WorldWideScience

Sample records for caulking

  1. The ins and outs of caulking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles Carll

    2006-01-01

    Effective water management involves understanding the roles of siding, trim, fenestration units, flashing, and (where appropriate) caulk seals and how these entities interface with each other. Where caulk seals are used, their geometry and dimensions are important to joint performance, as is the care with which they are executed. In selection of caulking material,...

  2. Systemic analysis of the caulking assembly process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodean Claudiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper highlights the importance of a caulking process which is nowadays less studied in comparison with the growing of its usage in the automotive industry. Due to the fact that the caulking operation is used in domains with high importance such as shock absorbers and brake systems there comes the demand of this paper to detail the parameters which characterize the process, viewed as input data and output data, and the requirements asked for the final product. The paper presents the actual measurement methods used for analysis the performance of the caulking assembly. All this parameters leads to an analysis algorithm of performance established for the caulking process which it is used later in the paper for an experimental research. The study is a basis from which it will be able to go to further researches in order to optimize the following processing.

  3. PCB-Caulk Replacement Project Johnson Space Center Houston, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, William M.; Stanch, Penney M.; Molenda, William

    2011-01-01

    Wet method reduced exposure by minimizing overall respirable particulate release. Dry method didn't introduce delays for primer/caulk application. Removed caulks came in many forms, from dry powdery to tarry sticky. Varying textures were not sampled or packaged differently. During the course of the project, EPA modified recommended practices to include full containment for exterior caulk removal. Changes are ongoing. Initial recommendations were directed to school buildings. EPA is researching risks due to caulk. Exposure guidance lacking except for 2 of 209 PCB congeners. Work was safely completed on schedule and under budget.

  4. How EPA's Asbestos Regulations Apply to Window Caulk, Glazing Compound, Wiring and Other Similar Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letters that provide guidance on asbestos National Emissions Standard of Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) applicability to linoleum, tar paper, electric wiring, floor tile mastic, caulking compounds, and other similar materials during demolition

  5. Polychlorinated biphenyls in the exterior caulk of San Francisco Bay Area buildings, California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosterhaus, Susan; McKee, Lester J; Yee, Donald; Kass, Jamie M; Wong, Adam

    2014-05-01

    Extensive evidence of the adverse impacts of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to wildlife, domestic animals, and humans has now been documented for over 40 years. Despite the ban on production and new use of PCBs in the United States in 1979, a number of fish consumption advisories remain in effect, and there remains considerable uncertainty regarding ongoing environmental sources and management alternatives. Using a blind sampling approach, 25 caulk samples were collected from the exterior of ten buildings in the San Francisco Bay Area and analyzed for PCBs using congener-specific gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and chlorine using portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF). PCBs were detected in 88% of the caulk samples collected from the study area buildings, with 40% exceeding 50 ppm. Detectable PCB concentrations ranged from 1 to 220,000 ppm. These data are consistent with previous studies in other cities that have identified relatively high concentrations of PCBs in concrete and masonry buildings built between 1950 and 1980. Portable XRF was not a good predictor of the PCB content in caulk and the results indicate that portable XRF analysis may only be useful for identifying caulk that contains low concentrations of Cl (≤ 10,000 ppm) and by extension low or no PCBs. A geographic information system-based approach was used to estimate that 10,500 kg of PCBs remain in interior and exterior caulk in buildings located in the study area, which equates to an average of 4.7 kg PCBs per building. The presence of high concentrations in the exterior caulk of currently standing buildings suggests that building caulk may be an ongoing source of PCBs to the San Francisco Bay Area environment. Further studies to expand the currently small international dataset on PCBs in caulking materials in buildings of countries that produced or imported PCBs appear justified in the context of both human health and possible ongoing environmental release. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier

  6. Chamber study of PCB emissions from caulking materials and light ballasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Guo, Zhishi; Krebs, Kenneth A; Stinson, Rayford A; Nardin, Joshua A; Pope, Robert H; Roache, Nancy F

    2015-10-01

    The emissions of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners from thirteen caulk samples were tested in a micro-chamber system. Twelve samples were from PCB-contaminated buildings and one was prepared in the laboratory. Nineteen light ballasts collected from buildings that represent 13 different models from five manufacturers were tested in 53-L environmental chambers. The rates of PCB congener emissions from caulking materials and light ballasts were determined. Several factors that may have affected the emission rates were evaluated. The experimentally determined emission factors showed that, for a given PCB congener, there is a linear correlation between the emission factor and the concentration of the PCB congener in the source. Furthermore, the test results showed that an excellent log-linear correlation exists between the normalized emission factor and the vapor pressure (coefficient of determination, r(2)⩾0.8846). The PCB congener emissions from ballasts at or near room temperature were relatively low with or without electrical load. However, the PCB congener emission rates increased significantly as the temperature increased. The results of this research provide new data and models for ranking the primary sources of PCBs and supports the development and refinement of exposure assessment models for PCBs. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Catalog of materials as potential sources of indoor air emissions. Volume 1. Insulation, wallcoverings, resilient floor coverings, carpet, adhesives, sealants and caulks, and pesticides. Final report, September 1991-September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leininger, A.E.; Scott, K.A.; Sarsony, E.C.; Huff, L.C.; Blackley, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    The catalog presents a discussion of and data on constituents and emissions from products that have the potential to impact the indoor air environment. The Catalog is intended as a tool to be used by researchers to help organize the study of materials as potential sources of indoor air emmisions. Included in the catalog are sections on seven product categories: insulation, wallcoverings, resilient floor coverings, carpet, adhesives, sealants and caulks, and pesticides. Each section presents a classification scheme for the product category, sales and usage volume data, qualitative data on product composition, and quantitative and qualitative data on emission rates to the indoor air. Emissions information is presented only for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) because these are the compounds most likely to be emitted from materials found in homes and office buildings. Data tables summarizing available emissions and constituent data are provided, and are organized according to the classification scheme presented for each product category.

  8. PEMBUATAN SISTEM KONTROL MESIN CAULKING ROD GUIDE OTOMATIS MENGGUNAKAN PLC OMRON CPM1A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahril Ardi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Kenaikan tingkat produksi shock absorber perusahaan manufaktur membuat proses produksi harus berjalan dengan baik . Pipa proses pemotongan pada mendempul panduan mesin batang memiliki beberapa masalah yang harus diatasi . Untuk mengatasi masalah tersebut kemudian melakukan modifikasi mesin batang mendempul yang secara otomatis dapat mengurangi waktu siklus pada proses mendempul batang dari 4,5 detik per potong sehingga tingkat produksi memotong garis pipa dapat ditingkatkan . Sistem kontrol otomatis mendempul mesin batang panduan ini dirancang untuk menggunakan Programmable Logic Controller (PLC

  9. CATALOG OF MATERIALS AS POTENTIAL SOURCES OF INDOOR AIR EMISSIONS - VOLUME 1. INSULATION, WALLCOVERINGS, RESI- LIENT FLOOR COVERINGS, CARPET, ADHESIVES, SEALANTS AND CAULKS, AND PESTICIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses and presents data on constituents and emissions from products that have the potential to impact the indoor air environment. t is a tool to be used by researchers to help organize the study of materials as potential sources of indoor air emissions. ncluded are...

  10. Prime Contract Awards Alphabetically by Contractor, by State or Country, and Place. Part 15 (Mountain States Caulking Inc-Pangborn Corp)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    CO 11 a) I M(OM 11 Lr) Lr) if) U) in 0000 (OCO w (0 (D Cl) In U) W11 In (0 - C4 0) CL : m (0 ca C) C> tD 0 CD, C14 " (D CD C> C> O In cli cli -1-4 C...on (n m 0) o tD -1 r- " m m m (0 o o N r- CD 1 on -1 m 00 11 1 < C’j -9 (\\j o 10 o o 00 -1 -1 a) 0 C) o o o -11 a r- 0 IN " 10 0 o o N o 0 m o r- C1...I 0 0 0 1440 󈧰 0) iz4 ) -4(0 .- 1-4 .(C, 2:In InLn In . N 2 M tf-40 D -42 3 ~Z ZZ 02 0C* z 1)Z -4f Z ZZ *z cnz ZZZZZ* (a4zM (7 (a lz 0)ZZZ* 2 * I.-z

  11. The Mass Spectrometric Ortho Effect Studied for All 209 PCB Congeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    A method for the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in caulk was developed; with application to a set of caulk and window glazing material samples. This method was evaluated by analyzing a combination of 47 samples of caulk, glazing materials, and including quality...

  12. 75 FR 51815 - National Toxicology Program (NTP); Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... present in paint pigments, ceramics, caulk, plastics, and electronic devices. Exposure to the general... information about current production levels, human exposure, use patterns, and environmental occurrence. This...

  13. Maintaining Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) during Construction and Renovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... VOCs. Common VOC sources include: Caulks, sealants, and coatings Adhesives Paints, varnishes and/or stains Wall coverings ... Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO ( ...

  14. 77 FR 59004 - Membership of the Senior Executive Service Standing Performance Review Boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-25

    ... DIRECTOR. ROGERS, MARK W SENIOR TRIAL ATTORNEY, CONSTITUTIONAL SECTION. RUDY, SUSAN K SENIOR TRIAL ATTORNEY..., OFFICE OF OVERSEAS PROSECUTORIAL DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE AND TRAINING. ALEXANDRE, CARL DIRECTOR, OPDAT..., DAVID ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, INVESTIGATIVE OPERATIONS. CAULK, CARL ASSISTANT DIRECTOR FOR JUDICIAL SECURITY...

  15. Prevention of leakage of low-melting-point metals from styrofoam molds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, M W; Robinson, A; Small, R C

    1975-10-01

    Leakage of low-melting-point metals from the underside of polystyrene molds can be prevented by applying a silicone caulking material to the bottom of the mold and pressing the mold on a metal plate before pouring.

  16. 7 CFR 3560.103 - Maintaining housing projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., decent, safe, and sanitary housing. Agency design requirements are discussed in § 3560.60. The Agency.... Kitchen counter, vanity tops, and back splashes must be properly caulked. (xxvii) Water closets. The...

  17. Mixed Lubrication Simulation of Hydrostatic Spherical Bearings for Hydraulic Piston Pumps and Motors

    OpenAIRE

    KAZAMA, Toshiharu

    2008-01-01

    Mixed and fluid film lubrication characteristics of hydrostatic spherical bearings for swash-plate-type axial piston pumps and motors are studied theoretically under non-steady-state conditions. The basic equations incorporating interference and contact of surface roughness are derived fundamentally through combination of the GW and PC models. Furthermore, a programming code that is applicable to the caulked-socket-type and open-socket-type bearings is developed. Effects of caulking, operatin...

  18. Review of PCBs in US schools: a brief history, an estimate of the number of impacted schools, and an approach for evaluating indoor air samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Robert F; Stewart, James H; Allen, Joseph G

    2016-02-01

    PCBs in building materials such as caulks and sealants are a largely unrecognized source of contamination in the building environment. Schools are of particular interest, as the period of extensive school construction (about 1950 to 1980) coincides with the time of greatest use of PCBs as plasticizers in building materials. In the USA, we estimate that the number of schools with PCB in building caulk ranges from 12,960 to 25,920 based upon the number of schools built in the time of PCB use and the proportion of buildings found to contain PCB caulk and sealants. Field and laboratory studies have demonstrated that PCBs from both interior and exterior caulking can be the source of elevated PCB air concentrations in these buildings, at levels that exceed health-based PCB exposure guidelines for building occupants. Air sampling in buildings containing PCB caulk has shown that the airborne PCB concentrations can be highly variable, even in repeat samples collected within a room. Sampling and data analysis strategies that recognize this variability can provide the basis for informed decision making about compliance with health-based exposure limits, even in cases where small numbers of samples are taken. The health risks posed by PCB exposures, particularly among children, mandate precautionary approaches to managing PCBs in building materials.

  19. Mixed Lubrication Simulation of Hydrostatic Spherical Bearings for Hydraulic Piston Pumps and Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazama, Toshiharu

    Mixed and fluid film lubrication characteristics of hydrostatic spherical bearings for swash-plate-type axial piston pumps and motors are studied theoretically under non-steady-state conditions. The basic equations incorporating interference and contact of surface roughness are derived fundamentally through combination of the GW and PC models. Furthermore, a programming code that is applicable to the caulked-socket-type and open-socket-type bearings is developed. Effects of caulking, operating conditions, and the bearing dimension on the motion of the sphere and tribological performance of the bearings are examined. Salient conclusions are the following: The sphere's eccentricity increases in the low supply pressure period. The time-lag of the load change engenders greater motion of the sphere. Caulking of the bearing socket suppresses the sphere's motion. The bearing stiffness increases and power loss decreases for smaller recess angles. Minimum power loss is given under the condition that the bearing socket radius nearly equals the equivalent load radius.

  20. Estudio comparativo de tres sistemas adhesivos de grabado total, con diferentes solventes en condiciones de dentina húmeda y seca. (Estudio in Vitro)

    OpenAIRE

    Orellana Jaimes, Noé

    2009-01-01

    El objetivo de esta investigación fue evaluar el comportamiento de los sistemas adhesivos de grabado total XP Bond (Caulk- Dentsply), Prime & Bond NT (Caulk-Dentsply) y Excite (Ivoclar/Vivadent), en las pruebas de monitoreo in Vitro de microtensión pre y post envejecido, micro-filtración, evaluación de la zona de interdifusiòn y simulación de interacción química de elementos básicos. Materiales y Métodos: Con el propósito de valorar el desempeño de los sistemas adhesivos de grabado tot...

  1. 49 CFR 192.275 - Cast iron pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cast iron pipe. 192.275 Section 192.275... Cast iron pipe. (a) Each caulked bell and spigot joint in cast iron pipe must be sealed with mechanical leak clamps. (b) Each mechanical joint in cast iron pipe must have a gasket made of a resilient...

  2. Non-destructive Analysis Reveals Effect of Installation Details on Plywood Siding Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher G. Hunt; Gregory T. Schueneman; Steven Lacher; Xiping Wang; R. Sam Williams

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of a variety of construction techniques on the performance of plywood siding and the applied paint, using both ultrasound and conventional visual inspection techniques. The impact of bottom edge contact, flashing vs. caulking board ends, priming the bottom edge, location (Wisconsin vs. Mississippi) and a gap behind the siding to...

  3. 75 FR 31317 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Area Source Standards for Paints and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... Governments G. Executive Order 13045: Protection of Children From Environmental Health and Safety Risks H... Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) at 29 CFR 1910.1200(g). It was not EPA's intent to omit... primarily engaged in manufacturing adhesives, glues, and caulking compounds. Printing Ink Manufacturing...

  4. 40 CFR 63.4781 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... destruction or removal before discharge to the atmosphere. Adhesive means any chemical substance that is... associated with a coating operation, such as spray booths, spray guns, racks, tanks, and hangers. Thus, it... limited to, paints, sealants, caulks, inks, adhesives, and maskants. Decorative, protective, or functional...

  5. Laboratory study of the PCB transport from primary sources to building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sorption of airborne polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by twenty building materials and their subsequent re-emission (desorption) from concrete were investigated using two 53-L environmental chambers connected in series with a field-collected caulk in the source chamber servin...

  6. Mechanisms and Mitigation of Hearing Loss from Blast Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    sealed with alginate dental impression material (Jeltrate, L.D. Caulk Co.). To prevent entry of air into the cochlea, the process of cochleostomy...body of the incus (Fig. 20). In another set, the transducer was clipped to the long process of the incus using an aWengen prosthesis (Fig. 21). In

  7. Electrochemical behavior of some commercial dental amalgams in artificial saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahoon, J R; Regalbuto, C

    1975-01-01

    Cathodic, linear anodic, and anodic polarization studies conducted on three commercial dental amalgams, Caulk Fine Cut Alloy, Spheralloy, and Dispersalloy, showed that all amalgams were in a passive state at the corrosion potential in synthetic saliva solution. The corrosion currents at the corrosion potential were therefore small for all the amalgams, in the range 0.08 to 0.30 muA/cm2. However, the Caulk Fine Cut Alloy and Spheralloy amalgams exhibited a breakdown of passivity and high anodic currents at potentials only approximately equal to 100 mV more noble than the corrosion potential whereas Dispersalloy amalgams maintained passivity at potentials up to 700 mV more noble than the corrosion potential. The breakdown of passivity in Caulk Alloy and Spheralloy amalgams is attributed to the presence of the gamma2 phase (Sn7-8Hg) whereas the passive behavior of Dispersalloy amalgam is attributed to the absence of the phase. It is concluded that none of the amalgams will exhibit severe general corrosion in use, but that both Caulk Alloy and Spheralloy amalgams will exhibit pitting corrosion whereas this type of corrosion should be minimal in Dispersalloy amalgams.

  8. Comparison of Passive and Active Air Sampling (PAAS) Methods for PCBs – A Pilot Study in New York City Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    PCBs were used extensively in school building materials (caulk and lighting fixture ballasts) during the approximate period of 1950-1978. Most of the schools built nationwide during this period have not had indoor air sampling conducted for PCBs. Passive air sampling holds promi...

  9. Demonstration of Improved Technologies for Rehabilitating Metal Roofing in Severely Corrosive Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    urethane caulk material. Overfill the \\< lid above the roof level and two to three inches beyond its edge. Feather the edge of the caulk and let~ cure...liatrly flush •y~s wi!b p)Mty of water f"r 3 0.m inutrs. Cull a pbyoicion ilnmediotrly. [jft tM uppuj!Dd IQw•r .y< lid "’""’ionally. Get immediate tn...If need~, ~ k: me-dk:nl a tt.e.mio11. LngesUou! Oo not induce v-omiting. If consciotL"" give plen9’ of wate.r or milk .. Get i mm.edhue me-dic:U

  10. Nondestructive spectroscopic characterization of building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassu, Aschalew; Walker, Lauren; Sanders, Rachel; Farley, Carlton; Mills, Jonathan; Sharma, Anup

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this research project is to demonstrate the application of Raman spectroscopy technique for characterization and identification of the distinct Raman signatures of construction materials. The results reported include the spectroscopic characterization of building materials using compact Raman system with 785 nm wavelength laser. The construction materials studied include polyblend sanded grout, fire barrier sealant, acrylic latex caulk plus and white silicone. It is found that, both fire barrier sealant and acrylic latex caulk plus has a prominent Raman band at 1082 cm-1, and three minor Raman signatures located at 275, 706 and 1436 cm-1. On the other hand, sand grout has three major Raman bands at 1265, 1368 and 1455 cm-1, and four minor peaks at 1573, 1683, 1762, and 1868 cm-1. White silicone, which is a widely used sealant material in construction industry, has two major Raman bands at 482 and 703 cm-1, and minor Raman characteristic bands at 783 and 1409 cm-1.

  11. Electromagnetic shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzeng, Wen-Shian V.

    1991-01-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials are well known in the art in forms such as gaskets, caulking compounds, adhesives, coatings and the like for a variety of EMI shielding purposes. In the past, where high shielding performance is necessary, EMI shielding has tended to use silver particles or silver coated copper particles dispersed in a resin binder. More recently, aluminum core silver coated particles have been used to reduce costs while maintaining good electrical and physical properties. (author). 8 figs

  12. Depth of Cure of New Flowable Composite Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    study. v ABSTRACT Objectives: This study evaluated the depth of cure of Surefil SDR Flow (Dentsply), Grandio Flow (VOCO) and Venus...bottom/maximum KHN or the scrape technique: Venus ≥ SDR ≥ Grandio ≥ Revolution. Conclusions: Venus Bulk Fill predictably exceeded the...composites are Surefil SDR Flow (Dentsply Caulk), Grandio Flow (VOCO) and Venus Bulk Fill (Heraeus Kulzer). 8 Surefil SDR (Stress Decreasing

  13. Fluoroelastomers for harsh environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferber, E.P. [DuPont Co., Newark, DE (United States); Alexander, J.E. [DuPont Co., Elkton, MD (United States)

    1996-11-01

    A review of fluoroelastomer materials and service in harsh chemical and thermal applications is provided as part of the Corrosion `96--Managing Corrosion with Plastics Symposium. Principles of material selection, application design, and service environments are defined and industrial applications for fluoroelastomers in seals, linings, tubing, hose, belting, fabrics, caulks, adhesives, laminates, and vibration absorption are discussed. This broad range of applications better enables participants to envision new applications to solve their specific needs.

  14. Syllabus of Dental Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    WOOLSEY 27 Zinc oxide and eugenol materials and resin cavity varnishes are contraindicated for use with all resin restorative materials. S.S. White has a...varnish of methyl cellulose which does not appear to affect the organic matrix in resin restorations. Low strength disalicylate bases, like "Dycal...34 (L.D.Caulk) and "Life" (Kerr), can be used to cover dentin surfaces in place of zinc oxide and eugenol materials ( eugenol inhibits the set of the organic

  15. INFILTRAÇÃO MARGINAL DE CIMENTOS IONOMÉRICOS MODIFICADOS POR RESINA MICROLEAKAGE OF RESIN-MODIFIED GLASS IONOMER CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo CARRARA

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Comparou-se a infiltração marginal de dois cimentos restauradores que liberam flúor, o Vitremer/3M e o Variglass/Caulk Dentsply. Cavidades classe II foram confeccionadas nas faces mesiais e distais de pré-molares extraídos. Cada dente recebeu uma restauração de cada material. Procedeu-se, então, a termociclagem em solução de fucsina básica a 0,5%. Nenhum material foi capaz de evitar a infiltração marginal, porém, esta foi menor nas restaurações de Vitremer/3M (pThe microleakage behavior of two hybrid glass ionomer cements used as restorative materials (Variglass/Caulk Dentsply and Vitremer/3M was compared. Separate class II cavities were prepared on the mesial and distal aspects of thirteen extracted premolars. One restoration of each material was placed on every tooth. The cervical margins of the restorations were left one millimeter below the cementoenamel junction. Thermocycling was conduced in a 0.5% basic fuchsin solution. The teeth were washed and sectioned for microleakage analysis under a dissecting microscope. None of the materials tested were able to inhibit dye penetration at the cervical margin. Vitremer/3M was more effective than Variglass/Caulk Dentsply in reducing microleakage.

  16. Bacterial Contamination of Endodontic Materials before and after Clinical Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Media; Koller, Garrit; Niazi, Sadia; Patel, Shanon; Mannocci, Francesco; Bruce, Kenneth; Foschi, Federico

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bacterial contamination in endodontic consumables (gutta-percha points, rubber dams, paper mixing pads, caulking agents, and endodontic instrument sponges [EISs]) before and after clinical use and storage. Materials were randomly sampled in triplicates at 3 time points (t 0 , at package opening; t 1 , at 7 days; and t 2 , at 14 days) during their clinical usage. The gutta-percha points and caulking agent (25 mg) were added to 1 mL phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The rubber dam, paper mixing pad, and EIS were added to 25 mL PBS. After vortexing, centrifuging, and removing the supernatant, the pellet was resuspended in 1 mL PBS, plated on fastidious anaerobic agar, and incubated aerobically and anaerobically. The grown colonies were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The total bacterial load was calculated in the remaining volume (800 μL) from each sample by quantitative polymerase chain reaction after DNA extraction. All tested materials showed a varied number of contaminated samples at the 3 time points (except EIS at t 0 ) using MALDI-TOF MS. The most isolated genera were Propionibacterium (42%) and Staphylococcus (32%). By using non-culture-based approaches, all tested materials at the 3 time points (except gutta-percha at t 0 and the caulking agent at t 0, t 1, and t 2 ) carried bacterial DNA. The majority of the tested materials harbored bacteria in their samples before and after clinical storage. Nosocomial infection derived from commonly used consumables could have an impact on the outcome of endodontic treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Avaliação in vitro da microinfiltração na interface selante/esmalte sob a influência de contaminação, emprego de "primer" e tipo de selante In vitro evaluation of sealant microleakage under the influence of contamination, use of primer and type of sealant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lídia CIAMPONI

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo avaliou, in vitro, a microinfiltração na interface selante/esmalte sob a influência de contaminação do meio (saliva, emprego de "primer" (Tenure - Den-Mat e tipo de selante (Concise Light Cured White Sealant - 3M; Fluroshield - Caulk/Dentsply. Os resultados foram obtidos a partir de medidas lineares, utilizando um sistema computadorizado de imagens digitalizadas (IMAGE PLUS. Pôde-se concluir que a contaminação salivar e a utilização de "primer" atuaram de maneira diversa nas diferentes etapas do procedimento clínico; os selantes comportaram-se de maneira semelhante quando submetidos às mesmas condições; o emprego do "primer" favoreceu o escoamento do selante Fluroshield (Caulk/Dentsply nos sulcos e pôde ser observado maior número de bolhas com esse material.This in vitro study investigated the effect of different types of sealants (Concise Light Cured White Sealant - 3M; Fluroshield - Caulk/Dentsply and the use of primer (Tenure - Den-Mat on the microleakage of saliva-contaminated enamel. Sealants were placed on 360 surfaces (occlusal, buccal and lingual of extracted teeth free of caries. After being prepared according to each experimental group, they were thermocycled (5 and 55ºC for 500 and 2.000 cycles. Then they were immersed in a silver nitrate solution (50% and cut in longitudinal slices. The results were described in linear measurements (mm by means of a digital-image analysis system. Contamination and use of primer had different influences when subjected to the different experimental conditions. Both sealants had the same influence on microleakage. Flow of Fluroshield into pit and fissures was improved by use of the primer, and a greater amount of bubbles could be observed in this material.

  18. In vitro evaluation of the marginal integrity of CAD/CAM interim crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelvin Khng, Kwang Yong; Ettinger, Ronald L; Armstrong, Steven R; Lindquist, Terry; Gratton, David G; Qian, Fang

    2016-05-01

    The accuracy of interim crowns made with computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) systems has not been well investigated. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the marginal integrity of interim crowns made by CAD/CAM compared with that of conventional polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) crowns. A dentoform mandibular left second premolar was prepared for a ceramic crown and scanned for the fabrication of 60 stereolithical resin dies, half of which were scanned to fabricate 15 Telio CAD-CEREC and 15 Paradigm MZ100-E4D-E4D crowns. Fifteen Caulk and 15 Jet interim crowns were made on the remaining resin dies. All crowns were cemented with Tempgrip under a 17.8-N load, thermocycled for 1000 cycles, placed in 0.5% acid fuschin for 24 hours, and embedded in epoxy resin before sectioning from the mid-buccal to mid-lingual surface. The marginal discrepancy was measured using a traveling microscope, and dye penetration was measured as a percentage of the overall length under the crown. The mean vertical marginal discrepancy of the conventionally made interim crowns was greater than for the CAD/CAM crowns (P=.006), while no difference was found for the horizontal component (P=.276). The mean vertical marginal discrepancy at the facial surface of the Caulk crowns was significantly greater than that of the other 3 types of interim crowns (Pcrowns was significantly larger than that of the other 3 types, with no difference at the lingual margins (P=.150). The mean percentage dye penetration for the Paradigm MZ100-E4D crowns was significantly greater and for Jet crowns significantly smaller than for the other 3 crowns (Pcrowns at the facial surface and with the horizontal marginal discrepancies of the Caulk interim crowns at the lingual surface (Pcrowns fabricated by CAD/CAM as compared with PMMA crowns; however, this difference was not observed for the horizontal component. The percentage dye penetration was correlated with vertical and horizontal

  19. Environmental Assessment for Housing Demolition, Construction, Renovation, and Leasing Bethel Manor, Lighter-Than-Air, and Heavier-Than-Air Military Family Housing Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    the front window, floor tiles, linoleum, outside caulking, tape, mastic, tile adhesive , and patio light fixture insulation. Samples collected from...1758 1763 1771 1769 1773 2003 STA TE R TE 600 B IG B ETH EL R D 2014 201 5 20 80 20 16 20 17 20 83 2082 2013 20 12 20 10 20 09 2011 200 8 1779 1667...for their respective home, in order to improve upon public awareness on self -help efforts, as well as historic information about each respective home

  20. Best Practices Case Study: David Weekley Homes - Eagle Springs and Waterhaven, Houston, TX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-04-01

    Case study describing David Weekley Homes, Houston Division, has qualified more than 1,240 homes for the DOE Builders Challenge. Advanced framed 2x6 walls with open headers and two-stud corners allow more room for R-20 damp sprayed cellulose wall cavity insulation that is covered with R-5 rigid XPS foam. A radiant barrier cuts heat gain in the R-38 insulated vented attics. Draft stopping at fireplace and duct chases and behind tubs, gluing sheetrock to framing, and extensive caulking make for air-tight homes at 3.0 ACH50.

  1. Considerations during crown reattachment procedure over the pulpal exposure: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bona Kim

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Crown reattachment is the most conservative treatment which can be used to restore fractured tooth, presumably with sufficient strength, while maintaining original contour, incisal translucency, and reducing chair time and cost. However, in case of crown fracture with pin-point pulp exposure, we should cautiously minimize the irritation to the pulp and consider pre-treatment pulpal status, choice of pulp capping materials, choice of bonding system and treatment sequence during crown reattachment procedures. This case reports the considerations while crown reattachment with direct pulp capping using calcium hydroxide (Dycal, Dentsply Caulk.

  2. Three-dimensional evaluation of surface roughness of resin composites after finishing and polishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Veena S; Sainudeen, Shan; Padmanabhan, Prabeesh; Vijayashankar, L V; Sujathan, Unu; Pillai, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of finishing and polishing procedures on four novel resin composites using three-dimensional optical profilometer. Four composites classified according to their filler size, were selected: Filtek™ Z350 XT/Nanofill (3M™ ESPE™), Esthet-X HD/Hybrid (Dentsply Caulk), Te Econom/Microfill (Ivoclar Vivadent(®)), Tetric EvoCeram(®) /Nanohybrid (Ivoclar Vivadent(®)). Composite specimens were made in Plexiglass mold and polished with Soflex (3M ESPE), Enhance + Pogo (Dentsply Caulk). Both the systems were used according to the manufacturers' instructions, and the polished surfaces were assessed with an optical profilometer. Kruskal-Wallis test and further pairwise comparison were performed by Mann-Whitney test. The smoothest surfaces for all the resin composites tested were obtained from the Mylar strip; statistically significant differences were observed among them (P = 0.001). The order of composites was ranked from the lowest to highest surface roughness; Filtek Z350 XT Econom < Tetric EvoCeram < Esthet XHD. Pairwise multiple comparison with Mann-Whitney test showed Filtek Z350 to have the smoothest surface and the least with Teric EvoCeram. Among the polishing systems, Soflex showed the smoothest surface and was significantly different from Pogo (P = 0.046). The effectiveness of the polishing systems seems to be dependent on the material used, treatment modality and also on the filler particle size.

  3. A Deep Morphological Characterization and Comparison of Different Dental Restorative Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Condò

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Giomer is a relatively new class of restorative material with aesthetics, handling and physical properties of composite resins, and benefits of glass ionomers: high radiopacity, antiplaque effect, fluoride release, and recharge. To verify the superior properties of Giomers, in this study, a deep morphological characterization has been performed with an in vitro comparative study among a Giomer (Beautifil® II by Shofu Dental Corporation, Osaka, Japan, a Compomer (Dyract Extra by Dentsply, Caulk, Germany, glass ionomer cement (Ketac fil plus by 3M ESPE, and a composite resin (Tetric Evoceram by Ivoclar. In particular, mechanical and optical properties and ageing effects have been compared to investigate materials similarities and differences. Indentation tests, UV-Visible spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and weight loss after storage in saliva or sugary drink have been carried out to analyze materials behavior in real conditions. The results confirm the high quality of Giomer material and indicate possible improvements in their usage.

  4. Passive solar construction handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, E.; Evans, D.; Gardstein, C.

    1981-08-01

    Many of the basic elements of passive solar design are reviewed. The unique design constraints presented in passive homes are introduced and many of the salient issues influencing design decisions are described briefly. Passive solar construction is described for each passive system type: direct gain, thermal storage wall, attached sunspace, thermal storage roof, and convective loop. For each system type, important design and construction issues are discussed and case studies illustrating designed and built examples of the system type are presented. Construction details are given and construction and thermal performance information is given for the materials used in collector components, storage components, and control components. Included are glazing materials, framing systems, caulking and sealants, concrete masonry, concrete, brick, shading, reflectors, and insulators. The Load Collector Ratio method for estimating passive system performance is appended, and other analysis methods are briefly summarized. (LEW)

  5. Locking mechanism for in-vessel components of tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, S.; Shimizu, K.; Koizumi, K.; Tada, E.

    1992-01-01

    The locking and unlocking mechanism for in-vessel replaceable components such as blanket modules, is one of the most critical issues of the tokamak fusion reactor, since the sufficient stiffness against the enormous electromagnetic loads and the easy replaceability are required. In this paper, the authors decide that a caulking cotter joint is worth initiating the R and D from veiwpoints of an effective use of space, a replaceability, a removability of nuclear heating, and a reliability. In this approach, the cotter driving (thrusting and plucking) mechanism is a critical technology. A flexible tube concept has been developed as the driving mechanism, where the stroke and driving force are obtained by a fat shape by the hydraulic pressure. The original normal tube is subjected to the working percentage of more than several hundreds percentage (from thickness of 1.2 mm to 0.2 mm) for plastically forming the flexible tube

  6. Measurement of PCB emissions from building surfaces using a novel portable emission test cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Nadja; Gunnarsen, Lars Bo; Andersen, Helle Vibeke

    2016-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were used in building materials like caulks and paints from 1930 e1970s and in some cases that caused elevated PCB concentrations in the indoor air at levels considered harmful to occupant health. PCBs are semivolatile organic compounds and capable of spreading from...... and there is a need to prioritise remediation measures on different materials. An inexpensive and portable emission test cell was developed to resemble indoor conditions in relation to the area specific ventilation rate. Emissions were measured using the test cell in the laboratory on freshly made PCB paint. Further......, the chamber was used for determining emissions from PCB-containing building materials in the field as well as remediated walls. The measurements showed that sorption of PCBs to chamber walls was insignificant after 2-4 days of exposure to the source. Over a period of two weeks emission rates did not change...

  7. Repair of amalgam restorations with conventional and bonded amalgam: an in vitro study = Reparo de restaurações de amálgama com amálgama adesivo e convencional: estudo in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Popoff, Daniela Araújo Veloso

    2010-01-01

    Objetivo: Avaliar a microinfiltração em restaurações de amálgama com reparo em amálgama ou amálgama adesivo. Métodos: Trinta pré-molares humanos extraídos foram restaurados com amálgama. Simu- lou-se um defeito nas restaurações reparado com: G1 - amálgama (n=15) (Permite C-SDI); G2 - amálgama adesivo (n=15) (Caulk 34% Condicionador dentário Gel Dentsply + Prime & Bond 2. 1 Dentsply + Permite C-SDI). Os dentes foram imersos em solução de nitrato de prata a 50%, termociclados e então, seciona...

  8. A global motion planner for curve-tracing robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Y.K.; Chen, P.C.; Neidigk, D.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maciejewski, A.A. [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1993-11-01

    We present a global motion planner for tracing curves in three dimensions with robot manipulator tool frames. This planner generates an efficient motion satisfying three types of constraints; constraints on the tool tip for curve tracing, robot kinematic constraints and robot-link collision constraints. Motions are planned using a global search algorithm and a local planner based on a potential-field approach. This planner can be used with potential-field approach. This planner can be used with any robots including redundant manipulators, and can any robots including redundant manipulators, and can control the trade-offs between its algorithmic completeness and computation time. It can be applied in many robotic tasks such as seam welding, caulking, edge deburrring and chamfering, and is expected to reduce motion programming times from days to minutes.

  9. Microleakage in Class II composite restorations with margins below the CEJ: In vitro evaluation of different restorative techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, Marco; Scribante, Andrea; Mekler, Jenia; Colombo, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microleakage in “deep” Class II composite restorations with gingival cavosurface margin below the CEJ (cemento-enamel junction) and restored with different techniques. Study Design: Fifty human teeth were used. In each tooth two standardized Class II slot cavities (on mesial and on distal surfaces) were prepared: the buccolingual extension of the cavities was 4 mm; the gingival wall was located in dentin/cementum (2 mm beyond the CEJ). The prepared teeth were randomly assigned to 5 experimental groups (of 10 specimens and 20 cavities each) and restored. Group 1: Filtek TM Supreme XTE Flowable (3MESPE) + Universal Filtek Supreme XTE (3MESPE), Group 2: GrandioSO Heavy Flow (Voco) + GrandioSo (Voco), Group 3: SDR™ (Dentsply Caulk) + Esthet-X® HD (Dentsply Caulk), Group 4: SonicFill (Kerr), Group 5: Grandio (Voco). After thermocycling, the specimens were immersed in a 0.5% basic fuchsine dye solution and incubated at 37°C for 24 hours. The teeth were subsequently sectioned mesiodistally. All specimens were examined at 25× in a stereomicroscope and standardized digital images were obtained. Dye penetration was measured from gingival margins. Results: The results demonstrated no significant leakage differences between Group 4 and Group 5, that both showed significantly higher frequency distribution of Score 0. Group 2 and Group 3 showed a significant prevalence of Score 1, whereas Group 1 showed significantly higher frequency of Score 2. Conclusions: None of the restorative techniques tested completely eliminated microleakage dye penetration in dentin margins; marginal adaptation in Class II composite restorations with gingival wall below the CEJ varied in both substrates and from different restorative techniques used. Key words:Microleakage, Class II composite restorations, CEJ. PMID:23722121

  10. Evaluation of PCB sources and releases for identifying priorities to reduce PCBs in Washington State (USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Holly; Delistraty, Damon

    2016-02-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitously distributed in the environment and produce multiple adverse effects in humans and wildlife. As a result, the purpose of our study was to characterize PCB sources in anthropogenic materials and releases to the environment in Washington State (USA) in order to formulate recommendations to reduce PCB exposures. Methods included review of relevant publications (e.g., open literature, industry studies and reports, federal and state government databases), scaling of PCB sources from national or county estimates to state estimates, and communication with industry associations and private and public utilities. Recognizing high associated uncertainty due to incomplete data, we strived to provide central tendency estimates for PCB sources. In terms of mass (high to low), PCB sources include lamp ballasts, caulk, small capacitors, large capacitors, and transformers. For perspective, these sources (200,000-500,000 kg) overwhelm PCBs estimated to reside in the Puget Sound ecosystem (1500 kg). Annual releases of PCBs to the environment (high to low) are attributed to lamp ballasts (400-1500 kg), inadvertent generation by industrial processes (900 kg), caulk (160 kg), small capacitors (3-150 kg), large capacitors (10-80 kg), pigments and dyes (0.02-31 kg), and transformers (PCB distribution and decrease exposures include assessment of PCBs in buildings (e.g., schools) and replacement of these materials, development of Best Management Practices (BMPs) to contain PCBs, reduction of inadvertent generation of PCBs in consumer products, expansion of environmental monitoring and public education, and research to identify specific PCB congener profiles in human tissues.

  11. Influence of dentin contamination by temporary cements on the bond strength of adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josimeri Hebling

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of adhesive systems to dentin contaminated by temporary cements with or without eugenol. Method: Flat dentin surfaces were obtained from twenty-four human third molars. With exception of the control group (n=8, the surfaces were covered with Interim Restorative Material (Caulk Dentsplay, Milford, DE, USA or Cavit (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA and kept in an oven at 37oC for seven days. After removing the cements, the adhesive systems Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA or Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan were applied in accordance with the manufacturers’ recommendations, and then the crowns were constructed in of resin composite. The teeth were sectioned into specimens with a cross-sectional bond area of 0.81mm2, which were sub mitted to microtensile testing in a mechanical test machine at an actuator speed of 0.5mm/min. The data were analyzed by t- and ANOVA tests, complemented by Tukey tests (α=0.05. Results: For Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA, bond strength did not differ statistically (p>0.05 for all the experimental conditions. For Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan, only the Interim Restorative Material (Caulk Dentsplay, Milford, DE, USA Group showed significantly lower bond strength (30.1±13.8 MPa in comparison with the other groups; control (38.9±13.5 MPa and Cavit (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA (42.1±11.0 MPa, which showed no significant difference between them.Conclusion: It was concluded that the previous covering of dentin with temporary cement containing eugenol had a deleterious effect on the adhesive performance of the self-etching system only.

  12. Drying time of tray adhesive for adequate tensile bond strength between polyvinylsiloxane impression and tray resin material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Myong-Hee; Shim, Joon-Sung; Lee, Keun-Woo; Chung, Moon-Kyu

    2009-07-01

    Use of custom tray and tray adhesive is clinically recommended for elastomeric impression material. However there is not clear mention of drying time of tray adhesive in achieving appropriate bonding strength of tray material and impression material. This study is to investigate an appropriate drying time of tray adhesives by evaluating tensile bonding strength between two types of polyvinylsiloxane impression materials and resin tray, according to various drying time intervals of tray adhesives, and with different manufacturing company combination of impression material and tray adhesive. Adhesives used in this study were Silfix (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, Del, USA) and VPS Tray Adhesive (3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) and impression materials were Aquasil Ultra (monophase regular set, Dentsply Caulk, Milford, Del, USA) and Imprint II Garant (regular body, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany). They were used combinations from the same manufacture and exchanged combinations of the two. The drying time was designed to air dry, 5 minutes, 10 minutes, 15 minutes, 20 minutes, and 25 minutes. Total 240 of test specimens were prepared by auto-polymerizing tray material (Instant Tray Mix, Lang, Wheeling, Il, USA) with 10 specimens in each group. The specimens were placed in the Universal Testing machine (Instron, model 3366, Instron Corp, University avenue, Nowood, MA, USA) to perform the tensile test (cross head speed 5 mm/min). The statistically efficient drying time was evaluated through ANOVA and Scheffe test. All the tests were performed at 95% confidence level. The results revealed that at least 10 minutes is needed for Silfix-Aquasil, and 15 minutes for VPS Tray Adhesive-Imprint II, to attain an appropriate tensile bonding strength. VPS Tray Adhesive-Imprint II had a superior tensile bonding strength when compared to Silfix-Aquasil over 15 minutes. Silfix-Aquasil had a superior bonding strength to VPS Tray Adhesive-Aquasil, and VPS Tray Adhesive-Imprint II had a superior tensile

  13. Indoor temperature changes after retrofit: inferences based on electricity billing data for nonparticipants and participants in the BPA Residential Weatherization Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirst, E.; White, D.

    1985-07-01

    This report discusses changes in indoor temperatures in response to retrofit improvements. The data on which this analysis is based are from an evaluation of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) interim Residential Weatherization Program. The BPA program, operated through participating private and public utilities throughout the Pacific Northwest, offered financial assistance (generally a cash rebate) to encourage installation of energy-efficiency improvements to existing homes in the region. These retrofits included attic, wall, floor and heating duct insulation; storm windows and doors; clock thermostats; and caulking and weatherstripping. This program, which operated during 1982 and 1983, weatherized 104 thousand homes at a total cost to BPA of $157 million. In mid-1983, staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Evaluation Research Corporation began an evaluation of the BPA program. The primary focus of this evaluation was assessment of the actual electricity saving that can be attributed to the program (Hirst, et al., 1985). These savings estimates were used to help assess the economic attractiveness of the program to participants, the BPA power system, and the Pacific Northwest region as a whole.

  14. Impact of a healthier home environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fauteux, A.

    2000-03-01

    The role of good ventilation in reducing asthma, a chronic inflammation of the airways, and the beneficial role that an R-2000 house could play in reducing the suffering from asthma are discussed. Superior insulation, a mould-free basement, hardwood and ceramic floors, very little carpeting, a central vacuum cleaner that is exhausted to the exterior, a heat recovery ventilator that provides continuous fresh air to every room, and a high efficiency particulate filter are some of the characteristics of an R-2000 house. Experience shows that airtightness alone is not enough, however, if an airtight house is fitted with central mechanical ventilation that can filter incoming air and minimize uncontrolled entry of outdoor pollutants that are allergens and irritants, suffering from respiratory ailments can be greatly reduced. For a healthier house, attention must also be paid to the presence of low-VOC or even no-VOC paints and caulks, household cleaners , 'air fresheners' and dry cleaning solvents, all of which can be expected to cause cell alterations, nervous and immune system dysfunctions, especially to those who suffer from respiratory ailments.

  15. Plant origin of Okinawan propolis: honeybee behavior observation and phytochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumazawa, Shigenori; Nakamura, Jun; Murase, Masayo; Miyagawa, Mariko; Ahn, Mok-Ryeon; Fukumoto, Shuichi

    2008-08-01

    Propolis is a natural resinous product collected by honeybees from certain plants. It has gained popularity as a food and alternative medicine. Poplar and Baccharis are well known as the source plants of European and Brazilian propolis, respectively. However, the propolis from Okinawa, Japan, contains some prenylflavonoids not seen in other regions such as Europe and Brazil, suggesting that the plant origin of Okinawan propolis is a particular plant that grows in Okinawa. To identify the plant origin of Okinawan propolis, we observed the behavior of honeybees as they collected material from plants and caulked it inside the hive. Honeybees scraped resinous material from the surface of plant fruits of Macaranga tanarius and brought it back to their hive to use it as propolis. We collected samples of the plant and propolis, and compared their constituents by high-performance liquid chromatography with a photo-diode array detector. We also compared their 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl radical scavenging activity. The chemical constituents and biological activity of the ethanol extracts of the plant did not differ from those of propolis. This indicates directly that the plant origin of Okinawan propolis is M. tanarius.

  16. Project report: Tritiated oil repackaging highlighting the ISMS process. Historical radioactive and mixed waste disposal request validation and waste disposal project (HDRV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schriner, J.A.

    1998-08-01

    The Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) was established to define a framework for the essential functions of managing work safely. There are five Safety Management Functions in the model of the ISMS process: (1) work planning, (2) hazards analysis, (3) hazards control, (4) work performance, and (5) feedback and improve. Recent activities at the Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility underscored the importance and effectiveness of integrating the ISMS process to safely manage high-hazard work with a minimum of personnel in a timely and efficient manner. This report describes how project personnel followed the framework of the ISMS process to successfully repackage tritium-contaminated oils. The main objective was to open the boxes without allowing the gaseous tritium oxide, which had built up inside the boxes, to release into the sorting room. The boxes would be vented out the building stack until tritium concentration levels were acceptable. The carboys would be repackaged into 30-gallon drums and caulked shut. Sealing the drums would decrease the tritium off-gassing into the RMWMF

  17. Kissing Bug (Triatoma spp.) Intrusion into Homes: Troublesome Bites and Domiciliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Stephen A.; Shirazi, F. Mazda; Boesen, Keith; Beatty, Norman L.; Dorn, Patricia L.; Smith, Shannon; Schmidt, Justin O.

    2016-01-01

    Kissing bugs (Triatoma spp.) frequently enter homes and bite human and pet occupants. Bites may lead to severe allergic reactions and, in some cases, death. Kissing bugs are also vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the cause of Chagas disease. In general, modern houses in the United States are not conducive to domiciliation of kissing bugs (bugs living out their entire life within the home with the presence of eggs, nymphs, adults, and exuviae). Construction features such as concrete foundations, solid walls and ceilings, window screens, tight thresholds for doors and windows, and other measures impede bug entry into homes, and air conditioning reduces the need for open doors and windows. Where Chagas disease is endemic in Mexico and Central and South America, homes often have thatch roofs, adobe walls, and open doors and windows. We investigated numerous instances of kissing bug intrusions into homes in Southern Arizona, California, and Louisiana and documented the reactions to kissing bug bites. Our work confirms the importance of modern home construction in limiting kissing bug intrusions. Older homes, especially those lacking modern screening, caulking, and weather stripping to reduce air leakage, may be subject to kissing bug intrusions and domiciliation. We describe a community in Southern Arizona where domiciliation of homes by Triatoma recurva is common. We also provide recent data regarding kissing bug bites and allergic reactions to the bites. PMID:27042091

  18. Accuracy and dimensional stability of extended-pour and conventional alginate impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbery, Terence A; Nehring, Joshua; Janus, Charles; Moon, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    The authors conducted a study to determine if two irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials (Cavex ColorChange, Cavex Holland BV, Haarlem, Netherlands; Jeltrate Plus Antimicrobial Dustless Alginate Impression Material, Dentsply Caulk, Milford, Del.) stored for five days were dimensionally accurate. The authors modified Ivorine teeth (Columbia Dentoform, Long Island City, N.Y.) on a Dentoform model (1560 series model, Columbia Dentoform) to allow measurements of tooth and arch width. They made impressions and generated casts immediately and at five additional times. They recorded tooth and arch widths on the casts and compared the measurements with those for the standard model. Compared with measurements for the model, the greatest measured difference in casts was 0.003 inches for Cavex ColorChange (extended-pour alginate) and 0.005 inches for Jeltrate Plus Antimicrobial Dustless Alginate Impression Material (conventional alginate). The percentage of dimensional change ranged from -0.496 to 0.161 percent for the extended-pour alginate and from -0.174 to 0.912 percent for the conventional alginate. Results of analysis of variance and paired t tests indicated that when generated immediately and at day 5, casts produced from both impression materials were not statistically different from the standard model (P alginate materials can produce accurate impressions at day 5 for diagnostic casts and for fabrication of acrylic appliances.

  19. Kissing Bug (Triatoma spp.) Intrusion into Homes: Troublesome Bites and Domiciliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Stephen A; Shirazi, F Mazda; Boesen, Keith; Beatty, Norman L; Dorn, Patricia L; Smith, Shannon; Schmidt, Justin O

    2016-01-01

    Kissing bugs (Triatoma spp.) frequently enter homes and bite human and pet occupants. Bites may lead to severe allergic reactions and, in some cases, death. Kissing bugs are also vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the cause of Chagas disease. In general, modern houses in the United States are not conducive to domiciliation of kissing bugs (bugs living out their entire life within the home with the presence of eggs, nymphs, adults, and exuviae). Construction features such as concrete foundations, solid walls and ceilings, window screens, tight thresholds for doors and windows, and other measures impede bug entry into homes, and air conditioning reduces the need for open doors and windows. Where Chagas disease is endemic in Mexico and Central and South America, homes often have thatch roofs, adobe walls, and open doors and windows. We investigated numerous instances of kissing bug intrusions into homes in Southern Arizona, California, and Louisiana and documented the reactions to kissing bug bites. Our work confirms the importance of modern home construction in limiting kissing bug intrusions. Older homes, especially those lacking modern screening, caulking, and weather stripping to reduce air leakage, may be subject to kissing bug intrusions and domiciliation. We describe a community in Southern Arizona where domiciliation of homes by Triatoma recurva is common. We also provide recent data regarding kissing bug bites and allergic reactions to the bites.

  20. Kissing Bug ( spp. Intrusion into Homes: Troublesome Bites and Domiciliation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Klotz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Kissing bugs ( Triatoma spp. frequently enter homes and bite human and pet occupants. Bites may lead to severe allergic reactions and, in some cases, death. Kissing bugs are also vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi , the cause of Chagas disease. In general, modern houses in the United States are not conducive to domiciliation of kissing bugs (bugs living out their entire life within the home with the presence of eggs, nymphs, adults, and exuviae. Construction features such as concrete foundations, solid walls and ceilings, window screens, tight thresholds for doors and windows, and other measures impede bug entry into homes, and air conditioning reduces the need for open doors and windows. Where Chagas disease is endemic in Mexico and Central and South America, homes often have thatch roofs, adobe walls, and open doors and windows. We investigated numerous instances of kissing bug intrusions into homes in Southern Arizona, California, and Louisiana and documented the reactions to kissing bug bites. Our work confirms the importance of modern home construction in limiting kissing bug intrusions. Older homes, especially those lacking modern screening, caulking, and weather stripping to reduce air leakage, may be subject to kissing bug intrusions and domiciliation. We describe a community in Southern Arizona where domiciliation of homes by Triatoma recurva is common. We also provide recent data regarding kissing bug bites and allergic reactions to the bites.

  1. Green PCB Remediation from Sediment Systems (GPRSS) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falker, John; Thompson, Karen; Zeitlin, Nancy; Quinn, Jacqueline; Parrish, Lewis M.

    2014-01-01

    An ongoing problem facing the global environment community including NASA centers is the removal and remediation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). PCBs were commonly used in a variety of materials including paints, caulking, and adhesives due to the advantageous physical and chemical properties that PCBs imparted to these various materials. Unfortunately, these properties have made the treatment of sites contaminated with these chemicals extremely difficult to deal with, due to their inherent chemical stability. The remediation of sediments contaminated with PCBs is especially difficult, primarily due to the risk of releasing the contaminant into the environment during the treatment process. Traditional treatment options involve the use of dredging and incineration of the contaminated soils/sediments, in which the chance of releasing the contaminants is greatly increased. The purpose of this project is to develop cleanup technology capable of remediating contaminated sediments in-situ, with minimum intrusion. This allows for the minimization of any potential contaminant release during the treatment process, providing a safer method for cleanup operations (as opposed to dredging/incineration) and still treating the basic problem of PCB contamination (as opposed to capping).

  2. Modular glovebox connector and associated good practices for control of radioactive and chemically toxic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, M.D.; Mewhinney, C.J.; Newton, G.J.

    1999-01-01

    Design and associated good practices are described for a modular glovebox connector to improve control of radioactive and chemically toxic materials. The connector consists of an anodized aluminum circular port with a mating spacer, gaskets, and retaining rings for joining two parallel ends of commercially available or custom-manufactured glovebox enclosures. Use of the connector allows multiple gloveboxes to be quickly assembled or reconfigured in functional units. Connector dimensions can be scaled to meet operational requirements for access between gloveboxes. Options for construction materials are discussed, along with recommendations for installation of the connector in new or retrofitted systems. Associated good practices include application of surface coatings and caulking, use of disposable glovebags, and proper selection and protection of gasket and glove materials. Use of the connector at an inhalation toxicology research facility has reduced the time and expense required to reconfigure equipment for changing operational requirements, the dispersion of contamination during reconfigurations, and the need for decommissioning and disposal of contaminated enclosures

  3. Sealing versus Nonsealing: Cost-benefit analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshula N Deshpande

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries still remains the second most prevalent disease after common cold, out of which occlusal caries is the most profound one. In India, more than 40% of children are found to be affected by dental caries. Occlusal surfaces of the teeth are most susceptible sites for caries development due to their morphology. They are least benefited from fluoride application. Various efforts have been made by the preventive means to decline the rate of caries, one of which being sealant application. Sealants have come into existence long back since 1971 when first pit and fissure sealant Nuva-Caulk came into existence. There have been piles of literature stating the benefits that arrive from sealing the teeth. However, one crucial point that is being missed most of the times is the cost-effectiveness of the sealant. There are various schools of thoughts, regarding this that is controversial ones. Some of the analysts believe that always sealing may be a bit costlier, but it reduces subsequent dental treatments and hence saves money as well as time. However, some believe that why to unnecessarily seal the teeth in all cases even when the child is not at a risk to develop caries. Hence, we need to foresee both the sides of equation. For best clinical practice and decision-making, we need to have a balance of best evidence, clinical judgment, and the most important, patient needs and preferences.

  4. Radon penetration of concrete slab cracks, joints, pipe penetrations, and sealants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, K K; Rogers, V C; Holt, R B; Pugh, T D; Grondzik, W A; de Meijer, R J

    1997-10-01

    Radon movement through 12 test slabs with different cracks, pipe penetrations, cold joints, masonry blocks, sealants, and tensile stresses characterized the importance of these anomalous structural domains. Diffusive and advective radon transport were measured with steady-state air pressure differences controlled throughout the deltaP = 0 to 60 Pa range. Diffusion coefficients (deltaP = 0) initially averaged 6.5 x 10(-8) m2 s(-1) among nine slabs with only 8% standard deviation, but increased due to drying by 0.16% per day over a 2-y period to an average of 2.0 x 10(-7) m2 s(-1). An asphalt coating reduced diffusion sixfold but an acrylic surface sealant had no effect. Diffusion was 42 times higher in solid masonry blocks than in concrete and was not affected by small cracks. Advective transport (deltaP slabs (10(-16) m2 permeability), pipe penetrations, and caulked gaps, but was significant for cracks, disturbed pipe penetrations, cold joints, masonry blocks, and concrete under tensile stress. Crack areas calculated to be as small as 10(-7) m2 significantly increased radon advection. Algebraic expressions predict air velocity and effective crack width from enhanced radon transport and air pressures. Masonry blocks, open cracks, and slab cold joints enhance radon penetration but stressed slabs, undisturbed pipe penetrations, and sealed cracks may not.

  5. Summary of detailed energy audit and building simulation on archetype sustainable house, Woodbridge ON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, A. [Ryerson Polytechnic Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; Dembo, A.; Zhou, J. [Ryerson Polytechnic Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Architectural Science

    2009-07-01

    This paper described energy and audit and building simulations conducted on an archetype sustainable house located in Woodbridge, Ontario. The house formed part of a project to construct low energy, sustainable house designs for mass production. The 2 houses formed a duplex. House A was designed using current best design practices, while house B was equipped with advanced and innovative technologies not commonly used in residential constructions. Natural Resources Canada's (NRCan) HOT2000 residential building simulation program was used to evaluate the performance of both houses in the duplex. The simulation program demonstrated that house B performed more efficiently than house A. However, neither houses met their designed values. Significantly larger space heating and cooling loads were identified. The program showed that additional weather-stripping around doors, and caulking around windows will help to reduce the amount of draft in the houses. Assessments are also needed to measure heat losses from the common wall in the basement. It was concluded that the energy performance of the house can be optimized by using the appropriate sealing techniques throughout the building envelope. 2 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Mechanical Properties of Surface-Charged Poly(Methyl Methacrylate as Denture Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang E. Park

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the mechanical properties of a new surface-modified denture resin for its suitability as denture base material. This experimental resin is made by copolymerization of methacrylic acid (MA to poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA to produce a negative charge. Four experimental groups consisted of Orthodontic Dental Resin (DENTSPLY Caulk as a control and three groups of modified PMMA (mPMMA produced at differing ratios of methacrylic acid (5 : 95, 10 : 90, and 20 : 80 MA : MMA. A 3-point flexural test using the Instron Universal Testing Machine (Instron Corp. measured force-deflection curves and a complete stress versus strain history to calculate the transverse strength, transverse deflection, flexural strength, and modulus of elasticity. Analysis of Variance and Scheffe Post-test were performed on the data. Resins with increased methacrylic acid content exhibited lower strength values for the measured physical properties. The most significant decrease occurred as the methacrylic acid content was increased to 20% mPMMA. No significant differences at P<.05 were found in all parameters tested between the Control and 5% mPMMA.

  7. Investigation of infiltration and indoor air quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    A multitask study was performed in the State of New York to provide information for guiding home energy conservation programs while maintaining acceptable indoor air quality. During the study, the statistical distribution of radon concentrations inside 2,400 homes was determined. The relationships among radon levels, house characteristics, and sources were also investigated. The direct impact that two specific air infiltration reduction measures--caulking and weatherstripping of windows and doors, and installation of storm windows and storm doors--have on house air leakage was investigated in 60 homes. The effect of house age on the impact of weatherization was also evaluated. Indoor and outdoor measurements of NO 2 , CO, SO 2 , and respirable suspended particulates (RSP) were made for 400 homes to determine the effect of combustion sources on indoor air quality and to characterize the statistical distribution of the concentrations. Finally, the combustion source data were combined with the information on air infiltration reduction measures to estimate the potential impact of these measures on indoor air quality

  8. An investigation of infiltration and indoor air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    A multitask study was performed in the State of New York to provide information for guiding home energy conservation programs while maintaining acceptable indoor air quality. During this study, the statistical distribution of radon concentrations inside 2400 homes was determined. The relationships among radon levels, house characteristics, and sources were also investigated. The direct impact that two specific air infiltration reduction measures -- caulking and weatherstripping of windows and doors, and installation of storm windows and storm doors -- have on house air leakage was investigated in 60 homes. The effect of house age on the impact of weatherization was also evaluated. Indoor and outdoor measurements of NO{sub 2}, CO, SO{sub 2}, and respirable suspended particulates (RSP) were made for 400 homes to determine the effect of combustion sources on indoor air quality and to characterize the statistical distribution of the concentrations. Finally, the combustion source data were combined with the information on air infiltration reduction measures to estimate the potential impact of these measures on indoor air quality. 87 tabs.

  9. The effect of spiked boots on logger safety, productivity and workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, P; Parker, R

    1994-04-01

    Analysis of 1657 lost-time logging accidents in the New Zealand logging industry (1985-1991) indicates that 17.5% were as a result of slips, trips and falls and a total of 2870 days were lost. Most (56%) of these slipping, tripping and falling accidents occurred in the felling and delimbing phase of the logging operation, where 37% of the workforce are employed. In an attempt to reduce the number of slipping injuries to loggers employed in felling and delimbing, a study of the effectiveness of spike-soled (caulk) boots was undertaken. Four loggers were intensively observed at work, by continuous time-study methods, while wearing their conventional rubber-soled boots and then spike-soled boots. The number of slips, work methods used, physiological workload and productivity were compared for loggers wearing the two footwear types. Results indicated that spike-soled boots were associated with a significant reduction in the frequency of slips and had no adverse effect on work methods, physiological workload or productivity. Spike-soled boots are now being promoted for use by loggers in New Zealand as a simple method to reduce slipping, tripping and falling accidents.

  10. Indoor air quality issues related to the acquisition of conservation in commercial buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechler, M.C.; Hadley, D.L.; Marseille, T.J.

    1990-09-01

    The quality of indoor air in commercial buildings is dependent on the complex interaction between sources of indoor pollutants, environmental factors within buildings such as temperature and humidity, the removal of air pollutants by air-cleaning devices, and the removal and dilution of pollutants from outside air. To the extent that energy conservation measures (ECMs) may affect a number of these factors, the relationship between ECMs and indoor air quality is difficult to predict. Energy conservation measures may affect pollutant levels in other ways. Conservation measures, such as caulking and insulation, may introduce sources of indoor pollutants. Measures that reduce mechanical ventilation may allow pollutants to build up inside structures. Finally, heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may provide surface areas for the growth of biogenic agents, or may encourage the dissemination of pollutants throughout a building. Information about indoor air quality and ventilation in both new and existing commercial buildings is summarized in this report. Sick building syndrome and specific pollutants are discussed, as are broader issues such as ventilation, general mitigation techniques, and the interaction between energy conservation activities and indoor air quality. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) prepared this review to aid the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) in its assessment of potential environmental effects resulting from conservation activities in commercial buildings. 76 refs., 2 figs., 19 tabs.

  11. Remediation Technologies Eliminate Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    groundwater tainted by chlorinated solvents once used to clean rocket engine components. The award-winning innovation (Spinoff 2010) is now NASA s most licensed technology to date. PCBs in paint presented a new challenge. Removing the launch stand for recycling proved a difficult operation; the toxic paint had to be fully stripped from the steel structure, a lengthy and costly process that required the stripped paint to be treated before disposal. Noting the lack of efficient, environmentally friendly options for dealing with PCBs, Quinn and her colleagues developed the Activated Metal Treatment System (AMTS). AMTS is a paste consisting of a solvent solution containing microscale particles of activated zero-valent metal. When applied to a painted surface, the paste extracts and degrades the PCBs into benign byproducts while leaving the paint on the structure. This provides a superior alternative to other methods for PCB remediation, such as stripping the paint or incinerating the structure, which prevents reuse and can release volatized PCBs into the air. Since its development, AMTS has proven to be a valuable solution for removing PCBs from paint, caulking, and various insulation and filler materials in older buildings, naval ships, and former munitions facilities where the presence of PCBs interferes with methods for removing trace explosive materials. Miles of potentially toxic caulking join sections of runways at airports. Any of these materials installed before 1979 potentially contain PCBs, Quinn says. "This is not just a NASA problem," she says. "It s a global problem."

  12. Polymerization shrinkage evaluation of three packable composite resins using a gas pycnometer Avaliação da contração de polimerização de três resinas compactáveis, medida por picnômetro a gás

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Amore

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern restorative dentistry has been playing an outstanding role lately since composite resins, allied to adhesive systems, have been widely applied on anterior and posterior teeth restorations. The evolution of composite resins has mostly been verified due to the improvement of their aesthetic behavior and the increase in their compressive and abrasive strengths. In spite of these developments, the polymerization shrinkage inherent to the material has been a major deficiency that, so far, has been impossible to avoid. Using a gas pycnometry, this research investigated the polymerization shrinkage of three packable composite resins: Filtek P60 (3M, Prodigy Condensable (Kerr, and SureFil (Dentsply/Caulk, varying the distance from the light source to the surface of the resins (2 mm or 10 mm. The pycnometer Accupyc 1330 (Micromeritics, USA precisely records helium displacement, allowing fast and reliable measurements of the volume of composite resin immediately before and after polymerization, without interference of temperature or humidity. Results were not found to be statistically different for the three tested resins, either for 2 mm or 10 mm-distance from the light source to the composite surface.A Odontologia Restauradora moderna tem se destacado nos últimos anos e as resinas compostas, aliadas aos sistemas adesivos, têm sido muito empregadas para restaurações de dentes anteriores e posteriores. A evolução das resinas compostas tem sido constatada na melhoria do seu comportamento estético e no aumento da sua resistência à compressão e à abrasão. Apesar dos avanços mencionados, a contração de polimerização, inerente a esse material, continua sendo uma grande deficiência e, por enquanto, impossível de ser evitada. Nesta pesquisa a contração de polimerização de três resinas compostas compactáveis, Filtek P60 (3M, Prodigy Condensável (Kerr e SureFil (Dentsply/Caulk, variando-se a distância entre a fonte de luz e a

  13. Leak tight sealants and joint details for concrete structure in RAPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singha Roy, P.K.; Baste, M.S.

    1975-01-01

    Leak tightness may pertain to either air or water and in extreme cases each will require separate consideration based on general basic requirements. Leak-tight sealants against air pressure are required in the construction joints and around penetrations in the concrete containment structures. The containment structures should be able to withstand the maximum anticipated design pressure during the incident of a MCA with only minimal leakage (0.1% of bldg. volume per day in RAPP) which is mostly through these joints. Apart from proper joint design and preparation the sealant itself must have superb adhesion to the concrete surface and integrify throughout its service life to prevent any rupture or micro-cracks at any section of the joint. Leak tightness pertains to water tightness as well. A critical water-tight joint at the bottom dome of the prestressed concrete dousing tank at its junction with the 36 inches dia dousing water pipes constructed in RAPP-2, which should be able to withstand the water pressure, continuous submergence in the water of the tank and the longitudinal and lateral movement of the water pipes during opening and closure of the dousing valves, has been made and hydrostatically tested when not even the slight sweating was found. The construction and materials of the above joints and the sealant along with the properties and performance observed during testing/use are described. As the sealant used is an imported poly-sulphide caulking compound suggestions have also been made, which may be kept in mind while developing an Indian substitute. (author)

  14. Repair of amalgam restorations with conventional and bonded amalgam: an in vitro study = Reparo de restaurações de amálgama com amálgama adesivo e convencional: estudo in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popoff, Daniela Araújo Veloso

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Avaliar a microinfiltração em restaurações de amálgama com reparo em amálgama ou amálgama adesivo. Métodos: Trinta pré-molares humanos extraídos foram restaurados com amálgama. Simu- lou-se um defeito nas restaurações reparado com: G1 - amálgama (n=15 (Permite C-SDI; G2 - amálgama adesivo (n=15 (Caulk 34% Condicionador dentário Gel – Dentsply + Prime & Bond 2. 1 – Dentsply + Permite C-SDI. Os dentes foram imersos em solução de nitrato de prata a 50%, termociclados e então, secionados longitudinalmente através da restauração e examinados por três examinadores usando um estereomicroscópio. A microinfiltração foi avaliada pela penetração de corante com uma escala de 0 a 4. Diferenças entre os grupos foram verificadas pelos testes Kruskal Wallis e Dunn. Resultados: Na interface reparo/dente, a técnica de reparo com amálgama adesivo foi signi- ficativamente mais efetiva, apresentando menor microinfiltração (escore 0=53. 3%, P= 0,0012. Já na interface reparo/restauração, houve menor microinfiltração nas restaurações reparadas com amálgama convencional (escore 0=86. 7%, P<0,001. Conclusão: Nenhum dos materiais eliminou a microinfiltração completamente. O uso de sistemas adesivos tem efeito significativo no selamento da interface reparo/dente, entretanto para interface reparo/restauração, ele pode aumentar a microinfiltração

  15. Sealing ability, water sorption, solubility and toothbrushing abrasion resistance of temporary filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, C M; Zanchi, C H; Rodrigues-Junior, S A; Moraes, R R; Pontes, L S; Bueno, M

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate marginal seal, water sorption, solubility and loss of mass after brushing of several temporary filling materials. For marginal seal, Class I cavities, including endodontic access preparations, were made in human molar teeth and restored using one or other of several temporary filling materials (n = 10): zinc oxide/calcium sulphate-based cement (Cavit, 3M,ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA), zinc oxide/eugenol cement (IRM, Dentsply Caulk, Milford, DE, USA), glass ionomer cement (Vidrion R, SSWhite, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil) or a dimethacrylate-based filling (Bioplic, Biodinâmica, Londrina, PR, Brazil). Dye penetration was assessed after thermocycling and immersion in 0.5% basic fuchsine solution. For water sorption, solubility and loss of mass analyses, disc-shaped specimens were made. Water sorption and solubility were evaluated by mass alteration after storage in distilled water for 7 days (n = 7). Loss of mass was calculated based on the difference of mass after abrasion with a toothbrush (n = 5), and surfaces were analysed by SEM. Data of water sorption, solubility and loss of mass were submitted to anova and Tukey's test, and marginal sealing data to Kruskal-Wallis test (P Cavit had the greatest water sorption and solubility. Vidrion R and Bioplic had the lowest solubility. Loss of mass after brushing was higher for Cavit, followed by Bioplic, IRM and Vidrion R. Cavit and Vidrion R were worn aggressively by brushing. The resin-based temporary filling Bioplic produced the best marginal seal, and was associated with the lowest water sorption, solubility and loss of mass.

  16. PCB-containing wood floor finish is a likely source of elevated PCBs in residents' blood, household air and dust: a case study of exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seryak Liesel M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs are persistent pollutants identified worldwide as human blood and breast milk contaminants. Because they bioaccumulate, consumption of meat, fish, and dairy products predicts human blood concentrations. PCBs were also used widely in building materials, including caulks and paints, but few studies have evaluated the contribution of these exposures to body burden. Methods In an earlier study, we detected PCBs in indoor air in 31% of 120 homes on Cape Cod, MA. Two of the homes had much higher concentrations than the rest, so we retested to verify the initial finding, evaluate blood PCB concentrations of residents, and identify the PCB source. Results Air and dust concentrations remained elevated over 5 years between initial and follow-up sampling. Blood serum concentrations of PCBs in residents of the homes were generally elevated above the 95th percentile of a representative sample of the US population. Serum concentrations in residents and air and dust concentrations were especially high in a home where a resident reported use of PCB-containing floor finish in the past, and where the floor of one room was sanded and refinished just prior to sample collection. Conclusion This case-study suggests that PCB residues in homes may be more significant contributors to overall exposure than diet for some people, and that use of a commercially-available PCB-containing wood floor finish in residences during the 1950s and 1960s is an overlooked but potentially important source of current PCB exposure in the general population.

  17. SU-F-T-171: Manufacturing Cost Effective Heterogeneous Phantoms for Use in Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruett, J; Chen, Y; Ahmad, S; Johnson, D [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of 3D printing cost effective heterogeneous phantoms for use in proton therapy treatment planning quality assurance. Methods: A desktop 3D printer was utilized to create a series of 2 cm × 2 cm × 4 cm PLA plastic blocks of varying fill materials and hexagonal fill pattern. The blocks were than tested when filled with air, polyurethane foam, paraffin, silicone, and caulk of calcium carbonate – acrylic polymer blend. The blocks were evaluated with a “GE Lightspeed” 16 slice CT scanner and average CT# of the materials’ centers evaluated. Blocks were then placed into a custom aperture fitted to a Mevion Proton system to determine the relative stopping power of each. Scans were performed in water tank with Marcus type parallel plate chamber under a beam with a range of 15 cm and modulation of 2 cm. Shifts in range occurring relative to the 80% distal edge of the open SOBP were evaluated. Results: The CT#s of the blocks were plotted against their measured relative stopping power. This curve was compared to that which is in clinical use. While the trend agrees generally, specific differences between the relative stopping powers were as great as 10%. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that it is possible to utilize different cost effective materials in the manufacturing of phantoms for use in proton therapy. While different materials may provide better agreement to established calibration curves, a custom curve specific to the materials used may be utilized to accurately predict proton treatment dose distributions.

  18. Interactions between resin monomers and commercial composite resins with human saliva derived esterases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffer, F; Finer, Y; Santerre, J P

    2002-04-01

    Cholesterol esterase (CE) and pseudocholinesterase (PCE) have been reported to degrade commercial and model composite resins containing bisphenylglycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA), triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) or the latter in combination with urethane modified BisGMA monomer systems. In addition, human saliva has been shown to contain esterase like activities similar to CE and PCE. Hence, it was the aim of the current study to determine to what extent human saliva could degrade two common commercial composite resins (Z250 from 3M Inc. and Spectrum TPH from L.D. Caulk) which contain the above monomer systems. Saliva samples from different volunteers were collected, processed, pooled, and freeze-dried. TEGDMA and BisGMA monomers were incubated with human saliva derived esterase activity (HSDEA) and their respective hydrolysis was monitored using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Both monomers were completely hydrolyzed within 25 h by HSDEA. Photopolymerized composites were incubated with buffer or human saliva (pH 7.0 and 37 C) for 2, 8 and 16 days. The incubation solutions were analyzed using HPLC and mass spectrometry. Surface morphology characterization was carried out using scanning electron microscopy. Upon biodegradation, the Z250 composite yielded higher amounts of BisGMA and TEGDMA related products relative to the TPH composite. However, there were higher amounts of ethoxylated bis-phenol A released from the TPH material. In terms of total mass of products released, human saliva demonstrated a greater ability to degrade Z250. In summary, HSDEA has been shown to contain esterase activities that can readily catalyze the biodegradation of current commercial composite resins.

  19. Partial Pulpotomy in Mature Permanent Teeth with Clinical Signs Indicative of Irreversible Pulpitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Nessrin A; Khazali, Mohammad A

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the outcome of partial pulpotomy using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) compared with calcium hydroxide (CH) in mature cariously exposed permanent molars. Fifty permanent molar teeth with carious exposures in 50 patients >20 years old were included. Preoperative pulpal and periapical diagnosis was established based on a history of presenting pain, results of cold testing, and radiographic findings. After informed consent, the tooth was anesthetized, isolated via a dental dam, and disinfected with 5% sodium hypochlorite before caries excavation. Partial pulpotomy was performed by amputating 2 mm of the exposed pulp, hemostasis was achieved, and the tooth was randomly assigned for the placement of either white MTA (White ProRoot; Dentsply, Tulsa, OK) or CH (Dycal; Dentsply Caulk, Milford, DE) as the pulpotomy agent. Postoperative periapical radiographs were taken after placement of the permanent restoration. Clinical and radiographic evaluation was completed after 6 months and 1 and 2 years postoperatively. Statistical analysis was performed using the Fisher exact test. Clinical signs and symptoms suggestive of irreversible pulpitis were established in all teeth. Immediate failure occurred in 4 teeth. At 1 year, MTA showed a higher tendency toward success compared with the CH group, and the difference was statistically significant after 2 years (83% vs 55%, P = .052 at 1 year; 85% vs 43%, P = .006 at 2 years). Sex did not have a statistically significant effect on the outcome. MTA partial pulpotomy sustained a good success rate over the 2-year follow-up in mature permanent teeth clinically diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis. More than half of the CH cases failed within 2 years. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. In vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Sidhant; Shashibhushan, K K; Poornima, P; Reddy, Vv Subba

    2016-01-01

    To assess and compare the retentive strength of two dual-polymerized self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE & SmartCem2, Dentsply Caulk) and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC; RelyX Luting 2, 3M ESPE) on stainless steel crown (SSC). Thirty extracted teeth were mounted on cold cured acrylic resin blocks exposing the crown till the cemento-enamel junction. Pretrimmed, precontoured SSC was selected for a particular tooth. Standardized tooth preparation for SSC was performed by single operator. The crowns were then luted with either RelyX U200 or SmartCem2 or RelyX Luting 2 cement. Retentive strength was tested using Instron universal testing machine. The retentive strength values were recorded and calculated by the formula: Load/Area. One-way analysis of variance was used for multiple comparisons followed by post hoc Tukey's test for groupwise comparisons. Unpaired t-test was used for intergroup comparisons. RelyX U200 showed significantly higher retentive strength than rest of the two cements (p 0.05). The retentive strength of dual-polymerized self-adhesive resin cements was better than RMGIC, and RelyX U200 significantly improved crown retention when compared with SmartCem2 and RelyX Luting 2. Pathak S, Shashibhushan KK, Poornima P, Reddy VVS. In vitro Evaluation of Stainless Steel Crowns cemented with Resin-modified Glass Ionomer and Two New Self-adhesive Resin Cements. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(3):197-200.

  1. The epidemiology of scleroderma among women: assessment of risk from exposure to silicone and silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, C J; Laing, T J; Gillespie, B W; Heeringa, S G; Alcser, K H; Mayes, M D; Wasko, M C; Cooper, B C; Garabrant, D H; Schottenfeld, D

    1996-11-01

    To investigate the relationship between exposure to silicone (including breast implants) and silica and the development of scleroderma (systemic sclerosis, SSc) among women. A population based case-control study was conducted among women in Michigan. 274 confirmed cases of SSc diagnosed between 1985 and 1991 were identified by contacting rheumatologists, hospitals, and a scleroderma support group. These cases and 1184 controls were interviewed by telephone to ascertain past exposures to silicone or silica. Silicone in the form of breast implants was not associated with significantly increased risk of SSc (adjusted odds ratio, 1.30; 95% confidence interval, 0.27 to 6.23). Among 20 other potential silicone exposure surveyed, self-reported exposure to silicone based glues, sealants, and caulks, manufacture or repair of windows or windshields, repairing or frequently using photocopy machines, consumption of simethicone-containing antacids, and implanted medication delivery pumps were significantly associated with SSc. However, blinded assessment of all job and hobby descriptions in terms of their potential for silicone exposure failed to support the first 3 associations, antacid consumption may have been confounded by esophageal dysmotility before the diagnosis of SSc, and other silicone containing device categories (pacemakers, central nervous system shunts, other shunts and catheters) were not significantly associated with SSc. Surgically implanted metallic fixation devices were associated with significantly reduced risk for SSc. No association was detected between SSc and silica dust exposure. Consistent with other studies, we found no increased risk of SSc among women with silicone breast implants, equivocal evidence of risk from other silicone exposures, and no evidence of risk from silica exposure.

  2. Endocrine disrupting chemicals in indoor and outdoor air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudel, Ruthann A.; Perovich, Laura J.

    The past 50 years have seen rapid development of new building materials, furnishings, and consumer products and a corresponding explosion in new chemicals in the built environment. While exposure levels are largely undocumented, they are likely to have increased as a wider variety of chemicals came into use, people began spending more time indoors, and air exchange rates decreased to improve energy efficiency. As a result of weak regulatory requirements for chemical safety testing, only limited toxicity data are available for these chemicals. Over the past 15 years, some chemical classes commonly used in building materials, furnishings, and consumer products have been shown to be endocrine disrupting chemicals - that is they interfere with the action of endogenous hormones. These include PCBs, used in electrical equipment, caulking, paints and surface coatings; chlorinated and brominated flame retardants, used in electronics, furniture, and textiles; pesticides, used to control insects, weeds, and other pests in agriculture, lawn maintenance, and the built environment; phthalates, used in vinyl, plastics, fragrances, and other products; alkylphenols, used in detergents, pesticide formulations, and polystyrene plastics; and parabens, used to preserve products like lotions and sunscreens. This paper summarizes reported indoor and outdoor air concentrations, chemical use and sources, and toxicity data for each of these chemical classes. While industrial and transportation-related pollutants have been shown to migrate indoors from outdoor sources, it is expected that indoor sources predominate for these consumer product chemicals; and some studies have identified indoor sources as the predominant factor influencing outdoor ambient air concentrations in densely populated areas. Mechanisms of action, adverse effects, and dose-response relationships for many of these chemicals are poorly understood and no systematic screening of common chemicals for endocrine disrupting

  3. Effect of double-layer application on bond quality of adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Satoshi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Imai, Arisa; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Erickson, Robert L; Latta, Mark A; Nakatsuka, Toshiyuki; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of double-layer application of universal adhesives on the bond quality and compare to other adhesive systems. Two universal adhesives used were in this study: Scotchbond Universal (SU), [3M ESPE] and Prime & Bond elect (PE), [Dentsply Caulk]. The conventional single-step self-etch adhesives G-ӕnial Bond (GB), [GC Corporation.] and BeautiBond (BB), [Shofu Inc.], and a two-step self-etch adhesive, Optibond XTR (OX), [Kerr Corporation], were used as comparison adhesives. Shear bond strengths (SBS) and shear fatigue strengths (SFS) to human enamel and dentin were measured in single application mode and double application mode. For each test condition, 15 specimens were prepared for SBS testing and 30 specimens for SFS testing. Enamel and dentin SBS of the universal adhesives in the double application mode were significantly higher than those of the single application mode. In addition, the universal adhesives in the double application mode had significantly higher dentin SFS values than those of the single application mode. The two-step self-etch adhesive OX tended to have lower bond strengths in the double application mode, regardless of the test method or adherent substrate. The double application mode is effective in enhancing SBS and SFS of universal adhesives, but not conventional two-step self-etch adhesives. These results suggest that, although the double application mode may enhance the bonding quality of a universal adhesive, it may be counter-productive for two-step self-etch adhesives in clinical use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Process Development for Removal of Siloxanes from ISS Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Layne; Perry, Jay; Kayatin, Matthew J.; Wilson, Mark; Gentry, Gregory J.; Bowman, Elizabeth; Monje, Oscar; Rector, Tony; Steele, John

    2015-01-01

    Dimethylsilanediol (DMSD) has been identified as a problematic organic contaminant aboard the ISS. This contaminant was initially identified in humidity condensate and in the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) product water in 2010 when routine water quality monitoring an increasing total organic carbon (TOC) trend in the WPA product water. Although DMSD is not a crew health hazard at the levels observed in the product water, it can degrade the WPA catalytic reactor's effectiveness and cause early replacement of Multifiltration Beds. DMSD may also degrade the performance of the Oxygen Generation System (OGS) which uses the WPA product water for electrolysis. An investigation into the source of DMSD has determined that polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) compounds are likely hydrolyzing in the Condensing Heat Exchangers (CHX) to form DMSD. PDMS compounds are prevalent aboard ISS from a variety of sources, including crew hygiene products, adhesives, caulks, lubricants, and various nonmetallic materials. PDMS compounds are also known to contribute to CHX hydrophilic coating degradation by rendering it hydrophobic and therefore adversely affecting its ability to effectively transmit water to the condensate bus. Eventually this loss in performance results in water droplets in the air flow exiting the CHX, which may lead to microbial growth in the air ducts and may impact the performance of downstream systems. Several options have been evaluated to address these concerns. Modifications to the Water Processor Multifiltration Beds and Catalytic Reactor for removal of DMSD were not considered viable, and did not address the issue with PDMS compound degradation of the CHX coating. Design concepts are now in development for removing PDMS compounds from the air stream before they can reach the CHX coating, thus preventing coating degradation and hydrolysis of the PDMS compounds to DMSD. This paper summarizes the current status of the effort to treat these contaminants on ISS.

  5. Shear bond strength of different restorative materials to mineral trioxide aggregate and Biodentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulumbaci, Fatih; Almaz, Merve Erkmen; Arikan, Volkan; Mutluay, Merve Safa

    2017-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Biodentine (calcium silicate-based materials) have great importance in dentistry. There is no study comparing the bond strength of Biodentine and MTA for composite, compomer, and compomer or resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGIC). Although many advantages of Biodentine over MTA; in this study, MTA has shown better shear bond strength (SBS) to restorative materials. Recently, a variety of calcium silicate-based materials are often used for pulp capping, perforation repair, and endodontic therapies. After those treatment procedures, teeth are commonly restored with composite resin, (RMGIC materials in pediatric dentistry. The aim of this study was to evaluate the SBS of composite resin (Filtek™ Z250; 3M ESPE, USA), compomer (Dyract XP; LD Caulk/Dentsply, USA), and resin-modified glass ionomer (Photac-Fil Quick Aplicap; 3M ESPE, USA) to white MTA and Biodentine. Ninety acrylic cylindrical blocks were prepared and divided into two groups ( n = 45). The acrylic blocks were randomly allocated into 3 subgroups; Group-1A: MTA + composite (Filtek™ Z250), Group-1B: MTA + compomer (Dyract XP), Group-1C: MTA + RMGIC (Photac-Fil Quick Aplicap), Group-2A: Biodentine + composite, Group-2B: Biodentine + compomer, Group-2C: Biodentine + RMGIC. The specimens were mounted in Universal Testing Machine. A crosshead speed 1 mm/min was applied to each specimen using a knife-edge blade until the bond between the MTA/Biodentine and restorative material failed. Failure modes of each group were evaluated under polarized light microscope at ×40 magnification. There was no statistically significant difference between MTA + Composite resin with MTA + Compomer; and MTA + RMGIC with Biodentine + RMGIC ( P > 0.05). There were statistically significant differences between other groups ( P MTA; MTA has shown better SBS to compomer and composite resin materials than Biodentine.

  6. Shear bond strength of different restorative materials to mineral trioxide aggregate and Biodentine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulumbaci, Fatih; Almaz, Merve Erkmen; Arikan, Volkan; Mutluay, Merve Safa

    2017-01-01

    Significance of Study: Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Biodentine (calcium silicate-based materials) have great importance in dentistry. There is no study comparing the bond strength of Biodentine and MTA for composite, compomer, and compomer or resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGIC). Although many advantages of Biodentine over MTA; in this study, MTA has shown better shear bond strength (SBS) to restorative materials. Aim: Recently, a variety of calcium silicate-based materials are often used for pulp capping, perforation repair, and endodontic therapies. After those treatment procedures, teeth are commonly restored with composite resin, (RMGIC materials in pediatric dentistry. The aim of this study was to evaluate the SBS of composite resin (Filtek™ Z250; 3M ESPE, USA), compomer (Dyract XP; LD Caulk/Dentsply, USA), and resin-modified glass ionomer (Photac-Fil Quick Aplicap; 3M ESPE, USA) to white MTA and Biodentine. Materials and Methods: Ninety acrylic cylindrical blocks were prepared and divided into two groups (n = 45). The acrylic blocks were randomly allocated into 3 subgroups; Group-1A: MTA + composite (Filtek™ Z250), Group-1B: MTA + compomer (Dyract XP), Group-1C: MTA + RMGIC (Photac-Fil Quick Aplicap), Group-2A: Biodentine + composite, Group-2B: Biodentine + compomer, Group-2C: Biodentine + RMGIC. The specimens were mounted in Universal Testing Machine. A crosshead speed 1 mm/min was applied to each specimen using a knife-edge blade until the bond between the MTA/Biodentine and restorative material failed. Failure modes of each group were evaluated under polarized light microscope at ×40 magnification. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between MTA + Composite resin with MTA + Compomer; and MTA + RMGIC with Biodentine + RMGIC (P > 0.05). There were statistically significant differences between other groups (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The results of the present study displayed that although many advantages of Biodentine over

  7. Design Solutions for the Treatment of DMSD in the ISS Water Recovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jay; Carter, Donald; Kayatin, Matthew; Bowman, Elizabeth; Gentry, Greg; Muirhead, Brian; Gazda, Daniel; Wilson, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Dimethylsilanediol (DMSD) has been identified as a problematic organic on ISS. This contaminant was initially identified in the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) product water in 2010 by the Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (TOCA). DMSD is not a crew health hazard at the levels observed in the product water, but it may degrade the performance of the Oxygen Generation System (OGS) which uses the WPA product water for electrolysis and does impact the effective operation of the WPA catalytic reactor. To mitigate these impacts, early replacement of the Multifiltration Beds in the WPA is required. An investigation has determined that the decomposition of atmospheric polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMSs) is the primary source of DMSD in the condensate. PDMSs are prevalent on ISS from a variety of sources, including crew hygiene products, adhesives, caulks, lubricants, and various nonmetallics. These PDMSs also contribute to degradation of the CHX hydrophilic coating, rendering it hydrophobic and therefore affecting its ability to transmit water to the condensate bus. In addition, literature research has determined that PDMSs are likely oxidized to DMSD in the atmosphere when exposed to hydroxyl radicals in the ISS atmosphere. To address these mechanisms, filters have been developed for removal of PDMSs from the ISS atmosphere. However, ongoing analysis indicates a significant reduction in atmospheric PDMSs is required to achieve a measurable reduction of DMSD in the condensate. As a result, additional measures are being pursued to mitigate this issue. First, credible sources are being investigated to quantity to the extent possible the significant sources of PDMSs and identify sources that can be reasonably removed from ISS. Second, a Reverse Osmosis technology is being investigated as an alternate means for removing DMSD from the condensate. This paper summarizes the current status of the overall effort to mitigate DMSD in the US condensate.

  8. Flexural and diametral tensile strength of composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Della Bona

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the flexural strength (sf and the diametral tensile strength (st of light-cured composite resins, testing the hypothesis that there is a positive relation between these properties. Twenty specimens were fabricated for each material (Filtek Z250- 3M-Espe; AM- Amelogen, Ultradent; VE- Vit-l-escence, Ultradent; EX- Esthet-X, Dentsply/Caulk, following ISO 4049 and ANSI/ADA 27 specifications and the manufacturers’ instructions. For the st test, cylindrical shaped (4 mm x 6 mm specimens (n = 10 were placed with their long axes perpendicular to the applied compressive load at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The sf was measured using the 3-point bending test, in which bar shaped specimens (n = 10 were tested at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Both tests were performed in a universal testing machine (EMIC 2000 recording the fracture load (N. Strength values (MPa were calculated and statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey (a = 0.05. The mean and standard deviation values (MPa were Z250-45.06 ± 5.7; AM-35.61 ± 5.4; VE-34.45 ± 7.8; and EX-42.87 ± 6.6 for st; and Z250-126.52 ± 3.3; AM-87.75 ± 3.8; VE-104.66 ± 4.4; and EX-119.48 ± 2.1 for sf. EX and Z250 showed higher st and sf values than the other materials evaluated (p < 0.05, which followed a decreasing trend of mean values. The results confirmed the study hypothesis, showing a positive relation between the material properties examined.

  9. Corrosion behaviour of high copper dental amalgams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, A U J; Ng, B L; Blackwood, D J

    2004-06-01

    This study evaluated the corrosion behaviour of two high copper dental amalgam alloys [Dispersalloy (Dentsply-Caulk) and Tytin (Kerr)] in different electrolytes. Amalgam specimens were prepared, coupled to a copper wire, cemented into glass tubes and polished to a 600-grit finish. A corrosion cell was prepared using a carbon counter-electrode, a standard calomel electrode as the reference and amalgam as the working electrode. The alloys were tested in the following mediums at 37 degrees C: (i) artificial saliva based on Fusayama's solution (FS), (ii) artificial saliva with citric acid adjusted to pH 4.0 (FC) and (iii) 1% sodium chloride solution (SC). Corrosion potentials (E(corr)) and corrosion rates (I(corr)) were determined using potentiostatic and impedance spectroscopy methods. Data was subjected to anova/Scheffe's post hoc test at 0.05 significance level. For both alloys, the corrosion potential in FS was significantly greater than in SC. Corrosion potential of Tytin in FS and SC was also significantly greater than in FC. The corrosion rate of Dispersalloy in FC was significantly greater than in FS and SC. For Tytin, corrosion rate in SC was significantly greater than in FS and FC. Although no significant difference in corrosion potential/rate was observed between the alloys when tested in FS, significant differences were observed when electrochemical testing was carried out in FC and SC. The corrosion behaviour of high copper amalgam alloys are both material and environment dependent. Certain food substances may increase the corrosion of high copper amalgams.

  10. Collector sealants and breathing. Final Report, 25 September 1978-31 December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, M A; Luck, R M; Yeoman, F A; Navish, Jr, F W

    1980-02-20

    The objectives of this program were: (1) to investigate the pertinent properties of a variety of possible sealants for solar collectors and identify the most promising candidates, and (2) to study the effect of breathing in flat-plate, thermal solar collector units. The study involved two types of sealants, Class PS which includes preformed seals or gaskets and Class SC which includes sealing compounds or caulks. It was the intent of the study to obtain data regarding initial properties of candidate elastomers from manufacturers and from the technical literature and to use those sources to provide data pertaining to endurance of these materials under environmental service conditions. Where necessary, these data were augmented by experimental measurements. Environmental stresses evaluated by these measurements included elevated temperatures, moisture, ultraviolet light, ozone and oxygen, and fungus. The second major area of the work involved a study of the effects of materials used and design on the durability of solar collectors. Factors such as design, fabrication, materials of construction, seals and sealing techniques and absorber plate coatings were observed on actual field units removed from service. Such phenomena as leakage, corrosion and formation of deposits on glazing and absorber plate were noted. An evaluation of the properties of several desiccants was made in order to providemeans to mitigate the deleterious effects of water on collector life. Adsorbents for organic degradation products of sealants were also investigated in order to protect the glazing and absorber plate from deposited coatings. Since adsorbents and desiccants in general tend to take up both water and organic decomposition products, relative affinities of a number of these agents for water and for organic compounds were determined . Results are presented in detail.

  11. Design and Delivery of a Filter for Removal of Siloxanes from the ISS Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Layne; Kayatin, Matthew; Perry, Jay; Agui, Juan; Green, Robert; Gentry, Gregory; Bowman, Elizabeth; Wilson, Mark; Rector, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Dimethylsilanediol (DMSD) has been identified as a problematic chemical contaminant aboard ISS. This contaminant was initially identified in the ISS condensate and in the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) product water in 2010 when an increasing total organic carbon (TOC) trend was detected in the water produced by the WPA. DMSD is not a crew health hazard at the levels observed in the product water, but it may degrade the performance of the Oxygen Generation System (OGS) which uses product produced by the WPA for electrolysis. In addition, DMSD can prevent the effective operation of the WPA catalytic reactor, and necessitates early replacement of Multifiltration Beds in the WPA. An investigation into the source of DMSD has determined that polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMSs) are hydrolyzing in the Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX) to form DMSD. PDMSs are prevalent aboard ISS from a variety of sources, including crew hygiene products, adhesives, caulks, lubricants, and various nonmetallics. TPDMSs are also implicated in CHX hydrophilic coating degradation, rendering it hydrophobic and adversely affecting its ability to effectively transmit water to the condensate bus. Eventually this loss in performance results in water droplets in the air flow out of the CHX core, which can lead to microbial growth in the air ducts and can impact the performance of downstream systems. Design concepts have now been developed for removing PDMS in the air stream before it can reach the CHX core, thus preventing degradation of the coating and decomposition of the PDMS to DMSD. This paper summarizes the current status of the effort to deliver filters to ISS for removing PDMSs from the atmosphere before they can adversely impact the performance of the CHX coating and the WPA.

  12. Application Of Lean Strategy To Redesign The Assembly Process Flow Of Glow Plug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Vylen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Lean manufacturing is an applied methodology of scientific objective techniques which will improve the tasks in a process to be performed with a minimum of non-value-added activities. It is being increasingly adopted as a potential solution for many automotive manufacturing industries. This paper addresses the implementation of lean principles in an automotive component manufacturing company with a focus on current manufacturing practices and visual identification of non-value-added time, such as bottle necking, waiting time and material handling, etc. The typical operations involved in making the Glow Plug are caulking, tig welding, MgO filling & O-ring pressing, swaging, facing, thread rolling, inspection and assembly. The facing operation can be eliminated by stabilizing the variations generated during the MgO filling machine. The MgO filling activity contains various forms of non-value-added activities such as worn-out gripper, insufficient clamping tension, physical shaking of the WPC on the agitation unit instead of fine vibration, Jerky insertion of the WPC shank into the agitation locator. It was identified that approximately 15mm material was wasted per piece, though there is no value addition on the part. This project utilizes Lean tools such as “Six Sigma” and “Value Stream Mapping” procedures. Resolving and improving the above problems resulted in drastic increase in productivity by 87% from 82%, reduction in the rejections by 13% from 18%, reduction in the manufacturing lead time by 2.62 days/annum, reduction in the utilization of shop floor space by 6m2 and also the manufacturing cost by 1.16 million INR/ annum.

  13. Preliminary experiences with 222Rn gas in Arizona homes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kearfott, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    Results of a survey of 222Rn gas using four-day charcoal canister tests in 759 Arizona homes are reported. Although the study was not random with respect to population or land area, it was useful in identifying areas at risk and locating several homes having elevated indoor 222Rn air concentrations. Approximately 18% of the homes tested exceeded 150 Bq m-3 (4 pCi L-1), with 7% exceeding 300 Bq m-3 (8 pCi L-1). Several Arizona cities had larger fractions of homes exceeding 150 Bq m-3 (4 pCi L-1), such as Carefree and Cave Creek (23%), Paradise Valley (30%), Payson (33%), and Prescott (31%). The Granite Dells and Groom Creek areas of Prescott had in excess of 40-60% of the houses tested exceeding 150 Bq m-3 (4 pCi L-1). Elevated 222Rn concentrations were measured for a variety of home types having different construction materials. Private well water was identified as a potentially significant source of 222Rn gas in Prescott homes, with water from one well testing over 3.5 MBq m-3 (94,000 pCi L-1). A 222Rn concentration in air exceeding 410,000 Bq m-3 (11,000 pCi L-1) was measured using a four-day charcoal canister test in a house in Prescott which had a well opening into a living space. Additional measurements in this 150-m3 dwelling revealed a strikingly heterogeneous 222Rn concentration. The excessive 222Rn level in the dwelling was reduced to less than 190 Bq m-3 (5.2 pCi L-1) by sealing the well head with caulking and providing passive ventilation through a pipe

  14. Adhesive performance of precoated brackets after expiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloud, Cayce C; Trojan, Terry M; Suliman, Sam N; Tantbirojn, Daranee; Versluis, Antheunis

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate adhesive performance in terms of debonding forces of precoated metal and ceramic brackets 4 years after expiration. Buccal and lingual surfaces of embedded extracted maxillary premolars were etched with 34% Tooth Conditioner Gel (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, Del), rinsed, and dried. Transbond MIP (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) was applied prior to placing adhesive precoated brackets (APC II Victory stainless steel and APC Plus Clarity ceramic brackets, 3M Unitek). The preexpiration brackets had 29-35 months before, and the postexpiration brackets were 45-52 months past, their expiration dates. Sample size was 17-21 per group. Debonding forces were determined by subjecting the bonded brackets to a shear force in a universal testing machine. Debonding forces were compared using two-way ANOVA. Debonded surfaces were examined under a stereomicroscope to determine failure modes, which were compared using the chi-square test. No statistically significant difference was found in debonding forces (P  =  .8581) or failure modes (P  =  .4538) between expired and unexpired brackets. Metal brackets required statistically significantly higher debonding forces than did ceramic brackets (P  =  .0001). For both expired and unexpired brackets, failure modes were mostly cohesive in the adhesive layer for ceramic brackets, and mixed between adhesive and cohesive failure in the adhesive layer for metal brackets. Adhesive precoated brackets did not have any reduction in enamel-adhesion properties up to 4 years after their expiration date. Extended shelf life testing for precoated dental brackets may be worth considering.

  15. Effect of fluoride varnishes on color stability of esthetic restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autio-Gold, Jaana T; Barrett, Allyson A

    2004-01-01

    Fluoride varnish applications were applied to two hybrid resin composite materials, Z-100 (3M Dental Products, St Paul, MN, USA) and Esthet-X (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, DE, USA), shades A1 and A2 and a glass ionomer, GC Fuji IX GP Fast (GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan), shade A2, to evaluate color stability. Specimens (12.6-mm dia x 2.3 mm) were prepared using a polyethylene frame, light-cured and polished through a 1-microm alumina finish. After the initial baseline color measurements, the discs were suspended in Fusayama artificial saliva (FAS) solution at 37 degrees C for 48 hours. Post immersion, the specimens were divided into five groups (n=15 each). The following fluoride varnishes were applied to four groups of test specimens: Duraphat (Colgate Oral Pharmaceutical, Inc, Canton MA, USA), Cavity Shield (OMNII Oral Pharmaceuticals, West Palm Beach, FL, USA), Duraflor (Pharmascience Inc, Montreal, Canada) and Fluor Protector (Vivadent, Ivoclar North America, Amherst, NY, USA). The varnish was allowed to dry for five minutes before immersion. The control group was not coated with varnish, although the specimens were immersed in FAS. All specimens were incubated in newly prepared FAS at 37 degrees C for 24 hours, cleaned with an electric toothbrush and the process repeated using newly prepared FAS. CIE L*a*b* color measurements were recorded five times: at baseline, after 48 hours FAS immersion, after cleaning the first and second fluoride varnish applications and after the final brushing using a commercial toothpaste (Crest). A Minolta CR-300 tristimulus colorimeter with an 8-mm aperture (Ramsey, NJ, USA) was used to record color measurements with the daylight (D65) setting. Calculations were performed for using CIE parameters deltaE*, deltaL*, delta a*, delta b*. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc test (Fisher's PLSD) were used for statistical analysis. After immersion in saliva, the tested glass ionomer (Fuji IX) produced the most significant color changes

  16. Map showing areas with potential for talc deposits in the Gravelly, Greenhorn, and Ruby ranges and the Henrys Lake Mountains of southwestern Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Berg, Richard B.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.

    1998-01-01

    For the last several years, Montana has been the leading talc producing state in the United States (U.S. Geological Survey, 1996). For example, in 1992 Montana supplied about 40 percent of the U.S. mine production of talc (Virta, 1992). All of this production has come from the large deposits of high purity talc in the southwestern part of the state. All Montana talc is currently (1997) extracted from four mines, each within the study area of this map—the open pit operations of the Treasure State, Regal, and Yellowstone mines and the underground operation of the Beaverhead mine (see map numbers 1-4 on list and map to the left). The related mineral chlorite is mined at the Antler mine, located nearby, but outside of the study area in the Highland Mountains. Montana talc has at least two market advantages: (1) some deposits are very large and near surface, allowing economic mining by open pit methods; and (2) the deposits are of high purity and lack tremolite or other amphibole mineral contaminants (such as absestos) that occur in some other talc-rich deposits. Talc from southwest Montana is used in ceramics, paint, paper, plastics, cosmetics, rubber, roofing, flooring, caulking, and agricultural applications. The talc is also used in the processes of recycling paper and plastics. Talc was first discovered in the early 1900's at the present site of the Yellowstone mine (Perry, 1948, p. 9). Modest production began in 1942 from shallow pits and adits, supplying steatite (massive, compact, high-purity) talc that was used to make ceramic insulators. The southwest Montana talc industry grew to become a significant part of the region's economy; this history is described by Perry (1948), Olson (1976), and Berg (1997). Exploration and development are likely to continue for the foreseeable future for several reasons: (1) mines are active in the area at present and an infrastructure for talc processing exists; (2) large changes in domestic and export talc markets are not

  17. Nanoscale chemical surface characterization of four different types of dental pulp-capping materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Victor; França, Rodrigo

    2017-03-01

    The surface of any dental pulp-capping material has important implications for its clinical success because it is in direct contact with dental tissue, which influences its cytotoxicity. The aim was to determine the chemical composition of the first atomic layers of four pulp-protection agents because these atoms can initiate the pulp healing process. Biodentine (Septodont), ProRoot MTA (Dentsply), Dycal (Caulk) and TheraCal (Bisco) were prepared (n=5) according to manufacturer recommendations. The chemical surface composition was analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the bulk composition was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Both survey and high resolution XPS spectra of the elements detected were obtained, with element-dependent probe depths of 4-5nm; the binding energy scale was normalized to the C1s adventitious carbon peak at 285eV. There was a significant difference between bulk and surface compositions for all the pulp-capping materials. The calcium surface concentrations at 0nm and 70nm were Dycal 7.9% and 15.1%; ProRoot MTA 14.1% and 17%; TheraCal 0% and 3.6%; and Biodentine 17.6% and 33.7%, respectively. Trace amounts of the following elements (<1%) were also found: Ti, S and Zr in Biodentine; Bi in ProRoot MTA and TheraCal; Na, P, Zn and N in Dycal. The XPS results showed that Ca in the surface layer could vary from 0 to 18%, depending on the material. Aliphatic carbons, from the polymerization reactions, especially in Dycal and TheraCal, were found to mask the other components. This study compares, for the first time, the chemical composition of the first atomic layers of four pulp-capping materials. This information is relevant because the interaction between pulpar cells and the material's outermost atomic layer is an important factor for leading the pulpal response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Color Changing Hydrogen Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Luke B.; Williams, Martha; Captain, Janine E.; Mohajeri, Nahid; Raissi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    During the Space Shuttle Program, one of the most hazardous operation that occurred was the loading of liquid hydrogen (LH2) during fueling operations of the spacecraft. Due to hydrogen's low explosive limit, any amount leaked could lead to catastrophic event. Hydrogen's chemical properties make it ideal as a rocket fuel; however, the fuel is deemed unsafe for most commercial use because of the inability to easily detect the gas leaking. The increased use of hydrogen over traditional fossil fuels would reduce greenhouse gases and America's dependency on foreign oil. Therefore a technology that would improve safety at NASA and in the commercial sector while creating a new economic sector would have a huge impact to NASA's mission. The Chemochromic Detector for sensing hydrogen gas leakage is a color-changing detector that is useful in any application where it is important to know not only the presence but also the location of the hydrogen gas leak. This technology utilizes a chemochromicpigment and polymer matrix that can be molded or spun into rigid or pliable shapes useable in variable temperature environments including atmospheres of inert gas, hydrogen gas, or mixtures of gases. A change in color of the detector material indicates where gaseous hydrogen leaks are occurring. The irreversible sensor has a dramatic color change from beige to dark grey and remains dark grey after exposure. A reversible pigment changes from white to blue in the presence of hydrogen and reverts back to white in the presence of oxygen. Both versions of the sensor's pigments were comprised of a mixture of a metal oxide substrate and a hydro-chromic compound (i.e., the compound that changed color in the presence of hydrogen) and immediately notified the operator of the presence of low levels of hydrogen. The detector can be used in a variety of formats including paint, tape, caulking, injection molded parts, textiles and fabrics, composites, and films. This technology brings numerous

  19. Effect of brushing on fluoride release from 3 bracket adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Robert N; Mack, Steven J; Wefel, James S; Vargas, Marcos A; Jakobsen, Jane R

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare fluoride ion release from 3 orthodontic bracket adhesives with and without brushing the bracketed teeth with a fluoridated dentifrice. The bracket adhesives included a light-cured composite resin (Transbond; 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif), a fluoride-releasing composite resin (Advance; L D Caulk Division, Dentsply International, Milford, Del), and a resin-modified glass ionomer (Fuji Ortho LC; GC America, Alsip, Ill). The teeth in the control group were not bonded with brackets. Sixty extracted human teeth were randomly assigned to 6 groups of 10 each: (1) Transbond, brushed; (2) Advance, brushed; (3) Advance, not brushed; (4) Fuji, brushed; (5) Fuji, not brushed; and (6) control, brushed. After bonding, each tooth was placed in a sealed plastic test tube containing 4 ml of deionized water. The toothpaste used in brushing contained 0.15% weight per volume sodium fluoride, 1500 parts per million parts fluoride (Winter-fresh gel; Colgate-Palmolive Co., New York, NY). Brushing began 24 hours after the teeth were bonded and placed in deionized water. After brushing, the teeth were thoroughly rinsed with deionized water and returned to a sealed test tube. Fluoride measurements were taken before brushing began, at intervals of 72 hours for 22 days, and 90 and 93 days after bonding. Findings included: (1) brushing significantly increased the release of fluoride ions from the teeth in the composite resin and control groups, (2) the enamel crowns of the unbonded control teeth absorbed and re-released a substantial amount of fluoride ions obtained from the toothpaste, (3) the brushed group of teeth bonded with the fluoride-releasing composite resin released significantly more fluoride on the last 4 days that measurements were taken after brushing than the nonbrushed group bonded with the same adhesive, (4) the brushed group of teeth bonded with the resin-modified glass ionomer released significantly more fluoride on the last 4

  20. Potential Exposure to Ebola Virus from Body Fluids due to Ambulance Compartment Permeability in Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Megan L; Nguyen, Duong T; Idriss, Barrie; Bennett, Sarah; Dunn, Angela; Martin, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    Prehospital care, including patient transport, is integral in the patient care process during the Ebola response. Transporting ill persons from the community to Ebola care facilities can stop community spread. Vehicles used for patient transport in infectious disease outbreaks should be evaluated for adequate infection prevention and control. An ambulance driver in Sierra Leone attributed his Ebola infection to exposure to body fluids that leaked from the patient compartment to the driver cabin of the ambulance. A convenience sample of 14 vehicles used to transport patients with suspected or confirmed Ebola in Sierra Leone were assessed. The walls separating the patient compartment and driver cabin in these vehicles were evaluated for structural integrity and potential pathways for body fluid leakage. Ambulance drivers and other staff were asked to describe their cleaning and decontamination practices. Ambulance construction and design standards from the National Fire Protection Association, US General Services Administration, and European Committee on Standardization (CEN) were reviewed. Many vehicles used by ambulance staff in Sierra Leone were not traditional ambulances, but were pick-up trucks or sport-utility vehicles that had been assembled or modified for patient transport. The wall separating the patient compartment and driver cabin in many vehicles did not have a waterproof seal around the edges. Staff responsible for cleaning and disinfection did not thoroughly clean bulk body fluids with disposable towels before disinfection of the patient compartment. Pressure from chlorine sprayers used in the decontamination process may have pushed body fluids from the patient compartment into the driver cabin through gaps around the wall. Ambulance design standards do not require a waterproof seal between the patient compartment and driver cabin. Sealing the wall by tightening or replacing existing bolts is recommended, followed by caulking of all seams with a

  1. MULTIDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH ON SHOREA JAVANICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.F. TORQUEBIAU*

    1987-01-01

    establishment of a permanent tree plantation, constitutes an efficient agroforestry system which is extensively described by Michon 1984, 1985; Michon et al 1984; and Torquebiau 1984. The resin of Shorea javanica is traditionally used for torches, caulking boats, batik coloring, etc., and is now exported to industrial countries where there is market for uses such as food additives, cosmetics, paints, varnishes a

  2. DNA Damage, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis Induction Caused by Lead in Human Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement G. Yedjou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the industrial use of lead has been significantly reduced from paints and ceramic products, caulking, and pipe solder. Despite this progress, lead exposure continues to be a significant public health concern. The main goal of this research was to determine the in vitro mechanisms of lead nitrate [Pb(NO32] to induce DNA damage, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in human leukemia (HL-60 cells. To reach our goal, HL-60 cells were treated with different concentrations of Pb(NO32 for 24 h. Live cells and necrotic death cells were measured by the propidium idiode (PI assay using the cellometer vision. Cell apoptosis was measured by the flow cytometry and DNA laddering. Cell cycle analysis was evaluated by the flow cytometry. The result of the PI demonstrated a significant (p < 0.05 increase of necrotic cell death in Pb(NO32-treated cells, indicative of membrane rupture by Pb(NO32 compared to the control. Data generated from the comet assay indicated a concentration-dependent increase in DNA damage, showing a significant increase (p < 0.05 in comet tail-length and percentages of DNA cleavage. Data generated from the flow cytometry assessment indicated that Pb(NO32 exposure significantly (p < 0.05 increased the proportion of caspase-3 positive cells (apoptotic cells compared to the control. The flow cytometry assessment also indicated Pb(NO32 exposure caused cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 checkpoint. The result of DNA laddering assay showed presence of DNA smear in the agarose gel with little presence of DNA fragments in the treated cells compared to the control. In summary, Pb(NO32 inhibits HL-60 cells proliferation by not only inducing DNA damage and cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 checkpoint but also triggering the apoptosis through caspase-3 activation and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation accompanied by secondary necrosis. We believe that our study provides a new insight into the mechanisms of Pb(NO32 exposure and its associated adverse

  3. Current developments in laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for use in geology, forensics, and nuclear nonproliferation research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messerly, Joshua D. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-08-26

    This dissertation focused on new applications of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The diverse fields that were investigated show the versatility of the technique. In Chapter 2, LA-ICP-MS was used to investigate the rare earth element (REE) profiles of garnets from the Broken Hill Deposit in New South Wales, Australia. The normalized REE profiles helped to shed new light on the formation of deposits of sulfide ores. This information may be helpful in identifying the location of sulfide ore deposits in other locations. New sources of metals such as Pg, Zn, and Ag, produced from these ores, are needed to sustain our current technological society. The application of LA-ICP-MS presented in Chapter 3 is the forensics analysis of automotive putty and caulking. The elemental analysis of these materials was combined with the use of Principal Components Analysis (PCA). The PCA comparison was able to differentiate the automotive putty samples by manufacturer and lot number. The analysis of caulk was able to show a differentiation based on manufacturer, but no clear differentiation was shown by lot number. This differentiation may allow matching of evidence in the future. This will require many more analyses and the construction of a database made up of many different samples. The 4th chapter was a study of the capabilities of LA-ICP-MS for fast and precise analysis of particle ensembles for nuclear nonproliferation applications. Laser ablation has the ability to spatially resolve particle ensembles which may contain uranium or other actinides from other particles present in a sample. This is of importance in samples obtained from air on filter media. The particle ensembles of interest may be mixed in amongst dust and other particulates. A problem arises when ablating these particle ensembles directly from the filter media. Dust particles other than ones of interest may be accidentally entrained in the aerosol of the ablated particle