WorldWideScience

Sample records for causal component mixtures

  1. Quantum-coherent mixtures of causal relations

    CERN Document Server

    MacLean, Jean-Philippe W; Spekkens, Robert W; Resch, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the causal influences that hold among the parts of a system is critical both to explaining that system's natural behaviour and to controlling it through targeted interventions. In a quantum world, understanding causal relations is equally important, but the set of possibilities is far richer. The two basic ways in which a pair of time-ordered quantum systems may be causally related are by a cause-effect mechanism or by a common cause acting on both. Here, we show that it is possible to have a coherent mixture of these two possibilities. We realize such a nonclassical causal relation in a quantum optics experiment and derive a set of criteria for witnessing the coherence based on a quantum version of Berkson's paradox. The interplay of causality and quantum theory lies at the heart of challenging foundational puzzles, such as Bell's theorem and the search for quantum gravity, but could also provide a resource for novel quantum technologies.

  2. Iterative Mixture Component Pruning Algorithm for Gaussian Mixture PHD Filter

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoxi Yan

    2014-01-01

    As far as the increasing number of mixture components in the Gaussian mixture PHD filter is concerned, an iterative mixture component pruning algorithm is proposed. The pruning algorithm is based on maximizing the posterior probability density of the mixture weights. The entropy distribution of the mixture weights is adopted as the prior distribution of mixture component parameters. The iterative update formulations of the mixture weights are derived by Lagrange multiplier and Lambert W funct...

  3. Systems and methods for removing components of a gas mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-09-06

    A system for removing components of a gaseous mixture is provided comprising: a reactor fluid containing vessel having conduits extending therefrom, aqueous fluid within the reactor, the fluid containing a ligand and a metal, and at least one reactive surface within the vessel coupled to a power source. A method for removing a component from a gaseous mixture is provided comprising exposing the gaseous mixture to a fluid containing a ligand and a reactive metal, the exposing chemically binding the component of the gaseous mixture to the ligand. A method of capturing a component of a gaseous mixture is provided comprising: exposing the gaseous mixture to a fluid containing a ligand and a reactive metal, the exposing chemically binding the component of the gaseous mixture to the ligand, altering the oxidation state of the metal, the altering unbinding the component from the ligand, and capturing the component.

  4. Brain responses to odor mixtures with sub-threshold components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eHummel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Although most odorants we encounter in daily life are mixtures of several chemical substances, we still lack significant information on how we perceive and how the brain processes mixtures of odorants. We aimed to investigate the processing of odor mixtures using behavioral measures and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. The odor mixture contained a target odor (ambroxan in a concentration at which it could be perceived by half of the subjects (sensitive group; the other half could not perceive the odor (insensitive group. In line with previous findings on multi-component odor mixtures, both groups of subjects were not able to distinguish a complex odor mixture containing or not containing the target odor. However, sensitive subjects had stronger activations than insensitive subjects in chemosensory processing areas such as the insula when exposed to the mixture containing the target odor. Furthermore, the sensitive group exhibited larger brain activations when presented with the odor mixture containing the target odor compared to the odor mixture without the target odor; this difference was smaller, though present for the insensitive group. In conclusion, we show that a target odor presented within a mixture of odors can influence brain activations although on a psychophysical level subjects are not able to distinguish the mixture with and without the target. On the practical side these results suggest that the addition of a certain compound to a mixture of odors may not be detected on a cognitive level; however, this additional odor may significantly change the cerebral processing of this mixture. In this context, FMRI offers unique possibilities to look at the subliminal effects of odors.

  5. The separation of solid and liquid components of mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved method of separating solid and liquid components of mixtures is described which is particularly suited for use in automated radioimmunoassay systems in the analysis of bound and free fractions. A second liquid, having a density intermediate between those of the solid and liquid components, is delivered to the solid/ liquid mixture to form a discrete layer below the mixture and the solid separates into this lower liquid layer assisted by centrifugal force. The second liquid of intermediate density is an aqueous solution of a highly hydrophilic and electrically non-polar solute, such as an aqueous sucrose solution. Further liquids of intermediate density and progressively higher density may be delivered to form further discrete layers below the initial layer of the second dense liquid. After separation of the solid and liquid components of the mixture, the supernatant liquid component of the original mixture is removed in a controlled and non-turbulent manner. The method is illustrated in radioimmunoassays for platelet β-thromboglobulin and human follicle stimulating hormone. (U.K.)

  6. Independent components in spectroscopic analysis of complex mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Kraskov, Alexander; Mushtakova, Svetlana P; 10.1016/j.chemolab.2010.05.023

    2010-01-01

    We applied two methods of "blind" spectral decomposition (MILCA and SNICA) to quantitative and qualitative analysis of UV absorption spectra of several non-trivial mixture types. Both methods use the concept of statistical independence and aim at the reconstruction of minimally dependent components from a linear mixture. We examined mixtures of major ecotoxicants (aromatic and polyaromatic hydrocarbons), amino acids and complex mixtures of vitamins in a veterinary drug. Both MICLA and SNICA were able to recover concentrations and individual spectra with minimal errors comparable with instrumental noise. In most cases their performance was similar to or better than that of other chemometric methods such as MCR-ALS, SIMPLISMA, RADICAL, JADE and FastICA. These results suggest that the ICA methods used in this study are suitable for real life applications.

  7. Predicting minimum fluidization velocities of multi-component solid mixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Asif

    2013-01-01

    Employing well-established mixing rules for mean properties,appropriate expressions are aerivea for predicting minimum fluidization velocities of multi-component solid mixtures in terms of monocomponent values for the velocity and the bed voidage at incipient fluidization.Based on flow regime and the mixing level of constituent species,it is found that these relationships differ significantly from each other,whether related to size-different or density-different mixtures.For mixed beds of size-different mixtures,the effect of volume contraction is accounted for by the mean voidage term,which is absent for segregated beds.Incorporating the volume-change of mixing leads to values of the mixture minimum fluidization velocities even lower than corresponding values for segregated bed,thus conforming to the trend reported in the literature.Size-different mixtures exhibit flow regime dependence irrespective of whether the bed is mixed or segregated.On the other hand,the mixing of constituent species does not affect the minimum fluidization velocity of density-different mixtures,as the difference in the expressions for a segregated and a mixed system is rather inconsequential.Comparison with experimental data available in the literature is made to test the efficacy of the minimum fluidization velocity expressions derived here.

  8. A micropolar mixture theory of multi-component porous media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu HUANG; Cheng-gang ZHAO

    2009-01-01

    A mixture theory is developed for multi-component micropolar porous media with a combination of the hybrid mixture theory and the micropolar continuum theory.The system is modeled as multi-component micropolar elastic solids saturated with multicomponent micropolar viscous fluids. Balance equations are given through the mixture theory. Constitutive equations are developed based on the second law of thermodynamics and constitutive assumptions. Taking account of compressibility of solid phases,the volume fraction of fluid as an independent state variable is introduced in the free energy function,and the dynamic compatibility condition is obtained to restrict the change of pressure difference on the solid-fluid interface. The constructed constitutive equations are used to close the field equations. The linear field equations are obtained using a linearization procedure,and the micropolar thermo-hydro-mechanical component transport model is established. This model can be applied to practical problems,such as contaminant,drug,and pesticide transport. When the proposed model is supposed to be porous media,and both fluid and solid are single-component,it will almost agree with Eringen's model.

  9. Efficient speaker verification using Gaussian mixture model component clustering.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Leon, Phillip L. (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); McClanahan, Richard D.

    2012-04-01

    In speaker verification (SV) systems that employ a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to make decisions on a supervector derived from Gaussian mixture model (GMM) component mean vectors, a significant portion of the computational load is involved in the calculation of the a posteriori probability of the feature vectors of the speaker under test with respect to the individual component densities of the universal background model (UBM). Further, the calculation of the sufficient statistics for the weight, mean, and covariance parameters derived from these same feature vectors also contribute a substantial amount of processing load to the SV system. In this paper, we propose a method that utilizes clusters of GMM-UBM mixture component densities in order to reduce the computational load required. In the adaptation step we score the feature vectors against the clusters and calculate the a posteriori probabilities and update the statistics exclusively for mixture components belonging to appropriate clusters. Each cluster is a grouping of multivariate normal distributions and is modeled by a single multivariate distribution. As such, the set of multivariate normal distributions representing the different clusters also form a GMM. This GMM is referred to as a hash GMM which can be considered to a lower resolution representation of the GMM-UBM. The mapping that associates the components of the hash GMM with components of the original GMM-UBM is referred to as a shortlist. This research investigates various methods of clustering the components of the GMM-UBM and forming hash GMMs. Of five different methods that are presented one method, Gaussian mixture reduction as proposed by Runnall's, easily outperformed the other methods. This method of Gaussian reduction iteratively reduces the size of a GMM by successively merging pairs of component densities. Pairs are selected for merger by using a Kullback-Leibler based metric. Using Runnal's method of reduction, we

  10. Merging Mixture Components for Cell Population Identification in Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Finak

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a framework for the identification of cell subpopulations in flow cytometry data based on merging mixture components using the flowClust methodology. We show that the cluster merging algorithm under our framework improves model fit and provides a better estimate of the number of distinct cell subpopulations than either Gaussian mixture models or flowClust, especially for complicated flow cytometry data distributions. Our framework allows the automated selection of the number of distinct cell subpopulations and we are able to identify cases where the algorithm fails, thus making it suitable for application in a high throughput FCM analysis pipeline. Furthermore, we demonstrate a method for summarizing complex merged cell subpopulations in a simple manner that integrates with the existing flowClust framework and enables downstream data analysis. We demonstrate the performance of our framework on simulated and real FCM data. The software is available in the flowMerge package through the Bioconductor project.

  11. Designing a Mixture Experiment When the Components are Subject to a Nonlinear Multiple-Component Constraint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Cooley, Scott K.; Vienna, John D.; Crum, Jarrod V.

    2016-05-04

    This article presents a case study of developing an experimental design for a constrained mixture experiment when the experimental region is defined by single-component constraints (SCCs), linear multiple-component constraints (MCCs), and a nonlinear MCC. Traditional methods and software for designing constrained mixture experiments with SCCs and linear MCCs are not directly applicable because of the nonlinear MCC. A modification of existing methodology to account for the nonlinear MCC was developed and is described in this article. The case study involves a 15-component nuclear waste glass example in which SO3 is one of the components. SO3 has a solubility limit in glass that depends on the composition of the balance of the glass. A goal was to design the experiment so that SO3 would not exceed its predicted solubility limit for any of the experimental glasses. The SO3 solubility limit had previously been modeled by a partial quadratic mixture (PQM) model expressed in the relative proportions of the 14 other components. The PQM model was used to construct a nonlinear MCC in terms of all 15 components. In addition, there were SCCs and linear MCCs. This article discusses the waste glass example and how a layered design was generated to (i) account for the SCCs, linear MCCs, and nonlinear MCC and (ii) meet the goals of the study.

  12. Effective-Medium Approach for Conductivities in Multi-Component Granular Mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We apply the effective-medium theory to a multi-component mixture system, by which the effective longitudinal and Hall conductivities can be calculated. We find that there is more than one threshold in the multi-component mixture, and the maximum number of thresholds is one less than the component number. Further, the thresholds are mainly dependent on the relative volume ratio of the components when the conductivity ratios between any two components are far larger or smaller than one

  13. Disentangling the developmental and neurobehavioural effects of perinatal exposure to a chemical mixture found in blood of Arctic populations: differential toxicity of mixture components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, W.; Nakai, J.; Yagminas, A.; Chu, I.; Moir, D. [Health Canada (Canada)

    2004-09-15

    The current study was designed to evaluate the neurobehavioral effects of perinatal exposure to a chemical mixture that is based on relative concentrations of persistent organic pollutants found in the blood of Canadian Arctic populations and contains 14 PCB congeners, 12 organochlorine pesticides and methyl mercury. This study compared the effects of the complete mixture with the effects of three major components of the mixture (the PCB component, the organochlorine pesticide component, and the methyl mercury component). By examining a range of neurobehavioural functions over development we also determine if specific neurobehavioural disturbances produced by the mixture can be attributed to components of the mixture and if neurobehavioural effects produced by components of the mixture are altered by concurrent exposure to other components in the mixture. Ninety-two nulliparious female Sprague-Dawley rats served as subjects.

  14. Magnetic ordering of three-component ultracold fermionic mixtures in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotnikov, Andrii; Hofstetter, Walter

    2014-06-01

    We study finite-temperature magnetic phases of three-component mixtures of ultracold fermions with repulsive interactions in optical lattices with simple cubic or square geometry by means of dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). We focus on the case of one particle per site (1/3 band filling) at moderate interaction strength, where we observe a sequence of thermal phase transitions into two- and three-sublattice ordered states by means of the unrestricted real-space generalization of DMFT. From our quantitative analysis we conclude that long-range ordering in three-component mixtures should be observable at comparable temperatures as in two-component mixtures.

  15. Turbulent Burning Velocities of Two-Component Fuel Mixtures of Methane, Propane and Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Hiroyuki; Nakahara, Masaya; Hashimoto, Jun; Barat, Dilmurat

    In order to clarify the turbulent burning velocity of multi-component fuel mixtures, both lean and rich two-component fuel mixtures, in which methane, propane and hydrogen were used as fuels, were prepared while maintaining the laminar burning velocity approximately constant. A distinct difference in the measured turbulent burning velocity at the same turbulence intensity is observed for two-component fuel mixtures having different addition rates of fuel, even the laminar burning velocities are approximately the same. The burning velocities of lean mixtures change almost constantly as the rate of addition changes, whereas the burning velocities of the rich mixtures show no such tendency. This trend can be explained qualitatively based on the mean local burning velocity, which is estimated by taking into account the preferential diffusion effect for each fuel component. In addition, a model of turbulent burning velocity proposed for single-component fuel mixtures may be applied to two-component fuel mixtures by considering the estimated mean local burning velocity of each fuel.

  16. Effective-Medium Approach for Conductivities in Multi-Component Granular Mixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ning; ZHANG Yong-You; JIN Guo-Jun

    2008-01-01

    @@ We apply the effective-medium theory to a multi-component mixture system, by which the effective longitudinal and Hall conductivities can be calculated.We find that there is more than one threshold in the multi-component mixture, and the maximum number of thresholds is one less than the component number.Further, the thresholds are mainly dependent on the relative volume ratio of the components when the conductivity ratios between any two components are far larger or smaller than one.

  17. Component separation in harmonically trapped boson-fermion mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Nicolai; Mølmer, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    We present a numerical study of mixed boson-fermion systems at zero temperature in isotropic and anise tropic harmonic traps. We investigate the phenomenon of component separation as a function of the strength ut the interparticle interaction. While solving a Gross-Pitaevskii mean-field equation ...

  18. Dynamic components of linear stable mixtures from fractional low order moments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Thomas; Kidmose, Preben; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2001-01-01

    The second moment-based independent component analysis scheme of Molgedey and Schuster (1994) is generalized to fractional low-order moments, relevant for linear mixtures of heavy tail stable processes. The Molgedey-Schuster algorithm stands out by allowing explicitly construction...... of the independent components. Surprisingly, this turns out to be possible also for decorrelation based on fractional low-order moments....

  19. Mixture component effects on the in vitro dermal absorption of pentachlorophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riviere, J.E.; Qiao, G.; Baynes, R.E.; Brooks, J.D. [Coll. of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Mumtaz, M. [Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2001-08-01

    Interactions between chemicals in a mixture and interactions of mixture components with the skin can significantly alter the rate and extent of percutaneous absorption, as well as the cutaneous disposition of a topically applied chemical. The predictive ability of dermal absorption models, and consequently the dermal risk assessment process, would be greatly improved by the elucidation and characterization of these interactions. Pentachlorophenol (PCP), a compound known to penetrate the skin readily, was used as a marker compound to examine mixture component effects using in vitro porcine skin models. PCP was administered in ethanol or in a 40% ethanol/60% water mixture or a 40% ethanol/60% water mixture containing either the rubefacient methyl nicotinate (MNA) or the surfactant sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), or both MNA and SLS. Experiments were also conducted with {sup 14}C-labelled 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCB) and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB). Maximal PCP absorption was 14.12% of the applied dose from the mixture containing SLS, MNA, ethanol and water. However, when PCP was administered in ethanol only, absorption was only 1.12% of the applied dose. There were also qualitative differences among the absorption profiles for the different PCP mixtures. In contrast with the PCP results, absorption of TCB or PCB was negligible in perfused porcine skin, with only 0.14% of the applied TCB dose and 0.05% of the applied PCB dose being maximally absorbed. The low absorption levels for the PCB congeners precluded the identification of mixture component effects. These results suggest that dermal absorption estimates from a single chemical exposure may not reflect absorption seen after exposure as a chemical mixture and that absorption of both TCB and PCB are minimal in this model system. (orig.)

  20. Phase Equilibrium Calculations for Multi-Component Polar Fluid Mixtures with tPC-PSAFT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karakatsani, Eirini; Economou, Ioannis

    2007-01-01

    The truncated Perturbed-Chain Polar Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (tPC-PSAFT) is applied to a number of different mixtures, including binary, ternary and quaternary mixtures of components that differ substantially in terms of intermolecular interactions and molecular size. In contrast...... to most other SAFT versions, tPC-PSAFT accounts explicitly for polar forces. Three pure-component parameters are required for non-polar and non-associating compounds, two additional parameters characterize the association contribution and one parameter is needed to account for polar interactions...

  1. Thermal gravitational separation of ternary mixture n-dodecane/isobutylbenzene/tetralin components in a porous medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larabi, Mohamed Aziz; Mutschler, Dimitri; Mojtabi, Abdelkader

    2016-06-28

    Our present work focuses on the coupling between thermal diffusion and convection in order to improve the thermal gravitational separation of mixture components. The separation phenomenon was studied in a porous medium contained in vertical columns. We performed analytical and numerical simulations to corroborate the experimental measurements of the thermal diffusion coefficients of ternary mixture n-dodecane, isobutylbenzene, and tetralin obtained in microgravity in the international space station. Our approach corroborates the existing data published in the literature. The authors show that it is possible to quantify and to optimize the species separation for ternary mixtures. The authors checked, for ternary mixtures, the validity of the "forgotten effect hypothesis" established for binary mixtures by Furry, Jones, and Onsager. Two complete and different analytical resolution methods were used in order to describe the separation in terms of Lewis numbers, the separation ratios, the cross-diffusion coefficients, and the Rayleigh number. The analytical model is based on the parallel flow approximation. In order to validate this model, a numerical simulation was performed using the finite element method. From our new approach to vertical separation columns, new relations for mass fraction gradients and the optimal Rayleigh number for each component of the ternary mixture were obtained. PMID:27369539

  2. Thermal gravitational separation of ternary mixture n-dodecane/isobutylbenzene/tetralin components in a porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larabi, Mohamed Aziz; Mutschler, Dimitri; Mojtabi, Abdelkader

    2016-06-01

    Our present work focuses on the coupling between thermal diffusion and convection in order to improve the thermal gravitational separation of mixture components. The separation phenomenon was studied in a porous medium contained in vertical columns. We performed analytical and numerical simulations to corroborate the experimental measurements of the thermal diffusion coefficients of ternary mixture n-dodecane, isobutylbenzene, and tetralin obtained in microgravity in the international space station. Our approach corroborates the existing data published in the literature. The authors show that it is possible to quantify and to optimize the species separation for ternary mixtures. The authors checked, for ternary mixtures, the validity of the "forgotten effect hypothesis" established for binary mixtures by Furry, Jones, and Onsager. Two complete and different analytical resolution methods were used in order to describe the separation in terms of Lewis numbers, the separation ratios, the cross-diffusion coefficients, and the Rayleigh number. The analytical model is based on the parallel flow approximation. In order to validate this model, a numerical simulation was performed using the finite element method. From our new approach to vertical separation columns, new relations for mass fraction gradients and the optimal Rayleigh number for each component of the ternary mixture were obtained.

  3. Performance Analysis of Neuro Genetic Algorithm Applied on Detecting Proportion of Components in Manhole Gas Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun Kumar Ojha

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents performance analysis of a real valued neuro genetic algorithm applied for thedetection of proportion of the gases found in manhole gas mixture. The neural network (NN trained usinggenetic algorithm (GA leads to concept of neuro genetic algorithm, which is used for implementing anintelligent sensory system for the detection of component gases present in manhole gas mixture Usually amanhole gas mixture contains several toxic gases like Hydrogen Sulfide, Ammonia, Methane, CarbonDioxide, Nitrogen Oxide, and Carbon Monoxide. A semiconductor based gas sensor array used for sensingmanhole gas components is an integral part of the proposed intelligent system. It consists of many sensorelements, where each sensor element is responsible for sensing particular gas component. Multiple sensorsof different gases used for detecting gas mixture of multiple gases, results in cross-sensitivity. The crosssensitivity is a major issue and the problem is viewed as pattern recognition problem. The objective of thisarticle is to present performance analysis of the real valued neuro genetic algorithm which is applied formultiple gas detection.

  4. Performance Analysis of Neuro Genetic Algorithm Applied on Detecting Proportion of Components in Manhole Gas Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun Kumar Ojha

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents performance analysis of a real valued neuro genetic algorithm applied for the detection of proportion of the gases found in manhole gas mixture. The neural network (NN trained using genetic algorithm (GA leads to concept of neuro genetic algorithm, which is used for implementing an intelligent sensory system for the detection of component gases present in manhole gas mixture Usually a manhole gas mixture contains several toxic gases like Hydrogen Sulfide, Ammonia, Methane, Carbon Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxide, and Carbon Monoxide. A semiconductor based gas sensor array used for sensing manhole gas components is an integral part of the proposed intelligent system. It consists of many sensor elements, where each sensor element is responsible for sensing particular gas component. Multiple sensors of different gases used for detecting gas mixture of multiple gases, results in cross-sensitivity. The crosssensitivity is a major issue and the problem is viewed as pattern recognition problem. The objective of this article is to present performance analysis of the real valued neuro genetic algorithm which is applied for multiple gas detection.

  5. Dynamics of Feshbach Molecules in an Ultracold Three-Component Mixture

    CERN Document Server

    Khramov, A Y; Jamison, A O; Dowd, W H; Gupta, S

    2012-01-01

    We present investigations of the formation rate and collisional stability of lithium Feshbach molecules in an ultracold three-component mixture composed of two resonantly interacting fermionic 6-Li spin states and bosonic 174-Yb. We observe long molecule lifetimes (> 100 ms) even in the presence of a large ytterbium bath and extract reaction rate coefficients of the system. We find good collisional stability of the mixture in the unitary regime, opening new possibilities for studies and probes of strongly interacting quantum gases in contact with a bath species.

  6. Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva-Aguilar Martín

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metals are ubiquitous pollutants present as mixtures. In particular, mixture of arsenic-cadmium-lead is among the leading toxic agents detected in the environment. These metals have carcinogenic and cell-transforming potential. In this study, we used a two step cell transformation model, to determine the role of oxidative stress in transformation induced by a mixture of arsenic-cadmium-lead. Oxidative damage and antioxidant response were determined. Metal mixture treatment induces the increase of damage markers and the antioxidant response. Loss of cell viability and increased transforming potential were observed during the promotion phase. This finding correlated significantly with generation of reactive oxygen species. Cotreatment with N-acetyl-cysteine induces effect on the transforming capacity; while a diminution was found in initiation, in promotion phase a total block of the transforming capacity was observed. Our results suggest that oxidative stress generated by metal mixture plays an important role only in promotion phase promoting transforming capacity.

  7. The Determination of Components of Radioactive Decay Mixtures by Computer Analysis of Count-Rate Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The components of a mixture of n radioactive isotopes can be determined from the change in activity with time provided that the activity of at least n-1 components changes significantly during the period of observation, either by direct decay or by the growth of decay products. ft is possible to predict a set of possible components for each mixture encountered, based on considerations such as the origin and history of the mixture and the separation chemistry and counting technique(s) used. If such considerations are properly applied, the set of possible components will include all of the actual components in the mixture. The appropriate growth and/or decay equations can then be formulated and solved simultaneously to obtain each component, or the mixture can be resolved graphically by extrapolations of the linear portions of the total decay-growth curve. However, when the number of components is large and/or when complex decay schemes are involved, these two techniques either cannot be applied or the errors associated with the estimates cannot be assessed. Selection of decay components by a least-squares procedure provides better estimates than solution by simultaneous equations alone. Consequently, a least-squares Fortran computer programme (designated CORD) has been developed which solves the general problem: given the times and counts per unit time from a sample, the possible radioisotopic parents and decay schemes and all associated decay constants and detection efficiencies compute the amount of each parent actually present at a predetermined zero time. In addition, the programme yields the amounts of the parents and daughters present at all data times. Initially used with bioassay and environmental samples, the programme has been specifically designed for analysing count-rate data obtained by non-spectroscopic alpha- or beta-counting. However, it should be adaptable to total gamma and spectroscopic data, provided the energy ranges over which these

  8. Advances in blind source separation (BSS) and independent component analysis (ICA) for nonlinear mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutten, Christian; Karhunen, Juha

    2004-10-01

    In this paper, we review recent advances in blind source separation (BSS) and independent component analysis (ICA) for nonlinear mixing models. After a general introduction to BSS and ICA, we discuss in more detail uniqueness and separability issues, presenting some new results. A fundamental difficulty in the nonlinear BSS problem and even more so in the nonlinear ICA problem is that they provide non-unique solutions without extra constraints, which are often implemented by using a suitable regularization. In this paper, we explore two possible approaches. The first one is based on structural constraints. Especially, post-nonlinear mixtures are an important special case, where a nonlinearity is applied to linear mixtures. For such mixtures, the ambiguities are essentially the same as for the linear ICA or BSS problems. The second approach uses Bayesian inference methods for estimating the best statistical parameters, under almost unconstrained models in which priors can be easily added. In the later part of this paper, various separation techniques proposed for post-nonlinear mixtures and general nonlinear mixtures are reviewed. PMID:15593377

  9. An aligned mixture probabilistic principal component analysis for fault detection of multimode chemical processes☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yawei Yang; Yuxin Ma; Bing Song; Hongbo Shi

    2015-01-01

    A novel approach named aligned mixture probabilistic principal component analysis (AMPPCA) is proposed in this study for fault detection of multimode chemical processes. In order to exploit within-mode correlations, the AMPPCA algorithm first estimates a statistical description for each operating mode by applying mixture prob-abilistic principal component analysis (MPPCA). As a comparison, the combined MPPCA is employed where mon-itoring results are softly integrated according to posterior probabilities of the test sample in each local model. For exploiting the cross-mode correlations, which may be useful but are inadvertently neglected due to separately held monitoring approaches, a global monitoring model is constructed by aligning al local models together. In this way, both within-mode and cross-mode correlations are preserved in this integrated space. Finally, the utility and feasibility of AMPPCA are demonstrated through a non-isothermal continuous stirred tank reactor and the TE benchmark process.

  10. Decoupling multimode vibrational relaxations in multi-component gas mixtures: Analysis of sound relaxational absorption spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Ke-Sheng; Wang Shu; Zhu Ming; Ding Yi; Hu Yi

    2013-01-01

    Decoupling the complicated vibrational-vibrational (V-V) coupling of a multimode vibrational relaxation remains a challenge for analyzing the sound relaxational absorption in multi-component gas mixtures.In our previous work [Acta Phys.Sin.61 174301 (2012)],an analytical model to predict the sound absorption from vibrational relaxation in a gas medium is proposed.In this paper,we develop the model to decouple the V-V coupled energy to each vibrationaltranslational deexcitation path,and analyze how the multimode relaxations form the peaks of sound absorption spectra in gas mixtures.We prove that a multimode relaxation is the sum of its decoupled single-relaxation processes,and only the decoupled process with a significant isochoric-molar-heat can be observed as an absorption peak.The decoupling model clarifies the essential processes behind the peaks in spectra arising from the multimode relaxations in multi-component gas mixtures.The simulation validates the proposed decoupling model.

  11. Numerical simulation of nonlinear acoustic attenuation of multi-component gas mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Shu; WANG Shu

    2009-01-01

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method was introduced to model the acoustic propagation in multi-component gas mixtures. And a theoretical predictive model of acoustic attenuation was proposed, which does not rely on experiential parameters. The acoustic attenuation spectra of various multi-component gas mixtures, consisting of nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, methane and water, were estimated by the DSMC method. The sound frequency range of interest is from 8 MHz to 232 MHz. Compared with the result of the relaxation attenuation based on the DL model plus that of the classical attenuation calculated by the Stokes-Kirchhoff formula, the estimations of acoustic attenuation of our model agreed with them. The precision of the model depends upon the understanding of the physical mechanism of molecule collision from which the attenuation arises. In addition, the result of our model shows that the characters of the frequency-dependent acoustic attenuation rely on the composition of the gas mixtures. And this could lead to the development of smart acoustic gas sensors capable of quantitatively determining gas composition in various environments and processes.

  12. Determination Of Gas Mixture Components Using Fluctuation Enhanced Sensing And The LS-SVM Regression Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lentka Łukasz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the effectiveness of determining gas concentrations by using a prototype WO3 resistive gas sensor together with fluctuation enhanced sensing. We have earlier demonstrated that this method can determine the composition of a gas mixture by using only a single sensor. In the present study, we apply Least-Squares Support-Vector-Machine-based (LS-SVM-based nonlinear regression to determine the gas concentration of each constituent in a mixture. We confirmed that the accuracy of the estimated gas concentration could be significantly improved by applying temperature change and ultraviolet irradiation of the WO3 layer. Fluctuation-enhanced sensing allowed us to predict the concentration of both component gases.

  13. Two-component mixture model: Application to palm oil and exchange rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoong, Seuk-Yen; Ismail, Mohd Tahir; Hamzah, Firdaus Mohamad

    2014-12-01

    Palm oil is a seed crop which is widely adopt for food and non-food products such as cookie, vegetable oil, cosmetics, household products and others. Palm oil is majority growth in Malaysia and Indonesia. However, the demand for palm oil is getting growth and rapidly running out over the years. This phenomenal cause illegal logging of trees and destroy the natural habitat. Hence, the present paper investigates the relationship between exchange rate and palm oil price in Malaysia by using Maximum Likelihood Estimation via Newton-Raphson algorithm to fit a two components mixture model. Besides, this paper proposes a mixture of normal distribution to accommodate with asymmetry characteristics and platykurtic time series data.

  14. A new blind fault component separation algorithm for a single-channel mechanical signal mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Tse, Peter W.

    2012-10-01

    A vibration signal collected from a complex machine consists of multiple vibration components, which are system responses excited by several sources. This paper reports a new blind component separation (BCS) method for extracting different mechanical fault features. By applying the proposed method, a single-channel mixed signal can be decomposed into two parts: the periodic and transient subsets. The periodic subset is related to the imbalance, misalignment and eccentricity of a machine. The transient subset refers to abnormal impulsive phenomena, such as those caused by localized bearing faults. The proposed method includes two individual strategies to deal with these different characteristics. The first extracts the sub-Gaussian periodic signal by minimizing the kurtosis of the equalized signals. The second detects the super-Gaussian transient signal by minimizing the smoothness index of the equalized signals. Here, the equalized signals are derived by an eigenvector algorithm that is a successful solution to the blind equalization problem. To reduce the computing time needed to select the equalizer length, a simple optimization method is introduced to minimize the kurtosis and smoothness index, respectively. Finally, simulated multiple-fault signals and a real multiple-fault signal collected from an industrial machine are used to validate the proposed method. The results show that the proposed method is able to effectively decompose the multiple-fault vibration mixture into periodic components and random non-stationary transient components. In addition, the equalizer length can be intelligently determined using the proposed method.

  15. Mixture models for studying stellar populations. I. Univariate mixture models, parameter estimation, and the number of discrete population components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A unified approach to the analysis of stellar populations through the application of finite mixture models is presented, and the statistical properties of univariate finite mixture models are examined. A review is presented of the analysis methods that are available, with emphasis on methods for estimating the parameters that describe the underlying stellar populations and for determining the number of discrete stellar populations. Attention is restricted to five variables: U, V, W, Fe/H, and age. Parameter and error estimation is demonstrated in two simulation experiments designed to assess the detectability of a thick disk in samples of solar neighborhood stars. 159 refs

  16. Partitioning detectability components in populations subject to within-season temporary emigration using binomial mixture models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine M O'Donnell

    Full Text Available Detectability of individual animals is highly variable and nearly always < 1; imperfect detection must be accounted for to reliably estimate population sizes and trends. Hierarchical models can simultaneously estimate abundance and effective detection probability, but there are several different mechanisms that cause variation in detectability. Neglecting temporary emigration can lead to biased population estimates because availability and conditional detection probability are confounded. In this study, we extend previous hierarchical binomial mixture models to account for multiple sources of variation in detectability. The state process of the hierarchical model describes ecological mechanisms that generate spatial and temporal patterns in abundance, while the observation model accounts for the imperfect nature of counting individuals due to temporary emigration and false absences. We illustrate our model's potential advantages, including the allowance of temporary emigration between sampling periods, with a case study of southern red-backed salamanders Plethodon serratus. We fit our model and a standard binomial mixture model to counts of terrestrial salamanders surveyed at 40 sites during 3-5 surveys each spring and fall 2010-2012. Our models generated similar parameter estimates to standard binomial mixture models. Aspect was the best predictor of salamander abundance in our case study; abundance increased as aspect became more northeasterly. Increased time-since-rainfall strongly decreased salamander surface activity (i.e. availability for sampling, while higher amounts of woody cover objects and rocks increased conditional detection probability (i.e. probability of capture, given an animal is exposed to sampling. By explicitly accounting for both components of detectability, we increased congruence between our statistical modeling and our ecological understanding of the system. We stress the importance of choosing survey locations and

  17. Neural Correlates of Causal Power Judgments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Dellarosa Cummins

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Causal inference is a fundamental component of cognition and perception. Probabilistic theories of causal judgment (most notably causal Bayes networks derive causal judgments using metrics that integrate contingency information. But human estimates typically diverge from these normative predictions. This is because human causal power judgments are typically strongly influenced by beliefs concerning underlying causal mechanisms, and because of the way knowledge is retrieved from human memory during the judgment process. Neuroimaging studies indicate that the brain distinguishes causal events from mere covariation, and between perceived and inferred causality. Areas involved in error prediction are also activated, implying automatic activation of possible exception cases during causal decision-making.

  18. The Development Of A Theoretical Lean Culture Causal Framework To Support The Effective Implementation Of Lean In Automotive Component Manufacturers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van der Merwe, Karl Robert

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Although it is generally accepted that lean manufacturing improves operational performance, many organisations are struggling to adapt to the lean philosophy. The purpose of this study is to contribute to a more effective strategy for implementing the lean manufacturing improvement philosophy. The study sets out both to integrate well-researched findings and theories related to generic organisational culture with more recent research and experience related to lean culture, and to examine the role that culture plays in the effective implementation of lean manufacturing principles and techniques. The ultimate aim of this exercise is to develop a theoretical lean culture causal framework.

  19. Human toxicology of chemical mixtures toxic consequences beyond the impact of one-component product and environmental exposures

    CERN Document Server

    Zeliger, Harold I

    2011-01-01

    In this important reference work, Zeliger catalogs the known effects of chemical mixtures on the human body and also proposes a framework for understanding and predicting their actions in terms of lipophile (fat soluble)/hydrophile (water soluble) interactions. The author's focus is on illnesses that ensue following exposures to mixtures of chemicals that cannot be attributed to any one component of the mixture. In the first part the mechanisms of chemical absorption at a molecular and macromolecular level are explained, as well as the body's methods of defending itself against xenobiotic intrusion. Part II examines the sources of the chemicals discussed, looking at air and water pollution, food additives, pharmaceuticals, etc. Part III, which includes numerous case studies, examines specific effects of particular mixtures on particular body systems and organs and presents a theoretical framework for predicting what the effects of uncharacterized mixtures might be. Part IV covers regulatory requirements and t...

  20. Development of a multi-component Damage Assessment Model (MDAM) for time-dependent mixture toxicity with toxicokinetic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Hyeon; Landrum, Peter F

    2006-02-15

    A new mixture toxicity model was developed to predict the time-dependent toxicity of a mixture with toxicokinetic interactions directed specifically toward addressing biotransformation. The Damage Assessment Model (DAM), a toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic model that describes and predicts the time-dependent toxicity of a single compound, was extended to a multicomponent model for mixture toxicity. The model assumes that cumulative damage from the parent compound, metabolites, and/or a biotransformation inhibitor are additive, and the sum of the cumulative damage determines mixture toxicity. Since incorporation of the damage addition hypothesis into the DAM was equivalent to an independent action model for mixture toxicity, it was applied to describe the combined effect of mixture components with potentially dissimilar modes of action. From the multicomponent DAM, a time-dependent toxic unit model was derived and applied to determine the toxic units of mixture components. This model suggests a series of experimental designs required to assess the role of biotransformation in the toxicity of metabolized organic compounds and a data analysis method to separately estimate toxicodynamic parameters forthe parent compound and metabolites. PMID:16572795

  1. ARTS: A System-Level Framework for Modeling MPSoC Components and Analysis of their Causality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahadevan, Shankar; Storgaard, Michael; Madsen, Jan;

    2005-01-01

    the MPSoC designers in modeling the different layers and understanding their causalities. While others have developed tools for static analysis and modeled limited correlations (processor-memory or processor-communication), our model captures the impact of dynamic and unpredictable OS behaviour......Designing complex heterogeneousmultiprocessor Systemon- Chip (MPSoC) requires support for modeling and analysis of the different layers i.e. application, operating system (OS) and platform architecture. This paper presents an abstract system-level modeling framework, called ARTS, to support...... on processor, memory and communication performance. In particular, we focus on analyzing the impact of application mapping on the processor and memory utilization taking the on-chip communication latency into account. A case-study of real-time multimedia application consisting of 114 tasks on a 6-processor...

  2. Causal universe

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, George FR; Pabjan, Tadeusz

    2013-01-01

    Written by philosophers, cosmologists, and physicists, this collection of essays deals with causality, which is a core issue for both science and philosophy. Readers will learn about different types of causality in complex systems and about new perspectives on this issue based on physical and cosmological considerations. In addition, the book includes essays pertaining to the problem of causality in ancient Greek philosophy, and to the problem of God's relation to the causal structures of nature viewed in the light of contemporary physics and cosmology.

  3. Identification and Characterization of Visible Absorption Components in Aqueous Methylglyoxal-Ammonium Sulfate Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGivern, W. S.; Allison, T. C.; Radney, J. G.; Zangmeister, C. D.

    2014-12-01

    The aqueous reaction of methylglyoxal (MG) with ammonium sulfate has been suggested as a source of atmospheric ``brown carbon.'' We have utilized high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and tandem mass spectrometry to study the products of this reaction at high concentrations. The overall product spectrum shows a large number of distinct components; however, the visible absorption from this mixture is derived a very small number of components. The largest contributor is an imine-substituted (C=N-H) product of aldol condensation/facile dehydration reaction between the parent MG and a hydrated product of the MG + ammonia reaction. The asymmetric nature of this compound relative to the aldol condensation of two MG results in a sufficiently large redshift of the UV absorption spectrum that absorption of visible radiation can occur in the long-wavelength tail. The simplicity of the imine products is a result of a strong bias toward ketimine products due to the extensive hydration of the aldehydic moiety in the parent in aqueous solution. In addition, a strong pH dependence of the absorption cross section was observed with significantly greater absorption under more basic conditions. We have performed time-dependent density functional theory calculations to evaluate the absorption spectra of all of the possible condensation products and their respective ions, and the results are consistent with the experimental observations. We have also observed smaller concentrations of other condensation products of the imine-substituted parent species that do not contribute significantly to the visible absorption but have not been previously discussed.

  4. Causal and causally separable processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreshkov, Ognyan; Giarmatzi, Christina

    2016-09-01

    The idea that events are equipped with a partial causal order is central to our understanding of physics in the tested regimes: given two pointlike events A and B, either A is in the causal past of B, B is in the causal past of A, or A and B are space-like separated. Operationally, the meaning of these order relations corresponds to constraints on the possible correlations between experiments performed in the vicinities of the respective events: if A is in the causal past of B, an experimenter at A could signal to an experimenter at B but not the other way around, while if A and B are space-like separated, no signaling is possible in either direction. In the context of a concrete physical theory, the correlations compatible with a given causal configuration may obey further constraints. For instance, space-like correlations in quantum mechanics arise from local measurements on joint quantum states, while time-like correlations are established via quantum channels. Similarly to other variables, however, the causal order of a set of events could be random, and little is understood about the constraints that causality implies in this case. A main difficulty concerns the fact that the order of events can now generally depend on the operations performed at the locations of these events, since, for instance, an operation at A could influence the order in which B and C occur in A’s future. So far, no formal theory of causality compatible with such dynamical causal order has been developed. Apart from being of fundamental interest in the context of inferring causal relations, such a theory is imperative for understanding recent suggestions that the causal order of events in quantum mechanics can be indefinite. Here, we develop such a theory in the general multipartite case. Starting from a background-independent definition of causality, we derive an iteratively formulated canonical decomposition of multipartite causal correlations. For a fixed number of settings and

  5. Causal mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2006-01-01

    The lecture note explains how to use the causal mapping method as well as the theoretical framework aoosciated to the method......The lecture note explains how to use the causal mapping method as well as the theoretical framework aoosciated to the method...

  6. Introducing Students to Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis and Determination of Kerosene Components in a Complex Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacot, Giselle Mae M.; Lee, Lyn May; Chin, Sung-Tong; Marriott, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GC-tandem MS (GC-MS/MS) are useful in many separation and characterization procedures. GC-MS is now a common tool in industry and research, and increasingly, GC-MS/MS is applied to the measurement of trace components in complex mixtures. This report describes an upper-level undergraduate experiment…

  7. Solid-Liquid Equilibria for Many-component Mixtures Using Cubic-Plus-Association (CPA) equation of state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fettouhi, André; Thomsen, Kaj

    2010-01-01

    In the creation of liquefied natural gas the formation of solids play a substantial role, hence detailed knowledge is needed about solid-liquid equilibria (SLE). In this abstract we shortly summarize the work we have carried out at CERE over the past year with SLE for many-component mixtures using...

  8. Enantiomer-specific analysis of multi-component mixtures by correlated electron imaging-ion mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanood, Mohammad M Rafiee; Ram, N Bhargava; Lehmann, C Stefan; Powis, Ivan; Janssen, Maurice H M

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous, enantiomer-specific identification of chiral molecules in multi-component mixtures is extremely challenging. Many established techniques for single-component analysis fail to provide selectivity in multi-component mixtures and lack sensitivity for dilute samples. Here we show how enantiomers may be differentiated by mass-selected photoelectron circular dichroism using an electron-ion coincidence imaging spectrometer. As proof of concept, vapours containing ∼1% of two chiral monoterpene molecules, limonene and camphor, are irradiated by a circularly polarized femtosecond laser, resulting in multiphoton near-threshold ionization with little molecular fragmentation. Large chiral asymmetries (2-4%) are observed in the mass-tagged photoelectron angular distributions. These asymmetries switch sign according to the handedness (R- or S-) of the enantiomer in the mixture and scale with enantiomeric excess of a component. The results demonstrate that mass spectrometric identification of mixtures of chiral molecules and quantitative determination of enantiomeric excess can be achieved in a table-top instrument. PMID:26104140

  9. Enantiomer-specific analysis of multi-component mixtures by correlated electron imaging–ion mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanood, Mohammad M Rafiee; Ram, N. Bhargava; Lehmann, C. Stefan; Powis, Ivan; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous, enantiomer-specific identification of chiral molecules in multi-component mixtures is extremely challenging. Many established techniques for single-component analysis fail to provide selectivity in multi-component mixtures and lack sensitivity for dilute samples. Here we show how enantiomers may be differentiated by mass-selected photoelectron circular dichroism using an electron–ion coincidence imaging spectrometer. As proof of concept, vapours containing ∼1% of two chiral monoterpene molecules, limonene and camphor, are irradiated by a circularly polarized femtosecond laser, resulting in multiphoton near-threshold ionization with little molecular fragmentation. Large chiral asymmetries (2–4%) are observed in the mass-tagged photoelectron angular distributions. These asymmetries switch sign according to the handedness (R- or S-) of the enantiomer in the mixture and scale with enantiomeric excess of a component. The results demonstrate that mass spectrometric identification of mixtures of chiral molecules and quantitative determination of enantiomeric excess can be achieved in a table-top instrument. PMID:26104140

  10. Separation of a binary mixture with a large mass difference between the components in a gas centrifuge

    OpenAIRE

    Abramov, Y. V.; Tokmantsev, V. I.

    2013-01-01

    The separation of a binary gaseous mixture of uranium hexafluoride 238UF6 with different light components in a high-speed centrifuge, intended for separating heavy isotopes, is examined. The mass of the light impurities is varied in the range M 1 = 0.02-0.349 kg/mole. It is shown that as the impurity mass decreases the structure of the flow fields in the centrifuge rotor changes considerably. If in the case of a mixture of heavy isotopes convective transport has a determining effect on the co...

  11. RELIABILITY OF A MULTI COMPONENT STRESS STRENGTH MODEL WITH STANDBY SYSTEM USING MIXTURE OF TWO EXPONENTIAL DISTRIBUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sandhya

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a multi component standby syst em of stress-strength model is considered to find the reliability. Reliability has been derived when stress-strength follow exponential distribution and mixture of two exponen tial distributions. The general expression for the reliability of a multi component standby system is obtained and the system reliability is computed numerically for different values of the st ress and strength parameters. The reliability of a multi component standby system has been developed when the initial stress distribution is arbitrary.

  12. Can crop types be resolved using mixture distribution components - Some initial results and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennington, R. K.; Sorensen, C. T.; Heydorn, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    For the analysis of remotely sensed data, it is frequently necessary to design a classifier in order to locate a ground cover class of interest or to estimate the proportion of this ground cover class. Advantages of a mixture distribution formulation are discussed, and a description is presented of the results of estimating the proportion of small grains in ten Landsat data segments using the mixture model. It is found that the mixture model proportion estimates have a very low variance and coefficient of variation. The discussed investigation implies that the mixtures model is a viable method for determining the distributions of classes of interest in remote sensing problems and in estimating the proportions of these classes directly.

  13. Separation of a mixture of particles into its individual components with the aid of the magneto-Archimedes separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magneto-Archimedes separation allows for separating mixtures of feeble magnetic materials into its components based on the difference of their densities and magnetic susceptibilities. So far, this technique was applied for the separation of relatively large particles of several millimeters in diameter. Here we apply this technique experimentally to the simultaneous quantitative analysis of multiple micrometer-sized particles in a fluid. It was confirmed that the magneto-Archimedes separation can be applied for the separation of mixture of microspheres larger than 20 μm. Further high performance separation efficiency is expected with the optimization of separation conditions including the control of the spatial distribution of the magnetic field. - Highlights: • The magneto-Archimedes separation is based on the magnetic levitation of materials. • It allows for separating mixtures into its components by the difference of properties. • The separation of mixture of spheres larger than 20 μm was confirmed experimentally. • It enables the simultaneous quantitative analysis of multiple particles

  14. Optimization of a Three-Component Green Corrosion Inhibitor Mixture for Using in Cooling Water by Experimental Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghari, E.; Ashassi-Sorkhabi, H.; Ahangari, M.; Bagheri, R.

    2016-04-01

    Factors such as inhibitor concentration, solution hydrodynamics, and temperature influence the performance of corrosion inhibitor mixtures. The simultaneous studying of the impact of different factors is a time- and cost-consuming process. The use of experimental design methods can be useful in minimizing the number of experiments and finding local optimized conditions for factors under the investigation. In the present work, the inhibition performance of a three-component inhibitor mixture against corrosion of St37 steel rotating disk electrode, RDE, was studied. The mixture was composed of citric acid, lanthanum(III) nitrate, and tetrabutylammonium perchlorate. In order to decrease the number of experiments, the L16 Taguchi orthogonal array was used. The "control factors" were the concentration of each component and the rotation rate of RDE and the "response factor" was the inhibition efficiency. The scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy techniques verified the formation of islands of adsorbed citrate complexes with lanthanum ions and insoluble lanthanum(III) hydroxide. From the Taguchi analysis results the mixture of 0.50 mM lanthanum(III) nitrate, 0.50 mM citric acid, and 2.0 mM tetrabutylammonium perchlorate under the electrode rotation rate of 1000 rpm was found as optimum conditions.

  15. Separation of a mixture of particles into its individual components with the aid of the magneto-Archimedes separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirota, Noriyuki, E-mail: hirota.noriyuki@nims.go.jp [Fine Particle Engineering Group, National Institute for Materials Science, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba (Japan); Chiba, Hayatoshi [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa (Japan); Okada, Hidehiko [Fine Particle Engineering Group, National Institute for Materials Science, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba (Japan); Ando, Tsutomu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nihon University, 1-2-1 Izumicho, Narashino 275-8575 (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    The magneto-Archimedes separation allows for separating mixtures of feeble magnetic materials into its components based on the difference of their densities and magnetic susceptibilities. So far, this technique was applied for the separation of relatively large particles of several millimeters in diameter. Here we apply this technique experimentally to the simultaneous quantitative analysis of multiple micrometer-sized particles in a fluid. It was confirmed that the magneto-Archimedes separation can be applied for the separation of mixture of microspheres larger than 20 μm. Further high performance separation efficiency is expected with the optimization of separation conditions including the control of the spatial distribution of the magnetic field. - Highlights: • The magneto-Archimedes separation is based on the magnetic levitation of materials. • It allows for separating mixtures into its components by the difference of properties. • The separation of mixture of spheres larger than 20 μm was confirmed experimentally. • It enables the simultaneous quantitative analysis of multiple particles.

  16. Sensory evaluation of character impact components in an apple model mixture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bult, J.H.F.; Schifferstein, H.N.J.; Roozen, J.P.; Boronat, E.D.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Kroeze, J.H.A.

    2002-01-01

    Food aromas generally are complex mixtures of volatiles. In the present study, we investigated the joint effects of hexyl acetate, trans-2-hexenal and 1-hexanol on the multi-attribute perception of an apple aroma. The first two substances were identified earlier as positive contributors to the apple

  17. Epidemiological causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabia, Alfredo

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological methods, which combine population thinking and group comparisons, can primarily identify causes of disease in populations. There is therefore a tension between our intuitive notion of a cause, which we want to be deterministic and invariant at the individual level, and the epidemiological notion of causes, which are invariant only at the population level. Epidemiologists have given heretofore a pragmatic solution to this tension. Causal inference in epidemiology consists in checking the logical coherence of a causality statement and determining whether what has been found grossly contradicts what we think we already know: how strong is the association? Is there a dose-response relationship? Does the cause precede the effect? Is the effect biologically plausible? Etc. This approach to causal inference can be traced back to the English philosophers David Hume and John Stuart Mill. On the other hand, the mode of establishing causality, devised by Jakob Henle and Robert Koch, which has been fruitful in bacteriology, requires that in every instance the effect invariably follows the cause (e.g., inoculation of Koch bacillus and tuberculosis). This is incompatible with epidemiological causality which has to deal with probabilistic effects (e.g., smoking and lung cancer), and is therefore invariant only for the population.

  18. Volatility of components of saturated vapours of UCl4-CsCl and UCl4-LiCl molten mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The flow method has been used for measuring the volatility of the components from UCl4-CsCl and UCl4-LiCl melted mixtures containing 2.0, 5.0, 12.0, 25.0, 33.0, 50.0, 67.0, and 83.0 mol.% of UCl4 within the temperature ranges of 903-1188 K and 740-1200 K, respectively. The chemical composition of saturated vapours above the melted salts has been determined. The melted mixtures in question exhibit negative deviation from ideal behaviour. Made was the conclusion about the presence in a vapour phase, along with monomeric UCl4, LiCl, CsCl and Li2Cl2, Cs2Cl2 dimers of double compounds of the MeUCl5 most probable composition. Their absolute contribution into a total pressure above the UCl4-CsCl melted mixtures is considerably smaller than above the UCl4 -LiCl mixtures

  19. Causality Principle

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Do Minh

    2001-01-01

    We advance a famous principle - causality principle - but under a new view. This principle is a principium automatically leading to most fundamental laws of the nature. It is the inner origin of variation, rules evolutionary processes of things, and the answer of the quest for ultimate theories of the Universe.

  20. Evaluation of biochar-anaerobic potato digestate mixtures as renewable components of horticultural potting media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Various formulations are used in horticultural potting media, with sphagnum peat moss, vermiculite and perlite currently among the most common components. We are examining a dried anaerobic digestate remaining after the fermentation of potato processing wastes to replace organic components such as p...

  1. Response of selected plant and insect species to simulated SRM exhaust mixtures and to exhaust components from SRM fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, W. W.

    1980-01-01

    The possible biologic effects of exhaust products from solid rocket motor (SRM) burns associated with the space shuttle are examined. The major components of the exhaust that might have an adverse effect on vegetation, HCl and Al2O3 are studied. Dose response curves for native and cultivated plants and selected insects exposed to simulated exhaust and component chemicals from SRM exhaust are presented. A system for dispensing and monitoring component chemicals of SRM exhaust (HCl and Al2O3) and a system for exposing test plants to simulated SRM exhaust (controlled fuel burns) are described. The effects of HCl, Al2O3, and mixtures of the two on the honeybee, the corn earworm, and the common lacewing and the effects of simulated exhaust on the honeybee are discussed.

  2. Employing per-component time step in DSMC simulations of disparate mass and cross-section gas mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Maltsev, Roman V

    2013-01-01

    A new approach to simulation of stationary flows by Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method is proposed. The idea is to specify an individual time step for each component of a gas mixture. The approach consists of modifications mainly to collision phase and recommendation on choosing time step ratios. It allows softening the demands on the computational resources for cases of disparate collision diameters of molecules and/or disparate molecular masses. These are the cases important in vacuum deposition technologies. Few tests of the new approach are made. Finally, the usage of new approach is demonstrated on a problem of silver nanocluster diffusion in carrier gas argon in conditions of silver deposition experiments.

  3. [Biodegradability of the components of natural hydrocarbon mixtures previously submitted to landfarming].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucci, G N; Pucci, O H

    2003-01-01

    The complex composition of the crude oil and the hydrocarbons that integrate the waste of the different stages of the oil industry turn this product a mixture that presents different difficulties for its elimination by biological methods. The objective of this paper was to study the biodegradation potential of autochthonous bacterial communities on hydrocarbons obtained from four polluted places and subjected to landfarming biorremediation system during a decade. The results showed a marked difference in biodegradability of the three main fractions of crude oil, aliphatic, aromatic, and polar fractions, obtained by column chromatography. All fractions were used as carbon source and energy. There were variations in the production of biomass among the different fractions as well as in the kinetics of biodegradation, according to the composition of each fraction.

  4. Membrane processes for fractionating mixtures with organic components. Membranverfahren zur Fraktionierung von Gemischen mit organischen Komponenten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautenbach, R.; Herion, C.; Janisch, I. (Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany, F.R.). Lehrstuhl fuer Verfahrenstechnik 1 und Inst. fuer Verfahrenstechnik); Dahm, W. (Environ Consult Ingenieurgesellschaft, Aachen (Germany, F.R.))

    1989-07-01

    The maximum demand that can be placed on development of processes for removal of contaminants from waste water and waste gases is that the separated substances can be recovered for use. In this context, membrane processes are attracting steadily increasing interest because the separated substances are changed neither chemically, nor biologically, nor thermally. Two examples, in which solvent mixtures are recovered from waste water and waste gases by means of reverse osmosis, pervaporation, and gas permeation, are cited to demonstrate the potential of the method. The examles, are preceded by a joint consideration of the three above-mentioned membrane processes, which all use so-called pore-free solution-diffusion membranes. The limitations, which result from practical limits of the driving force and the respective resistances to transport are discussed in detail. (orig.).

  5. Algorithms for Blind Components Separation and Extraction from the Time-Frequency Distribution of Their Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Barkat

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available We propose novel algorithms to select and extract separately all the components, using the time-frequency distribution (TFD, of a given multicomponent frequency-modulated (FM signal. These algorithms do not use any a priori information about the various components. However, their performances highly depend on the cross-terms suppression ability and high time-frequency resolution of the considered TFD. To illustrate the usefulness of the proposed algorithms, we applied them for the estimation of the instantaneous frequency coefficients of a multicomponent signal and the results are compared with those of the higher-order ambiguity function (HAF algorithm. Monte Carlo simulation results show the superiority of the proposed algorithms over the HAF.

  6. Context, causality, and appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Stephanie

    2013-04-01

    I applaud and elaborate on the contextualism at the heart of Bullot & Reber's (B&R's) theory, challenge two aspects of the appreciative structure they posit (the causal reasoning that allegedly underlies the design stance and the segregation of the component stages), suggest that expert and novice appreciators operate differently, and question the degree to which B&R's final theory is open to empirical investigation. PMID:23507111

  7. Evaporation of multi-component mixtures and shell formation in spray dried droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Pedro; Duarte, Íris; Porfirio, Tiago; Temtem, Márcio

    2015-11-01

    Drug particles where the active pharmaceutical ingredient (APIs) is dispersed in a polymer matrix forming an amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) is a commonly used strategy to increase the solubility and dissolution rate of poorly water soluble APIs. However, the formation and stability of an amorphous solid dispersion depends on the polymer/API combination and process conditions to generate it. The focus of the present work is to further develop a numerical tool to predict the formation of ASDs by spray drying solutions of different polymer/API combinations. Specifically, the evaporation of a multi-component droplet is coupled with a diffusion law within the droplet that minimizes the Gibbs free energy of the polymer/API/solvents system, following the Flory-Huggins model. Prior to the shell formation, the evaporation of the solvents is modelled following the simplified approach proposed by Abramzon & Sirignano (1989) which accounts for the varying relative velocity between the droplet and the drying gas. After shell formation, the diffusion of the solvents across the porous shell starkly modifies the evaporative dynamics.

  8. Component fractionation of temporal evolution in adsorption-desorption for binary gas mixtures on coals from Haishiwan Coal Mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Liguo; Cheng Yuanping; Li Wei; Lu Shouqing; Xu Chao

    2013-01-01

    Adsorption-desorption experiments on CO2-CH4 gas mixtures with varying compositions have been conducted to study the fractionation characteristics of CO2-CH4 on Haishiwan coal samples.These were carried out at constant temperature but different equilibrium pressure conditions.Based on these experimental results,the temporal evolution of component fractionation in the field was investigated.The results show that the CO2 concentration in the adsorbed phase is always greater than that in the original gas mixture during the desorption process,while CH4 shows the opposite characteristics.This has confirmed that CO2,with a greater adsorption ability has a predominant position in the competition with CH4 under different pressures.Where gas drainage is employed,the ratio of CO2 to CH4 varies with time and space in floor roadways used for gas drainage,and in the ventilation air in Nos.1 and 2 coal seams,which is consistent with laboratory results.

  9. "Zahraa", a Unani multicomponent herbal tea widely consumed in Syria: components of drug mixtures and alleged medicinal properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, M D; Llorach, R; Obon, C; Rivera, D

    2005-12-01

    In Unani system of medicine, drugs consist of complex formulae with more than three components, for which, literature analysing these mixtures as they are sold in the market is scarce. In this paper, the main botanical components of the herbal tea known as "Zahraa" in Damascus, which contains between 6 and 14 species components is elucidated: Alcea damascena (Mout.) Mout. (Malvaceae), Aloysia triphylla (L'Herit.) Britt. (Malvaceae), Astragalus cf. amalecitanus Boiss., Cercis siliquastrum L. subsp. hebecarpa (Bornm.) Yalt. and subsp. siliquastrum. (Leguminosae), Colutea cilicica Boiss. et Bal. in Boiss. (Leguminosae), Crataegus aronia (L.) Bosc. ex DC. (Rosaceae), Cytisopsis pseudocytisus (Boiss.) Fertig. (Leguminosae), Eleagnus angustifolia L. (Eleagnaceae), Equisetum telmateia Ehrh. (Equisetaceae), Helichrysum stoechas (L.) Moench. subsp. barrelieri (Ten.) Nyman. (Compositae), Matricaria recutita L. (Compositae), Mentha longifolia L. subsp. noeana (Boiss. ex. Briq.) Briq. (Labiatae), Mentha spicata L. subsp. condensata (Briq.) Greuter and Burdet (Labiatae), Micromeria myrtifolia Boiss. and Hohen. in Boiss. (Labiatae), Paronychia argentea Lam. (Caryophyllaceae), Phlomis syriaca Boiss. (Labiatae), Rosa damascena Mill. (Rosaceae), Salvia fruticosa Mill. (Labiatae), Sambucus nigra L. (Caprifoliaceae), Spartium junceum L. (Leguminosae), Zea mays L. (Gramineae). PMID:16084679

  10. Classification of a target analyte in solid mixtures using principal component analysis, support vector machines, and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Marie-Louise; Howley, Tom; Ryder, Alan G.; Leger, Marc N.; Madden, Michael G.

    2005-06-01

    The quantitative analysis of illicit materials using Raman spectroscopy is of widespread interest for law enforcement and healthcare applications. One of the difficulties faced when analysing illicit mixtures is the fact that the narcotic can be mixed with many different cutting agents. This obviously complicates the development of quantitative analytical methods. In this work we demonstrate some preliminary efforts to try and account for the wide variety of potential cutting agents, by discrimination between the target substance and a wide range of excipients. Near-infrared Raman spectroscopy (785 nm excitation) was employed to analyse 217 samples, a number of them consisting of a target analyte (acetaminophen) mixed with excipients of different concentrations by weight. The excipients used were sugars (maltose, glucose, lactose, sorbitol), inorganic materials (talcum powder, sodium bicarbonate, magnesium sulphate), and food products (caffeine, flour). The spectral data collected was subjected to a number of pre-treatment statistical methods including first derivative and normalisation transformations, to make the data more suitable for analysis. Various methods were then used to discriminate the target analytes, these included Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Principal Component Regression (PCR) and Support Vector Machines.

  11. Comparative effects of dietary nucleoside-nucleotide mixture and its components on endotoxin induced bacterial translocation and small intestinal injury in protein deficient mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Adjei, A A; Yamauchi, K.; Chan, Y. C.; Konishi, M; Yamamoto, S.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Nucleoside-nucleotide mixture has been shown to improve gut morphology and reduce the incidence of bacterial translocation in protein deficient mice. AIMS--To compare the reparative effect of nucleoside-nucleotide mixture and their individual components on maintenance of gut integrity and bacterial translocation based on their differential metabolism and utilisation. METHODS--ICR (CD-1) mice were randomised into eight groups of 10 animals each and fed 20% casein diet (control), pr...

  12. Retrieving simulated volcanic, desert dust and sea-salt particle properties from two/three-component particle mixtures using UV-VIS polarization lidar and T matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. David

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available During transport by advection, atmospheric nonspherical particles, such as volcanic ash, desert dust or sea-salt particles experience several chemical and physical processes, leading to a complex vertical atmospheric layering at remote sites where intrusion episodes occur. In this paper, a new methodology is proposed to analyse this complex vertical layering in the case of a two/three-component particle external mixtures. This methodology relies on an analysis of the spectral and polarization properties of the light backscattered by atmospheric particles. It is based on combining a sensitive and accurate UV-VIS polarization lidar experiment with T-matrix numerical simulations and air mass back trajectories. The Lyon UV-VIS polarization lidar is used to efficiently partition the particle mixture into its nonspherical components, while the T-matrix method is used for simulating the backscattering and depolarization properties of nonspherical volcanic ash, desert dust and sea-salt particles. It is shown that the particle mixtures' depolarization ratio δ p differs from the nonspherical particles' depolarization ratio δns due to the presence of spherical particles in the mixture. Hence, after identifying a tracer for nonspherical particles, particle backscattering coefficients specific to each nonspherical component can be retrieved in a two-component external mixture. For three-component mixtures, the spectral properties of light must in addition be exploited by using a dual-wavelength polarization lidar. Hence, for the first time, in a three-component external mixture, the nonsphericity of each particle is taken into account in a so-called 2β + 2δ formalism. Applications of this new methodology are then demonstrated in two case studies carried out in Lyon, France, related to the mixing of Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash with sulfate particles (case of a two-component mixture and to the mixing of dust with sea-salt and water-soluble particles

  13. Analysis of Causality Relationship of Components of Socio-ecological and Socio-economical System for Management of the Outermost Small Islands: A Case of Lingayan Island, Central Sulawesi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saleh Lubis

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia has more than 17,506 islands and 92 islands of them are outermost small islands.  Lingayan is one of them located in Northwest of Sulawesi Island and it has geostrategic role to determine the sea boundaries of Indonesian State (NKRI including the territorial seas, the exclusive economic zone and the continental shelf.  Recently, the coastal ecosystems of Lingayan has degraded and the island’s economy is weak so they cannot support the life’s survival of inhabiting people. This condition could weaken the geostrategic role in accordance with article 121 Chapter VIII of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS. Based on the above reasons, the study aim to examine and assess the causal relation of components in the socio-ecological and socio-economical systems as a basis for management of the Lingayan Island with target on conservation of coastal ecosystems and growth of inhabitant’ business economic.  Causalities relations within components were built using Statistic Equation Model (SEM with AMOS method and 40 constructed indicators as well as determinate the suitability program using Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP.  The research showed that there is relationship between the components of socio-ecological systems as indicated by the fit model of causal relation path diagram that provides chi square value = 236.994, RMSEA = 0.083, GFI = 0.884.  Furthermore, there is relationship between the components of socio-economical that provides chi square value = 192.824, RMSEA = 0.081, GFI = 0.900. The most appropriate programs are seaweed cultivation (34.0% and restoration (23.4%.

  14. A sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) sex pheromone mixture increases trap catch relative to a single synthesized component in specific environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas S.; Tix, John A.; Hlina, Benjamin L.; Wagner, C. Michael; Siefkes, Michael J.; Wang, Huiyong; Li, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    Spermiating male sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) release a sex pheromone, of which a component, 7α, 12α, 24-trihydoxy-3-one-5α-cholan-24-sulfate (3kPZS), has been identified and shown to induce long distance preference responses in ovulated females. However, other pheromone components exist, and when 3kPZS alone was used to control invasive sea lamprey populations in the Laurentian Great Lakes, trap catch increase was significant, but gains were generally marginal. We hypothesized that free-ranging sea lamprey populations discriminate between a partial and complete pheromone while migrating to spawning grounds and searching for mates at spawning grounds. As a means to test our hypothesis, and to test two possible uses of sex pheromones for sea lamprey control, we asked whether the full sex pheromone mixture released by males (spermiating male washings; SMW) is more effective than 3kPZS in capturing animals in traditional traps (1) en route to spawning grounds and (2) at spawning grounds. At locations where traps target sea lampreys en route to spawning grounds, SMW-baited traps captured significantly more sea lampreys than paired 3kPZS-baited traps (~10 % increase). At spawning grounds, no difference in trap catch was observed between 3kPZS and SMW-baited traps. The lack of an observed difference at spawning grounds may be attributed to increased pheromone competition and possible involvement of other sensory modalities to locate mates. Because fishes often rely on multiple and sometimes redundant sensory modalities for critical life history events, the addition of sex pheromones to traditionally used traps is not likely to work in all circumstances. In the case of the sea lamprey, sex pheromone application may increase catch when applied to specifically designed traps deployed in streams with low adult density and limited spawning habitat.

  15. Efficient numerical methods for simulating surface tension of multi-component mixtures with the gradient theory of fluid interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2015-08-01

    Surface tension significantly impacts subsurface flow and transport, and it is the main cause of capillary effect, a major immiscible two-phase flow mechanism for systems with a strong wettability preference. In this paper, we consider the numerical simulation of the surface tension of multi-component mixtures with the gradient theory of fluid interfaces. Major numerical challenges include that the system of the Euler-Lagrange equations is solved on the infinite interval and the coefficient matrix is not positive definite. We construct a linear transformation to reduce the Euler-Lagrange equations, and naturally introduce a path function, which is proven to be a monotonic function of the spatial coordinate variable. By using the linear transformation and the path function, we overcome the above difficulties and develop the efficient methods for calculating the interface and its interior compositions. Moreover, the computation of the surface tension is also simplified. The proposed methods do not need to solve the differential equation system, and they are easy to be implemented in practical applications. Numerical examples are tested to verify the efficiency of the proposed methods. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Studies of Molecular Orientation and Order in Self-Assembled Semifluorinated n-Alkylthiols: Single and Dual Component Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabolt, John F.; Tsao, Mei-Wei; Hoffmann, Catherine L.; Johnson, Harry E.; Castner, David G.; Ringsdorf, Helmut

    1997-03-01

    The structure, orientation and morphology of self-assembled monolayers of a semifluorinated n-alkythiol, F(CF_2)8 (CH_2)_11 SH (F8H11SH), have been investigated by polarized IR, angular dependent XPS, time-of-flight SIMS, contact angle and ellipsometric measurements. The orientation of the all trans hydrocarbon segment was found to be tilted much less from the surface normal than the 30 degree tilt found for octadecylthiol. This has been attributed to the steric constraints imposed by the larger cross section fluorocarbon helices which subsequently are tilted from the surface normal. In addition, studies of dual component mixtures of F8H11SH/F8SH and F8SH/F8H2SH have revealed that competitive adsorption occurs in the former producing monolayers which are deficient in the shorter F8SH molecules while in the latter equal representation of both F8SH and F8H2SH molecules are found on the surface due to their similar molecular lengths. These well-defined surfaces were investigated as alignment media for liquid crystals and a number of these templates have shown homeotropic and degenerate planar alignment of adjacent liquid crystal layers. The morphology of these surface layer is found to be very important in controlling the liquid crystal alignment.

  17. Separating spectral mixtures in hyperspectral image data using independent component analysis: validation with oral cancer tissue sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duann, Jeng-Ren; Jan, Chia-Ing; Ou-Yang, Mang; Lin, Chia-Yi; Mo, Jen-Feng; Lin, Yung-Jiun; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chiou, Jin-Chern

    2013-12-01

    Recently, hyperspectral imaging (HSI) systems, which can provide 100 or more wavelengths of emission autofluorescence measures, have been used to delineate more complete spectral patterns associated with certain molecules relevant to cancerization. Such a spectral fingerprint may reliably correspond to a certain type of molecule and thus can be treated as a biomarker for the presence of that molecule. However, the outcomes of HSI systems can be a complex mixture of characteristic spectra of a variety of molecules as well as optical interferences due to reflection, scattering, and refraction. As a result, the mixed nature of raw HSI data might obscure the extraction of consistent spectral fingerprints. Here we present the extraction of the characteristic spectra associated with keratinized tissues from the HSI data of tissue sections from 30 oral cancer patients (31 tissue samples in total), excited at two different wavelength ranges (330 to 385 and 470 to 490 nm), using independent and principal component analysis (ICA and PCA) methods. The results showed that for both excitation wavelength ranges, ICA was able to resolve much more reliable spectral fingerprints associated with the keratinized tissues for all the oral cancer tissue sections with significantly higher mean correlation coefficients as compared to PCA (p<0.001).

  18. Granger Causality and Unit Roots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodríguez-Caballero, Carlos Vladimir; Ventosa-Santaulària, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The asymptotic behavior of the Granger-causality test under stochastic nonstationarity is studied. Our results confirm that the inference drawn from the test is not reliable when the series are integrated to the first order. In the presence of deterministic components, the test statistic diverges...

  19. Application of the Second-Order Statistics for Estimation of the Pure Spectra of Individual Components from the Visible Hyperspectral Images of Their Mixture

    CERN Document Server

    Jong, Sung-Ho; Sin, Kye-Ryong

    2016-01-01

    The second-order statistics (SOS) can be applied in estimation of the pure spectra of chemical components from the spectrum of their mixture, when SOS seems to be good at estimation of spectral patterns, but their peak directions are opposite in some cases. In this paper, one method for judgment of the peak direction of the pure spectra was proposed, where the base line of the pure spectra was drawn by using their histograms and the peak directions were chosen so as to make all of the pure spectra located upwards over the base line. Results of the SOS analysis on the visible hyperspectral images of the mixture composed of two or three chemical components showed that the present method offered the reasonable shape and direction of the pure spectra of its components.

  20. Causal reasoning in physics

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Much has been written on the role of causal notions and causal reasoning in the so-called 'special sciences' and in common sense. But does causal reasoning also play a role in physics? Mathias Frisch argues that, contrary to what influential philosophical arguments purport to show, the answer is yes. Time-asymmetric causal structures are as integral a part of the representational toolkit of physics as a theory's dynamical equations. Frisch develops his argument partly through a critique of anti-causal arguments and partly through a detailed examination of actual examples of causal notions in physics, including causal principles invoked in linear response theory and in representations of radiation phenomena. Offering a new perspective on the nature of scientific theories and causal reasoning, this book will be of interest to professional philosophers, graduate students, and anyone interested in the role of causal thinking in science.

  1. Differential memory persistence of odour mixture and components in newborn rabbits: Competition between the whole and its parts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérard eCoureaud

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Interacting with the mother during the daily nursing, newborn rabbits experience her body odour cues. In particular, the mammary pheromone (MP contained in rabbit milk triggers the typical behaviour which helps to localize and seize the nipples. It also promotes the very rapid appetitive learning of simple or complex stimuli (odorants or mixtures through associative conditioning. We previously showed that 24h after MP-induced conditioning to odorants A (ethyl isobutyrate or B (ethyl maltol, newborn rabbits perceive the AB mixture in a weak configural way, i.e. they perceive the odour of the AB configuration in addition to the odours of the elements. Moreover, after conditioning to the mixture, elimination of the memories of A and B does not affect the memory of AB, suggesting independent elemental and configural memories of the mixture. Here, we evaluated whether configural memory persistence differs from elemental one. First, whereas 1 or 3-day-old pups conditioned to A or B maintained their responsiveness to the conditioned odorant for 4 days, those conditioned to AB did not respond to the mixture after the same retention period. Second, the pups conditioned to AB still responded to A and B 4 days after conditioning, which indicates stronger retention of the elements than of the configuration when all information are learned together. Third, we determined whether the memory of the elements competes with the memory of the configuration: after conditioning to AB, when the memories of A and B were erased using pharmacological treatment, the memory of the mixture was extended to day 5. Thus, newborn rabbits have access to both elemental and configural information in certain odour mixtures, and competition between these distinct representations of the mixture influences the persistence of their memories. Such effects certainly occur in the natural context of mother-pup interactions and may contribute to early acquisition of knowledge about the

  2. Numerical analysis of mass transfer with graphite oxidation in a laminar flow of multi-component gas mixture through a circular tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present paper, mass transfer has been numerically studied in a laminar flow through a circular graphite tube to evaluate graphite corrosion rate and generation rate of carbon monoxide during a pipe rupture accident in a high temperature gas cooled reactor. In the analysis, heterogeneous (graphite oxidation and graphite/carbon dioxide reaction) and homogeneous (carbon monoxide combustion) chemical reactions were dealt in the multi-component gas mixture; helium, oxygen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. Multi-component diffusion coefficients were used in a diffusion term. Mass conservation equations of each gas component, mass conservation equation and momentum conservation equations of the gas mixture were solved by using SIMPLE algorism. Chemical reactions between graphite and oxygen, graphite and carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide combustion were taken into account in the present numerical analysis. An energy equation for the gas mixture was not solved and temperature was held to be constant in order to understand basic mass transfer characteristics without heat transfer. But, an energy conservation equation for single component gas was added to know heat transfer characteristics without mass transfer. The effects of these chemical reactions on the mass transfer coefficients were quantitatively and qualitatively clarified in the range of 50 to 1000 of inlet Reynolds numbers, 0 to 0.5 of inlet oxygen mass fraction and 800 to 1600degC of temperature. (author)

  3. Polarity, viscosity, and ionic conductivity of liquid mixtures containing [C4C1im][Ntf2] and a molecular component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, J N Canongia; Gomes, Margarida F Costa; Husson, Pascale; Pádua, Agílio A H; Rebelo, Luis Paulo N; Sarraute, Sabine; Tariq, Mohammad

    2011-05-19

    In this study, we have focused on binary mixtures composed of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)-imide, [C(4)C(1)im][Ntf(2)], and a selection of six molecular components (acetonitrile, dichloromethane, methanol, 1-butanol, t-butanol, and water) varying in polarity, size, and isomerism. Two Kamlet-Taft parameters, the polarizability π* and the hydrogen bond acceptor β coefficient were determined by spectroscopic measurements. In most cases, the solvent power (dipolarity/polarizability) of the ionic liquid is only slightly modified by the presence of the molecular component unless large quantities of this component are present. The viscosity and electrical conductivity of these mixtures were measured as a function of composition and the relationship between these two properties were studied through Walden plot curves. The viscosity of the ionic liquid dramatically decreases with the addition of the molecular component. This decrease is not directly related to the volumetric properties of each mixture or its interactions. The conductivity presents a maximum as a function of the composition and, except for the case of water, the conductivity maxima decrease for more viscous systems. The Walden plots indicate enhanced ionic association as the ionic liquid gets more diluted, a situation that is the inverse of that usually found for conventional electrolyte solutions. PMID:21517046

  4. The Equation of Causality

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Do Minh

    1999-01-01

    We research the natural causality of the Universe. We find that the equation of causality provides very good results on physics. That is our first endeavour and success in describing a quantitative expression of the law of causality. Hence, our theoretical point suggests ideas to build other laws including the law of the Universe's evolution.

  5. Nature of the interfacial region between cementitious mixtures and rocks from the Palo Duro Basin and other seal components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the interface zone as an indicator of compatibility, preliminary tests were run using cement-based formulations designed to be used for shaft sealing in conjunction with evaporite and clastic rocks of the Palo Duro Basin, one of several potential sites for a high-level radioactive waste repository. Emphasis focused on two formulations, both designed to be slightly expansive. Mixture 83-05 was tested in combination with anhydrite and siltstone. A comparable mixture (83-03) containing salt was used with the halite. Cement, rocks, and their respective interfaces were examined using x-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Bond strengths between rock and cement as well as between selected steels and grout were determined as a function of curing conditions and pretest surface treatment. Permeabilities of cement/rock and cement/steel composites were also determined. Bond strength and permeability were found to vary with curing conditions as well as surface treatment

  6. Granger causality in wall-bounded turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granger causality is based on the idea that if a variable helps to predict another one, then they are probably involved in a causality relationship. This technique is based on the identification of a predictive model for causality detection. The aim of this paper is to use Granger causality to study the dynamics and the energy redistribution between scales and components in wall-bounded turbulent flows. In order to apply it on flows, Granger causality is generalized for snapshot-based observations of large size using linear-model identification methods coming from model reduction. Optimized DMD, a variant of the Dynamic Mode Decomposition, is considered for building a linear model based on snapshots. This method is used to link physical events and extract physical mechanisms associated to the bursting process in the logarithmic layer of a turbulent channel flow.

  7. Simultaneous determination of domperidone and cinnarizine in a binary mixture using derivative spectrophotometry, partial least squares and principle component regression calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Maissa Y; El-Zanfaly, Eman S; El-Tarras, Mohamed F; El-Bardicy, Mohamed G

    2003-01-01

    This work is concerned with the simultaneous determination of domperidone maleate (DOM) and cinnarizine (CINN) in a binary mixture form, without previous separation, by two different techniques. The first method is the application of derivative spectrophotometry where the linearity range and percentage recoveries for DOM and CINN were 2.5-30 micro g mL(-1), 5-25 micro g mL(-1) and 100.06+/-1.157, 99.93+/-1.377, respectively. The second method depends on the application of partial least squares (PLS) and principle component regression (PCR) models. A training set consisting of 10 mixtures containing 5-20 micro g mL(-1) for each component was used for the construction of the PCR and PLS models. These models were used after their validation for the prediction of the concentration of DOM and CINN in their mixtures. The proposed procedures were successfully applied for the simultaneous determination of both drugs in laboratory prepared mixtures and in commercial tablet preparations. The validity of the proposed methods was assessed by applying the standard addition technique where the percentage recovery of the added standard was found to be 99.98+/-0.297 and 99.84+/-0.700 for DOM and CINN, respectively, using the derivative spectrophotometric method and 100.29+/-0.398 and 100.11+/-0.363 for DOM and CINN, respectively, using the PLS and PCR methods. The proposed procedures are rapid, simple, require no preliminary separation steps and can be used for routine analysis of both drugs in quality control laboratories. PMID:12560964

  8. Times and Causality

    OpenAIRE

    Davidson, Russell

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of causal chains and mechanisms is an essential part of any scientific activity that aims at better explanation of its subject matter, and better understanding of it. While any account of causality requires that a cause should precede its effect, accounts of causality inphysics are complicated by the fact that the role of time in current theoretical physics has evolved very substantially throughout the twentieth century. In this article, I review the status of time and causa...

  9. How to be causal

    CERN Document Server

    Kinsler, Paul

    2011-01-01

    I explain a simple definition of causality in widespread use, and indicate how it links to the Kramers Kronig relations. The specification of causality in terms of temporal differential eqations then shows us the way to write down dynamical models so that their causal nature in the sense used here should be obvious to all. In particular, I apply this reasoning to Maxwell's equations, which is an instructive example since their casual properties are sometimes debated.

  10. In vitro activity of essential oils of Lippia sidoides and Lippia gracilis and their major chemical components against Thielaviopsis paradoxa, causal agent of stem bleeding in coconut palms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejane Rodrigues da Costa e Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils of Lippia sidoides, Lippia gracilis and their main chemical components were investigated for in vitro control of Thielaviopsis paradoxa. Mycelial growth and a number of pathogen conidia were inhibited by the essential oil of L. sidoides at all concentrations tested (0.2; 0.5; 1.0; 3.0 µL mL-1. L. sidoides oil contained 42.33% thymol and 4.56% carvacrol, while L. gracilis oil contained 10% thymol and 41.7% carvacrol. Mycelial growth and conidial production of T. paradoxa were completely inhibited by thymol at a 0.3 µL m-1 concentration. The results suggest that thymol could potentially be used for controlling coconut stem bleeding.

  11. Miscibility of Two Components in a Binary Mixture of 9-Phenyl Anthracene Mixed with Stearic Acid or Polymethyl Methacrylate at Air-Water Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P. K. Paul; Md. N. Islam; D. Bhattacharjee; S. A. Hussain

    2007-01-01

    We report the miscibility characteristics of two components in a binary mixture of 9-phenyl anthracene (PA) mixed with stearic acid (SA) or polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). The behaviour of surface pressure versus area per molecule isotherms reveal that the area per molecule decreases systematically with increasing molefractions of PA. The characteristics of areas per molecule versus molefractions and collapse pressure vs molefraction indicate that various interactions involved among the sample and matrix molecules. The interaction scheme is found to change with the change in surface pressure and molefraction of mixing. Scanning electron microscopic study confirms the aggregation of PA molecules in the mixed films.

  12. Application of the Second-Order Statistics for Estimation of the Pure Spectra of Individual Components from the Visible Hyperspectral Images of Their Mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Jong, Sung-Ho; Ri, Yong-U; Sin, Kye-Ryong

    2016-01-01

    The second-order statistics (SOS) can be applied in estimation of the pure spectra of chemical components from the spectrum of their mixture, when SOS seems to be good at estimation of spectral patterns, but their peak directions are opposite in some cases. In this paper, one method for judgment of the peak direction of the pure spectra was proposed, where the base line of the pure spectra was drawn by using their histograms and the peak directions were chosen so as to make all of the pure sp...

  13. Causality in Classical Electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Causality in electrodynamics is a subject of some confusion, especially regarding the application of Faraday's law and the Ampere-Maxwell law. This has led to the suggestion that we should not teach students that electric and magnetic fields can cause each other, but rather focus on charges and currents as the causal agents. In this paper I argue…

  14. Structure and component dynamics in binary mixtures of poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) with water and tetrahydrofuran: A diffraction, calorimetric, and dielectric spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goracci, G.; Arbe, A.; Alegría, A.; Su, Y.; Gasser, U.; Colmenero, J.

    2016-04-01

    We have combined X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction with polarization analysis, small angle neutron scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, and broad band dielectric spectroscopy to investigate the structure and dynamics of binary mixtures of poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) with either water or tetrahydrofuran (THF) at different concentrations. Aqueous mixtures are characterized by a highly heterogeneous structure where water clusters coexist with an underlying nano-segregation of main chains and side groups of the polymeric matrix. THF molecules are homogeneously distributed among the polymeric nano-domains for concentrations of one THF molecule/monomer or lower. A more heterogeneous situation is found for higher THF amounts, but without evidences for solvent clusters. In THF-mixtures, we observe a remarkable reduction of the glass-transition temperature which is enhanced with increasing amount of solvent but seems to reach saturation at high THF concentrations. Adding THF markedly reduces the activation energy of the polymer β-relaxation. The presence of THF molecules seemingly hinders a slow component of this process which is active in the dry state. The aqueous mixtures present a strikingly broad glass-transition feature, revealing a highly heterogeneous behavior in agreement with the structural study. Regarding the solvent dynamics, deep in the glassy state all data can be described by an Arrhenius temperature dependence with a rather similar activation energy. However, the values of the characteristic times are about three orders of magnitude smaller for THF than for water. Water dynamics display a crossover toward increasingly higher apparent activation energies in the region of the onset of the glass transition, supporting its interpretation as a consequence of the freezing of the structural relaxation of the surrounding matrix. The absence of such a crossover (at least in the wide dynamic window here accessed) in THF is attributed to

  15. Causality and Composite Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Joglekar, Satish D

    2007-01-01

    We study the question of whether a composite structure of elementary particles, with a length scale $1/\\Lambda$, can leave observable effects of non-locality and causality violation at higher energies (but $\\lesssim \\Lambda$). We formulate a model-independent approach based on Bogoliubov-Shirkov formulation of causality. We analyze the relation between the fundamental theory (of finer constituents) and the derived theory (of composite particles). We assume that the fundamental theory is causal and formulate a condition which must be fulfilled for the derived theory to be causal. We analyze the condition and exhibit possibilities which fulfil and which violate the condition. We make comments on how causality violating amplitudes can arise.

  16. Causality in demand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Max; Jensen, Frank; Setälä, Jari;

    2011-01-01

    to fish demand. On the German market for farmed trout and substitutes, it is found that supply sources, i.e. aquaculture and fishery, are not the only determinant of causality. Storing, tightness of management and aggregation level of integrated markets might also be important. The methodological......This article focuses on causality in demand. A methodology where causality is imposed and tested within an empirical co-integrated demand model, not prespecified, is suggested. The methodology allows different causality of different products within the same demand system. The methodology is applied...... implication is that more explicit focus on causality in demand analyses provides improved information. The results suggest that frozen trout forms part of a large European whitefish market, where prices of fresh trout are formed on a relatively separate market. Redfish is a substitute on both markets. The...

  17. Causality in Europeanization Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Kennet

    2012-01-01

    Discourse analysis as a methodology is perhaps not readily associated with substantive causality claims. At the same time the study of discourses is very much the study of conceptions of causal relations among a set, or sets, of agents. Within Europeanization research we have seen endeavours...... to develop discursive institutional analytical frameworks and something that comes close to the formulation of hypothesis on the effects of European Union (EU) policies and institutions on domestic change. Even if these efforts so far do not necessarily amount to substantive theories or claims of causality......, it suggests that discourse analysis and the study of causality are by no means opposites. The study of Europeanization discourses may even be seen as an essential step in the move towards claims of causality in Europeanization research. This chapter deals with the question of how we may move from the study...

  18. Agency, time and causality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eWidlok

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive Scientists interested in causal cognition increasingly search for evidence from non-WEIRD people but find only very few cross-cultural studies that specifically target causal cognition. This article suggests how information about causality can be retrieved from ethnographic monographs, specifically from ethnographies that discuss agency and concepts of time. Many apparent cultural differences with regard to causal cognition dissolve when cultural extensions of agency and personhood to non-humans are taken into account. At the same time considerable variability remains when we include notions of time, linearity and sequence. The article focuses on ethnographic case studies from Africa but provides a more general perspective on the role of ethnography in research on the diversity and universality of causal cognition.

  19. Melting of Single Lipid Components in Binary Lipid Mixtures: A Comparison between FTIR Spectroscopy, DSC and Monte Carlo Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Fidorra, M; Seeger, H M

    2007-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) Simulations, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to study the melting behavior of single lipid components in two-component membranes of 1,2-Dimyristoyl-D54-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (DMPC-d54) and 1,2-Distearoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (DSPC). Microscopic information on the temperature dependent melting of the single lipid species could be investigated using FTIR. The microscopic behavior measured could be well described by the results from the MC simulations. These simulations also allowed to calculate heat capacity profiles as determined with DSC. These ones provide macroscopic information about melting enthalpies and entropy changes which are not accessible with FTIR. Therefore, the MC simulations allowed us to link the two different experimental approaches of FTIR and DSC.

  20. A capillary liquid chromatography method for benzalkonium chloride determination as a component or contaminant in mixtures of biocides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Blanco, M C; Argente-García, A; Campíns-Falcó, P

    2016-01-29

    A method for quantifying benzalkonium chloride (BAK), an alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium compound, in several biocides formulations is proposed. A tertiary amine like N-(3-aminopropyl)-N-dodecyl-1,3-propanediamine (TA) and a straight-chain alkyl ammonium compound like trimethyl-tetradecyl ammonium chloride (TMTDAC), have been employed as trade surfactants besides BAK. Two capillary analytical columns with different polarities are tested: inertsil CN-3 capillary column (150mm×0.5mm i.d., 3μm particle diameter) and a non endcapped Zorbax C18 capillary column (35mm×0.5mm i.d., 5μm particle diameter). This latter column provided the best separation of the BAK homologues in less than 12min using acetonitrile:acetate buffer (50mM, pH 5) 85:15 at 20μLmin(-1). The proposed method combines on-line in-tube solid-phase microextraction (IT-SPME) coupled to capillary liquid chromatography (CapLC) and UV diode array detection. Matrix effect was present when TA were in excess to BAK. If TMTDAC is the co-biocide, matrix effect is always present. A decreasing of analytical response mainly for C12-BAK homologue was found using both chromatographic columns. The charged amount of mixture in the system was the most important parameter for obtaining reliable results. 1mL was the on line processed sample volume optimum for concentrations lower than 35μgmL(-1) of total surfactants. LODs were 0.03μgmL(-1) and 0.006μgmL(-1) for C12-BAK and C14-BAK, respectively. This method is also of use to evaluate the unwanted presence of BAK in biocide formulations due to industrial processes.

  1. Causal Newton Gravity Law

    CERN Document Server

    Zinoviev, Yury M

    2012-01-01

    The equations of the relativistic causal Newton gravity law for the planets of the solar system are studied in the approximation when the Sun rests at the coordinates origin and the planets do not iteract between each other.

  2. Causal spin foams

    CERN Document Server

    Immirzi, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    I discuss how to impose causality on spin-foam models, separating forward and backward propagation, turning a given triangulation to a 'causal set', and giving asymptotically the exponential of the Regge action, not a cosine. I show the equivalence of the prescriptions which have been proposed to achieve this. Essential to the argument is the closure condition for the 4-simplices, all made of space-like tetrahedra.

  3. Quantum Causal Graph Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Arrighi, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Consider a graph having quantum systems lying at each node. Suppose that the whole thing evolves in discrete time steps, according to a global, unitary causal operator. By causal we mean that information can only propagate at a bounded speed, with respect to the distance given by the graph. Suppose, moreover, that the graph itself is subject to the evolution, and may be driven to be in a quantum superposition of graphs---in accordance to the superposition principle. We show that these unitary causal operators must decompose as a finite-depth circuit of local unitary gates. This unifies a result on Quantum Cellular Automata with another on Reversible Causal Graph Dynamics. Along the way we formalize a notion of causality which is valid in the context of quantum superpositions of time-varying graphs, and has a number of good properties. Keywords: Quantum Lattice Gas Automata, Block-representation, Curtis-Hedlund-Lyndon, No-signalling, Localizability, Quantum Gravity, Quantum Graphity, Causal Dynamical Triangula...

  4. Warfarin and coumarin-like Murraya paniculata extract down-regulate EpCAM-mediated cell adhesion: individual components versus mixture for studying botanical metastatic chemopreventives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jingwei; Zhou, Suxia; Jiang, Zhou; Chi, Ting; Ma, Ji; Kuo, Minliang; Lee, Alan Yueh-Luen; Jia, Lee

    2016-01-01

    We recently defined cancer metastatic chemoprevention as utilizing safe and effective molecules to comprehensively prevent the spark of activation-adhesion-extravasation-proliferation metastatic cascade caused by circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The strategy focuses on preventing the most important starting point of the cascade. We identified an extract from a well-known medical plant Murraya paniculata, which inhibited both embryonic implantation to human endometrium as traditionally-used for abortion and CTC adhesion to human endothelium. Here, we separated and characterized five coumarin-containing components (Z1-Z5) from the botanic extract. Flow cytometry revealed that within 1-100 μg/mL, Z3 and Z5 down-regulated EpCAM expression in human colon HCT116, whereas, Z1 and Z2 did oppositely. Warfarin and Z1-Z5 component mixture (CM) also down-regulated EpCAM expression. The down-regulation of EpCAM by Z3, Z5, CM and warfarin was confirmed by western blotting, and caused inhibition on adhesion of cancer cells to human endothelial cells. Rat coagulation study showed that warfarin prolonged prothrombin time, whereas, Z3 did not. The present studies revealed that, for the first time, warfarin and coumarin-like components Z3, Z5 and CM from Murraya paniculata could directly inhibit EpCAM-mediated cell-cell adhesion. PMID:27480614

  5. Assimetria causal: um estudo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Túlio Aguiar

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo, examinamos o aspecto assimétrico da relação causal, confrontando-o com o ponto de vista humiano e neo-humiano. Seguindo Hausman e Ehring, favorecemos uma abordagem situacional para a assimetria causal. Nós exploramos a análise do famoso exemplo do mastro (Flagpole, esclarecendo as conexões entre causação e explicação. Nosso diagnóstico geral é que a tradição neo-humiana supõe, equivocadamente, que as relações nômicas, com exceção de pequenos detalhes, exaurem as relações causais.This paper examines the asymmetrical aspect of causal relation, confronting it to Humean and Neo-Humean's view. Following Hausman and Ehring, we favor a situational approach to causal asymmetry. We explore the Hausman's analysis of flagpole's example, clearing the connexions between causation and explanation. Our general diagnosis is that the Neo-humean tradition wrongly supposes that nomic relations, with the exception of minor details, exhaust the causal relations.

  6. Causality and the Doppler Peaks

    OpenAIRE

    Turok, Neil

    1996-01-01

    Could cosmic structure have formed by the action of causal physics within the standard hot big bang, or was a prior period of inflation required? Recently there has been some discussion of whether causal sources could reproduce the pattern of Doppler peaks of the standard scale-invariant adiabatic theory. This paper gives a rigorous definition of causality, and a causal decomposition of a general source. I present an example of a simple causal source which mimics the standard adiabatic theory...

  7. Causal graph dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Arrighi, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    We generalize the theory of Cellular Automata to arbitrary, time-varying graphs. In other words we formalize, and prove theorems about, the intuitive idea of a labelled graph which evolves in time - but under the natural constraint that information can only ever be transmitted at a bounded speed, with respect to the distance given by the graph. The notion of translation-invariance is also generalized. The definition we provide for these `causal graph dynamics' is simple and axiomatic. The theorems we provide also show that it is robust. For instance, causal graph dynamics are stable under composition and under restriction to radius one. In the finite case some fundamental facts of Cellular Automata theory carry through: causal graph dynamics admit a characterization as continuous functions and they are stable under inversion. The provided examples suggest a wide range of applications of this mathematical object, from complex systems science to theoretical physics. Keywords: Dynamical networks, Boolean network...

  8. Causal inference in econometrics

    CERN Document Server

    Kreinovich, Vladik; Sriboonchitta, Songsak

    2016-01-01

    This book is devoted to the analysis of causal inference which is one of the most difficult tasks in data analysis: when two phenomena are observed to be related, it is often difficult to decide whether one of them causally influences the other one, or whether these two phenomena have a common cause. This analysis is the main focus of this volume. To get a good understanding of the causal inference, it is important to have models of economic phenomena which are as accurate as possible. Because of this need, this volume also contains papers that use non-traditional economic models, such as fuzzy models and models obtained by using neural networks and data mining techniques. It also contains papers that apply different econometric models to analyze real-life economic dependencies.

  9. Complementarity, causality, and explanation

    CERN Document Server

    Losee, John

    2013-01-01

    Prior to the work of Niels Bohr, discussions on the relationship of cause and effect presupposed that successful causal attribution implies explanation. The success of quantum theory challenged this presupposition. In this succinct review of the history of these discussions, John Losee presents the philosophical background of debates over the cause-effect relation. He reviews the positions of Aristotle, René Descartes, Isaac Newton, David Hume, Immanuel Kant, and John Stuart Mill. He shows how nineteenth-century theories in physics and chemistry were informed by a dominant theory of causality

  10. Causal premise semantics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    The rise of causality and the attendant graph-theoretic modeling tools in the study of counterfactual reasoning has had resounding effects in many areas of cognitive science, but it has thus far not permeated the mainstream in linguistic theory to a comparable degree. In this study I show that a version of the predominant framework for the formal semantic analysis of conditionals, Kratzer-style premise semantics, allows for a straightforward implementation of the crucial ideas and insights of Pearl-style causal networks. I spell out the details of such an implementation, focusing especially on the notions of intervention on a network and backtracking interpretations of counterfactuals.

  11. Understanding Causal Coherence Relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, G.

    2008-01-01

    The research reported in this dissertation focuses on the cognitive processes and representations involved in understanding causal coherence relations in text. Coherence relations are the meaning relations between the information units in the text, such as Cause-Consequence. These relations can be m

  12. The suitability of concentration addition for predicting the effects of multi-component mixtures of up to 17 anti-androgens with varied structural features in an in vitro AR antagonist assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermler, Sibylle; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.kortenkamp@brunel.ac.uk

    2011-12-15

    The risks associated with human exposures to chemicals capable of antagonising the effects of endogenous androgens have attracted considerable recent interest. Exposure is typically to large numbers of chemicals with androgen receptor (AR) antagonist activity, yet there is limited evidence of the combined effects of multi-component mixtures of these chemicals. A few in vitro studies with mixtures of up to six AR antagonists suggest that the concept of concentration addition (CA) provides good approximations of experimentally observed mixture effects, but studies with larger numbers of anti-androgens, and with more varied structural features, are missing. Here we show that the mixture effects of up to 17 AR antagonists, comprising compounds as diverse as UV-filter substances, parabens, perfluorinated compounds, bisphenol-A, benzo({alpha})pyrene, synthetic musks, antioxidants and polybrominated biphenyls, can be predicted well on the basis of the anti-androgenicity of the single components using the concept of CA. We tested these mixtures in an in vitro AR-dependent luciferase reporter gene assay, based on MDA-kb2 cells. The effects of further mixtures, composed of four and six anti-androgens, could be predicted accurately by CA. However, there was a shortfall from expected additivity with a ten-component mixture at two different mixture ratios, but attempts to attribute these deviations to differential expression of hormone-metabolising CYP isoforms did not produce conclusive results. CA provides good approximations of in vitro mixture effects of anti-androgens with varying structural features. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Humans are exposed to a large number of androgen receptor antagonists. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is limited evidence of the combined effects of anti-androgenic chemicals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We modelled the predictability of combined effects of up to 17 anti-androgens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested the

  13. Revisiting Causality in Markov Chains

    OpenAIRE

    Shojaee, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Identifying causal relationships is a key premise of scientific research. The growth of observational data in different disciplines along with the availability of machine learning methods offers the possibility of using an empirical approach to identifying potential causal relationships, to deepen our understandings of causal behavior and to build theories accordingly. Conventional methods of causality inference from observational data require a considerable length of time series data to capt...

  14. Causality between time series

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, X San

    2014-01-01

    Given two time series, can one tell, in a rigorous and quantitative way, the cause and effect between them? Based on a recently rigorized physical notion namely information flow, we arrive at a concise formula and give this challenging question, which is of wide concern in different disciplines, a positive answer. Here causality is measured by the time rate of change of information flowing from one series, say, X2, to another, X1. The measure is asymmetric between the two parties and, particularly, if the process underlying X1 does not depend on X2, then the resulting causality from X2 to X1 vanishes. The formula is tight in form, involving only the commonly used statistics, sample covariances. It has been validated with touchstone series purportedly generated with one-way causality. It has also been applied to the investigation of real world problems; an example presented here is the cause-effect relation between two climate modes, El Ni\\~no and Indian Ocean Dipole, which have been linked to the hazards in f...

  15. Tachyon Kinematics and causality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chronological order of the events along a space-like path is not invariant under Lorentz transformations, as wellknown. This led to an early conviction that tachyons would give rise to causal anomalies. A relativistic version of the Stuckelberg-Feynman switching procedure (SWP) has been invoked as the suitable tool to eliminate those anomalies. The application of the SWP does eliminate the motions backwards in time, but interchanges the roles of source and dector. This fact triggered the proposal of a host of causal paradoxes. Till now, however, it has not been recognized that such paradoxes can be sensibly discussed (and completely solved, at least in microphysics) only after having properly developed the tachyon relativistic mechanics. We start by showing how to apply the SWP, both in the case of ordiry Special Relativity, and in the case with tachyons. Then, we carefully exploit the kinematics of the tachyon-exchange between to (ordinary) bodies. Being finally able to tackle the tachyon-causality problem, we successively solve the paradoxes: (i) by Tolman-Regge; (ii) by Pirani; (iii) by Edmonds; (iv) by Bell. At last, we discuss a further, new paradox associated with the transmission of signals by modulated tachyon beams

  16. Causality in physiological signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Andreas; Kraemer, Jan F; Penzel, Thomas; Bonnemeier, Hendrik; Kurths, Jürgen; Wessel, Niels

    2016-05-01

    Health is one of the most important non-material assets and thus also has an enormous influence on material values, since treating and preventing diseases is expensive. The number one cause of death worldwide today originates in cardiovascular diseases. For these reasons the aim of understanding the functions and the interactions of the cardiovascular system is and has been a major research topic throughout various disciplines for more than a hundred years. The purpose of most of today's research is to get as much information as possible with the lowest possible effort and the least discomfort for the subject or patient, e.g. via non-invasive measurements. A family of tools whose importance has been growing during the last years is known under the headline of coupling measures. The rationale for this kind of analysis is to identify the structure of interactions in a system of multiple components. Important information lies for example in the coupling direction, the coupling strength, and occurring time lags. In this work, we will, after a brief general introduction covering the development of cardiovascular time series analysis, introduce, explain and review some of the most important coupling measures and classify them according to their origin and capabilities in the light of physiological analyses. We will begin with classical correlation measures, go via Granger-causality-based tools, entropy-based techniques (e.g. momentary information transfer), nonlinear prediction measures (e.g. mutual prediction) to symbolic dynamics (e.g. symbolic coupling traces). All these methods have contributed important insights into physiological interactions like cardiorespiratory coupling, neuro-cardio-coupling and many more. Furthermore, we will cover tools to detect and analyze synchronization and coordination (e.g. synchrogram and coordigram). As a last point we will address time dependent couplings as identified using a recent approach employing ensembles of time series. The

  17. Revisiting Causality in Markov Chains

    CERN Document Server

    Shojaee, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Identifying causal relationships is a key premise of scientific research. The growth of observational data in different disciplines along with the availability of machine learning methods offers the possibility of using an empirical approach to identifying potential causal relationships, to deepen our understandings of causal behavior and to build theories accordingly. Conventional methods of causality inference from observational data require a considerable length of time series data to capture cause-effect relationship. We find that potential causal relationships can be inferred from the composition of one step transition rates to and from an event. Also known as Markov chain, one step transition rates are a commonly available resource in different scientific disciplines. Here we introduce a simple, effective and computationally efficient method that we termed 'Causality Inference using Composition of Transitions CICT' to reveal causal structure with high accuracy. We characterize the differences in causes,...

  18. High-power gas-discharge excimer ArF, KrCl, KrF and XeCl lasers utilising two-component gas mixtures without a buffer gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razhev, A. M.; Kargapol'tsev, E. S.; Churkin, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    Results of an experimental study of the influence of a gas mixture (laser active medium) composition on an output energy and total efficiency of gas-discharge excimer lasers on ArF* (193 nm), KrCl* (222 nm), KrF* (248 nm) and XeCl* (308 nm) molecules operating without a buffer gas are presented. The optimal ratios of gas components (from the viewpoint of a maximum output energy) of an active medium are found, which provide an efficient operation of laser sources. It is experimentally confirmed that for gas-discharge excimer lasers on halogenides of inert gases the presence of a buffer gas in an active medium is not a necessary condition for efficient operation. For the first time, in two-component gas mixtures of repetitively pulsed gas-discharge excimer lasers on electron transitions of excimer molecules ArF*, KrCl*, KrF* and XeCl*, the pulsed energy of laser radiation obtained under pumping by a transverse volume electric discharge in a low-pressure gas mixture without a buffer gas reached up to 170 mJ and a high pulsed output power (of up to 24 MW) was obtained at a FWHM duration of the KrF-laser pulse of 7 ns. The maximal total efficiency obtained in the experiment with two-component gas mixtures of KrF and XeCl lasers was 0.8%.

  19. Entropy of Causal Horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    We analyze spacetimes with horizons and study the thermodynamic aspects of causal horizons, suggesting that the resemblance between gravitational and thermodynamic systems has a deeper quantum mechanical origin. We find that the observer dependence of such horizons is a direct consequence of associating a temperature and entropy to a spacetime. The geometrical picture of a horizon acting as a one-way membrane for information flow can be accepted as a natural interpretation of assigning a quantum field theory to a spacetime with boundary, ultimately leading to a close connection with thermodynamics.

  20. Quantum information causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitalúa-García, Damián

    2013-05-24

    How much information can a transmitted physical system fundamentally communicate? We introduce the principle of quantum information causality, which states the maximum amount of quantum information that a quantum system can communicate as a function of its dimension, independently of any previously shared quantum physical resources. We present a new quantum information task, whose success probability is upper bounded by the new principle, and show that an optimal strategy to perform it combines the quantum teleportation and superdense coding protocols with a task that has classical inputs. PMID:23745844

  1. Inferring deterministic causal relations

    OpenAIRE

    Daniusis, Povilas; Janzing, Dominik; Mooij, Joris; Zscheischler, Jakob; Steudel, Bastian; Zhang, Kun; Schoelkopf, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    We consider two variables that are related to each other by an invertible function. While it has previously been shown that the dependence structure of the noise can provide hints to determine which of the two variables is the cause, we presently show that even in the deterministic (noise-free) case, there are asymmetries that can be exploited for causal inference. Our method is based on the idea that if the function and the probability density of the cause are chosen independently, then the ...

  2. Experimental test of nonlocal causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringbauer, Martin; Giarmatzi, Christina; Chaves, Rafael; Costa, Fabio; White, Andrew G; Fedrizzi, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Explaining observations in terms of causes and effects is central to empirical science. However, correlations between entangled quantum particles seem to defy such an explanation. This implies that some of the fundamental assumptions of causal explanations have to give way. We consider a relaxation of one of these assumptions, Bell's local causality, by allowing outcome dependence: a direct causal influence between the outcomes of measurements of remote parties. We use interventional data from a photonic experiment to bound the strength of this causal influence in a two-party Bell scenario, and observational data from a Bell-type inequality test for the considered models. Our results demonstrate the incompatibility of quantum mechanics with a broad class of nonlocal causal models, which includes Bell-local models as a special case. Recovering a classical causal picture of quantum correlations thus requires an even more radical modification of our classical notion of cause and effect.

  3. Causal inference based on counterfactuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Höfler M

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The counterfactual or potential outcome model has become increasingly standard for causal inference in epidemiological and medical studies. Discussion This paper provides an overview on the counterfactual and related approaches. A variety of conceptual as well as practical issues when estimating causal effects are reviewed. These include causal interactions, imperfect experiments, adjustment for confounding, time-varying exposures, competing risks and the probability of causation. It is argued that the counterfactual model of causal effects captures the main aspects of causality in health sciences and relates to many statistical procedures. Summary Counterfactuals are the basis of causal inference in medicine and epidemiology. Nevertheless, the estimation of counterfactual differences pose several difficulties, primarily in observational studies. These problems, however, reflect fundamental barriers only when learning from observations, and this does not invalidate the counterfactual concept.

  4. Experimental test of nonlocal causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringbauer, Martin; Giarmatzi, Christina; Chaves, Rafael; Costa, Fabio; White, Andrew G; Fedrizzi, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Explaining observations in terms of causes and effects is central to empirical science. However, correlations between entangled quantum particles seem to defy such an explanation. This implies that some of the fundamental assumptions of causal explanations have to give way. We consider a relaxation of one of these assumptions, Bell's local causality, by allowing outcome dependence: a direct causal influence between the outcomes of measurements of remote parties. We use interventional data from a photonic experiment to bound the strength of this causal influence in a two-party Bell scenario, and observational data from a Bell-type inequality test for the considered models. Our results demonstrate the incompatibility of quantum mechanics with a broad class of nonlocal causal models, which includes Bell-local models as a special case. Recovering a classical causal picture of quantum correlations thus requires an even more radical modification of our classical notion of cause and effect. PMID:27532045

  5. Experimental test of nonlocal causality

    OpenAIRE

    Ringbauer, Martin; Giarmatzi, Christina; Chaves, Rafael; Costa, Fabio; White, Andrew G.; Fedrizzi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Explaining observations in terms of causes and effects is central to empirical science. However, correlations between entangled quantum particles seem to defy such an explanation. This implies that some of the fundamental assumptions of causal explanations have to give way. We consider a relaxation of one of these assumptions, Bell’s local causality, by allowing outcome dependence: a direct causal influence between the outcomes of measurements of remote parties. We use interventional data fro...

  6. Causal evolution of wave packets

    CERN Document Server

    Eckstein, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Drawing from the optimal transport theory adapted to the relativistic setting we formulate the principle of a causal flow of probability and apply it in the wave packet formalism. We demonstrate that whereas the Dirac system is causal, the relativistic-Schr\\"odinger Hamiltonian impels a superluminal evolution of probabilities. We quantify the causality breakdown in the latter system and argue that, in contrast to the popular viewpoint, it is not related to the localisation properties of the states.

  7. Relativistic hydrodynamics - causality and stability

    OpenAIRE

    Ván, P.; Biró, T. S.

    2007-01-01

    Causality and stability in relativistic dissipative hydrodynamics are important conceptual issues. We argue that causality is not restricted to hyperbolic set of differential equations. E.g. heat conduction equation can be causal considering the physical validity of the theory. Furthermore we propose a new concept of relativistic internal energy that clearly separates the dissipative and non-dissipative effects. We prove that with this choice we remove all known instabilities of the linear re...

  8. Relationship of causal effects in a causal chain and related inference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG; Zhi; HE; Yangbo; WANG; Xueli

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the relationship among the total causal effect and local causal effects in a causal chain and identifiability of causal effects. We show a transmission relationship of causal effects in a causal chain. According to the relationship, we give an approach to eliminating confounding bias through controlling for intermediate variables in a causal chain.

  9. Causality Statistical Perspectives and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Berzuini, Carlo; Bernardinell, Luisa

    2012-01-01

    A state of the art volume on statistical causality Causality: Statistical Perspectives and Applications presents a wide-ranging collection of seminal contributions by renowned experts in the field, providing a thorough treatment of all aspects of statistical causality. It covers the various formalisms in current use, methods for applying them to specific problems, and the special requirements of a range of examples from medicine, biology and economics to political science. This book:Provides a clear account and comparison of formal languages, concepts and models for statistical causality. Addr

  10. Identifiability of causal effect for a simple causal model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑忠国; 张艳艳; 童行伟

    2002-01-01

    Counterfactual model is put forward to discuss the causal inference in the directed acyclic graph and its corresponding identifiability is thus studied with the ancillary information based on conditional independence. It is shown that the assumption of ignorability can be expanded to the assumption of replaceability,under which the causal efiects are identifiable.

  11. Structural Equations and Causal Explanations: Some Challenges for Causal SEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Keith A.

    2010-01-01

    One common application of structural equation modeling (SEM) involves expressing and empirically investigating causal explanations. Nonetheless, several aspects of causal explanation that have an impact on behavioral science methodology remain poorly understood. It remains unclear whether applications of SEM should attempt to provide complete…

  12. Inferring deterministic causal relations

    CERN Document Server

    Daniusis, Povilas; Mooij, Joris; Zscheischler, Jakob; Steudel, Bastian; Zhang, Kun; Schoelkopf, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    We consider two variables that are related to each other by an invertible function. While it has previously been shown that the dependence structure of the noise can provide hints to determine which of the two variables is the cause, we presently show that even in the deterministic (noise-free) case, there are asymmetries that can be exploited for causal inference. Our method is based on the idea that if the function and the probability density of the cause are chosen independently, then the distribution of the effect will, in a certain sense, depend on the function. We provide a theoretical analysis of this method, showing that it also works in the low noise regime, and link it to information geometry. We report strong empirical results on various real-world data sets from different domains.

  13. Influence of organic component on geometry and stability of the Dy(3) complexes with benzoic and aminobenzoic acids in water-80 vol.% DMSO(DMFA) mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data of pH-metric and magnetooptical analyses were used to evaluate stability and structure of benzoate and aminobenzoate dysprosium (3) complexes in water and water - 80 vol.% DMSO (DMFA) mixtures. Factors, dictating change of complex structure and stability when passing from water to organic water solvents, are discussed. 19 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  14. Expert Causal Reasoning and Explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, Benjamin

    The relationship between cognitive psychologists and researchers in artificial intelligence carries substantial benefits for both. An ongoing investigation in causal reasoning in medical problem solving systems illustrates this interaction. This paper traces a dialectic of sorts in which three different types of causal resaoning for medical…

  15. Introduction to causal dynamical triangulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Görlich, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    The method of causal dynamical triangulations is a non-perturbative and background-independent approach to quantum theory of gravity. In this review we present recent results obtained within the four dimensional model of causal dynamical triangulations. We describe the phase structure of the model...

  16. Re-thinking local causality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friederich, Simon

    2015-01-01

    There is widespread belief in a tension between quantum theory and special relativity, motivated by the idea that quantum theory violates J. S. Bell's criterion of local causality, which is meant to implement the causal structure of relativistic space-time. This paper argues that if one takes the es

  17. Causal Inference and Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, E. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Causal inference is of central importance to developmental psychology. Many key questions in the field revolve around improving the lives of children and their families. These include identifying risk factors that if manipulated in some way would foster child development. Such a task inherently involves causal inference: One wants to know whether…

  18. The Visual Causality Analyst: An Interactive Interface for Causal Reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Mueller, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Uncovering the causal relations that exist among variables in multivariate datasets is one of the ultimate goals in data analytics. Causation is related to correlation but correlation does not imply causation. While a number of casual discovery algorithms have been devised that eliminate spurious correlations from a network, there are no guarantees that all of the inferred causations are indeed true. Hence, bringing a domain expert into the casual reasoning loop can be of great benefit in identifying erroneous casual relationships suggested by the discovery algorithm. To address this need we present the Visual Causal Analyst-a novel visual causal reasoning framework that allows users to apply their expertise, verify and edit causal links, and collaborate with the causal discovery algorithm to identify a valid causal network. Its interface consists of both an interactive 2D graph view and a numerical presentation of salient statistical parameters, such as regression coefficients, p-values, and others. Both help users in gaining a good understanding of the landscape of causal structures particularly when the number of variables is large. Our framework is also novel in that it can handle both numerical and categorical variables within one unified model and return plausible results. We demonstrate its use via a set of case studies using multiple practical datasets. PMID:26529703

  19. Variational and scale mixture representations of non- Gaussian densities for estimation in the Bayesian Linear Model : sparse coding, independent component analysis, and minimum entropy segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Jason Allan

    2006-01-01

    This thesis considers representations of non-Gaussian probability densities for use in various estimation problems associated with the Bayesian Linear Model. We define a class of densities that we call Strongly Super- Gaussian, and show the relationship of these densities to Gaussian Scale Mixtures, and densities with positive kurtosis. Such densities have been used to model "sparse" random variables, with densities that are sharply peaked with heavy tails. We show that strongly super-Gaussia...

  20. How inhomogeneous salt distribution can affect the sensory properties of salt-reduced multi-component food: contribution of a mixture experimental design approach applied to pizza

    OpenAIRE

    Guilloux, Marion; PROST, Carole; Courcoux, Philippe; Le Bail, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Salt reduction in food is a major concern for public health authorities but remains a challenge for the food industry. Aims of this study are to modulate salt distribution between the ingredients of salt-reduced pizza (-30%) by modifying the salt content of each ingredient without changing the total salt content of pizza using mixture experimental design, to demonstrate its impact on sensory properties, and to determine the formulation with sensory properties, evaluated by Quantitative Descri...

  1. ["Karoshi" and causal relationships].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamajima, N

    1992-08-01

    This paper aims to introduce a measure for use by physicians for stating the degree of probable causal relationship for "Karoshi", ie, a sudden death from cerebrovascular diseases or ischemic heart diseases under occupational stresses, as well as to give a brief description for legal procedures associated with worker's compensation and civil trial in Japan. It is a well-used measure in epidemiology, "attributable risk percent (AR%)", which can be applied to describe the extent of contribution to "Karoshi" of the excess occupational burdens the deceased worker was forced to bear. Although several standards such as average occupational burdens for the worker, average occupational burdens for an ordinary worker, burdens in a nonoccupational life, and a complete rest, might be considered for the AR% estimation, the average occupational burdens for an ordinary worker should normally be utilized as a standard for worker's compensation. The adoption of AR% could be helpful for courts to make a consistent judgement whether "Karoshi" cases are compensatable or not. PMID:1392028

  2. Classical planning and causal implicatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blackburn, Patrick Rowan; Benotti, Luciana

    to generate clarification requests"; as a result we can model task-oriented dialogue as an interactive process locally structured by negotiation of the underlying task. We give several examples of Frolog-human dialog, discuss the limitations imposed by the classical planning paradigm, and indicate......In this paper we motivate and describe a dialogue manager (called Frolog) which uses classical planning to infer causal implicatures. A causal implicature is a type of Gricean relation implicature, a highly context dependent form of inference. As we shall see, causal implicatures are important...

  3. Effect of permethrin, anthracene and mixture exposure on shell components, enzymatic activities and proteins status in the Mediterranean clam Venerupis decussata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellami, Badreddine, E-mail: sellamibadreddine@gmail.com [Laboratory of Environment Biomonitoring, Coastal Ecology Unit, Faculty of Sciences of Bizerta, University of Carthage, 7021 Zarzouna (Tunisia); Khazri, Abdelhafidh [Laboratory of Environment Biomonitoring, Coastal Ecology Unit, Faculty of Sciences of Bizerta, University of Carthage, 7021 Zarzouna (Tunisia); Mezni, Amine [Unit of Research 99/UR12-30, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences of Bizerte, 7021 Jarzouna (Tunisia); Louati, Héla; Dellali, Mohamed; Aissa, Patricia; Mahmoudi, Ezzeddine; Beyrem, Hamouda [Laboratory of Environment Biomonitoring, Coastal Ecology Unit, Faculty of Sciences of Bizerta, University of Carthage, 7021 Zarzouna (Tunisia); Sheehan, David, E-mail: d.sheehan@ucc.ie [Environmental Research Institute and Department of Biochemistry, University College Cork, Western Gateway Building, Western Road, Cork (Ireland)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • We assessed toxicity of anthracene, permethrin and their mixture on clams. • Tissue and stressor-dependent changes were observed in biochemical responses. • Permethrin induces phase transition from aragonite to calcite in shell structure. • Interactive effects were observed on digestive gland and gill biomarkers. • Both approaches give new vision to risk assessment of organic pollution. - Abstract: Anthracene (ANT) and permethrin (PER) are two of the more toxic compounds reaching the marine environment. This study aimed to determine the impact of these molecules on Venerupis decussata, an economically important species cultured on the Tunisian coast. Shell structure and its possible transformation upon exposure to the two contaminants were studied by X-ray diffraction and gravimetric analyses. Results revealed a phase transition in shell composition from aragonite to calcite after PER exposure, to a mixture of PER and ANT (Mix) but not for ANT alone. Catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione transferase (GST) activities were determined in digestive gland and gills after exposure to ANT, PER and Mix to assess the impact of the contamination on the oxidative status of V. decussata. Enzyme activities increased in the digestive gland after PER treatment and in the gills after ANT treatment. PER exposure significantly reduced the levels of free thiols and increased levels of carbonylated proteins in the digestive gland, as compared to controls. In contrast, ANT exposure significantly reduced free thiols and increased the number of carbonylated proteins in the gills. Mix induced additive effects as measured by both enzymatic and proteomic approaches. The present study suggests that PER has a strong effect on shell structure; that PER and ANT exposure generate compound-dependent oxidative stress in the tissues of V. decussata and that a mixture of the two compounds has synergistic effects on biochemical response.

  4. Analysis of asphalt mixtures on town roads

    OpenAIRE

    Glavica, Primož

    2006-01-01

    Asphalt mixtures are most commonly used composite for construction of top layers of different drive ways. By definition asphalt mixtures are composed of crushed rock, fill, bitumen and additives. Percentage of individual components wary according to the purpose asphalt mixture is to be used for. Asphalt mixtures must be capable of enduring different types of load. According to the type of load asphalt mixtures are divided into asphalt mixtures used for supporting layers and asp...

  5. On causality of extreme events

    CERN Document Server

    Zanin, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    Multiple metrics have been developed to detect causality relations between data describing the elements constituting complex systems, all of them considering their evolution through time. Here we propose a metric able to detect causality within static data sets, by analysing how extreme events in one element correspond to the appearance of extreme events in a second one. The metric is able to detect both linear and non-linear causalities; to analyse both cross-sectional and longitudinal data sets; and to discriminate between real causalities and correlations caused by confounding factors. We validate the metric through synthetic data, dynamical and chaotic systems, and data representing the human brain activity in a cognitive task.

  6. Causal Structure and Spacetime Singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Stoica, Ovidiu Cristinel

    2015-01-01

    In General Relativity the metric can be recovered from the structure of the lightcones and a measure giving the volume element. Since the causal structure seems to be simpler than the Lorentzian manifold structure, this suggests that it is more fundamental. But there are cases when seemingly healthy causal structure and measure determine a singular metric. Here it is shown that this is not a bug, but a feature, because big-bang and black hole singularities are instances of this situation. But while the metric is special at singularities, being singular, the causal structure and the measure are not special in an explicit way at singularities. Therefore, considering the causal structure more fundamental than the metric provides a more natural framework to deal with spacetime singularities.

  7. Causal reasoning with mental models

    OpenAIRE

    Khemlani, Sangeet S.; Barbey, Aron K.; Johnson-Laird, Philip N

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines the model-based theory of causal reasoning. It postulates that the core meanings of causal assertions are deterministic and refer to temporally-ordered sets of possibilities: A causes B to occur means that given A, B occurs, whereas A enables B to occur means that given A, it is possible for B to occur. The paper shows how mental models represent such assertions, and how these models underlie deductive, inductive, and abductive reasoning yielding explanations. It reviews e...

  8. Consciousness and the "Causal Paradox"

    OpenAIRE

    Velmans, Max

    1996-01-01

    Viewed from a first-person perspective consciousness appears to be necessary for complex, novel human activity - but viewed from a third-person perspective consciousness appears to play no role in the activity of brains, producing a "causal paradox". To resolve this paradox one needs to distinguish consciousness of processing from consciousness accompanying processing or causing processing. Accounts of consciousness/brain causal interactions switch between first- and third-person perspectives...

  9. Realist Magic : Objects, Ontology, Causality

    OpenAIRE

    Morton, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Object-oriented ontology offers a startlingly fresh way to think about causality that takes into account developments in physics since 1900. Causality, argues, Object Oriented Ontology (OOO), is aesthetic. In this book, Timothy Morton explores what it means to say that a thing has come into being, that it is persisting, and that it has ended. Drawing from examples in physics, biology, ecology, art, literature and music, Morton demonstrates the counterintuitive yet elegant explanatory power of...

  10. Effect of permethrin, anthracene and mixture exposure on shell components, enzymatic activities and proteins status in the Mediterranean clam Venerupis decussata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellami, Badreddine; Khazri, Abdelhafidh; Mezni, Amine; Louati, Héla; Dellali, Mohamed; Aissa, Patricia; Mahmoudi, Ezzeddine; Beyrem, Hamouda; Sheehan, David

    2015-01-01

    Anthracene (ANT) and permethrin (PER) are two of the more toxic compounds reaching the marine environment. This study aimed to determine the impact of these molecules on Venerupis decussata, an economically important species cultured on the Tunisian coast. Shell structure and its possible transformation upon exposure to the two contaminants were studied by X-ray diffraction and gravimetric analyses. Results revealed a phase transition in shell composition from aragonite to calcite after PER exposure, to a mixture of PER and ANT (Mix) but not for ANT alone. Catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione transferase (GST) activities were determined in digestive gland and gills after exposure to ANT, PER and Mix to assess the impact of the contamination on the oxidative status of V. decussata. Enzyme activities increased in the digestive gland after PER treatment and in the gills after ANT treatment. PER exposure significantly reduced the levels of free thiols and increased levels of carbonylated proteins in the digestive gland, as compared to controls. In contrast, ANT exposure significantly reduced free thiols and increased the number of carbonylated proteins in the gills. Mix induced additive effects as measured by both enzymatic and proteomic approaches. The present study suggests that PER has a strong effect on shell structure; that PER and ANT exposure generate compound-dependent oxidative stress in the tissues of V. decussata and that a mixture of the two compounds has synergistic effects on biochemical response. PMID:25461742

  11. Correlation Measure Equivalence in Dynamic Causal Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Gyongyosi, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    We prove an equivalence transformation between the correlation measure functions of the causally-unbiased quantum gravity space and the causally-biased standard space. The theory of quantum gravity fuses the dynamic (nonfixed) causal structure of general relativity and the quantum uncertainty of quantum mechanics. In a quantum gravity space, the events are causally nonseparable and all time bias vanishes, which makes it no possible to use the standard causally-biased entropy and the correlation measure functions. Since a corrected causally-unbiased entropy function leads to an undefined, obscure mathematical structure, in our approach the correction is made in the data representation of the causally-unbiased space. We prove that the standard causally-biased entropy function with a data correction can be used to identify correlations in dynamic causal structures. As a corollary, all mathematical properties of the causally-biased correlation measure functions are preserved in the causally-unbiased space. The eq...

  12. Bianchi-I cosmology from causal thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bittencourt, Eduardo; Klippert, Renato

    2016-01-01

    We investigate diagonal Bianchi-I spacetimes in the presence of viscous fluids by using the shear and the anisotropic pressure components as the basic variables, where the viscosity is driven by the (second-order) causal thermodynamics. A few exact solutions are presented, among which we mention the anisotropic versions of de Sitter/anti-de Sitter geometries as well as an asymptotically isotropic spacetime presenting an effective constant cosmic acceleration without any cosmological constant. The qualitative analysis of the solutions for barotropic fluids with linear equations of state suggests that the behaviour is quite general.

  13. Trokomponentne granulisane smeše na bazi heksogena, aluminijuma i polistirena kao flegmatizatora / Three-component granular mixtures on the basis of hexogen, aluminium and polystirene as a binder

    OpenAIRE

    Mirjana N. Lukić-Anđelković

    2009-01-01

    U radu je prikazan način dobijanja i karakteristike trokomponentnih smeša RDX/Al/PS. Primenjen flegmatizator heksogena je termostabilni polimer polistiren čija je karakteristika da dobro prekriva. Primenjivan je konstantan sadržaj od 5% PS za različite sadržaje heksogena i aluminijuma. Sadržaj aluminijuma u smešama je 10, 15, 20 u 25% m/m. Ispitan je sastav i određena brzina detonacije. / The characteristics of three-component RDX/PS/Al mixtures have been described s well as the method for th...

  14. Response of selected plant and insect species to simulated solid rocket exhaust mixtures and to exhaust components from solid rocket fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, W. W.; Knott, W. M.; Stahel, E. P.; Ambrose, J. T.; Mccrimmon, J. N.; Engle, M.; Romanow, L. A.; Sawyer, A. G.; Tyson, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of solid rocket fuel (SRF) exhaust on selected plant and and insect species in the Merritt Island, Florida area was investigated in order to determine if the exhaust clouds generated by shuttle launches would adversely affect the native, plants of the Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge, the citrus production, or the beekeeping industry of the island. Conditions were simulated in greenhouse exposure chambers and field chambers constructed to model the ideal continuous stirred tank reactor. A plant exposure system was developed for dispensing and monitoring the two major chemicals in SRF exhaust, HCl and Al203, and for dispensing and monitoring SRF exhaust (controlled fuel burns). Plants native to Merritt Island, Florida were grown and used as test species. Dose-response relationships were determined for short term exposure of selected plant species to HCl, Al203, and mixtures of the two to SRF exhaust.

  15. Causality, causality, causality: the view of education inputs and outputs from economics

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa Barrow; Cecilia Elena Rouse

    2005-01-01

    Educators and policy makers are increasingly intent on using scientifically-based evidence when making decisions about education policy. Thus, education research today must necessarily be focused on identifying the causal relationships between education inputs and student outcomes. In this paper we discuss methodologies for estimating the causal effect of resources on education outcomes; we also review what we believe to be the best evidence from economics on a few important inputs: spending,...

  16. Trokomponentne granulisane smeše na bazi heksogena, aluminijuma i polistirena kao flegmatizatora / Three-component granular mixtures on the basis of hexogen, aluminium and polystirene as a binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana N. Lukić-Anđelković

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available U radu je prikazan način dobijanja i karakteristike trokomponentnih smeša RDX/Al/PS. Primenjen flegmatizator heksogena je termostabilni polimer polistiren čija je karakteristika da dobro prekriva. Primenjivan je konstantan sadržaj od 5% PS za različite sadržaje heksogena i aluminijuma. Sadržaj aluminijuma u smešama je 10, 15, 20 u 25% m/m. Ispitan je sastav i određena brzina detonacije. / The characteristics of three-component RDX/PS/Al mixtures have been described s well as the method for their preparation. Polystirene as a binder is a thermostable polymer with satisfactory characteristics for bonding explosives. The constant content of 5% m/m PS was applied for different contents of hexogen and aluminium. The content of Al in the mixtures was 10, 15, and 20% m/m. The composition of the bonded explosives was examined as well as the detonation velocity of these mixtures.

  17. Uniform infinite and Gibbs causal triangulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zohren, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    We discuss uniform infinite causal triangulations (UICT) and Gibbs causal triangulations which are probabilistic models for the causal dynamical triangulations (CDT) approach to quantum gravity. Since there is a bijection between causal triangulations and planar rooted trees we first discuss some as

  18. Causality and Tense - two temporal structure builders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oversteegen, E.

    2005-01-01

    By force of causes precede effects, causality contributes to the temporal meaning of discourse. In case of semantic causal relations, this contribution is straightforward, but in case of epistemic causal relations, it is not. In order to gain insight into the semantics of epistemic causal relations,

  19. Dynamics of tetrahydrofuran as minority component in a mixture with poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate): A neutron scattering and dielectric spectroscopy investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goracci, G., E-mail: sckgorag@ehu.es; Arbe, A. [Centro de Física de Materiales (CFM), CSIC–UPV/EHU–Materials Physics Center - MPC, Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Alegría, A. [Centro de Física de Materiales (CFM), CSIC–UPV/EHU–Materials Physics Center - MPC, Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Departamento de Física de Materiales (UPV/EHU), Apartado 1072, 20080 San Sebastián (Spain); Lohstroh, W. [Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum, Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstraße 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Su, Y. [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science JCNS, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Outstation at MLZ, Lichtenbergstraße 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Colmenero, J. [Centro de Física de Materiales - CFM, CSIC–UPV/EHU–Materials Physics Center - MPC, Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Departamento de Física de Materiales (UPV/EHU), Apartado 1072, 20080 San Sebastián (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center, Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain)

    2015-09-07

    We have investigated a mixture of poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) (70 wt. % PDMAEMA/30 wt. % THF) by combining dielectric spectroscopy and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) on a labelled sample, focusing on the dynamics of the THF molecules. Two independent processes have been identified. The “fast” one has been qualified as due to an internal motion of the THF ring leading to hydrogen displacements of about 3 Å with rather broadly distributed activation energies. The “slow” process is characterized by an Arrhenius-like temperature dependence of the characteristic time which persists over more than 9 orders of magnitude in time. The QENS results evidence the confined nature of this process, determining a size of about 8 Å for the volume within which THF hydrogens’ motions are restricted. In a complementary way, we have also investigated the structural features of the sample. This study suggests that THF molecules are well dispersed among side-groups nano-domains in the polymer matrix, ruling out a significant presence of clusters of solvent. Such a good dispersion, together with a rich mobility of the local environment, would prevent cooperativity effects to develop for the structural relaxation of solvent molecules, frustrating thereby the emergence of Vogel-Fulcher-like behavior, at least in the whole temperature interval investigated.

  20. Statistics, Causality and Bell's theorem

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, Richard D

    2012-01-01

    Bell's (1964) theorem is popularly supposed to establish the non-locality of quantum physics as a mathematical-physical theory. Building from this, observed violation of Bell's inequality in experiments such as that of Aspect and coworkers (1982) is popularly supposed to provide empirical proof of non-locality in the real world. This paper reviews recent work on Bell's theorem, linking it to issues in causality as understood by statisticians. The paper starts with a new proof of a strong (finite sample) version of Bell's theorem which relies only on elementary arithmetic and (counting) probability. This proof underscores the fact that Bell's theorem tells us that quantum theory is incompatible with the conjunction of three cherished and formerly uncontroversial physical principles, nicknamed here locality, realism, and freedom. The first, locality, is obviously connected to causality: causal influences need time to propagate spatially. Less obviously, the other two principles, realism and freedom, are also fo...

  1. Introductive remarks on causal inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana A. Romio

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the more challenging issues in epidemiological research is being able to provide an unbiased estimate of the causal exposure-disease effect, to assess the possible etiological mechanisms and the implication for public health. A major source of bias is confounding, which can spuriously create or mask the causal relationship. In the last ten years, methodological research has been developed to better de_ne the concept of causation in epidemiology and some important achievements have resulted in new statistical models. In this review, we aim to show how a technique the well known by statisticians, i.e. standardization, can be seen as a method to estimate causal e_ects, equivalent under certain conditions to the inverse probability treatment weight procedure.

  2. Causal reasoning with mental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemlani, Sangeet S; Barbey, Aron K; Johnson-Laird, Philip N

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines the model-based theory of causal reasoning. It postulates that the core meanings of causal assertions are deterministic and refer to temporally-ordered sets of possibilities: A causes B to occur means that given A, B occurs, whereas A enables B to occur means that given A, it is possible for B to occur. The paper shows how mental models represent such assertions, and how these models underlie deductive, inductive, and abductive reasoning yielding explanations. It reviews evidence both to corroborate the theory and to account for phenomena sometimes taken to be incompatible with it. Finally, it reviews neuroscience evidence indicating that mental models for causal inference are implemented within lateral prefrontal cortex. PMID:25389398

  3. Causal reasoning with mental models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeet eKhemlani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the model-based theory of causal reasoning. It postulates that the core meanings of causal assertions are deterministic and refer to temporally-ordered sets of possibilities: A causes B to occur means that given A, B occurs, whereas A enables B to occur means that given A, it is possible for B to occur. The paper shows how mental models represent such assertions, and how these models underlie deductive, inductive, and abductive reasoning yielding explanations. It reviews evidence both to corroborate the theory and to account for phenomena sometimes taken to be incompatible with it. Finally, it reviews neuroscience evidence indicating that mental models for causal inference are implemented within lateral prefrontal cortex.

  4. Gravitation, Causality, and Quantum Consistency

    CERN Document Server

    Hertzberg, Mark P

    2016-01-01

    We examine the role of consistency with causality and quantum mechanics in determining the properties of gravitation. We begin by constructing two different classes of interacting theories of massless spin 2 particles -- gravitons. One involves coupling the graviton with the lowest number of derivatives to matter, the other involves coupling the graviton with higher derivatives to matter, making use of the linearized Riemann tensor. The first class requires an infinite tower of terms for consistency, which is known to lead uniquely to general relativity. The second class only requires a finite number of terms for consistency, which appears as a new class of theories of massless spin 2. We recap the causal consistency of general relativity and show how this fails in the second class for the special case of coupling to photons, exploiting related calculations in the literature. In an upcoming publication [1] this result is generalized to a much broader set of theories. Then, as a causal modification of general ...

  5. Causality and Primordial Tensor Modes

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the real space correlation function of $B$-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a probe of superhorizon tensor perturbations created by inflation. By causality, any non-inflationary mechanism for gravitational wave production after reheating, like global phase transitions or cosmic strings, must have vanishing correlations for angular separations greater than the angle subtended by the particle horizon at recombination, i.e. $\\theta \\gtrsim 2^\\circ$. Since ordinary $B$-modes are defined non-locally in terms of the Stokes parameters $Q$ and $U$ and therefore don't have to respect causality, special care is taken to define `causal $\\tilde B$-modes' for the analysis. We compute the real space $\\tilde B$-mode correlation function for inflation and discuss its detectability on superhorizon scales where it provides an unambiguous test of inflationary gravitational waves. The correct identification of inflationary tensor modes is crucial since it relates directly to the energy s...

  6. Causal Models for Risk Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neysis Hernández Díaz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work a study about the process of risk management in major schools in the world. The project management tools worldwide highlights the need to redefine risk management processes. From the information obtained it is proposed the use of causal models for risk analysis based on information from the project or company, say risks and the influence thereof on the costs, human capital and project requirements and detect the damages of a number of tasks without tribute to the development of the project. A study on the use of causal models as knowledge representation techniques causal, among which are the Fuzzy Cognitive Maps (DCM and Bayesian networks, with the most favorable MCD technique to use because it allows modeling the risk information witho ut having a knowledge base either itemize.

  7. Univariate and multivariate molecular spectral analyses of lipid related molecular structural components in relation to nutrient profile in feed and food mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekara, Saman; Damiran, Daalkhaijav; Yu, Peiqiang

    2013-02-01

    The objectives of this study were (i) to determine lipid related molecular structures components (functional groups) in feed combination of cereal grain (barley, Hordeum vulgare) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) based dried distillers grain solubles (wheat DDGSs) from bioethanol processing at five different combination ratios using univariate and multivariate molecular spectral analyses with infrared Fourier transform molecular spectroscopy, and (ii) to correlate lipid-related molecular-functional structure spectral profile to nutrient profiles. The spectral intensity of (i) CH3 asymmetric, CH2 asymmetric, CH3 symmetric and CH2 symmetric groups, (ii) unsaturation (Cdbnd C) group, and (iii) carbonyl ester (Cdbnd O) group were determined. Spectral differences of functional groups were detected by hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal components analysis (PCA). The results showed that the combination treatments significantly inflicted modifications (P molecular spectral intensity (CH2 asymmetric stretching peak height, CH2 symmetric stretching peak height, ratio of CH2 to CH3 symmetric stretching peak intensity, and carbonyl peak area). Ratio of CH2 to CH3 symmetric stretching peak intensity, and carbonyl peak significantly correlated with nutrient profiles. Both PCA and HCA differentiated lipid-related spectrum. In conclusion, the changes of lipid molecular structure spectral profiles through feed combination could be detected using molecular spectroscopy. These changes were associated with nutrient profiles and functionality.

  8. On the Axioms of Causal Set Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Dribus, Benjamin F

    2013-01-01

    This paper offers suggested improvements to the causal sets program in discrete gravity, which treats spacetime geometry as an emergent manifestation of causal structure at the fundamental scale. This viewpoint, which I refer to as the causal metric hypothesis, is summarized by Rafael Sorkin's phrase, "order plus number equals geometry." Proposed improvements include recognition of a generally nontransitive causal relation more fundamental than the causal order, an improved local picture of causal structure, development and use of relation space methods, and a new background-independent version of the histories approach to quantum theory. Besides causal set theory, \\`a la Bombelli, Lee, Meyer, and Sorkin, this effort draws on Isham's topos-theoretic framework for physics, Sorkin's quantum measure theory, Finkelstein's causal nets, and Grothendieck's structural principles. This approach circumvents undesirable structural features in causal set theory, such as the permeability of maximal antichains, studied by ...

  9. Causality problem in Economic Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ LUIS RETOLAZA

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The main point of the paper is the problem of the economy to be consider like a science in the most strict term of the concept. In the first step we are going to tackle a presentation about what we understand by science to subsequently present some of the fallacies which have bring certain scepticism about the scientific character of the investigation in economy, to know: 1 The differences between hard and weak sciences -physics and social; 2 The differences between paradigm, —positivist and phenomenological— 3 The differences between physic causalityand historic causality. In the second step we are going to talk about two fundamental problems which are questioned: 1 the confusion between ontology and gnoseology and, 2 the erroneous concept of causality that commonly is used. In the last step of the paper we are going over the recent models of «causal explanation» and we suggest the probabilistic casualty development next with a more elaborated models of causal explanation, like a way to conjugate the scientific severity with the possibility to tackle complex economic realities.

  10. Causal Behaviour on Carter spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco, Oihane F

    2015-01-01

    In this work we will focus on the causal character of Carter Spacetime (see B. Carter, Causal structure in space-time, Gen. Rel. Grav. 1 4 337-406, 1971). The importance of this spacetime is the following: for the causally best well behaved spacetimes (the globally hyperbolic ones), there are several characterizations or alternative definitions. In some cases, it has been shown that some of the causal properties required in these characterizations can be weakened. But Carter spacetime provides a counterexample for an impossible relaxation in one of them. We studied the possibility of Carter spacetime to be a counterexample for impossible lessening in another characterization, based on the previous results. In particular, we will prove that the time-separation or Lorentzian distance between two chosen points in Carter spacetime is infinite. Although this spacetime turned out not to be the counterexample we were looking for, the found result is interesting per se and provides ideas for alternate approaches to t...

  11. Causal feedbacks in climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nes, van E.H.; Scheffer, M.; Brovkin, V.; Lenton, T.M.; Ye, H.; Deyle, E.; Sugihara, G.

    2015-01-01

    The statistical association between temperature and greenhouse gases over glacial cycles is well documented1, but causality behind this correlation remains difficult to extract directly from the data. A time lag of CO2 behind Antarctic temperature—originally thought to hint at a driving role for tem

  12. Free Fermions on causal sets

    CERN Document Server

    Noldus, Johan

    2013-01-01

    We construct a Dirac theory on causal sets; a key element in the construction being that the causet must be regarded as emergent in an appropriate sense too. We further notice that mixed norm spaces appear in the construction allowing for negative norm particles and "ghosts".

  13. Mixtures Estimation and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mengersen, Kerrie; Titterington, Mike

    2011-01-01

    This book uses the EM (expectation maximization) algorithm to simultaneously estimate the missing data and unknown parameter(s) associated with a data set. The parameters describe the component distributions of the mixture; the distributions may be continuous or discrete. The editors provide a complete account of the applications, mathematical structure and statistical analysis of finite mixture distributions along with MCMC computational methods, together with a range of detailed discussions covering the applications of the methods and features chapters from the leading experts on the subject

  14. Entanglement, holography and causal diamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Jan; Haehl, Felix M.; Heller, Michal P.; Myers, Robert C.

    2016-08-01

    We argue that the degrees of freedom in a d-dimensional CFT can be reorganized in an insightful way by studying observables on the moduli space of causal diamonds (or equivalently, the space of pairs of timelike separated points). This 2 d-dimensional space naturally captures some of the fundamental nonlocality and causal structure inherent in the entanglement of CFT states. For any primary CFT operator, we construct an observable on this space, which is defined by smearing the associated one-point function over causal diamonds. Known examples of such quantities are the entanglement entropy of vacuum excitations and its higher spin generalizations. We show that in holographic CFTs, these observables are given by suitably defined integrals of dual bulk fields over the corresponding Ryu-Takayanagi minimal surfaces. Furthermore, we explain connections to the operator product expansion and the first law of entanglemententropy from this unifying point of view. We demonstrate that for small perturbations of the vacuum, our observables obey linear two-derivative equations of motion on the space of causal diamonds. In two dimensions, the latter is given by a product of two copies of a two-dimensional de Sitter space. For a class of universal states, we show that the entanglement entropy and its spin-three generalization obey nonlinear equations of motion with local interactions on this moduli space, which can be identified with Liouville and Toda equations, respectively. This suggests the possibility of extending the definition of our new observables beyond the linear level more generally and in such a way that they give rise to new dynamically interacting theories on the moduli space of causal diamonds. Various challenges one has to face in order to implement this idea are discussed.

  15. 基于VbMoICA的机械故障盲源分离研究%Blind separation of mechanical fault sources based on variational Bayesian mixture of independent component analysers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳秀廷; 李志农; 陈金刚

    2012-01-01

    用独立分量分析(ICA)分解和表示数据时,假设整个数据分布完全可以用一个坐标系来描述.然而,当观测数据是由许多自相似的、非高斯的流形组成时,则硬是用一个单独的、全局的表示是不合适的,这样会产生一个次优的表示.针对ICA在盲源分离中的不足,在变分贝叶斯理论的基础上提出了一种基于变分贝叶斯混合独立分量分析的机械故障源盲分离方法.该方法是考虑到源信号来自于多个坐标系,然后在多个坐标系下建立独立分量分析混合模型对观测信号进行学习分离.实验结果表明,本文提出的方法是非常有效的.%Decomposing and representing data using independent component analysers(ICA)assumes that the whole data distribution is adequately described by one coordinate frame.However,if the observed data consists of various self-similar,non-Gaussian manifolds, enforcing a single, global representation is not appropriate and will produce a sub-optimal representation.In order to make up the lack of independent component analyser in blind sources separations, blind separation of mechanical fault sources based on variational Bayesian mixture of independent component analysers is presented based on variational Bayesian theory in this paper.Conside.ring the source signals coming from multiple frames, the method creats a mixture model of independent component analysers in multiple frameworks for learning the observed signals and separating thenuThe experimental results show that the method proposed in this paper is very effective.

  16. Anticipation of physical causality guides eye movements

    OpenAIRE

    Wende, Kim; Theunissen, Laetitia; Missal, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Causality is a unique feature of human perception. We present here a behavioral investigation of the influence of physical causality during visual pursuit of object collisions. Pursuit and saccadic eye movements of human subjects were recorded during ocular pursuit of two concurrently launched targets, one that moved according to the laws of Newtonian mechanics (the causal target) and the other one that moved in a physically implausible direction (the non-causal target). We found that anticip...

  17. Estimating causal structure using conditional DAG models

    OpenAIRE

    Oates, Chris J.; Smith, Jim Q.; Mukherjee, Sach

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers inference of causal structure in a class of graphical models called "conditional DAGs". These are directed acyclic graph (DAG) models with two kinds of variables, primary and secondary. The secondary variables are used to aid in estimation of causal relationships between the primary variables. We give causal semantics for this model class and prove that, under certain assumptions, the direction of causal influence is identifiable from the joint observational distribution ...

  18. Designing Effective Supports for Causal Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonassen, David H.; Ionas, Ioan Gelu

    2008-01-01

    Causal reasoning represents one of the most basic and important cognitive processes that underpin all higher-order activities, such as conceptual understanding and problem solving. Hume called causality the "cement of the universe" [Hume (1739/2000). Causal reasoning is required for making predictions, drawing implications and inferences, and…

  19. Representing Personal Determinants in Causal Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Albert

    1984-01-01

    Responds to Staddon's critique of the author's earlier article and addresses issues raised by Staddon's (1984) alternative models of causality. The author argues that it is not the formalizability of causal processes that is the issue but whether cognitive determinants of behavior are reducible to past stimulus inputs in causal structures.…

  20. Exploring Individual Differences in Preschoolers' Causal Stance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Aubry; Booth, Amy E.

    2016-01-01

    Preschoolers, as a group, are highly attuned to causality, and this attunement is known to facilitate memory, learning, and problem solving. However, recent work reveals substantial individual variability in the strength of children's "causal stance," as demonstrated by their curiosity about and preference for new causal information. In…

  1. Expectations and Interpretations during Causal Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Christian C.; Ahn, Woo-kyoung

    2011-01-01

    In existing models of causal induction, 4 types of covariation information (i.e., presence/absence of an event followed by presence/absence of another event) always exert identical influences on causal strength judgments (e.g., joint presence of events always suggests a generative causal relationship). In contrast, we suggest that, due to…

  2. Painless causality in defect calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, C; Cheung, Charlotte; Magueijo, Joao

    1997-01-01

    Topological defects must respect causality, a statement leading to restrictive constraints on the power spectrum of the total cosmological perturbations they induce. Causality constraints have for long been known to require the presence of an under-density in the surrounding matter compensating the defect network on large scales. This so-called compensation can never be neglected and significantly complicates calculations in defect scenarios, eg. computing cosmic microwave background fluctuations. A quick and dirty way to implement the compensation are the so-called compensation fudge factors. Here we derive the complete photon-baryon-CDM backreaction effects in defect scenarios. The fudge factor comes out as an algebraic identity and so we drop the negative qualifier ``fudge''. The compensation scale is computed and physically interpreted. Secondary backreaction effects exist, and neglecting them constitutes the well-defined approximation scheme within which one should consider compensation factor calculatio...

  3. Velocity requirements for causality violation

    CERN Document Server

    Modanese, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    It is known that the hypothetical existence of superluminal signals would imply the logical possibility of active causal violation: an observer in relative motion with respect to a primary source could in principle emit secondary superluminal signals (triggered by the primary ones) which go back in time and deactivate the primary source before the initial emission. This is a direct consequence of the structure of the Lorentz transformations, sometimes called "Regge-Tolman paradox". It is straightforward to find a formula for the velocity of the moving observer required to produce the causality violation. When applied to some recent claims of slight superluminal propagation, this formula yields a required velocity very close to the speed of light; this raises some doubts about the real physical observability of such violations. We re-compute this velocity requirement introducing a realistic delay between the reception of the primary signal and the emission of the secondary. It turns out that for -any- delay it...

  4. Phenomenology of Causal Dynamical Triangulations

    CERN Document Server

    Mielczarek, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    The four dimensional Causal Dynamical Triangulations (CDT) approach to quantum gravity is already more than ten years old theory with numerous unprecedented predictions such as non-trivial phase structure of gravitational field and dimensional running. Here, we discuss possible empirical consequences of CDT derived based on the two features of the approach mentioned above. A possibility of using both astrophysical and cosmological observations to test CDT is discussed. We show that scenarios which can be ruled out at the empirical level exist.

  5. Velocity Requirements for Causality Violation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modanese, Giovanni

    We re-examine the "Regge-Tolman paradox" with reference to some recent experimental results. It is straightforward to find a formula for the velocity v of the moving system required to produce causality violation. This formula typically yields a velocity very close to the speed of light (for instance, v/c > 0.97 for X-shaped microwaves), which raises some doubts about the real physical observability of the violations. We then compute the velocity requirement introducing a delay between the reception of the primary signal and the emission of the secondary. It turns out that in principle for any delay it is possible to find moving observers able to produce active causal violation. This is mathematically due to the singularity of the Lorentz transformations for β →1. For a realistic delay due to the propagation of a luminal precursor, we find that causality violations in the reported experiments are still more unlikely (v/c > 0.989), and even in the hypothesis that the superluminal propagation velocity goes to infinity, the velocity requirement is bounded by v/c > 0.62. We also prove that if two oscopic bodies exchange energy and momentum through superluminal signals, then the swap of signal source and target is incompatible with the Lorentz transformations; therefore it is not possible to distinguish between source and target, even with reference to a definite reference frame.

  6. Entanglement, Holography and Causal Diamonds

    CERN Document Server

    de Boer, Jan; Heller, Michal P; Myers, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    We argue that the degrees of freedom in a d-dimensional CFT can be re-organized in an insightful way by studying observables on the moduli space of causal diamonds (or equivalently, the space of pairs of timelike separated points). This 2d-dimensional space naturally captures some of the fundamental nonlocality and causal structure inherent in the entanglement of CFT states. For any primary CFT operator, we construct an observable on this space, which is defined by smearing the associated one-point function over causal diamonds. Known examples of such quantities are the entanglement entropy of vacuum excitations and its higher spin generalizations. We show that in holographic CFTs, these observables are given by suitably defined integrals of dual bulk fields over the corresponding Ryu-Takayanagi minimal surfaces. Furthermore, we explain connections to the operator product expansion and the first law of entanglement entropy from this unifying point of view. We demonstrate that for small perturbations of the va...

  7. Causality analysis in business performance measurement system using system dynamics methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Zainuridah; Yusoff, Wan Fadzilah Wan; Maarof, Faridah

    2014-07-01

    One of the main components of the Balanced Scorecard (BSC) that differentiates it from any other performance measurement system (PMS) is the Strategy Map with its unidirectional causality feature. Despite its apparent popularity, criticisms on the causality have been rigorously discussed by earlier researchers. In seeking empirical evidence of causality, propositions based on the service profit chain theory were developed and tested using the econometrics analysis, Granger causality test on the 45 data points. However, the insufficiency of well-established causality models was found as only 40% of the causal linkages were supported by the data. Expert knowledge was suggested to be used in the situations of insufficiency of historical data. The Delphi method was selected and conducted in obtaining the consensus of the causality existence among the 15 selected expert persons by utilizing 3 rounds of questionnaires. Study revealed that only 20% of the propositions were not supported. The existences of bidirectional causality which demonstrate significant dynamic environmental complexity through interaction among measures were obtained from both methods. With that, a computer modeling and simulation using System Dynamics (SD) methodology was develop as an experimental platform to identify how policies impacting the business performance in such environments. The reproduction, sensitivity and extreme condition tests were conducted onto developed SD model to ensure their capability in mimic the reality, robustness and validity for causality analysis platform. This study applied a theoretical service management model within the BSC domain to a practical situation using SD methodology where very limited work has been done.

  8. Causal reasoning and models of cognitive tasks for naval nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In complex industrial process control, causal reasoning appears as a major component in operators' cognitive tasks. It is tightly linked to diagnosis, prediction of normal and failure states, and explanation. This work provides a detailed review of literature in causal reasoning. A synthesis is proposed as a model of causal reasoning in process control. This model integrates distinct approaches in Cognitive Science: especially qualitative physics, Bayesian networks, knowledge-based systems, and cognitive psychology. Our model defines a framework for the analysis of causal human errors in simulated naval nuclear power plant fault management. Through the methodological framework of critical incident analysis we define a classification of errors and difficulties linked to causal reasoning. This classification is based on shallow characteristics of causal reasoning. As an origin of these errors, more elementary component activities in causal reasoning are identified. The applications cover the field of functional specification for man-machine interfaces, operators support systems design as well as nuclear safety. In addition of this study, we integrate the model of causal reasoning in a model of cognitive task in process control. (authors). 106 refs., 49 figs., 8 tabs

  9. Effects of Crude Oil/Dispersant Mixture and Dispersant Components on PPARγ Activity in Vitro and in Vivo: Identification of Dioctyl Sodium Sulfosuccinate (DOSS; CAS #577-11-7) as a Probable Obesogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin, Alexis M.; Bowers, Robert R.; Magaletta, Margaret E.; Holshouser, Steven; Maggi, Adriana; Ciana, Paolo; Guillette, Louis J.; Bowden, John A.; Kucklick, John R.; Baatz, John E.; Spyropoulos, Demetri D.

    2015-01-01

    adipocyte differentiation. Conclusions We conclude that DOSS is a putative obesogen worthy of further study, including epidemiological and clinical investigations into laxative prescriptions consisting of DOSS. Citation Temkin AM, Bowers RR, Magaletta ME, Holshouser S, Maggi A, Ciana P, Guillette LJ, Bowden JA, Kucklick JR, Baatz JE, Spyropoulos DD. 2016. Effects of crude oil/dispersant mixture and dispersant components on PPARγ activity in vitro and in vivo: identification of dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (DOSS; CAS #577-11-7) as a probable obesogen. Environ Health Perspect 124:112–119; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409672 PMID:26135921

  10. Breaking the arrows of causality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valsiner, Jaan

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical models of catalysis have proven to bring with them major breakthroughs in chemistry and biology, from the 1830s onward. It can be argued that the scientific status of chemistry has become established through the move from causal to catalytic models. Likewise, the central explanatory...... role of cyclical models in biology has made it possible to move from the idea of genetic determination to that of epigenetic negotiation as the core of biological theory. In psychology, catalytic thinking has been outside of the realm of accepted scientific schemes, as the axiomatic dependence upon the...

  11. The Impossibility of Causality Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Conway, Roger K.; P. A. V. B. Swamy; Yanagida, John F.; Muehlen, Peter von zur

    1984-01-01

    Causality tests developed by Sims and Granger are fatally flawed for several reasons First, when two variables, X and Y, are uncorrelated, X has no linear predictive value for Y, but X,and Y may be nonlinearly related unless they are statistically Independent, In which case X and Y are not related at all The light-hand side variables In a regression equation are exogenous If they are mean Independent of the disturbance term Mean Independence IS stronger than uncorrelatedness The proofs for de...

  12. Space and time in perceptual causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straube, Benjamin; Chatterjee, Anjan

    2010-01-01

    Inferring causality is a fundamental feature of human cognition that allows us to theorize about and predict future states of the world. Michotte suggested that humans automatically perceive causality based on certain perceptual features of events. However, individual differences in judgments of perceptual causality cast doubt on Michotte's view. To gain insights in the neural basis of individual difference in the perception of causality, our participants judged causal relationships in animations of a blue ball colliding with a red ball (a launching event) while fMRI-data were acquired. Spatial continuity and temporal contiguity were varied parametrically in these stimuli. We did not find consistent brain activation differences between trials judged as caused and those judged as non-caused, making it unlikely that humans have universal instantiation of perceptual causality in the brain. However, participants were slower to respond to and showed greater neural activity for violations of causality, suggesting that humans are biased to expect causal relationships when moving objects appear to interact. Our participants demonstrated considerable individual differences in their sensitivity to spatial and temporal characteristics in perceiving causality. These qualitative differences in sensitivity to time or space in perceiving causality were instantiated in individual differences in activation of the left basal ganglia or right parietal lobe, respectively. Thus, the perception that the movement of one object causes the movement of another is triggered by elemental spatial and temporal sensitivities, which themselves are instantiated in specific distinct neural networks. PMID:20463866

  13. Space and time in perceptual causality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Straube

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Inferring causality is a fundamental feature of human cognition that allows us to theorize about and predict future states of the world. Michotte suggested that humans automatically perceive causality based on certain perceptual features of events. However, individual differences in judgments of perceptual causality cast doubt on Michotte’s view. To gain insights in the neural basis of individual difference in the perception of causality, our participants judged causal relationships in animations of a blue ball colliding with a red ball (a launching event while fMRI-data were acquired. Spatial continuity and temporal contiguity were varied parametrically in these stimuli. We did not find consistent brain activation differences between trials judged as caused and those judged as non-caused, making it unlikely that humans have universal instantiation of perceptual causality in the brain. However, participants were slower to respond to and showed greater neural activity for violations of causality, suggesting that humans are biased to expect causal relationships when moving objects appear to interact. Our participants demonstrated considerable individual differences in their sensitivity to spatial and temporal characteristics in perceiving causality. These qualitative differences in sensitivity to time or space in perceiving causality were instantiated in individual differences in activation of the left basal ganglia or right parietal lobe, respectively. Thus, the perception that the movement of one object causes the movement of another is triggered by elemental spatial and temporal sensitivities, which themselves are instantiated in specific distinct neural networks.

  14. The Functions of Danish Causal Conjunctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Therkelsen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article I propose an analysis of the Danish causal conjunctions fordi, siden and for based on the framework of Danish Functional Grammar. As conjunctions they relate two clauses, and their semantics have in common that it indicates a causal relationship between the clauses. The causal conjunctions are different as far as their distribution is concerned; siden conjoins a subordinate clause and a main clause, for conjoins two main clauses, and fordi is able to do both. Methodologically I have based my analysis on these distributional properties comparing siden and fordi conjoining a subordinate and a main clause, and comparing for and fordi conjoining two main clauses, following the thesis that they would establish a causal relationship between different kinds of content. My main findings are that fordi establishes a causal relationship between the events referred to by the two clauses, and the whole utterance functions as a statement of this causal relationship. Siden presupposes such a general causal relationship between the two events and puts forward the causing event as a reason for assuming or wishing or ordering the caused event, siden thus establishes a causal relationship between an event and a speech act. For equally presupposes a general causal relationship between two events and it establishes a causal relationship between speech acts, and fordi conjoining two main clauses is able to do this too, but in this position it also maintains its event-relating ability, the interpretation depending on contextual factors.

  15. Mixture Based Outlier Filtration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pecherková

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Success/failure of adaptive control algorithms – especially those designed using the Linear Quadratic Gaussian criterion – depends on the quality of the process data used for model identification. One of the most harmful types of process data corruptions are outliers, i.e. ‘wrong data’ lying far away from the range of real data. The presence of outliers in the data negatively affects an estimation of the dynamics of the system. This effect is magnified when the outliers are grouped into blocks. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for outlier detection and removal. It is based on modelling the corrupted data by a two-component probabilistic mixture. The first component of the mixture models uncorrupted process data, while the second models outliers. When the outlier component is detected to be active, a prediction from the uncorrupted data component is computed and used as a reconstruction of the observed data. The resulting reconstruction filter is compared to standard methods on simulated and real data. The filter exhibits excellent properties, especially in the case of blocks of outliers. 

  16. Probabilistic causality and radiogenic cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review and scrutiny of the literature on probability and probabilistic causality shows that it is possible under certain assumptions to estimate the probability that a certain type of cancer diagnosed in an individual exposed to radiation prior to diagnosis was caused by this exposure. Diagnosis of this causal relationship like diagnosis of any disease - malignant or not - requires always some subjective judgments by the diagnostician. It is, therefore, illusory to believe that tables based on actuarial data can provide objective estimates of the chance that a cancer diagnosed in an individual is radiogenic. It is argued that such tables can only provide a base from which the diagnostician(s) deviate in one direction or the other according to his (their) individual (consensual) judgment. Acceptance of a physician's diagnostic judgment by patients is commonplace. Similar widespread acceptance of expert judgment by claimants in radiation compensation cases does presently not exist. Judicious use of the present radioepidemiological tables prepared by the Working Group of the National Institutes of Health or of updated future versions of similar tables may improve the situation. 20 references

  17. Variational multi-fluid dynamics and causal heat conductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, N.; Comer, G. L.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss heat conductivity from the point of view of a variational multi-fluid model, treating entropy as a dynamical entity. We demonstrate that a two-fluid model with a massive fluid component and a massless entropy can reproduce a number of key results from extended irreversible thermodynamics. In particular, we show that the entropy entrainment is intimately linked to the thermal relaxation time that is required to make heat propagation in solids causal. We also discuss non-local terms ...

  18. Optimal Parameters Multicomponent Mixtures Extruding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramil F. Sagitov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental research of multicomponent mixtures extruding from production wastes are carried out, unit for production of composites from different types of waste is presented. Having analyzed dependence of multicomponent mixtures extruding energy requirements on die length and components content at three values of angular rate of screw rotation, we received the values of energy requirements at optimal length of the die, angular speed and percent of binding additives.

  19. Linear causal modeling with structural equations

    CERN Document Server

    Mulaik, Stanley A

    2009-01-01

    Emphasizing causation as a functional relationship between variables that describe objects, Linear Causal Modeling with Structural Equations integrates a general philosophical theory of causation with structural equation modeling (SEM) that concerns the special case of linear causal relations. In addition to describing how the functional relation concept may be generalized to treat probabilistic causation, the book reviews historical treatments of causation and explores recent developments in experimental psychology on studies of the perception of causation. It looks at how to perceive causal

  20. The problem of causality in cultivation research

    OpenAIRE

    Rossmann, Constanze; Brosius, Hans-Bernd

    2004-01-01

    This paper offers an up-to-date review of problems in determining causal relationships in cultivation research, and considers the research rationales of various approaches with special reference to causal interpretation. It describes in turn a number of methodologies for addressing the problem and resolving it as far as this is possible. The issue of causal inference arises not only in cultivation research, however, but is basic to all media effects theories and approaches primarily at the ma...

  1. Identifying Causal Effects with Computer Algebra

    CERN Document Server

    García-Puente, Luis David; Sullivant, Seth

    2010-01-01

    The long-standing identification problem for causal effects in graphical models has many partial results but lacks a systematic study. We show how computer algebra can be used to either prove that a causal effect can be identified, generically identified, or show that the effect is not generically identifiable. We report on the results of our computations for linear structural equation models, where we determine precisely which causal effects are generically identifiable for all graphs on three and four vertices.

  2. Causal inference in economics and marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varian, Hal R

    2016-07-01

    This is an elementary introduction to causal inference in economics written for readers familiar with machine learning methods. The critical step in any causal analysis is estimating the counterfactual-a prediction of what would have happened in the absence of the treatment. The powerful techniques used in machine learning may be useful for developing better estimates of the counterfactual, potentially improving causal inference. PMID:27382144

  3. Causal inference in economics and marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varian, Hal R.

    2016-01-01

    This is an elementary introduction to causal inference in economics written for readers familiar with machine learning methods. The critical step in any causal analysis is estimating the counterfactual—a prediction of what would have happened in the absence of the treatment. The powerful techniques used in machine learning may be useful for developing better estimates of the counterfactual, potentially improving causal inference. PMID:27382144

  4. Heterogeneous Causal Effects and Sample Selection Bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breen, Richard; Choi, Seongsoo; Holm, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The role of education in the process of socioeconomic attainment is a topic of long standing interest to sociologists and economists. Recently there has been growing interest not only in estimating the average causal effect of education on outcomes such as earnings, but also in estimating how...... causal effects might vary over individuals or groups. In this paper we point out one of the under-appreciated hazards of seeking to estimate heterogeneous causal effects: conventional selection bias (that is, selection on baseline differences) can easily be mistaken for heterogeneity of causal effects...

  5. Novel microthermal sensor principle for determining the mixture ratio of binary fluid mixtures using Föppl vortices

    OpenAIRE

    B. Schmitt; Kiefer, C; Schütze, A.

    2015-01-01

    A novel sensor principle for determining binary fluid mixtures of known components is presented, making use of different thermal and rheological properties of the mixture's components. Using a microheater, a heat pulse is introduced in the mixture. The resulting temperature increase depends on the thermal properties of the mixture, allowing determination of the mixture ratio. Placing a bluff body in the fluid channel causes the formation of a stationary pair of vortices behi...

  6. Causal ubiquity in quantum physics. A superluminal and local-causal physical ontology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neelamkavil, Raphael

    2014-07-01

    A fixed highest criterial velocity (of light) in STR (special theory of relativity) is a convention for a layer of physical inquiry. QM (Quantum Mechanics) avoids action-at-a-distance using this concept, but accepts non-causality and action-at-a-distance in EPR (Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Paradox) entanglement experiments. Even in such allegedly [non-causal] processes, something exists processually in extension-motion, between the causal and the [non-causal]. If STR theoretically allows real-valued superluminal communication between EPR entangled particles, quantum processes become fully causal. That is, the QM world is sub-luminally, luminally and superluminally local-causal throughout, and the Law of Causality is ubiquitous in the micro-world. Thus, ''probabilistic causality'' is a merely epistemic term.

  7. Comparison theorems for causal diamonds

    CERN Document Server

    Berthiere, Clement; Solodukhin, Sergey N

    2015-01-01

    We formulate certain inequalities for the geometric quantities characterizing causal diamonds in curved and Minkowski spacetimes. These inequalities involve the red-shift factor which, as we show explicitly in the spherically symmetric case, is monotonic in the radial direction and it takes its maximal value at the centre. As a byproduct of our discussion we re-derive Bishop's inequality without assuming the positivity of the spatial Ricci tensor. We then generalize our considerations to arbitrary, static and not necessarily spherically symmetric, asymptotically flat spacetimes. In the case of spacetimes with a horizon our generalization involves the so-called {\\it domain of dependence}. The respective volume, expressed in terms of the duration measured by a distant observer compared with the volume of the domain in Minkowski spacetime, exhibits behaviours which differ if $d=4$ or $d>4$. This peculiarity of four dimensions is due to the logarithmic subleading term in the asymptotic expansion of the metric nea...

  8. Separation of gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apparatus is described for the separation of a gaseous plasma mixture into components in some of which the original concentration of a specific ion has been greatly increased or decreased, comprising: a source for converting the gaseous mixture into a train of plasma packets; an open-ended vessel with a main section and at least one branch section, adapted to enclose along predetermined tracks the original plasma packets in the main section, and the separated plasma components in the branch sections; drive means for generating travelling magnetic waves along the predetermined tracks with the magnetic flux vector of the waves transverse to each of the tracks; and means for maintaining phase coherence between the plasma packets and the magnetic waves at a value needed for accelerating the components of the packets to different velocities and in such different directions that the plasma of each packet is divided into distinctly separate packets in some of which the original concentration of a specific ion has been greatly increased or decreased, and which plasma packets are collected from the branch sections of the vessels. (author)

  9. Liquid class predictor for liquid handling of complex mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seglke, Brent W.; Lekin, Timothy P.

    2008-12-09

    A method of establishing liquid classes of complex mixtures for liquid handling equipment. The mixtures are composed of components and the equipment has equipment parameters. The first step comprises preparing a response curve for the components. The next step comprises using the response curve to prepare a response indicator for the mixtures. The next step comprises deriving a model that relates the components and the mixtures to establish the liquid classes.

  10. The Power of Causal Beliefs and Conflicting Evidence on Causal Judgments and Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Retamero, Rocio; Muller, Stephanie M.; Catena, Andres; Maldonado, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    In two experiments, we investigated the relative impact of causal beliefs and empirical evidence on both decision making and causal judgments, and whether this relative impact could be altered by previous experience. 2. Selected groups of participants in both experiments received pre-training with either causal or neutral cues, or no pre-training…

  11. A nonlinear impact: evidences of causal effects of social media on market prices

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, Thársis T. P.; Aste, Tomaso

    2016-01-01

    Online social networks offer a new way to investigate financial markets' dynamics by enabling the large-scale analysis of investors' collective behavior. We provide empirical evidence that suggests social media and stock markets have a nonlinear causal relationship. We take advantage of an extensive data set composed of social media messages related to DJIA index components. By using information-theoretic measures to cope for possible nonlinear causal coupling between social media and stock m...

  12. Simulation of mixture microstructures via particle packing models and their direct comparison with real mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliver, Eric A.

    particle-size distributions or mixture composition. Control charts based on tessellation measurements were used for direct, quantitative comparisons between real and simulated mixtures. Four sets of simulated and real mixtures were examined. Data from real mixture was matched with simulated data when the samples were well mixed and the particle size distributions and volume fractions of the components were identical. Analysis of mixture components that occupied less than approximately 10 vol% of the mixture was not practical unless the particle size of the component was extremely small and excellent quality high-resolution compositional micrographs of the real sample are available. These methods of analysis should allow future researchers to systematically evaluate and predict the impact and importance of variables such as component volume fraction and component particle size distribution as they pertain to the uniformity of powder mixture microstructures.

  13. Unpacking the causal chain of financial literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Carpena, Fenella; Cole, Shawn; Shapiro, Jeremy; Zia, Bilal

    2011-01-01

    A growing body of literature examines the causal impact of financial literacy on individual, household, and firm level outcomes. This paper unpacks the mechanism of impact by focusing on the first link in the causal chain. Specifically, it studies the experimental impact of financial literacy on three distinct dimensions of financial knowledge. The analysis finds that financial literacy do...

  14. Causal Indicator Models: Identification, Estimation, and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollen, Kenneth A.; Davis, Walter R.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the identification, estimation, and testing of structural equation models that have causal indicators. We first provide 2 rules of identification that are particularly helpful in models with causal indicators--the 2C emitted paths rule and the exogenous X rule. We demonstrate how these rules can help us distinguish identified from…

  15. Causal Moderation Analysis Using Propensity Score Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Nianbo

    2012-01-01

    This paper is based on previous studies in applying propensity score methods to study multiple treatment variables to examine the causal moderator effect. The propensity score methods will be demonstrated in a case study to examine the causal moderator effect, where the moderators are categorical and continuous variables. Moderation analysis is an…

  16. Controlling for causally relevant third variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodie, Adam S; Williams, Cristina C; Crooks, C L

    2003-10-01

    In 3 experiments, the authors tested the conditions under which 3rd variables are controlled for in making causal judgments. The authors hypothesized that 3rd variables are controlled for when the 3rd variables are themselves perceived as causal. In Experiment 1, the participants predicted test performance after seeing information about wearing a lucky garment, taking a test-preparation course, and staying up late. The course (perceived as more causally relevant) was controlled for more than was the garment (perceived as less causally relevant) in assessing the effectiveness of staying up late. In Experiments 2 and 3, to obviate the many alternative accounts that arise from the realistic cover story of Experiment 1, participants predicted flowers' blooming after the presentation or nonpresentation of liquids. When one liquid was trained as causal, it was controlled for more in judging another liquid than when it was trained as neutral. Overall, stimuli perceived as causal were controlled for more when judging other stimuli. The authors concluded that the effect of perceived causal relevance on causal conditionalizing is real and normatively reasonable. PMID:14672103

  17. On the spectral formulation of Granger causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicharro, D

    2011-12-01

    Spectral measures of causality are used to explore the role of different rhythms in the causal connectivity between brain regions. We study several spectral measures related to Granger causality, comprising the bivariate and conditional Geweke measures, the directed transfer function, and the partial directed coherence. We derive the formulation of dependence and causality in the spectral domain from the more general formulation in the information-theory framework. We argue that the transfer entropy, the most general measure derived from the concept of Granger causality, lacks a spectral representation in terms of only the processes associated with the recorded signals. For all the spectral measures we show how they are related to mutual information rates when explicitly considering the parametric autoregressive representation of the processes. In this way we express the conditional Geweke spectral measure in terms of a multiple coherence involving innovation variables inherent to the autoregressive representation. We also link partial directed coherence with Sims' criterion of causality. Given our results, we discuss the causal interpretation of the spectral measures related to Granger causality and stress the necessity to explicitly consider their specific formulation based on modeling the signals as linear Gaussian stationary autoregressive processes.

  18. mediation: R Package for Causal Mediation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin Tingley

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the R package mediation for conducting causal mediation analysis in applied empirical research. In many scientific disciplines, the goal of researchers is not only estimating causal effects of a treatment but also understanding the process in which the treatment causally affects the outcome. Causal mediation analysis is frequently used to assess potential causal mechanisms. The mediation package implements a comprehensive suite of statistical tools for conducting such an analysis. The package is organized into two distinct approaches. Using the model-based approach, researchers can estimate causal mediation effects and conduct sensitivity analysis under the standard research design. Furthermore, the design-based approach provides several analysis tools that are applicable under different experimental designs. This approach requires weaker assumptions than the model-based approach. We also implement a statistical method for dealing with multiple (causally dependent mediators, which are often encountered in practice. Finally, the package also offers a methodology for assessing causal mediation in the presence of treatment noncompliance, a common problem in randomized trials.

  19. Causally pathological spacetimes are physically relevant

    CERN Document Server

    Hubeny, V E; Ross, S F; Hubeny, Veronika E.; Rangamani, Mukund; Ross, Simon F.

    2005-01-01

    We argue that in the context of string theory, the usual restriction to globally hyperbolic spacetimes should be considerably relaxed. We exhibit an example of a spacetime which only satisfies the causal condition, and so is arbitrarily close to admitting closed causal curves, but which has a well-behaved dual description, free of paradoxes.

  20. Structural intervention distance for evaluating causal graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Jonas; Bühlmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Causal inference relies on the structure of a graph, often a directed acyclic graph (DAG). Different graphs may result in different causal inference statements and different intervention distributions. To quantify such differences, we propose a (pre-)metric between DAGs, the structural interventi...... implementation with software code available on the first author's home page....

  1. Campbell's and Rubin's Perspectives on Causal Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Stephen G.; Thoemmes, Felix

    2010-01-01

    Donald Campbell's approach to causal inference (D. T. Campbell, 1957; W. R. Shadish, T. D. Cook, & D. T. Campbell, 2002) is widely used in psychology and education, whereas Donald Rubin's causal model (P. W. Holland, 1986; D. B. Rubin, 1974, 2005) is widely used in economics, statistics, medicine, and public health. Campbell's approach focuses on…

  2. Causalities of the Taiwan Stock Market

    OpenAIRE

    Juhi-Lian Julian Ting

    2003-01-01

    Volatility, fitting with first order Landau expansion, stationarity, and causality of the Taiwan stock market (TAIEX) are investigated based on daily records. Instead of consensuses that consider stock market index change as a random time series we propose the market change as a dual time series consists of the index and the corresponding volume. Therefore, causalities between these two time series are investigated.

  3. Causal random geometry from stochastic quantization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjørn, Jan; Loll, R.; Westra, W.;

    2010-01-01

     in this short note we review a recently found formulation of two-dimensional causal quantum gravity defined through Causal Dynamical Triangulations and stochastic quantization. This procedure enables one to extract the nonperturbative quantum Hamiltonian of the random surface model including the...... the sum over topologies. Interestingly, the generally fictitious stochastic time corresponds to proper time on the geometries...

  4. Causality, Bell's theorem, and Ontic Definiteness

    CERN Document Server

    Henson, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Bell's theorem shows that the reasonable relativistic causal principle known as "local causality" is not compatible with the predictions of quantum mechanics. It is not possible maintain a satisfying causal principle of this type while dropping any of the better-known assumptions of Bell's theorem. However, another assumption of Bell's theorem is the use of classical logic. One part of this assumption is the principle of "ontic definiteness", that is, that it must in principle be possible to assign definite truth values to all propositions treated in the theory. Once the logical setting is clarified somewhat, it can be seen that rejecting this principle does not in any way undermine the type of causal principle used by Bell. Without ontic definiteness, the deterministic causal condition known as Einstein Locality succeeds in banning superluminal influence (including signalling) whilst allowing correlations that violate Bell's inequalities. Objections to altering logic, and the consequences for operational and...

  5. On the spectral dimension of causal triangulations

    CERN Document Server

    Durhuus, Bergfinnur; Wheater, John F

    2009-01-01

    We introduce an ensemble of infinite causal triangulations, called the uniform infinite causal triangulation, and show that it is equivalent to an ensemble of infinite trees, the uniform infinite planar tree. It is proved that in both cases the Hausdorff dimension almost surely equals 2. The infinite causal triangulations are shown to be almost surely recurrent or, equivalently, their spectral dimension is almost surely less than or equal to 2. We also establish that for certain reduced versions of the infinite causal triangulations the spectral dimension equals 2 both for the ensemble average and almost surely. The triangulation ensemble we consider is equivalent to the causal dynamical triangulation model of two-dimensional quantum gravity and therefore our results apply to that model.

  6. Causal ubiquity in quantum physics a superluminal and local-causal physical ontology

    CERN Document Server

    Neelamkavil, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    A fixed highest criterial velocity (of light) in STR (special theory of relativity) is a convention for a layer of physical inquiry. QM (Quantum Mechanics) avoids action-at-a-distance using this concept, but accepts non-causality and action-at-a-distance in EPR (Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Paradox) entanglement experiments. Even in such allegedly non-causal processes, something exists processually in extension-motion, between the causal and the non-causal. If STR theoretically allows real-valued superluminal communication between EPR entangled particles, quantum processes become fully causal. That

  7. Probing the Cultural Constitution of Causal Cognition - A Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Andrea; Beller, Sieghard

    2016-01-01

    To what extent is the way people perceive, represent, and reason about causal relationships dependent on culture? While there have been sporadic attempts to explore this question, a systematic investigation is still lacking. Here, we propose that human causal cognition is not only superficially affected by cultural background, but that it is co-constituted by the cultural nature of the human species. To this end, we take stock of on-going research, with a particular focus on the methodological approaches taken: cross-species comparisons, archeological accounts, developmental studies, cross-cultural, and cross-linguistic experiments, as well as in-depth within-culture analyses of cognitive concepts, processes, and changes over time. We argue that only a combination of these approaches will allow us to integrate different components of cognition, levels of analysis, and points of view-the key requirements for a comprehensive, interdisciplinary research program to advance this field. PMID:26941695

  8. Causal systems categories: differences in novice and expert categorization of causal phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottman, Benjamin M; Gentner, Dedre; Goldwater, Micah B

    2012-07-01

    We investigated the understanding of causal systems categories--categories defined by common causal structure rather than by common domain content--among college students. We asked students who were either novices or experts in the physical sciences to sort descriptions of real-world phenomena that varied in their causal structure (e.g., negative feedback vs. causal chain) and in their content domain (e.g., economics vs. biology). Our hypothesis was that there would be a shift from domain-based sorting to causal sorting with increasing expertise in the relevant domains. This prediction was borne out: the novice groups sorted primarily by domain and the expert group sorted by causal category. These results suggest that science training facilitates insight about causal structures.

  9. Spread of entanglement and causality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, Horacio; Liu, Hong; Mezei, Márk

    2016-07-01

    We investigate causality constraints on the time evolution of entanglement entropy after a global quench in relativistic theories. We first provide a general proof that the so-called tsunami velocity is bounded by the speed of light. We then generalize the free particle streaming model of [1] to general dimensions and to an arbitrary entanglement pattern of the initial state. In more than two spacetime dimensions the spread of entanglement in these models is highly sensitive to the initial entanglement pattern, but we are able to prove an upper bound on the normalized rate of growth of entanglement entropy, and hence the tsunami velocity. The bound is smaller than what one gets for quenches in holographic theories, which highlights the importance of interactions in the spread of entanglement in many-body systems. We propose an interacting model which we believe provides an upper bound on the spread of entanglement for interacting relativistic theories. In two spacetime dimensions with multiple intervals, this model and its variations are able to reproduce intricate results exhibited by holographic theories for a significant part of the parameter space. For higher dimensions, the model bounds the tsunami velocity at the speed of light. Finally, we construct a geometric model for entanglement propagation based on a tensor network construction for global quenches.

  10. Spread of entanglement and causality

    CERN Document Server

    Casini, Horacio; Mezei, Márk

    2015-01-01

    We investigate causality constraints on the time evolution of entanglement entropy after a global quench in relativistic theories. We first provide a general proof that the so-called tsunami velocity is bounded by the speed of light. We then generalize the free particle streaming model of arXiv:cond-mat/0503393 to general dimensions and to an arbitrary entanglement pattern of the initial state. In more than two spacetime dimensions the spread of entanglement in these models is highly sensitive to the initial entanglement pattern, but we are able to prove an upper bound on the normalized rate of growth of entanglement entropy, and hence the tsunami velocity. The bound is smaller than what one gets for quenches in holographic theories, which highlights the importance of interactions in the spread of entanglement in many-body systems. We propose an interacting model which we believe provides an upper bound on the spread of entanglement for interacting relativistic theories. In two spacetime dimensions with multi...

  11. Mining Causality for Explanation Knowledge from Text

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chaveevan Pechsiri; Asanee Kawtrakul

    2007-01-01

    Mining causality is essential to provide a diagnosis. This research aims at extracting the causality existing within multiple sentences or EDUs (Elementary Discourse Unit). The research emphasizes the use of causality verbs because they make explicit in a certain way the consequent events of a cause, e.g., "Aphids suck the sap from rice leaves. Then leaves will shrink. Later, they will become yellow and dry.". A verb can also be the causal-verb link between cause and effect within EDU(s), e.g., "Aphids suck the sap from rice leaves causing leaves to be shrunk" ("causing" is equivalent to a causal-verb link in Thai). The research confronts two main problems: identifying the interesting causality events from documents and identifying their boundaries. Then, we propose mining on verbs by using two different machine learning techniques, Naive Bayes classifier and Support Vector Machine. The resulted mining rules will be used for the identification and the causality extraction of the multiple EDUs from text. Our multiple EDUs extraction shows 0.88 precision with 0.75 recall from Na'ive Bayes classifier and 0.89 precision with 0.76 recall from Support Vector Machine.

  12. Causal localizations in relativistic quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causal localizations describe the position of quantum systems moving not faster than light. They are constructed for the systems with finite spinor dimension. At the center of interest are the massive relativistic systems. For every positive mass, there is the sequence of Dirac tensor-localizations, which provides a complete set of inequivalent irreducible causal localizations. They obey the principle of special relativity and are fully Poincaré covariant. The boosters are determined by the causal position operator and the other Poincaré generators. The localization with minimal spinor dimension is the Dirac localization. Thus, the Dirac equation is derived here as a mere consequence of the principle of causality. Moreover, the higher tensor-localizations, not known so far, follow from Dirac’s localization by a simple construction. The probability of localization for positive energy states results to be described by causal positive operator valued (PO-) localizations, which are the traces of the causal localizations on the subspaces of positive energy. These causal Poincaré covariant PO-localizations for every irreducible massive relativistic system were, all the more, not known before. They are shown to be separated. Hence, the positive energy systems can be localized within every open region by a suitable preparation as accurately as desired. Finally, the attempt is made to provide an interpretation of the PO-localization operators within the frame of conventional quantum mechanics attributing an important role to the negative energy states

  13. Causal localizations in relativistic quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castrigiano, Domenico P. L., E-mail: castrig@ma.tum.de; Leiseifer, Andreas D., E-mail: andreas.leiseifer@tum.de [Fakultät für Mathematik, TU München, Boltzmannstraße 3, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Causal localizations describe the position of quantum systems moving not faster than light. They are constructed for the systems with finite spinor dimension. At the center of interest are the massive relativistic systems. For every positive mass, there is the sequence of Dirac tensor-localizations, which provides a complete set of inequivalent irreducible causal localizations. They obey the principle of special relativity and are fully Poincaré covariant. The boosters are determined by the causal position operator and the other Poincaré generators. The localization with minimal spinor dimension is the Dirac localization. Thus, the Dirac equation is derived here as a mere consequence of the principle of causality. Moreover, the higher tensor-localizations, not known so far, follow from Dirac’s localization by a simple construction. The probability of localization for positive energy states results to be described by causal positive operator valued (PO-) localizations, which are the traces of the causal localizations on the subspaces of positive energy. These causal Poincaré covariant PO-localizations for every irreducible massive relativistic system were, all the more, not known before. They are shown to be separated. Hence, the positive energy systems can be localized within every open region by a suitable preparation as accurately as desired. Finally, the attempt is made to provide an interpretation of the PO-localization operators within the frame of conventional quantum mechanics attributing an important role to the negative energy states.

  14. Mixture Density Mercer Kernels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We present a method of generating Mercer Kernels from an ensemble of probabilistic mixture models, where each mixture model is generated from a Bayesian mixture...

  15. Perception of causality in schizophrenia spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschacher, Wolfgang; Kupper, Zeno

    2006-10-01

    Patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders often maintain deviating views on cause-effect relationships, especially when positive and disorganization symptoms are manifest. Altered perceived causality is prominent in delusional ideation, in ideas of reference, and in the mentalizing ability (theory of mind [ToM]) of patients. Perceiving causal relationships may be understood either as higher order cognitive reasoning or as low-level information processing. In the present study, perception of causality was investigated as a low-level, preattentional capability similar to gestalt-like perceptual organization. Thirty-one patients (24 men and 7 women with mean age 27.7 years) and the same number of healthy control subjects matched to patients with respect to age and sex were tested. A visual paradigm was used in which 2 identical discs move, from opposite sides of a monitor, steadily toward and then past one another. Their coincidence generates an ambiguous, bistable percept (discs either "stream through" or "bounce off" one another). The bouncing perception, ie, perceived causality, is enhanced when auditory stimuli are presented at the time of coincidence. Psychopathology was measured using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. It was found that positive symptoms were strongly associated with increased perceived causality and disorganization with attenuated perceived causality. Patients in general were not significantly different from controls, but symptom subgroups showed specifically altered perceived causality. Perceived causality as a basic preattentional process may contribute to higher order cognitive alterations and ToM deficiencies. It is suggested that cognitive remediation therapy should address both increased and reduced perception of causality. PMID:16896057

  16. On the origin of Hill's causal criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabia, A

    1991-09-01

    The rules to assess causation formulated by the eighteenth century Scottish philosopher David Hume are compared to Sir Austin Bradford Hill's causal criteria. The strength of the analogy between Hume's rules and Hill's causal criteria suggests that, irrespective of whether Hume's work was known to Hill or Hill's predecessors, Hume's thinking expresses a point of view still widely shared by contemporary epidemiologists. The lack of systematic experimental proof to causal inferences in epidemiology may explain the analogy of Hume's and Hill's, as opposed to Popper's, logic.

  17. Causal localizations in relativistic quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiseifer, Andreas David

    2014-06-30

    Sufficient and necessary conditions for causal localizations of massive relativistic systems are developed. It is proven that the Dirac- and the Dirac tensor-system are up to unitary equivalence the only irreducible causal localizations with finite spinor dimension which have a massive relativistic extension. A formula for this extension is given. The existence of arbitrarily good localized states of positive energy is shown. In the context of the causality condition a Paley-Wiener theorem for bounded measurable matrix-valued functions is proven.

  18. Causality and momentum conservation from relative locality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Bianco, Stefano; Brighenti, Francesco; Buonocore, Riccardo Junior

    2015-04-01

    Theories involving curved momentum space, which recently became a topic of interest in the quantum-gravity literature, can, in general, violate many apparently robust aspects of our current description of the laws of physics, including relativistic invariance, locality, causality, and global momentum conservation. Here, we explore some aspects of the pathologies arising in generic theories involving curved momentum space for what concerns causality and momentum conservation. However, we also report results suggesting that when momentum space is maximally symmetric, and the theory is formulated relativistically, most notably including translational invariance with the associated relativity of spacetime locality, momentum is globally conserved and there is no violation of causality.

  19. Causal structures of pp-waves

    CERN Document Server

    Hubeny, V E; Hubeny, Veronika E.; Rangamani, Mukund

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the causal structure of pp-wave spacetimes using the ideal point construction outlined by Geroch, Kronheimer, and Penrose. This generalizes the recent work of Marolf and Ross, who considered similar issues for plane wave spacetimes. We address the question regarding the dimension of the causal boundary for certain specific pp-wave backgrounds. In particular, we demonstrate that the pp-wave spacetime which gives rise to the N = 2 sine-Gordon string world-sheet theory is geodesically complete and has a one-dimensional causal boundary.

  20. The CMB in a Causal Set Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Zuntz, Joe

    2007-01-01

    We discuss Cosmic Microwave Background constraints on the causal set theory of quantum gravity, which has made testable predictions about the nature of dark energy. We flesh out previously discussed heuristic constraints by showing how the power spectrum of causal set dark energy fluctuations can be found from the overlap volumes of past light cones of points in the universe. Using a modified Boltzmann code we put constraints on the single parameter of the theory that are somewhat stronger than previous ones. We conclude that causal set theory cannot explain late-time acceleration without radical alterations to General Relativity.

  1. Intrinsic Universality of Causal Graph Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Martiel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Causal graph dynamics are transformations over graphs that capture two important symmetries of physics, namely causality and homogeneity. They can be equivalently defined as continuous and translation invariant transformations or functions induced by a local rule applied simultaneously on every vertex of the graph. Intrinsic universality is the ability of an instance of a model to simulate every other instance of the model while preserving the structure of the computation at every step of the simulation. In this work we present the construction of a family of intrinsically universal instances of causal graphs dynamics, each instance being able to simulate a subset of instances.

  2. Some properties of explosive mixtures containing peroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study concerns mixtures of triacetone triperoxide (3,3,6,6,9,9-hexamethyl-1,2,4,5,7,8-hexoxonane, TATP) and ammonium nitrate (AN) with added water (W), as the case may be, and dry mixtures of TATP with urea nitrate (UN). Relative performances (RP) of the mixtures and their individual components, relative to TNT, were determined by means of ballistic mortar. The detonation energies, E0, and detonation velocities, D, were calculated for the mixtures studied by means of the thermodynamic code CHEETAH. Relationships have been found and are discussed between the RP and the E0 values related to unit volume of gaseous products of detonation of these mixtures. These relationships together with those between RP and oxygen balance values of the mixtures studied indicate different types of participation of AN and UN in the explosive decomposition of the respective mixtures. Dry TATP/UN mixtures exhibit lower RP than analogous mixtures TATP/AN containing up to 25% of water. Depending on the water content, the TATP/AN mixtures possess higher detonability values than the ANFO explosives. A semi-logarithmic relationship between the D values and oxygen coefficients has been derived for all the mixtures studied at the charge density of 1000 kg m-3. Among the mixtures studied, this relationship distinguishes several samples of the type of 'tertiary explosives' as well as samples that approach 'high explosives' in their performances and detonation velocities

  3. Bound on genuine multipartite correlations from the principle of information causality

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Quantum mechanics is not the unique no-signaling theory which is endowed with stronger-than-classical correlations, and there exists a broad class of no-signaling theories allowing even stronger-than-quantum correlations. The principle of information causality has been suggested to distinguish quantum theory from these nonphysical theories, together with an elegant information-theoretic proof of the quantum bound of two-particle correlations. In this work, we extend this to genuine $N$-particle correlations that cannot be reduced to mixtures of states in which a smaller number of particles are entangled. The violation of Svetlichny's inequality is a confirmation of genuine multipartite correlations. We first express Svetlichny's inequality in terms of multipartite no-signaling boxes, then prove that the strongest genuine multipartite correlations lead to the maximal violation of information causality. The maximal genuine multipartite correlations under the constraint of information causality is found to be eq...

  4. Compositional Adjustment of Dirichlet Mixture Priors

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Xugang; Yu, Yi-Kuo; Altschul, Stephen F.

    2010-01-01

    Dirichlet mixture priors provide a Bayesian formalism for scoring alignments of protein profiles to individual sequences, which can be generalized to constructing scores for multiple-alignment columns. A Dirichlet mixture is a probability distribution over multinomial space, each of whose components can be thought of as modeling a type of protein position. Applied to the simplest case of pairwise sequence alignment, a Dirichlet mixture is equivalent to an implied symmetric substitution matrix...

  5. Causal reasoning and models of cognitive tasks for naval nuclear power plant operators; Raisonnement causal et modelisation de l`activite cognitive d`operateurs de chaufferie nucleaire navale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar-Ferrer, P.

    1995-06-01

    In complex industrial process control, causal reasoning appears as a major component in operators` cognitive tasks. It is tightly linked to diagnosis, prediction of normal and failure states, and explanation. This work provides a detailed review of literature in causal reasoning. A synthesis is proposed as a model of causal reasoning in process control. This model integrates distinct approaches in Cognitive Science: especially qualitative physics, Bayesian networks, knowledge-based systems, and cognitive psychology. Our model defines a framework for the analysis of causal human errors in simulated naval nuclear power plant fault management. Through the methodological framework of critical incident analysis we define a classification of errors and difficulties linked to causal reasoning. This classification is based on shallow characteristics of causal reasoning. As an origin of these errors, more elementary component activities in causal reasoning are identified. The applications cover the field of functional specification for man-machine interfaces, operators support systems design as well as nuclear safety. In addition of this study, we integrate the model of causal reasoning in a model of cognitive task in process control. (authors). 106 refs., 49 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. A Multivariate Granger Causality Concept towards Full Brain Functional Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christoph; Pester, Britta; Schmid-Hertel, Nicole; Witte, Herbert; Wismüller, Axel; Leistritz, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Detecting changes of spatially high-resolution functional connectivity patterns in the brain is crucial for improving the fundamental understanding of brain function in both health and disease, yet still poses one of the biggest challenges in computational neuroscience. Currently, classical multivariate Granger Causality analyses of directed interactions between single process components in coupled systems are commonly restricted to spatially low- dimensional data, which requires a pre-selection or aggregation of time series as a preprocessing step. In this paper we propose a new fully multivariate Granger Causality approach with embedded dimension reduction that makes it possible to obtain a representation of functional connectivity for spatially high-dimensional data. The resulting functional connectivity networks may consist of several thousand vertices and thus contain more detailed information compared to connectivity networks obtained from approaches based on particular regions of interest. Our large scale Granger Causality approach is applied to synthetic and resting state fMRI data with a focus on how well network community structure, which represents a functional segmentation of the network, is preserved. It is demonstrated that a number of different community detection algorithms, which utilize a variety of algorithmic strategies and exploit topological features differently, reveal meaningful information on the underlying network module structure.

  7. A Multivariate Granger Causality Concept towards Full Brain Functional Connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Schmidt

    Full Text Available Detecting changes of spatially high-resolution functional connectivity patterns in the brain is crucial for improving the fundamental understanding of brain function in both health and disease, yet still poses one of the biggest challenges in computational neuroscience. Currently, classical multivariate Granger Causality analyses of directed interactions between single process components in coupled systems are commonly restricted to spatially low- dimensional data, which requires a pre-selection or aggregation of time series as a preprocessing step. In this paper we propose a new fully multivariate Granger Causality approach with embedded dimension reduction that makes it possible to obtain a representation of functional connectivity for spatially high-dimensional data. The resulting functional connectivity networks may consist of several thousand vertices and thus contain more detailed information compared to connectivity networks obtained from approaches based on particular regions of interest. Our large scale Granger Causality approach is applied to synthetic and resting state fMRI data with a focus on how well network community structure, which represents a functional segmentation of the network, is preserved. It is demonstrated that a number of different community detection algorithms, which utilize a variety of algorithmic strategies and exploit topological features differently, reveal meaningful information on the underlying network module structure.

  8. Selecting appropriate cases when tracing causal mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beach, Derek; Pedersen, Rasmus Brun

    2016-01-01

    , ontological determinism, causal asymmetry and causal homogeneity and the importance of context. We then develop a set of case selection guidelines that are in methodological alignment with these underlying assumptions. Section 4 develops guidelines for research where the mechanism is the primary focus......The last decade has witnessed resurgence in the interest in studying the causal mechanisms linking causes and outcomes in the social sciences. This article explores the overlooked implications for case selection when tracing mechanisms using in-depth case studies. Our argument is that existing case...... selection guidelines are appropriate for research aimed at making cross-case claims about causal relationships, where case selection is primarily used to control for other causes. However, existing guidelines are not in alignment with case-based research that aims to trace mechanisms, where the goal is to...

  9. A Causal Model for Diagnostic Reasoning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Guoqiang; CHENG Hu

    2000-01-01

    Up to now, there have been many methods for knowledge representation and reasoning in causal networks, but few of them include the research on the coactions of nodes. In practice, ignoring these coactions may influence the accuracy of reasoning and even give rise to incorrect reasoning. In this paper, based on multilayer causal networks, the definitions on coaction nodes are given to construct a new causal network called Coaction Causal Network, which serves to construct a model of neural network for diagnosis followed by fuzzy reasoning, and then the activation rules are given and neural computing methods are used to finish the diagnostic reasoning. These methods are proved in theory and a method of computing the number of solutions for the diagnostic reasoning is given. Finally, the experiments and the conclusions are presented.

  10. The Gravity Dual of Boundary Causality

    CERN Document Server

    Engelhardt, Netta

    2016-01-01

    In gauge/gravity duality, points which are not causally related on the boundary cannot be causally related through the bulk; this is the statement of boundary causality. By the Gao-Wald theorem, the averaged null energy condition in the bulk is sufficient to ensure this property. Here we proceed in the converse direction: we derive a necessary as well as sufficient condition for the preservation of boundary causality under perturbative (quantum or stringy) corrections to the bulk. The condition that we find is a (background-dependent) constraint on the amount by which light cones can "open" over all null bulk geodesics. We show that this constraint is weaker than the averaged null energy condition.

  11. The Temporal Logic of Causal Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Kleinberg, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    Computational analysis of time-course data with an underlying causal structure is needed in a variety of domains, including neural spike trains, stock price movements, and gene expression levels. However, it can be challenging to determine from just the numerical time course data alone what is coordinating the visible processes, to separate the underlying prima facie causes into genuine and spurious causes and to do so with a feasible computational complexity. For this purpose, we have been developing a novel algorithm based on a framework that combines notions of causality in philosophy with algorithmic approaches built on model checking and statistical techniques for multiple hypotheses testing. The causal relationships are described in terms of temporal logic formulae, reframing the inference problem in terms of model checking. The logic used, PCTL, allows description of both the time between cause and effect and the probability of this relationship being observed. We show that equipped with these causal f...

  12. What becomes of a causal set

    CERN Document Server

    Wuthrich, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Unlike the relativity theory it seeks to replace, causal set theory has been interpreted to leave space for a substantive, though perhaps 'localized', form of 'becoming'. The possibility of fundamental becoming is nourished by the fact that the analogue of Stein's theorem from special relativity does not hold in causal set theory. Despite this, we find that in many ways, the debate concerning becoming parallels the well-rehearsed lines it follows in the domain of relativity. We present, however, some new twists and challenges. In particular, we show that a novel and exotic notion of becoming is compatible with causal sets. In contrast to the 'localized' becoming considered compatible with the dynamics of causal set theory by its advocates, our novel kind of becoming, while not answering to the typical A-theoretic demands, is 'global' and objective.

  13. Ten simple rules for dynamic causal modeling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stephan, K.E.; Penny, W.D.; Moran, R.J.; Ouden, H.E.M. den; Daunizeau, J.; Friston, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic causal modeling (DCM) is a generic Bayesian framework for inferring hidden neuronal states from measurements of brain activity. It provides posterior estimates of neurobiologically interpretable quantities such as the effective strength of synaptic connections among neuronal populations and

  14. Causality Between Urban Concentration and Environmental Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Pujiati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Population is concentrated in urban areas can cause the external diseconomies on environment if it exceeds the carrying capacity of the space and the urban economy. Otherwise the quality of the environment is getting better, led to the concentration of population in urban areas are increasingly high. This study aims to analyze the relationship of causality between the urban concentration and environmental quality in urban agglomeration areas. The data used in the study of secondary data obtained from the Central Bureau of statistics and the City Government from 2000 to 2013. The analytical method used is the Granger causality and descriptive. Granger causality study results showed no pattern of reciprocal causality, between urban concentration and the quality of the environment, but there unidirectional relationship between the urban concentration and environmental quality. This means that increasing urban concentration led to decreased environmental quality.

  15. Causal Structure and Birefringence in Nonlinear Electrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    de Melo, C. A. M.; Medeiros, L. G.; Pompeia, P. J.(Instituto de Fomento e Coordenação Industrial, Departamento de Ciência e Tecnologia Aeroespacial, Praça Mal. Eduardo Gomes 50, 12228-901, São José dos Campos, SP , Brazil)

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the causal structure of general nonlinear electrodynamics and determine which Lagrangians generate an effective metric conformal to Minkowski. We also proof that there is only one analytic nonlinear electrodynamics presenting no birefringence.

  16. Recursive unsupervised learning of finite mixture models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zivkovic, Zoran; Heijden, van der Ferdinand

    2004-01-01

    There are two open problems when finite mixture densities are used to model multivariate data: the selection of the number of components and the initialization. In this paper, we propose an online (recursive) algorithm that estimates the parameters of the mixture and that simultaneously selects the

  17. The Causal Effects of Father Absence

    OpenAIRE

    McLanahan, Sara; TACH, LAURA; Schneider, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The literature on father absence is frequently criticized for its use of cross-sectional data and methods that fail to take account of possible omitted variable bias and reverse causality. We review studies that have responded to this critique by employing a variety of innovative research designs to identify the causal effect of father absence, including studies using lagged dependent variable models, growth curve models, individual fixed effects models, sibling fixed effects models, natural ...

  18. Locally Causal Dynamical Triangulations in Two Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Loll, Renate

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the universal properties of a new two-dimensional quantum gravity model defined in terms of Locally Causal Dynamical Triangulations (LCDT). Measuring the Hausdorff and spectral dimensions of the dynamical geometrical ensemble, we find numerical evidence that the continuum limit of the model lies in a new universality class of two-dimensional quantum gravity theories, inequivalent to both Euclidean and Causal Dynamical Triangulations.

  19. Inter-causal Independence and Heterogeneous Factorization

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Nevin Lianwen; Poole, David L

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that conditional independence can be used to factorize a joint probability into a multiplication of conditional probabilities. This paper proposes a constructive definition of inter-causal independence, which can be used to further factorize a conditional probability. An inference algorithm is developed, which makes use of both conditional independence and inter-causal independence to reduce inference complexity in Bayesian networks.

  20. Causal Inference in Urban and Regional Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Nathaniel Baum-Snow; Fernando Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Recovery of causal relationships in data is an essential part of scholarly inquiry in the social sciences. This chapter discusses strategies that have been successfully used in urban and regional economics for recovering such causal relationships. Essential to any successful empirical inquiry is careful consideration of the sources of variation in the data that identify parameters of interest. Interpretation of such parameters should take into account the potential for their heterogeneity as ...

  1. Causal transmission in reduced-form models

    OpenAIRE

    Vassili Bazinas; Bent Nielsen

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method to explore the causal transmission of a catalyst variable through two endogenous variables of interest. The method is based on the reduced-form system formed from the conditional distribution of the two endogenous variables given the catalyst. The method combines elements from instru- mental variable analysis and Cholesky decomposition of structural vector autoregressions. We give conditions for uniqueness of the causal transmission.

  2. Causales de ausencia de responsabilidad penal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Sandoval Fernández

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo se ocupa de las causales de ausencia de responsabilidad penal, especialmente de aquellas que tienen efecto en el injusto. Como subtemas se delimita el concepto de responsabilidad penal y su ausencia. Se estudian las principales teorias a cerca de la relación tipicidad-antijuridicidad y su incidencia en el derecho penal colombiano. Por último contiene una propuesta acerca de cómo deberian agruparse las causales del arto 32 C. PlOO.

  3. Associative foundation of causal learning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polack, Cody W; McConnell, Bridget L; Miller, Ralph R

    2013-03-01

    Are humans unique in their ability to interpret exogenous events as causes? We addressed this question by observing the behavior of rats for indications of causal learning. Within an operant motor-sensory preconditioning paradigm, associative surgical techniques revealed that rats attempted to control an outcome (i.e., a potential effect) by manipulating a potential exogenous cause (i.e., an intervention). Rats were able to generate an innocuous auditory stimulus. This stimulus was then paired with an aversive stimulus. The animals subsequently avoided potential generation of the predictive cue, but not if the aversive stimulus was subsequently devalued or the predictive cue was extinguished (Exp. 1). In Experiment 2, we demonstrated that the aversive stimulus we used was in fact aversive, that it was subject to devaluation, that the cue-aversive stimulus pairings did make the cue a conditioned stimulus, and that the cue was subject to extinction. In Experiments 3 and 4, we established that the decrease in leverpressing observed in Experiment 1 was goal-directed instrumental behavior rather than purely a product of Pavlovian conditioning. To the extent that interventions suggest causal reasoning, it appears that causal reasoning can be based on associations between contiguous exogenous events. Thus, contiguity appears capable of establishing causal relationships between exogenous events. Our results challenge the widely held view that causal learning is uniquely human, and suggest that causal learning is explicable in an associative framework. PMID:22562460

  4. Device-independent test of causal order and relations to fixed-points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeler, Ämin; Wolf, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Bell non-local correlations cannot be naturally explained in a fixed causal structure. This serves as a motivation for considering models where no global assumption is made beyond logical consistency. The assumption of a fixed causal order between a set of parties, together with free randomness, implies device-independent inequalities—just as the assumption of locality does. It is known that local validity of quantum theory is consistent with violating such inequalities. Moreover, for three parties or more, even the (stronger) assumption of local classical probability theory plus logical consistency allows for violating causal inequalities. Here, we show that a classical environment (with which the parties interact), possibly containing loops, is logically consistent if and only if whatever the involved parties do, there is exactly one fixed-point, the latter being representable as a mixture of deterministic fixed-points. We further show that the non-causal view allows for a model of computation strictly more powerful than computation in a world of fixed causal orders.

  5. Shear viscosity of liquid mixtures: Mass dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Expressions for zeroth, second, and fourth sum rules of transverse stress autocorrelation function of two component fluid have been derived. These sum rules and Mori's memory function formalism have been used to study shear viscosity of Ar-Kr and isotopic mixtures. It has been found that theoretical result is in good agreement with the computer simulation result for the Ar-Kr mixture. The mass dependence of shear viscosity for different mole fraction shows that deviation from ideal linear model comes even from mass difference in two species of fluid mixture. At higher mass ratio shear viscosity of mixture is not explained by any of the emperical model. (author)

  6. Linear structures, causal sets and topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudetz, Laurenz

    2015-11-01

    Causal set theory and the theory of linear structures (which has recently been developed by Tim Maudlin as an alternative to standard topology) share some of their main motivations. In view of that, I raise and answer the question how these two theories are related to each other and to standard topology. I show that causal set theory can be embedded into Maudlin's more general framework and I characterise what Maudlin's topological concepts boil down to when applied to discrete linear structures that correspond to causal sets. Moreover, I show that all topological aspects of causal sets that can be described in Maudlin's theory can also be described in the framework of standard topology. Finally, I discuss why these results are relevant for evaluating Maudlin's theory. The value of this theory depends crucially on whether it is true that (a) its conceptual framework is as expressive as that of standard topology when it comes to describing well-known continuous as well as discrete models of spacetime and (b) it is even more expressive or fruitful when it comes to analysing topological aspects of discrete structures that are intended as models of spacetime. On one hand, my theorems support (a). The theory is rich enough to incorporate causal set theory and its definitions of topological notions yield a plausible outcome in the case of causal sets. On the other hand, the results undermine (b). Standard topology, too, has the conceptual resources to capture those topological aspects of causal sets that are analysable within Maudlin's framework. This fact poses a challenge for the proponents of Maudlin's theory to prove it fruitful.

  7. Mixture Experiments and their Application in Agricultural Research

    OpenAIRE

    Irum Raza; M. Asif Masood; Rashid Mahmood

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to show the applicability of Mixture designs in Agricultural Research System and to fit an appropriate mixture regression model making response variables as functions of the proportions of the mixture components. Data on four components namely neem oil, garlic oil, clove oil and tobacco extract (ml) were collected from field experiment conducted by Honeybee Research Institute, NARC. The main goal of the experiment was to check whether blending two components hav...

  8. Optimal mixture experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Sinha, B K; Pal, Manisha; Das, P

    2014-01-01

    The book dwells mainly on the optimality aspects of mixture designs. As mixture models are a special case of regression models, a general discussion on regression designs has been presented, which includes topics like continuous designs, de la Garza phenomenon, Loewner order domination, Equivalence theorems for different optimality criteria and standard optimality results for single variable polynomial regression and multivariate linear and quadratic regression models. This is followed by a review of the available literature on estimation of parameters in mixture models. Based on recent research findings, the volume also introduces optimal mixture designs for estimation of optimum mixing proportions in different mixture models, which include Scheffé’s quadratic model, Darroch-Waller model, log- contrast model, mixture-amount models, random coefficient models and multi-response model.  Robust mixture designs and mixture designs in blocks have been also reviewed. Moreover, some applications of mixture desig...

  9. The Cradle of Causal Reasoning: Newborns' Preference for Physical Causality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascalzoni, Elena; Regolin, Lucia; Vallortigara, Giorgio; Simion, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    Perception of mechanical (i.e. physical) causality, in terms of a cause-effect relationship between two motion events, appears to be a powerful mechanism in our daily experience. In spite of a growing interest in the earliest causal representations, the role of experience in the origin of this sensitivity is still a matter of dispute. Here, we…

  10. Causal impressions: predicting when, not just whether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Michael E; Rogers, Ester T; Beckmann, Joshua S

    2005-03-01

    In 1739, David Hume established the so-called cues to causality--environmental cues that are important to the inference of causality. Although this descriptive account has been corroborated experimentally, it has not been established why these cues are useful, except that they may reflect statistical regularities in the environment. One of the cues to causality, covariation, helps predict whether an effect will occur, but not its time of occurrence. In the present study, evidence is provided that spatial and temporal contiguity improve an observer's ability to predict when an effect will occur, thus complementing the utility of covariation as a predictor of whether an effect will occur. While observing Michotte's (1946/1963) launching effect, participants showed greater accuracy and precision in their predictions of the onset of movement by the launched object when there was spatial and temporal contiguity. Furthermore, when auditory cues that bridged a delayed launch were included, causal ratings and predictability were similarly affected. These results suggest that the everyday inference of causality relies on our ability to predict whether and when an effect will occur.

  11. Preschoolers prefer to learn causal information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aubry eAlvarez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Young children, in general, appear to have a strong drive to explore the environment in ways that reveal its underlying causal structure. But are they really attuned specifically to casual information in this quest for understanding, or do they show equal interest in other types of non-obvious information about the world? To answer this question, we introduced 20 three-year-old children to two puppets who were anxious to tell the child about a set of novel artifacts and animals. One puppet consistently described causal properties of the items while the other puppet consistently described carefully matched non-causal properties of the same items. After a familiarization period in which children learned which type of information to expect from each informant, children were given the opportunity to choose which they wanted to hear describe each of eight pictured test items. On average, children chose to hear from the informant that provided causal descriptions on 72% of the trials. This preference for causal information has important implications for explaining the role of conceptual information in supporting early learning and may suggest means for maximizing interest and motivation in young children.

  12. Effects of individual polychlorinated naphthalene (PCN) components of Halowax 1051 and two defined, artificial PCN mixtures on AHR and CYP1A1 protein expression, steroid secretion and expression of enzymes involved in steroidogenesis (CYP17, 17β-HSD and CYP19) in porcine ovarian follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barć, Justyna; Gregoraszczuk, Ewa Łucja

    2014-08-01

    In this study we tried to answer a question which component of Halowax 1051 is responsible for, observed in previously published study, androgenic effects of the mixture, and whether it is possible to draw conclusions about the action of mixtures by examining the effect of an indicator congener. Ovarian follicles were incubated with individual congeners of an artificial mixture for 6-24h. At the end of the incubation period, media were collected for determination of progesterone (P4), androstenedione (A4), testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2) levels by enzyme immunoassay, and follicles were retained for an examination of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), cytochrome p450 enzymes (CYP1A1, CYP17, CYP19), and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) protein expression by Western blotting. CN73 in dose 50pg/ml after 6h had no effect and decreased AHR expression after 24h, while at dose 400pg/ml increased AHR protein expression after 6h of exposure which remained elevated after 24h. CN74 and CN75 at both concentrations tested (25 and 50pg/ml) stimulated AHR protein expression after 6h and decreased it after 24h of exposure. Individual congeners induced a rapid increase in CYP1A1 protein expression, with a rank order of efficacy of CN73>CN74=CN75. All congeners increased P4/A4 and T/E2 secretion ratios in association with a decrease in the A4/T ratio, pointing to androgenic and anti-estrogenic properties of PCNs in ovarian follicles. The most potent congener in this context was CN73. The effects of mixtures were comparable to those of CN74 and CN75, and were not as strong as those observed for CN73. Collectively, these data suggest antagonistic actions of single congeners in a mixture, indicating that the actions of a mixture cannot be predicted based on the actions of individual congeners.

  13. Analytical processing of binary mixture information by olfactory bulb glomeruli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max L Fletcher

    Full Text Available Odors are rarely composed of a single compound, but rather contain a large and complex variety of chemical components. Often, these mixtures are perceived as having unique qualities that can be quite different than the combination of their components. In many cases, a majority of the components of a mixture cannot be individually identified. This synthetic processing of odor information suggests that individual component representations of the mixture must interact somewhere along the olfactory pathway. The anatomical nature of sensory neuron input into segregated glomeruli with the bulb suggests that initial input of odor information into the bulb is analytic. However, a large network of interneurons within the olfactory bulb could allow for mixture interactions via mechanisms such as lateral inhibition. Currently in mammals, it is unclear if postsynaptic mitral/tufted cell glomerular mixture responses reflect the analytical mixture input, or provide the initial basis for synthetic processing with the olfactory system. To address this, olfactory bulb glomerular binary mixture representations were compared to representations of each component using transgenic mice expressing the calcium indicator G-CaMP2 in olfactory bulb mitral/tufted cells. Overall, dorsal surface mixture representations showed little mixture interaction and often appeared as a simple combination of the component representations. Based on this, it is concluded that dorsal surface glomerular mixture representations remain largely analytical with nearly all component information preserved.

  14. Causal binding of actions to their effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehner, Marc J; Humphreys, Gruffydd R

    2009-10-01

    According to widely held views in cognitive science harking back to David Hume, causality cannot be perceived directly, but instead is inferred from patterns of sensory experience, and the quality of these inferences is determined by perceivable quantities such as contingency and contiguity. We report results that suggest a reversal of Hume's conjecture: People's sense of time is warped by the experience of causality. In a stimulus-anticipation task, participants' response behavior reflected a shortened experience of time in the case of target stimuli participants themselves had generated, relative to equidistant, equally predictable stimuli they had not caused. These findings suggest that causality in the mind leads to temporal binding of cause and effect, and extend and generalize beyond earlier claims of intentional binding between action and outcome.

  15. Causal inheritence in plane wave quotients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubeny, Veronika E.; Rangamani, Mukund; Ross, Simon F.

    2003-11-24

    We investigate the appearance of closed timelike curves in quotients of plane waves along spacelike isometries. First we formulate a necessary and sufficient condition for a quotient of a general spacetime to preserve stable causality. We explicitly show that the plane waves are stably causal; in passing, we observe that some pp-waves are not even distinguishing. We then consider the classification of all quotients of the maximally supersymmetric ten-dimensional plane wave under a spacelike isometry, and show that the quotient will lead to closed timelike curves iff the isometry involves a translation along the u direction. The appearance of these closed timelike curves is thus connected to the special properties of the light cones in plane wave spacetimes. We show that all other quotients preserve stable causality.

  16. The causal meaning of Hamilton's rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okasha, Samir; Martens, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    Hamilton's original derivation of his rule for the spread of an altruistic gene (rb>c) assumed additivity of costs and benefits. Recently, it has been argued that an exact version of the rule holds under non-additive pay-offs, so long as the cost and benefit terms are suitably defined, as partial regression coefficients. However, critics have questioned both the biological significance and the causal meaning of the resulting rule. This paper examines the causal meaning of the generalized Hamilton's rule in a simple model, by computing the effect of a hypothetical experiment to assess the cost of a social action and comparing it to the partial regression definition. The two do not agree. A possible way of salvaging the causal meaning of Hamilton's rule is explored, by appeal to R. A. Fisher's 'average effect of a gene substitution'. PMID:27069669

  17. Causality, initial conditions and inflationary magnetogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Tsagas, Christos G

    2016-01-01

    The post-inflationary evolution of inflation-produced magnetic fields, conventional or not, can change dramatically when two fundamental issues are accounted for. The first is causality, which demands that local physical processes can never affect superhorizon perturbations. The second is the nature of the transition from inflation to reheating and then to the radiation era, which determine the initial conditions at the start of these epochs. Technically, the latter issue can be addressed by appealing to Israel's junction conditions. Causality implies that inflationary magnetic fields dot not freeze into the matter until they have re-entered the causal horizon. The nature of cosmological transitions and the associated initial conditions, on the other hand, determine the large-scale magnetic evolution after inflation. Put together, the two can slow down the adiabatic decay of superhorizon-sized magnetic fields throughout their post-inflationary life and thus lead to considerably stronger residual strengths. Th...

  18. Normalizing the causality between time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, X. San

    2015-08-01

    Recently, a rigorous yet concise formula was derived to evaluate information flow, and hence the causality in a quantitative sense, between time series. To assess the importance of a resulting causality, it needs to be normalized. The normalization is achieved through distinguishing a Lyapunov exponent-like, one-dimensional phase-space stretching rate and a noise-to-signal ratio from the rate of information flow in the balance of the marginal entropy evolution of the flow recipient. It is verified with autoregressive models and applied to a real financial analysis problem. An unusually strong one-way causality is identified from IBM (International Business Machines Corporation) to GE (General Electric Company) in their early era, revealing to us an old story, which has almost faded into oblivion, about "Seven Dwarfs" competing with a giant for the mainframe computer market.

  19. A causally connected superluminal Warp Drive spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Loup, F; Waite, D; Halerewicz, E F; Stabno, M; Kuntzman, M; Sims, R

    2002-01-01

    It will be shown that while horizons do not exist for warp drive spacetimes traveling at subluminal velocities horizons begin to develop when a warp drive spacetime reaches luminal velocities. However it will be shown that the control region of a warp drive ship lie within the portion of the warped region that is still causally connected to the ship even at superluminal velocities, therefore allowing a ship to slow to subluminal velocities. Further it is shown that the warped regions which are causally disconnected from a warp ship have no correlation to the ship velocity.

  20. Causal interpretation of stochastic differential equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokol, Alexander; Hansen, Niels Richard

    2014-01-01

    We give a causal interpretation of stochastic differential equations (SDEs) by defining the postintervention SDE resulting from an intervention in an SDE. We show that under Lipschitz conditions, the solution to the postintervention SDE is equal to a uniform limit in probability of postintervention...... structural equation models based on the Euler scheme of the original SDE, thus relating our definition to mainstream causal concepts. We prove that when the driving noise in the SDE is a Lévy process, the postintervention distribution is identifiable from the generator of the SDE....

  1. Inferring causality from noisy time series data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønster, Dan; Fusaroli, Riccardo; Tylén, Kristian;

    2016-01-01

    Convergent Cross-Mapping (CCM) has shown high potential to perform causal inference in the absence of models. We assess the strengths and weaknesses of the method by varying coupling strength and noise levels in coupled logistic maps. We find that CCM fails to infer accurate coupling strength...... injections in intermediate-to-strongly coupled systems could enable more accurate causal inferences. Given the inherent noisy nature of real-world systems, our findings enable a more accurate evaluation of CCM applicability and advance suggestions on how to overcome its weaknesses....

  2. Bayesian D-Optimal Choice Designs for Mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Ruseckaite (Aiste); P.P. Goos (Peter); D. Fok (Dennis)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Consumer products and services can often be described as mixtures of ingredients. Examples are the mixture of ingredients in a cocktail and the mixture of different components of waiting time (e.g., in-vehicle and out-of-vehicle travel time) in a transportation setting.

  3. Purging mixture for extruder

    OpenAIRE

    Okpala, Chukwubuike

    2015-01-01

    This thesis work focuses on compounding a mechanical purge mixture for extruders. The base resin for making the purge mixture is recycled High Density Polyethylene chosen for its high density and good processing temperature. The additives are mainly clay and sili-con dioxide added as filler and scrubbing materials respectively. The purge mixture was produced by mixing the base resin and additives in percentage ratios into five places la-beled A, B, C, D, and E. the mixtures were extruded and ...

  4. Low temperature asphalt mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Modrijan, Damjan

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents the problem of manufacturing and building in the asphalt mixtures produced by the classical hot procedure and the possibility of manufacturing low temperature asphalt mixtures.We will see the main advantages of low temperature asphalt mixtures prepared with bitumen with organic addition Sasobit and compare it to the classical asphalt mixtures. The advantages and disadvantages of that are valued in the practical example in the conclusion.

  5. Separation of organic azeotropic mixtures by pervaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, R.W.

    1991-12-01

    Distillation is a commonly used separation technique in the petroleum refining and chemical processing industries. However, there are a number of potential separations involving azetropic and close-boiling organic mixtures that cannot be separated efficiently by distillation. Pervaporation is a membrane-based process that uses selective permeation through membranes to separate liquid mixtures. Because the separation process is not affected by the relative volatility of the mixture components being separated, pervaporation can be used to separate azetropes and close-boiling mixtures. Our results showed that pervaporation membranes can be used to separate azeotropic mixtures efficiently, a result that is not achievable with simple distillation. The membranes were 5--10 times more permeable to one of the components of the mixture, concentrating it in the permeate stream. For example, the membrane was 10 times more permeable to ethanol than methyl ethyl ketone, producing 60% ethanol permeate from an azeotropic mixture of ethanol and methyl ethyl ketone containing 18% ethanol. For the ethyl acetate/water mixture, the membranes showed a very high selectivity to water (> 300) and the permeate was 50--100 times enriched in water relative to the feed. The membranes had permeate fluxes on the order of 0.1--1 kg/m{sup 2}{center dot}h in the operating range of 55--70{degrees}C. Higher fluxes were obtained by increasing the operating temperature.

  6. Introducing Mechanics by Tapping Core Causal Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Kees; Westra, Axel; Emmett, Katrina; Eijkelhof, Harrie; Lijnse, Piet

    2008-01-01

    This article concerns an outline of an introductory mechanics course. It is based on the argument that various uses of the concept of force (e.g. from Kepler, Newton and everyday life) share an explanatory strategy based on core causal knowledge. The strategy consists of (a) the idea that a force causes a deviation from how an object would move of…

  7. Linear Response Laws and Causality in Electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuffa, Alex J.; Scales, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Linear response laws and causality (the effect cannot precede the cause) are of fundamental importance in physics. In the context of classical electrodynamics, students often have a difficult time grasping these concepts because the physics is obscured by the intermingling of the time and frequency domains. In this paper, we analyse the linear…

  8. A Causal Construction of Diffusion Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Banek, Tadeusz

    2010-01-01

    A simple nonlinear integral equation for Ito's map is obtained. Although, it does not include stochastic integrals, it does give causal construction of diffusion processes which can be easily implemented by iteration systems. Applications in financial modelling and extension to fBm are discussed.

  9. The metagenomic approach and causality in virology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Beres Castrignano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the metagenomic approach has been a very important tool in the discovery of new viruses in environmental and biological samples. Here we discuss how these discoveries may help to elucidate the etiology of diseases and the criteria necessary to establish a causal association between a virus and a disease.

  10. Causality and Time in Historical Institutionalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahoney, James; Mohamedali, Khairunnisa; Nguyen, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explores the dual concern with causality and time in historical institutionalism using a graphical approach. The analysis focuses on three concepts that are central to this field: critical junctures, gradual change, and path dependence. The analysis makes explicit and formal the logic...

  11. Escaping Myopia: Teaching Students about Historical Causality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    There are so many aspects to teaching history that are vital to creating well-rounded historical thinkers, but one of the most fundamental and most overlooked elements is the idea of causality. Far too many students do not understand the idea of causation, that there are multiple reasons for why historical events occurred and transpired in the way…

  12. Exploring Torus Universes in Causal Dynamical Triangulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budd, Timothy George; Loll, R.

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by the search for new observables in nonperturbative quantum gravity, we consider Causal Dynamical Triangulations (CDT) in 2+1 dimensions with the spatial topology of a torus. This system is of particular interest, because one can study not only the global scale factor, but also global...

  13. Marriage and Anomie: A Causal Argument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gary R.

    1974-01-01

    A sample of 394 married couples is employed to test the possibility of an association between marital satisfaction and personal (attitudinal) anomie. The hypothesis is supported. Conclusions are offered relevant to anomie theory, and to utilization of marital and family phenomena as independent variables in causal explanations of nonfamily events.…

  14. Manipulation and the causal Markov condition

    OpenAIRE

    Hausman, Daniel; Woodward, James

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between a manipulability conception of causation and the causal Markov condition (CM). We argue that violations of CM also violate widely shared expectations—implicit in the manipulability conception—having to do with the absence of spontaneous correlations. They also violate expectations concerning the connection between independence or dependence relationships in the presence and absence of interventions.

  15. Causality and Teleology in High School Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Pinchas

    1985-01-01

    Ability to distinguish between causal (cause-effect) and teleological (means-ends) explanations was measured in 1905 twelfth-grade biology students and found to be dependent on student knowledge. Although the inability to make these distinctions contributes to misconceptions in biology, appropriate instruction can easily remedy the problem. Sample…

  16. Causal and Teleological Explanations in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Cheng-Wai

    2009-01-01

    A causal explanation in biology focuses on the mechanism by which a biological process is brought about, whereas a teleological explanation considers the end result, in the context of the survival of the organism, as a reason for certain biological processes or structures. There is a tendency among students to offer a teleological explanation…

  17. Causality and analyticity in quantum fields theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a presentation of results on the causal and analytical structure of Green functions and on the collision amplitudes in fields theories, for massive particles of one type, with a positive mass and a zero spin value. (A.B.)

  18. Comments: Causal Interpretations of Mediation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Booil; Stuart, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    The authors thank Dr. Lindsay Page for providing a nice illustration of the use of the principal stratification framework to define causal effects, and a Bayesian model for effect estimation. They hope that her well-written article will help expose education researchers to these concepts and methods, and move the field of mediation analysis in…

  19. Sequential causal learning in humans and rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Lu; R.R. Rojas; T. Beckers; A. Yuille

    2008-01-01

    Recent experiments (Beckers, De Houwer, Pineño, & Miller, 2005;Beckers, Miller, De Houwer, & Urushihara, 2006) have shown that pretraining with unrelated cues can dramatically influence the performance of humans in a causal learning paradigm and rats in a standard Pavlovian conditioning paradigm. Su

  20. Liquids and liquid mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Rowlinson, J S; Baldwin, J E; Buckingham, A D; Danishefsky, S

    2013-01-01

    Liquids and Liquid Mixtures, Third Edition explores the equilibrium properties of liquids and liquid mixtures and relates them to the properties of the constituent molecules using the methods of statistical thermodynamics. Topics covered include the critical state, fluid mixtures at high pressures, and the statistical thermodynamics of fluids and mixtures. This book consists of eight chapters and begins with an overview of the liquid state and the thermodynamic properties of liquids and liquid mixtures, including vapor pressure and heat capacities. The discussion then turns to the thermodynami

  1. 狭缝式矩形喷动床中多粒度颗粒体系的最大喷动压降%MAXIMUM SPOUTED PRESSURE DROP OF MULTI-COMPONENT PARTICLE MIXTURES IN A SLOT -RECTANGULAR SPOUTED BED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宝群; 罗保林; 林尊锦

    2001-01-01

    The maximum spouted pressure drop of multisi ze composition glass bead mixtures was investigated in a rectangularslot spout ed bed with a gas entry slot which width varies from 2mm to 6mm .The experimenta l results of single and multisize composition particle mixtures showed that th e maximum spouted pressure drop was strongly dependent on the particle size and its composition in the particle mixtures, the static bed height and the gas entr y slot. In the present work, regimes describing variation of maximum spouted pre ssure drop for multisize composition particle mixtures were obtained. An empir ical relation for the maximum spouted pressure drop ΔPms was determined t o be:ΔPms(1-ε)(ρs-ρf)gH=0.023HDc-0.074HsDc0.028ρs-ρfρf-0.65∏ni=1dpiDc-0.54Xi (n=3)%在150mm×50mm×1100mm的矩形喷动床中,研究了单一粒径体系和二组分及三组分混合粒径颗粒体系的最大喷动压降受颗粒粒径及粒度组成、静止床高和气体入口狭缝宽度的影响情况。实验采用宽度为2、4、6mm三种宽度的狭缝式气体分布板,实验物料为单一粒径分别为1、1.5、2mm的玻璃珠。实验表明矩形喷动床的最大喷动压降与上述三种影响因素都有关系。本文还给出了最大喷动压降随这三种因素变化的实验关联式。

  2. Tutorial for mixture-process experiments with an industrial application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique Abreu Dal Bello

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a tutorial on mixture-process experiments and a case study of a chemical compound used in the delay mechanism for starting a rocket engine. The compound consists in a three-component mixture. Besides the mixture components, two process variables are considered. For the model selection, the use of an information criterion showed to be efficient in the case under study. A linear regression model was fitted. Through the developed model, the optimal proportions of the mixture components and the levels of the process variables were determined.

  3. Robust clustering using exponential power mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Liang, Faming

    2010-12-01

    Clustering is a widely used method in extracting useful information from gene expression data, where unknown correlation structures in genes are believed to persist even after normalization. Such correlation structures pose a great challenge on the conventional clustering methods, such as the Gaussian mixture (GM) model, k-means (KM), and partitioning around medoids (PAM), which are not robust against general dependence within data. Here we use the exponential power mixture model to increase the robustness of clustering against general dependence and nonnormality of the data. An expectation-conditional maximization algorithm is developed to calculate the maximum likelihood estimators (MLEs) of the unknown parameters in these mixtures. The Bayesian information criterion is then employed to determine the numbers of components of the mixture. The MLEs are shown to be consistent under sparse dependence. Our numerical results indicate that the proposed procedure outperforms GM, KM, and PAM when there are strong correlations or non-Gaussian components in the data. PMID:20163406

  4. Model structure selection in convolutive mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrholm, Mads; Makeig, Scott; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2006-01-01

    The CICAAR algorithm (convolutive independent component analysis with an auto-regressive inverse model) allows separation of white (i.i.d) source signals from convolutive mixtures. We introduce a source color model as a simple extension to the CICAAR which allows for a more parsimoneous represent......The CICAAR algorithm (convolutive independent component analysis with an auto-regressive inverse model) allows separation of white (i.i.d) source signals from convolutive mixtures. We introduce a source color model as a simple extension to the CICAAR which allows for a more parsimoneous...... representation in many practical mixtures. The new filter-CICAAR allows Bayesian model selection and can help answer questions like: 'Are we actually dealing with a convolutive mixture?'. We try to answer this question for EEG data....

  5. The causal link between energy and output growth: Evidence from Markov switching Granger causality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we empirically investigate the causal link between energy consumption and economic growth employing a Markov switching Granger causality analysis. We carry out our investigation using annual U.S. real GDP, total final energy consumption and total primary energy consumption data which cover the period between 1968 and 2010. We find that there are significant changes in the causal relation between energy consumption and economic growth over the sample period under investigation. Our results show that total final energy consumption and total primary energy consumption have significant predictive content for real economic activity in the U.S. economy. Furthermore, the causality running from energy consumption to output growth seems to be strongly apparent particularly during the periods of economic downturn and energy crisis. We also document that output growth has predictive power in explaining total energy consumption. Furthermore, the power of output growth in predicting total energy consumption is found to diminish after the mid of 1980s. - Highlights: • Total energy consumption has predictive content for real economic activity. • The causality from energy to output growth is apparent in the periods of recession. • The causality from energy to output growth is strong in the periods of energy crisis. • Output growth has predictive power in explaining total energy consumption. • The power of output growth in explaining energy diminishes after the mid of 1980s

  6. Assessing statistical significance in causal graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chindelevitch Leonid

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Causal graphs are an increasingly popular tool for the analysis of biological datasets. In particular, signed causal graphs--directed graphs whose edges additionally have a sign denoting upregulation or downregulation--can be used to model regulatory networks within a cell. Such models allow prediction of downstream effects of regulation of biological entities; conversely, they also enable inference of causative agents behind observed expression changes. However, due to their complex nature, signed causal graph models present special challenges with respect to assessing statistical significance. In this paper we frame and solve two fundamental computational problems that arise in practice when computing appropriate null distributions for hypothesis testing. Results First, we show how to compute a p-value for agreement between observed and model-predicted classifications of gene transcripts as upregulated, downregulated, or neither. Specifically, how likely are the classifications to agree to the same extent under the null distribution of the observed classification being randomized? This problem, which we call "Ternary Dot Product Distribution" owing to its mathematical form, can be viewed as a generalization of Fisher's exact test to ternary variables. We present two computationally efficient algorithms for computing the Ternary Dot Product Distribution and investigate its combinatorial structure analytically and numerically to establish computational complexity bounds. Second, we develop an algorithm for efficiently performing random sampling of causal graphs. This enables p-value computation under a different, equally important null distribution obtained by randomizing the graph topology but keeping fixed its basic structure: connectedness and the positive and negative in- and out-degrees of each vertex. We provide an algorithm for sampling a graph from this distribution uniformly at random. We also highlight theoretical

  7. Trimmed Granger causality between two groups of time series

    OpenAIRE

    Hung, Ying-Chao; Tseng, Neng-Fang; Balakrishnan, Narayanaswamy

    2014-01-01

    The identification of causal effects between two groups of time series has been an important topic in a wide range of applications such as economics, engineering, medicine, neuroscience, and biology. In this paper, a simplified causal relationship (called trimmed Granger causality) based on the context of Granger causality and vector autoregressive (VAR) model is introduced. The idea is to characterize a subset of “important variables” for both groups of time series so that the underlying cau...

  8. Institutional Investors and Stock Market Development: A Causality Study

    OpenAIRE

    Guler Aras; Alovsat Muslumov

    2008-01-01

    This article examines causality relationships between institutional investors and stock market development based on the panel data compiled from 23 OECD countries for the years 1982 through 2000. In order to test causality relationship, Sims’ causality test based on Granger definition of causality was used in our study. Our empirical results provide evidence that there are statistically significant positive relationship between institutional investors and stock market development. The develop...

  9. Interpretational Confounding or Confounded Interpretations of Causal Indicators?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainter, Sierra A.; Bollen, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    In measurement theory, causal indicators are controversial and little understood. Methodological disagreement concerning causal indicators has centered on the question of whether causal indicators are inherently sensitive to interpretational confounding, which occurs when the empirical meaning of a latent construct departs from the meaning…

  10. Rationales in Children's Causal Learning from Others' Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, David M.; Sommerville, Jessica A.

    2009-01-01

    Shown commensurate actions and information by an adult, preschoolers' causal learning was influenced by the pedagogical context in which these actions occurred. Four-year-olds who were provided with a reason for an experimenter's action relevant to learning causal structure showed more accurate causal learning than children exposed to the same…

  11. Mind and Meaning: Piaget and Vygotsky on Causal Explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilin, Harry

    1996-01-01

    Piaget's theory has been characterized as descriptive and not explanatory, not qualifying as causal explanation. Piaget was consistent in showing how his theory was both explanatory and causal. Vygotsky also endorsed causal-genetic explanation but, on the basis of knowledge of only Piaget's earliest works, he claimed that Piaget's theory was not…

  12. A Bayesian Theory of Sequential Causal Learning and Abstract Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongjing; Rojas, Randall R.; Beckers, Tom; Yuille, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    Two key research issues in the field of causal learning are how people acquire causal knowledge when observing data that are presented sequentially, and the level of abstraction at which learning takes place. Does sequential causal learning solely involve the acquisition of specific cause-effect links, or do learners also acquire knowledge about…

  13. How to Be Causal: Time, Spacetime and Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsler, Paul

    2011-01-01

    I explain a simple definition of causality in widespread use, and indicate how it links to the Kramers-Kronig relations. The specification of causality in terms of temporal differential equations then shows us the way to write down dynamical models so that their causal nature "in the sense used here" should be obvious to all. To extend existing…

  14. Causality and Nonlocality as Axioms for Quantum Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Popescu, Sandu; Rohrlich, Daniel

    1997-01-01

    Quantum mechanics permits nonlocality - both nonlocal correlations and nonlocal equations of motion - while respecting relativistic causality. Is quantum mechanics the unique theory that reconciles nonlocality and causality? We consider two models, going beyond quantum mechanics, of nonlocality: "superquantum" correlations, and nonlocal "jamming" of correlations. These models are consistent with some definitions of nonlocality and causality.

  15. Normalizing the causality between time series

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, X San

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a rigorous yet concise formula has been derived to evaluate the information flow, and hence the causality in a quantitative sense, between time series. To assess the importance of a resulting causality, it needs to be normalized. The normalization is achieved through distinguishing three types of fundamental mechanisms that govern the marginal entropy change of the flow recipient. A normalized or relative flow measures its importance relative to other mechanisms. In analyzing realistic series, both absolute and relative information flows need to be taken into account, since the normalizers for a pair of reverse flows belong to two different entropy balances; it is quite normal that two identical flows may differ a lot in relative importance in their respective balances. We have reproduced these results with several autoregressive models. We have also shown applications to a climate change problem and a financial analysis problem. For the former, reconfirmed is the role of the Indian Ocean Dipole as ...

  16. Sentencing goals, causal attributions, ideology, and personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, J S; Perkowitz, W T; Lurigio, A J; Weaver, F M

    1987-01-01

    Disparity in sentencing of criminals has been related to a variety of individual difference variables. We propose a framework establishing resonances or coherent patterns among sentencing goals, causal attributions, ideology, and personality. Two studies are described, one with law and criminology students, the other with probation officers. Relations among the different types of variables reveal two resonances among both students and officers. One comprises various conservative and moralistic elements: a tough, punitive stance toward crime; belief in individual causality for crime; high scores on authoritarianism, dogmatism, and internal locus of control; lower moral stage; and political conservatism. The second comprises various liberal elements: rehabilitation, belief in economic and other external determinants of crime, higher moral stage, and belief in the powers and responsibilities of government to correct social problems. Implications of these results are discussed for individual differences in sentencing, attribution theory, and attempts to reduce disparity. PMID:3820064

  17. A New Spin on Causality Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Hartman, Thomas; Kundu, Sandipan

    2016-01-01

    Causality in a shockwave state is related to the analytic properties of a four-point correlation function. Extending recent results for scalar probes, we show that this constrains the couplings of the stress tensor to light spinning operators in conformal field theory, and interpret these constraints in terms of the interaction with null energy. For spin-1 and spin-2 conserved currents in four dimensions, the resulting inequalities are a subset of the Hofman-Maldacena conditions for positive energy deposition. It is well known that energy conditions in holographic theories are related to causality on the gravity side; our results make a connection on the CFT side, and extend it to non-holographic theories.

  18. Consistence beats causality in recommender systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Xuzhen; Hu, Zheng; Zhang, Ping; Zhou, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The explosive growth of information challenges people's capability in finding out items fitting to their own interests. Recommender systems provide an efficient solution by automatically push possibly relevant items to users according to their past preferences. Recommendation algorithms usually embody the causality from what having been collected to what should be recommended. In this article, we argue that in many cases, a user's interests are stable, and thus the previous and future preferences are highly consistent. The temporal order of collections then does not necessarily imply a causality relationship. We further propose a consistence-based algorithm that outperforms the state-of-the-art recommendation algorithms in disparate real data sets, including \\textit{Netflix}, \\textit{MovieLens}, \\textit{Amazon} and \\textit{Rate Your Music}.

  19. An insider's guide to quantum causal histories

    CERN Document Server

    Markopoulou, F

    2000-01-01

    A review is given of recent work aimed at constructing a quantum theory of cosmology in which all observables refer to information measurable by observers inside the universe. At the classical level the algebra of observables should be modified to take into account the fact that observers can only give truth values to observables that have to do with their backwards light cone. The resulting algebra is a Heyting rather than a Boolean algebra. The complement is non-trivial and contains information about horizons and topology change. Representation of such observables quantum mechanically requires a many-Hilbert space formalism, in which different observers make measurements in different Hilbert spaces. I describe such a formalism, called "quantum causal histories"; examples include causally evolving spin networks and quantum computers.

  20. Uphill diffusion in multicomponent mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2015-05-21

    Molecular diffusion is an omnipresent phenomena that is important in a wide variety of contexts in chemical, physical, and biological processes. In the majority of cases, the diffusion process can be adequately described by Fick's law that postulates a linear relationship between the flux of any species and its own concentration gradient. Most commonly, a component diffuses down the concentration gradient. The major objective of this review is to highlight a very wide variety of situations that cause the uphill transport of one constituent in the mixture. Uphill diffusion may occur in multicomponent mixtures in which the diffusion flux of any species is strongly coupled to that of its partner species. Such coupling effects often arise from strong thermodynamic non-idealities. For a quantitative description we need to use chemical potential gradients as driving forces. The transport of ionic species in aqueous solutions is coupled with its partner ions because of the electro-neutrality constraints; such constraints may accelerate or decelerate a specific ion. When uphill diffusion occurs, we observe transient overshoots during equilibration; the equilibration process follows serpentine trajectories in composition space. For mixtures of liquids, alloys, ceramics and glasses the serpentine trajectories could cause entry into meta-stable composition zones; such entry could result in phenomena such as spinodal decomposition, spontaneous emulsification, and the Ouzo effect. For distillation of multicomponent mixtures that form azeotropes, uphill diffusion may allow crossing of distillation boundaries that are normally forbidden. For mixture separations with microporous adsorbents, uphill diffusion can cause supra-equilibrium loadings to be achieved during transient uptake within crystals; this allows the possibility of over-riding adsorption equilibrium for achieving difficult separations. PMID:25761383

  1. Consistence beats causality in recommender systems

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xuzhen; Tian, Hui; Hu, Zheng; Zhang, Ping; Zhou, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The explosive growth of information challenges people's capability in finding out items fitting to their own interests. Recommender systems provide an efficient solution by automatically push possibly relevant items to users according to their past preferences. Recommendation algorithms usually embody the causality from what having been collected to what should be recommended. In this article, we argue that in many cases, a user's interests are stable, and thus the previous and future prefere...

  2. Gauge theory origins of supergravity causal structure

    CERN Document Server

    Kabat, D; Kabat, Daniel; Lifschytz, Gilad

    1999-01-01

    We discuss the gauge theory mechanisms which are responsible for the causal structure of the dual supergravity. For D-brane probes we show that the light cone structure and Killing horizons of supergravity emerge dynamically. They are associated with the appearance of new light degrees of freedom in the gauge theory, which we explicitly identify. This provides a picture of physics at the horizon of a black hole as seen by a D-brane probe.

  3. Imposing causality on a matrix model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce a new matrix model that describes Causal Dynamical Triangulations (CDT) in two dimensions. In order to do so, we introduce a new, simpler definition of 2D CDT and show it to be equivalent to the old one. The model makes use of ideas from dually weighted matrix models, combined with multi-matrix models, and can be studied by the method of character expansion.

  4. Isocausal spacetimes may have different causal boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, J L; Herrera, J [Departamento de Algebra, Geometria y Topologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, Campus Teatinos, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Sanchez, M, E-mail: floresj@agt.cie.uma.es, E-mail: jherrera@uma.es, E-mail: sanchezm@ugr.es [Departamento de Geometria y Topologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, Avenida Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain)

    2011-09-07

    We construct an example which shows that two isocausal spacetimes, in the sense introduced recently in GarcIa-Parrado and Senovilla (2003 Class. Quantum Grav. 20 625-64), may have c-boundaries which are not equal (more precisely, not equivalent, as no bijection between the completions can preserve all the binary relations induced by causality). This example also suggests that isocausality can be useful for the understanding and computation of the c-boundary.

  5. A causally connected superluminal Warp Drive spacetime

    OpenAIRE

    Loup, F.; Held, R.; Waite, D; Halerewicz, Jr., E.; Stabno, M.; Kuntzman, M.; Sims, R.

    2002-01-01

    It will be shown that while horizons do not exist for warp drive spacetimes traveling at subluminal velocities horizons begin to develop when a warp drive spacetime reaches luminal velocities. However it will be shown that the control region of a warp drive ship lie within the portion of the warped region that is still causally connected to the ship even at superluminal velocities, therefore allowing a ship to slow to subluminal velocities. Further it is shown that the warped regions which ar...

  6. Relativistic causality and position space renormalization

    CERN Document Server

    Todorov, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    We survey the causal position space renormalization with a special attention to the role of Raymond Stora in the development of the subject. Renormalization is effected by subtracting pole terms in analytically regularized amplitudes. Residues are identified with periods whose relation to recent development in number theory is emphasized. We demonstrate the possibility of integration over internal vertices in the case of a (massless) conformal theory and display the dilation and the conformal anomaly.

  7. Extending Temporal Causal Graph For Diagnosis Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Belouaer, Lamia; Bouzid, Maroua; Mouhoub, Malek

    2009-01-01

    Poster International audience Abductive diagnosis (Brusoni et al. 1998) consists in finding explanations for given observations by using rules of inference based on the causal dependences of the system. Time is important for abductive diagnosis (Hamscher and Davis 1984), (Hamscher, Console, and Kleer 1992). There are few works in litterature handling temporal diagnosis (Kautz 1999). They differ in the expressiveness of the temporal knowledge. We propose a new approach for Temporal Diagn...

  8. Ten simple rules for dynamic causal modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Stephan, K E; Penny, W.D.; Moran, R. J.; den Ouden, H.E.M.; Daunizeau, J.; Friston, K J

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic causal modeling (DCM) is a generic Bayesian framework for inferring hidden neuronal states from measurements of brain activity. It provides posterior estimates of neurobiologically interpretable quantities such as the effective strength of synaptic connections among neuronal populations and their context-dependent modulation. DCM is increasingly used in the analysis of a wide range of neuroimaging and electrophysiological data. Given the relative complexity of DCM, compared to convent...

  9. Bayesian Discovery of Linear Acyclic Causal Models

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyer, Patrik O

    2012-01-01

    Methods for automated discovery of causal relationships from non-interventional data have received much attention recently. A widely used and well understood model family is given by linear acyclic causal models (recursive structural equation models). For Gaussian data both constraint-based methods (Spirtes et al., 1993; Pearl, 2000) (which output a single equivalence class) and Bayesian score-based methods (Geiger and Heckerman, 1994) (which assign relative scores to the equivalence classes) are available. On the contrary, all current methods able to utilize non-Gaussianity in the data (Shimizu et al., 2006; Hoyer et al., 2008) always return only a single graph or a single equivalence class, and so are fundamentally unable to express the degree of certainty attached to that output. In this paper we develop a Bayesian score-based approach able to take advantage of non-Gaussianity when estimating linear acyclic causal models, and we empirically demonstrate that, at least on very modest size networks, its accur...

  10. A causal dispositional account of fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triviño, Vanessa; Nuño de la Rosa, Laura

    2016-09-01

    The notion of fitness is usually equated to reproductive success. However, this actualist approach presents some difficulties, mainly the explanatory circularity problem, which have lead philosophers of biology to offer alternative definitions in which fitness and reproductive success are distinguished. In this paper, we argue  that none of these alternatives is satisfactory and, inspired by Mumford and Anjum's dispositional theory of causation, we offer a definition of fitness as a causal dispositional property. We argue that, under this framework, the distinctiveness that biologists usually attribute to fitness-namely, the fact that fitness is something different from both the physical traits of an organism and the number of offspring it leaves-can be explained, and the main problems associated with the concept of fitness can be solved. Firstly, we introduce Mumford and Anjum's dispositional theory of causation and present our definition of fitness as a causal disposition. We explain in detail each of the elements involved in our definition, namely: the relationship between fitness and the functional dispositions that compose it, the emergent character of fitness, and the context-sensitivity of fitness. Finally, we explain how fitness and realized fitness, as well as expected and realized fitness are distinguished in our approach to fitness as a causal disposition. PMID:27338570

  11. [Causality in cardiology: concepts in evolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Gustavo F

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes several concepts about causality from Empedocles, Aristoteles and Galeno, to Koch and Hill and the evolution of these concepts related to cardiovascular diseases. Also defines cause and risk, and the philosophical theories about scientific knowledge: inductive versus refutation analysis. On these basis, the study of cardiovascular disease's causality, especially coronary heart disease, allows us the identification of several risk factors involved in its development. However, even with the presently coronary heart disease risk charts (from Framingham and European studies) the higher probability for the development of a cardiovascular ischemic event is around 40%, establishing an important degree of uncertainty. With the improvement in molecular biology techniques, genetics have attempted to analyse several genetic polymorphisms in search of the origin of coronary heart disease. Unfortunately, less than 10% of these polymorphisms have had a positive correlation with coronary heart disease being of minor risk that those obtained for having the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus or hypercholesterolemia. On these basis, the requirement of new population research projects in which clinical and genetic risk factors are to be studied for the appropriate understanding of the causality process of cardiovascular diseases must be a worldwide priority.

  12. Causality, initial conditions, and inflationary magnetogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagas, Christos G.

    2016-05-01

    The post-inflationary evolution of inflation-produced magnetic fields, conventional or not, can change dramatically when two fundamental issues are accounted for. The first is causality, which demands that local physical processes can never affect superhorizon perturbations. The second is the nature of the transition from inflation to reheating and then to the radiation era, which determine the initial conditions at the start of these epochs. Causality implies that inflationary magnetic fields do not freeze into the matter until they have re-entered the causal horizon. The nature of the cosmological transitions and the associated initial conditions, on the other hand, determine the large-scale magnetic evolution after inflation. Put together, the two can slow down the adiabatic magnetic decay on superhorizon scales throughout the Universe's post-inflationary evolution and thus lead to considerably stronger residual magnetic fields. This is "good news" for both the conventional and the nonconventional scenarios of cosmic magnetogenesis. Mechanisms operating outside standard electromagnetism, in particular, do not need to enhance their fields too much during inflation in order to produce seeds that can feed the galactic dynamo today. In fact, even conventionally produced inflationary magnetic fields might be able to sustain the dynamo.

  13. A causal dispositional account of fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triviño, Vanessa; Nuño de la Rosa, Laura

    2016-09-01

    The notion of fitness is usually equated to reproductive success. However, this actualist approach presents some difficulties, mainly the explanatory circularity problem, which have lead philosophers of biology to offer alternative definitions in which fitness and reproductive success are distinguished. In this paper, we argue  that none of these alternatives is satisfactory and, inspired by Mumford and Anjum's dispositional theory of causation, we offer a definition of fitness as a causal dispositional property. We argue that, under this framework, the distinctiveness that biologists usually attribute to fitness-namely, the fact that fitness is something different from both the physical traits of an organism and the number of offspring it leaves-can be explained, and the main problems associated with the concept of fitness can be solved. Firstly, we introduce Mumford and Anjum's dispositional theory of causation and present our definition of fitness as a causal disposition. We explain in detail each of the elements involved in our definition, namely: the relationship between fitness and the functional dispositions that compose it, the emergent character of fitness, and the context-sensitivity of fitness. Finally, we explain how fitness and realized fitness, as well as expected and realized fitness are distinguished in our approach to fitness as a causal disposition.

  14. Causal beliefs about depression in different cultural groups – What do cognitive psychological theories of causal learning and reasoning predict?

    OpenAIRE

    York eHagmayer; Neele eEngelmann

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive psychological research focusses on causal learning and reasoning while cognitive anthropological and social science research tend to focus on systems of beliefs. Our aim was to explore how these two types of research can inform each other. Cognitive psychological theories (causal model theory and causal Bayes nets) were used to derive predictions for systems of causal beliefs. These predictions were then applied to lay theories of depression as a specific test case. A systematic...

  15. Causal beliefs about depression in different cultural groups—what do cognitive psychological theories of causal learning and reasoning predict?

    OpenAIRE

    Hagmayer, York; Engelmann, Neele

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive psychological research focuses on causal learning and reasoning while cognitive anthropological and social science research tend to focus on systems of beliefs. Our aim was to explore how these two types of research can inform each other. Cognitive psychological theories (causal model theory and causal Bayes nets) were used to derive predictions for systems of causal beliefs. These predictions were then applied to lay theories of depression as a specific test case. A systematic lite...

  16. Two-way and three-way approaches to ultra high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array dataset for the quantitative resolution of a two-component mixture containing ciprofloxacin and ornidazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinç, Erdal; Ertekin, Zehra Ceren; Büker, Eda

    2016-09-01

    Two-way and three-way calibration models were applied to ultra high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array data with coeluted peaks in the same wavelength and time regions for the simultaneous quantitation of ciprofloxacin and ornidazole in tablets. The chromatographic data cube (tensor) was obtained by recording chromatographic spectra of the standard and sample solutions containing ciprofloxacin and ornidazole with sulfadiazine as an internal standard as a function of time and wavelength. Parallel factor analysis and trilinear partial least squares were used as three-way calibrations for the decomposition of the tensor, whereas three-way unfolded partial least squares was applied as a two-way calibration to the unfolded dataset obtained from the data array of ultra high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection. The validity and ability of two-way and three-way analysis methods were tested by analyzing validation samples: synthetic mixture, interday and intraday samples, and standard addition samples. Results obtained from two-way and three-way calibrations were compared to those provided by traditional ultra high performance liquid chromatography. The proposed methods, parallel factor analysis, trilinear partial least squares, unfolded partial least squares, and traditional ultra high performance liquid chromatography were successfully applied to the quantitative estimation of the solid dosage form containing ciprofloxacin and ornidazole.

  17. Model structure selection in convolutive mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrholm, Mads; Makeig, S.; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2006-01-01

    The CICAAR algorithm (convolutive independent component analysis with an auto-regressive inverse model) allows separation of white (i.i.d) source signals from convolutive mixtures. We introduce a source color model as a simple extension to the CICAAR which allows for a more parsimonious represent......The CICAAR algorithm (convolutive independent component analysis with an auto-regressive inverse model) allows separation of white (i.i.d) source signals from convolutive mixtures. We introduce a source color model as a simple extension to the CICAAR which allows for a more parsimonious...

  18. The scent of mixtures: rules of odour processing in ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Margot; Giurfa, Martin; d'Ettorre, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Natural odours are complex blends of numerous components. Understanding how animals perceive odour mixtures is central to multiple disciplines. Here we focused on carpenter ants, which rely on odours in various behavioural contexts. We studied overshadowing, a phenomenon that occurs when animals having learnt a binary mixture respond less to one component than to the other, and less than when this component was learnt alone. Ants were trained individually with alcohols and aldehydes varying in carbon-chain length, either as single odours or binary mixtures. They were then tested with the mixture and the components. Overshadowing resulted from the interaction between chain length and functional group: alcohols overshadowed aldehydes, and longer chain lengths overshadowed shorter ones; yet, combinations of these factors could cancel each other and suppress overshadowing. Our results show how ants treat binary olfactory mixtures and set the basis for predictive analyses of odour perception in insects. PMID:25726692

  19. The scent of mixtures: rules of odour processing in ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Margot; Giurfa, Martin; d'Ettorre, Patrizia

    2015-03-02

    Natural odours are complex blends of numerous components. Understanding how animals perceive odour mixtures is central to multiple disciplines. Here we focused on carpenter ants, which rely on odours in various behavioural contexts. We studied overshadowing, a phenomenon that occurs when animals having learnt a binary mixture respond less to one component than to the other, and less than when this component was learnt alone. Ants were trained individually with alcohols and aldehydes varying in carbon-chain length, either as single odours or binary mixtures. They were then tested with the mixture and the components. Overshadowing resulted from the interaction between chain length and functional group: alcohols overshadowed aldehydes, and longer chain lengths overshadowed shorter ones; yet, combinations of these factors could cancel each other and suppress overshadowing. Our results show how ants treat binary olfactory mixtures and set the basis for predictive analyses of odour perception in insects.

  20. Riemann solvers for multi-component gas mixtures with temperature dependent heat capacities; Solveurs de riemann pour des melanges de gaz parfaits avec capacites calorifiques dependant de la temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beccantini, A

    2001-07-01

    This thesis represents a contribution to the development of upwind splitting schemes for the Euler equations for ideal gaseous mixtures and their investigation in computing multidimensional flows in irregular geometries. In the preliminary part we develop and investigate the parameterization of the shock and rarefaction curves in the phase space. Then, we apply them to perform some field-by-field decompositions of the Riemann problem: the entropy-respecting one, the one which supposes that genuinely-non-linear (GNL) waves are both shocks (shock-shock one) and the one which supposes that GNL waves are both rarefactions (rarefaction-rarefaction one). We emphasize that their analysis is fundamental in Riemann solvers developing: the simpler the field-by-field decomposition, the simpler the Riemann solver based on it. As the specific heat capacities of the gases depend on the temperature, the shock-shock field-by-field decomposition is the easiest to perform. Then, in the second part of the thesis, we develop an upwind splitting scheme based on such decomposition. Afterwards, we investigate its robustness, precision and CPU-time consumption, with respect to some of the most popular upwind splitting schemes for polytropic/non-polytropic ideal gases. 1-D test-cases show that this scheme is both precise (exact capturing of stationary shock and stationary contact) and robust in dealing with strong shock and rarefaction waves. Multidimensional test-cases show that it suffers from some of the typical deficiencies which affect the upwind splitting schemes capable of exact capturing stationary contact discontinuities i.e the developing of non-physical instabilities in computing strong shock waves. In the final part, we use the high-order multidimensional solver here developed to compute fully-developed detonation flows. (author)

  1. Prediction of saturated liquid enthalpy of refrigerant mixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN ZeShao; CHEN JianXin; HU Peng

    2007-01-01

    New corresponding temperature and corresponding enthalpy of refrigerant mixtures were defined. The relationship between saturated liquid corresponding enthalpy and corresponding temperature of refrigerant mixtures accorded with that of pure components. The characteristic parameters of saturated liquid enthalpy difference of refrigerant mixtures were calculated by three methods according to the different application conditions. The generalized equation of saturated liquid enthalpy of refrigerant mixtures was presented. The calculated values were compared with the values in literature for five ternary and binary refrigerant mixtures, namely R404A, R407A, R407B, R32/R134a, and R410A. The overall average absolute deviation was less than 1.0%.

  2. Phase equilibria for complex fluid mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prausnitz, J.M.

    1983-04-01

    After defining complex mixtures, attention is given to the canonical procedure used for the thermodynamics of fluid mixtures: first, we establish a suitable, idealized reference system and then we establish a perturbation (or excess function) which corrects the idealized system for real behavior. For complex mixtures containing identified components (e.g. alcohols, ketones, water) discussion is directed at possible techniques for extending to complex mixtures our conventional experience with reference systems and perturbations for simple mixtures. Possible extensions include generalization of the quasi-chemical approximation (local compositions) and superposition of chemical equilibria (association and solvation) on a physical equation of state. For complex mixtures containing unidentified components (e.g. coal-derived fluids), a possible experimental method is suggested for characterization; conventional procedures can then be used to calculate phase equilibria using the concept of pseudocomponents whose properties are given by the characterization data. Finally, as an alternative to the pseudocomponent method, a brief introduction is given to phase-equilibrium calculations using continuous thermodynamics.

  3. 混合物料中石墨组分的碎裂特性及参数估计%Fracturing characteristic and parameter estimate of graphite component of mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田金星; 谭旭升

    2014-01-01

    The batch grinding kinetic equation based on Reid balance calculus was used to study the grinding dynamics behavior of graphite in a mixed material of graphite-calcite. The results show that, for the function on the broken rate Si, the fracture rate of graphite components in function expression is related to timet, which shows the nonlinear relationship between lnmi andt. The simulation values and experiment values of graphite component nonlinear fracture results are well agree with each other. For the fracture distribution functionbij, the fracture distribution functions of graphite components in the mixed material grinding and separate mineral grinding are basically the same. The aforementioned conclusion can take theoretical guide for the production practice of graphite grinding.%利用Reid总体平衡微积分分批磨碎动力学方程,研究石墨−方解石物料混合磨碎时,石墨的磨碎动力学行为。结果表明:对碎裂速率函数S i而言,混合磨碎时石墨组分的碎裂速率函数Si表现为与时间t相关,即ln mi与t的关系曲线呈非线性关系。同时,模型仿真结果表明,石墨组分表现的非线性碎裂结果的模拟值与实验值吻合度较高;而石墨组分混合磨碎的碎裂分布函数b ij则与单独磨碎时的碎裂分布函数b ij基本相同。该结论可作为石墨磨碎生产实践的理论指导。

  4. The Causality between Human Capital and Economic Growth in Oil Exporting Countries: Panel Cointegration and Causality

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrara, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the causal relationship between education and GDP in a panel of 11 selected oil exporting countries by using panel unit root tests and panel cointegration analysis for the period 1970-2010. A three-variable model is formulated with oil exports as the third variable. The results show a strong causality from oil revenues and economic growth to education in the oil exporting countries. Yet, education does not have any significant effects on GDP in short- and long-run. It ...

  5. Mixture risk assessment: a case study of Monsanto experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, R S; Dudek, B R; Grothe, D R; Johannsen, F R; Lamb, I C; Martens, M A; Sherman, J H; Stevens, M W

    1996-01-01

    Monsanto employs several pragmatic approaches for evaluating the toxicity of mixtures. These approaches are similar to those recommended by many national and international agencies. When conducting hazard and risk assessments, priority is always given to using data collected directly on the mixture of concern. To provide an example of the first tier of evaluation, actual data on acute respiratory irritation studies on mixtures were evaluated to determine whether the principle of additivity was applicable to the mixture evaluated. If actual data on the mixture are unavailable, extrapolation across similar mixtures is considered. Because many formulations are quite similar in composition, the toxicity data from one mixture can be extended to a closely related mixture in a scientifically justifiable manner. An example of a family of products where such extrapolations have been made is presented to exemplify this second approach. Lastly, if data on similar mixtures are unavailable, data on component fractions are used to predict the toxicity of the mixture. In this third approach, process knowledge and scientific judgement are used to determine how the known toxicological properties of the individual fractions affect toxicity of the mixture. Three examples of plant effluents where toxicological data on fractions were used to predict the toxicity of the mixture are discussed. The results of the analysis are used to discuss the predictive value of each of the above mentioned toxicological approaches for evaluating chemical mixtures.

  6. Perception of trigeminal mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filiou, Renée-Pier; Lepore, Franco; Bryant, Bruce; Lundström, Johan N; Frasnelli, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminal system is a chemical sense allowing for the perception of chemosensory information in our environment. However, contrary to smell and taste, we lack a thorough understanding of the trigeminal processing of mixtures. We, therefore, investigated trigeminal perception using mixtures of 3 relatively receptor-specific agonists together with one control odor in different proportions to determine basic perceptual dimensions of trigeminal perception. We found that 4 main dimensions were linked to trigeminal perception: sensations of intensity, warmth, coldness, and pain. We subsequently investigated perception of binary mixtures of trigeminal stimuli by means of these 4 perceptual dimensions using different concentrations of a cooling stimulus (eucalyptol) mixed with a stimulus that evokes warmth perception (cinnamaldehyde). To determine if sensory interactions are mainly of central or peripheral origin, we presented stimuli in a physical "mixture" or as a "combination" presented separately to individual nostrils. Results showed that mixtures generally yielded higher ratings than combinations on the trigeminal dimensions "intensity," "warm," and "painful," whereas combinations yielded higher ratings than mixtures on the trigeminal dimension "cold." These results suggest dimension-specific interactions in the perception of trigeminal mixtures, which may be explained by particular interactions that may take place on peripheral or central levels.

  7. Perception of trigeminal mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filiou, Renée-Pier; Lepore, Franco; Bryant, Bruce; Lundström, Johan N; Frasnelli, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminal system is a chemical sense allowing for the perception of chemosensory information in our environment. However, contrary to smell and taste, we lack a thorough understanding of the trigeminal processing of mixtures. We, therefore, investigated trigeminal perception using mixtures of 3 relatively receptor-specific agonists together with one control odor in different proportions to determine basic perceptual dimensions of trigeminal perception. We found that 4 main dimensions were linked to trigeminal perception: sensations of intensity, warmth, coldness, and pain. We subsequently investigated perception of binary mixtures of trigeminal stimuli by means of these 4 perceptual dimensions using different concentrations of a cooling stimulus (eucalyptol) mixed with a stimulus that evokes warmth perception (cinnamaldehyde). To determine if sensory interactions are mainly of central or peripheral origin, we presented stimuli in a physical "mixture" or as a "combination" presented separately to individual nostrils. Results showed that mixtures generally yielded higher ratings than combinations on the trigeminal dimensions "intensity," "warm," and "painful," whereas combinations yielded higher ratings than mixtures on the trigeminal dimension "cold." These results suggest dimension-specific interactions in the perception of trigeminal mixtures, which may be explained by particular interactions that may take place on peripheral or central levels. PMID:25500807

  8. Causal Loop Analysis of coastal geomorphological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payo, Andres; Hall, Jim W.; French, Jon; Sutherland, James; van Maanen, Barend; Nicholls, Robert J.; Reeve, Dominic E.

    2016-03-01

    As geomorphologists embrace ever more sophisticated theoretical frameworks that shift from simple notions of evolution towards single steady equilibria to recognise the possibility of multiple response pathways and outcomes, morphodynamic modellers are facing the problem of how to keep track of an ever-greater number of system feedbacks. Within coastal geomorphology, capturing these feedbacks is critically important, especially as the focus of activity shifts from reductionist models founded on sediment transport fundamentals to more synthesist ones intended to resolve emergent behaviours at decadal to centennial scales. This paper addresses the challenge of mapping the feedback structure of processes controlling geomorphic system behaviour with reference to illustrative applications of Causal Loop Analysis at two study cases: (1) the erosion-accretion behaviour of graded (mixed) sediment beds, and (2) the local alongshore sediment fluxes of sand-rich shorelines. These case study examples are chosen on account of their central role in the quantitative modelling of geomorphological futures and as they illustrate different types of causation. Causal loop diagrams, a form of directed graph, are used to distil the feedback structure to reveal, in advance of more quantitative modelling, multi-response pathways and multiple outcomes. In the case of graded sediment bed, up to three different outcomes (no response, and two disequilibrium states) can be derived from a simple qualitative stability analysis. For the sand-rich local shoreline behaviour case, two fundamentally different responses of the shoreline (diffusive and anti-diffusive), triggered by small changes of the shoreline cross-shore position, can be inferred purely through analysis of the causal pathways. Explicit depiction of feedback-structure diagrams is beneficial when developing numerical models to explore coastal morphological futures. By explicitly mapping the feedbacks included and neglected within a

  9. On asymmetric causal relationships in Petropolitics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balan Feyza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to examine whether the First Law of Petropolitics denominated by Friedman in 2006 is valid for OPEC countries. To do this, this paper analyses the relationship between political risk and oil supply by applying the asymmetric panel causality test suggested by Hatemi-J (2011 to these countries for the period 1984-2014. The results show that the First Law of Petropolitics is valid for Angola, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the UAE, given that positive oil supply shocks significantly lead to negative political stability shocks, and negative oil supply shocks significantly lead to positive shocks in political stability.

  10. Rapidity Correlation Structures from Causal Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gavin, Sean; Zin, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Viscous diffusion can broaden the rapidity dependence of two-particle transverse momentum fluctuations. Surprisingly, measurements at RHIC by the STAR collaboration demonstrate that this broadening is accompanied by the appearance of unanticipated structure in the rapidity distribution of these fluctuations in the most central collisions. Although a first order classical Navier-Stokes theory can roughly explain the rapidity broadening, it cannot explain the additional structure. We propose that the rapidity structure can be explained using the second order causal Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics with stochastic noise.

  11. Foundational perspectives on causality in large-scale brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, Michael; Bressler, Steven L

    2015-12-01

    A profusion of recent work in cognitive neuroscience has been concerned with the endeavor to uncover causal influences in large-scale brain networks. However, despite the fact that many papers give a nod to the important theoretical challenges posed by the concept of causality, this explosion of research has generally not been accompanied by a rigorous conceptual analysis of the nature of causality in the brain. This review provides both a descriptive and prescriptive account of the nature of causality as found within and between large-scale brain networks. In short, it seeks to clarify the concept of causality in large-scale brain networks both philosophically and scientifically. This is accomplished by briefly reviewing the rich philosophical history of work on causality, especially focusing on contributions by David Hume, Immanuel Kant, Bertrand Russell, and Christopher Hitchcock. We go on to discuss the impact that various interpretations of modern physics have had on our understanding of causality. Throughout all this, a central focus is the distinction between theories of deterministic causality (DC), whereby causes uniquely determine their effects, and probabilistic causality (PC), whereby causes change the probability of occurrence of their effects. We argue that, given the topological complexity of its large-scale connectivity, the brain should be considered as a complex system and its causal influences treated as probabilistic in nature. We conclude that PC is well suited for explaining causality in the brain for three reasons: (1) brain causality is often mutual; (2) connectional convergence dictates that only rarely is the activity of one neuronal population uniquely determined by another one; and (3) the causal influences exerted between neuronal populations may not have observable effects. A number of different techniques are currently available to characterize causal influence in the brain. Typically, these techniques quantify the statistical

  12. Foundational perspectives on causality in large-scale brain networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, Michael; Bressler, Steven L.

    2015-12-01

    A profusion of recent work in cognitive neuroscience has been concerned with the endeavor to uncover causal influences in large-scale brain networks. However, despite the fact that many papers give a nod to the important theoretical challenges posed by the concept of causality, this explosion of research has generally not been accompanied by a rigorous conceptual analysis of the nature of causality in the brain. This review provides both a descriptive and prescriptive account of the nature of causality as found within and between large-scale brain networks. In short, it seeks to clarify the concept of causality in large-scale brain networks both philosophically and scientifically. This is accomplished by briefly reviewing the rich philosophical history of work on causality, especially focusing on contributions by David Hume, Immanuel Kant, Bertrand Russell, and Christopher Hitchcock. We go on to discuss the impact that various interpretations of modern physics have had on our understanding of causality. Throughout all this, a central focus is the distinction between theories of deterministic causality (DC), whereby causes uniquely determine their effects, and probabilistic causality (PC), whereby causes change the probability of occurrence of their effects. We argue that, given the topological complexity of its large-scale connectivity, the brain should be considered as a complex system and its causal influences treated as probabilistic in nature. We conclude that PC is well suited for explaining causality in the brain for three reasons: (1) brain causality is often mutual; (2) connectional convergence dictates that only rarely is the activity of one neuronal population uniquely determined by another one; and (3) the causal influences exerted between neuronal populations may not have observable effects. A number of different techniques are currently available to characterize causal influence in the brain. Typically, these techniques quantify the statistical

  13. Investigations of reversible thermochromic mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaren, Douglas C.

    Three-component organic thermochromic systems have potential applications in reversible, rewritable thermal printing. In principle, such mixtures could maintain a coloured or non-coloured state at ambient temperature depending on their thermal treatment. These systems generally consist of a functional dye (1--3 mol%), a weakly acidic colour developer (5--25 mol%), and a high-melting organic solvent (75--90 mol%). Colour development occurs at the fusion temperature of the mixture, which triggers the interaction of the dye and developer. Slow cooling of the melt results in an equilibrium state with low colour density, whereas rapid cooling of the melt results in a metastable state with high colour density. The metastable state can be decoloured by heating to an intermediate decolourisation temperature at which the coloured state becomes unstable. Barriers to the widespread use of reversible, rewritable thermochromic materials include problems with colour contrast, colour stability, and decolourisation rates. Development is hindered by a lack of detailed knowledge of the interactions between components in these systems. In this study the developer-dye and developer-solvent interactions were examined for an archetypal dye/developer/solvent thermochromic system. Vibrational spectroscopy, NMR, and thermal analysis were used to examine compounds formed in developer/dye and developer/solvent binary mixtures. Rewritable thermochromic properties such as metastable colour density, equilibrium colour density, and decolourisation rates were examined and discussed in terms of the thermodynamics of the developer/dye and developer/solvent interactions. Observed thermochromic properties are shown to be strongly correlated to a competition between the dye and the solvent for interaction with the developer. Increasing the attractive interaction between the solvent and developer results in enhanced rewritable thermochromic properties.

  14. God Does Not Play Dice: Causal Determinism and Preschoolers' Causal Inferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Laura E.; Sommerville, Jessica

    2006-01-01

    Three studies investigated children's belief in causal determinism. If children are determinists, they should infer unobserved causes whenever observed causes appear to act stochastically. In Experiment 1, 4-year-olds saw a stochastic generative cause and inferred the existence of an unobserved inhibitory cause. Children traded off inferences…

  15. Trivariate causality between economic growth, urbanisation and electricity consumption in Angola: Cointegration and causality analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the causal relationship between economic growth, urbanisation and electricity consumption in the case of Angola, while utilizing the data over the period of 1971–2009. We have applied Lee and Strazicich (2003. The Review of Economics and Statistics 63, 1082–1089; 2004. Working Paper. Department of Economics, Appalachian State University) unit root tests to examine the stationarity properties of the series. Using the Gregory–Hansen structural break cointegration procedure as a complement, we employ the ARDL bounds test to investigate long run relationships. The VECM Granger causality test is subsequently used to examine the direction of causality between economic growth, urbanisation, and electricity consumption. Our results indicate the existence of long run relationships. We further observe evidence in favour of bidirectional causality between electricity consumption and economic growth. The feedback hypothesis is also found between urbanisation and economic growth. Urbanisation and electricity consumption Granger cause each other. We conclude that Angola is energy-dependent country. Consequently, the relevant authorities should boost electricity production as one of the means of achieving sustainable economic development in the long run. - Highlights: • We consider the link between electricity consumption and economic growth in Angola. • Urbanisation is added to turn the research into a trivariate investigation. • Various time series procedures are used. • Results show that increasing electricity will improve economic growth in Angola. • Results show urbanisations reduced economic growth during civil war

  16. Interference between Cues Requires a Causal Scenario: Favorable Evidence for Causal Reasoning Models in Learning Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, David; Cobos, Pedro L.; Lopez, Francisco J.

    2008-01-01

    In an interference-between-cues design (IbC), the expression of a learned Cue A-Outcome 1 association has been shown to be impaired if another cue, B, is separately paired with the same outcome in a second learning phase. The present study examined whether IbC could be caused by associative mechanisms independent of causal reasoning processes.…

  17. Causal-Explanatory Pluralism: How Intentions, Functions, and Mechanisms Influence Causal Ascriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombrozo, Tania

    2010-01-01

    Both philosophers and psychologists have argued for the existence of distinct kinds of explanations, including teleological explanations that cite functions or goals, and mechanistic explanations that cite causal mechanisms. Theories of causation, in contrast, have generally been unitary, with dominant theories focusing either on counterfactual…

  18. Diagnostic reasoning using qualitative causal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of expert systems to reasoning problems involving real-time data from plant measurements has been a topic of much research, but few practical systems have been deployed. One obstacle to wider use of expert systems in applications involving real-time data is the lack of adequate knowledge representation methodologies for dynamic processes. Knowledge bases composed mainly of rules have disadvantages when applied to dynamic processes and real-time data. This paper describes a methodology for the development of qualitative causal models that can be used as knowledge bases for reasoning about process dynamic behavior. These models provide a systematic method for knowledge base construction, considerably reducing the engineering effort required. They also offer much better opportunities for verification and validation of the knowledge base, thus increasing the possibility of the application of expert systems to reasoning about mission critical systems. Starting with the Signed Directed Graph (SDG) method that has been successfully applied to describe the behavior of diverse dynamic processes, the paper shows how certain non-physical behaviors that result from abstraction may be eliminated by applying causal constraint to the models. The resulting Extended Signed Directed Graph (ESDG) may then be compiled to produce a model for use in process fault diagnosis. This model based reasoning methodology is used in the MOBIAS system being developed by Duke Power Company under EPRI sponsorship. 15 refs., 4 figs

  19. Emergent Horizons and Causal Structures in Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Avik; Kundu, Sandipan

    2016-01-01

    The open string metric arises kinematically in studying fluctuations of open string degrees of freedom on a D-brane. An observer, living on a probe D-brane, can send signals through the spacetime by using such fluctuations on the probe, that propagate in accordance with a metric which is conformal to the open string metric. Event horizons can emerge in the open string metric when one considers a D-brane with an electric field on its worldvolume. Here, we emphasize the role of and investigate, in details, the causal structure of the resulting open string event horizon and demonstrate, among other things, its close similarities to an usual black hole event horizon in asymptotically AdS-spaces. To that end, we analyze relevant geodesics, Penrose diagrams and various causal holographic observables for a given open string metric. For analytical control, most of our calculations are performed in an asymptotically AdS$_3$-background, however, we argue that the physics is qualitatively the same in higher dimensions. ...

  20. Immunity in arterial hypertension: associations or causalities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Hans-Joachim; Baumann, Marcus; Tripepi, Giovanni; Mallamaci, Francesca

    2015-12-01

    Numerous studies describe associations between markers of inflammation and arterial hypertension (aHT), but does that imply causality? Interventional studies that reduce blood pressure reduced also markers of inflammation, but does immunosuppression improve hypertension? Here, we review the available mechanistic data. Aberrant immunity can trigger endothelial dysfunction but is hardly ever the primary cause of aHT. Innate and adaptive immunity get involved once hypertension has caused vascular wall injury as immunity is a modifier of endothelial dysfunction and vascular wall remodelling. As vascular remodelling progresses, immunity-related mechanisms can become significant cofactors for cardiovascular (CV) disease progression; vice versa, suppressing immunity can improve hypertension and CV outcomes. Innate and adaptive immunity both contribute to vascular wall remodelling. Innate immunity is driven by danger signals that activate Toll-like receptors and other pattern-recognition receptors. Adaptive immunity is based on loss of tolerance against vascular autoantigens and includes autoreactive T-cell immunity as well as non-HLA angiotensin II type 1 receptor-activating autoantibodies. Such processes involve numerous other modulators such as regulatory T cells. Together, immunity is not causal for hypertension but rather an important secondary pathomechanism and a potential therapeutic target in hypertension.

  1. Causal mechanisms in airfoil-circulation formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J. Y.; Liu, T. S.; Liu, L. Q.; Zou, S. F.; Wu, J. Z.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we trace the dynamic origin, rather than any kinematic interpretations, of lift in two-dimensional flow to the physical root of airfoil circulation. We show that the key causal process is the vorticity creation by tangent pressure gradient at the airfoil surface via no-slip condition, of which the theoretical basis has been given by Lighthill ["Introduction: Boundary layer theory," in Laminar Boundary Layers, edited by L. Rosenhead (Clarendon Press, 1963), pp. 46-113], which we further elaborate. This mechanism can be clearly revealed in terms of vorticity formulation but is hidden in conventional momentum formulation, and hence has long been missing in the history of one's efforts to understand lift. By a careful numerical simulation of the flow around a NACA-0012 airfoil, and using both Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions, we illustrate the detailed transient process by which the airfoil gains its circulation and demonstrate the dominating role of relevant dynamical causal mechanisms at the boundary. In so doing, we find that the various statements for the establishment of Kutta condition in steady inviscid flow actually correspond to a sequence of events in unsteady viscous flow.

  2. EEG oscillations: From correlation to causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Christoph S; Strüber, Daniel; Helfrich, Randolph F; Engel, Andreas K

    2016-05-01

    Already in his first report on the discovery of the human EEG in 1929, Berger showed great interest in further elucidating the functional roles of the alpha and beta waves for normal mental activities. Meanwhile, most cognitive processes have been linked to at least one of the traditional frequency bands in the delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma range. Although the existing wealth of high-quality correlative EEG data led many researchers to the conviction that brain oscillations subserve various sensory and cognitive processes, a causal role can only be demonstrated by directly modulating such oscillatory signals. In this review, we highlight several methods to selectively modulate neuronal oscillations, including EEG-neurofeedback, rhythmic sensory stimulation, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS). In particular, we discuss tACS as the most recent technique to directly modulate oscillatory brain activity. Such studies demonstrating the effectiveness of tACS comprise reports on purely behavioral or purely electrophysiological effects, on combination of behavioral effects with offline EEG measurements or on simultaneous (online) tACS-EEG recordings. Whereas most tACS studies are designed to modulate ongoing rhythmic brain activity at a specific frequency, recent evidence suggests that tACS may also modulate cross-frequency interactions. Taken together, the modulation of neuronal oscillations allows to demonstrate causal links between brain oscillations and cognitive processes and to obtain important insights into human brain function. PMID:25659527

  3. Determinants of GDP: A VECM Forecasting and Granger Causality Analysis for Eight European Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkin, Graham

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the short-run and long-run causal relationships that may exist between a set of variables that are selected to proxy for components of expenditure based GDP for eight European countries, namely Cyprus, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Portugal, and Spain. Due to the identification of I(1) cointegrated variables, the analysis is performed within a VECM framework, that models each country individually as a closed economy, and then as an open econom...

  4. Two-Microphone Separation of Speech Mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Syskind; Wang, DeLiang; Larsen, Jan;

    2008-01-01

    combined, independent component analysis (ICA) and binary time–frequency (T–F) masking. By estimating binary masks from the outputs of an ICA algorithm, it is possible in an iterative way to extract basis speech signals from a convolutive mixture. The basis signals are afterwards improved by grouping...

  5. Spectral mixture analysis of multispectral thermal infrared images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remote spectral measurements of light reflected or emitted from terrestrial scenes is commonly integrated over areas sufficiently large that the surface comprises more than one component. Techniques have been developed to analyze multispectral or imaging spectrometer data in terms of a wide range of mixtures of a limited number of components. Spectral mixture analysis has been used primarily for visible and near-infrared images, but it may also be applied to thermal infrared data. Two approaches are reviewed: binary mixing and a more general treatment for isothermal mixtures of a greater number of components

  6. Nuclear fuel alloys or mixtures and method of making thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariani, Robert Dominick; Porter, Douglas Lloyd

    2016-04-05

    Nuclear fuel alloys or mixtures and methods of making nuclear fuel mixtures are provided. Pseudo-binary actinide-M fuel mixtures form alloys and exhibit: body-centered cubic solid phases at low temperatures; high solidus temperatures; and/or minimal or no reaction or inter-diffusion with steel and other cladding materials. Methods described herein through metallurgical and thermodynamics advancements guide the selection of amounts of fuel mixture components by use of phase diagrams. Weight percentages for components of a metallic additive to an actinide fuel are selected in a solid phase region of an isothermal phase diagram taken at a temperature below an upper temperature limit for the resulting fuel mixture in reactor use. Fuel mixtures include uranium-molybdenum-tungsten, uranium-molybdenum-tantalum, molybdenum-titanium-zirconium, and uranium-molybdenum-titanium systems.

  7. Comparison Analysis: Granger Causality and New Causality and Their Applications to Motor Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sanqing; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Jianhai; Kong, Wanzeng; Cao, Yu; Kozma, Robert

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we first point out a fatal drawback that the widely used Granger causality (GC) needs to estimate the autoregressive model, which is equivalent to taking a series of backward recursive operations which are infeasible in many irreversible chemical reaction models. Thus, new causality (NC) proposed by Hu et al. (2011) is theoretically shown to be more sensitive to reveal true causality than GC. We then apply GC and NC to motor imagery (MI) which is an important mental process in cognitive neuroscience and psychology and has received growing attention for a long time. We study causality flow during MI using scalp electroencephalograms from nine subjects in Brain-computer interface competition IV held in 2008. We are interested in three regions: Cz (central area of the cerebral cortex), C3 (left area of the cerebral cortex), and C4 (right area of the cerebral cortex) which are considered to be optimal locations for recognizing MI states in the literature. Our results show that: 1) there is strong directional connectivity from Cz to C3/C4 during left- and right-hand MIs based on GC and NC; 2) during left-hand MI, there is directional connectivity from C4 to C3 based on GC and NC; 3) during right-hand MI, there is strong directional connectivity from C3 to C4 which is much clearly revealed by NC than by GC, i.e., NC largely improves the classification rate; and 4) NC is demonstrated to be much more sensitive to reveal causal influence between different brain regions than GC. PMID:26099149

  8. Velocity limitations in coaxial plasma gun experiments with gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The velocity limitations found in many crossed field plasma experiments with neutral gas present are studied for binary mixtures of H2, He, N2 O2, Ne and Ar. The apparatus used is a coaxial plasma gun with an azimuthal magnetic bias field. The discharge parameters are chosen so that the plasma is weakly ionized. In some of the mixtures it is found that one of the components tends to dominate in the sense that only a small amount (regarding volume) of that component is needed for the discharge to adopt a limiting velocity close to that for the pure component. Thus in a mixture between a heavy and a light component having nearly equal ionization potentials the heavy component dominates. Also if there is a considerable difference in ionization potential between the components, the component with the lowest ionization potential tends to dominate. (author)

  9. On the causal structure between CO2 and global temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Adolf Stips; Diego Macias; Clare Coughlan; Elisa Garcia-Gorriz; X. San Liang

    2016-01-01

    We use a newly developed technique that is based on the information flow concept to investigate the causal structure between the global radiative forcing and the annual global mean surface temperature anomalies (GMTA) since 1850. Our study unambiguously shows one-way causality between the total Greenhouse Gases and GMTA. Specifically, it is confirmed that the former, especially CO2, are the main causal drivers of the recent warming. A significant but smaller information flow comes from aeroso...

  10. Non-parametric causal inference for bivariate time series

    CERN Document Server

    McCracken, James M

    2015-01-01

    We introduce new quantities for exploratory causal inference between bivariate time series. The quantities, called penchants and leanings, are computationally straightforward to apply, follow directly from assumptions of probabilistic causality, do not depend on any assumed models for the time series generating process, and do not rely on any embedding procedures; these features may provide a clearer interpretation of the results than those from existing time series causality tools. The penchant and leaning are computed based on a structured method for computing probabilities.

  11. Causality, Unintended Consequences and Deducing Shared Causes

    OpenAIRE

    Steven M. Shugan

    2007-01-01

    Despite warnings against inferring causality from observed correlations or statistical dependence, some articles do. Observed correlation is neither necessary nor sufficient to infer causality as defined by the term's everyday usage. For example, a deterministic causal process creates pseudorandom numbers; yet, we observe no correlation between the numbers. Child height correlates with spelling ability because age causes both. Moreover, order is problematic—we hear train whistles before obser...

  12. Dark matter perturbations and viscosity: a causal approach

    OpenAIRE

    Acquaviva, Giovanni; John, Anslyn; Pénin, Aurélie

    2016-01-01

    The inclusion of dissipative effects in cosmic fluids modifies their clustering properties and could have observable effects on the formation of large scale structures. We analyse the evolution of density perturbations of cold dark matter endowed with causal bulk viscosity. The perturbative analysis is carried out in the Newtonian approximation and the bulk viscosity is described by the causal Israel-Stewart (IS) theory. In contrast to the non-causal Eckart theory, we obtain a third order evo...

  13. Bayesian D-Optimal Choice Designs for Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Ruseckaite, Aiste; Goos, Peter; Fok, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Consumer products and services can often be described as mixtures of ingredients. Examples are the mixture of ingredients in a cocktail and the mixture of different components of waiting time (e.g., in-vehicle and out-of-vehicle travel time) in a transportation setting. Choice experiments may help to determine how the respondents' choice of a product or service is affected by the combination of ingredients. In such studies, individuals are confronted with sets of ...

  14. A-optimal designs for an additive quadratic mixture model

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, LY; Guan, YN; Zhang, CQ

    1998-01-01

    Quadratic models are widely used in the analysis of experiments involving mixtures. This paper gives A-optimal designs for an additive quadratic mixture model for q ≥ 3 mixture components. It is proved that in these A-optimal designs, vertices of the simplex S q-1 are support points, and other support points shift gradually from barycentres of depth 1 to barycentres of depth 3 as q increases. A-optimal designs with minimal support are also discussed.

  15. A classification system for tableting behaviors of binary powder mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Changquan Calvin Sun

    2016-01-01

    The ability to predict tableting properties of a powder mixture from individual components is of both fundamental and practical importance to the efficient formulation development of tablet products. A common tableting classification system (TCS) of binary powder mixtures facilitates the systematic development of new knowledge in this direction. Based on the dependence of tablet tensile strength on weight fraction in a binary mixture, three main types of tableting behavior are identified. Eac...

  16. Linkage intensity learning approach with genetic algorithm for causality diagram

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cheng-liang; CHEN Juan-juan

    2007-01-01

    The causality diagram theory, which adopts graphical expression of knowledge and direct intensity of causality, overcomes some shortages in belief network and has evolved into a mixed causality diagram methodology for discrete and continuous variable. But to give linkage intensity of causality diagram is difficult, particularly in many working conditions in which sampling data are limited or noisy. The classic learning algorithm is hard to be adopted. We used genetic algorithm to learn linkage intensity from limited data. The simulation results demonstrate that this algorithm is more suitable than the classic algorithm in the condition of sample shortage such as space shuttle's fault diagnoisis.

  17. Granger causality and transfer entropy are equivalent for Gaussian variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Lionel; Barrett, Adam B; Seth, Anil K

    2009-12-01

    Granger causality is a statistical notion of causal influence based on prediction via vector autoregression. Developed originally in the field of econometrics, it has since found application in a broader arena, particularly in neuroscience. More recently transfer entropy, an information-theoretic measure of time-directed information transfer between jointly dependent processes, has gained traction in a similarly wide field. While it has been recognized that the two concepts must be related, the exact relationship has until now not been formally described. Here we show that for Gaussian variables, Granger causality and transfer entropy are entirely equivalent, thus bridging autoregressive and information-theoretic approaches to data-driven causal inference.

  18. Granger causality and transfer entropy are equivalent for Gaussian variables

    CERN Document Server

    Barnett, Lionel; Seth, Anil

    2009-01-01

    Granger causality is a statistical notion of causal influence based on prediction via vector autoregression. Developed originally in the field of econometrics, it has since found application in a broader arena, particularly in neuroscience. More recently transfer entropy, an information-theoretic measure of time-directed information transfer between jointly dependent processes, has gained traction in a similarly wide field. It has always seemed plausible that the two concepts ought to be related. Here we show that for Gaussian variables, Granger causality and transfer entropy are entirely equivalent, thus bridging autoregressive and information-theoretic approaches to data-driven causal inference.

  19. Causality and stability of cosmic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porth, Oliver; Komissarov, Serguei S.

    2015-09-01

    In stark contrast to their laboratory and terrestrial counterparts, cosmic jets appear to be very stable. They are able to penetrate vast spaces, which exceed by up to a billion times the size of their central engines. We propose that the reason behind this remarkable property is the loss of causal connectivity across these jets, caused by their rapid expansion in response to fast decline of external pressure with the distance from the `jet engine'. In atmospheres with power-law pressure distribution, pext ∝ z-κ, the total loss of causal connectivity occurs, when κ > 2 - the steepness which is expected to be quite common for many astrophysical environments. This conclusion does not seem to depend on the physical nature of jets - it applies both to relativistic and non-relativistic flows, both magnetically dominated and unmagnetized jets. In order to verify it, we have carried out numerical simulations of moderately magnetized and moderately relativistic jets. The results give strong support to our hypothesis and provide with valuable insights. In particular, we find that the z-pinched inner cores of magnetic jets expand slower than their envelopes and become susceptible to instabilities even when the whole jet is stable. This may result in local dissipation and emission without global disintegration of the flow. Cosmic jets may become globally unstable when they enter flat sections of external atmospheres. We propose that the Fanaroff-Riley (FR) morphological division of extragalactic radio sources into two classes is related to this issue. In particular, we argue that the low power FR-I jets become reconfined, causally connected and globally unstable on the scale of galactic X-ray coronas, whereas more powerful FR-II jets reconfine much further out, already on the scale of radio lobes and remain largely intact until they terminate at hotspots. Using this idea, we derived the relationship between the critical jet power and the optical luminosity of the host

  20. Identifiability of large phylogenetic mixture models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, John A; Sullivant, Seth

    2012-01-01

    Phylogenetic mixture models are statistical models of character evolution allowing for heterogeneity. Each of the classes in some unknown partition of the characters may evolve by different processes, or even along different trees. Such models are of increasing interest for data analysis, as they can capture the variety of evolutionary processes that may be occurring across long sequences of DNA or proteins. The fundamental question of whether parameters of such a model are identifiable is difficult to address, due to the complexity of the parameterization. Identifiability is, however, essential to their use for statistical inference.We analyze mixture models on large trees, with many mixture components, showing that both numerical and tree parameters are indeed identifiable in these models when all trees are the same. This provides a theoretical justification for some current empirical studies, and indicates that extensions to even more mixture components should be theoretically well behaved. We also extend our results to certain mixtures on different trees, using the same algebraic techniques.

  1. [Construction of Three-Dimensional Isobologram for Ternary Pollutant Mixtures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, China) Isobolographic analysis was widely used in the interaction assessment of binary mixtures. However, how to construct a three-dimensional (3D) isobologram for the assessment of toxicity interaction within ternary mixtures is still not reported up to date. The main purpose of this paper is to develop a 3D isobologram where the relative concentrations of three components are acted as three coordinate axes in 3D space to examine the toxicity interaction within ternary mixtures. Taking six commonly used pesticides in China, including three herbicides (2, 4-D, desmetryne and simetryn) and three insecticides ( dimethoate, imidacloprid and propoxur) as the mixture components, the uniform design ray procedure (UD-Ray) was used to rationally design the concentration composition of various components in the ternary mixtures so that effectively and comprehensively reflected the variety of actual environmental concentrations. The luminescent inhibition toxicities of single pesticides and their ternary mixtures to Vibrio fischeri at various concentration levels were determined by the microplate toxicity analysis. Selecting concentration addition (CA) as the addition reference, 3D isobolograms were constructed to study the toxicity interactions of various ternary mixtures. The results showed that the 3D isobologram could clearly and directly exhibit the toxicity interactions of ternary mixtures, and extend the use of isobolographic analysis into the ternary mixtures.

  2. Multilevel Mixture Kalman Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Wang

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The mixture Kalman filter is a general sequential Monte Carlo technique for conditional linear dynamic systems. It generates samples of some indicator variables recursively based on sequential importance sampling (SIS and integrates out the linear and Gaussian state variables conditioned on these indicators. Due to the marginalization process, the complexity of the mixture Kalman filter is quite high if the dimension of the indicator sampling space is high. In this paper, we address this difficulty by developing a new Monte Carlo sampling scheme, namely, the multilevel mixture Kalman filter. The basic idea is to make use of the multilevel or hierarchical structure of the space from which the indicator variables take values. That is, we draw samples in a multilevel fashion, beginning with sampling from the highest-level sampling space and then draw samples from the associate subspace of the newly drawn samples in a lower-level sampling space, until reaching the desired sampling space. Such a multilevel sampling scheme can be used in conjunction with the delayed estimation method, such as the delayed-sample method, resulting in delayed multilevel mixture Kalman filter. Examples in wireless communication, specifically the coherent and noncoherent 16-QAM over flat-fading channels, are provided to demonstrate the performance of the proposed multilevel mixture Kalman filter.

  3. Explaining slow convergence of EM in low noise linear mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kaare Brandt; Winther, Ole

    2005-01-01

    This report conducts an investigation of the convergence properties of the EM algorithm used for linear mixture models. Since the linear mixture model is a rather general approach, the analysis is relevant for a wide range of models which to some degree are subsets of each other: Independent...... Component Analysis (ICA), probabilistic PCA, Factor Analysis (FA), Independent Factor Analysis (IFA) and Mean Field ICA....

  4. Degenerate atom-molecule mixture in a cold Fermi gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that the atom-molecule mixture formed in a degenerate atomic Fermi gas with interspecies repulsion near a Feshbach resonance constitutes a peculiar system where the atomic component is almost nondegenerate but quantum degeneracy of molecules is important. We develop a thermodynamic approach for studying this mixture, explain experimental observations, and predict optimal conditions for achieving molecular Bose-Einstein condensation

  5. Degenerate Atom-Molecule Mixture in a Cold Fermi Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Kokkelmans, S.J.J.M.F.; Shlyapnikov, G. V.; Salomon, R.

    2004-01-01

    We show that the atom-molecule mixture formed in a degenerate atomic Fermi gas with interspecies repulsion near a Feshbach resonance, constitutes a peculiar system where the atomic component is almost non-degenerate but quantum degeneracy of molecules is important. We develop a thermodynamic approach for studying this mixture, explain experimental observations and predict optimal conditions for achieving molecular BEC.

  6. Equity Theory Ratios as Causal Schemas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitis, Alexios; Hantzi, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Equity theory approaches justice evaluations based on ratios of exchange inputs to exchange outcomes. Situations are evaluated as just if ratios are equal and unjust if unequal. We suggest that equity ratios serve a more fundamental cognitive function than the evaluation of justice. More particularly, we propose that they serve as causal schemas for exchange outcomes, that is, they assist in determining whether certain outcomes are caused by inputs of other people in the context of an exchange process. Equality or inequality of ratios in this sense points to an exchange process. Indeed, Study 1 shows that different exchange situations, such as disproportional or balanced proportional situations, create perceptions of give-and-take on the basis of equity ratios. Study 2 shows that perceptions of justice are based more on communicatively accepted rules of interaction than equity-based evaluations, thereby offering a distinction between an attribution and an evaluation cognitive process for exchange outcomes. PMID:27594846

  7. Quantum Causality, Stochastics, Trajectories and Information

    CERN Document Server

    Belavkin, V P

    2002-01-01

    A history of the discovery of quantum mechanics and paradoxes of its interpretation is reconsidered from the modern point of view of quantum stochastics and information. It is argued that in the orthodox quantum mechanics there is no place for quantum phenomenology such as events. The development of quantum measurement theory, initiated by von Neumann, and Bell's conceptual critics of hidden variable theories indicated a possibility for resolution of this crisis. This can be done by divorcing the algebra of the dynamical generators and an extended algebra of the potential (quantum) and the actual (classical) observables. The latter, called beables, form the center of the algebra of all observables, as the only visible (macroscopic) observables must be compatible with any hidden (microscopic) observable. It is shown that within this approach quantum causality can be rehabilitated within an extended quantum mechanics (eventum mechanics) in the form of a superselection rule for compatibility of the consistent hi...

  8. Equity Theory Ratios as Causal Schemas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitis, Alexios; Hantzi, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Equity theory approaches justice evaluations based on ratios of exchange inputs to exchange outcomes. Situations are evaluated as just if ratios are equal and unjust if unequal. We suggest that equity ratios serve a more fundamental cognitive function than the evaluation of justice. More particularly, we propose that they serve as causal schemas for exchange outcomes, that is, they assist in determining whether certain outcomes are caused by inputs of other people in the context of an exchange process. Equality or inequality of ratios in this sense points to an exchange process. Indeed, Study 1 shows that different exchange situations, such as disproportional or balanced proportional situations, create perceptions of give-and-take on the basis of equity ratios. Study 2 shows that perceptions of justice are based more on communicatively accepted rules of interaction than equity-based evaluations, thereby offering a distinction between an attribution and an evaluation cognitive process for exchange outcomes.

  9. Causality and local determinism versus quantum nonlocality

    CERN Document Server

    Kupczynski, Marian

    2013-01-01

    The entanglement and the violation of Bell and CHSH inequalities in spin polarization correlation experiments (SPCE) is considered to be one of the biggest mysteries of Nature and is called quantum nonlocality. In this paper we show once again that this conclusion is based on imprecise terminology and on the lack of understanding of probabilistic models used in various proofs of Bell and CHSH theorems. These models are inconsistent with experimental protocols used in SPCE. This is the only reason why Bell and CHSH inequalities are violated. A probabilistic non-signalling description of SPCE, consistent with quantum predictions, is possible and it depends explicitly on the context of each experiment. It is also deterministic in the sense that the outcome is determined by supplementary local parameters describing both a physical signals and measuring instruments. The existence of such description gives additional arguments that quantum theory is emergent from some more detailed theory respecting causality and l...

  10. Causal structure and electrodynamics on Finsler spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Christian; Wohlfarth, Mattias N. R.

    2011-08-01

    We present a concise new definition of Finsler spacetimes that generalizes Lorentzian metric manifolds and provides consistent backgrounds for physics. Extending standard mathematical constructions known from Finsler spaces, we show that geometric objects like the Cartan nonlinear connection and its curvature are well defined almost everywhere on Finsler spacetimes, including their null structure. This allows us to describe the complete causal structure in terms of timelike and null curves; these are essential to model physical observers and the propagation of light. We prove that the timelike directions form an open convex cone with a null boundary, as is the case in Lorentzian geometry. Moreover, we develop action integrals for physical field theories on Finsler spacetimes, and tools to deduce the corresponding equations of motion. These are applied to construct a theory of electrodynamics that confirms the claimed propagation of light along Finsler null geodesics.

  11. Causal structure and electrodynamics on Finsler spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Pfeifer, Christian

    2011-01-01

    We present a concise new definition of Finsler spacetimes that generalize Lorentzian metric manifolds and provide consistent backgrounds for physics. Extending standard mathematical constructions known from Finsler spaces we show that geometric objects like the Cartan non-linear connection and its curvature are well-defined almost everywhere on Finsler spacetimes, also on their null structure. This allows us to describe the complete causal structure in terms of timelike and null curves; these are essential to model physical observers and the propagation of light. We prove that the timelike directions form an open convex cone with null boundary as is the case in Lorentzian geometry. Moreover, we develop action integrals for physical field theories on Finsler spacetimes, and tools to deduce the corresponding equations of motion. These are applied to construct a theory of electrodynamics that confirms the claimed propagation of light along Finsler null geodesics.

  12. Exploring Torus Universes in Causal Dynamical Triangulations

    CERN Document Server

    Budd, T G

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by the search for new observables in nonperturbative quantum gravity, we consider Causal Dynamical Triangulations (CDT) in 2+1 dimensions with the spatial topology of a torus. This system is of particular interest, because one can study not only the global scale factor, but also global shape variables in the presence of arbitrary quantum fluctuations of the geometry. Our initial investigation focusses on the dynamics of the scale factor and uncovers a qualitatively new behaviour, which leads us to investigate a novel type of boundary conditions for the path integral. Comparing large-scale features of the emergent quantum geometry in numerical simulations with a classical minisuperspace formulation, we find partial agreement. By measuring the correlation matrix of volume fluctuations we succeed in reconstructing the effective action for the scale factor directly from the simulation data. Apart from setting the stage for the analysis of shape dynamics on the torus, the new set-up highlights the role o...

  13. Equity Theory Ratios as Causal Schemas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexios Arvanitis

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Equity theory approaches justice evaluations based on ratios of exchange inputs to exchange outcomes. Situations are evaluated as just if ratios are equal and unjust if unequal. We suggest that equity ratios serve a more fundamental cognitive function than the evaluation of justice. More particularly, we propose that they serve as causal schemas for exchange outcomes, that is, they assist in determining whether certain outcomes are caused by inputs of other people in the context of an exchange process. Equality or inequality of ratios in this sense points to an exchange process. Indeed, Study 1 shows that different exchange situations, such as disproportional or balanced proportional situations, create perceptions of give-and-take on the basis of equity ratios. Study 2 shows that perceptions of justice are based more on communicatively accepted rules of interaction than equity-based evaluations, thereby offering a distinction between an attribution and an evaluation cognitive process for exchange outcomes.

  14. A study in cosmology and causal thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The especial relativity of thermodynamic theories for reversible and irreversible processes in continuous medium is studied. The formalism referring to equilibrium and non-equilibrium configurations, and theories which includes the presence of gravitational fields are discussed. The nebular model in contraction with dissipative processes identified by heat flux and volumetric viscosity is thermodymically analysed. This model is presented by a plane conformal metric. The temperature, pressure, entropy and entropy production within thermodynamic formalism which adopts the hypothesis of local equilibrium, is calculated. The same analysis is carried out considering a causal thermodynamics, which establishes a local entropy of non-equilibrium. Possible homogeneous and isotropic cosmological models, considering the new phenomenological equation for volumetric viscosity deriving from cause thermodynamics are investigated. The found out models have plane spatial section (K=0) and some ones do not have singularities. The energy conditions are verified and the entropy production for physically reasobable models are calculated. (M.C.K.)

  15. Causality constraints in conformal field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Thomas; Jain, Sachin; Kundu, Sandipan

    2016-05-01

    Causality places nontrivial constraints on QFT in Lorentzian signature, for example fixing the signs of certain terms in the low energy Lagrangian. In d dimensional conformal field theory, we show how such constraints are encoded in crossing symmetry of Euclidean correlators, and derive analogous constraints directly from the conformal bootstrap (analytically). The bootstrap setup is a Lorentzian four-point function corresponding to propagation through a shockwave. Crossing symmetry fixes the signs of certain log terms that appear in the conformal block expansion, which constrains the interactions of low-lying operators. As an application, we use the bootstrap to rederive the well known sign constraint on the (∂ ϕ)4 coupling in effective field theory, from a dual CFT. We also find constraints on theories with higher spin conserved currents. Our analysis is restricted to scalar correlators, but we argue that similar methods should also impose nontrivial constraints on the interactions of spinning operators.

  16. The balanced survivor average causal effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Tom; Joffe, Marshall; Hu, Bo; Li, Liang; Boucher, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Statistical analysis of longitudinal outcomes is often complicated by the absence of observable values in patients who die prior to their scheduled measurement. In such cases, the longitudinal data are said to be "truncated by death" to emphasize that the longitudinal measurements are not simply missing, but are undefined after death. Recently, the truncation by death problem has been investigated using the framework of principal stratification to define the target estimand as the survivor average causal effect (SACE), which in the context of a two-group randomized clinical trial is the mean difference in the longitudinal outcome between the treatment and control groups for the principal stratum of always-survivors. The SACE is not identified without untestable assumptions. These assumptions have often been formulated in terms of a monotonicity constraint requiring that the treatment does not reduce survival in any patient, in conjunction with assumed values for mean differences in the longitudinal outcome between certain principal strata. In this paper, we introduce an alternative estimand, the balanced-SACE, which is defined as the average causal effect on the longitudinal outcome in a particular subset of the always-survivors that is balanced with respect to the potential survival times under the treatment and control. We propose a simple estimator of the balanced-SACE that compares the longitudinal outcomes between equivalent fractions of the longest surviving patients between the treatment and control groups and does not require a monotonicity assumption. We provide expressions for the large sample bias of the estimator, along with sensitivity analyses and strategies to minimize this bias. We consider statistical inference under a bootstrap resampling procedure. PMID:23658214

  17. Assessing thalamocortical functional connectivity with Granger causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng; Maybhate, Anil; Israel, David; Thakor, Nitish V; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2013-09-01

    Assessment of network connectivity across multiple brain regions is critical to understanding the mechanisms underlying various neurological disorders. Conventional methods for assessing dynamic interactions include cross-correlation and coherence analysis. However, these methods do not reveal the direction of information flow, which is important for studying the highly directional neurological system. Granger causality (GC) analysis can characterize the directional influences between two systems. We tested GC analysis for its capability to capture directional interactions within both simulated and in vivo neural networks. The simulated networks consisted of Hindmarsh-Rose neurons; GC analysis was used to estimate the causal influences between two model networks. Our analysis successfully detected asymmetrical interactions between these networks ( , t -test). Next, we characterized the relationship between the "electrical synaptic strength" in the model networks and interactions estimated by GC analysis. We demonstrated the novel application of GC to monitor interactions between thalamic and cortical neurons following ischemia induced brain injury in a rat model of cardiac arrest (CA). We observed that during the post-CA acute period the GC interactions from the thalamus to the cortex were consistently higher than those from the cortex to the thalamus ( 1.983±0.278 times higher, p = 0.021). In addition, the dynamics of GC interactions between the thalamus and the cortex were frequency dependent. Our study demonstrated the feasibility of GC to monitor the dynamics of thalamocortical interactions after a global nervous system injury such as CA-induced ischemia, and offers preferred alternative applications in characterizing other inter-regional interactions in an injured brain.

  18. Recursive partitioning for heterogeneous causal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athey, Susan; Imbens, Guido

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we propose methods for estimating heterogeneity in causal effects in experimental and observational studies and for conducting hypothesis tests about the magnitude of differences in treatment effects across subsets of the population. We provide a data-driven approach to partition the data into subpopulations that differ in the magnitude of their treatment effects. The approach enables the construction of valid confidence intervals for treatment effects, even with many covariates relative to the sample size, and without "sparsity" assumptions. We propose an "honest" approach to estimation, whereby one sample is used to construct the partition and another to estimate treatment effects for each subpopulation. Our approach builds on regression tree methods, modified to optimize for goodness of fit in treatment effects and to account for honest estimation. Our model selection criterion anticipates that bias will be eliminated by honest estimation and also accounts for the effect of making additional splits on the variance of treatment effect estimates within each subpopulation. We address the challenge that the "ground truth" for a causal effect is not observed for any individual unit, so that standard approaches to cross-validation must be modified. Through a simulation study, we show that for our preferred method honest estimation results in nominal coverage for 90% confidence intervals, whereas coverage ranges between 74% and 84% for nonhonest approaches. Honest estimation requires estimating the model with a smaller sample size; the cost in terms of mean squared error of treatment effects for our preferred method ranges between 7-22%. PMID:27382149

  19. Separate spectrophotometric determination of gadolinium and dysprosium in binary mixtures by phthalexones using nomogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility has been shown of using different-ligand complexes of rare earths with phthalexones and cetylpyridinium for differential spectrophotometric determination of rare earths in mixtures. The molar absorptivities of individual components of a mixture are not constant values if the total mixture concentration changes. The application of an equation for calculation of mixture absorbances makes it possible to change concentration of the components in mixtures over a wide range (the limit Me1:Me2 ratio is 1:50). Simultaneous nomographic determinations of gadolinium and dysprosium in their mixtures were carried out

  20. World oil and agricultural commodity prices: Evidence from nonlinear causality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing co-movements between the world oil and agricultural commodity prices have renewed interest in determining price transmission from oil prices to those of agricultural commodities. This study extends the literature on the oil-agricultural commodity prices nexus, which particularly concentrates on nonlinear causal relationships between the world oil and three key agricultural commodity prices (corn, soybeans, and wheat). To this end, the linear causality approach of Toda-Yamamoto and the nonparametric causality method of Diks-Panchenko are applied to the weekly data spanning from 1994 to 2010. The linear causality analysis indicates that the oil prices and the agricultural commodity prices do not influence each other, which supports evidence on the neutrality hypothesis. In contrast, the nonlinear causality analysis shows that: (i) there are nonlinear feedbacks between the oil and the agricultural prices, and (ii) there is a persistent unidirectional nonlinear causality running from the oil prices to the corn and to the soybeans prices. The findings from the nonlinear causality analysis therefore provide clues for better understanding the recent dynamics of the agricultural commodity prices and some policy implications for policy makers, farmers, and global investors. This study also suggests the directions for future studies. - Research highlights: → This study determines the price transmission mechanisms between the world oil and three key agricultural commodity prices (corn, soybeans, and wheat). → The linear and nonlinear cointegration and causality methods are carried out. → The linear causality analysis supports evidence on the neutrality hypothesis. → The nonlinear causality analysis shows that there is a persistent unidirectional causality from the oil prices to the corn and to the soybeans prices.

  1. Mixture for removing tar and paraffin deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    kamenshchikov, F.A.; Frolov, M.A.; Golovin, I.N.; Khusainov, Z.M.; Smirnov, Ya.L.; Suchkov, B.M.

    1981-05-23

    Mixture is claimed for removing tar and paraffin deposits (TPD) on the basis of the butyl-benzene fraction (BBF), which is intended to more efficiently remove TPD from the surface of refinery equipment, additionally has piperylene, isoprene and isoamine with the following ratio of the components: piperylene, 19-31%; isoprene, 8-12%; isoamines, 8-12%, while BBF, the rest. The efficiency of the given compositions was assessed by the rate at which the plates were cleaned of TPD and pure commercial paraffin. It has been shown that BBF dissolves 4-6 times faster in the given mixture than in BBF and pyperylene.

  2. Determination of ECoG information flow activity based on Granger causality and Hilbert transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirer, R Murat; Özerdem, Mehmet Siraç; Bayrak, Coskun; Mendi, Engin

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of directional information flow patterns among different regions of the brain is important for investigating the relation between ECoG (electrocorticographic) and mental activity. The objective is to study and evaluate the information flow activity at different frequencies in the primary motor cortex. We employed Granger causality for capturing the future state of the propagation path and direction between recording electrode sites on the cerebral cortex. A grid covered the right motor cortex completely due to its size (approx. 8 cm×8 cm) but grid area extends to the surrounding cortex areas. During the experiment, a subject was asked to imagine performing two activities: movement of the left small finger and/or movement of the tongue. The time series of the electrical brain activity was recorded during these trials using an 8×8 (0.016-300 Hz band with) ECoG platinum electrode grid, which was placed on the contralateral (right) motor cortex. For detection of information flow activity and communication frequencies among the electrodes, we have proposed a method based on following steps: (i) calculation of analytical time series such as amplitude and phase difference acquired from Hilbert transformation, (ii) selection of frequency having highest interdependence for the electrode pairs for the concerned time series over a sliding window in which we assumed time series were stationary, (iii) calculation of Granger causality values for each pair with selected frequency. The information flow (causal influence) activity and communication frequencies between the electrodes in grid were determined and shown successfully. It is supposed that information flow activity and communication frequencies between the electrodes in the grid are approximately the same for the same pattern. The successful employment of Granger causality and Hilbert transformation for the detection of the propagation path and direction of each component of ECoG among different sub

  3. Adaptive Gaussian Mixture Filter Based on Statistical Linearization

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Marco F.

    2012-01-01

    Gaussian mixtures are a common density representation in nonlinear, non-Gaussian Bayesian state estimation. Selecting an appropriate number of Gaussian components, however, is difficult as one has to trade of computational complexity against estimation accuracy. In this paper, an adaptive Gaussian mixture filter based on statistical linearization is proposed. Depending on the nonlinearity of the considered estimation problem, this filter dynamically increases the number of components via spli...

  4. STAR-POLYMER -- COLLOID MIXTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.Dzubiella

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent results in theory and simulation of star-polymer--colloid mixtures are reviewed. We present the effective interaction between hard, colloidal particles and star polymers in a good solvent derived by monomer-resolved Molecular Dynamics simulations and theoretical arguments. The relevant parameters are the size ratio q between the stars and the colloids, as well as the number of polymeric arms f (functionality attached to the common center of the star. By covering a wide range of q's ranging from zero (star against a flat wall up to about 0.5, we establish analytical forms for the star-colloid interaction which are in excellent agreement with simulation results. By employing this cross interaction and the effective interactions between stars and colloids themselves, a demixing transition in the fluid phase is observed and systematically investigated for different arm numbers and size ratios. The demixing binodals are compared with experimental observations and found to be consistent. Furthermore, we map the full two-component system on an effective one-component description for the colloids, by inverting the two-component Ornstein-Zernike equations. Some recent results for the depletion interaction and freezing transitions are shown.

  5. Causal Propagators for the Second Order Wilson Loop

    OpenAIRE

    Pimentel, B. M.; Tomazelli, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    We evaluate the Wilson loop at second order in general non-covariant gauges by means of the causal principal-value prescription for the gauge- dependent poles in the gauge-boson propagator and show that the result agrees with the usual causal prescriptions.

  6. Time Symmetric Quantum Mechanics and Causal Classical Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bopp, Fritz W

    2016-01-01

    A two boundary quantum mechanics without time ordered causal structure is advocated as consistent theory. The apparent causal structure of usual "near future" macroscopic phenomena is attributed to a cosmological asymmetry and to rules governing the transition between microscopic to macroscopic observations. Our interest is a heuristic understanding of the resulting macroscopic physics.

  7. Child Care Subsidy Use and Child Development: Potential Causal Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkinson, Laura E.

    2011-01-01

    Research using an experimental design is needed to provide firm causal evidence on the impacts of child care subsidy use on child development, and on underlying causal mechanisms since subsidies can affect child development only indirectly via changes they cause in children's early experiences. However, before costly experimental research is…

  8. The Feasibility of Using Causal Indicators in Educational Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jue; Engelhard, George, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The authors of the focus article describe an important issue related to the use and interpretation of causal indicators within the context of structural equation modeling (SEM). In the focus article, the authors illustrate with simulated data the effects of omitting a causal indicator. Since SEMs are used extensively in the social and behavioral…

  9. Cause and Event: Supporting Causal Claims through Logistic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Ann A.; Gray, DeLeon L.

    2011-01-01

    Efforts to identify and support credible causal claims have received intense interest in the research community, particularly over the past few decades. In this paper, we focus on the use of statistical procedures designed to support causal claims for a treatment or intervention when the response variable of interest is dichotomous. We identify…

  10. Evidence for Deductive Reasoning in Blocking of Causal Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C.J.; Lovibond, P.F.; Condoleon, M.

    2005-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that pre-training of additivity (the outcome of two causal cues is larger than one causal cue) greatly enhances blocking. This manipulation could work by removing a ceiling effect on the outcome, as proposed by Cheng (1997). Alternatively, it could remove the logical ambiguity associated with blocking under…

  11. The causal boundary and its relations with the conformal boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, J, E-mail: jherrera@agt.cie.uma.e [Departamento de Algebra, GeometrIa y TopologIa, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, Campus Teatinos, 29071 Malaga (Spain)

    2010-05-01

    Our aim in this note is to present the results (obtained in [2]) which ensure that, under certain regularity conditions, the conformal boundary becomes equal to the causal boundary, not only as a point set, but in a topological and chronological level. In particular, under these conditions the conformal boundary becomes a powerful tool to compute the causal one.

  12. Causal Discourse Analyzer: Improving Automated Feedback on Academic ESL Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukharev-Hudilainen, Evgeny; Saricaoglu, Aysel

    2016-01-01

    Expressing causal relations plays a central role in academic writing. While it is important that writing instructors assess and provide feedback on learners' causal discourse, it could be a very time-consuming task. In this respect, automated writing evaluation (AWE) tools may be helpful. However, to date, there have been no AWE tools capable of…

  13. From Blickets to Synapses: Inferring Temporal Causal Networks by Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Chrisantha

    2013-01-01

    How do human infants learn the causal dependencies between events? Evidence suggests that this remarkable feat can be achieved by observation of only a handful of examples. Many computational models have been produced to explain how infants perform causal inference without explicit teaching about statistics or the scientific method. Here, we…

  14. Manifest Variable Granger Causality Models for Developmental Research: A Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Eye, Alexander; Wiedermann, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Granger models are popular when it comes to testing hypotheses that relate series of measures causally to each other. In this article, we propose a taxonomy of Granger causality models. The taxonomy results from crossing the four variables Order of Lag, Type of (Contemporaneous) Effect, Direction of Effect, and Segment of Dependent Series…

  15. Thinking Fast and Slow about Causality: Response to Palinkas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jeanne C.

    2014-01-01

    Larry Palinkas advances the developing science of social work by providing an explanation of how social science research methods, both qualitative and quantitative, can improve our capacity to draw casual inferences. Understanding causal relations and making causal inferences--with the promise of being able to predict and control outcomes--is…

  16. Temporal and Causal Reasoning in Deaf and Hearing Novice Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Susan; Oakhill, Jane; Arfé, Barbara; Boureux, Magali

    2014-01-01

    Temporal and causal information in text are crucial in helping the reader form a coherent representation of a narrative. Deaf novice readers are generally poor at processing linguistic markers of causal/temporal information (i.e., connectives), but what is unclear is whether this is indicative of a more general deficit in reasoning about…

  17. I-optimal mixture designs

    OpenAIRE

    Goos, Peter; JONES, Bradley; SYAFITRI, Utami

    2013-01-01

    In mixture experiments, the factors under study are proportions of the ingredients of a mixture. The special nature of the factors in a mixture experiment necessitates specific types of regression models, and specific types of experimental designs. Although mixture experiments usually are intended to predict the response(s) for all possible formulations of the mixture and to identify optimal proportions for each of the ingredients, little research has been done concerning their I-optimal desi...

  18. Bell's theorem and the causal arrow of time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argaman, Nathan

    2010-10-01

    Einstein held that the formalism of quantum mechanics involves "spooky actions at a distance." In the 1960s, Bell amplified this by showing that the predictions of quantum mechanics disagree with the results of any locally causal description. It should be appreciated that accepting nonlocal descriptions while retaining causality leads to a clash with relativity. Furthermore, the causal arrow of time by definition contradicts time-reversal symmetry. For these reasons, Wheeler and Feynman, Costa de Beauregard, Cramer, Price, and others have advocated abandoning microscopic causality. In this paper, a simplistic but concrete example of this line of thought is presented, in the form of a retro-causal toy model that is stochastic and provides an appealing description of the quantum correlations discussed by Bell. It is concluded that Einstein's "spooky actions" may occur "in the past" rather than "at a distance," resolving the tension between quantum mechanics and relativity and opening unexplored possibilities for future reformulations of quantum mechanics.

  19. Mitigating the effects of measurement noise on Granger causality

    CERN Document Server

    Nalatore, Hariharan; Ding, Mingzhou

    2007-01-01

    Computing Granger causal relations among bivariate experimentally observed time series has received increasing attention over the past few years. Such causal relations, if correctly estimated, can yield significant insights into the dynamical organization of the system being investigated. Since experimental measurements are inevitably contaminated by noise, it is thus important to understand the effects of such noise on Granger causality estimation. The first goal of this paper is to provide an analytical and numerical analysis of this problem. Specifically, we show that, due to noise contamination, (1) spurious causality between two measured variables can arise and (2) true causality can be suppressed. The second goal of the paper is to provide a denoising strategy to mitigate this problem. Specifically, we propose a denoising algorithm based on the combined use of the Kalman filter theory and the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm. Numerical examples are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the den...

  20. A causal net approach to relativistic quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateson, R. D.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we discuss a causal network approach to describing relativistic quantum mechanics. Each vertex on the causal net represents a possible point event or particle observation. By constructing the simplest causal net based on Reichenbach-like conjunctive forks in proper time we can exactly derive the 1+1 dimension Dirac equation for a relativistic fermion and correctly model quantum mechanical statistics. Symmetries of the net provide various quantum mechanical effects such as quantum uncertainty and wavefunction, phase, spin, negative energy states and the effect of a potential. The causal net can be embedded in 3+1 dimensions and is consistent with the conventional Dirac equation. In the low velocity limit the causal net approximates to the Schrodinger equation and Pauli equation for an electromagnetic field. Extending to different momentum states the net is compatible with the Feynman path integral approach to quantum mechanics that allows calculation of well known quantum phenomena such as diffraction.

  1. Causal Relationship Between Relative Price Variability and Inflation in Turkey:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nebiye Yamak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the causal relationship between inflation and relative price variability in Turkey for the period of January 2003-January 2014, by using panel data. In the study, a Granger (1969 non-causality test in heterogeneous panel data models developed by Dumitrescu and Hurlin (2012 is utilized to determine the causal relations between inflation rate relative price variability. The panel data consists of 4123 observations: 133 time observations and 31 cross-section observations. The results of panel causality test indicate that there is a bidirectional causality between inflation rate and relative price variability by not supporting the imperfection information model of Lucas and the menu cost model of Ball and Mankiw.

  2. Statistical causal inferences and their applications in public health research

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Pan; Chen, Ding-Geng

    2016-01-01

    This book compiles and presents new developments in statistical causal inference. The accompanying data and computer programs are publicly available so readers may replicate the model development and data analysis presented in each chapter. In this way, methodology is taught so that readers may implement it directly. The book brings together experts engaged in causal inference research to present and discuss recent issues in causal inference methodological development. This is also a timely look at causal inference applied to scenarios that range from clinical trials to mediation and public health research more broadly. In an academic setting, this book will serve as a reference and guide to a course in causal inference at the graduate level (Master's or Doctorate). It is particularly relevant for students pursuing degrees in Statistics, Biostatistics and Computational Biology. Researchers and data analysts in public health and biomedical research will also find this book to be an important reference.

  3. Quantum objects as elementary units of causality and locality

    CERN Document Server

    Diel, Hans H

    2016-01-01

    The author's attempt to construct a local causal model of quantum theory (QT) that includes quantum field theory (QFT) resulted in the identification of "quantum objects" as the elementary units of causality and locality. Quantum objects are collections of particles (including single particles) whose collective dynamics and measurement results can only be described by the laws of QT and QFT. Local causal models of quantum objects' internal dynamics are not possible if a locality is understood as a space-point locality. Within quantum objects, state transitions may occur which instantly affect the whole quantum object. The identification of quantum objects as the elementary units of causality and locality has two primary implications for a causal model of quantum objects: (1) quantum objects run autonomously with system-state update frequencies based on their local proper times and with either no or minimal dependency on external parameters. (2) The laws of physics that describe global (but relativistic) inter...

  4. A causal net approach to relativistic quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we discuss a causal network approach to describing relativistic quantum mechanics. Each vertex on the causal net represents a possible point event or particle observation. By constructing the simplest causal net based on Reichenbach-like conjunctive forks in proper time we can exactly derive the 1+1 dimension Dirac equation for a relativistic fermion and correctly model quantum mechanical statistics. Symmetries of the net provide various quantum mechanical effects such as quantum uncertainty and wavefunction, phase, spin, negative energy states and the effect of a potential. The causal net can be embedded in 3+1 dimensions and is consistent with the conventional Dirac equation. In the low velocity limit the causal net approximates to the Schrodinger equation and Pauli equation for an electromagnetic field. Extending to different momentum states the net is compatible with the Feynman path integral approach to quantum mechanics that allows calculation of well known quantum phenomena such as diffraction.

  5. Mixtures and interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groten, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    Drinking water can be considered as a complex mixture that consists of tens, hundreds or thousands of chemicals of which the composition is qualitatively and quantitatively not fully known. From a public health point of view it is most relevant to answer the question of whether chemicals in drinking

  6. The label switching problem in mixture models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Etemad

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mixture models are fascinating objects in that, while based on elementary distributions, they of-fer a much wider range of modeling possibilities than their components. They also need both highlycomplex computational challenges and delicate inferential derivations . In Bayesian framework thiskind of models do not admit an analytical solution and one should content him/her self by an ap-proximative solution.In this work, we introduce denition of identiability in statistical model. We focus on denition ofidentiability of mixtures of models from Bayesian point of view. This issue is called label-switchingproblem in Bayesian literatures. We will study a method to identify the mixtures parameter by usingMCMC output.

  7. Hierarchical similarity transformations between Gaussian mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigas, George; Nikou, Christophoros; Goletsis, Yorgos; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to estimate the density of a data space represented by a geometric transformation of an initial Gaussian mixture model. The geometric transformation is hierarchical, and it is decomposed into two steps. At first, the initial model is assumed to undergo a global similarity transformation modeled by translation, rotation, and scaling of the model components. Then, to increase the degrees of freedom of the model and allow it to capture fine data structures, each individual mixture component may be transformed by another, local similarity transformation, whose parameters are distinct for each component of the mixture. In addition, to constrain the order of magnitude of the local transformation (LT) with respect to the global transformation (GT), zero-mean Gaussian priors are imposed onto the local parameters. The estimation of both GT and LT parameters is obtained through the expectation maximization framework. Experiments on artificial data are conducted to evaluate the proposed model, with varying data dimensionality, number of model components, and transformation parameters. In addition, the method is evaluated using real data from a speech recognition task. The obtained results show a high model accuracy and demonstrate the potential application of the proposed method to similar classification problems. PMID:24808615

  8. Causal beliefs about depression in different cultural groups-what do cognitive psychological theories of causal learning and reasoning predict?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmayer, York; Engelmann, Neele

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive psychological research focuses on causal learning and reasoning while cognitive anthropological and social science research tend to focus on systems of beliefs. Our aim was to explore how these two types of research can inform each other. Cognitive psychological theories (causal model theory and causal Bayes nets) were used to derive predictions for systems of causal beliefs. These predictions were then applied to lay theories of depression as a specific test case. A systematic literature review on causal beliefs about depression was conducted, including original, quantitative research. Thirty-six studies investigating 13 non-Western and 32 Western cultural groups were analyzed by classifying assumed causes and preferred forms of treatment into common categories. Relations between beliefs and treatment preferences were assessed. Substantial agreement between cultural groups was found with respect to the impact of observable causes. Stress was generally rated as most important. Less agreement resulted for hidden, especially supernatural causes. Causal beliefs were clearly related to treatment preferences in Western groups, while evidence was mostly lacking for non-Western groups. Overall predictions were supported, but there were considerable methodological limitations. Pointers to future research, which may combine studies on causal beliefs with experimental paradigms on causal reasoning, are given.

  9. Causal beliefs about depression in different cultural groups – What do cognitive psychological theories of causal learning and reasoning predict?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    York eHagmayer

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive psychological research focusses on causal learning and reasoning while cognitive anthropological and social science research tend to focus on systems of beliefs. Our aim was to explore how these two types of research can inform each other. Cognitive psychological theories (causal model theory and causal Bayes nets were used to derive predictions for systems of causal beliefs. These predictions were then applied to lay theories of depression as a specific test case. A systematic literature review on causal beliefs about depression was conducted, including original, quantitative research. Thirty-six studies investigating 13 non-Western and 32 Western cultural groups were analysed by classifying assumed causes and preferred forms of treatment into common categories. Relations between beliefs and treatment preferences were assessed. Substantial agreement between cultural groups was found with respect to the impact of observable causes. Stress was generally rated as most important. Less agreement resulted for hidden, especially supernatural causes. Causal beliefs were clearly related to treatment preferences in Western groups, while evidence was mostly lacking for non-Western groups. Overall predictions were supported, but there were considerable methodological limitations. Pointers to future research, which may combine studies on causal beliefs with experimental paradigms on causal reasoning, are given.

  10. Causal beliefs about depression in different cultural groups-what do cognitive psychological theories of causal learning and reasoning predict?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmayer, York; Engelmann, Neele

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive psychological research focuses on causal learning and reasoning while cognitive anthropological and social science research tend to focus on systems of beliefs. Our aim was to explore how these two types of research can inform each other. Cognitive psychological theories (causal model theory and causal Bayes nets) were used to derive predictions for systems of causal beliefs. These predictions were then applied to lay theories of depression as a specific test case. A systematic literature review on causal beliefs about depression was conducted, including original, quantitative research. Thirty-six studies investigating 13 non-Western and 32 Western cultural groups were analyzed by classifying assumed causes and preferred forms of treatment into common categories. Relations between beliefs and treatment preferences were assessed. Substantial agreement between cultural groups was found with respect to the impact of observable causes. Stress was generally rated as most important. Less agreement resulted for hidden, especially supernatural causes. Causal beliefs were clearly related to treatment preferences in Western groups, while evidence was mostly lacking for non-Western groups. Overall predictions were supported, but there were considerable methodological limitations. Pointers to future research, which may combine studies on causal beliefs with experimental paradigms on causal reasoning, are given. PMID:25505432

  11. Causality and subjectivity in discourse : The meaning and use of causal connectives in spontaneous conversation, chat interactions and written text

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, T.J.M.; Spooren, W.P.M.S.

    2015-01-01

    Many languages of the world have connectives to express causal relations at the discourse level. Often, language users systematically prefer one lexical item (because) over another (even highly similar) one (since) to express a causal relationship. Such choices provide a window on speakers' cognitiv

  12. Causality and subjectivity in discourse: The meaning and use of causal connectives in spontaneous conversation, chat interactions and written text

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, T.J.M.; Spooren, W.P.M.S.

    2015-01-01

    Many languages of the world have connectives to express causal relations at the discourse level. Often, language users systematically prefer one lexical item (because) over another (even highly similar) one (since) to express a causal relationship. Such choices provide a window on speakers’ cognitiv

  13. Simulation of system models containing zero-order causal paths - I. Classification of zero-order causal paths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van J.; Breedveld, P.C.

    1991-01-01

    The existence of zero-order causal paths in bond graphs of physical systems implies the set of state equations to be an implicit mixed set of Differential and Algebraic Equations (DAEs). In the block diagram expansion of such a bond graph, this type of causal path corresponds with a zero-order loop.

  14. Obesity and asthma: co-morbidity or causal relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Huisstede, A; Braunstahl, G J

    2010-09-01

    There is substantial evidence that obesity and asthma are related. "Obese asthma" may be a unique phenotype of asthma, characterized by decreased lung volumes, greater symptoms for a given degree of lung function impairment, destabilization or lack of asthma control, lack of eosinophilic inflammation and a different response to controller medication. Whether this relationship between obesity and asthma is causal or represents co-morbidity due to other factors is unclear. In previous reviews concerning the relationship between obesity and asthma, five hypotheses were put forth. One of these hypotheses is that a low grade systemic inflammation caused by adipokines from the fat tissue causes or enhances bronchial inflammation. In animal models, there is an increasing amount of evidence for the role of adipokines derived from fat tissue in the relationship between obesity and asthma. The data are conflicting in humans. Since obesity is a component of the metabolic syndrome and the metabolic syndrome is also a form of systemic inflammation, it is to be expected that there is a relationship between metabolic syndrome and asthma. The few data that are available show that there is no relationship between metabolic syndrome and asthma, but there is one between the metabolic syndrome and asthma-like symptoms. Further research is needed to confirm the relationship between obesity and asthma in humans, where a rigorous approach in the diagnosis of asthma is essential. PMID:21214041

  15. G-computation demonstration in causal mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aolin; Arah, Onyebuchi A

    2015-10-01

    Recent work has considerably advanced the definition, identification and estimation of controlled direct, and natural direct and indirect effects in causal mediation analysis. Despite the various estimation methods and statistical routines being developed, a unified approach for effect estimation under different effect decomposition scenarios is still needed for epidemiologic research. G-computation offers such unification and has been used for total effect and joint controlled direct effect estimation settings, involving different types of exposure and outcome variables. In this study, we demonstrate the utility of parametric g-computation in estimating various components of the total effect, including (1) natural direct and indirect effects, (2) standard and stochastic controlled direct effects, and (3) reference and mediated interaction effects, using Monte Carlo simulations in standard statistical software. For each study subject, we estimated their nested potential outcomes corresponding to the (mediated) effects of an intervention on the exposure wherein the mediator was allowed to attain the value it would have under a possible counterfactual exposure intervention, under a pre-specified distribution of the mediator independent of any causes, or under a fixed controlled value. A final regression of the potential outcome on the exposure intervention variable was used to compute point estimates and bootstrap was used to obtain confidence intervals. Through contrasting different potential outcomes, this analytical framework provides an intuitive way of estimating effects under the recently introduced 3- and 4-way effect decomposition. This framework can be extended to complex multivariable and longitudinal mediation settings. PMID:26537707

  16. G-computation demonstration in causal mediation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent work has considerably advanced the definition, identification and estimation of controlled direct, and natural direct and indirect effects in causal mediation analysis. Despite the various estimation methods and statistical routines being developed, a unified approach for effect estimation under different effect decomposition scenarios is still needed for epidemiologic research. G-computation offers such unification and has been used for total effect and joint controlled direct effect estimation settings, involving different types of exposure and outcome variables. In this study, we demonstrate the utility of parametric g-computation in estimating various components of the total effect, including (1) natural direct and indirect effects, (2) standard and stochastic controlled direct effects, and (3) reference and mediated interaction effects, using Monte Carlo simulations in standard statistical software. For each study subject, we estimated their nested potential outcomes corresponding to the (mediated) effects of an intervention on the exposure wherein the mediator was allowed to attain the value it would have under a possible counterfactual exposure intervention, under a pre-specified distribution of the mediator independent of any causes, or under a fixed controlled value. A final regression of the potential outcome on the exposure intervention variable was used to compute point estimates and bootstrap was used to obtain confidence intervals. Through contrasting different potential outcomes, this analytical framework provides an intuitive way of estimating effects under the recently introduced 3- and 4-way effect decomposition. This framework can be extended to complex multivariable and longitudinal mediation settings

  17. Subband-based Single-channel Source Separation of Instantaneous Audio Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Taghia, Jalil; Doostari, Mohammad Ali

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a new algorithm is developed to separate the audio sources from a single instantaneous mixture. The algorithm is based on subband decomposition and uses a hybrid system of Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) and Principle Component Analysis (PCA) to construct artificial observations from the single mixture. In the separation stage of algorithm, we use Independent Component Analysis (ICA) to find independent components. At first the observed mixture is divided into a finite numbe...

  18. Quantitative measurement of mixtures by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Guifeng Liu; Zengyan Zhang; Shihua Ma; Hongwei Zhao; Xiaojing Ma; Wenfeng Wang

    2009-07-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) was applied for quantitatively analysing a series of binary mixtures and a ternary mixture. Binary mixtures having different weight ratios of two components, -aminophenol and m-nitroaniline, were investigated by THz-TDS in the range of 0.3 to 1.5 THz, and it was found that the absorption coefficients of the components in each mixture were linearly proportional to their concentrations in the mixture. The results from analysis were in agreement with actual values with a relative error of less than 7%. The quantitative method will help in the detection of illegal drugs, poisons and dangerous materials that are wrapped or mixed with other materials.

  19. Causation or only correlation? Application of causal inference graphs for evaluating causality in nano-QSAR models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizochenko, Natalia; Gajewicz, Agnieszka; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Puzyn, Tomasz

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we suggest that causal inference methods could be efficiently used in Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) modeling as additional validation criteria within quality evaluation of the model. Verification of the relationships between descriptors and toxicity or other activity in the QSAR model has a vital role in understanding the mechanisms of action. The well-known phrase ``correlation does not imply causation'' reflects insight statistically correlated with the endpoint descriptor may not cause the emergence of this endpoint. Hence, paradigmatic shifts must be undertaken when moving from traditional statistical correlation analysis to causal analysis of multivariate data. Methods of causal discovery have been applied for broader physical insight into mechanisms of action and interpretation of the developed nano-QSAR models. Previously developed nano-QSAR models for toxicity of 17 nano-sized metal oxides towards E. coli bacteria have been validated by means of the causality criteria. Using the descriptors confirmed by the causal technique, we have developed new models consistent with the straightforward causal-reasoning account. It was proven that causal inference methods are able to provide a more robust mechanistic interpretation of the developed nano-QSAR models.In this paper, we suggest that causal inference methods could be efficiently used in Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) modeling as additional validation criteria within quality evaluation of the model. Verification of the relationships between descriptors and toxicity or other activity in the QSAR model has a vital role in understanding the mechanisms of action. The well-known phrase ``correlation does not imply causation'' reflects insight statistically correlated with the endpoint descriptor may not cause the emergence of this endpoint. Hence, paradigmatic shifts must be undertaken when moving from traditional statistical correlation analysis to causal

  20. Maximum likelihood estimation of finite mixture model for economic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoong, Seuk-Yen; Ismail, Mohd Tahir

    2014-06-01

    Finite mixture model is a mixture model with finite-dimension. This models are provides a natural representation of heterogeneity in a finite number of latent classes. In addition, finite mixture models also known as latent class models or unsupervised learning models. Recently, maximum likelihood estimation fitted finite mixture models has greatly drawn statistician's attention. The main reason is because maximum likelihood estimation is a powerful statistical method which provides consistent findings as the sample sizes increases to infinity. Thus, the application of maximum likelihood estimation is used to fit finite mixture model in the present paper in order to explore the relationship between nonlinear economic data. In this paper, a two-component normal mixture model is fitted by maximum likelihood estimation in order to investigate the relationship among stock market price and rubber price for sampled countries. Results described that there is a negative effect among rubber price and stock market price for Malaysia, Thailand, Philippines and Indonesia.

  1. Simple energy barrier for component mixture of natural gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenchikov, Aleksey; Bubenchikov, Mikhail; Matvienko, Oleg; Tarasov, Egor; Usenko, Olesya

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the ability of a test molecule to overcome the energy barrier being in the gap between spherical nanoparticles. Three particles make a primitive structural element of composite porous material. The ability of molecules to converge with nanoparticles and then to move through more powerful repulsion field defines the filtration properties of porous materials. This paper presents the investigation of carbon nanoparticles and molecules of helium and methane bombarding them. Calculations proved that methane molecules can not get through three particles if the gap equals to 3.5 nm. For helium molecules this value makes 1.02 nm. These gaps remain the same when the size of nanoparticles increases. Therefore filters for helium separated from natural gas are to have nanopores within the range from 1.02 nm to 3.5 nm.

  2. On Optimum Causal Cognitive Spectrum Reutilization Strategy

    CERN Document Server

    Haghighi, Kasra; Agrell, Erik

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study opportunistic transmission strategies for cognitive radios (CR) in which causal noisy observation from a primary user(s) (PU) state is available. PU is assumed to be operating in a slotted manner, according to a two-state Markov model. The objective is to maximize utilization ratio (UR), i.e., relative number of the PU-idle slots that are used by CR, subject to interference ratio (IR), i.e., relative number of the PU-active slots that are used by CR, below a certain level. We introduce an a-posteriori LLR-based cognitive transmission strategy and show that this strategy is optimum in the sense of maximizing UR given a certain maximum allowed IR. Two methods for calculating threshold for this strategy in practical situations are presented. One of them performs well in higher SNRs but might have too large IR at low SNRs and low PU activity levels, and the other is proven to never violate the allowed IR at the price of a reduced UR. In addition, an upper-bound for the UR of any CR strategy...

  3. Causal structure and hierarchies of models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Kevin D

    2012-12-01

    Economics prefers complete explanations: general over partial equilibrium, microfoundational over aggregate. Similarly, probabilistic accounts of causation frequently prefer greater detail to less as in typical resolutions of Simpson's paradox. Strategies of causal refinement equally aim to distinguish direct from indirect causes. Yet, there are countervailing practices in economics. Representative-agent models aim to capture economic motivation but not to reduce the level of aggregation. Small structural vector-autoregression and dynamic stochastic general-equilibrium models are practically preferred to larger ones. The distinction between exogenous and endogenous variables suggests partitioning the world into distinct subsystems. The tension in these practices is addressed within a structural account of causation inspired by the work of Herbert Simon's, which defines cause with reference to complete systems adapted to deal with incomplete systems and piecemeal evidence. The focus is on understanding the constraints that a structural account of causation places on the freedom to model complex or lower-order systems as simpler or higher-order systems and on to what degree piecemeal evidence can be incorporated into a structural account.

  4. Body selectivity in occipitotemporal cortex: Causal evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Paul E; Peelen, Marius V

    2016-03-01

    Perception of others' bodies provides information that is useful for a number of important social-cognitive processes. Evidence from neuroimaging methods has identified focal cortical regions that are highly selective for perceiving bodies and body parts, including the extrastriate body area (EBA) and fusiform body area (FBA). Our understanding of the functional properties of these regions, and their causal contributions to behavior, has benefitted from the study of neuropsychological patients and particularly from investigations using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). We review this evidence, focusing on TMS studies that are revealing of how (and when) activity in EBA contributes to detecting people in natural scenes; to resolving their body shape, movements, actions, individual parts, and identities; and to guiding goal-directed behavior. These findings are considered in reference to a framework for body perception in which the patterns of neural activity in EBA and FBA jointly serve to make explicit the elements of the visual scene that correspond to the body and its parts. These representations are modulated by other sources of information such as prior knowledge, and are shared with wider brain networks involved in many aspects of social cognition. PMID:26044771

  5. Dynamic causal models and autopoietic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic Causal Modelling (DCM) and the theory of autopoietic systems are two important conceptual frameworks. In this review, we suggest that they can be combined to answer important questions about self-organising systems like the brain. DCM has been developed recently by the neuroimaging community to explain, using biophysical models, the non-invasive brain imaging data are caused by neural processes. It allows one to ask mechanistic questions about the implementation of cerebral processes. In DCM the parameters of biophysical models are estimated from measured data and the evidence for each model is evaluated. This enables one to test different functional hypotheses (i.e., models) for a given data set. Autopoiesis and related formal theories of biological systems as autonomous machines represent a body of concepts with many successful applications. However, autopoiesis has remained largely theoretical and has not penetrated the empiricism of cognitive neuroscience. In this review, we try to show the connections that exist between DCM and autopoiesis. In particular, we propose a simple modification to standard formulations of DCM that includes autonomous processes. The idea is to exploit the machinery of the system identification of DCMs in neuroimaging to test the face validity of the autopoietic theory applied to neural subsystems. We illustrate the theoretical concepts and their implications for interpreting electroencephalographic signals acquired during amygdala stimulation in an epileptic patient. The results suggest that DCM represents a relevant biophysical approach to brain functional organisation, with a potential that is yet to be fully evaluated. PMID:18575681

  6. Solution to causality paradox upon total reflection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiang-min; CAO Zhuang-qi; ZHU Peng-fei; SHEN Qi-shun

    2006-01-01

    A dispute about the existence of an additional time (named as the Goos-H(a)nchen time) associated with the Goos-H(a)nchen shift in total reflection has recently arisen.At the same time,an inconsistency between the optical ray model and the electromagnetic theory also appears in the optical planar waveguide.By analyzing light propagation in an optical planar waveguide with both the zigzag-ray model and the electromagnetic theory,this paper shows that the Goos-H(a)nchen time really exists,and the total time delay upon total reflection upon an ideal nonabsorbing plasma mirror is the sum of the group-delay time and the Goos-H(a)nchen time.The causality paradox of total reflection of a TM wave upon an ideal nonabsorbing plasma mirror is also solved taking into consideration the negative Goos-H(a)nchen shift.Finally,the expression of the group velocity of the guided mode in optical planar waveguide was obtained,which clearly shows that the time delay upon total reflection is the sum of the group-delay time and the Goos-H(a)nchen time at given any time.

  7. Applying Causal Discovery to the Output of Climate Models - What Can We Learn from the Causal Signatures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert-Uphoff, I.; Hammerling, D.; Samarasinghe, S.; Baker, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    The framework of causal discovery provides algorithms that seek to identify potential cause-effect relationships from observational data. The output of such algorithms is a graph structure that indicates the potential causal connections between the observed variables. Originally developed for applications in the social sciences and economics, causal discovery has been used with great success in bioinformatics and, most recently, in climate science, primarily to identify interaction patterns between compound climate variables and to track pathways of interactions between different locations around the globe. Here we apply causal discovery to the output data of climate models to learn so-called causal signatures from the data that indicate interactions between the different atmospheric variables. These causal signatures can act like fingerprints for the underlying dynamics and thus serve a variety of diagnostic purposes. We study the use of the causal signatures for three applications: 1) For climate model software verification we suggest to use causal signatures as a means of detecting statistical differences between model runs, thus identifying potential errors and supplementing the Community Earth System Model Ensemble Consistency Testing (CESM-ECT) tool recently developed at NCAR for CESM verification. 2) In the context of data compression of model runs, we will test how much the causal signatures of the model outputs changes after different compression algorithms have been applied. This may result in additional means to determine which type and amount of compression is acceptable. 3) This is the first study applying causal discovery simultaneously to a large number of different atmospheric variables, and in the process of studying the resulting interaction patterns for the two aforementioned applications, we expect to gain some new insights into their relationships from this approach. We will present first results obtained for Applications 1 and 2 above.

  8. Time reordered: Causal perception guides the interpretation of temporal order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechlivanidis, Christos; Lagnado, David A

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel temporal illusion in which the perceived order of events is dictated by their perceived causal relationship. Participants view a simple Michotte-style launching sequence featuring 3 objects, in which one object starts moving before its presumed cause. Not only did participants re-order the events in a causally consistent way, thus violating the objective temporal order, but they also failed to recognise the clip they had seen, preferring a clip in which temporal and causal order matched. We show that the effect is not due to lack of attention to the presented events and we discuss the problem of determining whether causality affects temporal order at an early perceptual stage or whether it distorts an accurately perceived order during retrieval. Alternatively, we propose a mechanism by which temporal order is neither misperceived nor misremembered but inferred "on-demand" given phenomenal causality and the temporal priority principle, the assumption that causes precede their effects. Finally, we discuss how, contrary to theories of causal perception, impressions of causality can be generated from dynamic sequences with strong spatiotemporal deviations. PMID:26402648

  9. Causality between Prices and Wages: VECM Analysis for EU-27

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriatik Hoxha

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The literature on causality as well as the empirical evidence clearly shows that there are two opposing groups of economists, who support different hypotheses with respect to the flow of causality in the price-wage causal relationship. The first group argues that causality runs from wages to prices, whereas the second argues that effect flows from prices to wages. Nonetheless, the literature review suggeststhat there is at least some consensus in that researcher’s conclusions may be contingent on the type of data employed, applied econometric model, or even that relationship may alter with economic cycles. This paper empirically examines theprice-wage causal relationship in EU-27, by using the OLS and VECM analysis, and it also provides robust evidence in support of a bilateral causal relationship between prices and wages, both in long-run as well as in the shortrun.Prior to designing and estimating the econometric model we have performed stationarity tests for the employed price, wage and productivity variables. Additionally, we have also specified the model taking into account the lag order as well as the rank of co-integration for the co-integrated variables. Furthermore, we have also applied respective restrictions on the parameters of estimatedVECM. The evidence resulting from model robustness checks indicates that results are statistically robust. Although far from closing the issue of causality between prices and wages, this paper at least provides some fresh evidence in the case of EU-27.

  10. Spacetime Causal Structure and Dimension from Horismotic Relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. C. Stoica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A reflexive relation on a set can be a starting point in defining the causal structure of a spacetime in General Relativity and other relativistic theories of gravity. If we identify this relation as the relation between lightlike separated events (the horismos relation, we can construct in a natural way the entire causal structure: causal and chronological relations, causal curves, and a topology. By imposing a simple additional condition, the structure gains a definite number of dimensions. This construction works with both continuous and discrete spacetimes. The dimensionality is obtained also in the discrete case, so this approach can be suited to prove the fundamental conjecture of causal sets. Other simple conditions lead to a differentiable manifold with a conformal structure (the metric up to a scaling factor as in Lorentzian manifolds. This structure provides a simple and general reconstruction of the spacetime in relativistic theories of gravity, which normally requires topological structure, differential structure, and geometric structure (which decomposes in the conformal structure, giving the causal relations and the volume element. Motivations for such a reconstruction come from relativistic theories of gravity, where the conformal structure is important, from the problem of singularities, and from Quantum Gravity, where various discretization methods are pursued, particularly in the causal sets approach.

  11. Causality between Prices and Wages: VECM Analysis for EU-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriatik HOXHA

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The literature on causality as well as the empirical evidence clearly shows that there are two opposing groups of economists, who support different hypotheses with respect to the flow of causality in the price-wage causal relationship. The first group argues that causality runs from wages to price, whereas the second argue that effect flows from prices to wages. Nonetheless, there is at least some consensus that researchers conclusions may be contingent on the type of data employed, applied econometric model, or even that the relationship may vary through economic cycles. This paper empirically examines the pricewage causal relationship in EMU, by using OLS and VECM analysis, and also it provides robust evidence in support of a bilateral causal relationship between prices and wages, both in long-run as well as in the short-run. Prior to designing and estimating the econometric model we have performed stationarity tests for the employed price, wage and productivity variables. Additionally, we have also specified the model taking into account the lag order as well as the rank of co-integration for the co-integrated variables. Furthermore, we have also applied respective restrictions on the parameters of the estimated VECM and finally model robustness checks indicate that results are statistically robust. Although far from closing the issue of causality between prices and variables, this paper at least provides some fresh evidence for the case of EMU.

  12. A Complex Systems Approach to Causal Discovery in Psychiatry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn N Saxe

    Full Text Available Conventional research methodologies and data analytic approaches in psychiatric research are unable to reliably infer causal relations without experimental designs, or to make inferences about the functional properties of the complex systems in which psychiatric disorders are embedded. This article describes a series of studies to validate a novel hybrid computational approach--the Complex Systems-Causal Network (CS-CN method-designed to integrate causal discovery within a complex systems framework for psychiatric research. The CS-CN method was first applied to an existing dataset on psychopathology in 163 children hospitalized with injuries (validation study. Next, it was applied to a much larger dataset of traumatized children (replication study. Finally, the CS-CN method was applied in a controlled experiment using a 'gold standard' dataset for causal discovery and compared with other methods for accurately detecting causal variables (resimulation controlled experiment. The CS-CN method successfully detected a causal network of 111 variables and 167 bivariate relations in the initial validation study. This causal network had well-defined adaptive properties and a set of variables was found that disproportionally contributed to these properties. Modeling the removal of these variables resulted in significant loss of adaptive properties. The CS-CN method was successfully applied in the replication study and performed better than traditional statistical methods, and similarly to state-of-the-art causal discovery algorithms in the causal detection experiment. The CS-CN method was validated, replicated, and yielded both novel and previously validated findings related to risk factors and potential treatments of psychiatric disorders. The novel approach yields both fine-grain (micro and high-level (macro insights and thus represents a promising approach for complex systems-oriented research in psychiatry.

  13. The Importance of Discovery in Children's Causal Learning from Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, David M; Sommerville, Jessica A

    2010-01-01

    Four-year-olds were more accurate at learning causal structures from their own actions when they were allowed to act first and then observe an experimenter act, as opposed to observing first and then acting on the environment. Children who discovered the causal efficacy of events (as opposed to confirming the efficacy of events that they observed another discover) were also more accurate than children who only observed the experimenter act on the environment; accuracy in the confirmation and observation conditions was at similar levels. These data suggest that while children learn from acting on the environment, not all self-generated action produces equivalent causal learning.

  14. Kernel canonical-correlation Granger causality for multiple time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guorong; Duan, Xujun; Liao, Wei; Gao, Qing; Chen, Huafu

    2011-04-01

    Canonical-correlation analysis as a multivariate statistical technique has been applied to multivariate Granger causality analysis to infer information flow in complex systems. It shows unique appeal and great superiority over the traditional vector autoregressive method, due to the simplified procedure that detects causal interaction between multiple time series, and the avoidance of potential model estimation problems. However, it is limited to the linear case. Here, we extend the framework of canonical correlation to include the estimation of multivariate nonlinear Granger causality for drawing inference about directed interaction. Its feasibility and effectiveness are verified on simulated data.

  15. Causality and prediction: differences and points of contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Carlos Silva Ayçaguer, PhD

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This contribution presents the differences between those variables that might play a causal role in a certain process and those only valuable for predicting the outcome. Some considerations are made about the core intervention of the association and the temporal precedence and biases in both cases, the study of causality and predictive modeling. In that context, several relevant aspects related to the design of the corresponding studies are briefly reviewed and some of the mistakes that are often committed in handling both, causality and prediction, are illustrated.

  16. Stock Market and Economic Growth in Malaysia: Causality Test

    OpenAIRE

    Har Wai Mun; Ee Chun Siong; Tan Chai Thing

    2009-01-01

    Stock market has been associated with economic growth through its role as source for new private capital.  On the other hand, economic growth may be the catalyst for stock market growth. Thus, the purpose of this paper was to explore causal relationships between stock market and the economy using formal tests of causality developed by C. J. Granger and yearly Malaysia data for the period 1977-2006. Results show that stock market Granger-caused economic activity with no reverse causality obser...

  17. Spatial Causality. An application to the Deforestation Process in Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Aliaga

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the causes of deforestation for a representative set of Bolivian municipalities. The literature on environmental economics insists on the importance of physical and social factors. We focus on the last group of variables. Our objective is to identify causal mechanisms between these factors of risk and the problem of deforestation. To this end, we present a testing strategy for spatial causality, based on a sequence of Lagrange Multipliers. The results that we obtain for the Bolivian case confirm only partially the traditional view of the problem of deforestation. Indeed, we only find unequivocal signs of causality in relation to the structure of property rights.

  18. Lattice Model for water-solute mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Furlan, A. P.; Almarza, N. G.; M. C. Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    A lattice model for the study of mixtures of associating liquids is proposed. Solvent and solute are modeled by adapting the associating lattice gas (ALG) model. The nature of interaction solute/solvent is controlled by tuning the energy interactions between the patches of ALG model. We have studied three set of parameters, resulting on, hydrophilic, inert and hydrophobic interactions. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations were carried out and the behavior of pure components and the excess proper...

  19. An Evaluation of Active Learning Causal Discovery Methods for Reverse-Engineering Local Causal Pathways of Gene Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Sisi; Kemmeren, Patrick; Aliferis, Constantin F; Statnikov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Reverse-engineering of causal pathways that implicate diseases and vital cellular functions is a fundamental problem in biomedicine. Discovery of the local causal pathway of a target variable (that consists of its direct causes and direct effects) is essential for effective intervention and can facilitate accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Recent research has provided several active learning methods that can leverage passively observed high-throughput data to draft causal pathways and then refine the inferred relations with a limited number of experiments. The current study provides a comprehensive evaluation of the performance of active learning methods for local causal pathway discovery in real biological data. Specifically, 54 active learning methods/variants from 3 families of algorithms were applied for local causal pathways reconstruction of gene regulation for 5 transcription factors in S. cerevisiae. Four aspects of the methods' performance were assessed, including adjacency discovery quality, edge orientation accuracy, complete pathway discovery quality, and experimental cost. The results of this study show that some methods provide significant performance benefits over others and therefore should be routinely used for local causal pathway discovery tasks. This study also demonstrates the feasibility of local causal pathway reconstruction in real biological systems with significant quality and low experimental cost.

  20. Electronic components

    CERN Document Server

    Colwell, Morris A

    1976-01-01

    Electronic Components provides a basic grounding in the practical aspects of using and selecting electronics components. The book describes the basic requirements needed to start practical work on electronic equipment, resistors and potentiometers, capacitance, and inductors and transformers. The text discusses semiconductor devices such as diodes, thyristors and triacs, transistors and heat sinks, logic and linear integrated circuits (I.C.s) and electromechanical devices. Common abbreviations applied to components are provided. Constructors and electronics engineers will find the book useful

  1. Causality Assessment in Premarketing Drug Clinical Trials: Regulatory Evolution in the USA and Ongoing Concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Stephen A

    2016-10-01

    causal relationship between the drug and the adverse event." However, such new requirements as aggregate analysis of specific events and expedited reporting of animal or in vitro data suggesting significant harm to humans, and subsequent guidance that sponsors develop "a systematic approach" to premarketing safety assessment, are among the components of the FDA's efforts to enhance determination of a "reasonable possibility" of causality. They are also philosophically consistent with the 1993 task force recommendations, and a reminder of the inherent hazards associated with the use of investigational drugs, particularly in the early stages of human study.

  2. Dynamic Interactions in Artificial Environments: Causal and Non-Causal Aspects for the Emergence of Meaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argyris Arnellos

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Initially, the analysis and development of adaptive artificial systems has been based in metaphors taken from philosophical schools as well as the disciplines of biology and cognitive science. So far, the dominant approaches exhibit many advantages in specific domains of application but there all have a certain drawback, which is their inability to produce an artificial system which will be able to internally ground its representations so as to use them to produce newer, more developed ones. The respective frameworks are studied in terms of this inability and it is concluded that the problem is traced in the purely causal treatment, function and creation of the notion of representation, wherever it is used. In the case of purely dynamic systems, where the representations seem not to be very useful, it is proposed that the incorporation of a special non-causal kind of representations would give a framework which seems promising in realizing real adaptation. The relevant architecture is analyzed and discussed mainly in terms of its functionality and its contribution to the integration of pragmatic meaning aspects in an artificial system's interaction.

  3. Separation of organic azeotropic mixtures by pervaporation. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, R.W.

    1991-12-01

    Distillation is a commonly used separation technique in the petroleum refining and chemical processing industries. However, there are a number of potential separations involving azetropic and close-boiling organic mixtures that cannot be separated efficiently by distillation. Pervaporation is a membrane-based process that uses selective permeation through membranes to separate liquid mixtures. Because the separation process is not affected by the relative volatility of the mixture components being separated, pervaporation can be used to separate azetropes and close-boiling mixtures. Our results showed that pervaporation membranes can be used to separate azeotropic mixtures efficiently, a result that is not achievable with simple distillation. The membranes were 5--10 times more permeable to one of the components of the mixture, concentrating it in the permeate stream. For example, the membrane was 10 times more permeable to ethanol than methyl ethyl ketone, producing 60% ethanol permeate from an azeotropic mixture of ethanol and methyl ethyl ketone containing 18% ethanol. For the ethyl acetate/water mixture, the membranes showed a very high selectivity to water (> 300) and the permeate was 50--100 times enriched in water relative to the feed. The membranes had permeate fluxes on the order of 0.1--1 kg/m{sup 2}{center_dot}h in the operating range of 55--70{degrees}C. Higher fluxes were obtained by increasing the operating temperature.

  4. Toxicological evaluation of chemical mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feron, V.J.; Groten, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses major developments in the safety evaluation of chemical mixtures during the past 15 years, reviews today's state of the art of mixture toxicology, and discusses challenges ahead. Well-thought-out tailor-made mechanistic and empirical designs for studying the toxicity of mixtures

  5. Separating Underdetermined Convolutive Speech Mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Syskind; Wang, DeLiang; Larsen, Jan;

    2006-01-01

    a method for underdetermined blind source separation of convolutive mixtures. The proposed framework is applicable for separation of instantaneous as well as convolutive speech mixtures. It is possible to iteratively extract each speech signal from the mixture by combining blind source separation...

  6. On Storks and Babies: Correlation, Causality and Field Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambrecht Anja

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The explosion of available data has created much excitement among marketing practitioners about their ability to better understand the impact of marketing investments. Big data allows for detecting patterns and often it seems plausible to interpret them as causal. While it is quite obvious that storks do not bring babies, marketing relationships are usually less clear. Apparent “causalities” often fail to hold up under examination. If marketers want to be sure not to walk into a causality trap, they need to conduct field experiments to detect true causal relationships. In the present digital environment, experiments are easier than ever to execute. However, they need to be prepared and interpreted with great care in order to deliver meaningful and genuinely causal results that help improve marketing decisions.

  7. Environment - Assisted Invariance, Causality, and Probabilities in Quantum Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Zurek, W. H.

    2002-01-01

    I introduce environment - assisted invariance -- a symmetry related to causality that is exhibited by correlated quantum states -- and describe how it can be used to understand the nature of ignorance and, hence, the origin of probabilities in quantum physics.

  8. Learning Why Things Change: The Difference-Based Causality Learner

    CERN Document Server

    Voortman, Mark; Druzdzel, Marek J

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present the Difference- Based Causality Learner (DBCL), an algorithm for learning a class of discrete-time dynamic models that represents all causation across time by means of difference equations driving change in a system. We motivate this representation with real-world mechanical systems and prove DBCL's correctness for learning structure from time series data, an endeavour that is complicated by the existence of latent derivatives that have to be detected. We also prove that, under common assumptions for causal discovery, DBCL will identify the presence or absence of feedback loops, making the model more useful for predicting the effects of manipulating variables when the system is in equilibrium. We argue analytically and show empirically the advantages of DBCL over vector autoregression (VAR) and Granger causality models as well as modified forms of Bayesian and constraintbased structure discovery algorithms. Finally, we show that our algorithm can discover causal directions of alpha r...

  9. Holographic entanglement and causal information in coherent states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scalar solitons in global AdS4 are holographically dual to coherent states carrying a non-trivial condensate of a scalar operator. We study the holographic information content of these states, focusing on a particular spatial region, by examining the entanglement entropy and causal holographic information. We show generically that whenever the dimension of the condensed operator is sufficiently low (characterized by the double-trace operator becoming relevant), such coherent states have lower entanglement and causal holographic information than the vacuum state of the system, despite having greater energy. We also use these geometries to illustrate the fact that causal wedges associated with a simply-connected boundary region can have non-trivial topology even in causally trivial spacetimes

  10. Cosmic Acceleration from Causal Backreaction with Recursive Nonlinearities

    CERN Document Server

    Bochner, Brett

    2013-01-01

    We revisit the causal backreaction paradigm, in which the need for Dark Energy is eliminated via the generation of an apparent cosmic acceleration from the causal flow of inhomogeneity information coming in towards each observer from distant structure-forming regions. This second-generation formalism incorporates "recursive nonlinearities": the process by which already-established metric perturbations will then act to slow down all future flows of inhomogeneity information. Here, the long-range effects of causal backreaction are now damped, weakening its impact for models that were previously best-fit cosmologies. Nevertheless, we find that causal backreaction can be recovered as a replacement for Dark Energy via the adoption of larger values for the dimensionless `strength' of the clustering evolution functions being modeled -- a change justified by the hierarchical nature of clustering and virialization in the universe, occurring on multiple cosmic length scales simultaneously. With this, and with one new m...

  11. Causal association rule mining methods based on fuzzy state description

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Kaijian; Liang Quan; Yang Bingru

    2006-01-01

    Aiming at the research that using more new knowledge to develope knowledge system with dynamic accordance, and under the background of using Fuzzy language field and Fuzzy language values structure as description framework, the generalized cell Automation that can synthetically process fuzzy indeterminacy and random indeterminacy and generalized inductive logic causal model is brought forward. On this basis, a kind of the new method that can discover causal association rules is provded. According to the causal information of standard sample space and commonly sample space,through constructing its state (abnormality) relation matrix, causal association rules can be gained by using inductive reasoning mechanism. The estimate of this algorithm complexity is given,and its validity is proved through case.

  12. Management’s causal reasoning on performance and earnings management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aerts, W.A.A.; Zhang, S.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the association between the intensity of causal reasoning on performance in a firm’s annual management commentary and its earnings management propensity. Anticipated earnings management concerns are argued to constitute a significant accountability predicament, bringing management to

  13. On the causal structure between CO2 and global temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stips, Adolf; Macias, Diego; Coughlan, Clare; Garcia-Gorriz, Elisa; Liang, X San

    2016-01-01

    We use a newly developed technique that is based on the information flow concept to investigate the causal structure between the global radiative forcing and the annual global mean surface temperature anomalies (GMTA) since 1850. Our study unambiguously shows one-way causality between the total Greenhouse Gases and GMTA. Specifically, it is confirmed that the former, especially CO2, are the main causal drivers of the recent warming. A significant but smaller information flow comes from aerosol direct and indirect forcing, and on short time periods, volcanic forcings. In contrast the causality contribution from natural forcings (solar irradiance and volcanic forcing) to the long term trend is not significant. The spatial explicit analysis reveals that the anthropogenic forcing fingerprint is significantly regionally varying in both hemispheres. On paleoclimate time scales, however, the cause-effect direction is reversed: temperature changes cause subsequent CO2/CH4 changes. PMID:26900086

  14. Obesity as a causal risk factor for deep venous thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klovaite, Jolanta; Benn, M; Nordestgaard, B G

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that obesity is causally associated with deep venous thrombosis (DVT). DESIGN: A Mendelian randomization design. SETTING: The Copenhagen General Population Study and the Copenhagen City Heart Study combined. SUBJECTS: Body mass index (BMI) measurements were...

  15. Replicating the benefits of closed timelike curves without breaking causality

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Xiao; Thompson, Jayne; Haw, Jing Yan; Vedral, Vlatko; Ralph, Timothy C; Lam, Ping Koy; Weedbrook, Christian; Gu, Mile

    2014-01-01

    In general relativity, closed timelike curves can break causality with remarkable and unsettling consequences. At the classical level, they induce causal paradoxes disturbing enough to motivate conjectures that explicitly prevent their existence. At the quantum level, resolving such paradoxes induce radical benefits - from cloning unknown quantum states to solving problems intractable to quantum computers. Instinctively, one expects these benefits to vanish if causality is respected. Here we show that in harnessing entanglement, we can efficiently solve NP-complete problems and clone arbitrary quantum states - even when all time-travelling systems are completely isolated from the past. Thus, the many defining benefits of closed timelike curves can still be harnessed, even when causality is preserved. Our results unveil the subtle interplay between entanglement and general relativity, and significantly improve the potential of probing the radical effects that may exist at the interface between relativity and q...

  16. Eventos Quânticos e Reducionismo Causal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Pessoa Jr.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the first step in an investigation of whether microscopic events can be reduced to a mereological composition of elementary events, especially in biological systems. The hypothesis is made that, between events in which quanta are exchanged, there is causal flow, but strictly speaking no events take place. A causal event is characterized by the possibility of an intervention or manipulation. Thus, three types of quantum mechanical events may be found: (1 detection of a quantum of energy; (2 confinement by an apparatus in a Glauber coherent state; (3 null result measurement (without exchange of quanta. The paper explores these three types of elementary causal events, e sets forth as the next step the investigation of the causal events involved in the action of a molecular motor.

  17. Causality and complexity: the myth of objectivity in science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulecky, Donald C

    2007-10-01

    Two distinctly different worldviews dominate today's thinking in science and in the world of ideas outside of science. Using the approach advocated by Robert M. Hutchins, it is possible to see a pattern of interaction between ideas in science and in other spheres such as philosophy, religion, and politics. Instead of compartmentalizing these intellectual activities, it is worthwhile to look for common threads of mutual influence. Robert Rosen has created an approach to scientific epistemology that might seem radical to some. However, it has characteristics that resemble ideas in other fields, in particular in the writings of George Lakoff, Leo Strauss, and George Soros. Historically, the atmosphere at the University of Chicago during Hutchins' presidency gave rise to Rashevsky's relational biology, which Rosen carried forward. Strauss was writing his political philosophy there at the same time. One idea is paramount in all this, and it is Lakoff who gives us the most insight into how the worldviews differ using this idea. The central difference has to do with causality, the fundamental concept that we use to build a worldview. Causal entailment has two distinct forms in Lakoff 's analysis: direct causality and complex causality. Rosen's writings on complexity create a picture of complex causality that is extremely useful in its detail, grounding in the ideas of Aristotle. Strauss asks for a return to the ancients to put philosophy back on track. Lakoff sees the weaknesses in Western philosophy in a similar way, and Rosen provides tools for dealing with the problem. This introduction to the relationships between the thinking of these authors is meant to stimulate further discourse on the role of complex causal entailment in all areas of thought, and how it brings them together in a holistic worldview. The worldview built on complex causality is clearly distinct from that built around simple, direct causality. One important difference is that the impoverished causal

  18. On directed information theory and Granger causality graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amblard, Pierre-Olivier; Michel, Olivier J J

    2011-02-01

    Directed information theory deals with communication channels with feedback. When applied to networks, a natural extension based on causal conditioning is needed. We show here that measures built from directed information theory in networks can be used to assess Granger causality graphs of stochastic processes. We show that directed information theory includes measures such as the transfer entropy, and that it is the adequate information theoretic framework needed for neuroscience applications, such as connectivity inference problems.

  19. The role of causal links in performance measurement models

    OpenAIRE

    Kasperskaya, Yulia; Tayles, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Several well-known managerial accounting performance measurement models rely on causal assumptions. Whilst users of the models express satisfaction and link them with improved organizational performance, academic research, of the realworld applications, shows few reliable statistical associations. This paper provides a discussion on the"problematic" of causality in a performance measurement setting. Design/methodology/approach: This is a conceptual study based on an analysis...

  20. The causal effect of teen motherhood on worklessness

    OpenAIRE

    WALKER, Ian; Zhu, Yu

    2009-01-01

    Teen motherhood continues to be high in the US and the UK relative to most other western European countries. While recent research has clarified how effective policies to reduce teen motherhood might be (Kearney (2009)), there remains little evidence that quantifies the causal effects of teen motherhood on such mothers and their first born children. This paper provides estimates of the causal effect of teen motherhood on worklessness and does so by exploiting the availability of two sources o...

  1. Causality between Electricity Consumption & Economic growth : Empirical Evidence from India

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Geetu; Sahu, Naresh Chandra

    2009-01-01

    In this study ,an attempt has been made to investigate causality between electricity consumption and economic growth in India by adopting Granger Engel causality model for 1960-2006 period .Test results shows that electricity consumption has positive effect on economic growth. The paper support for the reforms in power sector and indicates that electricity act as a catalyst in realizing various social and economic goals.

  2. The role of activity in visual impressions of causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Peter A

    2006-01-01

    Phenomenal causality is an illusion built on an incomplete perception. It is an illusion because we can have visual impressions of causality when no interaction between objects is actually taking place. It is an illusion built on an incomplete perception because causality as we understand it neglects some factors involved in objective descriptions of interactions between objects in terms of the laws of mechanics. So, why don't we perceive object interactions in accordance with the laws of mechanics? I first consider what kinds of things can and cannot be causes perceptually, arguing that active objects can be causes and non-moving objects cannot be. Then, I argue that causal understanding originates with what we have the most direct experience of, our own actions on objects, and extends out from this point of origin to other domains of causality by a form of schema matching the interpretation of stimulus input by matching to abstracted stored representations of experiences. Schema matching raises the possibility of many more kinds of phenomenal causality than have hitherto been considered, and I conclude by suggesting some possibilities.

  3. Causal quantum theory and the collapse locality loophole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causal quantum theory is an umbrella term for ordinary quantum theory modified by two hypotheses: state vector reduction is a well-defined process, and strict local causality applies. The first of these holds in some versions of Copenhagen quantum theory and need not necessarily imply practically testable deviations from ordinary quantum theory. The second implies that measurement events which are spacelike separated have no nonlocal correlations. To test this prediction, which sharply differs from standard quantum theory, requires a precise definition of state vector reduction. Formally speaking, any precise version of causal quantum theory defines a local hidden variable theory. However, causal quantum theory is most naturally seen as a variant of standard quantum theory. For that reason it seems a more serious rival to standard quantum theory than local hidden variable models relying on the locality or detector efficiency loopholes. Some plausible versions of causal quantum theory are not refuted by any Bell experiments to date, nor is it evident that they are inconsistent with other experiments. They evade refutation via a neglected loophole in Bell experiments--the collapse locality loophole--which exists because of the possible time lag between a particle entering a measurement device and a collapse taking place. Fairly definitive tests of causal versus standard quantum theory could be made by observing entangled particles separated by ≅0.1 light seconds

  4. Human Papilloma Viruses and Breast Cancer – Assessment of Causality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, James Sutherland; Glenn, Wendy K.; Whitaker, Noel James

    2016-01-01

    High risk human papilloma viruses (HPVs) may have a causal role in some breast cancers. Case–control studies, conducted in many different countries, consistently indicate that HPVs are more frequently present in breast cancers as compared to benign breast and normal breast controls (odds ratio 4.02). The assessment of causality of HPVs in breast cancer is difficult because (i) the HPV viral load is extremely low, (ii) HPV infections are common but HPV associated breast cancers are uncommon, and (iii) HPV infections may precede the development of breast and other cancers by years or even decades. Further, HPV oncogenesis can be indirect. Despite these difficulties, the emergence of new evidence has made the assessment of HPV causality, in breast cancer, a practical proposition. With one exception, the evidence meets all the conventional criteria for a causal role of HPVs in breast cancer. The exception is “specificity.” HPVs are ubiquitous, which is the exact opposite of specificity. An additional reservation is that the prevalence of breast cancer is not increased in immunocompromised patients as is the case with respect to HPV-associated cervical cancer. This indicates that HPVs may have an indirect causal influence in breast cancer. Based on the overall evidence, high-risk HPVs may have a causal role in some breast cancers. PMID:27747193

  5. Gas-phase detonation propagation in mixture composition gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, D A; Gamezo, V N; Oran, E S

    2012-02-13

    The propagation of detonations through several fuel-air mixtures with spatially varying fuel concentrations is examined numerically. The detonations propagate through two-dimensional channels, inside of which the gradient of mixture composition is oriented normal to the direction of propagation. The simulations are performed using a two-component, single-step reaction model calibrated so that one-dimensional detonation properties of model low- and high-activation-energy mixtures are similar to those observed in a typical hydrocarbon-air mixture. In the low-activation-energy mixture, the reaction zone structure is complex, consisting of curved fuel-lean and fuel-rich detonations near the line of stoichiometry that transition to decoupled shocks and turbulent deflagrations near the channel walls where the mixture is extremely fuel-lean or fuel-rich. Reactants that are not consumed by the leading detonation combine downstream and burn in a diffusion flame. Detonation cells produced by the unstable reaction front vary in size across the channel, growing larger away from the line of stoichiometry. As the size of the channel decreases relative to the size of a detonation cell, the effect of the mixture composition gradient is lessened and cells of similar sizes form. In the high-activation-energy mixture, detonations propagate more slowly as the magnitude of the mixture composition gradient is increased and can be quenched in a large enough gradient. PMID:22213660

  6. Elko and mass dimension one field of spin one half: causality and Fermi statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Ahluwalia, Dharam Vir

    2015-01-01

    We review how Elko arise as an extension of complex valued four-component Majorana spinors. This is followed by a discussion that constrains certain elements of phase freedom. A proof is reviewed that unambiguously establishes that Elko, and for that matter the indicated Majorana spinors, cannot satisfy Dirac equation. They, however do, as they must, satisfy spinorial Klein-Gordon equation. We then introduce a quantum field with Elko as its expansion coefficients and show that it is causal, satisfies Fermi statistics, and then refer to the existing literature to remind that its mass dimensionally is one. We conclude by providing an up-to-date bibliography on the subject.

  7. A causality analysis of the linearized relativistic Navier-Stokes equations

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval-Villalbazo, A

    2010-01-01

    It is shown by means of a simple analysis that the linearized system of transport equations for a relativistic, single component ideal gas at rest obeys the \\textit{antecedence principle}, which is often referred to as causality principle. This task is accomplished by examining the roots of the dispersion relation for such a system. This result is important for recent experiments performed in relativistic heavy ion colliders, since it suggests that the Israel-Stewart like formalisms may be unnecessary in order to describe relativistic fluids.

  8. Dynamic thermodiffusion model for binary liquid mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslamian, Morteza; Saghir, M Ziad

    2009-07-01

    Following the nonequilibrium thermodynamics approach, we develop a dynamic model to emulate thermo-diffusion process and propose expressions for estimating the thermal diffusion factor in binary nonassociating liquid mixtures. Here, we correlate the net heat of transport in thermodiffusion with parameters, such as the mixture temperature and pressure, the size and shape of the molecules, and mobility of the components, because the molecules have to become activated before they can move. Based on this interpretation, the net heat of transport of each component can be somehow related to the viscosity and the activation energy of viscous flow of the same component defined in Eyring's reaction-rate theory [S. Glasstone, K. J. Laidler, and H. Eyring, (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1941)]. This modeling approach is different from that of Haase and Kempers, in which thermodiffusion is considered as a function of the thermostatic properties of the mixture such as enthalpy. In simulating thermodiffusion, by correlating the net heat of transport with the activation energy of viscous flow, effects of the above mentioned parameters are accounted for, to some extent of course. The model developed here along with Haase-Kempers and Drickamer-Firoozabadi models linked with the Peng-Robinson equation of sate are evaluated against the experimental data for several recent nonassociating binary mixtures at various temperatures, pressures, and concentrations. Although the model prediction is still not perfect, the model is simple and easy to use, physically justified, and predicts the experimental data very good and much better than the existing models. PMID:19658691

  9. Dynamic thermodiffusion model for binary liquid mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslamian, Morteza; Saghir, M. Ziad

    2009-07-01

    Following the nonequilibrium thermodynamics approach, we develop a dynamic model to emulate thermo-diffusion process and propose expressions for estimating the thermal diffusion factor in binary nonassociating liquid mixtures. Here, we correlate the net heat of transport in thermodiffusion with parameters, such as the mixture temperature and pressure, the size and shape of the molecules, and mobility of the components, because the molecules have to become activated before they can move. Based on this interpretation, the net heat of transport of each component can be somehow related to the viscosity and the activation energy of viscous flow of the same component defined in Eyring’s reaction-rate theory [S. Glasstone, K. J. Laidler, and H. Eyring, The Theory of Rate Processes: The Kinetics of Chemical Reactions, Viscosity, Diffusion and Electrochemical Phenomena (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1941)]. This modeling approach is different from that of Haase and Kempers, in which thermodiffusion is considered as a function of the thermostatic properties of the mixture such as enthalpy. In simulating thermodiffusion, by correlating the net heat of transport with the activation energy of viscous flow, effects of the above mentioned parameters are accounted for, to some extent of course. The model developed here along with Haase-Kempers and Drickamer-Firoozabadi models linked with the Peng-Robinson equation of sate are evaluated against the experimental data for several recent nonassociating binary mixtures at various temperatures, pressures, and concentrations. Although the model prediction is still not perfect, the model is simple and easy to use, physically justified, and predicts the experimental data very good and much better than the existing models.

  10. Perceptual processing strategy and exposure influence the perception of odor mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Berre, Elodie; Thomas-Danguin, Thierry; Béno, Noëlle; Coureaud, Gérard; Etiévant, Patrick; Prescott, John

    2008-02-01

    In flavor perception, both experience with the components of odor/taste mixtures and the cognitive strategy used to examine the interactions between the components influence the overall mixture perception. However, the effect of these factors on odor mixtures perception has never been studied. The present study aimed at evaluating whether 1) previous exposure to the odorants included in a mixture or 2) the synthetic or analytic strategy engaged during odorants mixture evaluation determines odor representation. Blending mixtures, in which subjects perceived a unique quality distinct from those of components, were chosen in order to induce a priori synthetic perception. In the first part, we checked whether the chosen mixtures presented blending properties for our subjects. In the second part, 3 groups of participants were either exposed to the odorants contributing to blending mixtures with a "pineapple" or a "red cordial" odor or nonexposed. In a following task, half of each group was assigned to a synthetic or an analytical task. The synthetic task consisted of rating how typical (i.e., representative) of the target odor name (pineapple or red cordial) were the mixtures and each of their components. The analytical task consisted of evaluating these stimuli on several scales labeled with the target odor name and odor descriptors of the components. Previous exposure to mixture components was found to decrease mixture typicality but only for the pineapple blending mixture. Likewise, subjects engaged in an analytical task rated both blending mixtures as less typical than did subjects engaged in a synthetic task. This study supports a conclusion that odor mixtures can be perceived either analytically or synthetically according to the cognitive strategy engaged.

  11. Nuclear components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main features of the EPR concerning the fabrication of the reactor are: -) the size of the components, -) the modification of the design compared with classical PWR, and -) an intensive use of forging (in particular the cold and hot legs of the primary circuit are forged). This series of slides overviews the fabrication of the components for the EPR by highlighting the differences with the previous generation of reactors. 4 types of components are reviewed: the reactor vessel and internals, steam generators, primary circuit pipes, and primary coolant pumps. (A.C.)

  12. Spinodal decomposition of chemically reactive binary mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamorgese, A.; Mauri, R.

    2016-08-01

    We simulate the influence of a reversible isomerization reaction on the phase segregation process occurring after spinodal decomposition of a deeply quenched regular binary mixture, restricting attention to systems wherein material transport occurs solely by diffusion. Our theoretical approach follows a diffuse-interface model of partially miscible binary mixtures wherein the coupling between reaction and diffusion is addressed within the frame of nonequilibrium thermodynamics, leading to a linear dependence of the reaction rate on the chemical affinity. Ultimately, the rate for an elementary reaction depends on the local part of the chemical potential difference since reaction is an inherently local phenomenon. Based on two-dimensional simulation results, we express the competition between segregation and reaction as a function of the Damköhler number. For a phase-separating mixture with components having different physical properties, a skewed phase diagram leads, at large times, to a system converging to a single-phase equilibrium state, corresponding to the absolute minimum of the Gibbs free energy. This conclusion continues to hold for the critical phase separation of an ideally perfectly symmetric binary mixture, where the choice of final equilibrium state at large times depends on the initial mean concentration being slightly larger or less than the critical concentration.

  13. Spinodal decomposition of chemically reactive binary mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamorgese, A; Mauri, R

    2016-08-01

    We simulate the influence of a reversible isomerization reaction on the phase segregation process occurring after spinodal decomposition of a deeply quenched regular binary mixture, restricting attention to systems wherein material transport occurs solely by diffusion. Our theoretical approach follows a diffuse-interface model of partially miscible binary mixtures wherein the coupling between reaction and diffusion is addressed within the frame of nonequilibrium thermodynamics, leading to a linear dependence of the reaction rate on the chemical affinity. Ultimately, the rate for an elementary reaction depends on the local part of the chemical potential difference since reaction is an inherently local phenomenon. Based on two-dimensional simulation results, we express the competition between segregation and reaction as a function of the Damköhler number. For a phase-separating mixture with components having different physical properties, a skewed phase diagram leads, at large times, to a system converging to a single-phase equilibrium state, corresponding to the absolute minimum of the Gibbs free energy. This conclusion continues to hold for the critical phase separation of an ideally perfectly symmetric binary mixture, where the choice of final equilibrium state at large times depends on the initial mean concentration being slightly larger or less than the critical concentration. PMID:27627358

  14. Predicting diffusivities in dense fluid mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. DARIVA

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the Enskog solution of the Boltzmann equation, as corrected by Speedy, together with the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA perturbation theory of liquids is employed in correlating and predicting self-diffusivities of dense fluids. Afterwards this theory is used to estimate mutual diffusion coefficients of solutes at infinite dilution in sub and supercritical solvents. We have also investigated the behavior of Fick diffusion coefficients in the proximity of a binary vapor-liquid critical point since this subject is of great interest for extraction purposes. The approach presented here, which makes use of a density and temperature dependent hard-sphere diameter, is shown to be excellent for predicting diffusivities in dense pure fluids and fluid mixtures. The calculations involved highly nonideal mixtures as well as systems with high molecular asymmetry. The predicted diffusivities are in good agreement with the experimental data for the pure and binary systems. The methodology proposed here makes only use of pure component information and density of mixtures. The simple algebraic relations are proposed without any binary adjustable parameters and can be readily used for estimating diffusivities in multicomponent mixtures.

  15. Another(’s perspective on subjectivity in causal connectives: a usage-based analysis of volitional causal relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninke Stukker

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Dans une hypothèse de catégorisation linguistique, les connecteurs de cause sont pris comme des outils de catégorisation. En effet, des études sur corpus suggèrent que les connecteurs sont fortement spécialisés dans une seule catégorie de causalité spécifique, mais aussi que leur usage n'est pas limité aux catégories de causalité auxquelles ils sont prototypiquement associés. Si nous supposons que le sens des connecteurs causaux peut être adéquatement décrit en référence à des catégories conceptuelles bien définies, comment pouvons-nous expliquer qu’il y ait une variation dans leur usage réel? Nous mettons l'accent sur les relations de cohérence causale volitionnelle, qui constituent le contexte d'usage prototypique du connecteur néerlandais daarom ‘c'est pourquoi’. Un autre moyen d’expression des relations causales volitionnelles est le recours au connecteur dus ‘alors/donc’ qui est prototypiquement utilisé dans les relations de causalité épistémique. Notre hypothèse est que les relations de causalité volitionnelle exprimées par daarom vs dus diffèrent systématiquement en termes de subjectivité. Nous proposons un modèle d'analyse qui contient de multiples opérationnalisation de la notion de subjectivité et une distinction entre différents niveaux de complexité (sous-clause, clause, et discours. Nous constatons que les relations causales volitionnelles en dus contiennent plus souvent des éléments subjectifs que les relations causales volitionnelles en daarom. Nous interprétons cette distribution au sein d'un cadre théorique fondé sur l'usage (usage-based framework, et nous proposons d'analyser les cas volitionnels de dus comme des instanciations non-prototypiques du sens de dus,qui est donc intrinsèquement subjectif et prototypiquement épistémique.Under a linguistic categorization hypothesis causal connectives are taken as categorization devices. Indeed, corpus studies suggest that

  16. Realistic environmental mixtures of micropollutants in surface, drinking, and recycled water: herbicides dominate the mixture toxicity toward algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Janet Y M; Escher, Beate I

    2014-06-01

    Mixture toxicity studies with herbicides have focused on a few priority components that are most likely to cause environmental impacts, and experimental mixtures were often designed as equipotent mixtures; however, real-world mixtures are made up of chemicals with different modes of toxic action at arbitrary concentration ratios. The toxicological significance of environmentally realistic mixtures has only been scarcely studied. Few studies have simultaneously compared the mixture effect of water samples with designed reference mixtures comprised of the ratios of analytically detected concentrations in toxicity tests. In the present study, the authors address the effect of herbicides and other chemicals on inhibition of photosynthesis and algal growth rate. The authors tested water samples including secondary treated wastewater effluent, recycled water, drinking water, and storm water in the combined algae assay. The detected chemicals were mixed in the concentration ratios detected, and the biological effects of the water samples were compared with the designed mixtures of individual detected chemicals to quantify the fraction of effect caused by unknown chemicals. The results showed that herbicides dominated the algal toxicity in these environmentally realistic mixtures, and the contribution by the non-herbicides was negligible. A 2-stage model, which used concentration addition within the groups of herbicides and non-herbicides followed by the model of independent action to predict the mixture effect of the two groups, could predict the experimental mixture toxicity effectively, but the concentration addition model for herbicides was robust and sufficient for complex mixtures. Therefore, the authors used the bioanalytical equivalency concept to derive effect-based trigger values for algal toxicity for monitoring water quality in recycled and surface water. All water samples tested would be compliant with the proposed trigger values associated with the

  17. General solutions and causality for a Voigt medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duren, R.E.; Heestand, R.L. [Exxon Production Co., Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-01-01

    A 1-D wave equation solution for a propagating seismic pulse in a Voigt medium can be obtained by using a separation of variables to find time harmonic particular solutions and then superimposing the particular solutions. This superposition is a time convolution of the boundary condition (or incident pulse) and the medium`s impulse response. Even though causality is not introduced during the solution of the wave equation, the general solution is causal since the boundary condition is causal and the medium`s impulse response can be shown to be causal. The relationship between attenuation and phase velocity as well as their dependence on frequency arise from the form chosen for the particular solutions. The arbitrary constants associated with the particular solutions are determined by the boundary condition, and the initial condition is also dependent on the boundary condition; however, the initial condition is properly determined and does not depend on times after the initial time (thereby satisfying causality). The convolutional nature of the general solution allows it to also be expressed as a time convolution of the boundary conditions`s time derivative and the medium`s step function response. This expression can be viewed as a superposition of step function responses where the step function response is a particular solution to the wave equation obtained using an approach that is similar to one recently developed for propagating electric pulses. This new solution is obtained with the initial and boundary conditions being independently introduced during the solution of the wave equation. There is no frequency dependence in this solution, and the general solution is causal since it is a superposition of causal step function responses.

  18. UMA TEORÍA CAUSAL PARA LOS CASOS FREGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABEL WAJNERMAN PAZ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fodor ha argumentado a favor de un par de tesis que pueden caracterizarse como constituyendo un dilema: Por un lado, si adoptamos una teoría funcional para los conceptos explicamos semánticamente los casos Frege pero caemos en el holismo semántico. Por otro lado, si adoptamos una teoría causal/informacional evitamos el holismo pero no explicamos los casos Frege semánticamente. Fodor (por ej, 1994, 1998 y 2008 intenta evitar la segunda parte del dilema argumentando que los casos de Frege pueden tener una explicación sintáctica y no semántica. En este trabajo intentaré ofrecer una salida alternativa al dilema fodoriano. Propondré una explicación semántica de los casos Frege que incorpora tanto elementos de una teoría causal como de una de rol funcional. Afirmaré que el contenido cognitivo o estrecho de un concepto (el tipo de contenido aparentemente exigido por los casos Frege es el conjunto de contenidos causales/informacionales de las representaciones que figuran en su rol funcional. Considero que individuar a las representaciones en los roles por medio de sus contenidos causales permite evitar el holismo (evitando el proceso de ramsificación típicamente empleado para individuar a los roles y que identificar el contenido cognitivo con contenidos causales/informacionales de las representaciones en los roles permite evitar el referencialismo de las propuestas causales (podemos distinguir sentido de referencia en términos causales.

  19. Toxicological evaluation of chemical mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feron, V J; Groten, J P

    2002-06-01

    This paper addresses major developments in the safety evaluation of chemical mixtures during the past 15 years, reviews today's state of the art of mixture toxicology, and discusses challenges ahead. Well-thought-out tailor-made mechanistic and empirical designs for studying the toxicity of mixtures have gradually substituted trial-and-error approaches, improving the insight into the testability of joint action and interaction of constituents of mixtures. The acquired knowledge has successfully been used to evaluate the safety of combined exposures and complex mixtures such as, for example, the atmosphere at hazardous waste sites, drinking water disinfection by-products, natural flavouring complexes, and the combined intake of food additives. To consolidate the scientific foundation of mixture toxicology, studies are in progress to revisit the biological concepts and mathematics underlying formulas for low-dose extrapolation and risk assessment of chemical mixtures. Conspicuous developments include the production of new computer programs applicable to mixture research (CombiTool, BioMol, Reaction Network Modelling), the application of functional genomics and proteomics to mixture studies, the use of nano-optochemical sensors for in vivo imaging of physiological processes in cells, and the application of optical sensor micro- and nano-arrays for complex sample analysis. Clearly, the input of theoretical biologists, biomathematicians and bioengineers in mixture toxicology is essential for the development of this challenging branch of toxicology into a scientific subdiscipline of full value. PMID:11983277

  20. Opening the Black Box and Searching for Smoking Guns: Process Causality in Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Elisabeth E.; McWhorter, Rochell R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of qualitative research in causality, with particular emphasis on process causality. In one paper, it is not possible to discuss all the issues of causality, but the aim is to provide useful ways of thinking about causality and qualitative research. Specifically, a brief overview of the…