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Sample records for caulivora infecting soybean

  1. Survival of Diaporthe phaseolorum var. caulivora (causal agent of soybean stem canker) artificially inoculated in different crop residues

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    Grijalba, Pablo; Ridao, Azucena del C.

    2012-01-01

    Stem canker caused by Diaporthe phaseolorum var. caulivora is an important disease of soybean in Argentina. The objective of this study was to determine its survival ability in artificially infested straw under laboratory and field conditions. In laboratory, stem pieces of soybean, maize, sorghum, sunflower, potato and wheat were autoclaved, placed in petri dishes on Potato Dextrose Agar and Water Agar, and inoculated with a 7-day-old pathogen culture. All crop residues were colonized and pro...

  2. Diaporthe/Phomopsis Species on Soybean in Serbia

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    Miloš Vidić

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A complex of soybean diseases is caused by species from the genus Diaporthe /Phomopsis.Diaporthe phaseolorum (anamorph Phomopsis phaseoli and Phomopsis longicolla(teleomorph unknown are described as soybean pathogens. The first species includesthree varieties: D. phaseolorum var. sojae, anamorph Phomopsis sojae, the causal agent ofpod and stem blight, and D. phaseolorum var. caulivora and D. phaseolorum var. meridionalis,agents of northern and southern stem canker. The species P. longicolla is the most commonand most damaging agent of soybean seed decay.The diseases caused by parasites from this genus were first observed and described onsoybean in the USA. Presently they are widespread in most soybean-growing regions aroundthe world. Soybean in Serbia is attacked by all pathogens mentioned above, except forD. phaseolorum var. meridionalis, the causal agent of the southern stem canker. D. phaseolorumvar. caulivora (northern stem canker has the greatest economic importance becauseit causes wilt and drying of plants during pod development and grain filling. Most intensiveoutbreaks of the disease occurred in the 1980s in southern and southeastern Banat, southernBačka and Srem. Prematurely wilted plants yielded 50% to 62% (depending on varietyless than healthy plants. Such heavy losses raised the question of the profitability ofsoybean growing. P. sojae and P. longicolla are less important in Serbia at the moment. Intensiveinfections of soybean seed break out occasionally. It was found that P. longicolla isthe primary agent of seed decay and latent infections of seed in our country, although theother members of this genus may cause identical symptoms.Sexual cycle of development (teleomorph stage of the fungi of the genus Diaporthe/Phomopsis form perithecia with asci and ascospores, while in the asexual cycle (anamorphstage various types of conidia (α and β are formed in pycnidia. The species P. longicollahas no teleomorph stage.Infected harvest

  3. Transformation of multiple soybean cultivars by infecting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    And most GFP-positive plants were confirmed to be positive by Southern blot analysis, which showed that transformation of cotyledonary-node explants mediated by. Agrobacterium delivered T-DNA with one or two copies into soybean genome. In our study, the combination of Nannong88-1 with EHA105 is the optimum ...

  4. Two new 'legumoviruses' (genus Begomovirus) naturally infecting soybean in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabi, Olufemi J; Kumar, P Lava; Mgbechi-Ezeri, J U; Naidu, Rayapati A

    2010-05-01

    Two new 'legumoviruses' (genus Begomovirus; family Geminiviridae) naturally infecting soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) in Nigeria were molecularly characterized. Based on characteristic symptoms in soybean, the two viruses are provisionally designated as Soybean mild mottle virus (SbMMV) and Soybean chlorotic blotch virus (SbCBV). SbCBV has a bipartite genome, whereas SbMMV has only a DNA A component. The DNA A component of SbMMV is 2,768 nucleotides (nt) long and the DNA A and DNA B components of SbCBV are 2,708 and 2,647 nt long, respectively. In pairwise comparisons, the DNA A component of SbMMV and SbCBV showed 62% nt sequence identity, indicating that these two viruses are distinct. Whereas the DNA A of SbMMV contains two virion- and four complementary-sense open reading frames, that of SbCBV lacks the virus-sense AV2, a signature gene present in 'Old World' begomoviruses. A pairwise comparison with the corresponding nucleotide sequence of other begomoviruses in the databases indicated that SbCBV had a maximum of 74% identity with cowpea golden mosaic virus and SbMMV had a maximum of 65% identity with mungbean yellow mosaic India virus and kudzu mosaic virus. Phylogenetic analysis of the DNA A component of SbCBV and SbMMV together with those of other begomoviruses available in the databases showed clustering of the two viruses within the 'legumovirus' clade of the begomovirus phylogenetic tree. In addition, the DNA A and B components of SbCBV from Centrosema pubescens Benth were found to be identical to those from soybean, indicating that leguminous wild species are a potential alternative host for the virus. Since soybean is an introduced crop, the identification of two distinct begomoviruses naturally infecting soybean in Nigeria suggests the occurrence of 'legumoviruses' in plant species indigenous to Africa and underscores their potential threat to sustainable cultivation of soybean on the African continent.

  5. Pathogenic variation of Phakopsora pachyrhizi infecting soybean in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twizeyimana, M; Ojiambo, P S; Sonder, K; Ikotun, T; Hartman, G L; Bandyopadhyay, R

    2009-04-01

    Soybean rust, caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is an important disease in Nigeria and many other soybean-producing countries worldwide. To determine the geographical distribution of soybean rust in Nigeria, soybean fields were surveyed in the Derived Savanna (DS), Northern Guinea Savanna (NGS), and Southern Guinea Savanna (SGS) agroecological zones in Nigeria between 2004 and 2006. Disease severity in each zone was determined and analyzed using geostatistics. Prevalence of infected fields and disease severity in surveyed fields were significantly (P < 0.05) different between geographical zones with both variables being higher in the DS zone than in either NGS or SGS zones. Geostatistical analysis indicated that the spatial influence of disease severity at one location on severity at other locations was between 75 and 120 km. An exponential model best described the relationship between semivariance and lag distance when rust severity was high. Spatial interpolation of rust severity showed that locations in the DS zone were more conducive for the rust epidemic compared to areas in the NGS zone. In the 2005 survey, 116 purified isolates were established in culture on detached soybean leaves. To establish the nature of pathogenic variation in P. pachyrhizi, a set of four soybean accessions with Rpp(1), Rpp(2), Rpp(3), and Rpp(4) resistance genes, two highly resistant and two highly susceptible genotypes were inoculated with single uredinial isolates. Principal component analysis on the number of uredinia per square centimeter of leaf tissue for 116 isolates indicated that an adequate summary of pathogenic variation was obtained using only four genotypes. Of these four, PI 459025B (with Rpp(4) gene) and TGx 1485-1D had the lowest and highest number of uredinia per square centimeter, respectively. Based on cluster analysis of the number of uredinia per square centimeter, seven pathotype clusters were determined. Isolates in cluster III were the most virulent, while those

  6. Soybean Resistance to Cercospora sojina Infection Is Reduced by Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Kelly Juliane Telles; Debona, Daniel; França, Sueny Kelly Santos; Gonçalves, Mariana Gabriele Marcolino; DaMatta, Fábio Murilo; Rodrigues, Fabrício Ávila

    2014-11-01

    Frogeye leaf spot, caused by Cercospora sojina, is one of the most important leaf diseases of soybean worldwide. Silicon (Si) is known to increase the resistance of several plant species to pathogens. The cultivars Bossier and Conquista, which are susceptible and resistant, respectively, to frogeye leaf spot, supplied and nonsupplied with Si were examined for the activities of defense enzymes and the concentrations of total soluble phenolics (TSP) and lignin-thioglycolic acid (LTGA) derivatives at 8, 14, and 16 days after inoculation (dai) with C. sojina. The importance of cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDE) to the infection process of C. sojina and the effect of Si on their activities were also determined. Soybean plants were grown in hydroponic culture containing either 0 or 2 mM Si (-Si and +Si, respectively) and noninoculated or C. sojina inoculated. Severity of frogeye leaf spot was higher in cultivar Bossier plants than cultivar Conquista and also in the +Si plants compared with their -Si counterparts. Except for the concentrations of TSP and LTGA derivatives, activities of defense enzymes and the CWDE did not change for +Si noninoculated plants regardless of the cultivar. The activities of lipoxygenases, phenylalanine ammonia-lyases, chitinases, and polyphenoloxidases as well as the activities of CWDE decreased for the +Si inoculated plants. The results from this study demonstrated that defense enzyme activities decreased in soybean plants supplied with Si, which compromised resistance to C. sojina infection.

  7. Roles of small RNAs in soybean defense against Phytophthora sojae infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, James; Gao, Lei; Yang, Yang; Zhai, Jixian; Arikit, Siwaret; Yu, Yu; Duan, Shuyi; Chan, Vicky; Xiong, Qin; Yan, Jun; Li, Shengben; Liu, Renyi; Wang, Yuanchao; Tang, Guiliang; Meyers, Blake C; Chen, Xuemei; Ma, Wenbo

    2014-09-01

    The genus Phytophthora consists of many notorious pathogens of crops and forestry trees. At present, battling Phytophthora diseases is challenging due to a lack of understanding of their pathogenesis. We investigated the role of small RNAs in regulating soybean defense in response to infection by Phytophthora sojae, the second most destructive pathogen of soybean. Small RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), are universal regulators that repress target gene expression in eukaryotes. We identified known and novel small RNAs that differentially accumulated during P. sojae infection in soybean roots. Among them, miR393 and miR166 were induced by heat-inactivated P. sojae hyphae, indicating that they may be involved in soybean basal defense. Indeed, knocking down the level of mature miR393 led to enhanced susceptibility of soybean to P. sojae; furthermore, the expression of isoflavonoid biosynthetic genes was drastically reduced in miR393 knockdown roots. These data suggest that miR393 promotes soybean defense against P. sojae. In addition to miRNAs, P. sojae infection also resulted in increased accumulation of phased siRNAs (phasiRNAs) that are predominantly generated from canonical resistance genes encoding nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat proteins and genes encoding pentatricopeptide repeat-containing proteins. This work identifies specific miRNAs and phasiRNAs that regulate defense-associated genes in soybean during Phytophthora infection. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Comparison of Soybean Transformation Efficiency and Plant Factors Affecting Transformation during the Agrobacterium Infection Process

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    Yuying Jia

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The susceptibility of soybean genotype to Agrobacterium infection is a key factor for the high level of genetic transformation efficiency. The objective of this study is to evaluate the plant factors related to transformation in cotyledonary nodes during the Agrobacterium infection process. This study selected three genotypes (Williams 82, Shennong 9 and Bert with high transformation efficiency, which presented better susceptibility to Agrobacterium infection, and three low transformation efficiency genotypes (General, Liaodou 16 and Kottman, which showed a relatively weak susceptibility. Gibberellin (GA levels and soybean GA20ox2 and CYP707A2 transcripts of high-efficiency genotypes increased and were higher than those of low-efficiency genotypes; however, the opposite performance was shown in abscisic acid (ABA. Higher zeatin riboside (ZR content and DNA quantity, and relatively higher expression of soybean IPT5, CYCD3 and CYCA3 were obtained in high-efficiency genotypes. High-efficiency genotypes had low methyl jasmonate (MeJA content, polyphenol oxidase (PPO and peroxidase (POD activity, and relatively lower expression of soybean OPR3, PPO1 and PRX71. GA and ZR were positive plant factors for Agrobacterium-mediated soybean transformation by facilitating germination and growth, and increasing the number of cells in DNA synthesis cycle, respectively; MeJA, PPO, POD and ABA were negative plant factors by inducing defence reactions and repressing germination and growth, respectively.

  9. Comparison of Soybean Transformation Efficiency and Plant Factors Affecting Transformation during the Agrobacterium Infection Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yuying; Yao, Xingdong; Zhao, Mingzhe; Zhao, Qiang; Du, Yanli; Yu, Cuimei; Xie, Futi

    2015-08-07

    The susceptibility of soybean genotype to Agrobacterium infection is a key factor for the high level of genetic transformation efficiency. The objective of this study is to evaluate the plant factors related to transformation in cotyledonary nodes during the Agrobacterium infection process. This study selected three genotypes (Williams 82, Shennong 9 and Bert) with high transformation efficiency, which presented better susceptibility to Agrobacterium infection, and three low transformation efficiency genotypes (General, Liaodou 16 and Kottman), which showed a relatively weak susceptibility. Gibberellin (GA) levels and soybean GA20ox2 and CYP707A2 transcripts of high-efficiency genotypes increased and were higher than those of low-efficiency genotypes; however, the opposite performance was shown in abscisic acid (ABA). Higher zeatin riboside (ZR) content and DNA quantity, and relatively higher expression of soybean IPT5, CYCD3 and CYCA3 were obtained in high-efficiency genotypes. High-efficiency genotypes had low methyl jasmonate (MeJA) content, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD) activity, and relatively lower expression of soybean OPR3, PPO1 and PRX71. GA and ZR were positive plant factors for Agrobacterium-mediated soybean transformation by facilitating germination and growth, and increasing the number of cells in DNA synthesis cycle, respectively; MeJA, PPO, POD and ABA were negative plant factors by inducing defence reactions and repressing germination and growth, respectively.

  10. Differential expression of four soybean bZIP genes during Phakopsora pachyrhizi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Murilo S; Soares, Zamira G; Vidigal, Pedro M P; Barros, Everaldo G; Poddanosqui, Adriana M P; Aoyagi, Luciano N; Abdelnoor, Ricardo V; Marcelino-Guimarães, Francismar C; Fietto, Luciano G

    2015-11-01

    Asian soybean rust (ASR), caused by the obligate biotrophic fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is one of most important diseases in the soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) agribusiness. The identification and characterization of genes related to plant defense responses to fungal infection are essential to develop ASR-resistant plants. In this work, we describe four soybean genes, GmbZIP62, GmbZIP105, GmbZIPE1, and GmbZIPE2, which encode transcription factors containing a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain from two divergent classes, and that are responsive to P. pachyrhizi infection. Molecular phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that these genes encode proteins similar to bZIP factors responsive to pathogens. Yeast transactivation assays showed that only GmbZIP62 has strong transactivation activity in yeast. In addition, three of the bZIP transcription factors analyzed were also differentially expressed by plant defense hormones, and all were differentially expressed by fungal attack, indicating that these proteins might participate in response to ASR infection. The results suggested that these bZIP proteins are part of the plant defense response to P. pachyrhizi infection, by regulating the gene expression related to ASR infection responses. These bZIP genes are potential targets to obtain new soybean genotypes resistant to ASR.

  11. Correlations between traits in soybean (Glycine max L.) naturally infected with Asian rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, B; Serafim, F; Nogueira, A P O; Hamawaki, O T; de Sousa, L B; Hamawaki, R L

    2015-12-22

    Soybean (Glycine max L.)-breeding programs aim to develop cultivars with high grain yields and high tolerance to Asian soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi). Considering that the traits targeted for breeding are mainly quantitative in nature, knowledge of associations between traits allows the breeder to formulate indirect selection strategies. In this study, we investigated phenotypic, genotypic, and environmental correlations between the agronomic traits of soybean plants naturally infected with P. pachyrhizi, and identified agronomic traits that would be useful in indirectly selecting soybean genotypes for high yields. The study was conducted on the Capim Branco Farm, Uberlândia, Brazil, with 15 soybean genotypes, which were cultivated in a completely randomized block design with four replications. Fourteen phenotypic traits were evaluated using the GENES software. The phenotypic and genotypic correlations were positive and of a high magnitude between the total number of pods and the number of pods with two or three grains, indicating that the total number of pods is a useful trait for the indirect selection of soybean genotypes for high grain yields. Strong environmental correlations were found between plant height at blooming and maturity and grain yield and yield components.

  12. Putative Rust Fungal Effector Proteins in Infected Bean and Soybean Leaves.

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    Cooper, Bret; Campbell, Kimberly B; Beard, Hunter S; Garrett, Wesley M; Islam, Nazrul

    2016-05-01

    The plant-pathogenic fungi Uromyces appendiculatus and Phakopsora pachyrhizi cause debilitating rust diseases on common bean and soybean. These rust fungi secrete effector proteins that allow them to infect plants, but their effector repertoires are not understood. The discovery of rust fungus effectors may eventually help guide decisions and actions that mitigate crop production loss. Therefore, we used mass spectrometry to identify thousands of proteins in infected beans and soybeans and in germinated fungal spores. The comparative analysis between the two helped differentiate a set of 24 U. appendiculatus proteins targeted for secretion that were specifically found in infected beans and a set of 34 U. appendiculatus proteins targeted for secretion that were found in germinated spores and infected beans. The proteins specific to infected beans included family 26 and family 76 glycoside hydrolases that may contribute to degrading plant cell walls. There were also several types of proteins with structural motifs that may aid in stabilizing the specialized fungal haustorium cell that interfaces the plant cell membrane during infection. There were 16 P. pachyrhizi proteins targeted for secretion that were found in infected soybeans, and many of these proteins resembled the U. appendiculatus proteins found in infected beans, which implies that these proteins are important to rust fungal pathology in general. This data set provides insight to the biochemical mechanisms that rust fungi use to overcome plant immune systems and to parasitize cells.

  13. Effect of microalgae on intestinal inflammation triggered by soybean meal and bacterial infection in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Bravo-Tello

    Full Text Available Soybean meal has been used in many commercial diets for farm fish; despite this component inducing intestinal inflammation. On the other hand, microalgae have increasingly been used as dietary supplements in fish feed. Nevertheless, the vast quantity of microalgae species means that many remain under- or unstudied, thus limiting wide scale commercial application. In this work, we evaluated the effects to zebrafish (Danio rerio of including Tetraselmis sp (Ts; Phaeodactylum tricornutum (Pt; Chlorella sp (Ch; Nannochloropsis oculata (No; or Nannochloropsis gaditana (Ng as additives in a soybean meal-based diet on intestinal inflammation and survival after Edwardsiella tarda infection. In larvae fed a soybean meal diet supplemented with Ts, Pt, Ch, or Ng, the quantity of neutrophils present in the intestine drastically decreased as compared to larvae fed only the soybean meal diet. Likewise, Ts or Ch supplements in soybean meal or fishmeal increased zebrafish survival by more than 20% after being challenged. In the case of Ts, the observed effect correlated with an increased number of neutrophils present at the infection site. These results suggest that the inclusion of Ts or Ch in fish diets could allow the use of SBM and at the same time improve performance against pathogen.

  14. Effect of microalgae on intestinal inflammation triggered by soybean meal and bacterial infection in zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís, Camila J.; Ulloa, Pilar E.; Hedrera, Manuel; Pizarro-Guajardo, Marjorie; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Soybean meal has been used in many commercial diets for farm fish; despite this component inducing intestinal inflammation. On the other hand, microalgae have increasingly been used as dietary supplements in fish feed. Nevertheless, the vast quantity of microalgae species means that many remain under- or unstudied, thus limiting wide scale commercial application. In this work, we evaluated the effects to zebrafish (Danio rerio) of including Tetraselmis sp (Ts); Phaeodactylum tricornutum (Pt); Chlorella sp (Ch); Nannochloropsis oculata (No); or Nannochloropsis gaditana (Ng) as additives in a soybean meal-based diet on intestinal inflammation and survival after Edwardsiella tarda infection. In larvae fed a soybean meal diet supplemented with Ts, Pt, Ch, or Ng, the quantity of neutrophils present in the intestine drastically decreased as compared to larvae fed only the soybean meal diet. Likewise, Ts or Ch supplements in soybean meal or fishmeal increased zebrafish survival by more than 20% after being challenged. In the case of Ts, the observed effect correlated with an increased number of neutrophils present at the infection site. These results suggest that the inclusion of Ts or Ch in fish diets could allow the use of SBM and at the same time improve performance against pathogen. PMID:29117213

  15. Effect of soybean leaf and plant age on susceptibility to initiation of infection by Phakopsora pachyrhizi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although previous studies have been conducted to determine the relationship of plant and leaf age to susceptibility to soybean rust, this relationship still is unresolved. Some studies suggest that as plants reach the flowering stage they become more susceptible to initiation of infection. However, ...

  16. Potassium silicate and calcium silicate on the resistance of soybean to Phakopsora pachyrhizi infection

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz,Maria Fernanda; Rodrigues,Fabrício Ávila; Diniz,Ana Paula Cardoso; Moreira,Maurilio Alves; Barros,Everaldo Gonçalves

    2013-01-01

    The control of Asian Soybean Rust (ASR), caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, has been difficult due to the aggressiveness of the pathogen and the lack of resistant cultivars. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of spray of potassium silicate (PS) and soil amendment with calcium silicate (CS) on soybean resistance to ASR. The PS solution was sprayed to leaves 24 hours prior to fungal inoculation while CS was amended to the soil at thirty-five days before sowing. The infection ...

  17. More Cercospora Species Infect Soybeans across the Americas than Meets the Eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Ana Paula Gomes; Guillin, Eduardo A; Borges, Leandro Luiz; Silva, Amanda C T da; Almeida, Álvaro M R de; Grijalba, Pablo E; Gottlieb, Alexandra M; Bluhm, Burton H; Oliveira, Luiz Orlando de

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of soybean caused by Cercospora spp. are endemic throughout the world's soybean production regions. Species diversity in the genus Cercospora has been underestimated due to overdependence on morphological characteristics, symptoms, and host associations. Currently, only two species (Cercospora kikuchii and C. sojina) are recognized to infect soybean; C. kikuchii causes Cercospora leaf blight (CLB) and purple seed stain (PSS), whereas C. sojina causes frogeye leaf spot. To assess cryptic speciation among pathogens causing CLB and PSS, phylogenetic and phylogeographic analyses were performed with isolates from the top three soybean producing countries (USA, Brazil, and Argentina; collectively accounting for ~80% of global production). Eight nuclear genes and one mitochondrial gene were partially sequenced and analyzed. Additionally, amino acid substitutions conferring fungicide resistance were surveyed, and the production of cercosporin (a polyketide toxin produced by many Cercospora spp.) was assessed. From these analyses, the long-held assumption of C. kikuchii as the single causal agent of CLB and PSS was rejected experimentally. Four cercosporin-producing lineages were uncovered with origins (about 1 Mya) predicted to predate agriculture. Some of the Cercospora spp. newly associated with CLB and PSS appear to represent undescribed species; others were not previously reported to infect soybeans. Lineage 1, which contained the ex-type strain of C. kikuchii, was monophyletic and occurred in Argentina and Brazil. In contrast, lineages 2 and 3 were polyphyletic and contained wide-host range species complexes. Lineage 4 was monophyletic, thrived in Argentina and the USA, and included the generalist Cercospora cf. flagellaris. Interlineage recombination was detected, along with a high frequency of mutations linked to fungicide resistance in lineages 2 and 3. These findings point to cryptic Cercospora species as underappreciated global considerations for soybean

  18. Chemical properties of Aspergillus flavus-infected soybean seeds exposed to gamma-irradiation during storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahrous, S.R.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the chemical properties of Aspergillus flavus-infected soybean seeds exposed to different levels of gamma-irradiation; 0 1, 3 and 5 kGy, during storage. The results revealed that there was no effect of irradiation at different dose levels on moisture, protein, total lipids and amino acids content of the seeds for overall 60 days of storage under ambient temperature. At zero time, irradiation of A. flavus- infected-soybean seeds at 5.0 kGy caused a slight increase in peroxide value, no change in acid value, a slight decrease in saponification and iodine values in the crude oil extracted from the seeds. An increase in saturated fatty acids associated with a decrease in un-saturated fatty acids was also observed in the oil extracted from the seeds. Furthermore, at dose level 5 kGy the fungus growth was completely inhibited and there was no detection of aflatoxin B1 after 60 days of storage. It is concluded that gamma-irradiation of A. flavus-infected soybean seeds at dose level 5 kGY is sufficient to inhibit fungus growth and aflatoxin production over a storage period of 60 days without changes in major chemical properties of the seeds and the oil extracted from seeds

  19. The effect of Spirulina platensis versus soybean on insulin resistance in HIV-infected patients: a randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcel, Azabji-Kenfack; Ekali, Loni G; Eugene, Sobngwi; Arnold, Onana E; Sandrine, Edie D; von der Weid, Denis; Gbaguidi, Emmanuel; Ngogang, Jeanne; Mbanya, Jean C

    2011-07-01

    HIV-infected patients develop abnormalities of glucose metabolism due to the virus and antiretroviral drugs. Spirulina and soybean are nutritional supplements that are cheap, accessible in our community and affect glucose metabolism. We carried out a randomized study to assess the effect of Spirulina platensis versus soybean as a food supplement on HIV/HAART-associated insulin resistance (IR) in 33 insulin-resistant HIV-infected patients. The study lasted for two months at the National Obesity Centre of Cameroon. Insulin resistance was measured using the short insulin tolerance test. Physical activity and diet did not change over the study duration. On-treatment analysis was used to analyze data. The Mann-Whitney U test, the Students T test and the Chi square test were used as appropriate. Curve gradients were analyzed using ANCOVA. Seventeen subjects were randomized to spirulina and 16 to soybean. Each received 19 g of supplement daily. The follow up rate was 65% vs. 100% for spirulina and soybean groups, respectively, and both groups were comparable at baseline. After eight weeks, insulin sensitivity (IS) increased by 224.7% vs. 60% in the spirulina and soybean groups respectively (p spirulina versus soybean, respectively, improved their IS (p = 0.049) with a 1.45 (1.05-2.02) chance of improving insulin sensitivity on spirulina. This pilot study suggests that insulin sensitivity in HIV patients improves more when spirulina rather than soybean is used as a nutritional supplement. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01141777.

  20. The interaction of soybean reticulon homology domain protein (GmRHP) with Soybean mosaic virus encoded P3 contributes to the viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Lu, Lu; Wang, Ying; Yuan, Xingxing; Chen, Xin

    2018-01-15

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), a member of the Potyvirus genus, is a prevalent and devastating viral pathogen in soybean-growing regions worldwide. Potyvirus replication occurs in the 6K2-induced viral replication complex at endoplasmic reticulum exit sites. Potyvirus-encoded P3 is also associated with the endoplasmic reticulum and is as an essential component of the viral replication complex, playing a key role in viral replication. This study provides evidence that the soybean (Glycine max) reticulon homology domain protein (designated as GmRHP) interacts with SMV-P3 by using a two-hybrid yeast system to screen a soybean cDNA library. A bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay further confirmed the interaction, which occurred on the cytomembrane, endoplasmic reticulum and cytoskeleton in Nicotiana benthamiana cells. The transient expression of GmRHP can promote the coupling of Turnip mosaic virus replication and cell-to-cell movement in N. benthamiana. The interaction between the membrane protein SMV-P3 and GmRHP may contribute to the potyvirus infection, and GmRHP may be an essential host factor for P3's involvement in potyvirus replication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The transcriptomic changes of Huipizhi Heidou (Glycine max), a nematode-resistant black soybean during Heterodera glycines race 3 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuang; Chen, Yu; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yuanyuan; Jung, Ki-Hong; Chen, Lijie; Xuan, Yuanhu; Duan, Yuxi

    2018-01-01

    Glycine max (soybean) is an extremely important crop, representing a major source of oil and protein for human beings. Heterodera glycines (soybean cyst nematode, SCN) infection severely reduces soybean production; therefore, protecting soybean from SCN has become an issue for breeders. Black soybean has exhibited a different grade of resistance to SCN. However, the underlying mechanism of Huipizhi Heidou resistance against SCN remains elusive. The Huipizhi Heidou (ZDD2315) and race 3 of Heterodera glycines were chosen to study the mechanism of resistance via examination of transcriptomic changes. After 5, 10, and 15days of SCN infection, whole roots were sampled for RNA extraction, and uninfected samples were simultaneously collected as a control. 740, 1413, and 4925 genes were isolated by padj (p-value adjusted)<0.05 after 5, 10, and 15days of the infection, respectively, and 225 differentially expressed genes were overlapped at all the time points. We found that the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) at 5, 10, and 15days after infection were involved in various biological function categories; in particular, induced genes were enriched in defense response, hormone mediated signaling process, and response to stress. To verify the pathways observed in the GO and KEGG enrichment results, effects of hormonal signaling in cyst-nematode infection were further examined via treatment with IAA (indo-3-acetic acid), salicylic acid (SA), gibberellic acid (GA), jasmonic acid (JA), and ethephon, a precursor of ethylene. The results indicate that five hormones led to a significant reduction of J2 number in the roots of Huipizhi Heidou and Liaodou15, representing SCN-resistant and susceptible lines, respectively. Taken together, our analyses are aimed at understanding the resistance mechanism of Huipizhi Heidou against the SCN race 3 via the dissection of transcriptomic changes upon J2 infection. The data presented here will help further research on the basis of soybean and

  2. Molecular characterization and evolutionary analysis of soybean mosaic virus infecting Pinellia ternata in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haohua; ShenTu, Susu; Xue, Feng; Duns, Greg; Chen, Jishuang

    2008-02-01

    Twenty-nine Pinellia ternata specimens were collected from representative areas in China, including the major production provinces of Zhejiang, Henan, Shanxi, Hunan, Shandong and Hubei. Seven isolates related to soybean mosaic virus (SMV), which could be pathogenic on P. ternata and some soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars, were detected using double antibody sandwich immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA) and RT-PCR amplification performed with degenerate primer of potyviruses. It is revealed that the common potyvirus infecting P. ternata is, indeed, only SMVs rather than Dasheen mosaic virus (DsMV) as previously reported. Further molecular phylogenetic analysis of the coat protein (CP) genes of these SMV isolates from P. ternata and G. max, along with some other potyvirus members, such as DsMV and Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) reconstructed the evolutionary route on both nucleotide and amino acid levels. Similarity and homology of nucleotide sequences for SMV CP genes demonstrated high host correlation and low partial habitat correlation, while those of amino acid sequences also showed that the host correlation was more notable than the habitat correlation. The amino acid sequence of conserved region within CP determines the main function, which shows high homology between species. This study outspreaded from the viruses themselves and their relationship to the infected hosts and revealed the evolutionary strategies, especially the rapid variation or recombination of SMV of P. ternata, in order to adapt itself naturally to the special host.

  3. Potassium silicate and calcium silicate on the resistance of soybean to Phakopsora pachyrhizi infection

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    Maria Fernanda Cruz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The control of Asian Soybean Rust (ASR, caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, has been difficult due to the aggressiveness of the pathogen and the lack of resistant cultivars. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of spray of potassium silicate (PS and soil amendment with calcium silicate (CS on soybean resistance to ASR. The PS solution was sprayed to leaves 24 hours prior to fungal inoculation while CS was amended to the soil at thirty-five days before sowing. The infection process of P. pachyrhizi was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The uredia on leaves of plants sprayed with PS were smaller and more compact than those observed on the leaves of plants grown in soil amended with CS or in soil non-amended with CS (control treatment. On leaves of plants from the control treatment, uredia produced many urediniospores at 9 days after inoculation, and the ASR severity was 15, 8 and 9%, respectively, for plants from control, PS and CS treatments. In conclusion, the spray of PS contributed to reduce the number of uredia per cm² of leaf area and both PS spray and CS resulted in lower ASR symptoms.

  4. Adjuvant concentrations and uredospore densities on Phakopsora pachyrhizi infection efficiency in soybean

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    Tiago Zanatta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were carried out in a growth chamber to evaluate the effect of spreader and uredospore concentrations on the efficiency of infection by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the causal agent of Asian soybean rust. CD 214 RR soybean cultivar was inoculated with the following polyoxyethylene sorbitane monolaurate concentrations: 0, 30, 60, 120, 240, 480 and 960 µL.L-1 water, as well as a fixed uredospore concentration of 2 x 10(4 spores.mL-1. In a second phase, the inoculum concentrations of 0, 5 x 10³, 1 x 10(4, 2 x 10(4, 4 x 10(4, 8 x 10(4 and 16 x 10(4 uredospores.mL-1 were evaluated, and the spreader concentration of 240 µL.L-1, selected in the previous experiment, was fixed. The spreader concentration of 240 µL.L-1 can be used in artificial inoculation studies, as well as up to 4 x 10(4 uredospores.mL-1. In this work, there was a correlation between uredia and lesion density. Thus, the use of lesion density is recommended to assess disease intensity for its accuracy and less time consuming. There was also a positive correlation between uredia and lesion density.

  5. Timecourse microarray analyses reveal global changes in gene expression of susceptible Glycine max (soybean) roots during infection by Heterodera glycines (soybean cyst nematode).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkharouf, Nadim W; Klink, Vincent P; Chouikha, Imed B; Beard, Hunter S; MacDonald, Margaret H; Meyer, Susan; Knap, Halina T; Khan, Rana; Matthews, Benjamin F

    2006-09-01

    Changes in gene expression within roots of Glycine max (soybean), cv. Kent, susceptible to infection by Heterodera glycines (the soybean cyst nematode [SCN]), at 6, 12, and 24 h, and 2, 4, 6, and 8 days post-inoculation were monitored using microarrays containing more than 6,000 cDNA inserts. Replicate, independent biological samples were examined at each time point. Gene expression was analyzed statistically using T-tests, ANOVA, clustering algorithms, and online analytical processing (OLAP). These analyses allow the user to query the data in several ways without importing the data into third-party software. RT-PCR confirmed that WRKY6 transcription factor, trehalose phosphate synthase, EIF4a, Skp1, and CLB1 were differentially induced across most time-points. Other genes induced across most timepoints included lipoxygenase, calmodulin, phospholipase C, metallothionein-like protein, and chalcone reductase. RT-PCR demonstrated enhanced expression during the first 12 h of infection for Kunitz trypsin inhibitor and sucrose synthase. The stress-related gene, SAM-22, phospholipase D and 12-oxophytodienoate reductase were also induced at the early time-points. At 6 and 8 dpi there was an abundance of transcripts expressed that encoded genes involved in transcription and protein synthesis. Some of those genes included ribosomal proteins, and initiation and elongation factors. Several genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport were also more abundant. Those genes included glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and sucrose synthase. These results identified specific changes in gene transcript levels triggered by infection of susceptible soybean roots by SCN.

  6. Genome-wide annotation of the soybean WRKY family and functional characterization of genes involved in response to Phakopsora pachyrhizi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencke-Malato, Marta; Cabreira, Caroline; Wiebke-Strohm, Beatriz; Bücker-Neto, Lauro; Mancini, Estefania; Osorio, Marina B; Homrich, Milena S; Turchetto-Zolet, Andreia Carina; De Carvalho, Mayra C C G; Stolf, Renata; Weber, Ricardo L M; Westergaard, Gastón; Castagnaro, Atílio P; Abdelnoor, Ricardo V; Marcelino-Guimarães, Francismar C; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia; Bodanese-Zanettini, Maria Helena

    2014-09-10

    Many previous studies have shown that soybean WRKY transcription factors are involved in the plant response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Phakopsora pachyrhizi is the causal agent of Asian Soybean Rust, one of the most important soybean diseases. There are evidences that WRKYs are involved in the resistance of some soybean genotypes against that fungus. The number of WRKY genes already annotated in soybean genome was underrepresented. In the present study, a genome-wide annotation of the soybean WRKY family was carried out and members involved in the response to P. pachyrhizi were identified. As a result of a soybean genomic databases search, 182 WRKY-encoding genes were annotated and 33 putative pseudogenes identified. Genes involved in the response to P. pachyrhizi infection were identified using superSAGE, RNA-Seq of microdissected lesions and microarray experiments. Seventy-five genes were differentially expressed during fungal infection. The expression of eight WRKY genes was validated by RT-qPCR. The expression of these genes in a resistant genotype was earlier and/or stronger compared with a susceptible genotype in response to P. pachyrhizi infection. Soybean somatic embryos were transformed in order to overexpress or silence WRKY genes. Embryos overexpressing a WRKY gene were obtained, but they were unable to convert into plants. When infected with P. pachyrhizi, the leaves of the silenced transgenic line showed a higher number of lesions than the wild-type plants. The present study reports a genome-wide annotation of soybean WRKY family. The participation of some members in response to P. pachyrhizi infection was demonstrated. The results contribute to the elucidation of gene function and suggest the manipulation of WRKYs as a strategy to increase fungal resistance in soybean plants.

  7. Overexpression of tobacco osmotin (Tbosm) in soybean conferred resistance to salinity stress and fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanyam, Kondeti; Arun, Muthukrishnan; Mariashibu, Thankaraj Salammal; Theboral, Jeevaraj; Rajesh, Manoharan; Singh, Narendra K; Manickavasagam, Markandan; Ganapathi, Andy

    2012-12-01

    Salinity and fungal diseases are the two significant constraints limiting soybean productivity. In order to address these problems, we have transformed soybean cv. Pusa 16 via somatic embryogenesis with salinity induced and apoplastically secreted pathogenesis-related tobacco osmotin (Tbosm) gene using Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. Integration of Tbosm in randomly selected five GUS assay-positive independently transformed soybean plants was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern hybridization. Reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blotting confirmed that the Tbosm was expressed in three of the five transformed soybean plants. Further the Western blotting revealed that the truncated osmotin protein accumulated more in apoplastic fluid. The transformed (T(1)) soybean plants survived up to 200 mM NaCl, whereas non-transformed (NT) plants could withstand till 100 mM and perished at 150 mM NaCl. The biochemical analysis revealed the T(1) soybean plants accumulated higher amount of proline, chlorophyll, APX, CAT, SOD, DHAR, MDHAR, and RWC than NT plants. Leaf gas exchange measurements revealed that T(1) soybean plants maintained higher net photosynthetic rate, CO(2) assimilation, and stomatal conductance than NT plants. The three T(1) soybean plants expressing the osmotin gene also showed resistance against three important fungal pathogens of soybean--Microsphaera diffusa, Septoria glycines and Phakopsora pachyrhizi. The T(1) soybean plants produced 32-35 soybean pods/plant containing 10.3-12.0 g of seeds at 200 mM NaCl, whereas NT plant produced 28.6 soybean pods containing 9.6 g of seeds at 100 mM NaCl. The present investigation clearly shows that expression of Tbosm enhances salinity tolerance and fungal disease resistance in transformed soybean plants.

  8. The transcriptional landscape of Rhizoctonia solani AG1-IA during infection of soybean as defined by RNA-seq.

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    Tanya R Copley

    Full Text Available Rhizoctonia solani Kühn infects most plant families and can cause significant agricultural yield losses worldwide; however, plant resistance to this disease is rare and short-lived, and therefore poorly understood, resulting in the use of chemical pesticides for its control. Understanding the functional responses of this pathogen during host infection can help elucidate the molecular mechanisms that are necessary for successful host invasion. Using the pathosystem model soybean-R. solani anastomosis group AG1-IA, we examined the global transcriptional responses of R. solani during early and late infection stages of soybean by applying an RNA-seq approach. Approximately, 148 million clean paired-end reads, representing 93% of R. solani AG1-IA genes, were obtained from the sequenced libraries. Analysis of R. solani AG1-IA transcripts during soybean invasion revealed that most genes were similarly expressed during early and late infection stages, and only 11% and 15% of the expressed genes were differentially expressed during early and late infection stages, respectively. Analyses of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs revealed shifts in molecular pathways involved in antibiotics biosynthesis, amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism, as well as pathways involved in antioxidant production. Furthermore, several KEGG pathways were unique to each time point, particularly the up-regulation of genes related to toxin degradation (e.g., nicotinate and nicotinamid metabolism at onset of necrosis, and those linked to synthesis of anti-microbial compounds and pyridoxine (vitamin B6 biosynthesis 24 h.p.o. of necrosis. These results suggest that particular genes or pathways are required for either invasion or disease development. Overall, this study provides the first insights into R. solani AG1-IA transcriptome responses to soybean invasion providing beneficial information for future targeted control methods of this successful pathogen.

  9. Aggressiveness of Fusarium species and impact of root infection on growth and yield of soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, María M Díaz; Leandro, Leonor F; Munkvold, Gary P

    2013-08-01

    Fusarium spp. are commonly isolated from soybean roots but the pathogenic activity of most species is poorly documented. Aggressiveness and yield impact of nine species of Fusarium were determined on soybean in greenhouse (50 isolates) and field microplot (19 isolates) experiments. Root rot severity and shoot and root dry weights were compared at growth stages V3 or R1. Root systems were scanned and digital image analysis was conducted; yield was measured in microplots. Disease severity and root morphology impacts varied among and within species. Fusarium graminearum was highly aggressive (root rot severity >90%), followed by F. proliferatum and F. virguliforme. Significant variation in damping-off (20 to 75%) and root rot severity (60%) was observed among F. oxysporum isolates. In artificially-infested microplots, root rot severity was low (soybean at different plant stages and introduces root image analysis to assess the impact of root pathogens on soybean.

  10. The Lesion Simulating Disease (LSD) gene family as a variable in soybean response to Phakopsora pachyrhizi infection and dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabreira, Caroline; Cagliari, Alexandro; Bücker-Neto, Lauro; Wiebke-Strohm, Beatriz; de Freitas, Loreta B; Marcelino-Guimarães, Francismar C; Nepomuceno, Alexandre L; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia M A N; Bodanese-Zanettini, Maria H

    2013-08-01

    The Lesion Simulating Disease (LSD) genes encode a family of zinc finger proteins that are reported to play an important role in the hypersensitive response and programmed cell death (PCD) that are caused by biotic and abiotic stresses. In the present study, 117 putative LSD family members were identified in Viridiplantae. Genes with one, two, or three conserved LSD domains were identified. Proteins with three LSD domains were highly represented in the species analyzed and were present in basal organisms. Proteins with two LSD domains were identified only in the Embryophyte clade, and proteins possessing one LSD domain were highly represented in grass species. Expression analyses of Glycine max LSD (GmLSD) genes were performed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results indicated that GmLSD genes are not ubiquitously expressed in soybean organs and that their expression patterns are instead organ-dependent. The expression of the majority of GmLSD genes is modulated in soybean during Phakopsora pachyrhizi infection. In addition, the expression of some GmLSD genes is modulated in plants under dehydration stress. These results suggest the involvement of GmLSD genes in the response of soybean to both biotic and abiotic stresses.

  11. Soybean cyst nematode culture collections and field populations from North Carolina and Missouri reveal high incidences of infection by viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruark, Casey L; Koenning, Stephen R; Davis, Eric L; Opperman, Charles H; Lommel, Steven A; Mitchum, Melissa G; Sit, Tim L

    2017-01-01

    Five viruses were previously discovered infecting soybean cyst nematodes (SCN; Heterodera glycines) from greenhouse cultures maintained in Illinois. In this study, the five viruses [ScNV, ScPV, ScRV, ScTV, and SbCNV-5] were detected within SCN greenhouse and field populations from North Carolina (NC) and Missouri (MO). The prevalence and titers of viruses in SCN from 43 greenhouse cultures and 25 field populations were analyzed using qRT-PCR. Viral titers within SCN greenhouse cultures were similar throughout juvenile development, and the presence of viral anti-genomic RNAs within egg, second-stage juvenile (J2), and pooled J3 and J4 stages suggests active viral replication within the nematode. Viruses were found at similar or lower levels within field populations of SCN compared with greenhouse cultures of North Carolina populations. Five greenhouse cultures harbored all five known viruses whereas in most populations a mixture of fewer viruses was detected. In contrast, three greenhouse cultures of similar descent to one another did not possess any detectable viruses and primarily differed in location of the cultures (NC versus MO). Several of these SCN viruses were also detected in Heterodera trifolii (clover cyst) and Heterodera schachtii (beet cyst), but not the other cyst, root-knot, or reniform nematode species tested. Viruses were not detected within soybean host plant tissue. If nematode infection with viruses is truly more common than first considered, the potential influence on nematode biology, pathogenicity, ecology, and control warrants continued investigation.

  12. Tanscriptomic Study of the Soybean-Fusarium virguliforme Interaction Revealed a Novel Ankyrin-Repeat Containing Defense Gene, Expression of Whose during Infection Led to Enhanced Resistance to the Fungal Pathogen in Transgenic Soybean Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngaki, Micheline N; Wang, Bing; Sahu, Binod B; Srivastava, Subodh K; Farooqi, Mohammad S; Kambakam, Sekhar; Swaminathan, Sivakumar; Bhattacharyya, Madan K

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium virguliforme causes the serious disease sudden death syndrome (SDS) in soybean. Host resistance to this pathogen is partial and is encoded by a large number of quantitative trait loci, each conditioning small effects. Breeding SDS resistance is therefore challenging and identification of single-gene encoded novel resistance mechanisms is becoming a priority to fight this devastating this fungal pathogen. In this transcriptomic study we identified a few putative soybean defense genes, expression of which is suppressed during F. virguliforme infection. The F. virguliforme infection-suppressed genes were broadly classified into four major classes. The steady state transcript levels of many of these genes were suppressed to undetectable levels immediately following F. virguliforme infection. One of these classes contains two novel genes encoding ankyrin repeat-containing proteins. Expression of one of these genes, GmARP1, during F. virguliforme infection enhances SDS resistance among the transgenic soybean plants. Our data suggest that GmARP1 is a novel defense gene and the pathogen presumably suppress its expression to establish compatible interaction.

  13. Tanscriptomic Study of the Soybean-Fusarium virguliforme Interaction Revealed a Novel Ankyrin-Repeat Containing Defense Gene, Expression of Whose during Infection Led to Enhanced Resistance to the Fungal Pathogen in Transgenic Soybean Plants.

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    Micheline N Ngaki

    Full Text Available Fusarium virguliforme causes the serious disease sudden death syndrome (SDS in soybean. Host resistance to this pathogen is partial and is encoded by a large number of quantitative trait loci, each conditioning small effects. Breeding SDS resistance is therefore challenging and identification of single-gene encoded novel resistance mechanisms is becoming a priority to fight this devastating this fungal pathogen. In this transcriptomic study we identified a few putative soybean defense genes, expression of which is suppressed during F. virguliforme infection. The F. virguliforme infection-suppressed genes were broadly classified into four major classes. The steady state transcript levels of many of these genes were suppressed to undetectable levels immediately following F. virguliforme infection. One of these classes contains two novel genes encoding ankyrin repeat-containing proteins. Expression of one of these genes, GmARP1, during F. virguliforme infection enhances SDS resistance among the transgenic soybean plants. Our data suggest that GmARP1 is a novel defense gene and the pathogen presumably suppress its expression to establish compatible interaction.

  14. Soybean mosaic virus infection and helper component-protease enhance accumulation of Bean pod mottle virus-specific siRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean plants infected with Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) develop acute symptoms that usually decrease in severity over time. In other plant-virus interactions, this type of symptom recovery has been associated with degradation of viral RNAs by post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), which is ac...

  15. Soybean cyst nematode culture collections and field populations from North Carolina and Missouri reveal high incidences of infection by viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey L Ruark

    Full Text Available Five viruses were previously discovered infecting soybean cyst nematodes (SCN; Heterodera glycines from greenhouse cultures maintained in Illinois. In this study, the five viruses [ScNV, ScPV, ScRV, ScTV, and SbCNV-5] were detected within SCN greenhouse and field populations from North Carolina (NC and Missouri (MO. The prevalence and titers of viruses in SCN from 43 greenhouse cultures and 25 field populations were analyzed using qRT-PCR. Viral titers within SCN greenhouse cultures were similar throughout juvenile development, and the presence of viral anti-genomic RNAs within egg, second-stage juvenile (J2, and pooled J3 and J4 stages suggests active viral replication within the nematode. Viruses were found at similar or lower levels within field populations of SCN compared with greenhouse cultures of North Carolina populations. Five greenhouse cultures harbored all five known viruses whereas in most populations a mixture of fewer viruses was detected. In contrast, three greenhouse cultures of similar descent to one another did not possess any detectable viruses and primarily differed in location of the cultures (NC versus MO. Several of these SCN viruses were also detected in Heterodera trifolii (clover cyst and Heterodera schachtii (beet cyst, but not the other cyst, root-knot, or reniform nematode species tested. Viruses were not detected within soybean host plant tissue. If nematode infection with viruses is truly more common than first considered, the potential influence on nematode biology, pathogenicity, ecology, and control warrants continued investigation.

  16. A Novel Pathogenesis-Related Class 10 Protein Gly m 4l, Increases Resistance upon Phytophthora sojae Infection in Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Sujie; Jiang, Liangyu; Wu, Junjiang; Dong, Lidong; Cheng, Qun; Xu, Pengfei; Zhang, Shuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Phytophthora root and stem rot of soybean, caused by Phytophthora sojae (P. sojae), is a destructive disease in many soybean planting regions worldwide. In a previous study, an expressed sequence tag (EST) homolog of the major allergen Pru ar 1 in apricot (Prunus armeniaca) was identified up-regulated in the highly resistant soybean 'Suinong 10' infected with P. sojae. Here, the full length of the EST was isolated using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). It showed the highest homology of 53.46% with Gly m 4 after comparison with the eight soybean allergen families reported and was named Gly m 4-like (Gly m 4l, GenBank accession no. HQ913577.1). The cDNA full length of Gly m 4l was 707 bp containing a 474 bp open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 157 amino acids. Sequence analysis suggests that Gly m 4l contains a conserved 'P-loop' (phosphate-binding loop) motif at residues 47-55 aa and a Bet v 1 domain at residues 87-120 aa. The transcript abundance of Gly m 4l was significantly induced by P. sojae, salicylic acid (SA), NaCl, and also responded to methyl jasmonic acid (MeJA) and ethylene (ET). The recombinant Gly m 4l protein showed RNase activity and displayed directly antimicrobial activity that inhibited hyphal growth and reduced zoospore release in P. sojae. Further analyses showed that the RNase activity of the recombinant protein to degrading tRNA was significantly affected in the presence of zeatin. Over-expression of Gly m 4l in susceptible 'Dongnong 50' soybean showed enhanced resistance to P. sojae. These results indicated that Gly m 4l protein played an important role in the defense of soybean against P. sojae infection.

  17. Natural antisense transcripts in plants: a review and identification in soybean infected with Phakopsora pachyrhizi SuperSAGE library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto-Kido, Suzana de Aragão; Ferreira Neto, José Ribamar Costa; Pandolfi, Valesca; Marcelino-Guimarães, Francismar Corrêa; Nepomuceno, Alexandre Lima; Vilela Abdelnoor, Ricardo; Benko-Iseppon, Ana Maria; Kido, Ederson Akio

    2013-01-01

    Natural antisense ranscripts (NAT) are RNA molecules complementary to other endogenous RNAs. They are capable of regulating the expression of target genes at different levels (transcription, mRNA stability, translation, etc.). Such a property makes them ideal for interventions in organisms' metabolism. The present study reviewed plant NAT aspects, including features, availability and genesis, conservation and distribution, coding capacity, NAT pair expression, and functions. Besides, an in silico identification of NATs pairs was presented, using deepSuperSAGE libraries of soybean infected or not with Phakopsora pachyrhizi. Results showed that around 1/3 of the 77,903 predicted trans-NATs (by PlantsNATsDB database) detected had unitags mapped in both sequences of each pair. The same 1/3 of the 436 foreseen cis-NATs showed unitags anchored in both sequences of the related pairs. For those unitags mapped in NAT pairs, a modulation expression was assigned as upregulated, downregulated, or constitutive, based on the statistical analysis (P < 0.05). As a result, the infected treatment promoted the expression of 2,313 trans-NATs pairs comprising unitags exclusively from that library (1,326 pairs had unitags only found in the mock library). To understand the regulation of these NAT pairs could be a key aspect in the ASR plant response.

  18. Natural Antisense Transcripts in Plants: A Review and Identification in Soybean Infected with Phakopsora pachyrhizi SuperSAGE Library

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    Suzana de Aragão Britto-Kido

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural antisense ranscripts (NAT are RNA molecules complementary to other endogenous RNAs. They are capable of regulating the expression of target genes at different levels (transcription, mRNA stability, translation, etc.. Such a property makes them ideal for interventions in organisms' metabolism. The present study reviewed plant NAT aspects, including features, availability and genesis, conservation and distribution, coding capacity, NAT pair expression, and functions. Besides, an in silico identification of NATs pairs was presented, using deepSuperSAGE libraries of soybean infected or not with Phakopsora pachyrhizi. Results showed that around 1/3 of the 77,903 predicted trans-NATs (by PlantsNATsDB database detected had unitags mapped in both sequences of each pair. The same 1/3 of the 436 foreseen cis-NATs showed unitags anchored in both sequences of the related pairs. For those unitags mapped in NAT pairs, a modulation expression was assigned as upregulated, downregulated, or constitutive, based on the statistical analysis (P<0.05. As a result, the infected treatment promoted the expression of 2,313 trans-NATs pairs comprising unitags exclusively from that library (1,326 pairs had unitags only found in the mock library. To understand the regulation of these NAT pairs could be a key aspect in the ASR plant response.

  19. Quantification of incubation, latent and infection periods of Phakopsora pachyrhizi in soybean, according to chronological time and degree-days

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    Anderson Luiz Durante Danelli

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In experiments conducted in a growth chamber, the chronological time and the accumulated degree-days were determined for the duration of incubation, latent and infectious periods of Phakopsora pachyrhizi cultivars BRSGO 7560 and BRS 246 RR. Detached soybean leaflets were placed in gerbox-type acrylic boxes and inoculated with 20 x 103 uredospores/mL. The study was conducted at 12-h photoperiod and temperatures of 10ºC, 15ºC, 22ºC, 25ºC and 30°C for 30 days. Lesions and uredia/cm2were evaluated and the number of uredia per lesion was quantified after the beginning of sporulation. The sporulation potential was also quantified for cultivars BRSGO 7560 and BRS 246 RR. The steps of the infection process can be quantified based on both the chronological time and the accumulated heat. The cultivar BRSGO 7560 produced 4,012.8 spores/cm2 and BRS 246 RR, 7,348.4 uredospores/cm2. The largest number of uredia was produced at 25ºC in both cultivars; however, BRS 246 RR presented 372.7 uredia/cm2 and BRSGO 7560, 231.6 uredia/cm2. At 10ºC and 30°C, leaf infection did not occur in both cultivars.

  20. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Resistant and Susceptible Common Bean Genotypes in Response to Soybean Cyst Nematode Infection.

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    Shalu Jain

    Full Text Available Soybean cyst nematode (SCN; Heterodera glycines Ichinohe reproduces on the roots of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. and can cause reductions in plant growth and seed yield. The molecular changes in common bean roots caused by SCN infection are unknown. Identification of genetic factors associated with SCN resistance could help in development of improved bean varieties with high SCN resistance. Gene expression profiling was conducted on common bean roots infected by SCN HG type 0 using next generation RNA sequencing technology. Two pinto bean genotypes, PI533561 and GTS-900, resistant and susceptible to SCN infection, respectively, were used as RNA sources eight days post inoculation. Total reads generated ranged between ~ 3.2 and 5.7 million per library and were mapped to the common bean reference genome. Approximately 70-90% of filtered RNA-seq reads uniquely mapped to the reference genome. In the inoculated roots of resistant genotype PI533561, a total of 353 genes were differentially expressed with 154 up-regulated genes and 199 down-regulated genes when compared to the transcriptome of non- inoculated roots. On the other hand, 990 genes were differentially expressed in SCN-inoculated roots of susceptible genotype GTS-900 with 406 up-regulated and 584 down-regulated genes when compared to non-inoculated roots. Genes encoding nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat resistance (NLR proteins, WRKY transcription factors, pathogenesis-related (PR proteins and heat shock proteins involved in diverse biological processes were differentially expressed in both resistant and susceptible genotypes. Overall, suppression of the photosystem was observed in both the responses. Furthermore, RNA-seq results were validated through quantitative real time PCR. This is the first report describing genes/transcripts involved in SCN-common bean interaction and the results will have important implications for further characterization of SCN resistance genes in

  1. Investigation of the Fusarium virguliforme Transcriptomes Induced during Infection of Soybean Roots Suggests that Enzymes with Hydrolytic Activities Could Play a Major Role in Root Necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Binod B; Baumbach, Jordan L; Singh, Prashant; Srivastava, Subodh K; Yi, Xiaoping; Bhattacharyya, Madan K

    2017-01-01

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS) is caused by the fungal pathogen, Fusarium virguliforme, and is a major threat to soybean production in North America. There are two major components of this disease: (i) root necrosis and (ii) foliar SDS. Root symptoms consist of root necrosis with vascular discoloration. Foliar SDS is characterized by interveinal chlorosis and leaf necrosis, and in severe cases by flower and pod abscission. A major toxin involved in initiating foliar SDS has been identified. Nothing is known about how root necrosis develops. In order to unravel the mechanisms used by the pathogen to cause root necrosis, the transcriptome of the pathogen in infected soybean root tissues of a susceptible cultivar, 'Essex', was investigated. The transcriptomes of the germinating conidia and mycelia were also examined. Of the 14,845 predicted F. virguliforme genes, we observed that 12,017 (81%) were expressed in germinating conidia and 12,208 (82%) in mycelia and 10,626 (72%) in infected soybean roots. Of the 10,626 genes induced in infected roots, 224 were transcribed only following infection. Expression of several infection-induced genes encoding enzymes with oxidation-reduction properties suggests that degradation of antimicrobial compounds such as the phytoalexin, glyceollin, could be important in early stages of the root tissue infection. Enzymes with hydrolytic and catalytic activities could play an important role in establishing the necrotrophic phase. The expression of a large number of genes encoding enzymes with catalytic and hydrolytic activities during the late infection stages suggests that cell wall degradation could be involved in root necrosis and the establishment of the necrotrophic phase in this pathogen.

  2. Development of a Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction Detection Protocol for Cercospora kikuchii in Soybean Leaves and Its Use for Documenting Latent Infection as Affected by Fungicide Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, A K; Ward, N A; Robertson, C L; Chen, Z-Y; Schneider, R W

    2014-10-01

    Cercospora leaf blight (CLB) of soybean, caused by Cercospora kikuchii, is a serious disease in the southern United States. A sensitive TaqMan probe-based real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay was developed to specifically detect and quantify C. kikuchii in naturally infected soybean plants. The sensitivity was 1 pg of genomic DNA, which was equivalent to about 34 copies of genome of C. kikuchii. Using this qPCR assay, we documented a very long latent infection period for C. kikuchii in soybean leaves beginning at the V3 growth stage (as early as 22 days after planting). The levels of biomass of C. kikuchii remained low until R1, and a rapid increase was detected from the R2/R3 to R4/R5 growth stages shortly before the appearance of symptoms at R6. The efficacy of various fungicide regimens under field conditions also was evaluated over a 3-year period using this qPCR method. Our results showed that multiple fungicide applications beginning at R1 until late reproductive stages suppressed the development of C. kikuchii in leaves and delayed symptom expression. Different fungicide chemistries also had differential effects on the amount of latent infection and symptom expression during late reproductive growth stages.

  3. PsVPS1, a dynamin-related protein, is involved in cyst germination and soybean infection of Phytophthora sojae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delong Li

    Full Text Available Plant pathogens secrete effector proteins to suppress plant immunity. However, the mechanism by which oomycete pathogens deliver effector proteins during plant infection remains unknown. In this report, we characterized a Phytophthora sojae vps1 gene. This gene encodes a homolog of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuolar protein sorting gene vps1 that mediates budding of clathrin-coated vesicles from the late Golgi, which are diverted from the general secretory pathway to the vacuole. PsVPS1-silenced mutants were generated using polyethylene glycol-mediated protoplast stable transformation and were viable but had reduced extracellular protein activity. The PsVPS1-silenced mutants showed impaired hyphal growth, and the shapes of the vacuoles were highly fragmented. Silencing of PsVPS1 affected cyst germination as well as the polarized growth of germinated cysts. Silenced mutants showed impaired invasion of susceptible soybean plants regardless of wounding. These results suggest that PsVPS1 is involved in vacuole morphology and cyst development. Moreover, it is essential for the virulence of P. sojae and extracellular protein secretion.

  4. Analysis of Phakopsora pachyrhizi transcript abundance in critical pathways at four time-points during infection of a susceptible soybean cultivar using deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Arianne; Hosseini, Parsa; Li, Shuxian; Alkharouf, Nadim W; Matthews, Benjamin F

    2013-09-11

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the causal agent responsible for soybean rust, is among the top hundred most virulent plant pathogens and can cause soybean yield losses of up to 80% when appropriate conditions are met. We used mRNA-Seq by Illumina to analyze pathogen transcript abundance at 15 seconds (s), 7 hours (h), 48 h, and 10 days (d) after inoculation (ai) of susceptible soybean leaves with P. pachyrhizi to gain new insights into transcript abundance in soybean and the pathogen at specific time-points during the infection including the uredinial stage. Over three million five hundred thousand sequences were obtained for each time-point. Energy, nucleotide metabolism, and protein synthesis are major priorities for the fungus during infection and development as indicated by our transcript abundance studies. At all time-points, energy production is a necessity for P. pachyrhizi, as indicated by expression of many transcripts encoding enzymes involved in oxidative phosphorylation and carbohydrate metabolism (glycolysis, glyoxylate and dicarboxylate, pentose phosphate, pyruvate). However, at 15 sai, transcripts encoding enzymes involved in ATP production were highly abundant in order to provide enough energy for the spore to germinate, as observed by the expression of many transcripts encoding proteins involved in electron transport. At this early time-point, transcripts encoding proteins involved in RNA synthesis were also highly abundant, more so than transcripts encoding genes involved in DNA and protein synthesis. At 7 hai, shortly after germination during tube elongation and penetration, transcripts encoding enzymes involved in deoxyribonucleotide and DNA synthesis were highly abundant. At 48 hai, transcripts encoding enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism were highly abundant to provide for increased protein synthesis during haustoria maturation. During sporulation at 10 dai, the fungus still required carbohydrate metabolism, but there also was increased

  5. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) concentration and ACC synthase expression in soybean roots, root tips, and soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines)-infected roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark L; Xue, Ping; Yang, Ronghui

    2010-01-01

    Colonization of plant roots by root knot and cyst nematodes requires a functional ethylene response pathway. However, ethylene plays many roles in root development and whether its role in nematode colonization is direct or indirect, for example lateral root initiation or root hair growth, is not known. The temporal requirement for ethylene and localized synthesis of ethylene during the life span of soybean cyst nematode (SCN) on soybean roots was further investigated. Although a significant increase in ethylene evolution was not detected from SCN-colonized roots, the concentration of the immediate precursor to ethylene, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), was higher in SCN-colonized root pieces and root tips than in other parts of the root. Moreover, expression analysis of 17 ACC synthase (ACS) genes indicated that a select set of ACS genes is expressed in SCN-colonized root pieces that is clearly different from the set of genes expressed in non-colonized roots or root tips. Semi-quantitative real-time PCR indicated that ACS transcript accumulation correlates with the high concentration of ACC in root tips. In addition, an ACS-like sequence was found in the public SCN nucleotide database. Acquisition of a full-length sequence for this mRNA (accession GQ389647) and alignment with transcripts for other well-characterized ACS proteins indicated that the nematode sequence is missing a key element required for ACS activity and therefore probably is not a functional ACS. Moreover, no significant amount of ACC was found in any growth stage of SCN that was tested.

  6. The number of measurements needed to obtain high reliability for traits related to enzymatic activities and photosynthetic compounds in soybean plants infected with Phakopsora pachyrhizi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tássia Boeno de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Asian rust affects the physiology of soybean plants and causes losses in yield. Repeatability coefficients may help breeders to know how many measurements are needed to obtain a suitable reliability for a target trait. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the repeatability coefficients of 14 traits in soybean plants inoculated with Phakopsora pachyrhizi and to establish the minimum number of measurements needed to predict the breeding value with high accuracy. Experiments were performed in a 3x2 factorial arrangement with three treatments and two inoculations in a random block design. Repeatability coefficients, coefficients of determination and number of measurements needed to obtain a certain reliability were estimated using ANOVA, principal component analysis based on the covariance matrix and the correlation matrix, structural analysis and mixed model. It was observed that the principal component analysis based on the covariance matrix out-performed other methods for almost all traits. Significant differences were observed for all traits except internal CO2 concentration for the treatment effects. For the measurement effects, all traits were significantly different. In addition, significant differences were found for all Treatment x Measurement interaction traits except coumestrol, chitinase and chlorophyll content. Six measurements were suitable to obtain a coefficient of determination higher than 0.7 for all traits based on principal component analysis. The information obtained from this research will help breeders and physiologists determine exactly how many measurements are needed to evaluate each trait in soybean plants infected by P. pachyrhizi with a desirable reliability.

  7. The number of measurements needed to obtain high reliability for traits related to enzymatic activities and photosynthetic compounds in soybean plants infected with Phakopsora pachyrhizi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Tássia Boeno de; Azevedo Peixoto, Leonardo de; Teodoro, Paulo Eduardo; Alvarenga, Amauri Alves de; Bhering, Leonardo Lopes; Campo, Clara Beatriz Hoffmann

    2018-01-01

    Asian rust affects the physiology of soybean plants and causes losses in yield. Repeatability coefficients may help breeders to know how many measurements are needed to obtain a suitable reliability for a target trait. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the repeatability coefficients of 14 traits in soybean plants inoculated with Phakopsora pachyrhizi and to establish the minimum number of measurements needed to predict the breeding value with high accuracy. Experiments were performed in a 3x2 factorial arrangement with three treatments and two inoculations in a random block design. Repeatability coefficients, coefficients of determination and number of measurements needed to obtain a certain reliability were estimated using ANOVA, principal component analysis based on the covariance matrix and the correlation matrix, structural analysis and mixed model. It was observed that the principal component analysis based on the covariance matrix out-performed other methods for almost all traits. Significant differences were observed for all traits except internal CO2 concentration for the treatment effects. For the measurement effects, all traits were significantly different. In addition, significant differences were found for all Treatment x Measurement interaction traits except coumestrol, chitinase and chlorophyll content. Six measurements were suitable to obtain a coefficient of determination higher than 0.7 for all traits based on principal component analysis. The information obtained from this research will help breeders and physiologists determine exactly how many measurements are needed to evaluate each trait in soybean plants infected by P. pachyrhizi with a desirable reliability.

  8. Phytophthora suppressor of RNA silencing 2 is a conserved RxLR effector that promotes infection in soybean and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qin; Ye, Wenwu; Choi, Duseok; Wong, James; Qiao, Yongli; Tao, Kai; Wang, Yuanchao; Ma, Wenbo

    2014-12-01

    The genus Phytophthora consists of notorious and emerging pathogens of economically important crops. Each Phytophthora genome encodes several hundreds of cytoplasmic effectors, which are believed to manipulate plant immune response inside the host cells. However, the majority of Phytophthora effectors remain functionally uncharacterized. We recently discovered two effectors from the soybean stem and root rot pathogen Phytophthora sojae with the activity to suppress RNA silencing in plants. These effectors are designated Phytophthora suppressor of RNA silencing (PSRs). Here, we report that the P. sojae PSR2 (PsPSR2) belongs to a conserved and widespread effector family in Phytophthora. A PsPSR2-like effector produced by P. infestans (PiPSR2) can also suppress RNA silencing in plants and promote Phytophthora infection, suggesting that the PSR2 family effectors have conserved functions in plant hosts. Using Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated hairy roots induction, we demonstrated that the expression of PsPSR2 rendered hypersusceptibility of soybean to P. sojae. Enhanced susceptibility was also observed in PsPSR2-expressing Arabidopsis thaliana plants during Phytophthora but not bacterial infection. These experiments provide strong evidence that PSR2 is a conserved Phytophthora effector family that performs important virulence functions specifically during Phytophthora infection of various plant hosts.

  9. Preliminary Analysis of High-Throughput Expression Data and Small RNA in Soybean Stem Tissue Infected with Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    We recently published a report on transcriptome changes in soybean stem tissue challenged with Sclerotinia sclerotiorum based on cDNA microarray analysis. We are now advancing this study by examining the differential expression of small RNA (miRNAs and siRNAs) and gene transcripts using the Illumin...

  10. Robust RNAi-mediated resistance to infection of seven potyvirids in soybean expressing an intron hairpin NIb RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiangdong; Niu, Lu; Zhang, Wei; He, Hongli; Yang, Jing; Xing, Guojie; Guo, Dongquan; Du, Qian; Qian, Xueyan; Yao, Yao; Li, Qiyun; Dong, Yingshan

    2017-10-01

    Viral pathogens, such as soybean mosaic virus (SMV), are a major constraint in soybean production and often cause significant yield loss and quality deterioration. Engineering resistance by RNAi-mediated gene silencing is a powerful strategy for controlling viral diseases. In this study, a 248-bp inverted repeat of the replicase (nuclear inclusion b, NIb) gene was isolated from the SMV SC3 strain, driven by the leaf-specific rbcS2 promoter from Phaseolus vulgaris, and introduced into soybean. The transgenic lines had significantly lower average disease indices (ranging from 2.14 to 12.35) than did the non-transformed (NT) control plants in three consecutive generations, exhibiting a stable and significantly enhanced resistance to the SMV SC3 strain under field conditions. Furthermore, seed mottling did not occur in transgenic seeds, whereas the NT plants produced ~90% mottled seeds. Virus resistance spectrum screening showed that the greenhouse-grown transgenic lines exhibited robust resistance to five SMV strains (SC3, SC7, SC15, SC18, and a recombinant SMV), bean common mosaic virus, and watermelon mosaic virus. Nevertheless, no significantly enhanced resistance to bean pod mottle virus (BPMV, Comovirus) was observed in the transgenic lines relative to their NT counterparts. Consistent with the results of resistance evaluation, the accumulation of each potyvirid (but not of BPMV) was significantly inhibited in the transgenic plants relative to the NT controls as confirmed by quantitative real-time (qRT-PCR) and double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA). These results demonstrate that robust RNAi-mediated resistance to multiple potyvirids in soybean was conferred by expressing an intron hairpin SMV NIb RNA.

  11. Resistance to Phomopsis Seed Decay in Soybean

    OpenAIRE

    Shuxian Li; Pengyin Chen

    2013-01-01

    Phomopsis seed decay (PSD) of soybean is caused primarily by the fungal pathogen Phomopsis longicolla Hobbs along with other Phomopsis and Diaporthe spp. This disease causes poor seed quality and suppresses yield in most soybean-growing countries. Infected soybean seeds can be symptomless, but are typically shriveled, elongated, cracked, and have a chalky white appearance. Development of PSD is sensitive to environmental conditions. Hot and humid environments favor pathogen growth and disease...

  12. Pre-treatment of soybean plants with calcium stimulates ROS responses and mitigates infection by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfaoui, Arbia; El Hadrami, Abdelbasset; Daayf, Fouad

    2018-01-01

    Considering the high incidence of white mold caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in a variety of field crops and vegetables, different control strategies are needed to keep the disease under economical threshold. This study assessed the effect of foliar application of a calcium formulation on disease symptoms, oxalic acid production, and on the oxidative stress metabolism in soybean plants inoculated with each of two isolates of the pathogen that have contrasting aggressiveness (HA, highly-aggressive versus WA, weakly-aggressive). Changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in soybean plants inoculated with S. sclerotiorum isolates were assessed at 6, 24, 48 and 72 h post inoculation (hpi). Generation of ROS including hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), anion superoxide (O 2 - ) and hydroxyl radical (OH) was evaluated. Inoculation with the WA isolate resulted in more ROS accumulation compared to the HA isolate. Pre-treatment with the calcium formulation restored ROS production in plants inoculated with the HA isolate. We also noted a marked decrease in oxalic acid content in the leaves inoculated with the HA isolate in presence of calcium, which coincided with an increase in plant ROS production. The expression patterns of genes involved in ROS detoxification in response to the calcium treatments and/or inoculation with S. Sclerotiorum isolates were monitored by RT-qPCR. All of the tested genes showed a higher expression in response to inoculation with the WA isolate. The expression of most genes tested peaked at 6 hpi, which preceded ROS accumulation in the soybean leaves. Overall, these data suggest that foliar application of calcium contributes to a decrease in oxalic acid production and disease, arguably via modulation of the ROS metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. De novo Genome Assembly and Single Nucleotide Variations for Soybean Mosaic Virus Using Soybean Seed Transcriptome Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeonhwa Jo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Soybean is the most important legume crop in the world. Several diseases in soybean lead to serious yield losses in major soybean-producing countries. Moreover, soybean can be infected by diverse viruses. Recently, we carried out a large-scale screening to identify viruses infecting soybean using available soybean transcriptome data. Of the screened transcriptomes, a soybean transcriptome for soybean seed development analysis contains several virus-associated sequences. In this study, we identified five viruses, including soybean mosaic virus (SMV, infecting soybean by de novo transcriptome assembly followed by blast search. We assembled a nearly complete consensus genome sequence of SMV China using transcriptome data. Based on phylogenetic analysis, the consensus genome sequence of SMV China was closely related to SMV isolates from South Korea. We examined single nucleotide variations (SNVs for SMVs in the soybean seed transcriptome revealing 780 SNVs, which were evenly distributed on the SMV genome. Four SNVs, C-U, U-C, A-G, and G-A, were frequently identified. This result demonstrated the quasispecies variation of the SMV genome. Taken together, this study carried out bioinformatics analyses to identify viruses using soybean transcriptome data. In addition, we demonstrated the application of soybean transcriptome data for virus genome assembly and SNV analysis.

  14. Effects of temperature on urediniospore germination, germ tube growth, and initiation of infection in soybean by phakopsora isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde, M R; Berner, D K; Nester, S E; Frederick, R D

    2007-08-01

    ABSTRACT Temperature is a critical factor in plant disease development. As part of a research program to determine how specific environmental variables affect soybean rust, we determined temperature effects on urediniospore germination and germ tube growth of four isolates of Phakopsora pachyrhizi, one each from Brazil, Hawaii, Taiwan, and Zimbabwe, and an isolate of P. meibomiae from Puerto Rico, collected over a 25-year period. Also compared were the effects of temperature during a night dew period on initiation of disease by the P. pachyrhizi isolates. All variables were fit to a nonlinear beta function with temperature as the independent variable. Minimum, maximum, and optimum temperatures, along with shape parameters of the beta function for each variable, were statistically analyzed. All Phakopsora isolates behaved similarly as to how temperature affected urediniospore germination, germ tube growth, and initiation of disease. The results suggest that P. pachyrhizi has changed little in the past few decades with respect to how it responds to temperature and that previously collected research data continues to be valid, simplifying the development of soybean rust disease models.

  15. Archaeophytopathology of Global Soybean Rust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi and P. meibomiae are two rust species that infect soybean (Glycine max). A number of other hosts support the uredinial growth of these Phakopsora, including Pachyrhizus erosus, Pueraria lobata, and Vigna unguiculata, but no aecial host is known. Traditionally, these two species...

  16. Distinctively variable sequence-based nuclear DNA markers for multilocus phylogeography of the soybean- and rice-infecting fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG-1 IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    A series of multilocus sequence-based nuclear DNA markers was developed to infer the phylogeographical history of the Basidiomycetous fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG-1 IA infecting rice and soybean worldwide. The strategy was based on sequencing of cloned genomic DNA fragments (previously used as RFLP probes) and subsequent screening of fungal isolates to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Ten primer pairs were designed based on these sequences, which resulted in PCR amplification of 200-320 bp size products and polymorphic sequences in all markers analyzed. By direct sequencing we identified both homokaryon and heterokaryon (i.e. dikaryon) isolates at each marker. Cloning the PCR products effectively estimated the allelic phase from heterokaryotic isolates. Information content varied among markers from 0.5 to 5.9 mutations per 100 bp. Thus, the former RFLP codominant probes were successfully converted into six distinctively variable sequence-based nuclear DNA markers. Rather than discarding low polymorphism loci, the combination of these distinctively variable anonymous nuclear markers would constitute an asset for the unbiased estimate of the phylogeographical parameters such as population sizes and divergent times, providing a more reliable species history that shaped the current population structure of R. solani AG-1 IA. PMID:21637462

  17. Structural studies on the development of soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd.) in susceptible soybean leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, E.; Ebrahim-Nesbat, F.; Hoppe, H.H.

    1983-01-01

    Where soybeans are cultivated in the tropics, soybean rust may cause heavy crop losses. Resistance found so far was only of local and temporary value. More substantial breeding efforts are needed, but these may require a better understanding of the pathogen's biology and evolutionary capacity, the infection process and the host-pathogen relationships. The report deals with the infection process and the development of the fungus in a susceptible host variety. (author)

  18. RNA-seq data comparisons of wild soybean genotypes in response to soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengyou Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Soybean [Glycine max (L. Merr.] is an important crop rich in vegetable protein and oil, and is a staple food for human and animals worldwide. However, soybean plants have been challenged by soybean cyst nematode (SCN, Heterodera glycines, one of the most damaging pests found in soybean fields. Applying SCN-resistant cultivars is the most efficient and environmentally friendly strategy to manage SCN. Currently, soybean breeding and further improvement in soybean agriculture are hindered by severely limited genetic diversity in cultivated soybeans. G. soja is a soybean wild progenitor with much higher levels of genetic diversity compared to cultivated soybeans. In this study, transcriptomes of the resistant and susceptible genotypes of the wild soybean, Glycine soja Sieb & Zucc, were sequenced to examine the genetic basis of SCN resistance. Seedling roots were treated with infective second-stage juveniles (J2s of the soybean cyst nematode (HG type 2.5.7 for 3, 5, 8 days and pooled for library construction and RNA sequencing. The transcriptome sequencing generated approximately 245 million (M high quality (Q > 30 raw sequence reads (125 bp in length for twelve libraries. The raw sequence reads were deposited in NCBI sequence read archive (SRA database, with the accession numbers SRR5227314-25. Further analysis of this data would be helpful to improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of soybean-SCN interaction and facilitate the development of diverse SCN resistance cultivars.

  19. The effects of steroid implant and dietary soybean hulls on estrogenic activity of sera of steers grazing toxic endophyte-infected tall fescue pasture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy W. Shappell

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Soybean hulls (SBHs have been fed to cattle pasturing on endophyte-infected tall fescue in attempts to increase rate of gain. Literature reports indicated some symptoms associated with fescue toxicosis were ameliorated by the use of steroidal implants containing estradiol (E2 and progesterone (IMP, feeding SBHs, or the combination of the two. While the mechanism for amelioration was unclear, the SBHs were postulated as acting as a diluent of the toxic factors of the fescue. Alternatively, estradiol and phytoestrogens of SBHs might be acting through relaxation of the persistent vasoconstriction found in animals ingesting ergot alkaloids of endophyte-infected fescue. If so, estrogenic activity of serum of steers receiving SBHs, IMP, or a combination of the two should be elevated. Using the cellular proliferation assay of estrogenicity (E-Screen, estradiol equivalents (E2Eqs were determined on both SBHs and the serum of steers from a previously reported study. Range of SBHs was 5.0 to 8.5 ng Eqs g-1 DM (mean 6.5, n=4 different commercial sources of SBHs. At the rate fed, theoretical calculated blood E2Eq could be physiologically relevant (~ 80 pg mL-1, based on 2.3 kg SBHs d-1, 300 kg steer, 5.7% blood volume, and 10% absorption. Serum E2Eqs did increase in steers (P ≤ 0.05 with steroidal implants or fed SBHs by 56 and 151% over control respectively, and treatments were additive (211% increase. Serum prolactin was also greatest for the SBH+IMP group (188 ng mL-1, P < 0.05, concentrations comparable to values reported for steers grazing endophyte-free fescue. Prolactin in the SBH group was higher than IMP or control groups (146 vs 76 and 60 ng mL-1, respectively. Still unknown is if additional E2Eqs from dietary phytoestrogens or exogenous sources of estradiol can further reduce symptoms of fescue toxicosis. The E-Screen assay was an effective tool in monitoring serum for estrogenic effects of dietary supplementation with SBHs or estrogenic

  20. Control of virus diseases in soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, John H; Whitham, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    Soybean, one of the world's most important sources of animal feed and vegetable oil, can be infected by numerous viruses. However, only a small number of the viruses that can potentially infect soybean are considered as major economic problems to soybean production. Therefore, we consider management options available to control diseases caused by eight viruses that cause, or have the potential to cause, significant economic loss to producers. We summarize management tactics in use and suggest direction for the future. Clearly, the most important tactic is disease resistance. Several resistance genes are available for three of the eight viruses discussed. Other options include use of virus-free seed and avoidance of alternative virus hosts when planting. Attempts at arthropod vector control have generally not provided consistent disease management. In the future, disease management will be considerably enhanced by knowledge of the interaction between soybean and viral proteins. Identification of genes required for soybean defense may represent key regulatory hubs that will enhance or broaden the spectrum of basal resistance to viruses. It may be possible to create new recessive or dominant negative alleles of host proteins that do not support viral functions but perform normal cellular function. The future approach to virus control based on gene editing or exploiting allelic diversity points to necessary research into soybean-virus interactions. This will help to generate the knowledge needed for rational design of durable resistance that will maximize global production.

  1. Utilizing soybean milk to culture soybean pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liquid and semi-solid culture media are used to maintain and proliferate bacteria, fungi, and Oomycetes for research in microbiology and plant pathology. In this study, a comparison was made between soybean milk medium, also referred to as soymilk, and media traditionally used for culturing soybean ...

  2. Optimization of Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation in Soybean

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shuxuan; Cong, Yahui; Liu, Yaping; Wang, Tingting; Shuai, Qin; Chen, Nana; Gai, Junyi; Li, Yan

    2017-01-01

    High transformation efficiency is a prerequisite for study of gene function and molecular breeding. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation is a preferred method in many plants. However, the transformation efficiency in soybean is still low. The objective of this study is to optimize Agrobacterium-mediated transformation in soybean by improving the infection efficiency of Agrobacterium and regeneration efficiency of explants. Firstly, four factors affecting Agrobacterium infection e...

  3. Soybean diseases in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marcinkowska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Field observations on the occurrence of soybean diseases were undertaken in the southern and central regions of Poland in the period 1976-1980. Most prevalent were foliage diseases caused by Peronospora manshurica, Pseudomonas syrinqae pv. glycinea and soybean mosaic virus (SMV. Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Ascochyta sojaecola were reported as pathogens of local importance. The following pathogenic fungi: Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium culmorum, F. oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani were also isolated from soybean.

  4. PsMPK7, a stress-associated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in Phytophthora sojae, is required for stress tolerance, reactive oxygenated species detoxification, cyst germination, sexual reproduction and infection of soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian; Cao, Mingna; Ye, Wenwu; Li, Haiyang; Kong, Liang; Zheng, Xiaobo; Wang, Yuanchao

    2015-01-01

    The sensing of stress signals and their transduction into appropriate responses are crucial for the adaptation, survival and infection of phytopathogenic fungi and oomycetes. Amongst evolutionarily conserved pathways, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades function as key signal transducers that use phosphorylation to convey information. In this study, we identified a gene, designated PsMPK7, one of 14 predicted genes encoding MAPKs in Phytophthora sojae. PsMPK7 was highly transcribed in each tested stage, but was up-regulated in the zoospore, cyst and cyst germination stages. Silencing of PsMPK7 affected the growth of germinated cysts, oospore production and the pathogenicity of soybean. PsMPK7 transcription was induced by stresses from sorbitol, NaCl and hydrogen peroxide. Transformants in which PsMPK7 expression was silenced (PsMPK7-silenced) were significantly more sensitive to osmotic and oxidative stress. Aniline blue and diaminobenzidine staining revealed that the silenced lines did not suppress the host reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst, indicating that either the inoculated plants activated stronger defence responses to the transformants and/or the PsMPK7-silenced transformants failed to overcome plant defences. In addition, extracellular secretion of laccase decreased in the silenced lines. Overall, our results indicate that the PsMPK7 gene encodes a stress-associated MAPK in P. sojae that is important not only for responses to various stresses, but also for ROS detoxification, cyst germination, sexual oospore production and infection of soybean. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  5. Genetic analysis of soybean reactions to soybean mosaic virus

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Guorong

    1995-01-01

    The soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] mosaic disease, caused by soybean mosaic virus (SMV), is one of the most important soybean diseases in many areas of the world. This research, conducted in four separate studies, was designed to identify and characterize new sources of genes for resistance to SMV and to investigate the interaction of soybean resistance genes and SMV strains.

  6. Soybean Production Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Keith R.

    These lesson plans for teaching soybean production in a secondary or postsecondary vocational agriculture class are organized in nine units and cover the following topics: raising soybeans, optimum tillage, fertilizer and lime, seed selection, pest management, planting, troubleshooting, double cropping, and harvesting. Each lesson plan contains…

  7. "Candidatus phytoplasma costaricanum" a new phytoplasma associated with a newly emerging disease in soybean in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new phytoplasma associated with a newly emerging disease, soybean stunt (SoyST), in soybean (Glycine max) was found in 2002 in a soybean plantation in Alajuela Province, Costa Rica. The same or very closely related phytoplasma also infected sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum) with purple vein syndrome ...

  8. SOYBEAN.APHID.SD.2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infestations by soybean aphid (SA) can reduce soybean yield. Thus, SA-resistant soybean may be useful in reducing infestations and limiting yield loss. Expression of resistance was characterized among 746 soybean accessions in 56 growth chamber tests at the North Central Agricultural Research Labo...

  9. Resistance of Advanced Soybean Lines to Pod Borrer (Etiella zinckenella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heru Kuswantoro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The increasing and stabilizing of soybean product in Indonesia face many limitations. One of the limiting factors is pod borrer (Etiella zinckenella Treitschke infestation that is able to cause yield loss up to 80%. Objective of the research was to find out some advanced soybean lines that resistant to pod borrer. Design was randomized complete block with three replications. Soybean lines were grown gradualy to ensure the simultanously flowering. The plants were caged at 35 days after planting (DAT and infested with the imago of E. zinckenella at 56 DAT. Results showed that different soybean lines affected imago population, eggs population, larvae population, infected pods and infected seeds. Some genotypes were consistantly resistant to E. zinckenella. The resistance of those genotypes were non preference resistance based on eggs population, larvae population, infected pod and infected seeds. This study discovered nine soybean lines that is resistant to E. zinckenella, so that it can be beneficial for improving soybean resistance to this pest through releasing as a new resistant pod borer variety after tested further in potential yield and genetic x environment interaction trials. In addition, there were three varieties and two germplasm accessions that can be used as gene sources for improving the resistance of the varieties. The three varieties are able to be cultivated directly in field to decrease the E. zinckenella occurrence. 

  10. Ubiquitous urease affects soybean susceptibility to fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebke-Strohm, Beatriz; Pasquali, Giancarlo; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia; Bencke, Marta; Bücker-Neto, Lauro; Becker-Ritt, Arlete B; Martinelli, Anne H S; Rechenmacher, Ciliana; Polacco, Joseph C; Stolf, Renata; Marcelino, Francismar C; Abdelnoor, Ricardo V; Homrich, Milena S; Del Ponte, Emerson M; Carlini, Celia R; De Carvalho, Mayra C C G; Bodanese-Zanettini, Maria Helena

    2012-05-01

    The soybean ubiquitous urease (encoded by GmEu4) is responsible for recycling metabolically derived urea. Additional biological roles have been demonstrated for plant ureases, notably in toxicity to other organisms. However, urease enzymatic activity is not related to its toxicity. The role of GmEu4 in soybean susceptibility to fungi was investigated in this study. A differential expression pattern of GmEu4 was observed in susceptible and resistant genotypes of soybeans over the course of a Phakopsora pachyrhizi infection, especially 24 h after infection. Twenty-nine adult, transgenic soybean plants, representing six independently transformed lines, were obtained. Although the initial aim of this study was to overexpress GmEu4, the transgenic plants exhibited GmEu4 co-suppression and decreased ureolytic activity. The growth of Rhizoctonia solani, Phomopsis sp., and Penicillium herguei in media containing a crude protein extract from either transgenic or non-transgenic leaves was evaluated. The fungal growth was higher in the protein extracts from transgenic urease-deprived plants than in extracts from non-transgenic controls. When infected by P. pachyrhizi uredospores, detached leaves of urease-deprived plants developed a significantly higher number of lesions, pustules and erupted pustules than leaves of non-transgenic plants containing normal levels of the enzyme. The results of the present work show that the soybean plants were more susceptible to fungi in the absence of urease. It was not possible to overexpress active GmEu4. For future work, overexpression of urease fungitoxic peptides could be attempted as an alternative approach.

  11. Seasonal soybean crop reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaster, E. W. (Principal Investigator); Chance, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Data are presented from field measurements of 1980 including 5 acquisitions of handheld radiometer reflectance measurements, 7 complete sets of parameters for implementing the Suits mode, and other biophysical parameters to characterize the soybean canopy. LANDSAT calculations on the simulated Brazilian soybean reflectance are included along with data collected during the summer and fall on 1981 on soybean single leaf optical parameters for three irrigation treatments. Tests of the Suits vegetative canopy reflectance model for the full hemisphere of observer directions as well as the nadir direction show moderate agreement for the visible channels of the MSS and poor agreement in the near infrared channel. Temporal changes in the spectral characteristics of the single leaves were seen to occur as a function of maturity which demonstrates that the absorptance of a soybean single leaf is more a function of thetransmittancee characteristics than the seasonally consistent single leaf reflectance.

  12. Resistance mechanisms to toxin-mediated charcoal rot infection in maturity group III soybean: role of seed phenol lignin soflavones sugars and seed minerals in charcoal rot resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot is a disease caused by the fungus Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid, and thought to infect the plants through roots by a toxin-mediated mechanism, resulting in yield loss and poor seed quality, especially under drought conditions. The mechanism by which this infection occurs is not y...

  13. The Endosymbiont Arsenophonus Provides a General Benefit to Soybean Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) Regardless of Host Plant Resistance (Rag).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, Jason A; White, Jennifer A

    2015-06-01

    Soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), invokes substantial chemical treatment and economic cost in North America. Resistant soybean genotypes hold promise as a low-impact control methodology, but soybean aphid "biotypes" capable of development on resistant soy cast doubt on the durability of soy resistance. We hypothesized that variation in soybean aphid ability to colonize resistant soy is partially attributable to a bacterial symbiont of soybean aphid, Arsenophonus. We used microinjection to manipulate Arsenophonus infection in both virulent and avirulent aphid biotypes, resulting in five pairs of infected versus uninfected isolines. These isolines were subjected to various population growth rate assays on resistant Rag versus susceptible soybean. We found that aphid virulence on Rag soybean was not dependent on Arsenophonus: virulent aphid biotypes performed well on Rag soybean, and avirulent aphid biotypes performed poorly on Rag soybean, regardless of whether Arsenophonus was present or not. However, we did find that Arsenophonus-infected clones on average performed significantly better than their paired uninfected isolines. This pattern was not consistently evident on every date for every clone, either in the population assays nor when we compared lifetime fecundity of individual aphids in a separate experiment. Nevertheless, this overall benefit for infected aphids may be sufficient to explain the high frequency of Arsenophonus infection in soybean aphids. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Stability of soybean aphid resistance in soybean across different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, is the most important insect pest posing a threat to soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., grain production in the United States. Soybean cultivars with resistance are currently being deployed to aid in management of the pest. Temperature has been reported to ...

  15. Nutritional value of raw soybeans, extruded soybeans, roasted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty multiparous Holstein cows (29.8 ± 4.01days in milk; 671.6 ± 31.47 kg of body weight) were used in a completely randomized design to compare nutritional value of four fat sources including tallow, raw soybeans, extruded soybeans and roasted soybeans for 8 weeks. Experimental diets were a control containing 27.4 ...

  16. Differential regulation of defense-related proteins in soybean during compatible and incompatible interactions between Phytophthora sojae and soybean by comparative proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Maofeng; Ma, Hongyu; Li, Haiyang; Guo, Baodian; Zhang, Xin; Ye, Wenwu; Wang, Haonan; Wang, Qiuxia; Wang, Yuanchao

    2015-07-01

    Few proteomic studies have focused on the plant- Phytophthora interactions, our study provides important information regarding the use of proteomic methods for investigation of the basic mechanisms of plant-Phytophthora interactions. Phytophthora sojae is a fast-spreading and devastating pathogen that is responsible for root and stem rot in soybean crops worldwide. To better understand the response of soybean seedlings to the stress of infection by virulent and avirulent pathogens at the proteomic level, proteins extracted from the hypocotyls of soybean reference cultivar Williams 82 infected by P. sojae P6497 (race 2) and P7076 (race 19), respectively, were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. 95 protein spots were differently expressed, with 83 being successfully identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and subjected to further analysis. Based on the majority of the 83 defense-responsive proteins, and defense-related pathway genes supplemented by a quantitative reverse transcription PCR assay, a defense-related network for soybean infected by virulent and avirulent pathogens was proposed. We found reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst, the expression levels of salicylic acid (SA) signal pathway and biosynthesis of isoflavones were significantly up-regulated in the resistant soybean. Our results imply that following the P. sojae infection, ROS and SA signal pathway in soybean play the major roles in defense against P. sojae. This research will facilitate further investigation of the molecular regulatory mechanism of the defense response in soybean following infection by P. sojae.

  17. Biotechnology in soybean breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarić Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biotechnology can be defined broadly as a set of tools that allows scientists to genetically characterize or improve living organisms. Several emerging technologies, such as molecular characterization and genetic transformation, are already being used extensively for the purpose of plant improvement. Other emerging sciences, including genomics and proteomics, are also starting to impact plant improvement. Tools provided by biotechnology will not replace classical breeding methods, but rather will help provide new discoveries and contribute to improved nutritional value and yield enhancement through greater resistance to disease, herbicides and abiotic factors. In soybeans, biotechnology has and will continue to play a valuable role in public and private soybean breeding programs. Based on the availability and combination of conventional and molecular technologies, a substantial increase in the rate of genetic gain for economically important soybean traits can be predicted in the next decade. In this paper, a short review of technologies for molecular markers analysis in soybean is given as well as achievements in the area of genetic transformation in soybean.

  18. Fighting Asian soybean rust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caspar eLangenbach

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Phakopsora pachyrhizi is a biotrophic fungus provoking Asian soybean rust (SBR disease. SBR poses a major threat to global soybean production. Though several resistance genes provided soybean immunity to certain P. pachyrhizi races, the pathogen swiftly overcame this resistance. Therefore, fungicides are the only current means to control SBR. However, insensitivity to fungicides is soaring in P. pachyrhizi and, therefore, alternative measures are needed for SBR control. In this article, we discuss the different approaches for fighting SBR and their potential, disadvantages, and advantages over other measures. These encompass conventional breeding for SBR resistance, transgenic approaches, exploitation of transcription factors, secondary metabolites, and antimicrobial peptides, RNAi/HIGS, and biocontrol strategies. It seems that an integrating approach exploiting different measures is likely to provide the best possible means for the effective control of SBR.

  19. Expression of a complete soybean leghemoglobin gene in root nodules of transgenic Lotus corniculatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stougaard, J; Petersen, T E; Marcker, K A

    1987-01-01

    The complete soybean leghemoglobin lbc(3) gene was transferred into the legume Lotus corniculatus using an Agrobacterium rhizogenes vector system. Organ-specific expression of the soybean gene was observed in root nodules formed on regenerated transgenic plants after infection with Rhizobium loti...

  20. Identification of the soybean HyPRP family and specific gene response to Asian soybean rust disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro Bücker Neto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean [Glycine max (L. Merril], one of the most important crop species in the world, is very susceptible to abiotic and biotic stress. Soybean plants have developed a variety of molecular mechanisms that help them survive stressful conditions. Hybrid proline-rich proteins (HyPRPs constitute a family of cell-wall proteins with a variable N-terminal domain and conserved C-terminal domain that is phylogenetically related to non-specific lipid transfer proteins. Members of the HyPRP family are involved in basic cellular processes and their expression and activity are modulated by environmental factors. In this study, microarray analysis and real time RT-qPCR were used to identify putative HyPRP genes in the soybean genome and to assess their expression in different plant tissues. Some of the genes were also analyzed by time-course real time RT-qPCR in response to infection by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the causal agent of Asian soybean rust disease. Our findings indicate that the time of induction of a defense pathway is crucial in triggering the soybean resistance response to P. pachyrhizi. This is the first study to identify the soybean HyPRP group B family and to analyze disease-responsive GmHyPRP during infection by P. pachyrhizi.

  1. Identification of the soybean HyPRP family and specific gene response to Asian soybean rust disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Lauro Bücker; de Oliveira, Rafael Rodrigues; Wiebke-Strohm, Beatriz; Bencke, Marta; Weber, Ricardo Luís Mayer; Cabreira, Caroline; Abdelnoor, Ricardo Vilela; Marcelino, Francismar Correa; Zanettini, Maria Helena Bodanese; Passaglia, Luciane Maria Pereira

    2013-07-01

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merril], one of the most important crop species in the world, is very susceptible to abiotic and biotic stress. Soybean plants have developed a variety of molecular mechanisms that help them survive stressful conditions. Hybrid proline-rich proteins (HyPRPs) constitute a family of cell-wall proteins with a variable N-terminal domain and conserved C-terminal domain that is phylogenetically related to non-specific lipid transfer proteins. Members of the HyPRP family are involved in basic cellular processes and their expression and activity are modulated by environmental factors. In this study, microarray analysis and real time RT-qPCR were used to identify putative HyPRP genes in the soybean genome and to assess their expression in different plant tissues. Some of the genes were also analyzed by time-course real time RT-qPCR in response to infection by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the causal agent of Asian soybean rust disease. Our findings indicate that the time of induction of a defense pathway is crucial in triggering the soybean resistance response to P. pachyrhizi. This is the first study to identify the soybean HyPRP group B family and to analyze disease-responsive GmHyPRP during infection by P. pachyrhizi.

  2. Complete nucleotide sequences of seven soybean mosaic viruses (SMV), isolated from wild soybeans (Glycine soja) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun-Xia; Wu, Mian; Ma, Fang-Fang; Chen, Jian-Qun; Wang, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is a devastating plant virus classified in the family Potyviridae, and known to infect cultivated soybeans (Glycine max). In this study, seven new SMVs were isolated from wild soybean samples and analyzed by whole-genome sequencing. An updated SMV phylogeny was built with the seven new and 83 known SMV genomic sequences. Results showed that three northeastern SMV isolates were distributed in clade III and IV, while four southern SMVs were grouped together in clade II and all contained a recombinant BCMV fragment (~900 bp) in the upstream part of the genome. This work revealed that wild soybeans in China also act as important SMV hosts and play a role in the transmission and diversity of SMVs.

  3. Anatomia foliar de soja infectada por Phakopsora pachyrhizi H. Sydow & Sydow e tratadas com extratos vegetais Leaf anatomy of soybean infected with Phakopsora pachyrhizi H. Sydow & Sydow and treated with plant extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Mussury

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Folhas de Glycine max (L. Merril,infectadas pelo fungo Phakopsora pachyrhizi H. Sydow & Sydow e tratadas com extratos vegetais foram avaliadas, visando determinar in vivo as modificações anatômicas nas diferentes estruturas/tecidos foliares, além de reconhecer prováveis mecanismos de defesa. Folhas de soja cultivar 181 provenientes do quinto nó foram inoculadas com fungo e tratadas com diferentes extratos vegetais, água e álcool 70%. Para comparação foram analisadas a anatomia das folhas sadia e infectada e realizadas medidas nas estruturas/tecidos foliares. Na folha infectada, observou-se destruição da epiderme e parênquima lacunoso, visível proliferação de tricomas e cutícula espessada, principalmente na face abaxial. Observou-se a presença de compostos fenólicos nas células da epiderme quando rompida, em função do crescimento micelial. Nas folhas infectadas e tratadas com os extratos vegetais de Azadirachta indica, Maytenus ilicifolia e Allium sativum, as estruturas/tecidos vegetais apresentaram aumento de espessura por alongamento celular.Glycine max (L. Merril leaves, infected by the fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi H. Sydow & Sydow and treated with plant extracts, were evaluated with the aim of determining in vivo the anatomical modifications in different leaf structures and of identifying probable defense mechanisms. Leaves from the 181 soybean cultivar originated from the fifth node were inoculated with the fungus and treated with different plant extracts, water and alcohol at 70%. For comparison, the anatomy of the healthy and infected leaves was analyzed and the leaf structures were measured. In the infected leaf, there was destruction of the epidermis and lacunar parenchyma, apparent trichome proliferation and denser cuticle, especially on the abaxial surface. There were also phenolic compounds in ruptured epidermis cells, due to mycelium growth. In the infected leaves treated with Azadirachta indica, Maytenus

  4. Soybean Nitrogen Fixing Attributes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reproductive unit and nitrogen fixing attributes (Carruthers er. al., 2000). In combination with various lupin and forages, these authors showed that soybean grain yield was decreased by most treatments. In order to limit over population and pollution risks, low nitrogen fertilizer agricultural systems are likely to be advocated.

  5. Transgenic soybeans and soybean protein analysis: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Savithiry; Luthria, Devanand; Bae, Hanhong; Lakshman, Dilip; Mitra, Amitava

    2013-12-04

    To meet the increasing global demand for soybeans for food and feed consumption, new high-yield varieties with improved quality traits are needed. To ensure the safety of the crop, it is important to determine the variation in seed proteins along with unintended changes that may occur in the crop as a result various stress stimuli, breeding, and genetic modification. Understanding the variation of seed proteins in the wild and cultivated soybean cultivars is useful for determining unintended protein expression in new varieties of soybeans. Proteomic technology is useful to analyze protein variation due to various stimuli. This short review discusses transgenic soybeans, different soybean proteins, and the approaches used for protein analysis. The characterization of soybean protein will be useful for researchers, nutrition professionals, and regulatory agencies dealing with soy-derived food products.

  6. Organ-Specific Differential NMR-Based Metabonomic Analysis of Soybean [Glycine max (L. Merr.] Fruit Reveals the Metabolic Shifts and Potential Protection Mechanisms Involved in Field Mold Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-yu Yang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged, continuous rainfall is the main climatic characteristic of autumn in Southwest China, and it has been found to cause mildew outbreaks in pre-harvest soybean fields. Low temperature and humidity (LTH stress during soybean maturation in the field promotes pre-harvest mildew, resulting in damage to different organs of soybean fruits to different extents, but relatively little information on the resistance mechanisms in these fruits is available. Therefore, to understand the metabolic responses of soybean fruits to field mold (FM, the metabonomic variations induced by LTH were characterized using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR, and the primary metabolites from the pod, seed coat and cotyledon of pre-harvest soybean were quantified. Analysis of FM-damaged soybean germplasms with different degrees of resistance to FM showed that extracts were dominated by 66 primary metabolites, including amino acids, organic acids and sugars. Each tissue had a characteristic metabolic profile, indicating that the metabolism of proline in the cotyledon, lysine in the seed coat, and sulfur in the pod play important roles in FM resistance. The primary-secondary metabolism interface and its potential contribution to FM resistance was investigated by targeted analyses of secondary metabolites. Both the seed coat and the pod have distinct but nonexclusive metabolic responses to FM, and these are functionally integrated into FM resistance mechanisms.

  7. Molecular Soybean-Pathogen Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitham, Steven A; Qi, Mingsheng; Innes, Roger W; Ma, Wenbo; Lopes-Caitar, Valéria; Hewezi, Tarek

    2016-08-04

    Soybean hosts a wide variety of pathogens that cause significant yield losses. The importance of soybean as a major oilseed crop has led to research focused on its interactions with pathogens, such as Soybean mosaic virus, Pseudomonas syringae, Phytophthora sojae, Phakopsora pachyrhizi, and Heterodera glycines. Pioneering work on soybean's interactions with these organisms, which represent the five major pathogen groups (viruses, bacteria, oomycetes, fungi, and nematodes), has contributed to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying virulence and immunity. These mechanisms involve conserved and unique features that validate the need for research in both soybean and homologous model systems. In this review, we discuss identification of effectors and their functions as well as resistance gene-mediated recognition and signaling. We also point out areas in which model systems and recent advances in resources and tools have provided opportunities to gain deeper insights into soybean-pathogen interactions.

  8. INTERCROPPING OF BRAQUIARIA WITH SOYBEAN

    OpenAIRE

    Castagnara, Deise Dalazen; Bulegon, Lucas Guilherme; Zoz, Tiago [UNESP; Rossol, Charles Douglas; Berte, Luiz Neri; Rabello de Oliveira, Paulo Sergio; Neres, Marcela Abbado

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the intercropping of Brachiaria brizantha. Marandu with soybeans. The experiment has been planted in a 3 year prevailing area with no-tillage, in eutrophic Oxisol at Maripa - PR. The experimental design was a randomized block with five replications. For the forage study, four treatments were performed which consisted of seeding times brachiaria [early ( seven days before planting soybeans) joint (same day of soybean planting) and after (at stages V-3 an...

  9. Mutation breeding in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baradjanegara, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    In Indonesia, soybean is one of the important crop after rice. It is generally cultivated in the lowlands and rarely in the highlands. Seeds of soybean variety ORBA were treated with various doses of fast neutrons, gamma rays, EMS and NaN 3 with the aims of studying the mutagen effects in M-1 and M-2 generations and also to select mutants adapted to highland conditions. D-50 doses for gamma rays, fast neutrons and EMS were around 23 krad, 2,300 rad, 0.3%, respectively. Much higher chlorophyll mutation frequency was observed in EMS treatment of 0.3%. Seven mutants were shorter and four early mutants matured from 4 to 20 days earlier than the control plants. Two early mutants were quite adaptable in both the low and highlands and produced better yields than the parental material. (author)

  10. Fighting Asian Soybean Rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenbach, Caspar; Campe, Ruth; Beyer, Sebastian F; Mueller, André N; Conrath, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi is a biotrophic fungus provoking SBR disease. SBR poses a major threat to global soybean production. Though several R genes provided soybean immunity to certain P. pachyrhizi races, the pathogen swiftly overcame this resistance. Therefore, fungicides are the only current means to control SBR. However, insensitivity to fungicides is soaring in P. pachyrhizi and, therefore, alternative measures are needed for SBR control. In this article, we discuss the different approaches for fighting SBR and their potential, disadvantages, and advantages over other measures. These encompass conventional breeding for SBR resistance, transgenic approaches, exploitation of transcription factors, secondary metabolites, and antimicrobial peptides, RNAi/HIGS, and biocontrol strategies. It seems that an integrating approach exploiting different measures is likely to provide the best possible means for the effective control of SBR.

  11. Detection of novel QTLs for foxglove aphid resistance in soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxglove aphid, Aulacorthum solani (Kaltenbach), is a Hemipteran insect that infected a wide variety of plants worldwide and caused serious yield losses in crops. The objective of this study was to identify the putative QTL for foxglove aphid resistance in wild soybean, PI 366121, (Glycine soja Sieb...

  12. Archaeophytopathology of Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the soybean rust pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi and P. meibomiae are two rust species that infect soybean (Glycine max). Traditionally, these two species are said to differ in geographic distribution, with P. pachyrhizi confined to Asia, Africa & Australia, and P. meibomiae confined to South & Central America. Several herbar...

  13. Gene expression in leaves of susceptible Glycine max during infection with Phakopsora pachyrhizi using Next-Generation sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean rust is caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi and is a fungal disease that attacks soybean. We used an mRNA-Seq strategy to analyze the expression pattern of soybean genes and better understand molecular events occurring in soybean following the infection. cDNA libraries were constructed from RNA ...

  14. United States competitiveness in soybean trade :loss market share in the Japanese soybean import market

    OpenAIRE

    Cacho, Joyce Agnes Sabina

    1991-01-01

    US market share of the Japanese soybean market declined from 91 percent in 1970 to a record low of 75 percent in 1989. In the Japanese market US soybeans compete against Brazilian soybeans. Brazilian soybean exports have increased as soybean production has expanded. Though US soybeans remained price competitive throughout the 1970-1989 study period, both volume and market share of US soybeans have decreased since 1985. The loss of market share indicates loss of competitive position. The de...

  15. Effect Of Replacing Soybean Meal With Cooked Whole Soybean On ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... depression of any of the parameters considered. Thus in a humid tropical condition, cooked whole soybeans can be used to replace soybean meal in broiler diets at both starter and finisher phase without a depression on the bird performance. Journal of Applied Chemistry and Agricultural Research Vol. 3 1996: pp. 21-24 ...

  16. Registration of eight soybean germplasm lines resistant to soybean rust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean rust (SBR), caused by the fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi Sydow is a threat to soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] production worldwide. Although SBR has not caused widespread damage in North America, the crop is still threatened by the disease because most cultivars in production are susceptible...

  17. ANALYSIS IMPORT POLICY OF SOYBEAN ON ECONOMICS PERFORMANCE OF INDONESIAN SOYBEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthiah Abda Azizah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Trade liberalization is closely related to the opening of market access for Indonesian products to the world and vice versa. Since the soybean trade out of BULOG control began in 1998, soybean imports increased very rapidly (Sudaryanto and Swastika, 2007. This research aims to determine the general picture of soybean economy, factors analyses that influence the economic performance of Indonesian soybean and findings the alternative of policies that can reduce soybean imports in Indonesia. Methods of data analysis are descriptive analysis, 2SLS simultaneous equations, and simulation of policy alternatives. Results of the analysis of the factors that affect the economic performance of Indonesian soybean, consists of 1 The area of soybean harvest is influenced significantly by the price of domestic soybean and domestic prices of corn, 2 Productivity soybean influenced significantly by the domestic prices of soybean and fertilizer prices, 3 soybean demand influenced significantly by population, domestic prices of soybean, 4 domestic prices of soybean significantly affected by world prices of soybean, exchange rates, and soybean supply, 5 Imports of soybean influenced significantly by the domestic demand of soybean and soybean production. Therefore, policy scenarios should be made to reduce soybean imports, including by carrying out the expansion of soybean harvest policy, the policy of increasing the productivity of soybean, the policy of subsidizing the price of fertilizer.

  18. SOYBEAN PRODUCTION AND ECONOMIC OF INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulistiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Indonesian soybean production almost never moved, even tended to decrease. Indonesia does not have a specific area of land for planting soybeans. Soybean are generally just a byproduct of plant or land filling vacant after farmers grow rice. In addition soybean price fluctuations that affect tofu and tempe entrepreneurs, it turns soybean farmers are often losers. Policy biased to the consumer sector than soybean production, cause national soybean production declining. The decrease occurred primarily because of the narrowing of soybean plantation land owned by farmers, this happens because soy is less interesting than the business side so that the farmers based on rationality, farmers prefer the other commodities, especially rice. Increasing decline in domestic soybean production resulted in the growing dependence on imports which would deplete foreign exchange. Procurement policies of national soybean stocks through imports is easy to do but its adverse implications for the development of domestic agricultural production, especially soybeans, very bad.

  19. SCREENING SOYBEAN GENOTYPES FOR PROMISCUOUS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    2016-02-25

    Feb 25, 2016 ... Symbiotic potential, competitiveness and compatibility of indigenous. Bradyrhizobium Japonicum isolates to three soybean genotypes of two distinct agro- climatic regions of Rajasthan, India. Saudi. Journal of Biological Sciences 17: 303- 310. Muhammad, A. 2010. Response of a promiscuous soybean ...

  20. Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Type b) How to Take Your Child's Temperature Impetigo Infant Botulism Infections That Pets Carry Influenza (Flu) ... Herpes Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease Hives (Urticaria) Impetigo Infections That Pets Carry Lyme Disease Measles Molluscum ...

  1. Comparisons of visual rust assessments and DNA levels of Phakopsora pachyrhizi in soybean genotypes varying in rust resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean resistance to Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the cause of soybean rust, has been characterized by the following three infection types (i) immune response (IM; complete resistance) with no visible lesions, (ii) resistant reaction with reddish brown (RB) lesions (incomplete resistance), and (iii) susc...

  2. 7 CFR 1220.127 - Soybean products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Soybean products. 1220.127 Section 1220.127... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1220.127 Soybean products. The term...

  3. 7 CFR 1220.614 - Soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Soybeans. 1220.614 Section 1220.614 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1220.614 Soybeans. Soybeans means all...

  4. 7 CFR 1220.128 - Soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Soybeans. 1220.128 Section 1220.128 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1220.128 Soybeans. The term...

  5. Optimization of Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation in Soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuxuan; Cong, Yahui; Liu, Yaping; Wang, Tingting; Shuai, Qin; Chen, Nana; Gai, Junyi; Li, Yan

    2017-01-01

    High transformation efficiency is a prerequisite for study of gene function and molecular breeding. Agrobacterium tumefaciens -mediated transformation is a preferred method in many plants. However, the transformation efficiency in soybean is still low. The objective of this study is to optimize Agrobacterium -mediated transformation in soybean by improving the infection efficiency of Agrobacterium and regeneration efficiency of explants. Firstly, four factors affecting Agrobacterium infection efficiency were investigated by estimation of the rate of GUS transient expression in soybean cotyledonary explants, including Agrobacterium concentrations, soybean explants, Agrobacterium suspension medium, and co-cultivation time. The results showed that an infection efficiency of over 96% was achieved by collecting the Agrobacterium at a concentration of OD 650 = 0.6, then using an Agrobacterium suspension medium containing 154.2 mg/L dithiothreitol to infect the half-seed cotyledonary explants (from mature seeds imbibed for 1 day), and co-cultured them for 5 days. The Agrobacterium infection efficiencies for soybean varieties Jack Purple and Tianlong 1 were higher than the other six varieties. Secondly, the rates of shoot elongation were compared among six different concentration combinations of gibberellic acid (GA 3 ) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). The shoot elongation rate of 34 and 26% was achieved when using the combination of 1.0 mg/L GA 3 and 0.1 mg/L IAA for Jack Purple and Tianlong 1, respectively. This rate was higher than the other five concentration combinations of GA 3 and IAA, with an 18 and 11% increase over the original laboratory protocol (a combination of 0.5 mg/L GA 3 and 0.1 mg/L IAA), respectively. The transformation efficiency was 7 and 10% for Jack Purple and Tianlong 1 at this optimized hormone concentration combination, respectively, which was 2 and 6% higher than the original protocol, respectively. Finally, GUS histochemical staining, PCR

  6. Optimization of Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation in Soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuxuan; Cong, Yahui; Liu, Yaping; Wang, Tingting; Shuai, Qin; Chen, Nana; Gai, Junyi; Li, Yan

    2017-01-01

    High transformation efficiency is a prerequisite for study of gene function and molecular breeding. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation is a preferred method in many plants. However, the transformation efficiency in soybean is still low. The objective of this study is to optimize Agrobacterium-mediated transformation in soybean by improving the infection efficiency of Agrobacterium and regeneration efficiency of explants. Firstly, four factors affecting Agrobacterium infection efficiency were investigated by estimation of the rate of GUS transient expression in soybean cotyledonary explants, including Agrobacterium concentrations, soybean explants, Agrobacterium suspension medium, and co-cultivation time. The results showed that an infection efficiency of over 96% was achieved by collecting the Agrobacterium at a concentration of OD650 = 0.6, then using an Agrobacterium suspension medium containing 154.2 mg/L dithiothreitol to infect the half-seed cotyledonary explants (from mature seeds imbibed for 1 day), and co-cultured them for 5 days. The Agrobacterium infection efficiencies for soybean varieties Jack Purple and Tianlong 1 were higher than the other six varieties. Secondly, the rates of shoot elongation were compared among six different concentration combinations of gibberellic acid (GA3) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). The shoot elongation rate of 34 and 26% was achieved when using the combination of 1.0 mg/L GA3 and 0.1 mg/L IAA for Jack Purple and Tianlong 1, respectively. This rate was higher than the other five concentration combinations of GA3 and IAA, with an 18 and 11% increase over the original laboratory protocol (a combination of 0.5 mg/L GA3 and 0.1 mg/L IAA), respectively. The transformation efficiency was 7 and 10% for Jack Purple and Tianlong 1 at this optimized hormone concentration combination, respectively, which was 2 and 6% higher than the original protocol, respectively. Finally, GUS histochemical staining, PCR, herbicide

  7. Autoregulation of nodulation interferes with impacts of nitrogen fertilization levels on the leaf-associated bacterial community in soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Seishi; Anda, Mizue; Inaba, Shoko; Eda, Shima; Sato, Shusei; Sasaki, Kazuhiro; Tabata, Satoshi; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Sato, Tadashi; Shinano, Takuro; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2011-03-01

    The diversities leaf-associated bacteria on nonnodulated (Nod(-)), wild-type nodulated (Nod(+)), and hypernodulated (Nod(++)) soybeans were evaluated by clone library analyses of the 16S rRNA gene. To analyze the impact of nitrogen fertilization on the bacterial leaf community, soybeans were treated with standard nitrogen (SN) (15 kg N ha(-1)) or heavy nitrogen (HN) (615 kg N ha(-1)) fertilization. Under SN fertilization, the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria was significantly higher in Nod(-) and Nod(++) soybeans (82% to 96%) than in Nod(+) soybeans (54%). The community structure of leaf-associated bacteria in Nod(+) soybeans was almost unaffected by the levels of nitrogen fertilization. However, differences were visible in Nod(-) and Nod(++) soybeans. HN fertilization drastically decreased the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria in Nod(-) and Nod(++) soybeans (46% to 76%) and, conversely, increased those of Gammaproteobacteria and Firmicutes in these mutant soybeans. In the Alphaproteobacteria, cluster analyses identified two operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (Aurantimonas sp. and Methylobacterium sp.) that were especially sensitive to nodulation phenotypes under SN fertilization and to nitrogen fertilization levels. Arbuscular mycorrhizal infection was not observed on the root tissues examined, presumably due to the rotation of paddy and upland fields. These results suggest that a subpopulation of leaf-associated bacteria in wild-type Nod(+) soybeans is controlled in similar ways through the systemic regulation of autoregulation of nodulation, which interferes with the impacts of N levels on the bacterial community of soybean leaves.

  8. Effects of different extraction methods on total phenolic content and antioxidant activity in soybean cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusnawan, E.

    2018-01-01

    Soybean secondary metabolites particularly phenolic compounds act as chemical defence against biotic stress such as pathogen infection. Functional properties of these compounds have also been investigated. This study aimed to determine the effects of particle size and extraction methods on total flavonoid, phenolic contents as well as antioxidant activity in soybean seeds. This study also investigated the total phenolic contents and antioxidant activity of Indonesian soybean cultivars using the optimized extraction method. Soybean flour of ≤ 177 μm as many as 0.5 g was selected for extraction with 50% acetone for estimation of total phenolic and flavonoid contents and with 80% ethanol for antioxidant activity. Treatments of twice extraction either shaking followed by maceration or ultrasound-assisted extraction followed by maceration could be used to extract the secondary metabolite contents in soybean seeds. Flavonoid, phenolic contents and antioxidant activity of twenty soybean cultivars ranged from 0.23 to 0.44 mg CE/g, from 3.70 to 5.22 mg GAE/g, and from 4.97 to 9.04 µmol TE/g, respectively. A simple extraction with small amount of soybean flour such as investigated in this present study is effective to extract secondary metabolites especially when the availability of samples is limited such as breeding materials or soybean germplasm.

  9. Detection of genetically modified soybean in crude soybean oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, Zorica; Vasiljević, Ivana; Zdjelar, Gordana; Ðorđević, Vuk; Ignjatov, Maja; Jovičić, Dušica; Milošević, Dragana

    2014-02-15

    In order to detect presence and quantity of Roundup Ready (RR) soybean in crude oil extracted from soybean seed with a different percentage of GMO seed two extraction methods were used, CTAB and DNeasy Plant Mini Kit. The amplifications of lectin gene, used to check the presence of soybean DNA, were not achieved in all CTAB extracts of DNA, while commercial kit gave satisfactory results. Comparing actual and estimated GMO content between two extraction methods, root mean square deviation for kit is 0.208 and for CTAB is 2.127, clearly demonstrated superiority of kit over CTAB extraction. The results of quantification evidently showed that if the oil samples originate from soybean seed with varying percentage of RR, it is possible to monitor the GMO content at the first stage of processing crude oil. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Production of Aflatoxin on Soybeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S. K.; Venkitasubramanian, T. A.

    1975-01-01

    Probable factors influencing resistance to aflatoxin synthesis in soybeans have been investigated by using cultures of Aspergillus parasiticus NRRL 3240. Soybeans contain a small amount of zinc (0.01 μg/g) bound to phytic acid. Autoclaving soybeans at 15 pounds (6803.88 g) for 15 min increases the aflatoxin production, probably by making zinc available. Addition of zinc to both autoclaved and nonautoclaved soybeans promotes aflatoxin production. However, addition of varying levels of phytic acid at a constant concentration of zinc depresses aflatoxin synthesis with an increase in the added phytic acid. In a synthetic medium known to give good yields of aflatoxin, the addition of phytic acid (10 mM) decreases aflatoxin synthesis. PMID:1171654

  11. Nutritional value of raw soybeans, extruded soybeans, roasted soybeans and tallow as fat sources in early lactating dairy cows

    OpenAIRE

    Amanlou, H.; Maheri-Sis, N.; Bassiri, S.; Mirza-Aghazadeh, A.; Salamatdust, R.; Moosavi, A.; Karimi, V.

    2012-01-01

    Thirty multiparous Holstein cows (29.8 ± 4.01days in milk; 671.6 ± 31.47 kg of body weight) were used in a completely randomized design to compare nutritional value of four fat sources including tallow, raw soybeans, extruded soybeans and roasted soybeans for 8 weeks. Experimental diets were a control containing 27.4 % alfalfa silage, 22.5% corn silage, and 50.1% concentrate, and four diets with either tallow, raw soybean, extruded soybean, or roasted soybean added to provide 1.93% supplement...

  12. Spectral reflectance pattern in soybean for assessing yellow mosaic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazala, I F Saad; Sahoo, R N; Pandey, Rakesh; Mandal, Bikash; Gupta, V K; Singh, Rajendra; Sinha, P

    2013-09-01

    Remote sensing technique is useful for monitoring large crop area at a single time point, which is otherwise not possible by visual observation alone. Yellow mosaic disease (YMD) is a serious constraint in soybean production in India. However, hardly any basic information is available for monitoring YMD by remote sensing. Present study examines spectral reflectance of soybean leaves due to Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) infection in order to identify YMD sensitive spectral ratio or reflectance. Spectral reflectance measurement indicated significant (p infra-red region of spectrum. Reflectance sensitivity analysis indicated wavelength ~642, ~686 and ~750 nm were sensitive to YMD infection. Whereas, in yellow leaves induced due to nitrogen deficiency, the sensitive wavelength was ~589 nm. Due to viral infection, a shift occurred in red and infra-red slope (called red edge) on the left in comparison to healthy one. Red edge shift was a good indicator to discriminate yellow mosaic as chlorophyll gets degraded due to MYMIV infection. Correlation of reflectance at 688 nm (R688) and spectral reflectance ratio at 750 and 445 nm (R750/R445) with the weighted mosaic index indicated that detection of yellow mosaic is possible based on these sensitive bands. Our study for the first time identifies the yellow mosaic sensitive band as R688 and R750/R445, which could be utilized to scan satellite data for monitoring YMD affected soybean cropping regions.

  13. Etiology of phomopsis root rot in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Cecília Ghissi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In a survey of damages caused by soybean root rot to crops in the south of Brazil for several years, a root rot caused by Phomopsis sp has been found with increasing frequency. The primary symptoms are seen when the main root is cut longitudinally, including the death of the wood which shows white coloration and well-defined black lines that do not have a defined format. Thus, based on similarity, it has been called geographic root rot due to its aspect resembling irregular lines that separate regions on a map. In isolations, colonies and alpha spores of Phomopsis have prevailed. Pathogenicity test was done by means of inoculation in the crown of plants cultivated in a growth chamber. The geographic symptoms were reproduced in plants and the fungus Phomopsis sp. was reisolated. In soybean stems naturally infected with pod and stem blight, geographic symptoms caused by Phomopsis phaseoli are found. To the known symptoms on stems, pods and grains, that of root rot caused by P. phaseoli is now added.

  14. Phylogeny, gene structures, and expression patterns of the ERF gene family in soybean (Glycine max L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gaiyun; Chen, Ming; Chen, Xueping; Xu, Zhaoshi; Guan, Shan; Li, Lian-Cheng; Li, Aili; Guo, Jiaming; Mao, Long; Ma, Youzhi

    2008-01-01

    Members of the ERF transcription factor family play important roles in regulating gene expression in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. In soybean (Glycine max L.), however, only a few ERF genes have been studied so far. In this study, 98 unigenes that contained a complete AP2/ERF domain were identified from 63 676 unique sequences in the DFCI Soybean Gene Index database. The phylogeny, gene structures, and putative conserved motifs in soybean ERF proteins were analysed, and compared with those of Arabidopsis and rice. The members of the soybean ERF family were divided into 12 subgroups, similar to the case for Arabidopsis. AP2/ERF domains were conserved among soybean, Arabidopsis, and rice. Outside the AP2/ERF domain, many soybean-specific conserved motifs were detected. Expression analysis showed that nine unigenes belonging to six ERF family subgroups were induced by both biotic/abiotic stresses and hormone treatment, suggesting that they were involved in cross-talk between biotic and abiotic stress-responsive signalling pathways. Overexpression of two full-length genes from two different subgroups enhanced the tolerances to drought, salt stresses, and/or pathogen infection of the tobacco plants. These results will be useful for elucidating ERF gene-associated stress response signalling pathways in soybean. PMID:18832187

  15. Clinical characteristics of soybean allergy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballmer-Weber, Barbara K; Holzhauser, Thomas; Scibilia, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Soybean is a relevant allergenic food, but little is known about individual threshold doses in soy allergy.......Soybean is a relevant allergenic food, but little is known about individual threshold doses in soy allergy....

  16. Spectral Detection of Soybean Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and Confounding Insecticide Effects in Soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Tavvs Micael

    Soybean aphid, Aphis glycines (Hemiptera: Aphididae) is the primary insect pest of soybean in the northcentral United States. Soybean aphid may cause stunted plants, leaf discoloration, plant death, and decrease soybean yield by 40%. Sampling plans have been developed for supporting soybean aphid management. However, growers' perception about time involved in direct insect counts has been contributing to a lower adoption of traditional pest scouting methods and may be associated with the use of prophylactic insecticide applications in soybean. Remote sensing of plant spectral (light-derived) responses to soybean aphid feeding is a promising alternative to estimate injury without direct insect counts and, thus, increase adoption and efficiency of scouting programs. This research explored the use of remote sensing of soybean reflectance for detection of soybean aphids and showed that foliar insecticides may have implications for subsequent use of soybean spectral reflectance for pest detection. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  17. Characterization and quantification of fungal colonization of Phakopsora pachyrhizi in soybean genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittal, R; Paul, C; Hill, C B; Hartman, G L

    2014-01-01

    Soybean rust, caused by the fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is an economically important disease of soybean with potential to cause severe epidemics resulting in significant yield losses. Host resistance is one of the management tools to control this disease. This study compared soybean genotypes exhibiting immunity, complete and incomplete resistance, and susceptibility to an isolate of P. pachyrhizi based on visual assessment of reaction type, other visual traits such as sporulation, quantitative measurements of the amount of fungal DNA (FDNA) present in leaf tissues, and data on infection and colonization levels. Soybean genotype UG5 (immune), and plant introduction (PI) 567102B and PI 567104B (complete resistance) had lower quantities of uredinia and FDNA than four other genotypes with incomplete resistance. Based on microscopic observations, early events of spore germination, appressorium formation, and fungal penetration of the epidermis occurred within 24 h postinoculation and were similar among the tested soybean genotypes. Differences in infection among the genotypes were evident once the hyphae penetrated into the intercellular spaces between the mesophyll cells. At 2 days after inoculation (dai), soybean genotype Williams 82 had a significantly (P pachyrhizi interaction results in restricted hyphal development in mesophyll cell tissue, likely due to hypersensitive apoptosis.

  18. Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae ). Staphylococcus species is by far the most studied pathogen in musculoskeletal infections and can produce a multilayered biofilm...the immune system and may be involved in both the response to sepsis and malignancy. For example, in neonatal mice, BMP signaling is a normal part of

  19. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Soybean Flowering Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chol-Hee; Wong, Chui E.; Singh, Mohan B.; Bhalla, Prem L.

    2012-01-01

    Flowering is an important agronomic trait that determines crop yield. Soybean is a major oilseed legume crop used for human and animal feed. Legumes have unique vegetative and floral complexities. Our understanding of the molecular basis of flower initiation and development in legumes is limited. Here, we address this by using a computational approach to examine flowering regulatory genes in the soybean genome in comparison to the most studied model plant, Arabidopsis. For this comparison, a genome-wide analysis of orthologue groups was performed, followed by an in silico gene expression analysis of the identified soybean flowering genes. Phylogenetic analyses of the gene families highlighted the evolutionary relationships among these candidates. Our study identified key flowering genes in soybean and indicates that the vernalisation and the ambient-temperature pathways seem to be the most variant in soybean. A comparison of the orthologue groups containing flowering genes indicated that, on average, each Arabidopsis flowering gene has 2-3 orthologous copies in soybean. Our analysis highlighted that the CDF3, VRN1, SVP, AP3 and PIF3 genes are paralogue-rich genes in soybean. Furthermore, the genome mapping of the soybean flowering genes showed that these genes are scattered randomly across the genome. A paralogue comparison indicated that the soybean genes comprising the largest orthologue group are clustered in a 1.4 Mb region on chromosome 16 of soybean. Furthermore, a comparison with the undomesticated soybean (Glycine soja) revealed that there are hundreds of SNPs that are associated with putative soybean flowering genes and that there are structural variants that may affect the genes of the light-signalling and ambient-temperature pathways in soybean. Our study provides a framework for the soybean flowering pathway and insights into the relationship and evolution of flowering genes between a short-day soybean and the long-day plant, Arabidopsis. PMID:22679494

  20. Autoregulation of Nodulation Interferes with Impacts of Nitrogen Fertilization Levels on the Leaf-Associated Bacterial Community in Soybeans ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Seishi; Anda, Mizue; Inaba, Shoko; Eda, Shima; Sato, Shusei; Sasaki, Kazuhiro; Tabata, Satoshi; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Sato, Tadashi; Shinano, Takuro; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2011-01-01

    The diversities leaf-associated bacteria on nonnodulated (Nod−), wild-type nodulated (Nod+), and hypernodulated (Nod++) soybeans were evaluated by clone library analyses of the 16S rRNA gene. To analyze the impact of nitrogen fertilization on the bacterial leaf community, soybeans were treated with standard nitrogen (SN) (15 kg N ha−1) or heavy nitrogen (HN) (615 kg N ha−1) fertilization. Under SN fertilization, the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria was significantly higher in Nod− and Nod++ soybeans (82% to 96%) than in Nod+ soybeans (54%). The community structure of leaf-associated bacteria in Nod+ soybeans was almost unaffected by the levels of nitrogen fertilization. However, differences were visible in Nod− and Nod++ soybeans. HN fertilization drastically decreased the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria in Nod− and Nod++ soybeans (46% to 76%) and, conversely, increased those of Gammaproteobacteria and Firmicutes in these mutant soybeans. In the Alphaproteobacteria, cluster analyses identified two operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (Aurantimonas sp. and Methylobacterium sp.) that were especially sensitive to nodulation phenotypes under SN fertilization and to nitrogen fertilization levels. Arbuscular mycorrhizal infection was not observed on the root tissues examined, presumably due to the rotation of paddy and upland fields. These results suggest that a subpopulation of leaf-associated bacteria in wild-type Nod+ soybeans is controlled in similar ways through the systemic regulation of autoregulation of nodulation, which interferes with the impacts of N levels on the bacterial community of soybean leaves. PMID:21239540

  1. Laura: Soybean variety lacking Kunitz trypsin inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srebrić Mirjana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Grain of conventional soybean varieties requires heat processing to break down trypsin inhibitor's activity before using as food or animal feed. At the same time, protein denaturation and other qualitative changes occur in soybean grain, especially if the temperature of heating is not controlled. Two types of trypsin inhibitor were found in soybean grain the Kunitz trypsin inhibitor and the Bowman-Birk inhibitor. Mature grain of soybean Laura is lacking Kunitz trypsin inhibitor. Grain yield of variety Laura is equal to high yielding varieties from the maturity group I, where it belongs. Lacking of Kunitz-trypsin inhibitor makes soybean grain suitable for direct feeding in adult non ruminant animals without previous thermal processing. Grain of variety Laura can be processed for a shorter period of time than conventional soybeans. This way we save energy, and preserve valuable nutritional composition of soybean grain, which is of interest in industrial processing.

  2. Nuclear proteomic changes linked to soybean rust resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Bret; Campbell, Kimberly B; Feng, Jian; Garrett, Wesley M; Frederick, Reid

    2011-03-01

    Soybean rust, caused by the fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is an emerging threat to the US soybean crop. In an effort to identify proteins that contribute to disease resistance in soybean we compared a susceptible Williams 82 cultivar to a resistant Williams 82 inbred isoline harboring the Rpp1 resistance gene (R-gene). Approximately 4975 proteins from nuclear preparations of leaves were detected using a high-throughput liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. Many of these proteins have predicted nuclear localization signals, have homology to transcription factors and other nuclear regulatory proteins, and are phosphorylated. Statistics of summed spectral counts revealed sets of proteins with differential accumulation changes between susceptible and resistant plants. These protein accumulation changes were compared to previously reported gene expression changes and very little overlap was found. Thus, it appears that numerous proteins are post-translationally affected in the nucleus after infection. To our knowledge, this is the first indication of large-scale proteomic change in a plant nucleus after infection. Furthermore, the data reveal distinct proteins under control of Rpp1 and show that this disease resistance gene regulates nuclear protein accumulation. These regulated proteins likely influence broader defense responses, and these data may facilitate the development of plants with improved resistance.

  3. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Novel Loci for SC7 Resistance in a Soybean Mutant Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Che

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Soybean mosaic virus (SMV is a member of Potyvirus genus that causes severe yield loss and destroys seed quality in soybean [Glycine max (L. Merr.]. It is important to explore new resistance sources and discover new resistance loci to SMV, which will provide insights to improve breeding strategies for SMV resistance. Here, a genome-wide association study was conducted to accelerate molecular breeding for the improvement of resistance to SMV in soybean. A population of 165 soybean mutants derived from two soybean parents was used in this study. There were 104 SNPs identified significantly associated with resistance to SC7, some of which were located within previous reported quantitative trait loci. Three putative genes on chromosome 1, 9, and 12 were homologous to WRKY72, eEF1Bβ, and RLP9, which were involved in defense response to insect and disease in Arabidopsis. Moreover, the expression levels of these three genes changed in resistance and susceptible soybean accessions after SMV infection. These three putative genes may involve in the resistance to SC7 and be worthy to further research. Collectively, markers significantly associated with resistance to SC7 will be helpful in molecular marker-assisted selection for breeding resistant soybean accessions to SMV, and the candidate genes identified would advance the functional study of resistance to SMV in soybean.

  4. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Novel Loci for SC7 Resistance in a Soybean Mutant Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Zhijun; Liu, Hailun; Yi, Fanglei; Cheng, Hao; Yang, Yuming; Wang, Li; Du, Jingyi; Zhang, Peipei; Wang, Jiao; Yu, Deyue

    2017-01-01

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is a member of Potyvirus genus that causes severe yield loss and destroys seed quality in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]. It is important to explore new resistance sources and discover new resistance loci to SMV, which will provide insights to improve breeding strategies for SMV resistance. Here, a genome-wide association study was conducted to accelerate molecular breeding for the improvement of resistance to SMV in soybean. A population of 165 soybean mutants derived from two soybean parents was used in this study. There were 104 SNPs identified significantly associated with resistance to SC7, some of which were located within previous reported quantitative trait loci. Three putative genes on chromosome 1, 9, and 12 were homologous to WRKY72, eEF1Bβ, and RLP9, which were involved in defense response to insect and disease in Arabidopsis. Moreover, the expression levels of these three genes changed in resistance and susceptible soybean accessions after SMV infection. These three putative genes may involve in the resistance to SC7 and be worthy to further research. Collectively, markers significantly associated with resistance to SC7 will be helpful in molecular marker-assisted selection for breeding resistant soybean accessions to SMV, and the candidate genes identified would advance the functional study of resistance to SMV in soybean. PMID:29075282

  5. SOYBEAN - MOLECULAR ASPECTS OF BREEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Sudarić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The book Soybean: Molecular Aspects of Breeding focuses recent progress in our understanding of the genetics and molecular biology of soybean. This book is divided into four parts and contains 22 chapters. Part I, Molecular Biology and Biotechnology focuses advances in molecular biology and laboratory procedures that have been developed recently to manipulate DNA. Part II, Breeding for abiotic stress covers proteomics approaches form as a powerful tool for investigating the molecular mechanisms of the plant responses to various types of abiotic stresses. Part III, Breeding for biotic stress addresses issues related to application of molecular based strategies in order to increase soybean resistance to various biotic factors. Part IV, Recent Technology reviews recent technologies into the realm of soybean monitoring, processing and product use. While the information accumulated in this book is of primary interest for plant breeders, valuable insights are also offered to agronomists, molecular biologists, physiologists, plant pathologists, food scientists and students. The book is a result of efforts made by many experts from different countries (USA, Japan, Croatia, Serbia, China, Canada, Malawi, Iran, Hong Kong, Brasil, Mexico.

  6. Development of Separator for Soybeans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de H.C.P.; Rijpma, P.J.; Owaa, J.S.E.

    1997-01-01

    A simple and effective separator for soybeans was developed for small-scale farmers in Uganda, to clean the seeds from foreign material, chaff, broken beans etc. as demanded by local and world markets. It will help to avoid losses during post-harvest time and to reduce human drudgery of cleaning the

  7. Agriculture Education. Soybeans and Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuttgart Public Schools, AR.

    This curriculum guide is designed for group instruction of secondary students enrolled in one or two semester-long courses in agricultural education. The guide presents units of study in the following areas: (1) soybeans, (2) rice, and (3) orientation. Each of the 17 units of instruction follows a typical format: terminal objective, specific…

  8. Nutritional value of raw soybeans, extruded soybeans, roasted soybeans and tallow as fat sources in early lactating dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Moosavi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Thirty multiparous Holstein cows (29.8 ± 4.01days in milk; 671.6 ± 31.47 kg of body weight were used in a completely randomized design to compare nutritional value of four fat sources including tallow, raw soybeans, extruded soybeans and roasted soybeans for 8 weeks. Experimental diets were a control containing 27.4 % alfalfa silage, 22.5% corn silage, and 50.1% concentrate, and four diets with either tallow, raw soybean, extruded soybean, or roasted soybean added to provide 1.93% supplemental fat. Dry matter and NEL intakes were similar among treatments, while cows fed fat diets had significantly (P<0.05 high NEL intakes when compared to control with no fat. Supplemental fat, whether tallow or full fat soybeans increased milk production (1.89-2.45 kg/d; P<0.01 and FCM production (1.05-2.79; P<0.01. Milk fat yield and percentage of cows fed fat-supplemented diets were significantly (P<0.01 and P<0.05 respectively higher than control. Between fat-supplemented diets, roasted soybean caused highest milk fat yield and extruded soybean caused lowest milk fat yield. There was no significant effect of supplemental fat on the milk protein and lactose content and yield. Feed efficiency of fat-supplemented diets was significantly (P<0.01 higher than control. Body weight, body weight change and BCS (body condition score of cows, as well as energy balance and energy efficiency were similar between treatments. In conclusion, while there was no significant effect of fat sources on production response of cows, fat originating from heat-treated soybean help to minimize imported RUP (rumen undegradable protein sources level as fish meal in comparison with tallow and raw soybean oil. In the Current study, there was no statistical significance among nutritional values of oil from extruded soybeans and roasted soybeans.

  9. Foliar symptoms recovery: developing scoring technique for assessment of soybean resistance to CPMMV (Cowpea Mild Mottle Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Zubaidah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Soybean is a commodity that has an important role as the source of protein, but its production is affected by various factors including disease. CpMMV (Cowpea mild mottle virus is one of the most damaging viruses that cause soybean disease. CpMMVs belong to the group of Carlavirus that are transmitted by whitefly (Bemisia tabaci. The use of CpMMV resistant plants as biological control can prevent viral diseases. Indonesia has many soybean germplasm from many regions and introduction from other countries that need to be evaluated for CpMMV. The assessment technique for soybean resistance to CpMMV is not available yet, but it is still based on other virus diseases. The specific assessment of plant resistance is important because some diseases can cause certain symptoms, depends on the resistance and the kinds of plants that are infected. This paper presents the assessment technique for soybean resistance to CpMMV infection, which can be used for various purposes and studies. One of the benefits is to find out soybean resistance to CpMMV or other objectives. This resistance assessment is not only based on leaves symptoms, but also based on the phenomenon of foliar symptoms recovery. Keywords: CpMMV, foliar symptoms recovery, scoring technique, soybean resistance.

  10. Nutritional quality and ions uptake to PTNDS in soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minjuan; Fu, Yuming; Liu, Hong

    2016-02-01

    Porous-tube nutrient delivery system (PTNDS) allows high control of the root environment and prevents plant infections in both microgravity and ground conditions. In this paper, six soybean cultivars ('ZH13', 'ZH57', 'LD10', 'HH35', 'HH43', and 'ZGDD') were evaluated in terms of yield, photosynthetic efficiency, insoluble dietary fiber and ions uptake efficiency. Besides proximal composition, the concentrations of mineral and isoflavones were monitored in the seeds. 'HH35' and 'ZH13' plants showed much higher yield and harvest index, in addition to the lower lignin content of inedible biomass. Data showed that 'HH35' had the higher photosynthetic efficiency of soybean leaves with regard to photosynthetic rate and instantaneous carboxylation efficiency, whereas chlorophyll ratio and carotenoids content were no difference with the other cultivars. Both cations and anions except NH4(+) and H2PO4(-), were accumulated excessively compared to controls, especially with anions in PTNDS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. 7 CFR 1220.313 - Qualified State Soybean Boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Qualified State Soybean Boards. 1220.313 Section 1220... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN... Soybean Boards. The following State soybean promotion organizations shall be Qualified State Soybean...

  12. A 2014 nationwide survey of the distribution of Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYMMV) and Soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV) major viruses in South Korean soybean fields, and changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2014 symptomatic soybean samples were collected throughout Korea, and were tested for the most important soybean viruses found in Korea, namely Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), Soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV), and Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYMMV). SYMMV was most commonly detected,...

  13. Raffinose-Series Oligosaccharides in Soybean Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Švejstil R.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Soybean foods forming a substantial part of Asian diet have still more expanded into European diet. Raffinose-series oligosaccharides (RSO are important constituents of soya beans and they can be found also in soybean products. These oligosaccharides can be considered potentially prebiotic for their capability of influencing the composition of the host’s intestinal microbiota. The aim of the present paper was to determine the oligosaccharide content in various soybean products. Enzymatic assay has been used for the determination of oligosaccharides. RSO have been found in all tested samples and their content varied from 0.66 g per 100 g in soybean beverage to 5.59 g per 100 g in first clear soybean flour. Generally, the highest content of RSO has been detected in soybean flour in the average amount of 4.83 g per 100 g. There was no statistically significant difference observed in the amount of oligosaccharides in all four types of soybean flour (P < 0.01. Considerably high amounts of RSO have been found in sweet soybean bars and textured soy protein. Foods as soybean flour and soybean bar ‘Sójový suk’ seem to be effective natural sources of prebiotic oligosaccharides for humans.

  14. Artificial Selection for Determinate Growth Habit in Soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determinacy is an agronomically important trait associated with the domestication in soybean (Glycine max). Most soybean cultivars are classifiable into indeterminate and determinate growth habit, while Glycine soja, the wild progenitor of soybean, is indeterminate. Indeterminate (Dt1) and determina...

  15. Gamma Radiation-Induced Mutations in Soybeans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smutkupt, S.

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of soybean radiation experiments was to create genetic variability in soybeans of various cultivars, mutants and mutation-derived lines with the aim of producing superior breeding lines with resistance to soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyhrizi Syd.) It took altogether 12 generations over six years after gamma irradiation if soybean seeds to produce the best resistant line (81-1-038) which a variety could be developed from it. This Line 81-1-038 showed a very good specific resistance to soybean rust, Thai race 2 and moderately resistance to Thai race 1. In the rainy season of 1985, Line 81-1-038 out yielded S.J.4 (a mother line) by 868 kg/ha in a yield trail at Suwan Farm, Pak Chong, Nakorn Rajchasima. This soybean rust mutant was later named D oi Kham

  16. HERITABILITAS, NISBAH POTENSI, DAN HETEROSIS KETAHANAN KEDELAI (Glycine max [L.] Merrill TERHADAP SOYBEAN MOSAIC VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyimas Sa’diyah

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Heritability, potential ratio, and heterosis of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merrill resistance to soybean mosaic virus. The use of soybean cultivars with resistance to SMV is a way for controlling soybean mosaic disease. The objective of this research was to estimate the disease severity, the narrow sense heritability, potential ratio and heterosis of resistance character and number of pithy pods, number of healthy seeds, and healthy seeds weight per plant of ten F1 populations of soybean crossing result to SMV infection. The experiment was arranged in a randomized complete block design in two replications. Observed characters were disease severity, number of pithy pods, number of healthy seeds, and healthy seeds weight per plant. The result of this research showed that 1 the crossing combinations those which were resistant to SMV (lower disease severity were Yellow Bean x Tanggamus, Tanggamus x Orba, and Tanggamus x Taichung, 2 the narrow sense heritability of disease severity was included in medium criteria, 3 number of pithy pods belonged to high criteria, and 4 number of healthy seeds and healthy seeds weight per plant were included in low criteria. The crossing combinations that had low estimation value of heterosis and heterobeltiosis of resistance to SMV infection were Yellow Bean x Taichung, Bean x Tanggamus and Tanggamus x B3570. Disease severity or resistance to SMV is influenced by genetic and environmental factors.

  17. Use of soybean cake replacing soybean meal in diets of lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth dos Santos Moura

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the intake and digestibility, nitrogen balance and ruminal fermentation parameters in sheep fed diets containing levels of substitution of soybean meal for soybean cake. The diets consisted of five levels of protein soybean meal (0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 % by soybean cake. Diets were formulated with 12.5% CP, respecting the forage-to-concentrate ratio of 40:60.Tifton-85 hay was used as forage and the concentrate was formulated with corn, soybean meal, soybean cake and vitamin mineral supplement. Five crossbred lambs castrated, with average weight of 33.7 ± 5.8 kg were used and distributed in a Latin Square 5 × 5. No differences in intake and digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, total carbohydrate, non-fiber carbohydrates and total digestible nutrients. Increased linearly in ether extract intake by replacing protein from soybean meal by soybean cake in the diet but with no changes in the digestibility of this component. The nitrogen balance, nitrogen content fecal and urinary retained were not influenced by levels of substitution of soybean meal by soybeans cake in diets. For the index pH and concentration of ammonia nitrogen in rumen fluid did not differ between diets. It was concluded that the soybean cake can be used as an alternative food to replace soybean meal up to 100% unless there are changes in the rumen parameters, balance of nitrogen, intake and nutrient digestibility.

  18. Newly identified resistance to soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) in soybean plant introduction lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Host-plant resistance is potentially efficacious in managing the soybean aphid (SA, Aphis glycines Matsumura), a major invasive pest in northern soybean-production regions of North America. However, development of aphid-resistant soybean has been complicated by the presence of virulent SA biotypes,...

  19. Characterization and genetics of multiple soybean aphid biotype resistance in five soybean plant introductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) is the most important soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] insect pest in the USA. The objectives of this study were to characterize the resistance expressed in the five plant introductions (PIs) to four soybean aphid biotypes, determine the mode of resistance in...

  20. Discovery of a seventh Rpp soybean rust resistance locus in soybean accession PI 605823

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean rust, caused by the obligate biotrophic fungal pathogen Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd. & Syd, is a disease threat to soybean production in regions of the world with mild winters. Host plant resistance to P. pachyrhizi conditioned by Rpp genes has been found in numerous soybean accessions, and at...

  1. Overexpression of a soybean salicylic acid methlyltransferase gene confers resistance to soybean cyst nematode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines Ichinohe, SCN) is the most pervasive pest of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] in the USA and worldwide. SCN reduced soybean yields worldwide by an estimated billion dollars annually. These losses remained stable with the use of resistant cultivars but over ...

  2. Soybean germplasm accession seedling reactions to soybean rust isolates from Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean rust (SBR), caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is a threat to soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] production in regions of the world where winters are not cold enough to completely eliminate the many hosts of the fungus, so resistant soybean cultivars would be useful in managing this disease. Res...

  3. Brazilian Soybean Policy: The International Effects of Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Gary W. Williams; Robert L. Thompson

    1984-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of the complex set of Brazilian soybean sector policies on the world soybean and products market. Brazilian policy makers have intended to encourage domestic crushing of soybeans and exports of processed rather than raw soybeans. Removal of the Brazilian policy set for the period 1960–78 is simulated with an econometric model of the world soybean market. The results indicate that the intervention objectives were not achieved. Moreover, the U.S. soybean industry...

  4. A review of soybean rust from a South African perspective

    OpenAIRE

    J. Antony Jarvie

    2010-01-01

    This review article describes the nature of the soybean rust pathogen, its interaction with the soybean host and documents some of the history of soybean rust in South Africa. Soybean rust has affected soybean cropping in parts of South Africa since 2001. The disease causes leaf lesions, which may progress to premature defoliation and ultimately result in grain yield loss in susceptible soybean genotypes. Chemical control measures have been successfully employed to limit commercial yield loss...

  5. Isolation and validation of a candidate Rsv3 gene from a soybean genotype that confers strain-specific resistance to soybean mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Phu-Tri; Widyasari, Kristin; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2018-01-01

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus, significantly reduces soybean production worldwide. Rsv3, which confers strain-specific resistance to SMV, was previously mapped between the markers A519F/R and M3Satt in chromosome 14 of the soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] genotype L29. Analysis of the soybean genome database revealed that five different NBS-LRR sequences exist between the flanking markers. Among these candidate Rsv3 genes, the full-length cDNA of the Glyma.14g204700 was successfully cloned from L29. Over-expression of Glyma.14g204700 in leaves inoculated with SMV inhibited viral infection in a soybean genotype lacking Rsv3. In addition, the transient silencing of the candidate gene caused a high accumulation of an avirulent strain in L29 carrying Rsv3. Our results therefore provide additional line of evidence to support that Glyma.14g204700 is likely Rsv3 gene that confers strain-specific resistance to SMV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Soybean improvement: Achievements and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burton Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean is a major source of vegetable protein and oil in the world. Worldwide demand continues to be high and production has more than doubled in the past 20 years to a total of 264.2 million metric tons in 2011 (National Agricultural Statistics Service 2012. Much of this increase has been due to increased planting in Argentina and Brazil. But, there have been genetic gains as well. We now have powerful genetic tools and these will be useful in gene discovery and in developing selectable markers for those genes. But for traits that are quantitative and multigenic, marker assisted selection may not be practical. We are facing unprecedented changes in our climate which will require resourceful use of the new genetic tools along with standard plant breeding methodology to maintain soybean productivity and quality.

  7. Soybean biomass produced in Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Semino, Stella Maris; Paul, Helena; Tomei, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Soybean biomass for biodiesel, produced in Argentina amongst other places, is considered by some to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate climate change when compared with fossil fuel. To ensure that the production of biofuels is ‘sustainable', EU institutions and national governments are ...... for environmental sustainability. This is exemplified by soy, whose cultivation undermines the climate benefit claimed for soy-based biodiesel. This paper concludes that to certify soy monocultures as sustainable would exacerbate existing climatic and environmental problems....

  8. A STUDY ON WEED CONTROL IN SOYBEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. TJITROSEMITO

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Two field experiments on weed control in soybeans were carried out at BIOTROP, Bogor, Indonesia from February to June, 1989. The critical period for weed control was found to be between 20 - 40 days after planting of soybean (c. v. Wilis grown at a planting distance of 40 x 10 cm. It did not coincide with the fastest growth in terms of trifoliate leaf number. Further studies were suggested to understand the physiological growth of soybean related to weed control. Pendimethalin at 660- 1320 g a.e./ha applied one day after sowing did not cause any phytotoxic effect to soybean and had good weed control performance.

  9. Potential Overwintering Locations of Soybean Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) Colonizing Soybean in Ohio and Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Michael S; Hogg, David B

    2015-04-01

    Soybean aphids, Aphis glycines Matsumura, depend on long-distance, wind-aided dispersal to complete their life cycle. Despite our general understanding of soybean aphid biology, little is explicitly known about dispersal of soybean aphids between winter and summer hosts in North America. This study compared genotypic diversity of soybean aphids sampled from several overwintering locations in the Midwest and soybean fields in Ohio and Wisconsin to test the hypothesis that these overwintering locations are sources of the soybean colonists. In addition, air parcel trajectory analyses were used to demonstrate the potential for long-distance dispersal events to occur to or from these overwintering locations. Results suggest that soybean aphids from overwintering locations along the Illinois-Iowa border and northern Indiana-Ohio are potential colonists of soybean in Ohio and Wisconsin, but that Ohio is also colonized by soybean aphids from other unknown overwintering locations. Soybean aphids in Ohio and Wisconsin exhibit a small degree of population structure that is not associated with the locations of soybean fields in which they occur, but that may be related to specific overwintering environments, multiple introductions to North America, or spatial variation in aphid phenology. There may be a limited range of suitable habitat for soybean aphid overwintering, in which case management of soybean aphids may be more effective at their overwintering sites. Further research efforts should focus on discovering more overwintering locations of soybean aphid in North America, and the relative impact of short- and long-distance dispersal events on soybean aphid population dynamics. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Pressurized water extraction of isoflavones by experimental design from soybean flour and Soybean Protein Isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moras, Benjamin; Rey, Stéphane; Vilarem, Gérard; Pontalier, Pierre-Yves

    2017-01-01

    A Doehlert experimental design was conducted and surface response methodology was used to determine the effect of temperature, contact time and solid liquid ratio on isoflavone extraction from soybean flour or Soybean Protein Isolate in pressurized water system. The optimal conditions conducted gave an extraction yield of 85% from soybean flour. For Soybean Protein Isolate compared to soybean flour, the isoflavone extraction yield is 61%. This difference could be explained by higher aglycon content, while aglycon appears to be the least extracted isoflavone by pressurized water. The solid liquid ratio in the ASE cell was the overriding factor in obtaining high yields with both soybean products, while temperature has less influence. A high temperature causes conversion of the malonyls-glucosides and glucosides isoflavone derivatives into glucosides or aglycons forms. pressurized water extraction showed a high solubilization of protein material up to 95% of inserted Soybean Protein Isolate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Simplicillium lanosoniveum on Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the soybean rust pathogen, and its use as a biological control agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, N A; Robertson, C L; Chanda, A K; Schneider, R W

    2012-08-01

    The fungus Simplicillium lanosoniveum was isolated from soybean leaves infected with Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the soybean rust pathogen, in Louisiana and Florida. The fungus did not grow or become established on leaf surfaces until uredinia erupted, but when soybean rust signs and symptoms were evident, S. lanosoniveum colonized leaves within 3 days and sporulated within 4 days. Development of new uredinia was suppressed by about fourfold when S. lanosoniveum colonized uredinia. In the presence of S. lanosoniveum, uredinia became increasingly red-brown, and urediniospores turned brown and germinated at very low rates. Assays using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction revealed that the fungus colonized leaf surfaces when plants were infected with P. pachyrhizi, either in a latent stage of infection or when symptoms were present. However, when plants were inoculated before infection, there was no increase of DNA of S. lanosoniveum, suggesting that the pathogen must be present in order for the antagonist to become established on soybean leaf surfaces. We documented significantly lower amounts of DNA of P. pachyrhizi and lower disease severity when soybean leaves were colonized with S. lanosoniveum. These studies documented the mycophilic and disease-suppressive nature of S. lanosoniveum.

  12. Divergence of flowering genes in soybean

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-15

    Oct 15, 2012 ... Soybean genome sequences were blasted with Arabidopsis thaliana regulatory genes involved in photoperiod- dependent flowering. This approach enabled the identification of 118 genes involved in the flowering pathway. Two genome sequences of cultivated (Williams 82) and wild (IT182932) soybeans ...

  13. soybeans yoghurt production using starter culture from

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    Yoghurt was prepared from soy-milk equivalent. Soybeans used for milk production were selected, dehulled, blended then mixed with water in ratio l :6 respectively and filtered with a muslim cloth to obtain milk. On kilogram (lkg) of soybeans used produced soy-milk equivalent of six litres (6L) in moderate dilution.

  14. Soybean Yield Determinants and Response to Rhizobial

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    komla

    Abstract. The response of two soybean varieties (Samsoy—2 and improved variety TGx 1448-2E) to Bradyrhizobium inoculation in the northern Guinea savanna of Nigeria was tested in a researcher-managed on-farm trial. There were variations in soybean yields between and within farmers' fields. Data obtained from 24.

  15. Divergence of flowering genes in soybean

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soybean genome sequences were blasted with Arabidopsis thaliana regulatory genes involved in photoperiod-dependent flowering. This approach enabled the identification of 118 genes involved in the flowering pathway. Two genome sequences of cultivated (Williams 82) and wild (IT182932) soybeans were employed to ...

  16. Naturally fermented ethnic soybean foods of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Prakash Tamang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Kinema, hawaijar, tungrymbai, bekang, aakhone, and peruyaan are naturally fermented ethnic soybean foods of India; they are popular among the Mongolian-origin races in the Eastern Himalayas. Bacillus subtilis is the dominant functional bacterium in all naturally fermented soybean foods of these regions. Although there is a good demand for ethnic fermented soybean foods among local consumers in north-east India, the production is limited to household level. A ready-to-use pulverized starter culture for kinema production can be introduced to kinema-makers or similar sticky fermented soybean foods of north-east India and adapted to local conditions for additional income generation. Ethnic fermented soybeans are one of the major food resources in the Eastern Himalayas; they supplement inexpensive, high-digested plant protein in the local diet with low fat/cholesterol content and high nutritive value as well as antioxidant and other health-promoting properties.

  17. Food type soybean cooking time: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deonisio Destro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean is an extensive crop that produces more protein per hectare and, compared to other sources, has the lowest proteincost. This turns soybean into one of the basic foods with the potential to fight malnutrition and hunger in the planet. Even though itrepresents the fourth crop in grain production in the world (261 million tons year-1, most of its production is used as animal fodder.Currently, one of the greatest research challenges is to improve soybean production for human consumption. Cooking time is one theseveral characteristics that need improvement so that soybean can be used more extensively in our everyday diet. The objective of thiswork is to carry out a bibliographic review on the topic, to sensitize researchers in the area of soybean breeding about its importance.

  18. Effects of daily temperature highs on development of Phakopsora pachyrhizi on soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde, M R; Nester, S E; Berner, D K

    2012-08-01

    Although considerable information exists regarding the importance of moisture in the development of soybean rust, little is known about the influence of temperature. The purpose of our study was to determine whether temperature might be a significant limiting factor in the development of soybean rust in the southeastern United States. Soybean plants infected with Phakopsora pachyrhizi were incubated in temperature-controlled growth chambers simulating day and night diurnal temperature patterns representative of the southeastern United States during the growing season. At 3-day intervals beginning 12 days after inoculation, urediniospores were collected from each plant and counted. The highest numbers of urediniospores were produced when day temperatures peaked at 21 or 25°C and night temperatures dipped to 8 or 12°C. When day temperatures peaked at 29, 33, or 37°C for a minimum of 1 h/day, urediniospore production was reduced to 36, 19, and 0%, respectively, compared with urediniospore production at the optimum diurnal temperature conditions. Essentially, no lesions developed when the daily temperature high was 37°C or above. Temperature data obtained from the National Climatic Data Center showed that temperature highs during July and August in several southeastern states were too high for significant urediniospore production on 55 to 77% of days. The inhibition of temperature highs on soybean rust development in southeastern states not only limits disease locally but also has implications pertaining to spread of soybean rust into and development of disease in the major soybean-producing regions of the Midwestern and northern states. We concluded from our results that temperature highs common to southeastern states are a factor in the delay or absence of soybean rust in much of the United States.

  19. Selecting soybean resistant to the cyst nematode Heterodera glycines using simple sequence repeat (microssatellite) markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espindola, S M C G; Hamawaki, O T; Oliveira, A P; Hamawaki, C D L; Hamawaki, R L; Takahashi, L M

    2016-03-11

    The soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is a major cause of soybean yield reduction. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of marker-assisted selection to identify genotypes resistant to SCN race 3 infection, using Sat_168 and Sat-141 resistance quantitative trait loci. The experiment was carried out under greenhouse conditions, using soybean populations originated from crosses between susceptible and resistant parent stock: CD-201 (susceptible) and Foster IAC (resistant), Conquista (susceptible) and S83-30 (resistant), La-Suprema (susceptible) and S57-11 (resistant), and Parecis (susceptible) and S65-50 (resistant). Plants were inoculated with SCN and evaluated according to the female index (FI), those with FI markers Sat-141 and Sat_168. Marker selection efficiency was analyzed by a contingency table, taking into account genotypic versus phenotypic evaluations for each line. These markers were shown to be useful tool for selection of SCN race 3.

  20. Thua nao: Thai fermented soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekachai Chukeatirote

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Thua nao is a traditionally fermented food in Thailand. It is manufactured by fermenting cooked soybeans with naturally occurring microbes. There are also similar products including natto in Japan, kinema in India, and chongkukjang in Korea. In Thailand, thua nao is widely consumed, especially by people in the northern part. The product is generally regarded as a protein supplement and widely used as a condiment. Two major types of thua nao can be distinguished; fresh and dried forms. To date, scientific information on thua nao is scarce and thus this article aims to document the updated knowledge of Thai thua nao.

  1. Development of a new vector using Soybean yellow common mosaic virus for gene function study or heterologous protein expression in soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seungmo; Nam, Moon; Kim, Kil Hyun; Lee, Su-Heon; Moon, Jung-Kyung; Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Choung, Myoung-Gun; Kim, Sang-Mok; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-02-01

    A new vector using Soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV) was constructed for gene function study or heterologous protein expression in soybeans. The in vitro transcript with a 5' cap analog m7GpppG from an SYCMV full-length infectious vector driven by a T7 promoter infected soybeans (pSYCMVT7-full). The symptoms observed in the soybeans infected with either the sap from SYCMV-infected leaves or pSYCMVT7-full were indistinguishable, suggesting that the vector exhibits equivalent biological activity as the virus itself. To utilize the vector further, a DNA-based vector driven by the Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter was constructed. The complete sequence of the SYCMV genome was inserted into a binary vector flanked by a CaMV 35S promoter at the 5' terminus of the SYCMV genome and a cis-cleaving ribozyme sequence followed by a nopaline synthase terminator at the 3' terminus of the SYCMV genome (pSYCMV-full). The SYCMV-derived vector was tested for use as a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vector for the functional analysis of soybean genes. VIGS constructs containing either a fragment of the Phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene (pSYCMV-PDS1) or a fragment of the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RbcS) gene (pSYCMV-RbcS2) were constructed. Plants infiltrated with each vector using the Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation method exhibited distinct symptoms, such as photo-bleaching in plants infiltrated with pSYCMV-PDS1 and yellow or pale green coloring in plants infiltrated with pSYCMV-RbcS2. In addition, down-regulation of the transcripts of the two target genes was confirmed via northern blot analysis. Particle bombardment and direct plasmid DNA rubbing were also confirmed as alternative inoculation methods. To determine if the SYCMV vector can be used for the expression of heterologous proteins in soybean plants, the vector encoding amino acids 135-160 of VP1 of Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype O1 Campos (O1C

  2. Assessing the genetic diversity of cultivars and wild soybeans using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-02

    Aug 2, 2010 ... K=3. Figure 1. Genetic structure of 40 soybean germplasm. Table 3. Genetic variation statistics for 40 SSR loci in soybean. Statistics. Cultivars Landraces ... Table 4. Genetic differentiation (below diagonal) and gene flow (above diagonal) in soybean. POP ID. Cultivars Landraces. Wild soybeans. Cultivars.

  3. 21 CFR 172.723 - Epoxidized soybean oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Epoxidized soybean oil. 172.723 Section 172.723... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.723 Epoxidized soybean oil. Epoxidized soybean oil may be... reacting soybean oil in toluene with hydrogen peroxide and formic acid. (b) It meets the following...

  4. Optimisation of wheat-sprouted soybean flour bread using response ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of sprouted soybean flour on wheat bread was studied. Sprouting significantly increased the vitamin C content of soybean flour from 2.0 mg kg-1 to 3.25 mg kg-1. The sprouted soybean flour resulted in increased loaf volume, a firmer, spongy and more elastic loaf. However, increasing the sprouted soybean flour ...

  5. 7 CFR 810.1601 - Definition of soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definition of soybeans. 810.1601 Section 810.1601... GRAIN United States Standards for Soybeans Terms Defined § 810.1601 Definition of soybeans. Grain that consists of 50 percent or more of whole or broken soybeans (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) that will not pass...

  6. Essential oils and whole milk in the control of soybean powdery mildew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano José Perina

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to evaluate the potential of essential oils (EOs and cow's whole milk (CWM in order to control soybean powdery mildew and to estimate the most effective concentrations of these natural products in reducing the disease severity on soybean plants. Three experiments were carried out: The first experiment evaluated and selected the most effective treatments to reduce the severity of soybean powdery mildew under greenhouse conditions; the second experiment evaluated the effect of CWM and EOs of citronella, lemongrass, eucalyptus, cinnamon and tea tree on the pathogen through the ultrastructure analysis of soybean leaflets infected by Erysiphe diffusa using the scanning electron microscope (SEM and light microscope (LM technology. In the third experiment, the most effective products were tested at several concentrations in order to define the most effective concentrations to reduce disease severity under greenhouse conditions. The treatments CWM (100mL L-1 and EOs of citronella, lemongrass and eucalyptus (1.0mL L-1, reduced the disease severity from 67 to 74%. Direct effects from all natural products tested on the structures of E. diffusa were demonstrated through the SEM and LM analysis. Concentrations at 1.5mL L-1 for EOs of citronella, lemongrass and eucalyptus and also at 180mL L-1 for the treatment CWM were the most effective against E. diffusa on soybean.

  7. Hydroponic cultivation improves the nutritional quality of soybean and its products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Mariantonella; Paradiso, Roberta; De Pascale, Stefania; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2012-01-11

    Hydroponic cultivation allows the control of environmental conditions, saves irrigation water, increases productivity, and prevents plant infections. The use of this technique for large commodities such as soybean is not a relevant issue on fertile soils, but hydroponic soybean cultivation could provide proteins and oil in adverse environmental conditions. In this paper, the compositions of four cultivars of soybean seeds and their derivates, soy milk and okara, grown hydroponically were compared to that of the same cultivar obtained from soil cultivation in an open field. Besides proximal composition, the concentrations of phytic acid and isoflavones were monitored in the seeds, soy milk, and okara. Results demonstrated that, independent from the cultivar, hydroponic compared to soil cultivation promoted the accumulation of fats (from 17.37 to 21.94 g/100 g dry matter) and total dietary fiber (from 21.67 to 28.46 g/100 g dry matter) and reduced isoflavones concentration (from 17.04 to 7.66 mg/kg dry matter), whereas protein concentration was unaffected. The differences found in seed composition were confirmed in the respective okara products, but the effect of cultivation system was not significant looking at the soy milk composition. Data showed that hydroponic cultivation improved the nutritional quality of soybean seeds with regard to fats and dietary fiber. They also suggest that specific cultivars should be selected to obtain the desired nutritional features of the soybean raw material depending on its final destination.

  8. Improved Soybean Oil for Biodiesel Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tom Clemente; Jon Van Gerpen

    2007-11-30

    The goal of this program was to generate information on the utility of soybean germplasm that produces oil, high in oleic acid and low in saturated fatty acids, for its use as a biodiesel. Moreover, data was ascertained on the quality of the derived soybean meal (protein component), and the agronomic performance of this novel soybean germplasm. Gathering data on these later two areas is critical, with respect to the first, soybean meal (protein) component is a major driver for commodity soybean, which is utilized as feed supplements in cattle, swine, poultry and more recently aquaculture production. Hence, it is imperative that the resultant modulation in the fatty acid profile of the oil does not compromise the quality of the derived meal, for if it does, the net value of the novel soybean will be drastically reduced. Similarly, if the improved oil trait negative impacts the agronomics (i.e. yield) of the soybean, this in turn will reduce the value of the trait. Over the course of this program oil was extruded from approximately 350 bushels of soybean designated 335-13, which produces oil high in oleic acid (>85%) and low in saturated fatty acid (<6%). As predicted improvement in cold flow parameters were observed as compared to standard commodity soybean oil. Moreover, engine tests revealed that biodiesel derived from this novel oil mitigated NOx emissions. Seed quality of this soybean was not compromised with respect to total oil and protein, nor was the amino acid profile of the derived meal as compared to the respective control soybean cultivar with a conventional fatty acid profile. Importantly, the high oleic acid/low saturated fatty acids oil trait was not impacted by environment and yield was not compromised. Improving the genetic potential of soybean by exploiting the tools of biotechnology to improve upon the lipid quality of the seed for use in industrial applications such as biodiesel will aid in expanding the market for the crop. This in turn, may

  9. 78 FR 1 - Soybean Promotion and Research: Amend the Order To Adjust Representation on the United Soybean Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ...] Soybean Promotion and Research: Amend the Order To Adjust Representation on the United Soybean Board... number of members on the United Soybean Board (Board) to reflect changes in production levels that have occurred since the Board was reapportioned in 2009. As required by the Soybean Promotion, Research, and...

  10. Proteomic analysis of germinating urediniospores of Phakopsora pachyrhizi, causal agent of Asian soybean rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luster, Douglas G; McMahon, Michael B; Carter, Melissa L; Fortis, Laurie L; Nuñez, Alberto

    2010-10-01

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi is an obligate pathogen that causes Asian soybean rust. Asian soybean rust has an unusually broad host range and infects by direct penetration through the leaf cuticle. In order to understand the early events in the infection process, it is important to identify and characterize proteins in P. pachyrhizi. Germination of the urediniospore is the first stage in the infection process and represents a critical life stage applicable to studies with this obligate pathogen. We have applied a 2-DE and MS approach to identify 117 proteins from the National Center of Biotechnology Information nonredundant protein database and a custom database of Basidiomycota EST sequences. Proteins with roles in primary metabolism, energy transduction, stress, cellular regulation and signaling were identified in this study. This data set is accessible at http://world-2dpage.expasy.org/repository/database=0018.

  11. Mycoflora of Soybeans Used for Meju Fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Ho; Kim, Seon-Hwa; Kwon, Soon-Wo; Lee, Jong-Kyu

    2013-01-01

    Diverse fungi are present in Korean traditional meju and they are known to play an important role in fermented soybean products. To determine the origin of the fungi in meju, we examined the mycoflora of soybeans from 10 traditional meju factories. The samples were untreated or treated with sodium hypochlorite, and placed on malt extract agar (MEA), dichloran 18% glycerol agar (DG18), and dichloran rose bengal chloramphenicol agar (DRBC) medium. A total of 794 fungal strains were isolated and they were identified as 41 genera and 86 species. From sodium hypochlorite untreated soybeans, the genera, Cladosporium (55%), Eurotium (51%), Fusarium (33%), Penicillium (22%), and Aspergillus (exclusion of Eurotium) (20%), were mainly isolated, and Eurotium herbariorum (22%), Eurotium repens (18%), Cladosporium tenuissimum (18%), F. fujikuroi (18%), Aspergillus oryzae/flavus (7%), and Penicillium steckii (6%) were the predominant species. In case of sodium hypochlorite-treated soybeans, Eurotium (31%) and Cladosporium (5%) were frequently isolated, but Aspergillus (excluding Eurotium), Penicillium and Fusarium which were frequently isolated from untreated soybeans, were rarely isolated. Eurotium herbariorum (21%), Eurotium repens (8%), and Cladosporium tenuissimum (3%) were the predominant species. Of the 41 genera and 86 species isolated from soybeans, 13 genera and 33 species were also found in meju. These results suggest that the fungi on soybeans may influence the mycoflora of meju. PMID:23874133

  12. Screening Chinese soybean genotypes for Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation suitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhang-yue; Tian, Jing-luan; Fu, Wei-zhe; Li, Lin; Lu, Ling-hong; Zhou, Lian; Shan, Zhi-hui; Tang, Gui-xiang; Shou, Hui-xia

    2013-04-01

    The Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system is the most commonly used method in soybean transformation. Screening of soybean genotypes favorable for Agrobacterium-infection and tissue regeneration is the most important step to establish an efficient genetic transformation system. In this study, twenty soybean genotypes that originated from different soybean production regions in China were screened for transient infection, regeneration capacity, and stable transgenic efficiency. Three genotypes, Yuechun 04-5, Yuechun 03-3, and Tianlong 1, showed comparable stable transgenic efficiencies with that of the previously reported American genotypes Williams 82 and Jack in our experimental system. For the Tianlong 1, the average stable transformation efficiency is 4.59%, higher than that of control genotypes (Jack and Williams 82), which is enough for further genomic research and genetic engineering. While polymerase chain reaction (PCR), LibertyLink strips, and β-glucuronidase (GUS) staining assays were used to detect the insertion and expression of the transgene, leaves painted with 135 mg/L Basta could efficiently identify the transformants.

  13. Screening Chinese soybean genotypes for Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation suitability*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhang-yue; Tian, Jing-luan; Fu, Wei-zhe; Li, Lin; Lu, Ling-hong; Zhou, Lian; Shan, Zhi-hui; Tang, Gui-xiang; Shou, Hui-xia

    2013-01-01

    The Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system is the most commonly used method in soybean transformation. Screening of soybean genotypes favorable for Agrobacterium-infection and tissue regeneration is the most important step to establish an efficient genetic transformation system. In this study, twenty soybean genotypes that originated from different soybean production regions in China were screened for transient infection, regeneration capacity, and stable transgenic efficiency. Three genotypes, Yuechun 04-5, Yuechun 03-3, and Tianlong 1, showed comparable stable transgenic efficiencies with that of the previously reported American genotypes Williams 82 and Jack in our experimental system. For the Tianlong 1, the average stable transformation efficiency is 4.59%, higher than that of control genotypes (Jack and Williams 82), which is enough for further genomic research and genetic engineering. While polymerase chain reaction (PCR), LibertyLink strips, and β-glucuronidase (GUS) staining assays were used to detect the insertion and expression of the transgene, leaves painted with 135 mg/L Basta could efficiently identify the transformants. PMID:23549846

  14. Investigating the use of Active Crop Canopy Sensors for Soybean Management in Field Research and Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joshua Jay

    Approximately one-third of soybean yield gain is a result of improved agronomic practices, which includes disease and insect management. Treatments containing fungicide, insecticide, biological, and nutrient components were evaluated in Nebraska soybean fields during 2013 through 2015 to determine effects on soybean yield and profitability. The greatest yield (4.83 Mg ha -1, p=0.019) was achieved with a complete seed and pod set treatment, but resulted in the second lowest calculated net return (US151 ha -1, p=0.019) after accounting for fixed and variable costs at a soybean market price of US0.367 kg-1. The most profitable treatment was the fungicide seed treatment followed by no pod set treatment (US$241 ha-1, p=0.019). The use of pod set treatments in the absence of significant disease and insect pressure was not profitable in most instances. Crop canopy reflectance was measured several times throughout the season during 2014 and 2015 to evaluate normalized difference red edge (NDRE) index to predict soybean productivity. The NDRE values were used to calculate a cumulative reflectance value through the R6 growth stage, defined as area under the reflectance progress curve (AURPC). The AURPC values and seed yield were classified as top 25%, middle 50%, or bottom 25% by location. Multinomial regression determined that bottom AURPC values correctly predicted bottom yield 52.5% of the time (p=0.033), but ranged from 46.7 to 86.2% by location. Misclassifications by incorrectly identifying a bottom yield within the top AURPC ranged from 0.0% to 16.7% by location. The AURPC offers a novel method to delineate management zones in soybean production fields. Soybean canopy reflectance was also evaluated for the relationship between NDRE and soybean response to soybean cyst nematode (SCN; Heterodera glycines Ichinohe) infection. SCN-resistant and -susceptible varieties were planted in SCN-infested and non-infested sites during 2015 and 2016. Susceptible varieties yielded

  15. Overexpression of GmAKT2 potassium channel enhances resistance to soybean mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lian; He, Hongli; Liu, Ruifang; Han, Qiang; Shou, Huixia; Liu, Bao

    2014-06-03

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is the most prevalent viral disease in many soybean production areas. Due to a large number of SMV resistant loci and alleles, SMV strains and the rapid evolution in avirulence/effector genes, traditional breeding for SMV resistance is complex. Genetic engineering is an effective alternative method for improving SMV resistance in soybean. Potassium (K+) is the most abundant inorganic solute in plant cells, and is involved in plant responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Studies have shown that altering the level of K+ status can reduce the spread of the viral diseases. Thus K+ transporters are putative candidates to target for soybean virus resistance. The addition of K+ fertilizer significantly reduced SMV incidence. Analysis of K+ channel gene expression indicated that GmAKT2, the ortholog of Arabidopsis K+ weak channel encoding gene AKT2, was significantly induced by SMV inoculation in the SMV highly-resistant genotype Rsmv1, but not in the susceptible genotype Ssmv1. Transgenic soybean plants overexpressing GmAKT2 were produced and verified by Southern blot and RT-PCR analysis. Analysis of K+ concentrations on different leaves of both the transgenic and the wildtype (Williams 82) plants revealed that overexpression of GmAKT2 significantly increased K+ concentrations in young leaves of plants. In contrast, K+ concentrations in the old leaves of the GmAKT2-Oe plants were significantly lower than those in WT plants. These results indicated that GmAKT2 acted as a K+ transporter and affected the distribution of K+ in soybean plants. Starting from 14 days after inoculation (DAI) of SMV G7, severe mosaic symptoms were observed on the WT leaves. In contrast, the GmAKT2-Oe plants showed no symptom of SMV infection. At 14 and 28 DAI, the amount of SMV RNA in WT plants increased 200- and 260- fold relative to GmAKT2-Oe plants at each time point. Thus, SMV development was significantly retarded in GmAKT2-overexpressing transgenic soybean

  16. Systemic acquired resistance in soybean is regulated by two proteins, Orthologous to Arabidopsis NPR1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhu Devinder

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic acquired resistance (SAR is induced in non-inoculated leaves following infection with certain pathogenic strains. SAR is effective against many pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA is a signaling molecule of the SAR pathway. The development of SAR is associated with the induction of pathogenesis related (PR genes. Arabidopsis non-expressor of PR1 (NPR1 is a regulatory gene of the SA signal pathway 123. SAR in soybean was first reported following infection with Colletotrichum trancatum that causes anthracnose disease. We investigated if SAR in soybean is regulated by a pathway, similar to the one characterized in Arabidopsis. Results Pathogenesis-related gene GmPR1 is induced following treatment of soybean plants with the SAR inducer, 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (INA or infection with the oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora sojae. In P. sojae-infected plants, SAR was induced against the bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea. Soybean GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 genes showed high identities to Arabidopsis NPR1. They showed similar expression patterns among the organs, studied in this investigation. GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 are the only soybean homologues of NPR1and are located in homoeologous regions. In GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 transformed Arabidopsis npr1-1 mutant plants, SAR markers: (i PR-1 was induced following INA treatment and (ii BGL2 following infection with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst, and SAR was induced following Pst infection. Of the five cysteine residues, Cys82, Cys150, Cys155, Cys160, and Cys216 involved in oligomer-monomer transition in NPR1, Cys216 in GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 proteins was substituted to Ser and Leu, respectively. Conclusion Complementation analyses in Arabidopsis npr1-1 mutants revealed that homoeologous GmNPR1-1 and GmNPR1-2 genes are orthologous to Arabidopsis NPR1. Therefore, SAR pathway in soybean is most likely regulated by GmNPR1 genes. Substitution of Cys216 residue, essential

  17. Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the causal agent of Asian soybean rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goellner, Katharina; Loehrer, Marco; Langenbach, Caspar; Conrath, Uwe; Koch, Eckhard; Schaffrath, Ulrich

    2010-03-01

    The plant pathogenic basidiomycete fungi Phakopsora pachyrhizi and Phakopsora meibomiae cause rust disease in soybean plants. Phakopsora pachyrhizi originated in Asia-Australia, whereas the less aggressive P. meibomiae originated in Latin America. In the New World, P. pachyrhizi was first reported in the 1990s to have spread to Hawaii and, since 2001, it has been found in South America. In 2004, the pathogen entered continental USA. This review provides detailed information on the taxonomy and molecular biology of the pathogen, and summarizes strategies to combat the threat of this devastating disease. Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd. & P. Syd; uredial anamorph: Malupa sojae (syn. Uredo sojae); Domain Eukaryota; Kingdom Fungi; Phylum Basidiomycota; Order Uredinales; Class Urediniomycetes; Family Phakopsoraceae; Genus Phakopsora (http://www.indexfungorum.org). The nomenclature of rust spores and spore-producing structures used within this review follows Agrios GN (2005) Plant Pathology, 5th edn. London: Elsevier/Academic Press. In the field, P. pachyrhizi infects leaf tissue from a broad range (at least 31 species in 17 genera) of leguminous plants. Infection of an additional 60 species in other genera has been achieved under laboratory conditions. At the beginning of the disease, small, tan-coloured lesions, restricted by leaf veins, can be observed on infected soybean leaves. Lesions enlarge and, 5-8 days after initial infection, rust pustules (uredia, syn. uredinia) become visible. Uredia develop more frequently in lesions on the lower surface of the leaf than on the upper surface. The uredia open with a round ostiole through which uredospores are released.

  18. Pod Mildew on Soybeans Can Mitigate the Damage to the Seed Arising from Field Mold at Harvest Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiang; Deng, Juncai; Zhang, Ke; Wu, Haijun; Yang, Caiqiong; Zhang, Xiaowen; Du, Junbo; Shu, Kai; Yang, Wenyu

    2016-12-07

    Seedpods are the outermost barrier of legume plants encountered by pests and pathogens, but research on this tissue, especially regarding their chemical constituents, is limited. In the present study, a mildew-index-model-based cluster analysis was used to evaluate and identify groups of soybean genotypes with different organ-specific resistance against field mold. The constituents of soybean pods, including proteins, carbohydrates, fatty acids, and isoflavones, were analyzed. Linear regression and correlation analyses were also conducted between these main pod constituents and the organ-specific mildew indexes of seed (MIS) and pod (MIP). With increases in the contents of infection constituents, such as proteins, carbohydrates, and fatty acids, the MIP increased and the MIS decreased. The MIS decreased with increases in the contents of glycitein (GLE)-type isoflavonoids, which act as antibiotic constituents. Although the infection constituents in the soybean pods caused pod mildew, they also helped mitigate the corresponding seed mildew to a certain extent.

  19. Metabolomic profiling of the response of susceptible and resistant soybean strains to foxglove aphid, Aulacorthum solani Kaltenbach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Dan; Akashi, Hiromichi; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Tomita, Masaru; Soga, Tomoyoshi

    2013-04-15

    Aphid infection reduces soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) yield. Consequently, cultivation of aphid-resistant strains is a promising approach to pest control, and understanding the resistance mechanism is of importance. Here, we characterized the resistance of soybeans to foxglove aphid, Aulacorthum solani Kaltenbach, at the metabolite level. First, we evaluated aphid mortality and settlement rates on the leaves of two soybean strains, 'Tohoku149' and 'Suzuyutaka', and found that the former had strong resistance soon after introduction of the aphids. The metabolomic response to aphid introduction was analyzed using capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We found the following three features in the profiles: (1) concentrations of citrate, amino acids, and their intermediates were intrinsically higher for Tohoku149 than Suzuyutaka, (2) concentrations of several metabolites producing secondary metabolites, such as flavonoids and alkaloids, drastically changed 6h after aphid introduction, and (3) concentrations of TCA cycle metabolites increased in Tohoku149 48 h after aphid introduction. We also profiled free amino acids in aphids reared on both soybean strains and under starvation, and found that the profile of the aphids on Tohoku149 was similar to that of the starved aphids, but different to that of aphids on Suzuyutaka. These tests confirmed that aphids suck phloem sap even from Tohoku149. This study demonstrates the metabolomic profiles of both soybean strains and aphids, which will contribute to the molecular level understanding of mechanisms of soybean resistance to aphids. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Soybean breeding with EMS mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Aiqiu; Geng Yuxuan; Zhu Baogo

    1990-01-01

    Full text: 'Yudou No. 2' is a good soybean variety grown in the Honan Province. EMS was applied to seeds and valuable mutants were selected among the descendants. In a short period, several genetically stable strains were obtained. In the M 2 population, the early-maturing mutants were the most frequent, followed by short culm mutants. Other mutations altered leaf shape, grain size, habit of pod bearing, number of pods etc. One of the best strains is '86-180'. It is highly disease-resistant and ripens 19 days earlier than the original 'Yodou No. 2'. It bears more pods, although the seeds are a little bit smaller and is highly productive (4110kg/ha). Another good strain is '86-223'. It is also disease-resistant and highly productive (3390kg/ha). (author)

  1. Chrysodeixis includens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) on soybean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chrysodeixis includens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) on soybean treated with resistance inducers. P Vinicius de Souza, BR Machado, M Mueller de Freitas, F Correa, A Cirilo de Sousa Almeida, FG de Jesus ...

  2. GmSGT1 is differently required for soybean Rps genes-mediated and basal resistance to Phytophthora sojae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qiang; Cui, Xiaoxia; Su, Liming; Xu, Na; Guo, Na; Xing, Han; Dou, Daolong

    2014-08-01

    Using RNAi approach, we demonstrate that GmSGT1 is an essential component in soybean against Phytophthora sojae, but not required for Rps 2 or Rps 3a-mediated resistance. Utilization of disease resistance in soybean is a major approach to combat root and stem rot disease, which is caused by Phytophthora sojae and poses a growing threat to soybean safety production. The SGT1 protein is essential for disease resistance in many plant species. Here, we analyzed and characterized functions of GmSGT1 gene family in R protein-mediated resistance and basal defense in this important crop. Five candidate genes of GmSGT1 were identified and they were grouped into three clades. Transcriptional levels of all the tested genes were highly induced upon P. sojae infection in four soybean cultivars that confer different resistant levels. Using a gene silencing system in soybean cotyledons, we demonstrated that silencing GmSGT1 genes comprised race-specific resistance in soybean lines carrying genes at the following loci for race-specific resistance to P. sojae: Rps1a, Rps1c, Rps1d, Rps1k, and Rps8. In contrast, the resistance mediated by Rps2 or Rps3a was not affected. Silencing GmSGT1 genes in cotyledons also reduced resistance to this pathogen in a moderately partial resistant cultivar. We further showed that transient overexpression of GmSGT1-1 in Nicotiana benthamiana could enhance the resistance to P. capsici. These results suggest that GmSGT1 is an essential component for soybean in resisting the pathogen and pathways of Rps-mediated disease resistance are diverse in soybean.

  3. Use of induced mutations in soybean breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakri, A.H.; Jalani, B.S.; Ng, K.F.

    1981-01-01

    Artificial induction of mutation in plants is carried out using #betta#-irradiation and ethyl metanesulphonate (EMS) to expand the genetic variability of locally-grown soybean. This aspect of mutation breeding complements of conventional breeding approach undertaken by the Joint Malaysia Soybean Breeding Project group. Recovery of agronomically-important mutants such as earliness, lateness, bigger seed size and improved plant architecture were recorded. The significance of these findings is discussed. (author)

  4. THE IMPACT OF SOYBEAN AND CORN INTERCROPPING SYSTEM AND SOIL FERTILITY MANAGEMENT ON SOYBEAN APHID POPULATIONS APHIS GLYCINES (HEMIPTERA: APHIDIDAE AND SOYBEAN GROWTH PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosma Hasibuan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural management cropping systems play an important role in affecting a crop plant’s ability to tolerate or resist insect pests.  Field studies were conducted to examine the effect of two strategies management systems: fertilizer treatment and intercropping soybean with corn on soybean  aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura population and soybean growth  and yield parameters. The intercropping treatments were: soybean alone; 2:1 soybean/corn intercrop; and 3:1 soybean/corn intercrop. While the soil fertility treatments were the combination of NPK (urea 100 kg ha-1 + SP-36 200 kg ha-1 + KCl 200 kg ha-1 levels, dolomite (4 ton ha-1, compost  (10 ton ha-1, and chicken manure (10 ton ha-1.  The results of the first study showed that the intercropping soybean with corn  significantly reduced the population density of soybean aphids. However, there were no significant effects of intercropping systems on soybean growth (plant height and yield (number seed per pod and  thousand seed weight performances except on the number of soybean pods per plant. Meanwhile, the result of the second study indicated that soil fertilizer treatments had  a significant effect on the soybean plant characteristics: leaf numbers; pod numbers; and plant height.  Combining  intercropping methods and soil fertilizer management offer an opportunity to protect the soybean plants by natural and sustainable pest management.

  5. N - Fixation of Soybean and Residual Effect from N - Fixation of Soybean to Rice Yield in Rice - Soybean Cropping System Using N - 15 Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yathaputanon, C.; Chaiwannakupt, P.; Prasartsrisuparb, J; Arayangul, T.

    1998-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted for long term rice-soybean cropping system at Chiang Mai Field Crop Research Center, to estimate nitrogen fixation of soybean and residual benefit of the soybean stover to a following rice crop. Nitrogen fixation was estimated in the soybean using 15 N dilution technique and non nodulated groundnut as a standard crop. To estimate the residual nitrogen benefit to the rice crop was calculated by nitrogen-15 yield of rice where the soybean stover was either removed or returned. In the first year soybean fixed 48.42% of their nitrogen which producing 50.31 KgN/ha. Residual effect of soybean stover returned was 36.72% of nitrogen in rice which equal 50.62 KgN/ha. come from the soybean returned (stover plus root and nodule under the ground where the soybean stover was returned). The residual nitrogen-15 in the second year was too low to detect. No nitrogen fertilizer applied to the following rice plot where the soybean stover was returned, grain dry matter yield were up to 12% (1 st year) and 27% (2 nd year) grater than in the plots where the soybean stover was removed produce the highest grain dry matter yield which were higher 14 - 29% than the plots where the soybean stover was removed

  6. Chemical modification of soybean oil for lubricant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan Shijie; Mao Zongqiang [Tsinghua Univ., INET, BJ (China)

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a series of structural modifications of soybean oils for lubricant. The reaction was monitored and products were confirmed by NMR and FTIR. The structural modification is carried out in four stages, (1) synthesis of soybean oil isooctyl ester from soybean oil; (2) synthesis of epoxy-soybean oil isooctyl ester from soybean oil isooctyl ester; (3) synthesis of hydroxylated products from epoxy soybean oil isooctyl ester with fatty acid; (4) esterification of the hydroxylated product with anhydride. Rheological behaviour of the products was measured. Pour points of the products (3) were observed as low as -24 C (lauric acid) and -15 C (isooctanoic acid) respectively. When the hydroxyl groups in the products were esterified with and acid anhydride, the pour points were became higher, which were -21 C (lauric acid) and -6 C (isooctanoic acid) without pour point depressant, and -27 C (lauric acid) and -24 C (isooctanoic acid) with 1% of pour point depressant respectively. The products have suitable viscosity and viscosity index, and the viscosity indices are all above 100. (orig.)

  7. Soybean growth and yield under cover crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila de Oliveira

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of cover crops in no-tillage systems can provide better conditions for the development of soybean plants with positive effects on grain yield and growth analysis techniques allow researchers to characterize and understand the behavior of soybean plants under different straw covers. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize, using growth analysis, yield components and agronomic performance of soybean under common bean, Brachiaria brizantha and pearl millet straws. The experiment was performed on a soil under cerrado in the municipality of Santo Antônio de Goiás, GO. The experiment was arranged in a randomized complete block design with three treatments (cover crops and five replications. Soybean grain yield was lower in the B. brizantha straw treatment (3,708 kg ha-1 than both in the pearl millet (4.772 kg ha-1 and common bean straw treatments (5,200 kg ha-1. The soybean growth analysis in B. brizantha, pearl millet and common bean allowed characterizing the variation in the production of dry matter of leaves, stems, pods and total and leaf area index that provided different grain yields. The cover crop directly affects the soybean grain yield.

  8. Soybean in China: adaptating to the liberalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamet Jean-Paul

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Since 1978 and its opening, China has undergone a process of nutrition transition, animal products taking an increasing share. Anxious to ensure a certain level of food independence, Chinese authorities have developed national livestock production. The increase in volumes and the development of large scale breeding have increased the demand for commercial feed and thus soymeal. Meanwhile, edible oil consumption rose sharply, accentuating the demand for soybeans. To meet this demand, soybean imports were liberalized early, leading the country to become heavily dependent. China has indeed made the choice to maintain its independence in cereals at the expense of other grains, such as soybeans. Competition between corn and soybeans has turned in favor of the cereal, soybean production levelling off then regressing. China’s dependence extends to the crushing sector, controlled by foreign companies. Public supports in place, such as minimum prices, have resulted in increasing the price gap with imported products, leading to a reform of soybean policy in 2014.

  9. Regulation of soybean seed germination through ethylene production in response to reactive oxygen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Yushi; Koda, Yuka; Zheng, Shao-Hui; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Despite their toxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in plant cell signalling pathways, such as mediating responses to stress or infection and in programmed cell death, at lower levels. Although studies have indicated that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) promotes seed germination of several plants such as Arabidopsis, barley, wheat, rice and sunflower, the role of H2O2 in soybean seed germination is not well known. The aim of this study therefore was to investigate the relationships between ROS, plant hormones and soybean seed germination. Methods An examination was made of soybean seed germination, the expression of genes related to ethylene biosynthesis, endogenous ethylene contents, and the number and area of cells in the root tip, using N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, to counteract the effect of ROS. Key Results H2O2 promoted germination, which N-acetylcysteine suppressed, suggesting that ROS are involved in the regulation of soybean germination. H2O2 was produced in the embryonic axis after imbibition. N-Acetylcysteine suppressed the expression of genes related to ethylene biosynthesis and the production of endogenous ethylene. Interestingly, ethephon, which is converted to ethylene, and H2O2 reversed the suppression of seed germination by N-acetylcysteine. Furthermore, morphological analysis revealed that N-acetylcysteine suppressed cell elongation at the root tip, and this suppression was also reversed by ethephon or H2O2 treatments, as was the case in germination. Conclusions In soybean seeds, ROS produced in the embryonic axis after imbibition induce the production of endogenous ethylene, which promotes cell elongation in the root tip. This appears to be how ROS regulate soybean seed germination. PMID:23131300

  10. A review of soybean rust from a South African perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Antony Jarvie

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This review article describes the nature of the soybean rust pathogen, its interaction with the soybean host and documents some of the history of soybean rust in South Africa. Soybean rust has affected soybean cropping in parts of South Africa since 2001. The disease causes leaf lesions, which may progress to premature defoliation and ultimately result in grain yield loss in susceptible soybean genotypes. Chemical control measures have been successfully employed to limit commercial yield losses in South Africa; however, controlling the effects of this disease through host-resistance or tolerance mechanisms remains a long-term goal.

  11. Identificatoin and confirmation of resistance against soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) in eight wild soybean lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development and use of aphid-resistant soybean (Glycine max) cultivars has been complicated by the presence of multiple virulent biotypes of the soybean aphid (SA, Aphis glycines Matsumura). Ultimately, a variety of unique resistance sources may be needed to develop cultivars with a broad spectr...

  12. Infestation ratings database for soybean aphid on early-maturity wild soybean lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura; SA) is a major invasive pest of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] in northern production regions of North America. Although insecticides are currently the main method for controlling this pest, SA-resistant cultivars are being developed to sustainably manage ...

  13. Validation of a hairy roots system to study soybean-soybean aphid interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morriss, Stephanie C.; Studham, Matthew E.; Tylka, Gregory L.

    2017-01-01

    The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) is one of the main insect pests of soybean (Glycine max) worldwide. Genomics approaches have provided important data on transcriptome changes, both in the insect and in the plant, in response to the plant-aphid interaction. However, the difficulties to transform soybean and to rear soybean aphid on artificial media have hindered our ability to systematically test the function of genes identified by those analyses as mediators of plant resistance to the insect. An efficient approach to produce transgenic soybean material is the production of transformed hairy roots using Agrobacterium rhizogenes; however, soybean aphids colonize leaves or stems and thus this approach has not been utilized. Here, we developed a hairy root system that allowed effective aphid feeding. We show that this system supports aphid performance similar to that observed in leaves. The use of hairy roots to study plant resistance is validated by experiments showing that roots generated from cotyledons of resistant lines carrying the Rag1 or Rag2 resistance genes are also resistant to aphid feeding, while related susceptible lines are not. Our results demonstrate that hairy roots are a good system to study soybean aphid-soybean interactions, providing a quick and effective method that could be used for functional analysis of the resistance response to this insect. PMID:28358854

  14. Inheritance, fine-mapping, and candidate gene analyses of resistance to soybean mosaic virus strain SC5 in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Adhimoolam; Li, Kai; Jiang, Hua; Ren, Rui; Li, Cui; Zhi, Haijian; Chen, Shouyi; Gai, Junyi

    2017-08-01

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is one of the most devastating pathogens for soybeans in China. Among the country-wide 22 strains, SC5 dominates in Huang-Huai and Changjiang valleys. For controlling its damage, the resistance gene was searched through Mendelian inheritance study, gene fine-mapping, and candidate gene analysis combined with qRT-PCR (quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction) analysis. The parents F 1 , F 2 , and RILs (recombinant inbred lines) of the cross Kefeng-1 (Resistance, R) × NN1138-2 (Susceptible, S) were used to examine the inheritance of SC5-resistance. The F 1 was resistant and the F 2 and RILs segregated in a 3R:1S and 1R:1S ratio, respectively, indicating a single dominant gene conferring the Kefeng-1 resistance. Subsequently, the genomic region conferring the resistance was found in "Bin 352-Bin353 with 500 kb" on Chromosome 2 using the phenotyping data of the 427 RILs and a high-density genetic map with 4703 bin markers. In the 500 kb genomic region, 38 putative genes are contained. The association analysis between the SNPs in a putative gene and the resistance phenotype for the 427 RILs prioritized 11 candidate genes using Chi-square criterion. The expression levels of these genes were tested by qRT-PCR. On infection with SC5, 7 out of the 11 genes had differential expression in Kefeng-1 and NN1138-2. Furthermore, integrating SNP-phenotype association analysis with qRT-PCR expression profiling analysis, Glyma02g13495 was found the most possible candidate gene for SC5-resistance. This finding can facilitate the breeding for SC5-resistance through marker-assisted selection and provide a platform to gain a better understanding of SMV-resistance gene system in soybean.

  15. Overexpression of GmERF5, a new member of the soybean EAR motif-containing ERF transcription factor, enhances resistance to Phytophthora sojae in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lidong; Cheng, Yingxin; Wu, Junjiang; Cheng, Qun; Li, Wenbin; Fan, Sujie; Jiang, Liangyu; Xu, Zhaolong; Kong, Fanjiang; Zhang, Dayong; Xu, Pengfei; Zhang, Shuzhen

    2015-05-01

    Phytophthora root and stem rot of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], caused by Phytophthora sojae Kaufmann and Gerdemann, is a destructive disease throughout the soybean planting regions in the world. Here, we report insights into the function and underlying mechanisms of a novel ethylene response factor (ERF) in soybean, namely GmERF5, in host responses to P. sojae. GmERF5-overexpressing transgenic soybean exhibited significantly enhanced resistance to P. sojae and positively regulated the expression of the PR10, PR1-1, and PR10-1 genes. Sequence analysis suggested that GmERF5 contains an AP2/ERF domain of 58 aa and a conserved ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif in its C-terminal region. Following stress treatments, GmERF5 was significantly induced by P. sojae, ethylene (ET), abscisic acid (ABA), and salicylic acid (SA). The activity of the GmERF5 promoter (GmERF5P) was upregulated in tobacco leaves with ET, ABA, Phytophthora nicotianae, salt, and drought treatments, suggesting that GmERF5 could be involved not only in the induced defence response but also in the ABA-mediated pathway of salt and drought tolerance. GmERF5 could bind to the GCC-box element and act as a repressor of gene transcription. It was targeted to the nucleus when transiently expressed in Arabidopsis protoplasts. GmERF5 interacted with a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor (GmbHLH) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor (GmEIF) both in yeast cells and in planta. To the best of our knowledge, GmERF5 is the first soybean EAR motif-containing ERF transcription factor demonstrated to be involved in the response to pathogen infection. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Composition and safety analysis of Chinese traditional fermented soybean paste made by transgenic soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukui, Rui; Wenya, Wang; Hongxing, Zhang; Fusuo, Zhang; Yinhua, Jin; Jing, Guo

    2009-01-01

    The traditional Chinese soybean paste was produced by cooked transgenic soybean fermentation with the composition of moisture 53%, amino acid 0.84% (calculated by nitrogen), votive sugar 6.21% and total acid 1.66%. A number of microorganism species were isolated and identified, including fungi and bacteria, and the bacterium species Rhizopus oryzae Went and Prinsen Geerligs were dominant in transgenic soybean paste. The results showed that the transgenic soybean paste contain abundant amino acids and vitamins (vitamin A, 42.87 IU; vitamin B, 10.31 mg; vitamin B, 20.64 mg; nicotinamide, 2.54 mg; pantothenic acid, 0.63 mg; vitamin B, 6,847 microg; folic acid, 105 microg; vitamin B, 123.85 microg; and biotin, 56.34 microg). Pathogenic microorganisms were not be detected in the transgenic fermented soybean paste.

  17. A pigeonpea gene confers resistance to Asian soybean rust in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Cintia G; Guimarães, Gustavo Augusto; Nogueira, Sônia Regina; MacLean, Dan; Cook, Doug R; Steuernagel, Burkhard; Baek, Jongmin; Bouyioukos, Costas; Melo, Bernardo do V A; Tristão, Gustavo; de Oliveira, Jamile Camargos; Rauscher, Gilda; Mittal, Shipra; Panichelli, Lisa; Bacot, Karen; Johnson, Ebony; Iyer, Geeta; Tabor, Girma; Wulff, Brande B H; Ward, Eric; Rairdan, Gregory J; Broglie, Karen E; Wu, Gusui; van Esse, H Peter; Jones, Jonathan D G; Brommonschenkel, Sérgio H

    2016-06-01

    Asian soybean rust (ASR), caused by the fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is one of the most economically important crop diseases, but is only treatable with fungicides, which are becoming less effective owing to the emergence of fungicide resistance. There are no commercial soybean cultivars with durable resistance to P. pachyrhizi, and although soybean resistance loci have been mapped, no resistance genes have been cloned. We report the cloning of a P. pachyrhizi resistance gene CcRpp1 (Cajanus cajan Resistance against Phakopsora pachyrhizi 1) from pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) and show that CcRpp1 confers full resistance to P. pachyrhizi in soybean. Our findings show that legume species related to soybean such as pigeonpea, cowpea, common bean and others could provide a valuable and diverse pool of resistance traits for crop improvement.

  18. The strategy of sustainable soybean development to increase soybean needs in North Sumatera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handayani, L.; Rauf, A.; Rahmawaty; Supriana, T.

    2018-02-01

    The objective of the research was to analyze both internal and external factors influencing the strategy of sustainable soybean development to increase soybean needs in North Sumatera. SWOT analysis was used as the method of the research through identifying internal factors in the development of sustainable soybean the strategy to increase soybean production in research area is aggressive strategy or strategy of SO (Strengths - Oppurtunities) that is using force to exploit existing opportunity with activities as follows: (1). Use certified seeds in accordance with government regulations and policies. (2). Utilizing the level of soil fertility and cropping patterns to be able to meet the demand for soybeans. (3). Utilizing human resources by becoming a member of farmer groups.

  19. SEED VIGOR TESTING OF SOME DOMESTIC SOYBEAN CULTIVARS (Glycine max (L. Merrill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luka Andrić

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Seed ageing is an important cause of low vigor and bad field emergence, especially in adverse seedbed conditions. Therefore, in this investigation, soybean seed vigor was tested by four laboratory tests (germination energy GE, standard germination SG, cold test CT, electrical conductivity EC and in field trial, as well (early planting dates Epd and optimal planting dates Opd. The soybean seed of 5 cultivars from Agricultural Institute Osijek, produced in the 3 years (1999., 2000., 2001. was used in the investigation. The seed was stored in a warehouse conditions for 6, 18 or 30 months prior to testing. Tested soybean seed showed significant differences in seed vigor influenced by seed age, seed treatment with fungicide (Vitavax 200 FF, cultivar and planting date. High quality seed with GE and SG over 85%,performed quite well in both planting dates, as well as seeds with the CT over 70% or with EC under 42 μScm-1g-1. On the contrary, considering seed with reduced vigor there is a very great possibility of reduced FE especially in Epd. However, seed treatment with fungicide and sowing in optimal seedbed conditions can significantly contribute to improvement of soybean seed performance and stand establishment. Correlation analyses showed that all tested seed vigor parameters were significantly connected (sign. level 99%. At early planting, the strongest correlation was established between the field emergence and CT (untreated seed, r=0.949** and for treated seed r=0.951** whereas in optimal planting date was between the field emergence and SG (for untreated seed r=0. 938** and for treated seed r=0.942**. Laboratory seed health testing showed significant differences in fungal disease intensity influenced by fungicide seed treatment, cultivar and seed age. Total seed infection and infection with Fusarium spp. was adversely correlated with all vigor parameters. All tested vigor parameters of soybean seed had influence on grain yield indirectly by

  20. Arbuscular mycorrhiza detoxifying response against arsenic and pathogenic fungus in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnoletti, Federico N; Balestrasse, Karina; Lavado, Raúl S; Giacometti, Romina

    2016-11-01

    Uptake of Arsenic (As) in plant tissues can affect metabolism, causing physiological disorders, even death. As toxicity, but also pathogen infections trigger a generalised stress response called oxidative stress; however knowledge on the response of soybean (Glycine max L.) under multiple stressors is limited so far. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) enhance the tolerance of host plants to abiotic and biotic stress. Thus, we investigated the effects of the AMF Rhizophagus intraradices on soybean grown in As-contaminated soils as well as in the presence of the pathogen Macrophomina phaseolina (charcoal rot of the stem). Plant parameters and degree of mycorrhizal colonization under the different assessed treatments were analyzed. Content of As in roots and leaves was quantified. Increasing As level in the soil stopped plant growth, but promoted plant As uptake. Inoculation of soybean plants with M. phaseolina accentuated As effect at all physiological levels. In the presence of mycorrhizal symbiosis biomass dramatically increased, and significantly reduced the As concentration in plant tissues. Mycorrhization decreased oxidative damage in the presence of both As and the pathogen. Furthermore, transcription analysis revealed that the high-affinity phosphate transporter from R. intraradices RiPT and the gene encoding a putative arsenic efflux pump RiArsA were up-regulated under higher As doses. These results suggest that R. intraradices is most likely to get involved in the defense response against M. phaseolina, but also in the reduction of arsenate to arsenite as a possible detoxification mechanism in AMF associations in soybean. R. intraradices actively participates in the soybean antioxidant defense response against arsenic stress and M. phaseolina infection. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Soybean aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) response to soybean plant defense: stress levels, tradeoffs, and cross-virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, Laramy; Bickel, Ryan; Brisson, Jennifer; Heng-Moss, Tiffany; Siegfried, Blair; Zera, Anthony; Miller, Nick

    2014-02-01

    A variety of management methods to control the soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) have been investigated since its invasion into North America in 2000, among them plant resistance has emerged as a viable option for reducing aphid damage to soybeans and preventing outbreaks. Plant resistance methods often use natural soybean plant defenses that impose stress on aphids by reducing fitness and altering behavior. Research efforts have heavily focused on identification and development of aphid resistant soybean varieties, leaving much unknown about soybean aphid response to stressful host plant defenses. In this study, we aimed to 1) evaluate lifetime fitness consequences and phenotypic variation in response to host plant-induced stress and 2) investigate whether trade-offs involving fitness costs and/or cross-virulence to multiple antibiotic soybean varieties exists. We compared aphid survival and reproduction during and after a short period of exposure to soybeans with the Rag2 resistance gene and measured aphid clonal variation in response to Rag2 soybeans. In addition, we measured the performance of Rag2 virulent and avirulent aphids on five soybean varieties with various forms of antibiotic resistance. Our results indicate that plant defenses impose high levels of stress and have long-term fitness consequences, even after aphids are removed from resistant plants. We identified one aphid clone that was able to colonize Rag2 among the seven clones tested, suggesting that virulent genotypes may be prevalent in natural populations. Finally, although we did not find evidence of cross-virulence to multiple antibiotic soybean varieties, our results suggest independent mechanisms of aphid virulence to Rag1 and Rag2 that may involve fitness costs.

  2. Diallel analysis for frogeye leaf spot resistance in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gravina Geraldo de Amaral

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Seven soybean cultivars (Bossier, Cristalina, Davis, Kent, Lincoln, Paraná and Uberaba, with different levels of resistance to Cercospora sojina, were crossed in a diallel design to determine the general (GCA and specific (SCA combining abilities relative to the inheritance of the resistance. Race 04 of the fungus was inoculated in the parents and in the 21 F1 hybrids in a greenhouse in a completely randomized design, with 12 replications. The reactions to the disease were evaluated 20 days after the inoculation, always on the most infected leaflet. Both GCA and SCA were significant for all the evaluated characters, being inferred that, for the expression of the characters, the additive, dominant and, possibly, epistatic genic actions were important. The largest values of estimated SCA effect (ij were observed in the hybrid combinations where at least one parent presented high GCA. Cristalina, Davis and Uberaba cultivars showed the largest estimates for GCA effect (i, and from the analysis of ii, the contribution of these parents to heterosis of their hybrids will be towards the reduction of the disease symptoms. Therefore, these cultivars are indicated as parents in breeding programs that seek the development of soybean cultivars with resistance to frogeye leaf spot.

  3. Different responses of soybean cyst nematode resistance between ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    YONGCHUN LI

    parasitic nematode that feeds on the roots of soybean and most economically ... sified pest problems (Skorupska et al. 1994). Soybean cyst nematode .... Genomic DNA extraction and pooling for bulk segregant analysis. Genomic DNA was isolated ...

  4. Benefits of Neonicotinoid Seed Treatments to Soybean Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read about EPA’s analysis of use of the neonicotinoid seed treatments for insect control in U.S. soybean production. EPA concludes that these seed treatments provide little or no overall benefits to soybean production in most situations.

  5. Reference Genes in the Pathosystem Phakopsora pachyrhizi/ Soybean Suitable for Normalization in Transcript Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Hirschburger

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Phakopsora pachyrhizi is a devastating pathogen on soybean, endangering soybean production worldwide. Use of Host Induced Gene Silencing (HIGS and the study of effector proteins could provide novel strategies for pathogen control. For both approaches quantification of transcript abundance by RT-qPCR is essential. Suitable stable reference genes for normalization are indispensable to obtain accurate RT-qPCR results. According to the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE guidelines and using algorithms geNorm and NormFinder we tested candidate reference genes from P. pachyrhizi and Glycine max for their suitability in normalization of transcript levels throughout the infection process. For P. pachyrhizi we recommend a combination of CytB and PDK or GAPDH for in planta experiments. Gene expression during in vitro stages and over the whole infection process was found to be highly unstable. Here, RPS14 and UbcE2 are ranked best by geNorm and NormFinder. Alternatively CytB that has the smallest Cq range (Cq: quantification cycle could be used. We recommend specification of gene expression relative to the germ tube stage rather than to the resting urediospore stage. For studies omitting the resting spore and the appressorium stages a combination of Elf3 and RPS9, or PKD and GAPDH should be used. For normalization of soybean genes during rust infection Ukn2 and cons7 are recommended.

  6. Reference Genes in the Pathosystem Phakopsora pachyrhizi/ Soybean Suitable for Normalization in Transcript Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschburger, Daniela; Müller, Manuel; Voegele, Ralf T; Link, Tobias

    2015-09-23

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi is a devastating pathogen on soybean, endangering soybean production worldwide. Use of Host Induced Gene Silencing (HIGS) and the study of effector proteins could provide novel strategies for pathogen control. For both approaches quantification of transcript abundance by RT-qPCR is essential. Suitable stable reference genes for normalization are indispensable to obtain accurate RT-qPCR results. According to the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) guidelines and using algorithms geNorm and NormFinder we tested candidate reference genes from P. pachyrhizi and Glycine max for their suitability in normalization of transcript levels throughout the infection process. For P. pachyrhizi we recommend a combination of CytB and PDK or GAPDH for in planta experiments. Gene expression during in vitro stages and over the whole infection process was found to be highly unstable. Here, RPS14 and UbcE2 are ranked best by geNorm and NormFinder. Alternatively CytB that has the smallest Cq range (Cq: quantification cycle) could be used. We recommend specification of gene expression relative to the germ tube stage rather than to the resting urediospore stage. For studies omitting the resting spore and the appressorium stages a combination of Elf3 and RPS9, or PKD and GAPDH should be used. For normalization of soybean genes during rust infection Ukn2 and cons7 are recommended.

  7. Specific binding of a fungal glucan phytoalexin elicitor to membrane fractions from soybean Glycine max

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, W.E.; Ebel, J.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment of soybean tissues with elicitors results in the production of phytoalexins, one of a number of inducible plant defense reactions against microbial infections. The present study uses a β-1,3-[ 3 H] glucan elicitor fraction from Phytophthora megasperma f.sp. glycinea, a fungal pathogen of soybean, to identify putative elicitor targets in soybean tissues. Use of the radiolabeled elicitor disclosed saturable high-affinity elicitor binding site(s) in membrane fractions of soybean roots. Highest binding activity is associated with a plasma membrane-enriched fraction. The apparent K/sub d/ value for β-glucan elicitor binding is ≅ 0.2 x 10 -6 M and the maximum number of binding sites is 0.5 pmol per mg of protein. Competition studies the [ 3 H]glucan elicitor and a number of polysaccharides demonstrate that only polysaccharides of a branched β-glucan type effectively displace the radiolabeled ligand from membrane binding. Differential displacing activity of the glucans on P. megasperma elicitor binding corresponds closely to their respective ability to elicit phytoalexin production in a cotyledon bioassay

  8. Radiation processing and functional properties of soybean ( Glycine max)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pednekar, Mrinal; Das, Amit K.; Rajalakshmi, V.; Sharma, Arun

    2010-04-01

    Effect of radiation processing (10, 20 and 30 kGy) on soybean for better utilization was studied. Radiation processing reduced the cooking time of soybean and increased the oil absorption capacity of soy flour without affecting its proximate composition. Irradiation improved the functional properties like solubility, emulsification activity and foam stability of soybean protein isolate. The value addition effect of radiation processing has been discussed for the products (soy milk, tofu and tofu fortified patties) prepared from soybean.

  9. Radiation processing and functional properties of soybean (Glycine max)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pednekar, Mrinal, E-mail: mrinal1854@yahoo.co.i [Food Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India); Das, Amit K. [Department of Food Engineering, CFTRI, Mysore 570020, Karnataka (India); Rajalakshmi, V; Sharma, Arun [Food Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India)

    2010-04-15

    Effect of radiation processing (10, 20 and 30 kGy) on soybean for better utilization was studied. Radiation processing reduced the cooking time of soybean and increased the oil absorption capacity of soy flour without affecting its proximate composition. Irradiation improved the functional properties like solubility, emulsification activity and foam stability of soybean protein isolate. The value addition effect of radiation processing has been discussed for the products (soy milk, tofu and tofu fortified patties) prepared from soybean.

  10. Radiation processing and functional properties of soybean (Glycine max)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pednekar, Mrinal; Das, Amit K.; Rajalakshmi, V; Sharma, Arun

    2010-01-01

    Effect of radiation processing (10, 20 and 30 kGy) on soybean for better utilization was studied. Radiation processing reduced the cooking time of soybean and increased the oil absorption capacity of soy flour without affecting its proximate composition. Irradiation improved the functional properties like solubility, emulsification activity and foam stability of soybean protein isolate. The value addition effect of radiation processing has been discussed for the products (soy milk, tofu and tofu fortified patties) prepared from soybean.

  11. Genome Sequence of the Palaeopolyploid soybean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmutz, Jeremy; Cannon, Steven B.; Schlueter, Jessica; Ma, Jianxin; Mitros, Therese; Nelson, William; Hyten, David L.; Song, Qijian; Thelen, Jay J.; Cheng, Jianlin; Xu, Dong; Hellsten, Uffe; May, Gregory D.; Yu, Yeisoo; Sakura, Tetsuya; Umezawa, Taishi; Bhattacharyya, Madan K.; Sandhu, Devinder; Valliyodan, Babu; Lindquist, Erika; Peto, Myron; Grant, David; Shu, Shengqiang; Goodstein, David; Barry, Kerrie; Futrell-Griggs, Montona; Abernathy, Brian; Du, Jianchang; Tian, Zhixi; Zhu, Liucun; Gill, Navdeep; Joshi, Trupti; Libault, Marc; Sethuraman, Anand; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Nguyen, Henry T.; Wing, Rod A.; Cregan, Perry; Specht, James; Grimwood, Jane; Rokhsar, Dan; Stacey, Gary; Shoemaker, Randy C.; Jackson, Scott A.

    2009-08-03

    Soybean (Glycine max) is one of the most important crop plants for seed protein and oil content, and for its capacity to fix atmospheric nitrogen through symbioses with soil-borne microorganisms. We sequenced the 1.1-gigabase genome by a whole-genome shotgun approach and integrated it with physical and high-density genetic maps to create a chromosome-scale draft sequence assembly. We predict 46,430 protein-coding genes, 70percent more than Arabidopsis and similar to the poplar genome which, like soybean, is an ancient polyploid (palaeopolyploid). About 78percent of the predicted genes occur in chromosome ends, which comprise less than one-half of the genome but account for nearly all of the genetic recombination. Genome duplications occurred at approximately 59 and 13 million years ago, resulting in a highly duplicated genome with nearly 75percent of the genes present in multiple copies. The two duplication events were followed by gene diversification and loss, and numerous chromosome rearrangements. An accurate soybean genome sequence will facilitate the identification of the genetic basis of many soybean traits, and accelerate the creation of improved soybean varieties.

  12. Weed Control in Soybean (Glycine max)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kipkemoi, P.L.

    2002-01-01

    Weed Compete for limited growth factors with crop plants. This result in loss of crop vigour and hence reduces crop yields. A study was conducted in 1997 and 2001 to evaluate the use of herbicides and hand hoeing for weed control in soybeans. Crop establishment was by hand planting. The herbicides were applied using CP3 Knap sack sprayer calibrated to deliver a spray volume of 150l/ha. Hand weeding treatment were done as appropriate. The trial layout was randomised complete block design with four replications in both years. The tested herbicides did not satisfactorily control the weeds present at the experimental site in both years. Hand weeding on the other hand gave good control of the weeds which were reflected in high soybean yields. In these trials yields were negatively correlated with the number of weeds present. The tested herbicides alone appeared to be inadequate in controlling weeds in soybean. Compared with the weed-free treatment a single application of soil-applied or post-emergence herbicides did not control a broad spectrum of weeds and reduced soybean yields. It can also be inferred that soybean yield losses are minimised if they are kept weed free for at most 6 weeks after emergence

  13. Modeling distribution and abundance of soybean aphid in soybean fields using measurements from the surrounding landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlai, C A; Sikkema, S; Hallett, R H; Newman, J; Schaafsma, A W

    2010-02-01

    Soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) is a severe pest of soybean in central North America. Outbreaks of the aphid in Ontario are often spotty in distribution, with some geographical areas affected severely and others with few or no aphid populations occurring in soybean for the duration of the season. A. glycines spend summers on soybean and overwinter on buckthorn, a shrub that is widespread in southern Ontario and is commonly found in agricultural hedgerows and at the margins of woodlots. A. glycines likely use both short distance migratory flights from buckthorn and longer distance dispersal flights in the search for acceptable summer hosts. This study aims to model colonization of soybean fields by A. glycines engaged in early-season migration from overwintering hosts. Akaike's information criterion (AIC) was used to rank numerous competing linear and probit models using field parameters to predict aphid presence, colonization, and density. The variable that best modeled aphid density in soybean fields in the early season was the ratio of buckthorn density to field area, although dramatic differences in relationships between the parameters were observed between study years. This study has important applications in predicting areas that are at elevated risk of developing economically damaging populations of soybean aphid and which may act as sources for further infestation.

  14. Suitability of Soybean Meal from Insect-Resistant Soybeans for Broiler Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, María A; Davis, Adam J; Boerma, H Roger; Parrott, Wayne A

    2016-03-23

    Benning(M) and Benning(MGH) are near-isogenic lines (NILs) of the soybean cultivar Benning, which contain insect-resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs) from the soybean accession PI 229358. Benning(M) contains QTL-M, which confers antibiosis and antixenosis. In addition to QTL-M, Benning(MGH) contains QTL-G, which confers antibiosis, and QTL-H, which confers antixenosis. Soybean meal was produced from Benning and the NILs. Nutritional composition, digestible amino acid content, and nitrogen-corrected true metabolizable energy (TMEN) were equivalent among soybean meals. A 21-day broiler feeding trial was carried out to determine if the QTLs affect soybean meal quality. Weight gain and feed-to-gain ratio were evaluated. No biologically significant differences were detected for broilers fed Benning, Benning(M), and Benning(MGH). This demonstrates that soybean meal produced from the insect-resistant NILs is equivalent to soybean meal produced from their non-insect-resistant parent cultivar for broiler weight gain.

  15. The current status of the Soybean-Soybean mosaic virus (SMV Pathosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Soybean mosaic virus (SMV is one of the most devastating pathogens that cost huge economic losses in soybean production worldwide. Due to the duplicated genome, clustered and highly homologous nature of R genes, as well as recalcitrant to transformation, soybean disease resistance studies is largely lagging compared with other diploid crops. In this review, we focus on the major advances that have been made in identifying both the virulence/avirulence factors of SMV and mapping of SMV resistant genes in soybean. In addition, we review the progress in dissecting the SMV resistant signaling pathways in soybean, with a special focus on the studies using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS. The soybean genome has been fully sequenced, and the increasingly saturated SNP markers have been identified. With these resources available together with newly developed genome editing tools, and more efficient soybean transformation system, cloning SMV resistant genes, and ultimately generating cultivars with a broader spectrum resistance to SMV are becoming more realistic than ever.

  16. optimizing soybean flour., whey powder. and colostrum ratios for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    l4 days. If preserved colostrum could be supplemented with reconstituted soybean flour and whey powder, the period of colostrum feeding could be extended to 4 weeks. Various researchers reported the successful inclusion of soybean flour and/or soybean protein concentrate in milk replacers (Schmutz, Cravens, Soldner ...

  17. Pilot scale refinning of crude soybean oil | Mensah | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pilot scale refinning of crude soybean oil. ... Abstract. A laboratory process for refining soybean has been scaled up to a 145 tonne per annum pilot plant to refine crude soybean oil. ... The quality of the refined oil was found to be within national and codex standard specifications for edible oil from vegetable sources.

  18. Sustainability performance of soybean and beef chains in Latin America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pashaei Kamali, F.

    2015-01-01

    Sustainability Performance of Soybean and Beef Chains in Latin America

    The objective of this thesis, was to analyze the sustainability performance of soybean and beef production chains in Latin America (LA). First identifying a set of sustainability issues of soybean and

  19. Soybean Opportunity as Source of New Energy in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Muchlish Adie

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available These last few years, the name of soybeans soared as a source of biodiesel. Soy biodiesel is an alternative fuel produced from soybean oil. Soybean potential as an alternative renewable energy source because it is expected to have the highest energy content compared to other alternative fuels. Opportunities to develop biodiesel using soybean oil in Indonesia is quite large, considering the soybean is a commodity that is already known and widely cultivated almost in all over Indonesia. In addition, the use of soybean for biofuel feedstock is expected to motivate farmers to cultivate soybeans, so their use is not limited to non-energy raw materials. Soybean varieties that have a high oil content as well as high yield is a source of major biodiesel feedstock. From 73 soybean varieties that have been released in Indonesia, has an average oil content of 18%. Varieties with high oil content can be used as raw material for biodiesel. Research on the use of soy as an ingredient of energy crops (biodiesel have been carried out. In fact, soybean oil is the vegetable oil feedstock for most of the biodiesel being produced in the United States today. With the potential for soybean crops in Indonesia, both in terms of availability of land and varieties, the use of soybean oil for biofuel development in Indonesia is the flagship prospective materials for bio fuel substitute than other plants in the future.

  20. 7 CFR 407.16 - Group risk plan for soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Group risk plan for soybean. 407.16 Section 407.16..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GROUP RISK PLAN OF INSURANCE REGULATIONS § 407.16 Group risk plan for soybean. The provisions of the Group Risk Plan for Soybeans for the 2000 and succeeding crop years are as follows: 1...

  1. 7 CFR 1220.228 - Qualified State Soybean Boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Qualified State Soybean Boards. 1220.228 Section 1220... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Expenses and Assessments...

  2. Environmental stability of carbohydrate profiles in different soybean genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean is an important annual crop. The raffinose family of oligosaccharides (RFO) raffinose and stachyose are anti-nutritional carbohydrates present in soybean seeds. Consumption of soybean seed products with low RFO reduced flatulence in humans and increased metabolizable energy efficiency in chi...

  3. 7 CFR 1220.122 - Qualified State Soybean Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Qualified State Soybean Board. 1220.122 Section 1220... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1220.122...

  4. Assessing the genetic diversity of cultivars and wild soybeans using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increasing the diversity of the soybean germplasm base could introduce new genes affecting agronomic traits. In this study, we demonstrated the differences of genetic diversity level among 40 soybean accessions of cultivars, landraces and wild soybeans collected in the Shanxi Agricultural University using 40 simple ...

  5. Genetic analysis of resistance to soybean rust disease | Kiryowa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi Sydow.) causes the most damage of all the pathogens known to attack soybean (Glycine max. Merril). A study was conducted in Uganda to estimate the magnitude of genetic parameters controlling soybean rust resistance and to estimate narrow sense heritability of the resistance.

  6. Evaluation of Soybean Hulls in Grower Turkey Diets | Etuk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 42 day study was carried out to evaluate the effect of soybean hulls (SBH) in diets of grower turkeys. Four experimental turkey grower diets were formulated such that soybean hulls made up of 0.0 (control diet), 10.0, 20.0 and 30.0% of the diets respectively replacing maize and soybean meal. These diets were offered ...

  7. Effects of diets containing alkali-treated Soybeans on performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of diets containing alkali-treated Soybeans on performance traits, nutrient digestibility and cost benefits of broiler chickens. ... These factors accounted for the overall best performance recorded in 1% K2CO3 - treated soybeans which was closely followed by 1% Na2CO3 treated soybean base diets. Keywords: ...

  8. Antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi Kabatiella caulivora Var. A from Alyxia reinwardtii Bl.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sri Wulan Manuhara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Isolation and characterization of β-1,3-endoglucanase from cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L. have been done. It showed 40° C of optimum temperature, and optimum pH is 7. After the purification with hydrophobic interaction chromatography and ion exchange chromatography, it’s activity was increased. Based on SDS-PAGE analysis, β-1,3-endoglucanase have molecular weight around 48 kD. Antifungal activity of β-1,3-endoglukanase show that it has best inhibition zone on Fusarium solanii at extract from ion exchange chromatography.

  9. Physicochemical properties of soybean oil extracted from {gamma}-irradiated soybeans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myung-Woo Byun; Il-Jun Kang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Food Irradiation; Joong-Ho Kwon [Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Food Science and Technology; Hayashi, Yukako; Mori, Tomohiko [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Food Science

    1996-02-01

    Physicochemical properties of soybean oil extracted from {gamma}-irradiated soybeans (0-10 kGy) were investigated. No significant changes were observed in the total lipid content, fatty acid composition, acid value, peroxide value and trans fatty acid content at different irradiation doses. A tendency toward increased induction period was observed as irradiation dose increased. At higher dose levels than 10 kGy, n-hexanal increased remarkably as dose levels increased, showing the possibility of a chemical index for over-dose irradiation in soybeans. (author).

  10. Effect of Ultrasound in Soybean Protein Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukase, Hirokazu; Ohdaira, Etsuzo; Masuzawa, Nobuyoshi; Ide, Masao

    1994-05-01

    Application of ultrasound for accelerating the extraction of nutriments in food processing has been attempted. However, conditions of exposure to ultrasound were not clear in previous studies. This paper reports on the relationship between the ultrasonic pressure and the amount of extracted protein from soybeans. Experiments were conducted using a beaker, in which the ultrasonic fields were precisely measured. Soybean flakes suspended in water were put in the beaker and placed in a water tank. The amount of extracted protein in water upon ultrasonic exposure was calculated by the Kjeldahl method. It was found that the amount of extracted protein increased in proportion to ultrasonic pressure up to the total amount of soybean protein soluble in water. Furthermore, this paper describes the denaturation of the protein produced by the ultrasonic cavitation.

  11. Globalizing land use transitions: the soybean acceleration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reenberg, Anette; Fenger, Nina Astrid

    2011-01-01

    This note presents the recent global development trends in soybean cultivation as derived from the FAO statistics. It focuses on the change over the course of the last thirty years, when significant new allocations of the global production have occurred, which have turned South America into a lea......This note presents the recent global development trends in soybean cultivation as derived from the FAO statistics. It focuses on the change over the course of the last thirty years, when significant new allocations of the global production have occurred, which have turned South America...... into a leading player on the global scale. It takes point of departure in a land change science approach and employs the notions of underlying and proximate drivers and teleconnections to characterize the process of land use change in relation to the accelerating use of land for soybean cultivation....

  12. 77 FR 40529 - Soybean Promotion and Research: Amend the Order To Adjust Representation on the United Soybean Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ... Service 7 CFR Part 1220 [Doc. No. AMS-LS-12-0022] Soybean Promotion and Research: Amend the Order To Adjust Representation on the United Soybean Board AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: This proposed rule would adjust the number of members on the United Soybean Board...

  13. Soybean production in eastern and southern Africa and threat of yield loss due to soybean rust caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murithi, H.M.; Beed, F.; Tukamuhabwa, P.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.; Joosten, M.H.A.J.

    2016-01-01

    Soybean is a major source of oil and proteins worldwide. The demand for soybean has increased in Africa, driven by the growing feed industry for poultry, aquaculture and home consumption in the form of processed milk, baked beans and for blending with maize and wheat flour. Soybean, in addition

  14. Polymerase Chain Reaction Assays for the Detection and Discrimination of the Soybean Rust Pathogens Phakopsora pachyrhizi and P. meibomiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Reid D; Snyder, Christine L; Peterson, Gary L; Bonde, Morris R

    2002-02-01

    ABSTRACT Soybean rust occurs in Australia and many countries throughout Africa, Asia, and South America. The causal agents of soybean rust are two closely related fungi, Phakopsora pachyrhizi and P. meibomiae, which are differentiated based upon morphological characteristics of the telia. Determination of the nucleotide sequence of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region revealed greater than 99% nucleotide sequence similarity among isolates of either P. pachyrhizi or P. meibomiae, but only 80% sequence similarity between the two species. Utilizing differences within the ITS region, four sets of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers were designed specifically for P. pachyrhizi and two sets for P. meibomiae. Classical and real-time fluorescent PCR assays were developed to identify and differentiate between P. pachyrhizi and P. meibomiae. Identification of P. pachyrhizi from infected soybean leaves using the real-time PCR assay will allow for more rapid diagnoses.

  15. Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Soybean Root Hairs Inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Tran H.; Brechenmacher, Laurent; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Clauss, Therese RW; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hixson, Kim K.; Libault, Marc; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Yang, Feng; Yao, Qiuming; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Xu, Dong; Nguyen, Henry T.; Stacey, Gary

    2012-11-11

    Root hairs are single hair-forming cells on roots that function to increase root surface area, enhancing water and nutrient uptake. In leguminous plants, root hairs also play a critical role as the site of infection by symbiotic nitrogen fixing rhizobia, leading to the formation of a novel organ, the nodule. The initial steps in the rhizobia-root hair infection process are known to involve specific receptor kinases and subsequent kinase cascades. Here, we characterize the phosphoproteome of the root hairs and the corresponding stripped roots (i.e., roots from which root hairs were removed) during rhizobial colonization and infection to gain insight into the molecular mechanism of root hair cell biology. We chose soybean (Glycine max L.), one of the most important crop plants in the legume family, for this study because of its larger root size, which permits isolation of sufficient root hair material for phosphoproteomic analysis. Phosphopeptides derived from root hairs and stripped roots, mock inoculated or inoculated with the soybean-specific rhizobium Bradyrhizobium japonicum, were labeled with the isobaric tag 8-plex ITRAQ, enriched using Ni-NTA magnetic beads and subjected to nRPLC-MS/MS analysis using HCD and decision tree guided CID/ETD strategy. A total of 1,625 unique phosphopeptides, spanning 1,659 non-redundant phosphorylation sites, were detected from 1,126 soybean phosphoproteins. Among them, 273 phosphopeptides corresponding to 240 phosphoproteins were found to be significantly regulated (>1.5 fold abundance change) in response to inoculation with B. japonicum. The data reveal unique features of the soybean root hair phosphoproteome, including root hair and stripped root-specific phosphorylation suggesting a complex network of kinase-substrate and phosphatase-substrate interactions in response to rhizobial inoculation.

  16. Induced marker gene mutations in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, S.; Palmer, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    Full text: Non-fluorescent root mutants in soybean are useful as markers in genetic studies. 13 such mutants were detected among more than 150 000 seedlings derived from soybean lines treated with 6 mutagens. One of them, derived from variety 'Williams' treated with 20 kR gamma rays, did not correspond to the already known spontaneous non-fluorescent mutants. It was assigned the identification no. T285 and the gene symbol fr5. The other mutants corresponded with known loci fr1, fr2 or fr4. (author)

  17. Soybean-Enriched Snacks Based on African Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marengo, Mauro; Akoto, Hannah F.; Zanoletti, Miriam; Carpen, Aristodemo; Buratti, Simona; Benedetti, Simona; Barbiroli, Alberto; Johnson, Paa-Nii T.; Sakyi-Dawson, Esther O.; Saalia, Firibu K.; Bonomi, Francesco; Pagani, Maria Ambrogina; Manful, John; Iametti, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Snacks were produced by extruding blends of partially-defatted soybean flour with flours from milled or parboiled African-grown rice. The interplay between composition and processing in producing snacks with a satisfactory sensory profile was addressed by e-sensing, and by molecular and rheological approaches. Soybean proteins play a main role in defining the properties of the protein network in the products. At the same content in soybean flour, use of parboiled rice flour increases the snack’s hardness. Electronic nose and electronic tongue discriminated samples containing a higher amount of soybean flour from those with a lower soybean flour content. PMID:28231133

  18. Soybean-Enriched Snacks Based on African Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Marengo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Snacks were produced by extruding blends of partially-defatted soybean flour with flours from milled or parboiled African-grown rice. The interplay between composition and processing in producing snacks with a satisfactory sensory profile was addressed by e-sensing, and by molecular and rheological approaches. Soybean proteins play a main role in defining the properties of the protein network in the products. At the same content in soybean flour, use of parboiled rice flour increases the snack’s hardness. Electronic nose and electronic tongue discriminated samples containing a higher amount of soybean flour from those with a lower soybean flour content.

  19. Role of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Trichoderma spp. in the control of root rot disease of soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Ehteshamul-Haque

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Seed treatment of soybean with Bndyrhizobium japonicum, Trichoderma harzianum, T. viride, T. hamatum, T. koningii and T. pseudokoningii significantly controlled the infection of 30-day-old seedlingsby Maerophomina phaseolina, Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium spp. In 60-day-old plants Trichoderma spp.. and B. japonicum inhibited the grouth of R. solani and Fusarium spp., whereas the use of B. japonicum (TAL-102 with T. harzianum. T. viride, T. koningii and T. pseudokoningii controlled the infection by M. phaseolina. Greater grain yield was recorded when B. japonium (TAI-102 was used with T. hamatum.

  20. Proteomic Profiling and the Predicted Interactome of Host Proteins in Compatible and Incompatible Interactions Between Soybean and Fusarium virguliforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, M Javed; Majeed, Maryam; Humayun, Maheen; Lightfoot, David A; Afzal, Ahmed J

    2016-12-01

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS) is a complex of two diseases of soybean (Glycine max), caused by the soil borne pathogenic fungus Fusarium virguliforme. The root rot and leaf scorch diseases both result in significant yield losses worldwide. Partial SDS resistance has been demonstrated in multiple soybean cultivars. This study aimed to highlight proteomic changes in soybean roots by identifying proteins which are differentially expressed in near isogenic lines (NILs) contrasting at the Rhg1/Rfs2 locus for partial resistance or susceptibility to SDS. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis resolved approximately 1000 spots on each gel; 12 spots with a significant (P disease resistance, stress tolerance, and metabolism. This is the first report which identifies proteins whose abundances are altered in response to fungal infection leading to SDS. The results provide valuable information about SDS resistance in soybean plants, and plant partial resistance responses in general. More importantly, several of the identified proteins could be good candidates for the development of SDS-resistant soybean plants.

  1. [Construction and primary analysis of subtractive library induced by soybean mosaic virus (SMV)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Yan; Wang, Wei-Quan; Chen, Qing-Shan; Yang, Cui-Ping; Li, Wen-Bin; Xin, Da-Wei; Jin, Zhen-Guo; Song, Ying-Bo

    2005-03-01

    SMV is one of main diseases of soybean, which could affect yields and quality of soybean seriously. It was effective to soybean breeding by studying the expression of resistant gene to SMV with molecular technology. In this study, a soybean resistance line, DongNong 8143, was used to construct a subtractive cDNA library by SSH from soybean leaves inoculated by SMV No.1 at primary stage. cDNA dominantly or specifically expressed in infected leaves was purified using PCR Purification Kit and cloned into pGEM-T easy vector. Colonies were grown on LB-agar plates containing ampicillin, X-gal and IPTG. A subtractive plasmid library was constructed by SSH. Then the library was transformed to host bacteria E. coli DH5alpha, and the titer of the library was measured as 2 x 10(3) . 64 clones were picked up randomly and sequenced. Of them there is 50 clones which result of sequenced were good. The length of EST fragment varied from 136bp to 691bp, and the average length is 456bp. Among them, 41 sequences has poly(A). Through ESTs were compared with sequences in unigene database of GeneBank with BLASTn and BLASTx algorithm, 38 ESTs of them had comparatively clear results and the percent of them in acquired ESTs is 74%. The EST expression profile showed that the resistance-related genes include cell protection, signal transduction, restrict pathogen growth, system acquired resistance, and house-keeping gene. There are 12 ESTs, which have not comparatively clear results, that maybe new genes.

  2. Multiplex single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay for detection of soybean mosaic virus resistance genes in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ainong; Chen, Pengyin; Vierling, Richard; Zheng, Cuming; Li, Dexiao; Dong, Dekun; Shakiba, Ehsan; Cervantez, Innan

    2011-02-01

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is one of the most destructive viral diseases in soybean (Glycine max). Three independent loci for SMV resistance have been identified in soybean germplasm. The use of genetic resistance is the most effective method of controlling this disease. Marker assisted selection (MAS) has become very important and useful in the effort of selecting genes for SMV resistance. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), because of its abundance and high-throughput potential, is a powerful tool in genome mapping, association studies, diversity analysis, and tagging of important genes in plant genomics. In this study, a 10 SNPs plus one insert/deletion (InDel) multiplex assay was developed for SMV resistance: two SNPs were developed from the candidate gene 3gG2 at Rsv1 locus, two SNPs selected from the clone N11PF linked to Rsv1, one 'BARC' SNP screened from soybean chromosome 13 [linkage group (LG) F] near Rsv1, two 'BARC' SNPs from probe A519 linked to Rsv3, one 'BARC' SNP from chromosome 14 (LG B2) near Rsv3, and two 'BARC' SNPs from chromosome 2 (LG D1b) near Rsv4, plus one InDel marker from expressed sequence tag (EST) AW307114 linked to Rsv4. This 11 SNP/InDel multiplex assay showed polymorphism among 47 diverse soybean germplasm, indicating this assay can be used to investigate the mode of inheritance in a SMV resistant soybean line carrying Rsv1, Rsv3, and/or Rsv4 through a segregating population with phenotypic data, and to select a specific gene or pyramid two or three genes for SMV resistance through MAS in soybean breeding program. The presence of two SMV resistance genes (Rsv1 and Rsv3) in J05 soybean was confirmed by the SNP assay.

  3. Natural resistance of soybean cultivars to the soybean looper larva Chrysodeixis includens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Wille, Paulo Eduardo; Pereira, Bruna Angelina; Wille, Cleiton Luiz; Restelatto, Samanta Souza; Boff, Mari Inês Carissimi; Franco, Cláudio Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: The objective of this work was to evaluate the natural resistance of soybean cultivars to Chrysodeixis includens. For this, four commercial soybean cultivars recommended for the Southern region of Brazil were used: BR 36, NA 5909 RG, BMX Turbo RR, and Benso 1RR. In the laboratory, larvae were subjected to the antixenosis feeding assay, in which they were free or not to choose among old leaves, new leaves, and pods. Neonate larvae were subjected to two antibiosis tests: in the first ...

  4. Effects of rotation of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] crops on soil fertility in Elizabeth, Mississippi, USA

    OpenAIRE

    H.A., Reddy, K. and Pettigrew, W.T.

    2018-01-01

    The effects of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.): soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] rotation on the soil fertility levels are limited. An irrigated soybean: cotton rotation experiment was conducted from 2012 through 2015 near Elizabeth, Mississippi, USA. The crop rotation sequences were included continuous cotton (CCCC), continuous soybean (SSSS), cotton-soybean-cotton-soybean (CSCS), cotton-soybean-soybean-cotton (CSSC), soybean-cotton-cotton-soybean (SCCS), soybean-cotton-soybean-cotton (SCSC)....

  5. Temperature-Dependent Expression of NodC and Community Structure of Soybean-Nodulating Bradyrhizobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiro, Sokichi; Kuranaga, Chika; Yamamoto, Akihiro; Sameshima-Saito, Reiko; Saeki, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    In order to assess the physiological responses of bradyrhizobia and competition for the nodulation of soybean at different temperatures, we investigated the expression of the nodC gene at 20, 25, and 30°C and the abilities of bacteria to nodulate soybean in microcosms at day/night cultivation temperatures of 23/18°C, 28/23°C, and 33/28°C for 16/8 h. We tested five Bradyrhizobium USDA strains: B. diazoefficiens USDA 110(T) and 122, B. japonicum USDA 123, and B. elkanii USDA 31 and 76(T). The expression of nodC was up-regulated by increasing culture temperatures in USDA 110(T), 122, 31, and 76(T), but was down-regulated in USDA 123. The proportions of USDA 110(T) and 122 within the community were the greatest at 28/23°C. The population of USDA 31 increased, whereas that of USDA 123 decreased with increasing cultivation temperatures. On the other hand, infection by USDA 76(T) was not detected, and low numbers of USDA 76(T) nodules confirmed its poor nodulation ability. These results indicate that the competitiveness of and infection by USDA 110(T), 122, 123, and 31 for soybean nodulation depend on cultivation temperatures, and suggest that the temperature dependence of nodC expression affects the bradyrhizobial community structure.

  6. Multivariate analysis of combining ability for soybean resistance to Cercospora sojina Hara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo de Amaral Gravina

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Seven soybean cultivars (Bossier, Cristalina, Davis, Kent, Lincoln, Paraná and Uberaba, with different levels of resistance to Cercospora sojina, race 04, were crossed according to a diallel design, with no reciprocals, to determine the general and the specific combining abilities for the resistance. The evaluations of the reaction to the disease were performed 20 days after the inoculation of the fungus on the most infected leaflet of the plant, in the parents and in the F1 hybrids. To quantify the resistance, the following characteristics were evaluated: infection degree (ID; number of lesions per leaflet (NLL; lesion mean diameter (LMD; lesioned leaf area (LLA; percentage of lesioned leaf area (PLLA; number of lesions per square centimeter (NLC and disease index (DI. The relative importance of each characteristic was evaluated by the canonical variables analysis and the LLA and NLL characteristics were eliminated from the multivariate function. With the remaining five characteristics, a multivariate index was created using the first canonical vector, which was submitted to the diallel analysis, according to Griffings fixed model, method 2. The most important characters to discriminate resistant from susceptible soybean plants to C. sojina were: ID, LMD, NLC, DI and PLLA. Cristalina, Davis and Uberaba cultivars are the best ones among those tested that can be recommended as parents in soybean breeding programs seeking resistance to Cercospora sojina. The additive, dominant and epistatic genetic effects were important for the expression of the resistance, although the additive genetic effect was the most important component.

  7. Genetic architecture of wild soybean (Glycine soja) response to soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hengyou; Song, Qijian; Griffin, Joshua D; Song, Bao-Hua

    2017-12-01

    The soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is one of the most destructive pathogens of soybean plants worldwide. Host-plant resistance is an environmentally friendly method to mitigate SCN damage. To date, the resistant soybean cultivars harbor limited genetic variation, and some are losing resistance. Thus, a better understanding of the genetic mechanisms of the SCN resistance, as well as developing diverse resistant soybean cultivars, is urgently needed. In this study, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted using 1032 wild soybean (Glycine soja) accessions with over 42,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to understand the genetic architecture of G. soja resistance to SCN race 1. Ten SNPs were significantly associated with the response to race 1. Three SNPs on chromosome 18 were localized within the previously identified quantitative trait loci (QTLs), and two of which were localized within a strong linkage disequilibrium block encompassing a nucleotide-binding (NB)-ARC disease resistance gene (Glyma.18G102600). Genes encoding methyltransferases, the calcium-dependent signaling protein, the leucine-rich repeat kinase family protein, and the NB-ARC disease resistance protein, were identified as promising candidate genes. The identified SNPs and candidate genes can not only shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying SCN resistance, but also can facilitate soybean improvement employing wild genetic resources.

  8. Compositional differences in soybeans on the market: glyphosate accumulates in Roundup Ready GM soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøhn, T; Cuhra, M; Traavik, T; Sanden, M; Fagan, J; Primicerio, R

    2014-06-15

    This article describes the nutrient and elemental composition, including residues of herbicides and pesticides, of 31 soybean batches from Iowa, USA. The soy samples were grouped into three different categories: (i) genetically modified, glyphosate-tolerant soy (GM-soy); (ii) unmodified soy cultivated using a conventional "chemical" cultivation regime; and (iii) unmodified soy cultivated using an organic cultivation regime. Organic soybeans showed the healthiest nutritional profile with more sugars, such as glucose, fructose, sucrose and maltose, significantly more total protein, zinc and less fibre than both conventional and GM-soy. Organic soybeans also contained less total saturated fat and total omega-6 fatty acids than both conventional and GM-soy. GM-soy contained high residues of glyphosate and AMPA (mean 3.3 and 5.7 mg/kg, respectively). Conventional and organic soybean batches contained none of these agrochemicals. Using 35 different nutritional and elemental variables to characterise each soy sample, we were able to discriminate GM, conventional and organic soybeans without exception, demonstrating "substantial non-equivalence" in compositional characteristics for 'ready-to-market' soybeans. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. [Endophytic bacterial diversity of wild soybean (Glycine soja) varieties with different resistance to soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yunpeng; Shi, Fengyu; Hamid, M Imran; Zhu, Yingbo

    2014-08-04

    The aim of this study was to investigate endophytic bacterial diversity of wild soybean varieties with different resistance to soybean cyst nematode(Heterodera glycines) , for deciphering the interactions of soybean cyst nematode with endophytic bacteria. After screening wild soybean varieties against race 3 of H. glycines, we investigated endophytic bacterial diversity in root tissues of wild soybean varieties with different resistance to H. glycines using 16S rDNA cloning library and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis. Endophytic bacteria of wild soybean root belonged to 6 bacterial groups, the clones belonging to group Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were the endophyte dominants in wild soybean with 46.8% and 13.6% of total clones, respectively. Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria, Deincoccus-Thermus and Archaea were less represented. 18.8% of clone sequences were similar to those of uncultured bacteria in the environment. The bacterial diversity was higher in H. glycines-Resistant than -Susceptible wild soybean varieties, and the dominant group was different between H. glycines-Resistant and -Susceptible wild soybean varieties. Mesorhizobium tamadayense, Enterobacter ludwigii and Bacillus megaterium were the main bacterial groups in special operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of H. glycines-Resistant wild soybean variety. By 16S rDNA cloning library and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis, the diversity of dominant group of endophytic bacteria in root tissues has difference among H. glycines-Resistant and -Susceptible wild soybean varieties.

  10. Teaching Green Chemistry with Epoxidized Soybean Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcena, Homar; Tuachi, Abraham; Zhang, Yuanzhuo

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) provides students a vantage point on the application of green chemistry principles in a series of experiments. Qualitative tests review the reactions of alkenes, whereas spectroscopic analyses provide insight in monitoring functional group transformations.

  11. Globalizing land use transitions: the soybean acceleration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reenberg, Anette; Fenger, Nina Astrid

    2011-01-01

    into a leading player on the global scale. It takes point of departure in a land change science approach and employs the notions of underlying and proximate drivers and teleconnections to characterize the process of land use change in relation to the accelerating use of land for soybean cultivation....

  12. Effects of Soybean Cultivars on Soymilk Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziadekey, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Soymilk was prepared from twelve soybean cultivars grown under the same environmental conditions to evaluate their effects on soymilk characteristics. Significant correlations were observed between the Chemical composition of the seeds and the resultant soymilk. Soymilk solids were significantly affected by seed size and seed phosphorus contents. Cultivars with dark hilum produced soymilk with less attractive colour.

  13. ANALYSIS OF RESOURCE USE EFFICIENCY AMONG SOYBEAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-02-25

    Feb 25, 2015 ... ABSTRACT. The study examined the efficiency of resource use in soybean production in Gboko Local Government Area of Benue. State, Nigeria. ... KEYWORDS: Analysis, Resource use efficiency, Farmers, production function analysis, Benue, Nigeria. ... to paint removers and plastics (Liu 2008). Recently,.

  14. EVALUATION OF CASSAVA/SOYBEAN INTERCROPPING SYSTEM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of three cassava genotypes (NR 8212, TMS 91934 and TMS 30572) grown sole or intercropped with soybean were investigated in two field experiments in 2000/2001 and 2001/2002 cropping seasons at Umudike in the lowland humid forest zone of south-eastern Nigeria. The plant height, canopy diameter, ...

  15. soybean cultivars estimated by phenotypic characteristics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-06-25

    Jun 25, 2014 ... Bárbaro Junior and Antonio Orlando Di Mauro. Department of Plant Production, FCAV/UNESP-Jaboticabal- São Paulo State, Brazil. Received 27 January, 2014; Accepted 16 June, 2014. The aim of this study was to estimate the genetic diversity in 74 RR soybean cultivars from different. Brazilian breeding ...

  16. Sudden death syndrome of soybean in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS) is one of the most common and widely spread root disease affecting soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] in Argentina where it is an economically important crop. This disease was first discovered in this country in 1992 in the Pampas Region, and the following year in Northwest...

  17. Protein syntehsis during soybean seed maturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, L.A.; Rinne, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    The authors previous work has demonstrated that physiological and biochemical changes specifically associated with soybean seed maturation can be separated from events associated with seed development. The objective of this study was to determine if soybean seed metabolism is altered during maturation drying at the level of protein synthesis. Seed harvested 35 days after flowering (0% seedling growth) were induced to mature (100% seedling growth) through controlled dehydration. Proteins labeled with [ 35 S]-methionine were extracted and analyzed by 1-D PAGE coupled with autoradiography and densitometry. Results show a 31 kD and 128 kD polypeptide synthesized de novo during dehydration and precocious maturation. The same two polypeptides are synthesized during natural dehydration and maturation (>60 days after flowering). Furthermore, these polypeptides persist during rehydration and germination of both precociously and naturally matured seed, but specifically disappear during early seedling growth. The authors are currently investigating the role of protein synthesis during soybean seed maturation and if it is required for establishment of a soybean seedling

  18. Genetically modified soybean plants and their ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Mirjana B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Transgenic plants are developed by introgressing new genes using methods of molecular genetics and genetic engineering. The presence of these genes in plant genome is identified on the basis of specific oligonucleotides primers, and the use of PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction and DNA fragments multiplication. Genetically modified plants such as soybean constitute a newly created bioenergetic potential whose gene expression can cause disturbance of the biological balance ecosystem, soil structure and soil microbiological activity. Genetically modified plants may acquire monogenic or polygenic traits causing genetic and physiological changes in these plants, which may elicit a certain reaction of the environment including changes of microbiological composition of soil rhizosphere. The aim of introgressing genes for certain traits into a cultivated plant is to enhance its yield and intensify food production. There are more and more genetically modified plant species such as soybean, corn, potato, rice and others and there is a pressure to use them as human food and animal feed. Genetically modified soybean plants with introgressed gene for resistance to total herbicides, such as Round-up, are more productive than non-modified herbicide-sensitive soybeans.

  19. Screening soybean genotypes for promiscuous symbiotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted at Makerere University Agricultural Research Institute, Kabanyolo (MUARIK) with the aim of screening of soybean germplasm for promiscuous symbiotic association with Bradyrhizobium sp. in order to identify genotypes with potential to be used as parents to initiate a breeding ...

  20. Soybean peptide: optimal preparatory conditions, chemical and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The peptide fractionation, molecular weight determination of the resolved bands, coupled with amino acid profiles, all supported the similarity of peptide H8 to MSBP. The sample H8 was prepared from protein isolate from dehulled, defatted soybean (DHSB) at the temperature setting of 42.5 o C and pH of 2.0 (pepsin), 7.5 ...

  1. Curative and eradicant action of fungicides to control Phakopsora pachyrhizi in soybean plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlei Melo Reis

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Experiments were carried out in a growth chamber and laboratory to quantify the curative and eradicant actions of fungicides in Asian soybean rust control. The experiments were conducted with the CD 214 RR cultivar, assessing the following fungicides, separately or in association, chlorothalonil, flutriafol, cyproconazole + trifloxystrobin, epoxiconazole + pyraclostrobin, cyproconazole + azoxystrobin, and cyproconazole + picoxystrobin. The fungicides were applied at four (curative and nine days after inoculation (eradicant treatment. Treatments were evaluated according to the density of lesions and uredia/cm2, and the eradicant treatment was assessed based on the necrosis of lesions/uredia and on uredospore viability. Except for the fungicide chlorothalonil, there was curative action of latent/virtual infections by the fungicides. Penetrant fungicides that are absorbed have curative and eradicant action to soybean rust.

  2. A new hemoglobin gene from soybean: a role for hemoglobin in all plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, C R; Jensen, E O; LLewellyn, D J

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated a new hemoglobin gene from soybean. It is expressed in cotyledons, stems of seedlings, roots, young leaves, and in some cells in the nodules that are associated with the nitrogen-fixing Bradyrhizobium symbiont. This contrasts with the expression of the leghemoglobins, which...... are active only in the infected cells of the nodules. The deduced protein sequence of the new gene shows only 58% similarity to one of the soybean leghemoglobins, but 85-87% similarity to hemoglobins from the nonlegumes Parasponia, Casuarina, and barley. The pattern of expression and the gene sequence...... indicate that this new gene is a nonsymbiotic legume hemoglobin. The finding of this gene in legumes and similar genes in other species strengthens our previous suggestion that genomes of all plants contain hemoglobin genes. The specialized leghemoglobin gene family may have arisen from a preexisting...

  3. Heat treated soybeans in the nutrition of high producing dairy cows

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-05-09

    May 9, 2011 ... soybeans in the rumen is higher when compared to heat treated soybeans and raw soybeans as well. In same work, some very unfavorable effects of extruded soy- beans on fiber digestibility were observed which were more severe when compared to heat treated soybeans and raw soybeans. Eifert et al.

  4. The U.S. Soybean Industry. Agricultural Economic Report Number 588.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, James; And Others

    This report describes the U.S. soybean industry from producers to consumers and provides a single source of economic and statistical information on soybeans. Highlights are as follows: U.S. soybean production has increased sevenfold since 1950, making soybeans the second highest valued crop after corn. Soybean production has risen in response to…

  5. The effect of co-cultivation and selection parameters on Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Chinese soybean varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng-Jun; Wei, Zhi-Ming; Huang, Jian-Qiu

    2008-03-01

    In the present study, an efficient Agrobacterium-mediated gene transformation system was developed for soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] based on the examinations of several factors affecting plant transformation efficiency. Increased transformation efficiencies were obtained when the soybean cotyledonary node were inoculated with the Agrobacterium inoculum added with 0.02% (v/v) surfactant (Silwet L-77). The applications of Silwet L-77 (0.02%) during infection and L-cysteine (600 mg l(-1)) during co-cultivation resulted in more significantly improved transformation efficiency than each of the two factors alone. The optimized temperature for infected explant co-cultivation was 22 degrees C. Regenerated transgenic shoots were selected and produced more efficiently with the modified selection scheme (initiation on shoot induction medium without hygromycin for 7 days, with 3 mg l(-1) hygromycin for 10 days, 5 mg l(-1) hygromycin for another 10 days, and elongation on shoot elongation medium with 8 mg l(-1) hygromycin). Using the optimized system, we obtained 145 morphologically normal and fertile independent transgenic plants in five important Chinese soybean varieties. The transformation efficacies ranged from 3.8 to 11.7%. Stable integration, expression and inheritance of the transgenes were confirmed by molecular and genetic analysis. T(1) plants were analyzed and transmission of transgenes to the T(1 )generation in a Mendelian fashion was verified. This optimized transformation system should be employed for efficient Agrobacterium-mediated soybean gene transformation.

  6. Evaluation of North American isolates of Soybean mosaic virus for gain of virulence on Rsv-genotype soybeans with special emphasis on resistance-breaking determinants on Rsv4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatabi, B; Fajolu, O L; Wen, R-H; Hajimorad, M R

    2012-12-01

    Resistance to Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) in soybean is conferred by three dominant genes: Rsv1, Rsv3 and Rsv4. Over the years, scientists in the USA have utilized a set of standard pathotypes, SMV-G1 to SMV-G7, to study interaction with Rsv-genotype soybeans. However, these pathotypes were isolated from a collection of imported soybean germplasm over 30 years ago. In this study, 35 SMV field isolates collected in recent years from 11 states were evaluated for gain of virulence on soybean genotypes containing individual Rsv genes. All isolates were avirulent on L78-379 (Rsv1), whereas 19 were virulent on L29 (Rsv3). On PI88788 (Rsv4), 14 of 15 isolates tested were virulent; however, only one was capable of systemically infecting all of the inoculated V94-5152 (Rsv4). Nevertheless, virulent variants from 11 other field isolates were rapidly selected on initial inoculation onto V94-5152 (Rsv4). The P3 cistrons of the original isolates and their variants on Rsv4-genotype soybeans were sequenced. Analysis showed that virulence on PI88788 (Rsv4) was not associated, in general, with selection of any new amino acid, whereas Q1033K and G1054R substitutions were consistently selected on V94-5152 (Rsv4). The role of Q1033K and G1054R substitutions, individually or in combination, in virulence on V94-5152 (Rsv4) was confirmed on reconstruction in the P3 cistron of avirulent SMV-N, followed by biolistic inoculation. Collectively, our data demonstrate that SMV has evolved virulence towards Rsv3 and Rsv4, but not Rsv1, in the USA. Furthermore, they confirm that SMV virulence determinants on V94-5152 (Rsv4) reside on P3. © 2012 THE AUTHORS. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY © 2012 BSPP AND BLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD.

  7. Heating affects the content and distribution profile of isoflavones in steamed black soybeans and black soybean koji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ru-Yue; Chou, Cheng-Chun

    2008-09-24

    Steamed black soybeans and black soybean koji, a potentially functional food additive, were subjected to heating at 40-100 degrees C for 30 min. It was found that steamed black soybeans and black soybean koji after heating at 80 degrees C or higher generally showed reduced contents of malonylglucoside, acetylglucoside, and aglycone isoflavone and an increased content of beta-glucoside. A lower reduction in malonylglucoside and acetylglucoside isoflavone but greater reduction in aglycone content was noted in steamed black soybeans compared to black soybean koji after a similar heat treatment. After 30 min of heating at 100 degrees C, steamed black soybean retained ca. 90.3 and 83.8%, respectively, of its original malonylglucoside and acetylglucoside isoflavone, compared to lower residuals of 80.9 and 78.8%, respectively, for black soybean koji. In contrast, the heated black soybeans showed an aglycone residual of 68.0%, which is less than the 80.0% noted with the heated black soybean koji.

  8. Genetically modified and wild soybeans: an immunologic comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yum, Hye-Yung; Lee, Soo-Young; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Sohn, Myung-Hyun; Kim, Kyu-Earn

    2005-01-01

    Most traits introduced into genetically engineered crops result from the expression of new proteins. As the first step toward assessing the allergenic potential of genetically modified organism (GMO) food, immunologic and physicochemical characterizations are needed. We prepared crude extract from GMO soybeans, wild soybeans, curd, and soy milk and then performed sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). After acidification with HCl, the samples were separated to globulin and whey. To evaluate changes in protein composition, either the samples were heated or pepsin was added. Polymerase chain reaction with primer encoding the 35S-promotor and the 3-enol-pyruvyl-shikimat-5-phosphat-synthase gene were performed, respectively, to detect the GMO component. SDS-PAGE results showed definite protein bands at 80 kDa in GMO soybean, 50 kDa in wild soybean, and a similar distribution of protein bands was noticed below 40 kDa. It was difficult to observe protein distribution because of modifications that occurred during processing in soybean-processed products. After heating, proteins of GMO and wild soybeans showed similar distributions and no distinct bands were detected at 50 and 80 kDa. Although SDS-PAGE analyses of raw GMO and wild soybeans differed, the same protein bands of 68, 37, and 20 kDa were observed in the globulin fraction after acidification. After adding pepsin, 20- and 68-kDa bands were found preserved in GMO and wild soybeans. The polymerase chain reaction procedures with primers specific to GMO soybeans showed that GMO soybeans and some curd samples included a GMO component. The skin test results of 49 patients showed 13 positive results to wild soybeans and 8 positive results to GMO soybeans. One patient had a positive skin test result to GMO soybeans only. Sera from nine patients with positive skin tests to the crude extract and a positive capsulated allergen product test to the soybean antigen were used for the immunoblotting

  9. Degradation and removal of soybean allergen in Japanese soy sauce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magishi, Norihiro; Yuikawa, Naoya; Kobayashi, Makio; Taniuchi, Shoichiro

    2017-08-01

    Soy sauce is a traditional fermented seasoning of Japan and is available throughout the world. The two main raw ingredients of soy sauce are soybean and wheat, both of which are established food allergens. The present study examined the degradation and removal of soybean allergens in soy sauce by immunoblotting with anti‑soybean protein antibody from rabbit and sera from two children with soybean allergy. It was demonstrated that soybean allergens were gradually degraded during the fermentation process, but were not completely degraded in raw soy sauce. During the processes of heat‑treatment and filtration, the soluble soybean allergens in raw soy sauce were denatured to insoluble allergens by heat‑treatment and subsequently completely removed from soy sauce by filtration. Therefore, to reduce the allergenicity of soy sauce, heat‑treatment and filtration are very important processes in addition to the enzymatic degradation during the fermentation of soy sauce.

  10. Soybean Aphid Infestation Induces Changes in Fatty Acid Metabolism in Soybean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Kanobe

    Full Text Available The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura is one of the most important insect pests of soybeans in the North-central region of the US. It has been hypothesized that aphids avoid effective defenses by inhibition of jasmonate-regulated plant responses. Given the role fatty acids play in jasmonate-induced plant defenses, we analyzed the fatty acid profile of soybean leaves and seeds from aphid-infested plants. Aphid infestation reduced levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in leaves with a concomitant increase in palmitic acid. In seeds, a reduction in polyunsaturated fatty acids was associated with an increase in stearic acid and oleic acid. Soybean plants challenged with the brown stem rot fungus or with soybean cyst nematodes did not present changes in fatty acid levels in leaves or seeds, indicating that the changes induced by aphids are not a general response to pests. One of the polyunsaturated fatty acids, linolenic acid, is the precursor of jasmonate; thus, these changes in fatty acid metabolism may be examples of "metabolic hijacking" by the aphid to avoid the induction of effective defenses. Based on the changes in fatty acid levels observed in seeds and leaves, we hypothesize that aphids potentially induce interference in the fatty acid desaturation pathway, likely reducing FAD2 and FAD6 activity that leads to a reduction in polyunsaturated fatty acids. Our data support the idea that aphids block jasmonate-dependent defenses by reduction of the hormone precursor.

  11. Overexpression of Soybean Isoflavone Reductase (GmIFR) Enhances Resistance to Phytophthora sojae in Soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qun; Li, Ninghui; Dong, Lidong; Zhang, Dayong; Fan, Sujie; Jiang, Liangyu; Wang, Xin; Xu, Pengfei; Zhang, Shuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavone reductase (IFR) is an enzyme involved in the biosynthetic pathway of isoflavonoid phytoalexin in plants. IFRs are unique to the plant kingdom and are considered to have crucial roles in plant response to various biotic and abiotic environmental stresses. Here, we report the characterization of a novel member of the soybean isoflavone reductase gene family GmIFR. Overexpression of GmIFR transgenic soybean exhibited enhanced resistance to Phytophthora sojae. Following stress treatments, GmIFR was significantly induced by P. sojae, ethephon (ET), abscisic acid (placeCityABA), salicylic acid (SA). It is located in the cytoplasm when transiently expressed in soybean protoplasts. The daidzein levels reduced greatly for the seeds of transgenic plants, while the relative content of glyceollins in transgenic plants was significantly higher than that of non-transgenic plants. Furthermore, we found that the relative expression levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of transgenic soybean plants were significantly lower than those of non-transgenic plants after incubation with P. sojae, suggesting an important role of GmIFR might function as an antioxidant to reduce ROS in soybean. The enzyme activity assay suggested that GmIFR has isoflavone reductase activity.

  12. Quality characteristics of soybean pasted (Doenjang) manufactured with 2 soybean mutant lines derived from cv. baekwon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Jun; Kang, Si Yong; Choi, Hong Il; Kim, Jin Baek [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    In order to identification of the possibility of manufacturing soybean paste (doenjang) with soybean mutant lines induced from gamma-ray mutagenesis, this study was performed to investigate the quality characteristics of doenjang using two soybean mutant lines, Baekwon-1 (BW-1) and Baekwon-2 (BW-2) and their original cultivar (cv. Baekwon, BW) for 8 weeks. The BW and two mutant lines (BW-1 and BW-2) were showed higher content of amino type nitrogen than control (cv. Taegwang). The pH decreased and the titratable acidity increased all the samples during aging period. The lightness, redness and yellowness of doenjang were the lowest in BW. Total free sugar content of doenjang was the highest in control (10.43%) after 4 weeks and composed mainly fructose and glucose. The order of the free amino acid content was Glutamic acid>Leucine>Lysine>Phenylalanine>Aspartic acid in control, Glutamic acid>Leucine >Arginine>Lysine>Phenylalanine in BW, Glutamic acid>Lysine>Phenylalanine>Aspartic acid>Valine in BW-1 and Glutamic acid>Arginine>Lysine>Phenylalanine>Aspartic acid in BW-2, respectively. Our results showed that it is possible to increase the quality of doenjang using soybean mutant lines in manufacturing soybean paste.

  13. Systemic properties of myclobutanil in soybean plants, affecting control of Asian soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmitt, Gregory M; DeBoer, Gerrit; Ouimette, David; Iamauti, Marilene

    2008-12-01

    The demethylation inhibitor (DMI) fungicide myclobutanil can be an effective component of spray programmes designed to control the highly destructive plant pathogen Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd. & P. Syd., causal agent of Asian soybean rust. Myclobutanil is known from previous studies in grapevines to be xylem mobile. This study investigates the mobility profile of myclobutanil in soybean as an important component of its effective field performance. Over a 12 day period under greenhouse conditions, a constant uptake of myclobutanil from leaflet surfaces into the leaflet tissue was observed. Once in the leaflet, myclobutanil was seen to redistribute throughout the tissue, although no movement out of leaflets occurred owing to a lack of phloem mobility. The ability of myclobutanil to redistribute over distance within the soybean plant was revealed when visualizing movement of the compound to foliage above the point of application on the plant stem. An efficacy bioassay demonstrated that the systemic properties of myclobutanil allow control of disease at a point remote from the initial site of compound application. It is suggested that the high degree of xylem systemicity displayed by myclobutanil in soybean foliage is a contributory factor towards its commercial effectiveness for control of Asian soybean rust.

  14. Overexpression of four Arabidopsis thaliana NHLgenes in soybean (Glycine max) roots and their effect over resistance to the soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the US, the soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is the most destructive pathogen of soybean. Currently grown soybean varieties are not resistant to all field populations of SCN. We genetically engineered soybean roots so they expressed genes from the model plant, Arabidopsis. When the Arabidopsis genes, ...

  15. Application of Electronic Tongue in Identification of Soybeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorut, Camila; Silva, Josemeyre B.; Wiziack, Nadja K. L.; Paterno, Leonardo G.; Panizzi, Mercedes C. C.; Fonseca, Fernando J.

    2009-05-01

    Soybean is a product of great importance in the global economy and recognized by its great nourishing value with high protein content. In this work, a conducting polymer-based electronic tongue (ET) is employed to identify and discriminate five different soybeans cultivars with genetically distinct characteristics. Combination of electrical measurements and data analysis (PCA and PLS), permitted the ET system to discriminate the five different types of soybeans in accordance with a previous analysis performed by a human sensory panel.

  16. Protective effect of divalent cations against aluminum toxicity in soybean

    OpenAIRE

    Silva,Ivo Ribeiro da; Corrêa,Tarcísio Fernando Côrtes; Novais,Roberto Ferreira; Gebrim,Fabrício de Oliveira; Nunes,Flancer Novais; Silva,Eulene Francisco da; Smyth,Thomas Jot

    2008-01-01

    A large proportion of soybean fields in Brazil are currently cultivated in the Cerrado region, where the area planted with this crop is growing considerably every year. Soybean cultivation in acid soils is also increasing worldwide. Since the levels of toxic aluminum (Al) in these acid soils is usually high it is important to understand how cations can reduce Al rhizotoxicity in soybean. In the present study we evaluated the ameliorative effect of nine divalent cations (Ca, Mg, Mn, Sr, Sn, Cu...

  17. Intercropping soybean and maize in a derived savanna ecology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Compared to sole soybean, intercropping soybean and maize on flat and ridge reduced yields by 1.0 –29.1% and 29.4 - 40.2% respectively. In maize, intercropping on flat and ridge reduced yields by 13.2 - 25.2% and 24.8 - 43.5% respectively. Planting sole soybean on ridge enhanced mean yield by 18.6% as compared to ...

  18. Chances and limitations of European soybean production : market potential analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Berschneider, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Overseas imports of soybeans from Brazil, the US and Argentina to Europe are increasing every year. Simultaneously, GMO farming in these countries is being expanded ever further. European farming of protein crops especially soybeans is being pushed by organizations and protein initiatives for economical and ecological reasons. In 2015 soybean acreages expanded drastically due to the additional Greening political measures which came into force. Therefore it is worth asking about the potential ...

  19. Bioactive Proteins and Peptides from Soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyei, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Dietary proteins from soybeans have been shown to offer health benefits in vivo and/or in vitro either as intact proteins or in partially digested forms also called bioactive peptides. Upon oral administration and absorption, soy-derived bioactive peptides may induce several physiological responses such as antioxidative, antimicrobial, antihypertensive, anticancer and immunomodulatory effects. There has therefore been a mounting research interest in the therapeutic potential of soy protein hydrolysates and their subsequent incorporation in functional foods and 'Food for Specified Health Uses' (FOSHU) related products where their biological activities may assist in the promotion of good health or in the control and prevention of diseases. This mini review discusses relevant patents and gives an overview on bioactive proteins and peptides obtainable from soybeans. Processes for the production and formulation of these peptides are given, together with specific examples of their therapeutic potential and possible areas of application.

  20. Biochemical changes during aging of soybean seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balešević-Tubić Svetlana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical changes that occur in the seed as a result of ageing are very significant for seed quality and longevity. Because of its characteristic composition, processes occurring in the seed of oil crops during storage will be typical as well. Six soybean varieties developed in Institute of field and vegetable crops Novi Sad, submitted to accelerated and natural aging, under controlled and conventional storage conditions were used in these trials. The content of malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activities were studied. The biochemical processes i.e. lipid peroxidation, as well as the decrease in supeoxide dismutase and peroxidase activities (especially pronounced by applied accelerated aging were caused by both type of aging. The degree of seed damage and the ability of seed to resist the negative consequences of aging were influenced, beside duration of aging period, by type of storage and characteristics of soybean varieties. .

  1. Vigor of sunflower and soybean aging seed

    OpenAIRE

    Tatić M.; Balešević-Tubić S.; Ðorđević V.; Miklič V.; Vujaković M.; Ðukić V.

    2012-01-01

    Seed aging and deterioration affect seed vigor and viability. The characteristics of the chemical composition of oil crops seed are related to specific processes occurring in the seed during storage. This study was performed to examine the changes in seed vigor of different sunflower and soybean genotypes under controlled and conventional (uncontrolled) conditions of natural aging for six and twelve months. Obtained results show that the degree of seed dama...

  2. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SOYBEAN (A RESEARCH REPORT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NIJOTECH

    ABSTRACT. Physical properties of linear dimensions, sphericity and solid density of four different varieties of dry mature soybean were determined in this study. For the varieties - TGX1768-6F,. TGX-1681-3F, TGX-536-02D, and TGX-1740-3F, the mean sphericity are 0.745, 0.857, 0.830, and 0.829 respectively. It is shown ...

  3. Roasted soybeans (glycine max. (l) merril) for lactating dairy cows

    OpenAIRE

    Nelcy Madruga de Carvalho

    2001-01-01

    Soybeans were roasted in an experimental roaster during 2 or 3 minutes either at 380 or 490 ºC air temperature and kept or not for 30 minutes under steeping. The heat treatment effects on soybeans were evaluated in a first trial through two different procedures: a) after 16 hours of an “in situ” ruminal incubation period, all heat treated soybeans showed an increased (P0,05). In a second trial, soybeans roasted at 380 ºC, during 2 minutes and kept under steeping were included in isonitrogenou...

  4. Soybean DNA extraction from blended refined vegetable oils

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, J.; Fernandes, T.J.R.; Mafra, I.; Amaral, J.S.; Oliveira, M.B.P.P.

    2010-01-01

    The major genetically modified (GM) crop species is soybean (Glycine max), accounting for 53% of the total world’s GM planted area and 70% of the soybean annual production in 2008 [1]. Since the approval of Roundup Ready® (RR) soybean in EU, the production of soybean oil using GM seeds has been increasing. In EU, the doubts raised by the use of genetically modified organisms (GMO) lead to the mandatory labelling for food products containing more than 0.9% of authorised GMO. In blended edible ...

  5. Natural variability in abundance of prevalent soybean proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Savithiry S

    2010-12-01

    Soybean is an inexpensive source of protein for humans and animals. Genetic modifications (GMO) to soybean have become inevitable on two fronts, both quality and yield will need to improve to meet increasing global demand. To ensure the safety of the crop for consumers it is important to determine the natural variation in seed protein constituents as well as any unintended changes that may occur in the GMO as a result of genetic modification. Understanding the natural variation of seed proteins in wild and cultivated soybeans that have been used in conventional soybean breeding programs is critical for determining unintended protein expression in GMO soybeans. In recent years, proteomic technologies have been used as an effective analytical tool for examining modifications of protein profiles. We have standardized and applied these technologies to determine and quantify the spectrum of proteins present in soybean seed. We used two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for the separation, quantification, and identification of different classes of soybean seed proteins. We have observed significant variations in different classes of proteins, including storage, allergen and anti-nutritional protein profiles, between non-GMO cultivated and wild soybean varieties. This information is useful for scientists and regulatory agencies to determine whether the unintended expression of proteins found in transgenic soybean is within the range of natural variation. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Potential Market for Non-GMO Corn and Soybeans

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce A. Babcock; John C. Beghin

    1999-01-01

    Demand for non-GMO (genetically modified organism) corn and soybeans is high in the EU and Japan, which are two of the largest markets for U.S. corn and soybeans. This presents a potential problem for markets if U.S. processors find themselves scrambling to locate and purchase non-GMO crops. By looking at how the 1998 U.S. corn and soybean crops were used, Babcock and Beghin project possible demand in the 99/00 marketing year for non-GMO corn and soybeans.

  7. The comparative advantage of South Africa soybean production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahta Yonas T.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of trade policy on the South African soybean industry is analyzed by using 4 digits Standard International Trade Classification of soybean (1201 data of 1996–2011. The Revealed comparative advantage (RCA, Hirschman index, Major export category, Effective rate of protection (ERP and Nominal rate of protection (NRP were calculated. The RCA of the soybean industry in South Africa has shown a revealed comparative disadvantage from 1996–2011. Hirschman index indicates that the soybean industry shows lower concentration throughout 16 years. Lower concentration reduces the impact of international trade risk due to the possibility of price fluctuation of the soybean product. MEC measurement also indicates that South Africa does not rely its international trade from the soybean industry. ERP and NRP were also calculated, using an enterprise budget for soybean production. The result shows that the ERP is negative, which indicates that the weighted input tariffs on soybean inputs amount are more than the output tariffs; that is an indication producers of soybean would be better off, everything else being equal, by not being protected through tariffs. The NRP is higher than the ERP which implies that the tariff applied on the output is higher than the tariff applied on inputs. The structure of the tariff schedule may have an important bearing on efficiency. Thus, the study recommended that an extremely dispersed and ill-chosen tariff structure implies that protection remains uneven and gains from openness may still be confined.

  8. Rat and poultry feeding studies with soybean meal produced from imidazolinone-tolerant (CV127) soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoyun; de Brum, Paulo A R; Chukwudebe, Amechi; Privalle, Laura; Reed, Andrew; Wang, Yanqing; Zhou, Cui; Wang, Cuiyan; Lu, Jing; Huang, Kunlun; Contri, Daniela; Nakatani, Andreia; de Avila, Valdir S; Klein, Claudete H; de Lima, Gustavo J M M; Lipscomb, Elizabeth A

    2016-02-01

    The safety and nutritional properties of CV127 soybeans were evaluated in rat and broiler feeding studies. Some episodic differences were observed between rats fed CV127, Conquista, and the standard diet for the endpoints examined. None of these differences were considered treatment related, adverse, or biologically meaningful. In general, birds fed diets containing CV127, Conquista, or Monsoy 8001 showed no significant differences in growth and performance response variables. Chickens fed diets containing Coodetec 217 had lower body weight and weight gain for all developmental periods compared to CV127, but no significant differences were found in feed conversion for the two diets during any development period. The results of both feeding studies demonstrate that CV127 soybeans are as safe, wholesome, and nutritionally valuable as the other soybean meals tested, including those varieties for which histories of safe use have been established and well documented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Environmental accounting of biodiesel from soybeans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanelli, T.L. [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Rural

    2008-07-01

    As nonrenewable energy sources are depleted globally new sources of energy are becoming necessary. One option that has been explored in recent years is biodiesel production using agricultural products such as soybeans. The emergy accounting method gives value to environmental flows of energy and it quantifies the total amount of energy that has gone in to a product. Also, it provides an inventory of inputs and outputs that can be used to analyze what, if any, types of changes can be made to specific processes within the production as well as improvements in the efficiency of the system as a whole in order to increase the viability of biodiesel as a fuel source. This evaluation uses the concept of emergy to quantify the costs and returns of biodiesel production. This study showed that, currently in the typical production system in the US, biodiesel is not competitive to fossil fuel sources regarding energy providing. But, considering the depletion of the latter source it may become part of source for society. For biodiesel from soybean oil to become more energetically competitive the agricultural production has to be improved since it demands more than 80% of the used resources. Within the soybean production, topsoil loss was responsible for more than 40% which also negatively affects the renewability of this energy source. (author)

  10. Enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated soybean straw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zhong; Wang Qunhui; Jiang Zhaohua; Yang Xuexin; Ji Yongzhen

    2007-01-01

    In order to produce lactic acid, from agricultural residues such as soybean straw, which is a raw material for biodegradable plastic production, it is necessary to decompose the soybean straw into soluble sugars. Enzymatic hydrolysis is one of the methods in common use, while pretreatment is the effective way to increase the hydrolysis rate. The optimal conditions of pretreatment using ammonia and enzymatic hydrolysis of soybean straw were determined. Compared with the untreated straw, cellulose in straw pretreated by ammonia liquor (10%) soaking for 24 h at room temperature increased 70.27%, whereas hemicellulose and lignin in pretreated straw decreased to 41.45% and 30.16%, respectively. The results of infrared spectra (IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis also showed that the structure and the surface of the straw were changed through pretreatment that is in favor of the following enzymatic hydrolysis. maximum enzymatic hydrolysis rate of 51.22% was achieved at a substrate concentration of 5% (w/v) at 50 deg. C and pH 4.8 using cellulase (50 fpu/g of substrate) for 36 h

  11. Review of soybean resistance to pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidić Miloš

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an overview of the research on soybean resistance to pathogens. The review included most harmful agents of soybean diseases in Serbia, as well as those that are potentially harmful. Development and cultivation of resistant cultivars is the most efficient, economical and environmentally acceptable control measure for plant disease. It points to the variability in pathogenicity (physiological races of parasites, especially expressed in Phytophthora sojae, Peronospora manshurica and Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea, which requires continuous breeding for resistance. Resistant, partially resistant and moderately susceptible genotypes, which are used as donors of resistance genes to different pathogens, are listed in this paper. Also, avirulent genes in the parasite and resistance genes in soybean are indicated. Gene mapping significantly contributes to better understanding of the mode of inheritance and consequently, more efficient breeding for disease resistance. Significant improvement is expected by using molecular techniques, especially in dealing with Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea and Phomopsis longicolla. For these parasites only partial resistance has been reported but not complete resistance.

  12. Use of remote sensing, geographic information systems, and spatial statistics to assess spatio-temporal population dynamics of Heterodera glycines and soybean yield quantity and quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Antonio Jose De Araujo

    Soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., is an important source of oil and protein worldwide, and soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines, is among the most important yield-limiting factors in soybean production worldwide. Early detection of SCN is difficult because soybean plants infected by SCN often do not exhibit visible symptoms. It was hypothesized, however, that reflectance data obtained by remote sensing from soybean canopies may be used to detect plant stress caused by SCN infection. Moreover, reflectance measurements may be related to soybean growth and yield. Two field experiments were conducted from 2000 to 2002 to study the relationships among reflectance data, quantity and quality of soybean yield, and SCN population densities. The best relationships between reflectance and the quantity of soybean grain yield occurred when reflectance data were obtained late August to early September. Similarly, reflectance was best related to seed oil and seed protein content and seed size when measured during late August/early September. Grain quality-reflectance relationships varied spatially and temporally. Reflectance measured early or late in the season had the best relationships with SCN population densities measured at planting. Soil properties likely affected reflectance measurements obtained at the beginning of the season and somehow may have been related to SCN population densities at planting. Reflectance data obtained at the end of the growing season likely was affected by early senescence of SCN-infected soybeans. Spatio-temporal aspects of SCN population densities in both experiments were assessed using spatial statistics and regression analyses. In the 2000 and 2001 growing seasons, spring-to-fall changes in SCN population densities were best related to SCN population densities at planting for both experiments. However, within-season changes in SCN population densities were best related to SCN population densities at harvest for both experiments in

  13. Economic Injury Levels for Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae) on the Soybean Aphid Tolerant KS4202 Soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi-Werle, Lia; Baldin, Edson L L; Fischer, Hillary D; Heng-Moss, Tiffany M; Hunt, Thomas E

    2017-10-01

    The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is an invasive species from Asia that has been the major economic insect pest of soybeans, Glycine max (L.) Merrill, since 2000. While use of soybeans expressing antibiosis and antixenosis is a well-studied strategy to manage this pest, aphid-tolerant soybeans remain underexplored. This study examined the relationship between cumulative aphid-days (CAD) and yield loss in the tolerant soybean KS4202 during two growing seasons to determine the economic injury levels (EILs) for soybean aphids on KS4202. Soybean aphid infestations were initiated during the soybean reproductive stages. A range of CAD treatments (3,000-45,000 CADs) were applied during the growing seasons. Aphid populations reached 45,000 CAD in 2011 and 38,000 CAD in 2013 in plots that were not treated with insecticides. It was estimated that the population doubling time was 9.4 d. In infested plots, soybean yield was reduced by 1.4-13.3%, equivalent to a 3.1% yield loss for every 10,000 CAD. Overall, most CAD treatments did not affect yield parameters, although CAD > 39,000 caused a significant reduction in most yield parameters. The EILs calculated for KS4202 ranged from 526 to 2,050 aphids/plant, which were approximately 2.5-fold higher when compared to EILs previously calculated for susceptible soybean. The adoption of soybean aphid tolerant soybean with higher EILs may help mitigate treatment delay problems by lengthening the treatment lead-time and possibly reduce the number of insecticide applications. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Detection of Soybean mosaic virus by Reverse Transcription Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeong-Hoon Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Soybean mosaic virus (SMV is a prevalent pathogen that causes significant yield reduction in soybean production worldwide. SMV belongs to potyvirus and causes typical symptoms such as mild mosaic, mosaic and necrosis. SMV is seed-borne and also transmitted by aphid. Eleven SMV strains, G1 to G7, G5H, G6H, G7H, and G7a were reported in soybean varieties in Korea. A reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP method allowed one-step detection of gene amplification by simple procedure and needed only a simple incubator for isothermal template. This RT-LAMP method allowed direct detection of RNA from virus-infected plants without thermal cycling and gel electrophoresis. In this study, we designed RT-LAMP primers named SML-F3/B3/FIP/BIP from coat protein gene sequence of SMV. After the reaction of RT-LAMP, products were identified by electrophoresis and with the detective fluorescent dye, SYBR Green I under daylight and UV light. Optimal reaction condition was at 58°C for 60 min and the primers of RT-LAMP showed the specificity for nine SMV strains tested in this study.

  15. Major soybean maturity gene haplotypes revealed by SNPViz analysis of 72 sequenced soybean genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany Langewisch

    Full Text Available In this Genomics Era, vast amounts of next-generation sequencing data have become publicly available for multiple genomes across hundreds of species. Analyses of these large-scale datasets can become cumbersome, especially when comparing nucleotide polymorphisms across many samples within a dataset and among different datasets or organisms. To facilitate the exploration of allelic variation and diversity, we have developed and deployed an in-house computer software to categorize and visualize these haplotypes. The SNPViz software enables users to analyze region-specific haplotypes from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP datasets for different sequenced genomes. The examination of allelic variation and diversity of important soybean [Glycine max (L. Merr.] flowering time and maturity genes may provide additional insight into flowering time regulation and enhance researchers' ability to target soybean breeding for particular environments. For this study, we utilized two available soybean genomic datasets for a total of 72 soybean genotypes encompassing cultivars, landraces, and the wild species Glycine soja. The major soybean maturity genes E1, E2, E3, and E4 along with the Dt1 gene for plant growth architecture were analyzed in an effort to determine the number of major haplotypes for each gene, to evaluate the consistency of the haplotypes with characterized variant alleles, and to identify evidence of artificial selection. The results indicated classification of a small number of predominant haplogroups for each gene and important insights into possible allelic diversity for each gene within the context of known causative mutations. The software has both a stand-alone and web-based version and can be used to analyze other genes, examine additional soybean datasets, and view similar genome sequence and SNP datasets from other species.

  16. Major soybean maturity gene haplotypes revealed by SNPViz analysis of 72 sequenced soybean genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langewisch, Tiffany; Zhang, Hongxin; Vincent, Ryan; Joshi, Trupti; Xu, Dong; Bilyeu, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    In this Genomics Era, vast amounts of next-generation sequencing data have become publicly available for multiple genomes across hundreds of species. Analyses of these large-scale datasets can become cumbersome, especially when comparing nucleotide polymorphisms across many samples within a dataset and among different datasets or organisms. To facilitate the exploration of allelic variation and diversity, we have developed and deployed an in-house computer software to categorize and visualize these haplotypes. The SNPViz software enables users to analyze region-specific haplotypes from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) datasets for different sequenced genomes. The examination of allelic variation and diversity of important soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] flowering time and maturity genes may provide additional insight into flowering time regulation and enhance researchers' ability to target soybean breeding for particular environments. For this study, we utilized two available soybean genomic datasets for a total of 72 soybean genotypes encompassing cultivars, landraces, and the wild species Glycine soja. The major soybean maturity genes E1, E2, E3, and E4 along with the Dt1 gene for plant growth architecture were analyzed in an effort to determine the number of major haplotypes for each gene, to evaluate the consistency of the haplotypes with characterized variant alleles, and to identify evidence of artificial selection. The results indicated classification of a small number of predominant haplogroups for each gene and important insights into possible allelic diversity for each gene within the context of known causative mutations. The software has both a stand-alone and web-based version and can be used to analyze other genes, examine additional soybean datasets, and view similar genome sequence and SNP datasets from other species.

  17. Chemical interesterification of soybean oil and fully hydrogenated soybean oil: Influence of the reaction time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Ana Paula Badan; Masuchi, Monise Helen; Grimaldi, Renato; Goncalves, Lireny Aparecida Guaraldo

    2009-01-01

    Chemical interesterification is an important alternative to produce zero trans fats. In practice, however, excessive reaction times are used to ensure complete randomization. This work evaluated the influence of the reaction time on the interesterification of soybean oil/fully hydrogenated soybean oil blend, carried out in the following conditions: 100 deg C, 500 rpm stirring speed, 0.4% (w/w) sodium methoxide catalyst. The triacylglycerol composition, solid fat content and melting point analysis showed that the reaction was very fast, reaching the equilibrium within 5 min. This result suggests the interesterification can be performed in substantially lower times, with reduction in process costs. (author)

  18. Early-season soybean as a trap crop for stink bugs (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) in Arkansas' changing system of soybean production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J F; Luttrell, R G; Greene, J K; Tingle, C

    2009-04-01

    Early-season soybean, Glycine max L. Merrill, was evaluated in Arkansas soybean fields as a trap crop for a complex of stink bug species that included Nezara viridula L., Acrosternum hilare (Say), and Euschistus servus (Say). Early-season soybean production systems (ESPSs) are composed of indeterminate soybean cultivars planted in April. In the first year of a 2-yr study, field-scale trap crops ( approximately 0.5-1.0 ha) of maturity group (MG) III and IV soybean were planted adjacent to production fields of MG V soybean. Stink bugs were attracted first to the ESPS trap crops and were twice treated with insecticide, yet damaging populations developed later in the MG V soybean adjacent to the trap crops. General sampling and observations of low stink bug densities in commercial fields of soybean and corn across the study area suggested that stink bugs were widely distributed across the agricultural landscape. These observations and the subsequent discovery of additional ESPS fields outside the study area suggested that developing populations in the adjacent MG V soybean probably did not originate from the trap crops. However the source of the populations colonizing MG V soybean could not be determined, and we concluded that the scale of future experiments should be increased to better control stink bugs dispersing from other ESPSs outside the study area. In the second year of the study, the experiment was expanded in size to a farm- or community-scale project where entire fields of ESPSs (8-32 ha) were used as trap crops. Insecticide was applied to the trap-crop fields and other fields of ESPSs within a 0.8-km radius of targeted response fields, yet again there was no apparent effect on subsequent populations of stink bugs in the MG V response fields. With the recent expansion of ESPSs in Arkansas, it may be difficult to use ESPSs as a trap crop to lower stink bug populations across large enough areas to suppress populations in late-season soybean. Also, multiple

  19. Fluorescence imaging of soybean flavonol isolines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Edward H.; Mulchi, Charles L.; McMurtrey, James E., III; Chappelle, Emmett W.; Rowland, Randy A.

    1998-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to characterize the fluorescence emission of leaves from four soybean ('Harosoy') plants containing different concentrations of flavonols (kaempferol glycosides). The investigation utilized genetically mutated soybean flavonol isolines grown in a constant environment, thus limiting factors known to affect fluorescence emission characteristics other than different kaempferol glycosides concentrations. Flavonol isolines included OX922, OX941, OX942, OX944. The first two isolines contain kaempferol (K) glycosides; K3, K6, and K9, and the latter two did not have K3, K6, and K9. A fluorescence imaging system (FIS) was used to characterize steady state florescence images of the sample leaves measured at wavelengths centered at 450, 550, 680, and 740 nm with an excitation at 360 nm. Images taken with FIS greatly complement non-imaging fluorescence measurements by characterizing the spatial variation of fluorescence within leaves. We also acquired fluorescence emission spectra to characterize spectral features of the soybean flavonol isolines. The emission spectral shape of the fluorescence emission characteristics were not significantly different between the soybeans that contain kaempferol glycosides and the ones that do not contain kaempferol glycosides. Typical emission maxima of green vegetation in the blue, green, red, and far-red bands were noticed in all four soybean isolines. However, plants containing kaempferol glycosides, OX922 and OX941 had significantly lower intensities throughout the wavelength regions. These results imply that fluorescence emission intensities in the fluorescence emission bands studied are significantly affected by the presence and absence of kaempferol glycosides concentrations (UV radiation screening compounds). Pure kaempferol glycoside dissolved in solution show minimal fluorescence emission when excited with the absorption maximum radiation at 365 nm. However, a broad band emission can be seen in the green

  20. Hybridization between GM soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) and wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. et Zucc.) under field conditions in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuguti, Aki; Ohigashi, Kentaro; Yoshimura, Yasuyuki; Kaga, Akito; Kuroda, Yosuke; Matsuo, Kazuhito

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of information about natural hybridization between GM soybean (Glycine max) and wild soybean (Glycine soja) is required for risk assessment evaluation and to establish biosafety regulations in Japan. This is particularly important in areas where wild relatives of cultivated soybean are grown (i.e. East Asia including Japan). To collect information on temporal and spatial factors affecting variation in hybridization between wild and GM soybean, a two year hybridization experiment was established that included one wild soybean and five GM soybean cultivars with different maturity dates. Hybridization frequencies ranged from 0 to 0.097%. The maximum hybridization frequency (0.097%) was obtained from wild soybean crossed with GM soybean cv. AG6702RR, which were adjacently cultivated with wild soybean, with 25 hybrids out of 25 741 seedlings tested. Cultivar AG6702RR had the most synchronous flowering period with wild soybean. Ten hybrids out of 25 741 were produced by crossing with cv. AG5905RR, which had the second most synchronous flowering period with wild soybean. Most hybrids were found where GM and wild soybeans were adjacently cultivated, whereas only one hybrid was detected from wild soybean plants at 2 m, 4 m and 6 m from a pollen source (GM soybean). Differences in flowering phenology, isolation distance and presence of buffer plants accounted for half of the variation in hybridization frequency in this study. Temporal and spatial isolation will be effective strategies to minimize hybridization between GM and wild soybean. © ISBR, EDP Sciences.

  1. The pgip family in soybean and three other legume species: evidence for a birth-and-death model of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalunke, Raviraj M; Cenci, Alberto; Volpi, Chiara; O'Sullivan, Donal M; Sella, Luca; Favaron, Francesco; Cervone, Felice; De Lorenzo, Giulia; D'Ovidio, Renato

    2014-07-18

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are leucine-rich repeat (LRR) plant cell wall glycoproteins involved in plant immunity. They are typically encoded by gene families with a small number of gene copies whose evolutionary origin has been poorly investigated. Here we report the complete characterization of the full complement of the pgip family in soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) and the characterization of the genomic region surrounding the pgip family in four legume species. BAC clone and genome sequence analyses showed that the soybean genome contains two pgip loci. Each locus is composed of three clustered genes that are induced following infection with the fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary, and remnant sequences of pgip genes. The analyzed homeologous soybean genomic regions (about 126 Kb) that include the pgip loci are strongly conserved and this conservation extends also to the genomes of the legume species Phaseolus vulgaris L., Medicago truncatula Gaertn. and Cicer arietinum L., each containing a single pgip locus. Maximum likelihood-based gene trees suggest that the genes within the pgip clusters have independently undergone tandem duplication in each species. The paleopolyploid soybean genome contains two pgip loci comprised in large and highly conserved duplicated regions, which are also conserved in bean, M. truncatula and C. arietinum. The genomic features of these legume pgip families suggest that the forces driving the evolution of pgip genes follow the birth-and-death model, similar to that proposed for the evolution of resistance (R) genes of NBS-LRR-type.

  2. Two RxLR avirulence genes in Phytophthora sojae determine soybean Rps1k-mediated disease resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tianqiao; Kale, Shiv D; Arredondo, Felipe D; Shen, Danyu; Su, Liming; Liu, Li; Wu, Yuren; Wang, Yuanchao; Dou, Daolong; Tyler, Brett M

    2013-07-01

    Resistance to Phytophthora sojae (Rps) genes have been widely used in soybean against root and stem rot diseases caused by this oomycete. Among 15 known soybean Rps genes, Rps1k has been the most widely used in the past four decades. Here, we show that the products of two distinct but closely linked RxLR effector genes are detected by Rps1k-containing plants, resulting in disease resistance. One of the genes is Avr1b-1, that confers avirulence in the presence of Rps1b. Three lines of evidence, including overexpression and gene silencing of Avr1b-1 in stable P. sojae transformants, as well as transient expression of this gene in soybean, indicated that Avr1b could trigger an Rps1k-mediated defense response. Some isolates of P. sojae that do not express Avr1b are nevertheless unable to infect Rps1k plants. In those isolates, we identified a second RxLR effector gene (designated Avr1k), located 5 kb away from Avr1b-1. Silencing or overexpression of Avr1k in P. sojae stable transformants resulted in the loss or gain, respectively, of the avirulence phenotype in the presence of Rps1k. Only isolates of P. sojae with mutant alleles of both Avr1b-1 and Avr1k could evade perception by the soybean plants carrying Rps1k.

  3. Genetic variability in soybean ( Glycine max L.) for low soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of the genetic variability of soybean genotypes under low soil phosphorus (P) conditions provides an understanding of the genetic potential of the genotypes to improve the crop for low P tolerance. The study was designed objectively to estimate the extent of genetic variability of soybean genotypes for low P ...

  4. Soybeans yoghurt production using starter culture from 'nono ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yoghurt was prepared from soy-milk equivalent. Soybeans used for milk production were selected, dehulled, blended then mixed with water in ratio l :6 respectively and filtered with a muslim cloth to obtain milk. On kilogram (lkg) of soybeans used produced soy-milk equivalent of six litres (6L) in moderate dilution.

  5. MoleCillat'lmprovement of Food Functional Properties of Soybean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was made to elucidate the three dimensional structure of soybean glydnin which is one of the dominant storage proteins of soybean seeds. Previously, the twodisulphide bonds Cys12-Cys45 and Cys88-Cys298 in the proglydnin AlaBlb subunit were deleted andCys residues were replaced by Gly and Ser by ...

  6. Evaluation of four improved soybean varieties under different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-10-04

    Oct 4, 2007 ... The number of weeds per 1 m x 1 m guardant significantly varied among intercropping ... ability of soybean varieties in weed management under ..... Ababa, Ethiopia. pp. 124-131. Singh JN, Negi PS, Tripathi SK (1973). Study on the intercropping of soybean with maize and jower. India J. Agron. 18: 75-78.

  7. Changes in micronutrients, dry weight and plant growth of soybean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-06-03

    Jun 3, 2008 ... Salinity stress negatively affected soybean cultivars and the ... Key words: Soybean, Glycine max (L), salt stress, dry weight, micronutrient accumulation. ..... Iron, copper, zinc and manganese contents wheat and rice varieties under salt stress. Turk. J. Agric. Forest, 22: 227-233. Ashraf M, McNeilly T (1990).

  8. Determination of processed soybean meal degradability by Pinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination of processed soybean meal degradability by Pinus eldarica methanol extract. ... Protected soybean meal is an important part of high producing dairy cow diet and many methods are used for its safe and economic processing. Pinus eldarica contains xylose and resins and results show that these components ...

  9. Ruminal dry matter degradability of treated soybean meal as source ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Samples for treating soybean meal for 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24 and 48 h in the rumen of three Taleshi male cows were incubated. Soybean meal samples treated with black liquor and microwave radiation decreased water soluble protein fraction (a) and increased slowly protein degradation fraction (b); and treatment with 6% black ...

  10. Evaluation of microbial content of some soybean milk products ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluating the microbiological content of soybean milk, highly consumed by the public is the aim of this research work. Ten samples of soybean milk, locally prepared by different manufacturers were used for the study. The microbial load and identity of the microorganisms present were determined using standard ...

  11. A Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization System for Karyotyping Soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of a universal soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) cytogenetic map that associates classical genetic linkage groups, molecular linkage groups and a sequence-based physical map with the karyotype has been impeded due to the soybean chromosomes themselves, which are tiny and morphological...

  12. Genotype X environment interactions and stability of soybean for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soybean Glycine max (L.) Merrill] is the world's leading source of oil and protein. It has the highest protein content of all food crops and is second only to groundnut in terms of oil content among food legumes. Study on genotype x enviroment interaction (GE) and stability of twenty soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] genotypes ...

  13. Determination of degradability of treated soybean meal and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-01-05

    Jan 5, 2009 ... proteins sub-units fractions by a SDS-PAGE discontinues system. In the experiments, three ruminally ... Key words: Soybean meal, degradability, xylose, moisture heat, SDS-PAGE. INTRODUCTION. Soybean is a .... tent of their residues after rumen incubation by using the proce- dures of AOAC (1984).

  14. Pest Control in Corn and Soybeans: Weeds - Insects - Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doersch, R. E.; And Others

    This document gives the characteristics and application rates for herbicides used to control annual weeds in corn, annual and perennial broadleaf weeds in corn, quackgrass and yellow nutsedge in corn, and annual weeds in soybeans. It also gives insecticide use information for corn and soybeans. A brief discussion of disease control in corn and…

  15. Resistance to charcoal rot identified in ancestral soybean germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot, caused by the fungal pathogen Macrophomina phaseolina, is an economically important disease on soybean and other crops including maize, sorghum, and sunflowers. Without effective cultural or chemical options to control charcoal rot in soybean, finding sources of genetic resistance is o...

  16. Crop yields of sorhgum and soybeans in an intercrop. | Akunda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The yields of the three seasons of sorghum and soybeans are reported. In the first season, the sole crop yields of soybeans increased with increase in plant populations, contrary to the intercrops. Intercropping had significant influence of yields (p = 0.05). During this period, sorghum in sole stand increased with the increase ...

  17. Economics of Soybean Production Technology in the Guinea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the economics of soybean production technology in the Guinea Savanna of Nigeria within the framework of small scale farming households using rain-fed soybean production technology, The study measured the rate of compliance with the recommended package, profitability of, as well as the technical ...

  18. Effect of alkaline treated soybean meal on the performance, protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of alkaline treated soybean seeds on the performance, protein and energy efficiency of starter broilers. Soybean seeds were divided into 4 batches. The first batch was autoclaved at 100°C and the other batches soaked in aqueous solution of 3% concentration of sodium ...

  19. The nucleotide sequences of two leghemoglobin genes from soybean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiborg, O; Hyldig-Nielsen, J J; Jensen, E O

    1982-01-01

    We present the complete nucleotide sequences of two leghemoglobin genes isolated from soybean DNA. Both genes contain three intervening sequences in identical positions. Comparison of the coding sequences with known amino-acid sequences of soybean leghemoglobins suggest that the two genes...

  20. Management Practices of Soybean Producers in Marion County, Tennessee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, William A.; And Others

    The purposes of the study were to: (1) determine some major characteristics of Marion County soybean producers and their farms; (2) more accurately determine which recommended production practices soybean producers were using in 1968 and 1969; (3) study the relation between use of recommended production practices and yield levels; and (4) identify…

  1. A short communication: Response of Soybean to concomitant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low soil fertility especially N and P limits soybean production among the resource poor farmers in Kenya. A combination of effective rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi (AMF) inoculants can be used to alleviate these deficiencies. In this study, the response of soybean variety, Gazelle to 2 AMF species (Acaulospora ...

  2. Fingerprinting soybean germplasm and its utility in genomic research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The annual accessions in the United States Department of Agriculture, Soybean Germplasm Collection including 18,480 domesticated and 1,168 wild soybeans introduced from 84 countries or developed in the U.S. were genotyped with the SoySNP50K BeadChip containing >50K single nucleotide polymorphism (SN...

  3. Framing the issues of resistance management in soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    The soybean insect-pest complex consists of both long-established and new invasive pests. Management of these pests has been achieved by various means, but often relies heavily on the application of insecticides and the development of insect-resistant soybean varieties. Pest management practitione...

  4. Evidence of Gender Role in Soybean Production: Case Study from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evidence of Gender Role in Soybean Production: Case Study from Agrarian Communities in Benue state, Nigeria. ... Findings revealed that 67.5% of the respondents were between 30 and 49 years old and 70% had family size of between 5 and 7 members. Majority had formal education, but was relatively new in soybean ...

  5. In situ rumen degradability characteristics of rice straw, soybean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    김성진

    2012-10-05

    Oct 5, 2012 ... performance liquid chromatography; CP, crude protein; NDF, neutral detergent fibre; CF, crude fibre; EE, ether extract; AD, acid detergent; NPN, non-protein nitrogen. product feeds. Soybean curd residue (SCR) is a by- product which is produced in the process of making tofu or soymilk from soybeans.

  6. Rheological properties of soybean protein isolate gels containing emulsion droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, K.H.; Renkema, J.M.S.; Vliet, van T.

    2001-01-01

    Rheological properties of soybean protein gels containing various volume fractions oil droplets have been studied at small and large deformations. Dynamic viscoelastic properties of soybean protein isolate gels were determined as a function of the volume fraction of oil droplets stabilised by the

  7. Soybean response to nitrogen fertilizer under water deficit conditions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to determine the effect of water deficit and nitrogen fertilizer application on growth indices, yield and yield component of three soybean (Glycine Max L. Merr) genotypes a split plot factorial experiment based on randomized complete block with three replications was carried out. Soybean genotypes (Williams, K1410 ...

  8. The research on super absorption resin made from irradiation soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Lixin; Xu Dechun; Meng Lifen; Zhao Xiao'nan; Hu Shaoxin; Chen Changdong

    2012-01-01

    The research is based on the products made from the fermentation of soybean. Using γ-ray to irradiate the products made from the fermentation of soybean to make super absorption resin, and the result is that the products irradiated by 20 kGy can absorb nearly 2000 times of its volume. (authors)

  9. Intercropping soybean and maize in a derived savanna ecology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-08-20

    Aug 20, 2007 ... Since the land use efficiency resulting from intercrop- ping soybean and maize was advantageous, this cropp- ing system should be encouraged in peasant farming. Intercropping both crops is a means of increasing nutrient availability in family diets. Soybean contains lysine which is the amino acid limiting ...

  10. [Mapping and cloning of low phosphorus tolerance genes in soybeans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Zhang; Haina, Song; Hao, Cheng; Deyue, Yu

    2015-04-01

    Soybean is a major source of edible oil and phytoprotein. Low phosphorus available in soil is an important factor limiting the current soybean production. Effective ways to solve the problem include identification of germplasms and genes tolerant to low-phosphorus stress, and cultivation of soybean varieties with high phosphorus efficiency. Recently many researches have been carrying out investigations to map and clone genes related to phosphorus efficiency in soybeans. However, due to the complexity of the soybean genome and little knowledge of functional genes, it has been difficult to understand the mechanism of soybean tolerance to low phosphorus. Although quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping related to low phosphorus tolerance has made some progress, it remains elusive to obtain accurate candidate genes for molecular breeding applications, due to the limited accuracy of QTL. Even for the cloned soybean low phosphorus tolerance genes, the molecular mechanisms are largely unknown, further limiting the application to breeding. In this review, we summarize the progresses on mapping, cloning and functional characterization of soybean low phosphorus tolerance genes.

  11. Dynamics of water droplet impact and spread on soybean leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybeans are often sprayed to prevent significant yield loss from damage by insect pests and plant diseases. Understanding interactions of spray droplet reactions on soybean plant surfaces can lead to development of improved application strategies to enhance efficacy of pesticides. In this research,...

  12. Assessment of endophytic fungi cultural filtrate on soybean seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soybean seeds have high amount of isoflavones but its germination is often confronted with a variety of environmental problems resulting in low germination rate and growth. To overcome this in eco-friendly manner, we investigated the influence of cultural filtrate (CF) of gibberellins-producing endophytic fungi on soybean ...

  13. Floral bud distortion in soybean and incidence in Central India ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Floral bud distortion in soybean and incidence in Central India. V Jadhav Pravin, SS Mane, RS Nandanwar, PB Kale, MS Dudhare, MP Moharil, RG Dani. Abstract. We describe a peculiar and often harmful budding disorder in soybean, leading to huge yield loss in India. To determine the prevalence of floral distortion in ...

  14. Synthesis of lubrication fluids and surfactant precursors from soybean oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starting with soybean oil or soybean oil derived methyl oleate, a variety of compounds have been synthesized. The epoxidation of oleochemicals is a simple way to use the unsaturation naturally available in the vegetable oil and convert it into a variety of other useful chemicals. Epoxidized methyl...

  15. Limited hydrolysis of soybean protein concentrate and isolate with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-20

    Jul 20, 2009 ... increase their applications in foods, which might offer food producers more choice in production. One approach to improve the functional properties of soybean protein products is enzymatic treatment. It could be seen from literatures that limited proteolysis of soybean protein pro- ducts offered a possibility to ...

  16. Zygomycota associated with traditional meju, a fermented soybean starting material for soy sauce and soybean paste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, S.B.; Kim, D.H.; Lee, M.; Baek, S.Y.; Kwon, S.; Houbraken, J.; Samson, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    Various zygomycota species were detected during a study of the mycobiota of meju, a brick of dried fermented soybeans, used in Korean cuisine. Two hundred and sixty-eight strains were isolated from 98 finished meju products collected in various regions of Korea from 2009 to 2011, and 96 strains were

  17. Evaluation of late vegetative and reproductive stage soybeans for resistance to soybean aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, T J; Pierson, L M; Baldin, E L L; Hunt, T E; Heng-Moss, T M; Reese, J C

    2013-04-01

    The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, has become the most significant soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] insect pest in the north central soybean production region of North America. The objectives of this research were to measure selected genotypes for resistance to the soybean aphid in the later vegetative and reproductive stages under field conditions, and confirm the presence of tolerance in KS4202. The results from 2007 to 2011 indicate that KS4202 can support aphid populations with minimal yield loss at levels where significant yield loss would be expected in most other genotypes. The common Nebraska cultivar, 'Asgrow 2703', appears to show signs of tolerance as well. None of the yield parameters were significantly different between the aphid infested and noninfested treatments. Based on our results, genotypes may compensate for aphid feeding in different ways. Asgrow 2703 appears to produce a similar number of seeds as its noninfested counterpart, although the seeds produced are slightly smaller. Field evaluation of tolerance in KS4202 indicated a yield loss of only 13% at 34,585-53,508 cumulative aphid-days, when 24-36% yield loss would have been expected.

  18. Replacement of raw soybean with roasted soybean increased milk production in Holstein cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilson Sebastião Dias Júnior

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of total replacement of raw whole soybean (RAW for roastedwhole soybean (ROS on the production performance of Holstein cows. Two experiments were carried out usinga simple reversal design where RAW has been completely replaced by ROS. In experiment 1, 22 cows (175±60 days in milkwere used, and the dietary inclusion level of RAW or ROS was 3.7% of dry matter (DM. In experiment 2, 16 cows (130±50 days in milkwere used, and thedietary inclusion level of RAW or ROS was 11% of DM. In both experiments, ROS increased milk production by 1.1kgday-1 without changing fat and protein production. Dry matter intake or milk urea nitrogenwere not affected by dietary soy source. In experiment 2, plasma glucose concentration was decreased, and allantoin/creatinine ratio in urine tended to decreasein ROS. Experiment 2 also evaluated the nutrient digestibility and ruminal degradation kinetics of crude protein in two soybean sources. Roasting had no effect on the digestibility of DM, organic matter, and neutral detergent fiber. Roasted whole soybean hadgreater fraction B and lower protein degradation rate than did RAW; this showed that heat treatment was effective in increasing therumen undegradable amino acid flowto the animal, which suggesteda potential mechanism of action for improved performance observed in ROS.

  19. Soybean Proteome Database 2012: Update on the comprehensive data repository for soybean proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime eOhyanagi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Soybean Proteome Database (SPD was created to provide a data repository for functional analyses of soybean responses to flooding stress, thought to be a major constraint for establishment and production of this plant. Since the last publication of the SPD, we thoroughly enhanced the contents of database, particularly protein samples and their annotations from several organelles. The current release contains 23 reference maps of soybean (Glycine max cv. Enrei proteins collected from several organs, tissues and organelles including the maps for plasma membrane, cell wall, chloroplast and mitochondrion, which were electrophoresed on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels. Furthermore, the proteins analyzed with gel-free proteomics technique have been added and available online. In addition to protein fluctuations under flooding, those of salt and drought stress have been included in the current release. An omics table also has been provided to reveal relationships among mRNAs, proteins and metabolites with a unified temporal-profile tag in order to facilitate retrieval of the data based on the temporal profiles. An intuitive user interface based on dynamic HTML enables users to browse the network as well as the profiles of multiple omes in an integrated fashion. The SPD is available at: http://proteome.dc.affrc.go.jp/Soybean/.

  20. Overexpression of a soybean salicylic acid methyltransferase gene confers resistance to soybean cyst nematode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salicylic acid plays a critical role in activating plant defence responses after pathogen attack. Salicylic acid methyltransferase (SAMT) modulates the level of salicylic acid by converting salicylic acid to methyl salicylate. Here, we report that a SAMT gene from soybean (GmSAMT1) plays a role in s...

  1. Identification of a second Asian soybean rust resistance gene in Hyuuga soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Mandy D; Harris, Donna K; Ha, Bo-Keun; Hyten, David L; Cregan, Perry B; Frederick, Reid D; Boerma, H Roger; Pedley, Kerry F

    2011-05-01

    ABSTRACT Asian soybean rust (ASR) is an economically significant disease caused by the fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi. The soybean genes Rpp3 and Rpp?(Hyuuga) confer resistance to specific isolates of the pathogen. Both genes map to chromosome 6 (Gm06) (linkage group [LG] C2). We recently identified 12 additional soybean accessions that harbor ASR resistance mapping to Gm06, within 5 centimorgans of Rpp3 and Rpp?(Hyuuga). To further characterize genotypes with resistance on Gm06, we used a set of eight P. pachyrhizi isolates collected from geographically diverse areas to inoculate plants and evaluate them for differential phenotypic responses. Three isolates elicited different responses from soybean accessions PI 462312 (Ankur) (Rpp3) and PI 506764 (Hyuuga) (Rpp?[Hyuuga]). In all, 11 of the new accessions yielded responses identical to either PI 462312 or Hyuuga and 1 of the new accessions, PI 417089B (Kuro daizu), differed from all others. Additional screening of Hyuuga-derived recombinant inbred lines indicated that Hyuuga carries two resistance genes, one at the Rpp3 locus on Gm06 and a second, unlinked ASR resistance gene mapping to Gm03 (LG-N) near Rpp5. These findings reveal a natural case of gene pyramiding for ASR resistance in Hyuuga and underscore the importance of utilizing multiple isolates of P. pachyrhizi when screening for ASR resistance.

  2. Analysis of Gene expression in soybean (Glycine max roots in response to the root knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita using microarrays and KEGG pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal El-Din Abd El Kader Y

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Root-knot nematodes are sedentary endoparasites that can infect more than 3000 plant species. Root-knot nematodes cause an estimated $100 billion annual loss worldwide. For successful establishment of the root-knot nematode in its host plant, it causes dramatic morphological and physiological changes in plant cells. The expression of some plant genes is altered by the nematode as it establishes its feeding site. Results We examined the expression of soybean (Glycine max genes in galls formed in roots by the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, 12 days and 10 weeks after infection to understand the effects of infection of roots by M. incognita. Gene expression was monitored using the Affymetrix Soybean GeneChip containing 37,500 G. max probe sets. Gene expression patterns were integrated with biochemical pathways from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes using PAICE software. Genes encoding enzymes involved in carbohydrate and cell wall metabolism, cell cycle control and plant defense were altered. Conclusions A number of different soybean genes were identified that were differentially expressed which provided insights into the interaction between M. incognita and soybean and into the formation and maintenance of giant cells. Some of these genes may be candidates for broadening plants resistance to root-knot nematode through over-expression or silencing and require further examination.

  3. Improving protein quality of soybean through induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manjaya, J.G.

    2011-01-01

    Soybean is one of the most economical and nutritious food packed with basic nutrients that combat diseases stemming from mal- and under-nutrition. Despite its rich nutritional profile, use of soybean in food has been limited because soybean proteins are often associated with compounds, which could exert a negative impact on the nutritional quality of the protein. Trypsin inhibitor (TI) is one of the important anti-nutritional factors that exert negative effect by causing growth inhibition. Soybean cultivar VLS-2 was irradiated with 250 Gy gamma rays in a gamma cell (200) with 60 Co source installed at BARC to induce mutations for low trypsin inhibitor content. Three mutants with lower levels of TI content were identified and can be utilized for developing elite varieties of soybean. (author)

  4. Prebiotic Supplementation Has Only Minimal Effects on Growth Efficiency, Intestinal Health and Disease Resistance of Westslope Cutthroat Trout Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi Fed 30% Soybean Meal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy M. Sealey

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Prebiotics have successfully been used to prevent infectious diseases in aquaculture and there is an increasing amount of literature that suggests that these products can also improve alternative protein utilization and digestion. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine whether prebiotic supplementation increased the growth efficiency, intestinal health and disease resistance of cutthroat trout fed a high level of dietary soybean meal. To achieve this objective, juvenile Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi were fed a practical type formulation with 0 or 30% dietary soybean meal with or without the commercial prebiotic (Grobiotic-A prior to experimental exposure to Flavobacterium psychrophilum. Juvenile Westslope cutthroat trout (initial weight 7.8 g/fish ± standard deviation of 0.5 g were stocked at 30 fish/tank in 75 L tanks with six replicate tanks per diet and fed their respective diets for 20 weeks. Final weights of Westslope cutthroat trout were affected by neither dietary soybean meal inclusion level (P=0.9582 nor prebiotic inclusion (P=0.9348 and no interaction was observed (P=0.1242. Feed conversion ratios were similarly not affected by soybean meal level (P=0.4895, prebiotic inclusion (P=0.3258 or their interaction (P=0.1478. Histological examination of the distal intestine of Westslope cutthroat trout demonstrated increases in inflammation due to both increased soybean meal inclusion level (P=0.0038 and prebiotic inclusion (P=0.0327 without significant interaction (P=0.3370. Feeding dietary soybean meal level at 30% increased mortality of F.psychrophilum cohabitation challenged Westslope cutthroat trout (P=0.0345 while prebiotic inclusion tended to decrease mortality (P=0.0671. These results indicate that subclinical alterations in intestinal inflammation levels due to high dietary inclusion levels of soybean meal could predispose Westslope cutthroat trout to F.psychrophilum infection.

  5. Discovery of a seventh Rpp soybean rust resistance locus in soybean accession PI 605823.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Silas P; King, Zachary R; Walker, David R; Harris, Donna K; Pedley, Kerry F; Buck, James W; Boerma, H Roger; Li, Zenglu

    2018-01-01

    A novel Rpp gene from PI 605823 for resistance to Phakopsora pachyrhizi was mapped on chromosome 19. Soybean rust, caused by the obligate biotrophic fungal pathogen Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd. & P. Syd, is a disease threat to soybean production in regions of the world with mild winters. Host plant resistance conditioned by resistance to P. pachyrhizi (Rpp) genes has been found in numerous soybean accessions, and at least 10 Rpp genes or alleles have been mapped to six genetic loci. Identifying additional disease-resistance genes will facilitate development of soybean cultivars with durable resistance. PI 605823, a plant introduction from Vietnam, was previously identified as resistant to US populations of P. pachyrhizi in greenhouse and field trials. In this study, bulked segregant analysis using an F 2 population derived from 'Williams 82' × PI 605823 identified a genomic region associated with resistance to P. pachyrhizi isolate GA12, which had been collected in the US State of Georgia in 2012. To further map the resistance locus, linkage mapping was carried out using single-nucleotide polymorphism markers and phenotypic data from greenhouse assays with an F 2:3 population derived from Williams 82 × PI 605823 and an F 4:5 population derived from '5601T' × PI 605823. A novel resistance gene, Rpp7, was mapped to a 154-kb interval (Gm19: 39,462,291-39,616,643 Glyma.Wm82.a2) on chromosome 19 that is different from the genomic locations of any previously reported Rpp genes. This new gene could be incorporated into elite breeding lines to help provide more durable resistance to soybean rust.

  6. Optimization of Bleaching Parameters for Soybean Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Domijan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The final stage of edible soybean oil manufacture is refining, the most delicate phase of which is bleaching. At this step, undesirable substances are removed, such as pigments, traces of metals, phospholipids and certain degradation products. However, certain valuable compounds such as tocopherols and sterols may also be removed, significant loss of oxidative stability can occur, and fatty acid content may increase. To avoid these negative oil changes, bleaching parameters such as the concentration of bleaching clay, temperature and duration should be optimized. Since bleaching conditions depend on the properties of the bleaching clay as well as on the type of crude oil, bleaching parameters should be optimized with different types of clay for each vegetable oil. Since such optimization has not yet been reported for soybean oil treated with Pure-Flo® Supreme Pro-Active bleaching adsorbent, this study investigates the effect of bleaching parameters on bleaching efficiency, oxidative stability and the content and composition of bioactive compounds (tocopherols and sterols using the above mentioned clay in this type of oil. Results show that the amount of clay had the greatest influence on bleaching efficiency, especially according to the Lovibond scale, on transparency, and on phosphorus content. Temperature and clay amount significantly affected oxidative stability, in particular the formation of secondary oxidation products. Increasing the amount of clay decreased tocopherol content of the bleached oil. Neutralized soybean oil bleached for 20 min at 95 °C with 1 % Pure-Flo® Supreme Pro-Active bleaching clay showed the highest oxidative stability, best bleaching efficiency, and most favourable sterol content, although tocopherol content was reduced.

  7. Culturable endophytic bacterial communities associated with field-grown soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Lopes, K B; Carpentieri-Pipolo, V; Oro, T H; Stefani Pagliosa, E; Degrassi, G

    2016-03-01

    Assess the diversity of the culturable endophytic bacterial population associated with transgenic and nontransgenic soybean grown in field trial sites in Brazil and characterize them phenotypically and genotypically focusing on characteristics related to plant growth promotion. Endophytic bacteria were isolated from roots, stems and leaves of soybean cultivars (nontransgenic (C) and glyphosate-resistant (GR) transgenic soybean), including the isogenic BRS133 and BRS245RR. Significant differences were observed in bacterial densities in relation to genotype and tissue from which the isolates were obtained. The highest number of bacteria was observed in roots and in GR soybean. Based on characteristics related to plant growth promotion, 54 strains were identified by partial 16S rRNA sequence analysis, with most of the isolates belonging to the species Enterobacter ludwigii and Variovorax paradoxus. Among the isolates, 44·4% were able to either produce indoleacetic acid (IAA) or solubilize phosphates, and 9·2% (all from GR soybean) presented both plant growth-promoting activities. The results from this study indicate that the abundance of endophytic bacterial communities of soybean differs between cultivars and in general it was higher in the transgenic cultivars than in nontransgenic cultivars. BRS 245 RR exhibited no significant difference in abundance compared to nontransgenic BRS133. This suggests that the impact of the management used in the GR soybean fields was comparable with the impacts of some enviromental factors. However, the bacterial endophytes associated to GR and nontransgenic soybean were different. The soybean-associated bacteria showing characteristics related to plant growth promotion were identified as belonging to the species Pantoea agglomerans and Variovorax paradoxus. Our study demonstrated differences concerning compostion of culturable endophytic bacterial population in nontransgenic and transgenic soybean. © 2016 The Society for Applied

  8. Molecular characterization of resistance to soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd. & Syd.) in soybean cultivar DT 2000 (PI 635999)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance to soybean rust (SBR), caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd.& Syd., has been identified in many soybean germplasm accessions and is conferred by either dominant or recessive genes that have been mapped to six independent loci (Rpp1 – Rpp6), but No U.S. cultivars are resistant to SBR. The c...

  9. Impact of Rag1 aphid resistant soybeans on Binodoxys communis (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a parasitoid of soybean aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghising, Kiran; Harmon, Jason P; Beauzay, Patrick B; Prischmann-Voldseth, Deirdre A; Helms, Ted C; Ode, Paul J; Knodel, Janet J

    2012-04-01

    Multiple strategies are being developed for pest management of the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura; however, there has been little published research thus far to determine how such strategies may influence each other, thereby complicating their potential effectiveness. A susceptible soybean (Glycine max L.) variety without the Rag1 gene and a near isogenic resistant soybean variety with the Rag1 gene were evaluated in the laboratory for their effects on the fitness of the soybean aphid parasitoid, Binodoxys communis (Gahan). The presence or absence of the Rag1 gene was verified by quantifying soybean aphid growth. To test for fitness effects, parasitoids were allowed to attack soybean aphids on either a susceptible or resistant plant for 24 h and then aphids were kept on the same plant throughout parasitoid development. Parasitoid fitness was measured by mummy and adult parasitoid production, adult parasitoid emergence, development time, and adult size. Parasitoids that attacked soybean aphids on susceptible plants produced more mummies, more adult parasitoids, and had a higher emergence rate compared with those on resistant plants. Adult parasitoids that emerged from resistant plants took 1 d longer and were smaller compared with those from susceptible plants. This study suggests that biological control by B. communis may be compromised when host plant resistance is widely used for pest management of soybean aphids.

  10. The effect of soybean meal replacement with raw full-fat soybean in diets for broiler chickens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rada, V.; Lichovníková, M.; Šafařík, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (2016), s. 112-117 ISSN 0971-2119 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Raw full-fat soybean * soybean meal * broiler * growth * digestibility Subject RIV: GH - Livestock Nutrition Impact factor: 0.426, year: 2016

  11. Inhibition of soybean urease by triketone oximes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarun, E I; Rubinov, D B; Metelitza, D I

    2004-12-01

    Competitive inhibition of soybean urease by 15 triketone oximes has been studied at 36 degrees C in aqueous solution (pH 4.95). The studied oximes are supposed chelators for the nickel atom in the urease metallocenter. The inhibition constants of urea hydrolysis (K(i)) varied in the range 2.7-248 microM depending on the oxime structure. Analysis of this dependency demonstrates that the optimal inhibitor is the one containing carbonyl group in position 1 of the cycle, the ethoxyimino group and alkyl residue in the substituent in position 2, as well as the methoxycarbonyl group in position 4 of the cycle.

  12. Korean traditional fermented soybean products: Jang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghwa Shin

    2015-03-01

    Fermented products are going beyond the boundaries of their use as mere side dishes, and are seeing significant increases in their use as a functional food. Kanjang (fermented soy sauce, Doenjang (fermented soybean paste, and Gochujang (fermented red pepper paste are the most well-known fermented products in Korea. These products occupy an important place in people's daily lives as seasonings and are used in many side dishes. It has been proven through clinical studies that these products have many health benefits, such as their ability to fight cancer and diabetes, and to prevent obesity and constipation.

  13. Photosynthate partitioning and distribution in soybean plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latche, J.; Cavalie, G.

    1983-01-01

    Plants were grown in a controlled environment chamber and fed with a modified Hoagland solution containing nitrate as nitrogen source (N+ medium). Soybeans, 33 days old (flowering stage), 45 and 56 days old (pods formation and filling stages) were used for experimentation. In each experiment, the eight trifoliated leaf (F 8 ) was exposed to 14 CO 2 (10 μCi; 400 vpm), in the light (80 W x m -2 ) for 30 min. After a 6 h chase period (22 - 25 0 C; 80 W x m -2 ), the radiocarbon distribution among plant parts was determined and labelled compounds were identified. (orig.)

  14. Production of top quality soybean oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa, Dr. Ahmad

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper comments the most adequate conditions required to produce to quality soybean oil. It is essential to avoid contaminations (water, metallic, oxidation products, overheating, undue exposition to air, as well as an appropriate control of the different steps of the refining process.

    El trabajo presenta las condiciones recomendadas para obtener aceite de soja de la mejor calidad. Es importante evitar las contaminaciones (agua, metales y compuestos oxidados, los sobrecalentamientos, la exposición al aire, así como el adecuado control de los diferentes pasos del proceso de refinación.

  15. Responding to the soybean rust epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi Sydow), a major threat to soybean production, is a new pathogen on the African continent, where it is increasingly threatening soybean production. The fungus is highly variable, and this complicates most disease management strategies. Most research on soybean rust, ...

  16. The Utilization of Soybean Wild Relatives: How Can It Be Effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild soybean (G. soja Sieb. & Zucc.) is the progenitor of soybean and is native to China, Taiwan, Japan, eastern Russia and the Korean peninsula. Research has repeatedly demonstrated that wild soybean is more genetically diverse than the cultivated soybean. There are 26 perennial Glycine species tha...

  17. Development and phenotypic screening of an ethyl methane sulfonate mutant population in soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean is an important oil-producing crop in the Fabaceae family and is utilized in various industries. With increasing demands for soybean oil and other soybean products, its production must be increased. Genetic improvement of the crop is important to meet the increasing demands for soybean. A ne...

  18. Effects of different boiling time of soybean ( Glycine max (L) merril ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 56-day feeding trial was conducted with Oreochromis niloticus (Tilapia) fingerlings fed soybean boiled at different periods. The period treatment variations were unboiled soybean as control (T1); soybean seeds boiled for 20 minutes (T2); 30 minutes (T3); 40 minutes (T4) and for 50 minutes (T5). The soybean seeds so ...

  19. Whole genome co-expression analysis of soybean cytochrome P450 genes identifies nodulation-specific P450 monooxygenases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey Sona

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s catalyze oxidation of various substrates using oxygen and NAD(PH. Plant P450s are involved in the biosynthesis of primary and secondary metabolites performing diverse biological functions. The recent availability of the soybean genome sequence allows us to identify and analyze soybean putative P450s at a genome scale. Co-expression analysis using an available soybean microarray and Illumina sequencing data provides clues for functional annotation of these enzymes. This approach is based on the assumption that genes that have similar expression patterns across a set of conditions may have a functional relationship. Results We have identified a total number of 332 full-length P450 genes and 378 pseudogenes from the soybean genome. From the full-length sequences, 195 genes belong to A-type, which could be further divided into 20 families. The remaining 137 genes belong to non-A type P450s and are classified into 28 families. A total of 178 probe sets were found to correspond to P450 genes on the Affymetrix soybean array. Out of these probe sets, 108 represented single genes. Using the 28 publicly available microarray libraries that contain organ-specific information, some tissue-specific P450s were identified. Similarly, stress responsive soybean P450s were retrieved from 99 microarray soybean libraries. We also utilized Illumina transcriptome sequencing technology to analyze the expressions of all 332 soybean P450 genes. This dataset contains total RNAs isolated from nodules, roots, root tips, leaves, flowers, green pods, apical meristem, mock-inoculated and Bradyrhizobium japonicum-infected root hair cells. The tissue-specific expression patterns of these P450 genes were analyzed and the expression of a representative set of genes were confirmed by qRT-PCR. We performed the co-expression analysis on many of the 108 P450 genes on the Affymetrix arrays. First we confirmed that CYP93C5 (an

  20. An integrated RNAseq-1H NMR metabolomics approach to understand soybean primary metabolism regulation in response to Rhizoctonia foliar blight disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copley, Tanya R; Aliferis, Konstantinos A; Kliebenstein, Daniel J; Jabaji, Suha H

    2017-04-27

    Rhizoctonia solani AG1-IA is a devastating phytopathogen causing Rhizoctonia foliar blight (RFB) of soybean worldwide with yield losses reaching 60%. Plant defense mechanisms are complex and information from different metabolic pathways is required to thoroughly understand plant defense regulation and function. Combining information from different "omics" levels such as transcriptomics, metabolomics, and proteomics is required to gain insights into plant metabolism and its regulation. As such, we studied fluctuations in soybean metabolism in response to R. solani infection at early and late disease stages using an integrated transcriptomics-metabolomics approach, focusing on the regulation of soybean primary metabolism and oxidative stress tolerance. Transcriptomics (RNAseq) and metabolomics ( 1 H NMR) data were analyzed individually and by integration using bidirectional orthogonal projections to latent structures (O2PLS) to reveal possible links between the metabolome and transcriptome during early and late infection stages. O2PLS analysis detected 516 significant transcripts, double that reported in the univariate analysis, and more significant metabolites than detected in partial least squares discriminant analysis. Strong separation of treatments based on integration of the metabolomes and transcriptomes of the analyzed soybean leaves was revealed, similar trends as those seen in analyses done on individual datasets, validating the integration method being applied. Strong fluctuations of soybean primary metabolism occurred in glycolysis, the TCA cycle, photosynthesis and photosynthates in response to R. solani infection. Data were validated using quantitative real-time PCR on a set of specific markers as well as randomly selected genes. Significant increases in transcript and metabolite levels involved in redox reactions and ROS signaling, such as peroxidases, thiamine, tocopherol, proline, L-alanine and GABA were also recorded. Levels of ethanol increased 24

  1. Genome-Wide Identification of Chalcone Reductase Gene Family in Soybean: Insight into Root-Specific GmCHRs and Phytophthora sojae Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline J. Sepiol

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr is one of the main grain legumes worldwide. Soybean farmers lose billions of dollars’ worth of yield annually due to root and stem rot disease caused by the oomycete Phytophthora sojae. Many strategies have been developed to combat the disease, however, these methods have proven ineffective in the long term. A more cost effective and durable approach is to select a trait naturally found in soybean that can increase resistance. One such trait is the increased production of phytoalexin glyceollins in soybean. Glyceollins are isoflavonoids, synthesized via the legume-specific branch of general phenylpropanoid pathway. The first key enzyme exclusively involved in glyceollin synthesis is chalcone reductase (CHR which coacts with chalcone synthase for the production of isoliquiritigenin, the precursor for glyceollin biosynthesis. Here we report the identification of 14 putative CHR genes in soybean where 11 of them are predicted to be functional. Our results show that GmCHRs display tissue-specific gene expression, and that only root-specific GmCHRs are induced upon P. sojae infection. Among 4 root-specific GmCHRs, GmCHR2A is located near a QTL that is linked to P. sojae resistance suggesting GmCHR2A as a novel locus for partial resistance that can be utilized for resistance breeding.

  2. Proteomic Analysis of the Soybean Symbiosome Identifies New Symbiotic Proteins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Victoria C.; Loughlin, Patrick C.; Gavrin, Aleksandr; Chen, Chi; Brear, Ella M.; Day, David A.; Smith, Penelope M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Legumes form a symbiosis with rhizobia in which the plant provides an energy source to the rhizobia bacteria that it uses to fix atmospheric nitrogen. This nitrogen is provided to the legume plant, allowing it to grow without the addition of nitrogen fertilizer. As part of the symbiosis, the bacteria in the infected cells of a new root organ, the nodule, are surrounded by a plant-derived membrane, the symbiosome membrane, which becomes the interface between the symbionts. Fractions containing the symbiosome membrane (SM) and material from the lumen of the symbiosome (peribacteroid space or PBS) were isolated from soybean root nodules and analyzed using nongel proteomic techniques. Bicarbonate stripping and chloroform-methanol extraction of isolated SM were used to reduce complexity of the samples and enrich for hydrophobic integral membrane proteins. One hundred and ninety-seven proteins were identified as components of the SM, with an additional fifteen proteins identified from peripheral membrane and PBS protein fractions. Proteins involved in a range of cellular processes such as metabolism, protein folding and degradation, membrane trafficking, and solute transport were identified. These included a number of proteins previously localized to the SM, such as aquaglyceroporin nodulin 26, sulfate transporters, remorin, and Rab7 homologs. Among the proteome were a number of putative transporters for compounds such as sulfate, calcium, hydrogen ions, peptide/dicarboxylate, and nitrate, as well as transporters for which the substrate is not easy to predict. Analysis of the promoter activity for six genes encoding putative SM proteins showed nodule specific expression, with five showing expression only in infected cells. Localization of two proteins was confirmed using GFP-fusion experiments. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001132. This proteome will provide a rich resource for the study of the legume-rhizobium symbiosis. PMID

  3. Sowing seasons and quality of soybean seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ávila Marizangela Rizzatti

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the difficulties of producing high quality soybean [Glycine max (L. Merrill] seeds during the traditional cropping period in some areas of the State of Paraná, Brazil, a research project was carried out with the objective of evaluating the influence of sowing dates on the physiological and sanitary quality of seeds, during the 1998/99 and 1999/00 cropping seasons, in Maringá, PR, Brazil. The experiment consisted of five cultivar competition assays, arranged in a completely randomized block design, with each assay sown at different dates (10/15, 10/30, 11/15, 11/30 and 12/15 for each cropping season. The evaluated cultivars were BRS 132 (early, BRS 133 (semi-early, BR 16 (semi-early, BRS 134 (intermediate and FT- Estrela (late. Seeds obtained at the sowing dates were evaluated in the laboratory by germination, accelerated aging, and health tests. Sowing in November resulted in seeds with superior physiological and health quality. Cultivar BRS 133 showed the greatest stability in seed production with better quality for the different sowing dates. Cultivars BRS 134 and BRS 133, which were sown during the period from 10/15 to 11/30, produced seeds that had higher percentages of normal seedlings in the germination and accelerated aging tests. Advancing or delaying sowing dates had adverse effects on soybean seed production with regard to their sanitary quality.

  4. Methyl and ethyl soybean esters production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pighinelli, Anna Leticia Montenegro Turtelli; Park, Kil Jin; Zorzeto, Thais Queiroz [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FEAGRI/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Agricola], E-mail: annalets@feagri.unicamp.br; Bevilaqua, Gabriela [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (IQ/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2008-07-01

    Biodiesel is a fuel obtained from triglycerides found in nature, like vegetable oils and animal fats. Nowadays it has been the subject of many researches impulses by the creation of the Brazilian law that determined the blend of 2% of biodiesel with petrodiesel. Basically, there are no limitations on the oilseed type for chemical reaction, but due to high cost of this major feedstock, it is important to use the grain that is available in the region of production. Soybean is the oilseed mostly produced in Brazil and its oil is the only one that is available in enough quantity to supply the current biodiesel demand. The objective of this work was to study the effects of reaction time and temperature on soybean oil transesterification reaction with ethanol and methanol. A central composite experimental design with five variation levels was used and response surface methodology applied for the data analysis. The statistical analysis of the results showed that none of the factors affected the ethyl esters production. However, the methyl esters production suffered the influence of temperature (linear effect), reaction time (linear and quadratic) and interaction of these two variables. None of the generated models showed significant regression consequently it was not possible to build the response surface. The experiments demonstrated that methanol is the best alcohol for transesterification reactions and the ester yield was up to 85%. (author)

  5. Induced mutations for soybean rust resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smutkupt, S.; Wongpiyasatid, A.; Lamseejan, S.

    1983-01-01

    Soybean mutation experiments for inducing rust resistance in the cultivars G 8375, Wakashima mutant number 10, Taichung N, S.J.2, S.J.4, BM 50, BM 98, G 8377, G 8586 and G 8587 have been carried out since 1979. Six pods from each of 4438 control and 43,907 M 1 plants were randomly harvested. M 2 seeds of each cultivar of different doses were bulked (M 2 bulk). In addition, 270 good M 1 plants were selected and threshed singly (M 2 single). M 2 -bulk and M 2 -single seeds were advanced to M 3 . Both, M 3 -bulk and M 3 -single plants, together with the remaining M 2 -bulk seeds were screened for rust resistance in the rainy season of 1980 in Nong Hoi Valley (altitude about 1000 m above sea level) and at Mae Joe Station, both in Chiang Mai Province (latitude 18 deg. 31'-19 deg. N). Based on the IWGSR rating system, soybean plants with slow growth of rust were selected from both locations. The results were as follows: Six plants were selected from a total of 2802 control plants, and 115 from a total of 28,834 M 2 and M 3 plants. Further evaluation of these selections for rust resistance will be carried out in the rainy season of 1981 in Nong Hoi Valley, Chiang Mai. (author)

  6. Integrating microarray analysis and the soybean genome to understand the soybeans iron deficiency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Soybeans grown in the upper Midwestern United States often suffer from iron deficiency chlorosis, which results in yield loss at the end of the season. To better understand the effect of iron availability on soybean yield, we identified genes in two near isogenic lines with changes in expression patterns when plants were grown in iron sufficient and iron deficient conditions. Results Transcriptional profiles of soybean (Glycine max, L. Merr) near isogenic lines Clark (PI548553, iron efficient) and IsoClark (PI547430, iron inefficient) grown under Fe-sufficient and Fe-limited conditions were analyzed and compared using the Affymetrix® GeneChip® Soybean Genome Array. There were 835 candidate genes in the Clark (PI548553) genotype and 200 candidate genes in the IsoClark (PI547430) genotype putatively involved in soybean's iron stress response. Of these candidate genes, fifty-eight genes in the Clark genotype were identified with a genetic location within known iron efficiency QTL and 21 in the IsoClark genotype. The arrays also identified 170 single feature polymorphisms (SFPs) specific to either Clark or IsoClark. A sliding window analysis of the microarray data and the 7X genome assembly coupled with an iterative model of the data showed the candidate genes are clustered in the genome. An analysis of 5' untranslated regions in the promoter of candidate genes identified 11 conserved motifs in 248 differentially expressed genes, all from the Clark genotype, representing 129 clusters identified earlier, confirming the cluster analysis results. Conclusion These analyses have identified the first genes with expression patterns that are affected by iron stress and are located within QTL specific to iron deficiency stress. The genetic location and promoter motif analysis results support the hypothesis that the differentially expressed genes are co-regulated. The combined results of all analyses lead us to postulate iron inefficiency in soybean is a result of a

  7. An In Vitro Method for Studying the Three-Way Interaction between Soybean, Rhizophagus irregularis and the Soil-Borne Pathogen Fusarium virguliforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María L. Giachero

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we described an in vitro system adequate for investigating the pathosystem soybean/arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF/Fusarium virguliforme. Pre-mycorrhized plantlets with Rhizophagus irregularis were infected by F. virguliforme either locally via a plug of gel supporting mycelium (Method 1 or via a macroconidia suspension applied to the medium surface (Method 2. Root colonization by the AMF and infection by the pathogen were similar to the usual observations in pot experiments. Within a period of 18 days, more than 20% of the roots were colonized by the AMF and infection by the pathogen was observed in all the plants. In presence of AMF, a decrease in symptoms and in the level of root tissue infection was noticed. With Method 1, smaller necrotic lesions were observed in the pre-mycorrhized plantlets. In Method 2, pathogen infection was slower but more homogenous. These results demonstrated the suitability of the in vitro cultivation system to study the pathosystem soybean/AMF/F. virguliforme. We propose this in vitro cultivation system for studying the mechanisms involved in the biocontrol conferred by AMF against F. virguliforme in soybean.

  8. The induction of proteinases in corn and soybean by anoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanToai, T.; Hwang, Shihying

    1989-01-01

    This study characterized the anaerobic changes in proteinase activities in corn and soybean roots and to investigate the possibility that these changes might contribute to the differential anaerobiosis tolerance of the two species. After 24 h of anoxia, crude protein extracts from H60 corn and Keller soybean root tips (10cm) were assayed for proteinase activities at pH range from 4.5 to 9.5. Turnover of aberrant proteins was studied in seedlings labelled with 3 H-leucine for 12 h under: (a) puromycin (0.64 mM) in air, (b) ethanol (1%) in air, (c) nitrogen and (d) air. After the treatment, the labelled proteins remaining in roots were determined every 2 h for 6 h. In both corn and soybean, activities of alkali proteinases increased, and activities of acid proteinases declined under anoxia. Neutral proteinases increase in anoxic corn roots, but decline in anoxic soybean roots. The protein turnover rate in corn treated with puromycin, ethanol and nitrogen was much higher than in control roots. The protein turnover rate in soybean roots treated with puromycin, ethanol was similar to the rate of the control. The results indicated that: (a) anoxic corn can degrade aberrant proteins, but anoxic soybean cannot, (b) the degradation of aberrant proteins in anoxic corn is accomplished by neutral proteinases, and (c) the accumulation of aberrant proteins in soybean might contribute to the susceptibility of this species to anoxia

  9. Archaeological Soybean (Glycine max) in East Asia: Does Size Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gyoung-Ah; Crawford, Gary W.; Liu, Li; Sasaki, Yuka; Chen, Xuexiang

    2011-01-01

    The recently acquired archaeological record for soybean from Japan, China and Korea is shedding light on the context in which this important economic plant became associated with people and was domesticated. This paper examines archaeological (charred) soybean seed size variation to determine what insight can be gained from a comprehensive comparison of 949 specimens from 22 sites. Seed length alone appears to represent seed size change through time, although the length×width×thickness product has the potential to provide better size change resolution. A widespread early association of small seeded soybean is as old as 9000–8600 cal BP in northern China and 7000 cal BP in Japan. Direct AMS radiocarbon dates on charred soybean seeds indicate selection resulted in large seed sizes in Japan by 5000 cal BP (Middle Jomon) and in Korea by 3000 cal BP (Early Mumun). Soybean seeds recovered in China from the Shang through Han periods are similar in length to the large Korean and Japanese specimens, but the overall size of the large Middle and Late Jomon, Early Mumun through Three Kingdom seeds is significantly larger than any of the Chinese specimens. The archaeological record appears to disconfirm the hypothesis of a single domestication of soybean and supports the view informed by recent phyologenetic research that soybean was domesticated in several locations in East Asia. PMID:22073186

  10. Assessing Frogeye Leaf Spot Resistance on Recommended Soybean Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Jeong Kang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Soybean frogeye leaf spot caused by the fungus Cercospora sojina Hara, has known to lead a severe reduction of crop yield. Since frogeye leaf spot on soybean has recently become a serious problem in Korea, the susceptibility of recent recommended cultivars against C. sojina had been tested. To standardize the disease severity of soybean, the optimum sporulation condition of C. sojina and the disease index were established in this study. Sporulation was maximized on the 10% V8 juice agar with 12 h light and 12 h dark at 25°C. Spore suspension (105 spores/ml was sprayed on the leaves of soybean (V6 stage, and the disease responses to each isolate were evaluated on 28 days after inoculation. As a result, Daepung, Shinpaldal2ho, Yeonpung and Cheonga showed the resistance reaction to 8, 7, 6, 6 isolates of C. sojina, respectively, whereas Cheongja, Hwangkeum, Taekwang, Daewon, Cheonsang and Sinhwa showed the susceptible reaction to 8 isolates of C. sojina. Breeding the resistant soybean cultivars against C. sojina requires a uniform resistance for screening technique. The disease index of frogeye leaf spot on soybean developed in this study can be effectively used for the accurate field assay to select the frogeye leaf spot resistant soybean.

  11. Spatiotemporal deep imaging of syncytium induced by the soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsu, Mina; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Kurihara, Daisuke; Suzaki, Takuya; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Maruyama, Daisuke; Higashiyama, Tetsuya

    2017-11-01

    Parasite infections cause dramatic anatomical and ultrastructural changes in host plants. Cyst nematodes are parasites that invade host roots and induce a specific feeding structure called a syncytium. A syncytium is a large multinucleate cell formed by cell wall dissolution-mediated cell fusion. The soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines, is a major soybean pathogen. To investigate SCN infection and the syncytium structure, we established an in planta deep imaging system using a clearing solution ClearSee and two-photon excitation microscopy (2PEM). Using this system, we found that several cells were incorporated into the syncytium; the nuclei increased in size and the cell wall openings began to be visible at 2 days after inoculation (DAI). Moreover, at 14 DAI, in the syncytium developed in the cortex, there were thickened concave cell wall pillars that resembled "Parthenon pillars." In contrast, there were many thick board-like cell walls and rarely Parthenon pillars in the syncytium developed in the stele. We revealed that the syncytia were classified into two types based on the pattern of the cell wall structures, which appeared to be determined by the position of the syncytium inside roots. Our results provide new insights into the developmental process of syncytium induced by cyst nematode and a better understanding of the three-dimensional structure of the syncytium in host roots.

  12. Changes in antioxidant systems in soybean as affected by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malenčić, Djordje; Kiprovski, Biljana; Popović, Milan; Prvulović, Dejan; Miladinović, Jegor; Djordjević, Vuk

    2010-01-01

    Changes in antioxidant systems in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr., Fabaceae] genotypes infected with Sclerotinia sclerotiorum were studied 12, 24, 48 and 72h after inoculation. Generation of superoxide and hydroxyl radicals was evaluated together with the production of malonyldialdehyde, main end product of lipid peroxidation. Several enzymatic and non-enzymatic parameters were monitored as well, such as the activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and pyrogallol and guaiacol peroxidases, reduced glutathione, soluble proteins and total carotenoids content. Results showed that genotypes expressed oxidative burst as well as different antioxidant systems in response to biotic stress caused by pathogen invasion. It has been confirmed that, although hypersensitive cell death is efficient against biotrophic pathogens, it does not protect soybean plants against infection by the necrotrophic pathogen such as S. sclerotiorum. Still, some genotypes showed distinctive and combined activity of several biochemical parameters which may point to further directions in exploring host-pathogen relations and lead to selection and production of new genotypes with higher levels of tolerance. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of nonhost resistance of Arabidopsis to the Asian soybean rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehrer, Marco; Langenbach, Caspar; Goellner, Katharina; Conrath, Uwe; Schaffrath, Ulrich

    2008-11-01

    Asian soybean rust (ASR), caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is a devastating disease of soybean. We report the use of the nonhost plant Arabidopsis thaliana to identify the genetic basis of resistance to P. pachyrhizi. Upon attack by P. pachyrhizi, epidermal cells of wild-type Arabidopsis accumulated H2O2, which likely orchestrates the frequently observed epidermal cell death. However, even when epidermal cell death occurred, fungal hyphae grew on and infection was terminated at the mesophyll boundary. These events were associated with expression of PDF1.2, suggesting that P. pachyrhizi, an ostensible biotroph, mimics aspects of a necrotroph. Extensive colonization of the mesophyll occurred in Arabidopsis pen mutants with defective penetration resistance. Although haustoria were found occasionally in mesophyll cells, the successful establishment of biotrophy failed, as evidenced by the cessation of fungal growth. Double mutants affected in either jasmonic acid or salicylic acid signaling in the pen3-1 background revealed the involvement of both pathways in nonhost resistance (NHR) of Arabidopsis to P. pachyrhizi. Interestingly, expression of AtNHL10, a gene that is expressed in tissue undergoing the hypersensitive response, was only triggered in infected pen3-1 mutants. Thus, a suppression of P. pachyrhizi-derived effectors by PEN3 can be inferred. Our results demonstrate that Arabidopsis can be used to study mechanisms of NHR to ASR.

  14. Lady Beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) Communities in Soybean and Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, K K; Andow, D A

    2016-02-01

    Coccinellids provide the most effective natural control of soybean aphid, but outbreaks remain common. Previous work suggests that native coccinellids are rare in soybean, potentially limiting soybean aphid control. We compared the coccinellid community in soybean with that of maize to identify differences in how coccinellid species use these habitats. As maize has long been used by coccinellids in the Americas, we hypothesized that coccinellids native to the Americas would use maize habitats, while exotic coccinellids would be more common in soybean. We identified and quantified aphids and all species and stages of coccinellids in a randomized complete block experiment with four blocks of 10 by 10 -m plots of soybean and maize in central Minnesota during 2008 and 2009. Coccinellid egg masses were identified by hatching in the laboratory. We used repeated-measures ANOVA to identify the dominant species in each habitat and compared species richness and Shannon's diversity with a paired t-test. Aphids and coccinellids had a similar phenology across habitats, but the coccinellid species composition differed significantly between soybean and maize. In soybean, the exotic, Harmonia axyridis Pallas, was the dominant species, while in maize, H. axyridis and the native, Coleomegilla maculata De Geer, were co-dominant. Eggs of H. axyridis were abundant in both habitats. In contrast, C. maculata eggs were very rare in soybean, despite being abundant in adjacent plots of maize. Species diversity was higher in maize. These findings were consistent with other published studies of coccinellid communities in these habitats. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Improvement of soybean transformation via Agrobacterium tumefaciens methods involving α-aminooxyacetic acid and sonication treatments enlightened by gene expression profile analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Min; Liu, Zi-Hui; Yang, Rui-Juan; Li, Guo-Liang; Guo, Xiu-Lin; Zhang, Hua-Ning; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Di, Rui; Zhao, Qing-Song; Zhang, Meng-Chen

    2016-06-01

    Antagonists and sonication treatment relieved the structural barriers of Agrobacterium entering into cells; hindered signal perception and transmission; alleviated defense responses and increased cell susceptibility to Agrobacterium infection. Soybean gene expression analysis was performed to elucidate the general response of soybean plant to Agrobacterium at an early stage of infection. Agrobacterium infection stimulated the PAMPs-triggered immunity (BRI1, BAK1, BZR1, FLS2 and EFR) and effector-triggered immunity (RPM1, RPS2, RPS5, RIN4, and PBS1); up-regulated the transcript factors (WRKY25, WRKY29, MEKK1P, MKK4/5P and MYC2) in MAPK pathway; strengthened the biosynthesis of flavonoid and isoflavonoid in the second metabolism; finally led to a fierce defense response of soybean to Agrobacterium infection and thereby lower transformation efficiency. To overcome it, antagonist α-aminooxyacetic acid (AOA) and sonication treatment along with Agrobacterium infection were applied. This novel method dramatically decreased the expression of genes coding for F3'H, HCT, β-glucosidase and IF7GT, etc., which are important for isoflavone biosynthesis or the interconversion of aglycones and glycon; genes coding for peroxidase, FLS2, PBS1 and transcription factor MYC2, etc., which are important components in plant-pathogen interaction; and genes coding for GPAT and α-L-fucosidase, which are important in polyesters formation in cell membrane and the degradation of fucose-containing glycoproteins and glycolipids on the external surface of cell membrane, respectively. This analysis implied that AOA and sonication treatment not only relieved the structural membrane barriers of Agrobacterium entering into cells, but also hindered the perception of 'invasion' signal on cell membrane and intercellular signal transmission, thus effectively alleviated the defense responses and increased the cell susceptibility to Agrobacterium infection. All these factors benefit the transformation

  16. The effectiveness of post-culture liquids of antagonistic bacteria in the protection of soybean from soil-borne fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Patkowska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper was to determine the effectiveness of post-culture liquids of Bacillus sp. Bsch 19 and Pseudomonas sp. Psch 16 in the protection of soybean from soil-borne fungi. The use of post-culture liquids of those bacteria in seed dressing positively affected the number, healthiness and yielding of soybean plants. The plants were mainly infected by Fusarium spp., Phoma exigua var. exigua, Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Those fungi were isolated much more rarely from the plants in combinations with the use of post-culture liquids of antagonistic bacteria as compared with the plants from the control combination, i.e. without seed dressing. A reverse relation was found for the occurrence of saprophytic fungi from the genera of Gliocladium, Penicillium and Trichoderma

  17. Soybean biomass produced in Argentina: Myths and realities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semino, S; Jelsoee, E; Paul, H; Tomei, J; Joensen, L; Monti, M

    2009-01-01

    Soybean biomass for biodiesel, produced in Argentina amongst other places, is considered by some to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate climate change when compared with fossil fuel alternatives. To ensure that the production of biofuels is 'sustainable', EU institutions and national governments are designing certification schemes for the sustainable production of biomass. In this paper, we question the validity of these proposed environmental standards, using the production of Argentine soybean as a case study. We highlight the negative environmental and social impacts of intensive soybean production, and conclude that certification schemes are unlikely to be able to address the detrimental impacts of increased biofuel production and trade.

  18. Soybean biomass produced in Argentina: Myths and realities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semino, S; Jelsoee, E [Department of Environment, Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde University Universitetsvej 1, DK-4000, Roskilde (Denmark); Paul, H [ECONEXUS, PO Box 1455, Oxford OX4 9BS (United Kingdom); Tomei, J [UCL Energy Institute, Central House, 14 Upper Woburn Place, London, WC1H 0HY (United Kingdom); Joensen, L [Grupo de Reflexion Rural, Rondeau, 812 Marcos Paz, 1727, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Monti, M, E-mail: semino@ruc.d, E-mail: stella.semino@mail.d [Direccion de Extension e Investigacion Agropecuaria, Ministerio de la Produccion, Provincia de Santa Fe, Pte Peron y Garay, 6100, Rufino, Provincia de Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2009-11-01

    Soybean biomass for biodiesel, produced in Argentina amongst other places, is considered by some to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate climate change when compared with fossil fuel alternatives. To ensure that the production of biofuels is 'sustainable', EU institutions and national governments are designing certification schemes for the sustainable production of biomass. In this paper, we question the validity of these proposed environmental standards, using the production of Argentine soybean as a case study. We highlight the negative environmental and social impacts of intensive soybean production, and conclude that certification schemes are unlikely to be able to address the detrimental impacts of increased biofuel production and trade.

  19. Transcription of the soybean leghemoglobin genes during nodule development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcker, Anne; Ø Jensen, Erik; Marcker, Kjeld A

    1984-01-01

    During the early stages of soybean nodule development the leghemoglobin (Lb) genes are activated sequentially in the opposite order to which they are arranged in the soybean genome. At a specific stage after the initial activation of all the Lb genes, a large increment occurs in the transcription...... of the Lb(c1), Lb(c3) and Lb(a) genes while the transcription of the Lb(c2) gene is not amplified to a similar extent. All the Lb genes retain significant activity for a long period during the lifetime of a nodule. Consequently the soybean Lb genes are not regulated by a developmental gene switching...

  20. Effect of soybean derivatives (glycine max) on thyroid of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filisetti, T.M.C.C.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of a Brazilian variety soybean and their comercial products on thyroid gland is studied. Soybean derivatives are tested in rats through acute experiments of 3 to 24 hours and semichronic experiments of 16 to 29 days. The autoclaved extract administered after 6 to 24 hours decreases the percentage of iodine ( 131 I) uptake. Semichronic experiments show that the factor found in soybean provokes both an increase or a reduction in percentage of iodine ( 131 I) uptake, depending ou the oeriod of action [pt

  1. Diets based on soybean protein for Mediterranean fruit fly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobrinho, Raimundo Braga [Embrapa Agroindustria Tropical, Rua Dra. Sara Mesquita, 2270, CEP 60511-110 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)]. E-mail: braga@cnpat.embrapa.br; Caceres, Carlos; Islam, Amirul; Wornoayporn, Vivat [Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)]. E-mail: C.Caceres@iaea.org; Enkerlin, Walter [Insect Pest Control Section, Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: W.Enkerlin@iaea.org

    2006-04-15

    The objective of this work was to develop suitable and economic diets for mass rearing Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae). Diets containing sugar beet bagasse, wheat bran, brewer yeast, and others with wheat bran and palletized soybean protein from Brazil were tested. Diets based on soybean protein have shown promising results regarding pupal recovery, pupal weight and adult emergence. Soybean bagasse in the form of pellets with 60% of protein can be a very important substitute for other expensive sources of protein. (author)

  2. Fluoroorganic acids in soybean leaves exposed to fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, J.Y.O.; Yu, M.H.; Miller, G.W.; Welkie, G.W.

    1968-05-01

    Soybean plants were fumigated with HF or grown in nutrient solution containing sodium fluoride or fluoroacetate, and the organic acid fractions of the leaf extracts were compared. Organic acid extracts from these treatments contained fluoroorganic compounds that were chromatographically similar to fluoroacetate and fluorocitrate. These fractions were separated from HF- and NaF-treated leaf extracts and found to inhibit aconitase prepared from either pig heart or soybean fluorocitrate. Aconitase from soybean leaves was as sensitive to fluorocitrate as that isolated from pig heart. Fluorocitrate was identified in extracts of fluoride-treated plants by infrared spectroscopy.

  3. 7 CFR 1220.312 - Remittance of assessments and submission of reports to United Soybean Board or Qualified State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... to United Soybean Board or Qualified State Soybean Board. 1220.312 Section 1220.312 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND... of reports to United Soybean Board or Qualified State Soybean Board. (a) Each first purchaser and...

  4. Palm and partially hydrogenated soybean oils adversely alter lipoprotein profiles compared with soybean and canola oils in moderately hyperlipidemic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-López, Sonia; Ausman, Lynne M; Jalbert, Susan M; Erkkilä, Arja T; Lichtenstein, Alice H

    2006-07-01

    Partially hydrogenated fat has an unfavorable effect on cardiovascular disease risk. Palm oil is a potential substitute because of favorable physical characteristics. We assessed the effect of palm oil on lipoprotein profiles compared with the effects of both partially hydrogenated fat and oils high in monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fatty acids. Fifteen volunteers aged > or =50 y with LDL cholesterol > or =130 mg/dL were provided with food for each of 4 diets (35 d/phase) varying in type of fat (partially hydrogenated soybean, soybean, palm, or canola; two-thirds fat, 20% of energy). Plasma fatty acid profiles, lipids, lipoproteins, apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein B, lipoprotein(a), glucose, insulin, HDL subfractions, and indicators of lipoprotein metabolism (HDL-cholesterol fractional esterification rate, cholesteryl ester transfer protein, phospholipid transfer protein, and paraoxonase activities) were measured at the end of each phase. Plasma fatty acid profiles reflected the main source of dietary fat. Partially hydrogenated soybean and palm oils resulted in higher LDL-cholesterol concentrations than did soybean (12% and 14%, respectively; P oils. Apolipoprotein B (P palm oil compared with the other dietary fats. HDL3 cholesterol was higher after palm oil than after partially hydrogenated and soybean oils (P Palm and partially hydrogenated soybean oils, compared with soybean and canola oils, adversely altered the lipoprotein profile in moderately hyperlipidemic subjects without significantly affecting HDL intravascular processing markers.

  5. Compositional differences in soybeans on the market: Glyphosate accumulates in Roundup Ready GM soybeans

    OpenAIRE

    Bøhn, T.; Cuhra, M.; Traavik, T.; Sanden, M.; Fagan, J.; Primicerio, R.

    2014-01-01

    This article is part of Marek Cuhra's doctoral thesis which is available in Munin at http://hdl.handle.net/10037/7869 This article describes the nutrient and elemental composition, including residues of herbicides and pesticides, of 31 soybean batches from Iowa, USA. The soy samples were grouped into three different categories: (i) genetically modified, glyphosate-tolerant soy (GM-soy); (ii) unmodified soy cultivated using a conventional ‘‘chemical’’ cultivation regime; and (iii) unmodifie...

  6. Fine mapping of the Asian soybean rust resistance gene Rpp2 from soybean PI 230970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Neil; Kim, Myungsik; King, Zachary R; Harris, Donna K; Buck, James W; Li, Zenglu; Diers, Brian W

    2015-03-01

    Asian soybean rust (ASR) resistance gene Rpp2 has been fine mapped into a 188.1 kb interval on Glyma.Wm82.a2, which contains a series of plant resistance ( R ) genes. Asian soybean rust (ASR), caused by the fungus Phakopsora pachyrihizi Syd. & P. Syd., is a serious disease in major soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] production countries worldwide and causes yield losses up to 75 %. Defining the exact chromosomal position of ASR resistance genes is critical for improving the effectiveness of marker-assisted selection (MAS) for resistance and for cloning these genes. The objective of this study was to fine map the ASR resistance gene Rpp2 from the plant introduction (PI) 230970. Rpp2 was previously mapped within a 12.9-cM interval on soybean chromosome 16. The fine mapping was initiated by identifying recombination events in F2 and F3 plants using simple sequence repeat (SSR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers that flank the gene. Seventeen recombinant plants were identified and then tested with additional genetic markers saturating the gene region to localize the positions of each recombination. The progeny of these selected plants were tested for resistance to ASR and with SSR markers resulting in the mapping of Rpp2 to a 188.1 kb interval on the Williams 82 reference genome (Glyma.Wm82.a2). Twelve genes including ten toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-nucleotide-binding site (NBS)-leucine-rich repeat (LRR) genes were predicted to exist in this interval on the Glyma.Wm82.a2.v1 gene model map. Eight of these ten genes were homologous to the Arabidopsis TIR-NBS-LRR gene AT5G17680.1. The identified SSR and SNP markers close to Rpp2 and the candidate gene information presented in this study will be significant resources for MAS and gene cloning research.

  7. Identification of a major QTL allele from wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. & Zucc.) for increasing alkaline salt tolerance in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuyen, D D; Lal, S K; Xu, D H

    2010-07-01

    Salt-affected soils are generally classified into two main categories, sodic (alkaline) and saline. Our previous studies showed that the wild soybean accession JWS156-1 (Glycine soja) from the Kinki area of Japan was tolerant to NaCl salt, and the quantitative trait locus (QTL) for NaCl salt tolerance was located on soybean linkage group N (chromosome 3). Further investigation revealed that the wild soybean accession JWS156-1 also had a higher tolerance to alkaline salt stress. In the present study, an F(6) recombinant inbred line mapping population (n = 112) and an F(2) population (n = 149) derived from crosses between a cultivated soybean cultivar Jackson and JWS156-1 were used to identify QTL for alkaline salt tolerance in soybean. Evaluation of soybean alkaline salt tolerance was carried out based on salt tolerance rating (STR) and leaf chlorophyll content (SPAD value) after treatment with 180 mM NaHCO(3) for about 3 weeks under greenhouse conditions. In both populations, a significant QTL for alkaline salt tolerance was detected on the molecular linkage group D2 (chromosome 17), which accounted for 50.2 and 13.0% of the total variation for STR in the F(6) and the F(2) populations, respectively. The wild soybean contributed to the tolerance allele in the progenies. Our results suggest that QTL for alkaline salt tolerance is different from the QTL for NaCl salt tolerance found previously in this wild soybean genotype. The DNA markers closely associated with the QTLs might be useful for marker-assisted selection to pyramid tolerance genes in soybean for both alkaline and saline stresses.

  8. Arabidopsis nonhost resistance gene PSS1 confers immunity against an oomycete and a fungal pathogen but not a bacterial pathogen that cause diseases in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Rishi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonhost resistance (NHR provides immunity to all members of a plant species against all isolates of a microorganism that is pathogenic to other plant species. Three Arabidopsis thaliana PEN (penetration deficient genes, PEN1, 2 and 3 have been shown to provide NHR against the barley pathogen Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei at the prehaustorial level. Arabidopsis pen1-1 mutant lacking the PEN1 gene is penetrated by the hemibiotrophic oomycete pathogen Phytophthora sojae, the causal organism of the root and stem rot disease in soybean. We investigated if there is any novel nonhost resistance mechanism in Arabidopsis against the soybean pathogen, P. sojae. Results The P.sojaesusceptible (pss 1 mutant was identified by screening a mutant population created in the Arabidopsis pen1-1 mutant that lacks penetration resistance against the non adapted barley biotrophic fungal pathogen, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei. Segregation data suggested that PEN1 is not epistatic to PSS1. Responses of pss1 and pen1-1 to P. sojae invasion were distinct and suggest that PSS1 may act at both pre- and post-haustorial levels, while PEN1 acts at the pre-haustorial level against this soybean pathogen. Therefore, PSS1 encodes a new form of nonhost resistance. The pss1 mutant is also infected by the necrotrophic fungal pathogen, Fusarium virguliforme, which causes sudden death syndrome in soybean. Thus, a common NHR mechanism is operative in Arabidopsis against both hemibiotrophic oomycetes and necrotrophic fungal pathogens that are pathogenic to soybean. However, PSS1 does not play any role in immunity against the bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea, that causes bacterial blight in soybean. We mapped PSS1 to a region very close to the southern telomere of chromosome 3 that carries no known disease resistance genes. Conclusions The study revealed that Arabidopsis PSS1 is a novel nonhost resistance gene that confers a new form of

  9. Arabidopsis nonhost resistance gene PSS1 confers immunity against an oomycete and a fungal pathogen but not a bacterial pathogen that cause diseases in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumit, Rishi; Sahu, Binod B; Xu, Min; Sandhu, Devinder; Bhattacharyya, Madan K

    2012-06-13

    Nonhost resistance (NHR) provides immunity to all members of a plant species against all isolates of a microorganism that is pathogenic to other plant species. Three Arabidopsis thaliana PEN (penetration deficient) genes, PEN1, 2 and 3 have been shown to provide NHR against the barley pathogen Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei at the prehaustorial level. Arabidopsis pen1-1 mutant lacking the PEN1 gene is penetrated by the hemibiotrophic oomycete pathogen Phytophthora sojae, the causal organism of the root and stem rot disease in soybean. We investigated if there is any novel nonhost resistance mechanism in Arabidopsis against the soybean pathogen, P. sojae. The P.sojaesusceptible (pss) 1 mutant was identified by screening a mutant population created in the Arabidopsis pen1-1 mutant that lacks penetration resistance against the non adapted barley biotrophic fungal pathogen, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei. Segregation data suggested that PEN1 is not epistatic to PSS1. Responses of pss1 and pen1-1 to P. sojae invasion were distinct and suggest that PSS1 may act at both pre- and post-haustorial levels, while PEN1 acts at the pre-haustorial level against this soybean pathogen. Therefore, PSS1 encodes a new form of nonhost resistance. The pss1 mutant is also infected by the necrotrophic fungal pathogen, Fusarium virguliforme, which causes sudden death syndrome in soybean. Thus, a common NHR mechanism is operative in Arabidopsis against both hemibiotrophic oomycetes and necrotrophic fungal pathogens that are pathogenic to soybean. However, PSS1 does not play any role in immunity against the bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea, that causes bacterial blight in soybean. We mapped PSS1 to a region very close to the southern telomere of chromosome 3 that carries no known disease resistance genes. The study revealed that Arabidopsis PSS1 is a novel nonhost resistance gene that confers a new form of nonhost resistance against both a hemibiotrophic oomycete

  10. Soybean dwarf virus-resistant transgenic soybeans with the sense coat protein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tougou, Makoto; Yamagishi, Noriko; Furutani, Noriyuki; Shizukawa, Yoshiaki; Takahata, Yoshihito; Hidaka, Soh

    2007-11-01

    We transformed a construct containing the sense coat protein (CP) gene of Soybean dwarf virus (SbDV) into soybean somatic embryos via microprojectile bombardment to acquire SbDV-resistant soybean plants. Six independent T(0) plants were obtained. One of these transgenic lines was subjected to further extensive analysis. Three different insertion patterns of Southern blot hybridization analysis in T(1) plants suggested that these insertions introduced in T(0) plants were segregated from each other or co-inherited in T(1) progenies. These insertions were classified into two types, which overexpressed SbDV-CP mRNA and accumulated SbDV-CP-specific short interfering RNA (siRNA), or repressed accumulation of SbDV-CP mRNA and siRNA by RNA analysis prior to SbDV inoculation. After inoculation of SbDV by the aphids, most T(2) plants of this transgenic line remained symptomless, contained little SbDV-specific RNA by RNA dot-blot hybridization analysis and exhibited SbDV-CP-specific siRNA. We discuss here the possible mechanisms of the achieved resistance, including the RNA silencing.

  11. Characterization of Peroxidase Changes in Tolerant and Susceptible Soybeans Challenged by Soybean Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi-Werle, L; Heng-Moss, T M; Hunt, T E; Baldin, E L L; Baird, L M

    2014-10-01

    Changes in protein content, peroxidase activity, and isozyme profiles in response to soybean aphid feeding were documented at V1 (fully developed leaves at unifoliate node, first trifoliate leaf unrolled) and V3 (fully developed leaf at second trifoliate node, third trifoliate leaf unrolled) stages of soybean aphid-tolerant (KS4202) and -susceptible (SD76R) soybeans. Protein content was similar between infested and control V1 and V3 stage plants for both KS4202 and SD76R at 6, 16, and 22 d after aphid introduction. Enzyme kinetics studies documented that control and aphid-infested KS4202 V1 stage and SD76R V1 and V3 stages had similar levels of peroxidase activity at the three time points evaluated. In contrast, KS4202 aphid-infested plants at the V3 stage had significantly higher peroxidase activity levels than control plants at 6 and 22 d after aphid introduction. The differences in peroxidase activity observed between infested and control V3 stage KS4202 plants at these two time points suggest that peroxidases may be playing multiple roles in the tolerant plant. Native gels stained for peroxidase were able to detect differences in the isozyme profiles of aphid-infested and control plants for both KS4202 and SD76R. © 2014 Entomological Society of America.

  12. Genome-wide association study of soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines Ichinohe) HG type 2.5.7 (race 1) resistance in wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. & Zucc.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is one of the most destructive pathogens of soybean plants worldwide. Thus far, most of the commercial SCN-resistant soybean cultivars have been developed from very limited resistant germplasm resources. Overuse of these limited resistant sources has resulted in SCN race ...

  13. Evaluation of nutritional quality of Soybean-Acha composite biscuits ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    strain albino rat Feed intake, Weight gain, Feed Efficiency Ratio (FER), Protein Efficiency Ratio (PER) and proximate composition of the faeces. The feed intake and weight gain of the acha soybean composite biscuits and the acha biscuits ...

  14. Soybean hulls as an iron source for bread enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C.D.; Berry, M.F.; Weaver, C.M.

    Soybean hulls, a concentrated source of iron, may have potential as a source of iron fortification in baked products. Retention of /sup 59/Fe in rats from white bread containing intrinsically labeled soybean hulls did not differ significantly (p<0.05) from extrinsically labeled white bread fortified with bakery grade ferrous sulfate (70.4 and 63.1%, respectively). Physical and sensory evaluations of bread containing up to 5% soybean hulls did not differ from white bread in loaf volume, cross-sectional area, tenderness or overall acceptance. These results suggest that soybean hulls are a good source of available iron and may be added to bakery products without deleterious effects in baking performance and sensory acceptability.

  15. The chromosomal arrangement of six soybean leghemoglobin genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Kirsten; Abildsten, Dorte; Jensen, Erik Ø

    1983-01-01

    Clones containing six leghemoglobin (Lb) genes have been isolated from two genomic libraries of soybean. They encompass two independent DNA regions: a 40-kb region containing four genes in the order 5' Lba-Lbc(1)-[unk]Lb-Lbc(3) 3' with the same transcriptional polarity, and another 40-kb region...... containing two genes in the order 5' Lbc(4)-Lbc(2) 3' with the same polarity. The order in which the Lb genes are arranged in the soybean genome imply that they are activated in the opposite order to which they are arranged on the chromosome. There is a close similarity between corresponding DNA regions...... differs from that of the Lb genes. The existence of two very similar Lb gene clusters in soybean suggest that soybean may have evolved from an ancestral form by genome duplication. Udgivelsesdato: 1983-null...

  16. Glyphosate tolerance of soybean mutant gained after boarding on satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Lingxue; Ren Honglei; Zhang Hongyan; Liu Zhangxiong; Jin Longguo; Guo Yong; Qiu Lijuan; Tao Bo

    2011-01-01

    Glyphosate-tolerant germplasm and genetic variation characteristics of SP 2 and SP 3 soybean varieties boarded on Shijian No.8 satellite were analyzed after treated by herbicide glyphosate in the field. Abundant variations of traits were produced, and the resistance within and among cultivars were different in their offspring of space mutagenesis. Plant height and maturity were used as index to screen glyphosate tolerant materials. Space mutation increased of soybean 661 SP 3 of Zhongpin, and one glyphosate-resistance variant was screened from Zhongpin 661 SP 3 . It showed that glyphosate tolerance was different among offspring of different space mutagenesis soybean materials. It is feasible to systemically screen elite traits soybean by applying space mutation breeding. (authors)

  17. Performance of cassava intercropped with maize, soybean and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Performance of cassava intercropped with maize, soybean and cowpea in the forest zone of Ghana La performance du manioc intercultive avec le maïs, le soja et le niebe dans la zone forestiere du Ghana.

  18. Studies on the mechanism of radiosensitivity among soybean varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Yuchun

    1990-01-01

    After exposing 13 soybean varieties to γ-ray, the height of seedling, the length of the first internode and the area of the first leaf were measured. The results showed that there were significant difference in radiosensitivity among soybean varieties. The unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in soybean embryos irradiated or non-irradiated were studied with 3 H-TdR incorporation during the early germination. The results showed that there was the unscheduled DNA synthesis during the early stage of soaking in irradiated seed and differences of radiosensitivities among soybean varieties were related to abilities of repair. The variety with high repair ability was radioresistant and the variety with low repair ability was radiosensitive

  19. Gas exchange and morpho-physiological response of soybean to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gas exchange and morpho-physiological response of soybean to straw mulching under drought conditions. Lan-lan Xue, Long-chang Wang, Shakeel Ahmad Anjum, Muhammad Farrukh Saleem, Ming-chen Bao, Asif Saeed, Muhammad Faisal Bilal ...

  20. Efficient production of transgenic soybean (Glycine max [L] Merrill ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efficient production of transgenic soybean (Glycine max [L] Merrill) plants mediated via whisker-supersonic (WSS) method. MM Khalafalla, HA El-Shemy, SM Rahman, M Teraishi, H Hasegawa, T Terakawa, M Ishimoto ...

  1. Soybean hulls as an iron source for bread enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.D.; Berry, M.F.; Weaver, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    Soybean hulls, a concentrated source of iron, may have potential as a source of iron fortification in baked products. Retention of 59 Fe in rats from white bread containing intrinsically labeled soybean hulls did not differ significantly (p<0.05) from extrinsically labeled white bread fortified with bakery grade ferrous sulfate (70.4 and 63.1%, respectively). Physical and sensory evaluations of bread containing up to 5% soybean hulls did not differ from white bread in loaf volume, cross-sectional area, tenderness or overall acceptance. These results suggest that soybean hulls are a good source of available iron and may be added to bakery products without deleterious effects in baking performance and sensory acceptability

  2. EFFECT OF HEAT TREATMENT ON SOYBEAN PROTEIN SOLUBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RODICA CĂPRIŢĂ

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of soybean products in animal feeds is limited due to the presence of antinutritional factors (ANF. Proper heat processing is required to destroy ANF naturally present in raw soybeans and to remove solvent remaining from the oil extraction process. Over and under toasting of soybean causes lower nutritional value. Excessive heat treatment causes Maillard reaction which affects the availability of lysine in particular and produces changes to the chemical structure of proteins resulting in a decrease of the nutritive value. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of heating time on the protein solubility. The investigation of the heating time on protein solubility in soybean meal (SBM revealed a negative correlation (r = -0.9596. Since the urease index is suitable only for detecting under processed SBM, the protein solubility is an important index for monitoring SBM quality.

  3. Improvement of Soybean Products Through the Response Mechanism Analysis Using Proteomic Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Komatsu, Setsuko

    Soybean is rich in protein/vegetable oil and contains several phytochemicals such as isoflavones and phenolic compounds. Because of the predominated nutritional values, soybean is considered as traditional health benefit food. Soybean is a widely cultivated crop; however, its growth and yield are markedly affected by adverse environmental conditions. Proteomic techniques make it feasible to map protein profiles both during soybean growth and under unfavorable conditions. The stress-responsive mechanisms during soybean growth have been uncovered with the help of proteomic studies. In this review, the history of soybean as food and the morphology/physiology of soybean are described. The utilization of proteomics during soybean germination and development is summarized. In addition, the stress-responsive mechanisms explored using proteomic techniques are reviewed in soybean. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Differential expression of cysteine desulfurases in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heis Marta D

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron-sulfur [Fe-S] clusters are prosthetic groups required to sustain fundamental life processes including electron transfer, metabolic reactions, sensing, signaling, gene regulation and stabilization of protein structures. In plants, the biogenesis of Fe-S protein is compartmentalized and adapted to specific needs of the cell. Many environmental factors affect plant development and limit productivity and geographical distribution. The impact of these limiting factors is particularly relevant for major crops, such as soybean, which has worldwide economic importance. Results Here we analyze the transcriptional profile of the soybean cysteine desulfurases NFS1, NFS2 and ISD11 genes, involved in the biogenesis of [Fe-S] clusters, by quantitative RT-PCR. NFS1, ISD11 and NFS2 encoding two mitochondrial and one plastid located proteins, respectively, are duplicated and showed distinct transcript levels considering tissue and stress response. NFS1 and ISD11 are highly expressed in roots, whereas NFS2 showed no differential expression in tissues. Cold-treated plants showed a decrease in NFS2 and ISD11 transcript levels in roots, and an increased expression of NFS1 and ISD11 genes in leaves. Plants treated with salicylic acid exhibited increased NFS1 transcript levels in roots but lower levels in leaves. In silico analysis of promoter regions indicated the presence of different cis-elements in cysteine desulfurase genes, in good agreement with differential expression of each locus. Our data also showed that increasing of transcript levels of mitochondrial genes, NFS1/ISD11, are associated with higher activities of aldehyde oxidase and xanthine dehydrogenase, two cytosolic Fe-S proteins. Conclusions Our results suggest a relationship between gene expression pattern, biochemical effects, and transcription factor binding sites in promoter regions of cysteine desulfurase genes. Moreover, data show proportionality between NFS1 and ISD11

  5. Genome organization and characteristics of soybean microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Marie

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background microRNAs (miRNAs are key regulators of gene expression and play important roles in many aspects of plant biology. The role(s of miRNAs in nitrogen-fixing root nodules of leguminous plants such as soybean is not well understood. We examined a library of small RNAs from Bradyrhizobium japonicum-inoculated soybean roots and identified novel miRNAs. In order to enhance our understanding of miRNA evolution, diversification and function, we classified all known soybean miRNAs based on their phylogenetic conservation (conserved, legume- and soybean-specific miRNAs and examined their genome organization, family characteristics and target diversity. We predicted targets of these miRNAs and experimentally validated several of them. We also examined organ-specific expression of selected miRNAs and their targets. Results We identified 120 previously unknown miRNA genes from soybean including 5 novel miRNA families. In the soybean genome, genes encoding miRNAs are primarily intergenic and a small percentage were intragenic or less than 1000 bp from a protein-coding gene, suggesting potential co-regulation between the miRNA and its parent gene. Difference in number and orientation of tandemly duplicated miRNA genes between orthologous genomic loci indicated continuous evolution and diversification. Conserved miRNA families are often larger in size and produce less diverse mature miRNAs than legume- and soybean-specific families. In addition, the majority of conserved and legume-specific miRNA families produce 21 nt long mature miRNAs with distinct nucleotide distribution and regulate a more conserved set of target mRNAs compared to soybean-specific families. A set of nodule-specific target mRNAs and their cognate regulatory miRNAs had inverse expression between root and nodule tissues suggesting that spatial restriction of target gene transcripts by miRNAs might govern nodule-specific gene expression in soybean. Conclusions Genome

  6. Alternative Methods of Frying and Antioxidant Stability in Soybean Oil

    OpenAIRE

    Probir Kumar Ghosh; Dipan Chatterjee; Paramita Bhattacharjee

    2012-01-01

    A study on shallow and parfrying in soybean oil as alternatives to deep frying and evaluation of stability of a formulated antioxidant administered to the oil was conducted. Potato wedges were deep, shallow and parfried in soybean oil for optimized time and temperature. A citric acid based antioxidant using BHT was formulated and administered to the oils before frying. The performance of antioxidant was assessed by studying its physicochemical properties and DPPH radical scavenging activity w...

  7. Genetic effects of heavy ion irradiation in maize and soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatou, Osamu; Amano, Etsuo; Takahashi, Tan.

    1992-01-01

    Somatic mutation on leaves of maize and soybean were observed to investigate genetic effects of heavy ion irradiation. Maize seeds were irradiated with N, Fe and U ions and soybean seeds were irradiated with N ions. This is a preliminary report of the experiment, 1) to examine the mutagenic effects of the heavy ion irradiation, and 2) to evaluate the genetic effects of cosmic ray exposure in a space ship outside the earth. (author)

  8. Induced mutation in soybean (Glycine max L.) breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulmann Neto, A.; Menten, J.O.M.; Ando, A.

    1984-01-01

    The induced mutation in soybean (Glycine max, L.) breeding is studied. Seed treatment with gamma-rays or methanesulfonic acid ethyl ester (EMs) is used in the following varieties: Parana, Santa Rosa, UFV-1, Foscarin 31 and IAC-8. The study to obtain resistance to the soybean bud blight virus and mutants resistant to rust was done. Early mutants are also researched. (M.A.C.) [pt

  9. Soybean Extract Antioxidant Protective Activity Against Copper-Induced Cytotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Mansour I. Almansour

    2008-01-01

    The antioxidant activity of soybean crude extract against induced oxidative damage has been achieved through quails Coturnix coturnix treatment with various copper sulphate concentrations alone or with a protective dose of soybean crude extract. Several parameters of oxidative stress together with liver and kidney function tests in serum and liver tissue homogenate were studied. Hematologic indices and liver copper content were determined. Obtained data showed a significant increase in...

  10. A First Law Thermodynamic Analysis of Biodiesel Production from Soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzek, Tad W.

    2009-01-01

    A proper First Law energy balance of the soybean biodiesel cycle shows that the overall efficiency of biodiesel production is 0.18, i.e., only 1 in 5 parts of the solar energy sequestered as soya beans, plus the fossil energy inputs, becomes biodiesel. Soybean meal is produced with an overall energetic efficiency of 0.38, but it is not a fossil…

  11. Genetic diversity of soybean accessions using seed storage proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Z.; Naeem, R.

    2015-01-01

    Soybean, Glycine max (L) Merrill, is the most important grain legume in the world that has a fairly wide range of adaptations to different climatic conditions. The present study was conducted to assess genetic variations on 139 Soybean genotypes collected from different countries including Australia, Brazil, India, Japan, Pakistan, Tiwan, USA, Yugoslavia and China. A total of 17 bands have been identified for 139 Soybean genotypes which include 9 monomorphic bands and 8 polymorphic bands. Total number of bands was found highest for India (215) while these were lowest for Yugoslavia (33). Cluster analysis, clustered these accessions into 10 clusters without having any indication of grouping on the basis of their relationships to their regions. Pairwise comparisons based on Nei and Li similarities for inter-population genetic distances of soybean accessions ranged from 0.14 to 1.12. Genetic distances for soybean germplasm from different countries were found highest for Brazil (0.97+-0.03) while it was lowest for Taiwan (0.91+-0.02). Clustering for Soybean groups was clustered into three clusters including Korea, Taiwan in the first group while Yugoslavia and Japan were clustered in the second group. The third cluster was comprised of Soybean genotypes from China, Pakistan, USA, India Brazil and Australia. Total seed storage protein variation was partitioned by AMOVA on the basis of their origins into within-population and among-population components which revealed 10.00% of the total variation resided among countries and 90.0% within countries. Genetic patterns obtained from this study can help soybean breeders to make better plan for selecting germplasm from wide sources for a specific purposes. (author)

  12. Replenishment of Cultivated Soybean Varietes Market (Glycine hispida Maxim, Moench..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. І. Безручко

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available There provided ways of using valuable protein crop, soybean, as well as its production worldwide growth rates during recent years, possibility and necessity of attaching to the crop a strategic importance in our State and the tasks and outlooks of soybeanrecourses generation. A complete description of new soybean varieties listed in the Register of Varieties Suitable for Dissemination in Ukraine has also been provided.

  13. Deploying Fourier Coefficients to Unravel Soybean Canopy Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Jubery, Talukder Z.; Shook, Johnathon; Parmley, Kyle; Zhang, Jiaoping; Naik, Hsiang S.; Higgins, Race; Sarkar, Soumik; Singh, Arti; Singh, Asheesh K.; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2017-01-01

    Soybean canopy outline is an important trait used to understand light interception ability, canopy closure rates, row spacing response, which in turn affects crop growth and yield, and directly impacts weed species germination and emergence. In this manuscript, we utilize a methodology that constructs geometric measures of the soybean canopy outline from digital images of canopies, allowing visualization of the genetic diversity as well as a rigorous quantification of shape parameters. Our ch...

  14. Irradiation effects on the variability of yield characteristics of soybeans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasztor, K.; Egri, K.; Toeroek, Z.; Bornemiszane, P.P.

    1983-01-01

    The seeds of soybean varieties 'Merit' and 'S-1346' were irradiated by fast neutrons with doses between 4 and 174 Gy. The doses in the range of 57-174 Gy proved to be lethal. After low dose irradiation, shorter breeding time and the stimulation of plant growth could be observed. The effects of irradiation on the oil and protein contents of soybeans were contradictory. (V.N.)

  15. Immediate catalytic upgrading of soybean shell bio-oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertero, Melisa; Sedran, Ulises

    2016-01-01

    The pyrolysis of soybean shell and the immediate catalytic upgrading of the bio-oil over an equilibrium FCC catalyst was studied in order to define its potential as a source for fuels and chemicals. The experiments of pyrolysis and immediate catalytic upgrading were performed at 550 °C during 7 min with different catalysts to oil relationships in an integrated fixed bed pyrolysis-conversion reactor. The results were compared under the same conditions against those from pine sawdust, which is a biomass source commonly used for the production of bio-oil. In the pyrolysis the pine sawdust produced more liquids (61.4%wt.) than the soybean shell (54.7%wt.). When the catalyst was presented, the yield of hydrocarbons increased, particularly in the case of soybean shell, which was four time higher than in the pyrolysis. The bio-oil from soybean shell produced less coke (between 3.1 and 4.3%wt.) in its immediate catalytic upgrading than that from pine sawdust (between 5 and 5.8%wt.), due to its lower content of phenolic and other high molecular weight compounds (three and five times less, respectively). Moreover, soybean shell showed a higher selectivity to hydrocarbons in the gasoline range, with more olefins and less aromatic than pine sawdust. - Highlights: • Soybean shell is a possible source of fuels with benefits as compared to pine sawdust. • Bio-oils upgraded over FCC catalyst in an integrated pyrolysis-conversion reactor. • Pine sawdust bio-oil had more phenols than soybean shell bio-oil. • Soybean shell bio-oil produced more hydrocarbons in gasoline range and less coke.

  16. Improvement of the protein quality of corn with soybean protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressani, R; Elías, L G; Braham, J E

    1978-01-01

    In most Central American countries, lime-treated corn provides 31% of the total protein and 45% of the energy intake, and beans 24% of the protein and 12% of the calories. Such diet is low in protein quality and quantity, as well as in energy. To overcome these deficiencies, corn can be supplemented either with its limiting amino acids, lysine and tryptophan, or better still, with whole soybeans which improve not only the amount and quality of the protein consumed but, because of their high oil content, the energy intake as well. In addition, animal experiments have shown that for maximum utilization of these nutrients, adequate vitamin and mineral intake is indispensable. At a level of 15 parts of whole soybean or 8 parts soybean-derived products, to 85--92 parts of corn there were no significant changes in the rheological or organoleptic characteristics of the tortilla prepared there of. Higher levels of soybean products, however, may affect the consistency of the lime-treated corn dough and, therefore, the tortilla acceptability. Since corn is usually cooked, but not ground, at home, the soybean supplement can be successfully added at the wet--milling stage of dough preparation or whole soybeans and corn may be cooked together, when a nutritional intervention is desired at the village level. At an industrial scale, if whole soybeans are used, they may be cooked together with corn, and if soy flour is used, this can be mixed at the end of the process when the cooked corn is ground to a flour. A flow diagram for supplementing corn with 15% whole soybeans is presented. If interventions of this nature are to be successful, there is need for increasing the prestige of corn-based food, as well as of nutrition education programs in these populations.

  17. Domestication footprints anchor genomic regions of agronomic importance in soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yingpeng; Zhao, Xue; Liu, Dongyuan; Li, Yinghui; Lightfoot, David A; Yang, Zhijiang; Zhao, Lin; Zhou, Gang; Wang, Zhikun; Huang, Long; Zhang, Zhiwu; Qiu, Lijuan; Zheng, Hongkun; Li, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Present-day soybeans consist of elite cultivars and landraces (Glycine max, fully domesticated (FD)), annual wild type (Glycine soja, nondomesticated (ND)), and semi-wild type (semi-domesticated (SD)). FD soybean originated in China, although the details of its domestication history remain obscure. More than 500 diverse soybean accessions were sequenced using specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) to address fundamental questions regarding soybean domestication. In total, 64,141 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with minor allele frequencies (MAFs) > 0.05 were found among the 512 tested accessions. The results indicated that the SD group is not a hybrid between the FD and ND groups. The initial domestication region was pinpointed to central China (demarcated by the Great Wall to the north and the Qinling Mountains to the south). A total of 800 highly differentiated genetic regions and > 140 selective sweeps were identified, and these were three- and twofold more likely, respectively, to encompass a known quantitative trait locus (QTL) than the rest of the soybean genome. Forty-three potential quantitative trait nucleotides (QTNs; including 15 distinct traits) were identified by genome-wide association mapping. The results of the present study should be beneficial for soybean improvement and provide insight into the genetic architecture of traits of agronomic importance. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Differential responses of B vitamins in black soybean seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gi-Ppeum; Lee, Jinwook; Ahn, Kyung-Geun; Hwang, Young-Sun; Choi, Youngmin; Chun, Jiyeon; Chang, Woo-Suk; Choung, Myoung-Gun

    2014-06-15

    This study was aimed to determine the contents and the association of B vitamins from seeds of 10 black and one yellow soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) varieties with either green or yellow cotyledon. Thiamine, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), riboflavin and total riboflavin were found highest in 'Chengjakong', while flavin mononucleotide (FMN) was greatest in 'Mirang'. Nicotinic acid and total vitamin B3 were highest in 'Shingi' as a yellow soybean variety but pantothenic acid and pyridoxine contents were greatest in 'Tawon' and 'Mirang', respectively. These content variations of B vitamins directly reflected the wide segregation of soybean varieties on the principal component analysis (PCA) scores plot, indicating that these 4 soybean varieties appeared to be least associated with other soybean varieties based on the different responses of B vitamins. The results of cluster and correlation analyses presented that the cotyledon colour of soybean seed contributed to a variation of B vitamin contents. Overall, the results suggest that a wide range of B vitamin contents would be affected by genotypic factors alongside the difference of cotyledon colour. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Drought stress responses in soybean roots and nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Kunert

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Drought is considered to be a major threat to soybean production worldwide and yet our current understanding of the effects of drought on soybean productively is largely based on studies on above-ground traits. Although the roots and root nodules are important sensors of drought, the responses of these crucial organs and their drought tolerance features remain poorly characterized. The symbiotic interaction between soybean and rhizobia facilitates atmospheric nitrogen fixation, a process that provides essential nitrogen to support plant growth and development. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is important for sustainable agriculture, as it sustains plant growth on nitrogen-poor soils and limits fertilizer use for crop nitrogen nutrition. Recent developments have been made in our understanding of the drought impact on soybean root architecture and nodule traits, as well as underpinning transcriptome, proteome and also emerging metabolome information, with a view to improve the selection of more drought-tolerant soybean cultivars and rhizobia in the future. We conclude that the direct screening of root and nodule traits in the field as well as identification of genes, proteins and also metabolites involved in such traits will be essential in order to gain a better understanding of the regulation of root architecture, bacteroid development and lifespan in relation to drought tolerance in soybean.

  20. Drought Stress Responses in Soybean Roots and Nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert, Karl J; Vorster, Barend J; Fenta, Berhanu A; Kibido, Tsholofelo; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Foyer, Christine H

    2016-01-01

    Drought is considered to be a major threat to soybean production worldwide and yet our current understanding of the effects of drought on soybean productively is largely based on studies on above-ground traits. Although the roots and root nodules are important sensors of drought, the responses of these crucial organs and their drought tolerance features remain poorly characterized. The symbiotic interaction between soybean and rhizobia facilitates atmospheric nitrogen fixation, a process that provides essential nitrogen to support plant growth and development. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is important for sustainable agriculture, as it sustains plant growth on nitrogen-poor soils and limits fertilizer use for crop nitrogen nutrition. Recent developments have been made in our understanding of the drought impact on soybean root architecture and nodule traits, as well as underpinning transcriptome, proteome and also emerging metabolome information, with a view to improve the selection of more drought-tolerant soybean cultivars and rhizobia in the future. We conclude that the direct screening of root and nodule traits in the field as well as identification of genes, proteins and also metabolites involved in such traits will be essential in order to gain a better understanding of the regulation of root architecture, bacteroid development and lifespan in relation to drought tolerance in soybean.

  1. PROTECTION FOR OPTIMUM TARIFF OF SOYBEAN IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reni Kustiari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean is one of the major food commodities after rice and maize which have the advantage of protein-rich, therefore its usefulness as a food of vegetable protein source are various. National soybean consumption in 2011 amounted to 2.95 million tons, while domestik production had reached 851 thousand tons, there is a deficiency that must be imported around 2.1 million tons or about 71 percent of the total national consumption. Government support policies (seed, fertilizer and mechanization subsidy have increased farmers’ profit. However, protection policy such as import tariff of around 15.8 percent, 27.7 percent or 41.4 percent should be considered, in order farmer to achieve profits around 25 percent, 30 percent or 35 percent of total revenue, respectively. Import tariff above 27 percent could not be applied because bound rate of import soybean is 27 percent. Currently, the profit of soybean farming is around 16.5 percent of total revenue. The main purpose of this paper are as follows: (a to analyze the profitability of soybean farming system; (b to analyze the impact of government policies (import tariff on the economy in general, and (d to formulate policy recommendations for development of soybean industry and farmers’ income

  2. Diurnal Oscillations of Soybean Circadian Clock and Drought Responsive Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcolino-Gomes, Juliana; Rodrigues, Fabiana Aparecida; Fuganti-Pagliarini, Renata; Bendix, Claire; Nakayama, Thiago Jonas; Celaya, Brandon; Molinari, Hugo Bruno Correa; de Oliveira, Maria Cristina Neves; Harmon, Frank G.; Nepomuceno, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Rhythms produced by the endogenous circadian clock play a critical role in allowing plants to respond and adapt to the environment. While there is a well-established regulatory link between the circadian clock and responses to abiotic stress in model plants, little is known of the circadian system in crop species like soybean. This study examines how drought impacts diurnal oscillation of both drought responsive and circadian clock genes in soybean. Drought stress induced marked changes in gene expression of several circadian clock-like components, such as LCL1-, GmELF4- and PRR-like genes, which had reduced expression in stressed plants. The same conditions produced a phase advance of expression for the GmTOC1-like, GmLUX-like and GmPRR7-like genes. Similarly, the rhythmic expression pattern of the soybean drought-responsive genes DREB-, bZIP-, GOLS-, RAB18- and Remorin-like changed significantly after plant exposure to drought. In silico analysis of promoter regions of these genes revealed the presence of cis-elements associated both with stress and circadian clock regulation. Furthermore, some soybean genes with upstream ABRE elements were responsive to abscisic acid treatment. Our results indicate that some connection between the drought response and the circadian clock may exist in soybean since (i) drought stress affects gene expression of circadian clock components and (ii) several stress responsive genes display diurnal oscillation in soybeans. PMID:24475115

  3. Diurnal oscillations of soybean circadian clock and drought responsive genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Marcolino-Gomes

    Full Text Available Rhythms produced by the endogenous circadian clock play a critical role in allowing plants to respond and adapt to the environment. While there is a well-established regulatory link between the circadian clock and responses to abiotic stress in model plants, little is known of the circadian system in crop species like soybean. This study examines how drought impacts diurnal oscillation of both drought responsive and circadian clock genes in soybean. Drought stress induced marked changes in gene expression of several circadian clock-like components, such as LCL1-, GmELF4- and PRR-like genes, which had reduced expression in stressed plants. The same conditions produced a phase advance of expression for the GmTOC1-like, GmLUX-like and GmPRR7-like genes. Similarly, the rhythmic expression pattern of the soybean drought-responsive genes DREB-, bZIP-, GOLS-, RAB18- and Remorin-like changed significantly after plant exposure to drought. In silico analysis of promoter regions of these genes revealed the presence of cis-elements associated both with stress and circadian clock regulation. Furthermore, some soybean genes with upstream ABRE elements were responsive to abscisic acid treatment. Our results indicate that some connection between the drought response and the circadian clock may exist in soybean since (i drought stress affects gene expression of circadian clock components and (ii several stress responsive genes display diurnal oscillation in soybeans.

  4. Specific subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins play important roles during nodulation in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Swarup Roy; Pandey, Sona

    2013-05-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins comprising Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits regulate many fundamental growth and development processes in all eukaryotes. Plants possess a relatively limited number of G-protein components compared with mammalian systems, and their detailed functional characterization has been performed mostly in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa). However, the presence of single Gα and Gβ proteins in both these species has significantly undermined the complexity and specificity of response regulation in plant G-protein signaling. There is ample pharmacological evidence for the role of G proteins in regulation of legume-specific processes such as nodulation, but the lack of genetic data from a leguminous species has restricted its direct assessment. Our recent identification and characterization of an elaborate G-protein family in soybean (Glycine max) and the availability of appropriate molecular-genetic resources have allowed us to directly evaluate the role of G-protein subunits during nodulation. We demonstrate that all G-protein genes are expressed in nodules and exhibit significant changes in their expression in response to Bradyrhizobium japonicum infection and in representative supernodulating and nonnodulating soybean mutants. RNA interference suppression and overexpression of specific G-protein components results in lower and higher nodule numbers, respectively, validating their roles as positive regulators of nodule formation. Our data further show preferential usage of distinct G-protein subunits in the presence of an additional signal during nodulation. Interestingly, the Gα proteins directly interact with the soybean nodulation factor receptors NFR1α and NFR1β, suggesting that the plant G proteins may couple with receptors other than the canonical heptahelical receptors common in metazoans to modulate signaling.

  5. Infection of Lotus japonicus Roots by Mesorhizobium loti

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markmann, Katharina; Radutoiu, Elena Simona; Stougaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Like the two important crop legumes soybean and common bean, the model legume Lotus japonicus develops determinate root nodules. L. japonicus is normally infected through root hair infection threads in a process closely synchronised with the progressing primordial cell divisions and organ...

  6. Relationships among the Non-Genetically Modified Soybean and Energy Prices

    OpenAIRE

    Aruga, Kentaka

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, recently the use of soybeans as an energy source has drawn attention. It is concerned in Japan that if the use of soybeans for energy keeps increasing, not only the price of conventional soybeans, which is used for soybean oil, but also the price of non-genetically modified organism (Non-GMO) soybeans, which is consumed for food, will increase. This paper examines the price relationships between the non-GMO and conventional soybean prices, and energy prices such as those...

  7. Effects of replacing soybean meal with xylose-treated soybean meal on performance of nursing Awassi ewes and fattening lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mofleh S. Awawdeh

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of replacing soybean meal with xylose-treated soybean meal (soypass meal; SPM on performance of nursing Awassi ewes and fattening lambs. In Experiment 1, lasting for eight weeks, 39 Awassi ewes and their lambs were randomly assigned to three diets. Diets were formulated by replacing soybean meal from the basal diet (CON-SBM; n=13 with 50% (50% SPM; n=13 and 100% (100% SPM; n=13 SPM. Initial and final weights of the ewes were not different (P>0.55 among diets. Total gain and average daily gain (ADG of lambs were similar (P=0.44 among diets. Ewes fed the CON-SBM diet tended (P0.38 in milk component percentages among diets were observed. In Experiment 2, lasting for 63 days, twenty weaned lambs were used to determine the effects of replacing soybean meal with SPM on growth performance. Diets were either soybean meal (SBM; n=10 or SPM (SPM; n=10. Nutrient intake and digestibility were not different between diets. However, rumen undegradable protein intake was greater (P0.05 between the diets. Results suggest that replacement of soybean meal with soypass meal is not likely to produce any production benefits in nursing Awassi ewes and fattening lambs except for the slight improvement of milk yield.

  8. Gene Expression Profiling Soybean Stem Tissue Early Response to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and In Silico Mapping in Relation to Resistance Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernarda Calla

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available White mold, caused by (Lib. de Bary, can be a serious disease of crops grown under cool, moist environments. In many plants, such as soybean [ (L. Merr.], complete genetic resistance does not exist. To identify possible genes involved in defense against this pathogen, and to determine possible physiological changes that occur during infection, a microarray screen was conducted using stem tissue to evaluate changes in gene expression between partially resistant and susceptible soybean genotypes at 8 and 14 hours post inoculation. RNA from 15 day-old inoculated plants was labeled and hybridized to soybean cDNA microarrays. ANOVA identified 1270 significant genes from the comparison between time points and 105 genes from the comparison between genotypes. Selected genes were classified into functional categories. The analyses identified changes in cell-wall composition and signaling pathways, as well as suggesting a role for anthocyanin and anthocyanidin synthesis in the defense against . In-silico mapping of both the differentially expressed transcripts and of public markers associated with partial resistance to white mold, provided evidence of several differentially expressed genes being closely positioned to white mold resistance markers, with the two most promising genes encoding a PR-5 and anthocyanidin synthase.

  9. The role of mycorrhizal symbiosis in aluminum and phosphorus interactions in relation to aluminum tolerance in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang; Zhou, Jia; Wang, Guihua; Wang, Xiurong; Liao, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi protect plants against aluminum (Al) toxicity, but the mechanisms of Al and phosphorus (P) interactions in relation to Al tolerance in mycorrhizal plants are only poorly understood. In this study, varying Al and P treatments were applied to soybean plants cultivated in the presence or absence of three different AM fungi. The results showed that plants in symbiotic association with Gigaspora margarita displayed higher Al tolerance than Rhizophagus irregularis or Glomus claroideum. The effectiveness of G. margarita appeared to be associated with more abundant arbuscules and less affected intraradical hyphae compared to no Al controls. The highest levels of Al toxicity mitigation were observed with the combination of high P availability and AM fungal inoculation, which was associated with a concomitant increase in the expression of the AM-inducible phosphate (Pi) transporter gene GmPT9 in soybean. Taken together, these results suggest that AM symbiosis can alleviate Al toxicity in soybean through enhanced P nutrition, as well as, the alteration of the abundance of mycorrhizal infection structures. These findings highlight the importance of P nutrition status in ameliorating Al toxicity in mycorrhizal plants.

  10. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses identify a role for chlorophyll catabolism and phytoalexin during Medicago nonhost resistance against Asian soybean rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Uppalapati, Srinivasa Rao; Gill, Upinder S; Huhman, David; Tang, Yuhong; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2015-08-12

    Asian soybean rust (ASR) caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi is a devastating foliar disease affecting soybean production worldwide. Understanding nonhost resistance against ASR may provide an avenue to engineer soybean to confer durable resistance against ASR. We characterized a Medicago truncatula-ASR pathosystem to study molecular mechanisms of nonhost resistance. Although urediniospores formed appressoria and penetrated into epidermal cells of M. truncatula, P. pachyrhizi failed to sporulate. Transcriptomic analysis revealed the induction of phenylpropanoid, flavonoid and isoflavonoid metabolic pathway genes involved in the production of phytoalexin medicarpin in M. truncatula upon infection with P. pachyrhizi. Furthermore, genes involved in chlorophyll catabolism were induced during nonhost resistance. We further characterized one of the chlorophyll catabolism genes, Stay-green (SGR), and demonstrated that the M. truncatula sgr mutant and alfalfa SGR-RNAi lines showed hypersensitive-response-like enhanced cell death upon inoculation with P. pachyrhizi. Consistent with transcriptomic analysis, metabolomic analysis also revealed the accumulation of medicarpin and its intermediate metabolites. In vitro assay showed that medicarpin inhibited urediniospore germination and differentiation. In addition, several triterpenoid saponin glycosides accumulated in M. truncatula upon inoculation with P. pachyrhizi. In summary, using multi-omic approaches, we identified a correlation between phytoalexin production and M. truncatula defense responses against ASR.

  11. Aboveground feeding by soybean aphid, Aphis glycines, affects soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines, reproduction belowground.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T McCarville

    Full Text Available Heterodera glycines is a cyst nematode that causes significant lost soybean yield in the U.S. Recent studies observed the aphid Aphis glycines and H. glycines interacting via their shared host, soybean, Glycine max. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to discern the effect of A. glycines feeding on H. glycines reproduction. An H. glycines-susceptible cultivar, Kenwood 94, and a resistant cultivar, Dekalb 27-52, were grown in H. glycines-infested soil for 30 and 60 d. Ten days after planting, plants were infested with either zero, five, or ten aphids. At 30 and 60 d, the number of H. glycines females and cysts (dead females and the number of eggs within were counted. In general, H. glycines were less abundant on the resistant than the susceptible cultivar, and H. glycines abundance increased from 30 to 60 d. At 30 d, 33% more H. glycines females and eggs were produced on the resistant cultivar in the ten-aphid treatment compared to the zero-aphid treatment. However, at 30 d the susceptible cultivar had 50% fewer H. glycines females and eggs when infested with ten aphids. At 60 d, numbers of H. glycines females and cysts and numbers of eggs on the resistant cultivar were unaffected by A. glycines feeding, while numbers of both were decreased by A. glycines on the susceptible cultivar. These results indicate that A. glycines feeding improves the quality of soybean as a host for H. glycines, but at higher herbivore population densities, this effect is offset by a decrease in resource quantity.

  12. A Technique for Evaluating Heterodera glycines Development in Susceptible and Resistant Soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbrendt, J M; Lewis, S A; Shipe, E R

    1992-03-01

    A technique was developed to evaluate Heterodera glycines development in susceptible and resistant soybean. Roots of 3-day-old soybean were exposed to infective juveniles of H. glyci.nes in sand for 8 hours followed by washing and transfer to hydroponic culture. The cotyledons and apical meristem were removed and plants were maintained under constant light, which resulted in a dwarfed plant system. After 15 or 20 days at 27 C, nematodes were rated for development. Emerged males were sieved from the culture water and females were counted directly from the roots. Nematodes remaining in the roots were rated for development after staining and clearing the tissues. The proportion of nematodes at each stage of development and the frequency of completed molts for each stage were calculated from these data. This technique showed that resistance to H. glycines was stage related and did not affect males and females equally in all resistant hosts. The resistance of plant introduction PI 209332 primarily affected development of third and fourth-stage juveniles; 'Pickett' mainly affected second and third-stage juveniles, whereas PI 89772 affected all stages. Male development was markedly affected in PI 89772 and 'Pickett' but not in PI 209332.

  13. Inoculant of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Rhizophagus clarus increase yield of soybean and cotton under field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Viviana Torres Cely

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient availability is an important factor in crop production, and regular addition of chemical fertilizers is the most common practice to improve yield in agrosystems for intensive crop production. The use of some groups of microorganisms that have specific activity providing nutrients to plants is a good alternative, and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF enhance plant nutrition by providing especially phosphorus (P, improving plant growth and increasing crop production. Unfortunately, the use of AMF as an inoculant on a large scale is not yet widely used, because of several limitations in obtaining a large amount of inoculum due to several factors, such as low growth, the few species domesticated under in vitro conditions, and high competition with native AMF. The objective of this work was to test the infectivity of a Rhizophagus clarus inoculum and its effectiveness as an alternative for P supply in soybean (Glycine max L. and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.. The experiments were carried out in plots and the treatments were: Fertilizer; AMF, AMF + Fertilizer and AMF + ½ Fertilizer; non-inoculated and non-fertilized plants were considered the control. The parameters evaluated were AMF root colonization and effect of inoculation on plant growth and yield under a field conditions. The results showed that AMF inoculation increased the effect of fertilizer application in soybean, and that in cotton R. clarus was more effective than chemical fertilizer

  14. Molecular cloning and organization of two leghaemoglobin genomic sequences of soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, D.; Brisson, N.; Goodchild, B.; Verma, D. P. S.

    1981-02-01

    The leghaemoglobins (Lb) are myoglobin-like proteins found in all nitrogen-fixing root nodules of legumes1-3. They are encoded by plant nuclear genes4 which are specifically induced and form the predominant protein in nodules developed in symbiosis with the appropriate species of Rhizobium. The Lb is located in the host-cell cytoplasm of the infected cell5 and is thought to facilitate oxygen diffusion6,7. Amino acid sequencing of the soybean Lbs has revealed at least four primary structures differing only in a few amino acids8-10. We have previously estimated about 40 copies of Lb sequences in the soybean (Glycine max L.) genome by cDNA hybridization4. To investigate Lb gene organization and function, we prepared and characterized a Lb cDNA recombinant molecule, pLb1, and used it to isolate two genomic Lb sequences from a library constructed in Charon 4. We report here that the organization of the two genomic Lb sequences is quite distinct and one of them seems to have an intervening sequence(s). Hybridization of pLb1 with genomic DNA from various tissues showed that Lb sequences are dispersed through more than 30 kilobases of genomic DNA and that there is no apparent sequence rearrangement or methylation changes following induction of Lb genes.

  15. Characterization of kudzu (Pueraria spp.) resistance to Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the causal agent of soybean rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Stephen A; Mailhot, Daniel J; Gevens, Amanda J; Marois, Jim J; Wright, David L; Harmon, Carrie L; Harmon, Philip F

    2010-09-01

    Kudzu (Pueraria spp.) is an accessory host for soybean rust (SBR) (caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi) that is widespread throughout the southeastern United States. An expanded survey of kudzu sites was conducted in 2008 to determine the proportion of natural resistance in the north-Florida kudzu population. Of the 139 sites evaluated, approximately 18% were found to be free of SBR infection, while 23% had reduced sporulation. Ten accessions of kudzu from north-central Florida were characterized for their response to challenge by a single isolate of P. pachyrhizi under laboratory conditions. Three outcomes were observed: tan lesions with profuse sporulation (susceptible); reddish-brown lesions with delayed, reduced sporulation (resistant); and an immune response in which no lesions developed (immune). Of the 10 accessions, 6 were susceptible, 3 were immune, and 1 was resistant. Cytological examination revealed that resistant interactions were typified by early onset of a multicell hypersensitive response (HR) while typical immune interactions were the result of cell wall depositions that blocked penetration in combination with early onset of the HR. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to determine the extent of colonization. After 15 days, there was 10-fold less P. pachyrhizi DNA present in resistant compared with susceptible kudzu, while the amount of P. pachyrhizi DNA present in the immune kudzu was below the detection level. Susceptible kudzu had approximately half the amount of P. pachyrhizi DNA present when compared with a susceptible soybean cultivar.

  16. Molecular mapping of two loci that confer resistance to Asian rust in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Danielle C G; Yamanaka, Naoki; Brogin, Rodrigo L; Arias, Carlos A A; Nepomuceno, Alexandre L; Di Mauro, Antônio O; Pereira, Selma S; Nogueira, Livia M; Passianotto, André L L; Abdelnoor, Ricardo V

    2008-06-01

    Asian soybean rust (ASR) is caused by the fungal pathogen Phakopsora pachyrhizi Sydow & Sydow. It was first identified in Brazil in 2001 and quickly infected soybean areas in several countries in South America. Primary efforts to combat this disease must involve the development of resistant cultivars. Four distinct genes that confer resistance against ASR have been reported: Rpp1, Rpp2, Rpp3, and Rpp4. However, no cultivar carrying any of those resistance loci has been released. The main objective of this study was to genetically map Rpp2 and Rpp4 resistance genes. Two F(2:3) populations, derived from the crosses between the resistant lines PI 230970 (Rpp2), PI 459025 (Rpp4) and the susceptible cultivar BRS 184, were used in this study. The mapping populations and parental lines were inoculated with a field isolate of P. pachyrhizi and evaluated for lesion type as resistant (RB lesions) or susceptible (TAN lesions). The mapping populations were screened with SSR markers, using the bulk segregant analysis (BSA) to expedite the identification of linked markers. Both resistance genes showed an expected segregation ratio for a dominant trait. This study allowed mapping Rpp2 and Rpp4 loci on the linkage groups J and G, respectively. The associated markers will be of great value on marker assisted selection for this trait.

  17. Soybean Protein Fibres Part 2: Soybean Fibres Properties and Application Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Filiz Yıldırım

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean protein fibres (SPF, which is a protein based botanic fibre, has various beneficialproperties such as softness, brightness, smoothness, drape, UV and bacterial resistance. These fibers areused in production of various yarn blends, woven, knit and nonwoven fabrics to manufature apperal andhome textiles such as t-shirts, bedding, sweater and baby dress due to these superior properties. This review,about SPF, is divided into two sections. In the first part; structure and production stages of SPF and itsenviromental effects had been described. In the second part of this review, properties and application areasof SPF have been described.

  18. Endophytic fungi from selected varieties of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) and corn (Zea mays L.) grown in an agricultural area of Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, María L.; Pelizza, Sebastián A.; Cabello, Marta Noemí; Stenglein, Sebastián A.; Vianna, María F.; Scorsetti, Ana C.

    2016-01-01

    Endophytic fungi are ubiquitous and live within host plants without causing any noticeable symptoms of disease. Little is known about the diversity and function of fungal endophytes in plants, particularly in economically important species. The aim of this study was to determine the identity and diversity of endophytic fungi in leaves, stems and roots of soybean and corn plants and to determine their infection frequencies. Plants were collected in six areas of the provinces of Buenos Aires an...

  19. SoyDB: a knowledge database of soybean transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valliyodan Babu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors play the crucial rule of regulating gene expression and influence almost all biological processes. Systematically identifying and annotating transcription factors can greatly aid further understanding their functions and mechanisms. In this article, we present SoyDB, a user friendly database containing comprehensive knowledge of soybean transcription factors. Description The soybean genome was recently sequenced by the Department of Energy-Joint Genome Institute (DOE-JGI and is publicly available. Mining of this sequence identified 5,671 soybean genes as putative transcription factors. These genes were comprehensively annotated as an aid to the soybean research community. We developed SoyDB - a knowledge database for all the transcription factors in the soybean genome. The database contains protein sequences, predicted tertiary structures, putative DNA binding sites, domains, homologous templates in the Protein Data Bank (PDB, protein family classifications, multiple sequence alignments, consensus protein sequence motifs, web logo of each family, and web links to the soybean transcription factor database PlantTFDB, known EST sequences, and other general protein databases including Swiss-Prot, Gene Ontology, KEGG, EMBL, TAIR, InterPro, SMART, PROSITE, NCBI, and Pfam. The database can be accessed via an interactive and convenient web server, which supports full-text search, PSI-BLAST sequence search, database browsing by protein family, and automatic classification of a new protein sequence into one of 64 annotated transcription factor families by hidden Markov models. Conclusions A comprehensive soybean transcription factor database was constructed and made publicly accessible at http://casp.rnet.missouri.edu/soydb/.

  20. Detection of Unlabeled Genetically Modified Soybean in the Omani Market

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    Nabila Al-Sadqi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to screen for products containing Genetically Modified (GM food in the Omani market using detection methods for the presence of Roundup Ready Soybean, Bt176 and MON810 maize in food products and to quantify it in positive samples using real time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR. A total of 100 food samples were collected randomly from markets in Oman. Out of 59 samples, 8  (13.5% were successfully amplified with the maize plant specific PCR. GM screening showed negative for all samples, which indicated low or no GM maize in the samples tested. Out of 57 soy containing samples, 40 (70% were successfully amplified by the soybean plant specific PCR. Six samples out of the 40 (15% were found positive for GM using P35S-cf3/P35S-cr4 and HA-nos118-f/HA-nos118-r, primer pairs and using GMO5/GMO9 and GMO7/GMO8 primer pairs for specific detection of Roundup Ready Soybean. Real time PCR (TaqMan™ system was carried out for the positive Roundup Ready Soybean samples and results showed that 2 out of the positive GM soy samples contained more than 5%; a Soy Formula for Infants (imported sample contained 21% GM soybean and raw soybean seeds (imported in bulk amounts and packed in Oman  contained 88% GM soybean. The results demonstrate for the first time the presence of GM-soy in food products in the Omani market, reinforcing the need for the use of qualitative and quantitative methods for GM detection in food products.

  1. Association mapping of soybean seed germination under salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Guizhen; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Wenming; Ma, Deyuan; Zhang, Dan; Hao, Derong; Hu, Zhenbin; Yu, Deyue

    2015-12-01

    Soil salinity is a serious threat to agriculture sustainability worldwide. Seed germination is a critical phase that ensures the successful establishment and productivity of soybeans in saline soils. However, little information is available regarding soybean salt tolerance at the germination stage. The objective of this study was to identify the genetic mechanisms of soybean seed germination under salt stress. One natural population consisting of 191 soybean landraces was used in this study. Soybean seeds produced in four environments were used to evaluate the salt tolerance at their germination stage. Using 1142 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), the molecular markers associated with salt tolerance were detected by genome-wide association analysis. Eight SNP-trait associations and 13 suggestive SNP-trait associations were identified using a mixed linear model and the TASSEL 4.0 software. Eight SNPs or suggestive SNPs were co-associated with two salt tolerance indices, namely (1) the ratio of the germination index under salt conditions to the germination index under no-salt conditions (ST-GI) and (2) the ratio of the germination rate under salt conditions to the germination rate under no-salt conditions (ST-GR). One SNP (BARC-021347-04042) was significantly associated with these two traits (ST-GI and ST-GR). In addition, nine possible candidate genes were located in or near the genetic region where the above markers were mapped. Of these, five genes, Glyma08g12400.1, Glyma08g09730.1, Glyma18g47140.1, Glyma09g00460.1, and Glyma09g00490.3, were verified in response to salt stress at the germination stage. The SNPs detected could facilitate a better understanding of the genetic basis of soybean salt tolerance at the germination stage, and the marker BARC-021347-04042 could contribute to future breeding for soybean salt tolerance by marker-assisted selection.

  2. Manganese uptake and redistribution in soybean as affected by glyphosate

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    Ciro Antonio Rosolem

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Detrimental effects of glyphosate on plant mineral nutrition have been reported in the literature, particularly on Mn uptake and redistribution. However, in most of the experiments conducted so far glyphosate-susceptible plants were used. Effects of glyphosate on Mn absorption kinetics, accumulation, and distribution within the plant, as well as soybean response to Mn as affected by glyphosate were studied in three experiments. In the first experiment, in nutrient solution, the effect of glyphosate on soybean Mn uptake kinetic parameters (Imax, Km and Cmin was determined. In a second experiment, also in nutrient solution, differential Mn accumulation and distribution were studied for a conventional soybean cultivar and its near-isogenic glyphosate-resistant counterpart as affected by glyphosate. In a third experiment, response of glyphosate-resistant soybean cultivars to Mn application was studied in the presence of glyphosate, in pots with Mn-deficient soil. Maximum Mn influx (Imax was higher in the herbicide-resistant (GR cultivar than in its conventional counterpart. Glyphosate applied to nutrient solution at low rates decreased Km and Cmin. A few days after herbicide treatment, RR soybean plants developed yellowish leaves, a symptom which, in the field, could be misinterpreted as Mn deficiency, but herbicide application had no effect on Mn uptake or distribution within the plant. In the soil experiment, soybean Mn uptake was increased by Mn application, with no effect of glyphosate. Under greenhouse conditions, there was no evidence of deleterious effects of glyphosate on Mn absorption, accumulation and distribution in the plant and on soybean cultivars response to Mn application.

  3. Alternatives to sowing vegetable type soybeans

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    Edcarlos Mannfredini

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Today, soybean crops of the Tamba Kurodaisu cultivar are sown in beds prior to transplantation to the field. This planting system has caused crop failure due to damage to the root system. An experiment to test different sowing alternatives to obtain plantlets for cropping of food type big seeded soybean was set up with the following treatments: sowing in beds; sowing in 130 cm³ newspaper cups; sowing in test tubes of volumes of 30 cm³, 60 cm³ and 70 cm³; sowing in 70 cm³ disposable plastic cups; sowing on 90 cm³ styrofoam trays. A randomized complete block design was used, and the following traits were assessed: germination percentage; number of days to flowering; plant height at flowering; number of days to maturity; plant height at maturity; number of seeds per plant; individual plant yield; weight of a hundred seeds. Results should that three methods could be used to set up Tamba Kurodaisu cultivar crops: sowing in disposable plastic cups, sowing in beds with later transplant, or direct sowing in the field.Atualmente, as lavouras com o cultivar Tamba Kurodaisu são semeadas em canteiros, para posterior transplante no campo. Este sistema tem causado falhas na lavoura, por ocorrer danificação no sistema radicular. Com o objetivo de testar diferentes alternativas de semeadura para obtenção de mudas visando a implantação de lavouras de soja tipo alimento, com sementes graúdas, instalou-se um experimento com os seguintes tratamentos: Semeadura em canteiros; Semeadura em copos de jornal, com volume (V igual a 130 cm³; Semeadura em tubetes, com V = 30 cm³; V = 60 cm³; V = 70 cm³; Semeadura em copos plásticos descartáveis, com V = 70 cm³; Semeadura em bandejas de isopor, com V = 90cm³. O delineamento utilizado foi blocos casualizados, tendo sido avaliados os seguintes caracteres: Porcentagem de germinação; Número de plantas por parcela; Número de dias para o florescimento; Altura da planta no florescimento; Número de dias

  4. Dissection of two soybean QTL conferring partial resistance to Phytophthora sojae through sequence and gene expression analysis

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    Wang Hehe

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytophthora sojae is the primary pathogen of soybeans that are grown on poorly drained soils. Race-specific resistance to P. sojae in soybean is gene-for-gene, although in many areas of the US and worldwide there are populations that have adapted to the most commonly deployed resistance to P. sojae ( Rps genes. Hence, this system has received increased attention towards identifying mechanisms and molecular markers associated with partial resistance to this pathogen. Several quantitative trait loci (QTL have been identified in the soybean cultivar ‘Conrad’ that contributes to the expression of partial resistance to multiple P. sojae isolates. Results In this study, two of the Conrad QTL on chromosome 19 were dissected through sequence and expression analysis of genes in both resistant (Conrad and susceptible (‘Sloan’ genotypes. There were 1025 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 87 of 153 genes sequenced from Conrad and Sloan. There were 304 SNPs in 54 genes sequenced from Conrad compared to those from both Sloan and Williams 82, of which 11 genes had SNPs unique to Conrad. Eleven of 19 genes in these regions analyzed with qRT-PCR had significant differences in fold change of transcript abundance in response to infection with P. sojae in lines with QTL haplotype from the resistant parent compared to those with the susceptible parent haplotype. From these, 8 of the 11 genes had SNPs in the upstream, untranslated region, exon, intron, and/or downstream region. These 11 candidate genes encode proteins potentially involved in signal transduction, hormone-mediated pathways, plant cell structural modification, ubiquitination, and basal resistance. Conclusions These findings may indicate a complex defense network with multiple mechanisms underlying these two soybean QTL conferring resistance to P. sojae. SNP markers derived from these candidate genes can contribute to fine mapping of QTL and marker assisted breeding for

  5. Transcription profile of soybean-root-knot nematode interaction reveals a key role of phythormones in the resistance reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneventi, Magda Aparecida; da Silva, Orzenil Bonfim; de Sá, Maria Eugênia Lisei; Firmino, Alexandre Augusto Pereira; de Amorim, Regina Maria Santos; Albuquerque, Erika Valéria Saliba; da Silva, Maria Cristina Mattar; da Silva, Joseane Padilha; Campos, Magnólia de Araújo; Lopes, Marcus José Conceição; Togawa, Roberto Coiti; Pappas, Georgios Joanis; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria Fatima

    2013-05-10

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN- Meloidogyne genus) present extensive challenges to soybean crop. The soybean line (PI 595099) is known to be resistant against specific strains and races of nematode species, thus its differential gene expression analysis can lead to a comprehensive gene expression profiling in the incompatible soybean-RKN interaction. Even though many disease resistance genes have been studied, little has been reported about phytohormone crosstalk on modulation of ROS signaling during soybean-RKN interaction. Using 454 technology to explore the common aspects of resistance reaction during both parasitism and resistance phases it was verified that hormone, carbohydrate metabolism and stress related genes were consistently expressed at high levels in infected roots as compared to mock control. Most noteworthy genes include those encoding glycosyltransferases, peroxidases, auxin-responsive proteins and gibberellin-regulated genes. Our data analysis suggests the key role of glycosyltransferases, auxins and components of gibberellin signal transduction, biosynthesis and deactivation pathways in the resistance reaction and their participation in jasmonate signaling and redox homeostasis in mediating aspects of plant growth and responses to biotic stress. Based on this study we suggest a reasonable model regarding to the complex mechanisms of crosstalk between plant hormones, mainly gibberellins and auxins, which can be crucial to modulate the levels of ROS in the resistance reaction to nematode invasion. The model also includes recent findings concerning to the participation of DELLA-like proteins and ROS signaling controlling plant immune or stress responses. Furthermore, this study provides a dataset of potential candidate genes involved in both nematode parasitism and resistance, which can be tested further for their role in this biological process using functional genomics approaches.

  6. Patterns of urease synthesis in developing soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polacco, J C; Sparks, R B

    1982-07-01

    An examination of in vivo polysome-bound activity indicates that soybean (Glycine max, cv. Prize) seed urease is synthesized on large polysomes (n >/= 15). In vitro urease synthesis is directed by a large RNA (3,000-3,300 nucleotides). Urease synthesis occurs throughout the normal protein biosynthetic phase of the developing seed. Surprisingly, the activity/antigen ratios of urease increase throughout development. Urease appears to be in a more highly polymerized state in mature beans versus beans in early development.During the 55 days from pollination to maturity, urease specific antigen (antigen versus total seed protein) is greatest on the 20th day, representing 0.6% of total extractable protein. Its synthesis proceeds until the end of the protein biosynthetic phase, approximately day 40. In contrast, the appearance of urease enzyme activity lags that of antigen during early development (11-20 days) and plateaus in late development. Mixing experiments suggest no role for putative urease inhibitors or activators during development. However, several electrophoretically slow migrating forms are unique to the urease of mature beans. It is not known if these are more active species.An active urease species exhibits an RNAse-sensitive cosedimentation with a heavy polyribosome class (n >/= 15). Polyadenylated RNA, size-fractionated to 3,000 to 3,300 bases, directed the synthesis in vitro of a major translational product electrophoretically and immunologically similar to the in vivo-synthesized urease subunit.

  7. Phoma-like fungi on soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kövics, György János; Sándor, Erzsébet; Rai, Mahendra K; Irinyi, László

    2014-02-01

    Numerous coelomycetous fungi classified in Ascochyta, Phoma and Phyllosticta, and lately established and/or re-classified genera and species, namely Boeremia and Peyronellaea have been recorded from spots on leaves and pods of soybeans. These rarely observed pathogens are cosmopolitan, ubiquitous species on diseased and dead plant materials, and define frequently as weak or opportunistic parasites. Based on the Genealogical Concordance Phylogenetic Species Recognition, the authors summarize the re-evaluation of the taxonomic status of Phoma sojicola (syn. Ascochyta sojicola) and Phyllosticta sojicola. Inspite of the former delimitation of Ph. sojicola based on small differences in morphological features, it has proved to be identical to Peyronellaea pinodella (syn. Phoma pinodella). Similarly, it was also confirmed that Ph. sojicola was identical to Boeremia exigua var. exigua (syn. Phoma exigua var. exigua). The authors and co-workers contributed to the identification of Phoma-like fungi by combined conventional and molecular methods. Protein-encoding genes (TEF1 and β-tubulin) were successfully applied within the Phoma genus to infer phylogenetic relationships.

  8. Genome Duplication in Soybean (Glycine Subgenus Soja)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, R. C.; Polzin, K.; Labate, J.; Specht, J.; Brummer, E. C.; Olson, T.; Young, N.; Concibido, V.; Wilcox, J.; Tamulonis, J. P.; Kochert, G.; Boerma, H. R.

    1996-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism mapping data from nine populations (Glycine max X G. soja and G. max X G. max) of the Glycine subgenus soja genome led to the identification of many duplicated segments of the genome. Linkage groups contained up to 33 markers that were duplicated on other linkage groups. The size of homoeologous regions ranged from 1.5 to 106.4 cM, with an average size of 45.3 cM. We observed segments in the soybean genome that were present in as many as six copies with an average of 2.55 duplications per segment. The presence of nested duplications suggests that at least one of the original genomes may have undergone an additional round of tetraploidization. Tetraploidization, along with large internal duplications, accounts for the highly duplicated nature of the genome of the subgenus. Quantitative trait loci for seed protein and oil showed correspondence across homoeologous regions, suggesting that the genes or gene families contributing to seed composition have retained similar functions throughout the evolution of the chromosomes. PMID:8878696

  9. Nitrogen assimilation in soybean nodules, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyama, Takuji; Kumazawa, Kikuo

    1980-01-01

    In order to elucidate the pathways to assimilate the ammonia produced by N 2 -fixation in soybean nodules, 15 N-labeled compounds were administered to intact nodules or nodule slices pretreated with various inhibitors of nitrogen assimilation. After exposure to 15 N 2 , 15 N-incorporation into various nitrogenous compounds was investigated in attached nodules injected with methionine sulfoximine (MSX) or azaserine (AS). MSX treatment increased the 15 N content of ammonia more than 6 times, however, depressed 15 N content of most of amides and amino acids. AS treatment enhanced 15 N content of amido-N of glutamine as well as ammonia, but decreased amino-N of glutamine and most of amino acids. Experiments with nodule slices pretreated with MSX or AS solution and then fed with 15 N-labeled ammonia or amido- 15 N of glutamine showed the same trends. Aminooxyacetate inhibited nitrogen flow from glutamic acid to other amino acids. These results strongly indicate that the ammonia produced by N 2 -fixation is assimilated by GS/GOGAT system to glutamic acid and then transaminated to various amino acids in situ. 15 N-incorporation patterns in nodule slices fed with 15 N-labeled ammonia, hydroxylamine, nitrite were similar, but nitrate seemed to be reduced in a definite compartment and assimilated similarly as in intact nodules fed with 15 N 2 (author)

  10. Regeneration of soybean via embryogenic suspension culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Droste Annette

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to establish an alternative plant regeneration system for soybean [Glycine max (L. Merrill] cultivars used in Brazilian breeding programs, ten genotypes were tested for their embryogenic potential. Cotyledons were removed as explants from immature seeds harvested from field-grown plants. After 45 days on induction medium, the number of responding cotyledons and the number of somatic embryos per immature cotyledon were evaluated. The percentage of explants that produced somatic embryos varied from 1 to 70% among cultivars. The average number of somatic embryos produced per cotyledon pair ranged from 0.01 to 10.3 with a mean of 3.4. Suspension cultures were initiated with three Agrobacterium tumefaciens susceptible cultivars. Suspensions were successfully developed from Bragg and IAS5 cultivars. The packed cell volume, in one-month growth, increased 8.1 fold for Bragg and 3.5 fold for IAS5 and the fresh weight increased 6.6 and 2.8 fold, respectively. The cultivars differed for the analysed parameters. All tissue from each cultivar was transferred to the maturation medium and subsequently to the germination medium. The germination frequency was 45.7 and 54.9% for Bragg and IAS5, respectively. Plants were gradually exposed to ambient humidity over one week and then planted in soil. All plants yielded seeds in the greenhouse.

  11. [Inhibition of soybean urease by polycarbonyl compounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarun, E I; Rubinov, D B; Metelitsa, D I

    2005-01-01

    Competitive inhibition of soybean urease was studied at 36 degrees C in aqueous solution (pH 4.95) in the presence of polycarbonyl compounds (PCCs): oxalyldihydrazide (ODH), its polydisulfide (poly(DSODH)), three cyclic beta-triketones (CTKs), and seven cyclic PCC species of differing structure. The inhibition constants of ureolysis (Ki) varied in the range 8.5-3800 microM depending on the structure of organic chelators for the nickel atom in urease. It was shown that pH variation within the range from 3.85 to 7.40 exerted a strong effect on the values of Ki] of three CTKs and hydroxyurea, which was used as a reference: pH dependences of lgK(i) were linear in all cases and displayed a break at pH 6.0-6.5. The most effective inhibitor of ureolysis was poly(DSODH), which contained approximately 28 carbonyl groups in the polymer molecule. The role of such factors as the number of carbonyl groups per PCC molecule, mutual arrangement, and reaction medium pH in the efficiency of the process of urease inhibition is discussed.

  12. Nitrogen assimilation in soybean nodules, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyama, Takuji; Kumazawa, Kikuo

    1980-01-01

    15 N assimilation was studied in bacteroid and cytosol fractions of soybean nodules. In the first experiment, after exposing the intact nodules to 15 N 2 for 5 min and 10 min, most of the fixed 15 N was detected in cytosol fraction. In cytosol fraction, 15 N content of glutamine was the highest and followed by glutamic acid, alanine, and allantoin in this sequence, whereas, in bacteroid fraction, glutamic acid showed the highest 15 N content and alanine and glutamine followed. In the second experiment, 15 N assimilation of various 15 N-labeled compounds in the separated bacteroid and cytosol fractions was investigated. In the separated bacteroid fraction which was fed with 15 NH 4 , 15 N was incorporated very rapidly into glutamic acid, alanine, and aspartic acid, but very slowly into glutamine. From these results, it was suggested that most of the fixed ammonia was exported to cytosol and assimilated via glutamine synthetase to glutamine, then via glutamate synthase to glutamic acid, and from these compounds various nitrogenous compounds were formed, but in bacteroids glutamate dehydrogenase and alanine dehydrogenase played an important role in the assimilation of fixed ammonia though quantitatively the contribution to ammonia assimilation in nodules was much less compared with cytosol. (author)

  13. Vegetable soybean: seed composition and production research

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    Qiuying Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable soybean (edamame [Glycine max (L. Merr.] is a low input, high nutritional value, short crop cycle and soil-enriching profitable crop. It offers quick economic return and provides health benefits to the consumers. The market demand for edamame has begun to flourish and expand dramatically in recent decades due to increased awareness of nutritional properties, and the change in life styles towards healthier food. This article highlighted the importance of edamame as a nutraceutical and functional food-grade produce, summarised the research advances in seed composition and their roles, cultivar selection and crop establishment, planting date and fertilisation, weed management and harvesting. Current production problem of extensive labor at harvest and future research challenges in improving crop establishment, developing cultivars competitive to weed and resistant to pest insects/diseases, assessing biological activities of edamame elemental and phytochemical properties on cancer cell inhibition, and developing organic production system were also proposed with aims of enhancing farm profitability and expanding opportunities for extensive use of edamame.

  14. Effect of solar radiation on severity of soybean rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Heather M; George, Sheeja; Narváez, Dario F; Srivastava, Pratibha; Schuerger, Andrew C; Wright, David L; Marois, James J

    2012-08-01

    Soybean rust (SBR), caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is a damaging fungal disease of soybean (Glycine max). Although solar radiation can reduce SBR urediniospore survival, limited information is available on how solar radiation affects SBR progress within soybean canopies. Such information can aid in developing accurate SBR prediction models. To manipulate light penetration into soybean canopies, structures of shade cloth attenuating 30, 40, and 60% sunlight were constructed over soybean plots. In each plot, weekly evaluations of severity in lower, middle, and upper canopies, and daily temperature and relative humidity were recorded. Final plant height and leaf area index were also recorded for each plot. The correlation between amount of epicuticular wax and susceptibility of leaves in the lower, middle, and upper canopies was assessed with a detached leaf assay. Final disease severity was 46 to 150% greater in the lower canopy of all plots and in the middle canopy of 40 and 60% shaded plots. While daytime temperature within the canopy of nonshaded soybean was greater than shaded soybean by 2 to 3°C, temperatures recorded throughout typical evenings and mornings of the growing season in all treatments were within the range (10 to 28.5°C) for SBR development as was relative humidity. This indicates temperature and relative humidity were not limiting factors in this experiment. Epicuticular wax and disease severity in detached leaf assays from the upper canopy had significant negative correlation (P = 0.009, R = -0.84) regardless of shade treatment. In laboratory experiments, increasing simulated total solar radiation (UVA, UVB, and PAR) from 0.15 to 11.66 MJ m(-2) increased mortality of urediniospores from 2 to 91%. Variability in disease development across canopy heights in early planted soybean may be attributed to the effects of solar radiation not only on urediniospore viability, but also on plant height, leaf area index, and epicuticular wax, which influence

  15. Effects of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum waaL (rfaL) Gene on Hydrophobicity, Motility, Stress Tolerance, and Symbiotic Relationship with Soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Jun-Gu; Jeon, Han-Eul; So, Jae-Seong; Chang, Woo-Suk

    2015-07-23

    We cloned and sequenced the waaL (rfaL) gene from Bradyrhizobium japonicum, which infects soybean and forms nitrogen-fixing nodules on soybean roots. waaL has been extensively studied in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis of enteric bacteria, but little is known about its function in (brady)rhizobial LPS architecture. To characterize its role as O-antigen ligase in the LPS biosynthesis pathway, we constructed a waaL knock-out mutant and its complemented strain named JS015 and CS015, respectively. LPS analysis showed that an LPS structure of JS015 is deficient in O-antigen as compared to that of the wild type and complemented strain CS015, suggesting that WaaL ligates the O-antigen to lipid A-core oligosaccharide to form a complete LPS. JS015 also revealed increased cell surface hydrophobicity, but it showed decreased motility in soft agar plates. In addition to the alteration in cell surface properties, disruption of the waaL gene caused increased sensitivity of JS015 to hydrogen peroxide, osmotic pressure, and novobiocin. Specifically, plant tests revealed that JS015 failed to nodulate the host plant soybean, indicating that the rhizobial waaL gene is responsible for the establishment of a symbiotic relationship between soybean and B. japonicum.

  16. In Vitro assessment of the nutritive value of expanded soybean meal for dairy cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elwakeel Eman A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Little information is available about the nutritive value of expanded soybean meal, which is produced by expansion of soybeans prior to solvent extraction of the oil. During processing, expanded soybean meal is subjected to additional heat, which might increase the concentration of ruminally undegraded protein. Processing of soybeans with heat during oil extraction could affect lysine availability by increasing ruminally undegraded protein or by impairing intestinal digestion. Our objective was to compare solvent and expanded soybeans with regard to chemical composition and nutritive value for dairy cattle. Samples of expanded soybean meal (n = 14 and solvent-extracted soybean meal (n = 5 were obtained from People's Republic of China to study effects of the expansion process on nutritive value for dairy cattle. Solvent-extracted soybean meal (n = 2 and mechanically extracted (heated soybean meal (n = 2 from the United States served as references for comparison. Samples were analyzed for crude fat, long-chain fatty acids, crude protein, amino acids, chemically available lysine, in situ ruminal protein degradation, and in vitro intestinal digestibility. No differences were found between solvent-extracted soybean meals from China and expanded soybean meals from China for crude fat, crude protein, amino acids, or chemically available lysine. In situ disappearance of nitrogen, ruminally undegraded protein content, and in vitro intestinal digestion of the ruminally undegraded protein were generally similar between solvent-extracted soybean meals made in China and expanded soybean meals made in China; variation among soybean meals was small. Results indicate that the additional heat from the expansion process was not great enough to affect the nutritive value of soybean meal protein for ruminants. Although expansion may improve the oil extraction process, the impact on the resulting soybean meal is minimal and does not require consideration

  17. Characterization and differentiation of diverse transgenic and nontransgenic soybean varieties from CE protein profiles. Research article

    OpenAIRE

    García Ruiz, Carmen; García López, María Concepción; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Marina Alegre, María Luisa

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays, soybeans are commercialized in a wide variety of colors and tones. Moreover, some pigmented seeds are being commercialized as soybeans while, on other occasions, these seeds are labeled as mung beans, azuki beans or soybean frijoles generating confusion on their identity. In this work, CE has been applied for the first time for the characterization and differentiation of different pigmented beans commercialized as soybeans. Other seeds commercialized as azuki, mung gr...

  18. Genotypic Variation and Physiological Response of 10 Soybean Genotypes to Low-Zn Stress in Hydroponics

    OpenAIRE

    Hacisalihoglu, Gokhan; Lampley, Aja

    2009-01-01

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is one of the most important vegetable and oilseed crops with an annual value of over 36 billion dollars in the U.S. Soil Zn deficiency can reduce soybean yield and quality; therefore identifying Zn efficient genotypes can offer a sustainable solution to this problem. Furthermore, a reliable method for screening soybean lines would be useful for breeders. The main objective of this study was to detect genotypic variation in soybean under low Zn stress. Thi...

  19. TIME-VARYING MULTIPRODUCT HEDGE RATIO ESTIMATION IN THE SOYBEAN COMPLEX: A SIMPLIFIED APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Manfredo, Mark R.; Garcia, Philip; Leuthold, Raymond M.

    2000-01-01

    In developing optimal hedge ratios for the soybean processing margin, many authors have illustrated the importance of considering the interactions between the cash and futures prices for soybeans, soybean oil, and soybean meal. Conditional as well as time-varying hedge ratios have been examined, but in the case of multiproduct time-varying hedge ratios, the difficulty in estimation has been found to often outweigh any improvement in hedging effectiveness. This research examines the hedging ef...

  20. Study on Optimal Conditions of Alcalase Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Soybean Protein Isolate

    OpenAIRE

    Yongsheng Ma; Xianhui Sun; Lintong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Soybean protein isolate was hydrolyzed to obtain soybean polypeptide solution using Alcalase as hydrolase. Degree of hydrolysis and the recovery rate of protein were used to characterize the soybean protein hydrolysis reaction result. Influence factors of soybean protein hydrolysis reaction including the substrate concentration, temperature, pH, enzyme concentration characterized by E/S (ratio of Enzyme and Substrate) and hydrolysis time were systematically studied with single factor and mult...

  1. EFFECT OF REPLACING SOYBEAN MEAL BY SOYBEAN MILK WASTE ON CHOLESTEROL LEVEL OF KAMPONG CHICKENS MEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Kusmanto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Study was conducted to know effect of replacing soybean meal (SBM by soybean milk waste (SBMW on performance, carcass production, and fat and meat cholesterol of kampong chickens. Six weeks old kampong chickens consist of 40 male and 40 female randomly divided into four groups of treatment in five replications and consisted two male and two female each. Four group of treatment receiving ME 2600 kcal per kg and crude protein 17 percent, supplemented by lysine, methionin, and threonin amino acid. Ration and drinking water were offered ad libitum. Kampong chickens were kept up to 10 weeks old. Meat breast were taken for lipid and cholesterol test. Collected data were analysed by a one way classification of variance analysis (CRD, followed by testing significant means by Duncans Multiple Range Test (DMRT. Significant means of lipid and cholesterol of male and female every replication analysed by t-test. Result: replacing SBM by SBMW supplemented by essential amino acid maintained performance and carcass production, although it does not effectively reduce lipid and cholesterol level of kampong chickens meat.

  2. Optimization of prebiotics in soybean milk using mixture experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kongkarn Kijroongrojana

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A mixture experiment was used to optimize prebiotic mixtures in soybean milk formulation. Inulin (I, galactooligosaccharides(GOS, and isomalto-oligosaccharides (IMO were the prebiotic ingredients added (4% w/v to soybean milk. Thirteen formulations of soybean milk were compared using the general descriptive analysis and the growth of probiotics(Bifidobacterium bifidum DSM 20456, Lactobacillus plantarum TISTR 875, and Lactobacillus acidophilus TISTR 1034. There were no significant differences (p>0.05 in all sensory attributes (color, thickness, beany flavor, sweetness, viscosity, sweetness aftertaste among the samples. Various mixtures of the prebiotics had only a slight effect on the soybean milk color and viscosity (p0.05. The soybean milk supplemented with the optimized prebiotic mixture had higher (p<0.05carbohydrates, total soluble solid, total solid content, and viscosity than the control (without prebiotic. However, it had a lower L* value (lightness and a higher a* value (redness than the control (p<0.05.

  3. Soybean yield in relation to distance from the Itaipu reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Faria, Rogério Teixeira; Junior, Ruy Casão; Werner, Simone Silmara; Junior, Luiz Antônio Zanão; Hoogenboom, Gerrit

    2016-07-01

    Crops close to small water bodies may exhibit changes in yield if the water mass causes significant changes in the microclimate of areas near the reservoir shoreline. The scientific literature describes this effect as occurring gradually, with higher intensity in the sites near the shoreline and decreasing intensity with distance from the reservoir. Experiments with two soybean cultivars were conducted during four crop seasons to evaluate soybean yield in relation to distance from the Itaipu reservoir and determine the effect of air temperature and water availability on soybean crop yield. Fifteen experimental sites were distributed in three transects perpendicular to the Itaipu reservoir, covering an area at approximately 10 km from the shoreline. The yield gradient between the site closest to the reservoir and the sites farther away in each transect did not show a consistent trend, but varied as a function of distance, crop season, and cultivar. This finding indicates that the Itaipu reservoir does not affect the yield of soybean plants grown within approximately 10 km from the shoreline. In addition, the variation in yield among the experimental sites was not attributed to thermal conditions because the temperature was similar within transects. However, the crop water availability was responsible for higher differences in yield among the neighboring experimental sites related to water stress caused by spatial variability in rainfall, especially during the soybean reproductive period in January and February.

  4. The soybean and mungbean improvement programs at AVRDC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanmugasundaram, S.; Ahn, G.S.

    1983-01-01

    At the Asian Vegetable Research and Development Center (AVRDC) Soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr. and mungbean, Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek are included in the Legume Program for improvement. Germplasm collection in soybean and mungbean are 9,524 and 5,108 respectively. Developing improved selections with early, uniform maturity, high yield, wide adaptability and resistance to diseases and insects are the major breeding objectives for the tropics and subtropics. Genetic diversity and genetic resources are available in the germplasm for most of the desired traits both in soybean as well as mungbean. However, for traits such as soybean rust resistance in soybean and resistance to insects in mungbean are rare. Limited amount of radiation breeding is being employed in cooperation with Korean Atomic Energy Agency to obtain desirable genes in both species. A number of AVRDC identified accessions and breeding lines are being used by the national programs to develop improved cultivars. AVRDC developed breeding selections have been released as new cultivars in Costa Rica, Fiji, Korea, India, Indonesia, Malaysia and Taiwan. (author)

  5. Monitoring glyphosate residues in transgenic glyphosate-resistant soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arregui, María C; Lenardón, Argelia; Sanchez, Daniel; Maitre, María I; Scotta, Roberto; Enrique, Susana

    2004-02-01

    The availability of Roundup Ready (RR) varieties of soybean has increased the use of glyphosate for weed control in Argentina. Glyphosate [(N-phosphonomethyl)glycine] is employed for the eradication of previous crop vegetation and for weed control during the soybean growing cycle. Its action is effective, and low environmental impact has been reported so far. No residues have been observed in soil or water, either of glyphosate or its metabolite, AMPA (aminomethylphosphonic acid). The objective of this work was to monitor glyphosate and AMPA residues in soybean plants and grains in field crops in Santa Fe Province, Argentina. Five sites were monitored in 1997, 1998 and 1999. Individual soybean plants were sampled from emergence to harvest, dried and ground. Analysis consisted in residue extraction with organic solvents and buffers, agitation, centrifugation, clean-up and HPLC with UV detection. In soybean leaves and stems, glyphosate residues ranged from 1.9 to 4.4 mg kg(-1) and from 0.1 to 1.8 mg kg(-1) in grains. Higher concentrations were detected when glyphosate was sprayed several times during the crop cycle, and when treatments approached the flowering stage. AMPA residues were also detected in leaves and in grains, indicating metabolism of the herbicide.

  6. Combinatorially selected peptides for protection of soybean against Phakopsora pachyrhizi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhiwei D; Marois, James J; Stacey, Gary; Schoelz, James E; English, James T; Schmidt, Francis J

    2010-10-01

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the fungal pathogen that causes Asian soybean rust, has the potential to cause significant losses in soybean yield in many production regions of the United States. Germplasm with durable, single-gene resistance is lacking, and control of rust depends on timely application of fungicides. To assist the development of new modes of soybean resistance, we identified peptides from combinatorial phage-display peptide libraries that inhibit germ tube growth from urediniospores of P. pachyrhizi. Two peptides, Sp2 and Sp39, were identified that inhibit germ tube development when displayed as fusions with the coat protein of M13 phage or as fusions with maize cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (ZmCKX1). In either display format, the inhibitory effect of the peptides on germ tube growth was concentration dependent. In addition, when peptides Sp2 or Sp39 in either format were mixed with urediniospores and inoculated to soybean leaves with an 8-h wetness period, rust lesion development was reduced. Peptides Sp2 and Sp39, displayed on ZmCKX1, were found to interact with a 20-kDa protein derived from germinated urediniospores. Incorporating peptides that inhibit pathogen development and pathogenesis into breeding programs may contribute to the development of soybean cultivars with improved, durable rust tolerance.

  7. Host specificity of Aphelinus species collected from soybean aphid in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is native to Asia where it is an occasional pest of soybean, Glycine max (L.). Aphis glycines was found during 2000 in North America and since then has spread throughout much of the area where soybean is grown. In Asia, A. glycines ...

  8. Pyramiding different aphid-resistance genes in elite soybean germplasm to combat dynamic aphid populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The soybean aphid, an invasive species, has posed a significant threat to soybean production in North America since 2001. Use of resistant cultivars is an effective tactic to protect soybean yield. However, the variability and dynamics of aphid populations could limit the effectiveness of host-resis...

  9. Population genetic structure of Japanese wild soybean (Glycine soja) based on microsatellite variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Y; Kaga, A; Tomooka, N; Vaughan, D A

    2006-04-01

    The research objectives were to determine aspects of the population dynamics relevant to effective monitoring of gene flow in the soybean crop complex in Japan. Using 20 microsatellite primers, 616 individuals from 77 wild soybean (Glycine soja) populations were analysed. All samples were of small seed size ( 10 km) events among populations, and spatial autocorrelation analysis revealed that populations within a radius of 100 km showed a close genetic relationship to one another. When analysis of graphical ordination was applied to compare the microsatellite variation of wild soybean with that of 53 widely grown Japanese varieties of cultivated soybean (Glycine max), the primary factor of genetic differentiation was based on differences between wild and cultivated soybeans and the secondary factor was geographical differentiation of wild soybean populations. Admixture analysis revealed that 6.8% of individuals appear to show introgression from cultivated soybeans. These results indicated that population genetic structure of Japanese wild soybean is (i) strongly affected by the founder effect due to seed dispersal and inbreeding strategy, (ii) generally well differentiated from cultivated soybean, but (iii) introgression from cultivated soybean occurs. The implications of the results for the release of transgenic soybeans where wild soybeans grow are discussed.

  10. Pathogenic diversity of Phytophthora sojae and breeding strategies to develop Phytophthora-resistant soybeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora stem and root rot disease, caused by Phytophthora sojae, is one of the most destructive diseases of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.), and has been increasing in several soybean-producing areas around the world. This disease induces serious limitations on soybean production, with yield l...

  11. First report of Phakopsora pachyrhizi on soybean causing rust in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd. was reported on legume hosts other than soybean in Tanzania as early as 1979. Soybean rust (SBR), caused by P. pachyrhizi, was first reported on soybean in Africa in Uganda in 1996, and its introduction into Africa was proposed to occur through urediniospores blowing from ...

  12. Analysis of soybean supply to price changes in the domestic market ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study showed that farmers' responses were not encouraging in the production and supply of soybean in the domestic markets with respect to the dictate of prices, price expectations and price of groundnut as a chosen competitive enterprise. Keywords: Response, soybean supply, price changes, soybean market, ...

  13. 77 FR 41354 - Monsanto Co.; Availability of Petition for Determination of Nonregulated Status of Soybean...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ...] Monsanto Co.; Availability of Petition for Determination of Nonregulated Status of Soybean Genetically... soybean designated as MON 87712, which has been genetically engineered for increased yield. The petition.... Louis, MO, seeking a determination of nonregulated status of soybean (Glycine max) designated as event...

  14. The promise and limits for enhancing sulfur-containing amino acid content of soybean seed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybeans are an excellent source of protein in monogastric diets and rations with ~75% of soybeans produced worldwide used primarily for animal feed. Even though soybeans are protein-rich and have a well-balanced amino acid profile, the nutritive quality of this important crop could be further impr...

  15. Effect of Varying Toasting Time of Soybean Meal on Organ and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ninety Anak broiler chicks were used at four weeks of age in a 28 day feeding trial to assess the effect of toasting time of soybean on organ and carcass characteristics of finisher broiler birds. The birds were assigned to five dietary treatments containing raw soybean as control and full fat soybean toasted for 5, 10, 15 and 20 ...

  16. 49 CFR 1039.10 - Exemption of agricultural commodities except grain, soybeans, and sunflower seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., soybeans, and sunflower seeds. 1039.10 Section 1039.10 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS § 1039.10 Exemption of agricultural commodities except grain, soybeans, and sunflower... (STCC No. 0113), soybeans (STCC No. 01144), and sunflower seeds (STCC No. 0114940). 09 Fresh fish and...

  17. 7 CFR 810.1604 - Grades and grade requirements for soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Grades and grade requirements for soybeans. 810.1604... OFFICIAL UNITED STATES STANDARDS FOR GRAIN United States Standards for Soybeans Principles Governing the Application of Standards § 810.1604 Grades and grade requirements for soybeans. Grading factors Grades U.S...

  18. Characterization and product innovation of sufu - a Chinese fermented soybean food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, B.

    2003-01-01

     Over the centuries, Chinese people have consumed soybeans in various forms of traditional fermented soybean foods. Sufu ( Furu ), a cheese-like product originating in China, is one of the most popular fermented soybean foods in China, and is becoming popular

  19. Molecular mapping and genomics of soybean seed protein: A review and perspective for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meal protein derived from soybean [Glycine max (L) Merr.] seed is the primary source of protein in poultry and livestock feed. Protein is a key factor that determines the nutritional and economical value of soybean. Genetic improvement of soybean seed protein content is highly desirable, and major q...

  20. Effect of Soybean Sprouting and Beta-Glucanase Treatment of Wet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Soybean Sprouting and Beta-Glucanase Treatment of Wet Milled Soybean on the Chemical Properties of Soymilk from Different Varieties of Soybean. ... Sugars were also qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed with thin layer chromatography and spectrophotometry respectively. Proximate composition and dietary ...

  1. From George Washington Carver to the genome: leveraging genetics and molecular biology to improve soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 1904, George Washington Carver studying the composition of soybeans concluded that they are a valuable source of protein and oil. He proposed that rotating soybeans with other crops would replenish the soil with nitrogen and minerals for 2 years. His findings brought soybeans into the mainstream ...

  2. Soybean-derived Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI) blocks HIV entry into macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tong-Cui; Le Guo; Zhou, Run-Hong; Wang, Xu; Liu, Jin-Biao; Li, Jie-Liang; Zhou, Yu; Hou, Wei; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2018-01-01

    Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI) is a soybean-derived protease inhibitor that has anti-inflammation and anti-HIV effect. Here, we further investigated the anti-HIV action of BBI in macrophages, focusing on its effect on viral entry. We found that BBI could significantly block HIV entry into macrophages. Investigation of the mechanism(s) of the BBI action on HIV inhibition showed that BBI down-regulated the expression of CD4 receptor (as much as 80%) and induced the production of the CC chemokines (up to 60 folds at protein level) in macrophages. This inhibitory effect of BBI on HIV entry could be blocked by the neutralization antibodies to CC chemokines. These findings indicate that BBI may have therapeutic potential as a viral entry inhibitor for the prevention and treatment of HIV infection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Developmental and nutritional regulation of isoflavone secretion from soybean roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Akifumi; Yamazaki, Yumi; Yamashita, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Seiji; Nakayama, Toru; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2016-01-01

    Isoflavones play important roles in plant-microbe interactions in rhizospheres. Soybean roots secrete daidzein and genistein to attract rhizobia. Despite the importance of isoflavones in plant-microbe interactions, little is known about the developmental and nutritional regulation of isoflavone secretion from soybean roots. In this study, soybeans were grown in hydroponic culture, and isoflavone contents in tissues, isoflavone secretion from the roots, and the expression of isoflavone conjugates hydrolyzing beta-glucosidase (ICHG) were investigated. Isoflavone contents did not show strong growth-dependent changes, while secretion of daidzein from the roots dramatically changed, with higher secretion during vegetative stages. Coordinately, the expression of ICHG also peaked at vegetative stages. Nitrogen deficiency resulted in 8- and 15-fold increases in secretion of daidzein and genistein, respectively, with no induction of ICHG. Taken together, these results suggest that large amounts of isoflavones were secreted during vegetative stages via the hydrolysis of (malonyl)glucosides with ICHG.

  4. Stability studies on refined soybean oil stored in various conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arawande, J.O.; Amoo, I.A.

    2008-01-01

    The 12 months stability study of freshly produced refined soybean oil revealed that refined soybean oil stored in plastic containers in dark was more hydrolytically and oxidatively stable than that stored in other containers in light condition. There was no significant difference at P < 0.05 in free fatty acids and acid value of oil stored under light and dark conditions in tin and glass containers but there was significant difference at P < 0.05 in peroxide value of oil stored in light and dark conditions in all the storage containers. Light increased the degree of oxidative rancidity of refined soybean oil, the most in tin containers, followed by glass containers and the least in plastic containers. (author)

  5. Soybean diet breast tumor incidence in irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troll, W.; Wiesner, R.

    1980-01-01

    The relationship between feeding a diet rich in protease inhibitors and the reduction of mammary cancer induced by x-irradiation in Sprague-Dawley rats was examined. Of a total of 145 irradiated animals, 44% of the 45 rats fed a raw soybean diet containing a high concentration of protease inhibitor developed mammary tumors as compared to 74% of 50 rats fed a casein diet containing no protease inhibitor. Animals fed Purina rat chow which contained low levels of protease inhibitor exhibited a 70% mammary tumor incidence. No spontaneous neoplasms were found in any of the non-irradiated animals on the raw soybean diet whereas about 10% of the animals on the protease-free diet developed tumors. Thus, soybeans which are rich in protease inhibitors reduced the induction of mammary cancer in x-irradiated rats. This suggested that diets rich in protease inhibitors may contribute to reducing cancer incidence in man. (author)

  6. Transcription of the soybean leghemoglobin genes during nodule development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcker, Anne; Lund, Marianne; Jensen, Erik Ø

    1984-01-01

    During the early stages of soybean nodule development the leghemoglobin (Lb) genes are activated sequentially in the opposite order to which they are arranged in the soybean genome. At a specific stage after the initial activation of all the Lb genes, a large increment occurs in the transcription...... of the Lb(c1), Lb(c3) and Lb(a) genes while the transcription of the Lb(c2) gene is not amplified to a similar extent. All the Lb genes retain significant activity for a long period during the lifetime of a nodule. Consequently the soybean Lb genes are not regulated by a developmental gene switching...... mechanism as is the case for vertebrate globin genes. Concomitantly with the increase in Lb gene transcription some of the other nodule specific plant genes are activated. These specific changes in the activities of the Lb and nodulin genes precede the activation of the bacterial nitrogenase gene. Thus...

  7. Combustion of soybean oil and diesel mixtures for heating purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Adriana Correa; Sanz, Jose Francisco [European University Miguel de Cervantes, Valladolid (Spain)], E-mail: acorrea@uemc.es; Hernandez, Salvador; Navas, Luis Manuel; Rodriguez, Elena; Ruiz, Gonzalo [University of Valladolid (Spain). Dept. of Agricultural and Forest Engineering; San Jose, Julio [University of Valladolid (Spain). Dept. of Energetic Engineering; Gomez, Jaime [University of Valladolid (Spain). Dept. of Communications and Signal Theory and Telematics Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Using blends of vegetable oils with petroleum derivates for heating purposes has several advantages over other energy application for vegetable oils. This paper presents the results of an investigation by use of soybean oil and diesel mixture as fuel for producing heat in conventional diesel installation. The paper is set out as follows: properties characterization of soybean oil as fuel and of diesel oil, as well as the mixture of both; selection of the mixture according to their physical chemical properties and how they adapt to conventional combustion installation; experimentation with the selected mixture, allowing the main combustion parameters to be measured; processing the collected data, values of combustion, efficiency and reduction of emissions. Conclusions show that the use of soybean oil and diesel mixture for producing heat energy in conventional equipment is feasible and beneficial for reduction emissions. (author)

  8. Symbiotic N fixation of several soybean varieties and mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandanegara, S.; Hendratno, K.

    1988-01-01

    Symbiotic N fixation of several soybean varieties and mutants. Research activities comprising of three experiments were carried out to screen several soybean varieties and mutants for symbiotic N fixation potential. Depending on the medium used, plant response to strains was different. In sterile medium, Rhizobium strain USDA 136, 142 and TAL 102 showed a high nitrogen potential. In soil only Rhizobium strain USDA 110 had better performance and proved to be competitive to the native strains. Nitrogen-15 dilution method was used to screen nitrogen fixing ability of several soybean varieties and mutants. Guntur variety showed a better response to high dose of N fertilizer without disturbance in its fixing ability. This variety then was considered good to be introduced in the cropping system. (author). 8 refs

  9. Bioassay for detection of transgenic soybean seeds tolerant to glyphosate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres Antonio Carlos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Glyphosate is a systemic, nonselective, postemergence herbicide that inhibits growth of both weeds and crop plants. Once inside the plant, glyphosate interferes with biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, by inhibiting the activity of 5enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS, a key enzyme of the shikimate pathway. The objective of this work was to develop a simple, effective and inexpensible method for identification of transgenic soybean tolerant to glyphosate. This technique consisted in germinating soybean seeds in filter paper moistened with 100 to 200 muM of glyphosate. Transgenic soybean seeds tolerant to glyphosate germinated normally in this solution and, between 7 and 10 days, started to develop a primary root system. However non-transgenic seeds stopped primary root growth and emission of secondary roots.

  10. Soybean domestication: the origin, genetic architecture and molecular bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedivy, Eric J; Wu, Faqiang; Hanzawa, Yoshie

    2017-04-01

    Domestication provides an important model for the study of evolution, and information learned from domestication research aids in the continued improvement of crop species. Recent progress in de novo assembly and whole-genome resequencing of wild and cultivated soybean genomes, in addition to new archeological discoveries, sheds light on the origin of this important crop and provides a clearer view on the modes of artificial selection that drove soybean domestication and diversification. This novel genomic information enables the search for polymorphisms that underlie variation in agronomic traits and highlights genes that exhibit a signature of selection, leading to the identification of a number of candidate genes that may have played important roles in soybean domestication, diversification and improvement. These discoveries provide a novel point of comparison on the evolutionary bases of important agronomic traits among different crop species. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  11. Iron, zinc, and manganese distribution in mature soybean seeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvitanich, Cristina; Przybyłowicz, Wojciech J; Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, Jolanta

    2009-01-01

    approach, it is important to consider both the quantities and bioavailability of the target micronutrients. Both the speciation and the localization of the micronutrients within the seed can have an impact on bioavailability. In this study we use the sensitive and non-destructive micro-PIXE technique...... to reveal the distribution of iron, zinc, manganese and phosphorus within soybean seeds. We show that high concentrations of iron accumulate in the seed coats of mature soybean seeds. This iron accounted for 20 to 40% of the total seed iron. Furthermore, manganese and iron accumulated in close proximity...... the radicle tip. Our study provides a thorough description of the distribution of important micronutrients within the mature soybean seed....

  12. Interspecies gene transfer provides soybean resistance to a fungal pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenbach, Caspar; Schultheiss, Holger; Rosendahl, Martin; Tresch, Nadine; Conrath, Uwe; Goellner, Katharina

    2016-02-01

    Fungal pathogens pose a major challenge to global crop production. Crop varieties that resist disease present the best defence and offer an alternative to chemical fungicides. Exploiting durable nonhost resistance (NHR) for crop protection often requires identification and transfer of NHR-linked genes to the target crop. Here, we identify genes associated with NHR of Arabidopsis thaliana to Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the causative agent of the devastating fungal disease called Asian soybean rust. We transfer selected Arabidopsis NHR-linked genes to the soybean host and discover enhanced resistance to rust disease in some transgenic soybean lines in the greenhouse. Interspecies NHR gene transfer thus presents a promising strategy for genetically engineered control of crop diseases. © 2015 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Leaf and Canopy Level Detection of Fusarium Virguliforme (Sudden Death Syndrome in Soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ittai Herrmann

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Pre-visual detection of crop disease is critical for food security. Field-based spectroscopic remote sensing offers a method to enable timely detection, but still requires appropriate instrumentation and testing. Soybean plants were spectrally measured throughout a growing season to assess the capacity of leaf and canopy level spectral measurements to detect non-visual foliage symptoms induced by Fusarium virguliforme (Fv, which causes sudden death syndrome. Canopy reflectance measurements were made using the Piccolo Doppio dual field-of-view, two-spectrometer (400 to 1630 nm system on a tractor. Leaf level measurements were obtained, in different plots, using a handheld spectrometer (400 to 2500 nm. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA was applied to the spectroscopic data to discriminate between Fv-inoculated and control plants. Canopy and leaf spectral data allowed identification of Fv infection, prior to visual symptoms, with classification accuracy of 88% and 91% for calibration, 79% and 87% for cross-validation, and 82% and 92% for validation, respectively. Differences in wavelengths important to prediction by canopy vs. leaf data confirm that there are different bases for accurate predictions among methods. Partial least square regression (PLSR was used on a late-stage canopy level data to predict soybean seed yield, with calibration, cross-validation and validation R2 values 0.71, 0.59 and 0.62 (p < 0.01, respectively, and validation root mean square error of 0.31 t·ha−1. Spectral data from the tractor mounted system are thus sensitive to the expression of Fv root infection at canopy scale prior to canopy symptoms, suggesting such systems may be effective for precision agricultural research and management.

  14. Amino acid quantification in bulk soybeans by transmission Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulmerich, Matthew V; Gelber, Matthew K; Azam, Hossain M; Harrison, Sandra K; McKinney, John; Thompson, Dennis; Owen, Bridget; Kull, Linda S; Bhargava, Rohit

    2013-12-03

    Soybeans are a commodity crop of significant economic and nutritional interest. As an important source of protein, buyers of soybeans are interested in not only the total protein content but also in the specific amino acids that comprise the total protein content. Raman spectroscopy has the chemical specificity to measure the twenty common amino acids as pure substances. An unsolved challenge, however, is to quantify varying levels of amino acids mixed together and bound in soybeans at relatively low concentrations. Here we report the use of transmission Raman spectroscopy as a secondary analytical approach to nondestructively measure specific amino acids in intact soybeans. With the employment of a transmission-based Raman instrument, built specifically for nondestructive measurements from bulk soybeans, spectra were collected from twenty-four samples to develop a calibration model using a partial least-squares approach with a random-subset cross validation. The calibration model was validated on an independent set of twenty-five samples for oil, protein, and amino acid predictions. After Raman measurements, the samples were reduced to a fine powder and conventional wet chemistry methods were used for quantifying reference values of protein, oil, and 18 amino acids. We found that the greater the concentrations (% by weight component of interest), the better the calibration model and prediction capabilities. Of the 18 amino acids analyzed, 13 had R(2) values greater than 0.75 with a standard error of prediction c.a. 3-4% by weight. Serine, histidine, cystine, tryptophan, and methionine showed poor predictions (R(2) protein, oil, and specific amino acids in intact soybeans.

  15. Antioxidant properties of soybean seedlings inoculated with Trichoderma asperellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manojlović Ana S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in order to assess the effect of inoculation of soybean (Glycine max L. seeds with Trichoderma asperellum, followed by mites (Tetranychus urticae exposure on lipid peroxidation (LP process and the activity of antioxidant enzymes. T. urticae is an occasional pest of soybean that causes biotic stress. Biotic stress leads to overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS which may cause damage to vital biomolecules. Enzymatic antioxidant defense systems protect plants against oxidative stress. T. asperellum is commonly used as biocontrol agent against plant pathogens. It has been suggested that previous inoculation of seeds with T. asperellum may cause induced resistance against biotic stress. The aim of this study was to determine LP intensity and antioxidant enzymes activity in inoculated and non-inoculated soybean seedlings with and without exposure to mites. Noticeably higher LP intensity was detected in non-inoculated group treated with mites compared to control group. Inoculated soybean seedlings treated with mites had lower LP intensity compared to noninoculated group. Also, it has been noticed that inoculation with Trichoderma asperellum itself, produced mild stress in plants. In addition, positive correlation between enzymes activity and LP was noticed. The level of oxidative stress in plants was followed by the change of LP intensity. According to results obtained, it was concluded that the greatest oxidative stress occurred in non-inoculated group treated with mites and that inoculation successfully reduced oxidative stress. The results indicate that inoculation of soybean seeds with T. asperellum improves resistance of soybean seedlings against mites attack. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. TR-31022

  16. Ketocarotenoid Production in Soybean Seeds through Metabolic Engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily C Pierce

    Full Text Available The pink or red ketocarotenoids, canthaxanthin and astaxanthin, are used as feed additives in the poultry and aquaculture industries as a source of egg yolk and flesh pigmentation, as farmed animals do not have access to the carotenoid sources of their wild counterparts. Because soybean is already an important component in animal feed, production of these carotenoids in soybean could be a cost-effective means of delivery. In order to characterize the ability of soybean seed to produce carotenoids, soybean cv. Jack was transformed with the crtB gene from Pantoea ananatis, which codes for phytoene synthase, an enzyme which catalyzes the first committed step in the carotenoid pathway. The crtB gene was engineered together in combinations with ketolase genes (crtW from Brevundimonas sp. strain SD212 and bkt1 from Haematococcus pluvialis to produce ketocarotenoids; all genes were placed under the control of seed-specific promoters. HPLC results showed that canthaxanthin is present in the transgenic seeds at levels up to 52 μg/g dry weight. Transgenic seeds also accumulated other compounds in the carotenoid pathway, such as astaxanthin, lutein, β-carotene, phytoene, α-carotene, lycopene, and β-cryptoxanthin, whereas lutein was the only one of these detected in non-transgenic seeds. The accumulation of astaxanthin, which requires a β-carotene hydroxylase in addition to a β-carotene ketolase, in the transgenic seeds suggests that an endogenous soybean enzyme is able to work in combination with the ketolase transgene. Soybean seeds that accumulate ketocarotenoids could potentially be used in animal feed to reduce or eliminate the need for the costly addition of these compounds.

  17. Microbiology of traditional fermented soybean curd (Sufu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhoom, A.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms in traditional fermenting soybean curd (Sufu were quantitated. Total microbial populations of bacteria, molds and yeasts were 1.6×101 to 4.0×105, 2.4×101 to 3.9×105 and 4.4×103 to 8.0×105 CFU/g, respectively. Aspergillus, Penicillium, Rhizopus and Bacillus were dominantly found in koji inoculum. Bacillus, Pediococcus and Saccharomyces were mainly detected throughout the fermentation process. The other microorganisms were Staphylococcus, Pichia and Debaryomyces. All isolated microorganisms were halotolerant at salt concentrations between 5 to 20%. Aspergillus, Penicillium and Bacillus could produce potential proteolytic and amylolytic enzymes, implying that these microorganisms may play significant roles in the fermentation of tofu substrate. The nutritional evaluation of fermenting Sufu had protein content between 16.09-21.91%, sugar 4.23- 9.14%, lipid 7.20- 12.76%, salt 10.06-11.26%, humidity 47.55-57.97%, ash 9.24-15.63%, fibre 0.10-0.16%, pH 4.99-5.75 and fermenting temperature at 29-31ºC. Additionally, aflatoxin B1 at the concentration of 10.8- 22.8 ppb could be detected in the fermenting Sufu by ELISA methods whereas the final product of Sufu remained 18.4 ppb. Additionally, the commercial Sufu in the markets had aflatoxin in the range of 1.5-15.2 ppb which is in the control of FDA (U.S.A. standard that aflatoxin in food and peanut products should be less than 20 ppb.

  18. EFFECTIVENESS OF SOME POST-EMERGENCE HERBICIDES IN SOYBEAN

    OpenAIRE

    Knežević, Mira; Antunović, Manda; Ranogajec, Ljubica; Baličević, Renata

    2008-01-01

    A three-year field experiment was conducted in soybean on lessive pseudogley soil at Čačinci locality (P.P. Orahovica d.d.) in North-eastern Croatia to evaluate the effectiveness of chemical weed control through single or multiple applications of post-emergence herbicides, alone or in combinations and their effects on soybean yields. Main weeds were summer annual species of Echinochloa crus-galli (140 - 269 shoots/m2), Ambrosia artemisiifolia (8-56 plants/m2) and Chenopodium album (3-12 plant...

  19. The observation of soybean yield components in Ml generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muryono, H.

    1978-01-01

    Some properties of the soybean yield component in Ml generation were investigated. Soybean seed variety of Taichung were irradiated with gamma rays from the cobalt source at the Gamma Atomic Energy Research Centre, Yogyakarta. Seven different doses at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14 krads were used. Subsequent growth of the irradiated seed was carried out in the field and the ages of flowering, seedling height number of pods, number of fertile and infertile pods and percentage of sterility were recorded. It was found that the significant effect on the above variables was observed due to the gamma radiation doses between 8-12 krads. (author)

  20. Assessing the greenhouse gas emissions of Brazilian soybean biodiesel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Xin; Cherubin, Maurício Roberto; Moreira, Cindy Silva; Raucci, Guilherme Silva; Castigioni, Bruno de Almeida; Alves, Priscila Aparecida; Cerri, Domingos Guilherme Pellegrino; Mello, Francisco Fujita de Castro; Cerri, Carlos Clemente

    2017-01-01

    Soybean biodiesel (B100) has been playing an important role in Brazilian energy matrix towards the national bio-based economy. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is the most widely used indicator for assessing the environmental sustainability of biodiesels and received particular attention among decision makers in business and politics, as well as consumers. Former studies have been mainly focused on the GHG emissions from the soybean cultivation, excluding other stages of the biodiesel production. Here, we present a holistic view of the total GHG emissions in four life cycle stages for soybean biodiesel. The aim of this study was to assess the GHG emissions of Brazilian soybean biodiesel production system with an integrated life cycle approach of four stages: agriculture, extraction, production and distribution. Allocation of mass and energy was applied and special attention was paid to the integrated and non-integrated industrial production chain. The results indicated that the largest source of GHG emissions, among four life cycle stages, is the agricultural stage (42–51%) for B100 produced in integrated systems and the production stage (46–52%) for B100 produced in non-integrated systems. Integration of industrial units resulted in significant reduction in life cycle GHG emissions. Without the consideration of LUC and assuming biogenic CO2 emissions is carbon neutral in our study, the calculated life cycle GHG emissions for domestic soybean biodiesel varied from 23.1 to 25.8 gCO2eq. MJ-1 B100 and those for soybean biodiesel exported to EU ranged from 26.5 to 29.2 gCO2eq. MJ-1 B100, which represent reductions by 65% up to 72% (depending on the delivery route) of GHG emissions compared with the EU benchmark for diesel fuel. Our findings from a life cycle perspective contributed to identify the major GHG sources in Brazilian soybean biodiesel production system and they can be used to guide mitigation priority for policy and decision-making. Projected scenarios in