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Sample records for caucasian girls affect

  1. Does vitamin D supplementation of healthy Danish Caucasian girls affect bone turnover and bone mineralization?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molgaard, C.; Larnkjaer, A.; Cashman, K.D.

    2010-01-01

    of VDR and ER genotype on the effect of the supplementation. Methods: The girls (n = 221) were randomized to receive either 5 mu g or 10 mu g vitamin D-3 supplementation per day or placebo for 12 months. Whole body and lumbar spine bone mass measured by DXA and pubertal status were determined at baseline...... density (BMD) (p = 0.007) and bone mineral content (BMC) (p = 0.048) in the FF VDR genotype but not in the Ff or ff VDR genotypes. Conclusion: Supplementation with vitamin D (5 or 10 mu g/day) over 12 months increased the S-25OHD concentration but there was no effect on indices of bone health...... in the entire group of girls. However, there was an effect on BMD for a subgroup with the FF VDR genotype indicating an influence of genotype....

  2. Eating attitudes and body image in ethnic Japanese and Caucasian adolescent girls in the city of São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampei, Míriam A; Sigulem, Dirce M; Novo, Neil F; Juliano, Yara; Colugnati, Fernando A B

    2009-01-01

    Despite investigations into the rapid increase in eating disorders across diverse ethnic groups, conclusions concerning ethnicity and eating disorders are contradictory. The objective of the present study was to investigate eating attitudes in ethnic Japanese and Caucasian adolescents in Brazil. The influence of body mass index (BMI), menarche and social-affective relationships on the development of eating disorders was also assessed. Questionnaires evaluating the incidence of eating disorders and the influence of social-affective relationships were applied to 544 Japanese-Brazilian and Caucasian adolescent girls: 10 to 11-year-old Japanese-Brazilian (n = 122) and Caucasian (n = 176) pre-menarcheal adolescents, and 16 to 17-year-old Japanese-Brazilian (n = 71) and Caucasian (n = 175) post-menarcheal adolescents. Caucasian girls obtained higher scores on the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26), showed greater body image dissatisfaction, dieted more often and had more diet models introduced by their mothers and peers than the Japanese-Brazilian girls. CONCLUSION The Caucasian adolescents overall appeared to be more sensitive to aesthetic and social pressures regarding body image than the Japanese adolescents. The high incidence of EAT-26 scores above 20 in the Caucasian pre-menarcheal group indicates that individual body image concerns are developing at an earlier age. Multiple logistic regression revealed several associations between mother-teen interactions and the development of abnormal eating attitudes.

  3. Torpedo maculopathy with an anisometropic amblyopia in a 5-year-old Caucasian girl: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Dutra-Medeiros

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to report a clinical case of asymptomatic female Caucasian children with torpedo maculopathy. A 5-year-old girl was referred to our clinic for routine evaluation. The ophthalmic examination revealed best-corrected visual acuity of 20/20 in both eyes, without any changes in the biomicroscopy. Fundus examination showed normal findings in one eye, whereas in the contralateral eye it disclosed, in the temporal sector of the macular region, a whitish, atrophic, oval chorioretinal lesion with clearly defined margins. Posterior evaluations documented the stability of the lesion. Torpedo maculopathy diagnosis is based on its characteristic shape and peculiar location. The differential diagnosis has to be estabilished versus choroidal lesions (melanoma and nevus, congenital or iatrogenic hyperplasia of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE and particularly versus the congenital pigmented lesions associated with Gardner's syndrome.

  4. Estimation of body fat in Caucasian and African-American girls: total-body electrical conductivity methodology versus a four-component model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, W W; Stuff, J E; Butte, N F; Smith, E O; Ellis, K J

    2000-09-01

    Obesity has been increasing dramatically in recent years among children, particularly African-American girls. Total-body electrical conductivity (TOBEC) is a simple way to measure body fat with minimal risk. This study compared the agreement between the percentage of fat mass (%FM) predicted using two TOBEC equations with %FM measured by a four-component model in 73 Caucasian and 41 African-American girls. %FM predicted using the TOBEC equations was compared with %FM from the four-component model based on measurements of body density, body water and bone mineral content. Analyses by linear regression analysis and by the Bland and Altman methods comparison procedure showed that the equation using the square root of the TOBEC zero-order Fourier coefficient and the subject's height yielded more accurate and more reproducible %FM, regardless of race, than the TOBEC linear equation, which was based on the zero-, first- and second-order Fourier coefficients. The Bland and Altman comparison further revealed that the accuracy and limits of agreement of the TOBEC linear equation were related to body fatness among the Caucasian girls. The relationship, however, disappeared when prepubescent girls and a girl with low %FM were excluded from the analysis. The TOBEC square root equation with adjustment for body geometry and length is recommended for use in adolescent girls, as it yielded better agreement with the criterion method. However, further validation of the TOBEC instrumentation for estimating body fat in prepubescent children and children with low body fat is warranted.

  5. External Factors Affecting Gifted Girls' Academic and Career Achievements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mary Ann; Smith, Stephen W.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses the unique position that teachers have for observing the environmental influences affecting the career choices of gifted girls. It suggests ways for teachers to educate parents on the family's role in education and career achievement and to create an educational environment that promotes the development of talent. (Contains…

  6. Black Like Me: How Idealized Images of Caucasian Women Affect Body Esteem and Mood States of African-American Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisby, Cynthia M.

    Using the theory of social comparison, the present research explores how exposure to idealized images of physically attractive Caucasian women affects and changes the self-reported esteem levels of African-American undergraduate students. Though research reveals that the number of portrayals of African-Americans in ads is growing, little if any…

  7. Higher milk requirements for bone mineral accrual in adolescent girls bearing specific caucasian genotypes in the VDR promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterle, Laure; Jehan, Frederic; Sabatier, Jean-Pierre; Garabedian, Michele

    2009-08-01

    Low milk intakes hamper bone mineral acquisition during adolescence, especially in European girls. We hypothesized that ethnic-specific polymorphisms of the vitamin D receptor gene promoter (VDRp) influence this milk/bone association. We evaluated lumbar spine BMC and BMD, milk/dairy products and calcium intakes, markers of P-Ca metabolism, and VDRp polymorphisms at the Cdx-2 binding (rs11568820) and -1012 (rs4516035) loci in 117 healthy European peri- and postmenarcheal girls (14.9 +/- 1.6 yr) during a 4-yr follow-up. Calcium intakes from milk, nonmilk dairy products, and nondairy products averaged 199, 243, and 443 mg/d at the initiation of the study. Results show no association between milk intakes and bone mass accrual in girls bearing an A/A genotype at the -1012 VDRp locus (30% of the cohort). In contrast, A/G or G/G girls had lower spine BMC (-13%, p = 0.031), BMD (-10%, p = 0.004), and BMD Z-score (-0.84 SD, p = 0.0003) when their milk intakes were milk intakes and with girls with an A/A genotype. The negative impact of low milk intake persisted up to 19.0 +/- 1.7 yr. These findings suggest that European girls bearing a -1012 A/G or G/G VDRp genotype should have higher milk/calcium intakes for optimal vertebral mass accrual during adolescence than girls bearing an A/A genotype, a genotype found in 30% of European and 98% of Asian and Sub-Saharan African populations. VDRp genotype diversity may contribute to the ethnic differences observed in milk requirements for bone health during adolescence.

  8. Differing perceptions among ethnic minority and Caucasian medical students which may affect their relative academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandauka, Rumbidzai E; Russell, Jean M; Sandars, John; Vivekananda-Schmidt, Pirashanthie

    2015-01-01

    Ethnic minority (EM) medical students in the United Kingdom underperform academically compared to their Caucasian counterparts, but the reasons are unclear and further understanding is required. To explore self-reported factors that might influence academic underperformance of EM medical students. An online semi-structured questionnaire was used to identify associations between several dimensions that had been identified in previous research and obtain free-text comments. Three-hundred and fifty-one medical students (73.3% Caucasian and 26.5% EM) from the Universities of Sheffield, Keele and London responded. EM medical students were less satisfied with their academic performance and less likely to feel they belonged to the medical school community due to their cultural background, including socio-economic factors. Differences exist between EM and Caucasian medical students in their learning experiences in medical school. There is a need to increase awareness, for both medical students and teaching staff, of the impact of cultural diversity on academic performance at medical school.

  9. Severity, affect, family and environment (safe) approach to evaluate chronic pelvic pain in adolescent girls

    OpenAIRE

    Wadhwa Leena; Sharma J; Arora R; Malhotra M; Sharma S

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pelvic pain is common in adolescent girls in day-to-day practice. Severity, Affect, Family and Environment (SAFE) is a recent interview strategy to approach these patients and their families.. AIM: 1. To find the prevalence of pelvic pain in adolescent girls. 2. To find out the feasibility and acceptability of ′SAFE′ approach in evaluating chronic pelvic pain in adolescent girls. SETTINGS & DESIGN: 200 adolescent girls aged 13-23 years were selected at random ...

  10. Atitudes alimentares e imagem corporal em meninas adolescentes de ascendência nipônica e caucasiana em São Paulo (SP Eating attitudes and body image in ethnic Japanese and Caucasian adolescent girls in the city of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Míriam A. Sampei

    2009-04-01

    social-affective relationships on the development of eating disorders was also assessed. METHODS: Questionnaires evaluating the incidence of eating disorders and the influence of social-affective relationships were applied to 544 Japanese-Brazilian and Caucasian adolescent girls: 10 to 11-year-old Japanese-Brazilian (n = 122 and Caucasian (n = 176 pre-menarcheal adolescents, and 16 to 17-year-old Japanese-Brazilian (n = 71 and Caucasian (n = 175 post-menarcheal adolescents. RESULTS: Caucasian girls obtained higher scores on the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26, showed greater body image dissatisfaction, dieted more often and had more diet models introduced by their mothers and peers than the Japanese-Brazilian girls. CONCLUSION: The Caucasian adolescents overall appeared to be more sensitive to aesthetic and social pressures regarding body image than the Japanese adolescents. The high incidence of EAT-26 scores above 20 in the Caucasian pre-menarcheal group indicates that individual body image concerns are developing at an earlier age. Multiple logistic regression revealed several associations between mother-teen interactions and the development of abnormal eating attitudes.

  11. Emotion-Oriented Coping, Avoidance Coping, and Fear of Pain as Mediators of the Relationship between Positive Affect, Negative Affect, and Pain-Related Distress among African American and Caucasian College Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightsey, Owen Richard, Jr.; Wells, Anita G.; Wang, Mei-Chuan; Pietruszka, Todd; Ciftci, Ayse; Stancil, Brett

    2009-01-01

    The authors tested whether coping styles and fear of pain mediate the relationship between positive affect and negative affect on one hand and pain-related distress (PD) on the other. Among African American and Caucasian female college students, negative affect, fear of pain, and emotion-oriented coping together accounted for 34% of the variance…

  12. Assessment of intake of iron and nutrients that affect bioavailability of daily food rations of girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broniecka, Anna; Wyka, Joanna; Bronkowska, Monika; Piotrowska, Ewa; Biernat, Jadwiga

    2014-01-01

    In a human body iron occurs at a level of 3 to 5 g, 60-70 % of which are in hemoglobin, ca. 10% in myoglobin, and ca. 3% are accumulated in enzymes of cellular respiration or enzymes degrading toxic hydrogen peroxide. The other part of iron is accumulated in liver, spleen, kidneys and bone marrow. The dietary deficiency of iron appears at its insufficient level in a diet and at impaired absorption of iron ions present in food products by a body. Groups at an especially high risk of iron deficiencies include, among others, menstruating girls in the pubescence period and women with heavy and irregular menstruations, as well as vegetarians and patients with chronic enteritis. To evaluate the intake of iron and nutrients that affect its bioavailability from daily food rations of girls. The study included 159 girls aged 17-18, students of high schools in the city of Wroclaw. The study was conducted between November 2010 and ay 2011. Girls were divided into 3 subgroups according to the BMI score. Girls' diets were analyzed with the method of a direct interview of the last 24 hours before the test and the interview was repeated seven times. RESULTS The present study demonstrated that the intake of iron from food rations of almost all the girls surveyed was below the requirements defined for this age group. Statistically significant differences were noted in the intake of energy and nutrients among the three distinguished subgroups of girls. CONCLUSIONS Food rations of the surveyed girls were characterized by a low, compared to dietary allowances, calorific value, which resulted in deficiencies of nutrients increasing iron bioavailability.

  13. Factors Negatively Affect Speaking Skills at Saudi Colleges for Girls in the South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Mona M.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated factors negatively affect English language speaking skills in Saudi colleges for girls in the South in terms of: a) Instructors. b) Students. c) Curriculum and textbook. d) English Language teaching methods and exercises. e) Teaching and learning environment. To collect data for the study, a questionnaire papers were…

  14. Assessment of intake of iron and nutrients that affect bioavailability of daily food rations of girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Broniecka

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION AND AIM In a human body iron occurs at a level of 3 to 5 g, 60-70 % of which are in hemoglobin, ca. 10% in myoglobin, and ca. 3% are accumulated in enzymes of cellular respiration or enzymes degrading toxic hydrogen peroxide. The other part of iron is accumulated in liver, spleen, kidneys and bone marrow. The dietary deficiency of iron appears at its insufficient level in a diet and at impaired absorption of iron ions present in food products by a body. Groups at an especially high risk of iron deficiencies include, among others, menstruating girls in the pubescence period and women with heavy and irregular menstruations, as well as vegetarians and patients with chronic enteritis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the intake of iron and nutrients that affect its bioavailability from daily food rations of girls. MATERIAL AND METHODS The study included 159 girls aged 17-18, students of high schools in the city of Wroclaw. The study was conducted between November 2010 and ay 2011. Girls were divided into 3 subgroups according to the BMI score. Girls’ diets were analyzed with the method of a direct interview of the last 24 hours before the test and the interview was repeated seven times. RESULTS The present study demonstrated that the intake of iron from food rations of almost all the girls surveyed was below the requirements defined for this age group. Statistically significant differences were noted in the intake of energy and nutrients among the three distinguished subgroups of girls. CONCLUSIONS Food rations of the surveyed girls were characterized by a low, compared to dietary allowances, calorific value, which resulted in deficiencies of nutrients increasing iron bioavailability.

  15. Depressed affect and dietary restraint in adolescent boys' and girls' eating in the absence of hunger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Nichole R; Shomaker, Lauren B; Pickworth, Courtney K; Grygorenko, Mariya V; Radin, Rachel M; Vannucci, Anna; Shank, Lisa M; Brady, Sheila M; Courville, Amber B; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Yanovski, Jack A

    2015-08-01

    Data suggest that depressed affect and dietary restraint are related to disinhibited eating patterns in children and adults. Yet, experimental research has not determined to what extent depressed affect acutely affects eating in the absence of physiological hunger (EAH) in adolescents. In the current between-subjects experimental study, we measured EAH in 182 adolescent (13-17 y) girls (65%) and boys as ad libitum palatable snack food intake after youth ate to satiety from a buffet meal. Just prior to EAH, participants were randomly assigned to view either a sad or neutral film clip. Dietary restraint was measured with the Eating Disorder Examination. Adolescents who viewed the sad film clip reported small but significant increases in state depressed affect relative to adolescents who viewed the neutral film clip (p girls, but not boys (p girls' propensity to report restrained eating is associated with their greater disinhibited eating in the laboratory. Additional experimental research, perhaps utilizing a more potent laboratory stressor and manipulating both affective state and dietary restraint, is required to elucidate how state affect may interact with dietary restraint to influence EAH during adolescence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization is more robust in healthy African American compared to Caucasian donors and is not affected by the presence of sickle cell trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panch, Sandhya R; Yau, Yu Ying; Fitzhugh, Courtney D; Hsieh, Matthew M; Tisdale, John F; Leitman, Susan F

    2016-05-01

    Granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-stimulated hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) collected by apheresis have become the predominant graft source for HPC transplantation in adults. Among healthy allogeneic donors, demographic characteristics (age, sex, body mass index [BMI]) and baseline hematologic counts affect HPC mobilization, leading to variability in CD34+ apheresis yields. Racial differences in HPC mobilization are less well characterized. We retrospectively analyzed data from 1096 consecutive G-CSF-stimulated leukapheresis procedures in healthy allogeneic African American (AA) or Caucasian donors. In a multivariate analysis, after adjusting for age, sex, BMI, baseline platelet and mononuclear cell counts, and daily G-CSF dose, peak CD34+ cell mobilization was significantly higher among AAs (n = 215) than Caucasians (n = 881; 123 ± 87 × 10(6) cells/L vs. 75 ± 47 × 10(6) cells/L; p cells/L vs. 123 ± 87 × 10(6) cells/L) but not in Caucasians (74 ± 46 × 10(6) cells/L vs. 93 ± 53 × 10(6) cells/L; p sickle cell trait (SCT; n = 41) did not affect CD34+ mobilization (peak CD34+ 123 ± 91 × 10(6) cells/L vs. 107 ± 72 × 10(6) cells/L, HbAS vs. HbAA; p = 0.34). Adverse events were minimal and similar across race. AAs demonstrated significantly better CD34 mobilization responses to G-CSF than Caucasians. This was independent of other demographic and hematologic variables. Studying race-associated pharmacogenomics in relation to G-CSF may improve dosing strategies. Adverse event profile and CD34 mobilization were similar in AA donors with and without SCT. Our findings suggest that it would be safe to include healthy AA donors with SCT in unrelated donor registries. © 2016 AABB.

  17. The Main and Interactive Effects of Maternal Interpersonal Emotion Regulation and Negative Affect on Adolescent Girls' Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon-Gordon, Katherine L; Whalen, Diana J; Scott, Lori N; Cummins, Nicole D; Stepp, Stephanie D

    2016-06-01

    The transaction of adolescent's expressed negative affect and parental interpersonal emotion regulation are theoretically implicated in the development of borderline personality disorder (BPD). Although problem solving and support/validation are interpersonal strategies that foster emotion regulation, little is known about whether these strategies are associated with less BPD severity among adolescents. Adolescent girls (age 16; N = 74) and their mothers completed a conflict discussion task, and maternal problem solving, support/validation, and girls' negative affect were coded. Girls' BPD symptoms were assessed at four time points. A 3-way interaction of girls' negative affect, problem solving, and support/validation indicated that girls' negative affect was only associated with BPD severity in the context of low maternal support/validation and high maternal problem solving. These variables did not predict changes in BPD symptoms over time. Although high negative affect is a risk for BPD severity in adolescent girls, maternal interpersonal emotion regulation strategies moderate this link. Whereas maternal problem solving coupled with low support/validation is associated with a stronger negative affect-BPD relation, maternal problem solving paired with high support/validation is associated with an attenuated relationship.

  18. Genetic variations in FSH action affect sex hormone levels and breast tissue size in infant girls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Louise Scheutz; Hagen, Casper P; Assens, Maria

    2016-01-01

    , especially FSHR -29G>A and FSHR 2039A>G, affect female hormone profile and glandular breast tissue development already during minipuberty. Thus, genetic variations of FSH signaling appear to determine the individual set point of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis already early in life.......Context: Single nucleotide polymorphisms altering FSH action (FSHB -211G>T, FSHR -29G>A, and FSHR 2039A>G) are associated with peripubertal and adult levels of reproductive hormones and age at pubertal onset in girls. Objective: To investigate whether genetic polymorphisms altering FSH action...... by PCR using Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR genotyping assays; identification of glandular breast tissue by palpation and measurement of the diameter. Serum levels of anti-Müllerian hormone, FSH, LH, estradiol, inhibin B, and sex hormone-binding globulin were assessed by immunoassays. Results: FSHR -29G...

  19. School factors affecting postsecondary career pursuits of high-achieving girls in mathematics and science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hyunsil

    This study examined the influences of secondary school experiences of high-achieving girls in math and science on their postsecondary career pursuits in science fields. Specifically, using the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS:88), the study investigated how science class experiences in high school affect science career persistence of high-achieving girls over and above personal and family factors. Selecting the top 10% on the 8 th grade math and science achievement tests from two panel samples of 1988--1994 and 1988--2000, this study examined which science instructional experiences (i.e., lecture-oriented, experiment-oriented, and student-oriented) best predicted college major choices and postsecondary degree attainments in the fields of science after controlling for personal and family factors. A two-stage test was employed for the analysis of each panel sample. The first test examined the dichotomous career pursuits between science careers and non-science careers and the second test examined the dichotomous pursuits within science careers: "hard" science and "soft" science. Logistic regression procedures were used with consideration of panel weights and design effects. This study identified that experiment-oriented and student-oriented instructional practices seem to positively affect science career pursuits of high-achieving females, while lecture-oriented instruction negatively affected their science career pursuits, and that the longitudinal effects of the two positive instructional contributors to science career pursuits appear to be differential between major choice and degree attainment. This study also found that the influences of instructional practices seem to be slight for general females, while those for high-achieving females were highly considerable, regardless of whether negative or positive. Another result of the study found that only student-oriented instruction seemed to have positive effects for high-achieving males. In

  20. Pre-Meal Affective State and Laboratory Test Meal Intake in Adolescent Girls with Loss of Control Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranzenhofer, Lisa M.; Hannallah, Louise; Field, Sara E.; Shomaker, Lauren B.; Stephens, Mark; Sbrocco, Tracy; Kozlosky, Merel; Reynolds, James; Yanovski, Jack A.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Loss of control eating confers risk for excess weight gain and exacerbated disordered eating. Affect theory proposes that loss of control eating is used to cope with negative mood states. Self-report data suggest that negative affect may contribute to the etiology of loss of control eating, but this theory has not been well-tested using laboratory paradigms. We examined associations between pre-meal affective states and intake during a laboratory test meal. One-hundred and ten adolescent girls with reported loss of control eating whose body mass index fell between the 85th and 97th percentile for age and sex completed state mood ratings prior to a test-meal. Results indicated that pre-meal state negative affect was associated with greater carbohydrate and less protein consumption, as well as greater snack and dessert and less fruit and dairy intake. All girls experienced significant decreases in negative affect from pre- to post- meal, but intake during the meal was unassociated with post-meal affect. In support of affect theory, negative affective states reported among girls with loss of control may be a driving factor for increased energy-dense food intake, which may play a role in excess weight gain. PMID:23603224

  1. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Sexually Exploited, War-Affected Congolese Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Paul; McMullen, John; Shannon, Ciaran; Rafferty, Harry; Black, Alastair

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) delivered by nonclinical facilitators in reducing posttraumatic stress, depression, and anxiety and conduct problems and increasing prosocial behavior in a group of war-affected, sexually exploited girls in a single-blind, parallel-design, randomized,…

  2. Do physical activity facilities near schools affect physical activity in high school girls?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trilk, Jennifer L; Ward, Dianne S; Dowda, Marsha; Pfeiffer, Karin A; Porter, Dwayne E; Hibbert, James; Pate, Russell R

    2011-03-01

    To investigate associations between the number of physical activity facilities within walking distance of school and physical activity behavior in 12th grade girls during after-school hours. Girls (N=1394) from 22 schools completed a self-report to determine physical activity after 3:00 p.m. The number of physical activity facilities within a 0.75-mile buffer of the school was counted with a Geographic Information System. Associations between the number of facilities and girls' physical activity were examined using linear mixed-model analysis of variance. Overall, girls who attended schools with ≥5 facilities within the buffer reported more physical activity per day than girls in schools with schools with ≥5 facilities reported ∼12% more physical activity per day than girls who attended rural schools with schools with ≥5 vs. school siting decisions are made, the number of physical activity facilities surrounding the school should be considered to encourage physical activity in 12th grade girls. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Pubertal onset in girls is strongly influenced by genetic variation affecting FSH action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Casper P; Sørensen, Kaspar; Aksglaede, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Age at pubertal onset varies substantially in healthy girls. Although genetic factors are responsible for more than half of the phenotypic variation, only a small part has been attributed to specific genetic polymorphisms identified so far. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) stimulates ovarian...... follicle maturation and estradiol synthesis which is responsible for breast development. We assessed the effect of three polymorphisms influencing FSH action on age at breast deveopment in a population-based cohort of 964 healthy girls. Girls homozygous for FSHR -29AA (reduced FSH receptor expression......) entered puberty 7.4 (2.5-12.4) months later than carriers of the common variants FSHR -29GG+GA, p = 0.003. To our knowledge, this is the strongest genetic effect on age at pubertal onset in girls published to date....

  4. Longitudinal study of behavioral and affective patterns in girls with central precocious puberty during long-acting triptorelin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xhrouet-Heinrichs, D; Lagrou, K; Heinrichs, C; Craen, M; Dooms, L; Malvaux, P; Kanen, F; Bourguignon, J P

    1997-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the behavioral and affective characteristics and the changes in psychosocial functioning resulting from precocious puberty in 15 girls with central precocious puberty treated for 2 y using the GnRH agonist long-acting triptorelin, and in 5 untreated girls. After diagnosis of precocious puberty at 6.6-10.4 y of age, height, weight and pubertal development were evaluated at 3-month intervals over 2 y. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with the patient, the parents and the pediatric endocrinologists at 1, 8, 16 and 24 months after diagnosis. Standardized questionnaires (Child Behavior Checklist, Self-esteem Inventory) were administered at 1 and 24 months or 16 and 24 months, respectively. There was a mean 1.5-y delay between the observation of signs of puberty as reported by the parents and the diagnosis of precocious puberty at the first consultation of a pediatric endocrinologist. Before follow-up, all 20 girls were very concerned about physical differences from peers, particularly breast development. During therapy, breast regression to minimal or absent development occurred in 5/15 treated patients, who then no longer felt embarrassed about pubertal development in contrast to the other patients. Fear of sexuality remained obvious throughout the study in most patients. Feelings of loneliness and exemplary behavior were observed and tended to decrease in the treated patients and to increase in the untreated patients. Elevated scores of withdrawal, anxiety/depression and somatic complaints at Child Behavior Checklist were still observed after 2 y. These changes in behavioral and affective characteristics appeared to be related neither to height and weight, nor to development of pubic hair, which progressed in most patients. After 2 y, the physical differences remained a concern for 13 girls and the risk of short adult stature for 6. In summary, some behavioral and affective characteristics and particularities in

  5. Acute affective responses to prescribed and self-selected exercise sessions in adolescent girls: an observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Hamlyn-Williams, C. C.; Freeman, P.; Parfitt, G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Positive affective responses can lead to improved adherence to exercise. This study sought to examine the affective responses and exercise intensity of self-selected exercise in adolescent girls. Methods An observational study where twenty seven females (Age M = 14.6 ± 0.8 years) completed three 20-minute exercise sessions (2 self-selected and 1 prescribed intensity) and a graded exercise test. The intensity of the prescribed session was matched to the first self-selected session. ...

  6. Sedentary behavior, depressed affect, and indicators of mental well-being in adolescence: Does the screen only matter for girls?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchert, Vivien; Hanewinkel, Reiner; Isensee, Barbara

    2015-07-01

    The study investigated the effects of sedentary behavior (SB) on mental well-being and examined differences between screen-based (sSB) and non-screen-based sedentary behaviors (nSB) separately by gender. In a total sample of 1296 students (609 girls) aged 12-17 (m = 13.7, SD = 0.67), SB, depressed affect, self-esteem, physical self-concept, general self-efficacy and physical activity were assessed through self-administered questionnaires. Among girls, lower scores in self-esteem, physical self-concept as well as general self-efficacy were associated with higher sSB but not nSB. Among boys higher levels of sSB related to higher self-esteem, nSB but not sSB predicted higher scores in depressed affect, and there was a u-shaped association between sSB and general self-efficacy. Results replicate the inverse association between SB and mental well-being, and suggest a distinction between nSB and sSB especially among girls. Additional studies will be necessary to replicate, and further examine mediating mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cross-sectional evidence for a stress-negative affect pathway to substance use among sexual minority girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshal, Michael P; Burton, Chad M; Chisolm, Deena J; Sucato, Gina S; Friedman, Mark S

    2013-08-01

    Sexual minority girls (SMGs) are four times more likely to engage in substance use than are heterosexual girls. A better understanding of the explanatory mechanisms of this disparity is needed to inform prevention and intervention programs. The goal of this study was to conduct a preliminary test of a "stress-negative affect" pathway by examining gay-related victimization and depression as mediators of substance use among SMGs. Adolescent girls (N = 156, 41% SMGs) were recruited from two urban adolescent medicine clinics to participate in an NIH-funded study of adolescent substance use. The average age was 17.0 years old and 57% were nonwhite. Mediation analyses were conducted in a multiple regression framework using SPSS and a mediation macro utilizing bias-corrected bootstrapping. Four models were estimated to test mediated pathways from sexual orientation to gay-related victimization (Mediator 1), to depression symptoms (Mediator 2), and then to each of four substance use variables: cigarettes, marijuana, alcohol, and heavy alcohol use. Significant mediated pathways (mediation tests with 95% CIs) were found for cigarette, alcohol and heavy alcohol use outcome variables. Results provide preliminary support for the minority stress hypothesis and the stress-negative affect pathway, and may inform the development of future prevention and intervention programs. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. How gender- and violence-related norms affect self-esteem among adolescent refugee girls living in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, L; Asghar, K; Seff, I; Cislaghi, B; Yu, G; Tesfay Gessesse, T; Eoomkham, J; Assazenew Baysa, A; Falb, K

    2018-01-01

    Evidence suggests adolescent self-esteem is influenced by beliefs of how individuals in their reference group perceive them. However, few studies examine how gender- and violence-related social norms affect self-esteem among refugee populations. This paper explores relationships between gender inequitable and victim-blaming social norms, personal attitudes, and self-esteem among adolescent girls participating in a life skills program in three Ethiopian refugee camps. Ordinary least squares multivariable regression analysis was used to assess the associations between attitudes and social norms, and self-esteem. Key independent variables of interest included a scale measuring personal attitudes toward gender inequitable norms, a measure of perceived injunctive norms capturing how a girl believed her family and community would react if she was raped, and a peer-group measure of collective descriptive norms surrounding gender inequity. The key outcome variable, self-esteem, was measured using the Rosenberg self-esteem scale. Girl's personal attitudes toward gender inequitable norms were not significantly predictive of self-esteem at endline, when adjusting for other covariates. Collective peer norms surrounding the same gender inequitable statements were significantly predictive of self-esteem at endline ( ß  = -0.130; p   =  0.024). Additionally, perceived injunctive norms surrounding family and community-based sanctions for victims of forced sex were associated with a decline in self-esteem at endline ( ß  = -0.103; p   =  0.014). Significant findings for collective descriptive norms and injunctive norms remained when controlling for all three constructs simultaneously. Findings suggest shifting collective norms around gender inequity, particularly at the community and peer levels, may sustainably support the safety and well-being of adolescent girls in refugee settings.

  9. Factors that affect the food choices made by girls and young women, from minority ethnic groups, living in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J M; Devlin, E; Macaskill, S; Kelly, M; Chinouya, M; Raats, M M; Barton, K L; Wrieden, W L; Shepherd, R

    2007-08-01

    Lower birth weight, often found in infants from minority ethnic groups, may be partly because of the disproportionate representation of ethnic minority groups in low-income areas. To develop an intervention, to improve the nutritional intake of young women from populations at risk of low-birth-weight babies, which would be culturally sensitive and well received by the intended recipients, a community development approach was used to investigate factors that might influence food choice and the nutritional intake of girls and young women from ethnic minority groups. Focus group discussions were conducted across the UK, to explore factors that might affect the food choices of girls and young women of African and South Asian decent. The data was analysed using deductive content analysis (Qual. Soc. Res., 1, 2000, 1). Discussions were around the broad themes of buying and preparing food, eating food and dietary changes, and ideas for an intervention to improve diet. The focus group discussions indicated that all the communities took time, price, health and availability into consideration when making food purchases. The groups were also quite similar in their use of 'Western' foods which tended to be of the fast food variety. These foods were used when there was not enough time to prepare a 'traditional' meal. Many issues that affect the food choice of people who move to the UK are common within different ethnic groups. The idea of a practical intervention based on improving cooking skills was popular with all the groups.

  10. Self-Esteem and Negative Affect as Moderators of Sociocultural Influences on Body Dissatisfaction, Strategies To Decrease Weight, and Strategies To Increase Muscles among Adolescent Boys and Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardelli, Lina A.; McCabe, Marita P.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the impact of sociocultural influences and the moderating role of self-esteem and negative affect on body dissatisfaction and body change strategies for adolescent boys and girls. Surveys indicated that sociocultural pressures significantly predicted body dissatisfaction and body change strategies among both sexes. Both boys and girls…

  11. Pubertal Progression and Reproductive Hormones in Healthy Girls with Transient Thelarche

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Marie Lindhardt; Hagen, Casper P; Mieritz, Mikkel G

    2017-01-01

    in terms of pubertal progression, growth, genotypes, and reproductive hormones and to apply new puberty nomograms for breast stages, pubic hair, and menarche. Design: A prospective, longitudinal population-based study. Patients or Other Participants: Ninety-eight healthy Danish schoolchildren (Caucasian...... thelarche, reproductive hormones, genotype, and growth. Results: Twelve of 98 (12%) girls experienced TT. A larger proportion of girls with TT entered puberty by the pubarche pathway (50%) compared with girls with normal progression (15.4%), P = 0.014. Girls with TT progressed through puberty normally when...... evaluated using puberty nomograms. Reproductive hormones and growth velocity were lower at the first (transient) thelarche than the second (permanent) thelarche. Conclusion: TT is a frequent phenomenon that appears to be a peripheral occurrence independent of central puberty. It does not appear to affect...

  12. In the face of war: examining sexual vulnerabilities of Acholi adolescent girls living in displacement camps in conflict-affected Northern Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Sheetal H

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescent girls are an overlooked group within conflict-affected populations and their sexual health needs are often neglected. Girls are disproportionately at risk of HIV and other STIs in times of conflict, however the lack of recognition of their unique sexual health needs has resulted in a dearth of distinctive HIV protection and prevention responses. Departing from the recognition of a paucity of literature on the distinct vulnerabilities of girls in time of conflict, this study sought to deepen the knowledge base on this issue by qualitatively exploring the sexual vulnerabilities of adolescent girls surviving abduction and displacement in Northern Uganda. Methods Over a ten-month period between 2004–2005, at the height of the Lord’s Resistance Army insurgency in Northern Uganda, 116 in-depth interviews and 16 focus group discussions were held with adolescent girls and adult women living in three displacement camps in Gulu district, Northern Uganda. The data was transcribed and key themes and common issues were identified. Once all data was coded the ethnographic software programme ATLAS was used to compare and contrast themes and categories generated in the in-depth interviews and focus group discussions. Results Our results demonstrated the erosion of traditional Acholi mentoring and belief systems that had previously served to protect adolescent girls’ sexuality. This disintegration combined with: the collapse of livelihoods; being left in camps unsupervised and idle during the day; commuting within camp perimeters at night away from the family hut to sleep in more central locations due to privacy and insecurity issues, and; inadequate access to appropriate sexual health information and services, all contribute to adolescent girls’ heightened sexual vulnerability and subsequent enhanced risk for HIV/AIDS in times of conflict. Conclusions Conflict prevention planners, resettlement programme developers, and

  13. Sleep, Affect, and Social Competence from Preschool to Preadolescence: Distinct Pathways to Emotional and Social Adjustment for Boys and for Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Joan E; Weinraub, Marsha

    2017-01-01

    Using a normative sample of 1,057 children studied across 4 waves over 6 years with multiple informants, we investigated transactional relations for sleep problems, anxious-depressed symptoms, and social functioning from preschool to preadolescence, assessing cumulative effects on children's emotional and social adjustment. To examine sex differences in the developmental processes, we conducted separate analyses for boys and girls. For both boys and girls, longitudinal cross-lagged panel analyses showed that preschool sleep problems directly predicted anxious-depressed symptoms 2 years later; indirect effects continued into preadolescence. For girls, early and later sleep problems directly or indirectly predicted a wide variety of preadolescent emotional and social adjustment domains (e.g., depressive symptoms, school competence, emotion regulation, risk-taking behaviors). For boys, social competence played a more important role than sleep problems in predicting preadolescent adjustment. Among the first set of findings that demonstrate longitudinal relations between sleep problems and social functioning in middle childhood and preadolescence, these results support Dahl's and Walker's neurological models of sleep and emotional functioning. We discuss these findings in light of relations between sleep and affect during pre-pubertal development and discuss differential findings for boys and girls.

  14. Sleep, Affect, and Social Competence from Preschool to Preadolescence: Distinct Pathways to Emotional and Social Adjustment for Boys and for Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan E. Foley

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Using a normative sample of 1,057 children studied across 4 waves over 6 years with multiple informants, we investigated transactional relations for sleep problems, anxious-depressed symptoms, and social functioning from preschool to preadolescence, assessing cumulative effects on children's emotional and social adjustment. To examine sex differences in the developmental processes, we conducted separate analyses for boys and girls. For both boys and girls, longitudinal cross-lagged panel analyses showed that preschool sleep problems directly predicted anxious-depressed symptoms 2 years later; indirect effects continued into preadolescence. For girls, early and later sleep problems directly or indirectly predicted a wide variety of preadolescent emotional and social adjustment domains (e.g., depressive symptoms, school competence, emotion regulation, risk-taking behaviors. For boys, social competence played a more important role than sleep problems in predicting preadolescent adjustment. Among the first set of findings that demonstrate longitudinal relations between sleep problems and social functioning in middle childhood and preadolescence, these results support Dahl's and Walker's neurological models of sleep and emotional functioning. We discuss these findings in light of relations between sleep and affect during pre-pubertal development and discuss differential findings for boys and girls.

  15. Sleep, Affect, and Social Competence from Preschool to Preadolescence: Distinct Pathways to Emotional and Social Adjustment for Boys and for Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Joan E.; Weinraub, Marsha

    2017-01-01

    Using a normative sample of 1,057 children studied across 4 waves over 6 years with multiple informants, we investigated transactional relations for sleep problems, anxious-depressed symptoms, and social functioning from preschool to preadolescence, assessing cumulative effects on children's emotional and social adjustment. To examine sex differences in the developmental processes, we conducted separate analyses for boys and girls. For both boys and girls, longitudinal cross-lagged panel analyses showed that preschool sleep problems directly predicted anxious-depressed symptoms 2 years later; indirect effects continued into preadolescence. For girls, early and later sleep problems directly or indirectly predicted a wide variety of preadolescent emotional and social adjustment domains (e.g., depressive symptoms, school competence, emotion regulation, risk-taking behaviors). For boys, social competence played a more important role than sleep problems in predicting preadolescent adjustment. Among the first set of findings that demonstrate longitudinal relations between sleep problems and social functioning in middle childhood and preadolescence, these results support Dahl's and Walker's neurological models of sleep and emotional functioning. We discuss these findings in light of relations between sleep and affect during pre-pubertal development and discuss differential findings for boys and girls. PMID:28588517

  16. Disclosure bias for group versus individual reporting of violence amongst conflict-affected adolescent girls in DRC and Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Stark

    Full Text Available Methodologies to measure gender-based violence (GBV have received inadequate attention, especially in humanitarian contexts where vulnerabilities to violence are exacerbated. This paper compares the results from individual audio computer-assisted self-administered (ACASI survey interviews with results from participatory social mapping activities, employed with the same sample in two different post-conflict contexts. Eighty-seven internally displaced adolescent girls from the Democratic Republic of the Congo and 78 Sudanese girls living in Ethiopian refugee camps were interviewed using the two methodologies. Results revealed that the group-based qualitative method elicited narratives of violence focusing on events perpetrated by strangers or members of the community more distantly connected to girls. In contrast, ACASI interviews revealed violence predominantly perpetrated by family members and intimate partners. These findings suggest that group-based methods of information gathering frequently used in the field may be more susceptible to socially accepted narratives. Specifically, our findings suggest group-based methods may produce results showing that sexual violence perpetrated by strangers (e.g., from armed groups in the conflict is more prevalent than violence perpetrated by family and intimate partners. To the extent this finding is true, it may lead to a skewed perception that adolescent GBV involving strangers is a more pressing issue than intimate partner and family-based sexual violence, when in fact, both are of great concern.

  17. Disclosure bias for group versus individual reporting of violence amongst conflict-affected adolescent girls in DRC and Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Lindsay; Sommer, Marni; Davis, Kathryn; Asghar, Khudejha; Assazenew Baysa, Asham; Abdela, Gizman; Tanner, Sophie; Falb, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Methodologies to measure gender-based violence (GBV) have received inadequate attention, especially in humanitarian contexts where vulnerabilities to violence are exacerbated. This paper compares the results from individual audio computer-assisted self-administered (ACASI) survey interviews with results from participatory social mapping activities, employed with the same sample in two different post-conflict contexts. Eighty-seven internally displaced adolescent girls from the Democratic Republic of the Congo and 78 Sudanese girls living in Ethiopian refugee camps were interviewed using the two methodologies. Results revealed that the group-based qualitative method elicited narratives of violence focusing on events perpetrated by strangers or members of the community more distantly connected to girls. In contrast, ACASI interviews revealed violence predominantly perpetrated by family members and intimate partners. These findings suggest that group-based methods of information gathering frequently used in the field may be more susceptible to socially accepted narratives. Specifically, our findings suggest group-based methods may produce results showing that sexual violence perpetrated by strangers (e.g., from armed groups in the conflict) is more prevalent than violence perpetrated by family and intimate partners. To the extent this finding is true, it may lead to a skewed perception that adolescent GBV involving strangers is a more pressing issue than intimate partner and family-based sexual violence, when in fact, both are of great concern.

  18. Reaching Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Charlotte E.; Kuriloff, Peter J.; Cox, Amanda B.

    2014-01-01

    If educators want to engage girls in learning, they must align teaching practices with girls' specific needs. In a study modeled after Reichert and Hawley's study of boys, the authors learned that lessons with hands-on learning, elements of creativity, multimodal projects, and class discussions all worked to stimulate girls'…

  19. Genetic variations altering FSH action affect circulating hormone levels as well as follicle growth in healthy peripubertal girls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch, Alexander S.; Hagen, Casper P; Almstrup, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    -sectional and ongoing longitudinal study) and the Copenhagen Mother-Child Cohort (1997-2002, including transabdominal ultrasound (TAUS) of the ovaries in a subset of 91 peripubertal girls). PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: Clinical examinations, including pubertal breast stage (Tanner's classification B1-B5...... by competitive PCR. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: FSHR c.2039A>G minor alleles were positively associated with serum FSH (β = 0.08, P = 0.004), LH (β = 0.06, P = 0.012) and estradiol (β = 0.06, P = 0.017) (adjusted for Tanner stages). In a combined model, FSHR c.-29G>A and FSHR c.2039A>G alleles were...... with follicles counts, however, a cumulative minor allele count (FSHB c.-211 G>T and FSHR c.-29G>A) was negatively associated with the number of large follicles (≥5 mm) (n = 91, P = 0.04) (adjusted for Tanner stages). LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION: Since we studied girls and young adolescents during pubertal...

  20. LIFESTYLE PREDICTORS AFFECTING 21ST CENTURY EPIDEMIC OF OBESITY AMONG 18-24 YEAR OLD COLLEGE GIRLS IN AGRA, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HK Thakkar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The problem of overweight and obesity is not confined only to developed countries but is also widely prevalent in developing countries. Low levels of physical activity, TV watching, and dietary pattern are modifiable risk factors for overweight and obesity in college girls. Objective: To assess the prevalence of overweight and obesity as defined by the Body Mass Index(BMI criteria of WHO among 18-24 year old college girls in Agra and identify its associated factors. Material & Methods: A cross-sectional study, adopting a multistage stratified random sampling procedure, has been conducted in 2009 among 400 college going girls aged 18-24 years in randomly selected degree colleges of Agra(urban & rural. Pre-designed and pre-tested questionnaire was used to elicit the information about dietary history and physical activity. Height and weight was measured and BMI was calculated. Statistical Analysis: Percentage, chi square Results: The prevalence of overweight and obesity was found to be 18.5% & 4.5% respectively according to BMI criteria of WHO. Skipping of breakfast was found to be about 14.5%. Eating fast food on alternate basis at college and at other places was found to be common among 48.5% & 51% of the subjects respectively. The average time spent on watching television was significantly higher among the obese (4.2hrs/day & overweight (4.0hrs/day than among normal & underweight subjects (3.5hrs/day. Gossip hours found to be nearly twice among obese (1.8hrs/day as compared to normal & underweight (1.0hrs/day. It was found that close to two third (63.0% and more than half (55.7% of the subjects had never or occasionally been involved in outdoor and indoor games respectively and only one fourth (24.3% of the subjects involved in daily play. Among obese subjects, 28.3% of the subjects used to play for 2 hours/week. Almost all the subjects (94.3% were involved in daily household task like washing clothes. Three fourth (76.1% of obese

  1. Response time variability and response inhibition predict affective problems in adolescent girls, not in boys : the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deurzen, Patricia A. M.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Brunnekreef, J. Agnes; Ormel, Johan; Minderaa, Ruud B.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Huizink, Anja C.; Speckens, Anne E. M.; Oldehinkel, A. J.; Slaats-Willemse, Dorine I. E.

    The present study examines the relationship between neurocognitive functioning and affective problems through adolescence, in a cross-sectional and longitudinal perspective. Baseline response speed, response speed variability, response inhibition, attentional flexibility and working memory were

  2. Affecting Girls' Activity and Job Interests through Play: The Moderating Roles of Personal Gender Salience and Game Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Emily F.; Liben, Lynn S.

    2016-01-01

    Gender schema theory (GST) posits that children approach opportunities perceived as gender appropriate, avoiding those deemed gender inappropriate, in turn affecting gender-differentiated career trajectories. To test the hypothesis that children's gender salience filters (GSF--tendency to attend to gender) moderate these processes, 62 preschool…

  3. Turtle Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Charles; Ponder, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The day the Turtle Girls received Montel's adoption papers, piercing screams ricocheted across the school grounds instantaneously and simultaneously--in that moment, each student felt the joy of civic stewardship. Read on to find out how a visit to The Turtle Hospital inspired a group of elementary students to create a club devoted to supporting…

  4. Cult Girl

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Rasmus; Baharlooie, Navid

    2013-01-01

    to get paid for going out at night to party and being the centre of attention makes them feel appreciated. Others find that their limits are seriously tested, having to deal with drunken guys and jealous girlfriends. Cult arranges team-building courses designed to help the girls prepare for the job...

  5. Craniofacial characteristics of Caucasian and Afro-Caucasian Brazilian subjects with normal occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Janson

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare the skeletal, dental and soft tissue characteristics of Caucasian and Afro-Caucasian Brazilian subjects with normal occlusion and to evaluate sexual dimorphism within the groups. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The sample comprised lateral cephalograms of untreated normal occlusion subjects, divided into 2 groups. Group 1 included 40 Caucasian subjects (20 of each sex, with a mean age of 13.02 years; group 2 included 40 Afro-Caucasian subjects (20 of each sex, with a mean age of 13.02 years. Groups 1 and 2 and males and females within each group were compared with t tests. RESULTS: Afro-Caucasian subjects presented greater maxillary protrusion, smaller upper anterior face height and lower posterior face height, larger upper posterior face height, greater maxillary and mandibular dentoalveolar protrusion as well as soft tissue protrusion than Caucasian subjects. The Afro-Caucasian female subjects had less mandibular protrusion and smaller total posterior facial height and upper posterior facial height than males. CONCLUSIONS: Brazilian Afro-Caucasian subjects have greater dentoalveolar and soft tissue protrusion than Brazilian Caucasian subjects, with slight sexual dimorphism in some variables.

  6. Sleep, Affect, and Social Competence from Preschool to Preadolescence: Distinct Pathways to Emotional and Social Adjustment for Boys and for Girls

    OpenAIRE

    Joan E. Foley; Marsha Weinraub

    2017-01-01

    Using a normative sample of 1,057 children studied across 4 waves over 6 years with multiple informants, we investigated transactional relations for sleep problems, anxious-depressed symptoms, and social functioning from preschool to preadolescence, assessing cumulative effects on children's emotional and social adjustment. To examine sex differences in the developmental processes, we conducted separate analyses for boys and girls. For both boys and girls, longitudinal cross-lagged panel anal...

  7. The Evolution of a Therapeutic Group Approach to School-Age Pregnant Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braen, Bernard B.

    This report evaluates the Young Mothers' Educational Development Program sponsored by the State University of New York, for pregnant girls between the ages of 16 and 21. The program provided needed services in the areas of obstetrics, pediatrics, education, social work, nursing, and psychology. The girls were Black, Caucasian, and Indian.…

  8. Emotional Dysregulation and Interpersonal Difficulties as Risk Factors for Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in Adolescent Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, Molly; Zeman, Janice; Erdley, Cynthia; Lisa, Ludmila; Sim, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine a model of factors that place psychiatrically hospitalized girls at risk for non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). The role of familial and peer interpersonal difficulties, as well as emotional dysregulation, were examined in relationship to NSSI behaviors. Participants were 99 adolescent girls (83.2% Caucasian;…

  9. Diagnostic work-up of 449 consecutive girls who were referred to be evaluated for precocious puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Signe Sloth; Aksglaede, Lise; Mouritsen, Annette

    2011-01-01

    A decrease in age at pubertal onset has been observed internationally. The aim of this study was to describe a large cohort of Caucasian girls referred with signs of early puberty according to etiology and compare biochemical characteristics....

  10. Diagnostic work-up of 449 consecutive girls who were referred to be evaluated for precocious puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Signe Sloth; Aksglaede, Lise; Mouritsen, Annette

    2011-01-01

    A decrease in age at pubertal onset has been observed internationally. The aim of this study was to describe a large cohort of Caucasian girls referred with signs of early puberty according to etiology and compare biochemical characteristics.......A decrease in age at pubertal onset has been observed internationally. The aim of this study was to describe a large cohort of Caucasian girls referred with signs of early puberty according to etiology and compare biochemical characteristics....

  11. Anthropometric measurements for Asian and Caucasian elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netland, P A; Brownstein, H

    1985-02-01

    While differences in height and weight were observed, the results of this study indicate that there are similarities between Caucasian and Asian-American elderly in skin-fold measurements and prevalence of obesity. These results illustrate the value of skinfold thickness as a more accurate measure of adiposity than indexes on the basis of weight for given height. In addition, our results provide evidence for ethnic similarities in the distribution of subcutaneous fat and the prevalence of obesity in elderly Caucasians and Asian-Americans.

  12. Association between celiac disease and iron deficiency in Caucasians, but not non-Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Joseph A; McLachlan, Stela; Adams, Paul C; Eckfeldt, John H; Garner, Chad P; Vulpe, Chris D; Gordeuk, Victor R; Brantner, Tricia; Leiendecker-Foster, Catherine; Killeen, Anthony A; Acton, Ronald T; Barcellos, Lisa F; Nickerson, Debbie A; Beckman, Kenneth B; McLaren, Gordon D; McLaren, Christine E

    2013-07-01

    Celiac disease is an increasingly recognized disorder in Caucasian populations of European origin. Little is known about its prevalence in non-Caucasians. Although it is thought to be a cause of iron-deficiency anemia, little is known about the extent to which celiac disease contributes to iron deficiency in Caucasians, and especially non-Caucasians. We analyzed samples collected from participants in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening study to identify individuals with iron deficiency and to assess the frequency of celiac disease. We analyzed serum samples from white men (≥25 y) and women (≥50 y) who participated in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening study; cases were defined as individuals with iron deficiency (serum ferritin level, ≤12 μg/L) and controls were those without (serum ferritin level, >100 μg/L in men and >50 μg/L in women). All samples also were analyzed for human recombinant tissue transglutaminase immunoglobulin A; positive results were confirmed by an assay for endomysial antibodies. Patients with positive results from both celiac disease tests were presumed to have untreated celiac disease, and those with a positive result from only 1 test were excluded from analysis. We analyzed HLA genotypes and frequencies of celiac disease between Caucasians and non-Caucasians with iron deficiency. Celiac disease occurred in 14 of 567 cases (2.5%) and in only 1 of 1136 controls (0.1%; Fisher exact test, P = 1.92 × 10(-6)). Celiac disease was more common in Caucasian cases (14 of 363; 4%) than non-Caucasian cases (0 of 204; P = .003). Only 1 Caucasian control and no non-Caucasian controls had celiac disease. The odds of celiac disease in individuals with iron deficiency was 28-fold (95% confidence interval, 3.7-212.8) that of controls; 13 of 14 cases with celiac disease carried the DQ2.5 variant of the HLA genotype. Celiac disease is associated with iron deficiency in Caucasians. Celiac disease is rare among non-Caucasians

  13. Do Caucasian and Asian clocks tick differently?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Barbosa

    Full Text Available The Period 3 and Clock genes are important components of the mammalian molecular circadian system. Studies have shown association between polymorphisms in these clock genes and circadian phenotypes in different populations. Nevertheless, differences in the pattern of allele frequency and genotyping distribution are systematically observed in studies with different ethnic groups. To investigate and compare the pattern of distribution in a sample of Asian and Caucasian populations living in Brazil, we evaluated two well-studied polymorphisms in the clock genes: a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR in PER3 and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in CLOCK. The aim of this investigation was to search for clues about human evolutionary processes related to circadian rhythms. We selected 109 Asian and 135 Caucasian descendants. The frequencies of the shorter allele (4 repeats in the PER3 gene and the T allele in the CLOCK gene among Asians (0.86 and 0.84, respectively were significantly higher than among Caucasians (0.69 and 0.71, respectively. Our results directly confirmed the different distribution of these polymorphisms between the Asian and Caucasian ethnic groups. Given the genetic differences found between groups, two points became evident: first, ethnic variations may have implications for the interpretation of results in circadian rhythm association studies, and second, the question may be raised about which evolutionary conditions shaped these genetic clock variations.

  14. Do Caucasian and Asian clocks tick differently?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, A A; Pedrazzoli, M; Koike, B D V; Tufik, S

    2010-01-01

    The Period 3 and Clock genes are important components of the mammalian molecular circadian system. Studies have shown association between polymorphisms in these clock genes and circadian phenotypes in different populations. Nevertheless, differences in the pattern of allele frequency and genotyping distribution are systematically observed in studies with different ethnic groups. To investigate and compare the pattern of distribution in a sample of Asian and Caucasian populations living in Brazil, we evaluated two well-studied polymorphisms in the clock genes: a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) in PER3 and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in CLOCK. The aim of this investigation was to search for clues about human evolutionary processes related to circadian rhythms. We selected 109 Asian and 135 Caucasian descendants. The frequencies of the shorter allele (4 repeats) in the PER3 gene and the T allele in the CLOCK gene among Asians (0.86 and 0.84, respectively) were significantly higher than among Caucasians (0.69 and 0.71, respectively). Our results directly confirmed the different distribution of these polymorphisms between the Asian and Caucasian ethnic groups. Given the genetic differences found between groups, two points became evident: first, ethnic variations may have implications for the interpretation of results in circadian rhythm association studies, and second, the question may be raised about which evolutionary conditions shaped these genetic clock variations.

  15. Do Caucasian and Asian clocks tick differently?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Barbosa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Period 3 and Clock genes are important components of the mammalian molecular circadian system. Studies have shown association between polymorphisms in these clock genes and circadian phenotypes in different populations. Nevertheless, differences in the pattern of allele frequency and genotyping distribution are systematically observed in studies with different ethnic groups. To investigate and compare the pattern of distribution in a sample of Asian and Caucasian populations living in Brazil, we evaluated two well-studied polymorphisms in the clock genes: a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR in PER3 and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in CLOCK. The aim of this investigation was to search for clues about human evolutionary processes related to circadian rhythms. We selected 109 Asian and 135 Caucasian descendants. The frequencies of the shorter allele (4 repeats in the PER3 gene and the T allele in the CLOCK gene among Asians (0.86 and 0.84, respectively were significantly higher than among Caucasians (0.69 and 0.71, respectively. Our results directly confirmed the different distribution of these polymorphisms between the Asian and Caucasian ethnic groups. Given the genetic differences found between groups, two points became evident: first, ethnic variations may have implications for the interpretation of results in circadian rhythm association studies, and second, the question may be raised about which evolutionary conditions shaped these genetic clock variations.

  16. Perceived racism and alcohol consequences among African American and Caucasian college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grekin, Emily R

    2012-12-01

    Few studies have assessed relationships between perceived racism, racism-related stress, and alcohol problems. The current study examined these relationships within the context of tension reduction models of alcohol consumption. Participants were 94 African American and 189 Caucasian college freshmen who completed an online survey assessing perceived racism, alcohol consequences, alcohol consumption, negative affect, and deviant behavior. Hierarchical multiple regressions indicated that racism-related stress predicted alcohol consequences for both African American and Caucasian college students, even after controlling for alcohol consumption, negative affect, and behavioral deviance. The frequency of racist events predicted alcohol consequences for Caucasian but not African American students. These findings highlight the need to address racism and racism-related stress in college-based alcohol prevention and intervention efforts. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  17. Girls make sense: girls, celebrities and identities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duits, L.; van Romondt Vis, P.

    2009-01-01

    Combining intertextual, audience and feminist perspectives, this article investigates how young girls make meaning from celebrities. Based on focus group interviews with Dutch girls aged 12—13, it argues that girls' talk about celebrities functions as an identity tool in the reflexive project of the

  18. Differences between Caucasian and Asian attractive faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, S C

    2018-02-01

    There are discrepancies between the public's current beauty desires and conventional theories and historical rules regarding facial beauty. This photogrammetric study aims to describe in detail mathematical differences in facial configuration between attractive Caucasian and attractive Asian faces. To analyse the structural differences between attractive Caucasian and attractive Asian faces, frontal face and lateral face views for each race were morphed; facial landmarks were defined, and the relative photographic pixel distances and angles were measured. Absolute values were acquired by arithmetic conversion for comparison. The data indicate that some conventional beliefs of facial attractiveness can be applied but others are no longer valid in explaining perspectives of beauty between Caucasians and Asians. Racial differences in the perceptions of attractive faces were evident. Common features as a phenomenon of global fusion in the perspectives on facial beauty were revealed. Beauty standards differ with race and ethnicity, and some conventional rules for ideal facial attractiveness were found to be inappropriate. We must reexamine old principles of facial beauty and continue to fundamentally question it according to its racial, cultural, and neuropsychological aspects. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Girls' Education: The Power of Policy Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkman, Karen; Hoffman, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Girls' education has been a focus of international development policy for several decades. The discursive framing of international organizations' policy initiatives relating to girls' education, however, limits the potential for discussing complex gender issues that affect the possibilities for gender equity. Because discourse shapes our…

  20. Girl child: her rights and law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, S D

    1995-01-01

    This article points out the disparity between India's laws to protect female children and their actual living conditions. It is asserted that the role of women needs to be strengthened and that equal rights are executed to the advantage of children. Equality must come at the very beginning of life. Girl children need access to health, nutrition, education, and other basic services. In India, girls are guaranteed an equal right to education, but fewer girls are enrolled in primary school, and very few girls go on to secondary schools. There is no enforcement of compulsory laws, which particularly disadvantage girls from poor families. Girls marry below the legal minimum age. Early childbearing shortens women's life expectancy and adversely affects their health, nutrition, education, and employment opportunities. Prevention of early child marriage should be strictly enforced. Amniocentesis is performed in order to determine the sex of the child and abort female fetuses. The Juvenile Justice Act of 1986 includes special provisions for the protection, treatment, and rehabilitation of girls under 18 years old and of boys younger than 16. This act protects girls trapped in brothels for child prostitution and protects any person engaged in an immoral, drunken, or depraved life. Juvenile Welfare Boards address the problem of neglected girls and offer special protective homes and supervision by probation officers. The act needs to strengthen noninstitutional services, such as sponsorship, family assistance, foster care, and adoption. Girl children grow to womanhood. Effective social development in childhood reaps rewards in adulthood.

  1. Girls' Success: Mentoring Guide about HIV and AIDS. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Academy for Educational Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The issue of HIV and AIDS is a serious global issue that affects girls and boys, women and men, from all communities. Girls and women are particularly vulnerable to contracting HIV which can develop into AIDS. This guide for mentoring contains important information about HIV and AIDS related to young women and girls. The guide also provides ideas…

  2. Girls and ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with other girls, girls with ADHD experience more depression, anxiety, distress, poor teacher relationships, stress, external locus of control (the feeling that “the winds of fate” control their destiny instead of themselves), and impaired academics. Compared with boys with ADHD, girls with ADHD ...

  3. Cognitive Processing about Classroom-Relevant Contexts: Teachers' Attention to and Utilization of Girls' Body Size, Ethnicity, Attractiveness, and Facial Affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shirley S.; Treat, Teresa A.; Brownell, Kelly D.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines 2 aspects of cognitive processing in person perception--attention and decision making--in classroom-relevant contexts. Teachers completed 2 implicit, performance-based tasks that characterized attention to and utilization of 4 student characteristics of interest: ethnicity, facial affect, body size, and attractiveness. Stimuli…

  4. Sparking connections: An exploration of adolescent girls' relationships with science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Kathryn A.

    Despite progress in narrowing the gender gap, fewer women than men pursue science careers. Adolescence is a critical age when girls' science interest is sparked or smothered. Prior research provides data on who drops out of the "science pipeline" and when, but few studies examine why and how girls disconnect from science. This thesis is an in-depth exploratory study of adolescent girls' relationships with science based on a series of interviews with four middle-class Caucasian girls---two from public schools, two homeschooled. The girls' stones about their experiences with, feelings about, and perspectives on science, the science process, and their science learning environments are examined with a theoretical and analytic approach grounded in relational psychology. The potential link between girls' voices and their involvement in science is investigated. Results indicate that girls' relationships with science are multitiered. Science is engaging and familiar in the sense that girls are curious about the world, enjoy learning about scientific phenomena, and informally use science in their everyday fives. However, the girls in this study differentiated between the science they do and the field of science, which they view as a mostly male endeavor (often despite real life experiences to the contrary) that uses rather rigid methods to investigate questions of limited scope and interest. In essence, how these girls defined science defined their relationship with science: those with narrow conceptions of science felt distant from it. Adolescent girls' decreased involvement in science activities may be a relational act---a move away from a patriarchical process, pedagogy, and institution that does not resonate with their experiences, questions, and learning styles. Girls often feel like outsiders to science; they resist considering science careers when they have concerns that implicitly or explicitly, doing so would involve sacrificing their knowledge, creativity, or

  5. Cardiorespiratory fitness in urban adolescent girls: associations with race and pubertal status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, Catherine; Pfeiffer, Karin A; Kazanis, Anamaria; Ling, Jiying; Robbins, Lorraine B

    2017-01-01

    Cardiorespiratory fitness affords health benefits to youth. Among females, weight-relative fitness declines during puberty and is lower among African American (AA) than Caucasian girls. Data indicate racial differences in pubertal timing and tempo, yet the interactive influence of puberty and race on fitness, and the role of physical activity (PA) in these associations have not been examined. Thus, independent and interactive associations of race and pubertal development with fitness in adolescent girls, controlling for PA were examined. Girls in grades 5-8 (n = 1011; Caucasian = 25.2%, AA = 52.3%, Other Race group = 22.5%) completed the Pubertal Development Scale (pubertal stage assessment) and Fitnessgram® Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run (PACER) test (cardiorespiratory fitness assessment). PA was assessed by accelerometry. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to examine associations among race, pubertal stage and fitness, controlling for vigorous PA, AA, and pubertally advanced girls demonstrated lower fitness than Caucasian and less mature counterparts. Puberty and race remained significantly associated with fitness after controlling for vigorous PA. The interaction effect of race and puberty on fitness was non-significant. The pubertal influence on fitness is observed among AA adolescents. Associations between fitness and race/puberty appear to be independent of each other and vigorous PA. Pubertally advanced AA girls represent a priority group for fitness interventions.

  6. Alcohol Drinking Patterns among Asian and Caucasian Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sue, Stanley; And Others

    1979-01-01

    This article suggests that there are genetic and cultural factors which account for the difference in drinking patterns between Caucasian and Asian Americans. It is also suggested that Asian acculturation has an influence on this difference. (EB)

  7. Condylar volume and surface in Caucasian young adult subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Cordasco Giancarlo; Pagnoni Mario; Polimeni Antonella; Nucera Riccardo; Saccucci Matteo; Tecco Simona; Festa Felice; Iannetti Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background There have been no quantitative standards for volumetric and surface measurements of the mandibular condyle in Caucasian population. However, the recently developed cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system allows measurement of these parameters with high accuracy. Methods CBCT was used to measure the condylar volume, surface and the volume to surface ratio, called the Morphometric Index (MI), of 300 temporo-mandibular joints (TMJ) in 150 Caucasian young adult subjects, ...

  8. Protecting Black Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Monique W.

    2016-01-01

    Statistics show that black girls in U.S. K-12 public schools are overrepresented among students who face disciplinary approaches (such as suspensions) that exclude or even criminalize them. Morris explains how black girls face conditions that make them vulnerable to a phenomenon she calls "school to confinement pathways"--conditions like…

  9. Boys, Girls, and Microcomputing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lage, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    Reports results of an impressions formation test and survey of elementary and junior high school students. Indicates that younger students viewed technical fields favorably for either sex, whereas older students viewed the fields negatively for girls. Attributes a decline in interest among adolescent girls in computers in part to the normative…

  10. Girls' Education and Crises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesterfield, Ray; Enge, Kjell I.; Martinez-Enge, Pilar

    Research efforts have shown that girls' education is a key component in improving economic and social well-being. Investment in girls' education has been related to increased productivity and labor force participation, decreased fertility and infant mortality, and increased child health. Social, institutional, and political factors that contribute…

  11. Girls, girls, girls: Gender composition and female school choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeweis, Nicole; Zweimüller, Martina

    2012-08-01

    Gender segregation in employment may be explained by women's reluctance to choose technical occupations. However, the foundations for career choices are laid much earlier. Educational experts claim that female students are doing better in math and science and are more likely to choose these subjects if they are in single-sex classes. One possible explanation is that coeducational settings reinforce gender stereotypes. In this paper, we identify the causal impact of the gender composition in coeducational classes on the choice of school type for female students. Using natural variation in the gender composition of adjacent cohorts within schools, we show that girls are less likely to choose a traditionally female dominated school type and more likely to choose a male dominated school type at the age of 14 if they were exposed to a higher share of girls in previous grades.

  12. Girls, girls, girls: Gender composition and female school choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeweis, Nicole; Zweimüller, Martina

    2012-01-01

    Gender segregation in employment may be explained by women's reluctance to choose technical occupations. However, the foundations for career choices are laid much earlier. Educational experts claim that female students are doing better in math and science and are more likely to choose these subjects if they are in single-sex classes. One possible explanation is that coeducational settings reinforce gender stereotypes. In this paper, we identify the causal impact of the gender composition in coeducational classes on the choice of school type for female students. Using natural variation in the gender composition of adjacent cohorts within schools, we show that girls are less likely to choose a traditionally female dominated school type and more likely to choose a male dominated school type at the age of 14 if they were exposed to a higher share of girls in previous grades. PMID:24850996

  13. Differences in foot pressures between Caucasians and Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putti, A B; Arnold, G P; Abboud, R J

    2010-12-01

    Indians are the largest single ethnic minority group in the United Kingdom and form more than one million of the current population. No studies have investigated foot pressure differences between Caucasians and Indians. The aim of our study was to investigate the in-shoe pressure differences in Caucasians and Indians using the Pedar(®)-m (Novel GmbH, Germany). The study included 12 Caucasians and 21 Indians. Peak pressure (PP), contact area (CA), contact time (CT), pressure-time integral (PTI), force-time integral (FTI), instant of peak pressure (IPP), maximum force (MaxF) and mean force (MeanF) were recorded. Caucasians had higher significant PP compared to Indians under the heel (293 kPa vs. 251 kPa; Prace groups. The PTI was statistically significantly higher in Caucasians in the region of the 1st metatarsal head (79 kPas vs. 62 kPas; P=0.03) and 5th metatarsal head (58 kPas vs. 44 kPas; P=0.03). There were no significant differences among CT, FTI, IPP, MaxF and MeanF among them. The PP under the heel, 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 5th metatarsal heads and the PTI under the 1st and 5th metatarsal heads in Caucasians is higher than in Indians. There is no difference in the CA. Copyright © 2009 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Letting girls speak out about science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Dale; Leary, Rosemary

    The purpose of this study was to try to determine what influences girls to choose science. Forty girls were interviewed in Grades 2, 5, 8, 11 using a semistructured protocol. The interview focused on feelings about science, science careers, peer and parental support, and how science is taught. To determine whether their responses were based on gender, each girl was asked to respond to questions as if she were a boy. The girls were highly self-confident and positive about science. All of the girls took a strong equity position and asserted that women can and should do science. The girls liked learning science in an interactive social context rather than participating in activities that isolated them such as independent reading, writing, or note taking. Those who chose science careers were drawn to them because of strong affective experiences with a loved one and a desire to help. The interviews were analyzed through the framework of women's affective and psychological needs.Received: 15 July 1993; Revised: 23 May 1994;

  15. Girl prostitution in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, K K

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses the nature, magnitude, causes, and consequences of female child prostitution in India and offers measures for control and prevention of girl prostitution. Data are obtained from the 6-city study of prostitution and the author's own research. An estimated 85% of all prostitutes in Calcutta and Delhi entered the work at an early age. The numbers are rising. The promotion of tourism is linked with prostitution. Girl prostitutes are primarily located in low-middle income areas and business districts and are known by officials. Brothel keepers regularly recruit young girls. An estimated 33% of prostitutes are young girls. In Bangalore, Calcutta, Delhi, and Hyderabad, there are an estimated 10,000 girl prostitutes. UNICEF estimates about 300,000 child prostitutes. Girl prostitutes are grouped as common prostitutes, singers and dancers, call girls, religious prostitutes or devdasi, and caged brothel prostitutes. Religious prostitutes are mainly found in the South. Caged ones are found in Bombay. A little over 50% of prostitutes come from other countries, such as Nepal and Bangladesh. The girls tend to come from urban slums and poor rural areas. High prostitute supply regions include Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Maharashtra, Uttar Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, and West Bengel states. About 85% are Hindus, and about 66% are from scheduled castes and tribes. Bangalore and Bombay have a higher proportion of girl prostitutes. The causes of prostitution include ill treatment by parents, bad company, family prostitutes, social customs, inability to arrange marriage, lack of sex education, media, prior incest and rape, early marriage and desertion, lack of recreational facilities, ignorance, and acceptance of prostitution. Economic causes include poverty and economic distress. Psychological causes include desire for physical pleasure, greed, and dejection. Most enter involuntarily. A brief profile is given of the life of a prostitute.

  16. Body density differences between negro and caucasian professional football players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J.; Bagnall, K. M.; McFadden, K. D.; Mottola, M.

    1981-01-01

    Other workers have shown that the bone density for the average negro is greater than for the average caucasian. This would lead to greater values of body density for the average negro but it is confused because the average negro has a different body form (and consequently different proportions of body components) compared with the average caucasian. This study of body density of a group of professional Canadian football players investigates whether or not to separate negroes from caucasians when considering the formation of regression equations for prediction of body density. Accordingly, a group of 7 negroes and 7 caucasians were matched somatotypically and a comparison was made of their body density values obtained using a hydrostatic weighing technique and a closed-circuit helium dilution technique for measuring lung volumes. The results show that if somatotype is taken into account then no significant difference in body density values is found between negro and caucasian professional football players. The players do not have to be placed in separate groups but it remains to be seen whether or not these results apply to general members of the population. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:7317724

  17. Girls underestimate maths ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    A study by psychologists in the US has found that high-school girls rate their competence in mathematics lower than boys, even for those with similar abilities (Front. Psychol. 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00386).

  18. A Girl Is No Girl Is a Girl_: Girls-Work after Queer Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busche, Mart

    2013-01-01

    This contribution gives an overview over 40 years of girls-work in Germany. It highlights certain topics and theoretical implications and emphasises especially the realisation of queer theory and deconstructivism in the last 10 years. (Contains 4 notes.)

  19. Django fun for Girls!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays there is a gender gap in the IT world. Django Girls is a non-profit organization and a community that empowers and helps women to organize free, one-day programming workshops by providing tools, resources and support. Through Django Girls, we want to show our motivation in the IT world, how much fun is to code, and the things they are able to create coding. How is CERN getting involved?

  20. Prevalence of anaemia among school adolescent girls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Goyal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anaemia is a major public health problem especially among adolescent females and can result in diminished physical growth and cognitive development, performance in school and at work, and affects reproduction. Findings from NFHS-3 (2005-06 indicate that 56% of the adolescent girls in India are anaemic and, of these 17% suffer from moderate to severe anaemia. Aim & Objective: To find the prevalence of anaemia among adolescent girls in rural and urban schools of Haldwani. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in rural as well as urban schools of Haldwani from October 2012 to March 2014 among 770 (443 rural and 327 urban adolescent girls selected by multistage random sampling, using predesigned and pretested questionnaire to collect relevant data, and estimating haemoglobin concentration using Haemoglobin Colour Scale. Data was analysed by using SPSS v 20. Results: 48.18% of adolescent girls were found to have anaemia. Prevalence of anaemia was 43.11% and 55.04% among rural and urban school girls respectively. Mean haemoglobin concentration of study subjects was 11.35g/dl. Prevalence of mild, moderate and severe anaemia among study population was 34.53%, 10.13% and 3.52% respectively. Conclusion: The present study revealed that half of the school going adolescent girls were suffering from anaemia in rural and urban areas of Haldwani

  1. Wideband absorbance in Australian Aboriginal and Caucasian neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aithal, Sreedevi; Kei, Joseph; Driscoll, Carlie

    2014-05-01

    Despite the high prevalence of otitis media in Australian Aboriginal infants and children, the conductive mechanism of the outer and middle ear of Aboriginal neonates remains unclear. Differences in characteristics of the conductive pathway (outer and middle ear) between Aboriginal and Caucasian neonates have not been systematically investigated by using wideband acoustic immittance measures. The objective of this study was to compare wideband absorbance (WBA) in Australian Aboriginal and Caucasian neonates who passed or failed a screening test battery containing high-frequency tympanometry and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). A cross-sectional study design was used. The mean WBA as a function of frequency was compared between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal neonates who passed or failed the test battery. A total of 59 ears from 32 Aboriginal neonates (mean age, 51.9 h; standard deviation [SD], 18.2 h; range, 22-86 h) and 281 ears from 158 Caucasian neonates (mean age, 42.4 h; SD, 23.0 h; range, 8.1-152 h) who passed or failed 1000-Hz tympanometry and DPOAEs were included in the study. WBA results were analyzed by using descriptive statistics and t tests with Bonferroni adjustment. An analysis of variance with repeated measures was applied to the data. Aboriginal and Caucasian neonates had almost identical pass rates of 61%, as determined by the test battery. Despite the apparently equal pass rates, the mean WBA of Aboriginal neonates who passed the test battery was significantly lower than that of their Caucasian counterparts at frequencies between 0.4 and 2 kHz. The mean WBA of Aboriginal neonates who failed the test battery was significantly lower than that of their Caucasian counterparts who also failed the test battery at frequencies between 1.5 and 3 kHz. Both Aboriginal and Caucasian neonates who failed the test battery had significantly lower WBA values than their counterparts who passed the test battery. This study provided convincing

  2. Erythema dyschromicum perstans in a Caucasian pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisack, Alison M; Huggins, Richard H; Lim, Henry W

    2013-07-01

    Erythema dyschromicum perstans (EDP), or ashy dermatosis, is characterized by oval, blue-gray macules, which are completely asymptomatic. In adults, the condition is primarily seen in patients of color, most commonly those of Hispanic descent, and typically follows a chronic course. We describe a pediatric case of EDP in a Caucasian patient. In the pediatric population, EDP is more commonly observed in Caucasian patients and often shows significant recovery or complete resolution in a matter of years. This case report outlines the differences in EDP between adult and pediatric patients.

  3. Empowerment of Adolescent Girls for Sexual and Reproductive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adolescent girls should be empowered to acquire the ability to take care of their sexual and reproductive health. The present study aimed to improve the understanding of the factors affecting the empowerment of Iranian adolescent girls in terms of taking care of their sexual and reproductive health (e.g. pubertal and ...

  4. Assertiveness and attitudes of HIV/AIDS orphaned girls towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Whereas HIV/AIDS prevalence has been declining in Uganda from 30% to less than 10% in the last 2 decades, the number of HIV/AIDS orphaned girls in secondary schools is still high and girl children have tended to carry the heaviest burdens of family responsibilities thereby adversely affecting their assertiveness and ...

  5. Family Integrants Obstructing Pupils' School Attendance and Girl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Family Integrants Obstructing Pupils' School Attendance and Girl-Child Education in Plateau State: Current Status and Challenges for Counsellors. ... Findings revealed major integrants impeding parents from allowing their children to attend school regularly. They also affect the girl – child education. Such integrants include ...

  6. Large-scale in-vivo Caucasian facial soft tissue thickness database for craniofacial reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Greef, S; Claes, P; Vandermeulen, D; Mollemans, W; Suetens, P; Willems, G

    2006-05-15

    presented in this paper offers a denser sampling of the facial soft tissue depths of a more representative subset of the actual Caucasian population over the different age and body posture subcategories. This database can be used as an updated chart for manual and computer-based craniofacial approximation and allows more refined analyses of the possible factors affecting facial soft tissue depth.

  7. Light treatment for seasonal Winter depression in African-American vs Caucasian outpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzoma, Hyacinth N; Reeves, Gloria M; Langenberg, Patricia; Khabazghazvini, Baharak; Balis, Theodora G; Johnson, Mary A; Sleemi, Aamar; Scrandis, Debra A; Zimmerman, Sarah A; Vaswani, Dipika; Nijjar, Gagan Virk; Cabassa, Johanna; Lapidus, Manana; Rohan, Kelly J; Postolache, Teodor T

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare adherence, response, and remission with light treatment in African-American and Caucasian patients with Seasonal Affective Disorder. METHODS: Seventy-eight study participants, age range 18-64 (51 African-Americans and 27 Caucasians) recruited from the Greater Baltimore Metropolitan area, with diagnoses of recurrent mood disorder with seasonal pattern, and confirmed by a Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV, were enrolled in an open label study of daily bright light treatment. The trial lasted 6 wk with flexible dosing of light starting with 10000 lux bright light for 60 min daily in the morning. At the end of six weeks there were 65 completers. Three patients had Bipolar II disorder and the remainder had Major depressive disorder. Outcome measures were remission (score ≤ 8) and response (50% reduction) in symptoms on the Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (SIGH-SAD) as well as symptomatic improvement on SIGH-SAD and Beck Depression Inventory-II. Adherence was measured using participant daily log. Participant groups were compared using t-tests, chi square, linear and logistic regressions. RESULTS: The study did not find any significant group difference between African-Americans and their Caucasian counterparts in adherence with light treatment as well as in symptomatic improvement. While symptomatic improvement and rate of treatment response were not different between the two groups, African-Americans, after adjustment for age, gender and adherence, achieved a significantly lower remission rate (African-Americans 46.3%; Caucasians 75%; P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: This is the first study of light treatment in African-Americans, continuing our previous work reporting a similar frequency but a lower awareness of SAD and its treatment in African-Americans. Similar rates of adherence, symptomatic improvement and treatment response suggest that light treatment is a

  8. Racial differences in eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders among Caucasian and Asian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ito

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: We found that EoE occurs more frequently in Caucasian EGID patients than Asian EGID patients, while the reverse is true for EGE. Also, racial disparities in symptoms and eosinophil-infiltrated tissues were observed. Our findings suggest further genetic and environmental studies to elucidate the etiology of EGID.

  9. Eating Disorders: Explanatory Variables in Caucasian and Hispanic College Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviña, Vanessa; Day, Susan X.

    2016-01-01

    The authors explored Hispanic and Caucasian college women's (N = 264) behavioral and attitudinal symptoms of eating disorders after controlling for body mass index and internalization of the thinness ideal, as well as the roles of ethnicity and ethnic identity in symptomatology. Correlational analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, and…

  10. Psychological Factors of Familial Alcoholism in American Indians and Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Saumty, Deborah; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Investigated within-group differences for Indians with (N=28) and without (N=32) familial history of alcoholism; and assessed cross-cultural differences for Indian (N=31) and Caucasian (N=39) social drinkers with a familial history of alcoholism. Results showed no psychological functioning differences between the Indian groups, but cross-cultural…

  11. Leptin, Adiponectin, and Obesity among Caucasian and Asian Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon M. Conroy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethnic differences in adipose tissue distribution may contribute to different chronic disease risks across ethnic groups, and adipokines may mediate the risk. In a cross-sectional study, we examined ethnic differences in adipokines and inflammatory markers as related to body mass index (BMI among 183 premenopausal women with Caucasian and Asian ancestry. General linear models were used to estimate adjusted mean levels of leptin, adiponectin, interleukin-6, and C-reactive protein (CRP. Asian women had significantly lower serum levels of leptin, adiponectin, and CRP than Caucasian participants (P≤.01 across all levels of BMI. Among overweight and obese women, Asians showed a stronger association of CRP with leptin (β=1.34 versus β=0.64 and with adiponectin (β=−0.95 versus β=−0.75 than Caucasians. Compared to Caucasians of similar BMI, Asians may experience a higher chronic disease risk due to lower levels of adiponectin despite their lower levels of leptin.

  12. Eating Attitudes and Body Satisfaction among Asian and Caucasian Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Sameena; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Investigated whether religious affiliation (Hindu or Muslim) and gender were important factors in explaining difference in unhealthy eating attitudes of Asian adolescents living in United Kingdom compared with Caucasians. Muslim adolescents had most characteristic pattern of eating psychopathology. Muslim boys' eating attitudes were particularly…

  13. With Boys and Girls in Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurian, Michael; Stevens, Kathy

    2004-01-01

    New positron emission tomography (PET) and MRI technologies, which allow looking inside the brains, show that the brains of boys and girls differ both structurally and functionally that profoundly affect the human learning. These gender differences in the brain are corroborated in males and females throughout the world and do not differ…

  14. Attracting girls to physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Anne; Sui, Manling

    2013-03-01

    Large regional differences remain in the number of girls studying physics and the number of female physicists in academic positions. While many countries struggle with attracting female students to university studies in physics, climbing the academic ladder is the main challenge for these women. Furthermore, for many female physicists the working climate is not very supportive. The workshop Attracting Girls to Physics, organized as part of the 4th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics, South Africa 2011, addressed attitudes among education-seeking teenagers and approaches for attracting young girls to physics through successful recruitment plans, including highlighting the broad spectrum of career opportunities for those with physics qualifications. The current paper presents findings, examples of best practices, and recommendations resulting from this workshop.

  15. Depressive symptoms and sexual experiences among early adolescent girls: interpersonal avoidance as moderator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershenberg, Rachel; Davila, Joanne

    2010-08-01

    Building on the growing body of research that supports the relationship between depressive symptoms and sexual activities in adolescence, we examined how individual differences in interpersonal avoidance and anxiety might moderate this association. Data were collected from 71 early adolescent girls (M age 13.45 years; SD = 0.68; 89% Caucasian) concurrently and 1 year later. Results indicated that greater depressive symptoms predicted a greater frequency of sexual intercourse both concurrently and 1-year later, particularly among more interpersonally avoidant girls. However, greater depressive symptoms predicted a greater frequency of non-intercourse activities 1-year later among less avoidant girls. Implications for understanding how individual differences in interpersonal style may serve as risk or protective factors in dysphoric girls' sexual experiences are discussed.

  16. Of Boys and Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, Edward C.

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, much has been written about threats to boys' and girls' healthy participation in dance. This Viewpoints essay considers some of the causes and proposed remedies, which focus almost exclusively on the roles and responsibilities of dance educators and administrators. I suggest that what is missing from recent research,…

  17. Attracting Girls Into Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosny, Hala M.; Kahil, Heba M.

    2005-10-01

    From our national statistics, it is evident that in the population of physicists there are considerably fewer women than men. Our role is to attract girls to physics and thus decrease this gap. The institutional structure in Egypt provides an equal opportunity for girls to study sciences, including physics. It is reckoned that girls refrain from studying physics due to a group of social and economic factors. We will discuss teaching physics at schools and present some ideas to develop it. The media should play a role in placing female physicists in the spotlight. Unfortunately, careers that require intellectual skills are considered men's careers. This necessitates that society changes the way it sees women and trusts more in their skills and talents. We therefore call for the cooperation of governmental and nongovernmental bodies, together with universities and the production sectors involved. This will ultimately lead to enhancing the entrepreneurial projects related to physics and technology on the one hand, and will encourage girls to find challenging opportunities on the other.

  18. Attracting Girls Into Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Anne; Budil, Kimberly; Ducloy, Martial; McKenna, Janis

    2005-10-01

    We discuss goals and strategies to ensure access to and participation in physics for young girls and women, to build confidence in their abilities as scientists, and to continue to support them via networking, mentoring, and climate assessment as they advance to more senior stages in their careers.

  19. Fertility Issues in Girls and Women with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Fertility Issues in Girls and Women with Cancer Treatment ... Issues in Women . Cancer Treatments May Affect Your Fertility Cancer treatments are important for your future health, ...

  20. Syndrome-specific growth charts for 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in Caucasian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habel, Alex; McGinn, Michael-John; Zackai, Elaine H; Unanue, Nancy; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M

    2012-11-01

    Growth faltering occurs frequently in infancy in the 22q11 Deletion syndrome (22q11 DS). The subsequent course of growth in childhood and outcome for final adult height lacks consensus. We analyzed 5,149 growth data points from 812 Caucasian subjects with 22q11 DS, from neonates to 37 years old. Charts were constructed for height, weight, body mass index, and head circumference (OFC) using the LMS Chart Maker program. These charts were compared with the WHO birth to 4 years growth standard and US CDC 2000 growth reference between 5 and 20 years. Starting from the 50th centile at birth, by 6-9 months of age boys mean height and weight had fallen to the 9th centile, as did girls height but their weight fell less markedly, to the 25th centile. Feeding difficulties were non-contributory. In children under 2 years old with congenital heart disease (CHD) mean weight was -0.5 SD lighter than no CHD. Catch up growth occurred, more rapid in weight than height in boys. Up to 10 years old both sexes tracked between the 9th and 25th centiles. In adolescence, the trend was to overweight rather than obesity. At 19 years mean height was -0.72 SD for boys, -0.89 SD girls. OFC was significantly smaller than the WHO standard in infancy, between the 9th and 25th centile, rising to the 25th centile by 5 years old. Thereafter the mean was close to the 9th centile of the OFC UK growth reference, more prolonged and marked than in previous studies. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The Greening of Girls' Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Kathleen M.

    1973-01-01

    Examines the current nationwide drive to eliminate sexism in school sports. Discusses expenditures for boys' and girls' athletic programs, coaching salaries, facilities, and programs offered. A physician discusses the potentials for girls in competitive sports, and a girl who joined a high school all-male team is interviewed. (DN)

  2. Langer's axillary arch: a rare variant, and prevalence among Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turki, M A; Adds, P J

    2017-01-01

    During the dissection of a 79-year-old Caucasian female cadaver, a variant of Langer's axillary arch was found unilaterally in the left axilla. While Langer's axillary arches are not uncommon, this particular variant, attaching to the biceps brachii, is much rarer with a reported prevalence of only 0.25%. The case reported here, however, is only the third example of a Langer's axillary arch that has been found in the last 14 years in the Dissecting Room at St. George's, University of London, giving it an overall prevalence of approximately 1.0% amongst a population of around 280 Caucasian cadavers, much lower than the reported frequency of 7%. Langer's axillary arches can be completely asymptomatic in life, but may also cause a variety of issues both clinically and surgically.

  3. Midlife development and menopause in African American and Caucasian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampselle, Carolyn M; Harris, Vanessa; Harlow, Sioban D; Sowers, MaryFran

    2002-06-01

    Little is known about factors that enhance midlife women's well-being and even less about whether these factors differ for African Americans and Caucasians. We conducted focus groups with 30 women, grouped by ethnicity and menopausal status. Women identified midlife as a time of opportunity for self-development. Pre/perimenopausal women expressed more fears about severe emotional changes than did their postmenopausal counterparts. These fears were in sharp contrast to the women's descriptions of enhanced self-esteem. Caucasian women were primarily concerned about menopause as a harbinger of physical aging and the ensuing disadvantage of divergence from society's ideal of a youthful appearance, while African American women viewed menopause as a normal, even welcome, part of life. A language of emancipation and awareness of gender bias were prominent in the women's stories regardless of menopausal status or race. Further study should assess the role that feminist insights may play in the well-being of midlife women.

  4. A comparison between Chinese and Caucasian head shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Roger; Shu, Chang; Xi, Pengcheng; Rioux, Marc; Luximon, Yan; Molenbroek, Johan

    2010-10-01

    Univariate anthropometric data have long documented a difference in head shape proportion between Chinese and Caucasian populations. This difference has made it impossible to create eyewear, helmets and facemasks that fit both groups well. However, it has been unknown to what extend and precisely how the two populations differ from each other in form. In this study, we applied geometric morphometrics to dense surface data to quantify and characterize the shape differences using a large data set from two recent 3D anthropometric surveys, one in North America and Europe, and one in China. The comparison showed the significant variations between head shapes of the two groups and results demonstrated that Chinese heads were rounder than Caucasian counterparts, with a flatter back and forehead. The quantitative measurements and analyses of these shape differences may be applied in many fields, including anthropometrics, product design, cranial surgery and cranial therapy.

  5. Comparative economic competitiveness of the Central Caucasian states

    OpenAIRE

    Muzaffarli, (imanov)

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the competitiveness of the Central Caucasian states compared to other developing countries of Europe and Central Asia. An analysis of the methodology and results of international comparative studies of business competitiveness, economic growth, technological development, public institutions, macroeconomic environment and other parameters helps to identify the areas of potential competitive advantage of countries and to develop strategies designed to achieve and enhance t...

  6. Longitudinal differences in sleep duration in Hispanic and Caucasian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Daniel; Goodwin, James L; Quan, Stuart F; Morgan, Wayne J; Parthasarathy, Sairam

    2016-02-01

    Short sleep duration is associated with significant negative consequences, including poor school performance, behavioral problems, obesity, and hypertension. There is prior evidence that there are disparities in sleep duration related to ethnicity; however, there are no specific data on Hispanic children. We aimed to test the hypothesis that there are ethnic differences in parent-reported sleep duration in a community-based cohort of Hispanic and Caucasian children. We examined the parent-reported sleep patterns of a community-based prospective cohort (Tucson Children's Assessment of Sleep Apnea study [TuCASA]) involving 338 Hispanic and Caucasian children at two time points approximately five years apart. In the initial phase of the TuCASA study with a cohort median age of 8.8 years (interquartile range (IQR), 7.6-10.1 years), parent-reported sleep duration during weekdays was shorter in Hispanic (median, 9.5 h; IQR, 9.0, 10.0 years) than in Caucasian children (10 h; IQR, 9.5, 10.0 h; p sleep duration during weekends tended to be shorter in Hispanic than in Caucasian children (p = 0.06). Short sleep duration in Hispanic children may contribute to health disparities. Our research suggests that in Hispanic children, behavioral interventions toward improving sleep duration accomplished by earlier bedtimes or delayed school start times and mechanistic studies to unravel any inherent tendency toward a delayed sleep phase are needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Depression in Asian-American and Caucasian undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Christina B; Fang, Daniel Z; Zisook, Sidney

    2010-09-01

    Depression is a serious and often under-diagnosed and undertreated mental health problem in college students which may have fatal consequences. Little is known about ethnic differences in prevalence of depression in US college campuses. This study compares depression severity in Asian-American and Caucasian undergraduate students at the University of California San Diego (UCSD). Participants completed the nine item Patient Health Questionnaire and key demographic information via an anonymous online questionnaire. Compared to Caucasians, Asian-Americans exhibited significantly elevated levels of depression. Furthermore, Korean-American students were significantly more depressed than Chinese-American, other minority Asian-American, and Caucasian students. In general, females were significantly more depressed than males. Results were upheld when level of acculturation was considered. The demographic breakdown of the student population at UCSD is not representative to that of the nation. These findings suggest that outreach to female and Asian-American undergraduate students is important and attention to Korean-American undergraduates may be especially worthwhile. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Seasonal changes in vitamin D status among Danish adolescent girls and elderly women: the influence of sun exposure and vitamin D intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke; Brot, C; Jakobsen, Jette

    2013-01-01

    Background/objectives:To determine seasonal variation in vitamin D status in healthy Caucasian adolescent girls and elderly community-dwelling women living in Denmark, and to quantify the impact of sun exposure and intake on the seasonal changes in vitamin D status.Subjects/methods:A 1-year...

  9. Endothelin-1 Gene Polymorphisms rs5370, rs1476046, and rs3087459 are not Associated with Diabetic Nephropathy in Caucasians with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šeruga Maja

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic nephropathy (DN is a major microvascular complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Several lines of evidence implicate the endothelin (ET system in the pathophysiology of DN. The aim of the present study was to analyze if genetic polymorphisms of the ET-1 (EDN1 gene affect susceptibility to DN in Caucasians with T2DM.

  10. The influence of culture on the experiences of Korean, Korean American, and Caucasian-American family caregivers of frail older adults: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Eun-Hi

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore cultural influences on the experiences of Korean, Korean American, and Caucasian American family caregivers caring for frail older adults in terms of the selection of a primary caregiver, caregiving motivation, support/help-seeking, and negative emotional responses(depression and burden). Seven electronic databases were searched to retrieve studies from 1966 to 2005. Thirty-two studies were identified. This review supported cultural influences on the selection of primary caregiver, caregiving motivation, and support/help-seeking among the three caregiver groups. In Korean caregivers, the major primary caregivers were daughters-in-law while among Korean American and Caucasian American caregivers, the major primary caregivers were daughters or spouses. As a major caregiving motivation, Caucasian American caregivers reported filial affection while Korean caregivers and Korean American caregivers reported filial obligation. Korean caregivers reported higher extended family support, while Caucasian American caregivers reported higher utilization of formal support. Korean caregivers showed the highest levels of depression followed by Korean American caregivers and Caucasian American caregivers. In order to develop culturally appropriate interventions and policies, more research is needed to further explain these differences among the three groups, especially regarding support/help-seeking and negative emotional responses.

  11. Eating Behaviors and Obesity in African American and Caucasian Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    Sample of Midlife Women. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 2007. 33(3): p. 269-277. 36. Bellisle , F ., et al., The Eating Inventory and Body Adiposity...higher education ( F (1,96) = 6.10, p = 0.015). As expected, African American women had significantly higher mean BMI, ( F (1,96) = 7.94, p = 0.006) and...11 body fat percentage, ( F (1,96) = 7.27, p = 0.008) than Caucasian women. Participants reported minimal symptoms of depression assessed by the Beck

  12. Girls, get connected!

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2015-01-01

    On 23 April this year, the fifth annual "International Girls in ICT Day” took place: events all over the world gave young women the chance to see ICT from a new perspective, encouraging them to imagine a career in the field. This year, CERN took part!   Joao Antunes Pequenao (CERN Media Lab) explains his interactive simulation of the Higgs field. © ITU/P.Woods. The International Girls in ICT Day, launched and supported by the Geneva-based International Telecommunication Union (ITU), has already involved more than 111,000 young women in 140 countries, including France and Switzerland, of course. On 23 April, 120 young women aged between 13 and 16 from five schools in the Geneva region* were welcomed to the ITU headquarters, where they took part in a series of workshops on subjects ranging from mobile app development to satellite launching. As a key source of knowledge on the use and development of new technologies and as a strong believer in the promotion...

  13. Participation of adolescent girls in a study of sexual behaviors: balancing autonomy and parental involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Mary B; Wiemann, Constance; Rosenthal, Susan L

    2009-04-01

    The process of research with adolescents should balance parental involvement and adolescent autonomy. The attendance of parents and peers at research study visits of girls participating in a 6-month study of topical microbicide acceptability is described, as well as the participants' conversations with their parents. Girls, 14 through 21 years, were recruited from previous studies (3%), advertisements (14%), clinics (17%), and recommendations by friends (66%) to participate. Girls under 18 years were required to have parental consent, but parents could provide verbal phone consent as long as a signed consent form was returned before participation. The 208 participants were 41% African-American, 30% Hispanic, and 29% Caucasian. Girls averaged 18 years of age, and 95 (46%) were under 18. Seventeen percent of parents attended the first visit; only 1 parent attended with a daughter older than 18 years of age. The mothers of older adolescents were less likely to attend the appointment with them. More Caucasian than African-American girls came with a mother. Parental attendance decreased at follow-up visits. Thirty-seven percent of girls brought a peer to the first visit; there were no age or race/ethnic differences. There was no relationship between attending with a parent or peer and talking to a parent about the study. Some adolescents obtained parental consent to participate in the study while keeping their sexual behaviors private. Parental attendance at study visits may not be marker of parental involvement with the study. Creative ways for balancing concerns about confidentiality, promotion of autonomy, and adult involvement should be considered.

  14. Dental Maturity of Caucasian Children in the Indianapolis Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weddell, Lauren S.; Hartsfield, James K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare chronologic and dental age using Demirjian’s method. Methods Two hundred and fifty-seven panoramic radiographs of healthy 5- to 17.5-year-old Caucasian children in the Indianapolis area were evaluated using Demirjian’s 7 tooth method. Results The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for agreement with Demirjian was 0.94 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.87, 0.97). The ICC for repeatability of the investigator was 0.97 (95% CI=0.95, 0.99). Calculated dental age was significantly greater than chronologic age by 0.59 years (P<.001). There was no significant difference in the mean difference in ages between sexes (P=.73). Medicaid subjects had a significantly higher (P<.001) mean difference (0.82 years) than private insurance subjects (0.32 years). There was a significant negative correlation between the chronologic age and the difference in ages (r=−0.29, P<.001). Overweight (P<.001) and obese (P=.004) subjects were significantly more dentally advanced than normal (P=.35) and underweight (P=.42) subjects. Conclusions Demirjian’s method has high inter- and intraexaminer repeatability. Caucasian children in the Indianapolis area are more advanced dentally than the French-Canadian children studied by Demirjian. Difference between dental age and chronologic age varies depending on the age of the child, socioeconomic status, and body mass index. PMID:21703074

  15. Condylar volume and surface in Caucasian young adult subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordasco Giancarlo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been no quantitative standards for volumetric and surface measurements of the mandibular condyle in Caucasian population. However, the recently developed cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT system allows measurement of these parameters with high accuracy. Methods CBCT was used to measure the condylar volume, surface and the volume to surface ratio, called the Morphometric Index (MI, of 300 temporo-mandibular joints (TMJ in 150 Caucasian young adult subjects, with varied malocclusions, without pain or dysfunction of TMJs. Results The condylar volume was 691.26 ± 54.52 mm3 in males and 669.65 ± 58.80 mm3 in, and was significantly higher (p2 in males and 394.77 ± 60.73 mm2 in females. Furthermore, the condylar volume (693.61 ± 62.82 mm3 in the right TMJ was significantly higher than in the left (666.99 ± 48.67 mm3, p 2 in the right TMJ and 389.41 ± 56.63 mm2 in the left TMJ; t = 3.29; p Conclusion These data from temporomandibular joints of patients without pain or clinical dysfunction might serve as examples of normal TMJ's in the general population not seeking orthodontic care.

  16. Nose tip refinement using interdomal suture in caucasian nose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasinato, Rogério

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Refinement of the nose tip can be accomplished by a variety of techniques, but currently, the use of sutures in the nasal tip with conservative resection of the alar cartilage is the most frequently recommended approach. Objective: To classify the nasal tip and to demonstrate the interdomal suture applied to nasal tip refinement in the Caucasian nose, as well as to provide a simple and practical presentation of the surgical steps. Method: Development of surgical algorithm for nasal tip surgery: 1. Interdomal suture (double binding suture, 2. Interdomal suture with alar cartilage weakening (cross-hatching, 3. Interdomal suture with cephalic removal of the alar cartilage (McIndoe technique based on the nasal tip type classification. This classification assesses the interdomal distance (angle of domal divergence and intercrural distance, domal arch width, cartilage consistency, and skin type. Interdomal suture is performed through endonasal rhinoplasty by basic technique without delivery (Converse-Diamond technique under local anesthesia Conclusion: This classification is simple and facilitates the approach of surgical treatment of the nasal tip through interdomal suture, systematizing and standardizing surgical maneuvers for better refinement of the Caucasian nose.

  17. Girl child in rural India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendra, K

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses the status of the girl child in rural India. Rural children lack the advantages of modern amenities and facilities, such as transportation, electricity, media, hygiene, health care, and access to education. A young girl's status is related to her mother's status. Women are valued the most when a son is born. Girl children are considered an economic liability in child care costs, dowry costs, and marriage support. Since the 1970s, dowry demands have increased. Daughters must meet the demands of prospective in-law for education and dowry even after marriage. The attitudes of parents, families, and society encourage sex-selective abortion, infanticide, abuse in childhood, and domestic violence in adulthood. It was reported in 1994 that a woman is molested every 26 minutes and raped every 52 minutes. The government of India developed an action plan in 1992 for developing the girl child. Rural girl children spend their time cooking, cleaning, fetching wood and water, caring for children, and working in the fields sowing, transplanting, and weeding. Girl children contribute over 20% of total work at home. The only advantage a girl child has in rural areas is visibility. The greatest disadvantage is that her mother, who faced neglect herself, discriminates against her. Increasingly girl children contribute income to their household from Beedi making, gem polishing, embroidering, or paper bag making. Sometimes girls and boys work in hazardous occupations. Gender disparity is evident in school enrollment, drop out rates, literacy, and employment. In 1994, India passed a universal female education bill that offers parents incentives for access and punishment for keeping a girl out of school. Communities need to create a demand for rural girl children's education.

  18. Pubertal Timing, Peer Victimization, and Body Esteem Differentially Predict Depressive Symptoms in African American and Caucasian Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlat, Elissa J.; Shapero, Benjamin G.; Hamilton, Jessica L.; Stange, Jonathan P.; Abramson, Lyn Y.; Alloy, Lauren B.

    2015-01-01

    This study prospectively examined pubertal timing and peer victimization as interactive predictors of depressive symptoms in a racially diverse community sample of adolescents. We also expanded on past research by assessing body esteem as a mechanism by which pubertal timing and peer victimization confer risk for depression. In all, 218…

  19. Effect of acute aerobic exercise and histamine receptor blockade on arterial stiffness in African Americans and Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huimin; Ranadive, Sushant M; Lane-Cordova, Abbi D; Kappus, Rebecca M; Behun, Michael A; Cook, Marc D; Woods, Jeffrey A; Wilund, Kenneth R; Baynard, Tracy; Halliwill, John R; Fernhall, Bo

    2017-02-01

    African Americans (AA) exhibit exaggerated central blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV) in response to an acute bout of maximal exercise compared with Caucasians (CA). However, whether potential racial differences exist in central BP, elastic, or muscular arterial distensibility after submaximal aerobic exercise remains unknown. Histamine receptor activation mediates sustained postexercise hyperemia in CA but the effect on arterial stiffness is unknown. This study sought to determine the effects of an acute bout of aerobic exercise on central BP and arterial stiffness and the role of histamine receptors, in AA and CA. Forty-nine (22 AA, 27 CA) young and healthy subjects completed the study. Subjects were randomly assigned to take either histamine receptor antagonist or control placebo. Central blood BP and arterial stiffness measurements were obtained at baseline, and at 30, 60, and 90 min after 45 min of moderate treadmill exercise. AA exhibited greater central diastolic BP, elevated brachial PWV, and local carotid arterial stiffness after an acute bout of submaximal exercise compared with CA, which may contribute to their higher risk of cardiovascular disease. Unexpectedly, histamine receptor blockade did not affect central BP or PWV in AA or CA after exercise, but it may play a role in mediating local carotid arterial stiffness. Furthermore, histamine may mediate postexercise carotid arterial dilation in CA but not in AA. These observations provide evidence that young and healthy AA exhibit an exaggerated hemodynamic response to exercise and attenuated vasodilator response compared with CA.NEW & NOTEWORTHY African Americans are at greater risk for developing cardiovascular disease than Caucasians. We are the first to show that young and healthy African Americans exhibit greater central blood pressure, elevated brachial stiffness, and local carotid arterial stiffness following an acute bout of submaximal exercise

  20. Changing Girls' Education in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provasnik, Stephen; Brush, Lorie; Heyman, Cory; Fanning, Marina; Lent, Drew; De Wilde, Johan

    Guatemala's school completion rates are among the lowest in Latin America and are particularly low in rural indigenous areas ravaged by 36 years of civil conflict. In 1997, USAID launched the Girls' Education Activity, known as Proyecto Global in Guatemala, to increase the percentage of girls who complete fifth grade, especially in rural areas and…

  1. Tips for Getting Girls Involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettenheim, Susan Geller; Furger, Roberta; Siegman, Lisa; McLester, Susan

    2000-01-01

    Offers suggestions to keep girls interested and involved in digital technology. Highlights include role models; encouraging math and science courses; a computer club for girls; integrating computer activities into the curriculum; Web-based lessons; mentoring; appropriate software; designing with computer graphics; collaborative groups; and…

  2. The "Right" Sexuality for Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    Feminist researchers in psychology and education have been theorizing about the kind of sexuality girls ought to have. They are not afraid to investigate morality and what makes a good life. While they explore the meaning and cultural context of girls' sexual development, the good sexual life they describe may be an elusive ideal that, in the end,…

  3. Empirical Analysis Of Factors Influencing The Level Of Job Satisfaction Of Caucasian And Hispanic Accounting Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Glen D. Moyes; Tammi C. Redd

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the effect of 78 work-related variables on the level of job satisfaction of Caucasian and Hispanic accounting professionals. Factor analysis with Varimax Rotation reduced the number of variables to 12 factor groups for the Caucasian accountants and 11 factor groups for the Hispanic accountants. Data were analyzed using multiple regression models using the level of job satisfaction perceived by the Caucasian or Hispanic accountants as the dependent variable. From the Caucas...

  4. The Caucasian War of the 19th century:civilizational conflict and its functional specifics

    OpenAIRE

    Pashchenko, Irina; Urushadze, Amiran

    2012-01-01

    The authors rely on the civilizational approach and the theory of positive-functional conflict to discuss the nature and specific features of the Caucasian War. They supply new arguments to substantiate the civilizational nature of the Caucasian War of the 19th century. With this aim in view, they identify and analyze its functional repercussions: the emergence and development of cultural bilingualism; the transformations in imperial policy; and the appearance of the Caucasian theme in Russia...

  5. Towards a body hair atlas of women of caucasian ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, D; Hoff, A; Scheede, S; Fischer, F; Tilsner, J; Lüttke, J; Neumann, Y; Hagens, R

    2016-08-01

    A preliminary study was conducted in 17 female volunteers (mean age 29.8 years) to gain deeper insights into the characteristics of terminal Caucasian female body hair of different body parts. The focus on Caucasian women was driven by the high number of different scalp hair phenotypes in this ethnicity and intended to identify relevant differences between body areas to improve body hair removal approaches. Multiple growth parameters and structural parameters were assessed for hair on the upper arm, forearm, upper leg, lower leg, axilla and intimate area and compared to scalp data. In particular, macroscopic and much less microscopic or hair surface properties differ strikingly in the investigated body areas. Hair density on the body is much lower than on scalp with the highest hair density in the axilla and intimate area. Multihair follicular units are described for scalp but were also found to a smaller proportion in the axilla and the intimate area. Substantial percentages of hair triplets are only found on the scalp and intimate area. Hair diameter is highest in the intimate area, followed by axillary and lower leg hair and correlates with a faster hair growth rate. The angle of emerging hair is smallest in the intimate area, axilla and on the lower leg. Hair shafts on the lower leg and in the axilla have most overlapping cuticle layers, but independent of body region, no significant differences in the mean thickness of cuticle layers were detectable. In addition, no differences were found in the mean distance between cuticle layer edges along the hair shaft and the hair surface roughness. Hair on the scalp, forearm, upper arm and upper leg had an almost round shape, whereas hair of the lower leg, intimate area and axilla had more elliptical shape. Hairs on the arm showed the highest luminance values and no visible medulla. The darkest hairs were in the axilla and intimate area containing the highest level of visible medulla in hair shafts. To our knowledge

  6. Girl World: a primary prevention program for Mexican American girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patricia J; Bobo, Tess J; McLachlan, Kate; Avery, Shana; Burge, Sandra K

    2006-04-01

    Theories about women's health have not traditionally been extended to include the healthy development of young women. This article applies a women's health perspective to the implementation and evaluation processes of a gender-specific primary prevention program that worked with 9- to 14-year-old Hispanic girls in a low-income community. Although community-based after-school programs can be an important venue for education and girls' development, long-term effects are elusive to evaluate. The authors used ethnographic techniques to learn more about girls and their interactions with the program and to assess short-term program impact. Three themes were found: Program environment can contribute to girls' expression and behavior, issues of struggling families can slide girls into early adulthood, and mentoring can benefit both girls and adult women. Community-based primary prevention programs, although an essential part of a social safety net available to low-income girls, provide researchers with a unique set of evaluation challenges.

  7. Urinary tract infection in girls - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... improve within 1 to 2 days in most girls. The advice below may not be as accurate for girls with more complex problems. ... The following steps can help prevent UTIs in girls: Avoid giving your child bubble baths. Have your ...

  8. Reference Values of Pulmonary Function Tests for Canadian Caucasians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Gutierrez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A multicentre, cross-sectional study was carried out in six centres across Canada to establish a national standard for pulmonary function tests using healthy, lifetime nonsmokers, with each centre aiming to test 10 men and 10 women from each decade from 20 to 80 years of age. Data from each centre were used to derive prediction equations for each centre, and pooled data from all centres (total: 327 women and 300 men were used to derive Canadian predicted equations. The predictive models were compared with three widely used published models for selected tests. It was found that, in general, the equations modelled for each centre could be replaced by the models obtained when pooling all data (Canadian model. Comparisons with the published references showed good agreement and similar slopes for most tests. The results suggest that pulmonary function test results obtained from different centres in Canada were comparable and that standards currently used remain valid for Canadian Caucasians.

  9. Abdominal wall and labial edema presenting in a girl with Henoch-Schönlein purpura: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radina Maria

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Henoch-Schönlein purpura is a common immunoglobulin A-mediated vasculitic syndrome in children, characterized by purpuric rash, arthritis and abdominal pain. Renal involvement, manifested by the presence of hematuria and/or proteinuria, is also frequently seen. In most cases, patients with this disease achieve complete recovery, but some progress to renal impairment. Gastro-intestinal manifestations are present in two-thirds of affected patients and range from vomiting, diarrhea, and peri-umbilical pain to serious complications such as intussusception and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Case presentation We report the case of a 7-year-old Caucasian girl who presented with abdominal pain, labial swelling, and a large abdominal ecchymosis two weeks after having been diagnosed with Henoch-Schönlein purpura. A computed tomography scan revealed abdominal wall edema extending to the groin, without any intra-abdominal pathology. She was successfully treated with intravenous steroids. Conclusion Circumferential anterior abdominal wall edema and labial edema have never been reported previously, to the best of our knowledge, as a complication of Henoch-Schönlein purpura. These findings further contribute to the wide spectrum of manifestations of this disorder in the literature, aiding in its recognition and management.

  10. Condylar volume and surface in Caucasian young adult subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecco, Simona; Saccucci, Matteo; Nucera, Riccardo; Polimeni, Antonella; Pagnoni, Mario; Cordasco, Giancarlo; Festa, Felice; Iannetti, Giorgio

    2010-12-31

    There have been no quantitative standards for volumetric and surface measurements of the mandibular condyle in Caucasian population. However, the recently developed cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system allows measurement of these parameters with high accuracy. CBCT was used to measure the condylar volume, surface and the volume to surface ratio, called the Morphometric Index (MI), of 300 temporo-mandibular joints (TMJ) in 150 Caucasian young adult subjects, with varied malocclusions, without pain or dysfunction of TMJs. The condylar volume was 691.26 ± 54.52 mm3 in males and 669.65 ± 58.80 mm3 in, and was significantly higher (pcondylar surface, although without statistical significance (406.02 ± 55.22 mm2 in males and 394.77 ± 60.73 mm2 in females).Furthermore, the condylar volume (693.61 ± 62.82 mm3 ) in the right TMJ was significantly higher than in the left (666.99 ± 48.67 mm3, p condylar surface (411.24 ± 57.99 mm2 in the right TMJ and 389.41 ± 56.63 mm2 in the left TMJ; t = 3.29; p < 0.01). The MI is 1.72 ± 0.17 for the whole sample, with no significant difference between males and females or the right and left sides. These data from temporomandibular joints of patients without pain or clinical dysfunction might serve as examples of normal TMJ's in the general population not seeking orthodontic care.

  11. Attracting Girls into Physics (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadalla, Afaf

    2009-04-01

    A recent international study of women in physics showed that enrollment in physics and science is declining for both males and females and that women are severely underrepresented in careers requiring a strong physics background. The gender gap begins early in the pipeline, from the first grade. Girls are treated differently than boys at home and in society in ways that often hinder their chances for success. They have fewer freedoms, are discouraged from accessing resources or being adventurous, have far less exposure to problem solving, and are not encouraged to choose their lives. In order to motivate more girl students to study physics in the Assiut governorate of Egypt, the Assiut Alliance for the Women and Assiut Education District collaborated in renovating the education of physics in middle and secondary school classrooms. A program that helps in increasing the number of girls in science and physics has been designed in which informal groupings are organized at middle and secondary schools to involve girls in the training and experiences needed to attract and encourage girls to learn physics. During implementation of the program at some schools, girls, because they had not been trained in problem-solving as boys, appeared not to be as facile in abstracting the ideas of physics, and that was the primary reason for girls dropping out of science and physics. This could be overcome by holding a topical physics and technology summer school under the supervision of the Assiut Alliance for the Women.

  12. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Gene Polymorphism (V16A is Associated with Diabetic Retinopathy in Slovene (Caucasians Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojca Globočnik Petrovič

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Substantial data indicate that oxidative stress is involved in the development of diabetic retinopathy. Two candidate genes that affect the oxidative stress are manganese mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of the V16A polymorphism of the Mn-SOD gene and the 4a/b polymorphism of the eNOS gene in the development of diabetic retinopathy in Caucasians with type 2 diabetes.

  13. Differences between African American and Caucasian Students on Critical Thinking and Learning Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadzella, Bernadette M.; Masten, William G.; Huang, Jiafen

    1999-01-01

    Fifty-two Caucasian and 51 African American college students completed the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal and the Inventory of Learning Processes. Analysis of variance indicated that Caucasian students had significantly higher mean scores on the total critical thinking score and on four subtest scores of critical thinking. There were no…

  14. Cognitive Distortions about Sex and Sexual Offending: A Comparison of Sex Offending Girls, Delinquent Girls, and Girls from the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubik, Elizabeth K.; Hecker, Jeffrey E.

    2005-01-01

    Cognitive distortions about sexual offending were examined in 11 girls who committed sexual offenses, 12 girls who committed non-sexual criminal offenses, and 21 girls with no history of sexual or non-sexual offending. Participants responded to 12 vignettes that described sexual contact between an adolescent girl and a younger boy. The vignettes…

  15. Girls Online Feeling Out of Bounds: Girl Scout Research Institute Study on Teenage Girls and the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    A study of girls' Internet usage collected data from 1,246 girls aged 13-18 via focus groups, personal journals, and surveys. Many girls didn't know how to react to situations like pornography or sexual harassment in chat room conversations. Girls wanted proactive involvement from adults, not just prohibitive advice, on navigating the Internet.…

  16. Menstrual hygiene among adolescent girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Sharma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Menstruation and menstrual practices are still clouded by taboos and socio-cultural restrictions resulting in adolescent girls remaining ignorant of the scientific facts and hygienic health practices, which sometimes result into adverse health outcomes. Objective: To assess knowledge and practice regarding menstrual hygiene before and after teaching program among adolescent girls. Materials and Methods: A true experimental study was conducted among 50 adolescent girls of a secondary school situated in the Bhaniyawala of Dehradun district, Uttarakhand, with the help of a pre-designed and pre-tested questionnaire. Participants were randomly assigned into control (n=25 and experimental group (n=25. Adolescent girls from both groups were assessed for knowledge and practice regarding menstrual hygiene on day 1 and on 15th day.  Participants of experimental group were administered educational programme regarding menstrual hygiene on day 1 after assessment for knowledge and practice regarding menstrual hygiene. Data were analysed statistically by simple proportions. Results: The mean age of the adolescent girl was 13.88± 1.5 and age of menarche 12.74±0.98. Out of 50, 32 (64% mothers’ of adolescent girls were educated at graduate level.  The mean pre-test knowledge and practice in experimental group 8.04±1.54, 3.52±1.0 and control group 8.02±2.0, 3.24±1.0 respectively. The level of knowledge and practice regarding menstrual hygiene of subjects who participated in educational program was significantly better than that of the control group. Conclusions: Menstrual hygiene, a very important risk factor for reproductive tract infections, is a vital aspect of health education for adolescent girls. Educational television programmes, trained school nurses/health personnel, motivated school teachers and knowledgeable parents can play a very important role in transmitting the vital message of correct menstrual hygiene to the adolescent girl

  17. Recruitment strategies and comparison of prostate cancer-specific clinical data on African-American and Caucasian males with and without family history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, D M; Sartor, O; Halton, S L; Mercante, D E; Bailey-Wilson, J E; Rayford, W

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the United States. This is a complex disease with high heterogeneity and the exact causes are unknown in population-specific samples. Family history is a primary risk factor irrespective of race. Identifying prostate cancer families with multiple affected cancer cases is challenging. Herein we document recruitment techniques and present prostate cancer clinical factors described in a cohort of African Americans and Caucasians with or without a strong family history. A total of 521 prostate cancer patients (241 African Americans and 280 Caucasians) were identified using a novel cooperative methodology involving a combination of treating physicians and tumor registries. Higher prostate-specific antigen (PSA, P=0.0269) was found in familial cases as compared to sporadic cases in African-American men. In addition, PSA values for familial cases were higher (P=0.0093) in African-American as compared to Caucasian men. No differences were detected in Gleason score values in either race, regardless of family history. These findings remained the same after adjustment was made for age at diagnosis. In conclusion, methodologies for cohort acquisition, and clinical characteristics, are described for men with and without a family history of prostate cancer using both Caucasian and African-American populations.

  18. Comparing HLA shared epitopes in French Caucasian patients with scleroderma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doua F Azzouz

    Full Text Available Although many studies have analyzed HLA allele frequencies in several ethnic groups in patients with scleroderma (SSc, none has been done in French Caucasian patients and none has evaluated which one of the common amino acid sequences, (67FLEDR(71, shared by HLA-DRB susceptibility alleles, or (71TRAELDT(77, shared by HLA-DQB1 susceptibility alleles in SSc, was the most important to develop the disease. HLA-DRB and DQB typing was performed for a total of 468 healthy controls and 282 patients with SSc allowing FLEDR and TRAELDT analyses. Results were stratified according to patient's clinical subtypes and autoantibody status. Moreover, standardized HLA-DRß1 and DRß5 reverse transcriptase Taqman PCR assays were developed to quantify ß1 and ß5 mRNA in 20 subjects with HLA-DRB1*15 and/or DRB1*11 haplotypes. FLEDR motif is highly associated with diffuse SSc (χ(2 = 28.4, p<10-6 and with anti-topoisomerase antibody (ATA production (χ(2 = 43.9, p<10-9 whereas TRAELDT association is weaker in both subgroups (χ(2 = 7.2, p = 0.027 and χ(2 = 14.6, p = 0.0007 respectively. Moreover, FLEDR motif- association among patients with diffuse SSc remains significant only in ATA subgroup. The risk to develop ATA positive SSc is higher with double dose FLEDR than single dose with respectively, adjusted standardised residuals of 5.1 and 2.6. The increase in FLEDR motif is mostly due to the higher frequency of HLA-DRB1*11 and DRB1*15 haplotypes. Furthermore, FLEDR is always carried by the most abundantly expressed ß chain: ß1 in HLA DRB1*11 haplotypes and ß5 in HLA-DRB1*15 haplotypes.In French Caucasian patients with SSc, FLEDR is the main presenting motif influencing ATA production in dcSSc. These results open a new field of potential therapeutic applications to interact with the FLEDR peptide binding groove and prevent ATA production, a hallmark of severity in SSc.

  19. Puberty Experiences of Low-Income Girls in the United States: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Literature From 2000 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Ann C; Ramirez, Ana Maria; Lee, Grace; North, Savannah J; Askari, Melanie S; West, Rebecca L; Sommer, Marni

    2017-04-01

    Puberty is a critical period of development that lays the foundation for future sexual and reproductive health. It is essential to learn about the puberty experiences of low-income girls in the United States given their increased vulnerability to negative sexual and reproductive health outcomes. To understand the present-day puberty experiences of this population, we conducted a qualitative systematic review. We systematically searched the peer-reviewed literature published between 2000 and 2014 on the puberty experiences of low-income girls in the United States. Reviewers screened titles, abstracts, and the full texts of articles. Using standardized templates, reviewers assessed the methodologic quality and extracted data. Data were synthesized using thematic analysis. Confidence in each finding was assessed using Confidence in the Evidence from Reviews of Qualitative research. Twenty qualitative articles were included. They described the experiences of mostly African-American, Caucasian, and Hispanic girls living primarily in urban areas of Northeastern United States. Five overarching themes emerged: content of girls' puberty experiences, quality of girls' puberty experiences, messages girls receive about puberty, other factors that shape girls' puberty experiences, and relationships that shape girls' experiences of puberty. The limited existing evidence suggests that low-income girls in the United States are unprepared for puberty and have largely negative experiences of this transition. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Aspiring Girls: Great Expectations or Impossible Dreams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Gill; Posnett, Carol

    2012-01-01

    This study explores girls' aspirations for their future. The context was an ex-coalmining area where concerns had been raised by the local authority about the levels of girls' achievement. The focus of the research was the views of Year 6 girls as they prepared for their transition to secondary school and Year 11 girls as they prepared for their…

  1. Unusual hematologic disease affecting Caucasian children traveling to Southeast Asia: acquired platelet dysfunction with eosinophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselm Chi-Wai Lee

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available An 11-year-old American boy was staying with his family in Indonesia. He presented with a 5-month history of recurrent bruises and ecchymosis. A clinical diagnosis of acquired platelet dysfunction with eosinophilia was made when his full blood counts showed hypereosinophilia (7.4×10 9/L with normal platelet count and gray platelets under the microscope. The diagnosis was supported by abnormal platelet aggregation tests consistent with a storage pool disorder. The bleeding symptoms and eosinophilia resolved a month later with a full course of antihelminthic therapy. Hematologists should be aware of this unusual disease in travelers returning from the Southeast Asia.

  2. Genetic variation of FUT3 in Ghanaians, Caucasians, and Mongolians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soejima, Mikiko; Munkhtulga, Lkhagvasuren; Iwamoto, Sadahiko; Koda, Yoshiro

    2009-05-01

    The FUT3 gene regulates the expression of Lewis blood group antigens. Several lines of evidence suggest association between expression of these antigens and Helicobacter pylori infection or susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) responsible for the Lewis-negative phenotype have been reported, but systematic sequence analyses have not yet been performed. The polymerase chain reaction product containing the whole FUT3 coding region (1086 bp) was sequenced in three human populations, Ghanaians (n = 106), Caucasians (n = 100), and Mongolians (n = 50). Some haplotypes were determined by sequencing cloned inserts, and the other haplotypes were inferred by the free software program PHASE. Also examined was the functional significance of several newly identified SNPs by a transient expression study. Thirty-two SNPs were found, including 15 novel SNPs, in the three populations. The functional impact of three nonsynonymous SNPs that occurred on the Lewis-positive alleles or weakly enzyme-inactivating alleles was examined. A transient expression study suggested that 478C>T and 968G>C are enzyme-inactivating mutations. Sequence analysis identified many SNPs, but most of them are in complete linkage disequilibrium with previously reported SNPs responsible for the Lewis-negative phenotype. 13G>A, 59T>G, and 202T>C seem to be useful as tag SNPs for detection of Lewis-negative alleles in genotyping of Lewis blood groups and large-scale association studies with diseases in many populations.

  3. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a Caucasian Italian woman: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castellani Debora

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is an acute cardiac syndrome characterized by transient LV regional wall motion abnormalities (with peculiar apical ballooning appearance, chest pain or dyspnea, ST-segment elevation and minor elevations of cardiac enzyme levels Case presentation A 68-year-old woman was admitted to the Emergency Department because of sudden onset chest pain occurred while transferring her daughter, who had earlier suffered a major seizure, to the hospital. The EKG showed sinus tachycardia with ST-segment elevation in leads V2–V3 and ST-segment depression in leads V5–V6, she was, thus, referred for emergency coronary angiography. A pre-procedural transthoracic echocardiogram revealed regional systolic dysfunction of the LV walls with hypokinesis of the mid-apical segments and hyperkinesis of the basal segments. Coronary angiography showed patent epicardial coronary arteries; LV angiography demonstrated the characteristic morphology of apical ballooning with hyperkinesis of the basal segments and hypokinesis of the mid-apical segments. The post-procedural course was uneventful; on day 5 after admission the echocardiogram revealed full recovery of apical and mid-ventricular regional wall-motion abnormalities. Conclusion Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a relatively rare, unique entity that has only recently been widely appreciated. Acute stress has been indicated as a common trigger for the transient LV apical ballooning syndrome, especially in postmenopausal women. The present report is a typical example of stress-induced takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a Caucasian Italian postmenopausal woman.

  4. Phenotypic Diversity in Caucasian Adults with Moderate to Severe Class III Malocclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Uribe, Lina M.; Vela, Kaci C.; Kummet, Colleen; Dawson, Deborah V.; Southard, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Class III malocclusion is characterized by a composite of dento-skeletal patterns that lead to the forward positioning of the mandibular teeth in relation to the maxillary teeth and a concave profile. Environmental and genetic factors are associated with this condition, which affects 1% of the US population and imposes significant esthetic and functional burdens on affected individuals. The purpose of this study was to capture the phenotypic variation present in a large sample of white adults with Class III malocclusion by using multivariate reduction methods. METHODS Sixty-three lateral cephalometric variables were measured from pre-treatment records of 292 Class II Caucasian adults (126 males, 166 females; ages 16-57 years). Principal component analysis and cluster analysis were used to capture the phenotypic variation and identify the most homogeneous groups of individuals to reduce genetic heterogeneity. RESULTS Principal component analysis resulted in 6 principal components that accounted for 81.2% of the variation. The first three components represented variations in mandibular horizontal and vertical position, maxillary horizontal position, and mandibular incisor angulation, respectively. The cluster model identified 5 distinct subphenotypes of Class III malocclusion. CONCLUSIONS A spectrum of phenotypic definitions was obtained replicating results of previous studies and supporting the validity of these phenotypic measures in future research of genetic and environmental etiology of Class III malocclusion. PMID:23810043

  5. Girl child and gender bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhry, D P

    1995-01-01

    This article identifies gender bias against female children and youth in India. Gender bias is based on centuries-old religious beliefs and sayings from ancient times. Discrimination is reflected in denial or ignorance of female children's educational, health, nutrition, and recreational needs. Female infanticide and selective abortion of female fetuses are other forms of discrimination. The task of eliminating or reducing gender bias will involve legal, developmental, political, and administrative measures. Public awareness needs to be created. There is a need to reorient the education and health systems and to advocate for gender equality. The government of India set the following goals for the 1990s: to protect the survival of the girl child and practice safe motherhood; to develop the girl child in general; and to protect vulnerable girl children in different circumstances and in special groups. The Health Authorities should monitor the laws carefully to assure marriage after the minimum age, ban sex determination of the fetus, and monitor the health and nutrition of pre-school girls and nursing and pregnant mothers. Mothers need to be encouraged to breast feed, and to breast feed equally between genders. Every village and slum area needs a mini health center. Maternal mortality must decline. Primary health centers and hospitals need more women's wards. Education must be universally accessible. Enrollments should be increased by educating rural tribal and slum parents, reducing distances between home and school, making curriculum more relevant to girls, creating more female teachers, and providing facilities and incentives for meeting the needs of girl students. Supplementary income could be provided to families for sending girls to school. Recreational activities must be free of gender bias. Dowry, sati, and devdasi systems should be banned.

  6. Self-rated psychopathic traits in a sample of treatment-seeking adolescent girls with internalizing and externalizing disorders: comparisons to girls in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshukova, Svetlana; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu; Miettunen, Jouko; Marttila, Riikka; Aronen, Eeva T; Marttunen, Mauri; Kaivosoja, Matti; Lindberg, Nina

    2017-04-01

    Psychopathy research has thus far focused mostly on child, male, and delinquent samples, but the results are most likely non-generalizable to adolescent girls with mental health disorders. The present study aimed to compare self-rated psychopathic traits between female psychiatric outpatients and girls in the community, and to investigate how psychopathic traits relate to psychiatric disorders. The outpatient sample comprised 163 girls aged 15-17-years recruited from municipal mental health services. Psychiatric diagnoses were assessed based on the ICD-10 classification. The community sample comprised 355 girls from secondary, vocational, and high schools. The Youth Psychopathic trait Inventory (YPI) served as a self-assessment tool. Treatment-seeking girls exhibit a more impulsive and irresponsible lifestyle than do girls in the community. Girls with externalizing psychopathology, unlike those with an internalizing disorder, exhibit more deficient affective experience than do girls in the community. Psychopathic traits associate with having a psychiatric disorder, a depressive disorder, ADHD, and a conduct disorder. The psychiatric examination of treatment-seeking adolescent girls would likely benefit from screening for psychopathy and its underlying components.

  7. Caucasian Families Exhibit Significant Linkage of Myopia to Chromosome 11p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musolf, Anthony M; Simpson, Claire L; Moiz, Bilal A; Long, Kyle A; Portas, Laura; Murgia, Federico; Ciner, Elise B; Stambolian, Dwight; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E

    2017-07-01

    Myopia is a common visual disorder caused by eye overgrowth, resulting in blurry vision. It affects one in four Americans, and its prevalence is increasing. The genetic mechanisms that underpin myopia are not completely understood. Here, we use genotype data and linkage analyses to identify high-risk genetic loci that are significantly linked to myopia. Individuals from 56 Caucasian families with a history of myopia were genotyped on an exome-based array, and the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data were merged with microsatellite genotype data. Refractive error measures on the samples were converted into binary phenotypes consisting of affected, unaffected, or unknown myopia status. Parametric linkage analyses assuming an autosomal dominant model with 90% penetrance and 10% phenocopy rate were performed. Single variant two-point analyses yielded three significantly linked SNPs at 11p14.1 and 11p11.2; a further 45 SNPs at 11p were found to be suggestive. No other chromosome had any significant SNPs or more than seven suggestive linkages. Two of the significant SNPs were located in BBOX1-AS1 and one in the intergenic region between ORA47 and TRIM49B. Collapsed haplotype pattern two-point analysis and multipoint analyses also yielded multiple suggestively linked genes at 11p. Multipoint analysis also identified suggestive evidence of linkage on 20q13. We identified three genome-wide significant linked variants on 11p for myopia in Caucasians. Although the novel specific signals still need to be replicated, 11p is a promising region that has been identified by other linkage studies with a number of potentially interesting candidate genes. We hope that the identification of these regions on 11p as potential causal regions for myopia will lead to more focus on these regions and maybe possible replication of our specific linkage peaks in other studies. We further plan targeted sequencing on 11p for our most highly linked families to more clearly understand the

  8. Improving girls' schooling in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The Forum for African Women Educationalists (FAWE) is working to improve schooling for girls and women. The organization has 14 national chapters and has funded 14 projects in African Countries, including a program of alternative education for out-of-school girls, a remedial mathematics and science program, help for poor students, persuading teachers to allow pregnant girls to continue their schooling after delivery, and programs which allow daughters of farmers to schedule classes around their livestock duties. FAWE also sponsored a ministerial consultation on school dropouts and adolescent pregnancy which attracted an impressive number of male African Ministers of Education. In Ghana, the FAWE chapter acts as a think tank and a pressure group. Female education issues are explored through role-playing in workshops geared to improve public awareness of the importance of educating girls, and science clinics have been designed to increase appreciation for science and mathematics among girls. FAWE has produced publications in English and French, as well as a music tape and a documentary. FAWE is funded by a variety of private and international agencies and recently received recognition from the UN's Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization.

  9. Sociocultural and Individual Influences on Muscle Gain and Weight Loss Strategies among Adolescent Boys and Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardelli, Lina A.; McCabe, Marita P.

    2003-01-01

    The study examined the role of body dissatisfaction, body image importance, sociocultural influences (media and parent and peer encouragement), self-esteem and negative affect on body change strategies to decrease weight and increase muscles in adolescent boys and girls. Surveys were administered to 587 boys and 598 girls aged between 11 and 15…

  10. Girls' Active Identities: Navigating Othering Discourses of Femininity, Bodies and Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Within physical education and sport, girls must navigate discourses of valued athletic and gendered bodies that marginalise or "other" non-normative performances through systems of surveillance and punishment. The purpose of this paper is to share girls' perspectives on how these discourses affected their gender performances and activity…

  11. Inter-country and ethnic variation in colorectal cancer survival: Comparisons between a Philippine population, Filipino-Americans and Caucasians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gondos Adam

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous population-based studies showed differences in international and within country colorectal cancer survival estimates, but few investigated the role of prognostic factors. Using a "high resolution approach", we aimed to determine the effect of ethnicity and health care by comparing Filipino-Americans with Philippine residents, who have the same ethnicity, and with Caucasians living in the US, who have the same health care system. Methods Using databases from the Manila and Rizal Cancer Registries and the United States Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results, age-adjusted five-year absolute and relative survival estimates were computed and compared between Filipino-American colorectal cancer patients, cancer patients from the Philippines and Caucasian patients. Cox proportional hazards modelling was used to determine factors affecting survival differences. Results Much lower 5-year relative survival estimates were obtained for Philippine residents (37% as compared to those in Filipino-Americans (60.3% and Caucasians (62.4%. Differences in age, stage and receipt of surgery explained a large proportion of the survival differences between Philippine residents and Filipino-Americans. However, strong excess risk of death for Philippine residents remained after controlling for these and other variables (relative risk, RR, 2.03, 95% confidence interval, 95% CI, 1.83-2.25. Conclusions Strong survival disadvantages of Philippine residents compared to Filipino-American patients were disclosed, which most likely reflect differences in access to and utilization of health care. Health education and advocacy, for both patients and health practitioners, should likewise be given priority.

  12. Ethnic Differences in Insulin Sensitivity, β-Cell Function, and Hepatic Extraction Between Japanese and Caucasians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jonas B; Dalla Man, Chiara; Overgaard, Rune V

    2014-01-01

    : This was a cross-sectional study with oral glucose tolerance tests to assess β-cell function, hepatic insulin extraction, and insulin sensitivity. PARTICIPANTS: PARTICIPANTS included 120 Japanese and 150 Caucasian subjects. MAIN OUTCOMES: Measures of β-cell function, hepatic extraction, and insulin sensitivity...... were assessed using C-peptide, glucose, and insulin minimal models. RESULTS: Basal β-cell function (Φ(b)) was lower in Japanese compared with Caucasians (P ... compared with Caucasians (P insulin action showed higher sensitivity in the Japanese IGT subjects. Hepatic extraction was similar in NGT and IGT groups but higher in Japanese type 2 diabetic subjects (P insulin sensitivity, β-cell function...

  13. Predictors of Bone Mineral Density in African-American and Caucasian College-Aged Women

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Andrea K.; Ford, M. Allison; Jones, Tamekia L.; Nahar, Vinayak K.; Hallam, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research regarding risk factors and prevalence of low bone min-eral density (BMD) among African-American and Caucasian college-aged wom-en are limited. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine if selected predictors of BMD in African-American and Caucasian college-aged women differ by race.Methods: A total of 101 local African-American (n=50) and Caucasian (n=51) females, ages 18 to 30 years, were in this study. All data were collected in the Bone Density and B...

  14. Recurrent Breast Abscesses due to Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii, a Human Pathogen Uncommon in Caucasian Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Le Flèche-Matéos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii (Ck was first described in 1998 from human sputum. Contrary to what is observed in ethnic groups such as Maori, Ck is rarely isolated from breast abscesses and granulomatous mastitis in Caucasian women. Case Presentation. We herein report a case of recurrent breast abscesses in a 46-year-old Caucasian woman. Conclusion. In the case of recurrent breast abscesses, even in Caucasian women, the possible involvement of Ck should be investigated. The current lack of such investigations, probably due to the difficulty to detect Ck, may cause the underestimation of such an aetiology.

  15. Intensity of Oxidative Stress in Mongoloid and Caucasian Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikova, L I; Vlasov, B Ya; Kolesnikov, S I; Darenskaya, M A; Grebenkina, L A; Semenova, N V; Vanteeva, O A

    2016-10-01

    Specific features of LPO were studied in Mongoloid and Caucasian patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The intensity of LPO in Mongoloid patients was lower than in Caucasians: the level of primary and intermediate products was by lower 1.53 and 1.83 times, while total antioxidant activity was elevated by 1.44 times, which was also supported by oxidative stress coefficient (1.35 in Mongoloids and 2.32 in Caucasians). These differences suggest that differentiated approach is required for the treatment of these patients.

  16. Morphology: Osteometric Data from 360 Caucasian Dried Femori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Terzidis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to conduct direct measurements in a large sample of dried femori in order to record certain morphometric parameters of the femoral condyles and determine whether there are gender and side differences. Three hundred sixty (Greek Caucasian dried femori (180 left and 180 right, from 192 males and 168 females, were measured using a digital caliper. The mean age was 67.52 years. The mean bicondylar width of the femur was 8.86 cm ± 0.42 cm in men and 7.85 cm ± 0.30 cm in women (<0.01. The relative values for the medial condylar depth were 6.11 cm ± 0.34 cm and 5.59 cm ± 0.29 cm (<0.05; for the lateral condylar depth were 6.11 cm ± 0.33 cm and 5.54 cm ± 0.21 cm (<0.01; for the intercondylar width were 2.20 cm ± 0.18 cm and 1.87 cm ± 0.10 cm (<0.001; for the intercondylar depth were 2.78 cm ± 0.16 cm and 2.37 cm ± 0.12 cm (<0.001. No significant side-to-side difference was observed in any parameter. The femoral condyles differences in anatomy between genders might be useful to the design of total knee prostheses. The contralateral healthy side can be safely used for preoperative templating since there were no significant side differences.

  17. Diagnostic criteria for metabolic syndrome: caucasians versus African-Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeno, Stacey A; Deuster, Patricia A; Davis, Jennifer L; Kim-Dorner, Su-Jong; Remaley, Alan T; Poth, Merrily

    2010-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of risk factors used to identify individuals at greatest risk for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). Early diagnosis of CVD would benefit African-Americans (AA), who have a higher prevalence of and mortality rate from CVD compared to Caucasians (CA). Two definitions for metabolic syndrome were used to classify healthy CA and AA, and evaluate how other CVD risk factors [C-reactive protein (CRP), percent body fat, fitness level, insulin resistance, and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C)] changed metabolic syndrome classification. Healthy AA (n = 97) and CA (n = 51) ranging from normal weight to obese, 18-45 years of age, with neither hypertension nor diabetes, were evaluated for cardiorespiratory fitness, height, weight, percent body fat, hip and waist circumference, blood pressure (BP), and fasting blood glucose, insulin, triglycerides, HDL, non-HDL-C, and CRP. Participants were classified as meeting the criteria for metabolic syndrome according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III 2004 (NCEP ATP III) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) definitions. Significant ethnic differences (P < 0.01) in classification were noted for both metabolic syndrome definitions (NCEP ATP III, CA = 16.7% vs. AA = 5.7%; IDF, CA = 23.5% vs. AA = 8.2%). Ethnic differences were eliminated when fitness level or percent body fat was included as a criterion. If diagnosis of metabolic syndrome is intended for early recognition of CVD risk and slowing CVD development, current definitions for metabolic syndrome will not capture healthy AA. Health-care providers may consider assessing percent body fat and participation in regular exercise, because these criteria would help identify AA at risk.

  18. Television Images and Adolescent Girls' Body Image Disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, Renee A.

    1999-01-01

    Contributes to scholarship on the effects of media images on adolescents, using social-comparison theory and critical-viewing theory. Finds that media do have an impact on body-image disturbance. Suggests that body-image processing is the key to understanding how television images affect adolescent girls' body-image attitudes and behaviors. (SR)

  19. Developmental Psychology of Adolescent Girls: Conflicts and Identity Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Katherine C.

    2004-01-01

    Adolescents, particularly girls, have many identity conflicts and low self-esteem that may affect school success and development of a healthy identity. Many teenagers experience new societal expectations and responsibilities giving rise to identity confusion or internal conflicts that need to be resolved during adolescence. Their conflicts may…

  20. Trichomonas vaginalis infection among adolescent girls in some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The specimens were analyzed using wet mount examination and culture methods. A prevalence of 9.2% of T. vaginalis was observed among adolescent girls in this study. Level of education of parents, occupation of mothers, sexual relationship and clinical manifestation of participants significantly affected the prevalence of ...

  1. Eating Disorders in African American Girls: Implications for Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talleyrand, Regine M.

    2010-01-01

    Given the recent focus on eating disorders in children, it is imperative that counselors consider eating concerns that affect children of all racial and ethnic groups and hence are effective in working with this population. The author discusses risk factors that potentially contribute to eating disorders in African American girls given their…

  2. Clinical characteristics and long-term visual outcome of optic neuritis in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder: A comparison between Thai and American-Caucasian cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanikieti, Kavin; Poonyathalang, Anuchit; Jindahra, Panitha; Bouzika, Peggy; Rizzo, Joseph F; Cestari, Dean M

    2017-10-01

    Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) occurs more commonly in Asian than Caucasian populations. Few studies have examined the clinical features and visual outcome of optic neuritis (ON) within NMOSD in different racial populations. The objective of this study was to compare the clinical characteristics and long-term visual outcome of a Thai and an American-Caucasian cohort with NMOSD-related ON. Medical records including brain and orbital magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 16 consecutive subjects who developed visual loss due to ON as part of NMOSD evaluated at a single American tertiary referral center between 2006 and 2015 were reviewed and compared to those of 16 consecutive similar subjects evaluated at a single Thai tertiary referral center between 2010 and 2016. These cohorts represented the total number of NMOSD-related ON subjects seen during that time at those institutions. Statistical analyses were used for continuous and categorical data sets, and multiple regression analysis was used to adjust for differences in duration of follow-up and number of episodes of ON in each affected eye. All subjects within the Thai cohort were Asian, while the American cohort initially consisted of 14 Caucasian, 1 Asian and 1 African-American subject, but the latter two were excluded from analysis. In the Thai cohort, ON occurred in 21 eyes, with a total of 19 episodes, while in the American-Caucasian cohort ON occurred in 22 eyes, with a total of 21 episodes. Aquaporin 4 (AQP4)-antibody was positive in all subjects except for one American-Caucasian subject. The mean follow-up time was 17.8 (± 16.0) and 52.8 (± 51.9) months for the Thai and American-Caucasian populations, respectively. There was no difference between the two cohorts with respect to gender, age of NMOSD and NMOSD-related ON onset, initial clinical presentation of NMOSD, initial visual acuity and automated visual fields, prevalence of swollen optic disc in the acute phase, presence of pain on the

  3. Moyamoya Disease in an 18-Month-Old Female Caucasian Complicated by Cerebral Hyperperfusion Syndrome Following Indirect Revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchison, James; Wilson, John M; Ray, Coby; Ginsberg, Jessica; Nagy, Laszlo

    2017-10-09

    BACKGROUND Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome is a rare complication of indirect revascularization due to moyamoya disease, but has not been reported previously in the pediatric population. We present a case of an 18-month-old girl with moyamoya disease that was treated with bilateral pial synangiosis and had complications consistent with cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome. This case report discusses the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in cerebral hyperperfusion in moyamoya syndrome. CASE REPORT An 18-month-old female Caucasian presented with seizures and weakness of the left side. Angiography confirmed bilateral cerebral moyamoya disease that was worse on the right side. Indirect revascularization with pial synangiosis was first performed on the right side to allow for healing. Five months later, pial synangiosis was then performed on the left side. Postoperatively, the patient experienced increased intracranial pressure (ICP), suggesting cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome. She was treated with a repeat lumbar puncture, a lumbar drain, and a lumbar shunt. CONCLUSIONS This report demonstrates a case of cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome as a complication of moyamoya disease in a pediatric patient. Although the patient progressed well after placement of a lumbar shunt, this case demonstrates the occurrence of cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome as a complication of revascularization in pediatric patients and highlights the need for further research in this area.

  4. [To feed well and take good care of young girls is to promote maternal health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    countries have begun programs to assist girls who have left school at an early age. The InterAfrician Committee on Practices Affecting the Health of Girls and Children is leading efforts among 21 African committees and organizations to eliminate harmful traditional practices, including some practices during delivery, genital mutilation, nutritional taboos, and marriage of young children. Families who neglect the needs of their daughters are often attempting to make the best use of limited resources. Such practices are however a principal cause of poor health among women, and they must be combatted. The situation in each country should be defined through data comparing the status of girls and boys. Preventive measures include monitoring existing programs for inclusion of girls.

  5. Control beliefs and faith as stress moderators for Korean American versus Caucasian American protestants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorck, J P; Lee, Y S; Cohen, L H

    1997-02-01

    Examined relationships among negative life events, four locus of control attributions (Internality, Powerful Others, Chance and God Control), and psychological distress for Korean American versus Caucasian American Protestants. Negative events and Powerful Others beliefs were positively related to distress, whereas Internality was negatively related to distress. Ethnicity and God Control interacted: The relationship between God Control beliefs and anxiety was negative for Caucasians but positive for Koreans. Three-way interactions (Ethnicity x Locus of Control x Negative Events) also emerged. As Caucasians' Powerful Others beliefs increased, the positive relationship between negative events and depression became stronger; Koreans' Powerful Others beliefs had no such effect. As Caucasians' God Control beliefs increased, the negative event-depression relationship changed from positive to negative; the reverse was true for Koreans. Findings support the value of assessing ethnoculture and religiousness in stressful life events research.

  6. Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative disorder in the United States : Young Caucasian males are at highest risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dharnidharka, VR; Tejani, AH; Ho, PL; Harmon, WE

    2002-01-01

    We have previously documented Caucasian race and cadaver donor source as risk factors for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) development in recipients registered in the North American Pediatric Renal Transplant Cooperative Study (NAPRTCS). We analyzed data from the Scientific

  7. Cultural influences on stigmatization of problem gambling: East Asian and Caucasian canadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Jasmin; Horch, Jenny D; Hodgins, David C

    2011-12-01

    Cultural influences on problem gambling stigma were examined using a between subject vignette study design. Students of East Asian (n = 64) and Caucasian (n = 50) ancestry recruited from a Canadian University rated a vignette describing either an East Asian problem gambler or a Caucasian problem gambler on a measure of attitudinal social distance. In accordance with the hypothesis, a factorial ANOVA revealed that East Asian Canadians stigmatize problem gambling more than Caucasian Canadians. Moreover, East Asian participants stigmatized the East Asian individual described in the vignette more than they did the Caucasian individual. Individuals with gambling problems were generally not perceived as being dangerous. However, participants who perceived problem gambling as a dangerous condition wanted more social distance than those who did not perceive individuals with a gambling problem as dangerous.

  8. Comparison of Scheimpflug imaging parameters between steep and keratoconic corneas of Caucasian eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseynova T

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tukezban Huseynova,1 Farah Abdulaliyeva,2 Michele Lanza3 1Briz-L Eye Clinic, 2National Ophthalmology Center, Baku, Azerbaijan; 3Second University of Naples, Caserta, Campania, Italy Purpose: To compare the keratometric and pachymetric parameters of healthy eyes with those affected by steep cornea and keratoconus (KC using Scheimpflug camera.Setting: Briz-L Eye Clinic, Baku, Azerbaijan.Design: A cross-sectional study.Methods: In this study, 49 KC (Amsler–Krumeich stage 1 eyes and 36 healthy eyes were enrolled. A complete ophthalmic evaluation and a Scheimpflug camera scan were performed in every eye included in the study. Tomographic parameters such as parameters from the front and back cornea, maximum keratometry reading (Kmax, corneal volume (CV, anterior chamber volume (ChV, anterior chamber depth (ACD, anterior chamber angle (AC angle, keratometric power deviation (KPD, maximum front elevation (Max FE, and maximum back elevation (Max BE, as well as pachymetric progression indices (PPI, Ambrosio relational thickness (ART, index of surface variance (ISV, index of vertical asymmetry (IVA, center keratoconus index (CKI, index of height asymmetry (IHA, index of height decentration (IHD, and radius minimum (RM were collected and statistically compared between the two groups.Results: PPI, ART, ISV, IVA, CKI, IHA, IHD, and RM parameter values were significantly different (P<0.05 between the KC and healthy eyes. There were no significant differences in K mean and Q values of the frontal corneal parameters, as well as in Kmax, AC angle, RM, back, and front astigmatism, between stage 1 keratoconic and normal Caucasian eyes with steep cornea. All other parameters such as K mean and Q values of the back corneal parameters, Max FE, Max BE, ACD, ChV, and CV showed significant differences between the groups (P<0.05 for all. Conclusion: Scheimpflug imaging is able to detect corneal morphological differences between stage 1 KC eyes and healthy eyes with

  9. Asking mom: formative research for an HPV vaccine campaign targeting mothers of adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Autumn; Cates, Joan R; Diehl, Sandra J; Hartmann, Miriam

    2011-10-01

    Vaccination against the types of human papillomavirus (HPV) that cause about 70% of cervical cancers is approved for use in girls and women between 9 and 26 years of age and recommended routinely in 11-12-year-old girls. This article reports on the systematic theory-based formative research conducted to develop HPV vaccine messages for a campaign targeting racially diverse mothers of nonvaccinated 11-12-year-old girls in rural Southeastern United States. A consortium of 13 county health departments concerned about high rates of cervical cancer in their region relative to state and national averages initiated the campaign. The research examined behavioral determinants for vaccination decisions as well as mothers' reactions to message frames and emotional appeals. On the basis of focus groups and intercept interviews (n = 79), the authors demonstrated how preproduction message research and production message testing were used to develop messages that would motivate mothers of preteen girls. Core emotional truths that emerged were a mother's instinct to protect her daughter from harm and to embrace aspirations for her daughter's future. Mothers also reacted more positively to text about preventing cervical cancer than about preventing HPV, a sexually transmitted disease. Mothers preferred message concepts with photos of minorities and Caucasian mothers and daughters.

  10. Pain Perception in Latino vs. Caucasian and Male vs. Female Patients: Is There Really a Difference?

    OpenAIRE

    Aufiero, Molly; Stankewicz, Holly; Quazi, Shaila; Jacoby, Jeanne; Stoltzfus, Jill

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Pain is a common emergency department (ED) complaint. It is important tounderstand the differences in pain perception among different ethnic and demographic populations. Methods: We applied a standardized painful stimulus to Caucasian and Latino adult patients todetermine whether the level of pain reported differed depending on ethnicity (N=100; 50 Caucasian[C], 50 Latino [L] patients) and gender (N=100; 59 female, 41 male). Patients had an initial painscor...

  11. THE EFFECT OF WEEKLY STANDARD DOSES OF PRIMAQUINE AND CHLOROQUINE IN G6PD DEFICIENT CAUCASIANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    chloroquine on G6PD deficient Caucasians was studied. Seven sensitive Caucasians had significant hemolysis after a single weekly dose of the drugs measured by...the change in the 51Cr tagged red cell survival and in the hematocrit levels. G6PD deficient 51Cr tagged red cells belonging to some of these subjects...transfused into normals, receiving thereafter weekly doses of primaquine, were rapidly destroyed. Three G6PD deficient Sardinians did not show any

  12. The Caucasian diaspora-abkhaz and Adighes: episodes from the past

    OpenAIRE

    Vardania, Gudisa

    2007-01-01

    The author takes a look into the past in order to shed light on some of the still painful issues relating to the emergence of the Abkhaz-Adighe element of the Caucasian diaspora, the ups and downs of the Caucasian War Russia waged in the Caucasus for many years, the deportation of huge numbers of local people, and their arduous integration into Ottoman Turkey.

  13. The Losses of the Russian Armyduring the Caucasian War (1801–1864): Historical and Statistical Research

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandr A. Cherkasov; Vladimir G. Ivantsov; MichalSmigel; Violetta S. Molchanova

    2017-01-01

    The article reflects the data obtained from official documents published by the military historical department at the headquarter of the Caucasian military district about the Russian army losses in the period of the Caucasian War 1801–1864 years. There were used the materials of personal origin, pre-revolutionary research and modern scientific publications. The analyzed statistics includes the data about the losses of Russian army over the yearswith the release of different positions: the irr...

  14. The Caucasian War within the Covers of Voennyi Sbornik (Military Journal)

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandr A. Cherkasov; Vyacheslav I. Menkovsky; Vladimir G. Ivantsov; Aleksandr A. Ryabtsev; Violetta S. Molchanova; Olga V. Natolochnaya

    2014-01-01

    The article, using the publications of Voennyi Sbornik (Military Journal) considers the Caucasian War. The first article on this theme was published in 1859. The inner criticism of the historic source is conducted. The major rubrications of the journal are detected. Four major genres of publications, concerning the Caucasian War are singled out: 1. Recollections by the combatants; 2. Scenes from the battle and official information; 3. Military and historic research; 4. Biographies of the comb...

  15. Awareness of demands and unfairness and the importance of connectedness and security: Teenage girls' lived experiences of their everyday lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einberg, Eva-Lena; Lidell, Evy; Clausson, Eva K

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have demonstrated that stress and mental health problems have increased among adolescents and especially among girls, although little is still known concerning what girls experience in their everyday lives. The aim of this study was to describe the phenomenon of teenage girls' everyday lives, as experienced by the girls themselves. A phenomenological approach of reflective lifeworld research was used, and the findings are based on eight qualitative interviews with girls aged 13-16 years. The essence of teenage girls' everyday lives as experienced by the girls themselves can be described as consciousness regarding demands and unfairness and regarding the importance of connectedness and security. The girls are aware of the demands of appearance and success, and they are conscious of the gender differences in school and in the media that affect them. The girls are also conscious about the meaning of connectedness with friends and family, as well as the importance of the security of their confidence in friends and feeling safe where they stay. If teenage girls feel connected and secure, protective factors in the form of manageability and meaningfulness can act as a counterweight to the demands and unfairness of everyday life. For professionals who work with teenage girls, the results from this study can be important in their work to support these girls.

  16. Women, Girls, and Binge Drinking

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-08-01

    Bob Brewer, CDC's Alcohol Program Director, goes on the air to discuss the problem of binge drinking among women and girls.  Created: 8/1/2013 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 8/1/2013.

  17. Django Girls 2017 Workshop Saturday

    CERN Multimedia

    Lapka, Marzena

    2017-01-01

    On 7th and 8th April 2017 CERN welcomed its second Django Girls Geneva event at IdeaSquare. The workshop was organised by the CERN IT Department, Diversity and Local Engagement teams. Many volunteered helped to make it happen.

  18. The Girl-Child Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-05-20

    May 20, 2011 ... Abstract. Education is to be the right of every child universally including Nigeria, without discrimination against any child based on whatever reason(s) and none must be denied. However, it has been discovered that many girl-child in. Nigeria are at disadvantaged in comparison to their male counterpart.

  19. Multimodal imaging and diagnosis of myopic choroidal neovascularization in Caucasians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milani P

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Milani,1 Amedeo Massacesi,1 Stefania Moschini,1 Marco Setaccioli,1 Ennio Bulone,1 Gemma Tremolada,1 Stefano Ciaccia,1 Elena Mantovani,1 Daniela Morale,2 Fulvio Bergamini1 1Ophthalmology Department, Istituto Auxologico, 2Institute of Mathematics, Universita’ degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy Purpose: To investigate myopic choroidal neovascularization (mCNV by fluorescein angio­graphy (FA, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT, near-infrared (NIR reflectance, and autofluorescence (AF. Methods: This retrospective study included 65 eyes of 62 Caucasian patients with a mean age of 66.72 years (95% confidence interval [CI] 63–70 years and a mean refraction of -9.72 diopters (95% CI -8.74 to -10.70 diopters. Results: Most of the mCNV cases were foveal-juxtafoveal (60/65, 92.3%, with thickening of the corresponding retina (62/65, 95.3% and leakage on FA (44/65, 67.6%. No retinal fluid was detectable in 32 (49.2% eyes and there was no hemorrhage in 25 (38.4% eyes. Papillary chorio­retinal atrophy was evident in 58 (89.2%, a shadowing effect in 48 (73.8%, and an epiretinal membrane in 38 (58.4% eyes. If an area of macular chorioretinal atrophy was present, mCNV frequently developed adjacent to it and was hyperfluorescent rather than with leakage (P<0.001. In eyes with edema or hemorrhage, hyper-reflective foci were more frequent (P<0.005. NIR and AF features were indeterminable in 19 (29.2% and 27 (41.5% eyes, respectively. The predominant feature was black or grayish on NIR (34/65, 52.3% and patchy (hypo- and hyperfluorescence was observed on AF (25/65, 38.4%. FA and SD-OCT correctly detected mCNV in 49 (75.3% and 48 (73.8% eyes, respectively, whereas NIR and AF exhibited limited diagnostic sensitivity. Doubtful diagnosis was associated with hyperfluorescent mCNV (P<0.001, absence of retinal fluid and epiretinal membrane (P<0.05, and presence of macular chorioretinal atrophy (P<0.01. Conclusion: Tomographic, angiographic, AF

  20. Are Dimensions of Parenting Differentially Linked to Substance Use Across Caucasian and Asian American College Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Jeremy W; Patock-Peckham, Julie A; King, Kevin M

    2015-01-01

    Parental warmth and autonomy granting are commonly thought of as protective factors against substance use among Caucasians. However, limited research has examined whether associations between parenting dimensions and substance use outcomes are the same or different among Asian Americans. A final analytic sample of 839 college students was used to test whether race (Caucasian vs. Asian American) moderated the relations between parenting dimensions and substance use outcomes across Caucasians and Asian Americans. We utilized the Parental Bonding Instrument (Parker, Tupling, & Brown, 1979) to measure maternal and paternal warmth, encouragement of behavioral freedom, and denial of psychological autonomy. Multivariate regression models controlling for covariates including age, gender, and paternal education indicated four significant parenting by race interactions on alcohol problems and/or marijuana use. Specifically, maternal warmth was inversely associated with both alcohol problems and marijuana use among Caucasians but not among Asian Americans. Both maternal and paternal denial of psychological autonomy were positively associated with alcohol problems among Caucasians but not among Asian Americans. Consistent with emerging cross-cultural research, the associations between parenting dimensions and substance use behaviors observed in Caucasian populations may not be readily generalized to Asian Americans. These findings highlight the importance of considering different parenting dimensions in understanding substance use etiology among Asian Americans. Future research should use longitudinal data to replicate these findings across development and seek to identify other parenting dimensions that may be more relevant for Asian American youth.

  1. The palaeogeographic outlines of the Caucasus in the Jurassic: The Caucasian Sea and the Neotethys Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruban Dmitry A.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Caucasian Sea, fringing the northern margin of the Jurassic Neotethys Ocean, largely covered the Caucasus. Continental, shallow-marine and deep-marine palaeoenvironments delineate palaeogeographic outlines for three significant time slices: the Late Toarcian, the Early Bajocian and the Middle Oxfordian. These new palaeogeographic outlines of the Caucasus and adjacent territories match the Neotethys Ocean reconstructions. In the Late Toarcian the Caucasian Sea embraced the Greater Caucasus Basin and the Black Sea Caspian Sea Basin, which were divided by the Northern Transcaucasian Arc; it opened to the Neotethys Ocean which covered the Exterior Caucasian Basin. In the Early Bajocian, the Caucasian Sea only embraced the Greater Caucasus Basin; it opened the epicontinental seas of the Russian Platform, connecting them with the Neotethys Ocean by straits between islands of the Transcaucasian Arc. In the Middle Oxfordian, the Caucasian Sea which further embraced the Greater Caucasus Basin had its outer shelf fringed by carbonate build-ups. The connection between the Russian Platform shallow sea and the Neotethys Ocean was maintained. In the course of the Jurassic, a seaway developed along the northern margin of the Neotethys, of which the Caucasian Sea became a significant part.

  2. ["The girls are sick, weak and overstrained" Sickness among girls and boys based on Swedish physical examinations ca 1870-1930].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frih, Anna-Karin

    2004-01-01

    In the late 19th century a major physical examination of more than 11000 pupils was carried out in Swedish schools. There was a common belief among physicians and teachers that the current education had a most damaging influence on the health of boys and in particular girls. It was a well-known fact, according to some physicians, that a substantial number of Swedish girls suffered from diseases such as chlorosis and other ailments. Girls from the middle and upper classes were supposed to be the most affected. Based on the presumptions and observations, several physical examinations were preformed between 1870-1930. Swedish pupils were in a bad condition indeed. In the late 19th century more than 60 percent of all female students were in some way sick or in a bad condition. In comparison, 45 percent of all boys were not well. Most girls and boys were overstrained, anemic, suffered from headaches and had a poor appetite.A number of changes in the sickness and health of girls and boys during the period studied have been discovered. First, concepts of sickness and health were modified over time. What was defined as a sickness in the late 19th century was not interpreted in the same way a few decades later; Secondly, the prevalence of sickness in girls and boys changed over time. In the beginning of the period studied girls were sicker than boys, but in the end, in the 1930s, there was no obvious gender difference in the prevalence of sickness. In addition this article shows how the common belief, that middle and upper class girls were more exposed to and affected by illnesses, was not supported by the results from the contemporary physical examinations. Instead, it was evident that working class girls, in general, were sicker than boys with the same socio-economic status and also sicker than middle and upper class girls.

  3. Nutrient intake amongst rural adolescent girls of Wardha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliye C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the nutrient intake of rural adolescent girls. Materials and Methods: The cross-sectional study was carried in four adopted villages of the Department of Community Medicine, M.G.I.M.S., Sewagram. A household survey was carried out in the villages. A list of all the adolescent girls in the age group of 10-19 years was prepared by enumeration through house-to-house visit. All adolescent girls were included in the study. A pre-designed and pre-tested questionnaire was used to collect data on socio-demographic variables and anthropometric variables. A 24 h recall method was used to assess nutrient intake. Data generated was entered and analyzed using epi_info 2000. Nutrient intake was compared with ICMR Recommended Dietary Allowances. Nutritional status was assessed by BMI for age. Results: The mean height of the adolescent girls was 142.9 cm. Overall, 57% of the adolescents were thin (BMI for age <5 th percentile for CDC 2000 reference and 43% of the adolescents were normal (BMI for age between 5 th - 85 th percentile for CDC 2000 reference. The average energy intake, which was 1239.6±176.4 kcal/day, was deficient of RDA by 39%. The average protein intake was 39.5±7 gm/day. It was deficient by 36% and the average iron intake, which was 13.2±2.5 mg/day, was deficient by 48%. Conclusion: The findings reiterate the dietary deficiency among adolescent girls which adversely affects the nutritional status. If the poor nutritional status is not corrected promptly before they become pregnant, it adversely affects the reproductive outcome. If we have to meet out the goals of Reproductive and Child Health Program, intervention strategies to improve the dietary intake of adolescent girls are needed so that their requirements of energy, protein, vitamins and minerals are met.

  4. Improving academic self-efficacy, school connectedness, and identity in struggling middle school girls: a preliminary study of the REAL girls program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Michael J; Smith, Megan L; Kristjansson, Alfgeir L

    2015-02-01

    Girls struggling to be successful in middle school are often dealing with negative life experiences that affect their ability to achieve academically. Frequently, their academic failures and problem behaviors are associated with feeling overwhelmed by difficult and challenging life circumstances. In the absence of intervention, these patterns may contribute to girls chronically underperforming in school, dropping out of school, and becoming involved in delinquent and high-risk behaviors. This article describes a quasi-experimental, mixed-methods study of the REAL Girls program. REAL Girls was designed to help struggling middle school girls develop resilience--particularly academic self-efficacy, school connectedness, and identity--and achieve successful outcomes in school and life. In this study, using a crossover design, 48 girls identified as experiencing academic failure, school behavior problems, or truancy participated in one of two implementations of this 3-day intervention. Findings based on both quantitative and qualitative data suggest that REAL Girls contributed to positive increases in academic self-efficacy, school connectedness, and identity. Repeated measures analysis of variance and paired t tests suggest significant increases in each outcome variable, both immediately after program delivery and 2 weeks later, and effect size estimates suggest moderate to large program impact. Focus groups conducted 90 days after implementation of the program confirmed the quantitative findings and support the efficacy of the REAL Girls program and approach. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  5. Insulin sensitivity and lipid profiles in girls with central precocious puberty before and during gonadal suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kaspar; Mouritsen, Annette; Mogensen, Signe Sloth

    2010-01-01

    Early menarche is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. It is unknown whether metabolic risk factors are adversely affected in girls with central precocious puberty (CPP) already at time of diagnosis....

  6. Maternal Characteristics Predicting Young Girls' Disruptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, Elsa; Hipwell, Alison E.; Vermeiren, Robert; Loeber, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the relative predictive utility of maternal characteristics and parenting skills on the development of girls' disruptive behavior. The current study used five waves of parent- and child-report data from the ongoing Pittsburgh Girls Study to examine these relationships in a sample of 1,942 girls from age 7 to 12 years.…

  7. Middle School Girls' Envisioned Future in Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Experience is necessary but not sufficient to cause girls to envision a future career in computing. This study investigated the experiences and attitudes of girls who had taken three years of mandatory computer science classes in an all-girls setting in middle school, measured at the end of eighth grade. The one third of participants who were open…

  8. Motor performance in girls with Turner's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.; Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.; Eling, P.A.T.M.

    2000-01-01

    To validate the movement problems in daily life in girls with Turner's Syndrome (TS), reported by teachers, parents and the girls themselves. We examined whether these girls have an impaired motor ability and a specific pattern of motor impairment. As TS phenotypes are characterised by a particular

  9. The Young Gifted Girl: A Contemporary View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeper, Annemarie

    2003-01-01

    In this reprint of an article published in 1978, the role of women in society and its impact on gifted girls is discussed. It is argued that gender stereotypes work against gifted girls and that the women's movement has helped gifted girls develop a new image and concept of womanhood. (CR)

  10. Why do Adolescent Girls Idolize Male Celebrities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Yuna; Kasser, Tim

    2005-01-01

    Girls often idolize male celebrities, but this phenomenon has been studied little. The authors therefore assessed celebrity idolization among 142 junior high school girls and found that girls who strongly idolized a male celebrity had more experience dating, reported secure and preoccupied attachments to same-age boys, and were rated higher in…

  11. Associations of Anthropometric, Behavioral, and Social Factors on Level of Body Esteem in Peripubertal Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szamreta, Elizabeth A; Qin, Bo; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela A; Devine, Katie A; Stapleton, Jerod L; Ferrante, Jeanne M; Bandera, Elisa V

    2017-01-01

    Lower body esteem may decrease self-esteem and lead to adverse health effects in children. This study explored the role of anthropometric, behavioral, and social factors on body esteem in peripubertal girls. We evaluated associations of body esteem (measured by the Revised Body Esteem Scale) with body mass index (BMI), mother's BMI, puberty, physical activity, role models for appearance, and screen time among girls (ages 9 and 10) participating in the Jersey Girl Study (n = 120). Linear models were used to evaluate differences in body esteem scores. Overweight/obese girls had a significantly lower mean body esteem score compared with underweight/healthy weight girls {14.09 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.53-15.27) vs. 17.17 (95% CI: 16.87-17.43)}. Girls who were physically active for at least 7 hours per week had a significantly higher body esteem score than those who were less active, after adjusting for BMI (17.00 [95% CI: 16.62-17.32] vs. 16.39 [95% CI: 15.82-16.86]). Girls whose mothers were overweight/obese, who had entered puberty, and who cited girls at school or females in the media as role models had lower body esteem scores, but differences disappeared after adjusting for girl's BMI. A trend of higher body esteem scores was found for girls whose mothers were role models. Lower BMI and higher levels of physical activity are independently associated with higher body esteem score. Having classmates or girls/women in the media as role models may detrimentally affect girls' body esteem, but having mothers as role models may have a positive effect.

  12. Insulin sensitivity and lipid profiles in girls with central precocious puberty before and during gonadal suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kaspar; Mouritsen, Annette; Mogensen, Signe Sloth

    2010-01-01

    Early menarche is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. It is unknown whether metabolic risk factors are adversely affected in girls with central precocious puberty (CPP) already at time of diagnosis.......Early menarche is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. It is unknown whether metabolic risk factors are adversely affected in girls with central precocious puberty (CPP) already at time of diagnosis....

  13. Girls Talk Math - Engaging Girls Through Math Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Francesca; Morgan, Katrina

    2017-11-01

    ``Girls Talk Math: Engaging Girls through Math Media'' is a free two-week long summer day camp for high-school girls in the Triangle area of NC. This past June the camp had its second run thanks to renewed funding from the Mathematical Association of America Tensor Women and Mathematics Grant. The camp involved 35 local high-school students who identify as female. Campers complete challenging problem sets and research the life of a female scientist who worked on similar problems. They report their work in a blog post and record a podcast about the scientist they researched. The curriculum has been developed by Mathematics graduate students at UNC from an inquiry based learning perspective; problem sets topics include some theoretical mathematics, but also more applied physics-based material. Campers worked on fluid dynamics, special relativity, and quantum mechanics problem sets which included experiments. The camp has received positive feedback from the local community and the second run saw a large increase in the number of participants. The program is evaluated using pre and post surveys, which measure campers' confidence and interest in pursuing higher level courses in STEM. The results from the past two summers have been encouraging. Mathematical Association of America Tensor Women and Mathematics Grant.

  14. Comparing Neuropsychological Profiles between Girls with Asperger's Disorder and Girls with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Megan E.; Culotta, Vincent P.

    2012-01-01

    Research examining neuropsychological profiles of girls with Asperger's disorder (AD) is sparse. In this study, we sought to characterize neurocognitive profiles of girls with AD compared to girls with learning disabilities (LD). Two groups of school-age girls referred for neuropsychological assessment participated in the study. A total of 23…

  15. "It's Murder Out Today": Middle School Girls Speak Out about Girl Fighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letendre, Joan; Smith, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Girl fighting and its relational context is a problem that is receiving extensive attention in popular and academic circles. This article reports on a project that gathered the opinions from focus groups of seventh- and eighth-grade girls, organized to understand the perspectives of young adolescent girls in middle school on girl fighting. Both…

  16. Promoting the achievement of girls in GCSE science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Kevin Charles

    This study, designed to challenge the under-representation and limited attainment of girls in the physical sciences in an 11-16 comprehensive school, was suggested by research into attitude formation by Kelly et al in the early 1980s. Balanced science, in removing opportunities for girls to opt out of the physical sciences, made it essential to identify those factors which were adversely affecting girls' attitudes towards science.Preliminary research tasks investigated stereotypical attitudes towards science activities and the school curriculum amongst students and their parents. Additional research probed students' perceptions of their ability in science and the relevance of science subjects. Students' attitudes towards science and science teaching were investigated in relation to their option and career choices. These data influenced the choice of MEG Coordinated Science (The Suffolk Development) as the GCSE balanced science course for the school.The subsequent programme of action research included a series of small-scale investigations, involving both monitoring and evaluation, designed to develop the Suffolk scheme and satisfy the research aims. Student attitudes towards teaching methods and the Suffolk materials were amongst those areas investigated. After evaluation the findings were channelled into the action research spiral to integrate teaching methods and curriculum development thereby promoting the attitudes and achievement of the girls.Improvements in attainment by all students, particularly the girls, were illustrated by increasing GCSE success. Although the traditional pattern of boys' superiority within the physical sciences was markedly reduced the research demonstrated that it is possible to improve the attainment of girls within GCSE science without discriminating against boys.Student opinion and the GCSE data suggested that the girls' achievements could be partially explained by the coursework-led assessment which suited the girls' preferred

  17. Girl child and social change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, P

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses the state of social change and the disparity between India's Constitutional aims and actual practice in addressing gender inequality and the special risks of female children in India. The second part of this article summarizes Constitutional articles and laws relating to protection of women and a girl child. Before birth, a female child is at risk of fetal death. A woman is at risk of poorly performed abortions and maternal mortality. After birth, a girl child is at risk of child care of younger siblings, housework, lack of education, wage work for the household, sexual abuse, vulnerability at work or school or on the street, murder by her parents, abuse, malnutrition, and desertion. The SAARC summit declared 1990 the Year of the Girl Child. UN conventions and a world summit focused on the Rights of the Child. A child has a right to freedom from exploitation, neglect and abuse, and access to food, health care, and education. Articles 14, 15, and 16 of India's Constitution guarantee protection from discrimination on grounds of religion, race, caste, sex, or place of birth and equality of opportunity in public employment. Article 23 prohibits trafficking in humans and forced labor. Article 24 prohibits child labor under the age of 14 years. Article 39 assures an adequate means of livelihood, equal pay, and protection from child abuse and economic pressure to work in jobs unsuitable to a child's age and strength. Article 45 provides for free and compulsory education up to 14 years of age. Article 51 prohibits derogatory practices against women. Article 325 and 326 prohibits sex discrimination. Other laws pertain to dowry, marriage age, prostitution, abortion, juvenile justice, kidnapping, obscenity, procurement of a minor, sexual offenses, divorce and child support, child care, maternity benefits, and cruelty by a husband or relatives. The girl child in India continues to live in perpetual threat, both physiological and psychological.

  18. Vulnerable girls and dangerous boys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ann-Karina Eske

    2017-01-01

    The study explores the gendered institutional practices and rationalities applied to young people placed in Danish secure institutions. The study draws on ethnographic research, combining participant observation and interviews to gain insight into professionals’ gendered practices and rationaliti......, with minorizing effects on some boys and girls. The study provides unique insights from a gender-integrated context for confined young people and supplements scholarship on the gendered logics that underpin interventions operating within the penal–social work nexus....

  19. [Clinical features of girls with Asperger disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Yuko; Miyao, Masutomo; Okuyama, Makiko; Ida, Hiroyuki

    2013-09-01

    Symptoms of Asperger disorder (AD) in girls are often different from those in boys. In this study, the characteristics of girls with AD were examined. We retrospectively examined the records of 63 boys and 33 girls with AD. We evaluated the age, main problems, complications, and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (3rd Ed) scores. About 73% of girls were diagnosed with AD between 10 and 15 years of age, and they had physical complications or problems in the autonomic nervous system. Girls scored significantly lower in Mathematics score, and Block Design score than boys. The results suggest that there are differences in the AD symptoms exhibited by boys and girls. Further research is required to clarify the behavioral, neurological, and genetic links to these gender differences. In order to prevent secondary complications, it is necessary to establish specific diagnostic criteria for girls with AD.

  20. Body-Surface Compounds in Buckfast and Caucasian Honey Bee Workers (Apis Mellifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strachecka Aneta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Body-surface chemical compounds were studied in 1-day-old nest workers and foragers both in Buckfast and Caucasian bees. The workers of these two age-castes were sampled twice in each of two consecutive years. Body-surface lipids were determined by means of gas chromatography, with a GCQ mass spectrometer. Protein concentrations and activities on the body surface were examined in bee cuticle rinsings obtained from worker bees according to the methods of Lowry, of Anson, and of Lee and Lin. Protease and protease inhibitor activities were determined. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was performed. Caucasian bees, particularly foragers, had more lipids, but Buckfast bees (two age-castes had more proteins on their body surfaces. A total of 17 alkane types (C17 - C33, 13 alkene types (C21 - C33, 21 esters (C12 - C32, and a phenol (C14 were detected in both races. Alkene C33 was detected only in Caucasian bees. More alkanes, esters, and phenols were found in Caucasian 1-day-old nest workers and foragers than in these age-castes of Buckfast bees. The protein concentration and protease inhibitor activities were lower in Caucasian bees that had higher protease activities. These values corresponded with specific numbers and widths of the electrophoretic bands.

  1. Cardiovascular fitness and risk factors of healthy African Americans and Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeno, Stacey A; Kim-Dorner, Su-Jong; Deuster, Patricia A; Davis, Jennifer L; Remaley, Alan T; Poth, Merrily

    2010-01-01

    African Americans have a higher prevalence of and mortality rates from cardiovascular disease than Caucasians. One important risk factor for cardiovascular disease is poor cardiovascular fitness. We quantified associations between fitness and related primary risk factors for cardiovascular disease in healthy African Americans and Caucasians. Participants included African American (n = 91) and Caucasian (n = 51) men and women aged 18 to 45 years with a body mass index less than 38 kg/m2, fasting blood glucose less than 126 mg/dL, and blood pressure less than 140/90 mm Hg. Fitness, waist and hip circumference, percent body fat, fasting blood glucose, insulin, lipid profiles, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. The majority of African Americans (57.1%) were low-fair fitness (Caucasians, 31.4%), and only 20.8% were good/high fitness (Caucasians, 39.2%). The number of cardiovascular disease risk factors increased with decreasing fitness, and CRP was negatively associated with fitness in both groups. Low fitness may characterize apparently healthy African Americans as at risk for cardiovascular disease. Including fitness as a risk factor may improve early identification of at-risk African Americans. Importantly, prescribing exercise as medicine and promoting regular physical activity to improve fitness is essential among African Americans.

  2. Fatalism and health promoting behaviors in Chinese and Korean immigrants and Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiniger, Louise E; Sherman, Kerry A; Shaw, Laura-Kate E; Costa, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    Fatalism has been associated with non-adherence to health behavior in the past. This study compared fatalism of Chinese and Korean immigrants with native-born Caucasians (N = 309) and examined whether the relationship between fatalism and exercise, nutrition and medical screening would be moderated by ethnicity. Chinese reported higher fatalism than Caucasians and Koreans. Higher fatalism was associated with greater exercise among Chinese and Koreans, but less reported exercise among Caucasians. Caucasian participants had higher scores for nutrition and medical screening compared with Chinese and Korean immigrants. These findings indicate that fatalism is more prevalent among Chinese immigrants; however, there is no evidence of a detrimental effect of fatalism on exercise, nutrition or medical screening among the Asian immigrants. Caucasians with higher fatalism may be at greater risk of future illnesses, given the association between fatalism and sedentary behavior in this group. Differences between cultural groups in the adoption of health behavior justify the development and assessment of targeted interventions to optimize health promoting behaviors.

  3. British Gujarati Indian immigrants' and British Caucasians' beliefs about health and illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobanputra, Rena; Furnham, Adrian

    2005-12-01

    This study examined cultural differences in beliefs about health and illness to explore differences in younger and older British Caucasians' and British Gujarati Indian immigrants' beliefs about health and illness. This study required a matched group consisting of first- and second-generation Gujarati Indian immigrants and native British Caucasians to complete a questionnaire assessing their beliefs concerning health and illness. Factor analysis of the health beliefs questionnaire identified six clear factors accounting for 36.04% of the variance. Subsequent ANCOVAs conducted on the factor scores, partialling out the demographic differences between the participants, revealed that Gujarati Indian immigrants agreed with items reflecting supernatural explanations of ill health more than indigenous British Caucasian participants. Older Indian immigrants also rated chance-related factors as more important than older Caucasian immigrants. There were no significant differences between the Gujarati Indian immigrants and British Caucasians in terms of attributions made to psychological factors and self-responsibility, social factors and life circumstances, medical treatment and physical vulnerability and the external environment. Findings are discussed in relation to the model proposed by Helman (2001) and the impact of migration on health beliefs systems; practical implications of the findings are also highlighted.

  4. Body Composition in Asians and Caucasians: Comparative Analyses and Influences on Cardiometabolic Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Sumanto; Chia, Siok Ching; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar

    2015-01-01

    Within the last four decades Asia has witnessed major transformation in its population demographics, which gave rise to changes in food availability, food habits and lifestyle. A significant consequence of these changes has been the continuing rise in overweight and obesity across Asia. In parallel, there has been a significant rise in Asians in the incidence of the major chronic diseases, particularly in cardiometabolic disorders such as metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and other cardiovascular diseases. Given that the majority of the evidence, to date, investigating the associations between adiposity and cardiometabolic disorder risk have been obtained from studies undertaken either in European or in North American Caucasians, in this chapter, we have reviewed differences in body fat content and distribution between East Asians, South Asians, and Caucasians. The evidence is consistent that the content and distribution of body fat are markedly different between the various ethnic groups. We found that Asians have a greater predisposition towards adiposity at higher BMI than in Caucasians. Moreover, at any given level of adiposity, Asians have a much greater predisposition to risk of cardiometabolic disorders than Caucasians. We therefore strongly endorse the need for different adiposity cutoffs in Asians as compared to the Caucasians. We have also reviewed the predictive abilities of the various body composition/adiposity measures in determining risk of cardiometabolic disorders in Asians. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ovarian cancer survival population differences: a "high resolution study" comparing Philippine residents, and Filipino-Americans and Caucasians living in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uy Gemma

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In contrast to most other forms of cancer, data from some developing and developed countries show surprisingly similar survival rates for ovarian cancer. We aimed to compare ovarian cancer survival in Philippine residents, Filipino-Americans and Caucasians living in the US, using a high resolution approach, taking potential differences in prognostic factors into account. Methods Using databases from the SEER 13 and from the Manila and Rizal Cancer Registries, age-adjusted five-year absolute and relative survival estimates were computed using the period analysis method and compared between Filipino-American ovarian cancer patients with cancer patients from the Philippines and Caucasians in the US. Cox proportional hazards modelling was used to determine factors affecting survival differences. Results Despite more favorable distribution of age and cancer morphology and similar stage distribution, 5-year absolute and relative survival were lower in Philippine residents (Absolute survival, AS, 44%, Standard Error, SE, 2.9 and Relative survival, RS, 49.7%, SE, 3.7 than in Filipino-Americans (AS, 51.3%, SE, 3.1 and RS, 54.1%, SE, 3.4. After adjustment for these and additional covariates, strong excess risk of death for Philippine residents was found (Relative Risk, RR, 2.45, 95% confidence interval, 95% CI, 1.99-3.01. In contrast, no significant differences were found between Filipino-Americans and Caucasians living in the US. Conclusion Multivariate analyses disclosed strong survival disadvantages of Philippine residents compared to Filipino-American patients, for which differences in access to health care might have played an important role. Survival is no worse among Filipino-Americans than among Caucasians living in the US.

  6. Teacher Perceptions Affect Boys' and Girls' Reading Motivation Differently

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerma, Inouk E.; Mol, Suzanne E.; Jolles, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between teacher perceptions and children's reading motivation, with specific attention to gender differences. The reading self-concept, task value, and attitude of 160 fifth and sixth graders were measured. Teachers rated each student's reading comprehension. Results showed that for boys,…

  7. Aspiring to have the looks of a celebrity: young girls' engagement in appearance management behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trekels, Jolien; Eggermont, Steven

    2017-07-01

    Research suggests that sexualizing media messages are present in teen media and negatively affect young girls' body image. Yet, it is unknown whether exposure to teen television programs is associated with girls' engagement in appearance management behaviors. Two-wave longitudinal data among 785 girls (Mage = 11.65 years) were collected. Results show that teen television exposure was longitudinally related to appearance management, while the reverse relation was not supported. Approximately half of the girls indicated to manage their appearance to some extent, and 13- to 14-year-old girls were more likely to invest in their appearance than younger girls. Thirty percent of those who did not manage their appearance at the start of the study indicated to have initiated appearance management 6 months later. Frequent viewers were four times, three times, and twice as more likely to style their hair, wear heels, and apply make-up compared to non-viewers. The current study showed that teen media exposure plays a role in young girls' appearance management. The findings point to a need to teach young girls about stereotypical messages in media content directed towards them. Prevention efforts should focus on girls who frequently watch teen media. What is Known: • Sexualizing media messages are present in teen media. • Gender identity development is one of the key tasks during adolescence. What is New: • Tween television exposure predicts 9- to 14-year-old girls' engagement in appearance management over time. • Engagement in appearance management behaviors did not predict 9- to 14-year-old girls' exposure to tween television programs.

  8. Profiles of Motivation for Reading Among African American and Caucasian Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, John T; Coddington, Cassandra S; Wigfield, Allan

    2009-07-01

    Previous research has investigated motivations for reading by examining positive, or affirming, motivations including intrinsic motivation and self-efficacy. Related to them, we examined two negative, or undermining, motivations consisting of avoidance and perceived difficulty. We proposed that the motivations of intrinsic motivation and avoidance are relatively independent, and thus, can be combined to form meaningful profiles consisting of: avid, ambivalent, apathetic, and averse readers. With Grade 5 students we found that these motivations were relatively independent for both Caucasian and African American students. The two motivations uniquely explained a significant proportion of variance in reading comprehension and other cognitive reading variables. Although intrinsic motivation was stronger for Caucasians, avoidance was stronger for African Americans. The profile of the African American students contained higher proportions of averse and ambivalent readers than the Caucasian profile. The profile of avid readers showed higher reading achievement than the other profiles.

  9. Caucasian Mineralnye Vody’s Regional Metropole as a Geopolitical Centre of Russia’s South

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Golovanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shaping multilevel centre of metropolization in Caucasian Mineralnye Vody region, which geopolitical importance has signifi cantly increased following the creation of North Caucasian Federal District. If million-plus cities Krasnodar and Rostov-on-Don remain the main centers of growth, attracting the people, innovations and capital, in this macro-region, as a result of the integration of the Caucasian Mineralnye Vody region’s cities into the political unity integrated all inhabited localities into the single urban space, there would take place the formation of the higher level regional metropole, which would become a de facto economic, political and ideological center of North Caucasus and could seek the status of the main Russian South’s city.

  10. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis due to excessive L-thyroxine replacement in a Caucasian man.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, M J

    2009-09-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis is a potentially fatal complication of hyperthyroidism, more common in Asian races, which is defined by a massive intracellular flux of potassium. This leads to profound hypokalaemia and muscle paralysis. Although the paralysis is temporary, it may be lethal if not diagnosed and treated rapidly, as profound hypokalaemia may induce respiratory muscle paralysis or cardiac arrest. The condition is often misdiagnosed in the west due to its comparative rarity in Caucasians; however it is now increasingly described in Caucasians and is also being seen with increasing frequency in western hospitals due to increasing immigration and population mobility. Here we describe the case of a patient with panhypopituitarism due to a craniopharyngioma, who developed thyrotoxic periodic paralysis due to excessive L-thyroxine replacement. This disorder has been described in Asian subjects but, to our knowledge, thyrotoxic periodic paralysis secondary to excessive L-thyroxine replacement has never been described in Caucasians.

  11. Effect of cortisol on muscle sympathetic nerve activity in Pima Indians and Caucasians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vozarova, Barbora; Weyer, Christian; Snitker, Soren

    2003-01-01

    . Although glucocorticoids inhibit SNS activity, Pima Indians are not hypercortisolemic compared with Caucasians. This does not exclude the possibility that the SNS is more responsive to an inhibitory effect of cortisol in the former than in the latter group. We measured fasting plasma ACTH and cortisol...... (metyrapone) followed by cortisol replacement (hydrocortisone) on plasma ACTH, cortisol, and MSNA. There were no ethnic differences in fasting plasma ACTH or cortisol, but MSNA adjusted for percent body fat was lower in Pimas than in Caucasians (P cortisol...... to a tonic inhibitory effect of cortisol. However, an acute release of cortisol is likely to more effectively contain sympathoexcitation during stress in Pima Indians than in Caucasians, which may be an important mechanism of cardioprotection in this Native American population....

  12. Sexual Hookups and Alcohol Consumption Among African American and Caucasian College Students: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson Ross, Lisa; Zeigler, Stephanie; Kolak, Amy M; Epstein, Dryden

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated college students' sexual hooking up and its associations with alcohol consumption for men and women; furthermore, potential differences related to ethnicity were investigated. Students at a midsized southeastern university who identified as Caucasian or African American (N = 227) completed a survey assessing sexual behavior, demographics, and alcohol consumption. Heavy drinking was associated with ever hooking up, number of hookup partners, hookup frequency, and level of sexual contact during hooking up for Caucasian students, but not for their African American peers. Among Caucasians, moderate drinking men reported more intense sexual contact during hookups than their female peers who were moderate drinkers; sexual contact levels were more similar for men and women who were either nondrinkers or heavy drinkers. Limitations and strengths are discussed, as are ideas for future studies on hooking up and for educational efforts to protect against potentially negative outcomes of hooking up.

  13. Comparative study of dental cephalometric patterns of Japanese-Brazilian, Caucasian and Mongoloid patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Sathler

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to identify the patterns of dental variables of adolescent Japanese-Brazilian descents with normal occlusion, and also to compare them with a similar Caucasian and Mongoloid sample. METHODS: Lateral cephalometric radiographs were used to compare the groups: Caucasian (n = 40, Japanese-Brazilian (n = 32 and Mongoloid (n = 33. The statistical tests used were one-way ANOVA and ANCOVA. The cephalometric measurements used followed the analyses of Steiner, Tweed and McNamara Jr. RESULTS: Statistical differences (P < 0.05 indicated a smaller interincisal angle and overbite for the Japanese-Brazilian sample, when compared to the Caucasian sample, although with similar values to the Mongoloid group. CONCLUSION: The dental patterns found for the Japanese-Brazilian descents were, in general, more similar to those of the Mongoloid sample.

  14. Conceptual Understanding of the Russian-Caucasian Relations in the XVI–XIX centuries in the Official Imperial Historiography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hadzhi-Murat A. Sabanchiev; Madina A. Tekueva; Zareta H. Soblirova; Anzhela A. Zhurtova

    2017-01-01

    The domestic Caucasus Studies contains various, often conflicting concepts and approaches, claiming to be the most complete and objective coverage of issues of Russian-Caucasian historical interaction...

  15. A 3D analysis of Caucasian and African American facial morphologies in a US population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbert, Leslie; Kau, Chung How; Christou, Terpsithea; Vlachos, Christos; Souccar, Nada

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to compare facial morphologies of an adult African-American population to an adult Caucasian-American population using three-dimensional (3D) surface imaging. The images were captured using a stereophotogrammetric system (3dMDface(TM) system). Subjects were aged 19-30 years, with normal body mass index and no gross craniofacial anomalies. Images were aligned and combined using RF6 Plus Pack 2 software to produce a male and female facial average for each population. The averages were superimposed and the differences were assessed. The most distinct differences were in the forehead, alar base and perioricular regions. The average difference between African-American and Caucasian-American females was 1·18±0·98 mm. The African-American females had a broader face, wider alar base and more protrusive lips. The Caucasian-American females had a more prominent chin, malar region and lower forehead. The average difference between African-American and Caucasian-American males was 1·11±1·04 mm. The African-American males had a more prominent upper forehead and periocular region, wider alar base and more protrusive lips. No notable difference occurred between chin points of the two male populations. Average faces were created from 3D photographs, and the facial morphological differences between populations and genders were compared. African-American males had a more prominent upper forehead and periocular region, wider alar base and more protrusive lips. Caucasian-American males showed a more prominent nasal tip and malar area. African-American females had broader face, wider alar base and more protrusive lips. Caucasian-American females showed a more prominent chin point, malar region and lower forehead.

  16. Investigation of Caucasian rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci in African patients with the same disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The largest genetic risk to develop rheumatoid arthritis (RA) arises from a group of alleles of the HLA DRB1 locus ('shared epitope', SE). Over 30 non-HLA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) predisposing to disease have been identified in Caucasians, but they have never been investigated in West/Central Africa. We previously reported a lower prevalence of the SE in RA patients in Cameroon compared to European patients and aimed in the present study to investigate the contribution of Caucasian non-HLA RA SNPs to disease susceptibility in Black Africans. Methods RA cases and controls from Cameroon were genotyped for Caucasian RA susceptibility SNPs using Sequenom MassArray technology. Genotype data were also available for 5024 UK cases and 4281 UK controls and for 119 Yoruba individuals in Ibadan, Nigeria (YRI, HapMap). A Caucasian aggregate genetic-risk score (GRS) was calculated as the sum of the weighted risk-allele counts. Results After genotyping quality control procedures were performed, data on 28 Caucasian non-HLA susceptibility SNPs were available in 43 Cameroonian RA cases and 44 controls. The minor allele frequencies (MAF) were tightly correlated between Cameroonian controls and YRI individuals (correlation coefficient 93.8%, p = 1.7E-13), and they were pooled together. There was no correlation between MAF of UK and African controls; 13 markers differed by more than 20%. The MAF for markers at PTPN22, IL2RA, FCGR2A and IL2/IL21 was below 2% in Africans. The GRS showed a strong association with RA in the UK. However, the GRS did not predict RA in Africans (OR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.29 - 1.74, p = 0.456). Random sampling from the UK cohort showed that this difference in association is unlikely to be explained by small sample size or chance, but is statistically significant with p<0.001. Conclusions The MAFs of non-HLA Caucasian RA susceptibility SNPs are different between Caucasians and Africans, and several polymorphisms are barely detectable in

  17. Comparative study between crossbred and caucasians individuals using Ricketts cefalometric analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Menéndez Méndez, Leoncio; Docente del Departamento Académico de Estomatología Pediátrica de la UNMSM.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the sample mixed with Caucasian Ricketts cephalometric radiographs and determine if there are significant differences between the values found in our sample and standardized measures of Caucasians used as a standard in our study. The population was based on adolescent women’s secondary school level “Rosa de Santa Maria” Breña district, between 11 to 16 years of age. Which was selected a sample of 32 students, with characteristic patterns of racial mixing as peruvia...

  18. Reaching for the Stars: NASA Space Science for Girl Scouts (Girl Scout Stars)

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, E. K.; Harman, P. K.; Berg, J.; Friedman, W.; Fahy, J.; Henricks, J.; Chin, W.; Hudson, A.; Grissom, C.; Lebofsky, L. A.; McCarthy, D.; Gurton, S. P.; White, V.; Summer, T.; Mayo, L.; Patel, R.; Bass, K.

    2016-12-01

    Girl Scout Stars aims to enhance science, technology, engineering and mathermatics (STEM) experiences for Girl Scouts in grades K-12 through the national Girl Scout Leadership Experience. New space science badges are being created for every Girl Scout level. Using best practices, we engage girls and volunteers with the fundamental STEM concepts that underpin our human quest to explore the universe. Through early and sustained exposure to the people and assets of NASA and the excitement of NASA's Mission, they explore STEM content, discoveries, and careers. Today's tech savvy Girl Scout volunteers prefer just-in-time materials and asynchronous learning. The Girl Scout Volunteer Tool Kit taps into the wealth of online materials provided by NASA for the new space science badges. Training volunteers supports troop activities for the younger girls. For older girls, we enhance Girl Scout summer camp activities, support in-depth experiences at University of Arizona's Astronomy Camp, and "Destination" events for the 2017 total solar eclipse. We partner with the Night Sky Network to engage amateur astronomers with Girl Scouts. Univeristy of Arizona also leads Astronomy Camp for Girl Scout volunteers. Aires Scientific leads eclipse preparation and summer sessions at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for teams of volunteers, amateur astronomers and older Girl Scouts. There are 1,900,000 Girl Scouts and 800,000 volunteers in the USA. During development, we work with the Girl Scouts of Northern California (50,000 girl members and 31,000 volunteers) and expand across the USA to 121 Girl Scout councils over five years. SETI Institute leads the experienced space science educators and scientists at Astronomical Society of the Pacific, University of Arizona, and Aires Scientific. Girl Scouts of the USA leads dissemination of Girl Scout Stars to Councils across the USA with support of Girl Scouts of Northern California. Through professional development of Girl Scout volunteers, Girl

  19. Comprehensive analysis of the association of EGFR, CALM3 and SMARCD1 gene polymorphisms with BMD in Caucasian women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-Hong Zhou

    Full Text Available Three genes, including EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor, CALM3 (calmodulin 3, calcium-modulated protein 3 and SMARCD1 (SWI/SNF-related matrix-associated actin-dependent regulator of chromatin subfamily d member 1, play different roles in bone and/or fat metabolism in Caucasian women. In this population-based investigation of 870 unrelated postmenopausal Caucasian women, CALM3 polymorphisms were significantly associated with femoral neck bone mineral density (FNK BMD, hip BMD and spine BMD. Age and tobacco status also affected BMD levels and were therefore corrected for in our statistical analysis.EGFR, CALM3 and SMARCD1 play roles in bone and/or fat metabolism. However, the correlations between the polymorphisms of these three genes and body composition levels, including BMD, remain to be determined.A population-based investigation of 870 white women was conducted. Forty-four SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms in EGFR, CALM3 and SMARCD1 were chosen by the software, including those of potential functional importance. The candidate SNPs were genotyped by the KASPar assay for an association analysis with body composition levels. The correlation analysis was assessed by the Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient and Spearman rank-order correlation tests, and the family-wise error was corrected using the Wald test implemented in PLINK.The SNP rs12461917 in the 3'-flanking region of the CALM3 gene was significantly associated with FNK BMD (P = 0.001, hip BMD (P<0.001 and spine BMD (P = 0.001; rs11083838 in the 5'-flanking region of CALM3 gene was associated with spine BMD (P = 0.009. After adjusting for multiple comparisons, rs12461917 remained significant (P-adjusted = 0.033 for FNK BMD, P-adjusted = 0.006 for hip BMD and P-adjusted = 0.018 for spine BMD.Our data show that polymorphisms of the CALM3 gene in Caucasian women may contribute to variations in the BMD of the hip, spine and femoral neck.

  20. Premenstrual syndrome: frequency and severity in young college girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Samia; Afridi, Bilqis; Aman, Zahid; Tabassum, Wajeeha; Durrani, Rizwana

    2005-12-01

    To find out the frequency of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) in young college girls and to describe the severity of emotional, physical and behavioural symptoms. An observational study was conducted at the Khyber Medical College, Peshawar by convenient sampling on 384 young girls. Data was collected over two cycles by filling a 29 items shortened premenstrual assessment form based on Moos Menstrual Distress Questionnaire after taking consent from medical students. Results were given according to both criteria i.e. ICD-10 and DSM-IV. The frequency of premenstrual syndrome was 53% according to ICD-10 criteria, among which 42% was mild, 18.2% moderate and 31.7% severe. A total of 64 girls (18.2%) met the DSM-IV criteria for severe PMS or Premenstrual Dysphoric disorder (PMDD). The order of frequency of symptoms occurring in PMS was general body discomfort, anxiety, backache, fatigue and depression. Most frequently reported symptoms in PMDD group were anger, anxiety, stress, depression, fatigue and general body discomfort. Premenstrual syndrome is a common problem in young girls. Doctors should adopt comprehensive measures to reduce its incidence and improve the quality of life in the affected.

  1. Media Contributions to African American Girls' Focus on Beauty and Appearance: Exploring the Consequences of Sexual Objectification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Maya K.

    2008-01-01

    The media are dominated by images of women as sex objects whose value is based on their appearance. These portrayals can potentially limit girls' self-perceptions and influence their attitudes regarding the importance of appearance. However, relatively little is known about how African American adolescent girls are affected by these images. Using…

  2. Am I Too Fat to Be a Princess? Examining the Effects of Popular Children's Media on Young Girls' Body Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Sharon; Tantleff-Dunn, Stacey

    2010-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of brief exposure to appearance-related media on young girls' body image. One hundred and twenty-one girls aged 3-6 years old participated. Results indicated that exposure did not affect body dissatisfaction or engagement in appearance-related play behaviours. This is the first empirical study to provide…

  3. Helping Middle School Girls at Risk for School Failure Recover Their Confidence and Achieve School Success: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Middle school girls who are at risk have experienced a disproportionate number of intense and disruptive traumatic life events. Such events can adversely affect healthy development and often contribute to higher levels of school failure and problem behavior. Few programs focus on helping at-risk middle school girls achieve school success through…

  4. Educating the girl child in rural areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, S

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of educating female children in India. There is ample evidence worldwide that improvements in girls' education benefit the status of the family and empower women. The World Declaration of Education for All was adopted in Jomtein, Thailand in 1990. It urged access to and improvement in the quality of education of girls and women to remove obstacles that hamper active participation. 1990 was the Year of Literacy and the Year of the Girl Child. Girls lag in education worldwide. The gender gap is widest in India in levels of literacy, school enrollment, school dropouts, and opportunities for vocational training. There is a need to educate the public, particularly mothers, about the value of girls. In rural and backward areas of India, there is fear of educating girls that is related to prevalent practices of exploitation and violence against women. Education and vocational training should be linked with anti-poverty programs. Adult literacy should be linked with girls' education. The National Policy on Education in 1986 targeted removal of sex stereotyping from school curricula and promoted diversified curricula and access of girls to vocational and professional training programs. The policy recommended integrated child care services and primary education. The national action plan for the 1990s focuses on protection, survival, and development of the girl child in India. Special schools for developing skills in nutrition, cooking, sewing, home economics, and child development should be set up in villages for girls 12-20 years old. The gap in girls' education is attributed to apathy and resistance of parents, unfavorable attitudes toward coeducation, poverty of parents, shortages of schools, and poor quality instruction. Girls' continuing education should be ensured by incentives, such as free books and clothes; time tables conducive to work; support systems; and work schemes.

  5. Phenotype and frequency of STUB1 mutations: next-generation screenings in Caucasian ataxia and spastic paraplegia cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synofzik, Matthis; Schüle, Rebecca; Schulze, Martin; Gburek-Augustat, Janina; Schweizer, Roland; Schirmacher, Anja; Krägeloh-Mann, Ingeborg; Gonzalez, Michael; Young, Peter; Züchner, Stephan; Schöls, Ludger; Bauer, Peter

    2014-04-17

    Mutations in the gene STUB1, encoding the protein CHIP (C-terminus of HSC70-interacting protein), have recently been suggested as a cause of recessive ataxia based on the findings in few Chinese families. Here we aimed to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic spectrum of STUB1 mutations, and to assess their frequency in different Caucasian disease cohorts. 300 subjects with degenerative ataxia (n = 167) or spastic paraplegia (n = 133) were screened for STUB1 variants by whole-exome-sequencing (n = 204) or shotgun-fragment-library-sequencing (n = 96). To control for the specificity of STUB1 variants, we screened an additional 1707 exomes from 891 index families with other neurological diseases. We identified 3 ataxia patients (3/167 = 1.8%) with 4 novel missense mutations in STUB1, including 3 mutations in its tetratricopeptide-repeat domain. All patients showed evidence of pyramidal tract damage. Cognitive impairment was present only in one and hypogonadism in none of them. Ataxia did not start before age 48 years in one subject. No recessive STUB1 variants were identified in families with other neurological diseases, demonstrating that STUB1 variants are not simply rare polymorphisms ubiquitous in neurodegenerative disease. STUB1-disease occurs also in Caucasian ataxia populations (1.8%). Our results expand the genotypic spectrum of STUB1-disease, showing that pathogenic mutations affect also the tetratricopeptide-repeat domain, thus providing clinical evidence for the functional importance of this domain. Moreover, they further delineate the phenotypic core features of STUB1-ataxia. Pyramidal tract damage is a common accompanying feature and can include lower limb spasticity, thus adding STUB1-ataxia to the differential diagnosis of "spastic ataxias". However, STUB1 is rare in subjects with predominant spastic paraplegia (0/133). In contrast to previous reports, STUB1-ataxia can start even above age 40 years, and neither hypogonadism nor prominent cognitive

  6. Dieting in Spanish adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Guimerà, Gemma; Fauquet, Jordi; Portell, Mariona; Sánchez-Carracedo, David; Raich, Rosa M

    2008-05-01

    This article examines the relation between dieting and non-dieting adolescent girls and body mass index (BMI), eating attitudes and the influence of the aesthetic body shape model. Three hundred forty-nine Spanish adolescent girls in their second year of secondary education were selected. The research design was a cross-sectional ex post facto study and validated measures were used to assess the main variables. Fourteen per cent of the sample was on a diet. Of this group, 69% were overweight, 70% had disordered eating attitudes and 70% were influenced by the current aesthetic body shape model. In all situations, the scores for dieters were significantly higher than those for non-dieters. Although there is not yet any clear consensus with regards to how adolescents interpret the term 'diet', the results indicate major differences between dieters and non-dieters and that those who self-report that they are on a diet present elements of the risk of developing eating and weight disorders. (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association

  7. An Inaugural Girl Scout Destinations Astronomy Camp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebofsky, Larry A.; McCarthy, Donald W.; Wright, Joe; Wright, Rita; Mace, Mikayla; Floyd, Charmayne

    2017-10-01

    The University of Arizona (UA) conducted its first teenage Girl Scout Destinations Astronomy Camp. This program was preceded by 24 Leadership Workshops for Adult Girl Scout Leaders, initially supported by EPO funding from NIRCam for JWST. For five days in late June, 24 girls (ages 13-17 years) attended from 16 states. The Camp was led by UA astronomers and long-term educators. Representing Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) were a husband/wife amateur astronomer team who are SOFIA Airborne Astronomy and NASA Solar System Ambassadors. Other leaders included a Stanford undergraduate engineering student who is a lifelong Girl Scout and Gold Award recipient and a recent UA Master’s degree science journalist. The Camp is a residential, hands-on “immersion” adventure in scientific exploration using telescopes in southern Arizona’s Catalina Mountains near Tucson. Under uniquely dark skies girls become real astronomers, operating telescopes (small and large) and associated technologies, interacting with scientists, obtaining images and quantitative data, investigating their own questions, and most importantly having fun actually doing science and building observing equipment. Girls achieve a basic understanding of celestial objects, how and why they move, and their historical significance, leading to an authentic understanding of science, research, and engineering. Girls can lead these activities back home in their own troops and councils, encouraging others to consider STEM field careers. These programs are supported by a 5-year NASA Collaborative Agreement, Reaching for the Stars: NASA Science for Girl Scouts (www.seti.org/GirlScoutStars), through the SETI Institute in collaboration with the UA, GSUSA, Girl Scouts of Northern California, the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, and Aries Scientific, Inc. The Girl Scout Destinations Astronomy Camp aligns with the GSUSA Journey: It’s Your Planet-Love It! and introduces the girls to some of the activities being

  8. Girls and war: an extra vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, M

    1998-01-01

    It is no longer possible to consider the raping of girls as an isolated atrocity of war. In Uganda, guerrilla forces have kidnapped 6000-10,000 children and have forced the "most desirable" girls to become "wives" of warlords. Girls who manage to escape are deeply traumatized and suffer ill health as well as possible social ostracism. In refugee camps, recognition that adolescent girls face special risks of rape and of engaging in the informal prostitution that may expose them to HIV/AIDS has led to the introduction of new measures to increase female security. Families in refugee camps in Burundi and Somalia protect female honor by submitting their daughters to very early marriage, which also abuses the girls' rights. Girls conscripted to military groups are forced to transport materials, cook, or help loot villages. In conditions of war, even girls who remain at home protected by their families must assume extra responsibilities, especially if men go off to fight leaving women with the agricultural and livestock burdens. Girls will be the first children withdrawn from school to help keep the household afloat. Girls and women are also expected to tend those wounded by the very war that destroys the health care services that are vital to meet women's reproductive needs. Efforts are being made to identify rape as a specific war crime, and these efforts should be extended to the kidnapping and forced recruitment of children into combat roles. Moral codes must be reestablished, even if they are only nominal at present.

  9. Reaching for the Stars: NASA Science for Girl Scouts (Girl Scout Stars)

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, Edna; Harman, Pamela; Girl Scouts of the USA; Girl Scouts of Northern California; University of Arizona; Astronomical Society of the Pacific; Aires Scientific

    2017-01-01

    Girl Scout Stars aims to enhance STEM experiences for Girl Scouts in grades K-12. New space science badges are being created for every Girl Scout level. Using best practices, we engage girls and volunteers with the fundamental STEM concepts that underpin our human quest to explore the universe. Through early and sustained exposure to the people and assets of NASA and the excitement of NASA’s Mission, they explore STEM content, discoveries, and careers. Today’s tech savvy Girl Scout volunteers prefer just-in-time materials and asynchronous learning. The Volunteer Tool Kit taps into the wealth of NASA's online materials for the new space science badges. Training volunteers supports troop activities for the younger girls. For older girls, we enhance Girl Scout summer camp activities, support in-depth experiences at Univ. of Arizona’s Astronomy Camp, and “Destination” events for the 2017 total solar eclipse. We partner with the Night Sky Network to engage amateur astronomers with Girl Scouts. Univ. of Arizona also leads Astronomy Camp for Girl Scout volunteers. Aires Scientific leads eclipse preparation and summer sessions at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for teams of volunteers, amateur astronomers and older Girl Scouts.There are 1,900,000 Girl Scouts and 800,000 volunteers in the USA. During development, we work with the Girl Scouts of Northern California (50,000 girl members and 31,000 volunteers) and expand across the USA to 121 Girl Scout councils over five years. SETI Institute leads the space science educators and scientists at Astronomical Society of the Pacific, Univ. of Arizona, and Aires Scientific. Girl Scouts of the USA leads dissemination of Girl Scout Stars with support of Girl Scouts of Northern California. Through professional development of Girl Scout volunteers, Girl Scout Stars enhances public science literacy. Girl Scout Stars supports the NASA Science Mission Directorate Science Education Objectives and NASA’s STEM Engagement and

  10. Comparison of anterior segment morphology following prophylactic laser peripheral iridotomy in Caucasian and Chinese eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Roland Y; Kasuga, Toshimitsu; Cui, Qi N; Huang, Guofu; He, Mingguang; Lin, Shan C

    2014-07-01

    To compare anterior segment biometric parameters between Caucasians and Chinese before and after laser peripheral iridotomy. Prospective clinical cohort study. Caucasian and Chinese primary angle-closure suspects. Anterior segment optical coherence tomography images captured before and after laser peripheral iridotomy were analysed to measure anterior segment biometric parameters. Paired Student's t-tests were used for within-ethnic group comparisons. Univariate and linear mixed-effect regression models were used for between-ethnic group comparisons. Angle opening distance, angle recess area, iris thickness, iris curvature, anterior chamber area, anterior chamber volume and anterior chamber width. Caucasians had significantly greater preoperative angle recess area, anterior chamber width, and iris curvature and lower preoperative iris thickness compared to Chinese (P iris curvature were observed within both ethnic groups (P iris curvature did not differ between the two ethnic groups (P iris convexity after laser peripheral iridotomy. Although certain aspects of anterior segment anatomy differed between Caucasians and Chinese preoperatively, they did not translate into significant ethnic differences in the amount of laser peripheral iridotomy-induced changes in the anterior segment biometric parameters. © 2013 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  11. Quinine pharmacokinetics: ototoxic and cardiotoxic effects in healthy Caucasian subjects and in patients with falciparum malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessen, F. A.; van Boxtel, C. J.; Perenboom, R. M.; Tange, R. A.; Wetsteijn, J. C.; Kager, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    To study the pharmacokinetic behaviour of quinine in Caucasians with and without malaria. Quinine-dihydrochloride was administered intravenously as a single dose of 300 mg to 12 healthy subjects and as multiple doses of 600 mg in 4 h every 8 h in 10 patients with falciparum malaria. Plasma quinine

  12. Three-dimensional analysis of facial morphology in Brazilian population with Caucasian, Asian, and Black ethnicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Bettoni Rodrigues da Silva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare facial features related to the nose, lips and face between the Caucasian, Asian, and Black ethnicity in the Brazilian population by means of linear measurements and proportion indices obtained from the analysis of three-dimensional (3D images taken by 3D stereophotogrammetry. Materials and Methods: Thirty healthy subjects, being 10 Caucasians, 10 Blacks and 10 Asians had reference points (landmarks demarcated on their faces, 3D images were obtained (Vectra M3 and the following measurements were calculated: Facial proportion indices relative to the nose, lips and face. The statistical analysis was performed comparing the ethnic groups (one-way analysis of variance. Results: The Blacks and Asians showed the greatest difference in the face analysis (width, height of the lower face, upper face index and lower face index – P < 0.05. In the comparisons between groups, differences were verified to the mouth width and lower lip vermilion height. In the nose analysis, the biggest differences were obtained for the proportion indices, being that Caucasians versus Asians and Caucasians versus Blacks have showed the largest differences. Conclusion: This study found the presence of some similarities in the proportion indices of nose, lips and face between the ethnic groups of the Brazilian population, as well as some important differences that should be known to guide surgical and forensics procedures, among others.

  13. Cultural Variations in Parenting: Perceptions of Caucasian, African-American, Hispanic, and Asian-American Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, Teresa W.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examined cultural variations in parenting attitudes, behavior, and involvement of mothers and fathers in two-parent families. Findings from Caucasian (n=2,642), African-American (n=469), Hispanic-American (n=357), and Asian-American (n=49) parents revealed that, as group, ethnic parents indicated greater general emphasis on children exerting…

  14. A measuring system for facial aesthetics in Caucasian adolescents: reproducibility and validity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiekens, R.M.A.; Maltha, J.C.; Hof, M.A. van 't; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    A new measuring system to judge facial aesthetics in young Caucasians is presented. The system uses sets of three photographs (one frontal, one three-quarter smiling, and one lateral) as a stimulus. Scores are performed on a visual analogue scale (VAS) with separate sets of reference photographs for

  15. Brief Daily Exposures to Asian Females Reverses Perceptual Narrowing for Asian Faces in Caucasian Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzures, Gizelle; Wheeler, Andrea; Quinn, Paul C.; Pascalis, Olivier; Slater, Alan M.; Heron-Delaney, Michelle; Tanaka, James W.; Lee, Kang

    2012-01-01

    Perceptual narrowing in the visual, auditory, and multisensory domains has its developmental origins during infancy. The current study shows that experimentally induced experience can reverse the effects of perceptual narrowing on infants' visual recognition memory of other-race faces. Caucasian 8- to 10-month-olds who could not discriminate…

  16. Recruitment and Retention of Non-Caucasian Faculty in Southern Community Colleges: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    The increase in enrollment of African American, Hispanic, and Asian students in community colleges in the Southern parts of the United States of America sparked an interest in researching the hiring of non-Caucasian faculty in similar institutions and regions. This phenomenological study sought to unveil the personal experiences of non-Caucasian…

  17. Body composition differences between Polynesians and Caucasians assessed by bioelectrical impedance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinburn, B A; Craig, P L; Daniel, R; Dent, D P; Strauss, B J

    1996-10-01

    To assess differences in body composition between Polynesians and Caucasians subjects. 48 male and 80 female Polynesians from a village in Rarotonga, Cook islands (81% response rate) and representative sample of 243 male and 250 female Caucasians from Melbourne, Australia. Body mass index, resistance from bioelectrical impedance, percent body fat derived from 4 equations using resistance, weight, height, age and sex. Male and female Polynesians were younger (by 7.7 years, P < 0.001 and 4.1 years, P < 0.05) and heavier (by 10.7 kg and 12.5 kg, P < 0.0001) than their Caucasian counterparts. Electrical resistance was significantly lower in Polynesians of both sexes by over 130 omega (P < 0.0001). At every level of weight (adjusted for height and age), resistance was lower in the Polynesians (P < 0.0001) and at every level of body mass index, the predicted body fat from 4 different equations was lower in Polynesians (P < 0.0001). These results imply that, at any given body size. Polynesians are significantly leaner than Caucasians and that specific Polynesian standards for defining obesity need to be developed. The findings will need to be confirmed by other reference methods for measuring body composition.

  18. Molecular profiling of endometrial cancers from African-American and Caucasian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Sarah E; Olshen, Adam B; Levine, Douglas A; Viale, Agnès; Barakat, Richard R; Boyd, Jeff

    2006-05-01

    It is widely recognized that racial disparity in survival exists between African-American and Caucasian women with endometrial cancer (EC). Differential mutation frequencies in select genes have been postulated to explain these survival differences. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that African-American women with EC have a distinct gene expression profile compared to Caucasian women with EC. Microarray-based expression profiling using the Affymetrix U133A oligonucleotide array was performed on a series of ECs from African-American (n = 14) and Caucasian (n = 25). The two groups were matched for possible confounding variables including stage, histologic grade, and subtype. A model-based class comparison analysis was performed to generate a list of differentially expressed genes using a P value of profiles of ECs from African-American and Caucasian women. Thus, racial disparities in clinical outcomes are unlikely to reflect differences in gene expression and may instead be attributable to other epidemiologic, clinical, or pathologic factors.

  19. Impact of switching from Caucasian to Indian reference equations for spirometry interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, S K; Madan, M

    2018-03-01

    In the absence of ethnically appropriate prediction equations, spirometry data in Indian subjects are often interpreted using equations for other ethnic populations. To evaluate the impact of switching from Caucasian (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III [NHANES III] and Global Lung Function Initiative [GLI]) equations to the recently published North Indian equations on spirometric interpretation, and to examine the suitability of GLI-Mixed equations for this population. Spirometry data on 12 323 North Indian patients were analysed using the North Indian equations as well as NHANES III, GLI-Caucasian and GLI-Mixed equations. Abnormalities and ventilatory patterns were categorised and agreement in interpretation was evaluated. The NHANES III and GLI-Caucasian equations and, to a lesser extent, the GLI-Mixed equations, predicted higher values and labelled more measurements as abnormal. In up to one third of the patients, these differed from Indian equations in the categorisation of ventilatory patterns, with more patients classified as having restrictive and mixed disease. The NHANES III and GLI-Caucasian equations substantially overdiagnose abnormalities and misclassify ventilatory patterns on spirometry in Indian patients. Such errors of interpretation, although less common with the GLI-Mixed equations, remain substantial and are clinically unacceptable. A switch to Indian equations will have a major impact on interpretation.

  20. BMI and BAI as Markers of Obesity in a Caucasian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Zwierzchowska

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: BMI is known to have limited accuracy, which is different for males and females with similar body fat content. That is why Bergman et al. (Obesity 2011;19:1083-1089 introduced an alternative variable of obesity, called the body adiposity index (BAI. Their primary research was conducted in samples of Mexican-American and African-American populations. The objective of our research was to investigate the sex-specific relationship between both BMI and BAI and body fat content in a healthy Caucasian population. The accuracy of both indexes was compared. Methods: 684 women and 528 men aged 20-22 years with Caucasian origin only participated in the study. Participants were students of universities in southern Poland. They had no indication of cardiometabolic problems, as evaluated by interview. Results: The study revealed that BAI is a more sensitive method in assessing obesity in Caucasian males rather than BMI. In the population of Caucasian women BAI results indicate a significant underestimation of obesity. Conclusion: The fact that there is a high statistical correlation between BAI and % fat mass among obese and overweight men and women suggests that BAI could be highly specific provided that the BAI cutoffs will be adapted to the European population.

  1. Pain Perception in Latino vs. Caucasian and Male vs. Female Patients: Is There Really a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aufiero, Molly; Stankewicz, Holly; Quazi, Shaila; Jacoby, Jeanne; Stoltzfus, Jill

    2017-06-01

    Pain is a common emergency department (ED) complaint. It is important to understand the differences in pain perception among different ethnic and demographic populations. We applied a standardized painful stimulus to Caucasian and Latino adult patients to determine whether the level of pain reported differed depending on ethnicity (N=100; 50 Caucasian [C], 50 Latino [L] patients) and gender (N=100; 59 female, 41 male). Patients had an initial pain score of 0 or 1. A blood pressure cuff was inflated 20 mm HG above the patient's systolic blood pressure and held for three minutes. Pain scores, using both a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS) and a five-point Likert scale, were taken at the point of maximal stimulus (2 minutes 50 seconds after inflation), and at one- and two-minute intervals post deflation. There was a statistically significant difference between the Likert scale scores of Caucasian and Latino patients at 2min 50sec (mean rank: 4.35 [C] vs. 5.75 [L], pperception of pain than males at 2min 50sec on the VAS (mean value: 3.86 [F] vs. 2.24 [M], pLikert scale (mean rank: 5.63 [F] vs. 4.21 [M], p<0.01). Latinos and women report greater pain with a standardized pain stimulus as compared to Caucasians and men.

  2. The Educational Attainment of Minority Learners Who Attended 2-Year Colleges Compared to Caucasian Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Angel N.

    2013-01-01

    In this educational study, Caucasian and minority learners' grade point averages and overall academic success were examined at learning institutions. Several minorities experienced problems with completing college courses at universities and community colleges. Individuals from various racial backgrounds had school enrollment issues compared to…

  3. Instructor Reaction to Verbal and Nonverbal-Visual Styles: An Example of Navajo and Caucasian Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilmet, George M.

    1979-01-01

    Holds that differences observed in instructor attention to Navajo and Caucasian children are due to the contrasting verbal and nonverbal-visual styles displayed by the two groups. Offers an evaluation program which attempts to offset teachers' tendencies to attend differentially to children displaying diverse behavioral styles in the classroom.…

  4. Navajo and Caucasian Children's Verbal and Nonverbal-Visual Behavior in the Urban Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilmet, George M.

    1978-01-01

    A formal observation technique was used in an urban classroom context to assess the verbal and nonverbal-visual behavior of 17 Navajo and 7 Caucasian children. Two statistical techniques revealed significant intergroup differences in verbal and nonverbal-visual style. ( Author)

  5. Clinical Features Differ Substantially Between Caucasian and Asian Populations of Marfan Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, Romy; den Hartog, Alexander W; van de Riet, Liz; Timmermans, Janneke; Scholte, Arthur J; van den Berg, Maarten P; de Waard, Vivian; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Groenink, Maarten; Yip, James W; Mulder, Barbara J M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Prevention of aortic dissection and sudden death in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) requires accurate diagnosis. MFS is diagnosed by the Ghent criteria, which are primarily based on clinical features of Caucasian MFS populations. We determined whether the Ghent criteria apply to

  6. Clinical features differ substantially between caucasian and asian populations of marfan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, R.; Hartog, A.W. den; Riet, L. te; Timmermans, J.; Scholte, A.J.; Berg, M.P van den; Waard, V. de; Zwinderman, A.H.; Groenink, M.; Yip, J.W.; Mulder, B.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Prevention of aortic dissection and sudden death in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) requires accurate diagnosis. MFS is diagnosed by the Ghent criteria, which are primarily based on clinical features of Caucasian MFS populations. We determined whether the Ghent criteria apply to

  7. Nonsuicidal self-injury in Asian versus Caucasian university students: who, how, and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Brianna J; Arya, Shalini; Chapman, Alexander L

    2015-04-01

    The correlates of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among Asian and Caucasian university students; differences in the rates, frequency, forms, severity, and emotional contexts of NSSI among self-injuring students; and whether Asian students who are highly oriented toward Asian culture differed from those less oriented toward Asian culture in NSSI characteristics were investigated. University students (N = 931), including 360 Caucasian students (n = 95, 26.4%, with a history of ≥ 1 episode of NSSI) and 571 Asian students (n = 107, 18.7%, with a history of NSSI), completed questionnaires assessing NSSI, acculturation, and putative risk factors for NSSI. Caucasian students were more likely to report NSSI, particularly cutting behavior, self-injured with greater frequency and versatility, and reported greater increases in positively valenced, high arousal emotions following NSSI, compared to Asian students. Among Asian students, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, experiential avoidance, and anger suppression increased the likelihood of reporting a history of NSSI. Among Caucasian students, lack of emotional clarity and anger suppression increased likelihood of NSSI. Finally, some tentative findings suggested potentially important differences in rates and frequency of NSSI among Asian students who were highly oriented toward Asian culture compared with those less oriented toward Asian culture. © 2014 The American Association of Suicidology.

  8. [Struggle against typhus in the Caucasian front during the 1st World War].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatepe, Mustafa

    2002-01-01

    As an infectious disease, typhus has triggered many epidemics during the course of wars and caused thousands of death all through the ages. The French physician Charles Nicolle (1886-1936) defined its agent as a louse transferring the disease from man to man in 1909 and was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1928. Many cases were reported during the 1st World War both in the European and the Ottoman armies; and one of the most severe epidemics broke in the Caucasian front; a great number of civilians and soldiers died at winter in 1914 and 1915. Lice had to be destroyed in order to prevent the epidemic, but etuves in the Caucasian front was too few to achieve it. Clothes were cleansed in ovens by means of a method proposed by Dr. Abdülkadir Noyan (1886-1977). On March 28, 1915 the first typhus vaccination, obtained from the infected blood of the patients, was applied by Dr. Tevfik Salim (Saklam) (1882-1963). In 1916 Dr. Ahmet Fikri Tüzer discovered a disinfection apparatus called "buğu sandiği" (vapour box) which was widely used in the Caucasian front after 1917. This apparatus was highly useful in controlling the typhus epidemics. 164 health officers lost their lifes in the Caucasian front between 1914-1918, in addition, 7310 military casualties were recorded from 1915 to the end of the war.

  9. Spiritual Well-Being Scale Ethnic Differences between Caucasians and African-Americans: Follow Up Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Geri; Gridley, Betty; Fleming, Willie

    This follow up study is in response to Miller, Fleming, and Brown-Andersons (1998) study of ethnic differences between Caucasians and African-Americans where the authors suggested that the Spiritual Well-Being (SWB) Scale may need to be interpreted differently depending on ethnicity. In this study, confirmatory factor analyses were conducted for…

  10. Takayasu's arteritis: A rare cause of cardiac death in a Caucasian teenage female patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A.M. Saïd (Salah); J.C. Koetsveld-Baart (J.); J.C. den Hollander (Jan)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractA Caucasian teenage Dutch schoolgirl with known chronic low visual acuity and albinism, presented with frank acute pulmonary oedema, died after 1 h of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation for bradyarrhythmia and cardiac arrest. Two weeks prior to presentation, during sport training, she

  11. The relationship between mother?s parenting style and social adaptability of adolescent girls in Isfahan

    OpenAIRE

    Kazemi, Ashraf; Solokian, Soheila; Ashouri, Elaheh; Marofi, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Background: Social adaptability is an important requirement of the social life of adolescents, which can be affected by their mother?s parenting style (PS). The purpose of this study is to compare the social adaptability in four parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian, permissive and neglectful) through which mothers interact with their adolescent girls. Materials and Methods: This survey is a cross-sectional and analytical study on 737 adolescents that study in the all girls junior hi...

  12. Associations of anthropometric, behavioral, and social factors on level of body esteem in peripubertal girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szamreta, Elizabeth A.; Qin, Bo; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela A.; Devine, Katie A.; Stapleton, Jerod L.; Ferrante, Jeanne M.; Bandera, Elisa V.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Lower body esteem may decrease self-esteem and lead to adverse health effects in children. This study explored the role of anthropometric, behavioral, and social factors on body esteem in peripubertal girls. Method We evaluated associations of body esteem (measured by the Revised Body Esteem Scale) with body mass index (BMI), mother’s BMI, puberty, physical activity, role models for appearance, and screen time among girls (ages 9 and 10) participating in the Jersey Girl Study (n=120). Linear models were used to evaluate differences in body esteem scores. Results Overweight/obese girls had a significantly lower mean body esteem score compared to underweight/healthy weight girls [14.09 (95% CI 12.53–15.27) vs. 17.17 (95% CI 16.87–17.43)]. Girls who were physically active for at least 7 hours per week had a significantly higher body esteem score than those who were less active, after adjusting for BMI [17.00 (95% CI 16.62–17.32) vs. 16.39 (95% CI 15.82–16.86)]. Girls whose mothers were overweight/obese, who had entered puberty, and who cited girls at school or females in the media as role models had lower body esteem scores, but differences disappeared after adjusting for girl’s BMI. A trend of higher body esteem scores was found for girls whose mothers were role models. Conclusion Lower BMI and higher levels of physical activity are independently associated with higher body esteem score. Having classmates or girls/women in the media as role models may detrimentally affect girls’ body esteem, but having mothers as role models may have a positive effect. PMID:27902543

  13. Effect of natural sagittal trunk lean on standing balance in untreated scoliotic girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leteneur, Sébastien; Simoneau-Buessinger, Émilie; Barbier, Franck; Rivard, Charles-Hilaire; Allard, Paul

    2017-09-06

    Generally, scoliotic girls have a tendency to lean further back than a comparable group of non-scoliotic girls. To date, no study has addressed how standing balance in untreated scoliotic girls is affected by a natural backwardly or forwardly inclined trunk. 27 able-bodied young girls and 27 young girls with a right thoracic curve were classified as leaning forward or backward according to the median of their trunk sagittal inclination. Participants stood upright barefoot. Trunk and pelvis orientations were calculated from 8 bony landmarks. Upright standing balance was assessed by 9 parameters calculated from the excursion of the center of pressure and the free moment. In the anterior-posterior direction, backward scoliotic girls had a greater center of pressure range (P=0.036) and speed (P=0.015) by 10.4mm and 2.8mm/s respectively than the forward scoliotic group. Compared to their matching non-scoliotic group, the backward scoliotic girls stood more on their heels by 14.6mm (P=0.017) and display greater center of pressure speed by 2.5mm/s (P=0.028). Medio-lateral center of pressure range (P=0.018) and speed (P=0.008) were statistically higher by 8.7mm and 3.6mm/s for the backward group. Only the free moment RMS was significantly larger (P=0.045) for the backward scoliotic group when compared to the forwardly inclined scoliotic group. Only those with a backward lean displayed statistically significant differences from both forward scoliotic girls and non-scoliotic girls. Untreated scoliotic girls with an exaggerated back extension could profit more from postural rehabilitation to improve their standing balance. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Latina girls of Puerto Rican origin who are successful in science and mathematics high school courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oquendo-Rodriguez, Aida L.

    Professions and careers related to science and mathematics lack representation of minorities. Within these underrepresented minority populations there is no other group more affected than Latina women and girls. Women in general, are still underrepresented in many areas of our society. While women's roles are changing in today's society, most changes encourage the participation of more White/Anglo women in traditionally male roles. Latina women are still more disadvantaged than White women. There is no doubt that education is significant in increasing the participation of minorities in the fields of science and mathematics, especially for minority girls (Oakes, 1990; Rodriguez, 1993). This study explored the interests, life experiences, characteristics and motivations of Latina girls of Puerto Rican origin who are successful in science and mathematics high school courses. The study identifies factors that can influence the interest of Latina girls of Puerto Rican origin in science and mathematics career choices. This research is significant and relevant to educators and policy makers, especially to science and mathematics educators. The research is primarily descriptive and exploratory. It explores the social characteristics of Latina girls and professional women who have been successful in science and mathematics high school courses. The research offers the reader a visit to the participants' homes with descriptions and the opportunity to explore the thoughts and life experiences of Latina girls, their mothers and young Latina professionals of Puerto Rican origin. This research reveals the common characteristics of successful students found in the Latina girls of Puerto Rican origin who where interviewed. Creating a portrait of Latina girls of Puerto Rican origin who are successful in science and mathematics high school courses in one of the school districts of western Massachusetts. The research findings reveal that teacher relationships, family expectations

  15. Comparing Judgements of Social, Behavioural, Emotional and School Adjustment Functioning for Korean, Korean American and Caucasian American Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Woo Sik; Stinnett, Terry A.

    2005-01-01

    Social, emotional, behavioural and school adjustment functioning among Korean, Korean American and Caucasian American children was examined with the Behavior Assessment System for Children (BASC) Self-Report of Personality (SRP) and the Parent Rating Scale (PRS). One hundred and twenty Korean, Korean-American and Caucasian-American children, ages…

  16. Impact and characteristics of the non-Caucasian population in hospital admissions for diabetes onset during 2003-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San José, Patricia; Guerrero, Mireia; García-Martín, Isabel; Caballero, Jordi; Pérez-Maraver, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of non-Caucasian patients in hospital admissions for onset of symptomatic diabetes mellitus during the 2003-2010 period, and to analyze the characteristics differentiating them from the Caucasian population at diagnosis and 2 years later. A retrospective, observational study. Patients aged 18-40 years admitted for de novo symptomatic diabetes from January 2003 to October 2010. Prevalence of patients of non-Caucasian origin was analyzed, and clinical, biochemical, immunological, and beta-cell function of both populations were compared at diagnosis and 2 years later. Nineteen percent of patients admitted to hospital for de novo symptomatic diabetes were non-Caucasian, with a progressive increase in recent years. Non-Caucasian patients had milder decompensation (3.0% had ketoacidosis, as compared to 15.2% in the Caucasian group, P27.2 vs. 73.1%, P2±0.39 nmol/l, P2 vs. 0.25). Two years after diagnosis, less non-Caucasian patients were on intensified treatment (39.1 vs. 93.8%). Non-Caucasian patients had a lower prevalence of autoimmunity, better beta-cell function at diagnosis, particularly due to the subgroup with negative autoimmunity, and less need for intensive treatment 2 years after diagnosis, features which are more characteristic of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Girl Talk: A Smartphone Application to Teach Sexual Health Education to Adolescent Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayboy, Lynae M; Sepolen, Alexandra; Mezoian, Taylor; Schultz, Lucy; Landgren-Mills, Benedict S; Spencer, Noelle; Wheeler, Carol; Clark, Melissa A

    2017-02-01

    Produce Girl Talk, a free smartphone application containing comprehensive sexual health information, and determine the application's desirability and appeal among teenage girls. Thirty-nine girls ages 12 to 17 years from Rhode Island participated in a 2-phase prospective study. In phase I, 22 girls assessed a sexual health questionnaire in focus groups. In phase II, 17 girls with iPhones used Girl Talk for 2 weeks and answered the revised sexual health questionnaire and interview questions before and after use. Participants' responses to the sexual health questionnaire, interviews, and time viewing the application were used to determine feasibility and desirability of Girl Talk. Girl Talk was used on average for 48 minutes during participants' free time on weekends for 10- to 15-minute intervals. Reported usefulness of Girl Talk as a sexual health application from baseline (6 participants) to follow-up (16 participants) increased significantly (35.3% vs 94.1%; P education before using Girl Talk, but 16 out of 17 participants (94.1%) stated that the application provided new and/or more detailed information than health classes. Girl Talk can potentially connect teenage girls to more information about sexual health vs traditional methods, and participants recommended the application as a valuable resource to learn about comprehensive sexual health. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Human papillomavirus immunization uptake among girls with a refugee background compared with Danish-born girls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    P. Møller, Sanne; Kristiansen, Maria; Norredam, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Refugee children and their families may experience impaired access to healthcare; therefore, we aimed to uncover human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization patterns among a large group of refugee girls compared with Danish-born girls. We also examined possible predictors of uptake among refugee girl...

  19. Promoting Girls' Participation in Sports: Discursive Constructions of Girls in a Sports Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svender, Jenny; Larsson, Hakan; Redelius, Karin

    2012-01-01

    What does it mean to promote girls' participation in sports and which girls are seen as needing support? In this article we focus a government-financed sports venture and scrutinize the frames governing what is possible to say about girls and their participation in sports. By analyzing project applications from local sport clubs we investigate how…

  20. Girl Stuff: Same-Sex Relations in Girls' Public Reform Schools and the Institutional Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steet, Linda

    1998-01-01

    Examines data on same-sex relations in girls' reform schools, noting the invisibility of gay and lesbian lives in most educational research. Discusses difficulties with terminology, institutional efforts to curb girls' relationships and sexual behavior, the girls' creation of an alternative family structure, love letters, and interracial…

  1. Helping Girls Get Back on Track: An Implementation Study of the PACE Center for Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treskon, Louisa; Millenky, Megan; Freedman, Lily

    2017-01-01

    PACE Center for Girls is a unique program that provides academic and social services to girls ages 11 to 18. Girls eligible for PACE exhibit multiple health, safety, and delinquency risk factors, such as poor academic performance, exposure to abuse or violence, truancy, risky sexual behavior, and substance abuse. PACE seeks to help them onto a…

  2. Rare RNF213 variants in the C-terminal region encompassing the RING-finger domain are associated with moyamoya angiopathy in Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guey, Stéphanie; Kraemer, Markus; Hervé, Dominique; Ludwig, Thomas; Kossorotoff, Manoëlle; Bergametti, Françoise; Schwitalla, Jan Claudius; Choi, Simone; Broseus, Lucile; Callebaut, Isabelle; Genin, Emmanuelle; Tournier-Lasserve, Elisabeth

    2017-08-01

    Moyamoya angiopathy (MMA) is a cerebral angiopathy affecting the terminal part of internal carotid arteries. Its prevalence is 10 times higher in Japan and Korea than in Europe. In East Asian countries, moyamoya is strongly associated to the R4810K variant in the RNF213 gene that encodes for a protein containing a RING-finger and two AAA+ domains. This variant has never been detected in Caucasian MMA patients, but several rare RNF213 variants have been reported in Caucasian cases. Using a collapsing test based on exome data from 68 European MMA probands and 573 ethnically matched controls, we showed a significant association between rare missense RNF213 variants and MMA in European patients (odds ratio (OR)=2.24, 95% confidence interval (CI)=(1.19-4.11), P=0.01). Variants specific to cases had higher pathogenicity predictive scores (median of 24.2 in cases versus 9.4 in controls, P=0.029) and preferentially clustered in a C-terminal hotspot encompassing the RING-finger domain of RNF213 (P<10(-3)). This association was even stronger when restricting the analysis to childhood-onset and familial cases (OR=4.54, 95% CI=(1.80-11.34), P=1.1 × 10(-3)). All clinically affected relatives who were genotyped were carriers. However, the need for additional factors to develop MMA is strongly suggested by the fact that only 25% of mutation carrier relatives were clinically affected.

  3. Paraoxonase 1 Phenotype and Mass in South Asian versus Caucasian Renal Transplant Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip W. Connelly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available South Asian renal transplant recipients have a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease compared with Caucasian renal transplant recipients. We carried out a study to determine whether paraoxonase 1, a novel biomarker for cardiovascular risk, was decreased in South Asian compared with Caucasian renal transplant recipients. Subjects were matched two to one on the basis of age and sex for a total of 129 subjects. Paraoxonase 1 was measured by mass, arylesterase activity, and two-substrate phenotype assay. Comparisons were made by using a matched design. The frequency of PON1 QQ, QR and RR phenotype was 56%, 37%, and 7% for Caucasian subjects versus 35%, 44%, and 21% for South Asian subjects (χ2=7.72, P=0.02. PON1 mass and arylesterase activity were not significantly different between South Asian and Caucasian subjects. PON1 mass was significantly associated with PON1 phenotype (P=0.0001, HDL cholesterol (P=0.009, LDL cholesterol (P=0.02, and diabetes status (P<0.05. Arylesterase activity was only associated with HDL cholesterol (P=0.003. Thus the frequency of the PON1 RR phenotype was higher and that of the QQ phenotype was lower in South Asian versus Caucasian renal transplant recipients. However, ethnicity was not a significant factor as a determinant of PON1 mass or arylesterase activity, with or without analysis including PON1 phenotype. The two-substrate method for determining PON1 phenotype may be of value for future studies of cardiovascular complications in renal transplant recipients.

  4. Rosuvastatin pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics in Caucasian and Asian subjects residing in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmingham, Bruce K; Bujac, Sarah R; Elsby, Robert; Azumaya, Connie T; Zalikowski, Julie; Chen, Yusong; Kim, Kenneth; Ambrose, Helen J

    2015-03-01

    Systemic exposure to rosuvastatin in Asian subjects living in Japan or Singapore is approximately twice that observed in Caucasian subjects in Western countries or in Singapore. This study was conducted to determine whether pharmacokinetic differences exist among the most populous Asian subgroups and Caucasian subjects in the USA. Rosuvastatin pharmacokinetics was studied in Chinese, Filipino, Asian-Indian, Korean, Vietnamese, Japanese and Caucasian subjects residing in California. Plasma concentrations of rosuvastatin and metabolites after a single 20-mg dose were determined by mass spectrometric detection. The influence of polymorphisms in SLCO1B1 (T521>C [Val174Ala] and A388>G [Asn130Asp]) and in ABCG2 (C421>A [Gln141Lys]) on exposure to rosuvastatin was also assessed. The average rosuvastatin area under the curve from time zero to time of last quantifiable concentration was between 64 and 84 % higher, and maximum drug concentration was between 70 and 98 % higher in East Asian subgroups compared with Caucasians. Data for Asian-Indians was intermediate to these two ethnic groups at 26 and 29 %, respectively. Similar increases in exposure to N-desmethyl rosuvastatin and rosuvastatin lactone were observed. Rosuvastatin exposure was higher in subjects carrying the SLCO1B1 521C allele compared with that in non-carriers of this allele. Similarly, exposure was higher in subjects carrying the ABCG2 421A allele compared with that in non-carriers. Plasma exposure to rosuvastatin and its metabolites was significantly higher in Asian populations residing in the USA compared with Caucasian subjects living in the same environment. This study suggests that polymorphisms in the SLCO1B1 and ABCG2 genes contribute to the variability in rosuvastatin exposure.

  5. Say "adios" to the American dream? The interplay between ethnic and national identity among Latino and Caucasian Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, Thierry; Gavin, Kelly; Quintana, Francisco J

    2010-01-01

    In three studies, implicit and explicit measures were used to examine the interconnections between ethnic and national identities among Latino Americans and Caucasian Americans. Consistently, Latino Americans as a group were conceived of as being less American than Caucasian Americans (Studies 1-3). This effect was exhibited by both Caucasian and Latino participants. Overall, Caucasian participants displayed a stronger national identification than Latino participants (Studies 2 and 3). In addition, ethnic American associations accounted for the strength of national identification for Caucasian participants, but not for Latino participants (Study 2). Finally, ethnic differences in national identification among individuals who exclude Latino Americans from the national identity emerged when persistent ethnic disparities were primed, but not when increasing equalities were stressed (Study 3). In sum, ethnic American associations account for the merging versus dissociation between ethnic and national identifications and reflect a long-standing ethnic hierarchy in American society. (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Ethnic differences in abdominal visceral fat accumulation between Japanese, African-Americans, and Caucasians: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, S; Horimai, C; Katsukawa, F

    2003-10-01

    A meta-analysis was performed in order to test the hypothesis that Japanese have a greater amount of abdominal visceral fat (AVF) relative to abdominal subcutaneous fat (ASF) than Caucasians. Data were derived from published studies that included mean values for AVF and ASF areas, measured using computed tomography, and age for native Japanese, African-Americans, and Caucasians of both genders. Mean values from each study were used as single data points. A significant difference in AVF was observed between Japanese and Caucasian populations after adjusting for ASF, age, and sex ( p<0.05). However, the difference in AVF between Japanese and Caucasian females was lower than that between African-American and Caucasian females.

  7. Translating The girls of Balthus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Kohl Bines

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available What is the point in trying to write something that is irreducible to another form of expression? The question appears at the end of a noteworthy short story by the Brazilian writer Sergio Sant’Anna, which painstakingly describes a series of paintings by the Polish-French artist Balthasar Balthus. These paintings depict young girls in ambiguous poses, between innocence and lusciousness. The present paper investigates translation processes between painting and literature, through the topos of childhood, taken as a borderline zone and a passageway between the domains of silence and of language. To that end, the paper traces an intellectual itinerary that stems from the Freudian theory on aphasia.

  8. [A girl with Angelman syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobben, Jan Maarten; van Hal, Arjen; van den Puttelaar-van Hal, Nora; van Dijk, Fleur S

    2014-01-01

    Angelman syndrome is a genetic syndrome with a prevalence of 1 in 20,000. The combination of behaviour and phenotype makes this syndrome one of the easiest genetic syndromes to recognise. Here we describe the case of Femke, a 3-year-old girl with Angelman syndrome. The phenotype is described from a medical perspective as well from the perspective of the parents. Any physician might encounter a child or adult with a rare syndrome. It is difficult to determine what these kinds of syndrome entail based on tables or numbers alone. Descriptions of individual cases are therefore of utmost importance. Furthermore, it is important to recognise that, despite their possible considerable mental disabilities, people with genetic syndromes are just like any other human and should not be seen as just someone with a syndrome.

  9. Gender differences in an elementary school learning environment: A study on how girls learn science in collaborative learning groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspan, Yvette Frank

    Girls are marked by low self-confidence manifested through gender discrimination during the early years of socialization and culturalization (AAUW, 1998). The nature of gender bias affects all girls in their studies of science and mathematics, particularly in minority groups, during their school years. It has been found that girls generally do not aspire in either mathematical or science-oriented careers because of such issues as overt and subtle stereotyping, inadequate confidence in ability, and discouragement in scientific competence. Grounded on constructivism, a theoretical framework, this inquiry employs fourth generation evaluation, a twelve-step evaluative process (Guba & Lincoln, 1989). The focus is to discover through qualitative research how fifth grade girls learn science in a co-sexual collaborative learning group, as they engage in hands-on, minds-on experiments. The emphasis is centered on one Hispanic girl in an effort to understand her beliefs, attitudes, and behavior as she becomes a stakeholder with other members of her six person collaborative learning group. The intent is to determine if cultural and social factors impact the learning of scientific concepts based on observations from videotapes, interviews, and student opinion questionnaires. QSR NUD*IST 4, a computer software program is utilized to help categorize and index data. Among the findings, there is evidence that clearly indicates girls' attitudes toward science are altered as they interact with other girls and boys in a collaborative learning group. Observations also indicate that cultural and social factors affect girls' performance as they explore and discover scientific concepts with other girls and boys. Based upon what I have uncovered utilizing qualitative research and confirmed according to current literature, there seems to be an appreciable impact on the way girls appear to learn science. Rooted in the data, the results mirror the conclusions of previous studies, which

  10. A message to school girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinwande, A

    1993-06-01

    Information, education, and communication (IEC) programs need to be strengthened to appeal to adolescents, who are increasingly contributing to unwanted pregnancy and are using abortion as a means of birth control. Successful IEC programs have the following characteristics: 1) established communication theories that guide development of materials; 2) a multimedia and a mass media approach to information dissemination, and 3) emphasis on visual displays. The primary emphasis should be on presentation of a concise, clear message with the appropriate visual medium. Many communication specialists in developing countries, however, lack the training to design and use effective IEC software. Designing effective messages involves a process of integrating scientific ideas with artistic appeal. The aim is to stimulate the target audience to change its behavior of life style. The message must be convincing and contain practical and useful information. The IEC Software Design Cycle focuses on analysis and diagnosis, design production, pretesting and modification, and distribution and evaluation. Each of these processes are described. Necessary before any attempt is made is obtaining data on historical, sociocultural, and demographic characteristics, economic activities, health and social services, communication infrastructure, marriage and family life patterns, and decision making systems. Focus group discussions may be used to collect information about the target group. An example is given of the process of development, in a course through the Center or African Family Studies, of a poster about premarital sex directed to 11-16 year olds. On the basis of focus group discussions, it was decided that the message would be to encourage girls to talk with their mothers about family life and premarital sex. The poster was produced with 2 school girls talking in front of the school. The evaluation yielded modifications such as including a school building that resembled actual

  11. Pueblo Girls: Growing Up in Two Worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Marcia

    This book portrays San Ildefonso Pueblo on the east bank of the Rio Grande river in New Mexico through the lives of Sonja, age 10, and her sister Desiree, age 8. Growing up in San Ildefonso Pueblo, the girls enjoy the same activities as other American girls, such as basketball, cheerleading, playing video games, and sending e-mail. But they also…

  12. Smart Girls, Black Girls, Mean Girls, and Bullies: At the Intersection of Identities and the Mediating Role of Young Girls' Social Network in Mathematical Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholson, Maisie; Martin, Danny B.

    2014-01-01

    By taking an intersectional and emic view to studying a group of African American girls in a third-grade class, we attempted to capture the complexity of mathematics learning for these girls. Traditionally, children's social networks in school are framed as external to mathematics content learning. Our preliminary analyses of student interviews…

  13. Girls' and Women's Education in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

    As a result of intensive advocacy, girls' and women's education is a developmental priority in India. Availability of international development assistance for basic education and women's education has gone up significantly. Government and donor perceptions of gender issues in education and the importance of reaching out to girls to achieve the…

  14. Perceived Experiences with Sexism among Adolescent Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaper, Campbell; Brown, Christia Spears

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated predictors of adolescent girls' experiences with sexism and feminism. Girls (N = 600; M = 15.1 years, range = 12-18), of varied socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds, completed surveys of personal experiences with sexual harassment, academic sexism (regarding science, math, and computer technology), and athletics. Most girls…

  15. "Lolita": Genealogy of a Cover Girl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Shari L.

    2015-01-01

    At the publication of Vladimir Nabokov's controversial novel "Lolita" (1958), the author insisted that a girl never appear on the cover. This discourse analysis of 185 "Lolita" book covers, most of which feature a girl, considers the genealogy of "Lolita" in relation to representation, myth, and tacit knowledge…

  16. The Delta Team: Empowering Adolescent Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Marian White

    1994-01-01

    In response to adolescent girls' concerns about teen violence, rumors, grooming, careers, and equity, four women teachers and a woman administrator at a Maryland middle school developed the Delta Program. The program provides positive learning experiences, teaches social skills and conflict management techniques, empowers girls through mentoring…

  17. Letting Girls Speak Out about Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Dale; Leary, Rosemary

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to try to determine what influences girls to choose science. Forty girls were interviewed in Grades 2, 5, 8, 11 using a semistructured protocol. The interview focused on feelings about science, science careers, peer and parental support, and how science is taught. To determine whether their responses were based on…

  18. Understanding Teenage Girls: Culture, Identity and Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Horace R.; Brown-Thirston, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    "Understanding Teenage Girls: Culture, Identity and Schooling" focuses on a range of social phenomenon that impact the lives of adolescent females of color. The authors highlight the daily challenges that African-American, Chicana, and Puerto Rican teenage girls face with respect to peer and family influences, media stereotyping, body image,…

  19. 3748. Maori girls - at Waipahihi - Lake Taupo

    OpenAIRE

    Burton Brothers

    2003-01-01

    202 x 144 mm. A group portrait of Maori women and girls, posed by the entrance of an assembly house. Apart from the girl at the right, who wears a kahu-huruhuru or feather coat, the group is dressed in European clothes.

  20. Girls' Attitudes towards Science in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetcuti, Deborah A.; Kioko, Beriter

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated girls' attitudes towards science in Kenya. It was carried out with 120 girls from four secondary schools in the Eastern province of Kenya. These were an urban single-sex (SS) and co-educational (Co-Ed) school and a rural SS and Co-Ed school. Different schools were chosen in order to explore whether there are any differences…

  1. Relational Aggression among Middle School Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallape, Aprille

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the correlates that define relational aggression among middle school girls, the relationships among these factors, and the association between the correlates of relational aggression and the type of relational aggression (e.g., verbal, withdrawal) exhibited among middle school girls. The findings of this…

  2. Developing the Girl as a Leader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hembrow-Beach, Rose

    2011-01-01

    Single-sex educational environments can create young women who are engaged, active leaders. Girls receive differential treatment in combined-sex education environments. Girls often do not receive the encouragement or instruction to assume leadership. I want to identify the elements of single-sex education that foster female leadership and consider…

  3. Preventing youth violence perpetration among girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massetti, Greta M; Vivolo, Alana M; Brookmeyer, Kathryn; Degue, Sarah; Holland, Kristin M; Holt, Melissa K; Matjasko, Jennifer L

    2011-10-01

    In the last 10 years, several reviews of research on violence among girls have been conducted. This research helps to determine the extent of girls' use of violence however, it has not been translated into effective prevention programs for girls. This article reviews the research on risk and protective factors associated with violence, with particular attention on factors unique to girls or shared between boys and girls. Individual risk factors for youth violence include hyperactivity/inattention/impulsivity, risk taking/sensation seeking, low academic achievement, exposure to stress and victimization, and early puberty. Parent-child relationships/parental monitoring and supervision, parent criminal and antisocial behavior, and family conflicts and instability have been found to be relationship-level risk factors. Peer risk factors include deviant peer affiliation and gang membership. Risk factors at the community level include economic deprivation; community disorganization; the availability of drugs, alcohol, and firearms; and neighborhood crime. This review also includes a description of program effects for girls within the Model and Promising Blueprints for Violence Prevention Initiative programs. Very few evaluations have examined program effectiveness in preventing violence among girls. More evaluation research is needed to determine if evidence-based programs have positive impact on reducing violence and related risk factors among girls.

  4. Jessie, a Girl with Two Moms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Danné E.

    2016-01-01

    "The Jessie Books" are a seven-book series complete with a dedicated website. Each book features a 5-year-old girl named Jessie who happens to live in a city with her two moms. Each book features Jessie as an ordinary young girl engaging in familiar, life-enriching activities. Across "The Jessie Books," the community of…

  5. A Climbing Girl's Reflections about Angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyhn, Anne Birgitte

    2006-01-01

    The main research question in this paper is whether a climbing discourse can be a resource for a school-geometry discourse. The text is based on a 12-year old girl's story from an exciting climbing trip during her summer holiday. The girl uncovers some of her knowledge that had been invisible to her; she is guided to see some relations between her…

  6. Cinderella and Science: Career Counseling and Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheyden-Hilliard, Mary Ellen

    The need for educational and career counseling for girls and women is described in this paper. Expectations, the "Cinderella syndrome", independence, and adolescence are discussed. Factors which reduce girls' aspirations and options are identified. Career counseling that concerns itself with strength, independence, role model equality, and sharing…

  7. Girls Save the World through Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Christine

    2011-01-01

    It's no secret that fewer and fewer women are entering computer science fields. Attracting high school girls to computer science is only part of the solution. Retaining them while they are in higher education or the workforce is also a challenge. To solve this, there is a need to show girls that computer science is a wide-open field that offers…

  8. USAID Adolescent Girl Strategy Implementation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development, 2016

    2016-01-01

    USAID's commitment to empowering adolescent girls to reach their full potential is reflected in the Agency's larger efforts to achieve gender equality and women's empowerment. The Agency holds decades of experience leading advances for greater gender equality and empowerment that benefit adolescent girls; however, these activities have not been…

  9. Adolescent girls' and parents' views on recruiting and retaining girls into an after-school dance intervention: implications for extra-curricular physical activity provision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Powell Jane

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many adolescents are not sufficiently active and girls are less active than boys. Physical activity interventions delivered during curriculum time have reported weak effects. More sustained changes in physical activity may be obtained by facilitating participation in enjoyable activities. Dance is the favourite activity of UK girls but there is a shortage of dance provision. Dance sessions delivered after the school day could prove to be an effective means of engaging adolescent girls in physical activity. There is a lack of information about the factors that would affect girls' recruitment and retention in an after-school dance programme. Methods Focus groups were conducted with 65, Year 7 (11-12 year old girls from 4 secondary schools in Bristol. In-depth phone interviews were also conducted with 16 (4 per school of the girls' parents. Interviews and focus groups examined issues that would affect recruitment into the intervention, strategies that could be used to attract girls who have little or no previous experience in dance, any factors that would increase their interest in participating in an after-school dance programme and any factors that would affect retention in the programme. All interviews and focus groups were digitally recorded and thematically analysed. Results Girls reported that a taster session in which they had an opportunity to sample the intervention content and "word of mouth" campaigns by peers, who did not need to be their friends, would encourage them to participate in an after-school dance programme. Sessions that maximised enjoyment and facilitated socialisation opportunities would enhance retention. Parents reported that encouraging groups of friends to join the programme, and stressing the enjoyment of the session would increase participation. Conclusions Recruitment and retention campaigns that focus on enjoyment, socialisation, mastery, goal setting and relating to other girls may be effective

  10. Adolescent girls' and parents' views on recruiting and retaining girls into an after-school dance intervention: implications for extra-curricular physical activity provision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Many adolescents are not sufficiently active and girls are less active than boys. Physical activity interventions delivered during curriculum time have reported weak effects. More sustained changes in physical activity may be obtained by facilitating participation in enjoyable activities. Dance is the favourite activity of UK girls but there is a shortage of dance provision. Dance sessions delivered after the school day could prove to be an effective means of engaging adolescent girls in physical activity. There is a lack of information about the factors that would affect girls' recruitment and retention in an after-school dance programme. Methods Focus groups were conducted with 65, Year 7 (11-12 year old) girls from 4 secondary schools in Bristol. In-depth phone interviews were also conducted with 16 (4 per school) of the girls' parents. Interviews and focus groups examined issues that would affect recruitment into the intervention, strategies that could be used to attract girls who have little or no previous experience in dance, any factors that would increase their interest in participating in an after-school dance programme and any factors that would affect retention in the programme. All interviews and focus groups were digitally recorded and thematically analysed. Results Girls reported that a taster session in which they had an opportunity to sample the intervention content and "word of mouth" campaigns by peers, who did not need to be their friends, would encourage them to participate in an after-school dance programme. Sessions that maximised enjoyment and facilitated socialisation opportunities would enhance retention. Parents reported that encouraging groups of friends to join the programme, and stressing the enjoyment of the session would increase participation. Conclusions Recruitment and retention campaigns that focus on enjoyment, socialisation, mastery, goal setting and relating to other girls may be effective strategies for recruiting

  11. Adolescent girls' and parents' views on recruiting and retaining girls into an after-school dance intervention: implications for extra-curricular physical activity provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jago, Russell; Davis, Laura; McNeill, Jade; Sebire, Simon J; Haase, Anne; Powell, Jane; Cooper, Ashley R

    2011-08-23

    Many adolescents are not sufficiently active and girls are less active than boys. Physical activity interventions delivered during curriculum time have reported weak effects. More sustained changes in physical activity may be obtained by facilitating participation in enjoyable activities. Dance is the favourite activity of UK girls but there is a shortage of dance provision. Dance sessions delivered after the school day could prove to be an effective means of engaging adolescent girls in physical activity. There is a lack of information about the factors that would affect girls' recruitment and retention in an after-school dance programme. Focus groups were conducted with 65, Year 7 (11-12 year old) girls from 4 secondary schools in Bristol. In-depth phone interviews were also conducted with 16 (4 per school) of the girls' parents. Interviews and focus groups examined issues that would affect recruitment into the intervention, strategies that could be used to attract girls who have little or no previous experience in dance, any factors that would increase their interest in participating in an after-school dance programme and any factors that would affect retention in the programme. All interviews and focus groups were digitally recorded and thematically analysed. Girls reported that a taster session in which they had an opportunity to sample the intervention content and "word of mouth" campaigns by peers, who did not need to be their friends, would encourage them to participate in an after-school dance programme. Sessions that maximised enjoyment and facilitated socialisation opportunities would enhance retention. Parents reported that encouraging groups of friends to join the programme, and stressing the enjoyment of the session would increase participation. Recruitment and retention campaigns that focus on enjoyment, socialisation, mastery, goal setting and relating to other girls may be effective strategies for recruiting and retaining girls in an after

  12. Girls back off mathematics again: the views and experiences of girls in computer-based mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Colleen

    2002-12-01

    The views and experiences of girls in two co-educational mathematics classrooms in which computers were regularly used were researched. Data were collected by observation and videotaping of lessons, questionnaire, and interviews of students and the teachers. In this paper case studies of six girls are presented. Their `stories' reveal a diversity of experiences and views and multiple gender identities. High achieving girls persisted as "outsiders within," other girls "backed off", and exceptional girls challenged gender stereotypes. Implications for social justice in mathematics in the age of the super highway are discussed.

  13. Perceptions of the food marketing environment among African American teen girls and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibeau, Wendy S; Saksvig, Brit I; Gittelsohn, Joel; Williams, Sonja; Jones, Lindsey; Young, Deborah Rohm

    2012-02-01

    Obesity disproportionately affects African American adolescents, particularly girls. While ethnically targeted marketing of unhealthful food products contributes to this disparity, it is not known how African Americans perceive the food marketing environment in their communities. Qualitative methods, specifically photovoice and group discussions, were used to understand perceptions of African American adults and teen girls regarding targeted food marketing to adolescent girls. An advisory committee of four students, two faculty, and two parents was formed, who recruited peers to photograph their environments and participate in group discussions to answer "what influences teen girls to eat what they do." Seven adults and nine teens (all female) participated in the study. Discussions were transcribed, coded, and analyzed with ATLAS.ti to identify common and disparate themes among participants. Results indicated that adults and teens perceived the type of food products, availability of foods, and price to influence the girls' choices. The girls spoke about products that were highly convenient and tasty as being particularly attractive. The adults reported that advertisements and insufficient nutrition education were also influencers. The teens discussed that the places in which food products were available influenced their choices. Results suggest that the marketing of highly available, convenient food at low prices sell products to teen girls. Future work is needed to better understand the consumer's perspective on the food and beverage marketing strategies used. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A two-year perspective: who may ease the burden of girls' loneliness in school?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løhre, Audhild; Kvande, Marianne N; Hjemdal, Odin; Lillefjell, Monica

    2014-04-08

    Loneliness is negatively related to good health and wellbeing, especially among girls. There is little research, however, on factors that may ease the burdens of loneliness in the school setting. Thus, we explored the relationship between girls' loneliness and later school wellbeing adjusted for other adversities. Furthermore, we assessed the significance of having someone whom the girl trusted by investigating possible modifying influences on the addressed association. Altogether, 119 girls in grades 1-8 provided baseline data and answered the same set of questions two years later. Logistic regression models including perceived academic problems, victimisation by bullying, loneliness and trusted others were tested with bad versus good school wellbeing two years later as outcome using SPSS. In the multivariable analysis of loneliness, academic problems, and victimisation, loneliness was the only variable showing a strong and negative contribution to later school wellbeing. Next, demonstrated in separate models; the inclusion of having a trusted class advisor fully attenuated the association of loneliness with later school wellbeing. In contrast, other trusted teachers, trusted parents, or trusted students did not affect the association. Loneliness in girls strongly predicted school wellbeing two years later. However, having a class advisor whom the girl trusted to contact in hurtful situations clearly reduced the burden of loneliness. This finding highlights the clinical importance of stability, long-lasting relations, and trust that main teachers may represent for lonely girls.

  15. The tribal girl child in Rajasthan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanti, R

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the status of the girl child among tribes in India. Tribes have son preference but do not discriminate against girls by female infanticide or sex determination tests. Girls do not inherit land, but they are not abused, hated, or subjected to rigid social norms. Girls are not veiled and are free to participate in dancing and other recreational programs. There is no dowry on marriage. The father of the bridegroom pays a brideprice to the father of the girl. Widowed or divorced women are free to marry again. Daughters care for young children, perform housework, and work in the field with their brothers. In the tribal village of Choti Underi girls were not discriminated against in health and nutrition, but there was a gender gap in education. Both girls and boys were equally exposed to infection and undernourishment. Tribals experience high rates of infant and child mortality due to poverty and its related malnutrition. Child labor among tribals is a way of life for meeting the basic needs of the total household. A recent report on tribals in Rajasthan reveals that 15-20% of child labor involved work in mines that were dangerous to children's health. Girl children had no security provisions or minimum wages. Tribal children were exploited by human service agencies. Child laborers were raped. Government programs in tribal areas should focus on improving living conditions for children in general. Special programs for girls are needed for providing security in the workplace and increasing female educational levels. More information is needed on the work burden of tribal girls that may include wage employment as well as housework.

  16. The effect of BCMO1 gene variants on macular pigment optical density in young healthy Caucasians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary eKyle-Little

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Serum lutein (L and zeaxanthin (Z positively correlate with macular pigment optical density (MPOD, hence the latter is a valuable indirect tool for measuring L and Z content in the macula. L and Z have been attributed antioxidant capacity and protection from certain retinal diseases but their uptake within the eye is thought to depend on genetic, age and environmental factors. In particular gene variants within beta-carotene monooxygenase (BCMO1 are thought to modulate MPOD in the macula.Objectives: To determine the effect of BCMO1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs rs11645428, rs6420424 and rs6464851 on macular pigment optical density (MPOD in a cohort of young healthy participants of Caucasian origin with normal ocular health.Design: In this cohort study, MPOD was assessed in 46 healthy participants (22 male and 24 female with a mean age of 24 ± 4.0 years (range 19-33. The three SNPs, rs11645428, rs6420424, rs6564851 that have established associations with MPOD were determined using MassEXTEND (hME Sequenom assay. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA was performed on groups segregated into homozygous and heterozygous BCMO1 genotypes. Correlations between body mass index (BMI, iris colour, gender, central retinal thickness (CRT, diet and MPOD were investigated.Results: MPOD did not significantly vary with BCMO1 rs11645428 (F2,41 = 0.700, p = 0.503, rs6420424 (F2,41 = 0.210, p = 0.801 nor rs6464851 homozygous or heterozygous genotypes (F2,41 = 0,13, p = 0.88, in this young healthy cohort. The combination of these three SNPs into triple genotypes based on plasma conversion efficiency did not affect MPOD (F2,41 = 0.07, p = 0.9. There was a significant negative correlation with MPOD and central retinal thickness (r = - 0.39, p = 0.01 but no significant correlation between BMI, iris colour, gender and MPOD. Conclusion: Our results indicate that macular pigment deposition within the central retina is not dependent on BCMO1 gene variant

  17. Leadership Workshops for Adult Girl Scout Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebofsky, Larry A.; McCarthy, Donald; DeVore, Edna; Harman, Pamela; Reaching Stars Team

    2016-10-01

    This year, the University of Arizona is conducting its first two Leadership Workshops for Girl Scout adult leaders. These workshops are being supported by a five-year NASA Collaborative Agreement, Reaching for the Stars: NASA Science for Girl Scouts (www.seti.org/GirlScoutStars), through the SETI Institute in collaboration with the University of Arizona, Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA), the Girl Scouts of Northern California, the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, and Aries Scientific, Inc. These workshops are an outgrowth of Astronomy Camp for Girl Scout Leaders, a 14-year "Train the Trainer" program funded by NASA through the James Webb Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) education and outreach team. We are continuing our long-term relationship with all Girl Scout Councils to engage girls and young women not only in science and math education, but also in the astronomical and technological concepts relating to NASA's scientific mission. Our training aligns with the GSUSA Journey: It's Your Planet-Love It! and introduces participants to some of the activities that are being developed by the Girl Scout Stars team for GSUSA's new space science badges for all Girl Scout levels being developed as a part of Reaching for the Stars: NASA Science for Girl Scouts.The workshops include hands-on activities in basic astronomy (night sky, stars, galaxies, optics, telescopes, etc.) as well as some more advanced concepts such as lookback time and the expansion of the Universe. Since the inception of our original Astronomy Camp in 2003, our team has grown to include nearly 280 adult leaders, staff, and volunteers from over 79 Councils in 43 states and the District of Columbia so they can, in turn, teach young women essential concepts in astronomy, the night sky environment, applied math, and engineering. Our workshops model what astronomers do by engaging participants in the process of science inquiry, while equipping adults to host astronomy-related programs with

  18. Nobody's perfect: a qualitative examination of African American maternal caregivers' and their adolescent girls' perceptions of body image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Michell; Corona, Rosalie; Belgrave, Faye Z

    2014-06-01

    Using semi-structured interviews, we explored African American maternal caregivers' and their adolescent girls' (N=25 dyads) perceptions about the adolescent's body using Grounded Theory. Caregivers and adolescent girls (Mage=13.42) were asked what the adolescent girls liked most/least about their bodies and how peers and media may affect adolescent girls' perceptions. While some adolescent girls reported overall body satisfaction, others described features they would like to change. Belief in God, body acceptance, and appreciation for average/moderate features helped the adolescent girls maintain their positive body image. The body-related messages that adolescent girls received from caregivers and peers included compliments, pressure to lose weight, teasing, and advice. Adolescent girls also reported being either influenced by or skeptical of the images presented in the media. Programs that promote caregiver-adolescent communication about body perceptions and that build on the adolescent girls' media skepticism may prove useful for their health-related attitudes and behaviors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sociocultural influences on body image and body changes among adolescent boys and girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Marita P; Ricciardelli, Lina A

    2003-02-01

    In 2 studies, the authors evaluated the role of parents, peers, and the media in body image and body-change strategies among adolescent boys and girls. The respondents for Study 1 (423 boys and 377 girls) completed the Body Image and Body Change Inventory (L. A. Ricciardelli & M. P. McCabe, 2002) and the Perceived Sociocultural Influences on Body Image and Body Change Questionnaire (M. P. McCabe & L. A. Ricciardelli, 2001b). Body mass index and age were also included in the analyses. Regression analyses demonstrated that sociocultural influences and feedback from the participant's best male friend were important predictors for all body-change strategies among boys. For girls, sociocultural influences and feedback from the participant's best female friend and mother were important predictors for body-change strategies. The most consistent predictor of weight loss, weight gain, and strategies to increase muscles was body-image importance. In Study 2, the authors examined the influence of the same sociocultural variables, as well as negative affect and puberty on body image and body-change strategies among a second group of 199 boys and 267 girls. The results demonstrated that a broad range of sociocultural influences predicted body-change strategies for boys and girls, with negative affect also having a unique influence for boys but not for girls. Puberty played a minor role, once other sociocultural variables were entered into the regression equation. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  20. Higher anterior knee laxity influences the landing biomechanics displayed by pubescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Catherine Y; Munro, Bridget J; Steele, Julie R

    2017-01-01

    Despite an increase in anterior knee laxity (AKL) during the adolescent growth spurt in girls, it is unknown whether landing biomechanics are affected by this change. This study investigated whether pubescent girls with higher AKL displayed differences in their lower limb strength or landing biomechanics when performing a horizontal leap movement compared to girls with lower AKL. Forty-six pubescent girls (10-13 years) were tested at the time of their peak height velocity (PHV). Passive AKL was quantified and used to classify participants into higher (HAKL; peak displacement > 4 mm) and lower (LAKL; peak displacement biomechanics, which are suggested to assist the functional stability of their knees during this dynamic task. Further research is warranted, however, to confirm or refute this notion.

  1. Perinatal History and Functional Features of Reproductive System of Mothers of Adolescent Girls with Secondary Amenorrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. Nachotova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal histories of 172 adolescent girls aged 13–17 years with secondary amenorrhea (SA and 102 age-matched girls with regular menstrual cycle (comparison group, and reproductive status of their mothers have been studied. It has been found that the most unfavorable factor affecting the formation of SA in adolescent girls is the late menarche in their mothers. It is found that the probability of SA in girls born from the mothers with late menarche right after menarche or after previous menstrual disorders is 16-fold increased. Ir is determined that particularly unfavorable factor, 3-fold increasing the risk of the transformation of olygomenorrhea or pubertal uterine bleeding into SA, is the low birth weight registered in the patient’s history.

  2. Trends of fast food consumption among adolescent and young adult Saudi girls living in Riyadh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora A. ALFaris

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Saudi Arabia has passed through lifestyle changes toward unhealthy dietary patterns such as high fast food consumption. Adolescents and young adults, particularly girls, are the main groups exposed to and affected by these adverse eating behaviors. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the trends of fast food consumption among adolescent and young adult Saudi girls living in Riyadh, and to compare between them. Design: In a cross-sectional survey, 127 adolescent Saudi girls (13–18 years and 69 young adult Saudi girls (19–29 years were randomly recruited to participate in this study. Weight, height, waist circumference, and hip circumference were measured using standardized methods. Twenty-four-hour diet recall and a face-to-face interview food questionnaire were performed. Results: Most of the participants had adequate intake of protein, riboflavin, iron, and sodium, but exhibited low intake for several other nutrients. Among study participants, 95.4% consume restaurants’ fast food and 79.1% eat fast food at least once weekly. Burgers and carbonated soft drinks were the main kinds of fast food meals and beverages usually eaten by girls. Adolescent girls who usually ate large portion sizes of fast food had significantly higher mean waist circumference and hip circumference. Participants eat fast food primarily for enjoying the delicious taste, followed by convenience. Restaurants’ hygiene and safety standards were the main concern regarding fast food for 62.2% of girls. Finally, international restaurants were preferable by participants to buy fast food compared with local restaurants (70.9% vs. 29.1%. Conclusion: Our findings provide evidence on the high prevalence of fast food consumption among Saudi girls, suggesting an urgent need for community-based nutrition interventions that consider the trends of fast food consumption and targeted eating behaviors of adolescent and young adult girls.

  3. Trends of fast food consumption among adolescent and young adult Saudi girls living in Riyadh

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALFaris, Nora A.; Al-Tamimi, Jozaa Z.; Al-Jobair, Moneera O.; Al-Shwaiyat, Naseem M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Saudi Arabia has passed through lifestyle changes toward unhealthy dietary patterns such as high fast food consumption. Adolescents and young adults, particularly girls, are the main groups exposed to and affected by these adverse eating behaviors. Objective The aim of this study was to examine the trends of fast food consumption among adolescent and young adult Saudi girls living in Riyadh, and to compare between them. Design In a cross-sectional survey, 127 adolescent Saudi girls (13–18 years) and 69 young adult Saudi girls (19–29 years) were randomly recruited to participate in this study. Weight, height, waist circumference, and hip circumference were measured using standardized methods. Twenty-four-hour diet recall and a face-to-face interview food questionnaire were performed. Results Most of the participants had adequate intake of protein, riboflavin, iron, and sodium, but exhibited low intake for several other nutrients. Among study participants, 95.4% consume restaurants’ fast food and 79.1% eat fast food at least once weekly. Burgers and carbonated soft drinks were the main kinds of fast food meals and beverages usually eaten by girls. Adolescent girls who usually ate large portion sizes of fast food had significantly higher mean waist circumference and hip circumference. Participants eat fast food primarily for enjoying the delicious taste, followed by convenience. Restaurants’ hygiene and safety standards were the main concern regarding fast food for 62.2% of girls. Finally, international restaurants were preferable by participants to buy fast food compared with local restaurants (70.9% vs. 29.1%). Conclusion Our findings provide evidence on the high prevalence of fast food consumption among Saudi girls, suggesting an urgent need for community-based nutrition interventions that consider the trends of fast food consumption and targeted eating behaviors of adolescent and young adult girls. PMID:25792229

  4. Trends of fast food consumption among adolescent and young adult Saudi girls living in Riyadh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALFaris, Nora A; Al-Tamimi, Jozaa Z; Al-Jobair, Moneera O; Al-Shwaiyat, Naseem M

    2015-01-01

    Background : Saudi Arabia has passed through lifestyle changes toward unhealthy dietary patterns such as high fast food consumption. Adolescents and young adults, particularly girls, are the main groups exposed to and affected by these adverse eating behaviors. Objective : The aim of this study was to examine the trends of fast food consumption among adolescent and young adult Saudi girls living in Riyadh, and to compare between them. Design : In a cross-sectional survey, 127 adolescent Saudi girls (13-18 years) and 69 young adult Saudi girls (19-29 years) were randomly recruited to participate in this study. Weight, height, waist circumference, and hip circumference were measured using standardized methods. Twenty-four-hour diet recall and a face-to-face interview food questionnaire were performed. Results : Most of the participants had adequate intake of protein, riboflavin, iron, and sodium, but exhibited low intake for several other nutrients. Among study participants, 95.4% consume restaurants' fast food and 79.1% eat fast food at least once weekly. Burgers and carbonated soft drinks were the main kinds of fast food meals and beverages usually eaten by girls. Adolescent girls who usually ate large portion sizes of fast food had significantly higher mean waist circumference and hip circumference. Participants eat fast food primarily for enjoying the delicious taste, followed by convenience. Restaurants' hygiene and safety standards were the main concern regarding fast food for 62.2% of girls. Finally, international restaurants were preferable by participants to buy fast food compared with local restaurants (70.9% vs. 29.1%). Conclusion : Our findings provide evidence on the high prevalence of fast food consumption among Saudi girls, suggesting an urgent need for community-based nutrition interventions that consider the trends of fast food consumption and targeted eating behaviors of adolescent and young adult girls.

  5. Pubertal growth of the short normal girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, J; Bailey, B J; Voss, L D; Betts, P R

    1999-01-01

    To determine the timing, magnitude and duration of the pubertal spurt for short normal and average height girls, to compare these with Tanner's standard and to investigate predictors of pubertal growth. The growth of 46 short normal and 55 control girls, identified at school entry, was monitored throughout puberty. Height and weight were measured at 6-month intervals from which body mass index (BMI) was derived. Annual velocities were calculated and used to estimate the age and magnitude of peak height velocity (PHV). Age of menarche was recorded to the nearest month. Parents provided information on the child's medical and social history. The mean age at PHV, the magnitude of PHV and age at menarche were similar for both groups and close to Tanner's 50th centile values. Pre-pubertal BMI predicted age at menarche for short and control girls, accounting for 17% of the variance. There was a tendency for early maturing girls of average stature to have greater PHV. However, this relationship was not observed in short girls, nor did any other variable, genetic or environmental, predict the timing or magnitude of their pubertal spurt. Delayed puberty in short normal girls is unlikely and their growth during puberty is comparable to girls of average height. The pubertal variables measured remain close to Tanner's original standards for both groups, suggesting the lack of a secular trend towards earlier puberty in girls. The onset of menstruation is influenced by pre-pubertal BMI. However, the clinician should be aware that short normal girls have normal pubertal growth and that no genetic or environmental variable can predict the timing or magnitude of their growth spurt. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  6. Attractiveness in African American and Caucasian women: is beauty in the eyes of the observer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Dawnavan S; Sbrocco, Tracy; Odoms-Young, Angela; Smith, Dionne M

    2010-01-01

    Traditional body image studies have been constrained by focusing on body thinness as the sole component of attractiveness. Evidence suggests that African American women may hold a multifactorial view of attractiveness that extends beyond size to include factors such as dress attire and race. The current study employed a culturally sensitive silhouette Model Rating Task (MRT) to examine the effects of attire, body size, and race on attractiveness. Unexpectedly, minimal differences on attractiveness ratings emerged by attire, body size, or model race between African American and Caucasian women. Overall, participants preferred the dressed, underweight, and African American models. Factors such as exposure to diverse groups and changes in African American culture may explain the present findings. Future studies to delineate the components of attractiveness for African American and Caucasian women using the MRT are needed to broaden our understanding and conceptualization of attractiveness across racial groups.

  7. Comparison in maternal body composition between Caucasian Irish and Indian women.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Farah, N

    2012-02-01

    The use of body mass index (BMI) for the diagnosis of obesity has limitations, especially when comparing ethnic groups with different body proportions. The aim of this prospective study was to compare maternal body composition in early pregnancy between Caucasian Irish and Indian women. A total of 81 Indian women and 81 Irish Caucasian women were matched for age, parity and BMI. Maternal weight and height were measured, and body composition analysed using bioelectrical impedance. The Irish women were taller and weighed more than the Indian women (p<0.001). At any given BMI, the Indian women had a higher total body fat percentage, visceral fat level and high fat percentage than the Irish women (p=0.024, 0.001 and 0.001, respectively). Our findings suggest that lower BMI cut-offs should be used for screening for gestational diabetes mellitus in Indian women attending our antenatal services.

  8. Disordered eating in African American and Caucasian women: the role of ethnic identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuttlesworth, Mary E; Zotter, Deanne

    2011-01-01

    The influential roles of culture and ethnic identity are frequently cited in developing disordered eating and body dissatisfaction, constituting both protective and risk factors. For African American women, strongly identifying with African American cultural beauty ideals may protect against disordered eating to lose weight, but may actually increase risk in development of disordered eating directed at weight gain, such as binge eating. This study compares African American and Caucasian women on disordered eating measures, positing that African American women show greater risk for binge eating due to the impact of ethnic identity on body dissatisfaction. Findings indicate low levels of ethnic identity represent a risk factor for African American women, increasing the likelihood of showing greater binge eating and bulimic pathology. In Caucasian women, high levels of ethnic identity constitute a risk factor, leading to higher levels of both binge eating and global eating pathology. Implications for prevention and treatment are discussed.

  9. FEATURES OF TERRITORIAL INTEGRATION OF MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS IN THE CAUCASIAN MINERAL WATERS REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Михаил Влидимирович Беляев

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work is to describe the situation taken place with integration of marketing communications in the region. The author conducted research aimed at identifying the most popular and effective forms of communication with the consumer, allowing in detail to characterize the state of the advertising market of Caucasian Mineral Waters. Information concluded in article may be used by companies present in the Caucasian Mineral Waters region, to form notion about the effectiveness of the regional channels of communication with customers and building a more efficient model of advertising policy, also its could be useful for specialists, which are working in marketing communication and advertising sphere.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-9-34

  10. AHSG gene polymorphisms are associated with bone mineral density in Caucasian nuclear families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan-Jun; Wang, Yan-Bo; Lei, Shu-Feng; Long, Ji-Rong; Shen, Hui; Zhao, Lan-Juan; Jiang, De-Ke; Xiao, Su-Mei; Chen, Xiang-Ding; Chen, Yuan; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the role of alpha2-HS glycoprotein (AHSG) gene on bone mineral density (BMD) variation. A total of 665 subjects from 157 Caucasian nuclear families were genotyped at the AHSG NlaIII, SacI sites. The association and linkage between the single SNP markers and haplotypes constructed by two markers in this gene and BMDs at the spine and hip were determined by using quantitative transmission disequilibrium test (QTDT). Significant within-family associations were obtained for spine BMD at both of studied markers (P = 0.036 and 0.005 at the NlaIII and SacI sites, respectively). Significant (P = 0.008 at the NlaIII locus) (P = 0.004 at the SacI locus) total associations at spine BMD were detected. Haplotype analyses confirmed those within-family and total association. These data suggest the polymorphisms in the AHSG gene may have effects on BMD variation in Caucasian population.

  11. Compound Odontoma in young girl

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    Nurwahida Nurwahida

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Odontomas are the most common type of odontogenic tumors and generally they are asymptomatic. These tumors are formed from enamel and dentin, and can have variable amounts of cement and pulp tissues. According to radiographic, microscopic, and clinical features, two types of odontomas are recognized: Complex and compound odontomas. Complex odontomas occur mostly in the posterior part of the mandible and compound odontomas in the anterior maxilla. Case Report. A young girl patient, 9 years old came to Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery with a slow growing and asymptomatic swelling in her left posterior mandible for 5 years in his history taking. The panoramic radiograph show  a radioopacity and radiolucent lesion at the lower second molar region, with well-corticated limits. An insisional biopsi   confirmed  as compound odontoma. The surgery  performed with simple enucleation and curettage under general anaesthesia. Discussion. Compound odontomas are usually located in the anterior maxilla, over the crowns of unerupted teeth, or between the roots of erupted teeth. In this case report, Compound odontomas are found in the posterior mandible. Conclusion. Compound odontomas in the posterior mandible is a rare. The treatment of odontomas depends on the size of the lesion. The early diagnosis, the treatment of choice is conservative surgical enucleation and curettage and prognosis is excellent.

  12. Predictors of Bone Mineral Density in African-American and Caucasian College Aged Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea K. Johnson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research regarding risk factors and prevalence of low bone min-eral density (BMD among African-American and Caucasian college-aged wom-en are limited. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine if selected predictors of BMD in African-American and Caucasian college-aged women differ by race.Methods: A total of 101 local African-American (n=50 and Caucasian (n=51 females, ages 18 to 30 years, were in this study. All data were collected in the Bone Density and Body Composition Laboratory. BMD was measured using DXA technology. Race, family history of osteoporosis, BMI, current physical activity, osteoporosis knowledge, length of time on oral contraceptives, age at menarche and calcium intake were included in the multiple regression analyses with spinal and femoral BMD as dependent variables.Results: Overall, 38.6% had low spinal BMD and 7.9% had low femoral BMD. BMI (β=0.073, R2 = .148, P = .001, 95% CI [0.030, 0.116] and current physical activity (β=0.071, R2 = .148, P = .017, 95% CI [0.013, 0.129] were the only variables that were statistically significant in predicting spinal BMD. BMI (β=0.056, R2 = .13, P = .010, 95% CI [0.014, 0.098] and current physical activ-ity (β=0.078, R2 = .13, P = .007, 95% CI [0.022, 0.134] were also the only varia-bles that were statistically significant in predicting femoral BMD. Race was not a significant predictor of spinal or femoral BMD.Conclusion: It is imperative for both African-American and Caucasian women to engage in osteoporosis-preventive behaviors.

  13. Is pelvic organ support different between young nulliparous African and Caucasian women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, K L; Krause, H G; Wong, V; Goh, J; Dietz, H P

    2016-06-01

    There seems to be substantial variation in the prevalence of pelvic floor disorders between different ethnic groups. This may be due partially to differences in pelvic floor structure and functional anatomy. To date, data on this issue are sparse. The aim of this study was to compare hiatal dimensions, pelvic organ descent and levator biometry in young, healthy nulliparous Caucasian and African women. Healthy nulliparous non-pregnant volunteers attending a local nursing school in Uganda were invited to participate in this study during two fistula camps. All volunteers underwent a simple physician-administered questionnaire and a four-dimensional translabial ultrasound examination. Offline analysis was performed to assess hiatal dimensions, pelvic organ descent, levator muscle thickness and area. To compare findings with those obtained in nulliparous non-pregnant Caucasians, we retrieved the three-dimensional/four-dimensional ultrasound volume datasets of a previously published study. The dataset of 76 Ugandan and 49 Caucasian women was analyzed. The two groups were not matched but they were comparable in age and body mass index. All measurements of hiatal dimensions and pelvic organ descent were significantly higher among the Ugandans (all P ≤ 0.01); however, muscle thickness and area were not significantly different between the two groups. Substantial differences between Caucasian and Ugandan non-pregnant nulliparae were identified in this study comparing functional pelvic floor anatomy. It appears likely that these differences in functional anatomy are at least partly genetic in nature. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. SORL1 is genetically associated with late-onset Alzheimer's disease in Japanese, Koreans and Caucasians.

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    Akinori Miyashita

    Full Text Available To discover susceptibility genes of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD, we conducted a 3-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS using three populations: Japanese from the Japanese Genetic Consortium for Alzheimer Disease (JGSCAD, Koreans, and Caucasians from the Alzheimer Disease Genetic Consortium (ADGC. In Stage 1, we evaluated data for 5,877,918 genotyped and imputed SNPs in Japanese cases (n = 1,008 and controls (n = 1,016. Genome-wide significance was observed with 12 SNPs in the APOE region. Seven SNPs from other distinct regions with p-values <2×10(-5 were genotyped in a second Japanese sample (885 cases, 985 controls, and evidence of association was confirmed for one SORL1 SNP (rs3781834, P = 7.33×10(-7 in the combined sample. Subsequent analysis combining results for several SORL1 SNPs in the Japanese, Korean (339 cases, 1,129 controls and Caucasians (11,840 AD cases, 10,931 controls revealed genome wide significance with rs11218343 (P = 1.77×10(-9 and rs3781834 (P = 1.04×10(-8. SNPs in previously established AD loci in Caucasians showed strong evidence of association in Japanese including rs3851179 near PICALM (P = 1.71×10(-5 and rs744373 near BIN1 (P = 1.39×10(-4. The associated allele for each of these SNPs was the same as in Caucasians. These data demonstrate for the first time genome-wide significance of LOAD with SORL1 and confirm the role of other known loci for LOAD in Japanese. Our study highlights the importance of examining associations in multiple ethnic populations.

  15. Association of ABCB1 genetic variants with renal function in Africans and in Caucasians

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    Elston Robert C

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The P-glycoprotein, encoded by the ABCB1 gene, is expressed in human endothelial and mesangial cells, which contribute to control renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate. We investigated the association of ABCB1 variants with renal function in African and Caucasian subjects. Methods In Africans (290 subjects from 62 pedigrees, we genotyped the 2677G>T and 3435 C>T ABCB1 polymorphisms. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR was measured using inulin clearance and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF using para-aminohippurate clearance. In Caucasians (5382 unrelated subjects, we analyzed 30 SNPs located within and around ABCB1, using data from the Affymetrix 500 K chip. GFR was estimated using the simplified Modification of the Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD and Cockcroft-Gault equations. Results In Africans, compared to the reference genotype (GG or CC, each copy of the 2677T and 3435T allele was associated, respectively, with: GFR higher by 10.6 ± 2.9 (P P = 0.06 mL/min; ERPF higher by 47.5 ± 11.6 (P P = 0.007 mL/min; and renal resistances lower by 0.016 ± 0.004 (P P = 0.004 mm Hg/mL/min. In Caucasians, we identified 3 polymorphisms in the ABCB1 gene that were strongly associated with all estimates of GFR (smallest P value = 0.0006, overall P = 0.014 after multiple testing correction. Conclusion Variants of the ABCB1 gene were associated with renal function in both Africans and Caucasians and may therefore confer susceptibility to nephropathy in humans. If confirmed in other studies, these results point toward a new candidate gene for nephropathy in humans.

  16. Caucasian war as major factor of administrative policy of tsarist in Dagestan

    OpenAIRE

    GASANOV MAGOMED MAGOMEDOVICH

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with the place of the Caucasian War in the administrative-territorial policy of the Russian Empire in Dagestan. The paper is an attempt to highlight the role and importance of military-national governance is the most appropriate model of development of the administrative and political system of the North-Eastern Caucasus, and the involvement of these territories in the administrative and legal framework of the Russian Empire.

  17. Association between Apolipoprotein E genotype and cerebral palsy is not confirmed in a Caucasian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Gai L; Gibson, Catherine S; Goldwater, Paul N; Haan, Eric A; Priest, Kevin; Dekker, Gustaaf A; MacLennan, Alastair H

    2008-11-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE) plays a significant role in lipid metabolism and has been implicated in the growth and repair of injured neurons. Two small studies have suggested an association between APOE genotype and cerebral palsy. We investigated if APOE genotype is associated with an increased risk for cerebral palsy, influences the type of cerebral palsy or interacts with prenatal viral infection to influence risk of cerebral palsy. The population-based case-control study comprised newborn screening cards of 443 Caucasian patients with cerebral palsy and 883 Caucasian matched controls. APOE genotyping was performed on DNA extracted from dried blood spots. Allelic and genotypic frequencies did not differ between cases and controls and combined frequencies were 0.10 (epsilon2), 0.76 (epsilon3), 0.14 (epsilon4), 0.03 (epsilon2/epsilon2), 0.10 (epsilon2/epsilon3), 0.03 (epsilon2/epsilon4), 0.02 (epsilon4/epsilon4), 0.21 (epsilon3/epsilon4), 0.61 (epsilon3/epsilon3). APOE genotype was correlated with cerebral palsy, type of cerebral palsy, gestation at birth and the presence of viral nucleic acids detected in previous work. Analysis by gestational age (all gestational ages, >/=37, 32-36 and <32 weeks) and type of cerebral palsy (all types, diplegia, hemiplegia and quadriplegia) showed no association between APOE genotype and cerebral palsy in this Caucasian population. An association between prenatal viral infection, APOE genotype and cerebral palsy was not demonstrated. These results did not confirm an association between APOE genotype, cerebral palsy, type of cerebral palsy and prenatal infection in a Caucasian population. Given the low frequency of APOE epsilon2 and some of the heterozygote and homozygote combinations in this study, a larger study is assessing this further.

  18. What is the Impact of the Cosmetic Industry in the West on Caucasian Female Consumer Wellbeing?

    OpenAIRE

    Verbickaite, Gerda

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the impact that cosmetics have on female well-being regarding psychological, physical, social, career and education aspects. In the western world, cosmetic products are not only accepted, but are also often encouraged to be used for Caucasian females to look most attractive, thus be perceived more positively by society. “What is beautiful is good” (Dion, Berscheid, Walster, 1972), but it can also be harmful. Through various media channels, the perceptions of beauty are sha...

  19. Risk factors for cannabis use disorders in Caucasian and American population

    OpenAIRE

    Gerra, Maria Carla

    2017-01-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug globally and its use is associated with dependence, craving, and drug-seeking behaviour. Compared with other drugs of abuse, less is known about the susceptibility to cannabis use disorders. Hence, the aim of the present work was to identify potential genetic and environmental risk factors associated with cannabis use, comparing a group of marijuana users and control subjects in both Caucasian (93 controls and 92 marijuana users) and American (...

  20. Takayasu's arteritis: A rare cause of cardiac death in a Caucasian teenage female patient

    OpenAIRE

    Saïd, Salah; Koetsveld-Baart, J.; Hollander, Jan

    1997-01-01

    textabstractA Caucasian teenage Dutch schoolgirl with known chronic low visual acuity and albinism, presented with frank acute pulmonary oedema, died after 1 h of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation for bradyarrhythmia and cardiac arrest. Two weeks prior to presentation, during sport training, she complained of oppressive chest pain on exertion accompanied with vomiting without any other systemic symptoms. Post-mortem examination revealed supravalvular stenosis of the pulmonary trunk and ascending...

  1. Body Composition Is the Main Determinant for the Difference in Type 2 Diabetes Pathophysiology Between Japanese and Caucasians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jonas B; Pedersen, Maria; Tanaka, Haruhiko

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This cross-sectional clinical study compared the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes in Japanese and Caucasians and investigated the role of demographic, genetic, and lifestyle-related risk factors for insulin resistance and β-cell response. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 120...... the two regional cutoff values for obesity. RESULTS Insulin sensitivity was higher in Japanese compared with Caucasians, as indicated by the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance and Matsuda indices, whereas β-cell response was higher in Caucasians, as measured by homeostatic model assessment...

  2. Process evaluation of the Bristol girls dance project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Sebire

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Bristol Girls Dance Project was a cluster randomised controlled trial that aimed to increase objectively measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA levels of Year 7 (age 11–12 girls through a dance-based after-school intervention. The intervention was delivered in nine schools and consisted of up to forty after-school dance sessions. This paper reports on the main findings from the detailed process evaluation that was conducted. Methods Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from intervention schools. Dose and fidelity were reported by dance instructors at every session. Intervention dose was defined as attending two thirds of sessions and was measured by attendance registers. Fidelity to the intervention manual was reported by dance instructors. On four randomly-selected occasions, participants reported their perceived level of exertion and enjoyment. Reasons for non-attendance were self-reported at the end of the intervention. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with all dance instructors who delivered the intervention (n = 10 and school contacts (n = 9 in intervention schools. A focus group was conducted with girls who participated in each intervention school (n = 9. Results The study did not affect girls’ MVPA. An average of 31.7 girls participated in each school, with 9.1 per school receiving the intervention dose. Mean attendance and instructors’ fidelity to the intervention manual decreased over time. The decline in attendance was largely attributed to extraneous factors common to after-school activities. Qualitative data suggest that the training and intervention manual were helpful to most instructors. Participant ratings of session enjoyment were high but perceived exertion was low, however, girls found parts of the intervention challenging. Conclusions The intervention was enjoyed by participants. Attendance at the intervention sessions was low but typical of after

  3. Do men hold African-American and Caucasian women to different standards of beauty?✩

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Rachel E.K.; Carter, Michele M.; Sbrocco, Tracy; Gray, James J.

    2011-01-01

    Racial differences in men’s preferences for African-American and Caucasian women’s body size and shape were examined. As expected, there was a trend for African-American men to choose ideal figures with a lower waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), which is associated with a more curvaceous figure. Contrary to expectations, however, African-American men did not choose heavier female figures as ideal. In fact, both groups chose underweight and normal weight figures as ideal. The results from this study suggest that while preferences for WHR may continue to be associated with cultural factors, African-American and Caucasian men may have become more similar than different in their preferences for female weight. Also, the results suggest that within the African-American sample, there were two subsamples with regard to WHR preferences, with one subgroup endorsing the same ideal WHR as their Caucasian counterparts. The results are discussed in terms of possible changes to cultural values that may be reflected in a change in what is considered attractive. PMID:17606230

  4. Do men hold African-American and Caucasian women to different standards of beauty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Rachel E K; Carter, Michele M; Sbrocco, Tracy; Gray, James J

    2007-08-01

    Racial differences in men's preferences for African-American and Caucasian women's body size and shape were examined. As expected, there was a trend for African-American men to choose ideal figures with a lower waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), which is associated with a more curvaceous figure. Contrary to expectations, however, African-American men did not choose heavier female figures as ideal. In fact, both groups chose underweight and normal weight figures as ideal. The results from this study suggest that while preferences for WHR may continue to be associated with cultural factors, African-American and Caucasian men may have become more similar than different in their preferences for female weight. Also, the results suggest that within the African-American sample, there were two subsamples with regard to WHR preferences, with one subgroup endorsing the same ideal WHR as their Caucasian counterparts. The results are discussed in terms of possible changes to cultural values that may be reflected in a change in what is considered attractive.

  5. Association of the presence of bone bars on radiographs and hip fracture in postmenopausal Caucasian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, D B; Lopez-Ben, R; Morgan, S L; Rehder, D; Duke, J N; Fineberg, N; Pitt, M J

    2012-09-01

    To determine whether the presence of bone bars (BB) identified on anteroposterior hip radiographs are more prevalent in patients that have had a hip fracture as compared to patients without a fracture. Ninety-two Caucasian women with a unilateral proximal femur fracture were retrospectively evaluated and randomly selected using radiology database records to comprise the investigational group. Ninety-eight age-matched Caucasian women without hip fracture were selected as a control group. Anteroposterior hip radiographs were evaluated for the presence of BBs by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Chi-square tests were used to assess whether fractures were more prevalent in patients with BB than those without BB. The patient population was comprised Caucasian women with a mean age of 79.8 ± 6.4 years in the control group and 79.9 ± 6.6 years in the investigational group. Regardless of the reader, BB were identified in a significantly higher percentage of women with a fracture (75 versus 39%, p fracture. BB are associated with hip fracture. Their presence is a trigger for requesting a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) examination to confirm or refute a diagnosis of low bone mineral density (BMD) and a subsequent increased risk of fracture. Copyright © 2012 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. STRUGGLE AGAINST ORGANIZED CRIMINALITY AND CORRUPTION AS SAFETY CONDITION FOR NORT-CAUCASIAN FEDERAL DISTRICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Startsev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to address the problem of safety in the North Caucasian region, suppression of underground gangs’ subversive and terroristic activities have been continuously undertaken for quite a long time within the frames of the military force strategy. Since interrelation of these gangs with common criminal and corruption groups and individuals were not taken into account, the suppression has not proved to be effective. Data cited in the article demonstrate a high level of criminality in this region. Inefficiency is also characteristic for means and ways used by law enforcement bodies in their struggle with organized criminality and corruption obviously resulting in negative influence on the whole system of counteractions with respect of terrorism. There is another essential problem specific in particular to the North Caucasian region, the problem of clans reigning in state, power and other bodies. Solution of tasks put force by the Russian Federation President will make it possible to considerably improve the existing terrorism counteraction policy in the North Caucasian region of Russia.

  7. Analysis of sequence variability in the CART gene in relation to obesity in a Caucasian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hercberg Serge

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART is an anorectic neuropeptide located principally in hypothalamus. CART has been shown to be involved in control of feeding behavior, but a direct relationship with obesity has not been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of polymorphisms within the CART gene with regards to a possible association with obesity in a Caucasian population. Results Screening of the entire gene as well as a 3.7 kb region of 5' upstream sequence revealed 31 SNPs and 3 rare variants ; 14 of which were subsequently genotyped in 292 French morbidly obese subjects and 368 controls. Haplotype analysis suggested an association with obesity which was found to be mainly due to SNP-3608T>C (rs7379701 (p = 0.009. Genotyping additional cases and controls also of European Caucasian origin supported further this possible association between the CART SNP -3608T>C T allele and obesity (global p-value = 0.0005. Functional studies also suggested that the SNP -3608T>C could modulate nuclear protein binding. Conclusion CART SNP -3608T>C may possibly contribute to the genetic risk for obesity in the Caucasian population. However confirmation of the importance of the role of the CART gene in energy homeostasis and obesity will require investigation and replication in further populations.

  8. The moderating effects of parenting styles on African-American and Caucasian children's suicidal behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greening, Leilani; Stoppelbein, Laura; Luebbe, Aaron

    2010-04-01

    Given that parenting practices have been linked to suicidal behavior in adolescence, examining the moderating effect of parenting styles on suicidal behavior early in development could offer potential insight into possible buffers as well as directions for suicide prevention and intervention later in adolescence. Hence, the moderating effects of parenting styles, including authoritarian, permissive, and features of authoritative parenting, on depressed and aggressive children's suicidal behavior, including ideation and attempts, were evaluated with young children (N = 172; 72% male, 28% female) ranging from 6 to 12 years of age. African American (69%) and Caucasian (31%) children admitted for acute psychiatric inpatient care completed standardized measures of suicidal behavior, depressive symptoms, and proactive and reaction aggression. Their parents also completed standardized measures of parental distress and parenting style. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that, while statistically controlling for age and gender, children who endorsed more depressive symptoms or reactive aggression reported more current and past suicidal behavior than children who endorsed fewer depressive or aggressive symptoms. The significant positive relationship observed between depressive symptoms and childhood suicidal behavior, however, was attenuated by parental use of authoritarian parenting practices for African-American and older children but not for younger and Caucasian children. The ethnic/racial difference observed for the buffering effect of authoritarian parenting practices offers potential theoretical and clinical implications for conceptualizing the moderating effects of parenting styles on African-American and Caucasian children's suicidal behavior.

  9. In vivo and in vitro characterization of CYP2E1 activity in Japanese and Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, R B; Yamazaki, H; Chiba, K; O'Shea, D; Mimura, M; Guengerich, F P; Ishizaki, T; Shimada, T; Wilkinson, G R

    1996-10-01

    Chlorzoxazone's disposition after oral administration was determined in 20 young healthy Caucasian men and a similar group of Japanese men. The drug's plasma concentrations were significantly higher and its rate of elimination slower in Japanese compared to Caucasian men. Accordingly, chlorzoxazone's oral clearance was smaller (40%) in Japanese men and a similar difference (30%) was still apparent after normalizing for body weight (3.74 +/- 1.23 versus 5.05 +/- 1.41 ml.min-1.kg-1, P relationships were found between measures of CYP2E1 activity, both in vivo and in vitro, and genomic polymorphisms in the CYP2E1 gene identified by Rsal/Pstl and Dral restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Collectively, these data show an interracial difference in CYP2E1 activity. Because this enzyme is importantly involved in the activation of environmental procarcinogens, such a difference may account, in part, for the lower rate of some cancers, e.g., lung cancer, in Japanese compared to Caucasians men.

  10. Case of Thyrotoxic Periodic Paralysis in a Caucasian Male and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina K. Thethi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP, a known condition in Asian men, is becoming increasingly common in men from Western countries. Since suspicion for TPP as a differential in diagnosis is of utmost importance to avoid overcorrection of hypokalemia and other complications, we are reporting a case of TPP in a 25-year-old Caucasian male. Methods. The patient presented with intermittent lower extremity weakness after consumption of a large high-carbohydrate meal. Clinical examination revealed diffusely enlarged thyroid gland, no muscle power in lower extremities, tremors, and brisk deep tendon reflexes. Results. Clinical and laboratory findings were consistent with Graves’ disease and the patient had hypokalemia. The patient responded to potassium repletion and was treated with propylthiouracil and propranolol. After treatment with radioactive iodine, the patient developed postablative hypothyroidism for which he was treated with levothyroxine. Conclusion. Since this condition is overlooked by physicians in Western countries, we present a case of TPP in a Caucasian male thus showing the importance of consideration of TPP in Caucasians despite its rare occurrence and the need for prompt diagnosis to avoid the danger of hyperkalemia in management of the paralytic attack in TPP patients.

  11. Parenting and attachment among low-income African American and Caucasian preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Casey A; Wong, Kristyn; Stacks, Ann M; Beeghly, Marjorie; Barnett, Douglas

    2013-08-01

    Despite a plethora of research on parenting and infant attachment, much less is known about the contributions of parenting to preschool attachment, particularly within different racial groups. This study seeks to build on the extant literature by evaluating whether similar associations between parenting and attachment can be observed in African American and Caucasian families, and whether race moderates them. Seventy-four primary caregivers and their preschool children (51% African American, 49% Caucasian, 46% male) from similar urban, low-income backgrounds participated in two visits 4 weeks apart when children were between 4 and 5 years of age. Attachment was scored from videotapes of the Strange Situation paradigm using the preschool classification system developed by Cassidy, Marvin, and the MacArthur Working Group. Parenting was assessed using a multimethod, multicontext approach: in the child's home, in the laboratory, and via parent-report. Seventy-three percent of the children were classified as securely attached. Warm, responsive parenting behavior (but not race) predicted attachment. Although parents of African American and Caucasian children demonstrated some significant differences in parenting behaviors, race did not moderate the relationship between parenting and child attachment. These findings highlight the direct role that parenting plays over and above race in determining attachment security during the preschool period. © 2013 American Psychological Association

  12. The Losses of the Russian Armyduring the Caucasian War (1801–1864: Historical and Statistical Research

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    Aleksandr A. Cherkasov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article reflects the data obtained from official documents published by the military historical department at the headquarter of the Caucasian military district about the Russian army losses in the period of the Caucasian War 1801–1864 years. There were used the materials of personal origin, pre-revolutionary research and modern scientific publications. The analyzed statistics includes the data about the losses of Russian army over the yearswith the release of different positions: the irretrievable losses of officers and lower ranks with the division of themon reflection of highlanders’ attacks and military operations; sanitary losses; loss of prisoners. The article separately identifies from a statistical array the losses of officers, natives of the Caucasus, who served in the Russian army; the losses in the suppression of uprisings and unrest. Based on the analyzed data, the authors examined and compared the two stages of the Caucasian War: 1801–1836 and 1837–1864 years. The statistics of losses is analyzed in the context of specific historical events.

  13. Locus of control and peer relationships among Caucasian, Hispanic, Asian, and African American adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hannah Soo; Chang, Kyle Edward; Chen, Chuansheng; Greenberger, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Past research has shown that locus of control plays an important role in a wide range of behaviors, such as academic achievement and positive social behaviors. However, little is known about whether locus of control plays the same role in minority adolescents' peer relationships. The current study examined ethnic differences in the associations between locus of control and peer relationships in early adolescence using samples from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-K: 5,612 Caucasian, 1,562 Hispanic, 507 Asian, and 908 African-American adolescents) and the National Education Longitudinal Study (NELS: 8,484 Caucasian, 1,604 Hispanic, and 860 Asian, and 1,228 African American adolescents). Gender was approximately evenly split in both samples. The results from the two datasets were highly consistent. Significant interactions between ethnicity and locus of control indicated that having a more internal locus of control was particularly important for Caucasian students' peer relationships (ECLS-K) and social status (NELS), but less so for Asian, Hispanic, and African American students. Our findings suggest that the role of locus of control in peer relationship is contingent upon culture.

  14. Improving Academic Self-Efficacy, School Connectedness, and Identity in Struggling Middle School Girls: A Preliminary Study of the "REAL Girls" Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Michael J.; Smith, Megan L.; Kristjansson, Alfgeir L.

    2015-01-01

    Girls struggling to be successful in middle school are often dealing with negative life experiences that affect their ability to achieve academically. Frequently, their academic failures and problem behaviors are associated with feeling overwhelmed by difficult and challenging life circumstances. In the absence of intervention, these patterns may…

  15. Serum levels of antimüllerian hormone in early maturing girls before, during, and after suppression with GnRH agonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Casper P; Sørensen, Kaspar; Anderson, Richard A

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate whether serum antimüllerian hormone (AMH) levels are affected in early maturing girls, and whether pituitary suppression by long-acting GnRH agonist (GnRH-a) affects AMH.......To evaluate whether serum antimüllerian hormone (AMH) levels are affected in early maturing girls, and whether pituitary suppression by long-acting GnRH agonist (GnRH-a) affects AMH....

  16. Conjunctival Melanoma in Chinese Patients: Local Recurrence, Metastasis, Mortality, and Comparisons With Caucasian Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuandi; Wang, Yuxin; Jia, Renbing; Fan, Xianqun

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the prognosis in Chinese patients with conjunctival melanoma and determine its predictors. Further, to explore the racial differences in clinical characteristics and outcomes between Chinese and Caucasian patients. This cohort study included 57 eyes of 57 consecutive patients with pathologically verified conjunctival melanoma between 1996 and 2016. Medical records were reviewed for factors associated with the local recurrence, metastasis, and tumor-related mortality. All eligible patients were followed up for these three outcome measures. The demographic data, clinical characteristics, and outcomes were compared between Chinese and Caucasian patients. The mean follow-up period was 52.2 ± 49.4 months. Among the total 57 patients, 29 (51%) patients experienced local recurrence. The 1-, 5-, and 10-year recurrence rate was 31.0%, 59.7%, and 66.4%, respectively. Treatment complications detected in the follow-up included dry eye (32, 56.1%), irregular eyelid margin (25, 43.9%), eyelid retraction (18, 31.6%), blepharoptosis (9, 15.8%), mixed pigmentation of the tarsus reconstructed by mucosal membrane graft, corneal opacities (6, 10.5%), and symblepharon (2, 3.5%). Twenty (35%) patients developed metastasis. The 1-, 5-, and 10-year metastasis rate was 16.7%, 38.7%, and 50.9%, respectively. Fourteen (25%) patients died of conjunctival melanoma, with a median survival time of 24 months. The 1-, 5-, and 10-year tumor-related mortality was 3.8%, 30.5%, and 37.4%, respectively. Tumor hemorrhage is an independent risk factor for tumor-related death (hazard ratio [HR]: 18.81, P = 0.01) and metastasis (HR: 4.57, P = 0.02). Significant differences were noted between Chinese and Caucasians patients from America, Germany, and England in demographics, clinical characteristics, and outcomes. Compared to Caucasians, Chinese patients tended to have more male cases (P metastasis (P melanoma is a rare malignancy with great potential for mortality in Chinese. Special attention

  17. Naegleria fowleri That Induces Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis: Rapid Diagnosis and Rare Case of Survival in a 12-Year-Old Caucasian Girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Andrew L; Reed, Tameika; Stewart, Charlotte; Levy, Rebecca A

    2016-05-01

    Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a rare and almost always fatal disease that is caused by Naegleria fowleri, a freshwater thermophilic amoeba. Our case involves an adolescent female who presented with fever of unknown origin. A lumbar puncture was performed, and the Wright-Giemsa and Gram stained cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytospin slides showed numerous organisms. Experienced medical technologists in the microbiology and hematology laboratories identified the organisms as morphologically consistent with Naegleria species. The laboratory made a rapid diagnosis and alerted emergency department care providers within 75 minutes. The patient was treated for PAM with amphotericin, rifampin, azithromycin, fluconazole and aggressive supportive therapy including dexamethasone. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) was contacted, and miltefosine, an investigational medication, was started. Additional treatment included an intraventricular shunt and controlled hypothermia in order to mitigate potential cerebral edema. Our patient is a rare success story, as she was diagnosed swiftly, successfully treated, and survived PAM. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. The girl child and law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses the flaws in India's legislation dealing with female children and equality, marriage age, rape, adoption, child care, and inheritance. India's national policies treat children as commodities and not human beings with their own rights. The best interests of a child are not generally served in a manner that advances their welfare. Exploitation of children for labor and sexual abuse of children is widespread. Only some children have such basic needs met as education, nutrition, food, health, clothing, shelter. Children are defined by the UN as human beings below the age of 18 years. However, in India the Constitution protects only children younger than 14 in employment. The prostitution act protects children younger than 16. The juvenile justice protects girls under the age of 18 years and boys under the age of 16 years. Hindus recognize inheritance of family property only for sons. This custom contributes to the abortion of female fetuses. The practice of equal protection under the law has enough loopholes to safeguard the interests of masculine patriarchal values, norms, and structure. The Act of Marriage does not deal directly with the issue of validity and only recommends a suitable age of marriage. Women can seek divorce on the grounds she was too young to marry only if the marriage occurred before the age of 15 years. Sexual intercourse with a woman under 16 years old is rape, with or without her consent. However, in practice men receive a lesser punishment for rape if the woman is his own wife and not under 12 years of age. The rape must be reported within a year of its occurrence. India's laws penalize the adults involved in child marriages, but the Hindu Marriage Act punishes only the parties married, including the child. Marriage registration is not compulsory. India's protective laws distinguish between prostitutes and men who use prostitutes, husbands versus wives in fidelity disputes, married versus unmarried or "unchaste" women

  19. Body composition is the main determinant for the difference in type 2 diabetes pathophysiology between Japanese and Caucasians

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Møller, Jonas B; Pedersen, Maria; Tanaka, Haruhiko; Ohsugi, Mitsuru; Overgaard, Rune V; Lynge, Jan; Almind, Katrine; Vasconcelos, Nina-Maria; Poulsen, Pernille; Keller, Charlotte; Ueki, Kohjiro; Ingwersen, Steen H; Pedersen, Bente K; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This cross-sectional clinical study compared the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes in Japanese and Caucasians and investigated the role of demographic, genetic, and lifestyle-related risk...

  20. Familial occurrence of autoimmune diseases and autoantibodies in a Caucasian population of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corporaal, S.; Bijl, Marc; Kallenberg, Cees

    To determine the prevalence of autoimmune diseases and autoantibodies in relatives of Caucasian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) we questioned 118 patients for the prevalence of autoimmune diseases in their relatives. Multicase SLE families were selected for further investigation:

  1. Health concerns of sexual minority adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joanna D; Melchiono, Maurice W

    2006-08-01

    The goal of this article is to provide an overview of up-to-date health information about sexual minority female youth so that healthcare practitioners can better serve their healthcare needs. Sexual minority adolescent girls may follow diverse sexual developmental trajectories. Many in this population are quite healthy, but some may be disproportionately vulnerable to health risks, perhaps because of the stigma associated with minority sexuality in society. If sexually active, girls in this population often have sex with boys as well as girls and confront risks attendant with sex with both genders. They may demonstrate fluidity in their sexual identity as they move through adolescence. Data suggest that sexual minority adolescent girls are more likely to smoke cigarettes, drink alcohol, or use illicit drugs compared with girls who are heterosexual. They may be more likely to be victims of violence or victimization or to be depressed or suicidal. Sexual minority adolescent girls may be quite resilient, but they face a range of possible adverse health risks. Healthcare practitioners should keep their health issues in mind so they can offer healthcare and counseling that is sensitive, comprehensive, and appropriate.

  2. Girls' Attitudes Towards Science in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetcuti, Deborah A.; Kioko, Beriter

    2012-07-01

    This study investigated girls' attitudes towards science in Kenya. It was carried out with 120 girls from four secondary schools in the Eastern province of Kenya. These were an urban single-sex (SS) and co-educational (Co-Ed) school and a rural SS and Co-Ed school. Different schools were chosen in order to explore whether there are any differences in attitudes in SS and Co-Ed schools and in schools in rural and urban areas. The methodology included the use of both questionnaires and focus group interviews. The main aim was to gain insight into the extent and depth of students' attitudes towards science. The findings of the study showed that the majority of Kenyan girls who participated in the study have a favourable attitude towards science. Girls in SS schools were found to have a more favourable attitude than those in Co-Ed schools, while girls in rural area schools were found to find science more relevant than those in urban schools. It emerged from this study that the attitudes of Kenyan girls are influenced by their perceptions of the relevance of science, enjoyment of studying science, perceptions of the suitability of science for a career, and their perceptions of subject difficulty.

  3. Emotion recognition in girls with conduct problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenck, Christina; Gensthaler, Angelika; Romanos, Marcel; Freitag, Christine M; Schneider, Wolfgang; Taurines, Regina

    2014-01-01

    A deficit in emotion recognition has been suggested to underlie conduct problems. Although several studies have been conducted on this topic so far, most concentrated on male participants. The aim of the current study was to compare recognition of morphed emotional faces in girls with conduct problems (CP) with elevated or low callous-unemotional (CU+ vs. CU-) traits and a matched healthy developing control group (CG). Sixteen girls with CP-CU+, 16 girls with CP-CU- and 32 controls (mean age: 13.23 years, SD=2.33 years) were included. Video clips with morphed faces were presented in two runs to assess emotion recognition. Multivariate analysis of variance with the factors group and run was performed. Girls with CP-CU- needed more time than the CG to encode sad, fearful, and happy faces and they correctly identified sadness less often. Girls with CP-CU+ outperformed the other groups in the identification of fear. Learning effects throughout runs were the same for all groups except that girls with CP-CU- correctly identified fear less often in the second run compared to the first run. Results need to be replicated with comparable tasks, which might result in subgroup-specific therapeutic recommendations.

  4. Lysinuric protein intolerance in a 5-month-old girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viplav Narayan Deogaonkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI, also known as cationic aminoaciduria, hyperdibasic aminoaciduria type 2, or familial protein intolerance, is an autosomal recessive defect of diamino acid transport. LPI is characterized by the inability of the body to digest and utilize certain amino acids, namely lysine, arginine, and ornithine. As a result, there is an increased excretion of these amino acids, which in turn affects the liver, the gastrointestinal tract, lungs, immune system, spleen, and organs producing blood. We report a 5-month-old girl born of third degree consanguineous marriage who presented with hepatosplenomegaly with sepsis and worsening jaundice due to LPI.

  5. Phenotype and frequency of STUB1 mutations: next-generation screenings in Caucasian ataxia and spastic paraplegia cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Mutations in the gene STUB1, encoding the protein CHIP (C-terminus of HSC70-interacting protein), have recently been suggested as a cause of recessive ataxia based on the findings in few Chinese families. Here we aimed to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic spectrum of STUB1 mutations, and to assess their frequency in different Caucasian disease cohorts. Methods 300 subjects with degenerative ataxia (n = 167) or spastic paraplegia (n = 133) were screened for STUB1 variants by whole-exome-sequencing (n = 204) or shotgun-fragment-library-sequencing (n = 96). To control for the specificity of STUB1 variants, we screened an additional 1707 exomes from 891 index families with other neurological diseases. Results We identified 3 ataxia patients (3/167 = 1.8%) with 4 novel missense mutations in STUB1, including 3 mutations in its tetratricopeptide-repeat domain. All patients showed evidence of pyramidal tract damage. Cognitive impairment was present only in one and hypogonadism in none of them. Ataxia did not start before age 48 years in one subject. No recessive STUB1 variants were identified in families with other neurological diseases, demonstrating that STUB1 variants are not simply rare polymorphisms ubiquitous in neurodegenerative disease. Conclusions STUB1-disease occurs also in Caucasian ataxia populations (1.8%). Our results expand the genotypic spectrum of STUB1-disease, showing that pathogenic mutations affect also the tetratricopeptide-repeat domain, thus providing clinical evidence for the functional importance of this domain. Moreover, they further delineate the phenotypic core features of STUB1-ataxia. Pyramidal tract damage is a common accompanying feature and can include lower limb spasticity, thus adding STUB1-ataxia to the differential diagnosis of “spastic ataxias”. However, STUB1 is rare in subjects with predominant spastic paraplegia (0/133). In contrast to previous reports, STUB1-ataxia can start even above age 40

  6. A prospective cohort study comparing early opioid requirement between Chinese from Hong Kong and Caucasian Australians after major abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konstantatos, A H; Imberger, G; Angliss, M

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between ethnicity and early opioid consumption is not well understood. Our prospective cohort study tested whether Chinese patients in Hong Kong require less opioid after major abdominal surgery compared with Caucasian patients in Australia.......The relationship between ethnicity and early opioid consumption is not well understood. Our prospective cohort study tested whether Chinese patients in Hong Kong require less opioid after major abdominal surgery compared with Caucasian patients in Australia....

  7. Differences in Exercise Performance and Leisure-Time Physical Activity in Older Caucasians and African-Americans

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, Andrew W.; Montgomery, Polly S.

    2008-01-01

    Purposes: (a) To compare exercise performance and leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) between older Caucasians and African-Americans, (b) to assess the relationship between exercise performance and LTPA, and (c) to determine whether group differences in exercise performance persist after adjusting for differences in LTPA.Methods: A total of 207 Caucasians and 160 African-Americans who were 65 years of age and older participated in this study. Subjects were characterized on exercise perfor...

  8. An unusual insertion/deletion in the gene encoding the. beta. -subunit of propionyl-CoA carboxylase is a frequent mutation in Caucasian propionic acidemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahara, T.; Kraus, J.P.; Rosenberg, L.E. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (USA))

    1990-02-01

    Propionic acidemia is an inherited disorder of organic acid metabolism that is caused by deficiency of propionly-CoA carboxylase. Affected patients fall into two complementation groups, pccA and pccBC (subgroups B, C, and BC), resulting from deficiency of the nonidentical {alpha} and {beta} subunits of PCC, respectively. The authors have detected an unusual insertion/deletion in the DNA of patients from the pccBC and pccC subgroups that replaces 14 nucleotides in the coding sequence of the {beta} subunit with 12 nucleotides unrelated to this region of the gene. Among 14 unrelated Caucasian patients in the pccBc complementation group, this unique mutation was found in 8 of 28 mutant alleles examined. Mutant allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization to amplified genomic DNAs revealed that the inserted 12 nucleotides do not originate in an {approx}1000-bp region around the mutation. In the course of the investigation, they identified another mutation in the same exon: a 3-bp in-frame deletion that eliminates one of two isoleucine codons immediately preceding the Msp I site. Two unrelated patients were compound heterozygotes for this single-codon deletion and for the insertion/deletion described above. They conclude that either there is a propensity for the PCC {beta}-subunit gene to undergo mutations of this sort at this position or, more likely, the mutations in all of the involved Caucasian patients have a common origin in preceding generations.

  9. The visuo-cognitive and motor effect of amantadine in non-Caucasian patients with Parkinson's disease. A clinical and electrophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandini, F; Pierantozzi, M; Bodis-Wollner, I

    2002-01-01

    It has been reported that non-Caucasian populations often suffer from an atypical type of Parkinson's disease (PD) characterized by poor levodopa response, early cognitive impairment and autonomic dysfunction. We tested the effect of a well known antiparkinsonian compound, amantadine, in 23 Afro-American patients with PD in a time-limited (six months), open-label, clinical and electrophysiological (simultaneously recorded primary and cognitive visual evoked potentials) trial. Patients were given amantadine either as monotherapy (first group) or added to levodopa treatment (second group). Amantadine produced a significant (p discrimination paradigm, while the timing of primary visual evoked potentials was little or not at all affected. Amantadine also showed significant beneficial effects (p < 0.01) on the motor score of both groups as assessed by the Rated Parkinson's Disease Neurological Exam, including items related to autonomic dysfunction. These findings suggest that amantadine alone and as adjuvant to levodopa can significantly improve both the speed of visual cognitive processing and the clinical score in non caucasian patients with PD. For these populations amantadine can be thus considered a helpful therapeutical option.

  10. Understanding Aggressive Girls in Canada: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artz, Sibylle; Nicholson, Diana

    This review of the literature on aggression and violence in girls, especially girls in Canada, begins with data showing increasing rates of assault and other violent crimes by Canadian girls, although the rate for girls continues to be much less than for boys (a fact possibly responsible for the small amount of research on this population). The…

  11. Experiences in sport, physical activity, and physical education among Christian, Buddhist, and Hindu Asian adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kaori; Kodani, Iku; Gupta, Nidhi; Gill, Diane L

    2013-01-01

    Multicultural scholarship in sport and exercise psychology should help us understand and apply cultural competencies for all to be physically active. In the present study, two Asian countries, Japan and Singapore, were chosen. The participation rate for physical activities among adolescent girls tends to be lower than that of boys in both countries. Thus, the purpose of the project was to gain knowledge and understanding about sociocultural factors that may explain adolescent girls' perceptions and behaviors toward sport, physical activity, and physical education (PE). A qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews with focus groups was used to understand meanings of physical activity among Buddhist Japanese, and Hindu Indians and Christian Chinese from Singapore. Each focus group consisted of four or five girls and female researchers. Based on the analysis, we created four themes which were "cultural identities," "Asian girls and sport/physical activities," "PE experiences," "motivation for future involvement." The Buddhist Japanese, Hindu Indian, and Christian Chinese participants each reported unique physical activity experiences, and all the participants were aware of how Asian culture may affect being physically active. Experiences of PE classes were similar but perceptions of their PE attire were different for Christian Chinese and Hindu Indian adolescent girls. Based on the results, the importance of nurturing cultural competencies and ways to encourage girls to be physically active throughout life were discussed.

  12. Building Science Identity in Disadvantaged Teenage Girls using an Apprenticeship Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, E. C.; Conner, L.; Tzou, C.

    2015-12-01

    Expeditionary science differs from laboratory science in that expeditionary science teams conduct investigations in conditions that are often physically and socially, as well as intellectually, challenging. Team members live in close quarters for extended periods of time, team building and leadership affect the scientific process, and research tools are limited to what is available on site. Girls on Ice is an expeditionary science experience primarily for disadvantaged girls; it fully immerses girls in a mini scientific expedition to study alpine, glacierized environments. In addition to mentoring the girls through conducting their own scientific research, we encourage awareness and discussion of different sociocultural perspectives on the relation between the natural world, science, and society. The experience aligns closely with the apprenticeship model of learning, which can be effective in enhancing identification with science. Using a mixed-methods approach, we show that the Girls on Ice model helps girls (1) increase their interest and engagement in science and build a stronger science identity, (2) develop confidence, importantly they develop a combined physical and intellectual confidence; (3) engage in authentic scientific thinking, including critical thinking and problem solving; and (4) enhance leadership self-confidence. We discuss these results in a learning sciences framework, which posits that learning is inseparable from the social and physical contexts in which it takes place.

  13. Daily shame and hostile irritability in adolescent girls with borderline personality disorder symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lori N; Stepp, Stephanie D; Hallquist, Michael N; Whalen, Diana J; Wright, Aidan G C; Pilkonis, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Recent theoretical and empirical work suggests that adults with borderline personality disorder (BPD) have difficulty regulating both shame and anger, and that these emotions may be functionally related in clinically relevant ways (e.g., Schoenleber & Berenbaum, 2012b). The covariation of shame with anger-related emotions has important clinical implications for interventions targeting shame and uncontrolled anger in BPD. However, no studies have examined shame, anger, and their covariation in adolescents who may be at risk for developing BPD. Therefore, this study focuses on associations between BPD symptoms and patterns of covariation between daily experiences of shame and anger-related affects (i.e., hostile irritability) in a community sample of adolescent girls using ecological momentary assessment. Multilevel models revealed that girls with greater BPD symptoms who reported greater mean levels of shame across the week also tended to report more hostile irritability, even after controlling for guilt. Additionally, examination of within-person variability showed that girls with greater BPD symptoms reported more hostile irritability on occasions when they also reported greater concurrent shame, but this was only the case in girls of average socioeconomic status (i.e., those not receiving public assistance). Unlike shame, guilt was not associated with hostile irritability in girls with greater BPD symptoms. Results suggest that shame may be a key clinical target in the treatment of anger-related difficulties among adolescent girls with BPD symptoms. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Long-Term Exposure to American and European Movies and Television Series Facilitates Caucasian Face Perception in Young Chinese Watchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yamin; Zhou, Lu

    2016-10-01

    Most young Chinese people now learn about Caucasian individuals via media, especially American and European movies and television series (AEMT). The current study aimed to explore whether long-term exposure to AEMT facilitates Caucasian face perception in young Chinese watchers. Before the experiment, we created Chinese, Caucasian, and generic average faces (generic average face was created from both Chinese and Caucasian faces) and tested participants' ability to identify them. In the experiment, we asked AEMT watchers and Chinese movie and television series (CMT) watchers to complete a facial norm detection task. This task was developed recently to detect norms used in facial perception. The results indicated that AEMT watchers coded Caucasian faces relative to a Caucasian face norm better than they did to a generic face norm, whereas no such difference was found among CMT watchers. All watchers coded Chinese faces by referencing a Chinese norm better than they did relative to a generic norm. The results suggested that long-term exposure to AEMT has the same effect as daily other-race face contact in shaping facial perception. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Examining social support, rumination, and optimism in relation to binge eating among Caucasian and African-American college women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Tyler B; Lewis, Robin J

    2017-12-01

    Binge eating is a significant concern among college age women-both Caucasian and African-American women. Research has shown that social support, coping, and optimism are associated with engaging in fewer negative health behaviors including binge eating among college students. However, the impact of sources of social support (i.e., support from family, friends, and a special person), rumination, and optimism on binge eating as a function of race/ethnicity has received less attention. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between social support, rumination, and optimism and binge eating among Caucasian and American-American women, separately. Caucasian (n = 100) and African-American (n = 84) women from a university in the Mid-Atlantic US completed an online survey about eating behaviors and psychosocial health. Social support from friends was associated with less likelihood of binge eating among Caucasian women. Social support from family was associated with less likelihood of binge eating among African-American women, but greater likelihood of binge eating among Caucasian women. Rumination was associated with greater likelihood of binge eating among Caucasian and African-American women. Optimism was associated with less likelihood of binge eating among African-American women. These results demonstrate similarities and differences in correlates of binge eating as a function of race/ethnicity.

  16. [Girls of today, women of tomorrow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, C

    1996-01-01

    In many countries, girls are discriminated against in nutrition, education, health care, and other areas, to the detriment of their personal development. Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) concerned with promoting women's rights have come to regard the problem of girls' rights as very serious. Attention to girls in the past was focused on adolescent pregnancy or on social problems such as violence or child prostitution. But in the view of the NGOs, gender equity will be impossible to achieve as long as discrimination against girls continues. In addition, limiting the opportunities of girls will inevitably limit their potential contributions to society. The UN General Assembly in September 1989 approved the Convention on the Rights of Children, the principal goals of which were to eliminate malnutrition, preventable diseases, and illiteracy. The World Conference on Children in 1990 was attended by representatives of over 150 countries, who specified concrete goals. Measurable progress has occurred. UNICEF estimates, for example, that 2.5 million fewer children died on 1996 than in 1990, but it is probable that over half of the children in Latin America and the Caribbean live in poverty. In 1990, nearly 1 million children under age 5 in the region died of preventable diseases, and some 7 million were estimated to be malnourished, 1 million seriously. Infant mortality rates indicate that most countries of the region have improved their health status, but the rate has apparently increased in Haiti, Bolivia, and Peru. The Pan American Health Organization and the Demographic and Health Surveys have accumulated data indicating that excess mortality has occurred among girls 1-4 years old in at least 9 countries of the region. Some evidence suggests that health care is less likely to be sought for girls than boys. Domestic violence and sexual abuse are a serious problem for girls and women, but many countries continue to avoid the issue. The 1993 UN Declaration of Human

  17. Meeting the need. Special report: educating girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D

    1993-01-01

    Educated women are more productive, more confident, marry later, use family planning, and have healthier children. There are an estimated 600 million illiterate women in the world, which is double the number of male illiterates. Improvements have been made in the past 10 years in educating girls. Current figures indicate that 65% of girls and 78% of boys enter primary school in developing countries vs. 20% and 11%, respectively, 10 years earlier. 37% of girls and 48% of boys are in secondary schools. An additional 56 million girls need to be enrolled in order to achieve parity with boys. The education of girls in Africa has suffered setbacks in the past decade due to economic recession. Primary school enrollment fell from 80% of eligible children in 1980 to 76% in 1986. Many countries are having difficulty keeping pace with population growth and educating more girls. There are many factors which interfere with girls' schooling: shortages of schools, lack of educational materials, cost of schools or educational materials, girl's status in society, competition with other household chores, child labor, time schedules of classes, flexibility of schools in allowing dropping in and out of school, lack of the appropriate kind of resources, distance to schools, lack of sanitation, and values emphasizing "respectability" rather than autonomy. Many countries are using innovative solutions to these difficulties. For example, in Bangladesh, Liberia, Morocco, and Tanzania, schools are "double shift" where classes are conducted in the morning, in the afternoon, and sometimes again in the evening for adult education. Communities and shanty towns are constructing their own crude buildings as schools close to home. However, in Egypt school construction is not the only answer; 400 new primary schools were opened and male enrollment increased from 90% to 100% and female enrollment rose to 74%. In Nigeria, cost of books and uniforms prevents many from attending. Poor families must be

  18. Psychosocial Adjustment in School-age Girls With a Family History of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Angela R.; Patrick-Miller, Linda; Schwartz, Lisa; Egleston, Brian; Sands, Colleen Burke; Chung, Wendy K.; Glendon, Gord; McDonald, Jasmine A.; Moore, Cynthia; Rauch, Paula; Tuchman, Lisa; Andrulis, Irene L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Frost, Caren J.; Keegan, Theresa H.M.; Knight, Julia A.; Terry, Mary Beth; John, Esther M.; Daly, Mary B.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Understanding how young girls respond to growing up with breast cancer family histories is critical given expansion of genetic testing and breast cancer messaging. We examined the impact of breast cancer family history on psychosocial adjustment and health behaviors among >800 girls in the multicenter LEGACY Girls Study. METHODS Girls aged 6 to 13 years with a family history of breast cancer or familial BRCA1/2 mutation (BCFH+), peers without a family history (BCFH−), and their biological mothers completed assessments of psychosocial adjustment (maternal report for 6- to 13-year-olds, self-report for 10- to 13-year-olds), breast cancer–specific distress, perceived risk of breast cancer, and health behaviors (10- to 13-year-olds). RESULTS BCFH+ girls had better general psychosocial adjustment than BCFH− peers by maternal report. Psychosocial adjustment and health behaviors did not differ significantly by self-report among 10- to 13-year-old girls. BCFH+ girls reported higher breast cancer–specific distress (P = .001) and were more likely to report themselves at increased breast cancer risk than BCFH− peers (38.4% vs 13.7%, P communication. Higher daughter breast cancer–specific distress was associated with higher maternal breast cancer-specific distress. CONCLUSIONS Although growing up in a family at risk for breast cancer does not negatively affect general psychosocial adjustment among preadolescent girls, those from breast cancer risk families experience greater breast cancer–specific distress. Interventions to address daughter and mother breast cancer concerns and responses to genetic or familial risk might improve psychosocial outcomes of teen daughters. PMID:26482668

  19. Interpreting the relationships between single gender science classes and girls' academic motivation and interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sonya L.

    The purpose of this study was to determine how and to what extent single gender science classes affect motivation to learn scientific concepts, interest in science, and college major intent among high school and middle school girls. This study was designed to determine whether students' motivation to learn science changes when they are placed in a single gender science class. The study also measured whether the students' level of interest in science and desire to major in science changes based on their enrollment in a single gender class. Finally, the study investigated the career and college major intentions of the sample population used in the study. Girls in single gender groupings engage in more academic risk taking and participate more than girls in coeducational classes. This benefit alone responds to reform efforts and supports the abolition of gender-based obstacles. Single gender grouping could help encourage more girls to take interest in majoring in science, a field that is considered to be masculine. By increasing students' interest in science while enrolled in single gender classes, students may become more motivated to learn science. This study was conducted using seven, eighth, ninth and tenth grade girls from single sex and coeducational science classes. The students participated in 2 surveys, the Science Motivational Survey and the Test of Science Related Attitudes, at the beginning of the semester and at the end of the semester. In respect to girls in high school single gender science classes, results were contrary to recent studies that state that girls who received science education in a single gender setting have an increase in motivation and attitude towards science. The results did show that middle school girls in single gender science classes did show an increase in motivation.

  20. The effects of a science intervention program on the attitudes and achievement of high school girls in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steakley, Carrie Capers

    This study investigated the effects of a high school science intervention program that included hands-on activities, science-related career information and exposure, and real-world experiences on girls' attitudes and achievement in science. Eighty-four girls, 44 ninth-graders and 40 tenth-graders, and 105 parents participated in the study. Survey data was collected to assess the girls' attitudes toward science in seven distinct areas: social implications of science, normality of scientists, attitude toward scientific inquiry, adoption of scientific attitudes, enjoyment of science lessons, leisure interest in science, and career interest in science. Additional questionnaires were used to determine the extent of the girls' participation in sports and the attitudes of their parents toward science. The girls' cumulative science semester grade point averages since the seventh grade were used to assess academic science achievement. This study found no evidence that participation in the program improved the girls' attitudes or achievement in science. Parent attitudes and years of participation in sports were not accurate predictors of science achievement. Additionally, no significant relationship was detected between the girls' and their parents' perceptions of science. However, the study did suggest that extended participation in sports may positively affect science achievement for girls. This study holds implications for educational stakeholders who seek to implement intervention methods and programs that may improve student attitudes and achievement in science and attract more youth to future science-related careers.

  1. Effect of the sun on visible clinical signs of aging in Caucasian skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flament F

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Frederic Flament,1 Roland Bazin,2 Sabine Laquieze,3 Virginie Rubert,1 Elisa Simonpietri,4 Bertrand Piot1 1Department of Applied Research and Development, L'Oreal Research and Innovation, Paris, France; 2RB Consult, Bievres, France; 3Private Dermatology Consultancy Practice, Montpellier, France; 4BIOTHERM International, Levallois-Perret, France Objectives: Aging signs can be classified into four main categories: wrinkles/texture, lack of firmness of cutaneous tissues (ptosis, vascular disorders, and pigmentation heterogeneities. During a lifetime, skin will change in appearance and structure not only because of chronological and intrinsic processes but also due to several external factors such as gravity, sun and ultraviolet exposure, and high levels of pollution; or lifestyle factors that have important and obvious effects on skin aging, such as diet, tobacco, illness, or stress. The effect of these external factors leads to progressive degradations of tegument that appear with different kinetics. The aim of this study was to clinically quantify the effect of sun exposure on facial aging in terms of the appearance of new specific signs or in terms of increasing the classical signs of aging. Materials and methods: This study was carried out on 298 Caucasian women from 30 years to 78 years old. The participants were divided into two groups according to their sun exposure history: 157 women were characterized as sun-seeking, and the other 141 were classified as sun-phobic. This division was made possible by dermatologist grading of heliodermal status on the basis of several observations of classic criteria: wrinkles, sagging, pigmentation heterogeneities, vascular disorders, elastosis, and so on. This work was an opportunity to complete clinical photographic tools by adding in our portfolio new scales for signs observed in the two groups. Thus, 22 clinical parameters were investigated by a panel of twelve trained experts to characterize each woman

  2. Weight information labels on media models reduce body dissatisfaction in adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuis, Jolanda; Konijn, Elly A; Seidell, Jacob C

    2012-06-01

    To examine how weight information labels on variously sized media models affect (pre)adolescent girls' body perceptions and how they compare themselves with media models. We used a three (body shape: extremely thin vs. thin vs. normal weight) × three (information label: 6-kg underweight vs. 3-kg underweight vs. normal weight) experimental design in three age-groups (9-10 years, 12-13 years, and 15-16 years; n = 184). The girls completed questionnaires after exposure to media models. Weight information labels affected girls' body dissatisfaction, social comparison with media figures, and objectified body consciousness. Respondents exposed to an extremely thin body shape labeled to be of "normal weight" were most dissatisfied with their own bodies and showed highest levels of objectified body consciousness and comparison with media figures. An extremely thin body shape combined with a corresponding label (i.e., 6-kg underweight), however, induced less body dissatisfaction and less comparison with the media model. Age differences were also found to affect body perceptions: adolescent girls showed more negative body perceptions than preadolescents. Weight information labels may counteract the generally media-induced thin-body ideal. That is, when the weight labels appropriately informed the respondents about the actual thinness of the media model's body shape, girls were less affected. Weight information labels also instigated a normalization effect when a "normal-weight" label was attached to underweight-sized media models. Presenting underweight as a normal body shape, clearly increased body dissatisfaction in girls. Results also suggest age between preadolescence and adolescence as a critical criterion in responding to media models' body shape. Copyright © 2012 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. "The Girl Is Brought up Knowing She's Nothing": Listening to Voices of Tanzanian Women and Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagues, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Despite positive changes made in Tanzania to promote gender equality, discrimination toward women and girls still exists, especially in some remote areas. Often such inequality exists within family, schools, and the community, leading to a devaluing of girls that results in normalization of their exploitation. The author discusses findings from…

  4. Mean Girls, Homosociality and Football: An Education on Social and Power Dynamics between Girls and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kellie

    2015-01-01

    Relationships between girls and women have typically been explored through the lexicon of "friendship" or, where there is a presence of sexual desire, "lesbian". This article suggests the complexity and impact of female (same-sex) sociality, and its relationship to heteronormativity and power dynamics between girls and women…

  5. Missionary Girl Power: Saving the "Third World" One Girl at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensoy, Ozlem; Marshall, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Deborah Ellis's "The Breadwinner" is a popular young adult novel about Muslim girls. In this paper, we offer an analysis of the representation of Muslim girls and women in the book as well as responses from undergraduate students enrolled in a children's literature course to these constructions. Building on the work of postcolonial feminism…

  6. Girls' Bodily Activities in Physical Education How Current Fitness and Sport Discourses Influence Girls' Identity Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walseth, Kristin; Aartun, Iselin; Engelsrud, Gunn

    2017-01-01

    Girls' identity constructions are influenced by the dominant sport, health and beauty discourses in their society. Recent research indicates that sport and health discourses embedded in physical education (PE) compete for influence. Some of these studies have illustrated how these discourses inform girls' social construction of body ideals and…

  7. And Girl Justice for All: Blending Girl-Specific & Youth Development Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muno, Ann

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a Seattle-based nonprofit organization, Powerful Voices, designed to help girls realize their dreams, engage their communities, and shape a better world. One among many efforts to address the equity gap for girls of color, Powerful Voices intertwines gender- and race-specific practices with evidence-based…

  8. Girls Helping Girls: Assessing the Influence of College Student Mentors in an Afterschool Engineering Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Stephanie; Redmond, Adrienne; Thomas, Julie; High, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Current data suggest fewer females than males continue to be interested in engineering and that this gender gap is first evidenced during middle school years. One might expect that female engineering role models would encourage adolescent girls to pursue future careers in engineering and thereby increase the girls' interests in and attitudes…

  9. Girls' Rumination and Anxiety Sensitivity: Are They Related after Controlling for Girl, Maternal, and Parenting Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Christie; Epkins, Catherine C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rumination and anxiety sensitivity are posited cognitive vulnerabilities in the development and/or maintenance of depression and anxiety and have only been examined separately in youth. Objective: We examined the relation between rumination and anxiety sensitivity in girls, after controlling for other girl, maternal, and parenting…

  10. Future Girls, Transcendent Femininities and New Pedagogies: Toward Girls' Hybrid Bodies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzarito, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Media provides a material site for girls' identity formation and presents conflicting images of femininity, which challenge young women's self-expression and physicality development. The "problem" with girls' physicality has not been resolved, but rather complicated by discourses of new femininities in sport, fitness and health promoted…

  11. Girls' Success: Mentoring Guide on Transitioning Girls from School to Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Liza; Bertone, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Mentoring girls is a challenge. Girls will come to mentors with hard questions and great hope. Sometimes mentors will be able to help make their lives better; other times they will feel that they have not done very much. This guide serves as a road map for mentors. This guide focuses on a very important step in young women's journey toward…

  12. Girls and Computer Technology: Building Skills and Improving Attitudes through a Girls' Computer Club.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobosenski, Laura

    2001-01-01

    Describes a girls' computer club started at one elementary school as an action research project. Discusses research findings about girls and computer technology; getting started; building community and establishing communication; activities and projects; using games to build computer fluency; involving volunteers; and success of the club. Includes…

  13. D-amino acid oxidase activator gene (DAOA) variation affects cerebrospinal fluid homovanillic acid concentrations in healthy Caucasians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreou, Dimitrios; Saetre, Peter; Werge, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The D-amino acid oxidase activator (DAOA) protein regulates the function of D-amino oxidase (DAO), an enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative deamination of D-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (D-DOPA) and D-serine. D-DOPA is converted to L-3,4-DOPA, a precursor of dopamine, whereas D-serine participates in...

  14. Environmental problems of resort towns of Caucasian Mineralnye Vody region during the anthropocene era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimenko, Natalia; Chalaya, Elena; Povolotckaia, Nina; Artamonova, Mariya; Senik, Irina; Slepykh, Viktor

    2017-04-01

    There has been studied the influence of ecological factors on rehabilitation properties of the atmospheric surface layer (ASL) in the mountain resorts of the Caucasian Mineralnye Vody Region (CMVR) according to the research methods [1] accepted in balneology. Taking into consideration the data of the long-term complex multiple-factor bioclimatic monitoring (PRIC FMBA, IFA RAS, SNP), it has been revealed: - the increase in frequency of inter-day variability of the integral index of weather pathogenicity (IIWP) in the range of 0,352,0). These signs are noted on the background of the continuing period of climate warming. At the present time the rehabilitation potential of ASL in the resorts of Caucasian Mineralnye Vody region is estimated within 2,08-2,68 points (max =3,0 points). Mountainous areas are more sensitive to anthropogenic impacts, changes of radiation mode and circulation modes. It was revealed that there are a number of phenomena and trends in ASL of the mountainous sites, which are negative markers of urbanization process and advent of Anthropocene era. Therefore, it is actual to form a new concept of sustainable development of mountainous resort towns with scientifically grounded territorial complex system of conservation based on the modern principles of resort town-planning that will contain some scientifically proven and legally defended criteria of environmental pressures, principles of environmentally protective gardening, regulation of transportation flows, ecologically reasonable methods of waste elimination. Finally, all the efforts must be directed to preserving natural medical resources and ensuring of their renewal. References: 1. Resort study of Caucasian Mineralnye Vody region / Under the general edition of MD, prof. V. V. Uyba. Scientific publication. - Pyatigorsk: PRIC FMBA. Volume 1. - 2009. - 335 p.; Volume 2. - 2011. - 368 p.

  15. Fighting like a girl fighting like a guy: gender identity, ideology, and girls at early adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lyn Mikel; Tappan, Mark B

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter we explore the phenomenon of "girls fighting like guys" by listening to adolescent girls' justification for physical fighting with other girls. We argue that physical girlfighting is a particular kind of gendered performance--a performance of identity that expresses, at least in part, an answer to the question, "Who am I?"--that both perpetuates and challenges the usual notions of masculinity and femininity and the differential power associated with these discourses. We present a sociocultural approach to identity that we believe not only holds promise for helping us to understand girl-fighting behavior but also highlights the clear interrelationship between social identity and personal identity. We conclude by highlighting several implications of this analysis for those who work with girls (and boys) in educational and clinical settings.

  16. Conservation of a new breeding population of Caucasian lynx(Lynx lynx dinniki) in eastern Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    CHYNOWETH, MARK; ÇOBAN, EMRAH; ŞEKERCİOĞLU, ÇAĞAN

    2015-01-01

    Current data on the distribution and ecology of the Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) in Turkey are limited. Furthermore, lynx in the Caucasus region are likely to represent a subspecies of the Eurasian lynx, the Caucasian lynx (L. l. dinniki). Throughout its range, lynx increasingly face threats due to human activity, with habitat loss and prey depletion being of particular concern in eastern Turkey. As part of our camera trapping efforts to monitor large carnivores in the Sarıkamış-Allahuekber Nati...

  17. Health Information Seeking Among Rural African Americans, Caucasians, and Hispanics: It Is Built, Did They Come?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powe, Barbara D

    2015-09-01

    This cross-sectional study examines health information-seeking behaviors and access to and use of technology among rural African Americans, Caucasians, and Hispanics. There was a low level of health information seeking across the sample. Few used smartphones or tablets and did not endorse receiving health information from their health care provider by e-mail. Printed materials remained a source of health information as did friends and family. Information should be shared using multiple platforms including more passive methods such as television and radio. More research is needed to ensure the health literacy, numeracy, and ability to navigate the online environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tooth counts do not predict bone mineral density in early postmenopausal Caucasian women. EPIC study group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Earnshaw, S A; Keating, N; Hosking, D J

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that poor dental status may be a suitable criterion for bone densitometry referral in early postmenopausal women. We evaluated this hypothesis in a cohort of 1365 Caucasian women aged between 45 and 59 years, who were enrolled into an international multi...... with normal, osteopenic or osteoporotic BMD was similar for both tertiles. CONCLUSIONS: We found no relationship between tooth count and BMD in early postmenopausal women. This may be because in younger women dental status is a reflection more of dietary habits and past dental surgery than of age-related bone...

  19. Comparison of the epidemiology of acne vulgaris among Caucasian, Asian, Continental Indian and African American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, A C; Cheng, C E; Hillebrand, G G; Miyamoto, K; Kimball, A B

    2011-09-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common skin disease with a large quality of life impact, characterized by comedones, inflammatory lesions, secondary dyspigmentation and scarring. There are few large objective studies comparing acne epidemiology between racial and ethnic groups. This study aimed to define the prevalence and subtypes of acne in women of different racial groups from four ethnicities. The sample consisted of 2895 (384 African American, 520 Asian, 1295 Caucasian, 258 Hispanic and 438 Continental Indian) women ranging in age from 10 to 70 years. Photographs of subjects were graded for acne lesions, scars, dyspigmentation, and measurements taken of sebum excretion and pore size. Clinical acne was more prevalent in African American and Hispanic women (37%, 32% respectively) than in Continental Indian, Caucasian and Asian (23%, 24%, 30% respectively) women. All racial groups displayed equal prevalence of both subtypes of acne with the exception of Asians, for whom inflammatory acne was more prevalent than comedonal (20% vs. 10%) acne, and in Caucasians, for whom comedonal acne was more prevalent than inflammatory (14% vs. 10%) acne. Hyperpigmentation was more prevalent in African American and Hispanic (65%, 48% respectively) than in Asian, Continental Indian and Caucasian (18%, 10%, 25% respectively) women. Dyspigmentation and atrophic scarring were more common in African American and Hispanic women than in all other ethnicities. There was a negative correlation between pore size and skin lightness for all ethnicities. Sebum production was positively correlated with acne severity in African American, Asian and Hispanic women, and pore size was positively correlated with acne in African American, Asian and Continental Indian women, (for all above results, PAcne was evaluated only on the left side of the face and the two-dimensional nature of photography may not capture all skin surface changes. Acne prevalence and sequelae were more common in those with darker skin types

  20. Takayasu's arteritis: a rare cause of cardiac death in a Caucasian teenage female patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, S A; Koetsveld-Baart, J C; Den Hollander, J C

    1997-11-01

    A caucasian teenage Dutch schoolgirl with known chronic low visual acuity and albinism, presented with frank acute pulmonary oedema, died after 1 h of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation for bradyarrhythmia and cardiac arrest. Two weeks prior to presentation, during sport training, she complained of oppressive chest pain on exertion accompanied with vomiting without any other systemic symptoms. Post-mortem examination revealed supravalvular stenosis of the pulmonary trunk and ascending aorta with irregular intimal thickening associated with stenosis of the left coronary artery. Microscopic examination demonstrated cellular infiltration of the wall of the aorta and pulmonary trunk with formation of granulomas with multinucleated giant cells. These features are compatible with Takayasu's arteritis.

  1. Bristol girls dance project (BGDP): protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial of an after-school dance programme to increase physical activity among 11-12 year old girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jago, Russell; Edwards, Mark J; Sebire, Simon J; Cooper, Ashley R; Powell, Jane E; Bird, Emma L; Simon, Joanne; Blair, Peter S

    2013-10-24

    Many children do not meet current UK physical activity (PA) guidelines. Girls are less active than boys throughout childhood, and the age-related decline in PA, particularly from early adolescence, is steeper for girls than for boys. Dance is the favourite form of PA among UK secondary school aged girls. Delivering dance sessions after school could make a significant contribution to girls' PA. Therefore, after-school dance sessions may be an appropriate and cost-effective activity through which adolescent girls' PA levels can be increased. Two-arm cluster randomised control trial and economic evaluation conducted in 18 secondary schools across the greater Bristol area. All Year 7 girls in participating schools will receive a 'taster' dance session and subsequently be invited to participate in the project. There is space for up to 33 girls to participate in each school. Schools will be randomly assigned in equal numbers to intervention or control arms after baseline data has been collected. The nine intervention schools will receive a 20 week after-school dance-based intervention, consisting of 40 × 75 minute sessions, delivered by external dance instructors. Control schools will not receive the dance intervention. All measures will be assessed at baseline (time 0), at the end of the intervention period (time 1) and six months after the intervention has ended (time 2). Our primary interest is to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the intervention to affect the objectively-assessed (accelerometer) mean weekday minutes of moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) accumulated by Year 7 girls one year after the baseline measurement (time 2). This paper describes the protocol for the Bristol Girls Dance Project cluster randomized controlled trial and economic evaluation, which is attempting to increase MVPA among Year 7 girls in UK secondary schools. ISRCTN52882523.

  2. Interpreting the Relationships between Single Gender Science Classes and Girls' Academic Motivation and Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sonya L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how and to what extent single gender science classes affect motivation to learn scientific concepts, interest in science, and college major intent among high school and middle school girls. This study was designed to determine whether students' motivation to learn science changes when they are placed in a…

  3. A biopsychosocial model of body image concerns and disordered eating in early adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Rachel F; Paxton, Susan J; McLean, Siân A

    2014-05-01

    Body image and eating concerns are prevalent among early adolescent girls, and associated with biological, psychological and sociocultural risk factors. To date, explorations of biopsychosocial models of body image concerns and disordered eating in early adolescent girls are lacking. A sample of 488 early adolescent girls, mean age = 12.35 years (SD = 0.53), completed a questionnaire assessing depressive symptoms, self-esteem, body mass index (BMI), sociocultural appearance pressures, thin-ideal internalization, appearance comparison, body image concerns and disordered eating. Structural equation modelling was conducted to test a hypothetical model in which internalization and comparison were mediators of the effect of both negative affect and sociocultural influences on body image concerns and disordered eating. In addition, the model proposed that BMI would impact body image concerns. Although the initial model was a poor fit to the data, the fit was improved after the addition of a direct pathway between negative affect and bulimic symptoms. The final model explained a large to moderate proportion of the variance in body image and eating concerns. This study supports the role of negative affect in biopsychosocial models of the development of body image concerns and disordered eating in early adolescent girls. Interventions including strategies to address negative affect as well as sociocultural appearance pressures may help decrease the risk for body image concerns and disordered eating among this age group.

  4. Ovarian function in girls and women with GALT-deficiency galactosemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fridovich-Keil, Judith L.; Gubbels, Cynthia S.; Spencer, Jessica B.; Sanders, Rebecca D.; Land, Jolande A.; Rubio-Gozalbo, Estela

    Primary or premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) is the most common long-term complication experienced by girls and women with classic galactosemia; more than 80% and perhaps more than 90% are affected despite neonatal diagnosis and careful lifelong dietary restriction of galactose. In this review

  5. Weight information labels on media models reduce body dissatisfaction in adolescent girls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, Jolanda; Konijn, Elly A; Seidell, Jacob C

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine how weight information labels on variously sized media models affect (pre)adolescent girls' body perceptions and how they compare themselves with media models. METHODS: We used a three (body shape: extremely thin vs. thin vs. normal weight) × three (information label: 6-kg

  6. Boys' and Girls' Educational Choices in Secondary Education. The Role of Gender Ideology

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vleuten, Maaike; Jaspers, Eva; Maas, Ineke; van der Lippe, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explain why boys and girls in secondary education choose different educational tracks. We argue that adolescents internalise gender expectations as to what is "appropriate" male and female behaviour in their gender ideology. Gender ideology can affect educational choices by influencing (1) how adolescents evaluate…

  7. Risk Factors for Body Dissatisfaction in Adolescent Girls: A Longitudinal Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Whitenton, Kathryn

    2002-01-01

    This longitudinal study tested whether a set of sociocultural, biological, interpersonal, and affective factors predicted increases in body dissatisfaction in adolescent girls. Findings indicated that elevated adiposity, perceived pressure to be thin, thin-ideal internalization, and social support deficits predicted body dissatisfaction increases,…

  8. An Assessment of the Mass Media as Tools for Promoting Girl-Child ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An Assessment of the Mass Media as Tools for Promoting Girl-Child Education in Jos Metropolis. ... It therefore recommends among others that, the government needs to make laws that will prohibit early marriage, which mostly affect the female folk. The society generally should create avenue to empower parents to enable ...

  9. A Life History of a Korean Adolescent Girl Who Attempted Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sungeun

    2012-01-01

    The present study explores the life history of a South Korean adolescent girl who attempted suicide. The study focuses on how sociocultural values affected her suicide attempt and how she made meaning out of the experience. The results revealed that her life history was a process of seeking independence and autonomy, and freeing herself from…

  10. A Prospective Study of Extreme Weight Change Behaviors among Adolescent Boys and Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Marita P.; Ricciardelli, Lina A.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined changes in extreme weight change attitudes and behaviors (exercise dependence, food supplements, drive for thinness, bulimia) among adolescent boys and girls over a 16 month period. It also investigated the impact of body mass index, puberty, body image, depression and positive affect on these attitudes and behaviors 16 months…

  11. Active learning in optics for girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, R.; Ashraf, I.

    2017-08-01

    Active learning in Optics (ALO) is a self-funded program under the umbrella of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) and Quaid-i-Azam University (QAU) to bring physical sciences to traditionally underserved Girls high schools and colleges in Pakistan. There is a significant gender disparity in physical Sciences in Pakistan. In Department of Physics at QAU, approximately 10 to 20% of total students were used to be females from past many decades, but now this percentage is increasing. To keep it up at same pace, we started ALO in January 2016 as a way to provide girls an enriching science experiences, in a very friendly atmosphere. We have organized many one-day activities, to support and encourage girls' students of government high schools and colleges to pursue careers in sciences. In this presentation we will describe our experience and lesson learned in these activities.

  12. How Israeli social workers perceive adolescent girls in prostitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peled, Einat; Lugasi, Reut

    2015-04-01

    The phenomenon of girls in prostitution poses great challenges to professionals who work with adolescent girls at risk and in distress. Prostitution is socially stigmatized and seen as something shameful. However, current theory and research show adolescent girls in prostitution to be victims of violence, exploitation and trauma. This naturalistic qualitative study examined the views of 15 social workers at six Adolescent Girls Treatment Units in Israel on prostitution and on adolescent girls in prostitution. Data was collected through in-depth semi-structured interviews. The participants struggled to link the term "prostitution" with the adolescent girls in their care. The findings explore the source this perceived conflict, and its manifestation in the participants' professional intervention with the girls. The discussion examines the participants' professional discourse about adolescent girls in prostitution, and offers explanations for their difficulty in associating the adolescent girls in their care with prostitution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Electromyographic Threshold in Girls and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Devon; Dotan, Raffy; Pitt, Brynlynn; McKinlay, Brandon; O'Brien, Thomas D; Tokuno, Craig; Falk, Bareket

    2017-02-01

    The electromyographic threshold (EMGTh) is thought to reflect increased high-threshold/type-II motor-unit (MU) recruitment and was shown higher in boys than in men. Women differ from men in muscular function. Establish whether females' EMGTh and girls-women differences are different than males'. Nineteen women (22.9 ± 3.3yrs) and 20 girls (10.3 ± 1.1yrs) had surface EMG recorded from the right and left vastus lateralis muscles during ramped cycle-ergometry to exhaustion. EMG root-mean-squares were averaged per pedal revolution. EMGTh was determined as the least residual sum of squares for any two regression-line data divisions, if the trace rose ≥ 3SD above its regression line. EMGTh was expressed as % final power-output (%Pmax) and %VO2pk power (%PVO2pk). EMGTh was detected in 13 (68%) of women, but only 9 (45%) of girls (p < .005) and tended to be higher in the girls (%Pmax= 88.6 ± 7.0 vs. 83.0 ± 6.9%, p = .080; %PVO2pk= (101.6 ± 17.6 vs. 90.6 ± 7.8%, p = .063). When EMGTh was undetected it was assumed to occur at 100%Pmax or beyond. Consequently, EMGTh values turned significantly higher in girls than in women (94.8 ± 7.4 vs. 88.4 ± 9.9%Pmax, p = .026; and 103.2 ± 11.7 vs. 95.2 ± 9.9%PVO2pk, p = .028). During progressive exercise, girls appear to rely less on higher-threshold/type-II MUs than do women, suggesting differential muscle activation strategy.

  14. Pornography consumption among adolescent girls in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattebo, Magdalena; Tydén, Tanja; Häggström-Nordin, Elisabet; Nilsson, Kent W; Larsson, Margareta

    2016-08-01

    The aims of this study were to describe patterns of pornography consumption, investigate differences between consumers and non-consumers of pornography regarding sexual experiences, health and lifestyle and determine associations between pornography consumption and sexual experiences, health and lifestyle among adolescent girls. The hypotheses were that adolescent girls categorised as pornography consumers would report sexual experiences to a greater extent, and a riskier lifestyle and poorer health, compared with non-consumers. A classroom survey was conducted among 16-year-old girls (N = 393). One-third (30%) consumed pornography. In this group, almost half (43%) had fantasies about trying to copy sexual acts seen in pornography and 39% had tried to copy sexual activities seen in pornography. A higher proportion of pornography-consuming girls reported sexual experiences compared with peers. A third (30%) reported experience of anal sex compared with 15% among non-consuming peers (p = 0.001). Furthermore, peer-relationship problems (17% vs 9%; p = 0.015), use of alcohol (85% vs 69%; p = 0.001) and daily smoking (27% vs 14%; p = 0.002) were reported to a greater extent than in non-consuming peers. Pornography consumption, use of alcohol and daily smoking were associated with experience of casual sex. Pornography-consuming girls reported sexual experiences and a risky lifestyle to a greater extent compared with non-consuming girls. This indicates that pornography consumption may influence sexualisation and lifestyle. This is important to acknowledge when designing and implementing sexual health programmes for adolescents.

  15. OVARIAN RESERVE IN HEALTHY ADOLESCENT GIRLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Buralkina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Preserving reproductive health of girls is a pressing issue for the modern healthcare industry. The purpose of this study was to determine the metrics of ovarian reserve in healthy adolescent girls aged 15 to 17 in the Republic of Mordovia. 49 healthy adolescent girls aged 15 to 17 were examined in the study. A medical and social audit was conducted at the first state to study their medical history and hereditary factors. Their physical and sexual development (sexual form, characteristic of menstrual cycle, general and gynecological exam was assessed at the second stage. Hormonal status and ovarian reserve metrics were examined at the third stage. Ultrasonic examination of pelvic organs was conducted and concentrations of LH, FSH, estradiol and anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH in blood were determined. The study results obtained suggest that a reduced size of ovary in girls aged 16 compared with 15-year-old girls is accompanied with the tendency toward a reduced level of AMH and increased concentration of FSH in blood serum. A significant increase in the average size of both ovaries in 17-year-old adolescents is accompanied with the tendency toward increased AMH, and, by contrast, the tendency toward a reduced level of FSH. The level of estradiol significantly increases over age, i.e. over the period from 15 to 17 years. Hence, at ages 15 and 16 all reproductive system components continue to actively adjust to cyclical functioning. By age 17, a close relationship between ovarian reserve and hormonal status is established.Key words: reproductive health, ovarian reserve, hormonal status, girls. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(5:38-43

  16. Empowering the Girl Child, Improving Global Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesario, Sandra K; Moran, Barbara

    The health and productivity of a global society is dependent upon the elimination of gender inequities that prevent girls from achieving their full potential. Although some progress has been made in reducing social, economic, and health disparities between men and women, gender equality continues to be an elusive goal. The Millennium Development Goals (2000-2015) and the Sustainable Development Goals (2015-2030) include intergovernmental aspirations to empower women and stress that change must begin with the girl child. Copyright © 2017 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Bilateral ovarian tumour in a young girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Kumar Govindarajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral ovarian tumour in a girl presents the dilemma of conservative versus aggressive approach towards these tumours. When faced with suspicious tumour and complete replacement of the ovaries bilaterally, bilateral oophorectomy is a viable option, though the certain possibility of infertility and lifelong hormonal supplementation is unavoidable. We report a case of bilateral ovarian masses in a young girl, which on histopathological examination showed mature teratoma with aggregates of proliferating capillary and cavernous sized vessels in the tumour wall. Such associations are rare and must be differentiated from a vascular neoplasm.

  18. Django girls workshop at IdeaSquare

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Short video highlights of the Django Girls coding workshop organized at IdeaSquare on Feb 26-27, 2016 by the Rosehipsters non profit organization, supported by the CERN diversity team and the IT department, attracting 39 women from 15 countries. The aim of the workshop was to introduce participants to the world of computer programming and technology by teaching them how to successfully create a blog application and deploy it to the internet. Most of the 16 volunteer mentors were female. Django Girls is a non-profit organization and a community that empowers and helps women to organize free, one-day programming workshops by providing tools, resources and support.

  19. Whole genome distribution and ethnic differentiation of copy number variation in Caucasian and Asian populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Although copy number variation (CNV has recently received much attention as a form of structure variation within the human genome, knowledge is still inadequate on fundamental CNV characteristics such as occurrence rate, genomic distribution and ethnic differentiation. In the present study, we used the Affymetrix GeneChip(R Mapping 500K Array to discover and characterize CNVs in the human genome and to study ethnic differences of CNVs between Caucasians and Asians. Three thousand and nineteen CNVs, including 2381 CNVs in autosomes and 638 CNVs in X chromosome, from 985 Caucasian and 692 Asian individuals were identified, with a mean length of 296 kb. Among these CNVs, 190 had frequencies greater than 1% in at least one ethnic group, and 109 showed significant ethnic differences in frequencies (p<0.01. After merging overlapping CNVs, 1135 copy number variation regions (CNVRs, covering approximately 439 Mb (14.3% of the human genome, were obtained. Our findings of ethnic differentiation of CNVs, along with the newly constructed CNV genomic map, extend our knowledge on the structural variation in the human genome and may furnish a basis for understanding the genomic differentiation of complex traits across ethnic groups.

  20. Prediagnostic Helicobacter pylori Antibodies and Colorectal Cancer Risk in an Elderly, Caucasian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blase, Jennifer L; Campbell, Peter T; Gapstur, Susan M; Pawlita, Michael; Michel, Angelika; Waterboer, Tim; Teras, Lauren R

    2016-12-01

    Study results on overall seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori and colorectal cancer risk have been inconsistent. However, one study found positive associations with antibodies to specific H. pylori proteins. To follow up on those findings, we assessed associations of 15 H. pylori specific proteins with colorectal cancer incidence in the prospective Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort. Participants in this nested case-control study included 392 cases and 774 controls who were predominantly elderly (median age at blood draw: 71 years) and Caucasian (98%). Seroreactivity against 15 H. pylori proteins was assessed by fluorescent bead-based multiplex serology and associations with colorectal cancer were estimated using conditional logistic regression. Helicobacter pylori serostatus was not associated with colorectal cancer incidence (odds ratio (OR), 1.17, 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.91-1.50). Among individual antigens, GroEl serostatus was associated with colorectal cancer risk (OR, 1.32, 95% CI: 1.03-1.70), whereas CagM was associated with colon cancer risk only (OR, 1.35, 95% CI: 1.01-1.80). No dose-response relationships were observed for any of the antigens, including GroEl and CagM. The results of our study do not support an association between H. pylori infection and colorectal cancer risk in this elderly, mostly Caucasian population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Nasal base narrowing of the caucasian nose through the cerclage technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mocellin, Marcos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several techniques can be performed to reduce the nasal base (narrowing, as skin resection vestibular columellar skin resection, resection of skin in elliptical lip narinary, sloughing of skin and advancements (VY technique of Bernstein and the use of cerclage sutures in the nasal base. Objective: To evaluate the technique of cerclage performed in the nasal base, through endonasal rhinoplasty without delivery of basic technique, in the Caucasian nose, reducing the distance inter-alar flare and correcting the wing with consequent improvement in nasal harmony in the whole face. Methods: A retrospective analysis by analysis of clinical documents and photos of 43 patients in whom cerclage was made of the nasal base by resecting skin ellipse in the region of the vestibule and the nasal base (modified technique of Weir using colorless mononylon® 4 "0" with a straight cutting needle. The study was conducted in 2008 and 2009 at Hospital of Paraná Institute of Otolaryngology - IPO in Curitiba, Parana - Brazil. Patients had a follow up ranging 7-12 months. Results: In 100% of cases was achieved an improvement in nasal harmony, by decreasing the inter-alar distance. Conclusion: The encircling with minimal resection of vestibular skin and the nasal base is an effective method for the narrowing of the nasal base in the Caucasian nose, with predictable results and easy to perform.

  2. The interpupillary distance in adult Caucasian subjects, with reference to 'readymade' reading spectacle centration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pointer, Jonathan S

    2012-07-01

    The magnitude of the far interpupillary distance (FIPD) has recognized significance within and beyond clinical optometry. Quantitative information regarding the lesser-reported near parameter (NIPD) would similarly be of interest, and could be of relevance with regard to the visual comfort obtained with 'readymade' reading spectacles. Mensuration statistics relating to the FIPD and NIPD are presented, as collated from the spectacle dispensing records of n = 1354 healthy Caucasian presbyopic subjects. The FIPD data were partitioned across 4 age bands (by decade, 41-80 years of age): the NIPD data were distributed across seven nominal reading powers (in 0.50 D steps, +1.00 to +4.00 D). The results of these analyses are considered here, along with their potential application. Consistent gender (male > female) and classification (far > near) differences in IPD (both of approximately 3 mm) were confirmed throughout these data. The magnitude of the adult FIPD is in accord with previously published results; this dimension is now supplemented by NIPD values, whose relationship with total near power is also described. This new anthropometric survey indicates that inter- and intra-gender interocular facial measurement stability is a characteristic of presbyopic subjects. It is suggested that across the anticipated range of age and total reading power requirement of Caucasian (White Northern European) wearers of 'readymade' reading spectacles, adoption of a standard optical centration distance of 61 mm would be universally appropriate. Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2012 The College of Optometrists.

  3. Caucasian patients suffering from coronary vasospastic angina have an intact peripheral endothelium-dependent vasoreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ali; Vöhringer, Matthias; Athanasiadis, Anastasios; Ong, Peter; Merher, Rimma; Ratge, Dieter; Knabbe, Cornelius; Sechtem, Udo

    2009-06-26

    We sought to evaluate whether Caucasian patients suffering from vasospastic angina have a decreased brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) like their Japanese counterparts and whether certain serum factors known to be associated with impaired vasomotility or endothelial dysfunction are abnormal. In this prospectively conducted study, 33 subjects presenting with resting angina were identified to suffer from coronary vasospastic angina (coronary spasm group). A control group of 19 subjects with matched cardiovascular risk profiles was defined out of patients admitted to our hospital for evaluation of atypical chest pain. Intracoronary acetylcholine(ACh)-testing for vasospasm was performed in all patients after coronary artery disease (CAD) had been ruled out. Brachial artery FMD was measured using high-resolution ultrasound. There was no significant difference in brachial artery FMD between the coronary spasm and the control group (7.05+/-2.24% vs. 7.12+/-2.50%; p=0.93). The endothelium-independent vasodilator response of the brachial artery to sublingual nitroglycerin did not differ either between the two groups (21.88+/-6.13% vs. 21.48+/-7.38%; p=0.84). Simple and multiple linear regression analysis revealed that only baseline brachial artery diameter was a significant determinant of FMD (pendothelium-dependent or independent vasodilation in Caucasian patients suffering from coronary vasospastic angina illustrating a further clue for racial differences in the pathophysiology of vasospastic angina.

  4. Association between Sleep Disruption and Levels of Lipids in Caucasians with Type 2 Diabetes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wan Mahmood, Wan Aizad

    2013-08-29

    Aim. To investigate the association between sleep quality and duration with lipid and glycaemic control in Caucasian subjects with type 2 diabetes. Methods. Sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) in 114 type 2 diabetes (T2DM) subjects. Comparisons were made between subjects with different sleep quality and sleep duration. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to determine contributors to metabolic parameters. Results. Subjects with poor sleep quality (PQ; PSQI ≥ 6) had higher systolic blood pressure, glycated haemoglobin, urine albumin : creatinine ratio (UAC), total cholesterol (TC), and triglycerides (TG) (P < 0.05 for all) compared to those with good sleep quality (GQ; PSQI ≤ 5). Long sleep duration (LSD) subjects had higher TC and short sleep duration (SSD) subjects had higher TG compared to those with medium sleep duration. Sleep duration and PSQI score were independent predictors of TC and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), contributing to 14.0% and 6.1% of the total variance, respectively. Conclusions. In this Caucasian T2DM population, PQ is associated with adverse cardiovascular risk markers, and long and short sleep disruptions have an independent negative impact on lipids. Sleep assessment should be included as part of a diabetes clinic review.

  5. Clinical characteristics of African Americans vs Caucasian Americans with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cree, B A C; Khan, O; Bourdette, D; Goodin, D S; Cohen, J A; Marrie, R A; Glidden, D; Weinstock-Guttman, B; Reich, D; Patterson, N; Haines, J L; Pericak-Vance, M; DeLoa, C; Oksenberg, J R; Hauser, S L

    2004-12-14

    African American (AA) individuals are thought to develop multiple sclerosis (MS) less frequently than Caucasian American (CA) individuals. To compare the clinical characteristics of AA and CA patients with MS. The clinical features of MS were compared in a large retrospective cohort of AA (n = 375) and CA (n = 427) subjects. The proportion of women to men was similar in AA and CA subjects (81% [AA] vs 77% [CA]; p = 0.122). There were no differences in the proportions of subjects with relapsing-remitting, secondary progressive, primary progressive, and progressive relapsing MS. The median time to diagnosis was 1 year after symptom onset in AA subjects and 2 years after symptom onset in CA subjects (p = 0.0013). The age at onset was approximately 2.5 years later in AA than CA subjects (33.7 vs 31.1 years; p = 0.0001). AA subjects presented with multisite signs and symptoms at disease onset more often than CA subjects (p = 0.018). Clinical involvement restricted to the optic nerves and spinal cord (opticospinal MS) occurred in 16.8% of AA patients compared with 7.9% of CA patients (p older age at onset in AAs (p multiple sclerosis (MS) in Caucasian Americans, African American patients with MS have a greater likelihood of developing opticospinal MS and transverse myelitis and have a more aggressive disease course.

  6. Definition and characterization of relative hypo- and hyperleptinemia in a large Caucasian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, R; Bollheimer, L C; Zietz, B; Drobnik, W; Lackner, K; Schmitz, G; Schölmerich, J; Palitzsch, K-D

    2002-12-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone, leptin, has been implicated in the regulation of appetite, weight gain and glucose homeostasis as well as in liver fibrogenesis, hematopoiesis and immune function. No previous reports have clearly defined pathologically elevated or decreased serum leptin levels for Caucasian adults. The aim of this study was to define and characterize subjects with relative hyper- and hypoleptinemia in a large population-based German cohort. Percentiles of leptin levels by body mass index (BMI) were calculated from 4971 adult Germans, and the participants with leptin levels above the 95th and below the 5th percentile were defined as relatively hyperleptinemic and relatively hypoleptinemic, respectively, for their BMI. These participants were compared with the intermediate group with respect to anthropometric and clinical data and parameters of glucose and iron metabolism, lipid status, renal, adrenal and reproductive function. Relatively hyperleptinemic participants (HL) showed higher insulin, c-peptide, and total cholesterol levels than the hypoleptinemic subjects; in males, ferritin levels were higher and testosterone levels lower in the HL group. In conclusion, we report the first percentile curves for serum leptin by BMI in a large Caucasian population. Relatively low leptin values may be associated with a lower metabolic risk than relatively high serum leptin values.

  7. Smoking, nicotine dependence, and motives to quit in Asian American versus Caucasian college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Sarah; Kurz, Andrew S

    2012-10-01

    Few smoking cessation programs are designed for college students, a unique population that may categorically differ from adolescents and adults, and thus may have different motivations to quit than the general adult population. Understanding college student motives may lead to better cessation interventions tailored to this population. Motivation to quit may differ, however, between racial groups. The current study is a secondary analysis examining primary motives in college student smokers, and differences between Asian American and Caucasian students in smoking frequency, nicotine dependence, and motives to quit. Participants (N = 97) listed personal motives to quit cigarette smoking, which were then coded into categories: health, personal relationships (e.g., friends, family, romantic partners), self-view (e.g., "addicted" or "not in control"), image in society, impact on others or the environment (e.g., second-hand smoke, pollution), and drain on personal resources (e.g., money, time). Mean number of motives were highest in the category of health, followed by personal relationships, drain on resources, self-view, image, and impact. Asian American students listed significantly fewer motives in the categories of health, self-view and image, and significantly more in the category of personal relationships than Caucasian students. Nicotine dependence was significantly higher for Asian American students. However, frequency of smoking did not differ between groups. Results may inform customization of smoking cessation programs for college students and address relevant culturally specific factors of different racial groups.

  8. Selective Acculturation and the Dating Process: The Patterning of Chinese -Caucasian Interracial Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Melford S.

    1970-01-01

    Divergent expectations between Chinese American boys and girls may be related to: (1) influence of American racial stereotyping; (2) Chinese American interpersonal relationships in American society; (3) sex linked socialization practices; and (4) the closed nature of the Chinese community. Presented at American Anthropological Association,…

  9. Positive expectancies mediate the link between race and alcohol use in a sample of Native American and Caucasian college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looby, Alison; Luger, Elizabeth J; Guartos, Cynthia S

    2017-10-01

    Though abundant research suggests that Native Americans report high rates of alcohol use and related consequences, little research has examined drinking patterns among Native American college students. It is possible that drinking rates for this group may differ from their non-college counterparts and also from those of Caucasian college students. The aim of this study was to examine whether alcohol use differs between Native American and Caucasian college students, and specifically whether alcohol expectancy effects mediate the relationship between race and drinking. Participants were 43 Native American and 87 Caucasian college students who reported on their positive and negative expectancy effects and past-6-month drinking. Caucasians reported drinking significantly more alcohol and holding stronger positive expectancies. Bootstrapping mediational analysis with 95% confidence intervals indicated that positive but not negative expectancy effects mediated the relationship between race and past-6-month drinking. This preliminary research is the first to examine expectancy effects as mediators of the relationship between Native American and Caucasian race and drinking. Further understanding of the differences in positive expectancy effects between groups may have important implications for prevention and treatment of alcohol use among Native American college students. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Queering the Horse-Crazy Girl: Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Natalie Corinne

    2008-01-01

    This paper continues my examination of horse-crazy girls, contrasting two representations of girl-horse love in order to argue for a revaluation of this love. I suggest that popular framings of girl-horse love reconfirm existing systems of power and powerlessness, for girls, the women they become, and for horses. I begin with an analysis of Hasbro’s popular My Little PonyTM line of toys, which, I argue, sexualizes girls and girl-horse love, demeaning female subjectivity and agency and dismiss...

  11. Tween Girls' Perception of Gender Roles and Gender Identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tufte, Birgitte; Chan, Kara; Cappello, Gianna

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The present study aims to examine girls' perception of gender roles and gender identities in Hong Kong. Design/methodology/approach – A total of 16 girls aged 10 to 12 were asked to take pictures from the media that could illustrate “what girls or women should or should not be; and what...... girls or women should or should not do”. Qualitative interviews were conducted. Findings – Analysis of interviews and images captured found that tween girls' perceived gender roles for females were based on a mixture of traditional and contemporary role models. Girls in Hong Kong demonstrated...

  12. Abnormal white matter properties in adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E. Travis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa (AN is a serious eating disorder that typically emerges during adolescence and occurs most frequently in females. To date, very few studies have investigated the possible impact of AN on white matter tissue properties during adolescence, when white matter is still developing. The present study evaluated white matter tissue properties in adolescent girls with AN using diffusion MRI with tractography and T1 relaxometry to measure R1 (1/T1, an index of myelin content. Fifteen adolescent girls with AN (mean age = 16.6 years ± 1.4 were compared to fifteen age-matched girls with normal weight and eating behaviors (mean age = 17.1 years ± 1.3. We identified and segmented 9 bilateral cerebral tracts (18 and 8 callosal fiber tracts in each participant's brain (26 total. Tract profiles were generated by computing measures for fractional anisotropy (FA and R1 along the trajectory of each tract. Compared to controls, FA in the AN group was significantly decreased in 4 of 26 white matter tracts and significantly increased in 2 of 26 white matter tracts. R1 was significantly decreased in the AN group compared to controls in 11 of 26 white matter tracts. Reduced FA in combination with reduced R1 suggests that the observed white matter differences in AN are likely due to reductions in myelin content. For the majority of tracts, group differences in FA and R1 did not occur within the same tract. The present findings have important implications for understanding the neurobiological factors underlying white matter changes associated with AN and invite further investigations examining associations between white matter properties and specific physiological, cognitive, social, or emotional functions affected in AN.

  13. PREMENSTRUAL SYNDROME IN YOUNG GIRLS - ACADEMIC LOSS/WORK PRODUCTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayalakshmi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Premenstrual syndrome is a common problem in young girls which adversely affects their educational performance and emotional well - being. PMS is associated with reductions in health - related quality of life and work productivity impairment regardless of the criteria used. We evaluated the loss the work productivity and functional impairment adolescent girls associated with premenstrual symptoms and dysphoric disorder (PMDD. METHODS: A total of 100 unmarried girls who had regular cycles for last 6 months, between the age group of 13 - 19 years, having dysmenorrhic symptoms and having a menstrual cycle length 0f 21 - 35 days were enrolled. Data was collected on Socio economic profile menstrual profile, PMS symptoms ACOG, DSM - IV (PMDD & Work productivity loss & Impairment. Symptoms were recorded. RESULTS: Physical symptoms, the highest % of symptoms are with Abdominal Bloating (95.81%; Breast Discomfort (94.72%; Acne (93.44%; Body ache (90.71%; Increased appetite (87.43%. Psychological symptoms - Angry (94.35% >Anxiety (92.71% >Irritability (91.44% >Feeling depressed (90.35% >Feeling Stress (85.97%. Behavioral S ymptoms: - Personality Change (85.6% >Abstinence from Work (80.5% >Violent Outburst (77.9% Work Productivity Loss and Functional I mpairment: - 27.1% have reported to have a loss of more than 2 days; 12% have reported to have loss of more than 5 days; 2% have reported to have a loss of more than 14 days. CONCLUSION: In the present study, 41% had academic/ work loss. 24% of PMS patients who missed more than 5 days per month with 50% reduction in work productivity and 2% missed more than 14 days per month with impairment in work/social activities/relationships.

  14. Sexually abused children. Characterization of these girls when adolscents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Lars I; Hellberg, Dan

    2010-01-01

    To study associations between sexual abuse of girls in childhood and variables affecting life in adolescence. Anonymously, in the class room, all eligible female adolescents 13-18 years old (n = 1,428) in a medium-sized town completed a validated in-depth questionnaire (Q90) with 165 questions. A history of sexual offense was reported by 119 cases (8.3%, mean age 16.0 years). The remaining 1,309 girls (mean age 15.6 years) served as a comparison group. Questions included body perception, health, including psychosomatic symptoms, depression, suicidal thoughts, psychiatric medication, general questions about present life, peer relations, smoking, alcohol use, delinquent behaviors, and sexual behaviors. In most areas, adolescents with a history of sexual offense responded unfavorably compared with the comparison groups. Some examples were that despite a similar body mass index, 47% of the cases felt overweight as against 31% of the remaining adolescents (p = .0001). Among the sexually abused adolescents, self-perceived depression was more common (60% vs. 37%, p = .0001), as was psychiatric medication (10% vs. 2%, p = .0003). Loneliness was reported by 23% of the cases versus 13% (p = .005). Smoking, alcohol use, and minor criminality showed similar results. Sexual risk behaviors, i.e. multiple sexual partners, unwanted pregnancies, and sexually transmitted infections did not differ between the two groups of girls. Many adolescents with a history of childhood sexual offense feel unhappy, as is evident from the magnitude of the problems. This includes many aspects of adolescent life. It seems likely that the problems are at least partially related to sexual abuse in childhood.

  15. [Body image of short- and normally statured girls in pubertal age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głogowska, Joanna; Tomaszewski, Paweł; Milde, Katarzyna; Sienkiewicz-Dianzenza, Edyta; Stupnicki, Romuald

    2009-01-01

    Short stature and other growth disorders may be a subject of public stigmatising and that, especially during puberty, may lead to lowered self-esteem and increase inadequate self-perception of one's body image. To assess own body perception in short- and normally statured girls and to evaluate the concordance of self-image with an assessment performed by an external expert. Two groups of girls aged 14-16 years took part in the study: 25 short-statured girls (body height below 10th percentile) and 49 girls of normal body height. The subjects were given templates with 9 body silhouettes. They were asked to point out the silhouette that best represented their body and then the desired one. The third evaluation was performed by an external expert. Basing on the expert's assessment, the subjects were divided into three groups: slim (silhouettes 1 and 2), normal (3-4) and stocky (above 4). Regression slopes computed for the relationship between self-image and expert's assessment differed significantly in both groups: slim, short-statured girls overestimated their body image by about 1.5 unit while the stocky, short-statured ones by about one unit. Girls with normal body height overestimated their body image by about one unit irrespectively of the group they have been classified to. Additionally, stocky girls and those with normal body image from both groups wished to be leaner. Incompletely developed sense of identity as well as rapid changes in body composition and body proportions can be attributed to pubescence and may be the reason of inadequate perception of own body image. Additionally, self-image may be strongly affected by the beauty standards widely promoted by mass-media.

  16. The trafficking of women and girls in Taiwan: characteristics of victims, perpetrators, and forms of exploitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lanying

    2017-11-09

    Prior to the passing of 2009 Human Trafficking Prevention Act (HTPA), human trafficking was underestimated in Taiwan. In the past, domestic trafficking in women and girls often targeted vulnerable groups such as young girls from poor families or minority groups. Since the 1990s, an increasing flow of immigrant women, mainly from Vietnam and Indonesia and some from China, into Taiwan has created a new group of Human Trafficking victims. The current study intends to identify, describe, and categorize reported and prosecuted human trafficking cases involving women and girls according to the HTPA in Taiwan. Using the court proceedings of prosecuted trafficking in women and girls cases under Taiwan's HTPA from all 21 districts in Taiwan from 2009 to 2012 under the title keyword of 'Human Trafficking', this current study aims to categorize different patterns of existing trafficking in women and girls in Taiwan. The analysis is based on 37 court cases, involving 195 victimized women and girls and 118 perpetrators. This study identifies six forms of Human Trafficking victims according to their country of origin, vulnerability status, and means of transport. This study found that women and girls suffer from both labor and sexual exploitation, from mainly domestic male perpetrators. While sexual exploitation is more evenly distributed among citizens and immigrants and affects both adults and minors, labor exploitation seems to be an exclusive phenomenon among women immigrant workers in the data. Human Trafficking cases in Taiwan share many of the similarities of Human Trafficking in other regions, which are highly associated with gender inequality and gender-based vulnerability.

  17. SciTech Clubs for Girls. [Annual] technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogal, A.M.

    1993-02-01

    Since January 1992, 9 exhibits have been constructed by the SciTech Clubs for Girls, which involved 63 girls, ages 10 to 14. These exhibits are: Bubble Shapes by the St. Charles Cadette Girl Scout Troop No. 109. Density Games by the South Elgin Cadette Girl Scout Troop No. 132. Electric Fleas by the Warrenville Junior Girl Scout Troop No. 305. Energy vs. Power by the Aurora Junior Girl Scout Troop No. 242. The Organ Pipe by the Bartlett Junior Girl Scout Troop No. 107. Ohm`s Law by the Geneva Junior Girl Scout Troop No. 401. What is Gravity by the Pilsen YMCA girls. Insulation at Work by the Algonquin Junior Girl Scout Troop No. 303. Series vs. Parallel by the Leland Junior Girl Scout Troop No. 50. The report is a description of each exhibit and the group that built the exhibit. Each group had a minimum of 10 hours of contact time at SciTech with the SciTech Clubs for Girls Program Coordinator. All mentors are female. Each exhibit building experience includes a trip to the hardware store to purchase supplies. After the exhibit is complete, the girls receive certificates of achievement and a SciTech Club Patch.

  18. Written in Skin: SuicideGirls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steen Christiansen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Suicidegirls.com is a website which is both an online community, but also a softcore pin-up site, where the models feature extensive body modifications in the form of tattoos and piercings. The website promotes a democratic approach to the photo shoots, as the models remain in control, not the photographer. Marked by their body modifications, the Suicide Girls (as they call themselves, they actively attempt to subvert the typical pin-up conventions, by transgressing mainstream standards of beauty. In what seems remarkably similar to Judith Butler's account of subversive bodily acts, the pin-up shoots of the Suicide Girls mount a critique of a culture's view of the body as a natural entity. Cultural borders are crossed, as the bodies of the Suicide Girls embed ink into their bodies in the form of tattoos, and gender is played as a subversive game against the expectations of pin-up conventions. Acting as different and impure bodies, the Suicide Girls represent a threat to conventional conceptions of the body.

  19. A Saturday of science for girls

    CERN Multimedia

    Pauline Gagnon

    2013-01-01

    On Saturday 16 November, the University of Geneva's Faculty of Science welcomed 388 girls aged between 11 and 14 to take part in “Élargis tes horizons” (“Expand your horizons”). This initiative aims to encourage more girls to pursue a career in science.   The idea is to use fun, interactive workshops to pique their interest while they are at an age where they are starting to think about their future. They see, by example, that women can and already do work in science. All the workshops were led by women representing several different scientific disciplines. CERN participated along with EPFL, UNIGE and seven other organisations, with 23 workshops on offer in total. The girls had the opportunity, for example, to programme a robot, analyse DNA and design and print a 3D object. The 23 CERN women physicists who took part ran an information kiosk and three workshops, where the girls were invited to build a particle accelerator in a salad bo...

  20. Definitions of night eating in adolescent girls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Striegel-Moore, RH; Thompson, D; Franko, DL; Barton, B; Affenito, S; Schreiber, GB; Daniels, [No Value

    Objective: To describe the prevalence of night eating in a community cohort of black and white girls, using different definitions of night eating as described in the literature. Research Methods and Procedures: Three-day food diaries collected as part of the National Growth and Health Study were

  1. Schooling Adolescent Girls' Perception and Attitude Towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study to assess schooling adolescent girls' perception and attitude towards voluntary counselling and testing was conducted in 2009 in Morogoro Municipality. A sample of 110 respondents was chosen from 4 secondary schools and 1 teachers' college. The objectives were to determine the knowledge of adolescent ...

  2. Puberty in the Girl Who is Retarded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattullo, Ann

    Designed to help mothers of mentally retarded girls deal with the problems and concerns of puberty, the booklet provides information on physical and emotional changes, menstruation, masturbation, heterosexual behavior, contraception, protection against sexual aggression, the possibilities of marriage, and additional sources of information.…

  3. Postural Variables in Girls Practicing Volleyball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabara, Malgorzata; Hadzik, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Study aim: To assess body posture of young female volleyball players in relation to their untrained mates. Material and methods: A group of 42 volleyball players and another of 43 untrained girls, all aged 13-16 years were studied with respect to their body posture indices by using computer posturography. Spinal angles and curvatures were…

  4. Preadolescent Girls' and Boys' Virtual MUD Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Sandra L.; Strouse, Gabrielle A.; Strong, Bonnie L.; Huffaker, David A.; Lai, Sean

    2009-01-01

    Same and opposite-sex pairs of preadolescents interacted twice in a MUD, a virtual domain where they created characters known as avatars and socially interacted with one another. Boys interacted primarily through rapid scene shifts and playful exchanges; girls interacted with one another through written dialogue. Opposite-sex pairs lagged behind…

  5. Predictors of intuitive eating in adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Rachel; Tiggemann, Marika; Clark, Levina

    2015-02-01

    To examine proposed predictors of intuitive eating, including social appearance comparison, and to test a modified acceptance model of intuitive eating in adolescent girls. Participants were 400 adolescent girls aged 12-16 years who completed measures of body acceptance by others, self-objectification, social appearance comparison, body appreciation, and intuitive eating. Correlations showed that all proposed predictors were related to intuitive eating in the expected direction. In particular, social appearance comparison was negatively related to body appreciation and intuitive eating. After controlling for other predictors, social appearance comparison was shown to explain unique variance in intuitive eating. Using structural equation modeling, an integrated modified acceptance model of intuitive eating yielded an overall good fit to the data. Mediation analyses showed that there was a significant indirect effect of body acceptance by others on both body appreciation and intuitive eating through social appearance comparison and self-objectification. The findings extend the acceptance model of intuitive eating to adolescent girls but also identify social comparison as an important mechanism in this process. Practically, the findings highlight several areas that may be targeted to foster adaptive eating patterns in girls. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. "Dolly" Girls: Tweenies as Artefacts of Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Fiona; Kelly, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The apparent sexualization and exploitation of young girls by the consumer media is a much debated topic in the advanced liberal democracies. This paper will develop the argument that the "consumer-media culture" has established itself as one of the most powerful influences in processes of self-formation for young people, and that a…

  7. Listening to Girls Talk about Their Bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichter, Mimi

    2000-01-01

    This article, written by an anthropologist who has studied the culture of teenage girls, explores influences on their sense of self, including those of peers, parents, and the media. Educators and parents can play important roles in helping young people navigate successfully through adolescence. (Author/MKA)

  8. Should infant girls receive micronutrient supplements?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Christine Stabell; Lund, Sofia; Fisker, Ane

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have proposed the hypothesis that the combination of vitamin A supplementation and diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination may be associated with increased mortality in girls. Recent zinc/folic acid (FA) and iron supplementation trials did not find any beneficial effects...

  9. Measuring Mathematics Concept Attainment: Boys and Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Margaret L.; Romberg, Thomas A.

    Test development efforts for constructing 12 items to measure achievement of each of 30 selected mathematics concepts are described. The topics covered are sets, division and expressing relationships. Item and total score statistics for data collected on 196 girls who had just completed the fifth grade during early summer of 1970 and 195 boys who…

  10. "Scaling Up" Good Practices in Girls' Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanian, Ramya

    2005-01-01

    This publication focuses on strategies for meeting international targets and national goals for universalizing girls' access to, retention in and completion of quality education. This will be done through "scaling up" successful interventions, or components of interventions that can be replicated. UNESCO published this book within the…

  11. Sex Equity: Increasing Girls' Use of Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockheed, Marlaine E.; Frakt, Steven B.

    1984-01-01

    Indicates that although computer science has been free of male domination, the stereotype of computers as male machines is emerging with increasing growth in microcomputer use by children. Factors that account for this development and some strategies teachers can adopt to equalize computer use by boys and girls are presented. (MBR)

  12. Communication Skills in Girls with Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolotta, Theresa E.; Zipp, Genevieve P.; Simpkins, Susan D.; Glazewski, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Rett Syndrome (RS) is an X-linked, neurodevelopmental disorder that occurs primarily in females and causes significant impairment in cognition, motor control, and communication. Teachers and speech-language pathologists (SLPs) encounter girls with RS with increasing frequency as awareness of the disorder increases, yet the literature on clinical…

  13. Girls and Gender in Alternative Education Provision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Lisa; Thomson, Pat

    2011-01-01

    UK Government policy states that all young people aged 14-19 are entitled to a broad and balanced curriculum, with access to "personalised" education and training pathways. With boys currently leading the statistics on exclusion, girls' educational and social needs are often sidelined in alternative education provision, as the majority…

  14. Differences in gambling problem severity and gambling and health/functioning characteristics among Asian-American and Caucasian high-school students

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Grace; Tsai, Jack; Pilver, Corey E.; Tan, Hwee Sim; HOFF, RANI A.; Cavallo, Dana; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; Steinberg, Marvin A.; Rugle, Loreen; Potenza, Marc N.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of Asian-American adults have found high estimates of problematic gambling. However, little is known about gambling behaviors and associated measures among Asian-American adolescents. This study examined gambling perceptions and behaviors and health/functioning characteristics stratified by problem-gambling severity and Asian-American and Caucasian race using cross-sectional survey data of 121 Asian-American and 1,659 Caucasian high-school students. Asian-American and Caucasian adoles...

  15. Absence of ethnic differences in the pharmacokinetics of moxifloxacin, simvastatin, and meloxicam among three East Asian populations and Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasunuma, Tomoko; Tohkin, Masahiro; Kaniwa, Nahoko; Jang, In-Jin; Yimin, Cui; Kaneko, Masaru; Saito, Yoshiro; Takeuchi, Masahiro; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Uyama, Yoshiaki; Kawai, Shinichi

    2016-06-01

    To examine whether strict control of clinical trial conditions could reduce apparent differences of pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters among ethnic groups. Open-label, single dose PK studies of moxifloxacin, simvastatin and meloxicam were conducted in healthy male subjects from three East Asian populations (Japanese, Chinese and Koreans) and one Caucasian population as a control. These three drugs were selected because differences in PK parameters have been reported, even though the backgrounds of these East Asian populations are similar. Moxifloxacin (400 mg) was administered orally to 20 subjects, and plasma and urine levels of moxifloxacin and its metabolite (M2) were measured. Simvastatin (20 mg) was given to 40 subjects, and plasma levels of simvastatin and simvastatin acid were measured. Meloxicam (7.5 mg) was given to 30 subjects and its plasma concentration was determined. Intrinsic factors (polymorphism of UGT1A1 for moxifloxacin, SLCO1B1 for simvastatin, and CYP2C9 for meloxicam) were also examined. AUCinf values for moxifloxacin, simvastatin and meloxicam showed no significant differences among the East Asian groups. Cmax values of moxifloxacin and simvastatin, but not meloxicam, showed significant differences. There were no significant differences of data for M2 or simvastatin acid. Genetic analysis identified significant differences in the frequencies of relevant polymorphisms, but these differences did not affect the PK parameters observed. Although there were some differences in PK parameters among the three East Asian groups, the present study performed under strictly controlled conditions did not reproduce the major ethnic differences observed in previous studies. © 2016 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. Factors related to obesity and overweight among Black adolescent girls in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Megan R; Bennett, Gary G; Brandon, Debra H

    2017-02-01

    In the United States, Black adolescents have the highest prevalence of pediatric obesity and overweight among girls. While Black girls are disproportionately affected, the reasons for this health disparity remain unclear. The authors conducted a systematic review to investigate the factors related to obesity and overweight among Black adolescent girls. The authors searched four databases for relevant English-language publications using all publication years through 2015. Fifty-one studies met the inclusion criteria and were used for this review. Using a configuration approach to synthesis, three categories were identified, paralleling the bioecological theory of human development: (1) individual, (2) interpersonal, and (3) community and societal factors. A description of each factor's association with obesity among Black adolescent girls is presented. From this review, the authors identified a diverse and vast set of individual, interpersonal, and community and societal factors explored for their relationship with obesity and overweight. Given the insufficient repetition and limited significant findings among most factors, the authors believe that multiple gaps in knowledge exist across all categories regarding the factors related to obesity and overweight among Black adolescent girls. To improve the quality of research in this area, suggested research directions and methodological recommendations are provided.

  17. Hormonal changes during the first year of oestrogen treatment in constitutionally tall girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajs-Kuto, E; De Beeck, L O; Rooman, R P; Caju, M V

    1999-12-01

    Oestrogens are used to inhibit growth in girls with constitutionally tall stature. We studied the changes in different hormones that accompany such therapy. In this longitudinal study we examined the levels of total insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), free thyroxine (FT(4)), thyrotrophin (TSH), testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEA-S), cortisol and prolactin in two groups of girls receiving ethinyloestradiol at a dose of either 0.1mg daily (group A, n=22) or 0.2mg daily (group B, n=36). Hormonal measurements were performed at start of therapy and after 3, 6 and 12 months. In both groups the levels of IGF-I, testosterone and DHEA-S were reduced while the concentrations of cortisol and prolactin were increased. The pituitary-thyroid axis was not significantly affected by this therapy. The girls receiving 0.2mg ethinyloestradiol daily had lower IGF-I levels after 12 months of therapy and had higher serum prolactin concentrations than the girls treated with 0.1mg daily. The reduction in predicted height and the advancement in bone age were similar in both groups. Therapy with pharmacological doses of ethinyloestradiol changes the levels of several hormones including IGF-I, testosterone, DHEA-S, prolactin and cortisol but the role of the respective changes in the inhibition of growth is not clear. The suppression of DHEA-S levels by 40% suggests that the ovaries contribute significantly to the production of this hormone in pubertal girls.

  18. Idealized media images and adolescent body image: "comparing" boys and girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Duane A; Tiggemann, Marika

    2004-12-01

    Sociocultural theories of body image suggest that body dissatisfaction results from unrealistic societal beauty ideals, and one way of transmitting these ideals is through the mass media. The present research aimed to examine the effect of exposure to images of idealized beauty in the media on adolescent girls' and boys' body image. The participants (595 adolescents) viewed television commercials containing either images of the thin ideal for women, images of the muscular ideal for men, or non-appearance television commercials. Body dissatisfaction was measured before and after commercial viewing. It was found that exposure to idealized commercials led to increased body dissatisfaction for girls but not for boys. Idealized commercials led to increased negative mood and appearance comparison for girls and boys, although the effect on appearance comparison was stronger for girls. Further, participants high on appearance investment reported greater appearance comparison after viewing idealized commercials than those less strongly invested in their appearance. The results suggest the immediate impact of the media on body image is both stronger and more normative for girls than for boys, but that some boys may also be affected.

  19. Understanding gender norms, nutrition, and physical activity in adolescent girls: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Rebecca A; Rehman, Laurene; Kirk, Sara F L

    2015-01-24

    Public health is currently focused on childhood obesity, and the associated behaviors of physical activity and nutrition. Canadian youth are insufficiently active and do not meet nutritional guidelines. This is of particular concern for adolescent girls, as they are less active than boys, become less active as they age, and engage in unhealthy weight control behaviors. The purpose of this review is to determine what is known from the existing literature about how gender norms are understood in relation to the health-related behaviors of PA and nutrition in young girls. This scoping review follows the framework of Arksey and O'Malley, involving defining a research question, study identification and selection, charting, interpretation, summarizing, and reporting. In total, 28 documents are reviewed, and characteristics are summarized quantitatively and qualitatively. Five major themes are identified: (1) Girls' relationships with PA are complex and require negotiating gender roles, (2) the literature focuses on dieting rather than nutrition, (3) appearance and perceptions influence behaviors, (4) "body" focused discourse is significant to girls' experiences, and (5) social influences, institutions, and environments are influential and may offer opportunity for future research and action. Gaps in the literature are identified and discussed. It is concluded that young girls' activity and nutrition is affected by gender norms and feminine ideals through complex negotiations, perceptions, body-centered discourse, and societal influences.

  20. Using a socioecological approach to examine participation in sport and physical activity among rural adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Meghan M; Eime, Rochelle M; Payne, Warren R; Harvey, Jack T

    2009-07-01

    Adolescence is a critical time for developing lifelong healthy behaviors, including active lifestyles. Participation in sport and physical activity, however, declines during adolescence, and few studies have comprehensively identified why, particularly among rural girls. This article identifies a range of independent and interacting factors that influence sport and physical activity participation of rural adolescent girls. The socioecological model of health was used to guide four focus group discussions with Grade 7 girls (n = 34). The results showed that adolescent girls were positively influenced when sports or physical activities were fun, when they involved being with friends, and when they were supported by families and teachers through role modeling and positive feedback. A range of intrapersonal and organizational factors affected perceived self-competence, particularly the coeducational nature of school physical education classes and peer teasing, which supported social comparisons of skill level. In promoting sport and physical activity to rural adolescent girls, focus must be directed on developmentally appropriate activities that are fun, offering opportunities for single-sex classes, and generating cultural changes that encourage noncompetitive and self-referencing activities.

  1. Prevalence of prostate cancer and prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in Caucasian Mediterranean males: an autopsy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Chapado, Manuel; Olmedilla, Gabriel; Cabeza, Manuel; Donat, Emilio; Ruiz, Antonio

    2003-02-15

    The prevalence of carcinoma of the prostate gland (CaP) and high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) was assessed in a Spanish population, representative of the Caucasian Mediterranean (CM) ethnic group. Data were compared with those described in populations from other geographical regions and in other ethnic groups. CaP and HGPIN were evaluated in a consecutive series of prostatic glands collected at the post-mortem examination of 162 male patients born and living in Spain, aged 20-80 years, and dying from trauma. The glands were sliced every 2-3 mm. All slices were paraffin embedded and sectioned to obtain 5 microm whole-mount sections. To compare the prevalence rate in our series and in other Caucasian populations with that from other geographical areas and other ethnic groups, we used data from the autopsy study performed at the Wayne State University. Prevalence of CaP is 3.58, 8.82, 14.28, 23.80, 31.7, and 33.33% in the 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th decades, respectively. The rates of HGPIN were 7.14, 11.75, 35.71, 38.06, 45.40, and 48.15% at the 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 8th decades of life. Both CaP and HGPIN are located preferentially at the peripheral zone of the gland and in 21/27 cases (77.7%), an association between CaP and HGPIN was found. The prevalence of both lesions in CM males is significantly lower than in Caucasian American (CA) and Afro-American (AA) males in all the age groups evaluated. Microscopic foci of CaP and HGPIN can be documented in CM males from the 3rd decade of life onwards. The lesions become more frequent and extensive as age increases. The prevalence of both lesions seems to be significantly lower in the CM population than in CA and AA males in all the age groups evaluated. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. NASA Science4Girls: Engaging Girls in STEM at Their Local Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, B.; Smith, D.; Bleacher, L.; Hauck, K.; Soeffing, C.; NASA SMD EPO Community

    2014-07-01

    The NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Science Education and Public Outreach Forums coordinate the participation of SMD education and public outreach (EPO) programs in Women's History Month through the NASA Science4Girls and Their Families initiative. The initiative partners NASA science education programs with public libraries to provide NASA-themed hands-on education activities for girls and their families. The initiative has expanded from the successful 2012 Astro4Girls pilot to engage girls in all four NASA science discipline areas, which broadens the impact of the pilot by enabling audiences to experience the full range of NASA science topics and the different career skills each requires. The events focus on engaging underserved and underrepresented audiences in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) via use of research-based best practices, collaborations with libraries, partnerships with local and national organizations, and remote engagement of audiences.

  3. Lipid droplet dynamics and insulin sensitivity upon a 5-day high-fat diet in Caucasians and South Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmink, Anne; Bakker, Leontine E H; Guigas, Bruno; Kornips, Esther; Schaart, Gert; Meinders, A Edo; Jazet, Ingrid M; Hesselink, Matthijs K C

    2017-02-14

    A 5-day High-Fat High-Calorie diet (HFHC-diet) reduces insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (Rd) in South Asian, but not Caucasian healthy lean males. We aimed to investigate if differences in myocellular lipid handling are underlying this differential response. A two-step hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and muscle biopsies were performed in 12 healthy lean Caucasian and South Asian males (BMI fat). Triglyceride extractions and Western Blots for lipid droplet and mitochondrial proteins were performed. Intramyocellular lipid content and HFHC-diet response were similar between ethnicities (group effect: P = 0.094; diet effect: +~30%, P = 0.044). PLIN5 protein content increased upon the HFHC-diet (P = 0.031) and tended to be higher in South Asians (0.87 ± 0.42 AU vs. 1.35 ± 0.58 AU, P = 0.07). 4-HNE tended to increase in South Asians upon the HFHC-diet (interaction effect: P = 0.057). In Caucasians ΔPLIN5 content correlated with ΔRd (Caucasians: r = 0.756, P = 0.011; South Asians: r = -0.085, P = 0.816), while in South Asians Δ4-HNE associated with ΔPLIN5 content (Caucasians: r = 0.312, P = 0.380; South Asians: r = 0.771, P = 0.003). These data indicate that in Caucasians, PLIN5 may be protective against HFHC-diet induced insulin resistance, which for reasons not yet understood is not observed in South Asians, who possess increased lipid peroxidation levels.

  4. Promoting physical activity among adolescent girls: the Girls in Sport group randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okely, Anthony D; Lubans, David R; Morgan, Philip J; Cotton, Wayne; Peralta, Louisa; Miller, Judith; Batterham, Marijka; Janssen, Xanne

    2017-06-21

    Slowing the decline in participation in physical activity among adolescent girls is a public health priority. This study reports the outcomes from a multi-component school-based intervention (Girls in Sport), focused on promoting physical activity among adolescent girls. Group randomized controlled trial in 24 secondary schools (12 intervention and 12 control). Assessments were conducted at baseline (2009) and at 18 months post-baseline (2010). The setting was secondary schools in urban, regional and rural areas of New South Wales, Australia. All girls in Grade 8 in 2009 who attended these schools were invited to participate in the study (N = 1769). Using a Health Promoting Schools and Action Learning Frameworks, each school formed a committee and developed an action plan for promoting physical activity among Grade 8 girls. The action plan incorporated strategies in three main areas - i) the formal curriculum, ii) school environment, and iii) home/school/community links - based on the results of formative data from target girls and staff and on individual needs of the school. A member of the research team supported each school throughout the intervention. The main outcome measure was accelerometer-derived total physical activity (TPA) spent in physical activity. Data were analyzed from December 2011 to March 2012. 1518 girls (mean age 13.6y ±0.02) were assessed at baseline. There was a significant decline in TPA from baseline to 18-month follow-up with no differences between girls in the intervention and control schools. Only one-third of schools (4/12) implemented the intervention as per their action plan. Per-protocol analyses on these schools revealed a smaller decline in percentage of time spent in MVPA among girls in the intervention group (adjusted difference 0.5%, 95% CI = -0.01, 0.99, P = 0.05). The Girls in Sport intervention was not effective in reducing the decline in physical activity among adolescent girls. Lack of implementation by most

  5. Study the Prevalence of Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder in Hamadan High School Girls in 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Farhadi Nasab

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Premenstrual dysphoric disorder is considered as a mood disorders that 30 to 80 percent of women have at least mild symptoms and that 2 to 10 percent have severe symptoms of this disorder. The exact cause of this disorder is not clear, but according to one of the most common theories, it seems to be the higher level of estrogen to progesterone in affected women. The symptoms of this disorder include: hopelessness, agitation, emotional disturbance, anger and physical complaints (headache, breast tenderness and edema. The symptoms cause clinically significant impairment in social, occupational or interpersonal functioning. The purpose of this study was evaluation of the prevalence of premenstrual dysphoric disorder in Hamadan high school girls, in 2003.Materials & Methods: This was a descriptive-analytic cross-sectional study. Maximum sampling error was considered to be as 5% and confidence interval was 95%. 384 educating high school girls from Hamadan were selected randomly and were asked by questionnaires that were designed on the basis of premenstrual dysphoric disorder criteria, according to psychiatric references. Data were statistically analyzed by SPSS 10 using 2 test.Results: From 384 studied girls, 172 subjects (44.5% were diagnosed with premenstrual dysphoric disorder which 18 cases of them were suspicious to have other disorder such as depression. 102 patients among affected girls (59.3% were diagnosed during the first year of beginning menstruation. Duration of symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder was more than three days in 20% of cases. Mood, behavioral and physical symptoms were coexisted in 71.5%, 61% and 73.2% of the girls with premenstrual dysphoric disorder respectively, and these associations were statistically significant (p<0.01.Conclusion: Prevalence of premenstrual dysphoric disorder in Hamadan high school girls was near to its prevalence in general population (40%. More than two thirds

  6. What Girls Say About: The Pressure to Be Pretty

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Is an Intellectual Disability? Movie: Endocrine System What Girls Say About: The Pressure to Be Pretty KidsHealth > ... presión que existe para ser bonita Survey Says: Girls Worry About Their Looks Imagine a group of ...

  7. Boys More Likely to Hide a Concussion Than Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Boys More Likely to Hide a Concussion Than Girls Study of high school athletes suggests fear of ... less likely to speak up than high school girls, new research reveals. The findings, derived from surveying ...

  8. Exploring Girls' Science Affinities Through an Informal Science Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Brandy; Zvoch, Keith

    2017-10-01

    This study examines science interests, efficacy, attitudes, and identity—referred to as affinities, in the context of an informal science outreach program for girls. A mixed methods design was used to explore girls' science affinities before, during, and after participation in a cohort-based summer science camp. Multivariate analysis of survey data revealed that girls' science affinities varied as a function of the joint relationship between family background and number of years in the program, with girls from more affluent families predicted to increase affinities over time and girls from lower income families to experience initial gains in affinities that diminish over time. Qualitative examination of girls' perspectives on gender and science efficacy, attitudes toward science, and elements of science identities revealed a complex interplay of gendered stereotypes of science and girls' personal desires to prove themselves knowledgeable and competent scientists. Implications for the best practice in fostering science engagement and identities in middle school-aged girls are discussed.

  9. Chemosensory anxiety signals prime defensive behavior in prepubertal girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübke, Katrin T; Busch, Anne; Hoenen, Matthias; Schaal, Benoist; Pause, Bettina M

    2017-05-01

    Chemosensory anxiety signals effectively prime motor responses related to withdrawal behavior, such as the startle reflex, in adult humans. As the reproductive status strongly affects the response to social chemosignals, the current study examined whether chemosensory anxiety signals would augment the startle response in prepubertal children as it does in adults. Using cotton pads, axillary sweat was collected from 28 men while waiting for an important oral examination (anxiety condition), and during ergometer training (sport control condition). Using a constant-flow olfactometer, sweat samples and pure cotton samples (cotton control) were presented to 10 prepubertal girls aged 9-13years (M=11.25, SD=1.25) for 3000ms during inhalation. White noise bursts of 102dB(A) served as startle probes, and startle responses were recorded via electromyography of the orbicularis oculi muscle. The girls showed larger startle amplitudes to probes presented in the context of chemosensory anxiety signals as compared to a context of sport control sweat (panxiety signals prime defensive motor behavior. This effect appears unrelated to the odorous quality of anxiety sweat, but seems to reflect a specific preparedness to respond to the underlying social alarm signal. Thus, chemosensory communication supporting individual harm protection is independent of the reproductive status in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Seasonally-induced alterations of some facial signs in Caucasian women and their changes induced by a daily application of a photo-protective product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, F; Gautier, B; Benize, A-M; Charbonneau, A; Cassier, M

    2017-09-08

    These were two-fold: (i) to assess the possible changes in some facial signs induced in a 6-month period by the periodical shift from winter to summer in Caucasian women and (ii) to appraise the preventive effects of a strong photo-protective product. The facial signs of two cohorts of French women (N= 40 and 42), of comparable ages were graded between winter to summer. One group was left unprotected whereas the other daily applied a strong photo-protective product for 6 months. Facial signs (structural and pigmentation-related) were graded in blind by a panel of 12 experts from photographs taken under standard conditions. A global and focused analysis of the skin colour or dark spots, when present, was carried out through spectro-radiometry under diffuse and standardized visible light, using the L*, a*, b* referential system. The unprotected group showed significant changes in summer as compared to winter on 10 facial signs (two-third of the studied signs) that presented an increased severity, of variable respective amplitude. Five signs among the 10 were particularly and significantly affected by the seasonal transition, of an amplitude above the precision of the grading scale. Three of these five signs concerned structural elements (wrinkles), the two others being related to vascular disorders (redness). These season-induced alterations appear efficiently reduced in the photo-protected group. The colour of the facial skin then appears more homogeneous, less red, less dull, all criteria being quantified by the L*, a*, b* referential system. The comparison with a previous work carried out on Chinese women, through a similar protocol, shows that the photo-protective product brings, in Caucasian women, a more important effect upon structural and vascular features than upon pigmentation disorders, inversely to the results previously observed in Chinese women. The alterations in some facial signs occurring in a 6-month period between winter and summer are confirmed in

  11. Substance Use among Early Adolescent Girls: Risk and Protective Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Schinke, Steven P.; Fang, Lin; Cole, Kristin C. A.

    2008-01-01

    Disquieting rates of alcohol and drug use among adolescent girls call for original research on gender-specific risk and protective factors for substance use. Particularly salient are data on theory-driven factors that can inform prevention programming. Surveying 781 adolescent girls and their mothers, we found relationships between girls' use of alcohol, prescription drugs, and inhalants and girls' after-school destinations, body images, depression, best friend's substance use, maternal drink...

  12. Hispanic Americans and African Americans with multiple sclerosis have more severe disease course than Caucasian Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Rachel E; Antezana, Ariel O; Bacon, Tamar; Kister, Ilya

    2017-10-01

    Whether disease course in Hispanic Americans (HA) with multiple sclerosis (MS) is different from Caucasian Americans (CA) or African Americans (AA) is unknown. We compared MS severity in the three main ethnic populations in our tertiary MS clinics using disease duration-adjusted rank score of disability: Patient-Derived Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score (P-MSSS). The age- and gender-adjusted P-MSSS was significantly higher in HA (3.9 ± 2.6) and AA (4.5 ± 3.0) compared to CA (3.4 ± 2.6; p < 0.0001 for both). Adjusting for insurance did not change these results. These findings suggest that HA, as AA, have more rapid disability accumulation than CA.

  13. Genetic relationship of Sinorhizobium meliloti and Sinorhizobium medicae strains isolated from Caucasian region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Emanuele G; Pilli, Elena; Giuntini, Elisa; Roumiantseva, Marina L; Andronov, Euvgenij E; Onichtchouk, Olga P; Kurchak, Oksana N; Simarov, Boris V; Dzyubenko, Nikolay I; Mengoni, Alessio; Bazzicalupo, Marco

    2003-03-28

    Sinorhizobium meliloti and Sinorhizobium medicae are two closely related species of the genus Sinorhizobium showing a similar host range, nodulating leguminous species of the genera Medicago, Melilotus and Trigonella, but their phylogenic relationship has not been elucidated yet. In this paper we report the application of three different molecular markers, (i) RFLP of nodD genes, (ii) 16S-23S rDNA intergenic gene spacer fingerprinting and (iii) amplification fragment length polymorphism to S. meliloti and S. medicae strains isolated from the Caucasian area, which is the region of origin of the host plant Medicago. The analysis of data could suggest the origin of S. medicae strains from an ancestral S. meliloti population.

  14. Experience with S-1 in older Caucasian patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Stine Braendegaard; Zubcevic, Kanita; Qvortrup, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    of adverse events than capecitabine and may therefore be a suitable drug for elderly. However, data on the use of S-1 in Caucasian mCRC patients are lacking/scarce. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the present study we evaluated safety and the efficacy of S-1 alone or in combination with oxaliplatin (SOx......) or IRIS (n = 18) for mCRC. Median age was 76 years and most patients had a WHO performance status of 0 (32%) or 1 (56%). All patients were evaluable for response and safety. In the SOx group, 18 (41%) and 20 patients (45%) had partial response (PR) and stable disease (SD), respectively (disease control......BACKGROUND: An aging population will increase the number of older patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, there is limited knowledge about treatment in older patients as they are under-represented in clinical trials. The oral fluoropyrimidine S-1 is associated with a lower rate...

  15. Angiographic profile in childhood moyamoya disease; A study of 8 caucasian Indian children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, P.N.; Arya, B.Y.T.; Vasudev, M.K. (National Inst. of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bangalore (India). Dept. of Neuroradiology)

    1991-11-01

    The cerebral angiograms of 8 patients with childhood moyamoya disease showed that the common findings were stenosis/occlusion of the supraclinoid internal carotid artery and the proximal segments of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries and basal moyamoya. The volume of basal moyamoya and its collateral supply depended upon the stage of the disease. Leptomeningeal collaterals were frequent in the later stages. Stenotic lesions in the posterior circulation were seen in a majority (75%) of patients. A feature unique to the study was evidence of intracranial small-vessel disease and stenotic cervical internal carotid artery in half of the cases. The disease in the ethnic caucasian Indians seems largely similar to the classical disease frequently reported in the Japanese literature. (orig.).

  16. Lateral intercrural suture in the caucasian nose: Decreased domal divergence angle in endonasal rhinoplasty without delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger, Cezar Augusto Sarraf

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several techniques can be performed to improve nasal tip definition such as cartilage resection, tip grafts, or sutures. Objective: To evaluate the outcome of lateral intercrural suture at the lower lateral cartilage by endonasal rhinoplasty with a basic technique without delivery in decreasing the angle of domal divergence and improving the nasal tip definition. Method: This prospective study was performed in 64 patients in which a suture was made on the board head of the lower lateral cartilage in the joint between the dome and lateral crus, using polydioxanone (PDS with sharp, curved needle. Results: In all of the cases, better definition of the nasal tip was achieved by intercrural suturing for at least 6 months postoperatively. Conclusion: Lateral intercrural suture of the lower lateral cartilage provides improved nasal tip definition and can be performed by endonasal rhinoplasty without delivery in the Caucasian nose.

  17. Heavy and Special Weapons across the Territory of Black Sea Coastline during the Caucasian War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr A. Cherkasov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the heavy and special weapons of the Russian army during the Caucasian war across the territory of Black Sea coastline. By heavy equipment is meant all kinds of artillery systems which were used in the fortresses at that time. The particular importance is given to the special weapons, which include the minefields (mines and fougasses. It is proved that the mines on the galvanic elements were used not only in the navy but also for the needs of the ground forces. The authors came to the conclusion that the technical superiority of the Russian army became one of the main reasons for defeat of the highlanders in the war.

  18. [Gestational diabetes mellitus and maternal ethnicity: high prevalence of fetal macrosomia in non-Caucasian women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulinas, Anna; Biagetti, Betina; Vinagre, Irene; Capel, Ismael; Ubeda, Justa; María, Miguel Ángel; García-Patterson, Apolonia; Adelantado, Juan María; Ginovart, Gemma; Corcoy, Rosa

    2013-09-21

    Differences in perinatal outcomes according to ethnicity have been described in pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We analysed the relationship between ethnicity, maternal characteristics and perinatal outcomes in pregnant women with GDM. Retrospective analysis of women with GDM attended at the centre between 1986 and 2007. We studied 2,543 mother-infant pairs (8.9% multiple pregnancies, 2,480 Caucasian [C] and 63 non-Caucasian [NC] mothers). Maternal characteristics and perinatal outcomes were compared according to maternal ethnicity and multivariable logistic regression analyses (backward method) were performed to predict perinatal outcomes. The groups (C vs NC) differed in previous pregnancies, obstetric history, pregestational body mass index, delay between diagnosis and clinic entry, fasting plasma glucose at diagnosis and both initial and third trimester glycated hemoglobin, with all of them being worse in NC group. As to perinatal outcomes, we also observed differences in the prevalence of macrosomic (4.3 vs 19.4%) and large for gestational age newborns (LGA) (9.5 vs 32.3%), all of them being higher in the NC group. In the logistic regression analyses, NC was an independent predictor of macrosomia, LGA and jaundice with odds ratio ranging from 2.767 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.257-6.091) for LGA and 3.629 (95% CI 0.972-13.548) for neonatal jaundice. NC-GDM patients had more adverse perinatal outcomes only partially explained by medical history, anthropometric data and maternal glycemic control. NC ethnicity was an independent predictor of poor perinatal outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. The CAG repeat polymorphism in the Androgen receptor gene modifies the risk for hypospadias in Caucasians

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypospadias is a birth defect of the urethra in males, and a milder form of 46,XY disorder of sexual development (DSD). The disease is characterized by a ventrally placed urinary opening due to a premature fetal arrest of the urethra development. Moreover, the Androgen receptor (AR) gene has an essential role in the hormone-dependent stage of sexual development. In addition, longer AR polyglutamine repeat lengths encoded by CAG repeats are associated with lower transcriptional activity in vitro. In the present study, we aimed at investigating the role of the CAG repeat length in the AR gene in hypospadias cases as compared to the controls. Our study included 211 hypospadias and 208 controls of Caucasian origin. Methods We amplified the CAG repeat region with PCR, and calculated the difference in the mean CAG repeat length between the hypospadias and control group using the T-test for independent groups. Results We detected a significant increase of the CAG repeat length in the hypospadias cases when compared to the controls (contrast estimate: 2.29, 95% Confidence Interval (1.73-2.84); p-value: 0.001). In addition, the odds ratios between the hypospadias and controls revealed that the hypospadias cases are two to 3 times as likely to have longer CAG repeats than a shorter length for each repeat length investigated. Conclusions We have investigated the largest number of hypospadias cases with regards to the CAG repeat length, and we provide evidence that a higher number of the CAG repeat sequence in the AR gene have a clear effect on the risk of hypospadias in Caucasians. PMID:23167717

  20. Anthropometric study of the caucasian nose in the city of Curitiba: relevance of population evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballin, Annelyse Cristine; Carvalho, Bettina; Dolci, José Eduardo Lutaif; Becker, Renata; Berger, Cezar; Mocellin, Marcos

    2017-07-03

    Norms and patterns of nasal esthetics are essential for an adequate preoperative evaluation and surgical programming. The esthetic nasal patterns used are a blend of artistic beauty ideals and tracings in models and celebrities. Because they do not consider population measures, they vary according to the period, and allow a discrepancy between the surgeon's preference and the patient's real desire for rhinoplasty. Not all populations wish to obtain an esthetic result according to these values, but prefer a natural result, that is, one with some of the nasal characteristics of the population to which they belong to. The Brazilian population lacks population studies to evaluate its nose measurements. (1) To evaluate the anthropometric measures of Caucasian noses of people living in the city of Curitiba (state of Paraná), and to compare them to the ideal esthetic pattern of the literature; (2) To compare them between genders. This is a prospective cohort study involving 100 Caucasian volunteers at a tertiary hospital in Southern Brazil. Through the frontal and lateral view photos, intercanthal distance, alar distance, nasal dorsum length, nasofrontal angle, nasolabial angle, and nasal tip projection (Goode's method) were obtained. A statistical analysis was performed to compare the measures obtained between genders and with the ideal patterns. Comparing the results obtained with those predicted by the esthetic ideals, the sample presented: similar nasolabial angle (p=0.07), alar width greater than intercanthal distance (pideals. Comparing the genders, men had a sharper nasofrontal angle, and higher tip projection than women. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Kaiso is highly expressed in TNBC tissues of women of African ancestry compared to Caucasian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassey-Archibong, Blessing I; Hercules, Shawn M; Rayner, Lyndsay G A; Skeete, Desiree H A; Smith Connell, Suzanne P; Brain, Ian; Daramola, Adetola; Banjo, Adekunbiola A F; Byun, Jung S; Gardner, Kevin; Dushoff, Jonathan; Daniel, Juliet M

    2017-11-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is most prevalent in young women of African ancestry (WAA) compared to women of other ethnicities. Recent studies found a correlation between high expression of the transcription factor Kaiso, TNBC aggressiveness, and ethnicity. However, little is known about Kaiso expression and localization patterns in TNBC tissues of WAA. Herein, we analyze Kaiso expression patterns in TNBC tissues of African (Nigerian), Caribbean (Barbados), African American (AA), and Caucasian American (CA) women. Formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) TNBC tissue blocks from Nigeria and Barbados were utilized to construct a Nigerian/Barbadian tissue microarray (NB-TMA). This NB-TMA and a commercially available TMA comprising AA and CA TNBC tissues (AA-CA-YTMA) were subjected to immunohistochemistry to assess Kaiso expression and subcellular localization patterns, and correlate Kaiso expression with TNBC clinical features. Nigerian and Barbadian women in our study were diagnosed with TNBC at a younger age than AA and CA women. Nuclear and cytoplasmic Kaiso expression was observed in all tissues analyzed. Analysis of Kaiso expression in the NB-TMA and AA-CA-YTMA revealed that nuclear Kaiso H scores were significantly higher in Nigerian, Barbadian, and AA women compared with CA women. However, there was no statistically significant difference in nuclear Kaiso expression between Nigerian versus Barbadian women, or Barbadian versus AA women. High levels of nuclear Kaiso expression were detected in patients with a higher degree of African heritage compared to their Caucasian counterparts, suggesting a role for Kaiso in TNBC racial disparity.

  2. Girls' Engagement with/in Science: Teacher Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Patricia A.; Brickhouse, Nancy

    This study is an extension of an on-going longitudinal study, the Girls Engagement With/In Science (GEIS) Project. The GEIS Project was designed to understand how girls who are poor, minority or both, engage in science. The two teachers who form the focus for this study are these girls' 7th and 8th grade teachers. Data for this interpretive…

  3. Fruit and vegetable intake : Few adolescent girls meet national guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Striegel-Moore, RH; Thompson, DR; Affenito, SG; Franko, DL; Barton, BA; Schreiber, GB; Daniels, [No Value; Schmidt, M; Crawford, PB

    Objective. To examine longitudinal changes in daily fruit and vegetable consumption among black and white adolescent girls and calculate the percent of girls who met the Healthy People 2010 recommendations. Methods. Girls (1186 black and 1126 white) who participated in the National Heart, Lung, and

  4. Sexual behavior and treatment improvement of institutionalized girls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhof, K.S.; Scholte, R.H.J.; Burk, W.J.; Engels, R.C.M.E.; Dam, C. van; Veerman, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the association between sexual behavior and treatment improvement of institutionalized girls. Treatment files of 174 girls (M age = 15.71, SD = 1.14) were analyzed to obtain information about the sexual behavior of girls before admission. Based on their sexual behavior,

  5. Developing Sport Psychology in a girls' sport academy curriculum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    formance Sciences' (CHPS) Academy for Girls' Leadership and Sport Development. Sport. Psychology does not feature within the South African school curriculum specifically, yet the. CHPS recognises the importance of exposing girls to the principles and skills of Sport Psy- chology and has a leadership curriculum for girls ...

  6. The Pittsburgh Girls Study: Overview and Initial Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Kate; Hipwell, Alison; Chung, Tammy; Stepp, Stephanie; Stouthamer-Loeber, Magda; Loeber, Rolf; McTigue, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    The Pittsburgh Girls Study is a longitudinal, community-based study of 2,451 girls who were initially recruited when they were between the ages of 5 and 8 years. The primary aim of the study was testing developmental models of conduct disorder, major depressive disorder, and their co-occurrence in girls. In the current article, we summarize the…

  7. What's Sexy? Adolescent Girls Discuss Confidence, Danger, and Media Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Sharon; Farmer, Kaelin M.; Kosterina, Elena; Lambe Sariñana, Susan; Plocha, Aleksandra; Randazzo, Renee

    2016-01-01

    Building on qualitative research about sexualisation by media and culture and the impact on girls' development, in this article we present a discourse analysis of three focus groups of teen girls of colour and of diverse ethnicities asked to talk about sexiness. We focus on the ways the girls both support and resist hegemonic discourses about…

  8. Girls' Motivation, Participation And Preference For Visual Arts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Textiles-with-Graphic Design elective combination facilitates access into the fashion industry but many girls shun Picture-Making because girls generally lack the level of drawing skills required; Ceramics is “girl-friendly” except that clay easily dirties their clothes. Sculpture is the least preferred elective because it ...

  9. Identifying Girls Who Use Relational Aggression: A Proposed Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Angela; Smith, Lisa F.

    2012-01-01

    This study used mixed methods to compare perceptions of relational aggression (RA) of adolescent girls (n = 282) and their teachers (n = 15) in New Zealand, and to explore strategies for teachers to effectively manage RA in the classroom. Results indicated that younger adolescent girls view physical aggression as more acceptable than older girls,…

  10. Motor proficiency and physical fitness in active and inactive girls ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In modern day society physical activity levels diminish rapidly among girls and may be a direct consequence of girls experiencing motor difficulties. Therefore the aim of the study was to compare motor proficiency levels and physical fitness levels among active and inactive girls (N=97), aged 12 to 13 years. The BOTMP ...

  11. Strategies for Improving Participation and Performance of Girls in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The findings indicate that initiation of awareness programmes on the relevance of science for parents and girls and also making perception and attitudes of teachers vis-à-vis girls in science positive will go a long way in improving girls participation and performance in science. Furthermore, organization of science groups ...

  12. Girl-Child Education Outcomes: A Case Study from Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arku, Frank S.; Angmor, Emmanuel N.; Tetteh, Isaac K.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of girl-child education is largely documented and initiatives to promote girl-child education are widespread. However, studies on service delivery methods, processes and the impacts are limited in the literature. This study assessed the Plan Ghana's girl-child educational project. According to the findings, the project has helped to…

  13. The Benefits Associated with Dance Education for Adolescent Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicario, Terra; Chambliss, Catherine

    Dance education provides an opportunity for aerobic exercise and conditioning that is especially appealing to many girls. Dance may act as an outlet for girls and give them confidence, but, at the same time, it may create risks associated with perceived body-image. The benefits of taking dance classes were examined for girls, ages 13-20, enrolled…

  14. Humsathi: Empowering girls to become their own advocates and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Humsathi: Empowering girls to become their own advocates and boys as allies to end early child and forced marriage. In Pakistan, the legal age for marriage is 18 for boys and 16 for girls in all but one province. Laws prohibiting marriage of girls under 16 years of age have existed for more than half a century and yet, ...

  15. Exploring the causes of change in adolescent girls' sexual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These factors include changes in girls' attitudes to traditional practices, diversity in the agents of socialization as well as the age at menarche. This has resulted in a clash of value system between girls' sexual behaviours and that of the elderly. Thus, the social context in which girls are experiencing sexual and reproductive ...

  16. Bullying Among Teenage Girls: An Interview with Dr. Harriet Mosatche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevention Researcher, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Dr. Harriet Mosatche is an advice columnist on a web site for teen girls, as well as the Senior Director of Research and Programs at the Girl Scouts of the USA. Because of these dual roles, she has a unique perspective on the bullying issue. In this interview she answers a number of questions about bullying among teenage girls, including how boys…

  17. Music Therapy: A Therapeutic Intervention for Girls with Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Kathleen A.

    The paper reviews music therapy, the educational background of music therapists, music therapy's various settings, and its use as an intervention with girls with Rett Syndrome. Sample music therapy programs for three girls (aged 5, 14, and 20 years) with Rett Syndrome are presented. The sample programs provide: student descriptions; the girls'…

  18. Empowering Girls of Color through Authentic Science Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjapong, Edmund S.; Levy, Ian P.; Emdin, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The underrepresentation of girls and students of color in STEM fields, particularly in science, is an ongoing issue that is very well documented. There is a limited amount of research that provides insight on experiences of girls, especially girls of color, who have been exposed to authentic science experiences. This article interrogates the…

  19. Gendered Peer Involvement in Girls with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: Effects of Prenatal Androgens, Gendered Activities, and Gender Cognitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenbaum, Sheri A; Beltz, Adriene M; Bryk, Kristina; McHale, Susan

    2018-01-09

    A key question in understanding gender development concerns the origins of sex segregation. Children's tendencies to interact with same-sex others have been hypothesized to result from gender identity and cognitions, behavioral compatibility, and personal characteristics. We examined whether prenatal androgen exposure was related to time spent with boys and girls, and how that gendered peer involvement was related to sex-typed activities and gender identity and cognitions. We studied 54 girls with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) aged 10-13 years varying in degree of prenatal androgen exposure: 40 girls with classical CAH (C-CAH) exposed to high prenatal androgens and 14 girls with non-classical CAH (NC-CAH) exposed to low, female-typical, prenatal androgens. Home interviews and questionnaires provided assessments of gendered activity interests and participation, gender identity, and gender cognitions. Daily phone calls over 7 days assessed time spent in gendered activities and with peers. Girls with both C-CAH and NC-CAH interacted more with girls than with boys, with no significant group differences. The groups did not differ significantly in gender identity or gender cognitions, but girls with C-CAH spent more time in male-typed activities and less time in female-typed activities than did girls with NC-CAH. Time spent with girls reflected direct effects of gender identity/cognitions and gender-typed activities, and an indirect effect of prenatal androgens (CAH type) through gender-typed activities. Our results extend findings that prenatal androgens differentially affect gendered characteristics and that gendered peer interactions reflect combined effects of behavioral compatibility and feelings and cognitions about gender. The study also shows the value of natural experiments for testing hypotheses about gender development.

  20. The meaning of seasonal changes, nature, and animals for adolescent girls' wellbeing in northern Finland: A qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Varpu; Kyngäs, Helvi; Pölkki, Tarja

    2016-01-01

    Wellbeing is complex, holistic, and subjectively perceived. Issues such as gender, age, and environment seem to affect it. Therefore, the aim of this qualitative study was to describe the meaning of seasonal changes, nature, and animals towards 13-16-year-old girls' wellbeing in Northern Finland. In the spring of 2014, through purposive sampling, a total of 19 girls participated in semi-structured interviews from various parts of Northern Finland. The data were analysed using content analysis. Afterwards, the analysis combining the category participatory involvement with environment was found, and this consisted of three main categories: adaptation to seasonal changes, restorative nature, and empowering interactivity with animals. Seasonal changes had an effect on girls' wellbeing; in the summertime, they felt happy and vivacious, active, and outgoing. Instead, during the winter months, girls' mood and activity seemed to be lower and they felt lazier and depressed. Nature brought mainly positive feelings to girls; being in nature was experienced as liberating and relaxing, and it offered opportunities to relax and have sensory perceptions. Interaction with animals was perceived as empowering. They were experienced as altruistic and comforting companions. Animals were important to girls, and they contributed to girls' lives through positive effects towards their mental and physical wellbeing. Based on the results of this study, we can recommend that being in nature and interacting with animals should be supported because they seem to have benefits towards adolescent girls' health and wellbeing. In order to facilitate the negative effects of winter, the school days should be arranged in such a way that it would be possible for girls to have outdoor activities during the daytime. The challenge for the future is perhaps the purposeful utilisation of nature's and the animals' positive effects towards their wellbeing.

  1. EKSPLOITASI PADA PEREMPUAN SALES PROMOTION GIRLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Afta Lestari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Terjadi perubahan posisi perempuan yang semula hanya berada di sektor domestik, kini beralih ke sektor publik. Kondisi di perkotaan yang relatif lebih heterogen membuka peluang perempuan untuk bekerja di berbagai bidang, salah satunya adalah sales promotion girls (SPG. Dalam penelitian ini, penulis mengeksplorasi bagaimana profil SPG dan eksploitasi yang dialaminya. Penelitian ini menggunakan pendekatan kualitatif dengan teknik observasi, wawancara, dan dokumentasi dalam pengambilan datanya. Penampilan cantik dan menarik menjadi modal utama dalam pekerjaan ini. Sales Promotion Girls pada industri rokok dan minuman  berumur sekitar 21-30 tahun dengan jam kerja sekitar 5-7 jam perhari. Alasan bekerja di bidang ini adalah bahwa bidang ini merupakan pekerjaan ringan dan tidak memerlukan pendidikan yang tinggi, walaupun di sisi lain mereka hanya mendapatkan upah yang rendah. Perempuan dalam pekerjaan ini seringkali mengalami eksploitasi fisik berupa pelecehan seksual dan eksploitasi ekonomi berupa waktu kerja yang sampai malam hari dan tidak terpenuhinya hak-hak pekerja perempuan seperti faktor keselamatan dan hak untuk cuti. Dengan kondisi seperti ini, maka perlindungan terhadap perempuan bekerja pada umumnya dan sales promotion girls pada khususnya menjadi hal yang sangat penting untuk diperhatikan.A change in economic condition in Indonesia brings about a change of woman position, from formerly domestic sector to recently public sector. Urban areas that is relatively more heterogeneous than rural ones open opportunities for women to work in various fields, one of which is sales promotion girls (SPG. In this study, the author seeks to explore the SPG profile and the exploitation they experienced. The method used in this study are qualitative approach, with observation, interviews, and documentation. The research uncovered the following facts. Beautiful and attractive appearance becomes a priority in this work. Sales promotion girls on cigarettes

  2. Genome-Wide Association Meta-Analyses to Identify Common Genetic Variants Associated with Hallux Valgus in Caucasian and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Liu, Youfang; Hannan, Marian T.; Maixner, William; Smith, Shad B.; Diatchenko, Luda; Golightly, Yvonne M.; Menz, Hylton B.; Kraus, Virginia B.; Doherty, Michael; Wilson, A.G.; Jordan, Joanne M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hallux valgus (HV) affects ~36% of Caucasian adults. Although considered highly heritable, the underlying genetic determinants are unclear. We conducted the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) aimed to identify genetic variants associated with HV. Methods HV was assessed in 3 Caucasian cohorts (n=2,263, n=915, and n=1,231 participants, respectively). In each cohort, a GWAS was conducted using 2.5M imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Mixed-effect regression with the additive genetic model adjusted for age, sex, weight and within-family correlations was used for both sex-specific and combined analyses. To combine GWAS results across cohorts, fixed-effect inverse-variance meta-analyses were used. Following meta-analyses, top-associated findings were also examined in an African American cohort (n=327). Results The proportion of HV variance explained by genome-wide genotyped SNPs was 50% in men and 48% in women. A higher proportion of genetic determinants of HV was sex-specific. The most significantly associated SNP in men was rs9675316 located on chr17q23-a24 near the AXIN2 gene (p=5.46×10−7); the most significantly associated SNP in women was rs7996797 located on chr13q14.1-q14.2 near the ESD gene (p=7.21×10−7). Genome-wide significant SNP-by-sex interaction was found for SNP rs1563374 located on chr11p15.1 near the MRGPRX3 gene (interaction p-value =4.1×10−9). The association signals diminished when combining men and women. Conclusion Findings suggest that the potential pathophysiological mechanisms of HV are complex and strongly underlined by sex-specific interactions. The identified genetic variants imply contribution of biological pathways observed in osteoarthritis as well as new pathways, influencing skeletal development and inflammation. PMID:26337638

  3. Helping Girls Get Back on Track: An Implementation Study of the PACE Center for Girls. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treskon, Louisa; Millenky, Megan; Freedman, Lily

    2017-01-01

    PACE Center for Girls is a unique program that provides academic and social services to girls ages 11 to 18. Girls eligible for PACE exhibit multiple health, safety, and delinquency risk factors, such as poor academic performance, exposure to abuse or violence, truancy, risky sexual behavior, and substance abuse. PACE seeks to help them onto a…

  4. American Immigrant Girls' Understanding of Female Body Image in Disney: A Critical Analysis of Young Korean Girls' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lena

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses young Korean immigrant girls' understanding of American popular culture in a small-scale qualitative study in order to disclose young American immigrant girls' perspectives on such culture. In particular, this paper explores how these Korean girls (age five to eight) perceive female body images in American popular culture -…

  5. Horse-Girl Assemblages: Towards a Post-Human Cartography of Girls' Desire in an Ex-Mining Valleys Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renold, Emma; Ivinson, Gabrielle

    2014-01-01

    The paper works with queer and feminist post-human materialist scholarship to understand the way young teen valleys' girls experienced ubiquitous feelings of fear, risk, vulnerability and violence. Longitudinal ethnographic research of girls (aged 12-15) living in an ex-mining semi-rural community suggests how girls are negotiating complex…

  6. Testosterone metabolism: a possible biological underpinning of non-verbal IQ in intellectually gifted girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdiaková, Jaroslava; Celec, Peter; Laznibatová, Jolana; Minárik, Gabriel; Ostatníková, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The extraordinary giftedness is apparently a unique manifestation of a mutual interconnection between genes and environment. One of the possible etiological factors of intellectual giftedness is testosterone which is believed to affect the brain organization and function. The aim of our study was to analyze associations between 2D:4D digit ratio (a proxy of prenatal testosterone) and/or salivary testosterone levels with non-verbal IQ in intellectually gifted girls. Fifty-one girls with an age range of 10 to18 years and IQ scores higher than 130 were tested. Saliva samples were collected to obtain levels of salivary testosterone. 2D:4D digit ratio was measured on both hands as an indicator of prenatal testosterone. IQ parameters were assessed employing standardized set of tests. The CAG repeat polymorphism in exon 1 of the androgen receptor gene was analyzed to assess the sensitivity of androgen receptor. Testing of between-subjects effects proved significant interactions between right and left 2D:4D ratio, genetic variability in androgen receptor, and also salivary testosterone level with non-verbal IQ in gifted girls. Our results point out that the variability in parameters of androgenicity contributes to the variability of nonverbal IQ in gifted girls. However, the exact molecular mechanism of how testosterone acts on the brain and affects this cognitive domain remains still unclear.

  7. UK school visit: Alfriston School for girls

    CERN Multimedia

    Sophie Louise Hetherton

    2014-01-01

    Pupils with learning disabilities from Alfriston School in the UK visited the CMS detector last week. This visit was funded by the UK's Science and Technologies Facilities Council (STFC) as part of a grant awarded to support activities that will help to build the girls’ self-esteem and interest in physics.   Alfriston School students at CMS. On Friday, 10 October, pupils from Alfriston School – a UK secondary school catering for girls with a wide range of special educational needs and disabilities – paid a special visit to CERN. Dave Waterman, a science teacher at the school, recently received a Public Engagement Small Award from the STFC, which enabled the group of girls and accompanying teachers to travel to Switzerland and visit CERN. The awards form part of a project to boost the girls’ confidence and interest in physics. The aim is to create enthusiastic role models with first-hand experience of science who can inspire their peers back hom...

  8. Physics Girl: Where Education meets Cat Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowern, Dianna

    YouTube is usually considered an entertainment medium to watch cats, gaming, and music videos. But educational channels have been gaining momentum on the platform, some garnering millions of subscribers and billions of views. The Physics Girl YouTube channel is an educational series with PBS Digital Studios created by Dianna Cowern. Using Physics Girl as an example, this talk will examine what it takes to start a short-form educational video series, including logistics and resources. One benefit of video is that every failure is documented on camera and can, and will, be used in this talk as a learning tool. We will look at the channels demographical reach, discuss best practices for effective physics outreach, and survey how online media and technology can facilitate good and bad learning. The aim of this talk is to show how videos are a unique way to share science and enrich the learning experience, in and out of a classroom.

  9. CERN encourages girls to "expand their horizons"

    CERN Multimedia

    François Briard

    2015-01-01

    On 14 November, CERN took part for the fourth time in "Élargis tes horizons" (see here), a conference organised every two years at Geneva University for girls from the local region aged 11 to 14 aiming to encourage them to take up studies and careers in the scientific and technical domains.   Claude Sanz (left), a fellow in the EN Department, explaining to three girls how to build a particle accelerator in a salad bowl. This year, young physicists and engineers from ATLAS and CMS ran three workshops: "Seeing the invisible using a cloud chamber", "Great cold fun and treats with liquid nitrogen" and "Build your own accelerator in a salad bowl!" CERN was also represented at the Forum de Découverte, represented by the Diversity Office and the Medialab team, presenting the "Higgnite" interactive experiment, which illustrates the principle of the Higgs field. More...

  10. First Django Girls workshop in Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    Julliard, Laure

    2016-01-01

    A Django girls workshop organised by the R0SEH1PSters community from Geneva and supported by the CERN diversity team and the IT department took place at IdeaSquare on 26th and 27th February. Django Girls is a volunteer-run organisation with hundreds of people contributing to bring more women without prior IT backgrounds to the Python and Django community. Python is a widely used general-purpose and dynamic programming language while Django is a high-level Python Web framework that makes it easier to build better Web apps more quickly and with less code. Over 155 free workshops in 125 cities and 57 countries have been organised worldwide regularly since 2014. The aim of the workshop was to introduce participants to the world of computer programming and technology by teaching them how to successfully create a blog application and deploy it to the internet.

  11. Sydenham Chorea in a Girl with Dextrocardia and Situs Inversus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Vakilian

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sydenham Chorea (SC is a childhood disease that most frequently occurs after infection with group A β-hemolytic streptococcus species. SC is the most commonly acquired childhood chorea, usually affecting 5 to 15-year-old children. Dextrocardia situs inversus refers to the heart being situated on the right side of the body. We found a case of SC with coexisting dextrocardia and situs inversus, which is rare to our knowledge. A 14-year-old girl was referred to Ali-Ibn-Abiltaleb Hospital due to choreoathetotic movements more in her upper than lower extremities, which impaired her usual function. Antistreptolysin O (ASO titer was high. Her throat culture was positive for streptococci beta hemolytic. In cardiac study, moderate mitral regurgitation, tricuspid regurgitation, diastolic dysfunction, conus in the Right Ventricle Outlet (RVOT, rightsided aortic arch, dextrocardia, and situs inversus were reported. This was a rare case with SC that had such anomalies.

  12. ICT Interventions for Girls: Factors Influencing ICT Career Intentions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gorbacheva

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Intervention programs aimed at promoting study and work opportunities in the Information and Communications Technology (ICT field to schoolgirls have been encouraged to combat a decline in the interest among girls to study ICT at school. The goal of our study is to investigate the influence of such interventions on schoolgirls’ intentions to choose a career in the ICT field by analysing comprehensive survey data (n = 3577, collected during four interventions in Australia, using the Partial Least Squares method. Our study is also aimed at identifying other factors influencing ICT career intentions. We found that the attitude towards interventions has an indirect influence on ICT career intentions by affecting interest in ICT. Our results also challenge several existing theoretical studies by showing that factors that had previously been suggested as influencers were found to have little or no impact in this study, these being same-sex education and computer usage.

  13. The girl child and the family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojumdar, M

    The appalling conditions of the Hindu, Muslim, Christian, and Sikh female children in India are emphasized. There is systematic neglect and exploitation of girls from birth through death. Dowries are still expected at the time of marriage and for years to come, regardless of the illegality. Within marriage, there is cruelty and insult, and even bride killing, known as dowry death. Parents can be accomplices in permitting the injury to begin or continue with impunity. Patience and tolerance is expected of daughters; the husband is the commanding presence. Spinsterhood is shameful. Suicide is a viable option for widowhood. Over the 40 years of freedom from British rule, antiquated norms and superstitions persist. Fundamentalism in increasing. A daughter is pitied at birth and a mother is blamed. Mothers-in-law are notorious for the blaming. These beliefs occur in spite of scientific evidence that it is the male who carries the chromosome in the sperm for sex determination. A modern practice helps to perpetuate female infanticide: amniocentesis and abortion. When food shortages occur, the pecking order favors males over pregnant women and children. Illiteracy is high among girls, who are kept home and given household chores. Better education is given to males even in middle class homes. Peer pressure and societal attitudes maintain the subservience of females. Orphanages are filled with unwanted female babies. The rape of a girl is considered shameful for life, while the rape of a boy is disregarded as unfortunate and forgotten. Expectations are that boys will be decision makers and girls can cope with domestic matters. The brainwashing to inferiority continues until the son marries and is then perpetuated.

  14. Girls In STEM White Coat Ceremony 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal, Kelsey Ann Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Coronado, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-12-19

    Like working with children? Who doesn’t? Girls in STEM has myriad opportunities for you to help local Title 1 students in the classroom. You can choose to volunteer from the Lab, from the Bradbury Science Museum, or to travel to Abiquiu Elementary School (car provided) to do a science demonstration. The best part is that you can use the Community Outreach Partnership Code.

  15. Empowering the family for girl child development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, M

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses family interactions that devalue female children in India and the role of government in enriching family life. Child development is dependent upon the family and the social environment. Patriarchy establishes the structure, roles, and responsibilities of the family through hierarchies of age, gender, and generation. Males hold authoritative positions because of their control over resources and the assumption of their superiority. Family unity and stability is based on conformity with the community and kinship norms. The Indian family places a low priority on the development of individual family members and children. Female children are a low priority both as children and as girls. Girls carry a heavy domestic workload in the family, but girls do not receive recognition for their contributions. The family socializes children based on norms of gender and age inequalities. Deviation from patriarchal norms results in ostracism. Families without resources are vulnerable to deprivation and exploitation. Gaps have widened between rich and poor, and men and women. Particularly vulnerable groups are women in single-parent families and female-headed households. The combination of patriarchy, increased consumerism, and structural adjustment programs marginalizes girl children. Every family should be considered equal in dignity and worth and have the right to freedom, choices, life, security of person and privacy, and protection from domestic violence. Vulnerable family members need special attention. Every family member should take responsibility for promoting sensitivity and responsiveness, positive communication, companionable relationships, democratic decision making, respect for individual needs and differences, peaceful and nonviolent approaches for resolving conflicts, and support in crisis situations.

  16. Polymorphisms in the interleukin-1 (IL1) gene cluster are not associated with aggressive periodontitis in a large Caucasian population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiebig, A.; Jepsen, S.; Loos, B.G.; Scholz, C.; Schäfer, C.; Rühling, A.; Nothnagel, M.; Eickholz, P.; van der Velden, U.; Schenck, K.; Schreiber, S.; Grössner-Schreiber, B.

    2008-01-01

    Polymorphisms in the interleukin-1 (IL1) gene have been suggested to influence transcription of IL1A (interleukin-1α) and IL1B (interleukin-1β) and thereby the pathophysiology of periodontitis. This case-control association study on 415 northern European Caucasian patients with aggressive

  17. The Development of Resort and Tourist Destinations in the Caucasian Mineral Waters in the Context of Global and National Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander P. Gorbunov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The key tendencies of development of Russian market of tourist services as an integral part of the global market are examined in the paper. Special attention is paid to tourism market of the Stavropol territory is included in the top 10 most attractive from the point of view of tourism regions of Russia and the region of Caucasian Mineral Waters, as the main tourism destinations of the region. Disclosed key infrastructure constraints hampering the further development of tourist cluster of the Caucasian Mineral Waters, and offers recommendations for their mitigation. The analysis of competitive advantages of sanatorium-resort complex Caucasian Mineral Waters regarding the world's leading thermal spas reveals the competitiveness of resorts competitiveness of the bookings made for the price. Conducted comparative analysis made it possible to draw a conclusion about the high price competitiveness of services offered by spa resort towns Caucasian Mineral Waters agencies compared with foreign counterparts. However, even competitive costs regions may have very low levels of flows of tourists because of the inconsistency of the infrastructure properties (full or partial the goals of tourists. It is proved that the main obstacle to promote the territory with competitive natural and cultural characteristics into a full-fledged tourist destination is the poor quality of accommodation, as well as the low level of development of the system.

  18. Chronic family stress moderates the association between a TOMM40 variant and triglyceride levels in two independent Caucasian samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Rong; Brummett, Beverly H; Hauser, Elizabeth R

    2013-01-01

    independent Caucasian samples (242 U.S. women and men; 466 Danish men) testing the hypothesis that chronic family stress also moderates the association between rs157580 and triglyceride levels. The interaction of rs157580 and family stress in predicting triglyceride levels was statistically significant...

  19. Prospective study of risk factors for hepatitis C virus acquisition by Caucasian, Hispanic, and Asian American patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, E Y; Ha, N B; Ahmed, A; Ayoub, W; Daugherty, T; Garcia, G; Cooper, A; Keeffe, E B; Nguyen, M H

    2012-02-01

    Commonly known risk factors for infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) include blood transfusion, injection drug use, intranasal cocaine use, and body tattoos. We hypothesized that Asian Americans infected with HCV may not identify with these established risk factors present in Caucasians and Hispanics, and our aim was to conduct a survey of risk factors in HCV-infected patients in these ethnic groups. In this prospective study, 494 patients infected with HCV completed a detailed risk assessment questionnaire at a liver centre in Northern California from 2001 to 2008. Among subjects participating in this study, 55% identified themselves as Caucasian, 20% as Hispanic, and 25% as Asian. Asian Americans were older, less likely to smoke or consume alcohol, and have a family history of cancer compared with Caucasians and Hispanics. The laboratory profiles were similar, and genotype 1 was the most common infection in all groups (74-75%). The great majority of Caucasians (94%) and Hispanics (86%) identified with commonly known risk factors, which was in contrast to 67% of Asians (P Americans. These findings may guide the development of HCV screening in our increasingly diverse population. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Mental Illness Stigma as a Mediator of Differences in Caucasian and South Asian College Students' Attitudes toward Psychological Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loya, Fred; Reddy, Radhika; Hinshaw, Stephen P.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has established that Asian Americans use mental health services less frequently and hold poorer attitudes toward psychological counseling than Caucasians. The authors directly tested whether stigmatizing beliefs regarding mental illness might explain such differential attitudes toward counseling in a South Asian and Caucasian…