated habitats require sound tools to identify major drivers for spatial and temporal variations of temperature and related water quality variables. 3D hydrodynamic and water quality models are key components to abstract flow dynamics in complex river systems as they allow extrapolating available observations to ungaged locations and alternative scenarios. The data collection and model development are intended to support the Mid-Columbia Fisheries Enhancement Group in conjunction with the Benton Conservation District in efforts to understand how seasonal flow patterns in the Yakima and Columbia rivers interact with the Yakima delta geometry to cause the relatively high water temperatures previously observed west of Bateman Island. These high temperatures are suspected of limiting salmonid success in the area, possibly contributing to adjustments in migration patterns and increased predation. The Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) and Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP) are used to model flow patterns and enable simulations of temperature distributions and water quality parameters at the confluence. Model development is supported by a bathymetric campaign in 2011 to evaluate delta geometry and to construct the EFDC domain, a sonar river survey in 2012 to measure velocity profiles and to enable model calibration, and a continuous collection of temperature and dissolved oxygen records from Level Scout probes at key locations during last year to drive water quality simulations. The current model is able to reproduce main flow features observed at the confluence and is being prepared to integrate previous and current temperature observations. The final model is expected to evaluate scenarios for the removal or alteration of the Bateman Island Causeway. Alterations to the causeway that permit water passage to the south of Bateman Island are likely to dramatically alter the water flow patterns through the Yakima

  11. Costs of berm and causeway alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Arthur S.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments initiated in February 1985 and still in progress have demonstrated that removal of 30 cm of topsoil brings the specific activity of Bikini Island soil down to the level of that on Eneu and reduces the external exposure rate to gamma rays from an average of 68 pr/h to 5 pr/h. The analytical data completed thus far for food crops grown in the experimental and control areas indicate a parallel response. During 1986 results became available showing that removal of topsoil would also limit productivity. However, it is now known that with adequate care the excavated plot can be as productive as the unexcavated (natural) one. The removal of 30 cm (1 foot) of topsoil at Bikini Island would produce large amounts of waste vegetable matter and approximately 719,000 cubic meters of contaminated topsoil. Three principal alternatives have been considered for the disposal of the spoil. The cost estimates for these and other rehabilitation alternatives were developed in detail by a panel of engineers, chaired by BARC member Arthur S. Kubo, which met in January 1986. The panel's report constitutes Appendix C of BARC Report No. 4

  12. Productivity of Acacia angustissima accessions at two sites in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B. Isaac Nyoka

    2012-11-13

    Nov 13, 2012 ... 2World Agroforestry Centre, ICRAF-Zimbabwe Agroforestry Programme, P. O. Box, CY594,. Causeway, Harare, Zimbabwe. 3Agronomy Institute, DR and SS. P. O. Box CY550, Causeway, Harare, Zimbabwe. Accepted 2 ..... effect of the ith replication, Aj = fixed effect of the jth accession, εij = experimental ...

  13. 77 FR 50929 - Security Zones; 2012 RNC Bridge Security Zones, Captain of the Port St. Petersburg Zone, Tampa, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-23

    ... similar nature, intended to harm people, damage property, or disrupt the proceedings of the 2012... Island Causeway (Central Ave); Corey Causeway (Pasadena Ave); Blind Pass Bridge (699); and Pinellas... regulated navigation areas and other limited access areas: 33 U.S.C. 1226, 1231; 46 U.S.C. Chapter 701, 3306...

  14. Heuningnes (CSW19)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bickerton, IB

    1984-02-01

    Full Text Available on the longshore drift and run-off conditions. The recommendations in this report concerning increased tidal exchange through the forestry causeway should help to solve the management problem at the mouth....

  15. Le bilingue, surhomme ou infirme? (The Bilingual, Superman or Cripple?)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournier, Michel

    1975-01-01

    Discusses good translation techniques, "true bilingualism," and the effect of bilingualism on cognitive development. (Text is in French.) Available from Lloyds Bank Chambers, 91 Newington Causeway, London SE1 6BN, England. (AM)

  16. 23 CFR 661.51 - Can IRRBP funds be used for the approach roadway to a bridge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS INDIAN RESERVATION ROAD BRIDGE PROGRAM § 661.51 Can IRRBP funds be used for... § 661.5 are eligible. (b) Long approach fills, causeways, connecting roadways, interchanges, ramps, and...

  17. Cultural Resources Survey and Testing of the Mandeville Hurricane Protection Project, Mandeville, St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Luis

    1996-01-01

    ...). The survey was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New Orleans District, in response to planned construction activities associated with a hurricane protection project that would enclose Mandeville at Causeway Boulevard, Lake...

  18. Development of Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Granetto, Paul

    1994-01-01

    .... The DoD Hotline complaint alleged that the Navy was not receiving the fair market value for the land, the Navy was understating the estimated cost to construct the causeway and to develop Ford Island...

  19. Conservation management options and actions: putative decline of coral cover at Palmyra Atoll, Northern Line Islands, as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Jonathan P A; Bartz, R John; Brainard, Russell E; Collen, John D; Dunbar, Robert B; Garton, David W; Powell, Sam

    2014-07-15

    Localised loss of live coral cover at Palmyra Atoll (central Pacific Ocean) has been attributed to increased temperature and/or sedimentation arising from alterations made to the lagoon system. It has been hypothesised that a causeway spanning the lagoon hinders water circulation, resulting in warmer and/or more turbid water flowing towards a site of high coral cover and diversity (Coral Gardens). Analyses of a multi-site and multi-year data set revealed no differences in mean temperature or turbidity values on either side of the causeway and provided no evidence of significantly warmer or more turbid water at Coral Gardens. We conclude that the putative decline in live coral cover cannot be attributed to the presence of the causeway and that proposed management actions involving modification to the causeway cannot achieve the conservation outcomes suggested of them. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Subscriptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subscriptions Contact. Dr R Stewart Zimbabwe Veterinary Association PO Box CY 168 Causeway Harare ZIMBABWE Email: racheljestewart@gmail.com. A copy of each issue is sent to all members of the Association. The subscription for non-members is: * Inside Zimbabwe Z$300.00 per annum * Outside Zimbabwe ...

  1. 75 FR 6680 - Merchant Marine Personnel Advisory Committee; Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... Marriott Metairie at Lakeway Hotel, 3838 N. Causeway Boulevard, Metairie, LA. Send written material and..., Washington, DC 20593-7126. This notice may be viewed in our online docket, USCG-2010-0054, at http://www... the STCW Convention and the STCW Code Identified for Comprehensive Review; (d) Task Statement 71...

  2. Numerical Modelling Approaches for Assessing Improvements to the Flow Circulation in a Small Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng He

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Kamaniskeg Lake is a long, narrow, and deep small lake located in the northern part of Ontario, Canada. The goals of this paper were to examine various options to improve the water quality in the northern part of the lake by altering the local hydraulic flow conditions. Towards this end, a preliminary screening suggested that the flow circulation could be increased around a central island (Mask Island in the northern part of the lake by opening up an existing causeway connecting the mainland and central island. Three-dimensional (3D hydraulic and transport models were adopted in this paper to investigate the hydraulic conditions under various wind forces and causeway structures. The modelling results show that opening the causeway in a few places is unlikely to generate a large flow circulation around the central island. Full circulation only appears to be possible if the causeway is fully removed and a strong wind blows in a favourable direction. The possible reasons for existing water quality variations at the intake of a local WTP (water treatment plant are also explored in the paper.

  3. 33 CFR 110.46 - Newport Harbor, Newport, R.I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... beginning. (c) Area No. 3. The waters north of Goat Island Causeway Bridge beginning at Newport Harbor Light... beginning. (b) Area No. 2. The waters east of Goat Island beginning at a point bearing 090°, 245 yards from... following the east shore of Goat Island to the point of beginning. ...

  4. 78 FR 40436 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Navy Training Conducted at the Silver...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-05

    ... the Unmanned Underwater Vehicle Neutralization and Airborne Mine Neutralization System. Prior to... removal of Elevated Causeway System (ELCAS) support piles may also result in the harassment of marine... daylight hours; Anchored floats will be used to mark the outer limits of the mitigation zone (vsw, pos); A...

  5. 77 FR 55645 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Construction and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-10

    ... permanent fixed or floating storage or vaporization facilities are required. However, this means that the... Bridge section of the pipe (requiring dredging through the causeway). Install the STL Buoys. Install the... be required for passage under the Skyway Bridge and would be performed from a fixed working platform...

  6. MITE INCIDENCE AND CROP YIELD IN ZIMBABWE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plant Protection Research Institute (PPRI), P.O. Box CY 550, Causeway, Harare, Zimbabwe. 'International Centre of Insect Physiology ... shoots to limit plant growth and to divert nutrients to flower clusters on the main stem (Chen ..... two oblique crossed bamboo stakes and not pruned. They attributed the better control of the ...

  7. CTD and Bottle Data from Leg 1: 20 December 1986 - 18 January 1987. Leg 2: 17 July - 15 August 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    Science Division of Meteorology and Physical Oceanography University of Miami TIC 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway f ELECTE Miami, Florida 33149 S SEP2Z 1989D and...650, Japan Biblioteca, Centro de Investigacion Cientifca y Educacion Superior de Prof. Hideo Kawai Ensenada, Apartado Postal 2732 Kyoto University

  8. Ziziphus mauritiana Lamk.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-03

    Sep 3, 2008 ... 2Department of Agricultural Research and Extension Services, Agronomy Research Institute, Box CY 550, Causeway,. Harare .... value. Fruits that had a hue of dark red, dark reddish brown and dusky red were recorded as darkened. The content of vitamin C, reducing sugars and titratable acids of the fruits ...

  9. 76 FR 24087 - Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans; Notice of Meeting The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) gives notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act... Harbor View Room at the Best Western Bay Harbor Hotel, 7700 Courtney Campbell Causeway, Tampa, Florida...

  10. 41 CFR 105-53.118 - Locations of material available for public inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION 53-STATEMENT OF... 20405. Telephone 202-535-7788. (b) Business Service Center, General Services Administration, 10 Causeway... Administration, 26 Federal Plaza, NY, NY 10278. Telephone: 212-264-1234. (d) Business Service Center, General...

  11. 75 FR 81561 - Huron-Manistee National Forests, Michigan, Land and Resource Management Plan Supplemental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... Portrait of Hunters and Hunting License Trends in Michigan by the National Shooting Sports Foundation on... McKinley Road, Mio, MI, from 4-7 p.m.; 2/02/11--Causeway Bay Hotel (Will be Changing to Best Western), 6820...

  12. The effects of instream barriers on the distribution of migratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-02-09

    Feb 9, 2011 ... and by the construction of numerous causeways and bridges for convenient ... Fish were grouped by sampling gear and all catches were expressed ..... Anguilla mossambica caught in all 3 gear types for 4 surveys (n=3 nets x 3 gear types x 1 night x 4 surveys) per site caught in the Sundays River,. Eastern ...

  13. Density-stratified flow events in Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA: implications for mercury and salinity cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftz, David L.; Carling, Gregory T.; Angeroth, Cory; Freeman, Michael; Rowland, Ryan; Pazmiño, Eddy

    2014-01-01

    Density stratification in saline and hypersaline water bodies from throughout the world can have large impacts on the internal cycling and loading of salinity, nutrients, and trace elements. High temporal resolution hydroacoustic and physical/chemical data were collected at two sites in Great Salt Lake (GSL), a saline lake in the western USA, to understand how density stratification may influence salinity and mercury (Hg) distributions. The first study site was in a causeway breach where saline water from GSL exchanges with less saline water from a flow restricted bay. Near-surface-specific conductance values measured in water at the breach displayed a good relationship with both flow and wind direction. No diurnal variations in the concentration of dissolved (total and MeHg loadings was observed during periods of elevated salinity. The second study site was located on the bottom of GSL where movement of a high-salinity water layer, referred to as the deep brine layer (DBL), is restricted to a naturally occurring 1.5-km-wide “spillway” structure. During selected time periods in April/May, 2012, wind-induced flow reversals in a railroad causeway breach, separating Gunnison and Gilbert Bays, were coupled with high-velocity flow pulses (up to 55 cm/s) in the DBL at the spillway site. These flow pulses were likely driven by a pressure response of highly saline water from Gunnison Bay flowing into the north basin of Gilbert Bay. Short-term flow reversal events measured at the railroad causeway breach have the ability to move measurable amounts of salt and Hg from Gunnison Bay into the DBL. Future disturbance to the steady state conditions currently imposed by the railroad causeway infrastructure could result in changes to the existing chemical balance between Gunnison and Gilbert Bays. Monitoring instruments were installed at six additional sites in the DBL during October 2012 to assess impacts from any future modifications to the railroad causeway.

  14. Significance of beach geomorphology on fecal indicator bacteria levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Allison; Feng, Zhixuan; Kelly, Elizabeth; Reniers, Ad; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M

    2017-08-15

    Large databases of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) measurements are available for coastal waters. With the assistance of satellite imagery, we illustrated the power of assessing data for many sites by evaluating beach features such as geomorphology, distance from rivers and canals, presence of piers and causeways, and degree of urbanization coupled with the enterococci FIB database for the state of Florida. We found that beach geomorphology was the primary characteristic associated with enterococci levels that exceeded regulatory guidelines. Beaches in close proximity to marshes or within bays had higher enterococci exceedances in comparison to open coast beaches. For open coast beaches, greater enterococci exceedances were associated with nearby rivers and higher levels of urbanization. Piers and causeways had a minimal contribution, as their effect was often overwhelmed by beach geomorphology. Results can be used to understand the potential causes of elevated enterococci levels and to promote public health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Joint Logistics-over-the-Shore (LOTS) Test and Evaluation Report. Volume II. Analysis of Test Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-05

    Army’s with the exception of a chain container sling (primarily used at the COD) and a causeway ferry alongside the barqe -TCDF. The Navy had better...operations everywhere. w’hen the barqe -TCDF was forced to halt because of local wave action, the COD was able to continue. COD sea state ope?-ting...major areas of weakness with the barqe -TCLF (,anotier beina its deployment), the Army needs to closely monitor research and analyses programmed by the

  16. 77 FR 12476 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Lake Pontchartrain, Between Jefferson and St. Tammany Parishes, LA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ...The Commander, Eighth Coast Guard District has issued a temporary deviation from the regulations governing the operation of the north bascule span of the Greater New Orleans Expressway Commission Causeway across Lake Pontchartrain between Metairie, Jefferson Parish and Mandeville, St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana. This deviation allows the draws of the bridge to remain closed to navigation for four days to allow for the repair and maintenance of mechanical parts of the bascule.

  17. The effects of restricted circulation on the salt balance of Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, K.M.; Bolke, E.L.

    1973-01-01

    During the 1970-1972 water years a net load of dissolved solids of 0.26 billion tons moved from the south to north part of Great Salt Lake, Utah, through the causeway of the Southern Pacific Transportation Co. The load loss from the south part during the 1972 water year was only 0.01 billion tons, thus indicating that the salt balance between the two parts of the lake was near equilibrium for inflow conditions such as those of 1972.

  18. Biological and environmental characteristics of mangrove habitats from Manori creek, West Coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kulkarni, V.A.; Jagtap, T.G.; Mhalsekar, N.M.; Naik, A.N.

    , Anuradha N. Naik National Institute of Oceanography, Dr. Jack de Sequeira Road, Dona Paula, Panjim, Goa, 403004 Dr. Tanaji G. Jagtap a National Institute of Oceanography, Dr. Jack de Sequeira Road, Dona Paula, Panjim, Goa - 403004 Tel: 91 832..., submitted to IOC Ltd, Noida, India. 39pp. 3. Anon. (2004). Rapid EIA for construction of bridge at Ribandar causeway and reclamation for approach road, NIO tech. report. India. 73 pp. 4. Anon. (2006). Indian Tide Table. Part I. Indian and Selected...

  19. Aspects of the biology of Salicornia bigelovii torr. In relation to a proposed restoration of a wind-tidal flat system on the South Texas, USA Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuf, C.P.

    2006-01-01

    Wind-tidal flats are the dominant coastal wetland type in southern Texas USA. Succulent vascular plants are colonizing the flats in some locations, often where past dredge disposal along navigation channels and other activities have interrupted natural water communication between hypersaline bays and large areas of wind-tidal flats. The objective of this study was to test the feasibility of proposed removal of a causeway at Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge to restore the historic hydrologic regime and eradicate encroaching vascular plants, mostly Salicornia bigelovii, on the assumption that high sediment salt excluded these vascular plants under natural conditions. Assessment in spring 1998 of the density of Salicornia in relation to elevation and sediment salt of bare and vegetated zones on the vegetated flats on one side of the causeway and entirely barren flats with unimpaired connection to Laguna Madre on the other side of the causeway suggested that sediment salt >0.1 g ml-1 excluded vascular plants. However, bimonthly sampling in 1999-2000 revealed that sediment salt concentrations were >0.1 g ml-1 throughout the vegetated zone in July and more locally in the period of winter low water, with little impairment to established plants. This indicates that if control is desired, it must be exerted at germination and early establishment during and after fall high water. Continuous monitoring of water levels on either side of the causeway suggests that, even with removal of the causeway, flooding with hypersaline lagoon water will be too infrequent to counteract the freshening effect of a permanent hydraulic connection to the main agricultural drain of the lower Rio Grande Valley that has developed at the other end of the salt flat. Monitoring Salicornia distribution over six years documented huge variation between years but no trend toward increasing dominance of the flats. The results of this study illustrate that the most obvious alterations to a site may

  20. Simulation of tidal-flow, circulation, and flushing of the Charlotte Harbor Estuarine System, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, C.R.

    1996-01-01

    A two-dimensional circulation and constituent- transport model, SIMSYS2D, was used to simulate tidal-flow, circulation, and flushing characteristics in Charlotte Harbor. The model was calibrated and verified against field observations of stage,discharge, and velocity. Standard errors averaged about 3 percent of the range in stage at the tide stations and between 3 and 10 percent of the range in discharge measured in the inlets for the calibration period. Following calibration and verification, the model was applied to three different conditions. The first condition represented the existing physical configuration and typical freshwater inflow. The second condition represented reduced fresh water inflow, and the third represented an alteration of Sanibel Causeway. All three conditions were evaluated through Lagrangian particle tracks and simulated dye injections. Residual circulation patterns were similar for typical and reduced freshwater inflow, but reduced freshwater inflow increased the residence time in the upper harbor by a factor of two or more. Removal of Sanibel Causeway did not significantly affect residual flows in upper and lower Charlotte Harbor, Matlacha Pass, Gasparilla Sound, or the Gulf of Mexico. Analysis of Lagrangian particle tracks indicated changes in residence times in San Carlos Bay as a result of removing Sanibel Causeway, but the changes were not consistent for all particles. The residence time of 8 particles in San Carlos Bay decreased with removal of the causeway, 1 was unchanged, and the residence time of 3 particles increased. Simulated flushing characteristics of the estuarine system were affected more by reduced freshwater inflow than for typical freshwater inflow. After 30 days of simulation of reduced freshwater inflow, 42 percent of the dye injected into the upper harbor remained in the upper harbor, compared to 28 percent for typical freshwater inflow. The upper harbor has a relatively long flushing time because it is not directly

  1. Kelvin and industry in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossland, Bernard; Whitaker, Andrew

    2009-04-01

    Kelvin was a great mathematician, theoretical and experimental physicist, and educator, founding the first physical laboratory. He worked tirelessly for the creation of a reproducible set of physical units, and he was also an experienced and enthusiastic sailor. All these talents were linked to his extensive technological work, of which the most important examples were the laying of the Atlantic cable, and the marine compass. In Ireland his most important contributions were the occulting nature of the Holywood lighthouse, and his connection with the Giant's Causeway tramway. Kelvin's work on cabling and national maritime projects may have stimulated his later strong support of the British Empire and opposition to Home Rule in Ireland.

  2. Kelvin and industry in Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossland, Bernard; Whitaker, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Kelvin was a great mathematician, theoretical and experimental physicist, and educator, founding the first physical laboratory. He worked tirelessly for the creation of a reproducible set of physical units, and he was also an experienced and enthusiastic sailor. All these talents were linked to his extensive technological work, of which the most important examples were the laying of the Atlantic cable, and the marine compass. In Ireland his most important contributions were the occulting nature of the Holywood lighthouse, and his connection with the Giant's Causeway tramway. Kelvin's work on cabling and national maritime projects may have stimulated his later strong support of the British Empire and opposition to Home Rule in Ireland.

  3. Physical Monitoring of Flow Into and Within Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, T. A.; Naftz, D. L.; Perschon, W. C.

    2006-12-01

    Great Salt Lake (GSL) is the hydrologic terminus for the eastern part of the Great Basin. As the largest inland waterbody in the Western United States, GSL plays a critical ecologic role for many migratory bird species. In terms of harvest quantity and quality, the brine shrimp (Artemia) fishery of GSL is among the strongest in the world. The characteristic of GSL as a hydrologic sink amplifies anthropogenic activities throughout the basin, most specifically activities that occur along its eastern and southern shores, the urban corridor of the Wasatch Front. In 1959 GSL was divided into north and south parts by a rock-fill railroad causeway. Since then, an extreme density gradient between the north and south part exists as a result of limited conveyance of water from the south part where more than 95 percent of the total freshwater input occurs (Loving, and others, 2000). To date, little is known about the loading and cycling of various chemical constituents associated with human activities including nutrients, selenium, and mercury. Hydroacoustic technology, specifically acoustic Doppler technology, is currently being used to obtain a better physical understanding of GSL. Since 1999, stratified bi-directional discharge has been measured at the causeway breach with an acoustic Doppler current profiler. From these measurements, net flow components to the north and south have been used to assess the movement of water and salt through the causeway. Low hydraulic gradients and variable backwater conditions at the two largest inflows to GSL required the deployment of in-situ acoustic Doppler velocity meters to accurately compute continuous discharge, critical for constituent loading analyses. These discharge records, computed using the index velocity method, show sensitivity to large wind events that can lead to a complete reversal of flow. Velocity profiles acquired during two multi-day water-quality synoptic sampling runs with acoustic Doppler current profilers have

  4. The Dendrochronological Dating of Timber Crossings in West Jutland, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daly, Aoife

    2006-01-01

    complete sapwood, to bark edge, preserved. Skjern Bridge, across the Skjern River and also in west Jutland, is medieval in date, with phases from the 12th to 14th centuries. The bridge is one element in a complex of activity by the river including an earlier ford, a fish weir contemporary with the bridge......The dendrochronological analyses of a large number of timbers from two sites are described. Nybro causeway in west Jutland, Denmark, which was built in the 8th century AD, consists of numerous phases, identifiable due to the large number of dendrochronologically dated timbers, of which many had...

  5. A Summary of the Results of a Study of Acoustic Bottom Interaction in a Range Dependent Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-14

    Johns Hopkins Road Laurel, MD 20810 109 Attn: L . H. Wallman The University of Miami 10 Rickenbacker Causeway Miami, FL 33149 110 Attn: Dr. F. Tappert...8217 X4v~;i~Q2 \\ ’.X-C 0 fn 0K I ’ ........ .Y A J..~ a~ ~~A’, ~ l ~If U.- A4 UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (When Date Entered) REPORT...Propagation Loss versus Range for Bottom Slopes of 1 and 30 50 111.15 Downslope Propagation Loss versus Range for Bottom Slopes of l and 30 52 111.16

  6. Addressing the technical capacity constraints on community-based labour intensive road projects - a case study of the Amadiba road project

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lachman, A

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available with minimal changes to the vertical and horizontal alignments. Minor drainage works to reinstate or stabilize washouts and deal with localized road drainage were provided. Single lane low level causeways across rivers and streams were also constructed... of formation per team. This included the simultaneous digging and shaping of the side drain(s) and the achievement of a camber of 11%. This task was controlled by the use of templates. The earth was not compacted by machine but the local drivers were...

  7. Architecture, cobbled roads and chronology of the main sector of the site Las Mercedes-1, Central Caribbean of Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez Leiva, Ricardo; Chapdelaine, Claude

    2008-01-01

    Results from test-pit excavations, survey, and mapping at Las Mercedes-1, plus the center of a paramount chiefly polity in the Central Caribbean region of Costa Rica, are presented. Information on architecture, construction system, ceramic chronology, and funerary features, are reported. Radiocarbon dates have suggested that important construction works at the site's center were carried out circa A.D. 1000. Two cobble-paved, causeways, perpendicular to the river drainage system, were found to be linked to the main monumental compound as roads for formal access. Interest in the site has been revived and points the way to further researches at the site and its regional sphere. (author) [es

  8. Pollution history of a tropical estuary revealed by combined hydrodynamic modelling and sediment geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, J. E.; Greenaway, A. M.; Bigg, G. R.; Webber, D. F.; Dennis, P. F.; Guthrie, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrodynamic modelling of water movement in Hunts Bay, a protected part of Kingston Harbour, Jamaica, shows that depth averaged tidal flows are very low. In the northeast corner of Hunts Bay, water is essentially stagnant. Even under high flow conditions, much of the Bay bottom water is `bypassed' by buoyant, lower salinity surface flows. The muddy sediments of Hunts Bay reflect these sluggish to stagnant conditions; sediment cores from the northeast corner of the Bay contain progressively higher amounts of organic matter in their upper parts (˜last 15-20 years sedimentation). Combined C/N ratios and stable carbon isotope compositions of this organic matter imply a sewage origin. Both lead and chromium metal concentrations and enrichment factors relative to average crustal shales show geographically related patterns that reflect hydrodynamic circulation predicted by modelling. In particular, metal concentrations and enrichment factors are highest at the northern end of the bay, especially in the northeast corner. Modelling confirms that stagnant conditions would occur in the northeast part of the bay even without the presence of a major causeway. The causeway may contribute to low flow conditions, but is not the principal cause of organic contamination, which is simply an excessive input of sewage.

  9. Holocene morphogenesis of Alexander the Great's isthmus at Tyre in Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriner, Nick; Morhange, Christophe; Meulé, Samuel

    2007-05-01

    In 332 B.C., Alexander the Great constructed an ≈1,000-m-long causeway to seize the offshore island of Tyre. The logistics behind this engineering feat have long troubled archaeologists. Using the Holocene sedimentary record, we demonstrate that Alexander's engineers cleverly exploited a shallow proto-tombolo, or sublittoral sand spit, to breach the offshore city's defensive impregnability. We elucidate a three-phase geomorphological model for the spit's evolution. Settled since the Bronze Age, the area's geological record manifests a long history of natural and anthropogenic forcings. (i) Leeward of the island breakwater, the maximum flooding surface (e.g., drowning of the subaerial land surfaces by seawater) is dated ≈8000 B.P. Fine-grained sediments and brackish and marine-lagoonal faunas translate shallow, low-energy water bodies at this time. Shelter was afforded by Tyre's elongated sandstone reefs, which acted as a 6-km natural breakwater. (ii) By 6000 B.P., sea-level rise had reduced the dimensions of the island from 6 to 4 km. The leeward wave shadow generated by this island, allied with high sediment supply after 3000 B.P., culminated in a natural wave-dominated proto-tombolo within 1-2 m of mean sea level by the time of Alexander the Great (4th century B.C.). (iii) After 332 B.C., construction of Alexander's causeway entrained a complete anthropogenic metamorphosis of the Tyrian coastal system.

  10. Risk factors and spatial distribution of Schistosoma mansoni infection among primary school children in Mbita District, Western Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiyo Nagi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An increasing risk of Schistosoma mansoni infection has been observed around Lake Victoria, western Kenya since the 1970s. Understanding local transmission dynamics of schistosomiasis is crucial in curtailing increased risk of infection.We carried out a cross sectional study on a population of 310 children from eight primary schools. Overall, a total of 238 (76.8% children were infected with S. mansoni, while seven (2.3% had S. haematobium. The prevalence of hookworm, Trichuris trichiura and Ascaris lumbricoides were 6.1%, 5.2% and 2.3%, respectively. Plasmodium falciparum was the only malaria parasite detected (12.0%. High local population density within a 1 km radius around houses was identified as a major independent risk factor of S. mansoni infection. A spatial cluster of high infection risk was detected around the Mbita causeway following adjustment for population density and other potential risk factors.Population density was shown to be a major factor fuelling schistosome infection while individual socio-economic factors appeared not to affect the infection risk. The high-risk cluster around the Mbita causeway may be explained by the construction of an artificial pathway that may cause increased numbers of S. mansoni host snails through obstruction of the waterway. This construction may have, therefore, a significant negative impact on the health of the local population, especially school-aged children who frequently come in contact with lake water.

  11. Beyond the Stone Town: Maritime Architecture at Fourteenth-Fifteenth Century Songo Mnara, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Edward; Fleisher, Jeffrey; Wynne-Jones, Stephanie

    2012-10-01

    The towns of the Swahili coast of East Africa are widely acknowledged as the remains of a maritime society whose relationship with the ocean was fundamental to their economy and identity. Yet research that links the terrestrial environments of the towns to their adjacent maritime landscapes is rare, and urgently required in the light of marine erosional processes unmitigated by human actions. In the Kilwa archipelago of southern Tanzania, survey of the coastal foreshore has documented maritime architecture—particularly a series of coral-built causeways—that serve to link the medieval towns of this area to coastal resources and to expand the limits of the settlements themselves. This paper reports on survey recovering these causeways on Songo Mnara Island, putting the structures into context as part of the broader spatial manifestation of the island's fourteenth-fifteenth century town. Several possible uses of the causeways are discussed, including functional explanations linked to the exploitation of oceanic resources, and more social reasons of territoriality and spatial demarcation.

  12. Hydrogeochemistry of seasonal variation of Urmia Salt Lake, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Samad

    2006-07-11

    Urmia Lake has been designated as an international park by the United Nations. The lake occupies a 5700 km2 depression in northwestern Iran. Thirteen permanent rivers flow into the lake. Water level in the lake has been decreased 3.5 m in the last decade due to a shortage of precipitation and progressively dry climate. Geologically the lake basin is considered to be a graben of tectonic origin. Na, K, Ca, Li and Mg are the main cations with Cl, SO4, and HCO3 as the main anions. F & Br are the other main elements in the lake. A causeway crossing the lake is under construction, which may affect the lake's annual geochemistry. The main object of this project is mainly to consider the potential of K-mineral production along with ongoing salt production. Seven hundred and four samples were taken and partially analyzed for the main cations and anions. Surface water (0.5 m. depth) was analyzed for Na, K, Mg, Ca, Br and Li, and averaged 87.118 g/lit, 1.48 g/lit, 4.82 g/lit, 4.54 g/lit, 1.19 ppm and 12.7 ppm respectively for the western half of the lake. Sodium ranged between 84 to 91.2 g/lit, and showed higher concentrations in the south than in the north. This unexpected result may be caused by shallower depth in the south and a higher net evaporation effect. Calcium ranged between 4.2 to 5 g/lit, apparently slightly higher in the north. K is higher in the south, possibly due to rivers entering from south that may carry slightly higher K in solution. In the middle-range samples (0.5-5 m.), K averaged 1.43 g/lit and ranged from 1.40 to 1.46 g/lit. At this intermediate depth the distribution of K is clearly higher to the south of the causeway that is currently under construction. It is not clear whether this increase is the effect of the causeway or the effect of the salty Aji-Chay River to the east, and the Khoy salt domes to the north of the lake. At depth (5 m-10 m), K averaged 1.48 g/lit and ranged from 1.4 to 1.49 g/lit, differing only in the second decimal from the

  13. The pursuit of perfect packing

    CERN Document Server

    Weaire, Denis

    2000-01-01

    In 1998 Thomas Hales dramatically announced the solution of a problem that has long teased eminent mathematicians: what is the densest possible arrangement of identical spheres? The Pursuit of Perfect Packing recounts the story of this problem and many others that have to do with packing things together. The examples are taken from mathematics, physics, biology, and engineering, including the arrangement of soap bubbles in foam, atoms in a crystal, the architecture of the bee''s honeycomb, and the structure of the Giant''s Causeway. Using an informal style and with key references, the book also includes brief accounts of the lives of many of the scientists who devoted themselves to problems of packing over many centuries, together with wry comments on their efforts. It is an entertaining introduction to the field for both specialists and the more general public.

  14. Alexander the Great's tombolos at Tyre and Alexandria, eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriner, N.; Goiran, J. P.; Morhange, C.

    2008-08-01

    Tyre and Alexandria's coastlines are today characterised by wave-dominated tombolos, peculiar sand isthmuses that link former islands to the adjacent continent. Paradoxically, despite a long history of inquiry into spit and barrier formation, understanding of the dynamics and sedimentary history of tombolos over the Holocene timescale is poor. At Tyre and Alexandria we demonstrate that these rare coastal features are the heritage of a long history of natural morphodynamic forcing and human impacts. In 332 BC, following a protracted seven-month siege of the city, Alexander the Great's engineers cleverly exploited a shallow sublittoral sand bank to seize the island fortress; Tyre's causeway served as a prototype for Alexandria's Heptastadium built a few months later. We report stratigraphic and geomorphological data from the two sand spits, proposing a chronostratigraphic model of tombolo evolution.

  15. Kelvin and industry in Ireland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crossland, Bernard [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Whitaker, Andrew, E-mail: b.crossland@qub.ac.u, E-mail: a.whitaker@qub.ac.u [Department of Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-01

    Kelvin was a great mathematician, theoretical and experimental physicist, and educator, founding the first physical laboratory. He worked tirelessly for the creation of a reproducible set of physical units, and he was also an experienced and enthusiastic sailor. All these talents were linked to his extensive technological work, of which the most important examples were the laying of the Atlantic cable, and the marine compass. In Ireland his most important contributions were the occulting nature of the Holywood lighthouse, and his connection with the Giant's Causeway tramway. Kelvin's work on cabling and national maritime projects may have stimulated his later strong support of the British Empire and opposition to Home Rule in Ireland.

  16. Use of an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) to Measure Hypersaline Bidirectional Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K.K.; Loving, B.L.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey measures the exchange of flow between the north and south parts of Great Salt Lake, Utah, as part of a monitoring program. Turbidity and bidirectional flow through the breach in the causeway that divides the lake into two parts makes it difficult to measure discharge with conventional streamflow techniques. An acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) can be used to more accurately define the angles of flow and the location of the interface between the layers of flow. Because of the high salinity levels measured in Great Salt Lake (60-280 parts per thousand), special methods had to be developed to adjust ADCP-computed discharges for the increased speed of sound in hypersaline waters and for water entrained at the interface between flow layers.

  17. A preliminary survey of marine contamination from mining-related activities on Marinduque Island, Philippines: porewater toxicity and chemistry results from a field trip, October 14-19, 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, R. Scott; Nipper, Marion; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.

    2001-01-01

    measurement of porewater concentrations of several heavy metals associated with copper mining activities. Pore waters for toxicological and chemical analyses were collected at several stations on the coast of Marinduque, near the mouths of the Boac and Mogpog rivers, and near the causeways formed by mine tailings disposal. Porewater samples were also collected at the Tres Reyes Marine Reserve, so that these non-contaminated samples could serve as a reference for test performance. Sea urchin embryological development and fertilization were only significantly impaired by two porewater samples, suggesting the presence of contaminants in toxic amounts at those stations. The toxic samples were collected near the up current side of the Calancan (Marcopper) mine tailings causeway (stations 2 and 3 – see figure 10). The pore water from station 2 also had the highest levels of heavy metals, particularly cadmium, cobalt, copper, nickel, lead and zinc (Table 5). The concentrations of cobalt, nickel and zinc were also elevated 2 at station 3. Copper concentrations were also elevated at the two river mouth stations (8 and 9) and near the CMI tailings causeway (station 7). Visual observations also indicated biological degradation due to heavy siltation and smothered coral at a gradient off the Calancan causeway, suggesting that siltation might also be causing a physical impact. This preliminary survey suggests that effects related to past mining activities are still evident and warrant a more comprehensive study to assess their severity and areal extent.

  18. Las Pozas (Casaseca de las Chanas, Zamora: dos nuevos recintos de fosos calcolíticos en el Valle del Duero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García García, Marcos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Since 1975 the site of Las Pozas has given its name to the prebeaker horizon in the Spanish Northern Plateau. In the last decade several causewayed enclosures dated to this period have been discovered. This new situation has led us to revise the foundation site using remote sensing techniques. The infrared images have allowed us to distinguish two overlapping enclosures at Las Pozas: a north one with three interrupted ditches and a southern group composed of two circles. This paper describes the characteristics of both enclosures using as well the information provided by the 1979 and 1987 excavations. We believe this discovery certifies that causewayed enclosures were a common feature in the Douro Valley during the Copper Age.Desde 1975 el yacimiento de Las Pozas ha dado nombre al horizonte precampaniforme de la Submeseta Norte de la Península Ibérica. En la última década se han localizado varios recintos de fosos adscritos a este periodo que han motivado una revisión del yacimiento fundacional utilizando técnicas de teledetección. Las imágenes de infrarrojo han permitido distinguir en Las Pozas dos recintos de fosos superpuestos: el septentrional con tres líneas de foso y el meridional con dos. En este artículo se describen las características de ambos empleando la información revelada por las excavaciones de 1979 y 1987. Consideramos que el hallazgo certifica que este tipo de yacimientos no son una excepción en el Calcolítico del Valle del Duero.

  19. Nearshore circulation and water-column properties in the Skagit River Delta, northern Puget Sound, Washington: juvenile Chinook Salmon habitat availability in the Swinomish Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Eric E.; Stevens, Andrew W.; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Curran, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Time-series and spatial measurements of nearshore hydrodynamic processes and water properties were made in the Swinomish Channel to quantify the net direction and rates of surface water transport that influence habitat for juvenile Chinook salmon along their primary migratory corridor between the Skagit River and Padilla Bay in northern Puget Sound, Washington. During the spring outmigration of Skagit River Chinook between March and June 2007, currents measured with fixed acoustic doppler current profilers (ADCP) at the south and north end of the Swinomish Channel and with roving ADCP revealed that the currents are highly asymmetric with a dominant flow to the north (toward Padilla Bay). Maximum surface current velocities reached 1.5 m/s and were generally uniform across the channel near McGlinn Island Causeway. Transport times for surface water to travel the 11 km from the southern end of Swinomish Channel at McGlinn Island to Padilla Bay ranged from 2.1 hours to 5.5 days. The mean travel time was ~1 day, while 17 percent of the time, transport of water and passive particles occurred within 3.75 hours. Surface water in the Swinomish Channel during this time was generally very saline 20-27 psu, except south of the Rainbow Bridge in the town of La Conner where it ranged 0-15 psu depending on tide and Skagit River discharge. This salinity regime restricts suitable low salinity (

  20. An evaluation of temporal changes in sediment accumulation and impacts on carbon burial in Mobile Bay, Alabama, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher G.; Osterman, Lisa E.

    2014-01-01

    The estuarine environment can serve as either a source or sink of carbon relative to the coastal ocean carbon budget. A variety of time-dependent processes such as sedimentation, carbon supply, and productivity dictate how estuarine systems operate, and Mobile Bay is a system that has experienced both natural and anthropogenic perturbations that influenced depositional processes and carbon cycling. Sediments from eight box cores provide a record of change in bulk sediment accumulation and carbon burial over the past 110 years. Accumulation rates in the central part of the basin (0.09 g cm−2) were 60–80 % less than those observed at the head (0.361 g cm−2) and mouth (0.564 g cm−2) of the bay. Sediment accumulation in the central bay decreased during the past 90 years in response to both anthropogenic (causeway construction) and natural (tropical cyclones) perturbations. Sediment accumulation inevitably increased the residence time of organic carbon in the oxic zone, as observed in modeled remineralization rates, and reduced the overall carbon burial. Such observations highlight the critical balance among sediment accumulation, carbon remineralization, and carbon burial in dynamic coastal environments. Time-series analysis based solely on short-term observation would not capture the long-term effects of changes in sedimentation on carbon cycling. Identifying these relationships over longer timescales (multi-annual to decadal) will provide a far better evaluation of coastal ocean carbon budgets.

  1. Discovering the Ancient Maya from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, T. L.

    2008-01-01

    The Pet6n region of northern Guatemala contains some of the most significant Mayan archeological sites in Latin America. It was in this region that the Maya civilization began, flourished, and abruptly disappeared. Remote sensing technology is helping to locate and map ancient Maya sites that are threatened today by accelerating deforestation and looting. Thematic Mapper, IKONOS, and QuickBird satellite, and airborne STAR-3i and AIRSAR radar data, combined with Global Positioning System (GPS) technology, are successfully detecting ancient Maya features such as sites, roadways, canals, and water reservoirs. Satellite imagery is also being used to map the bajos, which are seasonally flooded swamps that cover over 40% of the land surface. Through the use of various airborne and satellite sensor systems we have been able to detect and map ancient causeways, temples, reservoirs, and land forms, and locate these features on the ground through GPS technology. Recently, we have discovered that there is a strong relationship between a tropical forest vegetation signature in satellite imagery and the location of archeological sites. We believe that the use of limestone and lime plasters in ancient Maya construction affects the moisture, nutrition, and plant species of the surface vegetation. We have mapped these vegetation signatures in the imagery and verified through field survey that they are indicative of archeological sites. Through the use of remote sensing and GIS technology it is possible to identify unrecorded archeological features in a dense tropical forest environment and monitor these cultural features for their protection.

  2. The architect Alexander Iosif Bernardazzi (1831–1907 and his first projects in Bessarabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Chastina

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This year marks the 185th birthday of the famous architect A. I. Bernardazzi, who is also known for creating various historic buildings in the Northern Caucasus, Ukraine and Bessarabia. The archival documents provide evidence of the beginning of Bernardazzi’s architectural career, when he was appointed as technician for the arrangement of the towns Akkerman and Bendery in 1853, as well as for building some bridges and causeways in those districts. In 1855 he participated in the setting of the third market at the Forest square, which was his first mission in Kishinev. Alexander Bernardazzi performed the duty of municipal architect from 1856 to 1878 replacing Luca Zaushkevich, another architect of Kishinev. In Bessarabia he designed and built buildings such as the temporary theatre, the Lutheran school, the railway station, the Greek Church, Manuk-Bey’s Palace etc. He also dealt with the pavement of streets, the construction of the urban water supply system and the cast-iron fence in Kishinev public garden. After his departure to Odessa, in the second half of the XX century, Alexander Bernardazzi continued to design social facilities in Bessarabia, which became best examples of European architecture.

  3. Final Gondwana breakup: The Paleogene South American native ungulates and the demise of the South America-Antarctica land connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reguero, Marcelo A.; Gelfo, Javier N.; López, Guillermo M.; Bond, Mariano; Abello, Alejandra; Santillana, Sergio N.; Marenssi, Sergio A.

    2014-12-01

    The biogeographic hypothesis more accepted today is that Antarctica (West Antarctica) and southern South America (Magellan region, Patagonia) were connected by a long and narrow causeway (Weddellian Isthmus) between the Antarctic Peninsula and South America since the Late Cretaceous (Campanian) until the Early Paleogene allowing terrestrial vertebrates to colonize new frontiers using this land bridge. Stratigraphically calibrated phylogenies including large, terrestrial native ungulates Litopterna and Astrapotheria taxa reveal long ghost lineages that extended into the Late Paleocene and provide evidence for the minimum times at which these "native ungulates" were present both on Antarctica and South America. Based on these results we estimate that the Weddellian Isthmus was functional as a land bridge until the Late Paleocene. Our data place the disconnection between Antarctica and South America in the Late Paleocene, indicating that the terrestrial faunistic isolation (Simpson's "splendid isolation") in South America begun at the end of the Paleocene (~ 56 to 57 m.y.). This faunistic isolation is documented to have occurred at least 25 Ma before the existence of deep-water circulation conditions in Drake Passage (~ 30 m.y.) based on the onset of seafloor spreading in the west Scotia Sea region. We hypothesize that in the early stages of extension (Late Paleocene, ~ 55 m.y.) a wide and relatively shallow epicontinental sea developed between the Antarctic Peninsula and South America drowning the Weddellian Isthmus and preventing the faunal interchange for obligate cursorial terrestrial forms.

  4. Bald eagles view their territory from high tower at KSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    A pair of Florida bald eagles take advantage of a tower to rest and view the landscape near the intersection of the NASA Causeway and Kennedy Parkway North at Kennedy Space Center. This pair of eagles nests near Kennedy Parkway and is seen frequently by KSC commuters and visitors. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana and the south Atlantic states. Bald Eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most southern Florida eagles nesting at KSC arrive during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. . Kennedy Space Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  5. Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Doyle W.; Gardner, Joe F.

    1999-01-01

    This document is intended as a source of general information and facts about Great Salt Lake, Utah. This U.S. Geological Survey information sheet answers frequently asked questions about Great Salt Lake. Topics include: History, salinity, brine shrimp, brine flies, migratory birds, and recreation. Great Salt Lake, the shrunken remnant of prehistoric Lake Bonneville, has no outlet. Dissolved salts accumulate in the lake by evaporation. Salinity south of the causeway has ranged from 6 percent to 27 percent over a period of 22 years (2 to 7 times saltier than the ocean). The high salinity supports a mineral industry that extracts about 2 million tons of salt from the lake each year. The aquatic ecosystem consists of more than 30 species of organisms. Harvest of its best-known species, the brine shrimp, annually supplies millions of pounds of food for the aquaculture industry worldwide. The lake is used extensively by millions of migratory and nesting birds and is a place of solitude for people. All this occurs in a lake that is located at the bottom of a 35,000-square-mile drainage basin that has a human population of more than 1.5 million.

  6. Influence of thermal loading on the ecology of intertidal algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vadas, R.L.; Keser, M.; Rusanowski, P.c.

    1976-01-01

    Thermal effluents from the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Company (operating intermittently from October 1972 to December 1974) increased water temperatures in the discharge area by 7 to 15 0 C. Plant operation and the removal of a causeway increased mixing and salinities in Montsweag Bay. Four small red algae immigrated into the area, but no species were lost from the system. Distribution and abundance patterns of the dominant algae, Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus, were altered by the thermal discharge. The cover of F. vesiculosus decreased, whereas that of A. nodosum increased in 1973 but declined significantly in 1974. Reductions in biomass and percent cover were accompanied by changes in the growth dynamics of A. nodosum. Growth and survival in the discharge area were enhanced in 1973 but reduced in 1974. Growth was initiated earlier at all sites affected by the warm water. Plants at experimental sites not directly in the discharge channel grew at accelerated rates during the two years, but stressed plants in the discharge produced few or no viable apexes in 1974. The net effect has been a compression and reduction of intertidal algae into a narrower and less dense band

  7. The Writing on the Wall: National and Global Implications of the Ruling Chinese Communist Party’s Domestic and Foreign Policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emile Kok-Kheng Yeoh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The December 201 5 crackdown on labour activists was the culmination of a year of the Chinese Communist Party regime’s war on China’s civil society kicked off by of the arrests of the “Feminist Five” in March followed by the infamous crackdown on civil rights lawyers that began on 5th July and lasted till August. At around the same time, from mid-October to end of December 2015, five owners and staff members of Hong Kong’s Mighty Current publishing company and Causeway Bay bookshop which respectively publishes and selling politically dissident books banned by China disappeared under mysterious circumstances (including one while vacationing in Pattaya, Thailand, and another while inspecting warehouse in Hong Kong and reemerged in mainland China under the custody of the Chinese authorities. While these volatile incidents were unfolding domestically, the year also witnessed the continued rise of China’s economic might in the global system. With specific focus on the latest events unfolding from year 2015 to the present, this paper attempts to interpret such developments especially in terms of government policies with respect to the State’s relations with the civil society since the leadership transition from Hu-Wen to Xi-Li administration, the implications of the global reach of China’s economic might and soft power in this regard, as well as the current nature of the governing regime of the Chinese Communist Party.

  8. The Writing on the Wall: National and Global Implications of the Ruling Chinese Communist Party’s Domestic and Foreign Policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emile Kok-Kheng Yeoh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The December 2015 crackdown on labour activists was the culmination of a year of the Chinese Communist Party regime’s war on China’s civil society kicked off with the arrests of the “Feminist Five” in March, followed by the infamous crackdown on civil rights lawyers that began on 5th July and lasted till August. At around the same time, from mid-October to end of December 2015, five owners and staff members of Hong Kong’s Mighty Current publishing company and Causeway Bay bookshop which respectively publishes and sells politically dissident books banned by China disappeared under mysterious circumstances (including one while vacationing in Pattaya, Thailand, and another while inspecting warehouse in Hong Kong and reemerged in mainland China under the custody of the Chinese authorities. While these volatile incidents were unfolding domestically, the year also witnessed the continued rise of China’s economic might in the global system. With specific focus on the latest events unfolding from year 2015 to the present, this paper attempts to interpret such developments especially in terms of government policies with respect to the State’s relations with the civil society since the leadership transition from Hu-Wen to Xi-Li administration, the implications of the global reach of China’s economic might and soft power in this regard, as well as the current nature of the governing regime of the Chinese Communist Party.

  9. Google Earth: Inspiration and Instrument for the Study of Ancient Civilizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Klokočník

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Satellite imaging is well known as a useful tool in many scientific disciplines and various applications.  Google Earth, with its free access, is now - thanks to increasing resolution and precision - such a tool. It can be very inspiring. It improves the visualization and dissemination of scientific data, and opens doors to new discoveries. For example, many Nasca geoglyphs are now visible to Google Earth and so are the orientations of Chinese pyramids, which appear to be laid out with the aid of a magnetic compass. Google Earth also infor-med us about the “new” archaeological locality Atzompa close to the well known “Monte Alban” near Oaxaca (Mexico, which we then visited (in March 2010. Google Earth can also “see” prehistoric causeways in Mesoamerica, “sacbeob” and in the Chaco valley (New Mexico. We find that Google Earth can save time and resources to researches significantly: before, during and after field works and measurements; we present examples.

  10. Overseas Voter Mobilisation in Singapore: Implications from Malaysia’s 13th General Election

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Gomez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses voter mobilisation and other election-related activities of Malaysian voters living, studying and working in Singapore in the context of Malaysia’s 13th general election (GE13. According to the World Bank, nearly 400,000 Malaysians reside in the city-state. Thus these figures represent a significant Malaysian voter pool based in Singapore. Efforts to mobilise these voters for general elections or other causes have political implications for both countries, which became apparent following Singapore-based Malaysians’ activities to encourage Malaysians to return home to cast their votes during the 13th general election. Singapore’s strict public assembly laws led to several legal issues related to the voter mobilisation and election campaign activities undertaken by Malaysians in the city-state. These legal issues became a source of friction between the two countries during the elections as government leaders and authorities on both sides of the causeway accused the other of interfering in domestic political matters. Given the growing number of Malaysians in Singapore and the likely repeat of Malaysian voter mobilisation activities in Singapore in the run-up to the fourteenth general election (GE14 in 2018, issues related to the election activities of Malaysian voters in Singapore stand to be another set of factors that will shape the health of bilateral relations between these two countries.

  11. Sediment Transport into the Swinomish Navigation Channel, Puget Sound—Habitat Restoration versus Navigation Maintenance Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarang Khangaonkar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The 11 mile (1.6 km Swinomish Federal Navigation Channel provides a safe and short passage to fishing and recreational craft in and out of Northern Puget Sound by connecting Skagit and Padilla Bays, US State abbrev., USA. A network of dikes and jetties were constructed through the Swinomish corridor between 1893 and 1936 to improve navigation functionality. Over the years, these river training dikes and jetties designed to minimize sedimentation in the channel have deteriorated, resulting in reduced protection of the channel. The need to repair or modify dikes/jetties for channel maintenance, however, may conflict with salmon habitat restoration goals aimed at improving access, connectivity and brackish water habitat. Several restoration projects have been proposed in the Skagit delta involving breaching, lowering, or removal of dikes. To assess relative merits of the available alternatives, a hydrodynamic model of the Skagit River estuary was developed using the Finite Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM. In this paper, we present the refinement and calibration of the model using oceanographic data collected from the years 2006 and 2009 with a focus on the sediment and brackish water transport from the river and Skagit Bay tide flats to the Swinomish Channel. The model was applied to assess the feasibility of achieving the desired dual outcome of (a reducing sedimentation and shoaling in the Swinomish Channel and (b providing a direct migration pathway and improved conveyance of freshwater into the Swinomish Channel. The potential reduction in shoaling through site-specific structure repairs is evaluated. Similarly, the potential to significantly improve of brackish water habitat through dike breach restoration actions using the McGlinn Causeway project example, along with its impacts on sediment deposition in the Swinomish Navigation Channel, is examined.

  12. Socioeconomic impacts and management ciguatera in the Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, R J

    1992-01-01

    population, pollution and development (e.g. causeways) pressures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Quantifying Ancient Maya Land Use Legacy Effects on Contemporary Rainforest Canopy Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica N. Hightower

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Human land use legacies have significant and long-lasting ecological impacts across landscapes. Investigating ancient (>400 years legacy effects can be problematic due to the difficulty in detecting specific, historic land uses, especially those hidden beneath dense canopies. Caracol, the largest (~200 km2 Maya archaeological site in Belize, was abandoned ca. A.D. 900, leaving behind myriad structures, causeways, and an extensive network of agricultural terraces that persist beneath the architecturally complex tropical forest canopy. Airborne LiDAR enables the detection of these below-canopy archaeological features while simultaneously providing a detailed record of the aboveground 3-dimensional canopy organization, which is indicative of a forest’s ecological function. Here, this remote sensing technology is used to determine the effects of ancient land use legacies on contemporary forest structure. Canopy morphology was assessed by extracting LiDAR point clouds (0.25 ha plots from LiDAR-identified terraced (n = 150 and non-terraced (n = 150 areas on low (0°–10°, medium (10°–20°, and high (>20° slopes. We calculated the average canopy height, canopy openness, and vertical diversity from the LiDAR returns, with topographic features (i.e., slope, elevation, and aspect as covariates. Using a PerMANOVA procedure, we determined that forests growing on agricultural terraces exhibited significantly different canopy structure from those growing on non-terraced land. Terraces appear to mediate the effect of slope, resulting in less structural variation between slope and non-sloped land and yielding taller, more closed, more vertically diverse forests. These human land uses abandoned >1000 years ago continue to impact contemporary tropical rainforests having implications related to arboreal habitat and carbon storage.

  14. Foreword – Upon the Second Anniversary of Occupy Campaign / Umbrella Movement in Hong Kong: Essays in Honour of a Pro-Democracy Sociopolitical Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emile Kok-Kheng Yeoh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available 28th September 2016 is the second anniversary of the Occupy Campaign / Umbrella Movement in Hong Kong. It is also the last anniversary of the said sociopolitical event, which arguably represented a most important milestone in Hong Kong’s post-1997 development, before 1st July 2017 that will mark the 20th anniversary of the “Handover”. It was on 28th September two years ago that pro-democracy protestors occupy the Admiralty, Causeway Bay, Mong Kok and Tsim Sha Tsui areas of Hong Kong in a momentous campaign initially planned out earlier by the “Occupy Central with Love and Peace” (OCLP movement, but launched earlier than scheduled when overtaken by the development of events, metamorphosed into unprecedented scale of demonstrations at multiple locations and was transformed into what was dubbed by the world media as the “Umbrella Movement” when umbrellas, which protestors were using to protect themselves when the police attacked them with tear gas and pepper spray, became a symbol of the occupation campaign. To commemorate this second anniversary of this Occupy Campaign a.k.a. Umbrella Movement, the present issue of Contemporary Chinese Political Economy and Strategic Relations: An International Journal entitled From Handover to Occupy Campaign: Democracy, Identity and the Umbrella Movement of Hong Kong represents a collection of specially selected articles focusing on this momentous event, its background of determining factors, theoretical and ideological underpinnings, as well as its implications for the future of the Hong Kong people’s valiant struggle for democracy against the backdrop of the formidable odds, since the 1997 “Handover”, as being under the sovereignty of a gigantic country with a entrenched ruling Chinese Communist Party (CCP6 regime that has no foreseeable intention of allowing for a transition from the present repressive one-party dictatorship to liberal democracy that would respect political freedom and

  15. The extant shore platform stromatolite (SPS facies association: a glimpse into the Archean?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Smith

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Shore platform stromatolites (SPS were first noted at Cape Morgan on the south-east African seaboard. Since then they have been found growing discontinuously in rocky peritidal zones along the entire southern African seaboard. They have also been found on the southwest Australian coast, at Giant's Causeway in Northern Ireland, and more recently at Harris on the Scottish Hebridean Atlantic coast. In this paper SPS occurrence and SPS potential as analogues for Precambrian fossil stromatolites, as well as potential stromatolite occurrences in shore platform regions on Mars, are assessed. Sub-horizontal surfaces promote stromatolite development, while tufa develops on cliffs and steep rocky surfaces. Tufa and stromatolites are end members of a spectrum dictated by coastal topography. Extant SPS occur on well indurated shore platforms in high wave energy settings, often around or near headlands. They can be associated with boulder beaches, boulder ridges, storm swash terraces, coastal dunes, and peat bogs. In contrast to other extant stromatolites, SPS are produced primarily by mineral precipitation, although minor trapping and binding stromatolites do occur. From a geological perspective, SPS develop in mildly transgressive siliciclastic settings in various climatic and tidal regimes. We suggest that SPS could be preserved in the geological record as micritic lenses on palaeo-shore platform surfaces. SPS share many features with Precambrian stromatolites and are a valid modern analogue despite the widely different atmospheric and oceanic conditions of the Archean. We suggest that terraces associated with former oceanic or lacustrine flooding surfaces on Mars are potential targets in the search for palaeo-SPS on Mars.

  16. Lake Urmia Shrinkage and its Effect on the Settlement of the Surrounding Areas Investigated Using Radar and Optical Satellite Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motagh, M.; Shamshiri, R.; Hosseini, F.; Sharifi, M. A.; Baes, M.

    2014-12-01

    With a total area of more than 50000 km^2 Lake Urmia basin in northwest of Iran was once one of the biggest salt lakes in the world. The lake has been shrinking in the recent years, losing in turn dramatically its area. A lot of factors have been attributed to this shrinking including construction of dams on the rivers feeding the lake and overexploitation of groundwater for agricultural and industrial purposes. In this study we first utilized time-series analysis of Landsat images to precisely quantify surface changes in the region between 1984 and 2013. We then analyzed a number of SAR images from 2002 to 2014 including 30 ASAR images from Envisat, 10 PALSAR images from ALOS, and more than 35 TerraSAR-X (TSX) in both Stripmap and Spot modes to assess surface ground deformation. Ground deformation was evaluated for both agricultural regions around the lake and Lake Urmia Causeway (LUC), connecting two provinces of East and West Azerbaijan on both sides of the lake. The InSAR results of the LUC embankments is further investigated using Finite Element approach to better understand the relation between soil parameters, lake level changes and settlement of the LUC. The classification results using optical imagery analysis show that human and anthropogenic activities have resulted in shrinking of Lake Urmia by more than 60% over the past 30 years. The agricultural areas around the lake are dominated by ground subsidence reaching to 10 cm/yr in places. The LUC embankments also show large deformation with peak settlement of more than 5 cm/yr over the last decade. FEM simulation shows that consolidation due to dissipation of excess pore pressure in embankments can satisfactorily explain its surface deformation.

  17. Mobile Bay: Chapter K in Emergent wetlands status and trends in the northern Gulf of Mexico: 1950-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Larry; Spear, Kathryn A.; Jones, Stephen; Thatcher, Cindy A.

    2011-01-01

    Mobile Bay is the largest bay found in Alabama’s coastal area (Handley et al., 2007). It was named an Estuary of National Significance in 1995 under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) National Estuary Program (NEP), and its Comprehensive Conservation Management Plan was completed in 2002. Mobile Bay is 1,070 km2 (413 miles2) in area and 51 km (32 miles) long, making it the sixth largest estuary in the continental United States (Mobile Bay NEP, 2008). Its ecosystem provides habitat for more than 300 species of birds, 310 species of fish, 68 species of reptiles, 57 species of mammals, 40 species of amphibians, and 15 species of shrimp (Mobile Bay NEP, 1997). Mobile Bay lies between the Mississippi and Atlantic Flyways (Mobile Bay NEP, 2003). Commercial and residential development and industrial use is heavy in the Mobile Bay area. Although local growth and industrial markets support the Mobile Bay area economy, the resulting environmental damage to the very ecosystem upon which they depend remains a threat to the environment, economy, and population.The Mobile Bay ecosystem boasts high biological diversity and productivity and supports many freshwater and saltwater species of recreational and commercial importance. The great diversity of Mobile Bay reflects the diversity of Alabama, which is home to the largest number of different plant and animal species of all states east of the Mississippi River (Stein, 2002), and is bolstered by the unique climate and geographic conditions surrounding the bay. Freshwater inflow from the Mobile-Tensaw River Delta, ranging from 60,000 to 3,700,000 gallons per second (Wallace, 1996), mixes with saltwater from the Gulf of Mexico, which enters Mobile Bay via wind and tides (Burgan and Engle, 2006). Because of the unique conditions surrounding Mobile Bay, including shallow waters, a dynamic climate, and artificial hydrologic modifications—such as the construction of the Mobile Bay Causeway in the 1920s, which serves

  18. Radar Image with Color as Height, Old Khmer Road, Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This image shows the Old Khmer Road (Inrdratataka-Bakheng causeway) in Cambodia extending from the 9th Century A.D. capitol city of Hariharalaya in the lower right portion of the image to the later 10th Century AD capital of Yasodharapura. This was located in the vicinity of Phnom Bakheng (not shown in image). The Old Road is believed to be more than 1000 years old. Its precise role and destination within the 'new' city at Angkor is still being studied by archeologists. But wherever it ended, it not only offered an immense processional way for the King to move between old and new capitols, it also linked the two areas, widening the territorial base of the Khmer King. Finally, in the past and today, the Old Road managed the waters of the floodplain. It acted as a long barrage or dam for not only the natural streams of the area but also for the changes brought to the local hydrology by Khmer population growth.The image was acquired by NASA's Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR). Image brightness is from the P-band (68 cm wavelength) radar backscatter, which is a measure of how much energy the surface reflects back towards the radar. Color is used to represent elevation contours. One cycle of color represents 20 m of elevation change, that is going from blue to red to yellow to green and back to blue again corresponds to 20 m of elevation change. Image dimensions are approximately 3.4 km by 3.5 km with a pixel spacing of 5 m. North is at top.AIRSAR flies aboard a NASA DC-8 based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. In the TOPSAR mode, AIRSAR collects radar interferometry data from two spatially separated antennas (2.6 meters, or 8.5 feet). Information from the two antennas is used to form radar backscatter imagery and to generate highly accurate elevation data. Built, operated and managed by JPL, AIRSAR is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise program. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Monitoring drying up of Urmia lake with satellite altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohi, Shirzad; Sneeuw, Nico

    2013-04-01

    Urmia lake is a UNESCO protected area with more than a hundred small rocky islands. It is home to several species of birds and animals. Located in northwestern Iran, it is the largest lake in the Middle East and the third largest salty water lake on earth. It has a surface area of approximately 5200 km², and an average depth of 16 m. Unfortunately during the recently years Urmia lake has been shrinking. If the drought process continues at the current rate it would be disappear in the near future. The main factors that speeds up the drought rate of the lake, are dam construction on the main rivers which feeds the lake, evaporation and lack of precipitation during recent years as well as irrigation. The construction of a causeway in the middle of the lake also affects the natural ecosystem of the lake. The case of Urmia lake and similar cases in other parts of the word emphasize the role of new technology such as satellite altimetry in better management of water resource and monitoring such critical situations. In this research we show the current situation and recent past of the lake from processing 10 years of Envisat satellite radar altimetry data. For internal validation of the result, water level time series were built from ascending and descending tracks separately and for external validation in-situ gauge measurements were used. Internal and external comparisons indicates the result are consistent, i.e there is no bias and systematic error in Envisat data. The RMSE between ascending and descending tracks is several centimeters and between satellite and gauge data is 1m. Water level time series analysis shows that there is a declining rate of 0.3 m/year in the water level but after 2005 it seems to have accelerated. This rate increases the salinity of lake and expands receding shoreline rapidly so the lake bed will reveal fast because the lake is shallow especially in the south part. Following this research we are investigating to find the best re-tracker in

  20. Open Pit Water Control Safety A Case Of Nchanga Open Pit Mine Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silwamba C

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mining in Chingola Zambia started underground in 1931 and was catastrophically flooded and closed. The present Nchanga Underground Mine NUG started in 1937. The Nchanga Open Pit NOP mine started in 1955 situated to the west of NUG and partially overlying it. Open pit water control safety operations in the Nchanga-Chingola area have successfully enabled the safe extraction of millions of tonnes of copper ore annually over the past 60 years from NUG mining as well as the NOP. At the start Nchanga mining license surface already had NUG and many watershed divides with the Nchanga and Chingola streams being the main streams feeding into Zambias second largest river Kafue river and 42 of the year was characterised by heavy rains ranging between 800mm to 1300mm per annum. In this paper the presence of very significant amounts of seasonal rain and subsurface water in the mining area was identified as both a curse and a blessing. An excess in seasonal rain and subsurface water would disrupt both open pit and underground mining operations. In order for NOP to be operated successfully stable and free from flooding coping water management tactics were adopted from 1955 to 2015 including 1. Underground mine pump chamber pumping system 2. Piezometer instrumented boreholes 3. Underground mine 1500-ft sub-haulage east borehole dewatering beneath the open pit 4. Nchanga and Chingola stream diversionary tunnel and open drains 5. Nchanga stream causeway and embankment dam in the Matero School Golf Club area 6. Pit perimeter borehole pumping 7. Outer and inner pit perimeter drains and bund walls 8. In-pit ramp side drains 9. In-pit sub-horizontal borehole geo-drains and water and 10. Pit bottom sump pumps. Application of grout curtains along the Vistula River Poland was noted as a possibility in the right circumstances although it had never been used at Nchanga Open Pit. An additional conclusion was that forward health safety and environmental end

  1. Methane fluxes along a salinity gradient on a restored salt marsh, Harpswell, ME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Cailene; Johnson, Beverly, ,, Dr.; Dostie, Phil; Bohlen, Curtis; Craig, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    This study functions as a pilot project to understand the relationship between salinity and methane emissions on a recently restored salt marsh in Casco Bay, Maine. Salt marshes are dynamic and highly productive ecosystems that provide a multitude of ecosystem services including nutrient filtration, storm-water buffering and carbon sequestration. These ecosystems are highly susceptible to anthropogenic alteration. The emplacement of causeways and narrow culverts, restricts tidal flow and leads to loss of healthy salinity gradients. Consequently, numerous salt marshes have experienced increases in freshwater vegetation growth as a result of coastal population expansion. Recent restoration efforts on Long Marsh, Harpswell, ME replaced a severely undersized culvert with a larger one in February, 2014. The salinity gradient has since been restored along much of the marsh, and freshwater vegetation that encroached on the marsh platform has died back. Vegetation and salinity are key indicators and drivers of CH4 emissions on salt marshes. Using static gas chambers, we quantified CH4 fluxes along two transects at five diverse sites ranging from healthy marsh (salinity of 27 to 31 psu) with Spartina vegetation, to regions invaded by Typha and other freshwater vegetation (salinity of 0 to 4 psu). Sampling was executed in the months of July, August and October. CH4 concentrations were determined using a gas chromatograph with a flame-ionization detector. Preliminary findings suggest reintroduction of healthy tidal flows into the marsh inhibits CH4 production, where the lowest fluxes with least variability were observed at the most saline sites with Spartina vegetation. The largest range of CH4 fluxes exhibited emissions from 0.75 μmol CH4/m2/hr to 518.4 μmol CH4/m2/hr at the Typha dominated sites from July to October. Fluxes at the saltwater and brackish regions were far less variable with ranges from 0.94 μmol CH4/m2/hr to 8.2 μmol CH4/m2/hr and 2.6 to 9.5 μmol CH4/m2

  2. Anthropogenic influences on the input and biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and mercury in Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naftz, David; Angeroth, Cory; Kenney, Terry; Waddell, Bruce; Darnall, Nathan; Silva, Steven; Perschon, Clay; Whitehead, John

    2008-01-01

    Despite the ecological and economic importance of Great Salt Lake (GSL), little is known about the input and biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and trace elements in the lake. In response to increasing public concern regarding anthropogenic inputs to the GSL ecosystem, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) initiated coordinated studies to quantify and evaluate the significance of nutrient and Hg inputs into GSL. A 6 per mille decrease in δ 15 N observed in brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) samples collected from GSL during summer time periods is likely due to the consumption of cyanobacteria produced in freshwater bays entering the lake. Supporting data collected from the outflow of Farmington Bay indicates decreasing trends in δ 15 N in particulate organic matter (POM) during the mid-summer time period, reflective of increasing proportions of cyanobacteria in algae exported to GSL on a seasonal basis. The C:N molar ratio of POM in outflow from Farmington Bay decreases during the summer period, supportive of the increased activity of N fixation indicated by decreasing δ 15 N in brine shrimp and POM. Although N fixation is only taking place in the relatively freshwater inflows to GSL, data indicate that influx of fresh water influences large areas of the lake. Separation of GSL into two distinct hydrologic and geochemical systems from the construction of a railroad causeway in the late 1950s has created a persistent and widespread anoxic layer in the southern part of GSL. This anoxic layer, referred to as the deep brine layer (DBL), has high rates of SO 4 2- reduction, likely increasing the Hg methylation capacity. High concentrations of methyl mercury (CH 3 Hg) (median concentration = 24 ng/L) were observed in the DBL with a significant proportion (31-60%) of total Hg in the CH 3 Hg form. Hydroacoustic and sediment-trap evidence indicate that turbulence introduced by internal waves generated during sustained wind events can

  3. Estimation of selenium loads entering the south arm of Great Salt Lake, Utah, from May 2006 through March 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftz, David L.; Johnson, William P.; Freeman, Michael L.; Beisner, Kimberly; Diaz, Ximena; Cross, VeeAnn A.

    2009-01-01

    Discharge and water-quality data collected from six streamflow-gaging stations were used in combination with the LOADEST software to provide an estimate of total (dissolved + particulate) selenium (Se) load to the south arm of Great Salt Lake (GSL) from May 2006 through March 2008. Total estimated Se load to GSL during this time period was 2,370 kilograms (kg). The 12-month estimated Se load to GSL for May 1, 2006, to April 30, 2007, was 1,560 kg. During the 23-month monitoring period, inflows from the Kennecott Utah Copper Corporation (KUCC) Drain and Bear River outflow contributed equally to the largest proportion of total Se load to GSL, accounting for 49 percent of the total Se load. Five instantaneous discharge measurements at three sites along the railroad causeway indicate a consistent net loss of Se mass from the south arm to the north arm of GSL (mean = 2.4 kg/day, n = 5). Application of the average daily loss rate equates to annual Se loss rate to the north arm of 880 kg (56 percent of the annual Se input to the south arm). The majority of Se in water entering GSL is in the dissolved (less than 0.45 micron) state and ranges in concentration from 0.06 to 35.7 micrograms per liter (ug/L). Particulate Se concentration ranged from less than 0.05 to 2.5 ug/L. Except for the KUCC Drain streamflow-gaging station, dissolved (less than 0.45 um) inflow samples contain an average of 21 percent selenite (SeO32-) during two sampling events (May 2006 and 2007). Selenium concentration in water samples collected from four monitoring sites within GSL during May 2006 through August 2007 were used to understand how the cumulative Se load was being processed by various biogeochemical processes within the lake. On the basis of the Mann-Kendall test results, changes in dissolved Se concentration at the four monitoring sites indicate a statistically significant (90-percent confidence interval) upward trend in Se concentration over the 16-month monitoring period. Furthermore

  4. Anthropogenic influences on the input and biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and mercury in Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naftz, David [US Geological Survey, Salt Lake City 84119, UT (United States)], E-mail: dlnaftz@usgs.gov; Angeroth, Cory; Kenney, Terry [US Geological Survey, Salt Lake City 84119, UT (United States); Waddell, Bruce; Darnall, Nathan [US Fish and Wildlife Service, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Silva, Steven [US Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Perschon, Clay [Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Whitehead, John [Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2008-06-15

    Despite the ecological and economic importance of Great Salt Lake (GSL), little is known about the input and biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and trace elements in the lake. In response to increasing public concern regarding anthropogenic inputs to the GSL ecosystem, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) initiated coordinated studies to quantify and evaluate the significance of nutrient and Hg inputs into GSL. A 6 per mille decrease in {delta}{sup 15}N observed in brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) samples collected from GSL during summer time periods is likely due to the consumption of cyanobacteria produced in freshwater bays entering the lake. Supporting data collected from the outflow of Farmington Bay indicates decreasing trends in {delta}{sup 15}N in particulate organic matter (POM) during the mid-summer time period, reflective of increasing proportions of cyanobacteria in algae exported to GSL on a seasonal basis. The C:N molar ratio of POM in outflow from Farmington Bay decreases during the summer period, supportive of the increased activity of N fixation indicated by decreasing {delta}{sup 15}N in brine shrimp and POM. Although N fixation is only taking place in the relatively freshwater inflows to GSL, data indicate that influx of fresh water influences large areas of the lake. Separation of GSL into two distinct hydrologic and geochemical systems from the construction of a railroad causeway in the late 1950s has created a persistent and widespread anoxic layer in the southern part of GSL. This anoxic layer, referred to as the deep brine layer (DBL), has high rates of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} reduction, likely increasing the Hg methylation capacity. High concentrations of methyl mercury (CH{sub 3}Hg) (median concentration = 24 ng/L) were observed in the DBL with a significant proportion (31-60%) of total Hg in the CH{sub 3}Hg form. Hydroacoustic and sediment-trap evidence indicate that turbulence introduced by internal waves

  5. Foreword – Upon the Twentieth Anniversary of the Hong Kong Handover: An Update on State-Civil Societal Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emile Kok-Kheng Yeoh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available 1st July 2017 is the twentieth anniversary of the handover of Hong Kong by Great Britain to the People’s Republic of China, thus ending 156 years of British Crown rule (from 1841 to 1997, though from 1941 to 1945 it was actually under the Japanese occupation. Then on 28th September 2014 a surprised sociopolitical event erupted that arguably marked a most important milestone in Hong Kong’s post-1997 development when pro-democracy protestors occupied the Admiralty, Causeway Bay, Mong Kok and Tsim Sha Tsui areas of Hong Kong. This momentous campaign, dubbed by the world media as the “Umbrella Movement”, was initially planned out earlier by the “Occupy Central with Love and Peace” (OCLP movement, but launched earlier than scheduled when overtaken by the development of events, metamorphosised into unprecedented scale of demonstrations in multiple locations. One can of course argue that the post-Mao China has changed so much, and that the economic success brought about by ditching Maoist central command economy for rugged capitalist market economy has legitimised the CCP’s continued monopoly of political power, but how would one explain the reaction of the Hong Kong people, especially the major part of the intelligentsia and the younger generation – that fear for and that distaste towards the CCP regime? How would one explain their reaction towards the death of persecuted dissidents, be they Li Wangyang, Cao Shunli or Liu Xiaobo, and towards Beijing’s creeping authoritarian intervention in Hong Kong’s governance, be it introduction of brainwashing school curriculum extoling the CCP, time-and-again interpretation of the Basic Law, or kidnapping of Hong Kong booksellers and publishers? How would one explain the eruption of 2014’s Occupy Campaign a.k.a. Umbrella Movement? It is to answer such questions and to delve analytically into the complex State-civil societal relations twenty years after the Handover, background of determining

  6. PREFACE: Kelvin and Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Raymond; McCartney, Mark; Whitaker, Andrew

    2009-07-01

    frequent visitor. While the most celebrated example of his engineering work was his massive contribution to the Atlantic telegraph cable, and his maritime and other inventions were used throughout the world, he was especially pleased to contribute to two important technical accomplishments in the north of Ireland, the occulting Holywood lighthouse and the Giant's Causeway tramway. Kelvin's interest in Ireland came again to the fore in the Home Rule debate at the end of the nineteenth century; Kelvin was vehemently opposed to Home Rule and became a passionate member of the Liberal Unionist party, a crucial factor in his becoming a peer. Accounts of these aspects of Kelvin's involvement with Ireland are given in our first four papers. The fifth paper was particularly appropriate for the meeting. It describes how an important contribution of Kelvin on optimal packing has been improved in Ireland by the speaker, Denis Weaire, himself, and how the result has been seen by the whole world in Beijing. Finally there is a discussion of Kelvin's place in the story of Irish science. There have been many highly accomplished Irish scientists, and the meeting showed clearly that Kelvin certainly deserves to be included among the greatest. Acknowledgments The meeting was the second regional event of the Institute of Physics (IOP) in Ireland, the first being the meeting on John Desmond Bernal: Science and Society held in Limerick in June 2006 and published in the same series as this volume. The meeting also benefited from the support of many bodies and institutions. We would like to thank the committee of the IOP in Ireland for providing finance and also giving their full support. We would particularly mention Vincent Casey, the Chair, who also chaired the afternoon session, Emma Sokell, the Secretary, and Denise Gabuzda and Kevin McGuigan, past and present Treasurers. We would also thank Sheila Gilheany and Alison Hackett for general help and encouragement, including assisting the

  7. The Costa Maya:  Evolution of a Touristic Landscape La Costa Maya : évolution d'un paysage touristique La Costa Maya : evolución de un paisaje turístico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus J. Meyer-Arendt

    2010-06-01

    ecotourism.  Development so far has been concentrated in Puerto Costa Maya, where a cruise ship pier and terminal were built in 2001.  The nearby beach resort (balneario of Majahual became dependent upon the 10-12 shiploads of tourists that descended upon it every week.  In spite of big development plans, the more remote beaches of the Costa Maya cater to fewer, but well-heeled ecotourists and dive tourists.  Hurricane Dean made landfall in August 2007 as a category-5 storm, and economic recovery only began in late 2008 when the cruise ship pier re-opened and Majahual rebuilt.  As of late 2009, the cruise-ship traffic had still not recovered to pre-Dean levels, and a global recession coupled with swine-flu and drug violence scares has lowered U.S. tourism to Mexico.  To what degree new tourism infrastructure such as an international airport at Tulum, a proposed causeway from Chetumal to the beach, and a new resort complex at Xahuayxel will stimulate tourism on the Mexican Costa Maya and eventually lead to a coastal highway link with San Pedro, Belize is still unknown.