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Sample records for caulobacter crescentus s-layer

  1. Enhanced neutralization of HIV by antibodies displayed on the S-layer of Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Mark; Lewis, Christopher J; Nomellini, John F; Horwitz, Marc S; Smit, John; Cavacini, Lisa A

    2011-12-01

    Innovative methods of prevention are needed to stop the more than two million new HIV-1 infections annually, particularly in women. Local application of anti-HIV antibodies has been shown to be effective at preventing infection in nonhuman primates; however, the concentrations needed are cost prohibitive. Display of antibodies on a particulate platform will likely prolong effectiveness of these anti-HIV agents and lower the cost of goods. Here, we demonstrate that the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus and its highly expressed surface-layer (S-layer) protein can provide this antibody display platform. Caulobacters displaying protein G, alone or with CD4 codisplay, successfully captured HIV-1-specific antibodies and demonstrated functional neutralization. Compared to soluble antibodies, a neutralizing anti-HIV antibody displayed on Caulobacter was as effective or more effective at neutralizing diverse HIV-1 isolates. Moreover, when an antibody reactive with an epitope induced by CD4 binding (CD4i) was codisplayed with CD4, there was significant enhancement in HIV-1 neutralization. These results suggest that caulobacters displaying anti-HIV antibodies offer a distinct improvement in the use of antibodies as microbicides. Furthermore, these reagents can specifically evaluate anti-HIV antibodies in concert with other HIV-1 blocking agents to assess the most suitable tools for conversion to scFvs, allowing for direct display within the S-layer protein and further reducing cost of goods. In summary, C. crescentus, which can be easily produced and chemically stabilized at low cost, is well suited for engineering as an effective platform, offering an inexpensive way to produce and deliver HIV-1-specific microbicides.

  2. Two outer membrane proteins contribute to cellular fitness in Caulobacter crescentus by preventing intracellular S-layer protein accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, K Wesley; Park, Dan M; Yung, Mimi C; Dohnalkova, Alice C; Smit, John; Jiao, Yongqin

    2016-09-23

    Surface layers, or S-layers, are two-dimensional protein arrays that form the outermost layer of many bacteria and archaea. They serve several functions including physical protection of the cell from environmental threats. The high abundance of S-layer proteins necessitates a highly efficient export mechanism to transport S-layer protein from the cytoplasm to the cell exterior. Caulobacter crescentus is unique in that it has two homologous, seemingly redundant outer membrane proteins, RsaFa and RsaFb, that, together with other components, form a type I protein translocation pathway for S-layer export. These proteins have homology to E. coli TolC, the outer membrane channel of multidrug efflux pumps. Here we provide evidence that, unlike TolC, RsaFa and RsaFb are not involved in either the maintenance of membrane stability or the active export of antimicrobial compounds. Rather, RsaFa and RsaFb are required to prevent intracellular accumulation and aggregation of the S-layer protein RsaA; deletion of RsaFa and RsaFb led to a general growth defect and lowered cellular fitness. Using Western blotting, transmission electron microscopy, and RNA-seq, we show that loss of both RsaFa and RsaFb led to accumulation of insoluble RsaA in the cytoplasm, which in turn caused upregulation of a number of genes involved in protein mis-folding and degradation pathways. These findings provide new insight into the requirement for RsaFa and RsaFb in cellular fitness and tolerance to antimicrobial agents and further our understanding of the S-layer export mechanism on both the transcriptional and translational levels in C. crescentus IMPORTANCE: Decreased growth rate and reduced cell fitness are common side effects of protein production in overexpression systems. Inclusion bodies typically form inside the cell largely due to lack of sufficient export machinery to transport the overexpressed proteins to the extracellular environment. This phenomenon can conceivably also occur in natural

  3. Factors controlling in vitro recrystallization of the Caulobacter crescentus paracrystalline S-layer.

    OpenAIRE

    Nomellini, J F; Kupcu, S; Sleytr, U B; Smit, J.

    1997-01-01

    The S-layer of Caulobacter is a two-dimensional paracrystalline array on the cell surface composed of a single protein, RsaA. We have established conditions for preparation of stable, soluble protein and then efficient in vitro recrystallization of the purified protein. Efficient recrystallization and long range order could not be obtained with pure protein only, though it was apparent that calcium was required for crystallization. Recrystallization was obtained when lipid vesicles were provi...

  4. Factors controlling in vitro recrystallization of the Caulobacter crescentus paracrystalline S-layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomellini, J F; Kupcu, S; Sleytr, U B; Smit, J

    1997-10-01

    The S-layer of Caulobacter is a two-dimensional paracrystalline array on the cell surface composed of a single protein, RsaA. We have established conditions for preparation of stable, soluble protein and then efficient in vitro recrystallization of the purified protein. Efficient recrystallization and long range order could not be obtained with pure protein only, though it was apparent that calcium was required for crystallization. Recrystallization was obtained when lipid vesicles were provided, but only when the vesicles contained the specific species of Caulobacter smooth lipopolysaccharide (SLPS) that previous studies implicated as a requirement for attaching the S-layer to the cell surface. The specific type of phospholipids did not appear critical; phospholipids rather different from those present in Caulobacter membranes or archaebacterial tetraether lipids worked equally well. The source of LPS was critical; rough and smooth variants of Salmonella typhimurium LPS as well as the rough form of Caulobacter LPS were ineffective. The requirement for calcium ions for recrystallization was further evaluated; strontium ions could substitute for calcium, and to a lesser extent, cobalt, barium, manganese and magnesium ions also stimulated crystallization. On the other hand, nickel and cadmium provided only weak crystallization stimulation, and zinc, copper, iron, aluminum ions, and the monovalent potassium, sodium, and lithium ions were ineffective. The recrystallization could also be reproduced with Langmuir-Blodgett lipid monolayers at an air-water interface. As with the vesicle experiments, this was only successful when SLPS was incorporated into the lipid mix. The best method for RsaA preparation, leading to apparently monomeric protein that was stable for many months, was an extraction with a low pH aqueous solution. We also achieved recrystallization, albeit at lower efficiency, using RsaA protein solubilized by 8 M urea, a method which allows retrieval of

  5. Two Outer Membrane Proteins Contribute to Caulobacter crescentus Cellular Fitness by Preventing Intracellular S-Layer Protein Accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overton, K. Wesley; Park, Dan M.; Yung, Mimi C.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Smit, John; Jiao, Yongqin; Parales, R. E.

    2016-09-23

    ABSTRACT

    Surface layers, or S-layers, are two-dimensional protein arrays that form the outermost layer of many bacteria and archaea. They serve several functions, including physical protection of the cell from environmental threats. The high abundance of S-layer proteins necessitates a highly efficient export mechanism to transport the S-layer protein from the cytoplasm to the cell exterior.Caulobacter crescentusis unique in that it has two homologous, seemingly redundant outer membrane proteins, RsaFaand RsaFb, which together with other components form a type I protein translocation pathway for S-layer export. These proteins have homology toEscherichia coliTolC, the outer membrane channel of multidrug efflux pumps. Here we provide evidence that, unlike TolC, RsaFaand RsaFbare not involved in either the maintenance of membrane stability or the active export of antimicrobial compounds. Rather, RsaFaand RsaFbare required to prevent intracellular accumulation and aggregation of the S-layer protein RsaA; deletion of RsaFaand RsaFbled to a general growth defect and lowered cellular fitness. Using Western blotting, transmission electron microscopy, and transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq), we show that loss of both RsaFaand RsaFbled to accumulation of insoluble RsaA in the cytoplasm, which in turn caused upregulation of a number of genes involved in protein misfolding and degradation pathways. These findings provide new insight into the requirement for RsaFaand RsaFbin cellular fitness and tolerance to antimicrobial agents and further our understanding of the S-layer export mechanism on both the transcriptional and translational levels in

  6. Evaluating secretion and surface attachment of SapA, an S-layer-associated metalloprotease of Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandham, Lyngrace; Nomellini, John F; Smit, John

    2012-10-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is used to display foreign peptides at high density as insertions into the surface (S)-layer protein (RsaA). Many recombinant RsaA proteins, however, are cleaved by SapA, a 71-kDa metalloprotease, suggesting a role in maintaining S-layer integrity. When overexpressed on a multicopy plasmid SapA was detected on the surface by fluorescent antibody only if RsaA and the O-side chain of LPS that mediates S-layer attachment were removed by mutation, indicating an outer membrane location beneath the S-layer. Secretion was mediated by the RsaA type 1 transporter since secretion was eliminated in transporter deficient strains or by C-terminal deletions in SapA (the presumed location of type 1 secretion signals). Secretion was required to become an active protease; mass spectrometry suggested this might be due to N-terminal processing during secretion, a feature shared with other type 1-secreted proteases. Overexpression leads to additional processing C-terminal to the protease domain, producing a 45-kDa protein. This was demonstrated to be self-processing. Deletion analysis revealed the C-terminal 100 amino acids were sufficient for anchoring and secretion. When protein G was fused to the last 238 amino acids of SapA it was secreted, surface attached and bound immunoglobulin, indicating potential for foreign protein display.

  7. Immobilization of bacterial S-layer proteins from Caulobacter crescentus on iron oxide-based nanocomposite: synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of zincite-coated Fe₂O₃ nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Neda

    2014-05-05

    Zinc oxide was coated on Fe2O3 nanoparticles using sol-gel spin-coating. Caulobacter crescentus have a crystalline surface layer (S-layer), which consist of one protein or glycoprotein species. The immobilization of bacterial S-layers obtained from C. crescentus on zincite-coated nanoparticles of iron oxide was investigated. The SDS PAGE results of S-layers isolated from C. crescentus showed the weight of 50 KDa. Nanoparticles of the Fe2O3 and zinc oxide were synthesized by a sol-gel technique. Fe2O3 nanoparticles with an average size of 50 nm were successfully prepared by the proper deposition of zinc oxide onto iron oxide nanoparticles surface annealed at 450 °C. The samples were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR).

  8. Immobilization of bacterial S-layer proteins from Caulobacter crescentus on iron oxide-based nanocomposite: Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of zincite-coated Fe2O3 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Neda

    Zinc oxide was coated on Fe2O3 nanoparticles using sol-gel spin-coating. Caulobacter crescentus have a crystalline surface layer (S-layer), which consist of one protein or glycoprotein species. The immobilization of bacterial S-layers obtained from C. crescentus on zincite-coated nanoparticles of iron oxide was investigated. The SDS PAGE results of S-layers isolated from C. crescentus showed the weight of 50 KDa. Nanoparticles of the Fe2O3 and zinc oxide were synthesized by a sol-gel technique. Fe2O3 nanoparticles with an average size of 50 nm were successfully prepared by the proper deposition of zinc oxide onto iron oxide nanoparticles surface annealed at 450 °C. The samples were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR).

  9. Uranium Biomineralization by Caulobacter crescentus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Y.; Yung, M.; Park, D.

    2014-12-01

    It is well known that microorganisms are able to mediate removal of U(VI) from solution through reduction to insoluble U(IV) oxides under anaerobic conditions, but microbial transformation of U(VI) under aerobic conditions are less well understood. Here, we describe two processes of U(VI) transformation by the aerobic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, known for its ubiquitous presence in aquatic systems and high U(VI) tolerance. U(VI) causes a temporary growth arrest in Caulobacter and growth recovery is not due to a decrease in U solubility, a common detoxification strategy employed by other microorganisms. Through functional reporter assays, we discovered that Caulobacter is able to reduce U(VI) bioavailability through a metabolism-dependent increase of medium pH, representing a novel U detoxification strategy. Upon recovery from growth arrest, Caulobacter proliferates with normal growth kinetics, accompanied by active U(VI) biomineralization. We found that phosphate metabolism is actively involved in the formation of U-P precipitates that are similar to autunite-group minerals. Comparisons of growth and U(VI) precipitation by wild type versus a phosphatase mutant indicates that extra-cytoplasmic phosphatase activity is not only responsible for the formation of cell-surface-bound U-P precipitates, but also plays an important role in cell survival under U stress. Our results highlight the importance of aerobic bacterial metabolism for U biogeochemistry.

  10. Core-oscillator model of Caulobacter crescentus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandecan, Yves; Biondi, Emanuele; Blossey, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is a powerful model organism for studies of bacterial cell cycle regulation. Although the major regulators and their connections in Caulobacter have been identified, it still is a challenge to properly understand the dynamics of its circuitry which accounts for both cell cycle progression and arrest. We show that the key decision module in Caulobacter is built from a limit cycle oscillator which controls the DNA replication program. The effect of an induced cell cycle arrest is demonstrated to be a key feature to classify the underlying dynamics.

  11. Development of an HIV-1 specific microbicide using Caulobacter crescentus S-layer mediated display of CD4 and MIP1alpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Nomellini

    Full Text Available The development of alternative strategies to prevent HIV infection is a global public health priority. Initial efforts in anti-HIV microbicide development have met with poor success as the strategies have relied on a non-specific mechanism of action. Here, we report the development of a microbicide aimed at specifically blocking HIV entry by displaying molecular components of the HIV/host cell attachment complex on the surface of Caulobacter crescentus, a harmless aquatic bacterium. This bacterium can be readily manipulated to present heterologous proteins at high density on its surface by genetic insertion into its crystalline surface layer protein. In separate constructions, we generated bacteria displaying domain 1 of CD4 and MIP1alpha. Each moiety reacted with specific antibodies by Western immunoblot and immuno-fluorescence microscopy. Microbicide functionality was assessed using an HIV pseudotype virus assay system representing Clade B subtypes. Bacteria displaying MIP1alpha reduced infectivity by 35-78% depending on the specific subtype while CD4 display reduced infection by as much as 56%. Combinations of both constructs reduced infectivity by nearly 98%. We demonstrated that HIV infection could be inhibited using a strategy aimed at HIV-specific molecular interactions with Caulobacter surface protein display, and that sufficient protein folding and conformation could be mimicked to bind and block entry. Further, this is the first demonstration that Caulobacter surface protein display may be a useful approach to preventing HIV infection or other viruses as a microbicide. We propose that this harmless bacterium, which is inexpensive to produce and formulate, might be suitable for topical applications as a viable alternative in the search for effective microbicides to counteract the world wide incidence of HIV infection.

  12. Metabolism of aromatic compounds by Caulobacter crescentus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, D.K.; Bourquin, A.W.

    1987-05-01

    Cultures of Caulobacter crescentus were found to grow on a variety of aromatic compounds. Degradation of benzoate, p-hydroxybenzoate, and phenol was found to occur via ..beta..-ketoadipate. The induction of degradative enzymes such as benzoate 1,2-dioxygenase, the ring cleavage enzyme catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, and cis,cis-muconate lactonizing enzyme appeared similar to the control mechanism present in Pseudomonas spp. Both benzoate 1,2-dioxygenase and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase had stringent specificities, as revealed by their action toward substituted benzoates and substituted catechols, respectively.

  13. Regulation of chromosomal replication in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Justine

    2012-03-01

    The alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus is characterized by its asymmetric cell division, which gives rise to a replicating stalked cell and a non-replicating swarmer cell. Thus, the initiation of chromosomal replication is tightly regulated, temporally and spatially, to ensure that it is coordinated with cell differentiation and cell cycle progression. Waves of DnaA and CtrA activities control when and where the initiation of DNA replication will take place in C. crescentus cells. The conserved DnaA protein initiates chromosomal replication by directly binding to sites within the chromosomal origin (Cori), ensuring that DNA replication starts once and only once per cell cycle. The CtrA response regulator represses the initiation of DNA replication in swarmer cells and in the swarmer compartment of pre-divisional cells, probably by competing with DnaA for binding to Cori. CtrA and DnaA are controlled by multiple redundant regulatory pathways that include DNA methylation-dependent transcriptional regulation, temporally regulated proteolysis and the targeting of regulators to specific locations within the cell. Besides being critical regulators of chromosomal replication, CtrA and DnaA are also master transcriptional regulators that control the expression of many genes, thus connecting DNA replication with other events of the C. crescentus cell cycle.

  14. Screen for localized proteins in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay H Russell

    Full Text Available Precise localization of individual proteins is required for processes such as motility, chemotaxis, cell-cycle progression, and cell division in bacteria, but the number of proteins that are localized in bacterial species is not known. A screen based on transposon mutagenesis and fluorescence activated cell sorting was devised to identify large numbers of localized proteins, and employed in Caulobacter crescentus. From a sample of the clones isolated in the screen, eleven proteins with no previously characterized localization in C. crescentus were identified, including six hypothetical proteins. The localized hypothetical proteins included one protein that was localized in a helix-like structure, and two proteins for which the localization changed as a function of the cell cycle, suggesting that complex three-dimensional patterns and cell cycle-dependent localization are likely to be common in bacteria. Other mutants produced localized fusion proteins even though the transposon has inserted near the 5' end of a gene, demonstrating that short peptides can contain sufficient information to localize bacterial proteins. The screen described here could be used in most bacterial species.

  15. A transducing bacteriophage for Caulobacter crescentus uses the paracrystalline surface layer protein as a receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    P. Edwards; Smit, J

    1991-01-01

    The bacteriophage phi Cr30, a transducing phage for Caulobacter crescentus strains, required the paracrystalline surface (S) layer for infectivity. Wild-type strains were phage resistant when rsaA, the gene for the 130K S-layer protein, was interrupted with an antibiotic resistance cassette. Strains that had lost the S layer by mutation were phage resistant, as were mutants that produce an S layer but which do not attach the structure to the cell surface. Phage sensitivity was restored to 130...

  16. Getting in the loop: regulation of development in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Patrick D; Brun, Yves V

    2010-03-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is an aquatic Gram-negative alphaproteobacterium that undergoes multiple changes in cell shape, organelle production, subcellular distribution of proteins, and intracellular signaling throughout its life cycle. Over 40 years of research has been dedicated to this organism and its developmental life cycles. Here we review a portion of many developmental processes, with particular emphasis on how multiple processes are integrated and coordinated both spatially and temporally. While much has been discovered about Caulobacter crescentus development, areas of potential future research are also highlighted.

  17. Computational Model of the Division Cycle of Caulobacter crescentus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazhnik, Paul; Li, Shenghua; Sobral, Bruno; Tyson, John J.

    2007-11-01

    Based on published experimental evidence, we propose a molecular mechanism and a quantitative computational model for cell cycle control in Caulobacter crescentus. Our model predicts the detailed temporal dynamics of regulatory gene expression during the cell cycle and differentiation process of wild-type cells as well as several mutant strains. Since many of the proteins involved in regulating the cell cycle of C.crescentus are conserved among other genera of α-proteobacteria, the proposed mechanism may be applicable to these species.

  18. The genetic basis of laboratory adaptation in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Melissa E; Castro-Rojas, Cyd Marie; Teiling, Clotilde; Du, Lei; Kapatral, Vinayak; Walunas, Theresa L; Crosson, Sean

    2010-07-01

    The dimorphic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus has evolved marked phenotypic changes during its 50-year history of culture in the laboratory environment, providing an excellent system for the study of natural selection and phenotypic microevolution in prokaryotes. Combining whole-genome sequencing with classical molecular genetic tools, we have comprehensively mapped a set of polymorphisms underlying multiple derived phenotypes, several of which arose independently in separate strain lineages. The genetic basis of phenotypic differences in growth rate, mucoidy, adhesion, sedimentation, phage susceptibility, and stationary-phase survival between C. crescentus strain CB15 and its derivative NA1000 is determined by coding, regulatory, and insertion/deletion polymorphisms at five chromosomal loci. This study evidences multiple genetic mechanisms of bacterial evolution as driven by selection for growth and survival in a new selective environment and identifies a common polymorphic locus, zwf, between lab-adapted C. crescentus and clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that have adapted to a human host during chronic infection.

  19. Extracellular gluco-oligosaccharide degradation by Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, Gerald N; Payea, Matthew J; Hurst, Logan R; Egan, Annie E; Martin, Brandon S; Periyannan, Gopal R

    2014-03-01

    The oligotrophic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus has the ability to metabolize various organic molecules, including plant structural carbohydrates, as a carbon source. The nature of β-glucosidase (BGL)-mediated gluco-oligosaccharide degradation and nutrient transport across the outer membrane in C. crescentus was investigated. All gluco-oligosaccharides tested (up to celloheptose) supported growth in M2 minimal media but not cellulose or CM-cellulose. The periplasmic and outer membrane fractions showed highest BGL activity, but no significant BGL activity was observed in the cytosol or extracellular medium. Cells grown in cellobiose showed expression of specific BGLs and TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs). Carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone lowered the rate of cell growth in cellobiose but not in glucose, indicating potential cellobiose transport into the cell by a proton motive force-dependent process, such as TBDR-dependent transport, and facilitated diffusion of glucose across the outer membrane via specific porins. These results suggest that C. crescentus acquires carbon from cellulose-derived gluco-oligosaccharides found in the environment by extracellular and periplasmic BGL activity and TBDR-mediated transport. This report on extracellular degradation of gluco-oligosaccharides and methods of nutrient acquisition by C. crescentus supports a broader suite of carbohydrate metabolic capabilities suggested by the C. crescentus genome sequence that until now have not been reported.

  20. The core and O-polysaccharide structure of the Caulobacter crescentus lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael D; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Nomellini, John F; Smit, John

    2015-01-30

    Here we describe the analysis of the structure of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Caulobacter crescentus strain JS1025, a derivative of C. crescentus CB15 NA1000 with an engineered amber mutation in rsaA, leading to the loss of the protein S-layer and gene CCNA_00471 encoding a putative GDP-L-fucose synthase. LPS was isolated using an aqueous membrane disruption method. Polysaccharide and core oligosaccharide were produced by mild acid hydrolysis and analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and chemical methods. Spectra revealed the presence of two polysaccharides, one of them, a rhamnan, could be removed using periodate oxidation. Another polymer, built from 4-amino-4-deoxy-D-rhamnose (perosamine), mannose, and 3-O-methyl-glucose, should be the O-chain of the LPS according to genetic data. The attribution of the rhamnan as a part of LPS or a separate polymer was not possible.

  1. Caulobacter crescentus exploits its helical cell body to swim efficiently

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Mendoza, Marcos; Valenzuela, Joanna

    2015-11-01

    How an organism gets its shape remains an open question of fundamental science. In this study, we measure the 3D shape of a bacterium, Caulobacter crescentus, using a computational graphic technique for free-swimming microorganisms to analyze thousands of image frames of the same individual bacterium. Rather than having a crescent shape, the cell body of the organism is found to be twisted with a helical pitch angle around 45 degrees. Moreover, the detailed size and geometry of the cell body, matches the optimized cell body obtained by the slender body theory for swimming at fixed power. This result sheds new light on the shape evolution of microorganisms, and suggests that C. crescentus has adapted to its natural habitat of fresh-water lakes and streams, lacking nutrients.

  2. The coding and noncoding architecture of the Caulobacter crescentus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Jared M; Zhou, Bo; Li, Gene-Wei; Lasker, Keren; Childers, W Seth; Williams, Brandon; Long, Tao; Crosson, Sean; McAdams, Harley H; Weissman, Jonathan S; Shapiro, Lucy

    2014-07-01

    Caulobacter crescentus undergoes an asymmetric cell division controlled by a genetic circuit that cycles in space and time. We provide a universal strategy for defining the coding potential of bacterial genomes by applying ribosome profiling, RNA-seq, global 5'-RACE, and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS) data to the 4-megabase C. crescentus genome. We mapped transcript units at single base-pair resolution using RNA-seq together with global 5'-RACE. Additionally, using ribosome profiling and LC-MS, we mapped translation start sites and coding regions with near complete coverage. We found most start codons lacked corresponding Shine-Dalgarno sites although ribosomes were observed to pause at internal Shine-Dalgarno sites within the coding DNA sequence (CDS). These data suggest a more prevalent use of the Shine-Dalgarno sequence for ribosome pausing rather than translation initiation in C. crescentus. Overall 19% of the transcribed and translated genomic elements were newly identified or significantly improved by this approach, providing a valuable genomic resource to elucidate the complete C. crescentus genetic circuitry that controls asymmetric cell division.

  3. The coding and noncoding architecture of the Caulobacter crescentus genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared M Schrader

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Caulobacter crescentus undergoes an asymmetric cell division controlled by a genetic circuit that cycles in space and time. We provide a universal strategy for defining the coding potential of bacterial genomes by applying ribosome profiling, RNA-seq, global 5'-RACE, and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS data to the 4-megabase C. crescentus genome. We mapped transcript units at single base-pair resolution using RNA-seq together with global 5'-RACE. Additionally, using ribosome profiling and LC-MS, we mapped translation start sites and coding regions with near complete coverage. We found most start codons lacked corresponding Shine-Dalgarno sites although ribosomes were observed to pause at internal Shine-Dalgarno sites within the coding DNA sequence (CDS. These data suggest a more prevalent use of the Shine-Dalgarno sequence for ribosome pausing rather than translation initiation in C. crescentus. Overall 19% of the transcribed and translated genomic elements were newly identified or significantly improved by this approach, providing a valuable genomic resource to elucidate the complete C. crescentus genetic circuitry that controls asymmetric cell division.

  4. CauloBrowser: A systems biology resource for Caulobacter crescentus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasker, Keren; Schrader, Jared M.; Men, Yifei; Marshik, Tyler; Dill, David L.; McAdams, Harley H.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is a premier model organism for studying the molecular basis of cellular asymmetry. The Caulobacter community has generated a wealth of high-throughput spatiotemporal databases including data from gene expression profiling experiments (microarrays, RNA-seq, ChIP-seq, ribosome profiling, LC-ms proteomics), gene essentiality studies (Tn-seq), genome wide protein localization studies, and global chromosome methylation analyses (SMRT sequencing). A major challenge involves the integration of these diverse data sets into one comprehensive community resource. To address this need, we have generated CauloBrowser (www.caulobrowser.org), an online resource for Caulobacter studies. This site provides a user-friendly interface for quickly searching genes of interest and downloading genome-wide results. Search results about individual genes are displayed as tables, graphs of time resolved expression profiles, and schematics of protein localization throughout the cell cycle. In addition, the site provides a genome viewer that enables customizable visualization of all published high-throughput genomic data. The depth and diversity of data sets collected by the Caulobacter community makes CauloBrowser a unique and valuable systems biology resource. PMID:26476443

  5. CauloBrowser: A systems biology resource for Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasker, Keren; Schrader, Jared M; Men, Yifei; Marshik, Tyler; Dill, David L; McAdams, Harley H; Shapiro, Lucy

    2016-01-04

    Caulobacter crescentus is a premier model organism for studying the molecular basis of cellular asymmetry. The Caulobacter community has generated a wealth of high-throughput spatiotemporal databases including data from gene expression profiling experiments (microarrays, RNA-seq, ChIP-seq, ribosome profiling, LC-ms proteomics), gene essentiality studies (Tn-seq), genome wide protein localization studies, and global chromosome methylation analyses (SMRT sequencing). A major challenge involves the integration of these diverse data sets into one comprehensive community resource. To address this need, we have generated CauloBrowser (www.caulobrowser.org), an online resource for Caulobacter studies. This site provides a user-friendly interface for quickly searching genes of interest and downloading genome-wide results. Search results about individual genes are displayed as tables, graphs of time resolved expression profiles, and schematics of protein localization throughout the cell cycle. In addition, the site provides a genome viewer that enables customizable visualization of all published high-throughput genomic data. The depth and diversity of data sets collected by the Caulobacter community makes CauloBrowser a unique and valuable systems biology resource.

  6. Analysis of the terminus region of the Caulobacter crescentus chromosome and identification of the dif site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Bugge

    2006-01-01

    The terminus region of the Caulobacter crescentus chromosome and the dif chromosome dimer resolution site were characterized. The Caulobacter genome contains skewed sequences that abruptly switch strands at dif and may have roles in chromosome maintenance and segregation. Absence of dif or the Xer...

  7. Physiochemical properties of Caulobacter crescentus holdfast: a localized bacterial adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berne, Cécile; Ma, Xiang; Licata, Nicholas A; Neves, Bernardo R A; Setayeshgar, Sima; Brun, Yves V; Dragnea, Bogdan

    2013-09-12

    To colonize surfaces, the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus employs a polar polysaccharide, the holdfast, located at the end of a thin, long stalk protruding from the cell body. Unlike many other bacteria which adhere through an extended extracellular polymeric network, the holdfast footprint area is tens of thousands times smaller than that of the total bacterium cross-sectional surface, making for some very demanding adhesion requirements. At present, the mechanism of holdfast adhesion remains poorly understood. We explore it here along three lines of investigation: (a) the impact of environmental conditions on holdfast binding affinity, (b) adhesion kinetics by dynamic force spectroscopy, and (c) kinetic modeling of the attachment process to interpret the observed time-dependence of the adhesion force at short and long time scales. A picture emerged in which discrete molecular units called adhesins are responsible for initial holdfast adhesion, by acting in a cooperative manner.

  8. Bacteria rolling: motilities of rosette colonies in Caulobacter crescentus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yu; Liu, Bin

    2016-11-01

    The aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus has two life cycle stages with distinct motilities: freely swimming swarmer cells and immotile stalked cells. Here, we show a new type of movement performed by freely suspended rosettes, spontaneous aggregates of stalked cells aligned radially relative to each other. Reproductive rosette members generate predivisional daughter cells with flagella, inducing rotations of the rosette as a whole. Such rotations exhibit dynamic angular velocities and lead to intermittent linear movements along liquid-solid interfaces, resembling rolling movements. We reconstructed the translational and rotational dynamics of the rosette movements from high-speed filming and long-term tracking. A mechanical model was developed to explain the hydrodynamic mechanism underlying such motilities. Our study illustrated a nontrivial mechanism for clustered bacteria to achieve motilities and sheds light on the adaptive significance of the collective behaviors of microorganisms in complex fluid environments.

  9. Ultraviolet mutagenesis and inducible DNA repair in Caulobacter crescentus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, R.A.

    1984-11-19

    The ability to reactivate ultraviolet (UV) damaged phage phiCbK (W-reactivation) is induced by UV irradiation of Caulobacter crescentus cells. Induction of W-reactivation potential is specific for phage phiCbK, requires protein synthesis, and is greatly reduced in the presence of the rec-526 mutation. The induction signal generated by UV irradiation is transient, lasting about 1 1/2 - 2 h at 30/sup 0/C; if chloramphenicol is present during early times after UV irradiation, induction of W-reactivation does not occur. Induction is maximal when cells are exposed to 5-10 J/m/sup 2/ of UV, a dose that also results in considerable mutagenesis of the cells. Taken together, these observations demonstrate the existence of a UV inducible, protein synthesis requiring, transiently signalled, rec-requiring DNA repair system analogous to W-reactivation in Escherichia coli. In addition, C. crescentus also has an efficient photoreactivation system that reverses UV damage in the presence of strong visible light.

  10. Intergenerational continuity of cell shape dynamics in Caulobacter crescentus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Charles S.; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the intergenerational shape dynamics of single Caulobacter crescentus cells using a novel combination of imaging techniques and theoretical modeling. We determine the dynamics of cell pole-to-pole lengths, cross-sectional widths, and medial curvatures from high accuracy measurements of cell contours. Moreover, these shape parameters are determined for over 250 cells across approximately 10000 total generations, which affords high statistical precision. Our data and model show that constriction is initiated early in the cell cycle and that its dynamics are controlled by the time scale of exponential longitudinal growth. Based on our extensive and detailed growth and contour data, we develop a minimal mechanical model that quantitatively accounts for the cell shape dynamics and suggests that the asymmetric location of the division plane reflects the distinct mechanical properties of the stalked and swarmer poles. Furthermore, we find that the asymmetry in the division plane location is inherited from the previous generation. We interpret these results in terms of the current molecular understanding of shape, growth, and division of C. crescentus.

  11. Correction of the Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 genome annotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert Ely

    Full Text Available Bacterial genome annotations are accumulating rapidly in the GenBank database and the use of automated annotation technologies to create these annotations has become the norm. However, these automated methods commonly result in a small, but significant percentage of genome annotation errors. To improve accuracy and reliability, we analyzed the Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 genome utilizing computer programs Artemis and MICheck to manually examine the third codon position GC content, alignment to a third codon position GC frame plot peak, and matches in the GenBank database. We identified 11 new genes, modified the start site of 113 genes, and changed the reading frame of 38 genes that had been incorrectly annotated. Furthermore, our manual method of identifying protein-coding genes allowed us to remove 112 non-coding regions that had been designated as coding regions. The improved NA1000 genome annotation resulted in a reduction in the use of rare codons since noncoding regions with atypical codon usage were removed from the annotation and 49 new coding regions were added to the annotation. Thus, a more accurate codon usage table was generated as well. These results demonstrate that a comparison of the location of peaks third codon position GC content to the location of protein coding regions could be used to verify the annotation of any genome that has a GC content that is greater than 60%.

  12. Correction of the Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 genome annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Bert; Scott, LaTia Etheredge

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial genome annotations are accumulating rapidly in the GenBank database and the use of automated annotation technologies to create these annotations has become the norm. However, these automated methods commonly result in a small, but significant percentage of genome annotation errors. To improve accuracy and reliability, we analyzed the Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 genome utilizing computer programs Artemis and MICheck to manually examine the third codon position GC content, alignment to a third codon position GC frame plot peak, and matches in the GenBank database. We identified 11 new genes, modified the start site of 113 genes, and changed the reading frame of 38 genes that had been incorrectly annotated. Furthermore, our manual method of identifying protein-coding genes allowed us to remove 112 non-coding regions that had been designated as coding regions. The improved NA1000 genome annotation resulted in a reduction in the use of rare codons since noncoding regions with atypical codon usage were removed from the annotation and 49 new coding regions were added to the annotation. Thus, a more accurate codon usage table was generated as well. These results demonstrate that a comparison of the location of peaks third codon position GC content to the location of protein coding regions could be used to verify the annotation of any genome that has a GC content that is greater than 60%.

  13. Proposed Physical Mechanism of Chromosome Segregation in Caulobacter crescentus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banigan, Edward; Gelbart, Michael; Gitai, Zemer; Liu, Andrea; Wingreen, Ned

    2010-03-01

    Chromosome segregation is a fundamental process for all cells, but the force-generating mechanisms that drive chromosome movements in bacteria are especially unclear. In Caulobacter crescentus, recent work has demonstrated that a structure made up of the ParA protein elongates from one cell pole and interacts with ParB, a protein binding to the chromosome near the origin of replication (ori). ParB disassembles ParA, causing ParA to pull ParB, and thus, the ori to the opposite end of the cell. We performed Brownian dynamics simulations of this system in order to uncover the physical mechanism of this motion. We find that motion of the ori is robust to several variations of the model as long as a steady-state concentration gradient of ParA is established in the moving frame of the ParB-decorated chromosome. We suggest that the mechanism is ``self-diffusiophoretic'': by disassembling ParA, ParB creates a concentration gradient of ParA so that the ParA concentration is higher in front of the chromosome than behind it. Since the chromosome is attracted to ParA via ParB, it moves up the gradient in the desired direction.

  14. Helical motion of the cell body enhances Caulobacter crescentus motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Gulino, Marco; Morse, Michael; Tang, Jay X; Powers, Thomas R; Breuer, Kenneth S

    2014-08-01

    We resolve the 3D trajectory and the orientation of individual cells for extended times, using a digital tracking technique combined with 3D reconstructions. We have used this technique to study the motility of the uniflagellated bacterium Caulobacter crescentus and have found that each cell displays two distinct modes of motility, depending on the sense of rotation of the flagellar motor. In the forward mode, when the flagellum pushes the cell, the cell body is tilted with respect to the direction of motion, and it precesses, tracing out a helical trajectory. In the reverse mode, when the flagellum pulls the cell, the precession is smaller and the cell has a lower translation distance per rotation period and thus a lower motility. Using resistive force theory, we show how the helical motion of the cell body generates thrust and can explain the direction-dependent changes in swimming motility. The source of the cell body precession is believed to be associated with the flexibility of the hook that connects the flagellum to the cell body.

  15. Structure and function of Caulobacter crescentus aldose-aldose oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taberman, Helena; Andberg, Martina; Koivula, Anu; Hakulinen, Nina; Penttilä, Merja; Rouvinen, Juha; Parkkinen, Tarja

    2015-12-15

    Aldose-aldose oxidoreductase (Cc AAOR) is a recently characterized enzyme from the bacterial strain Caulobacter crescentus CB15 belonging to the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase/inositol dehydrogenase/rhizopine catabolism protein (Gfo/Idh/MocA) family. Cc AAOR catalyses the oxidation and reduction of a panel of aldose monosaccharides using a tightly bound NADP(H) cofactor that is regenerated in the catalytic cycle. Furthermore, Cc AAOR can also oxidize 1,4-linked oligosaccharides. In the present study, we present novel crystal structures of the dimeric Cc AAOR in complex with the cofactor and glycerol, D-xylose, D-glucose, maltotriose and D-sorbitol determined to resolutions of 2.0, 1.8, 1.7, 1.9 and 1.8 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm), respectively. These complex structures allowed for a detailed analysis of the ligand-binding interactions. The structures showed that the C1 carbon of a substrate, which is either reduced or oxidized, is close to the reactive C4 carbon of the nicotinamide ring of NADP(H). In addition, the O1 hydroxy group of the substrate, which is either protonated or deprotonated, is unexpectedly close to both Lys(104) and Tyr(189), which may both act as a proton donor or acceptor. This led us to hypothesize that this intriguing feature could be beneficial for Cc AAOR to catalyse the reduction of a linear form of a monosaccharide substrate and the oxidation of a pyranose form of the same substrate in a reaction cycle, during which the bound cofactor is regenerated.

  16. Bioremediation of soluble heavy metals with recombinant Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhaohui; Lei, Yu; Patel, Jigar

    2010-01-01

    To achieve one-step separation of heavy metal ions from contaminated water, we have developed a novel bioremediation technology based on self-immobilization of the Caulobacter crescentus recombinant strain JS4022/p723-6H, which overexpresses hexahistidine peptide on the surface of the bacterial cells and serves as a whole-cell adsorbent for dissolved heavy metals. Biofilms formed by JS4022/p723-6H are effective at retaining cadmium from bacterial growth media or environmental water samples. Here we provide additional experiment data discussing the application potential of this new technology. Supplementation of calcium to the growth media produced robust JS4022/p723-6H cells by alleviating their sensitivity to chelators. After growth in the presence of 0.3% CaCl(2)·2H(2)O, double the amount of JS4022/p723-6H cells survived the treatment with 2 mM EDTA. Free cells of JS4022/p723-6H effectively sequestered 51% of the total cadmium from a Lake Erie water sample at pH 5.4, compared to 37% retrieved by the control strain. Similar levels of adsorption were observed at pH 4.2 as well. Cells of JS4022/p723-6H were tolerant of acid treatment for 90 min at pH ≥1.1 or 120 min at pH ≥2.5, which provides an avenue for the convenient regeneration of the bacterial cells metal-binding capacity with acidic solutions. Designs of possible bioreactors and an operation system are also presented.

  17. Mutations in the Lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis pathway interfere with crescentin-mediated cell curvature in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeen, Matthew T; Murolo, Michelle A; Briegel, Ariane; Bui, N Khai; Vollmer, Waldemar; Ausmees, Nora; Jensen, Grant J; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2010-07-01

    Bacterial cell morphogenesis requires coordination among multiple cellular systems, including the bacterial cytoskeleton and the cell wall. In the vibrioid bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, the intermediate filament-like protein crescentin forms a cell envelope-associated cytoskeletal structure that controls cell wall growth to generate cell curvature. We undertook a genetic screen to find other cellular components important for cell curvature. Here we report that deletion of a gene (wbqL) involved in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis pathway abolishes cell curvature. Loss of WbqL function leads to the accumulation of an aberrant O-polysaccharide species and to the release of the S layer in the culture medium. Epistasis and microscopy experiments show that neither S-layer nor O-polysaccharide production is required for curved cell morphology per se but that production of the altered O-polysaccharide species abolishes cell curvature by apparently interfering with the ability of the crescentin structure to associate with the cell envelope. Our data suggest that perturbations in a cellular pathway that is itself fully dispensable for cell curvature can cause a disruption of cell morphogenesis, highlighting the delicate harmony among unrelated cellular systems. Using the wbqL mutant, we also show that the normal assembly and growth properties of the crescentin structure are independent of its association with the cell envelope. However, this envelope association is important for facilitating the local disruption of the stable crescentin structure at the division site during cytokinesis.

  18. A physical approach to segregation and folding of the Caulobacter crescentus genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dame, R.T.; Tark-Dame, M.; Schiessel, H

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial genomes are functionally organized. This organization is dynamic and globally changing throughout the cell cycle. Upon initiation of replication of the chromosome, the two origins segregate and move towards their new location taking along the newly replicated genome. Caulobacter crescentus

  19. Multiple large filament bundles observed in Caulobacter crescentus by electron cryotomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Briegel, A; Dias, DP; Li, Z;

    2006-01-01

    , molecular mechanisms have remained obscure in part for lack of electron microscopy-resolution images where these filaments can be seen acting within their cellular context. Here, electron cryotomography was used to image the widely studied model prokaryote Caulobacter crescentus in an intact, near...

  20. RK2 plasmid dynamics in Caulobacter crescentus cells--two modes of DNA replication initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzyn, Katarzyna; Witosinska, Monika; Schweiger, Pawel; Bury, Katarzyna; Jenal, Urs; Konieczny, Igor

    2013-06-01

    Undisturbed plasmid dynamics is required for the stable maintenance of plasmid DNA in bacterial cells. In this work, we analysed subcellular localization, DNA synthesis and nucleoprotein complex formation of plasmid RK2 during the cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus. Our microscopic observations showed asymmetrical distribution of plasmid RK2 foci between the two compartments of Caulobacter predivisional cells, resulting in asymmetrical allocation of plasmids to progeny cells. Moreover, using a quantitative PCR (qPCR) method, we estimated that multiple plasmid particles form a single fluorescent focus and that the number of plasmids per focus is approximately equal in both swarmer and predivisional Caulobacter cells. Analysis of the dynamics of TrfA-oriV complex formation during the Caulobacter cell cycle revealed that TrfA binds oriV primarily during the G1 phase, however, plasmid DNA synthesis occurs during the S and G2 phases of the Caulobacter cell cycle. Both in vitro and in vivo analysis of RK2 replication initiation in C. crescentus cells demonstrated that it is independent of the Caulobacter DnaA protein in the presence of the longer version of TrfA protein, TrfA-44. However, in vivo stability tests of plasmid RK2 derivatives suggested that a DnaA-dependent mode of plasmid replication initiation is also possible.

  1. The curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus enhances surface colonization in flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persat, Alexandre; Stone, Howard A.; Gitai, Zemer

    2014-05-01

    Each bacterial species has a characteristic shape, but the benefits of specific morphologies remain largely unknown. To understand potential functions for cell shape, we focused on the curved bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. Paradoxically, C. crescentus curvature is robustly maintained in the wild but straight mutants have no known disadvantage in standard laboratory conditions. Here we demonstrate that cell curvature enhances C. crescentus surface colonization in flow. Imaging the formation of microcolonies at high spatial and temporal resolution indicates that flow causes curved cells to orient such that they arc over the surface, thereby decreasing the distance between the surface and polar adhesive pili, and orienting pili to face the surface. C. crescentus thus repurposes pilus retraction, typically used for surface motility, for surface attachment. The benefit provided by curvature is eliminated at high flow intensity, raising the possibility that diversity in curvature adapts related species for life in different flow environments.

  2. Whole-genome transcriptional analysis of heavy metal stresses inCaulobacter crescentus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Ping; Brodie, Eoin L.; Suzuki, Yohey; McAdams, Harley H.; Andersen, Gary L.

    2005-09-21

    The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus and related stalkbacterial species are known for their distinctive ability to live in lownutrient environments, a characteristic of most heavy metal contaminatedsites. Caulobacter crescentus is a model organism for studying cell cycleregulation with well developed genetics. We have identified the pathwaysresponding to heavy metal toxicity in C. crescentus to provide insightsfor possible application of Caulobacter to environmental restoration. Weexposed C. crescentus cells to four heavy metals (chromium, cadmium,selenium and uranium) and analyzed genome wide transcriptional activitiespost exposure using a Affymetrix GeneChip microarray. C. crescentusshowed surprisingly high tolerance to uranium, a possible mechanism forwhich may be formation of extracellular calcium-uranium-phosphateprecipitates. The principal response to these metals was protectionagainst oxidative stress (up-regulation of manganese-dependent superoxidedismutase, sodA). Glutathione S-transferase, thioredoxin, glutaredoxinsand DNA repair enzymes responded most strongly to cadmium and chromate.The cadmium and chromium stress response also focused on reducing theintracellular metal concentration, with multiple efflux pumps employed toremove cadmium while a sulfate transporter was down-regulated to reducenon-specific uptake of chromium. Membrane proteins were also up-regulatedin response to most of the metals tested. A two-component signaltransduction system involved in the uranium response was identified.Several differentially regulated transcripts from regions previously notknown to encode proteins were identified, demonstrating the advantage ofevaluating the transcriptome using whole genome microarrays.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Caulobacter crescentus bacteriophage φCbK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panis, Gaël; Lambert, Christophe; Viollier, Patrick H

    2012-09-01

    φCbK is a B3 morphotype bacteriophage of the Siphoviridae family that infects Caulobacter crescentus, the preeminent model system for bacterial cell cycle studies. The last 4 decades of research with φCbK as a genetic and cytological tool to study the biology of the host warrant an investigation of the phage genome composition. Herein, we report the complete genome sequence of φCbK and highlight unusual features that emerged from its annotation. The complete genome analysis of the φCbK phage provides new insight into its characteristics and potential interactions with its Caulobacter crescentus host, setting the stage for future functional studies with φCbK.

  4. Growth medium-dependent glycine incorporation into the peptidoglycan of Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin N Takacs

    Full Text Available The peptidoglycan (PG is a macromolecular component of the bacterial cell wall that maintains the shape and integrity of the cell. The PG of Caulobacter crescentus, unlike that of many other Gram-negative bacteria, has repeatedly been shown to contain significant amounts of glycine. This compositional peculiarity has been deemed an intrinsic characteristic of this species. By performing a comprehensive qualitative and quantitative analysis of the C. crescentus PG by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and mass spectrometry (MS, we show here that glycine incorporation into the C. crescentus PG depends on the presence of exogenous glycine in the growth medium. High levels of glycine were detected at the fifth position of the peptide side chains of PG isolated from C. crescentus cells grown in the complex laboratory medium PYE or in defined medium (M2G supplemented with casamino acids or glycine alone. In contrast, glycine incorporation was undetectable when cells were grown in M2G medium lacking glycine. Remarkably, glycine incorporation into C. crescentus peptidoglycan occurred even in the presence of low millimolar to sub-millimolar concentrations of free glycine. High glycine content in the PG had no obvious effects on growth rates, mode of PG incorporation or cell morphology. Hence, the C. crescentus PG is able to retain its physiological functions in cell growth and morphogenesis despite significant alterations in its composition, in what we deem to be unprecedented plasticity.

  5. Growth medium-dependent glycine incorporation into the peptidoglycan of Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, Constantin N; Hocking, Jason; Cabeen, Matthew T; Bui, Nhat Khai; Poggio, Sebastian; Vollmer, Waldemar; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The peptidoglycan (PG) is a macromolecular component of the bacterial cell wall that maintains the shape and integrity of the cell. The PG of Caulobacter crescentus, unlike that of many other Gram-negative bacteria, has repeatedly been shown to contain significant amounts of glycine. This compositional peculiarity has been deemed an intrinsic characteristic of this species. By performing a comprehensive qualitative and quantitative analysis of the C. crescentus PG by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry (MS), we show here that glycine incorporation into the C. crescentus PG depends on the presence of exogenous glycine in the growth medium. High levels of glycine were detected at the fifth position of the peptide side chains of PG isolated from C. crescentus cells grown in the complex laboratory medium PYE or in defined medium (M2G) supplemented with casamino acids or glycine alone. In contrast, glycine incorporation was undetectable when cells were grown in M2G medium lacking glycine. Remarkably, glycine incorporation into C. crescentus peptidoglycan occurred even in the presence of low millimolar to sub-millimolar concentrations of free glycine. High glycine content in the PG had no obvious effects on growth rates, mode of PG incorporation or cell morphology. Hence, the C. crescentus PG is able to retain its physiological functions in cell growth and morphogenesis despite significant alterations in its composition, in what we deem to be unprecedented plasticity.

  6. Reduction of Cr(VI) and survival in Cr-contaminated sites by Caulobacter crescentus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, P.; Chakraborty, R.; Brodie, E. L.; Andersen, G. L.; Hazen, T. C.

    2008-12-01

    The Caulobacter spp. is known to be able to live in low-nutrient environments, a characteristic of most heavy metal-contaminated sites. Recent studies have shown that Caulobacter crescentus can grow in chemically defined medium containing up to 1 mM uranium. Whole-genome transcriptional analysis and electron microscopic imaging of heavy metal stresses in Caulobacter crescentus also provided insight and evidence that the bacterium used an array of defensive mechanisms to deal with heavy metal stresses. In addition to up-regulated enzymes protecting against oxidative stress, DNA repair and down-regulated potential chromium transport, one of the major gene groups respond to chromium stress is "electron transport process and cytochrome oxidases", including cytochrome c oxidases, raising the possibility that the cells can employ the cytochromes to reduce chromium. Analysis of the microbial community at the chromium contaminated DOE site at Hanford, WA revealed the presence of Caulobacter spp. As an oligotroph, Caulobacter can play a significant role in chromium reduction in the environment where the nutrients are limited. This result was confirmed by both 16S rDNA based microarray (Phylochip) as well as by MDA-based clone library data. Based on these results we further investigated the capability of this organism to reduce Cr(VI) using the well known model strain Caulobacter crescentus CB15N. Preliminary cell suspension experiments were set up with glucose as the electron donor and Cr(VI) as the electron acceptor in phosphate based M2 salts buffer. After 22 hours almost 27% of Cr(VI) was reduced in the incubations containing active cells relative to the controls containing heat killed cells. Also, in another set of controls with no electron acceptor added, cells showed no increase in cell density during that time demonstrating that the reduction of Cr(VI) by cells of Caulobacter was due to biological activity. Future experiments will investigate the components

  7. Control of cell division and the spatial localization of assembled gene products in Caulobacter crescentus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathan, P.D.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments are described that examine the role of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) in the regulation of cell division in Caulobacter crescentus; and the spatial localization of methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) in C. crescentus swarmer and predivisional cells. In the analysis of PBP function, in vivo and in vitro assays are used to directly label C. crescentus PBPs with (/sup 3/H) penicillin G in wild type strain CB15, in a series of conditional cell division mutants and in new temperature sensitive cephalosporin C resistant mutants PC8002 and PC8003. 14 PBPs are characterized and a high molecular weight PBP (PBP 1B) that is required for cell division is identified. PBP 1B competes for ..beta..-lactams that induce filament formation and may be a high affinity binding protein. A second high molecular weight PBP (PBP 1C) is also associated with defective cell division. The examination of PBP patterns in synchronous swarmer cells reveals that the in vivo activity of PBP 1B and PBP 1C increases at the time that the cell division pathway is initiated. None of the PBPs, however, appear to be differentially localized in the C. crescentus cell. In the analysis of MCP localization, in vivo and in vitro assays are used to directly label C. crescentus MCPs with methyl-/sup 3/H. MCPs are examined in flagellated and non-flagellated vesicles prepared from cells by immunoaffinity chromatography.

  8. OmpW of Caulobacter crescentus Functions as an Outer Membrane Channel for Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Roland; Jones, Michael D; Younas, Farhan; Maier, Elke; Modi, Niraj; Mentele, Reinhard; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; Smit, John

    2015-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is an oligotrophic bacterium that lives in dilute organic environments such as soil and freshwater. This bacterium represents an interesting model for cellular differentiation and regulation because daughter cells after division have different forms: one is motile while the other is non-motile and can adhere to surfaces. Interestingly, the known genome of C. crescentus does not contain genes predicted to code for outer membrane porins of the OmpF/C general diffusion type present in enteric bacteria or those coding for specific porins selective for classes of substrates. Instead, genes coding for 67 TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors have been identified, suggesting that active transport of specific nutrients may be the norm. Here, we report that high channel-forming activity was observed with crude outer membrane extracts of C. crescentus in lipid bilayer experiments, indicating that the outer membrane of C. crescentus contained an ion-permeable channel with a single-channel conductance of about 120 pS in 1M KCl. The channel-forming protein with an apparent molecular mass of about 20 kDa was purified to homogeneity. Partial protein sequencing of the protein indicated it was a member of the OmpW family of outer membrane proteins from Gram-negative bacteria. This channel was not observed in reconstitution experiments with crude outer membrane extracts of an OmpW deficient C. crescentus mutant. Biophysical analysis of the C. crescentus OmpW suggested that it has features that are special for general diffusion porins of Gram-negative outer membranes because it was not a wide aqueous channel. Furthermore, OmpW of C. crescentus seems to be different to known OmpW porins and has a preference for ions, in particular cations. A putative model for OmpW of C. crescentus was built on the basis of the known 3D-structures of OmpW of Escherichia coli and OprG of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using homology modeling. A comparison of the two known structures

  9. OmpW of Caulobacter crescentus Functions as an Outer Membrane Channel for Cations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Benz

    Full Text Available Caulobacter crescentus is an oligotrophic bacterium that lives in dilute organic environments such as soil and freshwater. This bacterium represents an interesting model for cellular differentiation and regulation because daughter cells after division have different forms: one is motile while the other is non-motile and can adhere to surfaces. Interestingly, the known genome of C. crescentus does not contain genes predicted to code for outer membrane porins of the OmpF/C general diffusion type present in enteric bacteria or those coding for specific porins selective for classes of substrates. Instead, genes coding for 67 TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors have been identified, suggesting that active transport of specific nutrients may be the norm. Here, we report that high channel-forming activity was observed with crude outer membrane extracts of C. crescentus in lipid bilayer experiments, indicating that the outer membrane of C. crescentus contained an ion-permeable channel with a single-channel conductance of about 120 pS in 1M KCl. The channel-forming protein with an apparent molecular mass of about 20 kDa was purified to homogeneity. Partial protein sequencing of the protein indicated it was a member of the OmpW family of outer membrane proteins from Gram-negative bacteria. This channel was not observed in reconstitution experiments with crude outer membrane extracts of an OmpW deficient C. crescentus mutant. Biophysical analysis of the C. crescentus OmpW suggested that it has features that are special for general diffusion porins of Gram-negative outer membranes because it was not a wide aqueous channel. Furthermore, OmpW of C. crescentus seems to be different to known OmpW porins and has a preference for ions, in particular cations. A putative model for OmpW of C. crescentus was built on the basis of the known 3D-structures of OmpW of Escherichia coli and OprG of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using homology modeling. A comparison of the two

  10. Flagellar Motor Switching in Caulobacter Crescentus Obeys First Passage Time Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Michael; Bell, Jordan; Li, Guanglai; Tang, Jay X.

    2015-11-01

    A Caulobacter crescentus swarmer cell is propelled by a helical flagellum, which is rotated by a motor at its base. The motor alternates between rotating in clockwise and counterclockwise directions and spends variable intervals of time in each state. We measure the distributions of these intervals for cells either free swimming or tethered to a glass slide. A peak time of around one second is observed in the distributions for both motor directions with counterclockwise intervals more sharply peaked and clockwise intervals displaying a larger tail at long times. We show that distributions of rotation intervals fit first passage time statistics for a biased random walker and the dynamic binding of CheY-P to FliM motor subunits accounts for this behavior. Our results also suggest that the presence of multiple CheY proteins in C. crescentus may be responsible for differences between its switching behavior and that of the extensively studied E. coli.

  11. Estudo da regulação do gene cspD de Caulobacter crescentus.

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Antunes do Prado Tavares Silva

    2011-01-01

    CspD é uma das quatro proteínas de choque frio de Caulobacter crescentus, sendo maior que as outras CSPs por possuir dois domínios de choque frio, e tem seu papel na célula ainda desconhecido. O objetivo deste trabalho foi identificar e caracterizar os fatores in cis e in trans envolvidos na regulação da expressão do gene cspD em C. crescentus. Neste trabalho foi visto que a expressão de cspD é induzida pela carência de glicose no meio, mas não pela carência de nitrogênio. Esta indução é depe...

  12. Probing flagellar promoter occupancy in wild-type and mutant Caulobacter crescentus by chromatin immunoprecipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Nicole J; Viollier, Patrick H

    2011-06-01

    In the asymmetric predivisional cell of Caulobacter crescentus, TipF and TipN mark the cellular pole for future flagellar development. TipF is essential for motility and contains a cyclic-di-GMP phosphodiesterase-like (EAL) domain that is necessary for proper function. TipN is localized to the flagellar pole before TipF and is essential for the proper placement of the flagellum in C. crescentus. Using β-galactosidase promoter-probe assays and quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation, we investigated the influence of the C. crescentus flagellar assembly regulator TipF on flagellar gene transcription. We compared the transcriptional activity of class II-fliF-lacZ, class III-flgE-lacZ, and class IV-fljL-lacZ fusions in a ΔtipF mutant with that of other flagellar mutants and the wild-type strain. We subsequently verified the in vivo occupancy of the fliF, flgE, and fljL flagellar promoters by the flagellar regulators CtrA, FlbD, and FliX in addition to RNA polymerase. We deduce that TipF contributes to proper expression of flagellar genes in C. crescentus by acting both within and outside of the canonical flagellar gene expression hierarchy.

  13. A stochastic spatiotemporal model of a response-regulator network in the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Subramanian, Kartik; Chen, Minghan; Tyson, John J.; Cao, Yang

    2016-06-01

    The asymmetric cell division cycle in Caulobacter crescentus is controlled by an elaborate molecular mechanism governing the production, activation and spatial localization of a host of interacting proteins. In previous work, we proposed a deterministic mathematical model for the spatiotemporal dynamics of six major regulatory proteins. In this paper, we study a stochastic version of the model, which takes into account molecular fluctuations of these regulatory proteins in space and time during early stages of the cell cycle of wild-type Caulobacter cells. We test the stochastic model with regard to experimental observations of increased variability of cycle time in cells depleted of the divJ gene product. The deterministic model predicts that overexpression of the divK gene blocks cell cycle progression in the stalked stage; however, stochastic simulations suggest that a small fraction of the mutants cells do complete the cell cycle normally.

  14. Temporal controls of the asymmetric cell division cycle in Caulobacter crescentus.

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    Shenghua Li

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric cell division cycle of Caulobacter crescentus is orchestrated by an elaborate gene-protein regulatory network, centered on three major control proteins, DnaA, GcrA and CtrA. The regulatory network is cast into a quantitative computational model to investigate in a systematic fashion how these three proteins control the relevant genetic, biochemical and physiological properties of proliferating bacteria. Different controls for both swarmer and stalked cell cycles are represented in the mathematical scheme. The model is validated against observed phenotypes of wild-type cells and relevant mutants, and it predicts the phenotypes of novel mutants and of known mutants under novel experimental conditions. Because the cell cycle control proteins of Caulobacter are conserved across many species of alpha-proteobacteria, the model we are proposing here may be applicable to other genera of importance to agriculture and medicine (e.g., Rhizobium, Brucella.

  15. Compaction and transport properties of newly replicated Caulobacter crescentus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sun-Hae; McAdams, Harley H

    2011-12-01

    Upon initiating replication of the Caulobacter chromosome, one copy of the parS centromere remains at the stalked pole; the other moves to the distal pole. We identified the segregation dynamics and compaction characteristics of newly replicated Caulobacter DNA during transport (highly variable from cell to cell) using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. The parS centromere and a length (also highly variable) of parS proximal DNA on each arm of the chromosome are segregated with the same relatively slow transport pattern as the parS locus. Newly replicated DNA further than about 100 kb from parS segregates with a different and faster pattern, while loci at 48 kb from parS segregate with the slow pattern in some cells and the fast pattern in others. The observed parS-proximal DNA compaction characteristics have scaling properties that suggest the DNA is branched. HU2-deletion strains exhibited a reduced compaction phenotype except near the parS site where only the ΔHU1ΔHU2 double mutant had a compaction phenotype. The chromosome shows speed-dependent extension during translocation suggesting the DNA polymer is under tension. While DNA segregation is highly reliable and succeeds in virtually all wild-type cells, the high degree of cell to cell variation in the segregation process is noteworthy.

  16. Effects of (p)ppGpp on the progression of the cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Diego; Collier, Justine

    2014-07-01

    Bacteria must control the progression of their cell cycle in response to nutrient availability. This regulation can be mediated by guanosine tetra- or pentaphosphate [(p)ppGpp], which are synthesized by enzymes of the RelA/SpoT homologue (Rsh) family, particularly under starvation conditions. Here, we study the effects of (p)ppGpp on the cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus, an oligotrophic bacterium with a dimorphic life cycle. C. crescentus divides asymmetrically, producing a motile swarmer cell that cannot replicate its chromosome and a sessile stalked cell that is replication competent. The swarmer cell rapidly differentiates into a stalked cell in appropriate conditions. An artificial increase in the levels of (p)ppGpp in nonstarved C. crescentus cells was achieved by expressing a truncated relA gene from Escherichia coli, encoding a constitutively active (p)ppGpp synthetase. By combining single-cell microscopy, flow cytometry approaches, and swarming assays, we show that an increase in the intracellular concentration of (p)ppGpp is sufficient to slow down the swarmer-to-stalked cell differentiation process and to delay the initiation of chromosome replication. We also present evidence that the intracellular levels of two master regulators of the cell cycle of C. crescentus, DnaA and CtrA, are modulated in response to (p)ppGpp accumulation, even in the absence of actual starvation. CtrA proteolysis and DnaA synthesis seem indirectly inhibited by (p)ppGpp accumulation. By extending the life span of the motile nonreproductive swarmer cell and thus promoting dispersal and foraging functions over multiplication under starvation conditions, (p)ppGpp may play a central role in the ecological adaptation of C. crescentus to nutritional stresses.

  17. Regulatory response to carbon starvation in Caulobacter crescentus.

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    Leticia Britos

    Full Text Available Bacteria adapt to shifts from rapid to slow growth, and have developed strategies for long-term survival during prolonged starvation and stress conditions. We report the regulatory response of C. crescentus to carbon starvation, based on combined high-throughput proteome and transcriptome analyses. Our results identify cell cycle changes in gene expression in response to carbon starvation that involve the prominent role of the FixK FNR/CAP family transcription factor and the CtrA cell cycle regulator. Notably, the SigT ECF sigma factor mediates the carbon starvation-induced degradation of CtrA, while activating a core set of general starvation-stress genes that respond to carbon starvation, osmotic stress, and exposure to heavy metals. Comparison of the response of swarmer cells and stalked cells to carbon starvation revealed four groups of genes that exhibit different expression profiles. Also, cell pole morphogenesis and initiation of chromosome replication normally occurring at the swarmer-to-stalked cell transition are uncoupled in carbon-starved cells.

  18. Regulatory Response to Carbon Starvation in Caulobacter crescentus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britos, Leticia C.; Abeliuk, Eduardo; Taverner, Thomas; Lipton, Mary S.; McAdams, Harley; Shapiro, Lucy

    2011-04-11

    Bacteria adapt to shifts from rapid to slow growth, and have developed strategies for long-term survival during prolonged starvation and stress conditions. We report the regulatory response of C. crescentus to carbon starvation, based on combined high-throughput proteome and transcriptome analyses. Our results identify cell cycle changes in gene expression in response to carbon starvation that involve the prominent role of the FixK FNR/CAP family transcription factor and the CtrA cell cycle regulator. Notably, the SigT ECF sigma factor mediates the carbon starvation-induced degradation of CtrA, while activating a core set of general starvation-stress genes that respond to carbon starvation, osmotic stress, and exposure to heavy metals. Comparison of the response of swarmer cells and stalked cells to carbon starvation revealed four groups of genes that exhibit different expression profiles. Also, cell pole morphogenesis and initiation of chromosome replication normally occurring at the swarmer-to-stalked cell transition are uncoupled in carbon-starved cells.

  19. Biomineralization of Uranium by PhoY Phosphatase Activity Aids Cell Survival in Caulobacter crescentus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yung, M C [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jiao, Y [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-07-22

    Caulobacter crescentus is known to tolerate high levels of uranium [U(VI)], but its detoxification mechanism is poorly understood. Here we show that C. crescentus is able to facilitate U(VI) biomineralization through the formation of U-Pi precipitates via its native alkaline phosphatase activity. The U-Pi precipitates, deposited on the cell surface in the form of meta-autunite structures, have a lower U/Pi ratio than do chemically produced precipitates. The enzyme that is responsible for the phosphatase activity and thus the biomineralization process is identified as PhoY, a periplasmic alkaline phosphatase with broad substrate specificity. Furthermore, PhoY is shown to confer a survival advantage on C. crescentus toward U(VI) under both growth and nongrowth conditions. Results obtained in this study thus highlight U(VI) biomineralization as a resistance mechanism in microbes, which not only improves our understanding of bacterium-mineral interactions but also aids in defining potential ecological niches for metal-resistant bacteria.

  20. The flagellar motor of Caulobacter crescentus generates more torque when a cell swims backwards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lele, Pushkar P.; Roland, Thibault; Shrivastava, Abhishek; Chen, Yihao; Berg, Howard C.

    2016-02-01

    The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus swims by rotating a single right-handed helical filament. These cells have two swimming modes: a pusher mode, in which clockwise (CW) rotation of the filament thrusts the cell body forwards, and a puller mode, in which counterclockwise (CCW) rotation pulls it backwards. The situation is reversed in Escherichia coli, a bacterium that rotates several left-handed filaments CCW to drive the cell body forwards. The flagellar motor in E. coli generates more torque in the CCW direction than the CW direction in swimming cells. However, C. crescentus and other bacteria with single filaments swim forwards and backwards at similar speeds, prompting the assumption that motor torques in the two modes are the same. Here, we present evidence that motors in C. crescentus develop higher torques in the puller mode than in the pusher mode, and suggest that the anisotropy in torque generation is similar in the two species, despite the differences in filament handedness and motor bias.

  1. Dynamical modeling of the cell cycle and cell fate emergence in Caulobacter crescentus.

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    César Quiñones-Valles

    Full Text Available The division of Caulobacter crescentus, a model organism for studying cell cycle and differentiation in bacteria, generates two cell types: swarmer and stalked. To complete its cycle, C. crescentus must first differentiate from the swarmer to the stalked phenotype. An important regulator involved in this process is CtrA, which operates in a gene regulatory network and coordinates many of the interactions associated to the generation of cellular asymmetry. Gaining insight into how such a differentiation phenomenon arises and how network components interact to bring about cellular behavior and function demands mathematical models and simulations. In this work, we present a dynamical model based on a generalization of the Boolean abstraction of gene expression for a minimal network controlling the cell cycle and asymmetric cell division in C. crescentus. This network was constructed from data obtained from an exhaustive search in the literature. The results of the simulations based on our model show a cyclic attractor whose configurations can be made to correspond with the current knowledge of the activity of the regulators participating in the gene network during the cell cycle. Additionally, we found two point attractors that can be interpreted in terms of the network configurations directing the two cell types. The entire network is shown to be operating close to the critical regime, which means that it is robust enough to perturbations on dynamics of the network, but adaptable to environmental changes.

  2. Biomineralization of uranium by PhoY phosphatase activity aids cell survival in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Mimi C; Jiao, Yongqin

    2014-08-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is known to tolerate high levels of uranium [U(VI)], but its detoxification mechanism is poorly understood. Here we show that C. crescentus is able to facilitate U(VI) biomineralization through the formation of U-Pi precipitates via its native alkaline phosphatase activity. The U-Pi precipitates, deposited on the cell surface in the form of meta-autunite structures, have a lower U/Pi ratio than do chemically produced precipitates. The enzyme that is responsible for the phosphatase activity and thus the biomineralization process is identified as PhoY, a periplasmic alkaline phosphatase with broad substrate specificity. Furthermore, PhoY is shown to confer a survival advantage on C. crescentus toward U(VI) under both growth and nongrowth conditions. Results obtained in this study thus highlight U(VI) biomineralization as a resistance mechanism in microbes, which not only improves our understanding of bacterium-mineral interactions but also aids in defining potential ecological niches for metal-resistant bacteria.

  3. Dynamical modeling of the cell cycle and cell fate emergence in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñones-Valles, César; Sánchez-Osorio, Ismael; Martínez-Antonio, Agustino

    2014-01-01

    The division of Caulobacter crescentus, a model organism for studying cell cycle and differentiation in bacteria, generates two cell types: swarmer and stalked. To complete its cycle, C. crescentus must first differentiate from the swarmer to the stalked phenotype. An important regulator involved in this process is CtrA, which operates in a gene regulatory network and coordinates many of the interactions associated to the generation of cellular asymmetry. Gaining insight into how such a differentiation phenomenon arises and how network components interact to bring about cellular behavior and function demands mathematical models and simulations. In this work, we present a dynamical model based on a generalization of the Boolean abstraction of gene expression for a minimal network controlling the cell cycle and asymmetric cell division in C. crescentus. This network was constructed from data obtained from an exhaustive search in the literature. The results of the simulations based on our model show a cyclic attractor whose configurations can be made to correspond with the current knowledge of the activity of the regulators participating in the gene network during the cell cycle. Additionally, we found two point attractors that can be interpreted in terms of the network configurations directing the two cell types. The entire network is shown to be operating close to the critical regime, which means that it is robust enough to perturbations on dynamics of the network, but adaptable to environmental changes.

  4. A quantitative study of the division cycle of Caulobacter crescentus stalked cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenghua Li

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Progression of a cell through the division cycle is tightly controlled at different steps to ensure the integrity of genome replication and partitioning to daughter cells. From published experimental evidence, we propose a molecular mechanism for control of the cell division cycle in Caulobacter crescentus. The mechanism, which is based on the synthesis and degradation of three "master regulator" proteins (CtrA, GcrA, and DnaA, is converted into a quantitative model, in order to study the temporal dynamics of these and other cell cycle proteins. The model accounts for important details of the physiology, biochemistry, and genetics of cell cycle control in stalked C. crescentus cell. It reproduces protein time courses in wild-type cells, mimics correctly the phenotypes of many mutant strains, and predicts the phenotypes of currently uncharacterized mutants. Since many of the proteins involved in regulating the cell cycle of C. crescentus are conserved among many genera of alpha-proteobacteria, the proposed mechanism may be applicable to other species of importance in agriculture and medicine.

  5. Molecular recognition of RhlB and RNase D in the Caulobacter crescentus RNA degradosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Jarrod E; Luisi, Ben F; Hardwick, Steven W

    2014-12-01

    The endoribonuclease RNase E is a key enzyme in RNA metabolism for many bacterial species. In Escherichia coli, RNase E contributes to the majority of RNA turnover and processing events, and the enzyme has been extensively characterized as the central component of the RNA degradosome assembly. A similar RNA degradosome assembly has been described in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, with the interacting partners of RNase E identified as the Kreb's cycle enzyme aconitase, a DEAD-box RNA helicase RhlB and the exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase. Here we report that an additional degradosome component is the essential exoribonuclease RNase D, and its recognition site within RNase E is identified. We show that, unlike its E. coli counterpart, C. crescentus RhlB interacts directly with a segment of the N-terminal catalytic domain of RNase E. The crystal structure of a portion of C. crescentus RNase E encompassing the helicase-binding region is reported. This structure reveals that an inserted segment in the S1 domain adopts an α-helical conformation, despite being predicted to be natively unstructured. We discuss the implications of these findings for the organization and mechanisms of the RNA degradosome.

  6. Diverse functions for six glycosyltransferases in Caulobacter crescentus cell wall assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakhnina, Anastasiya A; Gitai, Zemer

    2013-10-01

    The essential process of peptidoglycan synthesis requires two enzymatic activities, transpeptidation and transglycosylation. While the PBP2 and PBP3 transpeptidases perform highly specialized functions that are widely conserved, the specific roles of different glycosyltransferases are poorly understood. For example, Caulobacter crescentus encodes six glycosyltransferase paralogs of largely unknown function. Using genetic analyses, we found that Caulobacter glycosyltransferases are primarily redundant but that PbpX is responsible for most of the essential glycosyltransferase activity. Cells containing PbpX as their sole glycosyltransferase are viable, and the loss of pbpX leads to a general defect in the integrity of the cell wall structure even in the presence of the other five glycosyltransferases. However, neither PbpX nor any of its paralogs is required for the specific processes of cell elongation or division, while the cell wall synthesis required for stalk biogenesis is only partially disrupted in several of the glycosyltransferase mutants. Despite their genetic redundancy, Caulobacter glycosyltransferases exhibit different subcellular localizations. We suggest that these enzymes have specialized roles and normally function in distinct subcomplexes but retain the ability to substitute for one another so as to ensure the robustness of the peptidoglycan synthesis process.

  7. Synchronization of Caulobacter crescentus for investigation of the bacterial cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Jared M; Shapiro, Lucy

    2015-04-08

    The cell cycle is important for growth, genome replication, and development in all cells. In bacteria, studies of the cell cycle have focused largely on unsynchronized cells making it difficult to order the temporal events required for cell cycle progression, genome replication, and division. Caulobacter crescentus provides an excellent model system for the bacterial cell cycle whereby cells can be rapidly synchronized in a G0 state by density centrifugation. Cell cycle synchronization experiments have been used to establish the molecular events governing chromosome replication and segregation, to map a genetic regulatory network controlling cell cycle progression, and to identify the establishment of polar signaling complexes required for asymmetric cell division. Here we provide a detailed protocol for the rapid synchronization of Caulobacter NA1000 cells. Synchronization can be performed in a large-scale format for gene expression profiling and western blot assays, as well as a small-scale format for microscopy or FACS assays. The rapid synchronizability and high cell yields of Caulobacter make this organism a powerful model system for studies of the bacterial cell cycle.

  8. Characterization of Uranium Tolerance and Biomineralization Potential of Caulobacter crescentus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, D.

    2015-12-01

    Due to its high toxicity and mobility, U(VI) poses a major environmental threat to ecosystems. The ubiquitous aerobic bacterium Caulobacter cresecentus is an attractive candidate for U(VI) bioremediation because of its ability to survive in low-nutrient environments (5, 6), tolerate high U concentrations and mineralize U(VI) aerobically through the formation of uranyl phosphate (U-Pi) precipitates. Despite these attractive environmental properties, both a systems level understanding of the adaptive response pathways involved in U tolerance and the environmental conditions affecting the biomineralization process and stability of biogenic U-Pi minerals remain limited. By measuring changes in both mRNA and protein expression during exposure to high U levels, we have identified the core stress response pathways involved in U tolerance. Pathways associated with heat shock, lipospolysaccharide biosynthesis and transport, outer membrane lipoprotein transport and outermembrane assembly were highly induced at both the RNA and protein levels. Correspondingly, removal of integral components of proteolysis pathways including clpA, clpS and degP significantly reduced U tolerance under biomineralization conditions. Surprisingly, in contrast to many other heavy metals, U did not cause oxidative stress or DNA damage. Together, these analyses indicate that U predominately targets the outermembrane and causes mis-folding of both cytoplasmic and extracytoplasmic proteins. Efforts are currently underway to characterize the morphological and structural properties of biogenic U-Pi minerals and the environmental factors that influence their production and stability. Preliminary AFM studies suggest that U-Pi minerals formed under biomineralization conditions appear morphologically distinct from those formed abiotically between U(VI) and inorganic phosphate. Additionally, we observed that biomineralization tolerates a wide pH range (pH 6-9). Our long-range goal is the development of a

  9. Phosphate starvation triggers production and secretion of an extracellular lipoprotein in Caulobacter crescentus.

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    Sophie Le Blastier

    Full Text Available Life in oligotrophic environments necessitates quick adaptive responses to a sudden lack of nutrients. Secretion of specific degradative enzymes into the extracellular medium is a means to mobilize the required nutrient from nearby sources. The aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus must often face changes in its environment such as phosphate limitation. Evidence reported in this paper indicates that under phosphate starvation, C. crescentus produces a membrane surface-anchored lipoprotein named ElpS subsequently released into the extracellular medium. A complete set of 12 genes encoding a type II secretion system (T2SS is located adjacent to the elpS locus in the C. crescentus genome. Deletion of this T2SS impairs release of ElpS in the environment, which surprisingly remains present at the cell surface, indicating that the T2SS is not involved in the translocation of ElpS to the outer membrane but rather in its release. Accordingly, treatment with protease inhibitors prevents release of ElpS in the extracellular medium suggesting that ElpS secretion relies on a T2SS-secreted protease. Finally, secretion of ElpS is associated with an increase in alkaline phosphatase activity in culture supernatants, suggesting a role of the secreted protein in inorganic phosphate mobilization. In conclusion, we have shown that upon phosphate starvation, C. crescentus produces an outer membrane bound lipoprotein, ElpS, which is further cleaved and released in the extracellular medium in a T2SS-dependent manner. Our data suggest that ElpS is associated with an alkaline phosphatase activity, thereby allowing the bacterium to gather inorganic phosphates from a poor environment.

  10. The Caulobacter crescentus chromosome replication origin evolved two classes of weak DnaA binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James A; Ouimet, Marie-Claude; Wargachuk, Richard; Marczynski, Gregory T

    2011-10-01

    The Caulobacter crescentus replication initiator DnaA and essential response regulator CtrA compete to control chromosome replication. The C. crescentus replication origin (Cori) contains five strong CtrA binding sites but only two apparent DnaA boxes, termed G-boxes (with a conserved second position G, TGATCCACA). Since clusters of DnaA boxes typify bacterial replication origins, this discrepancy suggested that C. crescentus DnaA recognizes different DNA sequences or compensates with novel DNA-binding proteins. We searched for novel DNA sites by scanning mutagenesis of the most conserved Cori DNA. Autonomous replication assays showed that G-boxes and novel W-boxes (TCCCCA) are essential for replication. Further analyses showed that C. crescentus DnaA binds G-boxes with moderate and W-boxes with very weak affinities significantly below DnaA's capacity for high-affinity Escherichia coli-boxes (TTATCCACA). Cori has five conserved W-boxes. Increasing W-box affinities increases or decreases autonomous replication depending on their strategic positions between the G-boxes. In vitro, CtrA binding displaces DnaA from proximal G-boxes and from distal W-boxes implying CtrA-DnaA competition and DnaA-DnaA cooperation between G-boxes and W-boxes. Similarly, during cell cycle progression, CtrA proteolysis coincides with DnaA binding to Cori. We also observe highly conserved W-boxes in other replication origins lacking E. coli-boxes. Therefore, strategically weak DnaA binding can be a general means of replication control.

  11. Genome analysis of DNA repair genes in the alpha proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus

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    Menck Carlos FM

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integrity of DNA molecules is fundamental for maintaining life. The DNA repair proteins protect organisms against genetic damage, by removal of DNA lesions or helping to tolerate them. DNA repair genes are best known from the gamma-proteobacterium Escherichia coli, which is the most understood bacterial model. However, genome sequencing raises questions regarding uniformity and ubiquity of these DNA repair genes and pathways, reinforcing the need for identifying genes and proteins, which may respond to DNA damage in other bacteria. Results In this study, we employed a bioinformatic approach, to analyse and describe the open reading frames potentially related to DNA repair from the genome of the alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. This was performed by comparison with known DNA repair related genes found in public databases. As expected, although C. crescentus and E. coli bacteria belong to separate phylogenetic groups, many of their DNA repair genes are very similar. However, some important DNA repair genes are absent in the C. crescentus genome and other interesting functionally related gene duplications are present, which do not occur in E. coli. These include DNA ligases, exonuclease III (xthA, endonuclease III (nth, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (ada gene, photolyase-like genes, and uracil-DNA-glycosylases. On the other hand, the genes imuA and imuB, which are involved in DNA damage induced mutagenesis, have recently been described in C. crescentus, but are absent in E. coli. Particularly interesting are the potential atypical phylogeny of one of the photolyase genes in alpha-proteobacteria, indicating an origin by horizontal transfer, and the duplication of the Ada orthologs, which have diverse structural configurations, including one that is still unique for C. crescentus. Conclusion The absence and the presence of certain genes are discussed and predictions are made considering the particular

  12. A modular BAM complex in the outer membrane of the alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus.

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    Khatira Anwari

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are organelles derived from an intracellular alpha-proteobacterium. The biogenesis of mitochondria relies on the assembly of beta-barrel proteins into the mitochondrial outer membrane, a process inherited from the bacterial ancestor. Caulobacter crescentus is an alpha-proteobacterium, and the BAM (beta-barrel assembly machinery complex was purified and characterized from this model organism. Like the mitochondrial sorting and assembly machinery complex, we find the BAM complex to be modular in nature. A approximately 150 kDa core BAM complex containing BamA, BamB, BamD, and BamE associates with additional modules in the outer membrane. One of these modules, Pal, is a lipoprotein that provides a means for anchorage to the peptidoglycan layer of the cell wall. We suggest the modular design of the BAM complex facilitates access to substrates from the protein translocase in the inner membrane.

  13. A NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase coordinates metabolism with cell division in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufay, François; Coppine, Jérôme; Mayard, Aurélie; Laloux, Géraldine; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2015-07-01

    Coupling cell cycle with nutrient availability is a crucial process for all living cells. But how bacteria control cell division according to metabolic supplies remains poorly understood. Here, we describe a molecular mechanism that coordinates central metabolism with cell division in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. This mechanism involves the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase GdhZ and the oxidoreductase-like KidO. While enzymatically active GdhZ directly interferes with FtsZ polymerization by stimulating its GTPase activity, KidO bound to NADH destabilizes lateral interactions between FtsZ protofilaments. Both GdhZ and KidO share the same regulatory network to concomitantly stimulate the rapid disassembly of the Z-ring, necessary for the subsequent release of progeny cells. Thus, this mechanism illustrates how proteins initially dedicated to metabolism coordinate cell cycle progression with nutrient availability.

  14. Alternative mechanism for bacteriophage adsorption to the motile bacterium Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Ferreira, Ricardo C; Viollier, Patrick H; Ely, Bert; Poindexter, Jeanne S; Georgieva, Maria; Jensen, Grant J; Wright, Elizabeth R

    2011-06-14

    2D and 3D cryo-electron microscopy, together with adsorption kinetics assays of Cb13 and CbK phage-infected Caulobacter crescentus, provides insight into the mechanisms of infection. Cb13 and CbK actively interact with the flagellum and subsequently attach to receptors on the cell pole. We present evidence that the first interaction of the phage with the bacterial flagellum takes place through a filament on the phage head. This contact with the flagellum facilitates concentration of phage particles around the receptor (i.e., the pilus portals) on the bacterial cell surface, thereby increasing the likelihood of infection. Phage head filaments have not been well characterized and their function is described here. Phage head filaments may systematically underlie the initial interactions of phages with their hosts in other systems and possibly represent a widespread mechanism of efficient phage propagation.

  15. ppGpp and polyphosphate modulate cell cycle progression in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutte, Cara C; Henry, Jonathan T; Crosson, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus differentiates from a motile, foraging swarmer cell into a sessile, replication-competent stalked cell during its cell cycle. This developmental transition is inhibited by nutrient deprivation to favor the motile swarmer state. We identify two cell cycle regulatory signals, ppGpp and polyphosphate (polyP), that inhibit the swarmer-to-stalked transition in both complex and glucose-exhausted media, thereby increasing the proportion of swarmer cells in mixed culture. Upon depletion of available carbon, swarmer cells lacking the ability to synthesize ppGpp or polyP improperly initiate chromosome replication, proteolyze the replication inhibitor CtrA, localize the cell fate determinant DivJ, and develop polar stalks. Furthermore, we show that swarmer cells produce more ppGpp than stalked cells upon starvation. These results provide evidence that ppGpp and polyP are cell-type-specific developmental regulators.

  16. Coordination between chromosome replication, segregation, and cell division in Caulobacter crescentus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Bugge

    2006-01-01

    , and the completely replicated terminus regions stay associated with each other after chromosome replication is completed, disassociating very late in the cell cycle shortly before the final cell division event. Invagination of the cytoplasmic membrane occurs earlier than separation of the replicated terminus regions...... and formation of separate nucleoids, which results in trapping of a chromosome on either side of the cell division septum, indicating that there is not a nucleoid exclusion phenotype.......Progression through the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle is coupled to a cellular differentiation program. The swarmer cell is replicationally quiescent, and DNA replication initiates at the swarmer-to-stalked cell transition. There is a very short delay between initiation of DNA replication...

  17. Regulation of the activity of the dual-function DnaA protein in Caulobacter crescentus.

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    Carmen Fernandez-Fernandez

    Full Text Available DnaA is a conserved essential bacterial protein that acts as the initiator of chromosomal replication as well as a master transcriptional regulator in Caulobacter crescentus. Thus, the intracellular levels of active DnaA need to be tightly regulated during the cell cycle. Our previous work suggested that DnaA may be regulated at the level of its activity by the replisome-associated protein HdaA. Here, we describe the construction of a mutant DnaA protein [DnaA(R357A]. The R357 residue in the AAA+ domain of the C. crescentus DnaA protein is equivalent to the R334 residue of the E. coli DnaA protein, which is required for the Regulatory Inactivation of DnaA (RIDA. We found that the expression of the DnaA(R357A mutant protein in C. crescentus, but not the expression of the wild-type DnaA protein at similar levels, causes a severe phenotype of over-initiation of chromosomal replication and that it blocks cell division. Thus, the mutant DnaA(R357A protein is hyper-active to promote the initiation of DNA replication, compared to the wild-type DnaA protein. DnaA(R357A could not replace DnaA in vivo, indicating that the switch in DnaA activity once chromosomal replication has started may be an essential process in C. crescentus. We propose that the inactivation of DnaA is the main mechanism ensuring that chromosomal replication starts only once per cell cycle. We further observed that the R357A substitution in DnaA does not promote the activity of DnaA as a direct transcriptional activator of four important genes, encoding HdaA, the GcrA master cell cycle regulator, the FtsZ cell division protein and the MipZ spatial regulator of cell division. Thus, the AAA+ domain of DnaA may play a role in temporally regulating the bifunctionality of DnaA by reallocating DnaA molecules from initiating DNA replication to transcribing genes within the unique DnaA regulon of C. crescentus.

  18. The Caulobacter crescentus phage phiCbK: genomics of a canonical phage

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    Gill Jason J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is a popular model for the study of cell cycle regulation and senescence. The large prolate siphophage phiCbK has been an important tool in C. crescentus biology, and has been studied in its own right as a model for viral morphogenesis. Although a system of some interest, to date little genomic information is available on phiCbK or its relatives. Results Five novel phiCbK-like C. crescentus bacteriophages, CcrMagneto, CcrSwift, CcrKarma, CcrRogue and CcrColossus, were isolated from the environment. The genomes of phage phiCbK and these five environmental phage isolates were obtained by 454 pyrosequencing. The phiCbK-like phage genomes range in size from 205 kb encoding 318 proteins (phiCbK to 280 kb encoding 448 proteins (CcrColossus, and were found to contain nonpermuted terminal redundancies of 10 to 17 kb. A novel method of terminal ligation was developed to map genomic termini, which confirmed termini predicted by coverage analysis. This suggests that sequence coverage discontinuities may be useable as predictors of genomic termini in phage genomes. Genomic modules encoding virion morphogenesis, lysis and DNA replication proteins were identified. The phiCbK-like phages were also found to encode a number of intriguing proteins; all contain a clearly T7-like DNA polymerase, and five of the six encode a possible homolog of the C. crescentus cell cycle regulator GcrA, which may allow the phage to alter the host cell’s replicative state. The structural proteome of phage phiCbK was determined, identifying the portal, major and minor capsid proteins, the tail tape measure and possible tail fiber proteins. All six phage genomes are clearly related; phiCbK, CcrMagneto, CcrSwift, CcrKarma and CcrRogue form a group related at the DNA level, while CcrColossus is more diverged but retains significant similarity at the protein level. Conclusions Due to their lack of any apparent relationship to

  19. Regulation of the activity of the dual-function DnaA protein in Caulobacter crescentus.

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    Fernandez-Fernandez, Carmen; Gonzalez, Diego; Collier, Justine

    2011-01-01

    DnaA is a conserved essential bacterial protein that acts as the initiator of chromosomal replication as well as a master transcriptional regulator in Caulobacter crescentus. Thus, the intracellular levels of active DnaA need to be tightly regulated during the cell cycle. Our previous work suggested that DnaA may be regulated at the level of its activity by the replisome-associated protein HdaA. Here, we describe the construction of a mutant DnaA protein [DnaA(R357A)]. The R357 residue in the AAA+ domain of the C. crescentus DnaA protein is equivalent to the R334 residue of the E. coli DnaA protein, which is required for the Regulatory Inactivation of DnaA (RIDA). We found that the expression of the DnaA(R357A) mutant protein in C. crescentus, but not the expression of the wild-type DnaA protein at similar levels, causes a severe phenotype of over-initiation of chromosomal replication and that it blocks cell division. Thus, the mutant DnaA(R357A) protein is hyper-active to promote the initiation of DNA replication, compared to the wild-type DnaA protein. DnaA(R357A) could not replace DnaA in vivo, indicating that the switch in DnaA activity once chromosomal replication has started may be an essential process in C. crescentus. We propose that the inactivation of DnaA is the main mechanism ensuring that chromosomal replication starts only once per cell cycle. We further observed that the R357A substitution in DnaA does not promote the activity of DnaA as a direct transcriptional activator of four important genes, encoding HdaA, the GcrA master cell cycle regulator, the FtsZ cell division protein and the MipZ spatial regulator of cell division. Thus, the AAA+ domain of DnaA may play a role in temporally regulating the bifunctionality of DnaA by reallocating DnaA molecules from initiating DNA replication to transcribing genes within the unique DnaA regulon of C. crescentus.

  20. The complex logic of stringent response regulation in Caulobacter crescentus: starvation signalling in an oligotrophic environment.

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    Boutte, Cara C; Crosson, Sean

    2011-05-01

    Bacteria rapidly adapt to nutritional changes via the stringent response, which entails starvation-induced synthesis of the small molecule, ppGpp, by RelA/SpoT homologue (Rsh) enzymes. Binding of ppGpp to RNA polymerase modulates the transcription of hundreds of genes and remodels the physiology of the cell. Studies of the stringent response have primarily focused on copiotrophic bacteria such as Escherichia coli; little is known about how stringent signalling is regulated in species that live in consistently nutrient-limited (i.e. oligotrophic) environments. Here we define the input logic and transcriptional output of the stringent response in the oligotroph, Caulobacter crescentus. The sole Rsh protein, SpoT(CC), binds to and is regulated by the ribosome, and exhibits AND-type control logic in which amino acid starvation is a necessary but insufficient signal for activation of ppGpp synthesis. While both glucose and ammonium starvation upregulate the synthesis of ppGpp, SpoT(CC) detects these starvation signals by two independent mechanisms. Although the logic of stringent response control in C. crescentus differs from E. coli, the global transcriptional effects of elevated ppGpp are similar, with the exception of 16S rRNA transcription, which is controlled independently of spoT(CC). This study highlights how the regulatory logic controlling the stringent response may be adapted to the nutritional niche of a bacterial species.

  1. The functions of DNA methylation by CcrM in Caulobacter crescentus: a global approach.

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    Gonzalez, Diego; Kozdon, Jennifer B; McAdams, Harley H; Shapiro, Lucy; Collier, Justine

    2014-04-01

    DNA methylation is involved in a diversity of processes in bacteria, including maintenance of genome integrity and regulation of gene expression. Here, using Caulobacter crescentus as a model, we exploit genome-wide experimental methods to uncover the functions of CcrM, a DNA methyltransferase conserved in most Alphaproteobacteria. Using single molecule sequencing, we provide evidence that most CcrM target motifs (GANTC) switch from a fully methylated to a hemi-methylated state when they are replicated, and back to a fully methylated state at the onset of cell division. We show that DNA methylation by CcrM is not required for the control of the initiation of chromosome replication or for DNA mismatch repair. By contrast, our transcriptome analysis shows that >10% of the genes are misexpressed in cells lacking or constitutively over-expressing CcrM. Strikingly, GANTC methylation is needed for the efficient transcription of dozens of genes that are essential for cell cycle progression, in particular for DNA metabolism and cell division. Many of them are controlled by promoters methylated by CcrM and co-regulated by other global cell cycle regulators, demonstrating an extensive cross talk between DNA methylation and the complex regulatory network that controls the cell cycle of C. crescentus and, presumably, of many other Alphaproteobacteria.

  2. The curved shape of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus enhances colonization of surfaces in flow

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    Persat, Alexandre; Gitai, Zemer; Stone, Howard

    2014-11-01

    Bacteria thrive in all types of fluid environments; flow is thus a ubiquitous aspect of their lives. Bacteria have evolved a variety of cellular components contributing to their growth in specific environments. However, cellular features that help them survive and develop in flow have been rarely characterized. Here, we show that Caulobacter crescentus may have evolved its curved shape to enhance the colonization of surfaces in flow. C. crescentus curvature is preserved in the wild but straight mutants have no known growth disadvantage in standard laboratory conditions. Leveraging microfluidics and single-cell imaging, we demonstrate that curvature enhances surface colonization in flow, promoting the formation of larger microcolonies. Cells attach to a surface from a single pole, so that flow affects their orientation. In flow, viscous forces generate a torque on the curved cell body, which reorients the cell in the direction of the flow. The curved cell appears to arc above the surface, optimally orienting its unattached pole towards the surface. This reduces the distance between the surface and the pole, thereby enhancing attachment of its progeny. Additionally, we show that curved shape enhances colony spreading across the direction of the flow, generating more robust biofilm compared to straight mutants.

  3. Behavior of Caulobacter Crescentus Diagnosed Using a 3-Channel Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jay; Morse, Michael; Colin, Remy; Wilson, Laurence

    2015-03-01

    Many motile microorganisms are able to detect chemical gradients in their surroundings in order to bias their motion towards more favorable conditions. We study the biased motility of Caulobacter crescentus, a singly flagellated bacteria, which alternate between forward and backward swimming, driven by its flagella motor, which switches in rotation direction. We observe the swimming patterns of C. crescents in an oxygen gradient, which is established by flowing atmospheric air and pure nitrogen through a 3 parallel channel microfluidic device. In this setup, oxygen diffuses through the PDMS device and the bacterial medium, creating a linear gradient. Using low magnification, dark field microscopy, individual cells are tracked over a large field of view, with particular interest in the cells' motion relative to the oxygen gradient. Utilizing observable differences between backward and forward swimming motion, motor switching events can be identified. By analyzing these run time intervals between motor switches as a function of a cell's local oxygen level, we demonstrate that C. crescentus displays aerotacitc behavior by extending forward swimming run times while moving up an oxygen gradient, resulting in directed motility towards oxygen sources. Additionally, motor switching response is sensitive to both the steepness of the gradient experienced and background oxygen levels with cells exhibiting a logarithmic response to oxygen levels. Work funded by the United States National Science Foundation and by the Rowland Institute at Harvard University.

  4. DipM, a new factor required for peptidoglycan remodelling during cell division in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möll, Andrea; Schlimpert, Susan; Briegel, Ariane; Jensen, Grant J; Thanbichler, Martin

    2010-07-01

    In bacteria, cytokinesis is dependent on lytic enzymes that facilitate remodelling of the cell wall during constriction. In this work, we identify a thus far uncharacterized periplasmic protein, DipM, that is required for cell division and polarity in Caulobacter crescentus. DipM is composed of four peptidoglycan binding (LysM) domains and a C-terminal lysostaphin-like (LytM) peptidase domain. It binds to isolated murein sacculi in vitro, and is recruited to the site of constriction through interaction with the cell division protein FtsN. Mutational analyses showed that the LysM domains are necessary and sufficient for localization of DipM, while its peptidase domain is essential for function. Consistent with a role in cell wall hydrolysis, DipM was found to interact with purified murein sacculi in vitro and to induce cell lysis upon overproduction. Its inactivation causes severe defects in outer membrane invagination, resulting in a significant delay between cytoplasmic compartmentalization and final separation of the daughter cells. Overall, these findings indicate that DipM is a periplasmic component of the C. crescentus divisome that facilitates remodelling of the peptidoglycan layer and, thus, coordinated constriction of the cell envelope during the division process.

  5. Characterization of Caulobacter crescentus response to low temperature and identification of genes involved in freezing resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzon, Ricardo R; Lang, Elza A S; Braz, Vânia S; Marques, Marilis V

    2008-11-01

    Free-living bacteria must respond to a wide range of temperature changes, and have developed specific mechanisms to survive in extreme environments. In this work we describe a remarkable resistance of mesophilic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus to several cycles of freezing at -80 degrees C, which was able to grow at low temperatures. Exponentially growing cells and late stationary-phase cells presented higher freezing resistance at both -20 and -80 degrees C than early stationary-phase cells. Cryotolerance was observed when log-phase cultures grown at 30 degrees C were preincubated at 5, 15 or 20 degrees C before freezing at -20 degrees C. A transposon library was screened to identify mutants sensitive to freezing at -80 degrees C and three strains presenting <10% survival were isolated. Identification of genes disrupted in each mutant showed that they encoded an AddA family DNA helicase, a DEAD/DEAH box RNA helicase and a putative RND (resistance, nodulation, cell division) efflux system component. These strains showed longer generation times than wild-type cells when growing at 15 degrees C, with the RNA helicase mutant presenting a severe growth defect. These analyses suggest that the singular intrinsic resistance to freezing of C. crescentus is in fact a consequence of several independent traits, especially the maintenance of a proper degree of supercoiling of nucleic acids.

  6. CspC and CspD are essential for Caulobacter crescentus stationary phase survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balhesteros, Heloise; Mazzon, Ricardo R; da Silva, Carolina A P T; Lang, Elza A S; Marques, Marilis V

    2010-09-01

    The cold shock response in bacteria involves the expression of low-molecular weight cold shock proteins (CSPs) containing a nucleic acid-binding cold shock domain (CSD), which are known to destabilize secondary structures on mRNAs, facilitating translation at low temperatures. Caulobacter crescentus cspA and cspB are induced upon cold shock, while cspC and cspD are induced during stationary phase. In this work, we determined a new coding sequence for the cspC gene, revealing that it encodes a protein containing two CSDs. The phenotypes of C. crescentus csp mutants were analyzed, and we found that cspC is important for cells to maintain viability during extended periods in stationary phase. Also, cspC and cspCD strains presented altered morphology, with frequent non-viable filamentous cells, and cspCD also showed a pronounced cell death at late stationary phase. In contrast, the cspAB mutant presented increased viability in this phase, which is accompanied by an altered expression of both cspC and cspD, but the triple cspABD mutant loses this characteristic. Taken together, our results suggest that there is a hierarchy of importance among the csp genes regarding stationary phase viability, which is probably achieved by a fine tune balance of the levels of these proteins.

  7. Functional characterization of two SOS-regulated genes involved in mitomycin C resistance in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Kulishev, Carina O; Alves, Ingrid R; Valencia, Estela Y; Pidhirnyj, María I; Fernández-Silva, Frank S; Rodrigues, Ticiane R; Guzzo, Cristiane R; Galhardo, Rodrigo S

    2015-09-01

    The SOS response is a universal bacterial regulon involved in the cellular response to DNA damage and other forms of stress. In Caulobacter crescentus, previous work has identified a plethora of genes that are part of the SOS regulon, but the biological roles of several of them remain to be determined. In this study, we report that two genes, hereafter named mmcA and mmcB, are involved in the defense against DNA damage caused by mitomycin C (MMC), but not against lesions induced by other common DNA damaging agents, such as UVC light, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and hydrogen peroxide. mmcA is a conserved gene that encodes a member of the glyoxalases/dioxygenases protein family, and acts independently of known DNA repair pathways. On the other hand, epistasis analysis showed that mmcB acts in the same pathway as imuC (dnaE2), and is required specifically for MMC-induced mutagenesis, but not for that induced by UV light, suggesting a role for MmcB in translesion synthesis-dependent repair of MMC damage. We show that the lack of MMC-induced mutability in the mmcB strain is not caused by lack of proper SOS induction of the imuABC operon, involved in translesion synthesis (TLS) in C. crescentus. Based on this data and on structural analysis of a close homolog, we propose that MmcB is an endonuclease which creates substrates for ImuABC-mediated TLS patches.

  8. A new factor stimulating peptidoglycan hydrolysis to separate daughter cells in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Justine

    2010-07-01

    Cell division in Gram-negative bacteria involves the co-ordinated invagination of the three cell envelope layers to form two new daughter cell poles. This complex process starts with the polymerization of the tubulin-like protein FtsZ into a Z-ring at mid-cell, which drives cytokinesis and recruits numerous other proteins to the division site. These proteins are involved in Z-ring constriction, inner- and outer-membrane invagination, peptidoglycan remodelling and daughter cell separation. Three papers in this issue of Molecular Microbiology, from the teams of Lucy Shapiro, Martin Thanbichler and Christine Jacobs-Wagner, describe a novel protein, called DipM for Division Involved Protein with LysM domains, that is required for cell division in Caulobacter crescentus. DipM localizes to the mid-cell during cell division, where it is necessary for the hydrolysis of the septal peptidoglycan to remodel the cell wall. Loss of DipM results in severe defects in cell envelope constriction, which is deleterious under fast-growth conditions. State-of-the-art microscopy experiments reveal that the peptidoglycan is thicker and that the cell wall is incorrectly organized in DipM-depleted cells compared with wild-type cells, demonstrating that DipM is essential for reorganizing the cell wall at the division site, for envelope invagination and cell separation in Caulobacter.

  9. Global regulation of gene expression and cell differentiation in Caulobacter crescentus in response to nutrient availability.

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    England, Jennifer C; Perchuk, Barrett S; Laub, Michael T; Gober, James W

    2010-02-01

    In a developmental strategy designed to efficiently exploit and colonize sparse oligotrophic environments, Caulobacter crescentus cells divide asymmetrically, yielding a motile swarmer cell and a sessile stalked cell. After a relatively fixed time period under typical culture conditions, the swarmer cell differentiates into a replicative stalked cell. Since differentiation into the stalked cell type is irreversible, it is likely that environmental factors such as the availability of essential nutrients would influence the timing of the decision to abandon motility and adopt a sessile lifestyle. We measured two different parameters in nutrient-limited chemostat cultures, biomass concentration and the ratio of nonstalked to stalked cells, over a range of flow rates and found that nitrogen limitation significantly extended the swarmer cell life span. The transcriptional profiling experiments described here generate the first comprehensive picture of the global regulatory strategies used by an oligotroph when confronted with an environment where key macronutrients are sparse. The pattern of regulated gene expression in nitrogen- and carbon-limited cells shares some features in common with most copiotrophic organisms, but critical differences suggest that Caulobacter, and perhaps other oligotrophs, have evolved regulatory strategies to deal distinctly with their natural environments. We hypothesize that nitrogen limitation extends the swarmer cell lifetime by delaying the onset of a sequence of differentiation events, which when initiated by the correct combination of external environmental cues, sets the swarmer cell on a path to differentiate into a stalked cell within a fixed time period.

  10. Regulated proteolysis of a transcription factor complex is critical to cell cycle progression in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gora, Kasia G; Cantin, Amber; Wohlever, Matthew; Joshi, Kamal K; Perchuk, Barrett S; Chien, Peter; Laub, Michael T

    2013-03-01

    Cell cycle transitions are often triggered by the proteolysis of key regulatory proteins. In Caulobacter crescentus, the G1-S transition involves the degradation of an essential DNA-binding response regulator, CtrA, by the ClpXP protease. Here, we show that another critical cell cycle regulator, SciP, is also degraded during the G1-S transition, but by the Lon protease. SciP is a small protein that binds directly to CtrA and prevents it from activating target genes during G1. We demonstrate that SciP must be degraded during the G1-S transition so that cells can properly activate CtrA-dependent genes following DNA replication initiation and the reaccumulation of CtrA. These results indicate that like CtrA, SciP levels are tightly regulated during the Caulobacter cell cycle. In addition, we show that formation of a complex between CtrA and SciP at target promoters protects both proteins from their respective proteases. Degradation of either protein thus helps trigger the destruction of the other, facilitating a cooperative disassembly of the complex. Collectively, our results indicate that ClpXP and Lon each degrade an important cell cycle regulator, helping to trigger the onset of S phase and prepare cells for the subsequent programmes of gene expression critical to polar morphogenesis and cell division.

  11. Critical clamp loader processing by an essential AAA+ protease in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vass, Robert H; Chien, Peter

    2013-11-01

    Chromosome replication relies on sliding clamps that are loaded by energy-dependent complexes. In Escherichia coli, the ATP-binding clamp loader subunit DnaX exists as both long (τ) and short (γ) forms generated through programmed translational frameshifting, but the need for both forms is unclear. Here, we show that in Caulobacter crescentus, DnaX isoforms are unexpectedly generated through partial proteolysis by the AAA+ protease casein lytic proteinase (Clp) XP. We find that the normally processive ClpXP protease partially degrades DnaX to produce stable fragments upon encountering a glycine-rich region adjacent to a structured domain. Increasing the sequence complexity of this region prevents partial proteolysis and generates a τ-only form of DnaX in vivo that is unable to support viability on its own. Growth is restored when γ is provided in trans, but these strains are more sensitive to DNA damage compared with strains that can generate γ through proteolysis. Our work reveals an unexpected mode of partial processing by the ClpXP protease to generate DnaX isoforms, demonstrates that both τ and γ forms of DnaX are required for Caulobacter viability, and identifies a role for clamp loader diversity in responding to DNA damage. The conservation of distinct DnaX isoforms throughout bacteria despite fundamentally different mechanisms for producing them suggests there may be a conserved need for alternate clamp loader complexes during DNA damaging conditions.

  12. Function and localization dynamics of bifunctional penicillin-binding proteins in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Wolfgang; Möll, Andrea; Kiekebusch, Daniela; Klein, Kathrin E; Thanbichler, Martin

    2014-04-01

    The peptidoglycan cell wall of bacteria is a complex macromolecule composed of glycan strands that are cross-linked by short peptide bridges. Its biosynthesis involves a conserved group of enzymes, the bifunctional penicillin-binding proteins (bPBPs), which contain both a transglycosylase and a transpeptidase domain, thus being able to elongate the glycan strands and, at the same time, generate the peptide cross-links. The stalked model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus possesses five bPBP paralogs, named Pbp1A, PbpC, PbpX, PbpY, and PbpZ, whose function is still incompletely understood. In this study, we show that any of these proteins except for PbpZ is sufficient for growth and normal morphogenesis when expressed at native or elevated levels, whereas inactivation of all five paralogs is lethal. Growth analyses indicate a central role of PbpX in the resistance of C. crescentus against the noncanonical amino acid d-alanine. Moreover, we show that PbpX and PbpY localize to the cell division site. Their recruitment to the divisome is dependent on the essential cell division protein FtsN and likely involves interactions with FtsL and the putative peptidoglycan hydrolase DipM. The same interaction pattern is observed for Pbp1A and PbpC, although these proteins do not accumulate at midcell. Our findings demonstrate that the bPBPs of C. crescentus are, to a large extent, redundant and have retained the ability to interact with the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machineries responsible for cell elongation, cytokinesis, and stalk growth. Nevertheless, they may preferentially act in specific peptidoglycan biosynthetic complexes, thereby facilitating the independent regulation of distinct growth processes.

  13. Development of an HIV-1 Microbicide Based on Caulobacter crescentus: Blocking Infection by High-Density Display of Virus Entry Inhibitors.

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    Christina Farr

    Full Text Available The HIV/AIDS pandemic remains an enormous global health concern. Despite effective prevention options, 2.6 million new infections occur annually, with women in developing countries accounting for more than half of these infections. New prevention strategies that can be used by women are urgently needed. Topical microbicides specific for HIV-1 represent a promising prevention strategy. Conceptually, using harmless bacteria to display peptides or proteins capable of blocking entry provides an inexpensive approach to microbicide development. To avoid the potential pitfalls of engineering commensal bacteria, our strategy is to genetically display infection inhibitors on a non-native bacterium and rely on topical application of stabilized bacteria before potential virus exposure. Due to the high density cell-surface display capabilities and the inherent low toxicity of the bacterium, the S-layer mediated protein display capabilities of the non-pathogenic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus has been exploited for this approach. We have demonstrated that C. crescentus displaying MIP1α or CD4 interfered with the virus entry pathway and provided significant protection from HIV-1 pseudovirus representing clade B in a standard single cycle infection assay. Here we have expanded our C. crescentus based microbicide approach with additional and diverse classes of natural and synthetic inhibitors of the HIV-1 entry pathway. All display constructs provided variable but significant protection from HIV-1 infection; some with protection as high as 70%. Further, we describe protection from infection with additional viral clades. These findings indicate the significant potential for engineering C. crescentus to be an effective and readily adaptable HIV-1 microbicide platform.

  14. Quantitative Selection Analysis of Bacteriophage φCbK Susceptibility in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Matthias; Beusch, Christian; Bösch, Yvonne; Cerletti, Dario; Flores-Tinoco, Carlos Eduardo; Del Medico, Luca; Tschan, Flavia; Christen, Beat

    2016-01-29

    Classical molecular genetics uses stringent selective conditions to identify mutants with distinct phenotypic responses. Mutations giving rise to less pronounced phenotypes are often missed. However, to gain systems-level insights into complex genetic interaction networks requires genome-wide assignment of quantitative phenotypic traits. In this paper, we present a quantitative selection approach coupled with transposon sequencing (QS-TnSeq) to globally identify the cellular components that orchestrate susceptibility of the cell cycle model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus toward bacteriophage φCbK infection. We found that 135 genes representing 3.30% of the Caulobacter genome exhibit significant accumulation of transposon insertions upon φCbK selection. More than 85% thereof consist of new factors not previously associated with phage φCbK susceptibility. Using hierarchical clustering of dose-dependent TnSeq datasets, we grouped these genes into functional modules that correlate with different stages of the φCbK infection process. We assign φCbK susceptibility to eight new genes that represent novel components of the pilus secretion machinery. Further, we demonstrate that, from 86 motility genes, only seven genes encoding structural and regulatory components of the flagellar hook increase phage resistance when disrupted by transposons, suggesting a link between flagellar hook assembly and pili biogenesis. In addition, we observe high recovery of Tn5 insertions within regulatory sequences of the genes encoding the essential NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex indicating that intact proton motive force is crucial for effective phage propagation. In sum, QS-TnSeq is broadly applicable to perform quantitative and genome-wide systems-genetics analysis of complex phenotypic traits.

  15. A physical approach to segregation and folding of the Caulobacter crescentus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dame, Remus T; Tark-Dame, Mariliis; Schiessel, Helmut

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial genomes are functionally organized. This organization is dynamic and globally changing throughout the cell cycle. Upon initiation of replication of the chromosome, the two origins segregate and move towards their new location taking along the newly replicated genome. Caulobacter crescentus employs a dedicated active partitioning (Par) system to move one copy of the parS centromere to the distal pole, while the other stays at the stalked pole. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, Hong and McAdams describe studies on the speed of segregation of parS and regions up to 150 kb away. They show clear differences in segregation rates between parS and 50 kb flanking regions versus regions further away. To assess segregation rates the authors track fluorescent markers during movement using time-lapse microscopy. The relation between genomic and physical distance of pairs of markers reflects how the genome is folded. This relation permits testing experimental data against models from polymer physics. Such models are helpful in understanding principles of genome folding. Although long used in studies on eukaryotes, this approach has rarely been applied to bacteria. Finally, the authors give the first direct evidence for a role of the bacterial chromatin protein HU in folding the genome in vivo.

  16. Potential role of a bistable histidine kinase switch in the asymmetric division cycle of Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Kartik; Paul, Mark R; Tyson, John J

    2013-01-01

    The free-living aquatic bacterium, Caulobacter crescentus, exhibits two different morphologies during its life cycle. The morphological change from swarmer cell to stalked cell is a result of changes of function of two bi-functional histidine kinases, PleC and CckA. Here, we describe a detailed molecular mechanism by which the function of PleC changes between phosphatase and kinase state. By mathematical modeling of our proposed molecular interactions, we derive conditions under which PleC, CckA and its response regulators exhibit bistable behavior, thus providing a scenario for robust switching between swarmer and stalked states. Our simulations are in reasonable agreement with in vitro and in vivo experimental observations of wild type and mutant phenotypes. According to our model, the kinase form of PleC is essential for the swarmer-to-stalked transition and to prevent premature development of the swarmer pole. Based on our results, we reconcile some published experimental observations and suggest novel mutants to test our predictions.

  17. A DNA damage-induced, SOS-independent checkpoint regulates cell division in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua W Modell

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cells must coordinate DNA replication with cell division, especially during episodes of DNA damage. The paradigm for cell division control following DNA damage in bacteria involves the SOS response where cleavage of the transcriptional repressor LexA induces a division inhibitor. However, in Caulobacter crescentus, cells lacking the primary SOS-regulated inhibitor, sidA, can often still delay division post-damage. Here we identify didA, a second cell division inhibitor that is induced by DNA damage, but in an SOS-independent manner. Together, DidA and SidA inhibit division, such that cells lacking both inhibitors divide prematurely following DNA damage, with lethal consequences. We show that DidA does not disrupt assembly of the division machinery and instead binds the essential division protein FtsN to block cytokinesis. Intriguingly, mutations in FtsW and FtsI, which drive the synthesis of septal cell wall material, can suppress the activity of both SidA and DidA, likely by causing the FtsW/I/N complex to hyperactively initiate cell division. Finally, we identify a transcription factor, DriD, that drives the SOS-independent transcription of didA following DNA damage.

  18. Potential role of a bistable histidine kinase switch in the asymmetric division cycle of Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartik Subramanian

    Full Text Available The free-living aquatic bacterium, Caulobacter crescentus, exhibits two different morphologies during its life cycle. The morphological change from swarmer cell to stalked cell is a result of changes of function of two bi-functional histidine kinases, PleC and CckA. Here, we describe a detailed molecular mechanism by which the function of PleC changes between phosphatase and kinase state. By mathematical modeling of our proposed molecular interactions, we derive conditions under which PleC, CckA and its response regulators exhibit bistable behavior, thus providing a scenario for robust switching between swarmer and stalked states. Our simulations are in reasonable agreement with in vitro and in vivo experimental observations of wild type and mutant phenotypes. According to our model, the kinase form of PleC is essential for the swarmer-to-stalked transition and to prevent premature development of the swarmer pole. Based on our results, we reconcile some published experimental observations and suggest novel mutants to test our predictions.

  19. A DNA damage-induced, SOS-independent checkpoint regulates cell division in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, Joshua W; Kambara, Tracy K; Perchuk, Barrett S; Laub, Michael T

    2014-10-01

    Cells must coordinate DNA replication with cell division, especially during episodes of DNA damage. The paradigm for cell division control following DNA damage in bacteria involves the SOS response where cleavage of the transcriptional repressor LexA induces a division inhibitor. However, in Caulobacter crescentus, cells lacking the primary SOS-regulated inhibitor, sidA, can often still delay division post-damage. Here we identify didA, a second cell division inhibitor that is induced by DNA damage, but in an SOS-independent manner. Together, DidA and SidA inhibit division, such that cells lacking both inhibitors divide prematurely following DNA damage, with lethal consequences. We show that DidA does not disrupt assembly of the division machinery and instead binds the essential division protein FtsN to block cytokinesis. Intriguingly, mutations in FtsW and FtsI, which drive the synthesis of septal cell wall material, can suppress the activity of both SidA and DidA, likely by causing the FtsW/I/N complex to hyperactively initiate cell division. Finally, we identify a transcription factor, DriD, that drives the SOS-independent transcription of didA following DNA damage.

  20. Motor Switching Rates in Caulobacter Crescentus Follow First Passage Time Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jay; Morse, Michael; Bell, Jordan; Li, Guanglai

    2015-03-01

    The flagellar motor of uni-flagellated bacterium Caulobacter crescentus switches stochastically between clockwise (CW) and counterclockwise (CCW) rotation. We performed measurements of the time intervals between switches in order to gain insight on motor dynamics and regulation. Our measurements were performed both on free swimming cells and tethered cells with their flagella attached to a glass slide. A peak time of approximately one second was observed in both motor directions with counterclockwise intervals more sharply peaked. The distributions of switching times can be fitted using biased first passage time statistics. We present a model of motor switching dynamics, which is controlled by the binding of CheY-P to motor subunits FliM. A lower threshold number of FliM with CheY-P bound triggers a switch in motor rotation from CW to CCW, whereas a higher threshold triggers an opposing switch from CCW to CW. The time intervals between alternating switches may be increased or decreased by regulating CheY-P concentration, resulting in biased directional motion in the cells swimming trajectory over many motor cycles under external spatial or temporal gradients. Work funded by the United States National Science Foundation.

  1. Identification of ClpP substrates in Caulobacter crescentus reveals a role for regulated proteolysis in bacterial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Nowsheen H; Vass, Robert H; Stoddard, Patrick R; Shin, Dong K; Chien, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Energy-dependent proteases ensure the timely removal of unwanted proteins in a highly selective fashion. In Caulobacter crescentus, protein degradation by the ClpXP protease is critical for cell cycle progression; however, only a handful of substrates are currently known. Here, we use a trapping approach to identify putative substrates of the ClpP associated proteases in C. crescentus. Biochemical validation of several of these targets reveals specific protease recognition motifs and suggests a need for ClpXP-specific degradation beyond degradation of known cell cycle regulators. We focus on a particular instance of regulated proteolysis in Caulobacter by exploring the role of ClpXP in degrading the stalk synthesis transcription factor TacA. We show that TacA degradation is controlled during the cell cycle dependent on the ClpXP regulator CpdR and that stabilization of TacA increases degradation of another ClpXP substrate, CtrA, while restoring deficiencies associated with prolific CpdR activity. Together, our work reveals a number of new validated ClpXP substrates, clarifies rules of protease substrate selection, and demonstrates how regulated protein degradation is critical for Caulobacter development and cell cycle progression.

  2. Cloning and cell cycle-dependent expression of DNA replication gene dnaC from Caulobacter crescentus.

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    Chromosome replication in the asymmetrically dividing bacteria Caulobacter crescentus is discontinuous with the new, motile swarmer cell undergoing an obligatory presynthetic gap period (G1 period) of 60 min before the initiation of DNA synthesis and stalk formation. To examine the regulation of the cell division cycle at the molecular level, we have cloned the DNA chain elongation gene dnaC from a genomic DNA library constructed in cosmid vector pLAFR1-7. To ensure that the cloned sequence c...

  3. Characterization of a unique Caulobacter crescentus aldose-aldose oxidoreductase having dual activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andberg, Martina; Maaheimo, Hannu; Kumpula, Esa-Pekka; Boer, Harry; Toivari, Mervi; Penttilä, Merja; Koivula, Anu

    2016-01-01

    We describe here the characterization of a novel enzyme called aldose-aldose oxidoreductase (Cc AAOR; EC 1.1.99) from Caulobacter crescentus. The Cc AAOR exists in solution as a dimer, belongs to the Gfo/Idh/MocA family and shows homology with the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase from Zymomonas mobilis. However, unlike other known members of this protein family, Cc AAOR is specific for aldose sugars and can be in the same catalytic cycle both oxidise and reduce a panel of monosaccharides at the C1 position, producing in each case the corresponding aldonolactone and alditol, respectively. Cc AAOR contains a tightly-bound nicotinamide cofactor, which is regenerated in this oxidation-reduction cycle. The highest oxidation activity was detected on D-glucose but significant activity was also observed on D-xylose, L-arabinose and D-galactose, revealing that both hexose and pentose sugars are accepted as substrates by Cc AAOR. The configuration at the C2 and C3 positions of the saccharides was shown to be especially important for the substrate binding. Interestingly, besides monosaccharides, Cc AAOR can also oxidise a range of 1,4-linked oligosaccharides having aldose unit at the reducing end, such as lactose, malto- and cello-oligosaccharides as well as xylotetraose. (1)H NMR used to monitor the oxidation and reduction reaction simultaneously, demonstrated that although D-glucose has the highest affinity and is also oxidised most efficiently by Cc AAOR, the reduction of D-glucose is clearly not as efficient. For the overall reaction catalysed by Cc AAOR, the L-arabinose, D-xylose and D-galactose were the most potent substrates.

  4. Expression and characterization of a GH39 β-xylosidase II from Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Juliana Moço; Graciano, Luciana; Abrahão, Josielle; Loth, Eduardo Alexandre; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira; Kadowaki, Marina Kimiko; Henn, Caroline; Simão, Rita de Cássia Garcia

    2012-12-01

    In the present work, the gene xynB2, encoding a β-xylosidase II of the Glycoside Hydrolase 39 (GH39) family, of Caulobacter crescentus was cloned and successfully overexpressed in Escherichia coli DH10B. The recombinant protein (CcXynB2) was purified using nickel-Sepharose affinity chromatography, with a recovery yield of 75.5 %. CcXynB2 appeared as a single band of 60 kDa on a sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel and was recognized by a specific polyclonal antiserum. The predicted CcXynB2 protein showed a high homology with GH39 β-xylosidases of the genus Xanthomonas. CcXynB2 exhibited an optimal activity at 55 °C and a pH of 6. CcXynB2 displayed stability at pH values of 4.5-7.5 for 24 h and thermotolerance up to 50 °C. The K (M) and V (Max) values were 9.3 ± 0.45 mM and 402 ± 19 μmol min(-1) for ρ-nitrophenyl-β-D-xylopyranoside, respectively. The purified recombinant enzyme efficiently produced reducing sugars from birchwood xylan and sugarcane bagasse fibers pre-treated with a purified xylanase. As few bacterial GH39 family β-xylosidases have been characterized, this work provides a good contribution to this group of enzymes.

  5. Superresolution imaging in live Caulobacter crescentus cells using photoswitchable enhanced yellow fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biteen, Julie S.; Thompson, Michael A.; Tselentis, Nicole K.; Shapiro, Lucy; Moerner, W. E.

    2009-02-01

    Recently, photoactivation and photoswitching were used to control single-molecule fluorescent labels and produce images of cellular structures beyond the optical diffraction limit (e.g., PALM, FPALM, and STORM). While previous live-cell studies relied on sophisticated photoactivatable fluorescent proteins, we show in the present work that superresolution imaging can be performed with fusions to the commonly used fluorescent protein EYFP. Rather than being photoactivated, however, EYFP can be reactivated with violet light after apparent photobleaching. In each cycle after initial imaging, only a sparse subset fluorophores is reactivated and localized, and the final image is then generated from the measured single-molecule positions. Because these methods are based on the imaging nanometer-sized single-molecule emitters and on the use of an active control mechanism to produce sparse sub-ensembles, we suggest the phrase "Single-Molecule Active-Control Microscopy" (SMACM) as an inclusive term for this general imaging strategy. In this paper, we address limitations arising from physiologically imposed upper boundaries on the fluorophore concentration by employing dark time-lapse periods to allow single-molecule motions to fill in filamentous structures, increasing the effective labeling concentration while localizing each emitter at most once per resolution-limited spot. We image cell-cycle-dependent superstructures of the bacterial actin protein MreB in live Caulobacter crescentus cells with sub-40-nm resolution for the first time. Furthermore, we quantify the reactivation quantum yield of EYFP, and find this to be 1.6 x 10-6, on par with conventional photoswitchable fluorescent proteins like Dronpa. These studies show that EYFP is a useful emitter for in vivo superresolution imaging of intracellular structures in bacterial cells.

  6. Modulation of medium pH by Caulobacter crescentus facilitates recovery from uranium-induced growth arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dan M; Jiao, Yongqin

    2014-09-01

    The oxidized form of uranium [U(VI)] predominates in oxic environments and poses a major threat to ecosystems. Due to its ability to mineralize U(VI), the oligotroph Caulobacter crescentus is an attractive candidate for U(VI) bioremediation. However, the physiological basis for U(VI) tolerance is unclear. Here we demonstrated that U(VI) caused a temporary growth arrest in C. crescentus and three other bacterial species, although the duration of growth arrest was significantly shorter for C. crescentus. During the majority of the growth arrest period, cell morphology was unaltered and DNA replication initiation was inhibited. However, during the transition from growth arrest to exponential phase, cells with shorter stalks were observed, suggesting a decoupling between stalk development and the cell cycle. Upon recovery from growth arrest, C. crescentus proliferated with a growth rate comparable to that of a control without U(VI), although a fraction of these cells appeared filamentous with multiple replication start sites. Normal cell morphology was restored by the end of exponential phase. Cells did not accumulate U(VI) resistance mutations during the prolonged growth arrest, but rather, a reduction in U(VI) toxicity occurred concomitantly with an increase in medium pH. Together, these data suggest that C. crescentus recovers from U(VI)-induced growth arrest by reducing U(VI) toxicity through pH modulation. Our finding represents a unique U(VI) detoxification strategy and provides insight into how microbes cope with U(VI) under nongrowing conditions, a metabolic state that is prevalent in natural environments.

  7. Activation and polar sequestration of PopA, a c-di-GMP effector protein involved in Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozaki, Shogo; Schalch-Moser, Annina; Zumthor, Ludwig;

    2014-01-01

    When Caulobacter crescentus enters S-phase the replication initiation inhibitor CtrA dynamically positions to the old cell pole to be degraded by the polar ClpXP protease. Polar delivery of CtrA requires PopA and the diguanylate cyclase PleD that positions to the same pole. Here we present evidence...

  8. The cloning, expression, purification, characterization and modeled structure of Caulobacter crescentus β-Xylosidase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graciano, Luciana; Corrêa, Juliana Moço; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira; Seixas, Flavio Augusto Vicente; Kadowaki, Marina Kimiko; Sampaio, Silvio César; Silva, José Luis da Conceição; Osaku, Clarice Aoki; Simão, Rita de Cássia Garcia

    2012-09-01

    The xynB1 gene (CCNA 01040) of Caulobacter crescentus that encodes a bifunctional enzyme containing the conserved β-Xylosidase and α-L-Arabinofuranosidase (β-Xyl I-α-L-Ara) domains was amplified by PCR and cloned into the vector pJet1.2Blunt. The xynB1 gene was subcloned into the vector pPROEX-hta that produces a histidine-fused translation product. The overexpression of recombinant β-Xyl I-α-L-Ara was induced with IPTG in BL21 (DE3) and the resulting intracellular protein was purified with pre-packaged nickel-Sepharose columns. The recombinant β-Xyl I-α-L-Ara exhibited a specific β-Xylosidase I activity of 1.25 U mg(-1) to oNPX and a specific α-L-Arabinofuranosidase activity of 0.47 U mg(-1) to pNPA. The predominant activity of the recombinant enzyme was its β-Xylosidase I activity, and the enzymatic characterization was focused on it. The β-Xylosidase I activity was high over the pH range 3-10, with maximal activity at pH 6. The enzyme activity was optimal at 45 °C, and a high degree of stability was verified over 240 min at this temperature. Moreover, β-Xylosidase activity was inhibited in the presence of the metals Zn(2+) and Cu(2+), and the enzyme exhibited K(M) and V(Max) values of 2.89 ± 0.13 mM and 1.4 ± 0.04 μM min(-1) to oNPX, respectively. The modeled structure of β-xylosidase I showed that its active site is highly conserved compared with other structures of the GH43 family. The increase in the number of contact residues responsible for maintaining the dimeric structure indicates that this dimer is more stable than the tetramer form.

  9. Suppression of amber codons in Caulobacter crescentus by the orthogonal Escherichia coli histidyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNAHis pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jae-hyeong; Llopis, Paula Montero; Heinritz, Jennifer; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine; Söll, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    While translational read-through of stop codons by suppressor tRNAs is common in many bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes, this phenomenon has not yet been observed in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. Based on a previous report that C. crescentus and Escherichia coli tRNA(His) have distinctive identity elements, we constructed E. coli tRNA(His) CUA, a UAG suppressor tRNA for C. crescentus. By examining the expression of three UAG codon- containing reporter genes (encoding a β-lactamase, the fluorescent mCherry protein, or the C. crescentus xylonate dehydratase), we demonstrated that the E. coli histidyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA(His) CUA pair enables in vivo UAG suppression in C. crescentus. E. coli histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS) or tRNA(His) CUA alone did not achieve suppression; this indicates that the E. coli HisRS/tRNA(His) CUA pair is orthogonal in C. crescentus. These results illustrate that UAG suppression can be achieved in C. crescentus with an orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/suppressor tRNA pair.

  10. Suppression of amber codons in Caulobacter crescentus by the orthogonal Escherichia coli histidyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNAHis pair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-hyeong Ko

    Full Text Available While translational read-through of stop codons by suppressor tRNAs is common in many bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes, this phenomenon has not yet been observed in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. Based on a previous report that C. crescentus and Escherichia coli tRNA(His have distinctive identity elements, we constructed E. coli tRNA(His CUA, a UAG suppressor tRNA for C. crescentus. By examining the expression of three UAG codon- containing reporter genes (encoding a β-lactamase, the fluorescent mCherry protein, or the C. crescentus xylonate dehydratase, we demonstrated that the E. coli histidyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA(His CUA pair enables in vivo UAG suppression in C. crescentus. E. coli histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS or tRNA(His CUA alone did not achieve suppression; this indicates that the E. coli HisRS/tRNA(His CUA pair is orthogonal in C. crescentus. These results illustrate that UAG suppression can be achieved in C. crescentus with an orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/suppressor tRNA pair.

  11. Identification of ω-aminotransferase from Caulobacter crescentus and site-directed mutagenesis to broaden substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Bum-Yeol; Ko, Seung-Hyun; Park, Hyung-Yeon; Seo, Joo-Hyun; Lee, Bon-Su; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2008-01-01

    A putative aminotransferase gene, cc3143 (aptA), from Caulobacter crescentus was screened by bioinformatical tools and overexpressed in E. coli, and the substrate specificity of the aminotransferase was investigated. AptA showed high activity for short-chain beta-amino acids. It showed the highest activity for 3-amino-n-butyric acid. It showed higher activity toward aromatic amines than aliphatic amines. The 3D model of the aminotransferase was constructed by homology modeling using a dialkylglycine decarboxylase PDB ID: 1DGE) as a template. Then, the aminotransferase was rationally redesigned to increase the activity for 3-amino- 3-phenylpropionic acid. The mutants N285A and V227G increased the relative activity for 3-amino-3-phenylpropionic acid to 3-amino-n-butyric acid by 11-fold and 3-fold, respectively, over that of wild type.

  12. Structural insights into ChpT, an essential dimeric histidine phosphotransferase regulating the cell cycle in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Clantin, Bernard; Dewitte, Frédérique; Lens, Zoé; Verger, Alexis; Biondi, Emanuele G; Villeret, Vincent

    2012-09-01

    Two-component and phosphorelay signal-transduction proteins are crucial for bacterial cell-cycle regulation in Caulobacter crescentus. ChpT is an essential histidine phosphotransferase that controls the activity of the master cell-cycle regulator CtrA by phosphorylation. Here, the 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of ChpT is reported. ChpT is a homodimer and adopts the domain architecture of the intracellular part of class I histidine kinases. Each subunit consists of two distinct domains: an N-terminal helical hairpin domain and a C-terminal α/β domain. The two N-terminal domains are adjacent within the dimer, forming a four-helix bundle. The ChpT C-terminal domain adopts an atypical Bergerat ATP-binding fold.

  13. High throughput 3D super-resolution microscopy reveals Caulobacter crescentus in vivo Z-ring organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Seamus J; Pengo, Thomas; Meibom, Karin L; Fernandez Fernandez, Carmen; Collier, Justine; Manley, Suliana

    2014-03-25

    We created a high-throughput modality of photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) that enables automated 3D PALM imaging of hundreds of synchronized bacteria during all stages of the cell cycle. We used high-throughput PALM to investigate the nanoscale organization of the bacterial cell division protein FtsZ in live Caulobacter crescentus. We observed that FtsZ predominantly localizes as a patchy midcell band, and only rarely as a continuous ring, supporting a model of "Z-ring" organization whereby FtsZ protofilaments are randomly distributed within the band and interact only weakly. We found evidence for a previously unidentified period of rapid ring contraction in the final stages of the cell cycle. We also found that DNA damage resulted in production of high-density continuous Z-rings, which may obstruct cytokinesis. Our results provide a detailed quantitative picture of in vivo Z-ring organization.

  14. The Caulobacter crescentus transducing phage Cr30 is a unique member of the T4-like family of myophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Bert; Gibbs, Whitney; Diez, Simon; Ash, Kurt

    2015-06-01

    Bacteriophage Cr30 has proven useful for the transduction of Caulobacter crescentus. Nucleotide sequencing of Cr30 DNA revealed that the Cr30 genome consists of 155,997 bp of DNA that codes for 287 proteins and five tRNAs. In contrast to the 67 % GC content of the host genome, the GC content of the Cr30 genome is only 38 %. This lower GC content causes both the codon usage pattern and the amino acid composition of the Cr30 proteins to be quite different from those of the host bacteria. As a consequence, the Cr30 mRNAs probably are translated at a rate that is slower than the normal rate for host mRNAs. A phylogenetic comparison of the genome indicates that Cr30 is a member of the T4-like family that is most closely related to a new group of T-like phages exemplified by фM12.

  15. Cloning and characterization of the gene encoding the PepF endopeptidase from the aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braz Vânia S.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The metallopeptidases have a very important role in bacteria, being involved in several processes that rely on protein turnover, such as nutrition, degradation of signal peptides, protein localization and virulence. We have cloned and characterized the gene of the metalloendopeptidase PepF from the aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. The gene upstream of pepF (orf1 encodes a conserved hypothetical protein found in Mycobacterium and Streptomyces. pepF is co-transcribed with the gene downstream (orf3, which encodes a protein that belongs to the ABC1 protein kinase family, suggesting that these two proteins may share a common function in the cell. The C. crescentus PepF protein possesses the conserved HEXGH motif present in zinc binding domains of PepF homologs. Disruption of the pepF gene by insertion of a vector sequence did not produced any growth defect, but the mutant strain possesses only 30% of the specific activity of endopeptidases present in the wild type strain. Deletions and point mutations in the regulatory region showed that there are two putative promoter regions, and the operon expression is independent of the transcription regulator CtrA. The results indicate that PepF is not essential for either growth or development of this bacterium using peptides as the sole carbon source, suggesting that other peptidases can be sharing this function.

  16. Osmolality-dependent relocation of penicillin-binding protein PBP2 to the division site in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Jason; Priyadarshini, Richa; Takacs, Constantin N; Costa, Teresa; Dye, Natalie A; Shapiro, Lucy; Vollmer, Waldemar; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2012-06-01

    The synthesis of the peptidoglycan cell wall is carefully regulated in time and space. In nature, this essential process occurs in cells that live in fluctuating environments. Here we show that the spatial distributions of specific cell wall proteins in Caulobacter crescentus are sensitive to small external osmotic upshifts. The penicillin-binding protein PBP2, which is commonly branded as an essential cell elongation-specific transpeptidase, switches its localization from a dispersed, patchy pattern to an accumulation at the FtsZ ring location in response to osmotic upshifts as low as 40 mosmol/kg. This osmolality-dependent relocation to the division apparatus is initiated within less than a minute, while restoration to the patchy localization pattern is dependent on cell growth and takes 1 to 2 generations. Cell wall morphogenetic protein RodA and penicillin-binding protein PBP1a also change their spatial distribution by accumulating at the division site in response to external osmotic upshifts. Consistent with its ecological distribution, C. crescentus displays a narrow range of osmotolerance, with an upper limit of 225 mosmol/kg in minimal medium. Collectively, our findings reveal an unsuspected level of environmental regulation of cell wall protein behavior that is likely linked to an ecological adaptation.

  17. Shotgun proteomic analysis unveils survival and detoxification strategies by Caulobacter crescentus during exposure to uranium, chromium, and cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Mimi C; Ma, Jincai; Salemi, Michelle R; Phinney, Brett S; Bowman, Grant R; Jiao, Yongqin

    2014-04-01

    The ubiquitous bacterium Caulobacter crescentus holds promise to be used in bioremediation applications due to its ability to mineralize U(VI) under aerobic conditions. Here, cell free extracts of C. crescentus grown in the presence of uranyl nitrate [U(VI)], potassium chromate [Cr(VI)], or cadmium sulfate [Cd(II)] were used for label-free proteomic analysis. Proteins involved in two-component signaling and amino acid metabolism were up-regulated in response to all three metals, and proteins involved in aerobic oxidative phosphorylation and chemotaxis were down-regulated under these conditions. Clustering analysis of proteomic enrichment revealed that the three metals also induce distinct patterns of up- or down-regulated expression among different functional classes of proteins. Under U(VI) exposure, a phytase enzyme and an ABC transporter were up-regulated. Heat shock and outer membrane responses were found associated with Cr(VI), while efflux pumps and oxidative stress proteins were up-regulated with Cd(II). Experimental validations were performed on select proteins. We found that a phytase plays a role in U(VI) and Cr(VI) resistance and detoxification and that a Cd(II)-specific transporter confers Cd(II) resistance. Interestingly, analysis of promoter regions in genes associated with differentially expressed proteins suggests that U(VI) exposure affects cell cycle progression.

  18. A novel membrane anchor for FtsZ is linked to cell wall hydrolysis in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Elizabeth L; Razavi, Shiva; Inoue, Takanari; Goley, Erin D

    2016-07-01

    In most bacteria, the tubulin-like GTPase FtsZ forms an annulus at midcell (the Z-ring) which recruits the division machinery and regulates cell wall remodeling. Although both activities require membrane attachment of FtsZ, few membrane anchors have been characterized. FtsA is considered to be the primary membrane tether for FtsZ in bacteria, however in Caulobacter crescentus, FtsA arrives at midcell after stable Z-ring assembly and early FtsZ-directed cell wall synthesis. We hypothesized that additional proteins tether FtsZ to the membrane and demonstrate that in C. crescentus, FzlC is one such membrane anchor. FzlC associates with membranes directly in vivo and in vitro and recruits FtsZ to membranes in vitro. As for most known membrane anchors, the C-terminal peptide of FtsZ is required for its recruitment to membranes by FzlC in vitro and midcell recruitment of FzlC in cells. In vivo, overproduction of FzlC causes cytokinesis defects whereas deletion of fzlC causes synthetic defects with dipM, ftsE and amiC mutants, implicating FzlC in cell wall hydrolysis. Our characterization of FzlC as a novel membrane anchor for FtsZ expands our understanding of FtsZ regulators and establishes a role for membrane-anchored FtsZ in the regulation of cell wall hydrolysis.

  19. Direct interaction of FliX and FlbD is required for their regulatory activity in Caulobacter crescentus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutton Rachel J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The temporal and spatial expression of late flagellar genes in Caulobacter crescentus is activated by the transcription factor FlbD and its partner trans-acting factor FliX. The physical interaction of these two proteins represents an alternative mechanism for regulating the activity of σ54 transcription factors. This study is to characterize the interaction of the two proteins and the consequences of the interaction on their regulatory activity. Results FliX and FlbD form stable complexes, which can stand the interference of 2.65 M NaCl. The stability of FliX and FlbD was affected by the co-existence of each other. Five FliX mutants (R71A, L85K, Δ117-118, T130L, and L136K were created by site-directed mutagenesis in conserved regions of the protein. All mutants were successfully expressed in both wild-type and ΔfliX Caulobacter strains. All but FliXL85K could rescue the motility and cell division defects of a ΔfliX mutant strain. The ability of FliX to regulate the transcription of class II and class III/IV flagellar promoters was fully diminished due to the L85K mutation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiment revealed that FliXL85K was unable to physically interact with FlbD. Conclusions FliX interacts with FlbD and thereby directly regulates the activity of FlbD in response to flagellar assembly. Mutations in highly conserved regions of FliX could severely affect the recognition between FliX and FlbD and hence interrupt the normal progression of flagellar synthesis and other developmental events in Caulobacter.

  20. Copper-zinc superoxide dismutase of Caulobacter crescentus: Cloning, sequencing, and mapping of the gene and periplasmic location of the enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinman, H.M. (Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (USA)); Ely, B. (Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia (USA))

    1990-06-01

    To investigate the function of the copper-zinc form of superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) (and its structural relationship to the eucaryotic CuZnSoDs) in the freshwater bacterium Caulobacter crecentus, the gene encoding CuZnSOD (sodC) of C. crescentus CB15 was cloned and sequenced. By hybridization to pulsed-field electrophoresis gels, sodC was mapped near cysE in the C. crescentus chromosome. Through analysis of spheroplasts, the two SODs of C. crescentus were shown to be differently localized, CuZnSOD in the periplasm and FeSOD in the cytoplasm. In its natural habitat, C. crescentus is frequently associated with blue-green algae (cyanobacteria). The oxygen evolved by these photosynthetic algae may create an extracellular oxidative stress against which the periplasmic CuZnSOD may defend more effectively than the cytoplasmic FeSOD. Amino acid sequence alignments of C. crescentus CuZnSOD with eucaryotic CuZnSODs and with CuZnSOD of Photobacterium leiognathi (the only other bacterium from which CuZnSOD has been isolated and sequenced) suggest similar supersecondary structures for bacterial and eucaryotic CuZnSODs but reveal four novel substitutions in C. crescentus CuZnSOD: a phenylalanine critical to intrasubunit hydrophobic bonding replaced by alanine, a histidine ligand of zinc replaced by aspartate, and substitutions of two other previously invariant residues that stabilize zinc or both copper and zinc.

  1. The β-sliding clamp directs the localization of HdaA to the replisome in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Carmen; Grosse, Karin; Sourjik, Victor; Collier, Justine

    2013-11-01

    The initiation of chromosome replication is tightly regulated in bacteria to ensure that it takes place only once per cell cycle. In many proteobacteria, this process requires the ATP-bound form of the DnaA protein. The regulatory inactivation of DnaA (RIDA) facilitates the conversion of DnaA-ATP into replication-inactive DnaA-ADP, thereby preventing overinitiation. Homologues of the HdaA protein, together with the β-clamp of the DNA polymerase (DnaN), are required for this process. Here, we used fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments to demonstrate that HdaA interacts with DnaN in live Caulobacter crescentus cells. We show that a QFKLPL motif in the N-terminal region of HdaA is required for this interaction and that this motif is also needed to recruit HdaA to the subcellular location occupied by the replisome during DNA replication. An HdaA mutant protein that cannot colocalize or interact with DnaN can also not support the essential function of HdaA. These results suggest that the recruitment of HdaA to the replisome is needed during RIDA in C. crescentus, probably as a means to sense whether chromosome replication has initiated before DnaA becomes inactivated. In addition, we show that a conserved R145 residue located in the AAA+ domain of HdaA is also needed for the function of HdaA, although it does not affect the interaction of HdaA with DnaN in vivo. The AAA+ domain of HdaA may therefore be required during RIDA after the initial recruitment of HdaA to the replisome by DnaN.

  2. Functional characterization of UDP-glucose:undecaprenyl-phosphate glucose-1-phosphate transferases of Escherichia coli and Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kinnari B; Toh, Evelyn; Fernandez, Ximena B; Hanuszkiewicz, Anna; Hardy, Gail G; Brun, Yves V; Bernards, Mark A; Valvano, Miguel A

    2012-05-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 WcaJ and the Caulobacter crescentus HfsE, PssY, and PssZ enzymes are predicted to initiate the synthesis of colanic acid (CA) capsule and holdfast polysaccharide, respectively. These proteins belong to a prokaryotic family of membrane enzymes that catalyze the formation of a phosphoanhydride bond joining a hexose-1-phosphate with undecaprenyl phosphate (Und-P). In this study, in vivo complementation assays of an E. coli K-12 wcaJ mutant demonstrated that WcaJ and PssY can complement CA synthesis. Furthermore, WcaJ can restore holdfast production in C. crescentus. In vitro transferase assays demonstrated that both WcaJ and PssY utilize UDP-glucose but not UDP-galactose. However, in a strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium deficient in the WbaP O antigen initiating galactosyltransferase, complementation with WcaJ or PssY resulted in O-antigen production. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) revealed the attachment of both CA and O-antigen molecules to lipid A-core oligosaccharide (OS). Therefore, while UDP-glucose is the preferred substrate of WcaJ and PssY, these enzymes can also utilize UDP-galactose. This unexpected feature of WcaJ and PssY may help to map specific residues responsible for the nucleotide diphosphate specificity of these or similar enzymes. Also, the reconstitution of O-antigen synthesis in Salmonella, CA capsule synthesis in E. coli, and holdfast synthesis provide biological assays of high sensitivity to examine the sugar-1-phosphate transferase specificity of heterologous proteins.

  3. Extracytoplasmic function (ECF sigma factor σF is involved in Caulobacter crescentus response to heavy metal stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohler Christian

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus inhabits low-nutrient environments and can tolerate certain levels of heavy metals in these sites. It has been reported that C. crescentus responds to exposure to various heavy metals by altering the expression of a large number of genes. Results In this work, we show that the ECF sigma factor σF is one of the regulatory proteins involved in the control of the transcriptional response to chromium and cadmium. Microarray experiments indicate that σF controls eight genes during chromium stress, most of which were previously described as induced by heavy metals. Surprisingly, σF itself is not strongly auto-regulated under metal stress conditions. Interestingly, σF-dependent genes are not induced in the presence of agents that generate reactive oxygen species. Promoter analyses revealed that a conserved σF-dependent sequence is located upstream of all genes of the σF regulon. In addition, we show that the second gene in the sigF operon acts as a negative regulator of σF function, and the encoded protein has been named NrsF (Negative regulator of sigma F. Substitution of two conserved cysteine residues (C131 and C181 in NrsF affects its ability to maintain the expression of σF-dependent genes at basal levels. Furthermore, we show that σF is released into the cytoplasm during chromium stress and in cells carrying point mutations in both conserved cysteines of the protein NrsF. Conclusion A possible mechanism for induction of the σF-dependent genes by chromium and cadmium is the inactivation of the putative anti-sigma factor NrsF, leading to the release of σF to bind RNA polymerase core and drive transcription of its regulon.

  4. Identification of a U/Zn/Cu responsive global regulatory two-component system in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dan M; Overton, K Wesley; Liou, Megan J; Jiao, Yongqin

    2016-12-30

    Despite the well-known toxicity of uranium (U) to bacteria, little is known about how cells sense and respond to U. The recent finding of a U-specific stress response in Caulobacter crescentus has provided a foundation for studying the mechanisms of U- perception in bacteria. To gain insight into this process, we used a forward genetic screen to identify the regulatory components governing expression of the urcA promoter (PurcA ) that is strongly induced by U. This approach unearthed a previously uncharacterized two-component system, named UzcRS, which is responsible for U-dependent activation of PurcA . UzcRS is also highly responsive to zinc and copper, revealing a broader specificity than previously thought. Using ChIP-seq, we found that UzcR binds extensively throughout the genome in a metal-dependent manner and recognizes a noncanonical DNA-binding site. Coupling the genome-wide occupancy data with RNA-seq analysis revealed that UzcR is a global regulator of transcription, predominately activating genes encoding proteins that are localized to the cell envelope; these include metallopeptidases, multidrug-resistant efflux (MDR) pumps, TonB-dependent receptors and many proteins of unknown function. Collectively, our data suggest that UzcRS couples the perception of U, Zn and Cu with a novel extracytoplasmic stress response.

  5. Bactofilins, a ubiquitous class of cytoskeletal proteins mediating polar localization of a cell wall synthase in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Juliane; Briegel, Ariane; Mörschel, Erhard; Kahnt, Jörg; Leser, Katja; Wick, Stephanie; Jensen, Grant J; Thanbichler, Martin

    2010-01-20

    The cytoskeleton has a key function in the temporal and spatial organization of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the identification of a new class of polymer-forming proteins, termed bactofilins, that are widely conserved among bacteria. In Caulobacter crescentus, two bactofilin paralogues cooperate to form a sheet-like structure lining the cytoplasmic membrane in proximity of the stalked cell pole. These assemblies mediate polar localization of a peptidoglycan synthase involved in stalk morphogenesis, thus complementing the function of the actin-like cytoskeleton and the cell division machinery in the regulation of cell wall biogenesis. In other bacteria, bactofilins can establish rod-shaped filaments or associate with the cell division apparatus, indicating considerable structural and functional flexibility. Bactofilins polymerize spontaneously in the absence of additional cofactors in vitro, forming stable ribbon- or rod-like filament bundles. Our results suggest that these structures have evolved as an alternative to intermediate filaments, serving as versatile molecular scaffolds in a variety of cellular pathways.

  6. The small protein MbiA interacts with MreB and modulates cell shape in Caulobacter crescentus.

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    Yakhnina, Anastasiya A; Gitai, Zemer

    2012-09-01

    In Caulobacter crescentus, the actin homologue MreB is critical for cell shape maintenance. Despite the central importance of MreB for cell morphology and viability, very little is known about MreB-interacting factors. Here, we use an overexpression approach to identify a novel MreB interactor, MbiA. MbiA interacts with MreB in both biochemical and genetic assays, colocalizes with MreB throughout the cell cycle, and relies on MreB for its localization. MbiA overexpression mimics the loss of MreB function, severely perturbing cell morphology, inhibiting growth and inducing cell lysis. Additionally, mbiA deletion shows a synthetic growth phenotype with a hypomorphic allele of the MreB interactor RodZ, suggesting that these two MreB-interacting proteins either have partially redundant functions or participate in the same functional complex. Our work thus establishes MbiA as a novel cell shape regulator that appears to function through regulating MreB, and opens avenues for discovery of more MreB-regulating factors by showing that overexpression screens are a valuable tool for uncovering potentially redundant cell shape effectors.

  7. Phosphotransferase-dependent accumulation of (p)ppGpp in response to glutamine deprivation in Caulobacter crescentus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronneau, Séverin; Petit, Kenny; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2016-01-01

    The alarmone (p)ppGpp is commonly used by bacteria to quickly respond to nutrient starvation. Although (p)ppGpp synthetases such as SpoT have been extensively studied, little is known about the molecular mechanisms stimulating alarmone synthesis upon starvation. Here, we describe an essential role of the nitrogen-related phosphotransferase system (PTSNtr) in controlling (p)ppGpp accumulation in Caulobacter crescentus. We show that cells sense nitrogen starvation by way of detecting glutamine deprivation using the first enzyme (EINtr) of PTSNtr. Decreasing intracellular glutamine concentration triggers phosphorylation of EINtr and its downstream components HPr and EIIANtr. Once phosphorylated, both HPr∼P and EIIANtr∼P stimulate (p)ppGpp accumulation by modulating SpoT activities. This burst of second messenger primarily impacts the non-replicative phase of the cell cycle by extending the G1 phase. This work highlights a new role for bacterial PTS systems in stimulating (p)ppGpp accumulation in response to metabolic cues and in controlling cell cycle progression and cell growth. PMID:27109061

  8. A DNA damage checkpoint in Caulobacter crescentus inhibits cell division through a direct interaction with FtsW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, Joshua W; Hopkins, Alexander C; Laub, Michael T

    2011-06-15

    Following DNA damage, cells typically delay cell cycle progression and inhibit cell division until their chromosomes have been repaired. The bacterial checkpoint systems responsible for these DNA damage responses are incompletely understood. Here, we show that Caulobacter crescentus responds to DNA damage by coordinately inducing an SOS regulon and inhibiting the master regulator CtrA. Included in the SOS regulon is sidA (SOS-induced inhibitor of cell division A), a membrane protein of only 29 amino acids that helps to delay cell division following DNA damage, but is dispensable in undamaged cells. SidA is sufficient, when overproduced, to block cell division. However, unlike many other regulators of bacterial cell division, SidA does not directly disrupt the assembly or stability of the cytokinetic ring protein FtsZ, nor does it affect the recruitment of other components of the cell division machinery. Instead, we provide evidence that SidA inhibits division by binding directly to FtsW to prevent the final constriction of the cytokinetic ring.

  9. DNA methylation by CcrM activates the transcription of two genes required for the division of Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Diego; Collier, Justine

    2013-04-01

    DNA methylation regulates many processes, including gene expression, by superimposing secondary information on DNA sequences. The conserved CcrM enzyme, which methylates adenines in GANTC sequences, is essential to the viability of several Alphaproteobacteria. In this study, we find that Caulobacter crescentus cells lacking the CcrM enzyme accumulate low levels of the two conserved FtsZ and MipZ proteins, leading to a severe defect in cell division. This defect can be compensated by the expression of the ftsZ gene from an inducible promoter or by spontaneous suppressor mutations that promote FtsZ accumulation. We show that CcrM promotes the transcription of the ftsZ and mipZ genes and that the ftsZ and mipZ promoter regions contain a conserved CGACTC motif that is critical to their activities and to their regulation by CcrM. In addition, our results suggest that the ftsZ promoter has the lowest activity when the CGACTC motif is non-methylated, an intermediate activity when it is hemi-methylated and the highest activity when it is fully methylated. The regulation of ftsZ expression by DNA methylation may explain why CcrM is essential in a subset of Alphaproteobacteria.

  10. Crystal structure of Caulobacter crescentus polynucleotide phosphorylase reveals a mechanism of RNA substrate channelling and RNA degradosome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwick, Steven W; Gubbey, Tobias; Hug, Isabelle; Jenal, Urs; Luisi, Ben F

    2012-04-01

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) is an exoribonuclease that cleaves single-stranded RNA substrates with 3'-5' directionality and processive behaviour. Its ring-like, trimeric architecture creates a central channel where phosphorolytic active sites reside. One face of the ring is decorated with RNA-binding K-homology (KH) and S1 domains, but exactly how these domains help to direct the 3' end of single-stranded RNA substrates towards the active sites is an unsolved puzzle. Insight into this process is provided by our crystal structures of RNA-bound and apo Caulobacter crescentus PNPase. In the RNA-free form, the S1 domains adopt a 'splayed' conformation that may facilitate capture of RNA substrates. In the RNA-bound structure, the three KH domains collectively close upon the RNA and direct the 3' end towards a constricted aperture at the entrance of the central channel. The KH domains make non-equivalent interactions with the RNA, and there is a marked asymmetry within the catalytic core of the enzyme. On the basis of these data, we propose that structural non-equivalence, induced upon RNA binding, helps to channel substrate to the active sites through mechanical ratcheting. Structural and biochemical analyses also reveal the basis for PNPase association with RNase E in the multi-enzyme RNA degradosome assembly of the α-proteobacteria.

  11. Phosphotransferase-dependent accumulation of (p)ppGpp in response to glutamine deprivation in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronneau, Séverin; Petit, Kenny; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2016-04-25

    The alarmone (p)ppGpp is commonly used by bacteria to quickly respond to nutrient starvation. Although (p)ppGpp synthetases such as SpoT have been extensively studied, little is known about the molecular mechanisms stimulating alarmone synthesis upon starvation. Here, we describe an essential role of the nitrogen-related phosphotransferase system (PTS(Ntr)) in controlling (p)ppGpp accumulation in Caulobacter crescentus. We show that cells sense nitrogen starvation by way of detecting glutamine deprivation using the first enzyme (EI(Ntr)) of PTS(Ntr). Decreasing intracellular glutamine concentration triggers phosphorylation of EI(Ntr) and its downstream components HPr and EIIA(Ntr). Once phosphorylated, both HPr∼P and EIIA(Ntr)∼P stimulate (p)ppGpp accumulation by modulating SpoT activities. This burst of second messenger primarily impacts the non-replicative phase of the cell cycle by extending the G1 phase. This work highlights a new role for bacterial PTS systems in stimulating (p)ppGpp accumulation in response to metabolic cues and in controlling cell cycle progression and cell growth.

  12. The role of spatial asymmetries in the development of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropini, Carolina; Chen, Erin; Sciochetti, Stephen; Newton, Austin; Laub, Michael; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2010-03-01

    Caulobacter is a model organism for cell cycle regulation and development. Upon division it differentiates into a sessile stalked cell and a motile swarmer cell. Throughout the cell cycle, the localization of several key proteins is highly regulated. We address the importance of spatial localization in signal transduction and development. Flagellar pole development is controlled by the response regulator DivK, whose phosphorylation state is controlled by the kinase DivJ and the phosphatase PleC. PleC localizes to the swarmer pole, while DivJ localizes at the stalked pole. We have constructed strains with a variety of PleC and DivJ localization patterns. Our results indicate that localization is not absolutely necessary in this system, rather localized proteins enhance the robustness to fluctuations. We further investigate the importance of spatial asymmetries in the regulation of the master cell-cycle-regulator CtrA. In its phosphorylated form, CtrA binds to the replication origin in Caulobacter in a highly cooperative fashion, and prevents DNA replication. The CtrA distribution is tightly controlled not only by localized phosphorylation and dephosphorylation but also synthesis and degradation. We find that physiological degradation rates exert only a small perturbation on the distribution generated by asymmetric phosphorylation.

  13. Interplay between the localization and kinetics of phosphorylation in flagellar pole development of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Tropini

    Full Text Available Bacterial cells maintain sophisticated levels of intracellular organization that allow for signal amplification, response to stimuli, cell division, and many other critical processes. The mechanisms underlying localization and their contribution to fitness have been difficult to uncover, due to the often challenging task of creating mutants with systematically perturbed localization but normal enzymatic activity, and the lack of quantitative models through which to interpret subtle phenotypic changes. Focusing on the model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, which generates two different types of daughter cells from an underlying asymmetric distribution of protein phosphorylation, we use mathematical modeling to investigate the contribution of the localization of histidine kinases to the establishment of cellular asymmetry and subsequent developmental outcomes. We use existing mutant phenotypes and fluorescence data to parameterize a reaction-diffusion model of the kinases PleC and DivJ and their cognate response regulator DivK. We then present a systematic computational analysis of the effects of changes in protein localization and abundance to determine whether PleC localization is required for correct developmental timing in Caulobacter. Our model predicts the developmental phenotypes of several localization mutants, and suggests that a novel strain with co-localization of PleC and DivJ could provide quantitative insight into the signaling threshold required for flagellar pole development. Our analysis indicates that normal development can be maintained through a wide range of localization phenotypes, and that developmental defects due to changes in PleC localization can be rescued by increased PleC expression. We also show that the system is remarkably robust to perturbation of the kinetic parameters, and while the localization of either PleC or DivJ is required for asymmetric development, the delocalization of one of these two components does

  14. Interplay between the localization and kinetics of phosphorylation in flagellar pole development of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropini, Carolina; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial cells maintain sophisticated levels of intracellular organization that allow for signal amplification, response to stimuli, cell division, and many other critical processes. The mechanisms underlying localization and their contribution to fitness have been difficult to uncover, due to the often challenging task of creating mutants with systematically perturbed localization but normal enzymatic activity, and the lack of quantitative models through which to interpret subtle phenotypic changes. Focusing on the model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, which generates two different types of daughter cells from an underlying asymmetric distribution of protein phosphorylation, we use mathematical modeling to investigate the contribution of the localization of histidine kinases to the establishment of cellular asymmetry and subsequent developmental outcomes. We use existing mutant phenotypes and fluorescence data to parameterize a reaction-diffusion model of the kinases PleC and DivJ and their cognate response regulator DivK. We then present a systematic computational analysis of the effects of changes in protein localization and abundance to determine whether PleC localization is required for correct developmental timing in Caulobacter. Our model predicts the developmental phenotypes of several localization mutants, and suggests that a novel strain with co-localization of PleC and DivJ could provide quantitative insight into the signaling threshold required for flagellar pole development. Our analysis indicates that normal development can be maintained through a wide range of localization phenotypes, and that developmental defects due to changes in PleC localization can be rescued by increased PleC expression. We also show that the system is remarkably robust to perturbation of the kinetic parameters, and while the localization of either PleC or DivJ is required for asymmetric development, the delocalization of one of these two components does not prevent

  15. Characterization of the Proteins Associated with Caulobacter crescentus Bacteriophage CbK Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Courtney T; Wilson, Kiesha M; Ely, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage genomes contain an abundance of genes that code for hypothetical proteins with either a conserved domain or no predicted function. The Caulobacter phage CbK has an unusual shape, designated morphotype B3 that consists of an elongated cylindrical head and a long flexible tail. To identify CbK proteins associated with the phage particle, intact phage particles were subjected to SDS-PAGE, and the resulting protein bands were digested with trypsin and analyzed using MALDI mass spectroscopy to provide peptide molecular weights. These peptide molecular weights were then compared with the peptides that would be generated from the predicted amino acid sequences that are coded by the CbK genome, and the comparison of the actual and predicted peptide masses resulted in the identification of single genes that could code for the set of peptides derived from each of the 20 phage proteins. We also found that CsCl density gradient centrifugation resulted in the separation of empty phage heads, phage heads containing material organized in a spiral, isolated phage tails, and other particulate material from the intact phage particles. This additional material proved to be a good source of additional phage proteins, and preliminary results suggest that it may include a CbK DNA replication complex.

  16. Three-dimensional super-resolution imaging of the midplane protein FtsZ in live Caulobacter crescentus cells using astigmatism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biteen, Julie S; Goley, Erin D; Shapiro, Lucy; Moerner, W E

    2012-03-01

    Single-molecule super-resolution imaging provides a non-invasive method for nanometer-scale imaging and is ideally suited to investigations of quasi-static structures within live cells. Here, we extend the ability to image subcellular features within bacteria cells to three dimensions based on the introduction of a cylindrical lens in the imaging pathway. We investigate the midplane protein FtsZ in Caulobacter crescentus with super-resolution imaging based on fluorescent-protein photoswitching and the natural polymerization/depolymerization dynamics of FtsZ associated with the Z-ring. We quantify these dynamics and determine the FtsZ depolymerization time to be divisional stage.

  17. Identification of the in vivo function of the high-efficiency D-mannonate dehydratase in Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 from the enolase superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichelecki, Daniel J; Graff, Dylan C; Al-Obaidi, Nawar; Almo, Steven C; Gerlt, John A

    2014-07-01

    The d-mannonate dehydratase (ManD) subgroup of the enolase superfamily contains members with varying catalytic activities (high-efficiency, low-efficiency, or no activity) that dehydrate d-mannonate and/or d-gluconate to 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate [Wichelecki, D. J., et al. (2014) Biochemistry 53, 2722-2731]. Despite extensive in vitro characterization, the in vivo physiological role of a ManD has yet to be established. In this study, we report the in vivo functional characterization of a high-efficiency ManD from Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 (UniProt entry B8GZZ7) by in vivo discovery of its essential role in d-glucuronate metabolism. This in vivo functional annotation may be extended to ~50 additional proteins.

  18. Activation and polar sequestration of PopA, a c-di-GMP effector protein involved in Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Shogo; Schalch-Moser, Annina; Zumthor, Ludwig; Manfredi, Pablo; Ebbensgaard, Anna; Schirmer, Tilman; Jenal, Urs

    2014-11-01

    When Caulobacter crescentus enters S-phase the replication initiation inhibitor CtrA dynamically positions to the old cell pole to be degraded by the polar ClpXP protease. Polar delivery of CtrA requires PopA and the diguanylate cyclase PleD that positions to the same pole. Here we present evidence that PopA originated through gene duplication from its paralogue response regulator PleD and subsequent co-option as c-di-GMP effector protein. While the C-terminal catalytic domain (GGDEF) of PleD is activated by phosphorylation of the N-terminal receiver domain, functional adaptation has reversed signal transduction in PopA with the GGDEF domain adopting input function and the receiver domain serving as regulatory output. We show that the N-terminal receiver domain of PopA specifically interacts with RcdA, a component required for CtrA degradation. In contrast, the GGDEF domain serves to target PopA to the cell pole in response to c-di-GMP binding. In agreement with the divergent activation and targeting mechanisms, distinct markers sequester PleD and PopA to the old cell pole upon S-phase entry. Together these data indicate that PopA adopted a novel role as topology specificity factor to help recruit components of the CtrA degradation pathway to the protease specific old cell pole of C. crescentus.

  19. A two-component system, an anti-sigma factor and two paralogous ECF sigma factors are involved in the control of general stress response in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Rogério F; Kohler, Christian; Gomes, Suely L

    2011-06-01

    The extracytoplasmic function sigma factor σ(T) is the master regulator of general stress response in Caulobacter crescentus and controls the expression of its paralogue σ(U). In this work we showed that PhyR and NepR act, respectively, as positive and negative regulators of σ(T) expression and function. Biochemical data also demonstrated that NepR directly binds σ(T) and the phosphorylated form of PhyR. We also described the essential role of the histidine kinase gene CC3474, here denominated phyK, for expression of σ(T)-dependent genes and for resistance to stress conditions. Additionally, in vivo evidence of PhyK-dependent phosphorylation of PhyR is presented. This study also identified a conserved cysteine residue (C95) located in the periplasmic portion of PhyK that is crucial for the function of the protein. Furthermore, we showed that PhyK, PhyR and σ(T) regulate the same set of genes and that σ(T) apparently directly controls most of its regulon. In contrast, σ(U) seems to have a very modest contribution to the expression of a subset of σ(T)-dependent genes. In conclusion, this report describes the molecular mechanism involved in the control of general stress response in C. crescentus.

  20. The LovK-LovR two-component system is a regulator of the general stress pathway in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Robert; Fiebig, Aretha; Crosson, Sean

    2012-06-01

    A conserved set of regulators control the general stress response in Caulobacter crescentus, including σ(T), its anti-σ factor NepR, the anti-anti-σ factor PhyR, and the transmembrane sensor kinase PhyK. We report that the soluble histidine kinase LovK and the single-domain response regulator LovR also function within the C. crescentus general stress pathway. Our genetic data support a model in which LovK-LovR functions upstream of σ(T) by controlling the phosphorylation state and thus anti-anti-σ activity of PhyR. Transcription of lovK and lovR is independently activated by stress through a mechanism that requires sigT and phyR. Conversely, lovK and lovR function together to repress transcription of the general stress regulon. Concordant with a functional role of the LovK-LovR two-component system as a negative regulator of the general stress pathway, lovK-lovR-null mutants exhibit increased cell survival after osmotic stress, while coordinate overexpression of lovK and lovR attenuates cell survival relative to that of the wild type. Notably, lovK can complement the transcriptional and cell survival defects of a phyK-null mutant when lovR is deleted. Moreover, in this same genetic background, σ(T)-dependent transcription is activated in response to osmotic stress. This result suggests that flavin-binding LOV (light, oxygen, or voltage) histidine kinases are competent to perceive cytoplasmic signals in addition to the environmental signal blue light. We conclude that the PhyK-PhyR and LovK-LovR two-component signaling systems coordinately regulate stress physiology in C. crescentus.

  1. (p)ppGpp modulates cell size and the initiation of DNA replication in Caulobacter crescentus in response to a block in lipid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Kristina V; Wood, Shannon M; Blair, Jimmy A; Nguyen, Bao T; Herrera, Anabel; Mora, Yannet G Perez; Cuajungco, Math P; Murray, Sean R

    2015-03-01

    Stress conditions, such as a block in fatty acid synthesis, signal bacterial cells to exit the cell cycle. Caulobacter crescentus FabH is a cell-cycle-regulated β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase that initiates lipid biosynthesis and is essential for growth in rich media. To explore how C. crescentus responds to a block in lipid biosynthesis, we created a FabH-depletion strain. We found that FabH depletion blocks lipid biosynthesis in rich media and causes a cell cycle arrest that requires the alarmone (p)ppGpp for adaptation. Notably, basal levels of (p)ppGpp coordinate both a reduction in cell volume and a block in the over-initiation of DNA replication in response to FabH depletion. The gene ctrA encodes a master transcription factor that directly regulates 95 cell-cycle-controlled genes while also functioning to inhibit the initiation of DNA replication. Here, we demonstrate that ctrA transcription is (p)ppGpp-dependent during fatty acid starvation. CtrA fails to accumulate when FabH is depleted in the absence of (p)ppGpp due to a substantial reduction in ctrA transcription. The (p)ppGpp-dependent maintenance of ctrA transcription during fatty acid starvation initiated from only one of the two ctrA promoters. In the absence of (p)ppGpp, the majority of FabH-depleted cells enter a viable but non-culturable state, with multiple chromosomes, and are unable to recover from the miscoordination of cell cycle events. Thus, basal levels of (p)ppGpp facilitate C. crescentus' re-entry into the cell cycle after termination of fatty acid starvation.

  2. Role of core promoter sequences in the mechanism of swarmer cell-specific silencing of gyrB transcription in Caulobacter crescentus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gober James W

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Each Caulobacter crescentus cell division yields two distinct cell types: a flagellated swarmer cell and a non-motile stalked cell. The swarmer cell is further distinguished from the stalked cell by an inability to reinitiate DNA replication, by the physical properties of its nucleoid, and its discrete program of gene expression. Specifically, with regard to the latter feature, many of the genes involved in DNA replication are not transcribed in swarmer cells. Results We show that for one of these genes involved in DNA replication, gyrB, its pattern of temporal expression depends upon an 80 base pair promoter region with strong resemblance to the Caulobacter crescentus σ73 consensus promoter sequence; regulation does not appear to be affected by the general strength of the promoter activity, as mutations that increased its conformity with the consensus did not affect its cell-cycle expression pattern. Transcription from the gyrB promoter in vitro required only the presence of the σ73 RNA polymerase (from E. coli and the requisite nucleoside triphosphates, although a distinct binding activity, present in crude whole-cell extracts, formed a complex gyrB promoter DNA. We also assayed the effect on gyrB expression in strains containing mutations in either smc or dps, two genes encoding proteins that condense DNA. However we found there was no change in the temporal pattern of gyrB transcription in strains containing deletions in either of these genes. Conclusion These experiments demonstrate that gyrB transcription does not require any auxiliary factors, suggesting that temporal regulation is not dependent upon an activator protein. Swarmer-specific silencing may not be attributable to the observed physical difference in the swarmer cell nucleoid, since mutations in either smc or dps, two genes encoding proteins that condense DNA, did not alter the temporal pattern of gyrB transcription in strains containing deletions in either

  3. Cold shock genes cspA and cspB from Caulobacter crescentus are posttranscriptionally regulated and important for cold adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzon, Ricardo R; Lang, Elza A S; Silva, Carolina A P T; Marques, Marilis V

    2012-12-01

    Cold shock proteins (CSPs) are nucleic acid binding chaperones, first described as being induced to solve the problem of mRNA stabilization after temperature downshift. Caulobacter crescentus has four CSPs: CspA and CspB, which are cold induced, and CspC and CspD, which are induced only in stationary phase. In this work we have determined that the synthesis of both CspA and CspB reaches the maximum levels early in the acclimation phase. The deletion of cspA causes a decrease in growth at low temperature, whereas the strain with a deletion of cspB has a very subtle and transient cold-related growth phenotype. The cspA cspB double mutant has a slightly more severe phenotype than that of the cspA mutant, suggesting that although CspA may be more important to cold adaptation than CspB, both proteins have a role in this process. Gene expression analyses were carried out using cspA and cspB regulatory fusions to the lacZ reporter gene and showed that both genes are regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Deletion mapping of the long 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of each gene identified a common region important for cold induction, probably via translation enhancement. In contrast to what was reported for other bacteria, these cold shock genes have no regulatory regions downstream from ATG that are important for cold induction. This work shows that the importance of CspA and CspB to C. crescentus cold adaptation, mechanisms of regulation, and pattern of expression during the acclimation phase apparently differs in many aspects from what has been described so far for other bacteria.

  4. Rapid in vitro assembly of Caulobacter crescentus FtsZ protein at pH 6.5 and 7.2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Sara L; Erickson, Harold P

    2013-08-16

    FtsZ from most bacteria assembles rapidly in vitro, reaching a steady-state plateau in 5-10 s after addition of GTP. A recent study used a novel dynamic light-scattering technique to assay the assembly of FtsZ from Caulobacter crescentus (CcFtsZ) and reported that assembly required 10 min, ∼100 times slower than for related bacteria. Previous studies had indicated normal, rapid assembly of CcFtsZ. We have reinvestigated the assembly kinetics using a mutant L72W, where assembly of subunits into protofilaments results in a significant increase in tryptophan fluorescence. We found that assembly reached a plateau in 5-10 s and showed no change in the following 10 min. This was confirmed by 90° light scattering and negative-stain electron microscopy. The very slow kinetics in the dynamic light-scattering study may be related to a refractory state induced when the FtsZ protein is stored without nucleotide, a phenomenon that we had observed in a previous study of EcFtsZ. We conclude that CcFtsZ is not an outlier, but shows rapid assembly kinetics similar to FtsZ from related bacteria.

  5. Analysis of the xynB5 gene encoding a multifunctional GH3-BglX β-glucosidase-β-xylosidase-α-arabinosidase member in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justo, Priscila Innocenti; Corrêa, Juliana Moço; Maller, Alexandre; Kadowaki, Marina Kimiko; da Conceição-Silva, José Luis; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira; Simão, Rita de Cássia Garcia

    2015-10-01

    The Caulobacter crescentus (NA1000) xynB5 gene (CCNA_03149) encodes a predicted β-glucosidase-β-xylosidase enzyme that was amplified by polymerase chain reaction; the product was cloned into the blunt ends of the pJet1.2 plasmid. Analysis of the protein sequence indicated the presence of conserved glycosyl hydrolase 3 (GH3), β-glucosidase-related glycosidase (BglX) and fibronectin type III-like domains. After verifying its identity by DNA sequencing, the xynB5 gene was linked to an amino-terminal His-tag using the pTrcHisA vector. A recombinant protein (95 kDa) was successfully overexpressed from the xynB5 gene in E. coli Top 10 and purified using pre-packed nickel-Sepharose columns. The purified protein (BglX-V-Ara) demonstrated multifunctional activities in the presence of different substrates for β-glucosidase (pNPG: p-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucoside) β-xylosidase (pNPX: p-nitrophenyl-β-D-xyloside) and α-arabinosidase (pNPA: p-nitrophenyl-α-L-arabinosidase). BglX-V-Ara presented an optimal pH of 6 for all substrates and optimal temperature of 50 °C for β-glucosidase and α-L-arabinosidase and 60 °C for β-xylosidase. BglX-V-Ara predominantly presented β-glucosidase activity, with the highest affinity for its substrate and catalytic efficiency (Km 0.24 ± 0.0005 mM, Vmax 0.041 ± 0.002 µmol min(-1) mg(-1) and Kcat/Km 0.27 mM(-1) s(-1)), followed by β-xylosidase (Km 0.64 ± 0.032 mM, Vmax 0.055 ± 0.002 µmol min(-1) mg(-1) and Kcat/Km 0.14 mM(-1)s(-1)) and finally α-L-arabinosidase (Km 1.45 ± 0.05 mM, Vmax 0.091 ± 0.0004 µmol min(-1) mg(-1) and Kcat/Km 0.1 mM(-1) s(-1)). To date, this is the first report to demonstrate the characterization of a GH3-BglX family member in C. crescentus that may have applications in biotechnological processes (i.e., the simultaneous saccharification process) because the multifunctional enzyme could play an important role in bacterial hemicellulose degradation.

  6. Cloning and expression of the xynA1 gene encoding a xylanase of the GH10 group in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graciano, Luciana; Corrêa, Juliana Moço; Vieira, Fabíola Giovanna Nesello; Bosetto, Adilson; Loth, Eduardo Alexandre; Kadowaki, Marina Kimiko; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira; Simão, Rita de Cássia Garcia

    2015-04-01

    Caulobacter crescentus (NA1000 strain) are aquatic bacteria that can live in environments of low nutritional quality and present numerous genes that encode enzymes involved in plant cell wall deconstruction, including five genes for β-xylosidases (xynB1-xynB5) and three genes for xylanases (xynA1-xynA3). The overall activity of xylanases in the presence of different agro-industrial residues was evaluated, and it was found that the residues from the processing of corn were the most efficient in inducing bacterial xylanases. The xynA1 gene (CCNA_02894) encoding a predicted xylanase of group 10 of glyco-hydrolases (GH10) that was efficiently overexpressed in Escherichia coli LMG194 using 0.02 % arabinose, after cloning into the vector pJet1.2blunt and subcloning into the expression vector pBAD/gIII, provided a fusion protein that contained carboxy-terminal His-tags, named XynA1. The characterization of pure XynA1 showed an enzymatic activity of 18.26 U mL(-1) and a specific activity of 2.22 U mg-(1) in the presence of xylan from beechwood as a substrate. XynA1 activity was inhibited by EDTA and metal ions such as Cu(2+) and Mg(2+). By contrast, β-mercaptoethanol, dithiothreitol (DTT), and Ca(2+) induced recombinant enzyme activity. Kinetic data for XynA1 revealed K M and V max values of 3.77 mg mL-(1) and 10.20 μM min-(1), respectively. Finally, the enzyme presented an optimum pH of 6 and an optimum temperature of 50 °C. In addition, 80 % of the activity of XynA1 was maintained at 50 °C for 4 h of incubation, suggesting a thermal stability for the biotechnological processes. This work is the first study concerning the cloning, overexpression, and enzymatic characterization of C. crescentus xylanase.

  7. Dynamical Localization of DivL and PleC in the Asymmetric Division Cycle of Caulobacter crescentus: A Theoretical Investigation of Alternative Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Kartik; Paul, Mark R; Tyson, John J

    2015-07-01

    Cell-fate asymmetry in the predivisional cell of Caulobacter crescentus requires that the regulatory protein DivL localizes to the new pole of the cell where it up-regulates CckA kinase, resulting in a gradient of CtrA~P across the cell. In the preceding stage of the cell cycle (the "stalked" cell), DivL is localized uniformly along the cell membrane and maintained in an inactive form by DivK~P. It is unclear how DivL overcomes inhibition by DivK~P in the predivisional cell simply by changing its location to the new pole. It has been suggested that co-localization of DivL with PleC phosphatase at the new pole is essential to DivL's activity there. However, there are contrasting views on whether the bifunctional enzyme, PleC, acts as a kinase or phosphatase at the new pole. To explore these ambiguities, we formulated a mathematical model of the spatiotemporal distributions of DivL, PleC and associated proteins (DivJ, DivK, CckA, and CtrA) during the asymmetric division cycle of a Caulobacter cell. By varying localization profiles of DivL and PleC in our model, we show how the physiologically observed spatial distributions of these proteins are essential for the transition from a stalked cell to a predivisional cell. Our simulations suggest that PleC is a kinase in predivisional cells, and that, by sequestering DivK~P, the kinase form of PleC enables DivL to be reactivated at the new pole. Hence, co-localization of PleC kinase and DivL is essential to establishing cellular asymmetry. Our simulations reproduce the experimentally observed spatial distribution and phosphorylation status of CtrA in wild-type and mutant cells. Based on the model, we explore novel combinations of mutant alleles, making predictions that can be tested experimentally.

  8. Dynamical Localization of DivL and PleC in the Asymmetric Division Cycle of Caulobacter crescentus: A Theoretical Investigation of Alternative Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartik Subramanian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell-fate asymmetry in the predivisional cell of Caulobacter crescentus requires that the regulatory protein DivL localizes to the new pole of the cell where it up-regulates CckA kinase, resulting in a gradient of CtrA~P across the cell. In the preceding stage of the cell cycle (the "stalked" cell, DivL is localized uniformly along the cell membrane and maintained in an inactive form by DivK~P. It is unclear how DivL overcomes inhibition by DivK~P in the predivisional cell simply by changing its location to the new pole. It has been suggested that co-localization of DivL with PleC phosphatase at the new pole is essential to DivL's activity there. However, there are contrasting views on whether the bifunctional enzyme, PleC, acts as a kinase or phosphatase at the new pole. To explore these ambiguities, we formulated a mathematical model of the spatiotemporal distributions of DivL, PleC and associated proteins (DivJ, DivK, CckA, and CtrA during the asymmetric division cycle of a Caulobacter cell. By varying localization profiles of DivL and PleC in our model, we show how the physiologically observed spatial distributions of these proteins are essential for the transition from a stalked cell to a predivisional cell. Our simulations suggest that PleC is a kinase in predivisional cells, and that, by sequestering DivK~P, the kinase form of PleC enables DivL to be reactivated at the new pole. Hence, co-localization of PleC kinase and DivL is essential to establishing cellular asymmetry. Our simulations reproduce the experimentally observed spatial distribution and phosphorylation status of CtrA in wild-type and mutant cells. Based on the model, we explore novel combinations of mutant alleles, making predictions that can be tested experimentally.

  9. DNA binding of the cell cycle transcriptional regulator GcrA depends on N6-adenosine methylation in Caulobacter crescentus and other Alphaproteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Fumeaux, Coralie; Mohapatra, Saswat S; Bompard, Coralie; Brilli, Matteo; Frandi, Antonio; Castric, Vincent; Villeret, Vincent; Viollier, Patrick H; Biondi, Emanuele G

    2013-05-01

    Several regulators are involved in the control of cell cycle progression in the bacterial model system Caulobacter crescentus, which divides asymmetrically into a vegetative G1-phase (swarmer) cell and a replicative S-phase (stalked) cell. Here we report a novel functional interaction between the enigmatic cell cycle regulator GcrA and the N6-adenosine methyltransferase CcrM, both highly conserved proteins among Alphaproteobacteria, that are activated early and at the end of S-phase, respectively. As no direct biochemical and regulatory relationship between GcrA and CcrM were known, we used a combination of ChIP (chromatin-immunoprecipitation), biochemical and biophysical experimentation, and genetics to show that GcrA is a dimeric DNA-binding protein that preferentially targets promoters harbouring CcrM methylation sites. After tracing CcrM-dependent N6-methyl-adenosine promoter marks at a genome-wide scale, we show that these marks recruit GcrA in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we found that, in the presence of a methylated target, GcrA recruits the RNA polymerase to the promoter, consistent with its role in transcriptional activation. Since methylation-dependent DNA binding is also observed with GcrA orthologs from other Alphaproteobacteria, we conclude that GcrA is the founding member of a new and conserved class of transcriptional regulators that function as molecular effectors of a methylation-dependent (non-heritable) epigenetic switch that regulates gene expression during the cell cycle.

  10. DNA binding of the cell cycle transcriptional regulator GcrA depends on N6-adenosine methylation in Caulobacter crescentus and other Alphaproteobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Fioravanti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Several regulators are involved in the control of cell cycle progression in the bacterial model system Caulobacter crescentus, which divides asymmetrically into a vegetative G1-phase (swarmer cell and a replicative S-phase (stalked cell. Here we report a novel functional interaction between the enigmatic cell cycle regulator GcrA and the N6-adenosine methyltransferase CcrM, both highly conserved proteins among Alphaproteobacteria, that are activated early and at the end of S-phase, respectively. As no direct biochemical and regulatory relationship between GcrA and CcrM were known, we used a combination of ChIP (chromatin-immunoprecipitation, biochemical and biophysical experimentation, and genetics to show that GcrA is a dimeric DNA-binding protein that preferentially targets promoters harbouring CcrM methylation sites. After tracing CcrM-dependent N6-methyl-adenosine promoter marks at a genome-wide scale, we show that these marks recruit GcrA in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we found that, in the presence of a methylated target, GcrA recruits the RNA polymerase to the promoter, consistent with its role in transcriptional activation. Since methylation-dependent DNA binding is also observed with GcrA orthologs from other Alphaproteobacteria, we conclude that GcrA is the founding member of a new and conserved class of transcriptional regulators that function as molecular effectors of a methylation-dependent (non-heritable epigenetic switch that regulates gene expression during the cell cycle.

  11. Localization of the outer membrane protein OmpA2 in Caulobacter crescentus depends on the position of the gene in the chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginez, Luis David; Osorio, Aurora; Poggio, Sebastian

    2014-08-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is an essential structure involved in nutrient uptake, protection against harmful substances, and cell growth. Different proteins keep the outer membrane from blebbing out by simultaneously interacting with it and with the cell wall. These proteins have been mainly studied in enterobacteria, where OmpA and the Braun and Pal lipoproteins stabilize the outer membrane. Some degree of functional redundancy exists between these proteins, since none of them is essential but the absence of two of them results in a severe phenotype. Caulobacter crescentus has a different strategy to maintain its outer membrane, since it lacks the Braun lipoprotein and Pal is essential. In this work, we characterized OmpA2, an OmpA-like protein, in this bacterium. Our results showed that this protein is required for normal stalk growth and that it plays a minor role in the stability of the outer membrane. An OmpA2 fluorescent fusion protein showed that the concentration of this protein decreases from the stalk to the new pole. This localization pattern is important for its function, and it depends on the position of the gene locus in the chromosome and, as a consequence, in the cell. This result suggests that little diffusion occurs from the moment that the gene is transcribed until the mature protein attaches to the cell wall in the periplasm. This mechanism reveals the integration of different levels of information from protein function down to genome arrangement that allows the cell to self-organize.

  12. A dynamic complex of signaling proteins uses polar localization to regulate cell-fate asymmetry in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsokos, Christos G; Perchuk, Barrett S; Laub, Michael T

    2011-03-15

    Cellular asymmetry is critical to metazoan development and the life cycle of many microbes. In Caulobacter, cell cycle progression and the formation of asymmetric daughter cells depend on the polarly-localized histidine kinase CckA. How CckA is regulated and why activity depends on localization are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the unorthodox kinase DivL promotes CckA activity and that the phosphorylated regulator DivK inhibits CckA by binding to DivL. Early in the cell cycle, CckA is activated by the dephosphorylation of DivK throughout the cell. However, in later stages, when phosphorylated DivK levels are high, CckA activation relies on polar localization with a DivK phosphatase. Localization thus creates a protected zone for CckA within the cell, without the use of membrane-enclosed compartments. Our results reveal the mechanisms by which CckA is regulated in a cell-type-dependent manner. More generally, our findings reveal how cells exploit subcellular localization to orchestrate sophisticated regulatory processes.

  13. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of an L-arabinonate dehydratase from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii and a D-xylonate dehydratase from Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Mubinur; Andberg, Martina; Koivula, Anu; Rouvinen, Juha; Hakulinen, Nina

    2016-08-01

    L-Arabinonate dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.25) and D-xylonate dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.82) are two enzymes that are involved in a nonphosphorylative oxidation pathway of pentose sugars. L-Arabinonate dehydratase converts L-arabinonate into 2-dehydro-3-deoxy-L-arabinonate, and D-xylonate dehydratase catalyzes the dehydration of D-xylonate to 2-dehydro-3-deoxy-D-xylonate. L-Arabinonate and D-xylonate dehydratases belong to the IlvD/EDD family, together with 6-phosphogluconate dehydratases and dihydroxyacid dehydratases. No crystal structure of any L-arabinonate or D-xylonate dehydratase is available in the PDB. In this study, recombinant L-arabinonate dehydratase from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii (RlArDHT) and D-xylonate dehydratase from Caulobacter crescentus (CcXyDHT) were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by the use of affinity chromatography followed by gel-filtration chromatography. The purified proteins were crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 293 K. Crystals of RlArDHT that diffracted to 2.40 Å resolution were obtained using sodium formate as a precipitating agent. They belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 106.07, b = 208.61, c = 147.09 Å, β = 90.43°. Eight RlArDHT molecules (two tetramers) in the asymmetric unit give a VM value of 3.2 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 62%. Crystals of CcXyDHT that diffracted to 2.66 Å resolution were obtained using sodium formate and polyethylene glycol 3350. They belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 270.42, b = 236.13, c = 65.17 Å, β = 97.38°. Four CcXyDHT molecules (a tetramer) in the asymmetric unit give a VM value of 4.0 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 69%.

  14. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of an l-arabinonate dehydratase from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii and a d-xylonate dehydratase from Caulobacter crescentus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Mubinur; Andberg, Martina; Koivula, Anu; Rouvinen, Juha; Hakulinen, Nina

    2016-01-01

    l-Arabinonate dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.25) and d-xylonate dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.82) are two enzymes that are involved in a nonphosphorylative oxidation pathway of pentose sugars. l-Arabinonate dehydratase converts l-arabinonate into 2-dehydro-3-deoxy-l-arabinonate, and d-xylonate dehydratase catalyzes the dehydration of d-xylonate to 2-dehydro-3-deoxy-d-xylonate. l-Arabinonate and d-xylonate dehydratases belong to the IlvD/EDD family, together with 6-phosphogluconate dehydratases and dihydroxyacid dehydratases. No crystal structure of any l-arabinonate or d-xylonate dehydratase is available in the PDB. In this study, recombinant l-arabinonate dehydratase from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii (RlArDHT) and d-xylonate dehydratase from Caulobacter crescentus (CcXyDHT) were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by the use of affinity chromatography followed by gel-filtration chromatography. The purified proteins were crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 293 K. Crystals of RlArDHT that diffracted to 2.40 Å resolution were obtained using sodium formate as a precipitating agent. They belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 106.07, b = 208.61, c = 147.09 Å, β = 90.43°. Eight RlArDHT molecules (two tetramers) in the asymmetric unit give a V M value of 3.2 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 62%. Crystals of CcXyDHT that diffracted to 2.66 Å resolution were obtained using sodium formate and polyethylene glycol 3350. They belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 270.42, b = 236.13, c = 65.17 Å, β = 97.38°. Four CcXyDHT molecules (a tetramer) in the asymmetric unit give a V M value of 4.0 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 69%. PMID:27487924

  15. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of an l-arabinonate dehydratase from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii and a d-xylonate dehydratase from Caulobacter crescentus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Mohammad Mubinur [University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu Campus, PO Box 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu (Finland); Andberg, Martina; Koivula, Anu [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd, PO Box 1000, FIN-02044 VTT Espoo (Finland); Rouvinen, Juha; Hakulinen, Nina, E-mail: nina.hakulinen@uef.fi [University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu Campus, PO Box 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu (Finland)

    2016-07-13

    l-Arabinonate dehydratase and d-xylonate dehydratase from the IlvD/EDD family were crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data sets were collected to resolutions of 2.40 and 2.66 Å from crystals of l-arabinonate dehydratase and d-xylonate dehydratase, respectively. l-Arabinonate dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.25) and d-xylonate dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.82) are two enzymes that are involved in a nonphosphorylative oxidation pathway of pentose sugars. l-Arabinonate dehydratase converts l-arabinonate into 2-dehydro-3-deoxy-l-arabinonate, and d-xylonate dehydratase catalyzes the dehydration of d-xylonate to 2-dehydro-3-deoxy-d-xylonate. l-Arabinonate and d-xylonate dehydratases belong to the IlvD/EDD family, together with 6-phosphogluconate dehydratases and dihydroxyacid dehydratases. No crystal structure of any l-arabinonate or d-xylonate dehydratase is available in the PDB. In this study, recombinant l-arabinonate dehydratase from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii (RlArDHT) and d-xylonate dehydratase from Caulobacter crescentus (CcXyDHT) were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by the use of affinity chromatography followed by gel-filtration chromatography. The purified proteins were crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 293 K. Crystals of RlArDHT that diffracted to 2.40 Å resolution were obtained using sodium formate as a precipitating agent. They belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 106.07, b = 208.61, c = 147.09 Å, β = 90.43°. Eight RlArDHT molecules (two tetramers) in the asymmetric unit give a V{sub M} value of 3.2 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 62%. Crystals of CcXyDHT that diffracted to 2.66 Å resolution were obtained using sodium formate and polyethylene glycol 3350. They belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 270.42, b = 236.13, c = 65.17 Å, β = 97.38°. Four CcXyDHT molecules (a tetramer) in the asymmetric unit give a V{sub M

  16. AnÃlise da expressÃo da β-Xilosidade II da bactÃria aquÃtica Caulobacter crescentus e seu papel no aproveitamento de resÃduos agroindustriais.

    OpenAIRE

    Juliana MoÃo CorrÃa

    2011-01-01

    Materiais lignocelulÃsicos sÃo abundantes em resÃduos agroindustriais e subprodutos da agroindÃstria e podem ser usados para produÃÃo de combustÃveis e outros quÃmicos de interesse comercial. Uma alternativa aos mÃtodos fÃsicos e quÃmicos para bioconversÃo de material lignocelulÃsico à o uso de enzimas produzidas por micro-organismos. A bactÃria aquÃtica Gram negativa Caulobacter crescentus apresenta potencial biotecnolÃgico para o uso destes resÃduos por conter em seu genoma v...

  17. Novel peptidoglycans in Caulobacter and Asticcacaulis spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Poindexter, J S; Hagenzieker, J G

    1982-01-01

    Peptidoglycan sacculi free of poly-beta-hydroxybutyric acid were prepared from whole cells of four species of Caulobacter and two species of Asticcacaluis and from morphological mutants of Caulobacter crescentus and Caulobacter leidyi. Acid hydrolysates of the sacculi were analyzed quantitatively, and each of the hydrolysates was found to contain significant amounts of only five ninhydrin-reactive compounds: alanine, glutamic acid, alpha , omega-diaminopimelic acid, muramic acid, and glucosam...

  18. Análise funcional das proteínas HrcA, GroES/GroEL e DnaK/DnaJ em Caulobacter crescentus

    OpenAIRE

    Michelle Fernanda Susin

    2005-01-01

    O operon groESL de C. crescentus apresenta dupla regulação. A indução deste operon por choque térmico é dependente do fator sigma de choque térmico σ32. A temperaturas fisiológicas, a expressão de groESL apresenta regulação temporal durante o ciclo celular da bactéria e o controle envolve a proteína repressora HrcA e o elemento CIRCE (controlling inverted repeat of chaperonin expression). Para estudar a atividade da proteína repressora in vitro, produzimos e purificamos de E. coli a Hrc...

  19. The Caulobacter crescentus ctrA P1 promoter is essential for the coordination of cell cycle events that prevent the overinitiation of DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schredl, Alexander T; Perez Mora, Yannet G; Herrera, Anabel; Cuajungco, Math P; Murray, Sean R

    2012-10-01

    The master regulator CtrA oscillates during the Caulobacter cell cycle due to temporally regulated proteolysis and transcription. It is proteolysed during the G1-S transition and reaccumulates in predivisional cells as a result of transcription from two sequentially activated promoters, P1 and P2. CtrA reinforces its own synthesis by directly mediating the activation of P2 concurrently with repression of P1. To explore the role of P1 in cell cycle control, we engineered a mutation into the native ctrA locus that prevents transcription from P1 but not P2. As expected, the ctrA P1 mutant exhibits striking growth, morphological and DNA replication defects. Unexpectedly, we found CtrA and its antagonist SciP, but not DnaA, GcrA or CcrM accumulation to be dramatically reduced in the ctrA P1 mutant. SciP levels closely paralleled CtrA accumulation, suggesting that CtrA acts as a rheostat to modulate SciP abundance. Furthermore, the reappearance of CtrA and CcrM in predivisional cells was delayed in the P1 mutant by 0.125 cell cycle unit in synchronized cultures. High levels of ccrM transcription despite low levels of CtrA and increased transcription of ctrA P2 in the ctrA P1 mutant are two examples of robustness in the cell cycle. Thus, Caulobacter can adjust regulatory pathways to partially compensate for reduced and delayed CtrA accumulation in the ctrA P1 mutant.

  20. The phylogenetic relationships of Caulobacter, Asticcacaulis and Brevundimonas species and their taxonomic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sly, L I; Cox, T L; Beckenham, T B

    1999-04-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among the species of Caulobacter, Asticcacaulis and Brevundimonas were studied by comparison of their 16S rDNA sequences. The analysis of almost complete sequences confirmed the early evolutionary divergence of the freshwater and marine species of Caulobacter reported previously [Stahl, D. A., Key, R., Flesher, B. & Smit, J. (1992). J Bacteriol 174, 2193-2198]. The freshwater species formed two distinct clusters. One cluster contained the species Caulobacter bacteroides, Caulobacter crescentus, Caulobacter fusiformis and Caulobacter henricii. C. bacteroides and C. fusiformis are very closely related (sequence identity 99.8%). The second cluster was not exclusive and contained the specis Caulobacter intermedius, Caulobacter subvibrioides and Caulobacter variabilis, as well as Brevundimonas diminuta and Brevundimonas vesicularis. The marine species Caulobacter halobacteroides and Caulobacter maris were very closely related, with a sequence identity of 99.7%. These two species were most closely but distantly related to the marine hyphal/budding bacteria Hyphomonas jannaschiana and Hirschia baltica, which formed a deep phylogenetic line with Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodobacter capsulatus. Caulobacter leidyia is unrelated to the other species of Caulobacter and belongs to the alpha-4 subclass of the Proteobacteria, forming a distinct cluster with Asticcacaulis excentricus and Asticcacaulis biprosthecium. The taxonomic implications of the polyphyletic nature of the genus Caulobacter and the absence of a type culture for the type species of the genus Caulobacter vibrioides, are discussed.

  1. Caulobacter and Asticcacaulis stalk bands as indicators of stalk age.

    OpenAIRE

    Poindexter, J S; Staley, J T

    1996-01-01

    The prosthecae (stalks) of dimorphic caulobacters of the genera Caulobacter and Asticcacaulis are distinguished among such appendages by the presence of disk-like components known as stalk bands. Whether bands are added to a cell's stalk(s) as a regular event coordinated with the cell's reproductive cycle has not been settled by previous studies. Analysis of the frequency of stalks with i, i + 1, i + 2, etc. bands 'among more than 7,000 stalks of Caulobacter crescentus revealed that in finite...

  2. Novel peptidoglycans in Caulobacter and Asticcacaulis spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, J S; Hagenzieker, J G

    1982-04-01

    Peptidoglycan sacculi free of poly-beta-hydroxybutyric acid were prepared from whole cells of four species of Caulobacter and two species of Asticcacaluis and from morphological mutants of Caulobacter crescentus and Caulobacter leidyi. Acid hydrolysates of the sacculi were analyzed quantitatively, and each of the hydrolysates was found to contain significant amounts of only five ninhydrin-reactive compounds: alanine, glutamic acid, alpha , omega-diaminopimelic acid, muramic acid, and glucosamine. Four types of peptidoglycans were distinguishable on the basis of the molar ratios among these five compounds. The respective ratios were as follows: in C. leidyi, 2:1:1:1:0.8; in Asticcacaulis biprosthecum, 1.7:1.6:1.1:0.7; in the cells of the remaining species, 2:1:1:1.2:0.8; and in stalks shed by the abscission mutant 2NY66, 2:1:1:1:1.67. Thus, in addition to some species differences among these caulobacters, it was found that the peptidoglycan sacculus of the stalked C. crescentus cell is chemically differentiated; the cellular peptidoglycan is richer in muramic acid than is the peptidoglycan of typical gram-negative bacteria, and the peptidoglycan of the stalk is correspondingly rich in glucosamine. Empirical formulas for the repeating units of the peptidoglycans have been inferred on the basis of the molar ratios of their amino components.

  3. Constriction and septation during cell division in caulobacters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, J S; Hagenzieker, J G

    1981-07-01

    Morphogenesis of the division site in caulobacters had been described as constrictive in Caulobacter spp. and septate in Asticcacaulis excentricus. However, subsequent studies of other gram-negative genera had implied that constrictive division was an artefact resulting from inadequate preservation of septa; exploration of alternatives to osmium fixation, particularly with aldehydes, was recommended. In this study, the appearance of sectioned division sites was reinvestigated in caulobacter cells prepared by 20 different procedures varying with respect to fixation agents, media, schedules, and temperatures, to dehydrating agents, and to embedding resins. Three types of division site morphogenesis were observed: constriction in C. bacteroides and C. crescentus, partial septation in C. leidyi, and complete, undivided septation in A. excentricus and A. biprosthecum. The anatomy of the division site depended on the bacterial strain, not on the method of preparation of the cells for sectioning. These studies confirm the earlier observations on osmium-fixed caulobacter cells and lead to the general conclusion that gram-negative bacteria with tapered poles probably divide by constriction, whereas septation results in blunt cell poles. A pattern of spiral, rather than circular, insertion of new envelope subunits at the cell equator is proposed as a basic developmental difference between constrictive and septate fission in gram-negative bacteria. Since caulobacter prosthecae can develop as extensions of tapered poles formed by constriction, whereas subpolar or lateral prosthecae occur in species with blunt poles resulting from septation, the site of formation of a thick septum appears unsuitable as a site of subsequent envelope outgrowth.

  4. Caulobacter and Asticcacaulis stalk bands as indicators of stalk age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, J S; Staley, J T

    1996-07-01

    The prosthecae (stalks) of dimorphic caulobacters of the genera Caulobacter and Asticcacaulis are distinguished among such appendages by the presence of disk-like components known as stalk bands. Whether bands are added to a cell's stalk(s) as a regular event coordinated with the cell's reproductive cycle has not been settled by previous studies. Analysis of the frequency of stalks with i, i + 1, i + 2, etc. bands 'among more than 7,000 stalks of Caulobacter crescentus revealed that in finite (batch) cultures (in which all offspring accumulate), the proportion of stalks with i + 1 hands was regularly 50% of the proportion of stalks with i bands. This implied that the number of bands correlated with the number of reproductive cycles completed by a stalked cell. In chemostat-maintained perpetual cultures, the proportion was greater than 50% because stalked cells, with their shorter reproductive cycle times, contributed a larger proportion of offspring to the steady-state population than did their swarmer siblings. In Asticcacaulis biprosthecum cells, which bear twin prosthecae, the twins on a typical cell possessed the same number of bands. For both genera, stalk bands provide a unique morphological feature that could be employed in an assessment of age distribution and reproductive dynamics within natural populations of these caulobacters.

  5. Motion of single MreB bacterial actin proteins in Caulobacter show treadmilling in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerner, W. E.; Kim, Soyeon; Gitai, Zemer; Kinkhabwala, Anika; McAdams, Harley; Shapiro, Lucy

    2006-03-01

    Ensemble imaging of a bacterial actin homologue, the MreB protein, suggests that the MreB proteins form a dynamic filamentous spiral along the long axis of the cell in Caulobacter crescentus. MreB contracts and expands along the cell axis and plays an important role in cell shape and polarity maintenance, as well as chromosome segregation and translocation of the origin of replication during cell division. In this study we investigated the real-time polymerization of MreB in Caulobacter crescentus using single-molecule fluorescence imaging. With time-lapse imaging, polymerized MreB could be distinguished from cytoplasmic MreB monomers, because single monomeric MreB showed fast motion characteristic of Brownian diffusion, while single polymerized MreB displayed slow, directed motion. This directional movement of labeled MreB in the growing polymer implies that treadmilling is the predominant mechanism in MreB filament formation. These single-molecule imaging experiments provide the first available information on the velocity of bacterial actin polymerization in a living cell.

  6. Depletion of the xynB2 gene upregulates β-xylosidase expression in C. crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Juliana Moço; Mingori, Moara Rodrigues; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira; Loth, Eduardo Alexandre; Seixas, Flávio Augusto Vicente; Simão, Rita de Cássia Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is able to express several enzymes involved in the utilization of lignocellulosic biomasses. Five genes, xynB1-5, that encode β-xylosidases are present in the genome of this bacterium. In this study, the xynB2 gene, which encodes β-xylosidase II (CCNA_02442), was cloned under the control of the PxylX promoter to generate the O-xynB2 strain, which overexpresses the enzyme in the presence of xylose. In addition, a null mutant strain, Δ-xynB2, was created by two homologous recombination events where the chromosomal xynB2 gene was replaced by a copy that was disrupted by the spectinomycin-resistant cassette. We demonstrated that C. crescentus cells lacking β-xylosidase II upregulates the xynB genes inducing β-xylosidase activity. Transcriptional analysis revealed that xynB1 (RT-PCR analysis) and xynB2 (lacZ transcription fusion) gene expression was induced in the Δ-xynB2 cells, and high β-xylosidase activity was observed in the presence of different agro-industrial residues in the null mutant strain, a characteristic that can be explored and applied in biotechnological processes. In contrast, overexpression of the xynB2 gene caused downregulation of the expression and activity of the β-xylosidase. For example, the β-xylosidase activity that was obtained in the presence of sugarcane bagasse was 7-fold and 16-fold higher than the activity measured in the C. crescentus parental and O-xynB2 cells, respectively. Our results suggest that β-xylosidase II may have a role in controlling the expression of the xynB1 and xynB2 genes in C. crescentus.

  7. Caulobacters in the Marine Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    LECIIN> PEANUT DOLICHOS SOYBEAN CONCONAV- ULEX WHEAT GERM RICINUS STRAIN AGGLUTININ BIFLORUS AGGLUTININ ALINA EUROPEAUS AGGLUTININ COMMUNI ~i MCS 3 MCS3...sampling locations. Strains were distinguishable by a variety of morphological and biochemical criteria. All required at least some percentage of...waters near Santa Barbara, California. Caulobacters as well as the morphologically similar Hyphomonas were found in virtually all samples. This

  8. Diversity in S-layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chaohua; Guo, Gang; Ma, Qiqi; Zhang, Fengjuan; Ma, Funing; Liu, Jianping; Xiao, Dao; Yang, Xiaolin; Sun, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Surface layers, referred simply as S-layers, are the two-dimensional crystalline arrays of protein or glycoprotein subunits on cell surface. They are one of the most common outermost envelope components observed in prokaryotic organisms (Archaea and Bacteria). Over the past decades, S-layers have become an issue of increasing interest due to their ubiquitousness, special features and functions. Substantial work in this field provides evidences of an enormous diversity in S-layers. This paper reviews and illustrates the diversity from several different aspects, involving the S-layer-carrying strains, the structure of S-layers, the S-layer proteins and genes, as well as the functions of S-layers.

  9. Caulobacter chromosome in vivo configuration matches model predictions for a supercoiled polymer in a cell-like confinement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Sun-Hae; Toro, Esteban; Mortensen, Kim;

    2013-01-01

    is the contour length, and cell-to-cell distribution of the interloci distance r is a universal function of r/n0.22 with broad cell-to-cell variability. For DNA segments greater than about 300 kb, the mean interloci distances scale as n, in agreement with previous observations. The 0.22 value of the scaling......We measured the distance between fluorescent-labeled DNA loci of various interloci contour lengths in Caulobacter crescentus swarmer cells to determine the in vivo configuration of the chromosome. For DNA segments less than about 300 kb, the mean interloci distances, 〈r〉, scale as n0.22, where n...... exponent for short DNA segments is consistent with theoretical predictions for a branched DNA polymer structure. Predictions from Brownian dynamics simulations of the packing of supercoiled DNA polymers in an elongated cell-like confinement are also consistent with a branched DNA structure, and simulated...

  10. Distinct constrictive processes, separated in time and space,divide Caulobacter inner and outer membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, Ellen M.; Comolli, Luis R.; Chen, Joseph C.; Downing,Kenneth H.; Moerner, W.E.; McAdams, Harley H.

    2005-05-01

    Cryo-electron microscope tomography (cryoEM) and a fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP) assay were used to characterize progression of the terminal stages of Caulobacter crescentus cell division. Tomographic cryoEM images of the cell division site show separate constrictive processes closing first the inner, and then the outer, membrane in a manner distinctly different from septum-forming bacteria. The smallest observed pre-fission constrictions were 60 nm for both the inner and outer membrane. FLIP experiments had previously shown cytoplasmic compartmentalization, when cytoplasmic proteins can no longer diffuse between the two nascent progeny cell compartments, occurring 18 min before daughter cell separation in a 135 min cell cycle. Here, we used FLIP experiments with membrane-bound and periplasmic fluorescent proteins to show that (1) periplasmic compartmentalization occurs after cytoplasmic compartmentalization, consistent with the cryoEM observations, and (2) inner membrane and periplasmic proteins can diffuse past the FtsZ constriction site, indicating that the cell division machinery does not block membrane diffusion.

  11. S-layer nanoglycobiology of bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Messner, Paul; Steiner, Kerstin; Zarschler, Kristof; Schäffer, Christina

    2008-01-01

    Cell surface layers (S-layers) are common structures of the bacterial cell envelope with a lattice-like appearance that are formed by a self-assembly process. Frequently, the constituting S-layer proteins are modified with covalently linked glycan chains facing the extracellular environment. S-layer glycoproteins from organisms of the Bacillaceae family possess long, O-glycosidically linked glycans that are composed of a great variety of sugar constituents. The observed variations already exc...

  12. S-layer nanoglycobiology of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messner, Paul; Steiner, Kerstin; Zarschler, Kristof; Schäffer, Christina

    2008-08-11

    Cell surface layers (S-layers) are common structures of the bacterial cell envelope with a lattice-like appearance that are formed by a self-assembly process. Frequently, the constituting S-layer proteins are modified with covalently linked glycan chains facing the extracellular environment. S-layer glycoproteins from organisms of the Bacillaceae family possess long, O-glycosidically linked glycans that are composed of a great variety of sugar constituents. The observed variations already exceed the display found in eukaryotic glycoproteins. Recent investigations of the S-layer protein glycosylation process at the molecular level, which has lagged behind the structural studies due to the lack of suitable molecular tools, indicated that the S-layer glycoprotein glycan biosynthesis pathway utilizes different modules of the well-known biosynthesis routes of lipopolysaccharide O-antigens. The genetic information for S-layer glycan biosynthesis is usually present in S-layer glycosylation (slg) gene clusters acting in concert with housekeeping genes. To account for the nanometer-scale cell surface display feature of bacterial S-layer glycosylation, we have coined the neologism 'nanoglycobiology'. It includes structural and biochemical aspects of S-layer glycans as well as molecular data on the machinery underlying the glycosylation event. A key aspect for the full potency of S-layer nanoglycobiology is the unique self-assembly feature of the S-layer protein matrix. Being aware that in many cases the glycan structures associated with a protein are the key to protein function, S-layer protein glycosylation will add a new and valuable component to an 'S-layer based molecular construction kit'. In our long-term research strategy, S-layer nanoglycobiology shall converge with other functional glycosylation systems to produce 'functional' S-layer neoglycoproteins for diverse applications in the fields of nanobiotechnology and vaccine technology. Recent advances in the field of

  13. Bi-modal distribution of the second messenger c-di-GMP controls cell fate and asymmetry during the caulobacter cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sören Abel

    Full Text Available Many bacteria mediate important life-style decisions by varying levels of the second messenger c-di-GMP. Behavioral transitions result from the coordination of complex cellular processes such as motility, surface adherence or the production of virulence factors and toxins. While the regulatory mechanisms responsible for these processes have been elucidated in some cases, the global pleiotropic effects of c-di-GMP are poorly understood, primarily because c-di-GMP networks are inherently complex in most bacteria. Moreover, the quantitative relationships between cellular c-di-GMP levels and c-di-GMP dependent phenotypes are largely unknown. Here, we dissect the c-di-GMP network of Caulobacter crescentus to establish a global and quantitative view of c-di-GMP dependent processes in this organism. A genetic approach that gradually reduced the number of diguanylate cyclases identified novel c-di-GMP dependent cellular processes and unraveled c-di-GMP as an essential component of C. crescentus cell polarity and its bimodal life cycle. By varying cellular c-di-GMP concentrations, we determined dose response curves for individual c-di-GMP-dependent processes. Relating these values to c-di-GMP levels modeled for single cells progressing through the cell cycle sets a quantitative frame for the successive activation of c-di-GMP dependent processes during the C. crescentus life cycle. By reconstructing a simplified c-di-GMP network in a strain devoid of c-di-GMP we defined the minimal requirements for the oscillation of c-di-GMP levels during the C. crescentus cell cycle. Finally, we show that although all c-di-GMP dependent cellular processes were qualitatively restored by artificially adjusting c-di-GMP levels with a heterologous diguanylate cyclase, much higher levels of the second messenger are required under these conditions as compared to the contribution of homologous c-di-GMP metabolizing enzymes. These experiments suggest that a common c-di-GMP pool

  14. Prosthecobacter fusiformis nov. gen. et sp., the fusiform caulobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, J T; Bont, J A; Jonge, K

    1976-01-01

    Four strains of heterotrophic, fusiform caulobacters have been isolated from freshwater sources. A single prostheca extends from one pole of mature cells, and cells attach to various substrata by means of a holdfast located at the distal tip of the appendage. Thus, superficially these bacteria bear a strong resemblance to bacteria in the genus Caulobacter. However, unlike Caulobacter these bacteria do not exhibit a dimorphic life cycle of motile, non-stalked daughter cells and immotile, stalked mother cells. Instead both mother and daughter cells are immotile, and at the time of cell separation the daughter cells are essentially identical mirror-image replicas of the mother cell. In addition, the prosthecae of these fusiform caulobacters do not have crossbands, they are somewhat wider than the stalks of Caulobacter and the pseudostalks of Asticcacaulis, and they terminate in a bulbous tip. The deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) base composition ranges from 54.6-60.1, well below the 62-67 range for the genus Caulobacter. Based upon these and other differences a new genus and species, Prosthecobacter fusiformis, is proposed for the fusiform caulobacters.

  15. S-layer protein self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pum, Dietmar; Toca-Herrera, Jose Luis; Sleytr, Uwe B

    2013-01-25

    Crystalline S(urface)-layers are the most commonly observed cell surface structures in prokaryotic organisms (bacteria and archaea). S-layers are highly porous protein meshworks with unit cell sizes in the range of 3 to 30 nm, and thicknesses of ~10 nm. One of the key features of S-layer proteins is their intrinsic capability to form self-assembled mono- or double layers in solution, and at interfaces. Basic research on S-layer proteins laid foundation to make use of the unique self-assembly properties of native and, in particular, genetically functionalized S-layer protein lattices, in a broad range of applications in the life and non-life sciences. This contribution briefly summarizes the knowledge about structure, genetics, chemistry, morphogenesis, and function of S-layer proteins and pays particular attention to the self-assembly in solution, and at differently functionalized solid supports.

  16. Growth Conditions Regulate the Requirements for Caulobacter Chromosome Segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shebelut, Conrad W.; Jensen, Rasmus Bugge; Gitai, Zemer

    2009-01-01

    Growth environments are important metabolic and developmental regulators. Here we demonstrate a growth environment-dependent effect on Caulobacter chromosome segregation of a small-molecule inhibitor of the MreB bacterial actin cytoskeleton. Our results also implicate ParAB as important segregation...... determinants, suggesting that multiple distinct mechanisms can mediate Caulobacter chromosome segregation and that their relative contributions can be environmentally regulated....

  17. Growth Conditions Regulate the Requirements for Caulobacter Chromosome Segregation▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Shebelut, Conrad W.; Jensen, Rasmus B.; Gitai, Zemer

    2008-01-01

    Growth environments are important metabolic and developmental regulators. Here we demonstrate a growth environment-dependent effect on Caulobacter chromosome segregation of a small-molecule inhibitor of the MreB bacterial actin cytoskeleton. Our results also implicate ParAB as important segregation determinants, suggesting that multiple distinct mechanisms can mediate Caulobacter chromosome segregation and that their relative contributions can be environmentally regulated.

  18. Growth conditions regulate the requirements for Caulobacter chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebelut, Conrad W; Jensen, Rasmus B; Gitai, Zemer

    2009-02-01

    Growth environments are important metabolic and developmental regulators. Here we demonstrate a growth environment-dependent effect on Caulobacter chromosome segregation of a small-molecule inhibitor of the MreB bacterial actin cytoskeleton. Our results also implicate ParAB as important segregation determinants, suggesting that multiple distinct mechanisms can mediate Caulobacter chromosome segregation and that their relative contributions can be environmentally regulated.

  19. Reassembly of S-layer proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    2014-08-01

    Crystalline bacterial cell surface layers (S-layers) represent the outermost cell envelope component in a broad range of bacteria and archaea. They are monomolecular arrays composed of a single protein or glycoprotein species and represent the simplest biological membranes developed during evolution. They are highly porous protein mesh works with unit cell sizes in the range of 3 to 30 nm, and pore sizes of 2 to 8 nm. S-layers are usually 5 to 20 nm thick (in archaea, up to 70 nm). S-layer proteins are one of the most abundant biopolymers on earth. One of their key features, and the focus of this review, is the intrinsic capability of isolated native and recombinant S-layer proteins to form self-assembled mono- or double layers in suspension, at solid supports, the air-water interface, planar lipid films, liposomes, nanocapsules, and nanoparticles. The reassembly is entropy-driven and a fascinating example of matrix assembly following a multistage, non-classical pathway in which the process of S-layer protein folding is directly linked with assembly into extended clusters. Moreover, basic research on the structure, synthesis, genetics, assembly, and function of S-layer proteins laid the foundation for their application in novel approaches in biotechnology, biomimetics, synthetic biology, and nanotechnology.

  20. Conserved S-Layer-Associated Proteins Revealed by Exoproteomic Survey of S-Layer-Forming Lactobacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brant R; Hymes, Jeffrey; Sanozky-Dawes, Rosemary; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2015-10-16

    The Lactobacillus acidophilus homology group comprises Gram-positive species that include L. acidophilus, L. helveticus, L. crispatus, L. amylovorus, L. gallinarum, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. gasseri, and L. johnsonii. While these bacteria are closely related, they have varied ecological lifestyles as dairy and food fermenters, allochthonous probiotics, or autochthonous commensals of the host gastrointestinal tract. Bacterial cell surface components play a critical role in the molecular dialogue between bacteria and interaction signaling with the intestinal mucosa. Notably, the L. acidophilus complex is distinguished in two clades by the presence or absence of S-layers, which are semiporous crystalline arrays of self-assembling proteinaceous subunits found as the outermost layer of the bacterial cell wall. In this study, S-layer-associated proteins (SLAPs) in the exoproteomes of various S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species were proteomically identified, genomically compared, and transcriptionally analyzed. Four gene regions encoding six putative SLAPs were conserved in the S-layer-forming Lactobacillus species but not identified in the extracts of the closely related progenitor, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, which does not produce an S-layer. Therefore, the presence or absence of an S-layer has a clear impact on the exoproteomic composition of Lactobacillus species. This proteomic complexity and differences in the cell surface properties between S-layer- and non-S-layer-forming lactobacilli reveal the potential for SLAPs to mediate intimate probiotic interactions and signaling with the host intestinal mucosa.

  1. Isolation and characterization of Caulobacter mutants impaired in adaptation to stationary phase Isolamento e caracterização de mutantes de Caulobacter deficientes na adaptação à fase estacionária

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria C. S. Italiani

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The entry into stationary phase causes a change in the pattern of gene expression of bacteria, when the cells must express a whole set of genes involved mainly with resistance to starvation and to environmental stresses. As an attempt to identify genes important for the survival of Caulobacter crescentus in stationary phase, we have screened a library of 5,000 clones generated by random transposon mutagenesis for mutants that showed reduced viability after prolonged growth. Four clones were selected, which displayed either lower viability or a longer time of recovery from stationary phase. The genes disrupted were identified, and the gene products were found to be mainly involved with amino acid metabolism (glutamate N-acetyltransferase, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase and L-aspartate oxidase or with recombination (exonuclease RecJ. Each mutant was tested for resistance to stresses, such as oxidative, saline, acidic, heat and UV exposure, showing different responses. Although the mutations obtained were not in genes involved specifically in stationary phase, our results suggest that amino acids metabolism may play an important role in keeping viability during this growth phase.A entrada em fase estacionária causa uma mudança no padrão de expressão gênica de bactérias, quando as células devem expressar um novo conjunto de genes envolvidos principalmente com resistência à carência alimentar e a estresses ambientais. Em uma tentativa de identificar genes importantes para a sobrevivência de Caulobacter crescentus em fase estacionária, nós varremos uma biblioteca de 5.000 clones gerados por transposição aleatória em busca de mutantes que mostrassem viabilidade reduzida após crescimento prolongado. Quatro clones foram selecionados, que mostraram menor viabilidade ou um maior tempo de recuperação da fase estacionária. Os genes interrompidos foram identificados, e os produtos gênicos mostraram-se estar envolvidos principalmente

  2. Nanotechnology with s-layer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Bernhard; Sleytr, Uwe B

    2013-01-01

    Nanosciences are distinguished by the cross-fertilization of biology, chemistry, material sciences, and solid-state physics and hence open up a great variety of new opportunities for innovation. The technological utilization of self-assembly systems, wherein molecules spontaneously associate under equilibrium conditions into reproducible supramolecular aggregates, is one key challenge in nanosciences for life and nonlife science applications. The attractiveness of such processes is due to their ability to build uniform, ultrasmall functional units and the possibility to exploit such structures at meso- and macroscopic scale very frequently by newly developed techniques and methods. By the utilization of crystalline bacterial cell-surface proteins (S-layer proteins) innovative approaches for the assembly of supramolecular structures and devices with dimensions of a few to tens of nanometers have been developed. S-layers have proven to be particularly suited as building blocks in a molecular construction kit involving all major classes of biological molecules. The controlled immobilization of biomolecules in an ordered fashion on solid substrates and their controlled confinement in definite areas of nanometer dimensions are key requirements for many applications including the development of bioanalytical sensors, biochips, molecular electronics, biocompatible surfaces, and signal processing between functional membranes, cells, and integrated circuits.

  3. Marine Caulobacters. Isolation, Characterization and Assessing the Potential for Genetic Experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    drain runoff and sites well removed from commercial development. Other samples were taken at sites along the California coast, ranging from Bodega Bay...h? lrolns to enable transfer of mob+ plasm ids. II Table 2. SALT REQUIREMENTS FOR MARINE CAULOBACTERS Marine Caulobacter Growth in i/OX Growth in

  4. S-Layer-Based Nanocomposites for Industrial Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Johannes; Matys, Sabine; Suhr, Matthias; Vogel, Manja; Günther, Tobias; Pollmann, Katrin

    This chapter covers the fundamental aspects of bacterial S-layers: what are S-layers, what is known about them, and what are their main features that makes them so interesting for the production of nanostructures. After a detailed introduction of the paracrystalline protein lattices formed by S-layer systems in nature the chapter explores the engineering of S-layer-based materials. How can S-layers be used to produce "industry-ready" nanoscale bio-composite materials, and which kinds of nanomaterials are possible (e.g., nanoparticle synthesis, nanoparticle immobilization, and multifunctional coatings)? What are the advantages and disadvantages of S-layer-based composite materials? Finally, the chapter highlights the potential of these innovative bacterial biomolecules for future technologies in the fields of metal filtration, catalysis, and bio-functionalization.

  5. The structure of bacterial S-layer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Howorka, Stefan; Keller, Walter

    2011-01-01

    S-layers are self-assembled paracrystalline protein lattices that cover many bacteria and almost all archaea. As an important component of the bacterial cell envelope, S-layers can fulfill various biological functions and are usually the most abundantly expressed protein species in a cell. Here we review the structures of the best characterized S-layer proteins from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as methods to determine their molecular architecture.

  6. Variability of S-layer proteins in Lactobacillus helveticus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waśko, Adam; Polak-Berecka, Magdalena; Kuzdraliński, Adam; Skrzypek, Tomasz

    2014-02-01

    The presence of S-layer proteins in the cell envelope of Lactobacillus helveticus may be technologically important. S-layer proteins are the adhesion site for cell envelope proteinase, which forms the proteolytic pathway in bacteria. Eleven strains of L. helveticus were examined for the presence of S-layer proteins and slpH genes. S-layer proteins from six strains were identified and sequenced. Multiple alignments of the deduced amino acid sequences demonstrated a strong sequence conservation of all Slp studied. Transmission Electron Microscopy analysis of the cells revealed the typical cell wall architecture of the S-layer. This is the first report on characterisation of glycosylated S-layer proteins from different strains of L. helveticus. The amino acid composition, the secondary structure, and the physical properties of these proteins were found to be quite similar to those of S-layer proteins from other lactobacilli. However, PCR analysis revealed that five of the examined strains of L. helveticus did not have slpH genes. This finding suggests that S-layer protein genes cannot be considered as housekeeping genes and cannot be used as molecular markers for L. helveticus.

  7. S-layer proteins of Lactobacillus acidophilus inhibits JUNV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, María Guadalupe; Prado Acosta, Mariano; Candurra, Nélida A; Ruzal, Sandra M

    2012-06-15

    It has been previously described that S-layer binds to the C-type lectin DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN, CD209). It was also shown that DC-SIGN is a cell-surface adhesion factor that enhances viral entry of several virus families. Among those, Junin virus (JUNV) entry is enhanced in cells expressing DC-SIGN and for that reason surface-layer protein (S-layer) of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4365 was evaluated as a possible JUNV inhibitor. Experiments using 3T3 cells stably expressing DC-SIGN, showed an almost complete inhibition of JUNV infection when they were treated with S-layer in a similar extend as the inhibition shown by mannan. However no inhibition effect was observed in 3T3 wild type cells or in 3T3 cells expressing liver/lymph node-specific ICAM-3 grabbing nonintegrin (L-SIGN or DC-SIGNR or CD209L). Treatments with S-layer during different times in the infection demonstrated that inhibition was only observed when S-layer was presented in early stages of the viral infection. This inhibition does not involve the classic recognition of mannose by this C-type lectin as the S-layer showed no evidence to be glycosylated. In fact, the highly basic nature of the S-layer (pI>9.5) seems to be involved in electrostatic interactions between DC-SIGN and S-layer, since high pH abolished the inhibitory effect on infection cause by the S-layer. In silico analysis predicts a Ca(2+)-dependant carbohydrate recognition domain in the SlpA protein. This novel characteristic of the S-layer, a GRAS status protein, contribute to the pathogen exclusion reported for this probiotic strain and may be applied as an antiviral agent to inhibit several kinds of viruses.

  8. Caulobacter chromosome segregation is an ordered multistep process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebelut, Conrad W; Guberman, Jonathan M; van Teeffelen, Sven; Yakhnina, Anastasiya A; Gitai, Zemer

    2010-08-10

    Despite its fundamental nature, bacterial chromosome segregation remains poorly understood. Viewing segregation as a single process caused multiple proposed mechanisms to appear in conflict and failed to explain how asymmetrically dividing bacteria break symmetry to move only one of their chromosomes. Here, we demonstrate that the ParA ATPase extends from one cell pole and pulls the chromosome by retracting upon association with the ParB DNA-binding protein. Surprisingly, ParA disruption has a specific effect on chromosome segregation that only perturbs the latter stages of this process. Using quantitative high-resolution imaging, we demonstrate that this specificity results from the multistep nature of chromosome translocation. We propose that Caulobacter chromosome segregation follows an ordered pathway of events with distinct functions and mechanisms. Initiation releases polar tethering of the origin of replication, distinction spatially differentiates the two chromosomes, and commitment irreversibly translocates the distal centromeric locus. Thus, much as eukaryotic mitosis involves a sequence of distinct subprocesses, Caulobacter cells also segregate their chromosomes through an orchestrated series of steps. We discuss how the multistep view of bacterial chromosome segregation can help to explain and reconcile outstanding puzzles and frame future investigation.

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGOR-01-1350 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGOR-01-1350 ref|NP_419199.1| beta-glucanase [Caulobacter crescentus CB15] ref...|YP_002515759.1| glucan endo-1,3-beta-glucosidase [Caulobacter crescentus NA1000] gb|AAK22367.1| beta-glucanase [Caulobacter crescent...us CB15] gb|ACL93851.1| glucan endo-1,3-beta-glucosidase [Caulobacter crescentus NA1000] NP_419199.1 3.7 27% ...

  10. Antigenic differences among Campylobacter fetus S-layer proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Dubreuil, J D; Kostrzynska, M; Austin, J W; Trust, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of S-layer proteins extracted from Campylobacter fetus strains by using acid glycine buffer showed that the predominant S-layer proteins of different strains had subunit molecular weights in the range of 90,000 to 140,000. Electron microscopy revealed oblique S-layer lattices with a spacing of approximately 5.6 nm (gamma = 75 degrees) on wild-type strains VC1, VC119, VC202, and VC203. Three variants of C. fetus VC119 producing a predom...

  11. Charakterisierung von S-Layer-Proteinen bei Prokaryoten

    OpenAIRE

    Akca, Erol

    2004-01-01

    S-Layer sind kristalline Proteinschichten, die als Komponenten von Zellwänden in allen Zweigen der Bakterien und Archaebakterien vorkommen. Aus der Domäne der Archaea wurden die S-Layer-Proteine mesophiler, thermophiler und hyperthermophiler Methanococcales verglichen. Die Zellwand dieser Organismen besteht nur aus einer S-Layerschicht, die die Zellen vor äußeren Einflüssen schützt. Analog zu den Methanococcales wurden S-Layer-Proteine mesophiler und thermophiler Vertreter aus der Familie der...

  12. Lysinibacillus sphaericus S-layer protein toxicity against Culex quinquefasciatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Lucía C; Ayala, Juan A; Dussán, Jenny

    2011-10-01

    The main toxicity mechanism of Lysinibacillus sphaericus, which is used in the control of mosquitoes, is its binary toxin produced during sporulation; additionally the Mtx1, Mtx2 and Mtx 3 toxins are expressed in vegetative cells. Mosquito larvicidal potency of the S-layer protein that is expressed in vegetative cells has been determined. The protein is similar to other S-layer proteins of mosquitocidal L. sphaericus strains. The LC50 values of the S-layer protein of the L. sphaericus OT4b25, OT4b26, and III(3)7 strains against third-instar larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus were 8.7, 24 and 0.68 μg/ml, respectively. To our knowledge this is the first study showing the mosquito larvicidal potency of the S-layer protein from Lysinibacillus sphaericus.

  13. Bacterial S-layer protein coupling to lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weygand, M.; Wetzer, B.; Pum, D.

    1999-01-01

    The coupling of bacterial surface (S)-layer proteins to lipid membranes is studied in molecular detail for proteins from Bacillus sphaericus CCM2177 and B. coagulans E38-66 recrystallized at dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) monolayers on aqueous buffer. A comparison of the monolayer...... that the phosphatidylethanolamine headgroups must reorient toward the surface normal to accommodate such changes. In terms of the protein structure (which is as yet unknown in three dimensions), the electron density profile reveals a thickness I(z) approximate to 90 Angstrom of the recrystallized S-layer and shows water......-filled cavities near its center. The protein volume fraction reaches maxima of >60% in two horizontal sections of the S-layer, close to the lipid monolayer and close to the free subphase. In between it drops to similar to 20%. Four S-layer protein monomers are located within the unit cell of a square lattice...

  14. S-layer fusion proteins--construction principles and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilk, Nicola; Egelseer, Eva M; Sleytr, Uwe B

    2011-12-01

    Crystalline bacterial cell surface layers (S-layers) are the outermost cell envelope component of many bacteria and archaea. S-layers are monomolecular arrays composed of a single protein or glycoprotein species and represent the simplest biological membrane developed during evolution. The wealth of information available on the structure, chemistry, genetics and assembly of S-layers revealed a broad spectrum of applications in nanobiotechnology and biomimetics. By genetic engineering techniques, specific functional domains can be incorporated in S-layer proteins while maintaining the self-assembly capability. These techniques have led to new types of affinity structures, microcarriers, enzyme membranes, diagnostic devices, biosensors, vaccines, as well as targeting, delivery and encapsulation systems.

  15. Nanobiotechnology with S-layer proteins as building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleytr, Uwe B; Schuster, Bernhard; Egelseer, Eva M; Pum, Dietmar; Horejs, Christine M; Tscheliessnig, Rupert; Ilk, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    One of the key challenges in nanobiotechnology is the utilization of self- assembly systems, wherein molecules spontaneously associate into reproducible aggregates and supramolecular structures. In this contribution, we describe the basic principles of crystalline bacterial surface layers (S-layers) and their use as patterning elements. The broad application potential of S-layers in nanobiotechnology is based on the specific intrinsic features of the monomolecular arrays composed of identical protein or glycoprotein subunits. Most important, physicochemical properties and functional groups on the protein lattice are arranged in well-defined positions and orientations. Many applications of S-layers depend on the capability of isolated subunits to recrystallize into monomolecular arrays in suspension or on suitable surfaces (e.g., polymers, metals, silicon wafers) or interfaces (e.g., lipid films, liposomes, emulsomes). S-layers also represent a unique structural basis and patterning element for generating more complex supramolecular structures involving all major classes of biological molecules (e.g., proteins, lipids, glycans, nucleic acids, or combinations of these). Thus, S-layers fulfill key requirements as building blocks for the production of new supramolecular materials and nanoscale devices as required in molecular nanotechnology, nanobiotechnology, biomimetics, and synthetic biology.

  16. Construction of silica-enhanced S-layer protein cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, D; Küpcü, S; Belton, D J; Perry, C C; Stöger-Pollach, M; Sleytr, U B; Pum, D

    2013-03-01

    The work presented here shows for the first time that it is possible to silicify S-layer coated liposomes and to obtain stable functionalized hollow nano-containers. For this purpose, the S-layer protein of Geobacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2 was recombinantly expressed and used for coating positively charged liposomes composed of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, cholesterol and hexadecylamine in a molar ratio of 10:5:4. Subsequently, plain (uncoated) liposomes and S-layer coated liposomes were silicified. Determination of the charge of the constructs during silicification allowed the deposition process to be followed. After the particles had been silicified, lipids were dissolved by treatment with Triton X-100 with the release of previously entrapped fluorescent dyes being determined by fluorimetry. Both, ζ-potential and release experiments showed differences between silicified plain liposomes and silicified S-layer coated liposomes. The results of the individual preparation steps were examined by embedding the respective assemblies in resin, ultrathin sectioning and inspection by bright-field transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Energy filtered TEM confirmed the successful construction of S-layer based silica cages. It is anticipated that this approach will provide a key to enabling technology for the fabrication of nanoporous protein cages for applications ranging from nano medicine to materials science.

  17. An SMC ATPase mutant disrupts chromosome segregation in Caulobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Monica A; Shapiro, Lucy

    2011-12-01

    Accurate replication and segregation of the bacterial genome are essential for cell cycle progression. We have identified a single amino acid substitution in the Caulobacter structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) protein that disrupts chromosome segregation and cell division. The E1076Q point mutation in the SMC ATPase domain caused a dominant-negative phenotype in which DNA replication was able to proceed, but duplicated parS centromeres, normally found at opposite cell poles, remained at one pole. The cellular positions of other chromosomal loci were in the wild-type order relative to the parS centromere, but chromosomes remained unsegregated and appeared to be stacked upon one another. Purified SMC-E1076Q was deficient in ATP hydrolysis and exhibited abnormally stable binding to DNA. We propose that SMC spuriously links the duplicated chromosome immediately after passage of the replication fork. In wild-type cells, ATP hydrolysis opens the SMC dimer, freeing one chromosome to segregate to the opposite pole. The loss of ATP hydrolysis causes the SMC-E1076Q dimer to remain bound to both chromosomes, inhibiting segregation.

  18. Role of S-layer proteins in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbino, E; Carasi, P; Mobili, P; Serradell, M A; Gómez-Zavaglia, A

    2015-12-01

    S-layers are paracrystalline bidimensional arrays of proteins or glycoproteins that overlay the cell surface of several genus and species of bacteria and archaea. As the outermost layer of several genus and species of microorganisms, S-layer proteins (SLP) are in direct contact with bacterial environment and thus may be involved in many of their surface properties, including adherence to various substrates, mucins and eukaryotic cells, aggregation and coaggregation with yeasts and other bacteria. In addition, SLP have been reported to be responsible for the bacterial protection against detrimental environmental conditions and to play an important role in surface recognition or as carriers of virulence factors. In this mini-review, we bring together the latest evidences about functional and mechanical properties of bacterial SLP from two different perspectives: (A) their role on bacterial adherence to different substrates and surfaces, and (B) their role as mechanical barriers in bacterial harmful environments.

  19. Monomolecular films of cholesterol oxidase and S-Layer proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Helen Conceição; Guimarães, Juliana Aguilar; Alves, Tito Livio Moitinho; Constantino, Carlos José Leopoldo

    2011-05-01

    Cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) is a flavoenzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of cholesterol to cholest-5-en-3-one and subsequently the isomerization to cholest-4-en-3-one. ChOx has been very commonly studied as the detection element in cholesterol biosensors. In the biosensor development field, a relatively new approach is the use of crystalline bacterial cell surface layers, known as S-Layer proteins. These proteins exhibit the ability of self-assembling at surfaces, opening a vast spectrum of applications, both in basic and applied researches. In our study, monomolecular films of ChOx and mixed films of ChOx/S-Layer proteins and DPPC/S-Layer proteins were produced using the Langmuir technique. Characterization of the films was performed by means of surface pressure-molecular area ( π- A) isotherms. Stable monolayers were obtained, which means that they can be transferred to solid substrates by Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Mixed monolayers showed an ideal like behavior.

  20. Genome Sequence of Selenium-Solubilizing Bacterium Caulobacter vibrioides T5M6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yihua; Qin, Yanan; Kot, Witold

    2016-01-01

    Caulobacter vibrioides T5M6 is a Gram-negative strain that strongly solubilizes selenium (Se) mineral into Se(IV) and was isolated from a selenium mining area in Enshi, southwest China. This strain produces the phytohormone IAA and promotes plant growth. Here we present the genome of this strain ...

  1. Magnetism of Au Nanoparticles on Sulfolubus Acidocaldarius S-Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolome, Juan; Bartolome, F.; Garcia, L. M.; Figueroa, A. I.; Herrmannsdoerfer, T.; Skrotzki, R.; Schoenemann, R.; Wosnitza, J.; Selenska-Pobell, S.; Geissler, A.; Reitz, T.; Wilhelm, F.; Rogalev, A.

    2011-03-01

    Au nanoparticles (NP) with diameters of a few nm have been synthesized on a protein S-layer of Sulfolobus Acidocaldarius bacteria. SQUID magnetization (1.8 K T 300 Kand 0 B 7 T) showssuperparamagneticbehavioratlow - T . ItsoriginlaysattheAuNP ' s , ashasbeenprovenbyAuL 2,3- edgeXMCDspectroscopy , performedintherange 2.2 T 20 KanduptoB app = 17 T . XMCDanalysisyieldsatotalmagneticmomentperAuatom μAu = 0.050 (1) μB , aparticleaveragemomentm part = 2.3 μB , Auorbitaltospinmomentratioofm L / m S = 0.29 Curie and - like superparamagnetism. Au - S bonds are detected by S K - edge XAS measurements. Besides , EXAFS at the Au L 3 -edge shows that the Au NP internal structure is fcc, and Au-S bonds are located at the particle surface. An increase of the hole charge carrier density in the Au 5d band due to electron transfer with the S-layer explains the Au magnetism. The observed magnetic moment per Au atom is 25 times larger than those previously found by XMCD in Au-thiol capped NPs.

  2. Characterization of Three Different Unusual S-Layer Proteins from Viridibacillus arvi JG-B58 That Exhibits Two Super-Imposed S-Layer Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhr, Matthias; Lederer, Franziska L; Günther, Tobias J; Raff, Johannes; Pollmann, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Genomic analyses of Viridibacillus arvi JG-B58 that was previously isolated from heavy metal contaminated environment identified three different putative surface layer (S-layer) protein genes namely slp1, slp2, and slp3. All three genes are expressed during cultivation. At least two of the V. arvi JG-B58 S-layer proteins were visualized on the surface of living cells via atomic force microscopy (AFM). These S-layer proteins form a double layer with p4 symmetry. The S-layer proteins were isolated from the cells using two different methods. Purified S-layer proteins were recrystallized on SiO2 substrates in order to study the structure of the arrays and self-assembling properties. The primary structure of all examined S-layer proteins lack some features that are typical for Bacillus or Lysinibacillus S-layers. For example, they possess no SLH domains that are usually responsible for the anchoring of the proteins to the cell wall. Further, the pI values are relatively high ranging from 7.84 to 9.25 for the matured proteins. Such features are typical for S-layer proteins of Lactobacillus species although sequence comparisons indicate a close relationship to S-layer proteins of Lysinibacillus and Bacillus strains. In comparison to the numerous descriptions of S-layers, there are only a few studies reporting the concomitant existence of two different S-layer proteins on cell surfaces. Together with the genomic data, this is the first description of a novel type of S-layer proteins showing features of Lactobacillus as well as of Bacillus-type S-layer proteins and the first study of the cell envelope of Viridibacillus arvi.

  3. S-layers at second glance? Altiarchaeal grappling hooks (hami resemble archaeal S-layer proteins in structure and sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Kristin Perras

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The uncultivated Ca. Altiarchaeum hamiconexum (formerly known as SM1 Euryarchaeon carries highly specialized nano-grappling hooks (hami on its cell surface. Until now little is known about the major protein forming these structured fibrous cell surface appendages, the genes involved or membrane anchoring of these filaments. These aspects were analyzed in depth in this study using environmental transcriptomics combined with imaging methods. Since a laboratory culture of this archaeon is not yet available, natural biofilm samples with high Ca. A. hamiconexum abundance were used for the entire analyses. The filamentous surface appendages spanned both membranes of the cell, which are composed of glycosyl-archaeol. The hami consisted of multiple copies of the same protein, the corresponding gene of which was identified via metagenome-mapped transcriptome analysis. The hamus subunit proteins, which are likely to self-assemble due to their predicted beta sheet topology, revealed no similiarity to known microbial flagella-, archaella-, fimbriae- or pili-proteins, but a high similarity to known S-layer proteins of the archaeal phylum at their N-terminal region (47-44% identity. Our results provide new insights into the structure of the unique hami and their major protein and indicate their divergent evolution with S-layer proteins.

  4. S-layers at second glance? Altiarchaeal grappling hooks (hami) resemble archaeal S-layer proteins in structure and sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perras, Alexandra K; Daum, Bertram; Ziegler, Christine; Takahashi, Lynelle K; Ahmed, Musahid; Wanner, Gerhard; Klingl, Andreas; Leitinger, Gerd; Kolb-Lenz, Dagmar; Gribaldo, Simonetta; Auerbach, Anna; Mora, Maximilian; Probst, Alexander J; Bellack, Annett; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The uncultivated "Candidatus Altiarchaeum hamiconexum" (formerly known as SM1 Euryarchaeon) carries highly specialized nano-grappling hooks ("hami") on its cell surface. Until now little is known about the major protein forming these structured fibrous cell surface appendages, the genes involved or membrane anchoring of these filaments. These aspects were analyzed in depth in this study using environmental transcriptomics combined with imaging methods. Since a laboratory culture of this archaeon is not yet available, natural biofilm samples with high Ca. A. hamiconexum abundance were used for the entire analyses. The filamentous surface appendages spanned both membranes of the cell, which are composed of glycosyl-archaeol. The hami consisted of multiple copies of the same protein, the corresponding gene of which was identified via metagenome-mapped transcriptome analysis. The hamus subunit proteins, which are likely to self-assemble due to their predicted beta sheet topology, revealed no similiarity to known microbial flagella-, archaella-, fimbriae- or pili-proteins, but a high similarity to known S-layer proteins of the archaeal domain at their N-terminal region (44-47% identity). Our results provide new insights into the structure of the unique hami and their major protein and indicate their divergent evolution with S-layer proteins.

  5. Characterization of Three Different Unusual S-Layer Proteins from Viridibacillus arvi JG-B58 That Exhibits Two Super-Imposed S-Layer Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Suhr, Matthias; Lederer, Franziska L; Günther, Tobias J.; Raff, Johannes; Pollmann, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Genomic analyses of Viridibacillus arvi JG-B58 that was previously isolated from heavy metal contaminated environment identified three different putative surface layer (S-layer) protein genes namely slp1, slp2, and slp3. All three genes are expressed during cultivation. At least two of the V. arvi JG-B58 S-layer proteins were visualized on the surface of living cells via atomic force microscopy (AFM). These S-layer proteins form a double layer with p4 symmetry. The S-layer proteins were isola...

  6. Photoluminescence studies of CdS layers for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemain, Frederique; Robin, Ivan-Christophe; Renet, Sebastien; Bernardi, Sergio [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA-LETI, Minatec Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2012-08-15

    Photoluminescence (PL) measurements were performed on polycrystalline CdS films grown by close space sublimation (CSS) or by chemical bath deposition (CBD) in order to observe the evolution of emission features according to the deposition technique and post-deposition treatments. CdS is naturally n-type because of the presence of sulphur vacancies and in most of the observed samples, a donor-acceptor pair involving the sulfur vacancies could be identified at 1.65 eV. Different complexes emissions could be identified depending on the deposition technique and post-growth treatment. The best efficiencies were measured on CdTe/CdS based solar cells for which the CdS layer presents an excitonic donor bound PL peak as well as an emission corresponding to interstitial cadmium (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Electron and scanning probe microscopy study of S-layers of plague microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konnov, Nikolai P.; Baiburin, Vil B.; Djatlov, Ivan A.; Antonova, Oksana A.; Volkov, Uryi P.

    1999-01-01

    Microscopy investigations of S-layers of plague microbes have been carried out. A protein forming S-layer was isolated, purified and its biochemical properties were studied. Images of plague cells with and without S-layer and images of isolated S-layer protein arrays on solid supports were obtained by transmission electron microscopy. An isolated protein forming the layer is self-assembled into crystalline structure with hexagonal pores are of regular size about 4 - 8 nm, which was observed by transmission electron micrographs. The STM images of plague microbes with S-layer and without one and the STM and AFM images of isolated S-layer protein arrays on mica surface were obtained.

  8. Interaction of S-layer proteins of Lactobacillus kefir with model membranes and cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmann, Axel; Delfederico, Lucrecia; Santos, Nuno Correia; Disalvo, E Anibal; Semorile, Liliana

    2017-01-12

    In previous works, it was shown that S-layer proteins from Lactobacillus kefir were able to recrystallize and stabilize liposomes, this feature reveling a great potential for developing liposomal-based carriers. Despite previous studies on this subject are important milestones, a number of questions remain unanswered; In this context, the feasibility of S-layer proteins as a biomaterial for drug delivery was evaluated in this work. First, S-layer proteins were fully characterized by Electron microscopy, 2D-electrophoresis, and HPAEC-PAD. Afterward, interactions of S-layer proteins with model lipid membranes were evaluated, showing that proteins adsorb to the lipid surface following a non-fickean or anomalous diffusion, when positively charged lipid were employed, suggesting that electrostatic interaction is a key factor in the recrystallization process on these proteins. Finally, the interaction of S-layer coated liposomes with CACO-2 cell line was assessed, First cytotoxicity of formulations was tested showing noncytotoxic effects in S-layer coated vesicles. Second, by flow cytometry, it was observed an increased ability to transfer cargo molecules into CACO-2 cells from S-layer coated liposomes in comparison to control ones. All data put together, supporting the idea that a combination of adhesive properties of S-layer proteins concomitant with higher stability of S-layer coated liposomes represents an exciting starting point in the development of new drug carriers.

  9. Bacillus anthracis SlaQ Promotes S-Layer Protein Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen-Mau, Sao-Mai; Oh, So-Young; Schneewind, Daphne I.; Missiakas, Dominique; Schneewind, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis vegetative forms assemble an S-layer comprised of two S-layer proteins, Sap and EA1. A hallmark of S-layer proteins are their C-terminal crystallization domains, which assemble into a crystalline lattice once these polypeptides are deposited on the bacterial surface via association between their N-terminal S-layer homology domains and the secondary cell wall polysaccharide. Here we show that slaQ, encoding a small cytoplasmic protein conserved among pathogenic bacilli elabo...

  10. S-layer proteins as basic building blocks in a biomolecular construction kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pum, Dietmar; Neubauer, Angela; Györvary, Erika; Sára, Margit; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    2000-06-01

    Crystalline bacterial cell surface layer (S-layer) proteins have been optimized during billions of years of biological evolution as constituent elements of one of the simplest self-assembly systems. Isolated S-layer proteins possess the intrinsic property of being able to recrystallize into two-dimensional arrays at a broad spectrum of surfaces (e.g. silicon) and interfaces (e.g. air-water interface or planar lipid films). The well-defined arrangement of functional groups on S-layer lattices allows the binding of molecules and particles in defined regular arrays. S-layers recrystallized on solid supports can be patterned in the submicrometre range using standard optical lithography. S-layers also represent templates for the formation of inorganic nanocrystal superlattices (e.g. CdS, Au, Ni, Pt, or Pd) as required for molecular electronics and nonlinear optics.

  11. Contribution of S-layer proteins to the mosquitocidal activity of Lysinibacillus sphaericus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allievi, Mariana Claudia; Palomino, María Mercedes; Prado Acosta, Mariano; Lanati, Leonardo; Ruzal, Sandra Mónica; Sánchez-Rivas, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Lysinibacillus sphaericus strains belonging the antigenic group H5a5b produce spores with larvicidal activity against larvae of Culex mosquitoes. C7, a new isolated strain, which presents similar biochemical characteristics and Bin toxins in their spores as the reference strain 2362, was, however, more active against larvae of Culex mosquitoes. The contribution of the surface layer protein (S-layer) to this behaviour was envisaged since this envelope protein has been implicated in the pathogenicity of several bacilli, and we had previously reported its association to spores. Microscopic observation by immunofluorescence detection with anti S-layer antibody in the spores confirms their attachment. S-layers and BinA and BinB toxins formed high molecular weight multimers in spores as shown by SDS-PAGE and western blot detection. Purified S-layer from both L. sphaericus C7 and 2362 strain cultures was by itself toxic against Culex sp larvae, however, that from C7 strain was also toxic against Aedes aegypti. Synergistic effect between purified S-layer and spore-crystal preparations was observed against Culex sp. and Aedes aegypti larvae. This effect was more evident with the C7 strain. In silico analyses of the S-layer sequence suggest the presence of chitin-binding and hemolytic domains. Both biochemical characteristics were detected for both S-layers strains that must justify their contribution to pathogenicity.

  12. A study of the thermal denaturation of the S-layer protein from Lactobacillus salivarius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lighezan, Liliana; Georgieva, Ralitsa; Neagu, Adrian

    2012-09-01

    Surface layer (S-layer) proteins display an intrinsic self-assembly property, forming monomolecular crystalline arrays, identified in outermost structures of the cell envelope in many organisms, such as bacteria and archaea. Isolated S-layer proteins also possess the ability to recrystallize into regular lattices, being used in biotechnological applications, such as controlling the architecture of biomimetic surfaces. To this end, the stability of the S-layer proteins under high-temperature conditions is very important. In this study, the S-layer protein has been isolated from Lactobacillus salivarius 16 strain of human origin, and purified by cation-exchange chromatography. Using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, we have investigated the thermal denaturation of the S-layer protein. The far- and near-UV CD spectra have been collected, and the temperature dependence of the CD signal in these spectral domains has been analyzed. The variable temperature results show that the secondary and tertiary structures of the S-layer protein change irreversibly due to the heating of the sample. After the cooling of the heated protein, the secondary and tertiary structures are partially recovered. The denaturation curves show that the protein unfolding depends on the sample concentration and on the heating rate. The secondary and tertiary structures of the protein suffer changes in the same temperature range. We have also detected an intermediate state in the protein denaturation pathway. Our results on the thermal behavior of the S-layer protein may be important for the use of S-layer proteins in biotechnological applications, as well as for a better understanding of the structure and function of S-layer proteins.

  13. Protein-mesoporous silicon matrix obtained by S-layer technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleps, Irina; Ignat, Teodora; Miu, Mihaela; Simion, Monica [National Institute for Research and Development in Microtechnologies (IMT-Bucharest), Bucharest (Romania); Teodosiu Popescu, Gabriela; Enache, Madalin; Dumitru, Lucia [Institute of Biology, Bucharest (Romania)

    2009-07-15

    Protein layers on porous silicon (PS) substrates were prepared using haloarchaea strain Haloferax sp. as S-layer subunits. The attaching of S-layer at PS samples was performed by immersing the PS samples in S-layer solution in sterile conditions, followed by 24 hours incubation at two temperatures, 4 and 24 C. Spectrophotometric determination of the S-layer attachment on the porous silicon substrate was performed at 280 nm wavelength by measuring the protein concentration in solution before and after the incubation of PS samples. The protein layer morphology on the PS substrate was investigated by electron microscopy. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Shift in S-layer protein expression responsible for antigenic variation in Campylobacter fetus.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, E; Garcia, M M; Blake, M. S.; Pei, Z.; Blaser, M J

    1993-01-01

    Campylobacter fetus strains possess regular paracrystalline surface layers (S-layers) composed of high-molecular-weight proteins and can change the size and crystalline structure of the predominant protein expressed. Polyclonal antisera demonstrate antigenic cross-reactivity among these proteins but suggest differences in epitopes. Monoclonal antibodies to the 97-kDa S-layer protein of Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus strain 82-40LP showed three different reactivities. Monoclonal antibody 1D1...

  15. S-layer production by Lactobacillus acidophilus IBB 801 under environmental stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosu-Tudor, Silvia-Simona; Brown, Lucia; Hebert, Elvira M; Brezeanu, Aurelia; Brinzan, Alexandru; Fadda, Silvina; Mozzi, Fernanda; Zamfir, Medana

    2016-05-01

    The ability of microorganisms to synthesize S-layer, the outermost structure of the microbial cell envelope composed of non-covalently bound proteins, has been ascribed to help microorganisms to exert their probiotic properties in the host. In this work, formation of S-layer by the potentially probiotic strain Lactobacillus acidophilus IBB 801 under different stress culture conditions (high incubation temperatures, presence of bile salts or NaCl, and acidic pH) was assayed. A marked S-layer synthesis by L. acidophilus IBB 801 was detected when the strain was grown at 42 °C and in the presence of 0.05 % bile salts or 2.0 % NaCl. The presence of S-layer proteins was further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and protein identification by MS/MS. The differential expression of the proteome of this strain at 42 °C, when a marked formation of S-layer was detected, revealed the overexpression of six proteins mainly related to general stress and protein biosynthesis and translation, while four proteins detected in lower amounts were involved in DNA repair and energy metabolism. As L. acidophilus IBB 801 produces both a bacteriocin and S-layer proteins, the strain could be of interest to be used in the formulation of functional food products with specific properties.

  16. Functional Analysis of an S-Layer-Associated Fibronectin-Binding Protein in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymes, Jeffrey P; Johnson, Brant R; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial surface layers (S-layers) are crystalline arrays of self-assembling proteinaceous subunits called S-layer proteins (Slps) that comprise the outermost layer of the cell envelope. Many additional proteins that are associated with or embedded within the S-layer have been identified in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, an S-layer-forming bacterium that is widely used in fermented dairy products and probiotic supplements. One putative S-layer-associated protein (SLAP), LBA0191, was predicted to mediate adhesion to fibronectin based on the in silico detection of a fibronectin-binding domain. Fibronectin is a major component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) of intestinal epithelial cells. Adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells is considered an important trait for probiotic microorganisms during transit and potential association with the intestinal mucosa. To investigate the functional role of LBA0191 (designated FbpB) in L. acidophilus NCFM, an fbpB-deficient strain was constructed. The L. acidophilus mutant with a deletion off bpB lost the ability to adhere to mucin and fibronectin in vitro Homologues off bpB were identified in five additional putative S-layer-forming species, but no homologues were detected in species outside theL. acidophilus homology group.

  17. Lipid modification gives rise to two distinct Haloferax volcanii S-layer glycoprotein populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandiba, Lina; Guan, Ziqiang; Eichler, Jerry

    2013-03-01

    The S-layer glycoprotein is the sole component of the protein shell surrounding Haloferax volcanii cells. The deduced amino acid sequence of the S-layer glycoprotein predicts the presence of a C-terminal membrane-spanning domain. However, several earlier observations, including the ability of EDTA to selectively solubilize the protein, are inconsistent with the presence of a trans-membrane sequence. In the present report, sequential solubilization of the S-layer glycoprotein by EDTA and then with detergent revealed the existence of two distinct populations of the S-layer glycoprotein. Whereas both S-layer glycoprotein populations underwent signal peptide cleavage and N-glycosylation, base hydrolysis followed by mass spectrometry revealed that a lipid, likely archaetidic acid, modified only the EDTA-solubilized version of the protein. These observations are consistent with the S-layer glycoprotein being initially synthesized as an integral membrane protein and subsequently undergoing a processing event in which the extracellular portion of the protein is separated from the membrane-spanning domain and transferred to a waiting lipid moiety.

  18. Enhanced PC12 cells proliferation with self-assembled S-layer proteins scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babolmorad, Ghazal; Emtiazi, Giti; Ghaedi, Kamran; Jodeiri, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Finding 3D biocompatible and biodegradable scaffold is important in tissue engineering which plays a critical role in transplanting methods. Several biomaterials, such as poly-L-lactide, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), poly(L-lactic acid)/poly(lactide-co-glycolide), alginate, collagen gel, and so on, have been applied as scaffold to culture cells in 3D environment. The most significant problem of the synthetic materials is lack of biocompatibility and bioactivity. Herein, self assemble S-layer proteins are used as a scaffold for PC12 cells culturing. For this purpose, S-layer protein was extracted from Bacillus coagulans HN68. Then, extracted S-layer was studied by SDS page and AFM. Using MTS test and Immunochemistry staining methods, the effect of self assembled S-layer scaffold on proliferation of PC12 cells was assayed. This study provides that S-layer could be an appropriate scaffold for PC12 cells culturing. Even though poly-L-ornithine is a common scaffold in PC12 cells culturing, the results show that (PLO)/S-layer is more protective.

  19. Archaeal S-layer glycoproteins: Post-translational modification in the face of extremes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry eEichler

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Corresponding to the sole or basic component of the surface (S-layer surrounding the archaeal cell in most known cases, S-layer glycoproteins are in direct contact with the harsh environments that characterize niches where Archaea can thrive. Accordingly, early work examining archaeal S-layer glycoproteins focused on identifying those properties that allow members of this group of proteins to maintain their structural integrity in the face of extremes of temperature, pH and salinity, as well as other physical challenges. However, with expansion of the list of archaeal strains serving as model systems, as well as growth in the number of molecular tools available for the manipulation of these strains, studies on archaeal S-layer glycoproteins are currently more likely to consider the various post-translational modifications these polypeptides undergo. For instance, archaeal S-layer glycoproteins can undergo proteolytic cleavage, both N- and O-glycosylation, lipid-modification and oligomerization. In this mini-review, recent findings related to the post-translational modification of archaeal S-layer glycoproteins are considered.

  20. Functional Analysis of an S-Layer-Associated Fibronectin-Binding Protein in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymes, Jeffrey P.; Johnson, Brant R.; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial surface layers (S-layers) are crystalline arrays of self-assembling proteinaceous subunits called S-layer proteins (Slps) that comprise the outermost layer of the cell envelope. Many additional proteins that are associated with or embedded within the S-layer have been identified in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, an S-layer-forming bacterium that is widely used in fermented dairy products and probiotic supplements. One putative S-layer-associated protein (SLAP), LBA0191, was predicted to mediate adhesion to fibronectin based on the in silico detection of a fibronectin-binding domain. Fibronectin is a major component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) of intestinal epithelial cells. Adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells is considered an important trait for probiotic microorganisms during transit and potential association with the intestinal mucosa. To investigate the functional role of LBA0191 (designated FbpB) in L. acidophilus NCFM, an fbpB-deficient strain was constructed. The L. acidophilus mutant with a deletion of fbpB lost the ability to adhere to mucin and fibronectin in vitro. Homologues of fbpB were identified in five additional putative S-layer-forming species, but no homologues were detected in species outside the L. acidophilus homology group. PMID:26921419

  1. The S-Layer Glycome—Adding to the Sugar Coat of Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Ristl

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The amazing repertoire of glycoconjugates present on bacterial cell surfaces includes lipopolysaccharides, capsular polysaccharides, lipooligosaccharides, exopolysaccharides, and glycoproteins. While the former are constituents of Gram-negative cells, we review here the cell surface S-layer glycoproteins of Gram-positive bacteria. S-layer glycoproteins have the unique feature of self-assembling into 2D lattices providing a display matrix for glycans with periodicity at the nanometer scale. Typically, bacterial S-layer glycans are O-glycosidically linked to serine, threonine, or tyrosine residues, and they rely on a much wider variety of constituents, glycosidic linkage types, and structures than their eukaryotic counterparts. As the S-layer glycome of several bacteria is unravelling, a picture of how S-layer glycoproteins are biosynthesized is evolving. X-ray crystallography experiments allowed first insights into the catalysis mechanism of selected enzymes. In the future, it will be exciting to fully exploit the S-layer glycome for glycoengineering purposes and to link it to the bacterial interactome.

  2. N-Glycosylation Is Important for Proper Haloferax volcanii S-Layer Stability and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Adi; Eichler, Jerry

    2017-03-15

    N-Glycosylation, the covalent linkage of glycans to select Asn residues of target proteins, is an almost universal posttranslational modification in archaea. However, whereas roles for N-glycosylation have been defined in eukarya and bacteria, the function of archaeal N-glycosylation remains unclear. Here, the impact of perturbed N-glycosylation on the structure and physiology of the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii was considered. Cryo-electron microscopy was used to examine right-side-out membrane vesicles prepared from cells of a parent strain and from strains lacking genes encoding glycosyltransferases involved in assembling the N-linked pentasaccharide decorating the surface layer (S-layer) glycoprotein, the sole component of the S-layer surrounding H. volcanii cells. Whereas a regularly repeating S-layer covered the entire surface of vesicles prepared from parent strain cells, vesicles from the mutant cells were only partially covered. To determine whether such N-glycosylation-related effects on S-layer assembly also affected cell function, the secretion of a reporter protein was addressed in the parent and N-glycosylation mutant strains. Compromised S-layer glycoprotein N-glycosylation resulted in impaired transfer of the reporter past the S-layer and into the growth medium. Finally, an assessment of S-layer glycoprotein susceptibility to added proteases in the mutants revealed that in cells lacking AglD, which is involved in adding the final pentasaccharide sugar, a distinct S-layer glycoprotein conformation was assumed in which the N-terminal region was readily degraded. Perturbed N-glycosylation thus affects S-layer glycoprotein folding. These findings suggest that H. volcanii could adapt to changes in its surroundings by modulating N-glycosylation so as to affect S-layer architecture and function.IMPORTANCE Long held to be a process unique to eukaryotes, it is now accepted that bacteria and archaea also perform N-glycosylation, namely, the covalent

  3. Permeability and charge-dependent adsorption properties of the S-layer lattice from Bacillus coagulans E38-66.

    OpenAIRE

    Sára, M; Pum, D; Sleytr, U B

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the permeability properties of the oblique S-layer lattice from Bacillus coagulans E38-66 after depositing cell wall fragments on a microfiltration membrane, cross-linking the S-layer protein with glutaraldehyde, and degrading the peptidoglycan with lysozyme. Comparative permeability studies on such multilayered S-layer membranes and suspended S-layer vesicles from thermophilic members of the family Bacillaceae with use of the space technique (M. Sára and U. B. Sleytr, J. Bact...

  4. Identification and characterization of the genes encoding a unique surface (S-) layer of Tannerella forsythia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seok-Woo; Sabet, Mojgan; Um, Heung-Sik; Yang, Jun; Kim, Hyeong C; Zhu, Weidong

    2006-04-12

    A newly emerged periodontopathic pathogen Tannerella forsythia (formerly Bacteroides forsythus), a Gram-negative, filament-shaped, strict anaerobic, non-pigmented oral bacterium, possesses a surface (S-) layer. In our previous studies, the S-layer has been isolated, and shown to mediate hemagglutination, adhesion/invasion of epithelial cell, and murine subcutaneous abscess formation. In the present study, biochemical and molecular genetic characterization of the S-layer are reported. Amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry indicated that the S-layer is composed of two different proteins, termed 200 and 210 kDa proteins. It was also shown that these proteins are glycosylated. The genes encoding the core proteins of these glycoproteins, designated as tfsA and tfsB, have been identified in silico, cloned, and their sequences have been determined. The tfsA (3.5 kb) and tfsB (4.1 kb) genes are located in tandem, and encode for 135 and 152 kDa proteins, respectively. An apparent discrepancy in molecular weights, 135 vs. 200 kDa and 152 vs. 210 kDa, is accounted for carbohydrate residues attached to the core proteins. Amino acid sequence comparison exhibited a 24% similarity between the 200 and 210 kDa proteins. Further sequence analyses showed that TfsA and TfsB possess putative signal peptide sequences with cleavage sites at alanine residues, and transmembrane domains on the C-terminal region. Northern blot and RT-PCR analyses confirmed an operon structure of tfsAB, suggesting co-regulation of these genes in producing the S-layer. Putative promoter sequences and transcription termination sequences for this operon have also been identified. Comparison with database indicates that the S-layer of T. forsythia has a unique structure exhibiting no homology to other known S-layers of prokaryotic organisms. The present study shows that the T. forsythia S-layer is very unique, since it appears to be composed of two large glycoproteins, and it does not reveal any homology to

  5. S-layers as patterning structures and supporting layers for biomimetic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pum, Dietmar; Wetzer, Barbara; Schuster, Bernhard; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    1997-03-01

    A new approach in nanostructure technology particularly in the functionalization of surfaces has been developed on the basis of crystalline bacterial cell surface layers (S- layers). S-layers are composed of monomolecular arrays of identical (glyco)proteins showing high molecular order, defined mass distribution and isoporosity, and a high binding capacity for functional macromolecules. The possibility for recrystallizing isolated S-layer subunits into large isoporous, coherent lattices at solid supports, at the air/water interface or on lipid films and for handling such layers by standard Langmuir-Blodgett techniques opens a broad spectrum of applications in basic and applied membrane research. S-layer supported functional phospholipid bilayers or tetraether lipid films mimic the molecular architecture of those archaebacterial cell envelopes that are exclusively composed of an S-layer and a plasma membrane. This novel concept could lead to new techniques for exploiting large scale structural and functional principles of membrane associated and integrated molecules (e.g. ion channels, proton pumps, receptors).

  6. Biomimetic interfaces based on S-layer proteins, lipid membranes and functional biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Bernhard; Sleytr, Uwe B

    2014-07-06

    Designing and utilization of biomimetic membrane systems generated by bottom-up processes is a rapidly growing scientific and engineering field. Elucidation of the supramolecular construction principle of archaeal cell envelopes composed of S-layer stabilized lipid membranes led to new strategies for generating highly stable functional lipid membranes at meso- and macroscopic scale. In this review, we provide a state-of-the-art survey of how S-layer proteins, lipids and polymers may be used as basic building blocks for the assembly of S-layer-supported lipid membranes. These biomimetic membrane systems are distinguished by a nanopatterned fluidity, enhanced stability and longevity and, thus, provide a dedicated reconstitution matrix for membrane-active peptides and transmembrane proteins. Exciting areas in the (lab-on-a-) biochip technology are combining composite S-layer membrane systems involving specific membrane functions with the silicon world. Thus, it might become possible to create artificial noses or tongues, where many receptor proteins have to be exposed and read out simultaneously. Moreover, S-layer-coated liposomes and emulsomes copying virus envelopes constitute promising nanoformulations for the production of novel targeting, delivery, encapsulation and imaging systems.

  7. An optimized multilayer structure of CdS layer for CdTe solar cells application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Junfeng, E-mail: pkuhjf@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Road Yiheyuan 5, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Liao Cheng, E-mail: Cliao@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Road Yiheyuan 5, Beijing 100871 (China); Jiang Tao [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Road Yiheyuan 5, Beijing 100871 (China); Spanheimer, C.; Haindl, G.; Fu, Ganhua; Krishnakumar, V. [Institute of Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Zhao Kui [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Road Yiheyuan 5, Beijing 100871 (China); Klein, A.; Jaegermann, W. [Institute of Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2011-04-28

    Research highlights: > Two different methods to prepare CdS films for CdTe solar cells. > A new multilayer structure of window layer for the CdTe solar cell. > Thinner CdS window layer for the solar cell than the standard CdS layer. > Higher performance of solar cells based on the new multilayer structure. - Abstract: CdS layers grown by 'dry' (close space sublimation) and 'wet' (chemical bath deposition) methods are deposited and analyzed. CdS prepared with close space sublimation (CSS) has better crystal quality, electrical and optical properties than that prepared with chemical bath deposition (CBD). The performance of CdTe solar cell based on the CSS CdS layer has higher efficiency than that based on CBD CdS layer. However, the CSS CdS suffers from the pinholes. And consequently it is necessary to prepare a 150 nm thin film for CdTe/CdS solar cell. To improve the performance of CdS/CdTe solar cells, a thin multilayer structure of CdS layer ({approx}80 nm) is applied, which is composed of a bottom layer (CSS CdS) and a top layer (CBD CdS). That bi-layer film can allow more photons to pass through it and significantly improve the short circuit current of the CdS/CdTe solar cells.

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CFAM-07-0011 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CFAM-07-0011 ref|NP_421849.1| hypothetical protein CC_3055 [Caulobacter crescent...us CB15] gb|AAK25017.1| hypothetical protein CC_3055 [Caulobacter crescentus CB15] NP_421849.1 4e-06 28% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MLUC-01-0541 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MLUC-01-0541 ref|NP_421849.1| hypothetical protein CC_3055 [Caulobacter crescent...us CB15] gb|AAK25017.1| hypothetical protein CC_3055 [Caulobacter crescentus CB15] NP_421849.1 5e-05 27% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-0132 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-0132 ref|NP_419922.1| hypothetical protein CC_1106 [Caulobacter crescent...us CB15] gb|AAK23090.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Caulobacter crescentus CB15] NP_419922.1 4e-19 26% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-3885 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-3885 ref|NP_422131.1| peptidase, M20/M25/M40 family [Caulobacter crescent...us CB15] gb|AAK25299.1| peptidase, M20/M25/M40 family [Caulobacter crescentus CB15] NP_422131.1 8.2 27% ...

  12. The S-Layer Protein of the Anammox Bacterium Kuenenia stuttgartiensis Is Heavily O-Glycosylated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Teeseling, Muriel C F; Maresch, Daniel; Rath, Cornelia B; Figl, Rudolf; Altmann, Friedrich; Jetten, Mike S M; Messner, Paul; Schäffer, Christina; van Niftrik, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria are a distinct group of Planctomycetes that are characterized by their unique ability to perform anammox with nitrite to dinitrogen gas in a specialized organelle. The cell of anammox bacteria comprises three membrane-bound compartments and is surrounded by a two-dimensional crystalline S-layer representing the direct interaction zone of anammox bacteria with the environment. Previous results from studies with the model anammox organism Kuenenia stuttgartiensis suggested that the protein monomers building the S-layer lattice are glycosylated. In the present study, we focussed on the characterization of the S-layer protein glycosylation in order to increase our knowledge on the cell surface characteristics of anammox bacteria. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis showed an O-glycan attached to 13 sites distributed over the entire 1591-amino acid S-layer protein. This glycan is composed of six monosaccharide residues, of which five are N-acetylhexosamine (HexNAc) residues. Four of these HexNAc residues have been identified as GalNAc. The sixth monosaccharide in the glycan is a putative dimethylated deoxyhexose. Two of the HexNAc residues were also found to contain a methyl group, thereby leading to an extensive degree of methylation of the glycan. This study presents the first characterization of a glycoprotein in a planctomycete and shows that the S-layer protein Kustd1514 of K. stuttgartiensis is heavily glycosylated with an O-linked oligosaccharide which is additionally modified by methylation. S-layer glycosylation clearly contributes to the diversification of the K. stuttgartiensis cell surface and can be expected to influence the interaction of the bacterium with other cells or abiotic surfaces.

  13. Structure prediction of an S-layer protein by the mean force method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horejs, C.; Pum, D.; Sleytr, U. B.; Tscheliessnig, R.

    2008-02-01

    S-layer proteins have a wide range of application potential due to their characteristic features concerning self-assembling, assembling on various surfaces, and forming of isoporous structures with functional groups located on the surface in an identical position and orientation. Although considerable knowledge has been experimentally accumulated on the structure, biochemistry, assemble characteristics, and genetics of S-layer proteins, no structural model at atomic resolution has been available so far. Therefore, neither the overall folding of the S-layer proteins—their tertiary structure—nor the exact amino acid or domain allocations in the lattices are known. In this paper, we describe the tertiary structure prediction for the S-layer protein SbsB from Geobacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2. This calculation was based on its amino acid sequence using the mean force method (MF method) achieved by performing molecular dynamic simulations. This method includes mainly the thermodynamic aspects of protein folding as well as steric constraints of the amino acids and is therefore independent of experimental structure analysis problems resulting from biochemical properties of the S-layer proteins. Molecular dynamic simulations were performed in vacuum using the simulation software NAMD. The obtained tertiary structure of SbsB was systematically analyzed by using the mean force method, whereas the verification of the structure is based on calculating the global free energy minimum of the whole system. This corresponds to the potential of mean force, which is the thermodynamically most favorable conformation of the protein. Finally, an S-layer lattice was modeled graphically using CINEMA4D and compared with scanning force microscopy data down to a resolution of 1nm. The results show that this approach leads to a thermodynamically favorable atomic model of the tertiary structure of the protein, which could be verified by both the MF Method and the lattice model.

  14. Characterization and scope of S-layer protein O-glycosylation in Tannerella forsythia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posch, Gerald; Pabst, Martin; Brecker, Lothar; Altmann, Friedrich; Messner, Paul; Schäffer, Christina

    2011-11-04

    Cell surface glycosylation is an important element in defining the life of pathogenic bacteria. Tannerella forsythia is a Gram-negative, anaerobic periodontal pathogen inhabiting the subgingival plaque biofilms. It is completely covered by a two-dimensional crystalline surface layer (S-layer) composed of two glycoproteins. Although the S-layer has previously been shown to delay the bacterium's recognition by the innate immune system, we characterize here the S-layer protein O-glycosylation as a potential virulence factor. The T. forsythia S-layer glycan was elucidated by a combination of electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as an oligosaccharide with the structure 4-Me-β-ManpNAcCONH(2)-(1→3)-[Pse5Am7Gc-(2→4)-]-β-ManpNAcA-(1→4)-[4-Me-α-Galp-(1→2)-]-α-Fucp-(1→4)-[-α-Xylp-(1→3)-]-β-GlcpA-(1→3)-[-β-Digp-(1→2)-]-α-Galp, which is O-glycosidically linked to distinct serine and threonine residues within the three-amino acid motif (D)(S/T)(A/I/L/M/T/V) on either S-layer protein. This S-layer glycan obviously impacts the life style of T. forsythia because increased biofilm formation of an UDP-N-acetylmannosaminuronic acid dehydrogenase mutant can be correlated with the presence of truncated S-layer glycans. We found that several other proteins of T. forsythia are modified with that specific oligosaccharide. Proteomics identified two of them as being among previously classified antigenic outer membrane proteins that are up-regulated under biofilm conditions, in addition to two predicted antigenic lipoproteins. Theoretical analysis of the S-layer O-glycosylation of T. forsythia indicates the involvement of a 6.8-kb gene locus that is conserved among different bacteria from the Bacteroidetes phylum. Together, these findings reveal the presence of a protein O-glycosylation system in T. forsythia that is essential for creating a rich glycoproteome pinpointing a possible relevance for the virulence of

  15. The S-layer gene of Lactobacillus helveticus CNRZ 892 : cloning, sequence and heterologous expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callegari, M.L.; Riboli, B.; Sanders, J.W; Cocconcelli, P.S.; Kok, J.; Venema, G; Morelli, L.

    1998-01-01

    Lactobacillus helveticus CNRZ 892 contains a surface layer (S-layer) composed of protein monomers of 43 kDa organized in regular arrays. The gene encoding this protein (slpH) has been cloned in Escherichia coli and sequenced. slpH consists of 440 codons and is preceded by a ribosome-binding site (RB

  16. FTIR spectroscopy structural analysis of the interaction between Lactobacillus kefir S-layers and metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbino, E.; Mobili, P.; Tymczyszyn, E.; Fausto, R.; Gómez-Zavaglia, A.

    2011-02-01

    FTIR spectroscopy was used to structurally characterize the interaction of S-layer proteins extracted from two strains of Lactobacillus kefir (the aggregating CIDCA 8348 and the non-aggregating JCM 5818) with metal ions (Cd +2, Zn +2, Pb +2 and Ni +2). The infrared spectra indicate that the metal/protein interaction occurs mainly through the carboxylate groups of the side chains of Asp and Glut residues, with some contribution of the NH groups belonging to the peptide backbone. The frequency separation between the νCOO - anti-symmetric and symmetric stretching vibrations in the spectra of the S-layers in presence of the metal ions was found to be ca. 190 cm -1 for S-layer CIDCA 8348 and ca. 170 cm -1 for JCM 5818, denoting an unidentate coordination in both cases. Changes in the secondary structures of the S-layers induced by the interaction with the metal ions were also noticed: a general trend to increase the amount of β-sheet structures and to reduce the amount of α-helices was observed. These changes allow the proteins to adjust their structure to the presence of the metal ions at minimum energy expense, and accordingly, these adjustments were found to be more important for the bigger ions.

  17. Characterization of a nanoscale S-layer protein based template for biomolecular patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wing Sze; Yung, Pun To

    2014-01-01

    Well organized template for biomolecular conjugation is the foundation for biosensing. Most of the current devices are fabricated using lithographic patterning processes and self-assembly monolayer (SAM) methods. However, the research toward developing a sub-10 nm patterned, self-regenerated template on various types of substrates is limited, mainly due to the limited functional groups of the building material. Bacterial surface layer proteins (S-layer proteins) can self-assemble into ordered lattice with regular pore sizes of 2-8 nm on different material supports and interfaces. The ordered structure can regenerate after extreme variations of solvent conditions. In this work, we developed a nanoscale biomolecular template based on S-layer proteins on gold surface for fabrication of sensing layer in biosensors. S-layer proteins were isolated from Bacillus cereus, Lysinibacillus sphaericus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus. Protein concentrations were measured by Bradford assay. The protein purities were verified by SDS-PAGE, showing molecular weights ranging from 97-135 kDa. The hydrophilicity of the substrate surface was measured after surface treatments of protein recrystallization. Atomic force microscopic (AFM) measurement was performed on substrate surface, indicating a successful immobilization of a monolayer of S-layer protein with 8-9 nm height on gold surface. The template can be applied on various material supports and acts as a self-regenerated sensing layer of biosensors in the future.

  18. Expression, secretion and antigenic variation of bacterial S-layer proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, H.J.; Pouwels, P.H.

    1996-01-01

    The function of the S-layer, a regularly arranged structure on the outside of numerous bacteria, appears to be different for bacteria living in different environments. Almost no similarity exists between the primary sequences of S-proteins, although their amino acid composition is comparable. S-prot

  19. SbsB structure and lattice reconstruction unveil Ca2+ triggered S-layer assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranova, Ekaterina; Fronzes, Rémi; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Van Gerven, Nani; Papapostolou, David; Péhau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Howorka, Stefan; Remaut, Han

    2012-07-05

    S-layers are regular two-dimensional semipermeable protein layers that constitute a major cell-wall component in archaea and many bacteria. The nanoscale repeat structure of the S-layer lattices and their self-assembly from S-layer proteins (SLPs) have sparked interest in their use as patterning and display scaffolds for a range of nano-biotechnological applications. Despite their biological abundance and the technological interest in them, structural information about SLPs is limited to truncated and assembly-negative proteins. Here we report the X-ray structure of the SbsB SLP of Geobacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2 by the use of nanobody-aided crystallization. SbsB consists of a seven-domain protein, formed by an amino-terminal cell-wall attachment domain and six consecutive immunoglobulin-like domains, that organize into a φ-shaped disk-like monomeric crystallization unit stabilized by interdomain Ca(2+) ion coordination. A Ca(2+)-dependent switch to the condensed SbsB quaternary structure pre-positions intermolecular contact zones and renders the protein competent for S-layer assembly. On the basis of crystal packing, chemical crosslinking data and cryo-electron microscopy projections, we present a model for the molecular organization of this SLP into a porous protein sheet inside the S-layer. The SbsB lattice represents a previously undescribed structural model for protein assemblies and may advance our understanding of SLP physiology and self-assembly, as well as the rational design of engineered higher-order structures for biotechnology.

  20. Bowman’s layer encystment in cases of persistent Acanthamoeba keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokogawa H

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Hideaki Yokogawa,1 Akira Kobayashi,1 Natsuko Yamazaki,1 Yasuhisa Ishibashi,2 Yosaburo Oikawa,3 Masaharu Tokoro,4 Kazuhisa Sugiyama11Department of Ophthalmology, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa, 2Department of Ophthalmology, East Washinomiya Hospital, Kuki, 3Department of Medical Zoology, Kanazawa Medical University, Kahoku, 4Department of Parasitology, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa, JapanBackground: The purpose of this study was to report Acanthamoeba encystment in Bowman’s layer in Japanese cases of persistent Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK.Methods: Laser confocal microscopic images of the cornea were obtained in vivo from 18 consecutive eyes from 17 confirmed AK patients. Retrospectively, 14 cases treated over 4 months were categorized as a nonpersistent group and three cases that required prolonged therapy for more than 6 months were categorized as a persistent group. Clinical outcomes based on final best-corrected visual acuity were retrospectively analyzed, and selected confocal images were evaluated qualitatively for abnormal findings.Results: The final best-corrected visual acuity was significantly lower (P < 0.01 for patients in the persistent group compared with that in the nonpersistent group. At the initial visit, in vivo confocal microscopy demonstrated Acanthamoeba cysts exclusively in the epithelial layer in both the nonpersistent group (80% and the persistent group (100%. At a subsequent follow-up visit, numerous Acanthamoeba cysts were observed in the epithelial cell layer and in Bowman’s layer in all patients with persistent AK, but Acanthamoeba cysts were undetectable in all cases with nonpersistent AK tested.Conclusion: Invasion of cysts into Bowman’s layer was characteristically observed in patients with persistence of AK. This finding suggests that invasion of Acanthamoeba cysts into Bowman’s layer may be a useful predictor for a persistent clinical

  1. The Global Regulatory Architecture of Transcription during the Caulobacter Cell Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Schrader, Jared M.; Kalogeraki, Virginia S.; Abeliuk, Eduardo; Dinh, Cong B.; Pham, James Q.; Cui, Zhongying Z.; Dill, David L.; McAdams, Harley H.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Each Caulobacter cell cycle involves differentiation and an asymmetric cell division driven by a cyclical regulatory circuit comprised of four transcription factors (TFs) and a DNA methyltransferase. Using a modified global 5′ RACE protocol, we globally mapped transcription start sites (TSSs) at base-pair resolution, measured their transcription levels at multiple times in the cell cycle, and identified their transcription factor binding sites. Out of 2726 TSSs, 586 were shown to be cell cycle-regulated and we identified 529 binding sites for the cell cycle master regulators. Twenty-three percent of the cell cycle-regulated promoters were found to be under the combinatorial control of two or more of the global regulators. Previously unknown features of the core cell cycle circuit were identified, including 107 antisense TSSs which exhibit cell cycle-control, and 241 genes with multiple TSSs whose transcription levels often exhibited different cell cycle timing. Cumulatively, this study uncovered novel new layers of transcriptional regulation mediating the bacterial cell cycle. PMID:25569173

  2. The global regulatory architecture of transcription during the Caulobacter cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Each Caulobacter cell cycle involves differentiation and an asymmetric cell division driven by a cyclical regulatory circuit comprised of four transcription factors (TFs and a DNA methyltransferase. Using a modified global 5' RACE protocol, we globally mapped transcription start sites (TSSs at base-pair resolution, measured their transcription levels at multiple times in the cell cycle, and identified their transcription factor binding sites. Out of 2726 TSSs, 586 were shown to be cell cycle-regulated and we identified 529 binding sites for the cell cycle master regulators. Twenty-three percent of the cell cycle-regulated promoters were found to be under the combinatorial control of two or more of the global regulators. Previously unknown features of the core cell cycle circuit were identified, including 107 antisense TSSs which exhibit cell cycle-control, and 241 genes with multiple TSSs whose transcription levels often exhibited different cell cycle timing. Cumulatively, this study uncovered novel new layers of transcriptional regulation mediating the bacterial cell cycle.

  3. Colorimetric As (V) detection based on S-layer functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Mathias; Matys, Sabine; Raff, Johannes; Pompe, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    Herein, we present simple and rapid colorimetric and UV/VIS spectroscopic methods for detecting anionic arsenic (V) complexes in aqueous media. The methods exploit the aggregation of S-layer-functionalized spherical gold nanoparticles of sizes between 20 and 50 nm in the presence of arsenic species. The gold nanoparticles were functionalized with oligomers of the S-layer protein of Lysinibacillus sphaericus JG-A12. The aggregation of the nanoparticles results in a color change from burgundy-red for widely dispersed nanoparticles to blue for aggregated nanoparticles. A detailed signal analysis was achieved by measuring the shift of the particle plasmon resonance signal with UV/VIS spectroscopy. To further improve signal sensitivity, the influence of larger nanoparticles was tested. In the case of 50 nm gold nanoparticles, a concentration of the anionic arsenic (V) complex lower than 24 ppb was detectable.

  4. Monodisperse gold nanoparticles formed on bacterial crystalline surface layers (S-layers) by electroless deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieluweit, S. [Center for Nanobiotechnology, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences (BOKU), Gregor Mendel-Strasse 33, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Pum, D. [Center for Nanobiotechnology, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences (BOKU), Gregor Mendel-Strasse 33, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Sleytr, U.B. [Center for Nanobiotechnology, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences (BOKU), Gregor Mendel-Strasse 33, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Kautek, W. [Department for Physical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 42, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: wolfgang.kautek@univie.ac.at

    2005-12-15

    The fabrication of patterned arrays of nanoparticles whose electronic, optical and magnetic properties will find technological applications, such as ultra-high-density memories, is currently one of the most important objectives of inorganic material research. In this study, the in situ electroless nucleation of ordered two-dimensional arrays of gold nanoparticles (5 nm in size) by using bacterial S-layers as molecular templates and their characterization by small spot X-ray photoelectron emission spectroscopy (XPS) is presented. This yielded the elemental composition of the nanoclusters, which consisted of almost entirely elemental gold, and possible side reactions on the cluster and protein surface. The preferential deposition of the gold nanoparticles on the S-layer suggests that topography and functional groups are important for superlattice formation.

  5. Demonstration of cornea Dua′s layer at a deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Kocluk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors aimed to present a deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK surgery case with mixed type bubble demonstrating Dua′s layer (DL. This was a reported case of DALK surgery. The authors encountered cornea DL structure at DALK surgery while cleaning the remaining stromal pieces. We also observed perforation in the central part of DL. However, DALK surgery could be completed. It is possible to encounter DL in a DALK surgery performed with mixed type big-bubble.

  6. Emulsomes meet S-layer proteins: an emerging targeted drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucisik, Mehmet H; Sleytr, Uwe B; Schuster, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Here, the use of emulsomes as a drug delivery system is reviewed and compared with other similar lipidic nanoformulations. In particular, we look at surface modification of emulsomes using S-layer proteins, which are self-assembling proteins that cover the surface of many prokaryotic organisms. It has been shown that covering emulsomes with a crystalline S-layer lattice can protect cells from oxidative stress and membrane damage. In the future, the capability to recrystallize S-layer fusion proteins on lipidic nanoformulations may allow the presentation of binding functions or homing protein domains to achieve highly specific targeted delivery of drug-loaded emulsomes. Besides the discussion on several designs and advantages of composite emulsomes, the success of emulsomes for the delivery of drugs to fight against viral and fungal infections, dermal therapy, cancer, and autoimmunity is summarized. Further research might lead to smart, biocompatible emulsomes, which are able to protect and reduce the side effects caused by the drug, but at the same time are equipped with specific targeting molecules to find the desired site of action.

  7. Relevance of glycosylation of S-layer proteins for cell surface properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Bernhard; Sleytr, Uwe B

    2015-06-01

    Elucidating the building principles and intrinsic features modulating certain water-associated processes (e.g., surface roughness in the nanometer scale, surface hydration and accompanied antifouling property, etc.) of surface structures from (micro)organisms is nowadays a highly challenging task in fields like microbiology, biomimetic engineering and (bio)material sciences. Here, we show for the first time the recrystallization of the wild-type S-layer glycoprotein wtSgsE from Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a and its recombinantly produced non-glycosylated form, rSgsE, on gold sensor surfaces. Whereas the proteinaceous lattice of the S-layer proteins is forming a rigid layer on the sensor surface, the glycan chains are developing an overall soft, highly dissipative film. Interestingly, to the wtSgsE lattice almost twice the amount of water is bound and/or coupled in comparison with the non-glycosylated rSgsE with the preferred region being the extending glycan residues. The present results are discussed in terms of the effect of the glycan residues on the recrystallization, the adjoining hydration layer, and the nanoscale roughness and fluidic behavior. The latter features may turn out to be one of the most general ones among bacterial and archaeal S-layer lattices.

  8. S-layer-streptavidin fusion proteins as template for nanopatterned molecular arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Dieter; Huber, Carina; Schlegel, Birgit; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Sára, Margit

    2002-11-01

    Biomolecular self-assembly can be used as a powerful tool for nanoscale engineering. In this paper, we describe the development of building blocks for nanobiotechnology, which are based on the fusion of streptavidin to a crystalline bacterial cell surface layer (S-layer) protein with the inherent ability to self-assemble into a monomolecular protein lattice. The fusion proteins and streptavidin were produced independently in Escherichia coli, isolated, and mixed to refold and purify heterotetramers of 1:3 stoichiometry. Self-assembled chimeric S-layers could be formed in suspension, on liposomes, on silicon wafers, and on accessory cell wall polymer containing cell wall fragments. The two-dimensional protein crystals displayed streptavidin in defined repetitive spacing, and they were capable of binding D-biotin and biotinylated proteins. Therefore, the chimeric S-layer can be used as a self-assembling nanopatterned molecular affinity matrix to arrange biotinylated compounds on a surface. In addition, it has application potential as a functional coat of liposomes.

  9. Participation of a cyanobacterial S layer in fine-grain mineral formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultze-Lam, S; Harauz, G; Beveridge, T J

    1992-12-01

    Cyanobacteria belonging to the Synechococcus group are ubiquitous inhabitants of diverse marine and freshwater environments. Through interactions with the soluble constituents of their aqueous habitats, they inevitably affect the chemistry of the waters they inhabit. Synechococcus strain GL24 was isolated from Fayetteville Green Lake, New York, where it has a demonstrated role in the formation of calcitic minerals. In order to understand the detailed interactions which lead to mineral formation by this organism, we have undertaken detailed ultrastructural studies of its cell surface and the initial events in mineral growth using a variety of electron microscopic and computer image enhancement techniques. Synechococcus strain GL24 has a hexagonally symmetrical S layer as its outermost cell surface component. The constituent protein(s) of this structure appears as a double band by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with M(r)s of 104,000 and 109,000. We demonstrate that the S layer acts as a template for fine-grain gypsum and calcite formation by providing discrete, regularly arranged nucleation sites for the critical initial events in the mineralization process. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a bacterial S layer has been shown to have a role in mineral formation in a natural environment, and this report provides conclusive evidence for the specific involvement of bacterial surfaces in natural mineral formation processes.

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of Ag2S Layers Formed on Polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Krylova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver sulphide, Ag2S, layers on the surface of polypropylene (PP film was formed by chemical bath deposition method (CBD. Film samples were characterised by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM, and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD. The surface morphology, texture, and uniformity of the silver sulphide layers were formed on PP surface dependent on the number of polymer immersions in the precursor solution. XPS analysis confirmed that on the surface of the polypropylene film, a layer of Ag2S was formed. ATR-FTIR and FTIR spectra analysis showed that the surface of Ag2S layers is slightly oxidized. All prepared layers gave multiple XRD reflections, corresponding to monoclinic Ag2S (acanthite. The Ag2S layer on polypropylene was characterized as an Ag+ ion selective electrode in terms of potential response and detection limit. The electrode was also tested as an end-point electrode for argentometric titration of thiamine hydrochloride.

  11. Surface-layer (S-layer) proteins sap and EA1 govern the binding of the S-layer-associated protein BslO at the cell septa of Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Valerie J; Kern, Justin W; Theriot, Julie A; Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique

    2012-08-01

    The Gram-positive pathogen Bacillus anthracis contains 24 genes whose products harbor the structurally conserved surface-layer (S-layer) homology (SLH) domain. Proteins endowed with the SLH domain associate with the secondary cell wall polysaccharide (SCWP) following secretion. Two such proteins, Sap and EA1, have the unique ability to self-assemble into a paracrystalline layer on the surface of bacilli and form S layers. Other SLH domain proteins can also be found within the S layer and have been designated Bacillus S-layer-associated protein (BSLs). While both S-layer proteins and BSLs bind the same SCWP, their deposition on the cell surface is not random. For example, BslO is targeted to septal peptidoglycan zones, where it catalyzes the separation of daughter cells. Here we show that an insertional lesion in the sap structural gene results in elongated chains of bacilli, as observed with a bslO mutant. The chain length of the sap mutant can be reduced by the addition of purified BslO in the culture medium. This complementation in trans can be explained by an increased deposition of BslO onto the surface of sap mutant bacilli that extends beyond chain septa. Using fluorescence microscopy, we observed that the Sap S layer does not overlap the EA1 S layer and slowly yields to the EA1 S layer in a growth-phase-dependent manner. Although present all over bacilli, Sap S-layer patches are not observed at septa. Thus, we propose that the dynamic Sap/EA1 S-layer coverage of the envelope restricts the deposition of BslO to the SCWP at septal rings.

  12. Partial analysis of the central domain of the Bacillus sphaericus JG-A12 S-layer protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnorpfeil, M.; Raff, J.; Flemming, K.; Selenska-Pobell, S.

    2002-05-01

    310 amino acids from the central domain of the B. sphaericus JG-A12 S-layer were analyzed. In contrast to the N-terminal domain of this protein, which possesses a unique structure, the part studied in this work shares a significant identity with the corresponding parts of several other B. sphaericus S-layers. (orig.)

  13. Expression and cytosolic assembly of the S-layer fusion protein mSbsC-EGFP in eukaryotic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blecha, Andreas; Zarschler, Kristof; Sjollema, Klaas A.; Veenhuis, Marten; Rödel, Gerhard; Rodel, G.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Native as well as recombinant bacterial cell surface layer (S-layer) protein of Geobacillus (G.) stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 assembles to supramolecular structures with an oblique symmetry. Upon expression in E. coli, S-layer self assembly products are formed in the cytosol. We tested

  14. Lactobacillus acidophilus S-layer protein-mediated inhibition of Salmonella-induced apoptosis in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengcheng; Yin, Yinyan; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2011-05-27

    Surface layer (S-layer) proteins are crystalline arrays of proteinaceous subunits present as the outermost component of the cell wall in several Lactobacillus species. The underlying mechanism for how S-layer proteins inhibit pathogen infections remains unclear. To gain insights into the mechanism of the antimicrobial activity of Lactobacillus S-layer proteins, we examined how Lactobacillus S-layer proteins impact Salmonella Typhimurium-induced apoptosis in vitro in Caco-2 human colon epithelial cells. When Caco-2 cells infected with Salmonella Typhimurium SL1344, we found that apoptosis was mediated by activation of caspase-3, but not caspase-1. When Salmonella Typhimurium SL1344 and S-layer proteins were coincubated simultaneously, Caco-2 cell apoptosis was markedly decreased and the cell damage was modified, as evaluated by flow cytometry and microscopy. Detailed analyses showed that the S-layer proteins inhibited the caspase-3 activity and activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathway. Taken together, these findings suggest that Lactobacillus S-layer proteins protected against Salmonella-induced apoptosis through reduced caspase-3 activation. In addition, Salmonella-induced apoptotic cell damage was modified by S-layer proteins through the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. This mechanism may represent a novel approach for antagonizing Salmonella infection.

  15. Identification of multiple putative S-layer genes partly expressed by Lysinibacillus sphaericus JG-B53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, Franziska L; Weinert, Ulrike; Günther, Tobias J; Raff, Johannes; Weiß, Stephan; Pollmann, Katrin

    2013-06-01

    Lysinibacillus sphaericus JG-B53 was isolated from the uranium mining waste pile Haberland near Johanngeorgenstadt, Germany. Previous studies have shown that many bacteria that have been isolated from these heavy metal contaminated environments possess surface layer (S-layer) proteins that enable the bacteria to survive by binding metals with high affinity. Conversely, essential trace elements are able to cross the filter layer and reach the interior of the cell. This is especially true of the S-layer of L. sphaericus JG-B53, which possesses outstanding recrystallization and metal-binding properties. In this study, S-layer protein gene sequences encoded in the genome of L. sphaericus JG-B53 were identified using next-generation sequencing technology followed by bioinformatic analyses. The genome of L. sphaericus JG-B53 encodes at least eight putative S-layer protein genes with distinct differences. Using mRNA analysis the expression of the putative S-layer protein genes was studied. The functional S-layer protein B53 Slp1 was identified as the dominantly expressed S-layer protein in L. sphaericus JG-B53 by mRNA studies, SDS-PAGE and N-terminal sequencing. B53 Slp1 is characterized by square lattice symmetry and a molecular mass of 116 kDa. The S-layer protein B53 Slp1 shows a high similarity to the functional S-layer protein of L. sphaericus JG-A12, which was isolated from the same uranium mining waste pile Haberland and has been described by previous research. These similarities indicate horizontal gene transfer and DNA rearrangements between these bacteria. The presence of multiple S-layer gene copies may enable the bacterial strains to quickly adapt to changing environments.

  16. Strong Paramagnetism of Gold Nanoparticles Deposited on a Sulfolobus acidocaldarius S Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomé, J.; Bartolomé, F.; García, L. M.; Figueroa, A. I.; Repollés, A.; Martínez-Pérez, M. J.; Luis, F.; Magén, C.; Selenska-Pobell, S.; Pobell, F.; Reitz, T.; Schönemann, R.; Herrmannsdörfer, T.; Merroun, M.; Geissler, A.; Wilhelm, F.; Rogalev, A.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic properties of Au nanoparticles deposited on an archaeal S layer are reported. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and superconducting quantum interference device magnetometries demonstrate that the particles are strongly paramagnetic, without any indication of magnetic blocking down to 16 mK. The average magnetic moment per particle is Mpart=2.36(7) μB. This contribution originates at the particle’s Au 5d band, in which an increased number of holes with respect to the bulk value is observed. The magnetic moment per Au atom is 25 times larger than any measured in other Au nanoparticles or any other configurations up to date.

  17. Construction of an S-layer protein exhibiting modified self-assembling properties and enhanced metal binding capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollmann, Katrin; Matys, Sabine

    2007-07-01

    The functional S-layer protein gene slfB of the uranium mining waste pile isolate Bacillus sphaericus JG-A12 was cloned as a polymerase chain reaction product into the expression vector pET Lic/Ek 30 and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli Bl21(DE3). The addition of His tags to the N and C termini enabled the purification of the recombinant protein by Ni-chelating chromatography. The Ni binding capacity of the His-tagged recombinant S-layer protein was compared with that of the wild-type S layer. The inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analyses demonstrate a significantly enhanced Ni binding capability of the recombinant protein. In addition, the self-assembling properties of the purified modified S-layer proteins were studied by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Whereas the wild-type S-layer proteins re-assembled into regular cylindric structures, the recombinant S-layer proteins reassembled into regular sheets that formed globular agglomerating structures. The nanoporous structure of the protein meshwork, together with its enhanced Ni binding capacity, makes the recombinant S-layer attractive as a novel self-assembling biological template for the fabrication of metal nanoclusters and construction of nanomaterials that are of technical interest.

  18. Analysis of self-assembly of S-layer protein slp-B53 from Lysinibacillus sphaericus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Falke, Sven; Drobot, Bjoern; Oberthuer, Dominik; Kikhney, Alexey; Guenther, Tobias; Fahmy, Karim; Svergun, Dmitri; Betzel, Christian; Raff, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    The formation of stable and functional surface layers (S-layers) via self-assembly of surface-layer proteins on the cell surface is a dynamic and complex process. S-layers facilitate a number of important biological functions, e.g., providing protection and mediating selective exchange of molecules and thereby functioning as molecular sieves. Furthermore, S-layers selectively bind several metal ions including uranium, palladium, gold, and europium, some of them with high affinity. Most current research on surface layers focuses on investigating crystalline arrays of protein subunits in Archaea and bacteria. In this work, several complementary analytical techniques and methods have been applied to examine structure-function relationships and dynamics for assembly of S-layer protein slp-B53 from Lysinibacillus sphaericus: (1) The secondary structure of the S-layer protein was analyzed by circular dichroism spectroscopy; (2) Small-angle X-ray scattering was applied to gain insights into the three-dimensional structure in solution; (3) The interaction with bivalent cations was followed by differential scanning calorimetry; (4) The dynamics and time-dependent assembly of S-layers were followed by applying dynamic light scattering; (5) The two-dimensional structure of the paracrystalline S-layer lattice was examined by atomic force microscopy. The data obtained provide essential structural insights into the mechanism of S-layer self-assembly, particularly with respect to binding of bivalent cations, i.e., Mg(2+) and Ca(2+). Furthermore, the results obtained highlight potential applications of S-layers in the fields of micromaterials and nanobiotechnology by providing engineered or individual symmetric thin protein layers, e.g., for protective, antimicrobial, or otherwise functionalized surfaces.

  19. Study of electronic and magnetic properties of MnS layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.Masrour; E.K.Hlil; M.Hamedoun; A.Benyoussef; O.Mounkachi

    2012-01-01

    Self-consistent ab initio calculations,based on the density functional theory (DFT) and using the full potential linear augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method,are performed to investigate both electronic and magnetic properties of the MnS layers.Polarized spin and spin-orbit coupling are included in the calculations within the framework of the antiferromagnetic state between two adjacent Mn layers.Magnetic moments considered to lie along axes are computed.Obtained data from ab initio calculations are used as input data for the high temperature series expansion (HTSE)calculations to compute other magnetic parameters.The zero-field high temperature static susceptibility series of the spin-4.39 nearest-neighbour Heisenberg model on centred face cubic (FCC) and lattices is thoroughly analysed by a power series coherent anomaly method (CAM).The exchange interactions between the magnetic atoms,the Néel temperature,and the critical exponent associated with the magnetic susceptibility are obtained for the MnS layer.

  20. Production and efficacy of an Aeromonas hydrophila recombinant S-layer protein vaccine for fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poobalane, Saravanane; Thompson, Kim D; Ardó, László; Verjan, Noel; Han, Hyun-Ja; Jeney, Galina; Hirono, Ikuo; Aoki, Takashi; Adams, Alexandra

    2010-04-30

    A recombinant protein for the S-layer protein of Aeromonas hydrophila was produced and its ability to protect common carp Cyprinus carpio L. against six virulent isolates of A. hydrophila was assessed. A group of 120 carp (30-40 g) were vaccinated intra-peritoneally with 0.1 ml of adjuvanted vaccine (30 microg protein per fish). Another group of 120 carp were injected with 0.1 ml of PBS-adjuvant mixture to serve as controls. Twenty fish from each group were challenged with each one of six virulent isolates of A. hydrophila 35 days post-vaccination. The fish were maintained in 12 separate tanks before terminating the experiment at 16 days post-challenge. The relative percentage survival (RPS) for the six isolates of A. hydrophila ranged from 56 to 87%. The difference in survival rate of fish challenged with four of the isolates was statistically significant in vaccinated fish compared to control fish, when analysed using a Chi-square test. The results of the study suggest that the recombinant S-layer protein of A. hydrophila could be useful as a vaccine antigen to protect fish against different isolates of this pathogenic bacterium.

  1. S-Layer Glycoproteins and Flagellins: Reporters of Archaeal Posttranslational Modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken F. Jarrell

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many archaeal proteins undergo posttranslational modifications. S-layer proteins and flagellins have been used successfully to study a variety of these modifications, including N-linked glycosylation, signal peptide removal and lipid modification. Use of these well-characterized reporter proteins in the genetically tractable model organisms, Haloferax volcanii, Methanococcus voltae and Methanococcus maripaludis, has allowed dissection of the pathways and characterization of many of the enzymes responsible for these modifications. Such studies have identified archaeal-specific variations in signal peptidase activity not found in the other domains of life, as well as the enzymes responsible for assembly and biosynthesis of novel N-linked glycans. In vitro assays for some of these enzymes have already been developed. N-linked glycosylation is not essential for either Hfx. volcanii or the Methanococcus species, an observation that allowed researchers to analyze the role played by glycosylation in the function of both S-layers and flagellins, by generating mutants possessing these reporters with only partial attached glycans or lacking glycan altogether. In future studies, it will be possible to consider questions related to the heterogeneity associated with given modifications, such as differential or modulated glycosylation.

  2. Comprehensive optical studies on SnS layers synthesized by chemical bath deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedi, Sreedevi; Minnam Reddy, Vasudeva Reddy; Park, Chinho; Chan-Wook, Jeon; Ramakrishna Reddy, K. T.

    2015-04-01

    A simple non-vacuum and cost effective wet chemical technique, chemical bath deposition was used to prepare tin sulphide (SnS) layers on glass substrates. The layers were formed by varying bath temperature in the range, 40-80 °C, keeping other deposition parameters as constant. An exhaustive investigation on their optical properties with bath temperature was made using the transmittance and reflectance measurements. The absorption coefficient was evaluated from the optical transmittance data utilizing Lambert's principle and is >104 cm-1 for all the as-prepared layers. The energy band gap of the layers was determined from the differential reflectance spectra that varied from 1.41 eV to 1.30 eV. Consequently, refractive index and extinction coefficient were obtained from Pankov relations and dispersion constants were calculated using Wemple-Didomenico method. In addition, other optical parameters such as the optical conductivity, dielectric constants, dissipation factor, high frequency dielectric constant and relaxation time were also calculated. Finally electrical parameters such as resistivity, carrier mobility and carrier density of as-prepared layers were estimated using optical data. A detailed analysis of the dependence of all above mentioned parameters on bath temperature is reported and discussed for a clean understanding of electronic characteristics of SnS layers.

  3. Preparation and Characterization of TiO2/CdS Layers as Potential Photoelectrocatalytic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teofil-Danut Silipas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The TiO2/CdS semiconductor composites were prepared on
    indium tin oxide (ITO substrates in di®erent mass proportions via wet-chemical techniques using bi-distilled water, acetyl-acetone, poly-propylene-glycol and Triton X-100 as additives. The composite layers were annealed in normal conditions at the temperature of 450±C, 120 min. with a rate of temperature increasing of 5±C/min. The structural and optical properties of all the TiO2/CdS ayers were characterized by X-ray di®raction, UV-VIS spectroscopy, spectrofluorimetry and FT/IR microscopy. The microstructural properties of the deposited TiO2/CdS layers can be modi¯ed by varying the mass proportions of TiO2:CdS. The good crystallinity level and the high optical adsorption of
    the TiO2/CdS layers make them attractive for photoelectrochemical cell applications.

  4. Phylogeny by a polyphasic approach of the order Caulobacterales, proposal of Caulobacter mirabilis sp. nov., Phenylobacterium haematophilum sp. nov. and Phenylobacterium conjunctum sp. nov., and emendation of the genus Phenylobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Wolf-Rainer; Macedo, Alexandre J; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Fischer, Roman; Pawelczyk, Sonja; Smit, John; Vancanneyt, Marc

    2008-08-01

    Three strains of Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming bacteria were isolated from fresh water and human blood. As determined by analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences, the prosthecate strain FWC 38T was affiliated to the alphaproteobacterial genus Caulobacter, with Caulobacter henricii (96.8 %) and Caulobacter fusiformis (96.8 %) as its closest relatives. The non-prosthecate strain LMG 11050T and the prosthecate strain FWC 21T both belonged to the genus Phenylobacterium with Phenylobacterium koreense (96.9 %) and Phenylobacterium immobile (96.3 %) as the closest relatives. This affiliation was supported by chemotaxonomic data (polar lipids and cellular fatty acids). Physiological and biochemical tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of the novel strains from all hitherto recognized species of the genera Caulobacter and Phenylobacterium. The strains therefore represent novel species, for which the names Caulobacter mirabilis sp. nov. (type strain FWC 38T=LMG 24261T=CCUG 55073T), Phenylobacterium conjunctum (type strain FWC 21T=LMG 24262T=CCUG 55074T), the first described prosthecate Phenylobacterium species, and Phenylobacterium haematophilum sp. nov. (type strain LMG 11050T=CCUG 26751T) are proposed. Marker nucleotides within the 16S rRNA genes were determined for the genera Asticcacaulis, Brevundimonas, Caulobacter and Phenylobacterium and the description of the genus Phenylobacterium is emended.

  5. Bio-Nanofabrication: Structuring Polymer Thin Films via Bacterial S-layer Proteins for Subsequent Use with Subtractive Nanofabrication Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esch, Mandy B.; Amponsah, Ebenezer K.; Bergkvist, Magnus

    2007-03-01

    Bio-molecule assisted lithography is a novel approach to create ordered patterns on the micro and nanometer size scale on thin films. The technique bears the potential to utilize self assembling properties of bio-molecules and to be integrated with conventional nanofabrication techniques. In the past, bacterial cell wall proteins (S-layers proteins) have been utilized to create ordered nanoparticle arrays. The work presented here employs S-layer proteins to shape UV-curable resist via an S-layer imprinted parylene template. Using this technique we can replicate S-layer patterns in resist thereby rendering the shape more resistant to subtractive nanofabrication techniques. The technique also demonstrates the adequacy of Nano Imprint Lithography to produce complex patterns not achievable with conventional lithography.

  6. AcmB Is an S-Layer-Associated β-N-Acetylglucosaminidase and Functional Autolysin in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brant R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autolysins, also known as peptidoglycan hydrolases, are enzymes that hydrolyze specific bonds within bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan during cell division and daughter cell separation. Within the genome of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, there are 11 genes encoding proteins with peptidoglycan hydrolase catalytic domains, 9 of which are predicted to be functional. Notably, 5 of the 9 putative autolysins in L. acidophilus NCFM are S-layer-associated proteins (SLAPs) noncovalently colocalized along with the surface (S)-layer at the cell surface. One of these SLAPs, AcmB, a β-N-acetylglucosaminidase encoded by the gene lba0176 (acmB), was selected for functional analysis. In silico analysis revealed that acmB orthologs are found exclusively in S-layer- forming species of Lactobacillus. Chromosomal deletion of acmB resulted in aberrant cell division, autolysis, and autoaggregation. Complementation of acmB in the ΔacmB mutant restored the wild-type phenotype, confirming the role of this SLAP in cell division. The absence of AcmB within the exoproteome had a pleiotropic effect on the extracellular proteins covalently and noncovalently bound to the peptidoglycan, which likely led to the observed decrease in the binding capacity of the ΔacmB strain for mucin and extracellular matrices fibronectin, laminin, and collagen in vitro. These data suggest a functional association between the S-layer and the multiple autolysins noncovalently colocalized at the cell surface of L. acidophilus NCFM and other S-layer-producing Lactobacillus species. IMPORTANCE Lactobacillus acidophilus is one of the most widely used probiotic microbes incorporated in many dairy foods and dietary supplements. This organism produces a surface (S)-layer, which is a self-assembling crystalline array found as the outermost layer of the cell wall. The S-layer, along with colocalized associated proteins, is an important mediator of probiotic activity through intestinal adhesion and modulation of

  7. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis CTC-A typical strain with high production of S-layer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhaoxia; Li, Junhua; Zheng, Jinshui; Geng, Ce; Peng, Donghai; Sun, Ming

    2016-02-20

    Bacillus thuringiensis CTC, which is identified as serotype H2, serovar. finitimus, is high production of S-layer protein. Due to the property of forming isoporous lattices on the whole cell surface, S-layer protein has been widely used in (nano) biotechnology, biomimetics, biomedicine, especially been employed for displaying many important active proteins. Here, we report the complete genome of strain CTC, which contains one circular chromosome and one linear plasmid.

  8. S-Layered Aneurinibacillus and Bacillus spp. Are Susceptible to the Lytic Action of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Membrane Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadurugamuwa, J. L.; Mayer, A.; Messner, P.; Sára, M.; Sleytr, U. B.; Beveridge, T. J.

    1998-01-01

    When S-layered strains of Bacillus stearothermophilus and Aneurinibacillus thermoaerophilus, possessing S-layers of different lattice type and lattice constant as well as S-(glyco)protein chemistry, and isogenic S-layerless variants were subjected to membrane vesicles (MVs) from P. aeruginosa during plaque assays on plates or CFU measurements on cell suspensions, all bacterial types lysed. Electron microscopy of negative stains, thin sections, and immunogold-labelled MV preparations revealed that the vesicles adhered to all bacterial surfaces, broke open, and digested the underlying peptidoglycan-containing cell wall of all cell types. Reassembled S-layer did not appear to be affected by MVs, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis showed that the S-(glyco)proteins remained intact. meso-Diaminopimelic acid, as a peptidoglycan breakdown product, was found in all culture supernatants after MV attack. These results suggest that even though MVs are much larger than the channels which penetrate these proteinaceous arrays, S-layers on gram-positive bacteria do not form a defensive barrier against the lytic action of MVs. The primary mode of attack is by the liberation from the MVs of a peptidoglycan hydrolase, which penetrates through the S-layer to digest the underlying peptidoglycan-containing cell wall. The S-layer is not affected by MV protease. PMID:9573179

  9. Identification of the S-layer glycoproteins and their covalently linked glycans in the halophilic archaeon Haloarcula hispanica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hua; Lü, Yang; Ren, Jinwei; Wang, Zhongfu; Wang, Qian; Luo, Yuanming; Han, Jing; Xiang, Hua; Du, Yuguo; Jin, Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Haloarcula hispanica is one of members of the Halobacteriaceae, which displays particularly low restriction activity and is therefore important as one of the most tractable haloarchaea for archaeal genetic research. Although the Har. hispanica S-layer protein has been reported glycosylated, the S-layer glycoprotein and its glycosylation have not been investigated yet. In this study, the S-layer proteins of Har. hispanica were extracted and characterized. The S-layer was found containing two different glycoproteins which shared highly similar amino acid sequences. The genes coding for these two S-layer glycoproteins were found next to each other in the genome. Moreover, the N- and O-linked glycans were released from these two S-layer glycoproteins for structural determination. Based on the mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance, the N-glycan was determined as a branched trisaccharide containing a 225 Da residue corresponded to a 2-amino-6-sulfo-2, 6-dideoxy-quinovose, which was the first time that a naturally occurring form of sulfoquinovosamine was identified. Besides, the O-glycan was characterized as a Glcα-1,4-Gal disaccharide by mass spectrometry combined with monosaccharide composition analysis and glycosidase treatment. The determination of the N- and O-glycan structure will be helpful for studying the diverse protein glycosylation pathways in archaea utilizing H. hispanica as a new model.

  10. In Vitro Characterization of the Two-Stage Non-Classical Reassembly Pathway of S-Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Breitwieser

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The recombinant bacterial surface layer (S-layer protein rSbpA of Lysinibacillus sphaericus CCM 2177 is an ideal model system to study non-classical nucleation and growth of protein crystals at surfaces since the recrystallization process may be separated into two distinct steps: (i adsorption of S-layer protein monomers on silicon surfaces is completed within 5 min and the amount of bound S-layer protein sufficient for the subsequent formation of a closed crystalline monolayer; (ii the recrystallization process is triggered—after washing away the unbound S-layer protein—by the addition of a CaCl2 containing buffer solution, and completed after approximately 2 h. The entire self-assembly process including the formation of amorphous clusters, the subsequent transformation into crystalline monomolecular arrays, and finally crystal growth into extended lattices was investigated by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Moreover, contact angle measurements showed that the surface properties of S-layers change from hydrophilic to hydrophobic as the crystallization proceeds. This two-step approach is new in basic and application driven S-layer research and, most likely, will have advantages for functionalizing surfaces (e.g., by spray-coating with tailor-made biological sensing layers.

  11. In Vitro Characterization of the Two-Stage Non-Classical Reassembly Pathway of S-Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitwieser, Andreas; Iturri, Jagoba; Toca-Herrera, Jose-Luis; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Pum, Dietmar

    2017-01-01

    The recombinant bacterial surface layer (S-layer) protein rSbpA of Lysinibacillus sphaericus CCM 2177 is an ideal model system to study non-classical nucleation and growth of protein crystals at surfaces since the recrystallization process may be separated into two distinct steps: (i) adsorption of S-layer protein monomers on silicon surfaces is completed within 5 min and the amount of bound S-layer protein sufficient for the subsequent formation of a closed crystalline monolayer; (ii) the recrystallization process is triggered—after washing away the unbound S-layer protein—by the addition of a CaCl2 containing buffer solution, and completed after approximately 2 h. The entire self-assembly process including the formation of amorphous clusters, the subsequent transformation into crystalline monomolecular arrays, and finally crystal growth into extended lattices was investigated by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Moreover, contact angle measurements showed that the surface properties of S-layers change from hydrophilic to hydrophobic as the crystallization proceeds. This two-step approach is new in basic and application driven S-layer research and, most likely, will have advantages for functionalizing surfaces (e.g., by spray-coating) with tailor-made biological sensing layers. PMID:28216572

  12. Production, secretion, and cell surface display of recombinant Sporosarcina ureae S-layer fusion proteins in Bacillus megaterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, Denise; Ostermann, Kai; Rödel, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Monomolecular crystalline bacterial cell surface layers (S-layers) have broad application potential in nanobiotechnology due to their ability to generate functional supramolecular structures. Here, we report that Bacillus megaterium is an excellent host organism for the heterologous expression and efficient secretion of hemagglutinin (HA) epitope-tagged versions of the S-layer protein SslA from Sporosarcina ureae ATCC 13881. Three chimeric proteins were constructed, comprising the precursor, C-terminally truncated, and N- and C-terminally truncated forms of the S-layer SslA protein tagged with the human influenza hemagglutinin epitope. For secretion of fusion proteins, the open reading frames were cloned into the Escherichia coli-Bacillus megaterium shuttle vector pHIS1525. After transformation of the respective plasmids into Bacillus megaterium protoplasts, the recombinant genes were successfully expressed and the proteins were secreted into the growth medium. The isolated S-layer proteins are able to assemble in vitro into highly ordered, crystalline, sheetlike structures with the fused HA tag accessible to antibody. We further show by fluorescent labeling that the secreted S-layer fusion proteins are also clustered on the cell envelope of Bacillus megaterium, indicating that the cell surface can serve in vivo as a nucleation point for crystallization. Thus, this system can be used as a display system that allows the dense and periodic presentation of S-layer proteins or the fused tags.

  13. S-layer proteins from Lactobacillus sp. inhibit bacterial infection by blockage of DC-SIGN cell receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado Acosta, Mariano; Ruzal, Sandra M; Cordo, Sandra M

    2016-11-01

    Many species of Lactobacillus sp. possess Surface(s) layer proteins in their envelope. Among other important characteristics S-layer from Lactobacillus acidophilus binds to the cellular receptor DC-SIGN (Dendritic Cell-Specific Intercellular adhesion molecule-3-Grabbing Non-integrin; CD209), which is involved in adhesion and infection of several families of bacteria. In this report we investigate the activity of new S-layer proteins from the Lactobacillus family (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus helveticus and Lactobacillus kefiri) over the infection of representative microorganisms important to human health. After the treatment of DC-SIGN expressing cells with these proteins, we were able to diminish bacterial infection by up to 79% in both gram negative and mycobacterial models. We discovered that pre-treatment of the bacteria with S-layers from Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus brevis reduced bacteria viability but also prevent infection by the pathogenic bacteria. We also proved the importance of the glycosylation of the S-layer from Lactobacillus kefiri in the binding to the receptor and thus inhibition of infection. This novel characteristic of the S-layers proteins may contribute to the already reported pathogen exclusion activity for these Lactobacillus probiotic strains; and might be also considered as a novel enzymatic antimicrobial agents to inhibit bacterial infection and entry to host cells.

  14. Probing peptide and protein insertion in a biomimetic S-layer supported lipid membrane platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiati, Samar; Schrems, Angelika; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Sleytr, Uwe B; Schuster, Bernhard

    2015-01-27

    The most important aspect of synthetic lipid membrane architectures is their ability to study functional membrane-active peptides and membrane proteins in an environment close to nature. Here, we report on the generation and performance of a biomimetic platform, the S-layer supported lipid membrane (SsLM), to investigate the structural and electrical characteristics of the membrane-active peptide gramicidin and the transmembrane protein α-hemolysin in real-time using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring in combination with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A shift in membrane resistance is caused by the interaction of α-hemolysin and gramicidin with SsLMs, even if only an attachment onto, or functional channels through the lipid membrane, respectively, are formed. Moreover, the obtained results did not indicate the formation of functional α-hemolysin pores, but evidence for functional incorporation of gramicidin into this biomimetic architecture is provided.

  15. Crystalline Bacterial Surface Layer (S-Layer) Opens Golden Opportunities for Nanobiotechnology in Textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Narges; Chand, Nima; Rassa, Mehdi

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on the successful recrystallization of bacterial S-layer arrays of the Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 at textile surfaces to create a novel method and material. Optimum bacterial growth was obtained at approximately 45 °C, pH 5.0, and 14 h pi. The cells were resuspended in guanidine hydrochloride and the 43 kDa S-protein was dialyzed and purified. The optimum reassembly on the polypropylene fabric surface in terms of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), reflectance, and uniformity (spectrophotometry) was obtained at 30 °C, pH 5.0 for 30 minutes in the presence of 2 gr/l (liquor ratio; 1:40) of the S-protein. Overall, our data showed that the functional aspects and specialty applications of the fabric would be very attractive for the textile and related sciences, and result in advanced technical textiles.

  16. Characterizing the S-layer structure and anti-S-layer antibody recognition on intact Tannerella forsythia cells by scanning probe microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yoo Jin; Sekot, Gerhard; Duman, Memed; Chtcheglova, Lilia; Messner, Paul; Peterlik, Herwig; Schäffer, Christina; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Tannerella forsythia is among the most potent triggers of periodontal diseases, and approaches to understand underlying mechanisms are currently intensively pursued. A ~22-nm-thick, 2D crystalline surface (S-) layer that completely covers Tannerella forsythia cells is crucially involved in the bacterium–host cross-talk. The S-layer is composed of two intercalating glycoproteins (TfsA-GP, TfsB-GP) that are aligned into a periodic lattice. To characterize this unique S-layer structure at the nanometer scale directly on intact T. forsythia cells, three complementary methods, i.e., small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and single-molecular force spectroscopy (SMFS), were applied. SAXS served as a difference method using signals from wild-type and S-layer-deficient cells for data evaluation, revealing two possible models for the assembly of the glycoproteins. Direct high-resolution imaging of the outer surface of T. forsythia wild-type cells by AFM revealed a p4 structure with a lattice constant of ~9.0 nm. In contrast, on mutant cells, no periodic lattice could be visualized. Additionally, SMFS was used to probe specific interaction forces between an anti-TfsA antibody coupled to the AFM tip and the S-layer as present on T. forsythia wild-type and mutant cells, displaying TfsA-GP alone. Unbinding forces between the antibody and wild-type cells were greater than with mutant cells. This indicated that the TfsA-GP is not so strongly attached to the mutant cell surface when the co-assembling TfsB-GP is missing. Altogether, the data gained from SAXS, AFM, and SMFS confirm the current model of the S-layer architecture with two intercalating S-layer glycoproteins and TfsA-GP being mainly outwardly oriented. PMID:24089361

  17. Characterizing the S-layer structure and anti-S-layer antibody recognition on intact Tannerella forsythia cells by scanning probe microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yoo Jin; Sekot, Gerhard; Duman, Memed; Chtcheglova, Lilia; Messner, Paul; Peterlik, Herwig; Schäffer, Christina; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2013-11-01

    Tannerella forsythia is among the most potent triggers of periodontal diseases, and approaches to understand underlying mechanisms are currently intensively pursued. A ~22-nm-thick, 2D crystalline surface (S-) layer that completely covers Tannerella forsythia cells is crucially involved in the bacterium-host cross-talk. The S-layer is composed of two intercalating glycoproteins (TfsA-GP, TfsB-GP) that are aligned into a periodic lattice. To characterize this unique S-layer structure at the nanometer scale directly on intact T. forsythia cells, three complementary methods, i.e., small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and single-molecular force spectroscopy (SMFS), were applied. SAXS served as a difference method using signals from wild-type and S-layer-deficient cells for data evaluation, revealing two possible models for the assembly of the glycoproteins. Direct high-resolution imaging of the outer surface of T. forsythia wild-type cells by AFM revealed a p4 structure with a lattice constant of ~9.0 nm. In contrast, on mutant cells, no periodic lattice could be visualized. Additionally, SMFS was used to probe specific interaction forces between an anti-TfsA antibody coupled to the AFM tip and the S-layer as present on T. forsythia wild-type and mutant cells, displaying TfsA-GP alone. Unbinding forces between the antibody and wild-type cells were greater than with mutant cells. This indicated that the TfsA-GP is not so strongly attached to the mutant cell surface when the co-assembling TfsB-GP is missing. Altogether, the data gained from SAXS, AFM, and SMFS confirm the current model of the S-layer architecture with two intercalating S-layer glycoproteins and TfsA-GP being mainly outwardly oriented.

  18. Synthesis of S-Layer Conjugates and Evaluation of Their Modifiability as a Tool for the Functionalization and Patterning of Technical Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrike Weinert; Katrin Pollmann; Astrid Barkleit; Manja Vogel; Tobias Günther; Johannes Raff

    2015-01-01

    Chemical functional groups of surface layer (S-layer) proteins were chemically modified in order to evaluate the potential of S-layer proteins for the introduction of functional molecules. S-layer proteins are structure proteins that self-assemble into regular arrays on surfaces. One general feature of S-layer proteins is their high amount of carboxylic and amino groups. These groups are potential targets for linking functional molecules, thus producing reactive surfaces. In this work, these ...

  19. An unusual promoter controls cell-cycle regulation and dependence on DNA replication of the Caulobacter fliLM early flagellar operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, C M; Shapiro, L

    1993-09-01

    Transcription of flagellar genes in Caulobacter crecentus is programmed to occur during the predivisional stage of the cell cycle. The mechanism of activation of Class II flagellar genes, the highest identified genes in the Caulobacter flagellar hierarchy, is unknown. As a step toward understanding this process, we have defined cis-acting sequences necessary for expression of a Class II flagellar operon, fliLM. Deletion analysis indicated that a 55 bp DNA fragment was sufficient for normal, temporally regulated promoter activity. Transcription from this promoter-containing fragment was severely reduced when chromosomal DNA replication was inhibited. Extensive mutational analysis of the promoter region from -42 to -5 identified functionally important nucleotides at -36 and -35, between -29 and -22, and at -12, which correlates well with sequences conserved between fliLM and the analogous regions of two other Class II flagellar operons. The promoter sequence does not resemble that recognized by any known bacterial sigma factor. Models for regulation of Caulobacter early flagellar promoters are discussed in which RNA polymerase containing a novel sigma subunit interacts with an activation factor bound to the central region of the promoter.

  20. Molecular and biochemical properties of the S-layer protein from the wine bacterium Lactobacillus hilgardii B706.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohm, Nina; Petri, Anna; Schlander, Martina; Schlott, Bernhard; König, Helmut; Claus, Harald

    2011-04-01

    Different strains of the genus Lactobacillus can be regularly isolated from must and wine samples. By various physiological activities, they can improve or reduce the wine quality. Lactobacillus hilgardii that is known to survive under harsh wine conditions is classified as a spoilage bacterium, e.g. due to the production of histamine. Many lactobacilli form an S-layer as the outermost cell wall component which has been found to facilitate the colonization of special ecological niches. A detailed understanding of the properties related to their S-layer proteins is necessary to improve the knowledge of the interactions between different bacterial cells and with the surrounding environments. The S-layer protein from the wine-related L. hilgardii strain B706 has been isolated and its gene sequence determined. The deduced amino acid sequence corresponds to a 41 kDa protein with an isoelectric point of 9.6 without additional posttranslational modifications after splitting off the leader peptide. The complete protein is organized in a 32 amino acids signal sequence for membrane translocation, a positively charged N-terminal domain that binds to the cell wall and a negatively charged C-terminal domain. When the S-layer was removed, the corresponding L. hilgardii B706 cells became more sensitive to bacteriolytic enzymes and some wine-related stress conditions. From a practical point of view, the S-layer may be considered as a target for the inhibition of food-spoiling lactobacilli.

  1. Controlling Assembly and Crystallization of S-layers on Diblock Copolymer Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunkel, Ilja; Lingenfelder, Magalí; Stel, Bart; Gu, Xiaodan; Russell, Thomas; Deyoreo, James

    2013-03-01

    Block copolymers (BCPs) self-assemble into arrays of nanoscopic morphologies, including lamellar, cylindrical, and spherical microdomains, that serve as ideal templates for the fabrication of nanostructured materials. The size of the microdomains is a function of the polymer size so tuning the copolymer's molecular weight allows for a precise control over the dimension of the BCP morphologies. Moreover, the heterogeneous chemical nature of BCPs allows them to be used as templates for well-defined protein adsorption. Here, we used nanoscopic BCP patterns as templates to study the assembly of S-layer proteins SbpA from Lysinibacillus sphaericus (ATCC 4525) by in-situ Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The templates were formed by polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) BCPs of various molecular weights after spin coating on solid surfaces and subsequent controlled solvent-vapor annealing. Our results show that by controlling the chemical contrast in templates of different geometry and periodicity, protein assemblies could be directed exclusively to the hydrophobic domains of the template. More importantly, our high-resolution AFM measurements indicate that the proteins crystallized in their native lattice while following the structure of the underlying template by preferential adsorption.

  2. Formation of CuxS Layers on Polypropylene Sulfurized by Molten Sulfur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasa ALABURDAITĖ

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The processes of formation of electrically conductive layers of copper sulfides CuxS by the sorption-diffusion method on polypropylene (PP using molten sulfur as sulfurizing agent was investigated. The amount of sorbed sulfur increased with the increase of the duration of treatment. Copper sulfide layers were formed on the surface of polypropylene after the treatment of sulfurized polymer with Cu(II/I salt solution. The amount of copper sulfide in layer increased with the increase of treatment duration in copper salt solution. XRD spectra of PP films treated for 3 min with molten sulfur and then with Cu(II/I salt solution for the different time showed that the copper sulfide phases, mostly digenite, Cu2-xS and a-chalcocite, Cu2S were formed in the layers. Electromotive force measurement results confirmed the composition of formed CuxS layers on PP. The phase composition of layers also changed after the annealing. The value of electrical resistance of copper sulfide layers on PP varied from 20 W/cm2 to 80 W/cm2 and after annealing at 80 °C - in the interval of 10 W/cm2 - 60 W/cm2.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.4.776

  3. Macrophage inducible C-type lectin (Mincle) recognizes glycosylated surface (S)-layer of the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinthamani, Sreedevi; Settem, Rajendra P.; Honma, Kiyonobu; Kay, Jason G.

    2017-01-01

    The oral pathogen Tannerella forsythia is implicated in the development of periodontitis, a common inflammatory disease that leads to the destruction of the gum and tooth supporting tissues, often leading to tooth loss. T. forsythia is a unique Gram-negative organism endowed with an elaborate protein O-glycosylation system that allows the bacterium to express a glycosylated surface (S)-layer comprising two high molecular weight glycoproteins modified with O-linked oligosaccharides. The T. forsythia S-layer has been implicated in the modulation of cytokine responses of antigen presenting cells, such as macrophages, that play a significant role during inflammation associated with periodontitis. The macrophage-inducible C-type lectin receptor (Mincle) is an FcRγ-coupled pathogen recognition receptor that recognizes a wide variety of sugar containing ligands from fungal and bacterial pathogens. In this study, we aimed to determine if Mincle might be involved in the recognition of T. forsythia S-layer and modulation of cytokine response of macrophages against the bacterium. Binding studies using recombinant Mincle-Fc fusion protein indicated a specific Ca2+-dependent binding of Mincle to T. forsythia S-layer. Subsequent experiments with Mincle-expressing and Mincle-knockdown macrophages revealed a role for Mincle/S-layer interaction in the induction of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine secretion in macrophages stimulated with T. forsythia as well as its S-layer. Together, these studies revealed Mincle as an important macrophage receptor involved in the modulation of cytokine responses of macrophages against T. forsythia, and thus may play a critical role in orchestrating the host immune response against the bacterium. PMID:28264048

  4. Macrophage inducible C-type lectin (Mincle) recognizes glycosylated surface (S)-layer of the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinthamani, Sreedevi; Settem, Rajendra P; Honma, Kiyonobu; Kay, Jason G; Sharma, Ashu

    2017-01-01

    The oral pathogen Tannerella forsythia is implicated in the development of periodontitis, a common inflammatory disease that leads to the destruction of the gum and tooth supporting tissues, often leading to tooth loss. T. forsythia is a unique Gram-negative organism endowed with an elaborate protein O-glycosylation system that allows the bacterium to express a glycosylated surface (S)-layer comprising two high molecular weight glycoproteins modified with O-linked oligosaccharides. The T. forsythia S-layer has been implicated in the modulation of cytokine responses of antigen presenting cells, such as macrophages, that play a significant role during inflammation associated with periodontitis. The macrophage-inducible C-type lectin receptor (Mincle) is an FcRγ-coupled pathogen recognition receptor that recognizes a wide variety of sugar containing ligands from fungal and bacterial pathogens. In this study, we aimed to determine if Mincle might be involved in the recognition of T. forsythia S-layer and modulation of cytokine response of macrophages against the bacterium. Binding studies using recombinant Mincle-Fc fusion protein indicated a specific Ca2+-dependent binding of Mincle to T. forsythia S-layer. Subsequent experiments with Mincle-expressing and Mincle-knockdown macrophages revealed a role for Mincle/S-layer interaction in the induction of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine secretion in macrophages stimulated with T. forsythia as well as its S-layer. Together, these studies revealed Mincle as an important macrophage receptor involved in the modulation of cytokine responses of macrophages against T. forsythia, and thus may play a critical role in orchestrating the host immune response against the bacterium.

  5. Role of S-layer proteins in the biosorption capacity of lead by Lactobacillus kefir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbino, Esteban; Carasi, Paula; Araujo-Andrade, Cuauhtémoc; Tymczyszyn, E Elizabeth; Gómez-Zavaglia, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The role of S-layer proteins (SLP) on the Pb(2+) sequestrant capacity by Lactobacillus kefir CIDCA 8348 and JCM 5818 was investigated. Cultures in the stationary phase were treated with proteinase K. A dot blot assay was carried out to assess the removal of SLP. Strains with and without SLP were exposed to 0-0.5 mM Pb(NO3)2. The maximum binding capacity (q max ) and the affinity coefficient (b) were calculated using the Langmuir equation. The structural effect of Pb(2+) on microorganisms with and without SLP was determined using Raman spectroscopy. The bacterial interaction with Pb(2+) led to a broadening in the phosphate bands (1,300-1,200 cm(-1) region) and strong alterations on amide and carboxylate-related bands (νCOO(-) as and νCOO(-) s). Microorganisms without SLP removed higher percentages of Pb(2+) and had higher q max than those bearing SLP. Isolated SLP had much lower q max and also removed lower percentages of Pb(2+) than the corresponding whole microorganisms. The hydrofobicity of both strains dramatically dropped when removing SLP. When bearing SLP, strains do not expose a large amount of charged groups on their surfaces, thus making less efficient the Pb(2+) removal. On the contrary, the extremely low hydrofobicity of microorganisms without SLP (and consequently, their higher capacity to remove Pb(2+)) can be explained on the basis of a greater exposure of charged chemical groups for the interaction with Pb(2+). The viability of bacteria without SLP was not significantly lower than that of bacteria bearing SLP. However, microorganisms without SLP were more prone to the detrimental effect of Pb(2+), thus suggesting that SLP acts as a protective rather than as a sequestrant layer.

  6. Targeting at the Nanoscale: A Novel S-Layer Fusion Protein Enabling Controlled Immobilization of Biotinylated Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Melinda

    2016-11-04

    With the aim of constructing an S-layer fusion protein that combines both excellent self-assembly and specific ligand i.e., biotin binding ability, streptavidin (aa 16-133) was fused to the S-layer protein of Sporosarcina ureae ATCC 13881 (SslA) devoid of its N-terminal 341 and C-terminal 172 amino acids. The genetically engineered chimeric protein could be successfully produced in E. coli, isolated, and purified via Ni affinity chromatography. In vitro recrystallisation experiments performed with the purified chimeric protein in solution and on a silicon wafer have demonstrated that fusion of the streptavidin domain does not interfere with the self-assembling properties of the S-layer part. The chimeric protein self-assembled into multilayers. More importantly, the streptavidin domain retained its full biotin-binding ability, a fact evidenced by experiments in which biotinylated quantum dots were coupled to the fusion protein monomers and adsorbed onto the in vitro recrystallised fusion protein template. In this way, this S-layer fusion protein can serve as a functional template for the controlled immobilization of biotinylated and biologically active molecules.

  7. Synergistic Activity Between S-Layer Protein and Spore-Crystal Preparations from Lysinibacillus sphaericus Against Culex quinquefasciatus Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Lucía C; Dussán, Jenny

    2017-03-01

    Lysinibacillus sphaericus is used for the biological control of mosquitoes. The main toxicity mechanism of pathogenic strains is a binary toxin produced during sporulation. S-layer is a proteinaceous structure on the surface of bacteria; its functions have been involved in the interaction between bacterial cells and the environment, for example, as protective coats, surface recognition, and biological control. In L. sphaericus, S-layer protein (SlpC) is expressed in vegetative cells, and is also found in spore-crystal preparations; it has larvicidal activity in Culex spp. In this study, partial and completed sporulated culture toxicities were compared; also, S-layer protein and spore-crystal proteins were tested against Culex quinquefasciatus larvae for possible interactions. Larvicidal activity obtained with a combination of SlpC and spore-crystal proteins from strain III(3)7 showed no significant interaction, whereas, combinations of both preparations from strain 2362 showed synergistic effect. The highest synergistic activity observed was between spore protein complex from strain 2362 and SlpC from III(3)7. S-layer protein could be considered a good alternative in formulation improvement, for biological control of mosquitoes.

  8. The secondary structure and the thermal unfolding parameters of the S-layer protein from Lactobacillus salivarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lighezan, Liliana; Georgieva, Ralitsa; Neagu, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    Surface layer (S-layer) proteins have been identified in the cell envelope of many organisms, such as bacteria and archaea. They self-assemble, forming monomolecular crystalline arrays. Isolated S-layer proteins are able to recrystallize into regular lattices, which proved useful in biotechnology. Here we investigate the structure and thermal unfolding of the S-layer protein isolated from Lactobacillus salivarius 16 strain of human origin. Using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and the software CDSSTR from DICHROWEB, CONTINLL from CDPro, as well as CDNN, we assess the fractions of the protein's secondary structural elements at temperatures ranging between 10 and 90 °C, and predict the tertiary class of the protein. To study the thermal unfolding of the protein, we analyze the temperature dependence of the CD signal in the far- and near-UV domains. Fitting the experimental data by two- and three-state models of thermal unfolding, we infer the midpoint temperatures, the temperature dependence of the changes in Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of the unfolding transitions in standard conditions, and the temperature dependence of the equilibrium constant. We also estimate the changes in heat capacity at constant pressure in standard conditions. The results indicate that the thermal unfolding of the S-layer protein from L. salivarius is highly cooperative, since changes in the secondary and tertiary structures occur simultaneously. The thermodynamic analysis predicts a "cold" transition, at about -3 °C, of both the secondary and tertiary structures. Our findings may be important for the use of S-layer proteins in biotechnology and in biomedical applications.

  9. Review of Information Authentication in Mobile Cloud over SaaS & PaaS Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet Guha

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Revolution has begun; time has come when we no more have to worry about the size, format & storage of data at a single place. Cloud computing is a revolution which has made world of internet more like a place of dynamic storage & facilitator of new methodology, which generates tools for consumers in a very effective style of computations. Cloud Computing has made lots of changes not only in infrastructure side, but has also deeply impacted the software industry. Many Companies, Institutions are moving towards using Cloud computing technology, but with every new technology emerging in this Information technology world, with major issues holds with security models to implement & problem like how we can keep data secured & safe. Cloud Computing; do pose various new security concerns, which have not been well identified & worked on. When we talk about the security of data in Cloud computing the vendor’s has to ensure assurance to get confidence of customer on the security issues. Institutions & organizations are planning to use cloud computing for certain level of confidential issues for their business applications though guaranteeing the security is difficult task for now. With most of companies & IT giants planning to incorporate usage of Mobile technology to enrich their existing services & with more & more advance smart phones available in market, we can think of certain ideas & solutions to use mobile devices as alert medium & help securing use of data & network in cloud environment to an extent? It can also help us to keep a watch on intruders & we can impose checks on illegal access to data & network. So we can think of using Mobile Technology with Cloud Networks. We in this paper, review certain security concerns in Cloud computing technology & also about certain ways to restrict & overcome such issues over SaaS & PaaS Layers using mobile technologies. In this paper we try to focus ourselves to find answers to all such questions

  10. Two groups of S-layer proteins, SLP1s and SLP2s, in Bacillus thuringiensis co-exist in the S-layer and in parasporal inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhou; Peng, Donghai; Zheng, Jinshui; Guo, Gang; Tian, Longjun; Yu, Ziniu; Sun, Ming

    2011-05-01

    We screened four B. thuringiensis strains whose parasporal inclusions contained the S-layer protein (SLP), and cloned two slp genes from each strain. Phylogenetic analysis indicated these SLPs could be divided into two groups, SLP1s and SLP2s. To confirm whether SLPs were present in the S-layer or as a parasporal inclusion, strains CTC and BMB1152 were chosen for further study. Western blots with whole-cell associated proteins from strains CTC and BMB1152 in the vegetative phase showed that SLP1s and SLP2s were constituents of the S-layer. Immunofluorescence utilizing spore-inclusion mixtures of strains CTC and BMB1152 in the sporulation phase showed that SLP1s and SLP2s were also constituents of parasporal inclusions. When heterogeneously expressed in the crystal negative strain BMB171, four SLPs from strains CTC and BMB1152 could also form parasporal inclusions. This temporal and spatial expression is not an occasional phenomenon but ubiquitous in B. thuringiensis strains.

  11. Multitechnique study on a recombinantly produced Bacillus halodurans laccase and an S-layer/laccase fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferner-Ortner-Bleckmann, Judith; Schrems, Angelika; Ilk, Nicola; Egelseer, Eva M; Sleytr, Uwe B; Schuster, Bernhard

    2011-06-01

    Methods for organizing functional materials at the nanometer scale are essential for the development of novel fabrication techniques. One of the most relevant areas of research in nanobiotechnology concerns technological utilization of self-assembly systems, wherein molecules spontaneously associate into reproducible supramolecular structures. For this purpose, the laccase of Bacillus halodurans C-125 was immobilized on the S-layer lattice formed by SbpA of Lysinibacillus sphaericus CCM 2177 either by (i) covalent linkage of the enzyme to the natural protein self-assembly system or (ii) by construction of a fusion protein comprising the S-layer protein and the laccase. The laccase and the S-layer fusion protein were produced heterologously in Escherichia coli. After isolation and purification, the properties of the proteins, as well as the specific activity of the enzyme moiety, were investigated. Interestingly, the S-layer part confers a much higher solubility on the laccase as observed for the sole enzyme. Comparative spectrophotometric measurements of the enzyme activity revealed similar but significantly higher values for rLac and rSbpA/Lac in solution compared to the immobilized state. However, rLac covalently linked to the SbpA monolayer yielded a four to five time higher enzymatic activity than rSbpA/Lac immobilized on a solid support. Combined quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and electrochemical measurements (performed in an electrochemical QCM-D cell) revealed that rLac immobilized on the SbpA lattice had an approximately twofold higher enzymatic activity compared to that obtained with the fusion protein.

  12. Two Distinct N-Glycosylation Pathways Process the Haloferax volcanii S-Layer Glycoprotein upon Changes in Environmental Salinity

    OpenAIRE

    Kaminski, Lina; Guan, Ziqiang; Yurist-Doutsch, Sophie; Eichler, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT N-glycosylation in Archaea presents aspects of this posttranslational modification not seen in either Eukarya or Bacteria. In the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii, the surface (S)-layer glycoprotein can be simultaneously modified by two different N-glycans. Asn-13 and Asn-83 are modified by a pentasaccharide, whereas Asn-498 is modified by a tetrasaccharide of distinct composition, with N-glycosylation at this position being related to environmental conditions. Specifically, N-glycosy...

  13. Identification of AglE, a Second Glycosyltransferase Involved in N Glycosylation of the Haloferax volcanii S-Layer Glycoprotein▿

    OpenAIRE

    Abu-Qarn, Mehtap; Giordano, Assunta; Battaglia, Francesca; Trauner, Andrej; Hitchen, Paul G.; Morris, Howard R.; Dell, Anne; Eichler, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    Archaea, like Eukarya and Bacteria, are able to N glycosylate select protein targets. However, in contrast to relatively advanced understanding of the eukaryal N glycosylation process and the information being amassed on the bacterial process, little is known of this posttranslational modification in Archaea. Toward remedying this situation, the present report continues ongoing efforts to identify components involved in the N glycosylation of the Haloferax volcanii S-layer glycoprotein. By co...

  14. Langmuir-Blodgett films of cholesterol oxidase and S-layer proteins onto screen-printed electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Juliana Aguilar; Ferraz, Helen Conceição; Alves, Tito Lívio Moitinho

    2014-04-01

    Stable Langmuir monolayers of cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) and S-layer proteins were produced at the water-air interface and subsequently transferred onto the surface of screen-printed carbon electrodes by the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. The modified electrode surface was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). AFM indicated the presence of deposited layers, showing reduction of surface roughness (RMS and Rt parameters). Significant changes in the shape of CVs were observed in modified electrodes compared to bare electrodes. The anodic peaks could be observed in cyclic voltammograms (CV), at a scan rate equal to 25 mV s-1, using electrodes with Z-type LB deposition. The presence of S-layer proteins in the ChOx LB film increases the oxidation peak intensity and reduces the oxidation potential. Altogether, these results demonstrate the feasibility of producing a cholesterol biosensor based on the immobilization of ChOx and S-layer proteins by LB technique.

  15. Recombinant S-layer proteins of Lactobacillus brevis mediating antibody adhesion to calf intestine alleviated neonatal diarrhea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khang, Yong-Ho; Park, Hee-Young; Jeong, Yoo-Seok; Kim, Jung-Ae; Kim, Young-Hwan

    2009-05-01

    A chimeric gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and a S-layer protein from Lactobacillus brevis KCTC3102, and/or two copies of the Fc-binding Z-domain, a synthetic analog of the B-domain of protein A, was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The S-layer fusion proteins produced in a 500-l fermentor were likely to be stable in the range of pH 5 to 8 and 0 degree to 40 degrees . Their adhesive property enabled an easy and rapid immobilization of enzymes or antibodies on solid materials such as plastics, glass, sol-gel films, and intestinal epithelial cells. Owing to their affinity towards intestinal cells and immunoglobulin G, the Slayer fusion proteins enabled the adhesion of antibodies to human epithelial cells. In addition, feeding a mixture of the S-layer fusion proteins and antibodies against neonatal calf diarrhea (coronavirus, rotavirus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella typhimurium) to Hanwoo calves resulted in 100% prevention of neonatal calf diarrhea syndrome (p<0.01),whereas feeding antibodies only resulted in 56% prevention.

  16. S-layer fusion protein as a tool functionalizing emulsomes and CurcuEmulsomes for antibody binding and targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucisik, Mehmet H; Küpcü, Seta; Breitwieser, Andreas; Gelbmann, Nicola; Schuster, Bernhard; Sleytr, Uwe B

    2015-04-01

    Selective targeting of tumor cells by nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems is highly desirable because it maximizes the drug concentration at the desired target while simultaneously protecting the surrounding healthy tissues. Here, we show a design for smart nanocarriers based on a biomimetic approach that utilizes the building principle of virus envelope structures. Emulsomes and CurcuEmulsomes comprising a tripalmitin solid core surrounded by phospholipid layers are modified by S-layer proteins that self-assemble into a two-dimensional array to form a surface layer. One significant advantage of this nanoformulation is that it increases the solubility of the lipophilic anti-cancer agent curcumin in the CurcuEmulsomes by a factor of 2700. In order to make the emulsomes specific for IgG, the S-layer protein is fused with two protein G domains. This S-layer fusion protein preserves its recrystallization characteristics, forming an ordered surface layer (square lattice with 13 nm unit-by-unit distance). The GG domains are presented in a predicted orientation and exhibit a selective binding affinity for IgG.

  17. Fluorescence energy transfer in the bi-fluorescent S-layer tandem fusion protein ECFP-SgsE-YFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainz, Birgit; Steiner, Kerstin; Sleytr, Uwe B; Pum, Dietmar; Toca-Herrera, José L

    2010-12-01

    This work reports for the first time on the fabrication of a bi-functional S-layer tandem fusion protein which is able to self-assemble on solid supports without losing its functionality. Two variants of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) were genetically combined with a self-assembly system having the remarkable opportunity to interact with each other and act as functional nanopatterning biocoating. The S-layer protein SgsE of Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a was fused with the cyan ECFP donor protein at the SgsE N-terminus and with the yellow YFP acceptor protein at the C-terminus. The fluorescence energy transfer was studied with spectrofluorimetry, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, whilst protein self-assembly (on silicon dioxide particles) and structural investigations were carried out with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency of reassembled SgsE tandem protein was 20.0 ± 6.1% which is almost the same transfer efficiency shown in solution (19.6 ± 0.1%). This work shows that bi-fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins self-assemble on silica particles retaining their fluorescent properties.

  18. Adhesive ability means inhibition activities for lactobacillus against pathogens and S-layer protein plays an important role in adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenming; Wang, Haifeng; Liu, Jianxin; Zhao, Yunhao; Gao, Kan; Zhang, Juan

    2013-08-01

    Eighty-five strains of lactobacillus were isolated from the pig intestine and identified by sequencing analysis based on 16S rRNA gene, from which five lactobacillus strains with high adhesive ability were selected. The inhibition ability of the five lactobacillus strains with or without S-layer proteins against adherence of Escherichia coli K88 and Salmonella enteritidis 50335 to Caco-2 was evaluated in vitro with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG strain (LGG) as a positive control. In addition, tolerance of lactobacilli to heat, acid, bile, Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) were assessed. All five selected strains, Lactobacillus salivarius ZJ614 (JN981856), Lactobacillus reuteri ZJ616 (JN981858), L. reuteri ZJ617 (JN981859), L. reuteri ZJ621 (JN981863) and L. reuteri ZJ623 (JN981865), showed inhibition against the two pathogens, E. coli K88 and S. enteritidis 50335. L. reuteri ZJ621 showed higher inhibition ability than the others to S. enteritidis 50335 (P S-layer protein, the inhibition activities of the lactobacilli against pathogens decreased significantly (P S-layer proteins plays an important role.

  19. Spectroscopic characterization of gold nanoparticles formed by cells and S-layer protein of Bacillus sphaericus JG-A12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merroun, M. [Institute of Radiochemistry, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany)]. E-mail: m.merroun@fz-rossendorf.de; Rossberg, A. [Institute of Radiochemistry, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Hennig, C. [Institute of Radiochemistry, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Scheinost, A.C. [Institute of Radiochemistry, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Selenska-Pobell, S. [Institute of Radiochemistry, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2007-01-15

    The strain Bacillus sphaericus JG-A12, isolated from a uranium mining waste pile near the town of Johanngeorgenstadt, is capable of selective and reversible accumulation of U, Cu, Pb, Al, and Cd from uranium waste waters. The cells of this strain are enveloped by a surface layer protein (S-layer). The highly regular structure of this S-layer with many pores of identical size offers good binding sites for different kinds of molecules and provides nucleation sites for the formation of metal nanoclusters or minerals. In this study we demonstrate that B. sphaericus JG-A12 cells and their purified S-layer protein were capable to reduce Au to metallic nanoclusters in the presence of reducing agents such as molecular H{sub 2}. The gold nanoparticles were regularly distributed and sized according to the pores of the protein lattice. The metallic nature of the clusters was confirmed by different techniques such as extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near edge (XANES) spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The size of the gold nanoparticles was estimated to be almost 1 nm. Our results demonstrate that B. sphaericus JG-A12 can be used to prepare gold nanoparticles tailor-made for industrial applications.

  20. Lactobacillus helveticus MIMLh5-specific antibodies for detection of S-layer protein in Grana Padano protected-designation-of-origin cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuknyte, Milda; Brockmann, Eeva-Christine; Huovinen, Tuomas; Guglielmetti, Simone; Mora, Diego; Taverniti, Valentina; Arioli, Stefania; De Noni, Ivano; Lamminmäki, Urpo

    2014-01-01

    Single-chain variable-fragment antibodies (scFvs) have considerable potential in immunological detection and localization of bacterial surface structures. In this study, synthetic phage-displayed antibody libraries were used to select scFvs against immunologically active S-layer protein of Lactobacillus helveticus MIMLh5. After three rounds of panning, five relevant phage clones were obtained, of which four were specific for the S-layer protein of L. helveticus MIMLh5 and one was also capable of binding to the S-layer protein of L. helveticus ATCC 15009. All five anti-S-layer scFvs were expressed in Escherichia coli XL1-Blue, and their specificity profiles were characterized by Western blotting. The anti-S-layer scFv PolyH4, with the highest specificity for the S-layer protein of L. helveticus MIMLh5, was used to detect the S-layer protein in Grana Padano protected-designation-of-origin (PDO) cheese extracts by Western blotting. These results showed promising applications of this monoclonal antibody for the detection of immunomodulatory S-layer protein in dairy (and dairy-based) foods.

  1. Expression and cytosolic assembly of the S-layer fusion protein mSbsC-EGFP in eukaryotic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veenhuis Marten

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Native as well as recombinant bacterial cell surface layer (S-layer protein of Geobacillus (G. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 assembles to supramolecular structures with an oblique symmetry. Upon expression in E. coli, S-layer self assembly products are formed in the cytosol. We tested the expression and assembly of a fusion protein, consisting of the mature part (aa 31–1099 of the S-layer protein and EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein, in eukaryotic host cells, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human HeLa cells. Results Upon expression in E. coli the recombinant mSbsC-EGFP fusion protein was recovered from the insoluble fraction. After denaturation by Guanidine (Gua-HCl treatment and subsequent dialysis the fusion protein assembled in solution and yielded green fluorescent cylindric structures with regular symmetry comparable to that of the authentic SbsC. For expression in the eukaryotic host Saccharomyces (S. cerevisiae mSbsC-EGFP was cloned in a multi-copy expression vector bearing the strong constitutive GPD1 (glyceraldehyde-3-phosophate-dehydrogenase promoter. The respective yeast transfomants were only slightly impaired in growth and exhibited a needle-like green fluorescent pattern. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM studies revealed the presence of closely packed cylindrical structures in the cytosol with regular symmetry comparable to those obtained after in vitro recrystallization. Similar structures are observed in HeLa cells expressing mSbsC-EGFP from the Cytomegalovirus (CMV IE promoter. Conclusion The mSbsC-EGFP fusion protein is stably expressed both in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in HeLa cells. Recombinant mSbsC-EGFP combines properties of both fusion partners: it assembles both in vitro and in vivo to cylindrical structures that show an intensive green fluorescence. Fusion of proteins to S-layer proteins may be a useful tool for high level expression in yeast and HeLa cells of

  2. A Highly Expressed High-Molecular-Weight S-Layer Complex of Pelosinus sp. Strain UFO1 Binds Uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorgersen, Michael P; Lancaster, W Andrew; Rajeev, Lara; Ge, Xiaoxuan; Vaccaro, Brian J; Poole, Farris L; Arkin, Adam P; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Adams, Michael W W

    2017-02-15

    Cell suspensions of Pelosinus sp. strain UFO1 were previously shown, using spectroscopic analysis, to sequester uranium as U(IV) complexed with carboxyl and phosphoryl group ligands on proteins. The goal of our present study was to characterize the proteins involved in uranium binding. Virtually all of the uranium in UFO1 cells was associated with a heterodimeric protein, which was termed the uranium-binding complex (UBC). The UBC was composed of two S-layer domain proteins encoded by UFO1_4202 and UFO1_4203. Samples of UBC purified from the membrane fraction contained 3.3 U atoms/heterodimer, but significant amounts of phosphate were not detected. The UBC had an estimated molecular mass by gel filtration chromatography of 15 MDa, and it was proposed to contain 150 heterodimers (UFO1_4203 and UFO1_4202) and about 500 uranium atoms. The UBC was also the dominant extracellular protein, but when purified from the growth medium, it contained only 0.3 U atoms/heterodimer. The two genes encoding the UBC were among the most highly expressed genes within the UFO1 genome, and their expressions were unchanged by the presence or absence of uranium. Therefore, the UBC appears to be constitutively expressed and is the first line of defense against uranium, including by secretion into the extracellular medium. Although S-layer proteins were previously shown to bind U(VI), here we showed that U(IV) binds to S-layer proteins, we identified the proteins involved, and we quantitated the amount of uranium bound.

  3. Purification and characterization of DR_2577 (SlpA) a major S-layer protein from Deinococcus radiodurans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farci, Domenica; Bowler, Matthew W.; Esposito, Francesca; McSweeney, Sean; Tramontano, Enzo; Piano, Dario

    2015-01-01

    The protein DR_2577 is a major Surface layer component of the radio-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. In the present study DR_2577 has been purified and its oligomeric profile characterized by means of size exclusion chromatography and gel electrophoresis. DR_2577 was found to be organized into three hierarchical orders characterized by monomers, stable dimers formed by the occurrence of disulfide bonds, and hexamers resulting from a combination of dimers. The structural implications of these findings are discussed providing new elements for a more integrated model of this S-layer. PMID:26074883

  4. Crystallization of domains involved in self-assembly of the S-layer protein SbsC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ðordić, Anđela; Egelseer, Eva M; Tesarz, Manfred; Sleytr, Uwe B; Keller, Walter; Pavkov-Keller, Tea

    2012-12-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 is completely covered with a two-dimensional crystalline monolayer composed of the S-layer protein SbsC. In order to complete the structure of the full-length protein, additional soluble constructs containing the crucial domains for self-assembly have been successfully cloned, expressed and purified. Crystals obtained from three different recombinant constructs yielded diffraction to 3.4, 2.8 and 1.5 Å resolution. Native data have been collected.

  5. Purification and characterization of DR_2577 (SlpA) a major S-layer protein from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farci, Domenica; Bowler, Matthew W; Esposito, Francesca; McSweeney, Sean; Tramontano, Enzo; Piano, Dario

    2015-01-01

    The protein DR_2577 is a major Surface layer component of the radio-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. In the present study DR_2577 has been purified and its oligomeric profile characterized by means of size exclusion chromatography and gel electrophoresis. DR_2577 was found to be organized into three hierarchical orders characterized by monomers, stable dimers formed by the occurrence of disulfide bonds, and hexamers resulting from a combination of dimers. The structural implications of these findings are discussed providing new elements for a more integrated model of this S-layer.

  6. Analysis of the interaction between Bacillus coagulans and Bacillus thuringiensis S-layers and calcium ions by XRD, light microscopy, and FTIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babolmorad, Ghazal; Emtiazi, Giti; Emamzadeh, Rahman

    2014-05-01

    S-layer is a self-assemble regularly crystalline surface that covers major cell wall component of many bacteria and archaea and exhibits a high metal-binding capacity. We have studied the effect of the calcium ions and type of solid support (glass or mica) on the structure of the S-layers from Bacillus coagulans HN-68 and Bacillus thuringiensis MH14 upon simple methods based on light microscopy and AFM. Furthermore, the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) study is indicated that the calcium-S-layer interaction occurred mainly through the carboxylate groups of the side chains of aspartic acid (Asp) and glutamic acid (Glu) and nitrogen atoms of Lys, Asn, and histidine (His) amino acids and N-H groups of the peptide backbone. Studied FTIR revealed that inner faces of S-layer are mainly negative, and outer faces of S-layer are mainly positive. Probably, calcium ions with positive charges bound to the carboxyl groups of Glu and Asp. Accordingly, calcium ions are anchored in the space between the inner faces of S-layer with negative charge and the surface of mica with negative charge. This leads to regular arrangement of the S-layer subunits.

  7. Bacillus anthracis acetyltransferases PatA1 and PatA2 modify the secondary cell wall polysaccharide and affect the assembly of S-layer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunderberg, J Mark; Nguyen-Mau, Sao-Mai; Richter, G Stefan; Wang, Ya-Ting; Dworkin, Jonathan; Missiakas, Dominique M; Schneewind, Olaf

    2013-03-01

    The envelope of Bacillus anthracis encompasses a proteinaceous S-layer with two S-layer proteins (Sap and EA1). Protein assembly in the envelope of B. anthracis requires S-layer homology domains (SLH) within S-layer proteins and S-layer-associated proteins (BSLs), which associate with the secondary cell wall polysaccharide (SCWP), an acetylated carbohydrate that is tethered to peptidoglycan. Here, we investigated the contributions of two putative acetyltransferases, PatA1 and PatA2, on SCWP acetylation and S-layer assembly. We show that mutations in patA1 and patA2 affect the chain lengths of B. anthracis vegetative forms and perturb the deposition of the BslO murein hydrolase at cell division septa. The patA1 and patA2 mutants are defective for the assembly of EA1 in the envelope but retain the ability of S-layer formation with Sap. SCWP isolated from the patA1 patA2 mutant lacked acetyl moieties identified in wild-type polysaccharide and failed to associate with the SLH domains of EA1. A model is discussed whereby patA1- and patA2-mediated acetylation of SCWP enables the deposition of EA1 as well as BslO near the septal region of the B. anthracis envelope.

  8. Synthesis of S-layer conjugates and evaluation of their modifiability as a tool for the functionalization and patterning of technical surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinert, Ulrike; Pollmann, Katrin; Barkleit, Astrid; Vogel, Manja; Günther, Tobias; Raff, Johannes

    2015-05-27

    Chemical functional groups of surface layer (S-layer) proteins were chemically modified in order to evaluate the potential of S-layer proteins for the introduction of functional molecules. S-layer proteins are structure proteins that self-assemble into regular arrays on surfaces. One general feature of S-layer proteins is their high amount of carboxylic and amino groups. These groups are potential targets for linking functional molecules, thus producing reactive surfaces. In this work, these groups were conjugated with the amino acid tryptophan. In another approach, SH-groups were chemically inserted in order to extend the spectrum of modifiable groups. The amount of modifiable carboxylic groups was further evaluated by potentiometric titration in order to evaluate the potential efficiency of S-layer proteins to work as matrix for bioconjugations. The results proved that S-layer proteins can work as effective matrices for the conjugation of different molecules. The advantage of using chemical modification methods over genetic methods lies in its versatile usage enabling the attachment of biomolecules, as well as fluorescent dyes and inorganic molecules. Together with their self-assembling properties, S-layer proteins are suitable as targets for bioconjugates, thus enabling a nanostructuring and bio-functionalization of surfaces, which can be used for different applications like biosensors, filter materials, or (bio)catalytic surfaces.

  9. Inhibition of H9N2 Virus Invasion into Dendritic Cells by the S-Layer Protein from L. acidophilus ATCC 4356.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xue; Huang, Lulu; Zhu, Liqi; Mou, Chunxiao; Hou, Qihang; Yu, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are essential for the prevention of virus invasion and the maintenance of the immune balance. However, the mechanism of competition between probiotics and virus are unknown. The objectives of this study were to isolate the surface layer (S-layer) protein from L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 as a new antiviral material, to evaluate the stimulatory effects of the S-layer protein on mouse dendritic cells (DCs) and to verify its ability to inhibit the invasion of H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) in DCs. We found that the S-layer protein induced DCs activation and up-regulated the IL-10 secretion. The invasion and replication of the H9N2 virus in mouse DCs was successfully demonstrated. However, the invasion of H9N2 virus into DCs could be inhibited by treatment with the S-layer protein prior to infection, which was verified by the reduced hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) mRNA expression, and nucleoprotein (NP) protein expression in the DCs. Furthermore, treatment with the S-layer protein increases the Mx1, Isg15, and Ddx58 mRNA expressions, and remits the inflammatory process to inhibit H9N2 AIV infection. In conclusion, the S-layer protein stimulates the activation of mouse DCs, inhibits H9N2 virus invasion of DCs, and stimulates the IFN-I signaling pathway. Thus, the S-layer protein from Lactobacillus is a promising biological antiviral material for AIV prevention.

  10. Inhibition of H9N2 virus invasion into dendritic cells by the S-layer protein from L. acidophilus ATCC 4356

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Gao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are essential for the prevention of virus invasion and the maintenance of the immune balance. However, the mechanism of competition between probiotics and virus are unknown. The objectives of this study were to isolate the surface layer (S-layer protein from L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 as a new antiviral material, to evaluate the stimulatory effects of the S-layer protein on mouse dendritic cells (DCs and to verify its ability to inhibit the invasion of H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV in DCs. We found that the S-layer protein induced DCs activation and up-regulated the IL-10 secretion. The invasion and replication of the H9N2 virus in mouse DCs was successfully demonstrated. However, the invasion of H9N2 virus into DCs could be inhibited by treatment with the S-layer protein prior to infection, which was verified by the reduced hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA mRNA expression, and nucleoprotein (NP protein expression in the DCs. Furthermore, treatment with the S-layer protein increases the Mx1, Isg15, and Ddx58 mRNA expressions, and remits the inflammatory process to inhibit H9N2 AIV infection. In conclusion, the S-layer protein stimulates the activation of mouse DCs, inhibits H9N2 virus invasion of DCs, and stimulates the IFN-I signalling pathway. Thus, the S-layer protein from Lactobacillus is a promising biological antiviral material for AIV prevention.

  11. Synthesis of S-Layer Conjugates and Evaluation of Their Modifiability as a Tool for the Functionalization and Patterning of Technical Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Weinert

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemical functional groups of surface layer (S-layer proteins were chemically modified in order to evaluate the potential of S-layer proteins for the introduction of functional molecules. S-layer proteins are structure proteins that self-assemble into regular arrays on surfaces. One general feature of S-layer proteins is their high amount of carboxylic and amino groups. These groups are potential targets for linking functional molecules, thus producing reactive surfaces. In this work, these groups were conjugated with the amino acid tryptophan. In another approach, SH-groups were chemically inserted in order to extend the spectrum of modifiable groups. The amount of modifiable carboxylic groups was further evaluated by potentiometric titration in order to evaluate the potential efficiency of S-layer proteins to work as matrix for bioconjugations. The results proved that S-layer proteins can work as effective matrices for the conjugation of different molecules. The advantage of using chemical modification methods over genetic methods lies in its versatile usage enabling the attachment of biomolecules, as well as fluorescent dyes and inorganic molecules. Together with their self-assembling properties, S-layer proteins are suitable as targets for bioconjugates, thus enabling a nanostructuring and bio-functionalization of surfaces, which can be used for different applications like biosensors, filter materials, or (biocatalytic surfaces.

  12. Lactobacillus S-layer protein inhibition of Salmonella-induced reorganization of the cytoskeleton and activation of MAPK signalling pathways in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengcheng; Yu, Qinghua; Ye, Xiaolan; Wang, Zhisheng; Yang, Qian

    2011-09-01

    Surface layer (S-layer) proteins are crystalline arrays of proteinaceous subunits that are present as the outermost component of the cell wall in several Lactobacillus species. The S-layer proteins have been shown to play a role in the antimicrobial activity of certain lactobacilli. However, it is not fully understood how the S-layer proteins exert this biological function. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that Lactobacillus acidophilus S-layer proteins antagonize Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) infection by protecting against F-actin cytoskeleton rearrangements and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathways. Monolayer transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) was measured after S. Typhimurium infection in Caco-2 cultured human intestinal cells with L. acidophilus S-layer proteins. F-actin rearrangement and MAPK activation were also assessed by immunofluorescence staining or Western blotting. The results showed that when S. Typhimurium was co-incubated with S-layer proteins, the S. Typhimurium-induced Caco-2 cell F-actin rearrangement was reduced, and the S. Typhimurium-induced TER decrease and interleukin 8 (IL-8) secretion were attenuated. Additionally, L. acidophilus S-layer proteins could inhibit S. Typhimurium-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38. This study indicates that L. acidophilus S-layer proteins are able to inhibit S. Typhimurium infection through blocking S. Typhimurium-induced F-actin rearrangements and S. Typhimurium-induced ERK1/2, JNK and p38 activation in Caco-2 cells. These data provide a rationale for the use of lactobacillus S-layer proteins as therapeutic and preventative agents, at least in infectious diarrhoea.

  13. Influence of the Secondary Cell Wall Polymer on the Reassembly, Recrystallization, and Stability Properties of the S-Layer Protein from Bacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sára, Margit; Dekitsch, Christine; Mayer, Harald F.; Egelseer, Eva M.; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    1998-01-01

    The high-molecular-weight secondary cell wall polymer (SCWP) from Bacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2 is mainly composed of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) and is involved in anchoring the S-layer protein via its N-terminal region to the rigid cell wall layer. In addition to this binding function, the SCWP was found to inhibit the formation of self-assembly products during dialysis of the guanidine hydrochloride (GHCl)-extracted S-layer protein. The degree of assembly (DA; percent assembled from total S-layer protein) that could be achieved strongly depended on the amount of SCWP added to the GHCl-extracted S-layer protein and decreased from 90 to 10% when the concentration of the SCWP was increased from 10 to 120 μg/mg of S-layer protein. The SCWP kept the S-layer protein in the water-soluble state and favored its recrystallization on solid supports such as poly-l-lysine-coated electron microscopy grids. Derived from the orientation of the base vectors of the oblique S-layer lattice, the subunits had bound with their charge-neutral outer face, leaving the N-terminal region with the polymer binding domain exposed to the ambient environment. From cell wall fragments about half of the S-layer protein could be extracted with 1 M GlcNAc, indicating that the linkage type between the S-layer protein and the SCWP could be related to that of the lectin-polysaccharide type. Interestingly, GlcNAc had an effect on the in vitro self-assembly and recrystallization properties of the S-layer protein that was similar to that of the isolated SCWP. The SCWP generally enhanced the stability of the S-layer protein against endoproteinase Glu-C attack and specifically protected a potential cleavage site in position 138 of the mature S-layer protein. PMID:9696762

  14. Surface (S)-layer proteins of Deinococcus radiodurans and their utility as vehicles for surface localization of functional proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Chitra Seetharam; Basu, Bhakti; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The radiation resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans contains two major surface (S)-layer proteins, Hpi and SlpA. The Hpi protein was shown to (a) undergo specific in vivo cleavage, and (b) closely associate with the SlpA protein. Using a non-specific acid phosphatase from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, PhoN as a reporter, the Surface Layer Homology (SLH) domain of SlpA was shown to bind deinococcal peptidoglycan-containing cell wall sacculi. The association of SlpA with Hpi on one side and peptidoglycan on the other, localizes this protein in the 'interstitial' layer of the deinoccocal cell wall. Gene chimeras of hpi-phoN and slh-phoN were constructed to test efficacy of S-layer proteins, as vehicles for cell surface localization in D. radiodurans. The Hpi-PhoN protein localized exclusively in the membrane fraction, and displayed cell-based phosphatase activity in vivo. The SLH-PhoN, which localized to both cytosolic and membrane fractions, displayed in vitro activity but no cell-based in vivo activity. Hpi, therefore, emerged as an efficient surface localizing protein and can be exploited for suitable applications of this superbug.

  15. A bacterial glycan core linked to surface (S)-layer proteins modulates host immunity through Th17 suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settem, R P; Honma, K; Nakajima, T; Phansopa, C; Roy, S; Stafford, G P; Sharma, A

    2013-03-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a pathogen implicated in periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the tooth-supporting tissues often leading to tooth loss. This key periodontal pathogen is decorated with a unique glycan core O-glycosidically linked to the bacterium's proteinaceous surface (S)-layer lattice and other glycoproteins. Herein, we show that the terminal motif of this glycan core acts to modulate dendritic cell effector functions to suppress T-helper (Th)17 responses. In contrast to the wild-type bacterial strain, infection with a mutant strain lacking the complete S-layer glycan core induced robust Th17 and reduced periodontal bone loss in mice. Our findings demonstrate that surface glycosylation of this pathogen may act to ensure its persistence in the host likely through suppression of Th17 responses. In addition, our data suggest that the bacterium then induces the Toll-like receptor 2-Th2 inflammatory axis that has previously been shown to cause bone destruction. Our study provides a biological basis for pathogenesis and opens opportunities in exploiting bacterial glycans as therapeutic targets against periodontitis and a range of other infectious diseases.

  16. Protein N-glycosylation in Archaea: defining Haloferax volcanii genes involved in S-layer glycoprotein glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Qarn, Mehtap; Eichler, Jerry

    2006-07-01

    In this study, characterization of the N-glycosylation process in the haloarchaea Haloferax volcanii was undertaken. Initially, putative Hfx. volcanii homologues of genes involved in eukaryal or bacterial N-glycosylation were identified by bioinformatics. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirmed that the proposed N-glycosylation genes are transcribed, indicative of true proteins being encoded. Where families of related gene sequences were detected, differential transcription of family members under a variety of physiological and environmental conditions was shown. Gene deletions point to certain genes, like alg11, as being essential yet revealed that others, such as the two versions of alg5, are not. Deletion of alg5-A did, however, lead to slower growth and interfered with surface (S)-layer glycoprotein glycosylation, as detected by modified migration on SDS-PAGE and glycostaining approaches. As deletion of stt3, the only component of the oligosaccharide transferase complex detected in Archaea, did not affect cell viability, it appears that N-glycosylation is not essential in Hfx. volcanii. Deletion of stt3 did, nonetheless, hinder both cell growth and S-layer glycoprotein glycosylation. Thus, with genes putatively involved in Hfx. volcanii protein glycosylation identified and the ability to address the roles played by the encoded polypeptides in modifying a reporter glycoprotein, the steps of the archaeal N-glycosylation pathway can be defined.

  17. Studying the Stability of S-Layer Protein of Lactobacillus Acidophilus ATCC 4356 in Simulated Gastrointestinal Fluids Using SDS-PAGE and Circular Dichroism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Neda; Kermanshahi, Rouha Kasra; Erfan, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Crystalline arrays of proteinaceous subunits forming surface layers (S-layers) are now recognized as one of the most common outermost cell envelope components of prokaryotic organisms. The surface layer protein of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC4356 is composed of a single species of protein of apparent molecular weight of 43-46 KDa. Considering the Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC4356 having the S-layer is stable in harsh gastrointestinal (GI) conditions, a protective role against destructive GI factors which has been proposed for these nanostructures. It opens interesting perspectives in the using and development of this S-layer as a protective coat for oral administration of unstable drug nanocarriers. To achieve this goal, it is necessary to study the in-vitro stability of the S-layers in the simulated gastrointestinal fluids (SGIF). This study was planned to evaluate the in-vitro stability of the extracted S-layer protein of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC4356 in SGIF using it as a protective coat in oral drug delivery. Sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy were used to study the stability of the S-layer protein incubated in SGIF. Both the SDS-PAGE and CD spectra results showed that Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC4356 S-layer protein is stable in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) with pH = 2 up to 5 min. It is stable in SGF pH = 3.2 and above it, with and without pepsin. It is also stable in all the simulated intestinal fluids. This S-layer is also stable in all of the simulated intestinal fluids.

  18. Lactobacillus helveticus MIMLh5-Specific Antibodies for Detection of S-Layer Protein in Grana Padano Protected-Designation-of-Origin Cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Stuknyte, M.; Brockmann, E.; Huovinen, T.; Guglielmetti, S.; De Mora, D; Taverniti, V.; Arioli, S.; De Noni, I.; Lamminmäki, U

    2014-01-01

    Single-chain variable-fragment antibodies (scFvs) have considerable potential in immunological detection and localization of bacterial surface structures. In this study, synthetic phage-displayed antibody libraries were used to select scFvs against immunologically active S-layer protein of Lactobacillus helveticus MIMLh5. After three rounds of panning, five relevant phage clones were obtained, of which four were specific for the S-layer protein of L. helveticus MIMLh5 and one was also capable...

  19. The S-layer protein DR_2577 binds deinoxanthin and under desiccation conditions protect against UV-radiation in Deinococcus radiodurans

    OpenAIRE

    Domenica eFarci; Chavdar eSlavov; Enzo eTramontano; Dario ePiano

    2016-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans has the puzzling ability to withstand over a broad range of extreme conditions including high doses of ultraviolet radiation and deep desiccation. This bacterium is surrounded by a surface layer (S-layer) built of a regular repetition of several proteins, assembled to form a paracrystalline structure. Here we report that the deletion of a main constituent of this S-layer, the gene DR_2577, causes a decrease in the UVC resistance, especially in dessicated cells. Moreove...

  20. The S-layer Protein DR_2577 Binds Deinoxanthin and under Desiccation Conditions Protects against UV-Radiation in Deinococcus radiodurans

    OpenAIRE

    Farci, Domenica; Slavov, Chavdar; Tramontano, Enzo; Piano, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans has the puzzling ability to withstand over a broad range of extreme conditions including high doses of ultraviolet radiation and deep desiccation. This bacterium is surrounded by a surface layer (S-layer) built of a regular repetition of several proteins, assembled to form a paracrystalline structure. Here we report that the deletion of a main constituent of this S-layer, the gene DR_2577, causes a decrease in the UVC resistance, especially in desiccated cells. Moreove...

  1. A S-Layer Protein of Bacillus anthracis as a Building Block for Functional Protein Arrays by In Vitro Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu-Ying; Wang, Dian-Bing; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Bi, Li-Jun; Zhang, Ji-Bin; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Xian-En

    2015-11-18

    S-layer proteins create a cell-surface layer architecture in both bacteria and archaea. Because S-layer proteins self-assemble into a native-like S-layer crystalline structure in vitro, they are attractive building blocks in nanotechnology. Here, the potential use of the S-layer protein EA1 from Bacillus anthracis in constructing a functional nanostructure is investigated, and apply this nanostructure in a proof-of-principle study for serological diagnosis of anthrax. EA1 is genetically fused with methyl parathion hydrolase (MPH), to degrade methyl parathion and provide a label for signal amplification. EA1 not only serves as a nanocarrier, but also as a specific antigen to capture anthrax-specific antibodies. As results, purified EA1-MPH forms a single layer of crystalline nanostructure through self-assembly. Our chimeric nanocatalyst greatly improves enzymatic stability of MPH. When applied to the detection of anthrax-specific antibodies in serum samples, the detection of our EA1-MPH nanostructure is nearly 300 times more sensitive than that of the unassembled complex. Together, it is shown that it is possible to build a functional and highly sensitive nanosensor based on S-layer protein. In conclusion, our present study should serve as a model for the development of other multifunctional nanomaterials using S-layer proteins.

  2. 基于新月柄杆菌RsaA外运机制的EspA及EspA-IL-24融合蛋白胞外分泌表达研究%Study on Extracellular Expression of EspA and EspA-IL-24 Proteins in Escherichia coli Following RsaA Exportation Mechanism of Caulobacter crescentus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁亚蕾; 周立雄; 毛旭虎; 张卫军; 程琰; 余抒; 邹全明

    2008-01-01

    目的:实现大肠杆菌分泌蛋白(Esp)A及EspA与白细胞介素(IL)-24融合蛋白的胞外分泌表达,进一步验证基于新月柄杆菌RsaA外运机制的原核胞外分泌表达载体系统的有效性和通用性,并改造优化该系统.方法:利用分子克隆手段,按RsaA分泌系统操纵子组织方式,将获得的RsaA系统元件编码序列和异源调控序列克隆至pQE30骨架质粒,构建新的胞外分泌表达质粒pQABP2S;以大肠杆菌为宿主菌诱导表达EspA及EspA-IL-24融合蛋白,并通过Western blot检测目标蛋白在培养上清中的表达.结果:获得了新的胞外分泌表达载体pQABP2S;与对照相比,该载体宿主系统培养上清中目标蛋白EspA及EspA-IL-24的表达量明显增加.结论:在大肠杆菌中通过RsaA分泌系统可实现分子大小不同的EspA及EspA-IL-24融合蛋白的特异性分泌表达,进一步证实该分泌表达策略的有效性和通用性;调整调控序列以优化分泌系统的尝试,为此类基因工程技术平台的开发提供了借鉴.

  3. 新月柄杆菌RsaA分泌系统用于大肠杆菌胞外递送重组蛋白的初步研究%Preliminary Study on Exportation of Heterologous Recombinant Proteins in Escherichia coli Utilizing RsaA Secretion System of Caulobacter crescentus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁亚蕾; 周立雄; 肖斌; 张卫军; 曾浩; 毛旭虎; 邹全明

    2008-01-01

    目的:构建基于新月柄杆菌RsaA外运机制的以大肠杆菌为宿主的原核胞外分泌表达载体系统.方法:利用分子克隆手段,按RsaA分泌系统操纵子组织方式,将RsaA系统外运功能基因配合以异源调控序列克隆至pQE30骨架质粒.以绿色荧光蛋白(GFP)为报告分子、大肠杆菌M15为宿主菌,诱导表达后通过Western Blotting检测培养上清中GFP的表达.结果:获得了与设计完全一致的pQABPS载体,利用该载体系统,在培养上清中报告分子GFP的表达明显增加,且是通过特异的RsaA外运机制被分泌至胞外的,而非渗漏表达或简单的信号肽引导.结论:在大肠杆菌中重现了RsaA分泌系统的外运功能,为该系统在基因工程领域的应用研究打下了良好基础.

  4. Entropically driven self-assembly of Lysinibacillus sphaericus S-layer proteins analyzed under various environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Leonardo Maestri; Strickland, Aaron; Mark, Sonny S; Bergkvist, Magnus; Sierra-Sastre, Yajaira; Batt, Carl A

    2010-02-11

    S-Layer proteins are an example of bionanostructures that can be exploited in nanofabrication. In addition to their ordered structure, the ability to self-assembly is a key feature that makes them a promising technological tool. Here, in vitro self-assembly kinetics of SpbA was investigated, and found that it occurs at a rate that is dependent on temperature, its concentration, and the concentration of calcium ions and sodium chloride. The activation enthalpy (120.81 kJ . mol(-1)) and entropy (129.34 J . mol(-1) . K(-1)) obtained infers that the incorporation of monomers incurs in a net loss of hydrophobic surface. By understanding how the protein monomers drive the self-assembly at different conditions, the rational optimization of this process was feasible.

  5. Lactobacillus kefiri shows inter-strain variations in the amino acid sequence of the S-layer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamud, Mariano; Carasi, Paula; Bronsoms, Sílvia; Trejo, Sebastián A; Serradell, María de Los Angeles

    2017-04-01

    The S-layer is a proteinaceous envelope constituted by subunits that self-assemble to form a two-dimensional lattice that covers the surface of different species of Bacteria and Archaea, and it could be involved in cell recognition of microbes among other several distinct functions. In this work, both proteomic and genomic approaches were used to gain knowledge about the sequences of the S-layer protein (SLPs) encoding genes expressed by six aggregative and sixteen non-aggregative strains of potentially probiotic Lactobacillus kefiri. Peptide mass fingerprint (PMF) analysis confirmed the identity of SLPs extracted from L. kefiri, and based on the homology with phylogenetically related species, primers located outside and inside the SLP-genes were employed to amplify genomic DNA. The O-glycosylation site SASSAS was found in all L. kefiri SLPs. Ten strains were selected for sequencing of the complete genes. The total length of the mature proteins varies from 492 to 576 amino acids, and all SLPs have a calculated pI between 9.37 and 9.60. The N-terminal region is relatively conserved and shows a high percentage of positively charged amino acids. Major differences among strains are found in the C-terminal region. Different groups could be distinguished regarding the mature SLPs and the similarities observed in the PMF spectra. Interestingly, SLPs of the aggregative strains are 100% homologous, although these strains were isolated from different kefir grains. This knowledge provides relevant data for better understanding of the mechanisms involved in SLPs functionality and could contribute to the development of products of biotechnological interest from potentially probiotic bacteria.

  6. Description of a Putative Oligosaccharyl:S-Layer Protein Transferase from the Tyrosine O-Glycosylation System of Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051(T).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristl, Robin; Janesch, Bettina; Anzengruber, Julia; Forsthuber, Agnes; Blaha, Johanna; Messner, Paul; Schäffer, Christina

    2012-12-01

    Surface (S)-layer proteins are model systems for studying protein glycosylation in bacteria and simultaneously hold promises for the design of novel, glyco-functionalized modules for nanobiotechnology due to their 2D self-assembly capability. Understanding the mechanism governing S-layer glycan biosynthesis in the Gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051(T) is necessary for the tailored glyco-functionalization of its S-layer. Here, the putative oligosaccharyl:S-layer protein transferase WsfB from the P. alvei S-layer glycosylation gene locus is characterized. The enzyme is proposed to catalyze the final step of the glycosylation pathway, transferring the elongated S-layer glycan onto distinct tyrosine O-glycosylation sites. Genetic knock-out of WsfB is shown to abolish glycosylation of the S-layer protein SpaA but not that of other glycoproteins present in P. alvei CCM 2051(T), confining its role to the S-layer glycosylation pathway. A transmembrane topology model of the 781-amino acid WsfB protein is inferred from activity measurements of green fluorescent protein and phosphatase A fused to defined truncations of WsfB. This model shows an overall number of 13 membrane spanning helices with the Wzy_C domain characteristic of O-oligosaccharyl:protein transferases (O-OTases) located in a central extra-cytoplasmic loop, which both compares well to the topology of OTases from Gram-negative bacteria. Mutations in the Wzy_C motif resulted in loss of WsfB function evidenced in reconstitution experiments in P. alvei ΔWsfB cells. Attempts to use WsfB for transferring heterologous oligosaccharides to its native S-layer target protein in Escherichia coli CWG702 and Salmonella enterica SL3749, which should provide lipid-linked oligosaccharide substrates mimicking to some extent those of the natural host, were not successful, possibly due to the stringent function of WsfB. Concluding, WsfB has all features of a bacterial O-OTase, making it the most probable

  7. Characterization of a S-layer protein from Lactobacillus crispatus K313 and the domains responsible for binding to cell wall and adherence to collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhilan; Kong, Jian; Hu, Shumin; Kong, Wentao; Lu, Wenwei; Liu, Wei

    2013-03-01

    It was previously shown that the surface (S)-layer proteins covering the cell surface of Lactobacillus crispatus K313 were involved in the adherence of this strain to human intestinal cell line HT-29. To further elucidate the structures and functions of S-layers, three putative S-layer protein genes (slpA, slpB, and slpC) of L. crispatus K313 were amplified by PCR, sequenced, and characterized in detail. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis reveals that slpA was silent under the tested conditions; whereas slpB and slpC, the putative amino acid sequences which exhibited minor similarities to the previously reported S-layer proteins in L. crispatus, were actively expressed. slpB, which was predominantly expressed in L. crispatus K313, was further investigated for its functional domains. Genetic truncation of the untranslated leader sequence (UTLS) of slpB results in a reduction in protein production, indicating that the UTLS contributed to the efficient S-layer protein expression. By producing a set of N- and C-terminally truncated recombinant SlpB proteins in Escherichia coli, the cell wall-binding region was mapped to the C terminus, where rSlpB(380-501) was sufficient for binding to isolated cell wall fragments. Moreover, the binding ability of the C terminus was variable among the Lactobacillus species (S-layer- and non-S-layer-producing strains), and teichoic acid may be acting as the receptor of SlpB. To determine the adhesion region of SlpB to extracellular matrix proteins, ELISA was performed. Binding to immobilized types I and IV collagen was observed with the His-SlpB(1-379) peptides, suggesting that the extracellular matrix protein-binding domain was located in the N terminus.

  8. GneZ, a UDP-GlcNAc 2-epimerase, is required for S-layer assembly and vegetative growth of Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Ting; Missiakas, Dominique; Schneewind, Olaf

    2014-08-15

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, forms an S-layer atop its peptidoglycan envelope and displays S-layer proteins and Bacillus S-layer-associated (BSL) proteins with specific functions to support cell separation of vegetative bacilli and growth in infected mammalian hosts. S-layer and BSL proteins bind via the S-layer homology (SLH) domain to the pyruvylated secondary cell wall polysaccharide (SCWP) with the repeat structure [→4)-β-ManNAc-(1→4)-β-GlcNAc-(1→6)-α-GlcNAc-(1→]n, where α-GlcNAc and β-GlcNAc are substituted with two and one galactosyl residues, respectively. B. anthracis gneY (BAS5048) and gneZ (BAS5117) encode nearly identical UDP-GlcNAc 2-epimerase enzymes that catalyze the reversible conversion of UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-ManNAc. UDP-GlcNAc 2-epimerase enzymes have been shown to be required for the attachment of the phage lysin PlyG with the bacterial envelope and for bacterial growth. Here, we asked whether gneY and gneZ are required for the synthesis of the pyruvylated SCWP and for S-layer assembly. We show that gneZ, but not gneY, is required for B. anthracis vegetative growth, rod cell shape, S-layer assembly, and synthesis of pyruvylated SCWP. Nevertheless, inducible expression of gneY alleviated all the defects associated with the gneZ mutant. In contrast to vegetative growth, neither germination of B. anthracis spores nor the formation of spores in mother cells required UDP-GlcNAc 2-epimerase activity.

  9. Inhibition of Shigella sonnei adherence to HT-29 cells by lactobacilli from Chinese fermented food and preliminary characterization of S-layer protein involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-Chun; Zhang, Lan-Wei; Tuo, Yan-Feng; Guo, Chun-Feng; Yi, Hua-Xi; Li, Jing-Yan; Han, Xue; Du, Ming

    2010-10-01

    In this study, seven lactobacilli with a high degree of antagonistic activity against three pathogens and good adherence to HT-29 cells were selected. The ability of these seven lactobacilli to inhibit adhesion of Shigella sonnei to intestinal mucosa was studied on cultured HT-29 cells. Lactobacilli were added simultaneously with, before or after S. sonnei to test for their effectiveness in exclusion, competition and displacement assays, respectively. Lactobacillus paracasei subp. paracasei M5-L, Lactobacillus rhamnosus J10-L and Lactobacillus casei Q8-L all exhibited significant inhibitory activity. In order to elucidate the inhibitory functions of S-layer proteins, the S-layer proteins were removed with 5 M LiCl from the M5-L, J10-L and Q8-L strains. Under such conditions, inhibition activity was decreased in all three strains, as revealed in exclusion, competition and displacement assays. SDS-PAGE analysis confirmed the presence of S-layer proteins with dominant bands of approximately 45 kDa. Further analysis of S-layer proteins revealed that the hydrophobic amino acids accounted for 40.5%, 41.5% and 43.8% of the total amino acid for the M5-L, J10-L and Q8-L strains, respectively. These findings suggest that the M5-L, J10-L and Q8-L strains possess the ability to inhibit S. sonnei adherence to HT-29 cells, and S-layer proteins are involved in this adhesion inhibition.

  10. Heterologous protein display on the cell surface of lactic acid bacteria mediated by the s-layer protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Lanlan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have revealed that the C-terminal region of the S-layer protein from Lactobacillus is responsible for the cell wall anchoring, which provide an approach for targeting heterologous proteins to the cell wall of lactic acid bacteria (LAB. In this study, we developed a new surface display system in lactic acid bacteria with the C-terminal region of S-layer protein SlpB of Lactobacillus crispatus K2-4-3 isolated from chicken intestine. Results Multiple sequence alignment revealed that the C-terminal region (LcsB of Lb. crispatus K2-4-3 SlpB had a high similarity with the cell wall binding domains SA and CbsA of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lb. crispatus. To evaluate the potential application as an anchoring protein, the green fluorescent protein (GFP or beta-galactosidase (Gal was fused to the N-terminus of the LcsB region, and the fused proteins were successfully produced in Escherichia coli, respectively. After mixing them with the non-genetically modified lactic acid bacteria cells, the fused GFP-LcsB and Gal-LcsB were functionally associated with the cell surface of various lactic acid bacteria tested. In addition, the binding capacity could be improved by SDS pretreatment. Moreover, both of the fused proteins could simultaneously bind to the surface of a single cell. Furthermore, when the fused DNA fragment of gfp:lcsB was inserted into the Lactococcus lactis expression vector pSec:Leiss:Nuc, the GFP could not be secreted into the medium under the control of the nisA promoter. Western blot, in-gel fluorescence assay, immunofluorescence microscopy and SDS sensitivity analysis confirmed that the GFP was successfully expressed onto the cell surface of L. lactis with the aid of the LcsB anchor. Conclusion The LcsB region can be used as a functional scaffold to target the heterologous proteins to the cell surfaces of lactic acid bacteria in vitro and in vivo, and has also the potential for biotechnological

  11. Lactobacillus buchneri S-layer as carrier for an Ara h 2-derived peptide for peanut allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzengruber, Julia; Bublin, Merima; Bönisch, Eva; Janesch, Bettina; Tscheppe, Angelika; Braun, Matthias L; Varga, Eva-Maria; Hafner, Christine; Breiteneder, Heimo; Schäffer, Christina

    2017-05-01

    Peanut allergy is an IgE-mediated severe hypersensitivity disorder. The lack of a treatment of this potentially fatal allergy has led to intensive research on vaccine development. Here, we describe the design and initial characterization of a carrier-bound peptide derived from the most potent peanut allergen, Ara h 2, as a candidate vaccine. Based on the adjuvant capability of bacterial surface (S-) layers, a fusion protein of the S-layer protein SlpB from Lactobacillus buchneri CD034 and the Ara h 2-derived peptide AH3a42 was produced. This peptide comprised immunodominant B-cell epitopes as well as one T cell epitope. The fusion protein SlpB-AH3a42 was expressed in E. coli, purified, and tested for its IgE binding capacity as well as for its ability to activate sensitized rat basophil leukemia (RBL) cells. The capacity of Ara h 2-specific IgG rabbit-antibodies raised against SlpB-AH3a42 or Ara h 2 to inhibit IgE-binding was determined by ELISA inhibition assays using sera of peanut allergic patients sensitized to Ara h 2. IgE specific to the SlpB-AH3a42 fusion protein was detected in 69% (25 of 36) of the sera. Despite the recognition by IgE, the SlpB-AH3a42 fusion protein was unable to induce β-hexosaminidase release from sensitized RBL cells at concentrations up to 100ng per ml. The inhibition of IgE-binding to the natural allergen observed after pre-incubation of the 20 sera with rabbit anti-SlpB-AH3a42 IgG was more than 30% for four sera, more than 20% for eight sera, and below 10% for eight sera. In comparison, anti-Ara h 2 rabbit IgG antibodies inhibited binding to Ara h 2 by 48% ±13.5%. Our data provide evidence for the feasibility of this novel approach towards the development of a peanut allergen peptide-based carrier-bound vaccine. Our experiments further indicate that more than one allergen-peptide will be needed to induce a broader protection of patients allergic to Ara h 2.

  12. The S-layer Protein DR_2577 Binds Deinoxanthin and under Desiccation Conditions Protects against UV-Radiation in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farci, Domenica; Slavov, Chavdar; Tramontano, Enzo; Piano, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans has the puzzling ability to withstand over a broad range of extreme conditions including high doses of ultraviolet radiation and deep desiccation. This bacterium is surrounded by a surface layer (S-layer) built of a regular repetition of several proteins, assembled to form a paracrystalline structure. Here we report that the deletion of a main constituent of this S-layer, the gene DR_2577, causes a decrease in the UVC resistance, especially in desiccated cells. Moreover, we show that the DR_2577 protein binds the carotenoid deinoxanthin, a strong protective antioxidant specific of this bacterium. A further spectroscopical characterization of the deinoxanthin-DR_2577 complex revealed features which could suggest a protective role of DR_2577. We propose that, especially under desiccation, the S-layer shields the bacterium from incident ultraviolet light and could behave as a first lane of defense against UV radiation.

  13. The S-layer protein DR_2577 binds deinoxanthin and under desiccation conditions protect against UV-radiation in Deinococcus radiodurans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenica eFarci

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Deinococcus radiodurans has the puzzling ability to withstand over a broad range of extreme conditions including high doses of ultraviolet radiation and deep desiccation. This bacterium is surrounded by a surface layer (S-layer built of a regular repetition of several proteins, assembled to form a paracrystalline structure. Here we report that the deletion of a main constituent of this S-layer, the gene DR_2577, causes a decrease in the UVC resistance, especially in dessicated cells. Moreover, we show that the DR_2577 protein binds the carotenoid deinoxanthin, a strong protective antioxidant specific of this bacterium. A further spectroscopical characterization of the deinoxanthin-DR_2577 complex revealed features which could suggest a protective role of DR_2577. We propose that, especially under dessication, the S-layer shields the bacterium from incident ultraviolet light and could behave as a first lane of defence against UV radiation.

  14. Calcium dependent formation of tubular assemblies by recombinant S-layer proteins in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkmaz, Nuriye; Ostermann, Kai; Roedel, Gerhard, E-mail: nuriye_korkmaz@yahoo.com, E-mail: kai.ostermann@tu-dresden.de, E-mail: gerhard.roedel@tu-dresden.de [Institut fuer Genetik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Zellescher Weg 20b, 01217 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-03-04

    Surface layer proteins have the appealing property to self-assemble in nanosized arrays in solution and on solid substrates. In this work, we characterize the formation of assembly structures of the recombinant surface layer protein SbsC of Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATTC 12980, which was tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein and expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The tubular structures formed by the protein in vivo are retained upon bursting the cells by osmotic shock; however, their average length is decreased. During dialysis, monomers obtained by treatment with chaotropic chemicals recrystallize again to form tube-like structures. This process is strictly dependent on calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) ions, with an optimal concentration of 10 mM. Further increase of the Ca{sup 2+} concentration results in multiple non-productive nucleation points. We further show that the lengths of the S-layer assemblies increase with time and can be controlled by pH. After 48 h, the average length at pH 9.0 is 4.13 {mu}m compared to 2.69 {mu}m at pH 5.5. Successful chemical deposition of platinum indicates the potential of recrystallized mSbsC-eGFP structures for nanobiotechnological applications.

  15. Exploring the molecular forces within and between CbsA S-layer proteins using single molecule force spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbelen, Claire [Unite de chimie des interfaces, Universite catholique de Louvain, Croix du Sud 2/18, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Antikainen, Jenni; Korhonen, Timo K. [General Microbiology, Faculty of Biosciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Fin-00014 (Finland); Dufrene, Yves F. [Unite de chimie des interfaces, Universite catholique de Louvain, Croix du Sud 2/18, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)], E-mail: dufrene@cifa.ucl.ac.be

    2007-10-15

    We used single molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) to gain insight into the molecular forces driving the folding and assembly of the S-layer protein CbsA. Force curves recorded between tips and supports modified with CbsA proteins showed sawtooth patterns with multiple force peaks of 58{+-}26 pN that we attribute to the unfolding of {alpha}-helices, in agreement with earlier secondary structure predictions. The average unfolding force increased with the pulling speed but was independent on the interaction time. Force curves obtained for CbsA peptides truncated in their C-terminal region showed similar periodic features, except that fewer force peaks were seen. Furthermore, the average unfolding force was 83{+-}45 pN, suggesting the domains were more stable. By contrast, cationic peptides truncated in their N-terminal region showed single force peaks of 366{+-}149 pN, presumably reflecting intermolecular electrostatic bridges rather than unfolding events. Interestingly, these large intermolecular forces increased not only with pulling speed but also with interaction time. We expect that the intra- and intermolecular forces measured here may play a significant role in controlling the stability and assembly of the CbsA protein.

  16. Calcium dependent formation of tubular assemblies by recombinant S-layer proteins in vivo and in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Nuriye; Ostermann, Kai; Rödel, Gerhard

    2011-03-01

    Surface layer proteins have the appealing property to self-assemble in nanosized arrays in solution and on solid substrates. In this work, we characterize the formation of assembly structures of the recombinant surface layer protein SbsC of Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATTC 12980, which was tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein and expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The tubular structures formed by the protein in vivo are retained upon bursting the cells by osmotic shock; however, their average length is decreased. During dialysis, monomers obtained by treatment with chaotropic chemicals recrystallize again to form tube-like structures. This process is strictly dependent on calcium (Ca2 + ) ions, with an optimal concentration of 10 mM. Further increase of the Ca2 + concentration results in multiple non-productive nucleation points. We further show that the lengths of the S-layer assemblies increase with time and can be controlled by pH. After 48 h, the average length at pH 9.0 is 4.13 µm compared to 2.69 µm at pH 5.5. Successful chemical deposition of platinum indicates the potential of recrystallized mSbsC-eGFP structures for nanobiotechnological applications.

  17. Capacity of graphite's layered structure to suppress the sputtering yield: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Jiting [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zheng, Tao, E-mail: tzheng@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yang, Jiangyan; Kong, Shuyan; Xue, Jianming; Wang, Yugang [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Nordlund, Kai [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, Helsinki 00014 (Finland)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • We simulated 20–120 keV C{sub 60} impact on carbon materials using MD method. • We found that small yield on graphite is mainly induced by its layered structure. • It is the first time that structure effect on sputtering is detailedly discussed. • Our results are consistent with previous experiments and simulations. - Abstract: 20–120 keV C{sub 60} bombardment on graphite and 20 keV C{sub 60} impact on diamond are studied by classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The number of atoms ejected from graphite after a 20 keV C{sub 60} impact is found to be much smaller than that from diamond. By analyzing the microscopic sputtering process, we find this difference is due to the combined effects of graphite's low number density and layered structure. These two features of graphite make the pressure waves during the spike stage much weaker and the crater rim much more stable, compared to the case of diamond. While the role of atomic density on sputtering has been discussed in previous studies, effect of layered structure has not gained much attention yet. To affirm this effect and exclude the influence of density, we have also simulated C{sub 60} impact on an amorphous carbon (a-C) target whose density is very close to that of graphite. The yield of a-C is higher than that of graphite, certifying the capacity of graphite's layered structure to suppress the sputtering yield.

  18. The Lactobacillus acidophilus S-layer protein gene expression site comprises two consensus promoter sequences, one of which directs transcription of stable mRNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, H.J.; Kolen, C.P.A.M.; Andreadaki, F.J.; Leer, R.J.; Pouwels, P.H.

    1996-01-01

    S-proteins are proteins which form a regular structure (S-layer) on the outside of the cell walls of many bacteria. Two S-protein-encoding genes are located in opposite directions on a 6.0-kb segment of the chromosome of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 bacteria. Inversion of this chromosomal seg

  19. Protein glycosylation as an adaptive response in Archaea: growth at different salt concentrations leads to alterations in Haloferax volcanii S-layer glycoprotein N-glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ziqiang; Naparstek, Shai; Calo, Doron; Eichler, Jerry

    2012-03-01

    To cope with life in hypersaline environments, halophilic archaeal proteins are enriched in acidic amino acids. This strategy does not, however, offer a response to transient changes in salinity, as would post-translational modifications. To test this hypothesis, N-glycosylation of the Haloferax volcanii S-layer glycoprotein was compared in cells grown in high (3.4 M NaCl) and low (1.75 M NaCl) salt, as was the glycan bound to dolichol phosphate, the lipid upon which the N-linked glycan is assembled. In high salt, S-layer glycoprotein Asn-13 and Asn-83 are modified by a pentasaccharide, while dolichol phosphate is modified by a tetrasaccharide comprising the first four pentasaccharide residues. When the same targets were considered from cells grown in low salt, substantially less pentasaccharide was detected. At the same time, cells grown at low salinity contain dolichol phosphate modified by a distinct tetrasaccharide absent in cells grown at high salinity. The same tetrasaccharide modified S-layer glycoprotein Asn-498 in cells grown in low salt, whereas no glycan decorated this residue in cells grown in the high-salt medium. Thus, in response to changes in environmental salinity, Hfx. volcanii not only modulates the N-linked glycans decorating the S-layer glycoprotein but also the sites of such post-translational modification.

  20. Interchange of the active and silent S-layer protein genes of Lactobacillus acidophilus by inversion of the chromosomal sip segment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, H.J.; Kolen, C.P.A.M.; Pouwels, P.H.

    1996-01-01

    The most-dominant surface-exposed protein in many bacterial species is the S-protein. This protein crystallises into a regular monolayer on the outside surface of the bacteria: the S-layer. Lactobacillus acidophilus harbours two S-protein-encoding genes, slpA and slpB, only one of which (slpA) is ex

  1. Glyco-engineering in Archaea: differential N-glycosylation of the S-layer glycoprotein in a transformed Haloferax volcanii strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calo, Doron; Guan, Ziqiang; Eichler, Jerry

    2011-07-01

    Archaeal glycoproteins present a variety of N-linked glycans not seen elsewhere. The ability to harness the agents responsible for this unparalleled diversity offers the possibility of generating glycoproteins bearing tailored glycans, optimized for specific functions. With a well-defined N-glycosylation pathway and available genetic tools, the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii represents a suitable platform for such glyco-engineering efforts. In Hfx. volcanii, the S-layer glycoprotein is modified by an N-linked pentasaccharide. In the following, S-layer glycoprotein N-glycosylation was considered in cells in which AglD, the dolichol phosphate mannose synthase involved in addition of the final residue of the pentasaccharide, was replaced by a haloarchaeal homologue of AglJ, the enzyme involved in addition of the first residue of the N-linked pentasaccharide. In the engineering strain, the S-layer glycoprotein is modified by a novel N-linked glycan not found on this reporter from the parent strain. Moreover, deletion of AglD alone and introduction of the AglJ homologue from Halobacterium salinarum, OE2528R, into the deletion strain resulted in increased biosynthesis of the novel 894 Da glycan concomitant with reduced biogenesis of the pentasaccharide normally N-linked to the S-layer glycoprotein. These findings justify efforts designed to transform Hfx. volcanii into a glyco-engineering 'workshop'.

  2. Biosorption of uranium and copper by Bacillus Sphaericus JG-A12 cells, spores and S-layer proteins embedded in sol-gel ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raff, J.; Soltmann, U.; Boettcher, H. [Arbeitsgruppe Funktionelle Schichten, GMBU e.V., Dresden (Germany); Matys, S.; Pompe, W. [Inst. fuer Materialwissenschaft, Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Selenska-Pobell, S.

    2002-05-01

    Vegetative cells, spores and stabilized S-layer sheets of B. sphaericus JG-A12 were embedded in SiO{sub 2} bulk particles using sol-gel techniques. In sorption experiments the metal binding capacity of the free biocomponents and the corresponding biological ceramics were compared. (orig.)

  3. Rare Arsenic-Antimony-Sulphide Bio-immobilization and Bacterial S-layer Preservation in Siliceous Sediments from Champagne Pool Hot-Spring, Waiotapu, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, V. R.; Renaut, R. W.; Jones, B.; Ferris, F. G.

    2003-12-01

    Champagne Pool is a large (65 m diameter, 150 m deep) hot spring in the Waiotapu geothermal area of North Island, New Zealand. The spring discharges water of a mildly acid chloride type, with a pH of 5.2, a constant temperature of 75 oC and a silica concentration of 460 ppm. Siliceous sinter, loose sediments, and flocs suspended in the spring water are composed of opaline silica and metal-rich sulfides that contain many well-preserved, mineralized microbes. Detailed analysis by transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry has shown that bacterial cell wall and capsular material is preserved by the immobilization of high levels of As (up to 33 wt%), Sb (up to 60 wt%), and S (up to 20 wt%) in the organic matrix. Significant precipitate formation is absent (and when present only small microcrysts form), suggesting much of the As-Sb-S has accumulated through adsorption processes. When extensive biomineral precipitates are present upon the cell wall, they are composed of Al rich amorphous silicates. This suggests a 2-step biomineralization process whereby As and Sb sulfur complexes are adsorbed onto the cell surface polymers first, followed by inorganically driven precipitation of the supersaturated amorphous silica phase. Despite the lack of detailed preservation, biomineralization commonly preserves S-layers, an ordered mosaic of proteins on the outer surface of the cell wall. These are the finest ultrastructural details thus far found preserved by hot-spring biomineralization. Preserved S-layers exhibited either a hexagonal (p6) or square (p4) lattice structure with unit-unit spacing of 9.7 +/- 1.6 nm. Because S-layer morphology varies considerably between species it can be used as a fingerprint to aid identification of microfossils. By considering both S-layer morphology and the hot-spring habitat (pH, Eh, temp etc) it is suggested the S-layers preserved here belong to Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum or Desulfotomaculum nigrifacans. To

  4. The S-layer proteins of Tannerella forsythia are secreted via a type IX secretion system that is decoupled from protein O-glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomek, M B; Neumann, L; Nimeth, I; Koerdt, A; Andesner, P; Messner, P; Mach, L; Potempa, J S; Schäffer, C

    2014-12-01

    Conserved C-terminal domains (CTD) have been shown to act as a signal for the translocation of certain proteins across the outer membrane of Bacteroidetes via a type IX secretion system (T9SS). The genome sequence of the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia predicts the presence of the components for a T9SS in conjunction with a suite of CTD proteins. T. forsythia is covered with a two-dimensional crystalline surface (S-) layer composed of the glycosylated CTD proteins TfsA and TfsB. To investigate, if T9SS is functional in T. forsythia, T9SS-deficient mutants were generated by targeting either TF0955 (putative C-terminal signal peptidase) or TF2327 (PorK ortholog), and the mutants were analyzed with respect to secretion, assembly and glycosylation of the S-layer proteins as well as proteolytic processing of the CTD and biofilm formation. In either mutant, TfsA and TfsB were incapable of translocation, as evidenced by the absence of the S-layer in transmission electron microscopy of ultrathin-sectioned bacterial cells. Despite being entrapped within the periplasm, mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the S-layer proteins were modified with the complete, mature glycan found on the secreted proteins, indicating that protein translocation and glycosylation are two independent processes. Further, the T9SS mutants showed a denser biofilm with fewer voids compared with the wild-type. This study demonstrates the functionality of T9SS and the requirement of CTD for the outer membrane passage of extracellular proteins in T. forsythia, exemplified by the two S-layer proteins. In addition, T9SS protein translocation is decoupled from O-glycan attachment in T. forsythia.

  5. Comparison between the structural, morphological and optical properties of CdS layers prepared by Close Space Sublimation and RF magnetron sputtering for CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldmeier, E.M., E-mail: efeldmeier@surface.tu-darmstadt.de; Fuchs, A.; Schaffner, J.; Schimper, H.-J.; Klein, A.; Jaegermann, W.

    2011-08-31

    CdS layers deposited by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering at different substrate temperatures and Close Space Sublimation (CSS) on SnO{sub 2}:F films have been investigated. Both types of films were prepared in the integrated ultra high-vacuum system known as DAISY-SOL and characterised with respect to crystal structure, texture, morphology, stoichiometry and optical properties. For this purpose, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction and optical transmittance measurements were used in this work. The results show that RF sputtering produces dense and pin-hole free CdS layers with a more pronounced crystallographic texture, a cadmium excess and a higher optical absorption than those prepared by CSS.

  6. The S-Layer Proteins of Two Bacillus stearothermophilus Wild-Type Strains Are Bound via Their N-Terminal Region to a Secondary Cell Wall Polymer of Identical Chemical Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egelseer, Eva Maria; Leitner, Karl; Jarosch, Marina; Hotzy, Christoph; Zayni, Sonja; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Sára, Margit

    1998-01-01

    Two Bacillus stearothermophilus wild-type strains were investigated regarding a common recognition and binding mechanism between the S-layer protein and the underlying cell envelope layer. The S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p6 has a molecular weight of 130,000 and assembles into a hexagonally ordered lattice. The S-layer from B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 shows oblique lattice symmetry and is composed of subunits with a molecular weight of 122,000. Immunoblotting, peptide mapping, N-terminal sequencing of the whole S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 and of proteolytic cleavage fragments, and comparison with the S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p6 revealed that the two S-layer proteins have identical N-terminal regions but no other extended structurally homologous domains. In contrast to the heterogeneity observed for the S-layer proteins, the secondary cell wall polymer isolated from peptidoglycan-containing sacculi of the different strains showed identical chemical compositions and comparable molecular weights. The S-layer proteins could bind and recrystallize into the appropriate lattice type on native peptidoglycan-containing sacculi from both organisms but not on those extracted with hydrofluoric acid, leading to peptidoglycan of the A1γ chemotype. Affinity studies showed that only proteolytic cleavage fragments possessing the complete N terminus of the mature S-layer proteins recognized native peptidoglycan-containing sacculi as binding sites or could associate with the isolated secondary cell wall polymer, while proteolytic cleavage fragments missing the N-terminal region remained unbound. From the results obtained in this study, it can be concluded that S-layer proteins from B. stearothermophilus wild-type strains possess an identical N-terminal region which is responsible for anchoring the S-layer subunits to a secondary cell wall polymer of identical chemical composition. PMID:9515918

  7. A rhomboid protease gene deletion affects a novel oligosaccharide N-linked to the S-layer glycoprotein of Haloferax volcanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Juliana; Casabuono, Adriana; Ferrari, María Celeste; Paggi, Roberto Alejandro; De Castro, Rosana Esther; Couto, Alicia Susana; Giménez, María Inés

    2014-04-18

    Rhomboid proteases occur in all domains of life; however, their physiological role is not completely understood, and nothing is known of the biology of these enzymes in Archaea. One of the two rhomboid homologs of Haloferax volcanii (RhoII) is fused to a zinc finger domain. Chromosomal deletion of rhoII was successful, indicating that this gene is not essential for this organism; however, the mutant strain (MIG1) showed reduced motility and increased sensitivity to novobiocin. Membrane preparations of MIG1 were enriched in two glycoproteins, identified as the S-layer glycoprotein and an ABC transporter component. The H. volcanii S-layer glycoprotein has been extensively used as a model to study haloarchaeal protein N-glycosylation. HPLC analysis of oligosaccharides released from the S-layer glycoprotein after PNGase treatment revealed that MIG1 was enriched in species with lower retention times than those derived from the parent strain. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that the wild type glycoprotein released a novel oligosaccharide species corresponding to GlcNAc-GlcNAc(Hex)2-(SQ-Hex)6 in contrast to the mutant protein, which contained the shorter form GlcNAc2(Hex)2-SQ-Hex-SQ. A glycoproteomics approach of the wild type glycopeptide fraction revealed Asn-732 peptide fragments linked to the sulfoquinovose-containing oligosaccharide. This work describes a novel N-linked oligosaccharide containing a repeating SQ-Hex unit bound to Asn-732 of the H. volcanii S-layer glycoprotein, a position that had not been reported as glycosylated. Furthermore, this study provides the first insight on the biological role of rhomboid proteases in Archaea, suggesting a link between protein glycosylation and this protease family.

  8. Identifying assembly-inhibiting and assembly-tolerant sites in the SbsB S-layer protein from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinns, Helen; Badelt-Lichtblau, Helga; Egelseer, Eva Maria; Sleytr, Uwe B; Howorka, Stefan

    2010-01-29

    Surface layer (S-layer) proteins self-assemble into two-dimensional crystalline lattices that cover the cell wall of all archaea and many bacteria. We have generated assembly-negative protein variants of high solubility that will facilitate high-resolution structure determination. Assembly-negative versions of the S-layer protein SbsB from Geobacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2 were obtained using an insertion mutagenesis screen. The haemagglutinin epitope tag was inserted at 23 amino acid positions known to be located on the monomer protein surface from a previous cysteine accessibility screen. Limited proteolysis, circular dichroism, and fluorescence were used to probe whether the epitope insertion affected the secondary and tertiary structures of the monomer, while electron microscopy and size-exclusion chromatography were employed to examine proteins' ability to self-assemble. The screen not only identified assembly-compromised mutants with native fold but also yielded correctly folded, self-assembling mutants suitable for displaying epitopes for biomedical and biophysical applications, as well as cryo-electron microscopy imaging. Our study marks an important step in the analysis of the S-layer structure. In addition, the approach of concerted insertion and cysteine mutagenesis can likely be applied for other supramolecular assemblies.

  9. FlaF Is a β-Sandwich Protein that Anchors the Archaellum in the Archaeal Cell Envelope by Binding the S-Layer Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Ankan; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Chaudhury, Paushali; Tripp, Patrick; Arvai, Andrew S; Ishida, Justin P; Tainer, John A; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2015-05-05

    Archaea employ the archaellum, a type IV pilus-like nanomachine, for swimming motility. In the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, the archaellum consists of seven proteins: FlaB/X/G/F/H/I/J. FlaF is conserved and essential for archaellum assembly but no FlaF structures exist. Here, we truncated the FlaF N terminus and solved 1.5-Å and 1.65-Å resolution crystal structures of this monotopic membrane protein. Structures revealed an N-terminal α-helix and an eight-strand β-sandwich, immunoglobulin-like fold with striking similarity to S-layer proteins. Crystal structures, X-ray scattering, and mutational analyses suggest dimer assembly is needed for in vivo function. The sole cell envelope component of S. acidocaldarius is a paracrystalline S-layer, and FlaF specifically bound to S-layer protein, suggesting that its interaction domain is located in the pseudoperiplasm with its N-terminal helix in the membrane. From these data, FlaF may act as the previously unknown archaellum stator protein that anchors the rotating archaellum to the archaeal cell envelope.

  10. 炭疽芽孢杆菌S-层蛋白功能研究进展%S-layer proteins of Bacillus anthracis: research progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雪芳; 刘先凯; 陈福生; 王恒樑

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is the etiological agent of anthrax. Currently, plasmids pXOl and pX02 of B. anthracis, which were encoding the virulence genes and capsule synthesis genes respectively, have been studied thoroughly. However, the S-layer, a protein paracrystalline structure that exists between the capsule and the cell wall of B. anthracis, is less known. Sap( surface array protein ) and EA1( extracellular antigen 1 ) are the major proteins of S-layer as well as some other relative proteins in B. anthracis. Investigation of the interaction of these proteins and their immunologic mechanism is vital for understanding the pathogenesis of B. anthracis. This brief review will focus on recent researches on the components of S-layer proteins, their linkage with the cell wall and the regulation patterns of their encoding genes of S-layer proteins, their role in the pathogenesis of B. anthracis, and the relationship between S-layer proteins and host immune systems.%炭疽芽孢杆菌是人畜共患病炭疽的病原菌.目前,对炭疽杆菌2个毒力大质粒(编码主要毒力基因的pXO1与编码合成荚膜基因的pXO2)的研究比较深入;炭疽杆菌细胞壁与荚膜间还存在一种蛋白性质的类晶体(paracrystalline)结构:S-层(surface-layer,表层)结构.炭疽杆菌的S-层蛋白主要为表面排列蛋白(surface array protein,Sap)和胞外抗原1(extracellular antigen 1,EA1),此外,在炭疽杆菌中还存在其他一些与S-层相关的蛋白,了解这些蛋白的相互作用及免疫机制对深入认识炭疽杆菌的致病机制具有重要意义.本文将就近年来关于炭疽杆菌S-层蛋白成分、与细胞壁的连接、S-层基因的调控、致病性及其与宿主免疫机制的关系等方面的研究进展做一简要综述.

  11. Improve the open-circuit voltage of ZnO solar cells with inserting ZnS layers by two ways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yunfei [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yang, Jinghai, E-mail: jhyang1@jlnu.edu.cn [Institute of Condensed State Physics, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China); Yang, Lili; Cao, Jian [Institute of Condensed State Physics, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China); Gao, Ming [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Institute of Condensed State Physics, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China); Zhang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Zhe [Institute of Condensed State Physics, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China); Song, Hang [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China)

    2013-04-15

    ZnS NPs layers were deposited on ZnO NRs by two different ways. One is spin coating; the other is successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The ZnO NRs/ZnS NPs composites were verified by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and UV–visible spectrophotometer; their morphologies and thicknesses were examined by scanning electron microscopic and transmission electron microscopic images. The CdS quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) were constructed using ZnO NRs/ZnS NPs composites as photoanode and their photovoltaic characteristic was studied by J–V curves. The results indicated that the way of SILAR is more beneficial for retarding the back transfer of electrons to CdS and electrolyte than spin coating method. The open-circuit voltage increased to 0.59 V by introducing a ZnS layer through SILAR method. When ZnS NPs layer was deposited for 10 times on ZnO NRs, the conversion efficiency of QDSSC shows ∼3.3 folds increments of as-synthesized ZnO solar cell. - Graphical abstract: When ZnO nanorods were deposited by ZnS for 10 times, the conversion efficiency of QDSSC shows ∼3.3 folds increments of as-synthesized ZnO solar cell. Highlights: ► ZnS layers were deposited with two different ways. ► The way of SILAR is more beneficial for retarding the back transfer of electrons. ► The open-circuit voltage increased to 0.59 V by introducing a ZnS layer through SILAR method.

  12. Mutually exclusive distribution of the sap and eag S-layer genes and the lytB/lytA cell wall hydrolase genes in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soufiane, Brahim; Sirois, Marc; Côté, Jean-Charles

    2011-10-01

    Recently, two Bacillus thuringiensis strains were reported to synthesize parasporal inclusion bodies made not of the expected crystal (Cry) proteins but rather of the surface layer proteins (SLP) Sap (encoded by sap) and EA1 (encoded by eag), respectively. Whether the presence of the sap and eag genes is restricted to these two B. thuringiensis strains or ubiquitous in B. thuringiensis is unknown. We report here the distribution of the sap and eag genes in B. thuringiensis. Strains in the Bacillus cereus group were added for comparison purposes. We show that sap and eag are either present in tandem in 35% of the B. thuringiensis strains analysed and absent in 65% of the strains. When absent, a different tandem, the lytB/lytA cell wall hydrolase genes, is present. The distribution of the sap and eag S-layer and the lytB/lytA cell wall hydrolase genes is not species-specific in B. thuringiensis, B. cereus and Bacillus weihenstephanensis. Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus mycoides harbor sap and eag but not lytB/lytA. The sap, eag and lytB/lytA genes were absent in Bacillus pseudomycoides. Clearly, the distribution of the sap and eag S-layer and the lytB/lytA cell wall hydrolase genes in B. thuringiensis and in the Bacillus cereus group is mutually exclusive. We also showed that two genes involved in cell wall metabolism, csaA and csaB, are present not only upstream of the sap and eag S-layer genes, but also upstream of the lytB/lytA tandem in strains where sap and eag are absent. Bootstrapped neighbor-joining trees were inferred from the translated amino acid sequences of sap, eag and the tandem lytB/lytA, respectively.

  13. Are the surface layer homology domains essential for cell surface display and glycosylation of the S-layer protein from Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051T?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesch, Bettina; Messner, Paul; Schäffer, Christina

    2013-02-01

    Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051(T) cells are decorated with a two-dimensional (2D) crystalline array comprised of the glycosylated S-layer protein SpaA. At its N terminus, SpaA possesses three consecutive surface layer (S-layer) homology (SLH) domains containing the amino acid motif TRAE, known to play a key role in cell wall binding, as well as the TVEE and TRAQ variations thereof. SpaA is predicted to be anchored to the cell wall by interaction of the SLH domains with a peptidoglycan (PG)-associated, nonclassical, pyruvylated secondary cell wall polymer (SCWP). In this study, we have analyzed the role of the three predicted binding motifs within the SLH domains by mutating them into TAAA motifs, either individually, pairwise, or all of them. Effects were visualized in vivo by homologous expression of chimeras made of the mutated S-layer proteins and enhanced green fluorescent protein and in an in vitro binding assay using His-tagged SpaA variants and native PG-containing cell wall sacculi that either contained SCWP or were deprived of it. Experimental data indicated that (i) the TRAE, TVEE, and TRAQ motifs are critical for the binding function of SLH domains, (ii) two functional motifs are sufficient for cell wall binding, regardless of the domain location, (iii) SLH domains have a dual-recognition function for the SCWP and the PG, and (iv) cell wall anchoring is not necessary for SpaA glycosylation. Additionally, we showed that the SLH domains of SpaA are sufficient for in vivo cell surface display of foreign proteins at the cell surface of P. alvei.

  14. AglJ adds the first sugar of the N-linked pentasaccharide decorating the Haloferax volcanii S-layer glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Lina; Abu-Qarn, Mehtap; Guan, Ziqiang; Naparstek, Shai; Ventura, Valeria V; Raetz, Christian R H; Hitchen, Paul G; Dell, Anne; Eichler, Jerry

    2010-11-01

    Like the Eukarya and Bacteria, the Archaea also perform N glycosylation. Using the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii as a model system, a series of Agl proteins involved in the archaeal version of this posttranslational modification has been identified. In the present study, the participation of HVO_1517 in N glycosylation was considered, given its homology to a known component of the eukaryal N-glycosylation pathway and because of the genomic proximity of HVO_1517 to agl genes encoding known elements of the H. volcanii N-glycosylation process. By combining the deletion of HVO_1517 with mass spectrometric analysis of both dolichol phosphate monosaccharide-charged carriers and the S-layer glycoprotein, evidence was obtained showing the participation of HVO_1517, renamed AglJ, in adding the first hexose of the N-linked pentasaccharide decorating this reporter glycoprotein. The deletion of aglJ, however, did not fully prevent the attachment of a hexose residue to the S-layer glycoprotein. Moreover, in the absence of AglJ, the level of only one of the three monosaccharide-charged dolichol phosphate carriers detected in the cell was reduced. Nonetheless, in cells lacking AglJ, no further sugar subunits were added to the remaining monosaccharide-charged dolichol phosphate carriers or to the monosaccharide-modified S-layer glycoprotein, pointing to the importance of the sugar added through the actions of AglJ for proper N glycosylation. Finally, while aglJ can be deleted, H. volcanii surface layer integrity is compromised in the absence of the encoded protein.

  15. Nanoscale mono- and multi-layer cylinder structures formed by recombinant S-layer proteins of mosquitocidal Bacillus sphaericus C3-41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Yang, Lingling; Hu, Xiaomin; Zheng, Dasheng; Yan, Jianpin; Yuan, Zhiming

    2013-08-01

    The mature surface layer (S-layer) protein SlpC of mosquitocidal Bacillus sphaericus C3-41 comprises amino acids 31-1,176 and could recrystallize in vitro. The N-terminal SLH domain is responsible for binding function. Deletion of this part, S-layer proteins could not bind to the cell wall sacculi. To investigate the self-assembly ability of SlpC from B. sphaericus, nine truncations were constructed and their self-assembly properties were compared with the recombinant mature S-layer protein rSlpC₃₁₋₁,₁₇₆. The results showed that rSbsC₃₁₋₁,₁₇₆ and truncations rSlpC₂₁₁₋₁,₁₇₆, rSlpC₂₇₈₋₁,₁₇₆, rSlpC₃₁₋₁,₁₀₀, and rSlpC₃₁₋₁,₀₅₀ could assemble into multilayer cylinder structures, while N-terminal truncations rSlpC₃₃₈₋₁,₁₇₆, rSlpC₄₃₈₋₁,₁₇₆, and rSlpC₄₉₈₋₁,₁₇₆ mainly showed monolayer cylinders in recombinant Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells. Growth phase analysis of the self-assembly process revealed that rSlpC₄₉₈₋₁,₁₇₆ mainly formed monolayer cylinders in the early stage (0.5 and 1 h induction of expression), but few double-layer or multilayer cylinders were also found with the cells growing, while rSlpC₃₁₋₁,₁₇₆ could formed multilayer cylinders in all the growth stage in the E. coli cells. It is concluded that the deletion of the C-terminal 126 aa or the N-terminal 497 aa did not interfere with the self-assembly process, the fragment (amino acids 278 to 337) is essential for the multilayer cylinder formation in E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells in the early stage and the fragment (amino acids 338 to 497) is related to monolayer cylinder formation. The information is important for further studies on the assembly mechanism of S-layer proteins and forms a basis for further studies concerning surface display and nanobiotechnology.

  16. Identification and functional analysis of the S-layer protein SplA of Paenibacillus larvae, the causative agent of American Foulbrood of honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppinga, Lena; Janesch, Bettina; Fünfhaus, Anne; Sekot, Gerhard; Garcia-Gonzalez, Eva; Hertlein, Gillian; Hedtke, Kati; Schäffer, Christina; Genersch, Elke

    2012-01-01

    The gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium Paenibacillus larvae is the etiological agent of American Foulbrood (AFB), a globally occurring, deathly epizootic of honey bee brood. AFB outbreaks are predominantly caused by two genotypes of P. larvae, ERIC I and ERIC II, with P. larvae ERIC II being the more virulent genotype on larval level. Recently, comparative proteome analyses have revealed that P. larvae ERIC II but not ERIC I might harbour a functional S-layer protein, named SplA. We here determine the genomic sequence of splA in both genotypes and demonstrate by in vitro self-assembly studies of recombinant and purified SplA protein in combination with electron-microscopy that SplA is a true S-layer protein self-assembling into a square 2D lattice. The existence of a functional S-layer protein is novel for this bacterial species. For elucidating the biological function of P. larvae SplA, a genetic system for disruption of gene expression in this important honey bee pathogen was developed. Subsequent analyses of in vivo biological functions of SplA were based on comparing a wild-type strain of P. larvae ERIC II with the newly constructed splA-knockout mutant of this strain. Differences in cell and colony morphology suggest that SplA is a shape-determining factor. Marked differences between P. larvae ERIC II wild-type and mutant cells with regard to (i) adhesion to primary pupal midgut cells and (ii) larval mortality as measured in exposure bioassays corroborate the assumption that the S-layer of P. larvae ERIC II is an important virulence factor. Since SplA is the first functionally proven virulence factor for this species, our data extend the knowledge of the molecular differences between these two genotypes of P. larvae and contribute to explaining the observed differences in virulence. These results present an immense advancement in our understanding of P. larvae pathogenesis.

  17. Chemically deposited In2S3-Ag2S layers to obtain AgInS2 thin films by thermal annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, S.; Peña, Y.; Calixto-Rodriguez, M.; López-Mata, C.; Ramón, M. L.; Gómez, I.; Acosta, A.

    2012-12-01

    AgInS2 thin films were obtained by the annealing of chemical bath deposited In2S3-Ag2S layers at 400 °C in N2 for 1 h. According to the XRD and EDX results the chalcopyrite structure of AgInS2 has been obtained. These films have an optical band gap, Eg, of 1.86 eV and an electrical conductivity value of 1.2 × 10-3 (Ω cm)-1.

  18. Absorption, steady-state fluorescence, fluorescence lifetime, and 2D self-assembly properties of engineered fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins of Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainz, Birgit; Steiner, Kerstin; Möller, Marco; Pum, Dietmar; Schäffer, Christina; Sleytr, Uwe B; Toca-Herrera, José L

    2010-01-11

    S-layer fusion protein technology was used to design four different fluorescent fusion proteins with three different GFP mutants and the red fluorescent protein mRFP1. Their absorption spectra, steady-state fluorescence, and fluorescence lifetime were investigated as a function of pH. It was found that fluorescence intensities and lifetime of the GFP mutant S-layer fusion proteins decreased about 50% between pH 6 and pH 5. The spectral properties of the red S-layer fusion protein were minimally affected by pH variations. These results were compared with His-tagged reference fluorescent proteins, demonstrating that the S-layer protein did not change the general spectral properties of the whole fusion protein. In addition, the pK(a) values of the fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins were calculated. Finally, it was shown that the S-layer fusion proteins were able to self-assemble forming 2D nanostructures of oblique p2 symmetry with lattice parameters of about a = 11 nm, b = 14 nm, and gamma = 80 degrees . The fluorescence tag did not hinder the natural self-assembly process of the S-layer protein. The combination of the fluorescence properties and the self-assembly ability of the engineered fusion proteins make them a promising tool to generate biomimetic surfaces for future applications in nanobiotechnology at a wide range of pH.

  19. Identification of Two Binding Domains, One for Peptidoglycan and Another for a Secondary Cell Wall Polymer, on the N-Terminal Part of the S-Layer Protein SbsB from Bacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sára, Margit; Egelseer, Eva M.; Dekitsch, Christine; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    1998-01-01

    First studies on the structure-function relationship of the S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p2 revealed the coexistence of two binding domains on its N-terminal part, one for peptidoglycan and another for a secondary cell wall polymer (SCWP). The peptidoglycan binding domain is located between amino acids 1 to 138 of the mature S-layer protein comprising a typical S-layer homologous domain. The SCWP binding domain lies between amino acids 240 to 331 and possesses a high serine plus glycine content. PMID:9852032

  20. Recrystallized S-layer protein of a probiotic Propionibacterium: structural and nanomechanical changes upon temperature or pH shifts probed by solid-state NMR and AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de sa Peixoto, Paulo; Roiland, Claire; Thomas, Daniel; Briard-Bion, Valérie; Le Guellec, Rozenn; Parayre, Sandrine; Deutsch, Stéphanie-Marie; Jan, Gwénaël; Guyomarc'h, Fanny

    2015-01-01

    Surface protein layers (S layers) are common constituents of the bacterial cell wall and originate from the assembly of strain-dependent surface layer proteins (Slps). These proteins are thought to play important roles in the bacteria's biology and to have very promising technological applications as biomaterials or as part of cell-host cross-talk in probiotic mechanism. The SlpA from Propionibacterium freudenreichii PFCIRM 118 strain was isolated and recrystallized to investigate organization and assembly of the protein using atomic force microscopy and solid-state (1)H and (13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance. SlpA was found to form hexagonal p1 monolayer lattices where the protein exhibited high proportions of disordered regions and of bound water. The lattice structure was maintained, but softened, upon mild heating or acidification, probably in relation with the increasing mobilities of the disordered protein regions. These results gave structural insights on the mobile protein regions exposed by S layer films, upon physiologically relevant changes of their environmental conditions.

  1. Distinct glycan-charged phosphodolichol carriers are required for the assembly of the pentasaccharide N-linked to the Haloferax volcanii S-layer glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ziqiang; Naparstek, Shai; Kaminski, Lina; Konrad, Zvia; Eichler, Jerry

    2010-12-01

    In Archaea, dolichol phosphates have been implicated as glycan carriers in the N-glycosylation pathway, much like their eukaryal counterparts. To clarify this relation, highly sensitive liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry was employed to detect and characterize glycan-charged phosphodolichols in the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii. It is reported that Hfx. volcanii contains a series of C(55) and C(60) dolichol phosphates presenting saturated isoprene subunits at the α and ω positions and sequentially modified with the first, second, third and methylated fourth sugar subunits comprising the first four subunits of the pentasaccharide N-linked to the S-layer glycoprotein, a reporter of N-glycosylation. Moreover, when this glycan-charged phosphodolichol pool was examined in cells deleted of agl genes encoding glycosyltransferases participating in N-glycosylation and previously assigned roles in adding pentasaccharide residues one to four, the composition of the lipid-linked glycans was perturbed in the identical manner as was S-layer glycoprotein N-glycosylation in these mutants. In contrast, the fifth sugar of the pentasaccharide, identified as mannose in this study, is added to a distinct dolichol phosphate carrier. This represents the first evidence that in Archaea, as in Eukarya, the oligosaccharides N-linked to glycoproteins are sequentially assembled from glycans originating from distinct phosphodolichol carriers.

  2. Biosynthesis and Role of N-Linked Glycosylation in Cell Surface Structures of Archaea with a Focus on Flagella and S Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken F. Jarrell

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetics and biochemistry of the N-linked glycosylation system of Archaea have been investigated over the past 5 years using flagellins and S layers as reporter proteins in the model organisms, Methanococcus voltae, Methanococcus maripaludis, and Haloferax volcanii. Structures of archaeal N-linked glycans have indicated a variety of linking sugars as well as unique sugar components. In M. voltae, M. maripaludis, and H. volcanii, a number of archaeal glycosylation genes (agl have been identified by deletion and complementation studies. These include many of the glycosyltransferases and the oligosaccharyltransferase needed to assemble the glycans as well as some of the genes encoding enzymes required for the biosynthesis of the sugars themselves. The N-linked glycosylation system is not essential for any of M. voltae, M. maripaludis, or H. volcanii, as demonstrated by the successful isolation of mutants carrying deletions in the oligosaccharyltransferase gene aglB (a homologue of the eukaryotic Stt3 subunit of the oligosaccharyltransferase complex. However, mutations that affect the glycan structure have serious effects on both flagellation and S layer function.

  3. Hypothetical protein Avin_16040 as the S-layer protein of Azotobacter vinelandii and its involvement in plant root surface attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Pauline Woan Ying; Jong, Bor Chyan; Najimudin, Nazalan

    2015-11-01

    A proteomic analysis of a soil-dwelling, plant growth-promoting Azotobacter vinelandii strain showed the presence of a protein encoded by the hypothetical Avin_16040 gene when the bacterial cells were attached to the Oryza sativa root surface. An Avin_16040 deletion mutant demonstrated reduced cellular adherence to the root surface, surface hydrophobicity, and biofilm formation compared to those of the wild type. By atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis of the cell surface topography, the deletion mutant displayed a cell surface architectural pattern that was different from that of the wild type. Escherichia coli transformed with the wild-type Avin_16040 gene displayed on its cell surface organized motifs which looked like the S-layer monomers of A. vinelandii. The recombinant E. coli also demonstrated enhanced adhesion to the root surface.

  4. The S-layer homology domain-containing protein SlhA from Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051(T is important for swarming and biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Janesch

    Full Text Available Swarming and biofilm formation have been studied for a variety of bacteria. While this is well investigated for Gram-negative bacteria, less is known about Gram-positive bacteria, including Paenibacillus alvei, a secondary invader of diseased honeybee colonies infected with Melissococcus pluton, the causative agent of European foulbrood (EFB.Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051(T is a Gram-positive bacterium which was recently shown to employ S-layer homology (SLH domains as cell wall targeting modules to display proteins on its cell surface. This study deals with the newly identified 1335-amino acid protein SlhA from P. alvei which carries at the C‑terminus three consecutive SLH-motifs containing the predicted binding sequences SRGE, VRQD, and LRGD instead of the common TRAE motif. Based on the proof of cell surface location of SlhA by fluorescence microscopy using a SlhA-GFP chimera, the binding mechanism was investigated in an in vitro assay. To unravel a putative function of the SlhA protein, a knockout mutant was constructed. Experimental data indicated that one SLH domain is sufficient for anchoring of SlhA to the cell surface, and the SLH domains of SlhA recognize both the peptidoglycan and the secondary cell wall polymer in vitro. This is in agreement with previous data from the S-layer protein SpaA, pinpointing a wider utilization of that mechanism for cell surface display of proteins in P. alvei. Compared to the wild-type bacterium ΔslhA revealed changed colony morphology, loss of swarming motility and impaired biofilm formation. The phenotype was similar to that of the flagella knockout Δhag, possibly due to reduced EPS production influencing the functionality of the flagella of ΔslhA.This study demonstrates the involvement of the SLH domain-containing protein SlhA in swarming and biofilm formation of P. alvei CCM 2051(T.

  5. Balanced transcription of cell division genes in Bacillus subtilis as revealed by single cell analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trip, Erik Nico; Veening, Jan-Willem; Stewart, Eric J.; Errington, Jeff; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2013-01-01

    Cell division in bacteria is carried out by a set of conserved proteins that all have to function at the correct place and time. A cell cycle-dependent transcriptional programme drives cell division in bacteria such as Caulobacter crescentus. Whether such a programme exists in the Gram-positive mode

  6. Establishment of oxidative D-xylose metabolism in Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijnen, J.P.; Winde, J.H.de; Ruijssenaars, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative D-xylose catabolic pathway of Caulobacter crescentus, encoded by the xylXABCD operon, was expressed in the gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas putida S12. This engineered transformant strain was able to grow on D-xylose as a sole carbon source with a biomass yield of 53% (based on g [d

  7. Cell wall growth during elongation and division : one ring to bind them?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2007-01-01

    The role of the cell division protein FtsZ in bacterial cell wall (CW) synthesis is believed to be restricted to localizing proteins involved in the synthesis of the septal wall. Elsewhere, compelling evidence is provided that in Caulobacter crescentus, FtsZ plays an additional role in CW synthesis

  8. Identification of the major expressed S-layer and cell surface-layer-related proteins in the model methanogenic archaea: Methanosarcina barkeri Fusaro and Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlin, Lars; Leon, Deborah R; Kim, Unmi; Loo, Joseph A; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R; Gunsalus, Robert P

    2012-01-01

    Many archaeal cell envelopes contain a protein coat or sheath composed of one or more surface exposed proteins. These surface layer (S-layer) proteins contribute structural integrity and protect the lipid membrane from environmental challenges. To explore the species diversity of these layers in the Methanosarcinaceae, the major S-layer protein in Methanosarcina barkeri strain Fusaro was identified using proteomics. The Mbar_A1758 gene product was present in multiple forms with apparent sizes of 130, 120, and 100 kDa, consistent with post-translational modifications including signal peptide excision and protein glycosylation. A protein with features related to the surface layer proteins found in Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A and Methanosarcina mazei Goel was identified in the M. barkeri genome. These data reveal a distinct conserved protein signature with features and implied cell surface architecture in the Methanosarcinaceae that is absent in other archaea. Paralogous gene expression patterns in two Methanosarcina species revealed abundant expression of a single S-layer paralog in each strain. Respective promoter elements were identified and shown to be conserved in mRNA coding and upstream untranslated regions. Prior M. acetivorans genome annotations assigned S-layer or surface layer associated roles of eighty genes: however, of 68 examined none was significantly expressed relative to the experimentally determined S-layer gene.

  9. Improve the open-circuit voltage of ZnO solar cells with inserting ZnS layers by two ways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yunfei; Yang, Jinghai; Yang, Lili; Cao, Jian; Gao, Ming; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Zhe; Song, Hang

    2013-04-01

    ZnS NPs layers were deposited on ZnO NRs by two different ways. One is spin coating; the other is successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The ZnO NRs/ZnS NPs composites were verified by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and UV-visible spectrophotometer; their morphologies and thicknesses were examined by scanning electron microscopic and transmission electron microscopic images. The CdS quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) were constructed using ZnO NRs/ZnS NPs composites as photoanode and their photovoltaic characteristic was studied by J-V curves. The results indicated that the way of SILAR is more beneficial for retarding the back transfer of electrons to CdS and electrolyte than spin coating method. The open-circuit voltage increased to 0.59 V by introducing a ZnS layer through SILAR method. When ZnS NPs layer was deposited for 10 times on ZnO NRs, the conversion efficiency of QDSSC shows ˜3.3 folds increments of as-synthesized ZnO solar cell.

  10. Truncation Derivatives of the S-Layer Protein of Sporosarcina ureae ATCC 13881 (SslA: Towards Elucidation of the Protein Domain Responsible for Self-Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda Varga

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The cell surface of Sporosarcina ureae ATCC 13881 is covered by an S-layer (SslA consisting of identical protein subunits that assemble into lattices exhibiting square symmetry. In this work the self-assembly properties of the recombinant SslA were characterised with an emphasis on the identification of protein regions responsible for self-assembly. To this end, recombinant mature SslA (aa 31-1097 and three SslA truncation derivatives (one N-terminal, one C-terminal and one CN-terminal were produced in a heterologous expression system, isolated, purified and their properties analysed by in vitro recrystallisation experiments on a functionalised silicon wafer. As a result, recombinant mature SslA self-assembled into crystalline monolayers with lattices resembling the one of the wild-type SslA. The study identifies the central protein domain consisting of amino acids 341-925 self-sufficient for self-assembly. Neither the first 341 amino acids nor the last 172 amino acids of the protein sequence are required to self-assemble into lattices.

  11. The β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) is required for the assembly of a primitive S-layer protein in the ancient outer membrane of Thermus thermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Federico; Ferreras, Eloy; Berenguer, José

    2012-11-01

    The ancient bacterial lineage Thermus spp has a primitive form of outer membrane attached to the cell wall through SlpA, a protein that shows intermediate properties between S-layer proteins and outer membrane (OM) porins. In E. coli and related Proteobacteria, porins are secreted through the BAM (β-barrel assembly machinery) pathway, whose main component is BamA. A homologue to this protein is encoded in all the Thermus spp so far sequenced, so we wondered if this pathway could be responsible for SlpA secretion in this ancient bacterial model. To analyse this hypothesis, we attempted to get mutants on this BamA(th) of T. thermophilus HB27. Knockout and deletion mutants lacking the last 10 amino acids were not viable, whereas its depletion by means of a BamA antisense RNA lead defective attachment to the cell wall of its OM-like envelope. Such defects were related to defective folding of the SlpA protein that was more sensitive to proteases than in a wild-type strain. A similar phenotype was found in mutants lacking the terminal Phe of SlpA. Further protein-protein interaction assays confirmed the existence of specific binding between SlpA and BamA(th). Taking together, these data suggest that SlpA is secreted through a BAM-like pathway in this ancestral bacterial lineage, supporting an ancient origin of this pathway before the evolution of the Proteobacteria.

  12. Truncation Derivatives of the S-Layer Protein of Sporosarcina ureae ATCC 13881 (SslA): Towards Elucidation of the Protein Domain Responsible for Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Melinda

    2016-08-24

    The cell surface of Sporosarcina ureae ATCC 13881 is covered by an S-layer (SslA) consisting of identical protein subunits that assemble into lattices exhibiting square symmetry. In this work the self-assembly properties of the recombinant SslA were characterised with an emphasis on the identification of protein regions responsible for self-assembly. To this end, recombinant mature SslA (aa 31-1097) and three SslA truncation derivatives (one N-terminal, one C-terminal and one CN-terminal) were produced in a heterologous expression system, isolated, purified and their properties analysed by in vitro recrystallisation experiments on a functionalised silicon wafer. As a result, recombinant mature SslA self-assembled into crystalline monolayers with lattices resembling the one of the wild-type SslA. The study identifies the central protein domain consisting of amino acids 341-925 self-sufficient for self-assembly. Neither the first 341 amino acids nor the last 172 amino acids of the protein sequence are required to self-assemble into lattices.

  13. A fusion tag to fold on: the S-layer protein SgsE confers improved folding kinetics to translationally fused enhanced green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristl, Robin; Kainz, Birgit; Stadlmayr, Gerhard; Schuster, Heinrich; Pum, Dietmar; Messner, Paul; Obinger, Christian; Schaffer, Christina

    2012-09-01

    Genetic fusion of two proteins frequently induces beneficial effects to the proteins, such as increased solubility, besides the combination of two protein functions. Here, we study the effects of the bacterial surface layer protein SgsE from Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a on the folding of a C-terminally fused enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) moiety. Although GFPs are generally unable to adopt a functional confirmation in the bacterial periplasm of Escherichia coli cells, we observed periplasmic fluorescence from a chimera of a 150-amino-acid N-terminal truncation of SgsE and EGFP. Based on this finding, unfolding and refolding kinetics of different S-layer-EGFP chimeras, a maltose binding protein-EGFP chimera, and sole EGFP were monitored using green fluorescence as indicator for the folded protein state. Calculated apparent rate constants for unfolding and refolding indicated different folding pathways for EGFP depending on the fusion partner used, and a clearly stabilizing effect was observed for the SgsE_C fusion moiety. Thermal stability, as determined by differential scanning calorimetry, and unfolding equilibria were found to be independent of the fused partner. We conclude that the stabilizing effect SgsE_C exerts on EGFP is due to a reduction of degrees of freedom for folding of EGFP in the fused state.

  14. The S-Layer Glycoprotein of the Crenarchaeote Sulfolobus acidocaldarius Is Glycosylated at Multiple Sites with Chitobiose-Linked N-Glycans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Peyfoon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycosylation of the S-layer of the crenarchaea Sulfolobus acidocaldarius has been investigated using glycoproteomic methodologies. The mature protein is predicted to contain 31 N-glycosylation consensus sites with approximately one third being found in the C-terminal domain spanning residues L1004-Q1395. Since this domain is rich in Lys and Arg and therefore relatively tractable to glycoproteomic analysis, this study has focused on mapping its N-glycosylation. Our analysis identified nine of the 11 consensus sequence sites, and all were found to be glycosylated. This constitutes a remarkably high glycosylation density in the C-terminal domain averaging one site for each stretch of 30–40 residues. Each of the glycosylation sites observed was shown to be modified with a heterogeneous family of glycans, with the largest having a composition Glc1Man2GlcNAc2 plus 6-sulfoquinovose (QuiS, consistent with the tribranched hexasaccharide previously reported in the cytochrome b558/566 of S. acidocaldarius. S. acidocaldarius is the only archaeal species whose N-glycans are known to be linked via the chitobiose core disaccharide that characterises the N-linked glycans of Eukarya.

  15. The S-layer glycoprotein of the crenarchaeote Sulfolobus acidocaldarius is glycosylated at multiple sites with chitobiose-linked N-glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyfoon, Elham; Meyer, Benjamin; Hitchen, Paul G; Panico, Maria; Morris, Howard R; Haslam, Stuart M; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Dell, Anne

    2010-09-29

    Glycosylation of the S-layer of the crenarchaea Sulfolobus acidocaldarius has been investigated using glycoproteomic methodologies. The mature protein is predicted to contain 31 N-glycosylation consensus sites with approximately one third being found in the C-terminal domain spanning residues L(1004)-Q(1395). Since this domain is rich in Lys and Arg and therefore relatively tractable to glycoproteomic analysis, this study has focused on mapping its N-glycosylation. Our analysis identified nine of the 11 consensus sequence sites, and all were found to be glycosylated. This constitutes a remarkably high glycosylation density in the C-terminal domain averaging one site for each stretch of 30-40 residues. Each of the glycosylation sites observed was shown to be modified with a heterogeneous family of glycans, with the largest having a composition Glc(1)Man(2)GlcNAc(2) plus 6-sulfoquinovose (QuiS), consistent with the tribranched hexasaccharide previously reported in the cytochrome b(558/566) of S. acidocaldarius. S. acidocaldarius is the only archaeal species whose N-glycans are known to be linked via the chitobiose core disaccharide that characterises the N-linked glycans of Eukarya.

  16. Photoluminescence characteristics of CdS layers deposited in a chemical bath and their correlation to CdS/CdTe solar cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza-Perez, R.; Aguilar-Hernandez, J.; Sastre-Hernandez, J.; Ximello-Quiebras, N.; Contreras-Puente, G.; Vigil-Galan, O.; Moreno-Garcia, E. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas del IPN, Edificio 9, UPALM, DF 07738 (Mexico); Santana-Rodriguez, G. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Coyoacan 04510, DF (Mexico); Morales-Acevedo, A. [CINVESTAV-IPN, Depto. de Ingenieria Electrica, Avenida IPN No. 2508, DF 07360 (Mexico)

    2006-06-15

    In this work, we study CdS films processed by chemical bath deposition (CBD) using different thiourea concentrations in the bath solution with post-thermal treatments using CdCl{sub 2}. We study the effects of the thiourea concentration on the photovoltaic performance of the CdS/CdTe solar cells, by the analysis of the I-V curve, for S/Cd ratios in the CBD solution from 3 to 8. In this range of S/Cd ratios the CdS/CdTe solar cells show variations of the open circuit voltage (V{sub oc}), the short circuit current (J{sub sc}) and the fill factor (FF). Other experimental data such as the optical transmittance and photoluminescence were obtained in order to correlate to the I-V characteristics of the solar cells. The best performance of CdS-CdTe solar cells made with CdS films obtained with a S/Cd ratio of 6 is explained in terms of the sulfur vacancies to sulfur interstitials ratio in the CBD-CdS layers. (author)

  17. S-layer homology domain proteins Csac_0678 and Csac_2722 are implicated in plant polysaccharide deconstruction by the extremely thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Inci; Blumer-Schuette, Sara E; Kelly, Robert M

    2012-02-01

    The genus Caldicellulosiruptor contains extremely thermophilic bacteria that grow on plant polysaccharides. The genomes of Caldicellulosiruptor species reveal certain surface layer homology (SLH) domain proteins that have distinguishing features, pointing to a role in lignocellulose deconstruction. Two of these proteins in Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus (Csac_0678 and Csac_2722) were examined from this perspective. In addition to three contiguous SLH domains, the Csac_0678 gene encodes a glycoside hydrolase family 5 (GH5) catalytic domain and a family 28 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM); orthologs to Csac_0678 could be identified in all genome-sequenced Caldicellulosiruptor species. Recombinant Csac_0678 was optimally active at 75°C and pH 5.0, exhibiting both endoglucanase and xylanase activities. SLH domain removal did not impact Csac_0678 GH activity, but deletion of the CBM28 domain eliminated binding to crystalline cellulose and rendered the enzyme inactive on this substrate. Csac_2722 is the largest open reading frame (ORF) in the C. saccharolyticus genome (predicted molecular mass of 286,516 kDa) and contains two putative sugar-binding domains, two Big4 domains (bacterial domains with an immunoglobulin [Ig]-like fold), and a cadherin-like (Cd) domain. Recombinant Csac_2722, lacking the SLH and Cd domains, bound to cellulose and had detectable carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) hydrolytic activity. Antibodies directed against Csac_0678 and Csac_2722 confirmed that these proteins bound to the C. saccharolyticus S-layer. Their cellular localization and functional biochemical properties indicate roles for Csac_0678 and Csac_2722 in recruitment and hydrolysis of complex polysaccharides and the deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass. Furthermore, these results suggest that related SLH domain proteins in other Caldicellulosiruptor genomes may also be important contributors to plant biomass utilization.

  18. Haloferax volcanii archaeosortase is required for motility, mating, and C-terminal processing of the S-layer glycoprotein: Haloferax volcanii archeosortase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdul Halim, Mohd Farid [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Biology, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm [Department of Membrane Biochemistry, Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry, 82152, Martinsried, Germany; Zou, James [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Biology, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA; Frisch, Andrew [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Biology, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA; Haft, Daniel [J. Craig Venter Institute, Rockville, MD, 20850, USA; Wu, Si [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA; Tolić, Nikola [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA; Brewer, Heather [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA; Payne, Samuel H. [Division of Biological Sciences, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA; Pohlschroder, Mechthild [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Biology, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA

    2013-05-28

    Cell surfaces are decorated by a variety of proteins that facilitate interactions with their environments and support cell stability.These secreted proteins are anchored to the cell by mechanisms that are diverse, and, in archaea, poorly understood. Recently published in silico data suggest that in some species a subset of secreted euryarchaeal proteins, which includes the S-­layer glycoprotein, is processed and covalently linked tot he cell membrane by enzymes referred to as archaeosortases. In silico work led to the proposal that an independent, sortase-like system for proteolysis-coupled carboxy-terminal lipid modification exists in bacteria (exosortase) and archaea (archaeosortase). Here, we provide the first in vivo characterization of an archaeosortase in the haloarchaeal model organism Haloferax volcanii. Deletion of the artA gene (HVO_0915) resulted in multiple biological phenotypes: (a) poor growth, especially under low-salt conditions, (b) alterations in cell shape and the S-layer, (c) impaired motility, suppressors of which still exhibit poor growth, and (d) impaired conjugation. We studied one of the ArtA substrates, the S-layer glycoprotein, using detailed proteomic analysis. While the carboxy-terminal region of S-layer glycoproteins, consisting of a threonine-rich O-glycosylated region followed by a hydrophobic transmembrane helix, has been notoriously resistant to any proteomic peptide identification, we were able to identify two overlapping peptides from the transmembrane domain present in the ΔartA strain but not in the wild-type strain. This clearly shows that ArtA is involved in carboxy-terminal posttranslational processing of the S-layer glycoprotein. As it is known from previous studies that a lipid is covalently attached to the carboxy-terminal region of the S-layer glycoprotein, our data strongly support the conclusion that archaeosortase functions analogously to sortase, mediating proteolysis-coupled, covalent cell surface attachment.

  19. Minimum entropy principle-based solar cell operation without a pn-junction and a thin CdS layer to extract the holes from the emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böer, Karl W.

    2016-10-01

    The solar cell does not use a pn-junction to separate electrons from holes, but uses an undoped CdS layer that is p-type inverted when attached to a p-type collector and collects the holes while rejecting the backflow of electrons and thereby prevents junction leakage. The operation of the solar cell is determined by the minimum entropy principle of the cell and its external circuit that determines the electrochemical potential, i.e., the Fermi-level of the base electrode to the operating (maximum power point) voltage. It leaves the Fermi level of the metal electrode of the CdS unchanged, since CdS does not participate in the photo-emf. All photoelectric actions are generated by the holes excited from the light that causes the shift of the quasi-Fermi levels in the generator and supports the diffusion current in operating conditions. It is responsible for the measured solar maximum power current. The open circuit voltage (Voc) can approach its theoretical limit of the band gap of the collector at 0 K and the cell increases the efficiency at AM1 to 21% for a thin-film CdS/CdTe that is given as an example here. However, a series resistance of the CdS forces a limitation of its thickness to preferably below 200 Å to avoid unnecessary reduction in efficiency or Voc. The operation of the CdS solar cell does not involve heated carriers. It is initiated by the field at the CdS/CdTe interface that exceeds 20 kV/cm that is sufficient to cause extraction of holes by the CdS that is inverted to become p-type. Here a strong doubly charged intrinsic donor can cause a negative differential conductivity that switches-on a high-field domain that is stabilized by the minimum entropy principle and permits an efficient transport of the holes from the CdTe to the base electrode. Experimental results of the band model of CdS/CdTe solar cells are given and show that the conduction bands are connected in the dark, where the electron current must be continuous, and the valence bands are

  20. Heterologous Expression and Purification of S-layer Protein Genes of Bacillus thuringiensis%苏云金芽胞杆菌S-层蛋白基因的异源表达及分离纯化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓琳; 郭刚; 张凤娟; 孙士锋; 朱朝华; 曾会才

    2013-01-01

      S-层(S-layer)普遍存在于古菌、G+、G-菌中,由S-层蛋白所构成细菌S-层结构的生物体中,其功能引起了科学家的广泛关注,但目前S-层的功能大都处于推测阶段.究其原因,是因为外源S-层基因可以造成宿主大肠杆菌的致死效应.本研究将一株苏云金芽胞杆菌的两个S-层蛋白基因(GenBank登录号为AJ012290和AY460125)的3'端序列在大肠杆菌BL21(DE3)中成功进行异源表达,在0.8 mmol/L IPTG诱导培养6 h时,菌体中包涵体表达量达到最高;并对表达蛋白进行了初步分离纯化,以期为后期利用该纯化蛋白进行抗血清制备,进而对该菌的S-层蛋白在宿主菌中的定位、功能分析打下基础.%Surface layer, S-layer, is a part of the cell envelope commonly found in bacteria (both Gram-positive bac-teria and Gram-negative bacteria), as well as among archaea. The functions of S-layer, attracting wide attention from scientists, are not clearly studied yet due to the lethal effect of exogenous S-layer protein gene to Escherichia coli host strains. Most of the functions we knew currently are deduced and have not been certified. In this study, the 3' end sequence from two S-layer protein gene of a Bacillus thuringiensis strain (GenBank accession number AJ012290 and AY460125) have been successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The expression of the inclusion body in the mycelium reached the highest level after culturing for 6 h in 0.8 mmol/L IPTG. The expressed proteins were preliminary separated and purified, in order to lay a foundation for the preparation of antiserum, and for the localiza-tion and function analysis of S-layer protein in the host.

  1. Bioadsorption of Rare Earth Elements through Cell Surface Display of Lanthanide Binding Tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dan M; Reed, David W; Yung, Mimi C; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M; Anderko, Andrzej; Fujita, Yoshiko; Riman, Richard E; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Jiao, Yongqin

    2016-03-01

    With the increasing demand for rare earth elements (REEs) in many emerging clean energy technologies, there is an urgent need for the development of new approaches for efficient REE extraction and recovery. As a step toward this goal, we genetically engineered the aerobic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus for REE adsorption through high-density cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags (LBTs) on its S-layer. The LBT-displayed strains exhibited enhanced adsorption of REEs compared to cells lacking LBT, high specificity for REEs, and an adsorption preference for REEs with small atomic radii. Adsorbed Tb(3+) could be effectively recovered using citrate, consistent with thermodynamic speciation calculations that predicted strong complexation of Tb(3+) by citrate. No reduction in Tb(3+) adsorption capacity was observed following citrate elution, enabling consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles. The LBT-displayed strain was effective for extracting REEs from the acid leachate of core samples collected at a prospective rare earth mine. Our collective results demonstrate a rapid, efficient, and reversible process for REE adsorption with potential industrial application for REE enrichment and separation.

  2. Bacterial Cell Surface Adsorption of Rare Earth Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Y.; Park, D.; Reed, D.; Fujita, Y.; Yung, M.; Anderko, A.; Eslamimanesh, A.

    2015-12-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) play a critical role in many emerging clean energy technologies, including high-power magnets, wind turbines, solar panels, hybrid/electric vehicle batteries and lamp phosphors. In order to sustain demand for such technologies given current domestic REE shortages, there is a need to develop new approaches for ore processing/refining and recycling of REE-containing materials. To this end, we have developed a microbially-mediated bioadsorption strategy with application towards enrichment of REE from complex mixtures. Specifically, the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus was genetically engineered to display lanthanide binding tags (LBTs), short peptides that possess high affinity and specificity for rare earth elements, on its cell surface S-layer protein. Under optimal conditions, LBT-displayed cells adsorbed greater than 5-fold more REE than control cells lacking LBTs. Competition binding experiments with a selection of REEs demonstrated that our engineered cells could facilitate separation of light- from heavy- REE. Importantly, binding of REE onto our engineered strains was much more favorable compared to non-REE metals. Finally, REE bound to the cell surface could be stripped off using citrate, providing an effective and non-toxic REE recovery method. Together, this data highlights the potential of our approach for selective REE enrichment from REE containing mixtures.

  3. Tuning band alignment by CdS layers using a SILAR method to enhance TiO2/CdS/CdSe quantum-dot solar-cell performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bingkai; Zheng, Jiaxin; Li, Xiaoning; Fang, Yanyan; Wang, Lin-Wang; Lin, Yuan; Pan, Feng

    2016-04-28

    We report tuning band alignment by optimized CdS layers using a SILAR method to achieve the recorded best performance with about 6% PCE in TiO2/CdS/CdSe QDSSCs. Combining experimental and theoretical studies, we find that a better lattices match between CdS and TiO2 assists the growth of CdSe, and the combined effect of charge transfer and surface dipole moment at the TiO2/CdS/CdSe interface shifts the energy levels of TiO2 upward and increases Voc of the solar cells. More importantly, the band gap of CdS buffer layers is sensitive to the distortion induced by lattice mismatch and numbers of CdS layers. For example, the barrier for charge transfer disappears when there are more than 4 layers of CdS, facilitating the charge injection from CdSe to TiO2.

  4. Characterization of CBD-CdS layers with different S/Cd ratios in the chemical bath and their relation with the efficiency of CdS/CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil-Galan, O. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas-I.P.N., Edificio No. 9 U.P.A.L.M. 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: osvaldo@esfm.ipn.mx; Morales-Acevedo, A. [CINVESTAV-IPN, Electrical Engineering Departament, Av. IPN No 2508, 07360 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Cruz-Gandarilla, F. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas-I.P.N., Edificio No. 9 U.P.A.L.M. 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Jimenez-Escamilla, M.G. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas-I.P.N., Edificio No. 9 U.P.A.L.M. 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Aguilar-Hernandez, J. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas-I.P.N., Edificio No. 9 U.P.A.L.M. 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Contreras-Puente, G. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas-I.P.N., Edificio No. 9 U.P.A.L.M. 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Sastre-Hernandez, J. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas-I.P.N., Edificio No. 9 U.P.A.L.M. 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Sanchez-Meza, E. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas-I.P.N., Edificio No. 9 U.P.A.L.M. 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Ramon-Garcia, M.L. [Centro de Investigaciones en Energia.UNAM. Privada Xochicalco s/n Col. Centro Temixco. CP. 62580 Morelos (Mexico)

    2007-05-31

    In previous papers we have reported the improvement of the efficiency of CdS/CdTe solar cells by varying the thiourea/CdCl{sub 2} ratio (R {sub tc}) in the chemical bath solution used for the deposition of the CdS layers. In this work, a more complete study concerning the physical properties of Chemical Bath Deposited (CBD) CdS layers studied by photoluminescence, X-ray diffraction and optical spectroscopy are correlated to the I-V characteristics under AM 1.5 sunlight and the spectral response of CdS/CdTe solar cells. It is confirmed that the optimum R {sub tc} for the CBD CdS films is R {sub tc} = 5, since in this case the best solar cells were obtained and these films show the better optical and structural characteristics.

  5. 嗜酸乳杆菌S-层蛋白的提取和鉴定%Extraction and Characterization of S Layer Protein from Lactobacillus acidophilus CGMCC 1.1878

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹琼芳; 潘道东; 郭宇星; 曾小群; 孙杨赢; 曹锦轩

    2016-01-01

    Crude S-layer protein derived from three Lactobacillus strains was extracted by two methods,and was revalued by SDS-PAGE analysis.The SDS-PAGE indicated that the crude protein in MW 40-60 ku was more potent when extracted by 4 mol/L LiC1.To get the purified S-layer protein,the extracted protein of Lactobacillus acidophilus CGMCC 1.1878 was isolated by gel filtration chromatography,and characterized by MALDI-TOF-TOF MS/MS.The appearance of S-layer protein was observed by scanning electron microscope.The results of MS/MS showed that the purified protein was S-layer protein with a molecular mass of 46 ku from Lactobacillus acidophilus.%采用高浓度溶剂法(氯化锂/盐酸胍)及溶菌酶结合氯化锂法提取3株乳酸杆菌的表层粗蛋白,通过SDSPAGE比较不同方法及菌株的蛋白提取效果.对嗜酸乳杆菌CGMCC l.1878袁层粗蛋白进行凝胶过滤层析纯化后,采用MALDITOF-TOF对纯化的蛋白进行二级质谱鉴定,用扫描电镜观察蛋白表面形态.结果表明:高浓度溶剂法提取的蛋白条带多集中在40~60 ku,其中,氯化锂溶剂所提蛋白特征条带明显,便于纯化及分析.根据MASCOT软件搜索及NCBInr数据库比对,成功鉴定出该纯化蛋白为嗜酸乳杆菌S层蛋白,分子质量为46 ku.

  6. Genetic evidence for the involvement of the S-layer protein gene sap and the sporulation genes spo0A, spo0B, and spo0F in Phage AP50c infection of Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaut, Roger D; Beaber, John W; Zemansky, Jason; Kaur, Ajinder P; George, Matroner; Biswas, Biswajit; Henry, Matthew; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Hannah, Ryan M; Pope, Robert K; Read, Timothy D; Stibitz, Scott; Calendar, Richard; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga

    2014-03-01

    In order to better characterize the Bacillus anthracis typing phage AP50c, we designed a genetic screen to identify its bacterial receptor. Insertions of the transposon mariner or targeted deletions of the structural gene for the S-layer protein Sap and the sporulation genes spo0A, spo0B, and spo0F in B. anthracis Sterne resulted in phage resistance with concomitant defects in phage adsorption and infectivity. Electron microscopy of bacteria incubated with AP50c revealed phage particles associated with the surface of bacilli of the Sterne strain but not with the surfaces of Δsap, Δspo0A, Δspo0B, or Δspo0F mutants. The amount of Sap in the S layer of each of the spo0 mutant strains was substantially reduced compared to that of the parent strain, and incubation of AP50c with purified recombinant Sap led to a substantial reduction in phage activity. Phylogenetic analysis based on whole-genome sequences of B. cereus sensu lato strains revealed several closely related B. cereus and B. thuringiensis strains that carry sap genes with very high similarities to the sap gene of B. anthracis. Complementation of the Δsap mutant in trans with the wild-type B. anthracis sap or the sap gene from either of two different B. cereus strains that are sensitive to AP50c infection restored phage sensitivity, and electron microscopy confirmed attachment of phage particles to the surface of each of the complemented strains. Based on these data, we postulate that Sap is involved in AP50c infectivity, most likely acting as the phage receptor, and that the spo0 genes may regulate synthesis of Sap and/or formation of the S layer.

  7. Genetic Evidence for the Involvement of the S-Layer Protein Gene sap and the Sporulation Genes spo0A, spo0B, and spo0F in Phage AP50c Infection of Bacillus anthracis

    OpenAIRE

    Roger D Plaut; Beaber, John W.; Zemansky, Jason; Kaur, Ajinder P.; George, Matroner; Biswas, Biswajit; Henry, Matthew; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Hannah, Ryan M.; Pope, Robert K.; Timothy D. Read; Stibitz, Scott; Calendar, Richard; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga

    2014-01-01

    In order to better characterize the Bacillus anthracis typing phage AP50c, we designed a genetic screen to identify its bacterial receptor. Insertions of the transposon mariner or targeted deletions of the structural gene for the S-layer protein Sap and the sporulation genes spo0A, spo0B, and spo0F in B. anthracis Sterne resulted in phage resistance with concomitant defects in phage adsorption and infectivity. Electron microscopy of bacteria incubated with AP50c revealed phage particles assoc...

  8. Extraction and identification of adhesion-associated S-layer proteins of L. casei LC2W%干酪乳杆菌LC2W表面黏附相关蛋白的提取与鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周方方; 吴正钧; 王荫榆; 郭本恒

    2009-01-01

    Objective To extract and identify the S-layer proteins of Lactobacillus casei LC2W that associates with adhesion and preliminarily study the mechemism of LC2W adhesion on MKN-45 cells. Method S-layer proteins were extracted by LiCl and isolated by Sephadex G-75. Then the adhesion assay, electron microscopic observation and SDS-PAGE were used to identify the S-layer protein associated with adhesion. Result After the treatment of LiCl, electron microscopic observation showed that the surface of LC2W was rough but the cells were still in their integrity. The ability of adhesion to MKN-45 cells was significantly reduced. S-layer proteins of LC2W were composed of three proteins with molecular weights of 41.6, 63.5 and 66.2 kDa, respectively. After the isolation by Sephadex G-75, it was found that the 41.6 kDa fraction could significantly improve the adhesion of LC2W treated by LiCl and the adhesive ability of the treated cells amounted to the level of the normal ones. Conclusion The S-layer proteins were involved in the adhesion of LC2W on MKN-45 and the active component was the protein with molecular weight of 41.6 kDa.%目的 提取和鉴定干酪乳杆菌LC2W表面黏附相关蛋白,初步探索LC2W对胃癌细胞MKN-45细胞的黏附机制.方法 LiCl处理、Sephadex G-75柱层析分离提取LC2W的表面蛋白,用黏附试验、电镜观察和SDS-PAGE电泳进行黏附相关蛋白的鉴定.结果 LC2W经LiCl处理后,扫描电镜结果发现菌体表面粗糙但仍完整,黏附试验表明其对MKN-45细胞的黏附能力显著降低.提取到的表面蛋白的分子量分别为41.6、63.5、66.2 kDa.粗提物经柱层析后发现分子量为41.6 kDa的组分可以明显增强经LiCl处理过的菌体的黏附,而与未经处理的菌体黏附情况类似.结论 表面蛋白参与了LC2W对MKN-45细胞的黏附,其主要活性成分的分子量为41.6 kDa.

  9. Entropy-driven spatial organization of highly confined polymers: Lessons for the bacterial chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Suckjoon; Mulder, Bela

    2006-08-01

    Despite recent progress in visualization experiments, the mechanism underlying chromosome segregation in bacteria still remains elusive. Here we address a basic physical issue associated with bacterial chromosome segregation, namely the spatial organization of highly confined, self-avoiding polymers (of nontrivial topology) in a rod-shaped cell-like geometry. Through computer simulations, we present evidence that, under strong confinement conditions, topologically distinct domains of a polymer complex effectively repel each other to maximize their conformational entropy, suggesting that duplicated circular chromosomes could partition spontaneously. This mechanism not only is able to account for the spatial separation per se but also captures the major features of the spatiotemporal organization of the duplicating chromosomes observed in Escherichia coli and Caulobacter crescentus. bacterial chromosome segregation | Caulobacter crescentus | Escherichia coli | polymer physics

  10. Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Analyses of pH-Dependent Protein Expression in Facultatively Alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 Lead to Characterization of an S-Layer Protein with a Role in Alkaliphily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, Raymond; Messner, Paul; Guffanti, Arthur A.; Kent, Rebecca; Scheberl, Andrea; Kendrick, Nancy; Krulwich, Terry Ann

    2000-01-01

    The large majority of proteins of alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 grown at pH 7.5 and 10.5, as studied by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analyses, did not exhibit significant pH-dependent variation. A new surface layer protein (SlpA) was identified in these studies. Although the prominence of some apparent breakdown products of SlpA in gels from pH 10.5-grown cells led to discovery of the alkaliphile S-layer, the largest and major SlpA forms were present in large amounts in gels from pH 7.5-grown cells as well. slpA RNA abundance was, moreover, unchanged by growth pH. SlpA was similar in size to homologues from nonalkaliphiles but contained fewer Arg and Lys residues. An slpA mutant strain (RG21) lacked an exterior S-layer that was identified in the wild type by electron microscopy. Electrophoretic analysis of whole-cell extracts further indicated the absence of a 90-kDa band in the mutant. This band was prominent in wild-type extracts from both pH 7.5- and 10.5-grown cells. The wild type grew with a shorter lag phase than RG21 at either pH 10.5 or 11 and under either Na+-replete or suboptimal Na+ concentrations. The extent of the adaptation deficit increased with pH elevation and suboptimal Na+. By contrast, the mutant grew with a shorter lag and faster growth rate than the wild type at pH 7.5 under Na+-replete and suboptimal Na+ conditions, respectively. Logarithmically growing cells of the two strains exhibited no significant differences in growth rate, cytoplasmic pH regulation, starch utilization, motility, Na+-dependent transport of α-aminoisobutyric acid, or H+-dependent synthesis of ATP. However, the capacity for Na+-dependent pH homeostasis was diminished in RG21 upon a sudden upward shift of external pH from 8.5 to 10.5. The energy cost of retaining the SlpA layer at near-neutral pH is apparently adverse, but the constitutive presence of SlpA enhances the capacity of the extremophile to adjust to high pH. PMID:11029415

  11. 基于短乳杆菌S层启动子组成型乳酸杆菌表达系统的构建%Construction of constitutive expression system based on Lactobacillus brevis S layer promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李一经; 秦思; 唐丽杰; 葛俊伟; 乔薪瑗; 崔文; 姜艳平

    2013-01-01

    pPG612 is a shuttle vector suitiable for cloning in both E.coli and Lactobacillus.In the current study,we replaced the promoter of pPG612 vector with S-layer protein's promoter SlpA of Lactobaccillus brevis,and thus constructed a type of expression vector of lactic acid bacteria,of which the expressing foreign protein ability was detected with the TGEV N gene as a target gene in three lactic acid bacillus.We further confirmed that the vector was able to express TGEV N gene N with SDS-PAGE and westem blot.In conclusion,SIpA was a constitutive promoter which could be applied to more studies in the near future.%以大肠杆菌和乳酸菌穿梭分泌表达型载体pPG612为基本模型,用短乳杆菌S层启动子SlpA替换载体上gusA启动子,并以TGEVN蛋白基因为目基因构建一种乳酸杆菌组成型表达载体,用以检测SIpA启动子在三种不同乳酸杆菌中表达能力.结果表明,该组成型启动子具有表达外源功能蛋白功能,且具有严格宿主选择性,为进一步利用该载体及组成型启动子进行其他应用奠定了基础.

  12. S-Layer Architectures: Extending the Morphogenetic Potential of S-Layer Protein Self Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    architectures :  Extending  the  morphogenetic  potential  of   S-­‐layer  protein  self...ray  scattering  and   a   fractal  mean  force  concept:  From  protein  structure  to  nano-­‐disc  assemblies  ...  39...developed   a   broad   range   of   nanometer   scale   architectures   based   on   the   self-­‐ assembly   of  

  13. S-Layer Based Bio-Imprinting - Synthetic S-Layer Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-09

    synthesized  in  wet...synthesis  and  spin  coating   Polymers  were   synthesized   following  protocols  published   in  previous  work  [40,  54...ethanol,  and  containing   ammonia .  After  stirring,  the  resulting   silica  particles  have  diameters  between

  14. 乳源短乳杆菌M8 S-层蛋白的提纯及其生物学特征分析%Purification and Biological Characterization of S-Layer Proteins in Lactobacillus brevis M8, Isolated from Fresh Milk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖荣; 范郁冰; 张丽丽; 李宗军

    2012-01-01

    通过利用原子力显微镜(AFM)来观察凝胶过滤层析法提纯短乳杆菌M8菌株的S-层蛋白的表面形貌,同时探讨S-层蛋白的再生特性及黏附特性。结果表明:凝胶过滤层析法能够获得纯度较高的S-层蛋白;该蛋白在纯水中可自我组装成纳米级“团簇”结构;去除S-层蛋白的菌体细胞仍然具有生命活性,适当培养后可重新表达该蛋白;短乳杆菌M8可黏附到Caco-2细胞上,其S-层蛋白介导此过程。%The aim of this study was to purify S-layer proteins from Lactobacillus brevis M8, isolated from fresh milk, by Sephadex G-75 column chromatography and observe their surface morphology under atomic force microscope (AFM). Also, regeneration and adhesion characteristics were explored. Highly pure S-layer proteins were obtained by Sephadex G-75 column chromatography, which could form nano-cluster by self-assemblage. Lactobacillus brevis M8 cells without S-layer proteins could re-express the proteins after re-incubation. Lactobacillus brevis M8 could adhere to Caco-2 cells, which was mediated by the S-layer proteins.

  15. Coordination of division and development influences complex multicellular behavior in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinwoo Kim

    Full Text Available The α-Proteobacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens has proteins homologous to known regulators that govern cell division and development in Caulobacter crescentus, many of which are also conserved among diverse α-Proteobacteria. In light of recent work demonstrating similarity between the division cycle of C. crescentus and that of A. tumefaciens, the functional conservation for this presumptive control pathway was examined. In C. crescentus the CtrA response regulator serves as the master regulator of cell cycle progression and cell division. CtrA activity is controlled by an integrated pair of multi-component phosphorelays: PleC/DivJ-DivK and CckA-ChpT-CtrA. Although several of the conserved orthologues appear to be essential in A. tumefaciens, deletions in pleC or divK were isolated and resulted in cell division defects, diminished swimming motility, and a decrease in biofilm formation. A. tumefaciens also has two additional pleC/divJhomologue sensor kinases called pdhS1 and pdhS2, absent in C. crescentus. Deletion of pdhS1 phenocopied the ΔpleC and ΔdivK mutants. Cells lacking pdhS2 morphologically resembled wild-type bacteria, but were decreased in swimming motility and elevated for biofilm formation, suggesting that pdhS2 may serve to regulate the motile to non-motile switch in A. tumefaciens. Genetic analysis suggests that the PleC/DivJ-DivK and CckA-ChpT-CtrA phosphorelays in A. tumefaciens are vertically-integrated, as in C. crescentus. A gain-of-function mutation in CckA (Y674D was identified as a spontaneous suppressor of the ΔpleC motility phenotype. Thus, although the core architecture of the A. tumefaciens pathway resembles that of C. crescentus there are specific differences including additional regulators, divergent pathway architecture, and distinct target functions.

  16. A role for the weak DnaA binding sites in bacterial replication origins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    DnaA initiates the chromosomal DNA replication in nearly all bacteria, and replication origins are characterized by binding sites for the DnaA protein (DnaA-boxes) along with an ‘AT-rich’ region. However, great variation in number, spatial organization and specificity of DnaA-boxes is observed...... between species. In the study by Taylor et al. (2011), new and unexpectedly weak DnaA-boxes were identified within the Caulobacter crescentus origin of replication (Cori). The position of weak and stronger DnaA-boxes follows a pattern seen in Escherichia coli oriC. This raises the possibility...

  17. Bacterial chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possoz, Christophe; Junier, Ivan; Espeli, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Dividing cells have mechanisms to ensure that their genomes are faithfully segregated into daughter cells. In bacteria, the description of these mechanisms has been considerably improved in the recent years. This review focuses on the different aspects of bacterial chromosome segregation that can be understood thanks to the studies performed with model organisms: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Caulobacter crescentus and Vibrio cholerae. We describe the global positionning of the nucleoid in the cell and the specific localization and dynamics of different chromosomal loci, kinetic and biophysic aspects of chromosome segregation are presented. Finally, a presentation of the key proteins involved in the chromosome segregation is made.

  18. Metabolic control of cell division in α-proteobacteria by a NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufay, François; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2016-01-01

    Prior to initiate energy-consuming processes, such as DNA replication or cell division, cells need to evaluate their metabolic status. We have recently identified and characterized a new connection between metabolism and cell division in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. We showed that an NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GdhZ) coordinates growth with cell division according to its enzymatic activity. Here we report the conserved role of GdhZ in controlling cell division in another α-proteobacterium, the facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus. We also discuss the importance of amino acids as a main carbon source for α-proteobacteria.

  19. Requirement of the Carboxyl Terminus of a Bacterial Chemoreceptor for Its Targeted Proteolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, M. R. K.; Maddock, Janine R.; Shapiro, Lucille

    1993-03-01

    The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus yields two different progeny at each cell division; a chemotactically competent swarmer cell and a sessile stalked cell. The chemotaxis proteins are synthesized in the predivisional cell and then partition only to the swarmer cell upon division. The chemoreceptors that were newly synthesized were located at the nascent swarmer pole of the predivisional cell, an indication that asymmetry was established prior to cell division. When the swarmer cell differentiated into a stalked cell, the chemoreceptor was specifically degraded by virtue of an amino acid sequence located at its carboxyl terminus. Thus, a temporally and spatially restricted proteolytic event was a component of this differentiation process.

  20. Curvature and shape determination of growing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2009-12-01

    Bacterial cells come in a variety of shapes, determined by the stress-bearing cell wall. Though many molecular details about the cell wall are known, our understanding of how a particular shape is produced during cell growth is at its infancy. Experiments on curved Escherichia coli grown in microtraps, and on naturally curved Caulobacter crescentus, reveal different modes of growth: one preserving arc length and the other preserving radius of curvature. We present a simple model for curved cell growth that relates these two growth modes to distinct but related growth rules—“hooplike growth” and “self-similar growth”—and discuss the implications for microscopic growth mechanisms.

  1. Accumulation of Microswimmers near a Surface Mediated by Collision and Rotational Brownian Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanglai; Tang, Jay X.

    2009-08-01

    In this Letter we propose a kinematic model to explain how collisions with a surface and rotational Brownian motion give rise to accumulation of microswimmers near a surface. In this model, an elongated microswimmer invariably travels parallel to the surface after hitting it from an oblique angle. It then swims away from the surface, facilitated by rotational Brownian motion. Simulations based on this model reproduce the density distributions measured for the small bacteria E. coli and Caulobacter crescentus, as well as for the much larger bull spermatozoa swimming between two walls.

  2. Accumulation of Microswimmers due to Their Collisions with a Surface

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Guanglai

    2008-01-01

    In this letter we propose a kinematic model to show how collisions with a surface and rotational Brownian motion give rise to the accumulation of micro-swimmers near a surface. In this model, an elongated microswimmer invariably travels parallel to the surface after hitting it from any incident angle. It then swims away from the surface after some time, facilitated by rotational Brownian motion. Simulations based on this model reproduce the density distributions measured for the small bacteria E. coli and Caulobacter crescentus, as well as for the much larger bull spermatozoa swimming in confinement.

  3. A novel aldose-aldose oxidoreductase for co-production of D-xylonate and xylitol from D-xylose with Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Wiebe, Marilyn G.; Nygård, Yvonne; Oja, Merja; Andberg, Martina; Ruohonen, Laura; Koivula, Anu; Penttilä, Merja; Toivari, Mervi

    2015-01-01

    An open reading frame CC1225 from the Caulobacter crescentus CB15 genome sequence belongs to the Gfo/Idh/MocA protein family and has 47 % amino acid sequence identity with the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase from Zymomonas mobilis (Zm GFOR). We expressed the ORF CC1225 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and used a yeast strain expressing the gene coding for Zm GFOR as a reference. Cell extracts of strains overexpressing CC1225 (renamed as Cc aaor) showed some Zm GFOR type of activity, prod...

  4. In-phase oscillation of global regulons is orchestrated by a pole-specific organizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janakiraman, Balaganesh; Mignolet, Johann; Narayanan, Sharath; Viollier, Patrick H; Radhakrishnan, Sunish Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Cell fate determination in the asymmetric bacterium Caulobacter crescentus (Caulobacter) is triggered by the localization of the developmental regulator SpmX to the old (stalked) cell pole during the G1→S transition. Although SpmX is required to localize and activate the cell fate-determining kinase DivJ at the stalked pole in Caulobacter, in cousins such as Asticcacaulis, SpmX directs organelle (stalk) positioning and possibly other functions. We define the conserved σ(54)-dependent transcriptional activator TacA as a global regulator in Caulobacter whose activation by phosphorylation is indirectly down-regulated by SpmX. Using a combination of forward genetics and cytological screening, we uncover a previously uncharacterized and polarized component (SpmY) of the TacA phosphorylation control system, and we show that SpmY function and localization are conserved. Thus, SpmX organizes a site-specific, ancestral, and multifunctional regulatory hub integrating the in-phase oscillation of two global transcriptional regulators, CtrA (the master cell cycle transcriptional regulator A) and TacA, that perform important cell cycle functions.

  5. DISPLAYING POLYHISTIDINE PEPTIDE ON THE CELL SURFACE OF BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS BY S-LAYER PROTEIN%利用S-层蛋白在苏云金芽胞杆菌细胞表面展示多聚组氨酸肽

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王莉; 孙明; 喻子牛

    2003-01-01

    @@ S-层(S-layer)是由单一的蛋白或糖蛋白组成的薄层晶状结构,它广泛存在于古细菌和真细菌细胞的最外表面,可包裹整个细胞.S-层在结构化学、形态学、遗传学以及物理化学等方面具有独特的性质,使之在生物技术、分子纳米技术和仿生学等领域蕴藏着广泛的应用潜力[1,2].

  6. The Construction of S-Layer Protein Surface Display System of L.acidophilus and the Analysis on Restricted Enzyme Sites%嗜酸乳杆菌S-层蛋白表面展示系统的构建及酶切位点分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘琼; 王春凤; 杨桂连; 秦守涛; 刘曼

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to clone and express S-layer protein gene of L acidophilus to construct a novel expression system capable of locating antigen molecules on the cell surface of L. Actobacillus. [ Method ] The SlpA gene including N-terminal signal sequence, variable domain and C-terminal domain anchors sequence was amplified via PCR from genome extract of the L. Acidophilus. This sequence was digested and ligated into an E. Coli-L. Actobacillus shuttle secretion vector pW425et,and a cell surface display system called pW425et-S was obtained with a restriction endonuclease recognition site qualifying for integration of exogenous genes. [ Result] Recombinant pW425et-S was transformed into competent cell E. Coli X13 which thymidylate synthetase ( ThyA) was deficiency. SDS-PAGE and Western-blotting analysis were used to detect the expression condition of S-layer protein. S-layer protein of L. Acidophilus was expressed by recombinant and this protein can be detected by whole-cell ELISA. [ Conclusion ] S-layer protein gene of L acidophilus was cloned and surface display system pW425et-S was constructed and that vector can be used as an applicable operate platform for exploitation of L actobacillus vivi-vector oral vaccine.%[目的]克隆和表达嗜酸乳杆菌S-层蛋白基因,用其构建能承载外源抗原表位的乳酸菌细胞表面展示系统.[方法]以染色体DNA为模板克隆S-层蛋白基因SlpA,通过酶切、连接将其插入大肠杆菌-乳酸菌穿梭表达载体pW425et,构建表面展示系统pW425et-S,并对酶切位点进行分析.[结果]将pW425et-S转化入thyA基因缺陷型E.coli X13感受态细胞,SDS-PAGE、Western-blotting、全细胞ELISA检测表明,在重组菌表面表达出S-层蛋白,构建出表面展示系统,确定BstEⅡ作为融合外源保护性抗原基因的酶切位点.[结论]克隆出嗜酸乳杆菌S-层蛋白基因,成功构建表面展示系统pW425et-S,为开发乳酸菌活载体口服活菌疫苗提供了可行性操作平台.

  7. Tethered motion of uniflagellated bacteria at the liquid-solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jordan; Tang, Jay

    Direct evidence of the bacterial flagellar motor's rotation was first noted when multiflagellated bacterial cells were observed (under the optical microscope) to rotate when tethered to glass by a single flagellum. The tethered cell assay has continued to play a significant role throughout the subsequent studies of motor characteristics and behavior. Such studies have expanded to include uniflagellated bacteria, such as Vibrio alginolyticus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Caulobacter crescentus. Here we show that such cells are not necessarily tethered by their flagellum, but rather elsewhere on the cell body. The observed cell body rotation is actually due to the flagellum either ``rolling'' against the glass surface, or pushing the cell body at the flagellar base. These motions are directly observed for Vibrio alginolyticus with darkfield microscopy. Additionally, our recently measured distributions of intervals between motor switches for tethered Caulobacter crescentus also confirm this more complicated mode of tethering. Therefore, the rotational speed of tethered uniflagellated bacteria may not equate to that of the motor itself, as is commonly assumed.

  8. Bacterial Swimming and Accumulation at the Fluid Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jay

    2012-02-01

    Micro-organisms often reside and thrive at the fluid boundaries. The tendency of accumulation is particularly strong for flagellated bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Vibro alginolyticus, and Caulobacter crescentus. We measured the distribution of a forward swimming strain of Caulobacter crescentus near a solid surface using a three-dimensional tracking technique based on darkfield microscopy and found that the swimming bacteria accumulate heavily within micrometers from the surface, even though individual swimmers are not trapped long enough to display circular trajectories. We attributed this accumulation to frequent collisions of the swimming cells with the surface, causing them to align parallel to the surface as they continually move forward. The extent of accumulation at the steady state is accounted for by balancing alignment caused by these collisions with the rotational Brownian motion of the micrometer-sized bacteria. We performed simulations based on this model, which reproduces the measured results. Additional simulations demonstrate the dependence of accumulation on swimming speed and cell size, showing that longer and faster cells accumulate more near a surface than shorter and slower ones do. Our ongoing experimental effort also includes observation of similar phenomena at the interfaces of either water-oil or water-air, noting even stronger trapping of the swimming bacteria than near a solid surface. These studies reveal a rich range of fluid physics for further analysis.

  9. 短小乳杆菌内蒙古分离株S-层蛋白的普查、鉴定和基因分析%Detection, Identification and Genetic Analysis of S-Layer Protein of Lactobacillus brevis Isolated from Inner Mongolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    兰丽; 魏建民; 王艳霞; 王敏; 满达; 格日勒图

    2012-01-01

    S-层蛋白(S-layers protein)是位于某些细菌表面的高度有序的具有超微结构的一种外膜蛋白.本试验以蒙古族传统乳制品中分离的短小乳杆菌(Lactobacillus brevis)为材料,应用SDS-PAGE技术对若干乳杆菌进行S-层蛋白的普查,并应用PCR方法克隆出L.brevis的slp基因,对该slp基因进行测序及序列分析.试验结果表明,SDS-PAGE电泳结果显示L.brevis样品在44~55 ku之间出现目的条带,与文献报道的S-层蛋白大小范围一致;PCR方法正确扩增出大小约为1300 bp的slp基因,经DNAStar软件遗传分析发现该基因与鸡乳酸杆菌株(GenBank登录号:AY597266.1)的亲缘关系和遗传距离最近,与其他种类乳酸菌遗传距离也非常相近;经Genetyx生物软件推导出的S-层蛋白大小理论值约为47 ku,具有显著的外膜蛋白的特性.本试验为后续遗传改造等研究工作奠定基础.%The surface layers protein (SLP) is a major composition of the bacterial outermost envelope with highly ordered ultrastructure. The Lactobacillus brevis which isolated from Mongolian traditional dairy products were used as materials in this study. The S-layer proteins from several Lactobacillus were detected by SDS-PAGE and slp gene was cloned by PCR and then analyzed the slp gene sequence of Lactobacillus breris. The results showed that the protein sample of Lactobacillus breris showed target band about 44 to 55 ku which had the same size range of SLP that had been reported,and slp gene about 1300 bp was amplified by PCR method. The DNAStar software found that the protein had recently kinship and genetic distance with L. gallinarum strain (GenBank: AY597266. 1) and was similar to other Lactobacillus spp. The theoretical size of S-layer protein was about 47 ku released by the Genetyx software and had significant feature of outer membrane proteins. This layed foundation for genetic modification and other research work.

  10. Complete genome of Phenylobacterium zucineum – a novel facultative intracellular bacterium isolated from human erythroleukemia cell line K562

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Jie

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phenylobacterium zucineum is a recently identified facultative intracellular species isolated from the human leukemia cell line K562. Unlike the known intracellular pathogens, P. zucineum maintains a stable association with its host cell without affecting the growth and morphology of the latter. Results Here, we report the whole genome sequence of the type strain HLK1T. The genome consists of a circular chromosome (3,996,255 bp and a circular plasmid (382,976 bp. It encodes 3,861 putative proteins, 42 tRNAs, and a 16S-23S-5S rRNA operon. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that it is phylogenetically closest to Caulobacter crescentus, a model species for cell cycle research. Notably, P. zucineum has a gene that is strikingly similar, both structurally and functionally, to the cell cycle master regulator CtrA of C. crescentus, and most of the genes directly regulated by CtrA in the latter have orthologs in the former. Conclusion This work presents the first complete bacterial genome in the genus Phenylobacterium. Comparative genomic analysis indicated that the CtrA regulon is well conserved between C. crescentus and P. zucineum.

  11. The adhesive and cohesive properties of a bacterial polysaccharide adhesin are modulated by a deacetylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zhe; Brown, Pamela J B; Elliott, Ellen N; Brun, Yves V

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial exopolysaccharide synthesis is a prevalent and indispensible activity in many biological processes, including surface adhesion and biofilm formation. In Caulobacter crescentus, surface attachment and subsequent biofilm growth depend on the ability to synthesize an adhesive polar polysaccharide known as the holdfast. In this work, we show that polar polysaccharide synthesis is a conserved phenomenon among Alphaproteobacterial species closely related to C. crescentus. Among them, mutagenesis of Asticcacaulis biprosthecum showed that disruption of the hfsH gene, which encodes a putative polysaccharide deacetylase, leads to accumulation of holdfast in the culture supernatant. Examination of the hfsH deletion mutant in C. crescentus revealed that this strain synthesizes holdfast; however, like the A. biprosthecum hfsH mutant, the holdfasts are shed into the medium and have decreased adhesiveness and cohesiveness. Site-directed mutagenesis at the predicted catalytic site of C. crescentus HfsH phenocopied the ΔhfsH mutant and abolished the esterase activity of HfsH. In contrast, overexpression of HfsH increased cell adherence without increasing holdfast synthesis. We conclude that the polysaccharide deacetylase activity of HfsH is required for the adhesive and cohesive properties of the holdfast, as well as for the anchoring of the holdfast to the cell envelope.

  12. Dynamics of the bacterial intermediate filament crescentin in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osigwe Esue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Crescentin, the recently discovered bacterial intermediate filament protein, organizes into an extended filamentous structure that spans the length of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus and plays a critical role in defining its curvature. The mechanism by which crescentin mediates cell curvature and whether crescentin filamentous structures are dynamic and/or polar are not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using light microscopy, electron microscopy and quantitative rheology, we investigated the mechanics and dynamics of crescentin structures. Live-cell microscopy reveals that crescentin forms structures in vivo that undergo slow remodeling. The exchange of subunits between these structures and a pool of unassembled subunits is slow during the life cycle of the cell however; in vitro assembly and gelation of C. crescentus crescentin structures are rapid. Moreover, crescentin forms filamentous structures that are elastic, solid-like, and, like other intermediate filaments, can recover a significant portion of their network elasticity after shear. The assembly efficiency of crescentin is largely unaffected by monovalent cations (K(+, Na(+, but is enhanced by divalent cations (Mg(2+, Ca(2+, suggesting that the assembly kinetics and micromechanics of crescentin depend on the valence of the ions present in solution. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that crescentin forms filamentous structures that are elastic, labile, and stiff, and that their low dissociation rate from established structures controls the slow remodeling of crescentin in C. crescentus.

  13. A Localized Complex of Two Protein Oligomers Controls the Orientation of Cell Polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Adam M; Mann, Thomas H; Lasker, Keren; Ahrens, Daniel G; Eckart, Michael R; Shapiro, Lucy

    2017-02-28

    Signaling hubs at bacterial cell poles establish cell polarity in the absence of membrane-bound compartments. In the asymmetrically dividing bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, cell polarity stems from the cell cycle-regulated localization and turnover of signaling protein complexes in these hubs, and yet the mechanisms that establish the identity of the two cell poles have not been established. Here, we recapitulate the tripartite assembly of a cell fate signaling complex that forms during the G1-S transition. Using in vivo and in vitro analyses of dynamic polar protein complex formation, we show that a polymeric cell polarity protein, SpmX, serves as a direct bridge between the PopZ polymeric network and the cell fate-directing DivJ histidine kinase. We demonstrate the direct binding between these three proteins and show that a polar microdomain spontaneously assembles when the three proteins are coexpressed heterologously in an Escherichia coli test system. The relative copy numbers of these proteins are essential for complex formation, as overexpression of SpmX in Caulobacter reorganizes the polarity of the cell, generating ectopic cell poles containing PopZ and DivJ. Hierarchical formation of higher-order SpmX oligomers nucleates new PopZ microdomain assemblies at the incipient lateral cell poles, driving localized outgrowth. By comparison to self-assembling protein networks and polar cell growth mechanisms in other bacterial species, we suggest that the cooligomeric PopZ-SpmX protein complex in Caulobacter illustrates a paradigm for coupling cell cycle progression to the controlled geometry of cell pole establishment.IMPORTANCE Lacking internal membrane-bound compartments, bacteria achieve subcellular organization by establishing self-assembling protein-based microdomains. The asymmetrically dividing bacterium Caulobacter crescentus uses one such microdomain to link cell cycle progression to morphogenesis, but the mechanism for the generation of this

  14. The development of cellular stalks in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J M; Stanier, R Y

    1966-03-01

    Extensive stalk elongation in Caulobacter and Asticcacaulis can be obtained in a defined medium by limiting the concentration of phosphate. Caulobacter cells which were initiating stalk formation were labeled with tritiated glucose. After removal of exogenous tritiated material, the cells were subjected to phosphate limitation while stalk elongation occurred. The location of tritiated material in the elongated stalks as detected by radioautographic techniques allowed identification of the site of stalk development. The labeling pattern obtained was consistent with the hypothesis that the materials of the stalk are synthesized at the juncture of the stalk with the cell. Complementary labeling experiments with Caulobacter and Asticcacaulis confirmed this result. In spheroplasts of C. crescentus prepared by treatment with lysozyme, the stalks lost their normal rigid outline after several minutes of exposure to the enzyme, indicating that the rigid layer of the cell wall attacked by lysozyme is present in the stalk. In spheroplasts of growing cells induced with penicillin, the stalks did not appear to be affected, indicating that the stalk wall is a relatively inert, nongrowing structure. The morphogenetic implications of these findings are discussed.

  15. 几种乳酸菌S-层蛋白的普查以及slp基因的克隆与序列分析%Detection of S-layer protein for Lactobacillus spp.and molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the gene slp in L.acidophilus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    双杰; 包秋华; 永胜; 王艳霞; 张和平; 格日勒图

    2010-01-01

    从内蒙古传统发酵乳制品中分离的几种乳酸菌,包括干酪乳杆菌、乳酸乳球菌、发酵乳杆菌、植物乳杆菌、嗜酸乳杆菌、双歧乳杆菌和嗜酸乳杆菌标准株(L.acidophilus ATCC4356)等为实验材料,应用SDS-PAGE方法和PCK方法分别进行S-层蛋白(S-layers pro-tein,SLP)的普查和slp基因的检测.结果表明:在各种乳酸茵中,经SDS-PAGE电泳方法检测,只有植物乳杆菌、嗜酸乳杆菌和其标准菌株的样品中出现膜外蛋白的可疑条带,大小为44~66ku之间,与文献报道的slp基因表达产物大小范围是一致;经PCR方法检测,只有嗜酸乳杆菌和其标准菌株L.acidoilus ATCC4356中扩增出slp基因可疑条带,其大小约为1 300 bp.并对嗜酸乳杆菌slp基因进行克隆、基因序列测序和分析.

  16. Effects of S-layer proteins from lactobacillus against Salmonella typhimurium adhesion and invasion on Caco-2 cells%乳酸杆菌S-层蛋白对鼠伤寒沙门氏菌黏附及入侵Caco-2细胞的拮抗作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李鹏成; 叶小兰; 王志胜; 庾庆华; 杨倩

    2010-01-01

    [目的]对嗜酸乳杆菌的S-层蛋白(S-layer protein)进行提纯,研究嗜酸乳酸杆菌和S-层蛋白对鼠伤寒沙门氏菌黏附和入侵的拮抗作用.[方法]应用阴离子交换柱(DE52)对嗜酸乳酸杆菌的S-层蛋白进行提纯,然后分别研究了嗜酸乳酸杆菌和S-层蛋白对鼠伤寒沙门氏菌黏附及入侵Caco-2细胞的作用.[结果]S-层蛋白能显著地抑制鼠伤寒沙门氏菌的黏附及入侵;在竞争、排斥、置换3种黏附试验中,S-层蛋白可显著降低鼠伤寒沙门氏菌的黏附,其相对黏附力分别为1.17%±5.97%、8.71%±1.36%、10.56%±0.92%,差异极显著(P<0.01),其中竞争试验效果最好;并且S-层蛋白对鼠伤寒沙门氏菌黏附抑制作用极显著高于嗜酸乳酸杆菌(P<0.01);此外,S-层蛋白也能显著抑制鼠伤寒沙门氏菌入侵.[结论]乳酸杆菌S-层蛋白对鼠伤寒沙门氏菌可产生显著的拮抗作用,这可能与S-层蛋白和鼠伤寒沙门氏菌的宿主黏附受体存在竞争作用有关;提示乳酸杆菌S-层蛋白可用于预防和治疗鼠伤寒沙门氏菌感染,并有望成为抗生素的替代品.

  17. The diversity and evolution of cell cycle regulation in alpha-proteobacteria: a comparative genomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengoni Alessio

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, CtrA coordinates DNA replication, cell division, and polar morphogenesis and is considered the cell cycle master regulator. CtrA activity varies during cell cycle progression and is modulated by phosphorylation, proteolysis and transcriptional control. In a phosphorylated state, CtrA binds specific DNA sequences, regulates the expression of genes involved in cell cycle progression and silences the origin of replication. Although the circuitry regulating CtrA is known in molecular detail in Caulobacter, its conservation and functionality in the other alpha-proteobacteria are still poorly understood. Results Orthologs of Caulobacter factors involved in the regulation of CtrA were systematically scanned in genomes of alpha-proteobacteria. In particular, orthologous genes of the divL-cckA-chpT-ctrA phosphorelay, the divJ-pleC-divK two-component system, the cpdR-rcdA-clpPX proteolysis system, the methyltransferase ccrM and transcriptional regulators dnaA and gcrA were identified in representative genomes of alpha-proteobacteria. CtrA, DnaA and GcrA binding sites and CcrM putative methylation sites were predicted in promoter regions of all these factors and functions controlled by CtrA in all alphas were predicted. Conclusions The regulatory cell cycle architecture was identified in all representative alpha-proteobacteria, revealing a high diversification of circuits but also a conservation of logical features. An evolutionary model was proposed where ancient alphas already possessed all modules found in Caulobacter arranged in a variety of connections. Two schemes appeared to evolve: a complex circuit in Caulobacterales and Rhizobiales and a simpler one found in Rhodobacterales.

  18. Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabeen, M.; Charbon, Godefroid; Vollmer, W.

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure...... that collapses into a helix when detached from the cell membrane, suggesting that it is normally maintained in a stretched configuration. Crescentin causes an elongation rate gradient around the circumference of the sidewall, creating a longitudinal cell length differential and hence curvature. Such curvature...... can be produced by physical force alone when cells are grown in circular microchambers. Production of crescentin in Escherichia coli is sufficient to generate cell curvature. Our data argue for a model in which physical strain borne by the crescentin structure anisotropically alters the kinetics...

  19. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12020-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :none) Caulobacter crescentus NA1000, ... 151 5e-35 CP000614_1881( CP000614 |pid:none) Burkholderia vietnam...um discoideum histidine kinase DhkG (d... 46 3.7 1 ( AF088979 ) Dictyostelium discoideum beige protein...ccus opacus B4 DNA, comp... 160 1e-37 AL939110_99( AL939110 |pid:none) Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) co...:none) Burkholderia sp. 383 chromosome ... 96 3e-18 AL939126_48( AL939126 |pid:none) Streptomyces coelico...:none) Psychromonas ingrahamii 37, com... 96 4e-18 CP001157_559( CP001157 |pid:none) Azotobacter vinelandii DJ, co

  20. Themes and Variations: Regulation of RpoN-Dependent Flagellar Genes across Diverse Bacterial Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Tsang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flagellar biogenesis in bacteria is a complex process in which the transcription of dozens of structural and regulatory genes is coordinated with the assembly of the flagellum. Although the overall process of flagellar biogenesis is conserved among bacteria, the mechanisms used to regulate flagellar gene expression vary greatly among different bacterial species. Many bacteria use the alternative sigma factor σ54 (also known as RpoN to transcribe specific sets of flagellar genes. These bacteria include members of the Epsilonproteobacteria (e.g., Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni, Gammaproteobacteria (e.g., Vibrio and Pseudomonas species, and Alphaproteobacteria (e.g., Caulobacter crescentus. This review characterizes the flagellar transcriptional hierarchies in these bacteria and examines what is known about how flagellar gene regulation is linked with other processes including growth phase, quorum sensing, and host colonization.

  1. Scaling laws governing stochastic growth and division of single bacterial cells

    CERN Document Server

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Henry, Jonathan T; Lo, Klevin; Burov, Stanislav; Lin, Yihan; Crooks, Gavin E; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R; Scherer, Norbert F

    2014-01-01

    Uncovering the quantitative laws that govern the growth and division of single cells remains a major challenge. Using a unique combination of technologies that yields unprecedented statistical precision, we find that the sizes of individual Caulobacter crescentus cells increase exponentially in time. We also establish that they divide upon reaching a critical multiple ($\\approx$1.8) of their initial sizes, rather than an absolute size. We show that when the temperature is varied, the growth and division timescales scale proportionally with each other over the physiological temperature range. Strikingly, the cell-size and division-time distributions can both be rescaled by their mean values such that the condition-specific distributions collapse to universal curves. We account for these observations with a minimal stochastic model that is based on an autocatalytic cycle. It predicts the scalings, as well as specific functional forms for the universal curves. Our experimental and theoretical analysis reveals a ...

  2. Noise in Exponential Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Wright, Charles; Henry, Jon; Burov, Stas; Lin, Yihan; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron; Scherer, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    The interplay between growth and division of cells is has been studied in the context of exponential growth of bacterial cells (in suitable conditions) for decades. However, bulk culture studies obscure phenomena that manifest in single cells over many generations. We introduce a unique technology combining microfluidics, single-cell imaging, and quantitative analysis. This enables us to track the growth of single Caulobacter crescentus stalked cells over hundreds of generations. The statistics that we extract indicate a size thresholding mechanism for cell division and a non-trivial scaling collapse of division time distributions at different temperatures. In this talk I shall discuss these observations and a stochastic model of growth and division that captures all our observations with no free parameters.

  3. Effects of hydrodynamic interactions in bacterial swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Suddhashil; Lun Wu, Xiao

    2008-03-01

    The lack of precise experimental data has prevented the investigation of the effects of long range hydrodynamic interactions in bacterial swimming. We perform measurements on various strains of bacteria with the aid of optical tweezers to shed light on this aspect of bacterial motility. Geometrical parameters recorded by fluorescence microscopy are used with theories which model flagella propulsion (Resistive force theory & Lighthill's formulation which includes long range interactions). Comparison of the predictions of these theories with experimental data, observed directly from swimming bacterium, led to the conclusion that while long range inetractions were important for single polar flagellated strains (Vibrio Alginolyticus & Caulobacter Crescentus), local force theory was adequate to describe the swimming of multi-flagellated Esherichia Coli. We performed additional measurements on E. Coli minicells (miniature cells with single polar flagellum) to try and determine the cause of this apparent effect of shielding of long range interactions in multiple flagellated bacteria.

  4. Bacteriocuprein superoxide dismutases in pseudomonads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinman, H.M.

    1985-06-01

    Two new instances of the rare bacteriocuprein form of superoxide dismutase have been discovered in Pseudomonas diminuta and P. maltophilia. Each species contains a manganese superoxide dismutase as well. Eight other strains of Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas spp. lacked bacteriocupreins and contained either a manganese or an iron superoxide dismutase. Native molecular weights and isoelectric points were determined for all these bacterial dismutases. A monospecific polyclonal antibody was prepared against the bacteriocuprein from Photobacterium leiognathi; it was not cross-reactive with the bacteriocuprein from either Pseudomonas strain. Bacteriocupreins have previously been identified in only two procaryotes, P. leiognathi and Caulobacter crescentus. The discovery of the Pseudomonas bacteriocupreins reveals a broader distribution, raising the possibility that bacteriocupreins are a continuous line of descent among procryotes and not isolated evolutionary occurrences, as previous data suggested.

  5. Accumulation of swimming bacteria near a solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanglai; Bensson, James; Nisimova, Liana; Munger, Daniel; Mahautmr, Panrapee; Tang, Jay X.; Maxey, Martin R.; Brun, Yves V.

    2011-10-01

    We measured the distribution of a forward swimming strain of Caulobacter crescentus near a surface using a three-dimensional tracking technique based on dark field microscopy and found that the swimming bacteria accumulate heavily within a micrometer from the surface. We attribute this accumulation to frequent collisions of the swimming cells with the surface, causing them to align parallel to the surface as they continually move forward. The extent of accumulation at the steady state is accounted for by balancing alignment caused by these collisions with the rotational Brownian motion of the micrometer-sized bacteria. We performed a simulation based on this model, which reproduced the measured results. Additional simulations demonstrate the dependence of accumulation on swimming speed and cell size, showing that longer and faster cells accumulate more near a surface than shorter and slower ones do.

  6. UV-induced dark repair mechanisms in bacteria associated with drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungfer, Christina; Schwartz, Thomas; Obst, Ursula

    2007-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus and Aquabacterium commune, both isolated from drinking water, as well as environmental isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecium were treated with different UV fluences to study their capacity to restore induced DNA damages. Here, the induction of a key mechanism of bacterial dark repair, the so-called recA system, was analysed. With newly designed probes, the specific recA mRNA was detected by Northern blot. Additionally, the RecA protein was measured by the Western blot technique using a specific antibody. In drinking water bacteria as well as in opportunistic microorganisms, a specific induction of dark repair mechanisms was found even at UV fluences higher than 400J/m(2), the German standard for UV disinfection. This induction depended on the incubation time after UV treatment. Nevertheless, the UV-induced recA expressions were found to differ in the bacteria under investigation.

  7. Brucella abortus Cell Cycle and Infection Are Coordinated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bolle, Xavier; Crosson, Sean; Matroule, Jean-Yves; Letesson, Jean-Jacques

    2015-12-01

    Brucellae are facultative intracellular pathogens. The recent development of methods and genetically engineered strains allowed the description of cell-cycle progression of Brucella abortus, including unipolar growth and the ordered initiation of chromosomal replication. B. abortus cell-cycle progression is coordinated with intracellular trafficking in the endosomal compartments. Bacteria are first blocked at the G1 stage, growth and chromosome replication being resumed shortly before reaching the intracellular proliferation compartment. The control mechanisms of cell cycle are similar to those reported for the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, and they are crucial for survival in the host cell. The development of single-cell analyses could also be applied to other bacterial pathogens to investigate their cell-cycle progression during infection.

  8. Synthetic interaction between the TipN polarity factor and an AcrAB-family efflux pump implicates cell polarity in bacterial drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Clare L; Viollier, Patrick H

    2014-05-22

    Quinolone antibiotics are clinically important drugs that target bacterial DNA replication and chromosome segregation. Although the AcrAB-family efflux pumps generally protect bacteria from such drugs, the physiological role of these efflux systems and their interplay with other cellular events are poorly explored. Here, we report an intricate relationship between antibiotic resistance and cell polarity in the model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. We show that a polarity landmark protein, TipN, identified by virtue of its ability to direct flagellum placement to the new cell pole, protects cells from toxic misregulation of an AcrAB efflux pump through a cis-encoded nalidixic acid-responsive transcriptional repressor. Alongside the importance of polarity in promoting the inheritance and activity of virulence functions including motility, we can now ascribe to it an additional role in drug resistance that is distinct from classical efflux mechanisms.

  9. Cloning and functional analysis of the sequences flanking mini-Tn5 in the magnetosomes deleted mutant NM4 of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Feng; LI; Ying; JIANG; Wei; WANG; Zhenfang; LI; Jilun

    2005-01-01

    A magnetosome deleted mutant NM4 of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1 was generated by mini-Tn5 transposon mutagenesis, and a 5045-bp fragment flanking mini-Tn5 in NM4 was cloned by Anchored PCR. Sequencing analysis showed that this fragment involved six putative open reading frames (ORFs); the mini-Tn5 was inserted into ORF4. Functional complementary test indicated that the 5045-bp fragment was required for biosynthesis of magnetosomes in M. gryphiswaldense MSR-1. The protein encoded by ORF4 had 25% of identity with the chemotaxis protein CheYIII of Caulobacter crescentus CB15, and the protein encoded by ORF4 contained a conserved signal receiver domain that can receive the signal from the sensor partner of the bacterial two-component systems. It was suggested that the protein encoded by ORF4 may take part in the signal transduction relating to biosynthesis of magnetosomes.

  10. Aging of prokaryotic organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Simon

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Until recently it was thought that aging is a characteristic feature only of cells and organisms of eukaryotic origin. Recent studies on Caulobacter crescentus showed that their dimorphic life cycle associated with asymmetric cell division leads to a gradual increase in the time needed for the development of new bacteria generations, which may reflect aging of this organism. Moreover, as shown in Escherichia coli, accelerated exhaustion of proliferative capacity and bacteria death are caused by inheritance of certain structures from the mother cell during cell division. A similar phenomenon, called ‘conditional senescence’, has been observed during the stationary phase of growth in liquid cultures. The aim of this paper is to present the current state of knowledge on the causes, mechanisms and evolutionary significance of aging in bacteria. Some issues associated with bacterial aging will be discussed in the context of similar phenomena occurring in eukaryotic cells.

  11. Sinorhizobium meliloti CpdR1 is critical for co-ordinating cell cycle progression and the symbiotic chronic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hajime; De Nisco, Nicole J; Chien, Peter; Simmons, Lyle A; Walker, Graham C

    2009-08-01

    ATP-driven proteolysis plays a major role in regulating the bacterial cell cycle, development and stress responses. In the nitro -fixing symbiosis with host plants, Sinorhizobium meliloti undergoes a profound cellular differentiation, including endoreduplication of the ome. The regulatory mechanisms governing the alterations of the S. meliloti cell cycle in planta are largely unknown. Here, we report the characterization of two cpdR homologues, cpdR1 and cpdR2, of S. meliloti that encode single-domain response regulators. In Caulobacter crescentus, CpdR controls the polar localization of the ClpXP protease, thereby mediating the regulated proteolysis of key protein(s), such as CtrA, involved in cell cycle progression. The S. meliloti cpdR1-null mutant can invade the host cytoplasm, however, the intracellular bacteria are unable to differentiate into bacteroids. We show that S. meliloti CpdR1 has a polar localization pattern and a role in ClpX positioning similar to C. crescentus CpdR, suggesting a conserved function of CpdR proteins among alpha-proteobacteria. However, in S. meliloti, free-living cells of the cpdR1-null mutant show a striking morphology of irregular coccoids and aberrant DNA replication. Thus, we demonstrate that CpdR1 mediates the co-ordination of cell cycle events, which are critical for both the free-living cell division and the differentiation required for the chronic intracellular infection.

  12. The DivJ, CbrA and PleC system controls DivK phosphorylation and symbiosis in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Francesco; Frage, Benjamin; Ferri, Lorenzo; De Nisco, Nicole J; Mohapatra, Saswat S; Taddei, Lucilla; Fioravanti, Antonella; Dewitte, Frederique; Galardini, Marco; Brilli, Matteo; Villeret, Vincent; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Mengoni, Alessio; Walker, Graham C; Becker, Anke; Biondi, Emanuele G

    2013-10-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti is a soil bacterium that invades the root nodules it induces on Medicago sativa, whereupon it undergoes an alteration of its cell cycle and differentiates into nitrogen-fixing, elongated and polyploid bacteroid with higher membrane permeability. In Caulobacter crescentus, a related alphaproteobacterium, the principal cell cycle regulator, CtrA, is inhibited by the phosphorylated response regulator DivK. The phosphorylation of DivK depends on the histidine kinase DivJ, while PleC is the principal phosphatase for DivK. Despite the importance of the DivJ in C. crescentus, the mechanistic role of this kinase has never been elucidated in other Alphaproteobacteria. We show here that the histidine kinases DivJ together with CbrA and PleC participate in a complex phosphorylation system of the essential response regulator DivK in S. meliloti. In particular, DivJ and CbrA are involved in DivK phosphorylation and in turn CtrA inactivation, thereby controlling correct cell cycle progression and the integrity of the cell envelope. In contrast, the essential PleC presumably acts as a phosphatase of DivK. Interestingly, we found that a DivJ mutant is able to elicit nodules and enter plant cells, but fails to establish an effective symbiosis suggesting that proper envelope and/or low CtrA levels are required for symbiosis.

  13. Structural and physical aspects of bacterial chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldringh, Conrad L; Nanninga, Nanne

    2006-11-01

    Microscopic observations on the bacterial nucleoid suggest that the chromosome occurs in the cell as a compact nucleoid phase separate from the cytoplasm. Physical theory likewise predicts a phase separation, taking into consideration DNA supercoiling, nucleoid-binding proteins, and excluded-volume interactions between DNA and cytoplasmic proteins. Specific DNA loci, visualized as oriC-GFP spots in the densely packed nucleoid, exhibit a very low diffusion coefficient indicating that they are virtually immobile and may primarily be moved by overall length growth. Such gradual movement could be effectuated by replication, transertion (combined transcription, translation, and insertion of proteins), and actin- (MreB) directed surface synthesis. Differences in the movement and positioning of gene loci between Escherichia coli and Caulobacter crescentus are discussed. We propose that a low diffusion coefficient could explain the linear positioning of genes in the nucleoid and that differential transcriptional activity could induce different mobilities between either replichores (E. coli) or daughter strands (C. crescentus). The transertion process, possibly in combination with MreB cytoskeletal tracks, could overcome the compaction forces and move specific chromosomal regions and the nucleoid as a whole without invoking a dedicated mechanism.

  14. A spindle-like apparatus guides bacterial chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptacin, Jerod L; Lee, Steven F; Garner, Ethan C; Toro, Esteban; Eckart, Michael; Comolli, Luis R; Moerner, W E; Shapiro, Lucy

    2010-08-01

    Until recently, a dedicated mitotic apparatus that segregates newly replicated chromosomes into daughter cells was believed to be unique to eukaryotic cells. Here we demonstrate that the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus segregates its chromosome using a partitioning (Par) apparatus that has surprising similarities to eukaryotic spindles. We show that the C. crescentus ATPase ParA forms linear polymers in vitro and assembles into a narrow linear structure in vivo. The centromere-binding protein ParB binds to and destabilizes ParA structures in vitro. We propose that this ParB-stimulated ParA depolymerization activity moves the centromere to the opposite cell pole through a burnt bridge Brownian ratchet mechanism. Finally, we identify the pole-specific TipN protein as a new component of the Par system that is required to maintain the directionality of DNA transfer towards the new cell pole. Our results elucidate a bacterial chromosome segregation mechanism that features basic operating principles similar to eukaryotic mitotic machines, including a multivalent protein complex at the centromere that stimulates the dynamic disassembly of polymers to move chromosomes into daughter compartments.

  15. The CckA-ChpT-CtrA phosphorelay system is regulated by quorum sensing and controls flagellar motility in the marine sponge symbiont Ruegeria sp. KLH11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jindong Zan

    Full Text Available Bacteria respond to their environment via signal transduction pathways, often two-component type systems that function through phosphotransfer to control expression of specific genes. Phosphorelays are derived from two-component systems but are comprised of additional components. The essential cckA-chpT-ctrA phosphorelay in Caulobacter crescentus has been well studied and is important in orchestrating the cell cycle, polar development and flagellar biogenesis. Although cckA, chpT and ctrA homologues are widespread among the Alphaproteobacteria, relatively few is known about their function in the large and ecologically significant Roseobacter clade of the Rhodobacterales. In this study the cckA-chpT-ctrA system of the marine sponge symbiont Ruegeria sp. KLH11 was investigated. Our results reveal that the cckA, chpT and ctrA genes positively control flagellar biosynthesis. In contrast to C. crescentus, the cckA, chpT and ctrA genes in Ruegeria sp. KLH11 are non-essential and do not affect bacterial growth. Gene fusion and transcript analyses provide evidence for ctrA autoregulation and the control of motility-related genes. In KLH11, flagellar motility is controlled by the SsaRI system and acylhomoserine lactone (AHL quorum sensing. SsaR and long chain AHLs are required for cckA, chpT and ctrA gene expression, providing a regulatory link between flagellar locomotion and population density in KLH11.

  16. Accumulation of swimming bacteria near an interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jay; Li, Guanglai

    2012-11-01

    Microbes inhabit planet earth over billions of years and have adapted to diverse physical environment of water, soil, and particularly at or near interfaces. We focused our attention on the locomotion of Caulobacter crescentus, a singly flagellated bacterium, at the interface of water/solid or water/air. We measured the distribution of a forward swimming strain of C. crescentus near a surface using a three-dimensional tracking technique based on dark field microscopy and found that the swimming bacteria accumulate heavily within a micrometer from the surface. We attribute this accumulation to frequent collisions of the swimming cells with the surface, causing them to align parallel to the surface as they continually move forward. The extent of accumulation at the steady state is accounted for by balancing alignment caused by these collisions with rotational Brownian motion of the micrometer-sized bacteria. We performed a simulation based on this model, which reproduced the measured results. Additional simulations demonstrate the dependence of accumulation on swimming speed and cell size, showing that longer and faster cells accumulate more near a surface than shorter and slower ones do. The overarching goal of our study is to describe interfacial microbial behavior through detailed analysis of their motion. We acknowledge support by NSF PHY 1058375.

  17. Phase resetting reveals network dynamics underlying a bacterial cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihan Lin

    Full Text Available Genomic and proteomic methods yield networks of biological regulatory interactions but do not provide direct insight into how those interactions are organized into functional modules, or how information flows from one module to another. In this work we introduce an approach that provides this complementary information and apply it to the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, a paradigm for cell-cycle control. Operationally, we use an inducible promoter to express the essential transcriptional regulatory gene ctrA in a periodic, pulsed fashion. This chemical perturbation causes the population of cells to divide synchronously, and we use the resulting advance or delay of the division times of single cells to construct a phase resetting curve. We find that delay is strongly favored over advance. This finding is surprising since it does not follow from the temporal expression profile of CtrA and, in turn, simulations of existing network models. We propose a phenomenological model that suggests that the cell-cycle network comprises two distinct functional modules that oscillate autonomously and couple in a highly asymmetric fashion. These features collectively provide a new mechanism for tight temporal control of the cell cycle in C. crescentus. We discuss how the procedure can serve as the basis for a general approach for probing network dynamics, which we term chemical perturbation spectroscopy (CPS.

  18. Human Cells Require Non-stop Ribosome Rescue Activity in Mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather A Feaga

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria use trans-translation and the alternative rescue factors ArfA (P36675 and ArfB (Q9A8Y3 to hydrolyze peptidyl-tRNA on ribosomes that stall near the 3' end of an mRNA during protein synthesis. The eukaryotic protein ICT1 (Q14197 is homologous to ArfB. In vitro ribosome rescue assays of human ICT1 and Caulobacter crescentus ArfB showed that these proteins have the same activity and substrate specificity. Both ArfB and ICT1 hydrolyze peptidyl-tRNA on nonstop ribosomes or ribosomes stalled with ≤6 nucleotides extending past the A site, but are unable to hydrolyze peptidyl-tRNA when the mRNA extends ≥14 nucleotides past the A site. ICT1 provided sufficient ribosome rescue activity to support viability in C. crescentus cells that lacked both trans-translation and ArfB. Likewise, expression of ArfB protected human cells from death when ICT1 was silenced with siRNA. These data indicate that ArfB and ICT1 are functionally interchangeable, and demonstrate that ICT1 is a ribosome rescue factor. Because ICT1 is essential in human cells, these results suggest that ribosome rescue activity in mitochondria is required in humans.

  19. Comparative analysis of wolbachia genomes reveals streamlining and divergence of minimalist two-component systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Steen; Serbus, Laura Renee

    2015-03-24

    Two-component regulatory systems are commonly used by bacteria to coordinate intracellular responses with environmental cues. These systems are composed of functional protein pairs consisting of a sensor histidine kinase and cognate response regulator. In contrast to the well-studied Caulobacter crescentus system, which carries dozens of these pairs, the streamlined bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis encodes only two pairs: CckA/CtrA and PleC/PleD. Here, we used bioinformatic tools to compare characterized two-component system relays from C. crescentus, the related Anaplasmataceae species Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia chaffeensis, and 12 sequenced Wolbachia strains. We found the core protein pairs and a subset of interacting partners to be highly conserved within Wolbachia and these other Anaplasmataceae. Genes involved in two-component signaling were positioned differently within the various Wolbachia genomes, whereas the local context of each gene was conserved. Unlike Anaplasma and Ehrlichia, Wolbachia two-component genes were more consistently found clustered with metabolic genes. The domain architecture and key functional residues standard for two-component system proteins were well-conserved in Wolbachia, although residues that specify cognate pairing diverged substantially from other Anaplasmataceae. These findings indicate that Wolbachia two-component signaling pairs share considerable functional overlap with other α-proteobacterial systems, whereas their divergence suggests the potential for regulatory differences and cross-talk.

  20. Characterization of porcine-specific surface (S-) layer protein carrying Lactobacillus species, S-layer proteins and the adhesin of Escherichia coli F18 fimbriae

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Pigs coexist with diverse and dense commensal microbiota in their gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Lactobacilli, identified as common members of porcine intestinal microbiota, have been considered to be an important group of bacteria in maintaining the stability of GIT, in preventing intestinal infections and generally, in supporting intestinal health. Because several species of lactobacilli have GRAS (generally regarded as safe) status and some of them have an ability to interact with intestina...

  1. Sequential evolution of bacterial morphology by co-option of a developmental regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Brown, Pamela J. B.; Ducret, Adrien; Brun, Yves V.

    2014-02-01

    What mechanisms underlie the transitions responsible for the diverse shapes observed in the living world? Although bacteria exhibit a myriad of morphologies, the mechanisms responsible for the evolution of bacterial cell shape are not understood. We investigated morphological diversity in a group of bacteria that synthesize an appendage-like extension of the cell envelope called the stalk. The location and number of stalks varies among species, as exemplified by three distinct subcellular positions of stalks within a rod-shaped cell body: polar in the genus Caulobacter and subpolar or bilateral in the genus Asticcacaulis. Here we show that a developmental regulator of Caulobacter crescentus, SpmX, is co-opted in the genus Asticcacaulis to specify stalk synthesis either at the subpolar or bilateral positions. We also show that stepwise evolution of a specific region of SpmX led to the gain of a new function and localization of this protein, which drove the sequential transition in stalk positioning. Our results indicate that changes in protein function, co-option and modularity are key elements in the evolution of bacterial morphology. Therefore, similar evolutionary principles of morphological transitions apply to both single-celled prokaryotes and multicellular eukaryotes.

  2. A model for the condensation of the bacterial chromosome by the partitioning protein ParB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broedersz, Chase; Wingreen, Ned

    2013-03-01

    The molecular machinery responsible for faithful segregation of the chromosome in bacteria such as Caulobacter crescentus and Bacillus subtilis includes the ParABS a.k.a. Spo0J/Soj partitioning system. In Caulobacter, prior to division, hundreds of ParB proteins bind to the DNA near the origin of replication, and localize to one pole of the cell. Subsequently, the ParB-DNA complex is translocated to the far pole by the binding and retraction of the ParA spindle-like apparatus. Remarkably, the localization of ParB proteins to specific regions of the chromosome appears to be controlled by only a few centromeric parS binding sites. Although lateral interactions between DNA-bound ParB are likely to be important for their localization, the long-range order of ParB domains on the chromosome appears to be inconsistent with a picture in which protein-protein interactions are limited to neighboring DNA-bound proteins. We developed a coarse-grained Brownian dynamics model that allows for lateral and 3D protein-protein interactions among bound ParB proteins. Our model shows how such interactions can condense and organize the DNA spatially, and can control the localization and the long-range order of the DNA-bound proteins.

  3. Cyclic di-GMP acts as a cell cycle oscillator to drive chromosome replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lori, C; Ozaki, S; Steiner, S; Böhm, R; Abel, S; Dubey, B N; Schirmer, T; Hiller, S; Jenal, U

    2015-07-01

    Fundamental to all living organisms is the capacity to coordinate cell division and cell differentiation to generate appropriate numbers of specialized cells. Whereas eukaryotes use cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases to balance division with cell fate decisions, equivalent regulatory systems have not been described in bacteria. Moreover, the mechanisms used by bacteria to tune division in line with developmental programs are poorly understood. Here we show that Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium with an asymmetric division cycle, uses oscillating levels of the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) to drive its cell cycle. We demonstrate that c-di-GMP directly binds to the essential cell cycle kinase CckA to inhibit kinase activity and stimulate phosphatase activity. An upshift of c-di-GMP during the G1-S transition switches CckA from the kinase to the phosphatase mode, thereby allowing replication initiation and cell cycle progression. Finally, we show that during division, c-di-GMP imposes spatial control on CckA to install the replication asymmetry of future daughter cells. These studies reveal c-di-GMP to be a cyclin-like molecule in bacteria that coordinates chromosome replication with cell morphogenesis in Caulobacter. The observation that c-di-GMP-mediated control is conserved in the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens suggests a general mechanism through which this global regulator of bacterial virulence and persistence coordinates behaviour and cell proliferation.

  4. Structural insights into bacterial flagellar hooks similarities and specificities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young-Ho; Barker, Clive S.; Bulieris, Paula V.; Matsunami, Hideyuki; Samatey, Fadel A.

    2016-01-01

    Across bacteria, the protein that makes the flagellar hook, FlgE, has a high variability in amino acid residue composition and sequence length. We hereby present the structure of two fragments of FlgE protein from Campylobacter jejuni and from Caulobacter crescentus, which were obtained by X-ray crystallography, and a high-resolution model of the hook from Caulobacter. By comparing these new structures of FlgE proteins, we show that bacterial hook can be divided in two distinct parts. The first part comprises domains that are found in all FlgE proteins and that will make the basic structure of the hook that is common to all flagellated bacteria. The second part, hyper-variable both in size and structure, will be bacteria dependent. To have a better understanding of the C. jejuni hook, we show that a special strain of Salmonella enterica, which was designed to encode a gene of flgE that has the extra domains found in FlgE from C. jejuni, is fully motile. It seems that no matter the size of the hook protein, the hook will always have a structure made of 11 protofilaments. PMID:27759043

  5. Bacterial Swimming at Air/Water and Oil/Water Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Michael; Huang, Athena; Li, Guanglai; Tang, Jay

    2012-02-01

    The microbes inhabiting the planet over billions of years have adapted to diverse physical environments of water, soil, and interfaces between water and either solid or air. Following recent studies on bacterial swimming and accumulation near solid surfaces, we turn our attention to the behavior of Caulobacter crescentus, a singly flagellated bacterium, at water/air and water/oil interfaces. The latter is motivated by relevance to microbial degradation of crude oil in light of the recent oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Our ongoing study suggests that Caulobacter swarmer cells tend to get physically trapped at both water/air and water/oil interfaces, accumulating at the surface to a greater degree than boundary confinement properties like that of solid surfaces would predict. At the water/air interface, swimmers move in tight circles at half the speed of swimmers in the bulk fluid. At the water/oil interface, swimming circles are even tighter with further reduced swimming speed. We report experimental data and present preliminary analysis of the findings based on low Reynolds number hydrodynamics, the known surface tension, and surface viscosity at the interface. The analysis will help determine properties of the bacterium such as their surface charge and hydrophobicity.

  6. A pseudokinase couples signaling pathways to enable asymmetric cell division in a bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Seth Childers

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria face complex decisions when initiating developmental events such as sporulation, nodulation, virulence, and asymmetric cell division. These developmental decisions require global changes in genomic readout, and bacteria typically employ intricate (yet poorly understood signaling networks that enable changes in cell function. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus divides asymmetrically to yield two functionally distinct cells: a motile, chemotactic swarmer cell, and a sessile stalked cell with replication and division capabilities. Work from several Caulobacter labs has revealed that differentiation requires concerted regulation by several two-component system (TCS signaling pathways that are differentially positioned at the poles of the predivisional cell (Figure 1. The strict unidirectional flow from histidine kinase (HK to the response regulator (RR, observed in most studied TCS, is difficult to reconcile with the notion that information can be transmitted between two or more TCS signaling pathways. In this study, we uncovered a mechanism by which daughter cell fate, which is specified by the DivJ-DivK-PleC system and effectively encoded in the phosphorylation state of the single-domain RR DivK, is communicated to the CckA-ChpT-CtrA signaling pathway that regulates more than 100 genes for polar differentiation, replication initiation and cell division. Using structural biology and biochemical findings we proposed a mechanistic basis for TCS pathway coupling in which the DivL pseudokinase is repurposed as a sensor rather than participant in phosphotransduction.

  7. Genetic and computational identification of a conserved bacterial metabolic module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara C Boutte

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We have experimentally and computationally defined a set of genes that form a conserved metabolic module in the alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus and used this module to illustrate a schema for the propagation of pathway-level annotation across bacterial genera. Applying comprehensive forward and reverse genetic methods and genome-wide transcriptional analysis, we (1 confirmed the presence of genes involved in catabolism of the abundant environmental sugar myo-inositol, (2 defined an operon encoding an ABC-family myo-inositol transmembrane transporter, and (3 identified a novel myo-inositol regulator protein and cis-acting regulatory motif that control expression of genes in this metabolic module. Despite being encoded from non-contiguous loci on the C. crescentus chromosome, these myo-inositol catabolic enzymes and transporter proteins form a tightly linked functional group in a computationally inferred network of protein associations. Primary sequence comparison was not sufficient to confidently extend annotation of all components of this novel metabolic module to related bacterial genera. Consequently, we implemented the Graemlin multiple-network alignment algorithm to generate cross-species predictions of genes involved in myo-inositol transport and catabolism in other alpha-proteobacteria. Although the chromosomal organization of genes in this functional module varied between species, the upstream regions of genes in this aligned network were enriched for the same palindromic cis-regulatory motif identified experimentally in C. crescentus. Transposon disruption of the operon encoding the computationally predicted ABC myo-inositol transporter of Sinorhizobium meliloti abolished growth on myo-inositol as the sole carbon source, confirming our cross-genera functional prediction. Thus, we have defined regulatory, transport, and catabolic genes and a cis-acting regulatory sequence that form a conserved module required for myo

  8. Global analysis of cell cycle gene expression of the legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nisco, Nicole J; Abo, Ryan P; Wu, C Max; Penterman, Jon; Walker, Graham C

    2014-03-04

    In α-proteobacteria, strict regulation of cell cycle progression is necessary for the specific cellular differentiation required for adaptation to diverse environmental niches. The symbiotic lifestyle of Sinorhizobium meliloti requires a drastic cellular differentiation that includes genome amplification. To achieve polyploidy, the S. meliloti cell cycle program must be altered to uncouple DNA replication from cell division. In the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, cell cycle-regulated transcription plays an important role in the control of cell cycle progression but this has not been demonstrated in other α-proteobacteria. Here we describe a robust method for synchronizing cell growth that enabled global analysis of S. meliloti cell cycle-regulated gene expression. This analysis identified 462 genes with cell cycle-regulated transcripts, including several key cell cycle regulators, and genes involved in motility, attachment, and cell division. Only 28% of the 462 S. meliloti cell cycle-regulated genes were also transcriptionally cell cycle-regulated in C. crescentus. Furthermore, CtrA- and DnaA-binding motif analysis revealed little overlap between the cell cycle-dependent regulons of CtrA and DnaA in S. meliloti and C. crescentus. The predicted S. meliloti cell cycle regulon of CtrA, but not that of DnaA, was strongly conserved in more closely related α-proteobacteria with similar ecological niches as S. meliloti, suggesting that the CtrA cell cycle regulatory network may control functions of central importance to the specific lifestyles of α-proteobacteria.

  9. Crystal growth, electrical and photophysical properties of Tl2S layered single crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A M Badr; H A Elshaikh; I M Ashraf

    2009-05-01

    The Tl2S compound was prepared in a single crystal form using a special local technique, and the obtained crystals were analysed by X-ray diffraction. For the resultant crystals, the electrical properties (electrical conductivity and Hall effect) and steady-state photoconductivity were elucidated in this work. The electrical measurements extend from 170 to 430 K, where it was found that ⊥ = 8.82 × 10−5 Sm-1 when current flow direction makes right angle to the cleavage plane of the crystals. In the same range of temperatures, it was found that ∥ = 4.73 × 10−5 Sm-1 when the current flow is parallel to the cleavage plane. In line with the investigated range of temperatures, the widths of the band gaps were calculated and discussed as also the results of the electrical conductivity and Hall effect measurements. In addition, the anisotropy of the electrical conductivity (⊥/∥) for the obtained crystals was also studied in this work. Finally the photosensitivity was calculated for different levels of illumination as a result of the photoconductivity measurements, which showed that the recombination process in Tl2S single crystals is a monomolecular process.

  10. Characteristics of photoconductivity in Tl{sub 2}S layered single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashraf, I.M.; Elshaikh, H.A.; Badr, A.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science (Aswan), South Valley University (Egypt)

    2004-03-01

    In this work the photoconductivity measurements are carried out for single crystals of the Tl{sub 2}S compound by using both pulsed excitation (a.c) and steady state (d.c) methods in order to elucidate the nature of photoconductivity (PC) in this compound. Results are reported in the temperature range from 77 K to 300 K, excitation intensity range from 1800 V to 5200 V Lux, applied voltage range from 2 V to 14 V, and wavelength range from 840 nm to 1450 nm. Both of the ac-photoconductivity (ac-PC) and the spectral distribution of the photocurrent are studied at different values of light intensity, applied voltage, and temperature. Dependencies of the carrier lifetime on the light intensity, the applied voltage, and the temperature have also been investigated as results of the ac-PC measurements. The temperature dependence of the energy gap width has been described as a result of studying the dc-photoconductivity (dc-PC). (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Magnetic Au Nanoparticles on Archaeal S-Layer Ghosts as Templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Selenska-Pobell

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell‐ghosts representing empty cells of the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, consisting only of their highly ordered and unusually stable outermost proteinaceous surface layer (S‐layer, were used as templates for Au nanoparticles fabrication. The properties of these archaeal Au nanoparticles differ significantly from those produced earlier by us onto bacterial S‐layer sheets. The archaeal Au nanoparticles, with a size of about 2.5 nm, consist exclusively of metallic Au(0, while those produced on the bacterial S‐layer had a size of about 4 nm and represented a mixture of Au(0 and Au(III in the ratio of 40 to 60 %. The most impressive feature of the archaeal Au nanoparticles is that they are strongly paramagnetic, in contrast to the bacterial ones and also to bulk gold. SQUID magnetometry and XMCD measurements demonstrated that the archaeal Au nanoparticles possess a rather large magnetic moment of about 0.1 µB/atom. HR‐ TEM‐EDX analysis revealed that the archaeal Au nanoparticles are linked to the sulfur atoms of the thiol groups of the amino acid cysteine, characteristic only for archaeal S‐layers. This is the first study demonstrating the formation of such unusually strong magnetic Au nanoparticles on a non‐modified archaeal S‐layer.

  12. Molecule Recognition Imaging and Highly Ordered Gold Nanoparticle Templating of Functional Bacterial S-Layer Nanoarrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jilin TANG; Andreas Ebner; Helga Badelt-Lichtblau; Christian Rankl; Michael Leitner; Hermann J.Gruber; Uwe B.Sleytr; Nicola Ilk; Peter Hinterdorfer

    2009-01-01

    @@ Molecular recognition between receptors and their cognate ligands plays an important role in life sciences.Such specific interactions include those between complementary strands of DNA,enzyme and substrate,antigen and antibody,lectin and carbohydrate,ligands and cell surface receptors as well as between cell adhesion proteins.

  13. Cell surface hydrophobicity is conveyed by S-layer proteins - A study in recombinant lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, H.C. van der; Belt-Gritter, B. van de; Pouwels, P.H.; Martinez, B.; Busscher, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Cell surface hydrophobicity is one of the most important factors controlling adhesion of microorganisms to surfaces. In this paper, cell surface properties of lactobacilli and recombinant lactobacilli with and without a surface layer protein (SLP) associated with cell surface hydrophobicity were det

  14. Defect characterization of Ga$_4$Se$_3$S layered single crystals by thermoluminescence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Isik M; Delice S; Gasanly N

    2016-04-01

    Trapping centres in undoped Ga$_4$Se$_3$S single crystals grown by Bridgman method were characterized for the first time by thermoluminescence (TL) measurements carried out in the low temperature range of 15−300 K. After illuminating the sample with blue light (∼470 nm) at 15 K, TL glow curve exhibited one peak around 74 K when measured with a heating rate of 0.4 K/s.The results of the various analysis methods were in good agreement about the presence of one trapping centre with an activation energy of 27 meV. Analysis of curve fitting method indicated that mixed order of kinetics dominates the trapping process. Heating rate dependence and distribution of the traps associated with the observed TL peak were also studied. The shift of peak maximum temperature from 74 to 113 K with increasing rate from 0.4 to 1.2 K/s was revealed. Distribution of traps was investigated using an experimental technique based on cleaning the centres giving emission at lower temperatures. Activation energies of the levels were observed to be increasing from 27 to 40 meV by rising the stopping temperature from 15 to 36 K.

  15. Replication initiator DnaA binds at the Caulobacter centromere and enables chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mera, Paola E; Kalogeraki, Virginia S; Shapiro, Lucy

    2014-11-11

    During cell division, multiple processes are highly coordinated to faithfully generate genetically equivalent daughter cells. In bacteria, the mechanisms that underlie the coordination of chromosome replication and segregation are poorly understood. Here, we report that the conserved replication initiator, DnaA, can mediate chromosome segregation independent of replication initiation. It does so by binding directly to the parS centromere region of the chromosome, and mutations that alter this interaction result in cells that display aberrant centromere translocation and cell division. We propose that DnaA serves to coordinate bacterial DNA replication with the onset of chromosome segregation.

  16. A novel aldose-aldose oxidoreductase for co-production of D-xylonate and xylitol from D-xylose with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, Marilyn G; Nygård, Yvonne; Oja, Merja; Andberg, Martina; Ruohonen, Laura; Koivula, Anu; Penttilä, Merja; Toivari, Mervi

    2015-11-01

    An open reading frame CC1225 from the Caulobacter crescentus CB15 genome sequence belongs to the Gfo/Idh/MocA protein family and has 47 % amino acid sequence identity with the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase from Zymomonas mobilis (Zm GFOR). We expressed the ORF CC1225 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and used a yeast strain expressing the gene coding for Zm GFOR as a reference. Cell extracts of strains overexpressing CC1225 (renamed as Cc aaor) showed some Zm GFOR type of activity, producing D-gluconate and D-sorbitol when a mixture of D-glucose and D-fructose was used as substrate. However, the activity in Cc aaor expressing strain was >100-fold lower compared to strains expressing Zm gfor. Interestingly, C. crescentus AAOR was clearly more efficient than the Zm GFOR in converting in vitro a single sugar substrate D-xylose (10 mM) to xylitol without an added cofactor, whereas this type of activity was very low with Zm GFOR. Furthermore, when cultured in the presence of D-xylose, the S. cerevisiae strain expressing Cc aaor produced nearly equal concentrations of D-xylonate and xylitol (12.5 g D-xylonate l(-1) and 11.5 g D-xylitol l(-1) from 26 g D-xylose l(-1)), whereas the control strain and strain expressing Zm gfor produced only D-xylitol (5 g l(-1)). Deletion of the gene encoding the major aldose reductase, Gre3p, did not affect xylitol production in the strain expressing Cc aaor, but decreased xylitol production in the strain expressing Zm gfor. In addition, expression of Cc aaor together with the D-xylonolactone lactonase encoding the gene xylC from C. crescentus slightly increased the final concentration and initial volumetric production rate of both D-xylonate and D-xylitol. These results suggest that C. crescentus AAOR is a novel type of oxidoreductase able to convert the single aldose substrate D-xylose to both its oxidized and reduced product.

  17. Disease: H01148 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H01148 Caulobacter infection The genus Caulobacter includes gram-negative bacteria characterized by asymmetr...ic cell division and stalk. Although infection with Caulobacter species is rare, it

  18. Mathematical modeling of bacterial track-altering motors: Track cleaving through burnt-bridge ratchets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtylla, Blerta; Keener, James P.

    2015-04-01

    The generation of directed movement of cellular components frequently requires the rectification of Brownian motion. Molecular motor enzymes that use ATP to walk on filamentous tracks are typically involved in cell transport, however, a track-altering motor can arise when an enzyme interacts with and alters its track. In Caulobacter crescentus and other bacteria, an active DNA partitioning (Par) apparatus is employed to segregate replicated chromosome regions to specific locations in dividing cells. The Par apparatus is composed of two proteins: ParA, an ATPase that can form polymeric structures on the nucleoid, and ParB, a protein that can bind and destabilize ParA structures. It has been proposed that the ParB-mediated alteration of ParA structures could be responsible for generating the directed movement of DNA during bacterial division. How precisely these actions are coordinated and translated into directed movement is not clear. In this paper we consider the C. crescentus segregation apparatus as an example of a track altering motor that operates using a so-called burnt-bridge mechanism. We develop and analyze mathematical models that examine how diffusion and ATP-hydrolysis-mediated monomer removal (or cleaving) can be combined to generate directed movement. Using a mean first passage approach, we analytically calculate the effective ParA track-cleaving velocities, effective diffusion coefficient, and other higher moments for the movement a ParB protein cluster that breaks monomers away at random locations on a single ParA track. Our model results indicate that cleaving velocities and effective diffusion constants are sensitive to ParB-induced ATP hydrolysis rates. Our analytical results are in excellent agreement with stochastic simulation results.

  19. New criteria for selecting the origin of DNA replication in Wolbachia and closely related bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldo Laura

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The annotated genomes of two closely related strains of the intracellular bacterium Wolbachia pipientis have been reported without the identifications of the putative origin of replication (ori. Identifying the ori of these bacteria and related alpha-Proteobacteria as well as their patterns of sequence evolution will aid studies of cell replication and cell density, as well as the potential genetic manipulation of these widespread intracellular bacteria. Results Using features that have been previously experimentally verified in the alpha-Proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, the origin of DNA replication (ori regions were identified in silico for Wolbachia strains and eleven other related bacteria belonging to Ehrlichia, Anaplasma, and Rickettsia genera. These features include DnaA-, CtrA- and IHF-binding sites as well as the flanking genes in C. crescentus. The Wolbachia ori boundary genes were found to be hemE and COG1253 protein (CBS domain protein. Comparisons of the putative ori region among related Wolbachia strains showed higher conservation of bases within binding sites. Conclusion The sequences of the ori regions described here are only similar among closely related bacteria while fundamental characteristics like presence of DnaA and IHF binding sites as well as the boundary genes are more widely conserved. The relative paucity of CtrA binding sites in the ori regions, as well as the absence of key enzymes associated with DNA replication in the respective genomes, suggest that several of these obligate intracellular bacteria may have altered replication mechanisms. Based on these analyses, criteria are set forth for identifying the ori region in genome sequencing projects.

  20. Essential Genome of the Metabolically Versatile Alphaproteobacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechter, Kieran B.; Gallagher, Larry; Pyles, Harley; Manoil, Colin S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rhodopseudomonas palustris is an alphaproteobacterium that has served as a model organism for studies of photophosphorylation, regulation of nitrogen fixation, production of hydrogen as a biofuel, and anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds. This bacterium is able to transition between anaerobic photoautotrophic growth, anaerobic photoheterotrophic growth, and aerobic heterotrophic growth. As a starting point to explore the genetic basis for the metabolic versatility of R. palustris, we used transposon mutagenesis and Tn-seq to identify 552 genes as essential for viability in cells growing aerobically on semirich medium. Of these, 323 have essential gene homologs in the alphaproteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, and 187 have essential gene homologs in Escherichia coli. There were 24 R. palustris genes that were essential for viability under aerobic growth conditions that have low sequence identity but are likely to be functionally homologous to essential E. coli genes. As expected, certain functional categories of essential genes were highly conserved among the three organisms, including translation, ribosome structure and biogenesis, secretion, and lipid metabolism. R. palustris cells divide by budding in which a sessile cell gives rise to a motile swarmer cell. Conserved cell cycle genes required for this developmental process were essential in both C. crescentus and R. palustris. Our results suggest that despite vast differences in lifestyles, members of the alphaproteobacteria have a common set of essential genes that is specific to this group and distinct from that of gammaproteobacteria like E. coli. IMPORTANCE Essential genes in bacteria and other organisms are those absolutely required for viability. Rhodopseudomonas palustris has served as a model organism for studies of anaerobic aromatic compound degradation, hydrogen gas production, nitrogen fixation, and photosynthesis. We used the technique of Tn-seq to determine the essential genes of

  1. Timescales and Frequencies of Reversible and Irreversible Adhesion Events of Single Bacterial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Michelle D; Zucker, Lauren I; Brown, Pamela J B; Kysela, David T; Brun, Yves V; Jacobson, Stephen C

    2015-12-15

    In the environment, most bacteria form surface-attached cell communities called biofilms. The attachment of single cells to surfaces involves an initial reversible stage typically mediated by surface structures such as flagella and pili, followed by a permanent adhesion stage usually mediated by polysaccharide adhesives. Here, we determine the absolute and relative timescales and frequencies of reversible and irreversible adhesion of single cells of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus to a glass surface in a microfluidic device. We used fluorescence microscopy of C. crescentus expressing green fluorescent protein to track the swimming behavior of individual cells prior to adhesion, monitor the cell at the surface, and determine whether the cell reversibly or irreversibly adhered to the surface. A fluorescently labeled lectin that binds specifically to polar polysaccharides, termed holdfast, discriminated irreversible adhesion events from reversible adhesion events where no holdfast formed. In wild-type cells, the holdfast production time for irreversible adhesion events initiated by surface contact (23 s) was 30-times faster than the holdfast production time that occurs through developmental regulation (13 min). Irreversible adhesion events in wild-type cells (3.3 events/min) are 15-times more frequent than in pilus-minus mutant cells (0.2 events/min), indicating the pili are critical structures in the transition from reversible to irreversible surface-stimulated adhesion. In reversible adhesion events, the dwell time of cells at the surface before departing was the same for wild-type cells (12 s) and pilus-minus mutant cells (13 s), suggesting the pili do not play a significant role in reversible adhesion. Moreover, reversible adhesion events in wild-type cells (6.8 events/min) occur twice as frequently as irreversible adhesion events (3.3 events/min), demonstrating that most cells contact the surface multiple times before transitioning from reversible to

  2. The cGMP signaling pathway affects feeding behavior in the necromenic nematode Pristionchus pacificus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina M Kroetz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The genetic tractability and the species-specific association with beetles make the nematode Pristionchus pacificus an exciting emerging model organism for comparative studies in development and behavior. P. pacificus differs from Caenorhabditis elegans (a bacterial feeder by its buccal teeth and the lack of pharyngeal grinders, but almost nothing is known about which genes coordinate P. pacificus feeding behaviors, such as pharyngeal pumping rate, locomotion, and fat storage. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed P. pacificus pharyngeal pumping rate and locomotion behavior on and off food, as well as on different species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Caulobacter crescentus. We found that the cGMP-dependent protein kinase G (PKG Ppa-EGL-4 in P. pacificus plays an important role in regulating the pumping rate, mouth form dimorphism, the duration of forward locomotion, and the amount of fat stored in intestine. In addition, Ppa-EGL-4 interacts with Ppa-OBI-1, a recently identified protein involved in chemosensation, to influence feeding and locomotion behavior. We also found that C. crescentus NA1000 increased pharyngeal pumping as well as fat storage in P. pacificus. CONCLUSIONS: The PKG EGL-4 has conserved functions in regulating feeding behavior in both C. elegans and P. pacificus nematodes. The Ppa-EGL-4 also has been co-opted during evolution to regulate P. pacificus mouth form dimorphism that indirectly affect pharyngeal pumping rate. Specifically, the lack of Ppa-EGL-4 function increases pharyngeal pumping, time spent in forward locomotion, and fat storage, in part as a result of higher food intake. Ppa-OBI-1 functions upstream or parallel to Ppa-EGL-4. The beetle-associated omnivorous P. pacificus respond differently to changes in food state and food quality compared to the exclusively bacteriovorous C. elegans.

  3. Bacterial scaffold directs pole-specific centromere segregation.

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    Ptacin, Jerod L; Gahlmann, Andreas; Bowman, Grant R; Perez, Adam M; von Diezmann, Alexander R S; Eckart, Michael R; Moerner, W E; Shapiro, Lucy

    2014-05-13

    Bacteria use partitioning systems based on the ParA ATPase to actively mobilize and spatially organize molecular cargoes throughout the cytoplasm. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus uses a ParA-based partitioning system to segregate newly replicated chromosomal centromeres to opposite cell poles. Here we demonstrate that the Caulobacter PopZ scaffold creates an organizing center at the cell pole that actively regulates polar centromere transport by the ParA partition system. As segregation proceeds, the ParB-bound centromere complex is moved by progressively disassembling ParA from a nucleoid-bound structure. Using superresolution microscopy, we show that released ParA is recruited directly to binding sites within a 3D ultrastructure composed of PopZ at the cell pole, whereas the ParB-centromere complex remains at the periphery of the PopZ structure. PopZ recruitment of ParA stimulates ParA to assemble on the nucleoid near the PopZ-proximal cell pole. We identify mutations in PopZ that allow scaffold assembly but specifically abrogate interactions with ParA and demonstrate that PopZ/ParA interactions are required for proper chromosome segregation in vivo. We propose that during segregation PopZ sequesters free ParA and induces target-proximal regeneration of ParA DNA binding activity to enforce processive and pole-directed centromere segregation, preventing segregation reversals. PopZ therefore functions as a polar hub complex at the cell pole to directly regulate the directionality and destination of transfer of the mitotic segregation machine.

  4. Atomic-resolution structure of cytoskeletal bactofilin by solid-state NMR.

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    Shi, Chaowei; Fricke, Pascal; Lin, Lin; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Wegstroth, Melanie; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Thanbichler, Martin; Lange, Adam

    2015-12-01

    Bactofilins are a recently discovered class of cytoskeletal proteins of which no atomic-resolution structure has been reported thus far. The bacterial cytoskeleton plays an essential role in a wide range of processes, including morphogenesis, cell division, and motility. Among the cytoskeletal proteins, the bactofilins are bacteria-specific and do not have a eukaryotic counterpart. The bactofilin BacA of the species Caulobacter crescentus is not amenable to study by x-ray crystallography or solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) because of its inherent noncrystallinity and insolubility. We present the atomic structure of BacA calculated from solid-state NMR-derived distance restraints. We show that the core domain of BacA forms a right-handed β helix with six windings and a triangular hydrophobic core. The BacA structure was determined to 1.0 Å precision (heavy-atom root mean square deviation) on the basis of unambiguous restraints derived from four-dimensional (4D) HN-HN and 2D C-C NMR spectra.

  5. Precursor-centric genome-mining approach for lasso peptide discovery.

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    Maksimov, Mikhail O; Pelczer, István; Link, A James

    2012-09-18

    Lasso peptides are a class of ribosomally synthesized posttranslationally modified natural products found in bacteria. Currently known lasso peptides have a diverse set of pharmacologically relevant activities, including inhibition of bacterial growth, receptor antagonism, and enzyme inhibition. The biosynthesis of lasso peptides is specified by a cluster of three genes encoding a precursor protein and two enzymes. Here we develop a unique genome-mining algorithm to identify lasso peptide gene clusters in prokaryotes. Our approach involves pattern matching to a small number of conserved amino acids in precursor proteins, and thus allows for a more global survey of lasso peptide gene clusters than does homology-based genome mining. Of more than 3,000 currently sequenced prokaryotic genomes, we found 76 organisms that are putative lasso peptide producers. These organisms span nine bacterial phyla and an archaeal phylum. To provide validation of the genome-mining method, we focused on a single lasso peptide predicted to be produced by the freshwater bacterium Asticcacaulis excentricus. Heterologous expression of an engineered, minimal gene cluster in Escherichia coli led to the production of a unique lasso peptide, astexin-1. At 23 aa, astexin-1 is the largest lasso peptide isolated to date. It is also highly polar, in contrast to many lasso peptides that are primarily hydrophobic. Astexin-1 has modest antimicrobial activity against its phylogenetic relative Caulobacter crescentus. The solution structure of astexin-1 was determined revealing a unique topology that is stabilized by hydrogen bonding between segments of the peptide.

  6. Surface contact stimulates the just-in-time deployment of bacterial adhesins.

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    Li, Guanglai; Brown, Pamela J B; Tang, Jay X; Xu, Jing; Quardokus, Ellen M; Fuqua, Clay; Brun, Yves V

    2012-01-01

    The attachment of bacteria to surfaces provides advantages such as increasing nutrient access and resistance to environmental stress. Attachment begins with a reversible phase, often mediated by surface structures such as flagella and pili, followed by a transition to irreversible attachment, typically mediated by polysaccharides. Here we show that the interplay between pili and flagellum rotation stimulates the rapid transition between reversible and polysaccharide-mediated irreversible attachment. We found that reversible attachment of Caulobacter crescentus cells is mediated by motile cells bearing pili and that their contact with a surface results in the rapid pili-dependent arrest of flagellum rotation and concurrent stimulation of polar holdfast adhesive polysaccharide. Similar stimulation of polar adhesin production by surface contact occurs in Asticcacaulis biprosthecum and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Therefore, single bacterial cells respond to their initial contact with surfaces by triggering just-in-time adhesin production. This mechanism restricts stable attachment to intimate surface interactions, thereby maximizing surface attachment, discouraging non-productive self-adherence, and preventing curing of the adhesive.

  7. Low pH D-xylonate production with Pichia kudriavzevii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toivari, Mervi; Vehkomäki, Maija-Leena; Nygård, Yvonne; Penttilä, Merja; Ruohonen, Laura; Wiebe, Marilyn G

    2013-04-01

    D-xylonic acid is one of the top 30 most desirable chemicals to be derived from biomass sugars identified by the US Department of Energy, being applicable as a non-food substitute for D-gluconic acid and as a platform chemical. We engineered the non-conventional yeast Pichia kudriavzevii VTT C-79090T to express a D-xylose dehydrogenase coding gene from Caulobacter crescentus. With this single modification the recombinant P. kudriavzevii strain produced up to 171 g L(-1) of D-xylonate from 171 g L(-1) D-xylose at a rate of 1.4 g L(-1) h(-1) and yield of 1.0 g [g substrate consumed](-1), which was comparable with D-xylonate production by Gluconobacter oxydans or Pseudomonas sp. The productivity of the strain was also remarkable at low pH, producing 146 g L(-1) D-xylonate at 1.2 g L(-1) h(-1) at pH 3.0. This is the best low pH production reported for D-xylonate. These results encourage further development towards industrial scale production.

  8. High yield production of D-xylonic acid from D-xylose using engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huaiwei; Valdehuesa, Kris Niño G; Nisola, Grace M; Ramos, Kristine Rose M; Chung, Wook-Jin

    2012-07-01

    An engineered Escherichia coli was constructed to produce D-xylonic acid, one of the top 30 high-value chemicals identified by US Department of Energy. The native pathway for D-xylose catabolism in E. coli W3110 was blocked by disrupting xylose isomerase (XI) and xylulose kinase (XK) genes. The native pathway for xylonic acid catabolism was also blocked by disrupting two genes both encoding xylonic acid dehydratase (yagE and yjhG). Through the introduction of a D-xylose dehydrogenase from Caulobacter crescentus, a D-xylonic acid producing E. coli was constructed. The recombinant E. coli produced up to 39.2 g L(-1) D-xylonic acid from 40 g L(-1) D-xylose in M9 minimal medium. The average productivity was as high as 1.09 g L(-1) h(-1) and no gluconic acid byproduct was produced. These results suggest that the engineered E. coli has a promising application for the industrial-scale production of D-xylonic acid.

  9. Structure of a putative trans-editing enzyme for prolyl-tRNA synthetase from Aeropyrum pernix K1 at 1.7 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murayama, Kazutaka; Kato-Murayama, Miyuki; Katsura, Kazushige; Uchikubo-Kamo, Tomomi; Yamaguchi-Hirafuji, Machiko; Kawazoe, Masahito; Akasaka, Ryogo; Hanawa-Suetsugu, Kyoko; Hori-Takemoto, Chie [RIKEN Genomic Sciences Center, Yokohama (Japan); Terada, Takaho [RIKEN Genomic Sciences Center, Yokohama (Japan); RIKEN Harima Institute at SPring-8, Hyogo (Japan); Shirouzu, Mikako [RIKEN Harima Institute at SPring-8, Hyogo (Japan); Yokoyama, Shigeyuki, E-mail: yokoyama@biochem.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [RIKEN Genomic Sciences Center, Yokohama (Japan); RIKEN Harima Institute at SPring-8, Hyogo (Japan); Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2005-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the APE2540 protein from A. pernix K1 has been determined by the multiple anomalous dispersion method at 1.7 Å resolution. The structure includes two monomers in the asymmetric unit and shares structural similarity with the YbaK protein or cysteinyl-tRNA{sup Pro} deacylase from H. influenzae. The crystal structure of APE2540, the putative trans-editing enzyme ProX from Aeropyrum pernix K1, was determined in a high-throughput manner. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.4, b = 58.9, c = 53.6 Å, β = 106.8°. The structure was solved by the multiwavelength anomalous dispersion method at 1.7 Å and refined to an R factor of 16.8% (R{sub free} = 20.5%). The crystal structure includes two protein molecules in the asymmetric unit. Each monomer consists of eight β-strands and seven α-helices. A structure-homology search revealed similarity between the trans-editing enzyme YbaK (or cysteinyl-tRNA{sup Pro} deacylase) from Haemophilus influenzae (HI1434; 22% sequence identity) and putative ProX proteins from Caulobacter crescentus (16%) and Agrobacterium tumefaciens (21%)

  10. N-Acetylglucosamine-dependent biofilm formation in Pectobacterium atrosepticum is cryptic and activated by elevated c-di-GMP levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Coulthurst, Sarah J; Sanjuán, Juan; Salmond, George P C

    2011-12-01

    The phytopathogenic bacterium Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pba) strain SCRI1043 does not exhibit appreciable biofilm formation under standard laboratory conditions. Here we show that a biofilm-forming phenotype in this strain could be activated from a cryptic state by increasing intracellular levels of c-di-GMP, through overexpression of a constitutively active diguanylate cyclase (PleD*) from Caulobacter crescentus. Randomly obtained Pba transposon mutants defective in the pga operon, involved in synthesis and translocation of poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (PGA), were all impaired in this biofilm formation. The presence of the PGA-degrading enzyme dispersin B in the growth media prevented biofilm formation by Pba overexpressing PleD*, further supporting the importance of PGA for biofilm formation by Pba. Importantly, a pga mutant exhibited a reduction in root binding to the host plant under conditions of high intracellular c-di-GMP levels. A modest but consistent increase in pga transcript levels was associated with high intracellular levels of c-di-GMP. Our results indicate tight control of PGA-dependent biofilm formation by c-di-GMP in Pba.

  11. Bacillus subtilis chromosome organization oscillates between two distinct patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xindan; Montero Llopis, Paula; Rudner, David Z

    2014-09-02

    Bacterial chromosomes have been found to possess one of two distinct patterns of spatial organization. In the first, called "ori-ter" and exemplified by Caulobacter crescentus, the chromosome arms lie side-by-side, with the replication origin and terminus at opposite cell poles. In the second, observed in slow-growing Escherichia coli ("left-ori-right"), the two chromosome arms reside in separate cell halves, on either side of a centrally located origin. These two patterns, rotated 90° relative to each other, appear to result from different segregation mechanisms. Here, we show that the Bacillus subtilis chromosome alternates between them. For most of the cell cycle, newly replicated origins are maintained at opposite poles with chromosome arms adjacent to each other, in an ori-ter configuration. Shortly after replication initiation, the duplicated origins move as a unit to midcell and the two unreplicated arms resolve into opposite cell halves, generating a left-ori-right pattern. The origins are then actively segregated toward opposite poles, resetting the cycle. Our data suggest that the condensin complex and the parABS partitioning system are the principal driving forces underlying this oscillatory cycle. We propose that the distinct organization patterns observed for bacterial chromosomes reflect a common organization-segregation mechanism, and that simple modifications to it underlie the unique patterns observed in different species.

  12. Filament depolymerization can pull a chromosome during bacterial mitosis

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    Banigan, Edward; Gelbart, Michael; Gitai, Zemer; Liu, Andrea; Wingreen, Ned

    2011-03-01

    Chromosome segregation is fundamental to all cells, but the force-generating mechanisms underlying chromosome translocation in bacteria remain mysterious. Caulobacter crescentus utilizes a depolymerization-driven process in which a ParA protein structure elongates from the new cell pole and binds to a ParB-decorated chromosome, and then retracts via disassembly, thus pulling the chromosome across the cell. This poses the question of how a depolymerizing structure can robustly pull the chromosome that is disassembling it. We perform Brownian dynamics simulations with a simple and physically consistent model of the ParABS system. The simulations suggest that the mechanism of translocation is ``self-diffusiophoretic'': by disassembling ParA, ParB generates a ParA concentration gradient so that the concentration of ParA is higher in front of the chromosome than behind it. Since the chromosome is attracted to ParA via ParB, it moves up the ParA gradient and across the cell. We find that translocation is controlled by the product of an effective relaxation time for the chromosome and the rate of ParA disassembly. Our results provide a physical explanation of the mechanism of depolymerization-driven translocation and suggest physical explanations for recent experimental observations.

  13. Chromosome replication and segregation govern the biogenesis and inheritance of inorganic polyphosphate granules.

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    Henry, Jonathan T; Crosson, Sean

    2013-10-01

    Prokaryotes and eukaryotes synthesize long chains of orthophosphate, known as polyphosphate (polyP), which form dense granules within the cell. PolyP regulates myriad cellular functions and is often localized to specific subcellular addresses through mechanisms that remain undefined. In this study, we present a molecular-level analysis of polyP subcellular localization in the model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. We demonstrate that biogenesis and localization of polyP is controlled as a function of the cell cycle, which ensures regular partitioning of granules between mother and daughter. The enzyme polyphosphate kinase 1 (Ppk1) is required for granule production, colocalizes with granules, and dynamically localizes to the sites of new granule synthesis in nascent daughter cells. Localization of Ppk1 within the cell requires an intact catalytic active site and a short, positively charged tail at the C-terminus of the protein. The processes of chromosome replication and segregation govern both the number and position of Ppk1/polyP complexes within the cell. We propose a multistep model in which the chromosome establishes sites of polyP coalescence, which recruit Ppk1 to promote the in situ synthesis of large granules. These findings underscore the importance of both chromosome dynamics and discrete protein localization as organizing factors in bacterial cell biology.

  14. Cell cycle coordination and regulation of bacterial chromosome segregation dynamics by polarly localized proteins.

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    Schofield, Whitman B; Lim, Hoong Chuin; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2010-09-15

    What regulates chromosome segregation dynamics in bacteria is largely unknown. Here, we show in Caulobacter crescentus that the polarity factor TipN regulates the directional motion and overall translocation speed of the parS/ParB partition complex by interacting with ParA at the new pole. In the absence of TipN, ParA structures can regenerate behind the partition complex, leading to stalls and back-and-forth motions of parS/ParB, reminiscent of plasmid behaviour. This extrinsic regulation of the parS/ParB/ParA system directly affects not only division site selection, but also cell growth. Other mechanisms, including the pole-organizing protein PopZ, compensate for the defect in segregation regulation in ΔtipN cells. Accordingly, synthetic lethality of PopZ and TipN is caused by severe chromosome segregation and cell division defects. Our data suggest a mechanistic framework for adapting a self-organizing oscillator to create motion suitable for chromosome segregation.

  15. Evidence for a DNA-relay mechanism in ParABS-mediated chromosome segregation.

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    Lim, Hoong Chuin; Surovtsev, Ivan Vladimirovich; Beltran, Bruno Gabriel; Huang, Fang; Bewersdorf, Jörg; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2014-05-23

    The widely conserved ParABS system plays a major role in bacterial chromosome segregation. How the components of this system work together to generate translocation force and directional motion remains uncertain. Here, we combine biochemical approaches, quantitative imaging and mathematical modeling to examine the mechanism by which ParA drives the translocation of the ParB/parS partition complex in Caulobacter crescentus. Our experiments, together with simulations grounded on experimentally-determined biochemical and cellular parameters, suggest a novel 'DNA-relay' mechanism in which the chromosome plays a mechanical function. In this model, DNA-bound ParA-ATP dimers serve as transient tethers that harness the elastic dynamics of the chromosome to relay the partition complex from one DNA region to another across a ParA-ATP dimer gradient. Since ParA-like proteins are implicated in the partitioning of various cytoplasmic cargos, the conservation of their DNA-binding activity suggests that the DNA-relay mechanism may be a general form of intracellular transport in bacteria.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02758.001.

  16. The bacterial cell cycle regulator GcrA is a σ70 cofactor that drives gene expression from a subset of methylated promoters.

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    Haakonsen, Diane L; Yuan, Andy H; Laub, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    Cell cycle progression in most organisms requires tightly regulated programs of gene expression. The transcription factors involved typically stimulate gene expression by binding specific DNA sequences in promoters and recruiting RNA polymerase. Here, we found that the essential cell cycle regulator GcrA in Caulobacter crescentus activates the transcription of target genes in a fundamentally different manner. GcrA forms a stable complex with RNA polymerase and localizes to almost all active σ(70)-dependent promoters in vivo but activates transcription primarily at promoters harboring certain DNA methylation sites. Whereas most transcription factors that contact σ(70) interact with domain 4, GcrA interfaces with domain 2, the region that binds the -10 element during strand separation. Using kinetic analyses and a reconstituted in vitro transcription assay, we demonstrated that GcrA can stabilize RNA polymerase binding and directly stimulate open complex formation to activate transcription. Guided by these studies, we identified a regulon of ∼ 200 genes, providing new insight into the essential functions of GcrA. Collectively, our work reveals a new mechanism for transcriptional regulation, and we discuss the potential benefits of activating transcription by promoting RNA polymerase isomerization rather than recruitment exclusively.

  17. Cyclic di-GMP mediates a histidine kinase/phosphatase switch by noncovalent domain cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Badri N; Lori, Christian; Ozaki, Shogo; Fucile, Geoffrey; Plaza-Menacho, Ivan; Jenal, Urs; Schirmer, Tilman

    2016-09-01

    Histidine kinases are key components of regulatory networks in bacteria. Although many of these enzymes are bifunctional, mediating both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of downstream targets, the molecular details of this central regulatory switch are unclear. We showed recently that the universal second messenger cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) drives Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle progression by forcing the cell cycle kinase CckA from its default kinase into phosphatase mode. We use a combination of structure determination, modeling, and functional analysis to demonstrate that c-di-GMP reciprocally regulates the two antagonistic CckA activities through noncovalent cross-linking of the catalytic domain with the dimerization histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domain. We demonstrate that both c-di-GMP and ADP (adenosine diphosphate) promote phosphatase activity and propose that c-di-GMP stabilizes the ADP-bound quaternary structure, which allows the receiver domain to access the dimeric DHp stem for dephosphorylation. In silico analyses predict that c-di-GMP control is widespread among bacterial histidine kinases, arguing that it can replace or modulate canonical transmembrane signaling.

  18. Non-destructive monitoring of microbial biofilms at solid-liquid interfaces using on-line devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nivens, D.E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Chemistry Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Inst. for Applied Microbiology); Chambers, J.Q. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Chemistry); White, D.C. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Inst. for Applied Microbiology Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Microbiology Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Corrosion, biofouling, and related problems have been an impetus for investigating interactions between microorganisms and solid surfaces. In recent years, a number of studies have been performed to assess the damages caused by microbial influenced corrosion (MIC). In a number of these studies, electrochemical techniques have monitored the performance of metal surfaces exposed to bacteria. However, most of these methods can only indirectly detect the presence of biofilms. In this paper, two non-destructive on-line monitoring devices, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FT/IR) and the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) were used to directly monitor biofilm formation. These devices have been developed to study the initial fouling process and subsequent biofilm development and not merely the effects of the living film on the host material. The ATR-FT/IR technique provides information about biomass, exopolymer production, and the nutritional status of microbial biofilms. The QCM provides a direct measure of biomass. ATR-FT/IR and QCM detect 10{sup 6} and 10{sup 4} Caulobacter crescentus cells/cm{sup 2}, respectively. Both techniques can be coupled with electrochemical methods for deeper insight into mechanisms of MIC. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Cyclic di-GMP mediates a histidine kinase/phosphatase switch by noncovalent domain cross-linking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Badri N.; Lori, Christian; Ozaki, Shogo; Fucile, Geoffrey; Plaza-Menacho, Ivan; Jenal, Urs; Schirmer, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    Histidine kinases are key components of regulatory networks in bacteria. Although many of these enzymes are bifunctional, mediating both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of downstream targets, the molecular details of this central regulatory switch are unclear. We showed recently that the universal second messenger cyclic di–guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) drives Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle progression by forcing the cell cycle kinase CckA from its default kinase into phosphatase mode. We use a combination of structure determination, modeling, and functional analysis to demonstrate that c-di-GMP reciprocally regulates the two antagonistic CckA activities through noncovalent cross-linking of the catalytic domain with the dimerization histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domain. We demonstrate that both c-di-GMP and ADP (adenosine diphosphate) promote phosphatase activity and propose that c-di-GMP stabilizes the ADP-bound quaternary structure, which allows the receiver domain to access the dimeric DHp stem for dephosphorylation. In silico analyses predict that c-di-GMP control is widespread among bacterial histidine kinases, arguing that it can replace or modulate canonical transmembrane signaling. PMID:27652341

  20. Contribution of cell body to the thrust production of flagellate bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Powers, Thomas R.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2013-11-01

    We trace individual motile microorganisms using a digital 3D tracking microscope in which the microscope stage follows the motion of the target. Using this technology, we not only trace a single cell over extended duration but also obtain the cell kinematics with high spatial and temporal resolution. We apply this tracking microscope to a study of Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium that moves up to 100 microns (or 50 body lengths) per second and reverses its direction of motion by switching the rotation direction of its single helical flagellum. We show that when the cell reverses the rotation direction of the right-handed flagellum, e.g., switching from CW (a pusher) to CCW (a puller), its cell-kinematics is not completely reversible. In case of a puller, the cell almost spins along its long axis. However, in case of a pusher, besides spinning, the cell body precesses along its swimming direction, following a helical trajectory. These two types of cell-kinematics contribute to different cell motilities: the pusher rotates slower for the same swimming speed. We present a resistive force theory to account for this behavior, and by computing the torque on the cell body, we show that the finite precession angle of the bacterial pusher is optimized for swimming with fixed torque.

  1. Accumulation of microswimmers near surface due to steric confinement and rotational Brownian motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanglai; Tang, Jay

    2009-03-01

    Microscopic swimmers display some intriguing features dictated by Brownian motion, low Reynolds number fluid mechanics, and boundary confinement. We re-examine the reported accumulation of swimming bacteria or bull spermatozoa near the boundaries of a fluid chamber, and propose a kinematic model to explain how collision with surface, confinement and rotational Brownian motion give rise to the accumulation of micro-swimmers near a surface. In this model, an elongated microswimmer invariably travels parallel to the surface after hitting it from any incident angle. It then takes off and swims away from the surface after some time due to rotational Brownian motion. Based on this analysis, we obtain through computer simulation steady state density distributions that reproduce the ones measured for the small bacteria E coli and Caulobacter crescentus, as well as for the much larger bull spermatozoa swimming near surfaces. These results suggest strongly that Brownian dynamics and surface confinement are the dominant factors for the accumulation of microswimmers near a surface.

  2. LDSS-P: an advanced algorithm to extract functional short motifs associated with coordinated gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichida, Hiroyuki; Long, Sharon R.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying functional elements in promoter sequences is a major goal in computational and experimental genome biology. Here, we describe an algorithm, Local Distribution of Short Sequences for Prokaryotes (LDSS-P), to identify conserved short motifs located at specific positions in the promoters of co-expressed prokaryotic genes. As a test case, we applied this algorithm to a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium, Sinorhizobium meliloti. The LDSS-P profiles that overlap with the 5′ section of the extracytoplasmic function RNA polymerase sigma factor RpoE2 consensus sequences displayed a sharp peak between -34 and -32 from TSS positions. The corresponding genes overlap significantly with RpoE2 targets identified from previous experiments. We further identified several groups of genes that are co-regulated with characterized marker genes. Our data indicate that in S. meliloti, and possibly in other Rhizobiaceae species, the master cell cycle regulator CtrA may recognize an expanded motif (AACCAT), which is positionally shifted from the previously reported CtrA consensus sequence in Caulobacter crescentus. Bacterial one-hybrid experiments showed that base substitution in the expanded motif either increase or decrease the binding by CtrA. These results show the effectiveness of LDSS-P as a method to delineate functional promoter elements. PMID:27190233

  3. Intracellular chemical gradients: morphing principle in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endres Robert G

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Advances in computational biology allow systematic investigations to ascertain whether internal chemical gradients can be maintained in bacteria – an open question at the resolution limit of fluorescence microscopy. While it was previously believed that the small bacterial cell size and fast diffusion in the cytoplasm effectively remove any such gradient, a new computational study published in BMC Biophysics supports the emerging view that gradients can exist. The study arose from the recent observation that phosphorylated CtrA forms a gradient prior to cell division in Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium known for its complicated cell cycle. Tropini et al. (2012 postulate that such gradients can provide an internal chemical compass, directing protein localization, cell division and cell development. More specifically, they describe biochemical and physical constraints on the formation of such gradients and explore a number of existing bacterial cell morphologies. These chemical gradients may limit in vitro analyses, and may ensure timing control and robustness to fluctuations during critical stages in cell development.

  4. Dissecting the specificity of protein-protein interaction in bacterial two-component signaling: orphans and crosstalks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Procaccini

    Full Text Available Predictive understanding of the myriads of signal transduction pathways in a cell is an outstanding challenge of systems biology. Such pathways are primarily mediated by specific but transient protein-protein interactions, which are difficult to study experimentally. In this study, we dissect the specificity of protein-protein interactions governing two-component signaling (TCS systems ubiquitously used in bacteria. Exploiting the large number of sequenced bacterial genomes and an operon structure which packages many pairs of interacting TCS proteins together, we developed a computational approach to extract a molecular interaction code capturing the preferences of a small but critical number of directly interacting residue pairs. This code is found to reflect physical interaction mechanisms, with the strongest signal coming from charged amino acids. It is used to predict the specificity of TCS interaction: Our results compare favorably to most available experimental results, including the prediction of 7 (out of 8 known interaction partners of orphan signaling proteins in Caulobacter crescentus. Surveying among the available bacterial genomes, our results suggest 15∼25% of the TCS proteins could participate in out-of-operon "crosstalks". Additionally, we predict clusters of crosstalking candidates, expanding from the anecdotally known examples in model organisms. The tools and results presented here can be used to guide experimental studies towards a system-level understanding of two-component signaling.

  5. Cell fate regulation governed by a repurposed bacterial histidine kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Seth Childers

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the simplest organisms to divide asymmetrically is the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. The DivL pseudo-histidine kinase, positioned at one cell pole, regulates cell-fate by controlling the activation of the global transcription factor CtrA via an interaction with the response regulator (RR DivK. DivL uniquely contains a tyrosine at the histidine phosphorylation site, and can achieve these regulatory functions in vivo without kinase activity. Determination of the DivL crystal structure and biochemical analysis of wild-type and site-specific DivL mutants revealed that the DivL PAS domains regulate binding specificity for DivK∼P over DivK, which is modulated by an allosteric intramolecular interaction between adjacent domains. We discovered that DivL's catalytic domains have been repurposed as a phosphospecific RR input sensor, thereby reversing the flow of information observed in conventional histidine kinase (HK-RR systems and coupling a complex network of signaling proteins for cell-fate regulation.

  6. On the link between cell cycle and infection of the Alphaproteobacterium Brucella abortus

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    Michaël Deghelt

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the Brucella genus are responsible for brucellosis, a worldwide zoonosis. These bacteria are known to have a peculiar intracellular trafficking, with a first long and non-proliferative endosomal stage and a second proliferation stage, often associated with its localization of the bacteria in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. However, the status of the bacterial cell cycle during the non-proliferative phase was still unknown. In a recent study [Nat. Communic. 5:4366], we followed the cell cycle of B. abortus in culture and inside the host cells. In culture, B. abortus initiates the replication of its large chromosome before the small chromosome. The origin and terminator regions of these two chromosomes display distinct localization and dynamics within B. abortus. In HeLa cells and RAW264.7 macrophages, the bacteria in G1 (i.e. before the initiation of chromosomes replication are preferentially found during the endosomal stage of the infection. During this period, growth is also arrested. The cell cycle arrest and resume during the B. abortus trafficking in host cell suggest that like the model Alphaproteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, these bacteria are able to block their cell cycle at the G1 phase when starvation is sensed.

  7. How to make a spiral bacterium

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    Wolgemuth, Charles W.; Inclan, Yuki F.; Quan, Julie; Mukherjee, Sulav; Oster, George; Koehl, M. A. R.

    2005-09-01

    The motility of some kinds of bacteria depends on their spiral form, as does the virulence of certain pathogenic species. We propose a novel mechanism for the development of spiral shape in bacteria and the supercoiling of chains ('filaments') of many cells. Recently discovered actin-like proteins lying just under the cell wall form fibers that play a role in maintaining cell shape. Some species have a single actin-like fiber helically wrapped around the cell, while others have two fibers wrapped in the same direction. Here, we show that if these fibers elongate more slowly than growth lengthens the cell, the cell both twists and bends, taking on a spiral shape. We tested this mechanism using a mathematical model of expanding fiber-wound structures and via experiments that measure the shape changes of elongating physical models. Comparison of the model with in vivo experiments on stationary phase Caulobacter crescentus filaments provide the first evidence that mechanical stretching of cytoskeletal fibers influences cell morphology. Any hydraulic cylinder can spiral by this mechanism if it is reinforced by stretch-resistant fibers wrapped helically in the same direction, or shortened by contractile elements. This might be useful in the design of man-made actuators.

  8. A cell cycle and nutritional checkpoint controlling bacterial surface adhesion.

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    Aretha Fiebig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In natural environments, bacteria often adhere to surfaces where they form complex multicellular communities. Surface adherence is determined by the biochemical composition of the cell envelope. We describe a novel regulatory mechanism by which the bacterium, Caulobacter crescentus, integrates cell cycle and nutritional signals to control development of an adhesive envelope structure known as the holdfast. Specifically, we have discovered a 68-residue protein inhibitor of holdfast development (HfiA that directly targets a conserved glycolipid glycosyltransferase required for holdfast production (HfsJ. Multiple cell cycle regulators associate with the hfiA and hfsJ promoters and control their expression, temporally constraining holdfast development to the late stages of G1. HfiA further functions as part of a 'nutritional override' system that decouples holdfast development from the cell cycle in response to nutritional cues. This control mechanism can limit surface adhesion in nutritionally sub-optimal environments without affecting cell cycle progression. We conclude that post-translational regulation of cell envelope enzymes by small proteins like HfiA may provide a general means to modulate the surface properties of bacterial cells.

  9. A Conserved Mode of Protein Recognition and Binding in a ParD−ParE Toxin−Antitoxin Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, Kevin M.; Crosson, Sean (UC)

    2010-05-06

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems form a ubiquitous class of prokaryotic proteins with functional roles in plasmid inheritance, environmental stress response, and cell development. ParDE family TA systems are broadly conserved on plasmids and bacterial chromosomes and have been well characterized as genetic elements that promote stable plasmid inheritance. We present a crystal structure of a chromosomally encoded ParD-ParE complex from Caulobacter crescentus at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. This TA system forms an {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} heterotetramer in the crystal and in solution. The toxin-antitoxin binding interface reveals extensive polar and hydrophobic contacts of ParD antitoxin helices with a conserved recognition and binding groove on the ParE toxin. A cross-species comparison of this complex structure with related toxin structures identified an antitoxin recognition and binding subdomain that is conserved between distantly related members of the RelE/ParE toxin superfamily despite a low level of overall primary sequence identity. We further demonstrate that ParD antitoxin is dimeric, stably folded, and largely helical when not bound to ParE toxin. Thus, the paradigmatic model in which antitoxin undergoes a disorder-to-order transition upon toxin binding does not apply to this chromosomal ParD-ParE TA system.

  10. Nutritional Control of DNA Replication Initiation through the Proteolysis and Regulated Translation of DnaA.

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    David J Leslie

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria can arrest their own growth and proliferation upon nutrient depletion and under various stressful conditions to ensure their survival. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for suppressing growth and arresting the cell cycle under such conditions remain incompletely understood. Here, we identify post-transcriptional mechanisms that help enforce a cell-cycle arrest in Caulobacter crescentus following nutrient limitation and during entry into stationary phase by limiting the accumulation of DnaA, the conserved replication initiator protein. DnaA is rapidly degraded by the Lon protease following nutrient limitation. However, the rate of DnaA degradation is not significantly altered by changes in nutrient availability. Instead, we demonstrate that decreased nutrient availability downregulates dnaA translation by a mechanism involving the 5' untranslated leader region of the dnaA transcript; Lon-dependent proteolysis of DnaA then outpaces synthesis, leading to the elimination of DnaA and the arrest of DNA replication. Our results demonstrate how regulated translation and constitutive degradation provide cells a means of precisely and rapidly modulating the concentration of key regulatory proteins in response to environmental inputs.

  11. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for the production of xylonate.

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    Yujin Cao

    Full Text Available Xylonate is a valuable chemical for versatile applications. Although the chemical synthesis route and microbial conversion pathway were established decades ago, no commercial production of xylonate has been obtained so far. In this study, the industrially important microorganism Escherichia coli was engineered to produce xylonate from xylose. Through the coexpression of a xylose dehydrogenase (xdh and a xylonolactonase (xylC from Caulobacter crescentus, the recombinant strain could convert 1 g/L xylose to 0.84 g/L xylonate and 0.10 g/L xylonolactone after being induced for 12 h. Furthermore, the competitive pathway for xylose catabolism in E. coli was blocked by disrupting two genes (xylA and xylB encoding xylose isomerase and xylulose kinase. Under fed-batch conditions, the finally engineered strain produced up to 27.3 g/L xylonate and 1.7 g/L xylonolactone from 30 g/L xylose, about 88% of the theoretical yield. These results suggest that the engineered E. coli strain has a promising perspective for large-scale production of xylonate.

  12. Computational and genetic reduction of a cell cycle to its simplest, primordial components.

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    Seán M Murray

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available What are the minimal requirements to sustain an asymmetric cell cycle? Here we use mathematical modelling and forward genetics to reduce an asymmetric cell cycle to its simplest, primordial components. In the Alphaproteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, cell cycle progression is believed to be controlled by a cyclical genetic circuit comprising four essential master regulators. Unexpectedly, our in silico modelling predicted that one of these regulators, GcrA, is in fact dispensable. We confirmed this experimentally, finding that ΔgcrA cells are viable, but slow-growing and elongated, with the latter mostly due to an insufficiency of a key cell division protein. Furthermore, suppressor analysis showed that another cell cycle regulator, the methyltransferase CcrM, is similarly dispensable with simultaneous gcrA/ccrM disruption ameliorating the cytokinetic and growth defect of ΔgcrA cells. Within the Alphaproteobacteria, gcrA and ccrM are consistently present or absent together, rather than either gene being present alone, suggesting that gcrA/ccrM constitutes an independent, dispensable genetic module. Together our approaches unveil the essential elements of a primordial asymmetric cell cycle that should help illuminate more complex cell cycles.

  13. A cell cycle kinase with tandem sensory PAS domains integrates cell fate cues

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    Mann, Thomas H.; Seth Childers, W.; Blair, Jimmy A.; Eckart, Michael R.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    All cells must integrate sensory information to coordinate developmental events in space and time. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus uses two-component phospho-signalling to regulate spatially distinct cell cycle events through the master regulator CtrA. Here, we report that CckA, the histidine kinase upstream of CtrA, employs a tandem-PAS domain sensor to integrate two distinct spatiotemporal signals. Using CckA reconstituted on liposomes, we show that one PAS domain modulates kinase activity in a CckA density-dependent manner, mimicking the stimulation of CckA kinase activity that occurs on its transition from diffuse to densely packed at the cell poles. The second PAS domain interacts with the asymmetrically partitioned second messenger cyclic-di-GMP, inhibiting kinase activity while stimulating phosphatase activity, consistent with the selective inactivation of CtrA in the incipient stalked cell compartment. The integration of these spatially and temporally regulated signalling events within a single signalling receptor enables robust orchestration of cell-type-specific gene regulation. PMID:27117914

  14. Microscopic and Spectroscopic Characterization of Calcified Microorganisms at the Nanometer-Scale in Experimental and Field Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzerara, K.; Yoon, T.; Menguy, N.; Tyliszczak, T.; Brown, G. E.

    2004-12-01

    Calcium phosphates and calcium carbonates are the most prevalent minerals involved in microbial fossilization. Structural characterization of both the organic and mineral components in such samples is, however, usually difficult at the appropriate spatial resolution, i.e., at the submicrometer scale. We have used a combination of Scanning Transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), a synchrotron-based technique, and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) to characterize both the Ca-containing biominerals and the functional groups present in the organic components associated with them (STXM). These data, in turn, provide a better understanding of the mechanisms, products, and biomolecules involved in microbial calcification. We have studied the experimental biomineralization of the model strain Caulobacter crescentus by calcium phosphates, and the calcification of natural biofilms by aragonite in an alkaline lake in Turkey. The precipitation of calcium phosphate and calcium carbo