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Sample records for causalgia

  1. Causalgia pathogenesis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KUENKEL, V H

    1952-12-01

    Gross and microscopic anatomical evidence indicates that pain fibers involved in causalgia are those distributed to blood vessels-possibly to the arterioles-and that, for the greater part, these fibers constitute part of the general visceral afferent system. Several investigators have reported evidence that injury to a peripheral nerve of such a type as to cause damage to the vasomotor control of any area produces the initial pain in an extremity, and it is predicated that the arteriolar constriction causing the pain is then prolonged by the sensitization of arteriolar smooth muscle to the amount of epinephrine normally in the blood. If the condition is not treated, tissue anoxia occurs to such an extent that irreversible changes take place in the affected area.Treatment of causalgia in the lower extremities is directed toward interruption of either the vasomotor or afferent supply of blood vessels by blocking or excision of the second to fourth lumbar ganglia inclusive with the intervening chains. For the upper extremities, the blocking or disconnection of the second and third thoracic ganglia with interruption of the sympathetic chain between the third and fourth ganglia is considered a feasible method of treatment which does not produce the concomitant disability of Horner's syndrome. PMID:13009495

  2. [Causalgia in neurologic expert assessment].

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    Suchenwirth, R M

    1990-08-01

    Rendering an expert opinion on causalgia, after having clear determined it as the disease, poses many problems to the examiner. One ought to make this diagnosis with its serious consequences only under the following conditions: --when it is a case of a mostly partial trauma of a nerve with considerable intermingling of sympathetic fibres; --when the pains have a burning and primarily superficial character; --when the pain appear soon (hours, mostly days or weeks, more rarely months afterward) after the trauma; --when the pains are accompanied by considerable vasovegetative symptoms (cold sweats, cyanosis, hyperhidrosis and others). Secondary algodystrophic changes (muscle, joints, bones, and skin) are to be considered. In quantitatively judging the effects, an over-evaluation, as well as an underevaluation, is to be avoided by all means. Therapeutic effects and spontaneous remission after six to twelve months are to be considered. An exemplary case, in which a deterioriation of the capacity to work from 20 to 100% (!) was assumed, showed the need for taking the personality structure of patient into consideration. PMID:2399634

  3. MRI Findings of Causalgia of the Lower Extremity Following Transsphenoidal Resection of Pituitary Tumor

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    D. Ryan Ormond

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Causalgia is continuing pain, allodynia, or hyperalgesia after nerve injury with edema, changes in skin blood flow, or abnormal sudomotor activity. Here we report a case of lower extremity causalgia following elective transsphenoidal resection of a pituitary tumor in a young man. Clinical Presentation. A 33-year-old man with acromegaly underwent elective sublabial transsphenoidal resection of his pituitary tumor. During the three-hour surgery, the lower limbs were kept in a supine, neutral position with a pillow under the knees. The right thigh was slightly internally rotated with a tape to expose fascia lata, which was harvested to repair the sella. Postoperatively, he developed causalgia in a distal sciatic and common peroneal nerve distribution. Pain was refractory to several interventions. Finally, phenoxybenzamine improved his pain significantly. Conclusions. Malpositioning in the operating room resulted in causalgia in this young man. Phenoxybenzamine improved, and ultimately resolved, his symptoms. Improvement in his pain symptoms correlated with resolution of imaging changes in the distal sciatic and peroneal nerves on the side of injury.

  4. [Neurologic aspects of clinical manifestations, pathophysiology and therapy of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (causalgia, Sudeck's disease)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, H; Griesser, H J; Hornyak, M

    1991-04-01

    The symptomatology of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), a diagnostic term which today includes causalgia and M. Sudeck, is characterized clinically by a triad of autonomic (sympathetic), motor and sensory disturbances. They develop following a noxious event--though independent of its nature and location--in a generalized distribution pattern at the distal site of the affected extremity. Pathophysiologically, a complex disturbance of the sympathetic vasoconstrictor system is involved, which mediates the dominant symptoms of RSD, namely the spontaneous pain and the swelling. This disturbance is thought to be initiated by nociceptive impulses, occurring in conjunction with the preceding noxious event, and to be maintained reflexly, in a form of a vicious circle, by means of the typical pain sensation accompanying the RSD-syndrome. From these ideas, an important part of the RSD therapy is deduced; i.e. the early interruption of the neuronal sympathetic activity by means of a sympathetic blockade. Such a blockade can interrupt the pain and at the same time also the vicious circle of RSD. Altogether, for the RSD syndrome there are relevant neurological aspects with respect to its clinical symptomatology, its pathophysiology and its therapy. PMID:1713305

  5. Facilitação e dominância dos sintomas sôbre a dor da angina de peito e causalgia

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    Nelson Pires

    1962-09-01

    Full Text Available O autor traz à consideração clínica a "facilitação" que Sherrington apreciou nos experimentos de neurofisiologia, e que explica aspectos clínicos importantíssimos em psicologia e em neurologia visceral. Pretende o autor explicar seus casos de dor (um de causalgia no membro superior e três de angina de peito em portadores de esclerose coronária. Ora a anestesia terapêutica no gânglio estrelado, ora na cadeia ganglionar torácica simpática, ora a radioterapia, ora a psicoterapia removeram a dor "facilitada" a tal ponto que se tornara "dominante", isto é, mesmo estímulos inadequados a provocavam. Os doentes eram inválidos e recuperaram-se. A neurofisiologia moderna autoriza a interpretação dessa terapêutica: suprimiu-se - com a anestesia, com a radioterapia e com a psicoterapia - o circuito neural auto-alimentado reverberante, hiperfuncionante em todo ou em parte de seu trajeto, quer aferente ao córtex quer aferente às coronárias. O autor discute o valor clínico dos acessos anginosos apontando fatos que documentam que o acesso "ilegítimo" (psicógeno deve ter como causa a estimulação das aferências vegetativas ao córtex em qualquer ponto (ganglionar, medular ou cortical. Os acessos "legítimos", produzindo lesões transitórias ou definitivas e até morte,, devem ser explicados pela atividade das eferências vagais que executam os efetôres espásticos das coronárias. A dor é apresentada como fenômeno de "gravação neural", aprendido, memorizado e automatizado, ativado em feed-back ora nas aferências vegetativas ao córtex, ora nas eferências, mais perigosas e mortais. Debate-se a superestimada psicogenia da angina de peito.

  6. History of Pain Research and Management in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Harold Merskey

    1998-01-01

    Scattered accounts of the treatment of pain by aboriginal Canadians are found in the journals of the early explorers and missionaries. French and English settlers brought with them the remedies of their home countries. The growth of medicine through the 18th and 19th centuries, particularly in Europe, was mirrored in the practice and treatment methods of Canadians and Americans. In the 19th century, while Americans learned about causalgia and the pain of wounds, Canadian insurrections were mu...

  7. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome and Treatment Approaches

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    Neslihan Gokcen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Complex Regional Pain Syndrome is a symptom complex including severe pain which is disproportioned by the initiating event. Formerly, it was known as reflex sympathetic dystropy, Sudeck’s atrophy and algoneurodystrophy. There are two types of complex regional pain syndrome (CPRS. CRPS type 1 (Reflex sympathetic dystropy occurs after a minor trauma of the extremities, CRPS type 2 (Causalgia occurs following peripheral nevre injury. Diagnosis is made according to the history, symptoms and physical findings of the patients. Patient education, physical therapy and medical treatment are the most common treatment approaches of complex regional pain syndrome. The aim of this review is to revise the treatment options ofcomplex regional pain syndrome, as well as to overview the new treatment approaches and options for the refractory complex regional pain syndrome cases. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(4.000: 514-531

  8. [Historical review of algodystrophy: part I].

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    Zyluk, A

    1997-01-01

    The history of algodystrophy discerning, its recognition as a separate clinical entity and evolution of ideas about its nature is presented on the basis of historical and scientific literature. First cases resembling algodystrophy were described as early as in XVI and XVIII century. A more detailed description of limb dystrophy that followed gunshot injuries was reported by American surgeon Weir Mitchell in 1864, who coined this condition as "causalgia". In the year 1900 Paul Sudeck of Germany described radiological changes secondary, as he believed, to inflammatory process within the limb as patchy osteoporosis. His name is still attached to this syndrome in German and Polish literature. French neurosurgeon Rene Leriche believed, that the syndrome was caused by increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system and introduced a surgical periarterial sympathectomy. Oscar Steinbrocker of the United States separated particular form of algodystrophy known as shoulder-hand syndrome; later, he introduced the treatment of this condition with steroids. PMID:9377976

  9. Sudeck atrophy.

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    Staunton, H

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the contribution of Sudeck to the understanding of the condition commonly referred to as 'Sudeck's atrophy' and which is commonly used as a synonym for a condition variously called reflex sympathetic dystrophy, causalgia, algodystrophy and others. Sudeck came to show in his later papers that the so-called atrophy was, in the majority of cases, a normal inflammatory process of bone change in the course of healing after an inflammatory/infective or traumatic insult. Contrary to the views of much current literature, the vast majority of such cases had a good prognosis. In those cases which became pathological and had a correspondingly poorer prognosis, the characteristic clinical picture becomes associated with radiological and pathological changes, which, uniquely, are described by Sudeck. A knowledge of such radiological and pathological substrate for clinical symptomatology is important in the analysis of pain following trauma. PMID:17274178

  10. Publications on Peripheral Nerve Injuries during World War I: A Dramatic Increase in Knowledge.

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    Koehler, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Publications from French (Jules Tinel and Chiriachitza Athanassio-Bénisty), English (James Purves-Stewart, Arthur Henry Evans and Hartley Sidney Carter), German (Otfrid Foerster and Hermann Oppenheim) and American (Charles Harrison Frazier and Byron Stookey) physicians from both sides of the front during World War I (WWI) contributed to a dramatic increase in knowledge about peripheral nerve injuries. Silas Weir Mitchell's original experience with respect to these injuries, and particularly causalgia, during the American Civil War was further expanded in Europe during WWI. Following the translation of one of his books, he was referred to mainly by French physicians. During WWI, several French books were in turn translated into English, which influenced American physicians, as was observed in the case of Byron Stookey. The establishment of neurological centres played an important role in the concentration of experience and knowledge. Several eponyms originated during this period (including the Hoffmann-Tinel sign and the Froment sign). Electrodiagnostic tools were increasingly used.

  11. Simpatectomia cervicotoracica por videotoracoscopia: experiência inicial Thoracoscopic cervicodorsal sympathectomy: initial results

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    Paulo Kauffman

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente trabalho é avaliar os resultados iniciais obtidos com a simpatectomia cervicotorácica videotoracoscópica. De outubro de 1995 a outubro de 1997 foram realizados 24 procedimentos em 14 pacientes: dez homens e quatro mulheres, com idades que variaram de 16 a 56 anos, média de 30 anos. Indicações para a operação foram: hiperidrose palmar em dez pacientes, isquemia de mão em três e causalgia em um. Nos casos de hiperidrose, a ressecção da cadeia simpática incluiu T2 e T3. Nos portadores de isquemia e causalgia também o gânglio estrelado foi ressecado. Vinte e três das 24 extremidades mostraram excelente resposta imediata à simpatectomia. Somente uma extremidade de paciente com hiperidrose permaneceu inalterada devido a procedimento incompleto, tendo sido desnervada pela mesma técnica em reoperação posterior, com bom resultado. Pneumotórax residual pós-operatório ocorreu em uma paciente com resolução espontânea. Treze pacientes tiveram seguimento que variou de dois a 18 meses, com média de 11 meses. Não houve mortalidade nessa série, e a principal complicação tardia observada nos pacientes operados por hiperidrose foi a hiperidrose compensatória, que ocorreu, em grau variado, nos nove pacientes com seguimento, sendo que em 30% deles esta manifestação foi significativa. Concluímos tratar-se de procedimento simples, seguro, eficiente e de melhor aceitação por parte dos pacientes do que a operação convencional.This report analyzes the initial results of thoracoscopic cervicodorsal sympathectomy. From October 1995 to October 1997, 24 procedures were accomplished in 14 patients. Ten were males and four were females ranging in age from 16 to 56 (mean 30. Surgical indications were: palmar hyperhidrosis in ten, ischemia of the hand in three and causalgia in one. Resection of the sympathetic chain in hyperhidrosis included T2 and T3. In those with ischemia and causalgia the stellate ganglion was

  12. Clinical, electrophysiological, and prognostic study of postinjection sciatic nerve injury: An avoidable cause of loss of limb in the peripheral medical service

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    Wani Maqbool

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Post injection sciatic nerve injury is a common cause of sciatic nerve mononeuropathy in the developing world largely due to inadequate health care facilites in the rural regions. Objective: The study was conducted to analyse the pattern of this nerve lesion in clinical and electrophysiological parameters and also to study the outcome in a conservatively treated cohort. Materials and Methods: One hundred and six patients who underwent evaluation at our laboratory from 2000 to 2006 for post injection sciatic neuropathy formed the study population. Twenty two of these were followed up (mean 6.6 months for the outcome. Results: In the cases with full data, common peroneal division of the sciatic nerve was affected alone or predominantly. On follow up, 72% cases showed little or partial recovery. Thirty two percent patients had residual trophic changes and causalgia at their last visit. Conclusion: The majority of cases of postinjection sciatic nerve injury have poor prognosis on conservative treatment.

  13. A cervical ligamentum flavum cyst in an 82-year-old woman presenting with spinal cord compression: a case report and review of the literature

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    Brotis Alexandros G

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We report on a very rare case of a cervical ligamentum flavum cyst, which presented with progressive myelopathy and radiculopathy. The cyst was radically extirpated and our patient showed significant recovery. A review of the relevant literature yielded seven cases. Case presentation An 82-year-old Greek woman presented with progressive bilateral weakness of her upper extremities and causalgia, cervical pain, episodes of upper extremity numbness and significant walking difficulties. Her neurological examination showed diffusely decreased motor strength in both her upper and lower extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging of her cervical spine demonstrated a large, well-demarcated cystic lesion on the dorsal aspect of her spinal cord at the C3 to C4 level, significantly compressing the spinal cord at this level, in close proximity to the yellow ligament and the C3 left lamina. The largest diameter of this lesion was 1.4 cm, and there was no lesion enhancement after the intravenous administration of a paramagnetic contrast. The lesion was surgically removed after a bilateral C3 laminectomy. The thick cystic wall was yellow and fibro-elastic in consistency, while its content was gelatinous and yellow-brownish. A postoperative cervical-spine magnetic resonance image was obtained before her discharge, demonstrating decompression of her spinal cord and dural expansion. Her six-month follow-up evaluation revealed complete resolution of her walking difficulties, improvement in the muscle strength of her arms (4+/5 in all the affected muscle groups, no causalgia and a significant decrease in her preoperative upper extremity numbness. Conclusion Cervical ligamentum flavum cysts are rare benign lesions, which should be included in the list of differential diagnosis of spinal cystic lesions. They can be differentiated from other intracanalicular lesions by their hypointense appearance on T1-weighted and hyperintense appearance on T2

  14. CRPS of the upper or lower extremity: surgical treatment outcomes

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    Rosson Gedge D

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The hypothesis is explored that CRPS I (the "new" RSD persists due to undiagnosed injured joint afferents, and/or cutaneous neuromas, and/or nerve compressions, and is, therefore, a misdiagnosed form of CRPS II (the "new" causalgia. An IRB-approved, retrospective chart review on a series of 100 consecutive patients with "RSD" identified 40 upper and 30 lower extremity patients for surgery based upon their history, physical examination, neurosensory testing, and nerve blocks. Based upon decreased pain medication usage and recovery of function, outcome in the upper extremity, at a mean of 27.9 months follow-up (range of 9 to 81 months, gave results that were excellent in 40% (16 of 40 patients, good in 40% (16 of 40 patients and failure 20% (8 of 40 patients. In the lower extremity, at a mean of 23.0 months follow-up (range of 9 to 69 months the results were excellent in 47% (14 of 30 patients, good in 33% (10 of 30 patients and failure 20% (6 of 30 patients. It is concluded that most patients referred with a diagnosis of CRPS I have continuing pain input from injured joint or cutaneous afferents, and/or nerve compressions, and, therefore, similar to a patient with CRPS II, they can be treated successfully with an appropriate peripheral nerve surgical strategy.

  15. Steroid atrophy scarring treated with fat grafting in a patient with complex regional pain syndrome: A case report.

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    Strickland, Leah R; Collawn, Sherry S

    2016-06-01

    Subcutaneous atrophy is a known complication of steroid injections. Excellent results with fat grafting for the treatment of steroid atrophy have been documented. However, the benefit of treating steroid-induced subcutaneous atrophy in an extremity diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) has not been described. CRPS, known formerly as reflex sympathetic dystrophy or RSD, causalgia, or reflex neurovascular dystrophy, is a severe, progressive musculoskeletal pain syndrome characterized by pain which is disproportionate to the severity of the inciting event, edema, or skin changes. Common treatment modalities include pharmacotherapy, physical therapy, and nerve blocks-each therapy producing varying results. We present a literature review of CRPS and the case of a 15-year-old female who developed CRPS of the left lower leg after arthroscopic debridement with retrograde drilling of an osteochondral lesion. Steroid atrophy of the involved area following a saphenous nerve block complicated the patient's treatment course. The area of atrophy was treated with autologous fat grafting. Following the adipose injection procedure, the patient experienced almost complete resolution of her CPRS-associated pain symptoms, along with improved cosmetic appearance of the area. PMID:26735938

  16. Silas Weir Mitchell: Neurologists and Neurology during the American Civil War.

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    Boller, François; Birnbaum, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    With few exceptions, neurology was nonexistent in the United States until the Civil War years. From 1861 to 1865, the United States saw a bitter armed conflict between the North (the Union) and the South (the Confederate States or Confederacy), and during those years, neurology was born in the United States. In 1861, Silas Weir Mitchell, together with George Morehouse and William Keen, opened and operated the first neurological hospital in Philadelphia, with the backing of the Surgeon General William Hammond. They treated and studied many peripheral nerve diseases, which led to their making the medical world aware of several conditions, including causalgia (now known as complex regional pain syndrome) and the phantom limb phenomenon. Progress in neurology, both at that time and in subsequent years, owed a great deal to cross-fertilization from Europe. Charles Edouard Brown-Séquard exemplified this. He held multiple medical positions on both sides of the Atlantic, including a position at Harvard in 1864. His teachings, to some extent, contributed to the development of neurology in the United States. In the Confederate states, medical care was less well organized, and neurology only developed later. After the war, in 1874, Mitchell, Hammond, and a few others founded the American Neurological Association. While war influenced the development of medicine, and neurology in particular, medicine also helped to shape the outcome of the war. PMID:27035676

  17. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type I: historical perspective and critical issues.

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    Iolascon, Giovanni; de Sire, Alessandro; Moretti, Antimo; Gimigliano, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The history of algodystrophy is controversial and its denomination has changed significantly over time. Silas Weir Mitchell described several cases of causalgia due to gunshot wounds that occurred during the American Civil War, increasing knowledge about this clinical condition. A later key milestone in the history of CRPS is tied to the name of Paul Sudeck that, using X-ray examinations, described findings of bone atrophy following a traumatic event or infection of the upper limb. The most widely accepted pathogenic hypothesis, proposed by Rene Leriche, supported a key role of the sympathetic nervous system in the onset of the typical clinical picture of the disease, which was thus defined as "reflex sympathetic dystrophy". In the 50s John J. Bonica proposed a staging of CRPS. In a consensus conference held in Budapest in 2003, it was proposed a new classification system that included the presence of at least two clinical signs included in the four categories and at least three symptoms in its four categories. There have been other classification systems proposed for the diagnosis of CRPS, such as Veldman diagnostic criteria based on the presence of at least 4 signs and symptoms of the disease associated with a worsening of the same following the use of the limb and their location in the same area distal to the one that suffered the injury. On the other hand, the Atkins diagnostic criteria are much more objective than those proposed by IASP and are specifically applicable to an orthopaedic context. However, current classification systems and related criteria proposed to make a diagnosis of CRPS, do not include instrumental evaluations and imaging, but rely solely on clinical findings. This approach does not allow an optimal disease staging especially in orthopaedics. PMID:27134625

  18. Current status of thoracic dorsal sympathectomy.

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    Welch, E; Geary, J

    1984-01-01

    This article summarizes over 20 years of experience (1962 to 1982) with cervical sympathectomy (thoracic dorsal sympathectomy) in 46 patients undergoing 68 sympathectomies. All operations were performed through an anterior supraclavicular approach. Indications for surgery were intractable Raynaud's disease (26 patients), atherosclerotic obliterative arterial disease (five), causalgia (five), posttraumatic sympathetic dystrophy (seven), collagen vascular disorders (eight), hyperhidrosis (12), occupational-related digital thrombosis (four), and thrombosis secondary to intra-arterial injection (one). The incidence of complications and side effects, both temporary and permanent, including Horner's syndrome, is reviewed in detail. Particular reference is made to the various surgical techniques of managing the stellate ganglion; four patients had two-third to three-fourth resection of the stellate ganglion down to and including the T-3 thoracic ganglion, two had preservation of the stellate ganglion and resection of the T-2 through T-4 ganglia, seven had excision of the entire stellate ganglion down to and including the T-4 ganglion, seven had resection of the lower third of the stellate ganglion down to and including the T-4 ganglion, and 48 had removal of the lower half of the stellate ganglion down to and including the T-3 ganglion. The study reviews the literature germane to anatomic considerations and suggests revisions in current texts and atlases. By retrospective analysis of the records and a follow-up questionnaire, which provided an 86% follow-up (average 8.4 years), the paper points to the distinctive clinical characteristics of the different groups within the population undergoing the operation and provides guidelines for patient selection and conclusions on the place for this operation in the management of vascular diseases involving the upper extremity. PMID:6481864

  19. Silas Weir Mitchell and "The Strange Case of George Dedlow".

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    Kline, David G

    2016-07-01

    It has been said of Silas Weir Mitchell (1829-1914) that as a young man he was first among the physiologists of his day, in middle age first among physicians, and as an older man, one of the most noted novelists of his country. Mitchell's novels were written in his later life as a means to avoid boredom during lengthy summer vacations that were the norm for that time among the affluent members of Philadelphia society. These novels were criticized by some because of poor plots, which in some instances failed to move along, or for text that offered a stereotyped depiction of genteel society and the effects that war or personal disaster had on the characters' behavior The criticism came despite the fact that all critics agreed that Mitchell's portrayals of psychopathology in his fictional characters was unique and accurate. However, in his 30s, Mitchell had written and by chance had published a fictional short story that not only transcended such criticisms but became immensely popular. "The Strange Case of George Dedlow" portrays a union officer who was not a physician but who had some medical background and who sustained a series of war wounds leading to severe nerve pain, the author's first description of causalgia, multiple amputations, and the psychological as well as physical symptoms of phantom limb syndrome. The protagonist tells of his torments in the first person in a very engaging fashion. Thus, long before he began writing his, at that time, acclaimed novels in the 1880s, Mitchell wrote a piece of fiction that combines accurate and very important medical observations with fiction of great historical interest. The following rendering of this now classic short story includes selected quotes and some interpretation and is perhaps appropriate for this year, 2 years after the centenary year of his death in 1914.

  20. Síndrome dolorosa complexa regional: epidemiologia, fisiopatologia, manifestações clínicas, testes diagnósticos e propostas terapêuticas Síndrome dolorosa compleja regional: epidemiología, fisiopatología, manifestaciones clínicas, tests diagnósticos y propuestas terapéuticas Complex regional pain syndrome: epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic tests and therapeutic proposals

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    Francisco Carlos Obata Cordon

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A Síndrome Dolorosa Complexa Regional (SDCR, assim denominada a partir de 1994 pelo Consenso da Associação Internacional para o Estudo da Dor (AIED e anteriormente denominada de várias formas, tais como Distrofia Simpático Reflexa, Causalgia, Algodistrofia ou Atrofia de Sudeck, é uma doença cuja compreensão dos limites clínicos, fisiopatologia e implicações de patogenia ainda é pobre. Disto resulta a enorme insatisfação não só para os pacientes como para os profissionais da saúde quanto aos métodos terapêuticos atualmente disponíveis. O objetivo deste trabalho é rever a literatura e atualizar um conjunto de informações com o intuito da melhor compreensão desta importante síndrome dolorosa. CONTEÚDO: Este é um trabalho de revisão da literatura nos diversos aspectos da SDCR, com ênfase em suas causas, definição e taxonomia, fisiopatologia, características clínicas, testes diagnósticos e propostas de tratamentos mais recentes. CONCLUSÕES: Poucos são os estudos controlados adequadamente, encobertos e aleatórios, publicados com grandes amostras, havendo muitas dúvidas sobre esta doença. Desta forma, ainda há enorme empirismo na sua terapêutica, e os resultados obtidos são insatisfatórios.JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: La Síndrome Dolorosa Compleja Regional (SDCR, así denominada a partir de 1994 pelo Consenso de la Associación Internacional para el Estudió del Dolor (AIED y anteriormente denominada de varias formas, tales como Distrofia Simpático Refleja, Causalgia, Algodistrofia o Atrofia de Sudeck, es una enfermedad cuya comprensión de los limites clínicos, fisiopatología e implicaciones de patogenia aun es pobre. De esto resulta la enorme insatisfacción no solamente para los pacientes como para los profesionales de la salud, cuanto a los métodos terapéuticos actualmente disponibles. El objetivo de este trabajo es rever la literatura y actualizar un conjunto de

  1. Parche de lidocaína al 5% para el tratamiento del SDRC de extremidad superior por bloqueo transcutáneo del plexo braquial: Caso Clínico Licodocaíne patch for the treatment of CRPS in the arm by transcutaneous block of the brachial plexus: Clinical case

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    M. A. Vidal

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome de dolor regional complejo (SDRC se manifiestan con una clínica variada que se caracteriza por dolor, impotencia funcional, trastornos vaso-sudomotores y alteraciones tróficas. Está causado por una lesión primaria o una disfunción del Sistema Nervioso Periférico, estableciéndose dos grupos: SDRC-I que sustituye al término DSR y el SDRCII en lugar del término causalgia. Caso clínico: Varón de 37 años de edad, que tras ser sometido a una artroscopia de hombro comenzó a presentar dolor en el hombro y limitación funcional importante, así como ciertos cambios vasomotores de la misma extremidad, por lo que se diagnosticó de SDRC. El paciente siguió varias pautas de tratamiento analgésico por vía oral, fue sometido a numerosas infiltraciones intraarticulares, se realizaron bloqueos del ganglio estrellado e inició tratamiento rehabilitador. Durante estos meses la evolución clínica del paciente fue tórpida, reapareciendo el dolor en todas las ocasiones y sin presentar mejoría de la movilidad. Se decidió iniciar tratamiento con parches de lidocaína al 5%, con lo que se consiguió controlar el dolor del paciente y finalizó la rehabilitación con recuperación completa. El parche de lidocaína al 5% es un analgésico tópico desarrollado para el tratamiento del dolor neuropático de origen periférico. Está aprobado en EEUU para el tratamiento de la neuralgia postherpética. Sin embargo, se está probando su utilización en otras formas de dolor neuropático, como la neuropatía diabética, el dolor crónico de espalda y el dolor miofascial. El SDRC está asociado con una actividad anormal del sistema nervioso simpático, por lo que el bloqueo simpático mediante anestésicos locales es ampliamente utilizado. En el caso concreto de los parches de lidocaína al 5% se ha publicado un caso de tratamiento de forma efectiva. Este caso es similar al que nosotros describimos, que también fue refractario al tratamiento

  2. History of Pain Research and Management in Canada

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    Harold Merskey

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Scattered accounts of the treatment of pain by aboriginal Canadians are found in the journals of the early explorers and missionaries. French and English settlers brought with them the remedies of their home countries. The growth of medicine through the 18th and 19th centuries, particularly in Europe, was mirrored in the practice and treatment methods of Canadians and Americans. In the 19th century, while Americans learned about causalgia and the pain of wounds, Canadian insurrections were much less devastating than the United States Civil War. By the end of that century, a Canadian professor working in the United States, Sir William Osler, was responsible for a standard textbook of medicine with a variety of treatments for painful illnesses. Yet pain did not figure in the index of that book. The modern period in pain research and management can probably be dated to the 20 years before the founding of the International Association for the Study of Pain. Pride of place belongs to The management of pain by John Bonica, published in Philadelphia in 1953 and based upon his work in Tacoma and Seattle. Ideas about pain were evolving in Canada in the 1950s with Donald Hebb, Professor of Psychology at McGill University in Montreal, corresponding with the leading American neurophysiologist, George H Bishop. Hebb's pupil Ronald Melzack engaged in studies of early experiences in relation to pain and, joining with Patrick Wall at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, published the 1965 paper in Science that revolutionized thinking. Partly because of this early start with prominent figures and partly because of its social system in the organization of medicine, Canada became a centre for a number of aspects of pain research and management, ranging from pain clinics in Halifax, Kingston and Saskatoon - which were among the earliest to advance treatment of pain - to studying the effects of implanted electrodes for neurosurgery. Work in Toronto by Moldofsky

  3. Parche de lidocaína al 5% para el tratamiento del SDRC de extremidad superior por bloqueo transcutáneo del plexo braquial: Caso Clínico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Vidal

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome de dolor regional complejo (SDRC se manifiestan con una clínica variada que se caracteriza por dolor, impotencia funcional, trastornos vaso-sudomotores y alteraciones tróficas. Está causado por una lesión primaria o una disfunción del Sistema Nervioso Periférico, estableciéndose dos grupos: SDRC-I que sustituye al término DSR y el SDRCII en lugar del término causalgia. Caso clínico: Varón de 37 años de edad, que tras ser sometido a una artroscopia de hombro comenzó a presentar dolor en el hombro y limitación funcional importante, así como ciertos cambios vasomotores de la misma extremidad, por lo que se diagnosticó de SDRC. El paciente siguió varias pautas de tratamiento analgésico por vía oral, fue sometido a numerosas infiltraciones intraarticulares, se realizaron bloqueos del ganglio estrellado e inició tratamiento rehabilitador. Durante estos meses la evolución clínica del paciente fue tórpida, reapareciendo el dolor en todas las ocasiones y sin presentar mejoría de la movilidad. Se decidió iniciar tratamiento con parches de lidocaína al 5%, con lo que se consiguió controlar el dolor del paciente y finalizó la rehabilitación con recuperación completa. El parche de lidocaína al 5% es un analgésico tópico desarrollado para el tratamiento del dolor neuropático de origen periférico. Está aprobado en EEUU para el tratamiento de la neuralgia postherpética. Sin embargo, se está probando su utilización en otras formas de dolor neuropático, como la neuropatía diabética, el dolor crónico de espalda y el dolor miofascial. El SDRC está asociado con una actividad anormal del sistema nervioso simpático, por lo que el bloqueo simpático mediante anestésicos locales es ampliamente utilizado. En el caso concreto de los parches de lidocaína al 5% se ha publicado un caso de tratamiento de forma efectiva. Este caso es similar al que nosotros describimos, que también fue refractario al tratamiento