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Sample records for cattle diseases

  1. Retrospective study on cattle and poultry diseases in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Byaruhanga

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cattle and poultry enterprises are among the major contributors to food security and socioeconomic empowerment of households in Uganda. However, various diseases constrain their productivity. A two-year retrospective study between April 2012 and March 2014 was conducted using records for cattle and poultry diseases diagnosed at the Central Diagnostic Laboratory (CDL to determine prevalent diseases in Uganda. The laboratory received 836 samples from poultry (36.3% and cattle (63.7%. Of the 836 samples, 47.5% had a definitive diagnosis of disease causation. Most of the cattle and poultry diseases diagnosed were protozoan diseases (39.3% followed by bacterial (21.4%, viral (17.1%, helminthiasis (11.1%, nutritional diseases (4% and others (7.1%. For poultry, viral diseases (29.5% and protozoan diseases (27.1% especially newcastle disease (44.3% and coccidiosis (100% respectively, were the most diagnosed. While for cattle, hemo-protozoan parasites (52.1% were the most prevalent, of which 92.9% were east coast fever infection. Bacterial infection (20.5% in cattle were the second most diagnosed diseases and mastitis was the most diagnosed (46.2%. In summary, coccidioisis, collibacillosis, newcastle disease, gumboro disease, and avian helminthiasis were the most prevalent poultry diseases while in cattle, east coast fever, helminthiasis, mastitis, brucellosis and rabies were the most frequently diagnosed diseases. This study has identified the major diseases that hinder poultry and cattle production in Uganda. The data generated by CDL could be used for surveillance, monitoring and designing strategic interventions for control of poultry and cattle diseases in Uganda. Keywords: Coccidiosis, Collibacillosis, East coast fever, Mastitis, Newcastle disease, Rabies

  2. Retrospective Survey on Major Cattle Diseases in Guto Gida woreda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Retrospective Survey on Major Cattle Diseases in Guto Gida woreda, Eastern Wollega, Nekemte, Ethiopia. ... Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal ... Retrospective survey of five years was conducted from February 2009 to October 2014 to investigate the extent of major cattle disease and different treatment ...

  3. Prevalence of major skin diseases of cattle and associated risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Across-sectional study was conducted on 384 cattle to identify skin diseases and associated risk factors in cattle in and around Ambo town, Ethiopia. Thorough clinical examination was made followed by collection of skin scrapping and visible ecto-parasites for laboratory identification. The overall prevalence was 73.7%, ...

  4. Empowering women to tackle cattle lung disease

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    being trained on the new, cutting edge technologies in Canada. Empowering women to tackle cattle lung ... family's nutrition. We would like our cattle to be vaccinated so that we do not lose milk and the income we get from sales of milk. Halima Omar, Hidaya. Enhanced participation of women smallholder farmers in vaccine.

  5. Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus-Associated Disease in Feedlot Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Robert L

    2015-11-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDv) is associated with bovine respiratory disease complex and other diseases of feedlot cattle. Although occasionally a primary pathogen, BVDv's impact on cattle health is through the immunosuppressive effects of the virus and its synergism with other pathogens. The simple presence or absence of BVDv does not result in consistent health outcomes because BVDv is only one of many risk factors that contribute to disease syndromes. Current interventions have limitations and the optimum strategy for their uses to limit the health, production, and economic costs associated with BVDv have to be carefully considered for optimum cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Control and eradication of endemic infectious diseases in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houe, Hans; Nielsen, Liza Rosenbaum; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    "Control and eradication of endemic infectious diseases in cattle" provides the key elements that should be addressed in the establishment of bovine disease control and eradication programmes. The book aims to reach a broad group of readers, including: students; professionals in veterinary practice......, industry and governmental institutions; researchers; and others involved in control and eradication of endemic diseases in livestock. Key elements range from socioeconomic aspects such as motivation; veterinary science (including assessment of biosecurity and establishment of test...... examples: bovine virus diarrhoea virus, Salmonella Dublin and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The three authors have been particularly involved in the research and development of control and eradication efforts in the Danish cattle industry for these three diseases. The basic idea is to enable...

  7. Web Based Cattle Disease Expert System Diagnosis with forward Chaining Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamsuri, Ahmad; Syafitri, Wenni; Sadar, Muhamad

    2017-12-01

    Cattle is one of the livestock who have high economic potential, whether for livestock, cattle seed, or even for food stock. Everything that comes from Cattle is a treasure for example the Milk, the Meat, and Cattle-hide. The factor that cause Cattles to die is the spread of disease that could crock up the Cattle’s health. So that the Expert system is needed to utilize and analye the Cattle’s disease so it could detect the disease without going to the veterinarian. Forward chaining method is one of the correct method in this expert system wherein began with Symptoms to determine the illness. From this matter, we built a web based expert system application on Cattles disease to ease the disease detection and showing the brief information about the Cattles itself.

  8. Prevalence of Hydatid Disease in Cattle and Camel Slaughtered at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A prevalence study of hydatidosis among cattle and came slaughtered at Damaturu abattoir, Yobe State, Nigeria, from 2003 to 2006 was conducted using slaughter records and post-mortem inspection of organs. Out of 8, 592 cattle and camel inspected, 0.6% was positive with specific prevalence of 0.4% in cattle and 6.3% ...

  9. Prevalence of hemoprotozoan diseases in cattle population of chittagong division, Bangladesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alim, Md. Abdul; Das, Shubhagata; Roy, Krisna

    2012-01-01

    A one year (2009-10) prevalence study on hemoprotozoan diseases was conducted in crossbred and indigenous cattle, Chittagong, Bangladesh. Blood samples were collected randomly from 216 crossbred and 432 indigenous cattle of four representative areas in three consecutive seasons. Samples were...

  10. Natural Besnoitia besnoiti infections in cattle: chronology of disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollnick, Nicole S; Scharr, Julia C; Schares, Gereon; Langenmayer, Martin C

    2015-02-14

    Bovine besnoitiosis is an emerging protozoan disease in cattle. Neither vaccines nor chemotherapeutic drugs are currently available for prevention and treatment of Besnoitia besnoiti infections. Therefore the implementation of appropriate disease management strategies is of utmost importance. The aim of this longitudinal study was to complement current knowledge on the chronology of disease progression. This was realized by correlating clinical findings in early stages of naturally acquired bovine besnoitiosis with results of real-time PCR of skin biopsies and of two western immunoblots and an immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT). Animals for this study were obtained by i) closely monitoring a cow-calf operation with a high prevalence of bovine besnoitiosis for cases of acute disease, and by ii) conducting a 12-week cohabitation experiment on pasture with five healthy heifers, a healthy bull and five B. besnoiti infected cows. A control group of six healthy heifers was kept at a minimal distance of 20 m. Further, the spectrum of potential insect vectors was determined. Infected cattle were followed up to a maximum of 221 days after first detection of B. besnoiti antibodies. Two severely affected cows developed visible and palpable alterations of skin, a decrease in body condition despite good feed intake, and chronic bovine besnoitiosis-associated laminitis leading to non-healing sole ulcers. The cows also had high reciprocal IFAT titers and high loads of parasite DNA in skin samples. Two heifers developed a mild clinical course characterized by few parasitic cysts visible in the scleral conjunctivae and vestibula vaginae. Both heifers became infected during the time of high insect activity of the species Musca domestica, Musca autumnalis, Haematobia irritans, and Stomoxys calcitrans. When a third heifer became subclinically infected, low insect activity was recorded. None of the six control heifers contracted a B. besnoiti infection. In chronic besnoitiosis

  11. Market Impacts of Reducing the Prevalence of Bovine Respiratory Disease in United States Beef Cattle Feedlots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamina Keiko Johnson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bovine respiratory disease (BRD is a common endemic disease among North American feedlot cattle. BRD can lead to significant economic losses for individual beef cattle feedlot producers through mortality and morbidity. With promising new management and technology research that could reduce BRD prevalence, this study evaluates the potential impacts of a reduction of BRD in the US beef cattle feedlot sector. Using a multi-market, multi-commodity partial equilibrium economic model of the US agricultural industry, we evaluate the market impacts of reduced BRD to producers from various livestock, meat, and feedstuffs industries. We find that as morbidity and mortality is reduced, beef cattle producers experience losses due to increased supplies (lower beef cattle prices and increased demand for feedstuff (higher feedstuff prices. Beef cattle processors see gains as the price of beef cattle is lower, whereas feedstuff producers gain from higher feedstuff prices. Producers in the allied industries (pork, lamb, poultry, and eggs see a small reduction in returns as consumers substitute with less expensive beef products. Consumers see gains in welfare as the increase in beef cattle supply results in lower beef prices. These lower beef prices more than offset the small increases in pork, lamb, poultry, and egg prices. Overall, the potential economic welfare change due to management and technologies that reduce BRD is a net gain for the US society as a whole.

  12. Potential risk of regional disease spread in West Africa through cross-border cattle trade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna S Dean

    Full Text Available Transboundary animal movements facilitate the spread of pathogens across large distances. Cross-border cattle trade is of economic and cultural importance in West Africa. This study explores the potential disease risk resulting from large-scale, cross-border cattle trade between Togo, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Benin, and Nigeria for the first time.A questionnaire-based survey of livestock movements of 226 cattle traders was conducted in the 9 biggest cattle markets of northern Togo in February-March 2012. More than half of the traders (53.5% operated in at least one other country. Animal flows were stochastically simulated based on reported movements and the risk of regional disease spread assessed. More than three quarters (79.2%, range: 78.1-80.0% of cattle flowing into the market system originated from other countries. Through the cattle market system of northern Togo, non-neighbouring countries were connected via potential routes for disease spread. Even for diseases with low transmissibility and low prevalence in a given country, there was a high risk of disease introduction into other countries.By stochastically simulating data collected by interviewing cattle traders in northern Togo, this study identifies potential risks for regional disease spread in West Africa through cross-border cattle trade. The findings highlight that surveillance for emerging infectious diseases as well as control activities targeting endemic diseases in West Africa are likely to be ineffective if only conducted at a national level. A regional approach to disease surveillance, prevention and control is essential.

  13. Potential Risk of Regional Disease Spread in West Africa through Cross-Border Cattle Trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Anna S.; Fournié, Guillaume; Kulo, Abalo E.; Boukaya, G. Aboudou; Schelling, Esther; Bonfoh, Bassirou

    2013-01-01

    Background Transboundary animal movements facilitate the spread of pathogens across large distances. Cross-border cattle trade is of economic and cultural importance in West Africa. This study explores the potential disease risk resulting from large-scale, cross-border cattle trade between Togo, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Benin, and Nigeria for the first time. Methods and Principal Findings A questionnaire-based survey of livestock movements of 226 cattle traders was conducted in the 9 biggest cattle markets of northern Togo in February-March 2012. More than half of the traders (53.5%) operated in at least one other country. Animal flows were stochastically simulated based on reported movements and the risk of regional disease spread assessed. More than three quarters (79.2%, range: 78.1–80.0%) of cattle flowing into the market system originated from other countries. Through the cattle market system of northern Togo, non-neighbouring countries were connected via potential routes for disease spread. Even for diseases with low transmissibility and low prevalence in a given country, there was a high risk of disease introduction into other countries. Conclusions By stochastically simulating data collected by interviewing cattle traders in northern Togo, this study identifies potential risks for regional disease spread in West Africa through cross-border cattle trade. The findings highlight that surveillance for emerging infectious diseases as well as control activities targeting endemic diseases in West Africa are likely to be ineffective if only conducted at a national level. A regional approach to disease surveillance, prevention and control is essential. PMID:24130721

  14. 9 CFR 73.4 - Interstate shipment of exposed but not visibly diseased cattle from a quarantined or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE... nonquarantined area; conditions under which permitted. Cattle not visibly diseased with scabies, but which are... the means of conveyance shall be placarded and the billing shall be marked “Cattle Exposed to Scabies...

  15. Immunological control of ticks and tick-borne diseases that impact cattle health and production in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cattle industry is one of the most important agroeconomic activities in Mexico. The national herd is estimated to include approximately 33.5 million head of cattle. Ticks and tick-borne diseases are principal factors with a negative impact on cattle health and production in Mexico. The most econ...

  16. Isolation of lumpy skin disease virus from cattle in and around ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Lumpy Skin Disease was found to be a serious disease in the study area. So, further investigation is needed on identification of the causative agents and Molecular characterization of Lumpy Skin Disease Virus and risk factors of the disease in South Wollo Zone. Keywords: Cattle, Dessie and Kombolcha, LSD, LSDV, ...

  17. Isolation of mycoplasma species from the lower respiratory tract of healthy cattle and cattle with respiratory disease in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, A; Ball, H; Dizier, I; Trolin, A; Bell, C; Mainil, J; Linden, A

    2002-10-19

    Between 1997 and 2000, a total of 150 healthy cattle and 238 animals with respiratory disease were examined for six Mycoplasma species. Attempts were made to detect Mycoplasma canis, Mycoplasma dispar and Ureaplasma diversum in calves with recurrent disease, and all three of these species were identified in calves with recurrent disease and in healthy lungs. In healthy calves, 84 per cent of bronchoalveolar lavage fluids were mycoplasma free; when cultures were positive, Mycoplasma bovirhinis was the only species isolated. Mycoplasmas were isolated from 78 per cent of animals suffering recurrent respiratory disease and from 65 per cent of acute respiratory cases. Mycoplasma bovis was isolated from bronchoalveolar lavages from 35 per cent of calves suffering recurrent respiratory disease, and from 50 per cent of acute cases, and from 20 per cent of pneumonic cases examined postmortem. M bovis was associated with other Mycoplasma species in 44 per cent of cases. M dispar was also isolated from 45.5 per cent of calves suffering recurrent respiratory disease, often in association with M bovis. M canis was identified for the first time in diseased Belgian cattle. Other mycoplasmas, including Mycoplasma arginini, Mycoplasma alkalescens and U diversum, were isolated less frequently. Associations between mycoplasmas and other pathogens were often observed. Among lungs infected with Pasteurella and/or Mannheimia species, more than 50 per cent were mixed infections with M bovis.

  18. Ureaplasma diversum as a cause of reproductive disease in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R; Chelmonska-Soyta, A; Smits, B; Foster, R; Rosendal, S

    1994-11-01

    This article includes a brief review of the classification, habitat, and characteristics of the ureaplasmas, followed by a discussion of the pathogenesis, transmission, clinical syndromes, diagnosis, immunity, and treatment of Ureaplasma diversum infections in cattle.

  19. Testing new dairy cattle for disease can boost herd health, cut costs

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Dale A; Adaska, J M; Higginbotham, G E; Castillo, Alejandro R Dr.; Collar, Carol; Sischo, William M

    2009-01-01

    Dairy producers seldom test or examine incoming cattle, although these important biosecurity practices are recommended. This pilot project examined risk management decisions that producers make when faced with test-positive animals in purchased groups of dairy cattle, in order to provide information on disease risks and conditions that could affect animal health and performance. New arrivals to seven herds at dairy farms in four California counties were examined and tested for a range of cond...

  20. No evidence for involvement of sheep in the epidemiology of cattle virulent epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedmi, M; Levi, S; Galon, N; Bomborov, V; Yadin, H; Batten, C; Klement, E

    2011-03-24

    Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) is an Orbivirus. While not previously considered as an important disease in cattle, several EHDV serotypes (EHDV-6 and 7) have recently been implicated in disease outbreaks. The involvement of sheep in the epidemiology of EHDV is still not understood. In this study we compared the prevalence of antibodies to EHDV and bluetongue virus (BTV) in sheep to their prevalence in cattle after an outbreak of EHDV that occurred in Israel during 2006. Sixty-six sheep and lambs scattered in seven herds were compared to 114 cows and calves scattered in 13 dairy cattle herds, matched to the sheep herds by location. While antibody prevalence to EHDV was high in cattle (35.2% within the outbreak zone) no evidence of exposure to EHDV was found in sheep (p<0.0001). Antibodies to BTV were apparent in both cattle and sheep though in the former it was significantly higher (63.2%, 16.7% respectively, p<0.0001), suggesting higher exposure of cattle to biting Culicoides midges. Taken together, these results imply that sheep have a negligible role in the epidemiology of EHDV. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Economic effects of foot and mouth disease outbreaks along the cattle marketing chain in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluka, Sylvia Angubua

    2016-06-01

    Disease outbreaks increase the cost of animal production; reduce milk and beef yield, cattle sales, farmers' incomes, and enterprise profitability. The study assessed the economic effects of foot and mouth disease (FMD) outbreaks along the cattle marketing chain in selected study districts in Uganda. The study combined qualitative and quantitative study designs. Respondents were selected proportionally using simple random sampling from the sampling frame comprising of 224, 173, 291, and 185 farmers for Nakasongola, Nakaseke, Isingiro, and Rakai, respectively. Key informants were selected purposively. Data analysis combined descriptive, modeling, and regression analysis. Data on the socio-economic characteristics and how they influenced FMD outbreaks, cattle markets revenue losses, and the economic cost of the outbreaks were analyzed using descriptive measures including percentages, means, and frequencies. Farmers with small and medium herds incurred higher control costs, whereas large herds experienced the highest milk losses. Total income earned by the actors per month at the processing level reduced by 23%. In Isingiro, bulls and cows were salvage sold at 83% and 88% less market value, i.e., a loss of $196.1 and $1,552.9 in small and medium herds, respectively. All actors along the cattle marketing chain incur losses during FMD outbreaks, but smallholder farmers are most affected. Control and prevention of FMD should remain the responsibility of the government if Uganda is to achieve a disease-free status that is a prerequisite for free movement and operation of cattle markets throughout the year which will boost cattle marketing.

  2. Empowering women to tackle cattle lung disease | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    28 févr. 2014 ... Together all players are ensuring maximum adoption to improve cattle health and farmers' livelihoods. The research team is using novel, modern, molecular biology technologies. They are developing a stable, safe, and effective vaccine that can be used by small-scale livestock keepers, including women.

  3. Sero-prevalence of foot and mouth disease in cattle in Borena Zone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross-sectional study was carried out between April and November 2015 to in- vestigate the sero-prevalence of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in cattle in Borena zone using 3ABC-Enzyme Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay (ELISA) to detect anti- body against foot-and-mouth disease virus and semi structured questionnaire.

  4. Prevalence and risk factors for foot and mouth disease infection in cattle in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnekave, Ehud; van Maanen, Kees; Shilo, Hila; Gelman, Boris; Storm, Nick; Abed El Khaliq, Mohamad; Sharir, Beni; Berke, Olaf; Klement, Eyal

    2016-08-01

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease with major economic consequences. In Israel, FMD epidemics recur almost every year and mostly affect cattle. The highest number of outbreaks occurs among beef cattle farms, followed by feedlot farms and dairy farms. We performed several cross-sectional serological studies in Israel during 2006-2014, aimed to reveal if the virus is endemic among cattle and to determine the sero-prevalence of antibodies directed against non-structural proteins (NSP) of FMD virus. Additionally we aimed to determine the risk factors for such sero-positivity. A risk based sampling was performed and the presence of anti-NSP antibodies was estimated using the PrioCHECK(®) ELISA kit. Beef cattle showed the highest sero-prevalence (13.2%, CI95%=10.8-15.8%). Higher FMD sero-prevalence in beef cattle sampled in 2014 was associated with previous FMD outbreaks in the farm and with age (adult cows versus calves (pvaccination and stringent control measures that were applied during outbreaks such as emergency vaccination and strict quarantine. Early detection of FMD outbreaks among grazing beef herds as well as the implementation of control measures among these farms are therefore the methods of choice to prevent future outbreaks in Israel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of novel seroreactive antigens in Johne’s disease cattle using the Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johne’s disease, a chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory disease caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map), is endemic in dairy cattle and other ruminants worldwide and remains a challenge to diagnose using traditional serological methods. Given the close phylogenetic relations...

  6. Role of bovine herpesvirus type 5 (BoHV-5) in diseases of cattle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bovine herpesvirus type 5 (BoHV-5) belongs to the family Herpesviridae, subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae, genus Varicellovirus. This virus is a major causative agent of non-suppurative meningoencephalitis in young cattle. It was first isolated in 1962 from a neurological disease outbreak in Australia. BoHV-5 is genetically and ...

  7. Seroprevalence of some bovine viral respiratory diseases among non vaccinated cattle in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abd El Fatah Mahmoud

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Four viral pathogens, bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV, and bovine herpes virus type 1 (BHV-1, bovine parainfluenza type 3 virus (PI-3V, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV are mainly associated with bovine respiratory diseases that cause major economic losses in the dairy cattle industry. This study aimed to document exposure of cattle in Saudi Arabia to infectious BVDV, BHV-1, PI-3V and BRSV viruses in non vaccinated cattle in order to obtain epidemiological and immunological information. Materials and Methods: In the present study, 460 random serum samples obtained from non vaccinated cattle in five districts (Riyadh, Eastern Province, Jizan, Najran, Asir of Saudi Arabia between January to March 2011. These samples were tested for presence of antibodies against BVDV, BHV-1, BRSV and PIV-3 by commercial indirect ELISA kits. Results: Our findings displayed that Seropositivity rates were 26 % for BVD, 17.4 % for BHV-1, 69.1 % for PI-3V and 75.6 % for BRSV in the sampled population. In addition, coinfections with more than one virus were considerably common among non-vaccinated dairy cattle. Conclusion: These results indicate that exposure to these agents is common within the study areas. Preventive and control measures against these infectious agents should therefore be adopted. [Vet World 2013; 6(1.000: 1-4

  8. Neuropathological survey reveals underestimation of the prevalence of neuroinfectious diseases in cattle in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truchet, Laura; Walland, Julia; Wüthrich, Daniel; Boujon, Céline L; Posthaus, Horst; Bruggmann, Rémy; Schüpbach-Regula, Gertraud; Oevermann, Anna; Seuberlich, Torsten

    2017-09-01

    Neuroinfectious diseases in livestock represent a severe threat to animal health, but their prevalence is not well documented and the etiology of disease often remains unidentified. The aims of this study were to generate baseline data on the prevalence of neuroinfectious diseases in cattle in Switzerland by neuropathological survey, and to identify disease-associated pathogens. The survey was performed over a 1-year period using a representative number of brainstem samples (n=1816) from fallen cattle. In total, 4% (n=73) of the animals had significant lesions, the most frequent types of which were indicative of viral (n=27) and bacterial (n=31) etiologies. Follow-up diagnostics by immunohistochemistry, PCR protocols and next-generation sequencing identified infection with Listeria monocytogenes (n=6), ovine herpesvirus 2 (n=7), bovine astrovirus CH13 (n=2), bovine herpesvirus 6 (n=6), bovine retrovirus CH15 (n=2), posavirus 1 (n=2), and porcine astroviruses (n=2). A retrospective questionnaire-based investigation indicated that animals' owners observed clinical signs of neurological disease in about one-third of cases with lesions, which was estimated to correspond to approximately 85 cases per year in the adult fallen cattle population in Switzerland. This estimate stands in sharp contrast to the number of cases reported to the authorities and reveals a gap in disease surveillance. Systematic neuropathological examination and follow-up molecular testing of neurologically diseased cattle could significantly enhance the efficiency of disease detection for the purposes of estimating the prevalence of endemic diseases, identifying new or re-emerging pathogens, and providing "early warnings" of disease outbreaks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Epidemiology of bovine Johne's disease (BJD) in beef cattle herds in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, J W A; Webb Ware, J K; Kluver, P

    2012-01-01

    To describe the epidemiology of bovine Johne's disease (BJD) in beef herds in Australia. Retrospective survey of beef herds detected with BJD between 1991 and 2006. Information about the management and physical characteristics of affected herds, index and clinical cases, testing and control programs, and attitudes to BJD were collated from existing data and personal interviews of herd owners or managers. Herds were excluded if they contained fewer than 30 breeding cows or operated as a dairy farm. Records from 109 herds demonstrated the first detected ('index') case was 3.4-fold more likely to be a beef rather than dairy breed. However, further analysis revealed association with dairy cattle was an important risk factor for introducing BJD. Index cases were most likely detected by veterinarians investigating clinical cases of scouring or ill-thrifty animals during winter, particularly bulls or aged cows. Most herds with clinical BJD had only a single case, with only one high prevalence herd detected in the survey group. Over the period of observation, test and cull programs did not eradicate BJD unless combined with culling of known high-risk animals, but removal of high-risk cattle by partial or total destocking generally restored the trading status of affected herds. Excluding cattle with dairy contact from beef herds, ensuring more effective farm biosecurity, promptly seeking veterinary advice regarding scouring cattle and sourcing replacement cattle from demonstrably low-risk herds, such as CattleMAP and 'Beef Only' herds, are simple strategies that should reduce the risk of introducing BJD infection into beef herds. © 2012 The Authors. Australian Veterinary Journal © 2012 Australian Veterinary Association.

  10. Assessment of financial impact of foot and mouth disease on smallholder cattle farmers in Southern Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J R; Suon, S; Andrews, C J; Henry, L A; Windsor, P A

    2013-04-01

    The financial impact of an outbreak of FMD in 2010 on 62 smallholder cattle farmers in four villages in southern Cambodia was investigated by a financial impact survey questionnaire. Financial losses associated with FMD infection were severe with variation depending on whether the animal survived or died or was used for draft. The average post-FMD loss varied from USD 216.32, a 54% reduction from the pre-FMD value because of weight loss and treatment costs, to USD 370.54, a 92% reduction from pre-FMD values if the animal was treated, died and a rental draft replacement was required. Partial budget analysis identified a strongly positive incentive for cattle to be vaccinated biannually for FMD, providing USD 31.48 per animal for each animal owned. However low vaccination rates suggest that farmers are mostly unaware of the need or averse to the practice of vaccinating their cattle for FMD. This may be due to poor understanding of preventative disease strategies such as vaccination, unavailable disposable income for purchase of vaccines, and failure to recognize the full costs that are incurred when the disease occurs. Enhancing smallholder cattle productivity through the introduction of forage growing systems has been suggested as a pathway for alleviating rural poverty in the Mekong region. As our financial analysis identified a net benefit of vaccination for smallholder farmer enterprises in an endemic FMD area in Cambodia, it is considered important that farmer education strategies aimed at improving cattle productivity, also include both access to vaccine and training in preventative disease risk management and biosecurity practices in Cambodia. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Dermatophytes Fungi Trichophyton Verrucosum A Causative Agent of Ringworm Disease on Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djaenudin Gholib

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Ringworm is a superficial mycosis which affected surface parts of the body such as skin, hair, nail or horn. These parts are rich of keratine that required for the fungi to grow. The disease affects both animals and human (zoonosis, and it results in hair loss, crusted of skin, swelling, erythema and itchy. The disease is considered as important because it affects health condition and animal production. The causative agent is fungal dermatophytes group especially Trichophyton verrucosum. Cases occurred in Indonesia and first officially reported and published in 1980 on imported dairy cows from Australia, and a causative agent was identified as Trichophyton verrucosum. Recently, the same cases occurred in young dairy calves and lactating cattle. Pathogenity test in rabbits by artificial infection revealed the growth of the colonies. Post infection and vaccination provide resistency on cattle. Therefore beside therapeutic method, the vaccination program is useful to be included in prevention of the disease.

  12. Prevention of foot-and-mouth disease in cattle using a prime-boot-vaccination strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gullberg, Maria; Lohse, Louise; Bøtner, Anette

    by recombinant FMDV empty capsid particles, or vice versa, prior to challenge. Animals given a primary vaccination with the rSFV-FMDV vector and then boosted with FMDV empty capsids showed a strong anti-FMDV antibody response prior to challenge. Following challenge with FMDV, the cattle were protected against......Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is one of the most economically important infectious diseases of production animals globally. Vaccination can help to control this disease, however, current vaccines are imperfect. They are made using chemically inactivated FMD virus (FMDV) that is produced in mammalian...... with 3Cpro then processing of the FMDV capsid precursor protein is observed within cells and the proteins assemble into empty capsid particles. In cattle vaccinated once with these rSFV-FMDV vectors alone, anti-FMDV antibodies were elicited but the immune response was insufficient to give protection...

  13. Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis (Ibr on Cattle in Indonesia and The Strategy For Disease Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Abdul Adjid

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis (IBR caused by Bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1 infects cattle and widely spreads in Indonesia. The disease infected cattle in breeding centers, artificial insemination centers and also holderfarmers. This infectious disease may cause economical losses primarily due to reproductive failure of infected animals. Recommended strategy for disease control is step by step control with priorities, started from upper to downstream, from breeding and artificial insemination (AI centers as the first priority, then village breeding centers as the second priority, and the last priority is in cattle owned by smallholders. In the breeding and AI centers, eradication of the disease is carried out by surveilance, excluding reactors, and applying biosecurity. In the village breeding centers, the use of semen for AI should come from centers that free from IBR, the use of bull that free from IBR, surveilance and application of biosecurity. At the farmer levels, IBR control is bone by using semen from AI centers free from IBR and routine vaccination. The final step is performed after evaluating the successful rate and economic impact of the disease control.

  14. Disease and Behavioral Dynamics for Brucellosis Control in Elk and Cattle in the Greater Yellowstone Area

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Fang; Horan, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates private responses and ecological impacts of policies proposed to confront the problem of brucellosis being spread from elk to cattle in Wyoming. The policies consist of combinations of changes in elk feeding and population levels. Farmers' responses to these dynamics are modeled along with the associated impacts to livestock population dynamics. Our findings suggest that feedbacks between jointly determined disease dynamics and decentralized economic behavior matter, a...

  15. Evaluation of Mollicutes Microorganisms in Respiratory Disease of Cattle and Their Relationship to Clinical Signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortorelli, G; Carrillo Gaeta, N; Mendonça Ribeiro, B L; Miranda Marques, L; Timenetsky, J; Gregory, L

    2017-07-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is an important problem in cattle production that is responsible for economic losses in dairy herds. Mycoplasma spp. are described as an important etiological agent of BRD. To evaluate the occurrence of the most important mycoplasmas in the lower respiratory tract of healthy and BRD cattle in relationship to clinical signs of BRD. Sixty young dairy cattle were classified as healthy (n = 32) or cattle showing clinical signs of BRD (n = 28). Tracheal lavage samples were collected and added to tubes containing Hayflick media. Mycoplasma spp. were identified by the presence of "fried egg" like colonies, biochemical tests and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Occurrence of Mollicutes, M. bovis, M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC and M. dispar was evaluated. The association between clinical signs of BRD and the presence of Mycoplasma spp. also was evaluated. Colonies were obtained from a 1-year-old BRD calf only. However, species identification was not possible. Mollicutes (P = .035) and M. dispar (P = .036) were more common in BRD cattle. The relationship between Mollicutes and crackle (P = .057) was not significant. M. dispar was associated to tachypnea (P = .045) and mixed dyspnea (P = .003). Relationships to heart rate (P = .062) and crackle (P = .062) were not significant. The results confirmed the importance of mycoplasma as an etiologic agent of BRD and suggested M. dispar as part of the respiratory microbiota and its possible role in the development of BRD. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  16. Seroepidemiological investigation of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotypes in cattle around Lake Mburo National Park in South-Western Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mwiine, Frank Norbert; Ayebazibwe, Chrisostom; Alexandersen, Søren

    2010-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) outbreaks in cattle occur annually in Uganda. In this study the authors investigated antibodies against FMD virus (FMDV) in cattle in surrounding areas of Lake Mburo National Park in South-western Uganda. Two hundred and eleven serum samples from 23 cattle herds were...

  17. Trichloroacetic Acid Spray for the Treatment of Foot Ulcers of Foot and Mouth Disease in Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imad I. Aldabagh, Oday S. Al-Obaddy and Hafidh I. Al-Sadi*

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An attempt was made to evaluate the therapeutic effect of trichloroacetic acid (TCA for ulcers of the hooves of 120 cattle affected with foot and mouth disease (FMD. Each hoof was cleaned and washed with water before using the TCA spray (2% once daily. Biopsies were taken from the soft tissue lesions before and after10 days of treatment. These tissue specimens were processed routinely for histopathological examination. A marked improvement was seen in the pain inflicted by palpation of the affected hoof. Microscopically, coagulative necrosis of the soft tissue of the hoof was seen. An advanced stage of healing of the hoof ulcers was observed on 10th day post–treatment. It was concluded that 2% solution of TCA was an effective treatment of ulcers of the hooves of cattle affected with FMD.

  18. Integrated tick and tick-borne disease control trials in crossbred dairy cattle in Malawi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Whiteland, A. P.; Mfitilodze, M. W.

    1996-01-01

    , but there were no incidents of tick-borne disease in the immunised group. In a second trial, which tested a strategic dipping regimen, 107 animals were dipped 9 times over a 6 month period. Despite heavy challenge by B. bovis and moderate challenge by B. bigemina and Anaplasma spp, demonstrated serologically......, there was only a single clinical case of babesiosis. The observations provide encouragement for the introduction of integrated tick and tick-borne disease control programmes in improved cattle in ECF endemic areas....

  19. Validation of Nordic dairy cattle disease recording databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Ann-Kristina; Thomsen, Peter Thorup; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær

    2012-01-01

    The Nordic countries Denmark (DK), Finland (FIN), Norway (NO) and Sweden (SE) all have unique national databases holding the disease records of dairy cows. The objective of this study was to estimate and compare completeness for locomotor disorders in the four Nordic national databases......-month periods in 2008 these farmers recorded the disease events they observed on the farm. Data from the four national databases were extracted in May 2009. The two data sources, farmer recordings and national databases, were managed in a comparable way in all four countries, and common diagnostic codes...... were created and added to match recordings appearing in both datasets. In all 555 farmers completed data records in the first data-recording period, and 515 farmers did so in the second period. In DK, FIN, NO and SE, 55%, 77%, 82% and 75%, participating farmers completed the recordings during the first...

  20. The impact of movements and animal density on continental scale cattle disease outbreaks in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhnerkempe, Michael G; Tildesley, Michael J; Lindström, Tom; Grear, Daniel A; Portacci, Katie; Miller, Ryan S; Lombard, Jason E; Werkman, Marleen; Keeling, Matt J; Wennergren, Uno; Webb, Colleen T

    2014-01-01

    Globalization has increased the potential for the introduction and spread of novel pathogens over large spatial scales necessitating continental-scale disease models to guide emergency preparedness. Livestock disease spread models, such as those for the 2001 foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) epidemic in the United Kingdom, represent some of the best case studies of large-scale disease spread. However, generalization of these models to explore disease outcomes in other systems, such as the United States's cattle industry, has been hampered by differences in system size and complexity and the absence of suitable livestock movement data. Here, a unique database of US cattle shipments allows estimation of synthetic movement networks that inform a near-continental scale disease model of a potential FMD-like (i.e., rapidly spreading) epidemic in US cattle. The largest epidemics may affect over one-third of the US and 120,000 cattle premises, but cattle movement restrictions from infected counties, as opposed to national movement moratoriums, are found to effectively contain outbreaks. Slow detection or weak compliance may necessitate more severe state-level bans for similar control. Such results highlight the role of large-scale disease models in emergency preparedness, particularly for systems lacking comprehensive movement and outbreak data, and the need to rapidly implement multi-scale contingency plans during a potential US outbreak.

  1. Virus Excretion from Foot-And-Mouth Disease Virus Carrier Cattle and Their Potential Role in Causing New Outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthiban, Aravindh Babu R; Mahapatra, Mana; Gubbins, Simon; Parida, Satya

    2015-01-01

    The role of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) carrier cattle in causing new outbreaks is still a matter of debate and it is important to find out these carrier animals by post-outbreak serosurveillance to declare freedom from FMDV infection. In this study we explore the differences in viral shedding between carrier and non-carrier animals, quantify the transmission rate of FMDV infection from carriers to susceptible animals and identify potential viral determinants of viral persistence. We collected nasal and saliva samples from 32 vaccinated and 7 unvaccinated FMDV carrier cattle and 48 vaccinated and 13 unvaccinated non-carrier cattle (total n=100) during the acute phase of infection (up to 28 days post-challenge) and then from limited number of animals up to a maximum 168 days post-challenge. We demonstrate that unvaccinated cattle excrete significantly higher levels of virus for longer periods compared with vaccinated cattle and this is independent of whether or not they subsequently become carriers. By introducing naïve cattle in to the FMDV carrier population we show the risk of new outbreaks is clearly very low in controlled conditions, although there could still be a potential threat of these carrier animals causing new outbreaks in the field situation. Finally, we compared the complete genome sequences of viruses from carrier cattle with the challenge virus and found no evidence for viral determinants of the carrier state.

  2. Knowledge and disease management skills of cattle owners on East Coast Fever and Foot and Mouth Disease in Kazungula and Livingstone Districts of Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chisembele, C.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective animal disease control and prevention should be based on accurate information from the field. Part of this field information can be obtained from the cattle owners. In order to assess their disease knowledge, a survey focusing on East Coast Fever (ECF and Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD was organised among 302 cattle owners from the Kazungula and Livingstone Districts of the Southern Province of Zambia. The cattle owners' level of knowledge of ECF was low (34% with most of those able to describe the disease belonging to the endemic zone where ECF caused high death rates in cattle. A larger proportion of the cattle owners (46% were able to give an adequate description of FMD symptoms. It reached up to 61% in the FMD high-risk zone. Reporting to the animal health service providers appeared to be low. The results of the survey showed that attempts should be made to improve the cattle owners' knowledge and response to important diseases by carrying out more extension and sensitization activities. This is especially so in areas of low infection or where the disease was experienced long time ago.

  3. Implications of the cattle trade network in Cameroon for regional disease prevention and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Paolo; Porphyre, Thibaud; Handel, Ian; Hamman, Saidou M.; Ngu Ngwa, Victor; Tanya, Vincent; Morgan, Kenton; Christley, Rob; Bronsvoort, Barend M. Dec.

    2017-03-01

    Movement of live animals is a major risk factor for the spread of livestock diseases and zoonotic infections. Understanding contact patterns is key to informing cost-effective surveillance and control strategies. In West and Central Africa some of the most rapid urbanization globally is expected to increase the demand for animal-source foods and the need for safer and more efficient animal production. Livestock trading points represent a strategic contact node in the dissemination of multiple pathogens. From October 2014 to May 2015 official transaction records were collected and a questionnaire-based survey was carried out in cattle markets throughout Western and Central-Northern Cameroon. The data were used to analyse the cattle trade network including a total of 127 livestock markets within Cameroon and five neighboring countries. This study explores for the first time the influence of animal trade on infectious disease spread in the region. The investigations showed that national borders do not present a barrier against pathogen dissemination and that non-neighbouring countries are epidemiologically connected, highlighting the importance of a regional approach to disease surveillance, prevention and control. Furthermore, these findings provide evidence for the benefit of strategic risk-based approaches for disease monitoring, surveillance and control, as well as for communication and training purposes through targeting key regions, highly connected livestock markets and central trading links.

  4. Host response to Foot- and Mouth Disease infection in cattle; possible implications for the development of “carriers”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenfeldt, Carolina; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    in persistence of FMD in cattle are not fully known. A series of animal experiments, with the aim of investigating the innate immune response, and possible implications for the development of persistently infected FMD carrier-animals in cattle has been performed. Bull calves of 4-5 months of age were infected......Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a viral disease with severe financial implications for agricultural industries and the trade of animal products in affected countries. Any cloven hoofed animal species may become infected, and ruminants, especially cattle and buffalo, may develop into persistently...... infected “carriers” shedding low amounts of virus for several years after exposure to the disease. FMD in ruminants involves initial viral replication in pharyngeal epithelia, from where the virus spreads systemically. Mortality rates are low in adult animals but the morbidity is very high and the disease...

  5. Risk factors for episodes of enteric disease in cattle wastes handlers in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madoshi, B; Lupindu, A. M.; Mtambo, MMA

    2017-01-01

    This study explored risk factors associated with episodes of enteric disease in animal waste handlers as occupational hazards in Tanzania. A qualitative survey involving 124 animal waste handlers from Morogoro peri-urban and urban areas was carried out. Large number of respondents (84) had.......2 %). The handlers who had experienced enteric episodes were found to be those who had little knowledge on occupational hazards (p=0.000 and OR=20.5), limited knowledge on enteric zoonotic pathogens (p=0.019 and OR = 8.62), and experience on handling cattle wastes was statistically associated with enteric episodes...

  6. Protection of Cattle against Foot-and-Mouth Disease by a Synthetic Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimarchi, Richard; Brooke, Gerald; Gale, Charles; Cracknell, Victor; Doel, Timothy; Mowat, Noel

    1986-05-01

    A chemically synthesized peptide consisting essentially of two separate regions (residues 141 to 158 and 200 to 213) of a virus coat protein (VP1) from the 01 Kaufbeuren strain of foot-and-mouth disease virus was prepared free of any carrier protein. It elicited high levels of neutralizing antibody and protected cattle against intradermolingual challenge by inoculation with infectious virus. Comparative evaluation of this peptide with a single-site peptide (residues 141 to 158) in guinea pigs suggests the importance of the VP1 carboxyl terminal residues in enhancing the protective response.

  7. Tick-borne diseases in cattle: applications of proteomics to develop new generation vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelino, Isabel; de Almeida, André Martinho; Ventosa, Miguel; Pruneau, Ludovic; Meyer, Damien F; Martinez, Dominique; Lefrançois, Thierry; Vachiéry, Nathalie; Coelho, Ana Varela

    2012-07-19

    Tick-borne diseases (TBDs) affect 80% of the world's cattle population, hampering livestock production throughout the world. Livestock industry is important to rural populations not only as food supply, but also as a source of income. Tick control is usually achieved by using acaricides which are expensive, deleterious to the environment and can induce chemical resistance of vectors; the development of more effective and sustainable control methods is therefore required. Theileriosis, babesiosis, anaplasmosis and heartwater are the most important TBDs in cattle. Immunization strategies are currently available but with variable efficacy. To develop a new generation of vaccines which are more efficient, cheaper and safer, it is first necessary to better understand the mechanisms by which these parasites are transmitted, multiply and cause disease; this becomes especially difficult due to their complex life cycles, in vitro culture conditions and the lack of genetic tools to manipulate them. Proteomics and other complementary post-genomic tools such as transcriptomics and metabolomics in a systems biology context are becoming key tools to increase knowledge on the biology of infectious diseases. Herein, we present an overview of the so called "Omics" studies currently available on these tick-borne pathogens, giving emphasis to proteomics and how it may help to discover new vaccine candidates to control TBDs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. AWARENESS OF FARMERS REGARDING HYGIENIC HANDLING OF THEIR CATTLE TO PREVENT ZOONOTIC DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Biswas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Villagers have got the habit to remain in close contact with their cattle which may lead to spread of zoonotic diseases. Once concept of hygienic animal handling is assessed, effective measures can be taken to prevent the zoonotic transmission of diseases. With this aim, 270 farmers from nine villages of nine Gram Panchayet of Murarai-II block of Birbhum district, West Bengal, India were selected randomly. They were personally interviewed with twelve questions related with such knowledge. A score of 1 was given for correct answer and 0 for other answer including wrong and unknown answer. After analysis of data, a mean score of 7.96 was obtained by the farmers. Only significantly higher result was scored by the age group of 20-30 years farmers but in the rest age groups there were no significant differences. Positive correlation was observed between the knowledge score and education level. Better knowledge score was noted among the farmers having more number of animals. Male respondents and respondents having training related to animal husbandry scored better (P <_ 0.05. In the present study most of the farmers found to have minimum knowledge about the hygienic handling of their cattle.

  9. Prevalence of pathogens from Mollicutes class in cattle affected by respiratory diseases and molecular characteristics of Mycoplasma bovis field strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szacawa Ewelina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mycoplasma bovis is one of the main pathogens involved in cattle pneumonia. Other mycoplasmas have also been directly implicated in respiratory diseases in cattle. The prevalence of different Mycoplasma spp. in cattle affected by respiratory diseases and molecular characteristics of M. bovis field strains were evaluated. Material and Methods: In total, 713 nasal swabs from 73 cattle herds were tested. The uvrC gene fragment was amplified by PCR and PCR products were sequenced. PCR/DGGE and RAPD were performed. Results: It was found that 39 (5.5% samples were positive for M. bovis in the PCR and six field strains had point nucleotide mutations. Additionally, the phylogenetic analysis of 20 M. bovis field strains tested with RAPD showed two distinct groups of M. bovis strains sharing only 3.8% similarity. PCR/DGGE analysis demonstrated the presence of bacteria belonging to the Mollicutes class in 79.1% of DNA isolates. The isolates were identified as: Mycoplasma bovirhinis, M. dispar, M. bovis, M. canis, M. arginini, M. canadense, M. bovoculi, M. alkalescens, and Ureaplasma diversum. Conclusion: Different Mycoplasma spp. strains play a crucial role in inducing respiratory diseases in cattle.

  10. Effect of a combination of antimicrobial agents for the treatment of respiratory disease in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, T; Sakai, J; Ogata, Y; Urushiyama, Y

    1996-08-01

    Clinical effect of the administration of thiamphenicol (TP) and tylosin (TS) on bovine respiratory disease was investigated. Group I (n = 64) were administered TP (10 mg/kg) and TS (4 mg/kg), group II (n = 26) were given TP (5 mg/kg) and TS (2 mg/kg). For the control, TP group (n = 25) were given 20 mg/kg of TP and ampicillin group (n = 23) were given 10 mg/kg of ampicillin. As a result, improvement of clinical findings was more rapid and the cure rate was significantly higher in group I compared to those in the other 3 groups. These results showed that a combination therapy with minimal basic doses of TP and TS is very effective for some respiratory diseases in cattle.

  11. Associations between exposure to viruses and bovine respiratory disease in Australian feedlot cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, K E; Barnes, T S; Morton, J M; Gravel, J L; Commins, M A; Horwood, P F; Ambrose, R C; Clements, A C A; Mahony, T J

    2016-05-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the most important cause of clinical disease and death in feedlot cattle. Respiratory viral infections are key components in predisposing cattle to the development of this disease. To quantify the contribution of four viruses commonly associated with BRD, a case-control study was conducted nested within the National Bovine Respiratory Disease Initiative project population in Australian feedlot cattle. Effects of exposure to Bovine viral diarrhoea virus 1 (BVDV-1), Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and Bovine parainfluenza virus 3 (BPIV-3), and to combinations of these viruses, were investigated. Based on weighted seroprevalences at induction (when animals were enrolled and initial samples collected), the percentages of the project population estimated to be seropositive were 24% for BoHV-1, 69% for BVDV-1, 89% for BRSV and 91% for BPIV-3. For each of the four viruses, seropositivity at induction was associated with reduced risk of BRD (OR: 0.6-0.9), and seroincrease from induction to second blood sampling (35-60 days after induction) was associated with increased risk of BRD (OR: 1.3-1.5). Compared to animals that were seropositive for all four viruses at induction, animals were at progressively increased risk with increasing number of viruses for which they were seronegative; those seronegative for all four viruses were at greatest risk (OR: 2.4). Animals that seroincreased for one or more viruses from induction to second blood sampling were at increased risk (OR: 1.4-2.1) of BRD compared to animals that did not seroincrease for any viruses. Collectively these results confirm that prior exposure to these viruses is protective while exposure at or after feedlot entry increases the risk of development of BRD in feedlots. However, the modest increases in risk associated with seroincrease for each virus separately, and the progressive increases in risk with multiple viral exposures highlights

  12. Prevalence and antibody to foot-and-mouth disease in cattle and buffalo in Myanmar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maung Kyin, M.

    2000-01-01

    A serological survey for the prevalence of antibody to foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) was performed in six Divisions and three States in Myanmar. A liquid phase blocking ELISA prepared and standardized by World Reference Laboratory (WRL) for FMD was used for this study. A total of 831 serum samples from cattle and buffalo were collected by a random process and assayed for antibody against FMD virus types O, A, C and Asia I. Positive reactions to FMD virus O, A, C, and Asia I sero-types were detected. Even in the free zone area, (Ngape township) and the buffer zone (Minbu township) serum samples showed positive reactions. Ten percent of the sera tested showed positive reactions to all sero-types within the free zone and buffer zone. The majority of cattle and buffaloes, except those in the FMD free and buffer zones, were not vaccinated against FMD. The percentage of positive sera in each State and Divisions varied from 16 to 90 for at least one sero-type. More epithelial specimens from FMD outbreaks should be submitted for investigation and further nation-wide serological surveys for FMD should be carried out if a national policy for FMD control and eradication is to be effective and enforceable. (author)

  13. Respiratory disease associated with bovine coronavirus infection in cattle herds in Southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaro, Nicola; Campolo, Marco; Desario, Costantina; Cirone, Francesco; D'Abramo, Maria; Lorusso, Eleonora; Greco, Grazia; Mari, Viviana; Colaianni, Maria Loredana; Elia, Gabriella; Martella, Vito; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2008-01-01

    Four outbreaks of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with bovine coronavirus (BCoV) infection in Italian cattle herds were reported. In 3 outbreaks, BRD was observed only in 2-3-month-old feedlot calves, whereas in the remaining outbreak, lactating cows, heifers, and calves were simultaneously affected. By using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), BCoV RNA was detected in all outbreaks without evidence of concurrent viral pathogens (i.e., bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpesvirus type 1, bovine viral diarrhea virus, bovine parainfluenza virus). Common bacteria of cattle were recovered only from 2 outbreaks of BRD: Staphylococcus spp. and Proteus mirabilis (outbreak 1) and Mannheimia haemolytica (outbreak 4). A recently established real-time RT-PCR assay showed that viral RNA loads in nasal secretions ranged between 3.10 x 10(2) and 7.50 x 10(7) RNA copies/microl of template. Bovine coronavirus was isolated from respiratory specimens from all outbreaks except outbreak 1, in which real-time RT-PCR found very low viral titers in nasal swabs.

  14. Pathologic and Immunohistochemical Findings of Natural Lumpy Skin Disease in Egyptian Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MS El-Neweshy*, TM El-Shemey1 and SA Youssef

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate clinical and pathologic characteristics of acute and subacute lumpy skin disease (LSD among naturally infected cattle and to study the localization of LSDV capsid antigen within different cells of the skin and regional lymph nodes using immunohistochemistry. Herein, we describe the gross, histologic, and immunohistochemical findings in 13 dairy cattle, 11 beef calves and 2 newly born calves that were naturally infected with LSDV. Prominent gross changes in all cases included numerous 1-6 cm well circumscribed, round cutaneous nodules with severe enlargement of superficial lymph nodes. Histologic changes in all acute cases consisted of severe ballooning degeneration of the epidermis, lymphoplasmacytic dermatitis, folliculitis, furunculosis, with severe vasculitis affecting the dermal capillaries, venules and arterioles. Rare intracytoplasmic inclusions were present in degenerated epidermal cells. Subacute cases showed multifocal areas of pannicular infarction with severe vasculitis affecting the neighboring arterioles and venules. Strong positive immunoreactivity for LSDV was identified primarily within macrophages and in degenerated epidermal cells. However, no viral antigen was present in endothelial cells. It can be concluded that vasculitis is a constant lesion in acute and subacute LSD and is most likely of an immune-mediated mechanism rather than a true tropism of the LSDV to endothelial cells.

  15. Recommendations for recording and calculating the incidence of selected clinical diseases of dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelton, D F; Lissemore, K D; Martin, R E

    1998-09-01

    The report upon which the current discussion is based was prepared in response to the increasing interest of the dairy industry in the recording of clinical disease data. The major objective was to introduce guidelines and standards for the recording and presentation of the diseases of dairy cattle. Eight clinically identifiable diseases of economic importance to the dairy industry were considered: milk fever, retained placenta, metritis, ketosis, left displaced abomasum, cystic ovarian disease, lameness, and clinical mastitis. Standardized definitions for these diseases were established through consultation with industry partners. Two approaches to summarization and reporting were proposed. For retrospective analysis, which is used when historical data are summarized for genetic evaluation for example, lactational incidence risk (cumulative incidence) has been recommended. For current analysis, which is used for herd health monitoring, a true incidence rate has been recommended. Milk fever and retained placenta were exceptions to the latter because of their short periods of risk. For these two diseases, lactational incidence risks are reported.

  16. Risk factors for foot and mouth disease outbreaks in grazing beef cattle herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnekave, E; Zamir, L; Hamd, F; Even Tov, B; Klement, E

    2015-06-15

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is considered one of the most important diseases of cattle. Recurrence of FMD outbreaks in Israel is common, even though routine vaccination of livestock is mandatory and control measures are applied during the outbreaks. Grazing beef herds are occasionally involved in these outbreaks and play an important role in disseminating the disease, due to the large efflux of animals from these herds to feedlots. Nevertheless, the risk factors for the occurrence of FMD among these herds have never been investigated. In 2011, Israel faced a large scale outbreak of serotype O FMD virus, which strongly affected beef cattle. We conducted a case-control study of 44 beef cattle herds grazing in the Golan Heights in order to determine the risk factors for FMDV infection. Data were analyzed using a generalized estimation equation (GEE) with a logit link function. Multivariable analysis was conducted for factors with p-value lower than 0.1 in the univariable analysis. The presence of calves under 6 months of age was found as a significant risk factor for FMDV infection in the univariable analysis (odds ratio (OR)=5.95, confidence intervals of 95% (CI95%)=1.59-22.29, p=0.008). This was also the only variable that remained statistically significant in the multivariable analysis. Herds in which more than 6 months between vaccination of adults and exposure had elapsed were in higher risk, albeit not statistically significant, for the occurrence of FMDV infection (OR=3.29, CI95%=0.83-12.99, p=0.089). The higher probability of infection in herds, which included young calves may be a result of their higher susceptibility due to administration of only one or no vaccine prior to the outbreak. The results of the study thus support increasing the frequency of vaccination of both cows and calves in grazing beef herds. Intensifying surveillance where young calves are abundant may also prove efficient for early detection of infected herds and for mitigating outbreaks

  17. Microbiological and histopathological findings in cases of fatal bovine respiratory disease of feedlot cattle in Western Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Calvin W; Abutarbush, Sameeh M; Morley, Paul S; Jim, G Kee; Pittman, Tom J; Schunicht, Oliver C; Perrett, Tye; Wildman, Brian K; Fenton, R Kent; Guichon, P Timothy; Janzen, Eugene D

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the microbiologic agents and pathologic processes in fatal bovine respiratory disease (BRD) of feedlot cattle and to investigate associations between agents and pathologic processes. Ninety feedlot calves diagnosed at necropsy with BRD and 9 control calves without BRD were examined, using immunohistochemical (IHC) staining and histopathologic studies. Mannheimia haemolytica (MH) (peracute, acute, and subacute cases) and Mycoplasma bovis (MB) (subacute, bronchiolar, and chronic cases) were the most common agents identified in fatal BRD cases. Significant associations (P BRD of feedlot cattle.

  18. An abattoir-based study of the prevalence of subclinical Johne's disease in adult cattle in south west England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinkaya, B.; Egan, K.; Harbour, D. A.; Morgan, K. L.

    1996-01-01

    The prevalance of subclinical Johne's disease was estimated in adult cattle slaughtered at three major abattoirs in south west England. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on IS900 was used to detect Mycobacterium paratuberculosis in intestinal lymph nodes of 1553 cattle. Culture was also carried out on all PCR positive and inconclusive samples. The prevalence of subclinical disease in adult cattle was 3.5% (95% confidence intervals (CI) 2.6-4.7) by PCR and 2.6% (CI 1.8-3.6) by culture. The proportion of the disease in each month ranged from 1.6% (CI 0.2-5.5) in April to 4.6% (CI 2.8-6.9) in November, but the difference was not significant (P > 0.05). The proportion of PCR positive lymph nodes in each abattoir ranged from 2.8% (CI 1.6-4.6) to 4.9% (CI 2.9-7.6), this difference was not significant either (P > 0.05). The prevalence in young cattle was 2.0% (CI 0.6-4.5). The difference between age groups was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Images Fig. 3 PMID:8666083

  19. Stomoxys calcitrans parasitism associated with cattle diseases in Espírito Santo do Pinhal, São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Avelino J; de Castro, Bruno G

    2004-10-01

    The stable fly has been of great significance to livestock production in the county of Espirito Santo do Pinhal; it has a painful bite, sucks blood, and carries many diseases. The aim of this study was to establish a relationship between the parasitism of Stomoxys calcitrans, manure management, cattle diseases, and technical support. According to the farmers the stable fly reaches its highest level in the rainy season, the same period in which diseases were detected. Most of the farmers said that they did not receive technical assistance. The association of inappropriate manure management, verified in this survey, with the low frequency of technical visits, resulted in a low level of technology utilization. Better technological assistance could moderate the stable fly infestation and help manage serious cattle diseases.

  20. Contribution of draft cattle to rural livelihoods in a district of southeastern Uganda endemic for bovine parasitic diseases: an economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okello, Walter O; Muhanguzi, Dennis; MacLeod, Ewan T; Welburn, Susan C; Waiswa, Charles; Shaw, Alexandra P

    2015-11-05

    A study was conducted in Tororo District in eastern Uganda to assess the socio-economic contribution of draft cattle to rural livelihoods. The aim of the study was to empirically quantify the economic value of draft cattle thus contributing to understanding the impact of endemic parasitic diseases of cattle on livestock productivity and subsequently household income, labor and food security. A total of 205 draft cattle keeping households (n = 205) were randomly selected and structured household questionnaires were administered, focusing on work oxen use, productivity, inputs and outputs. The data obtained was analyzed using standard statistical methods and used to calculate the gross margin from the draft cattle enterprise. Secondary data were obtained from focus group discussions and key informant interviews and these were analyzed using Bayesian methods. The study showed that, apart from being labor saving, the use of animal traction is highly profitable with the gross margin per year from the use of draft cattle amounting to 245 United States dollars per work oxen owning household. The cash obtained from hiring out draft animals was equivalent to nearly a quarter of the average local household's monetary receipts. It also revealed that endemic bovine parasitic diseases such as trypanosomiasis and tick-borne diseases reduced draft cattle output by 20.9 % and potential household income from the use of draft oxen by 32.2 %. The presence of endemic cattle diseases in rural Uganda is adversely affecting the productivity of draft cattle, which in turn affects household income, labor and ultimately food security. This study highlights the contribution of draft cattle to rural livelihoods, thus increasing the expected impact of cost-effective control strategies of endemic production limiting livestock diseases in Uganda.

  1. Association of herd BHV-1 seroprevalence with respiratory disease in youngstock in Estonian dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaperi, K; Bougeard, S; Aleksejev, A; Orro, T; Viltrop, A

    2012-10-01

    The associations between herd bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) seroprevalence, along with other infectious and farm management factors with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in dairy calves and heifers, were investigated. Serum samples from 103 dairy cattle herds were analyzed for antibodies against BHV-1, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), and Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis). A questionnaire was used to record herd management practices. A high occurrence of respiratory disease in unweaned calves was associated with low to moderate and high prevalence of BHV-1 among cows (OR=14.8, p=0.005 and OR=19.2, p=0.002, respectively) and positive BVDV status of a herd (OR=5.1, p=0.02). The presence of BVDV in a herd was related to a high incidence of respiratory disease in heifers 3-16 months old (OR=4.3, p=0.027). Based on the results of multiple correspondence analysis, holding youngstock separately from cows until pregnancy, introducing new animals and the activities of on-farm employees may contribute to a higher incidence of BRD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease of clinically infected cattle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Affected animal were Friesian cattle crossbred with local N'dama breed of cattle. Clinical diagnosis was made using signs of oral and feet lesions causing severe anorexia and lameness respectively in affected animals and calves. Feet lesions were found to be similar to those in exotic animals with sloughing of hoof unlike ...

  3. The role of iatrogenic disease of cattle in admission to veterinary hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Sala

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Iatrogenic diseases are due to negligence or malpractice (Pezza et al.,2008. In human medicine, these conditions are widely described (Weingart et al., 2000, mostly for insurance issues related to hospitalization, while in veterinary medicine are reported only occasional case reports. 4155 clinical records related to cattle admitted to the Clinic for Ruminants and Swine of the University of Milan between 2005 and 2017 were analyzed. Clinical cases that required admission because of an iatrogenic related disease were selected for this study. For case selection, 3 experienced veterinarians examined the clinical records, cross-compared the selection and pick 114 cases (2,7%. The iatrogenic diseases were primarily caused by farmers (93% than veterinary practitioner (7%. Iatrogenic diseases were caused mostly by erroneous administration of drugs (47,4%, excessive traction at birth (17,5%, improper milk or colostrum administration, frequently performed by oroesophageal tubing (16,7% or by forced administration using a nipple bottle (12,3%. As verified by our study, farmers often performs medical, nursing and zootechnical procedures without adequate competences and sometimes choose medical treatment for sick animals without professional consultation of veterinarians.The veterinarian rule is fundamental in farmer education. Clinicians, especially in some professional branches as neonatology, should be more responsible of their assignments, avoiding delegation of specific procedures to unskilled staff. The importance of communication in improving management and health in dairy farms has been recently demonstrated (Jansen and Lam, 2012; Jansen et al., 2010. Effective communication has a key role in dairy herd health and communication strategies are required to support diseases control programs (Lievaart et al., 2008. More attention to iatrogenic issue may have a positive impact on animal and public health. Moreover, a decrease of unnecessary and injurious

  4. Survey of marbofloxacin susceptibility of bacteria isolated from cattle with respiratory disease and mastitis in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroemer, S; Galland, D; Guérin-Faublée, V; Giboin, H; Woehrlé-Fontaine, F

    2012-01-01

    A monitoring programme conducted in Europe since 1994 to survey the marbofloxacin susceptibility of bacterial pathogens isolated from cattle has established the susceptibility of bacterial strains isolated before any antibiotic treatment from bovine mastitis and bovine respiratory disease (BRD) cases between 2002 and 2008. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by a standardised microdilution technique. For respiratory pathogens, Pasteurella multocida and Mannheimia haemolytica isolates (751 and 514 strains, respectively) were highly susceptible to marbofloxacin (MIC≤0.03 µg/ml for 77.39 per cent of the strains) and only 1.75 per cent of M haemolytica strains were resistant (MIC≥4 µg/ml). Histophilus somni isolates (73 strains) were highly susceptible to marbofloxacin (0.008 to 0.06 µg/ml). Mycoplasma bovis MIC (171 strains) ranged from 0.5 to 4 µg/ml. For mastitis pathogens, the majority of Escherichia coli isolates were highly susceptible to marbofloxacin (95.8 per cent of 617 strains). Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (568 and 280 strains) had a homogenous population with MIC centred on 0.25 µg/ml. Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae (660 and 217 strains) were moderately susceptible with MIC centred on 1 µg/ml. Marbofloxacin MIC for these various pathogens appeared stable over the seven years of the monitoring programme and was similar to previously published MIC results.

  5. Association of herd BRSV and BHV-1 seroprevalence with respiratory disease and reproductive performance in adult dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaperi, Kerli; Bougeard, Stephanie; Aleksejev, Annely; Orro, Toomas; Viltrop, Arvo

    2012-01-30

    The aim of this study was to detect the associations between bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) status of a herd and respiratory disease (BRD) occurrence and reproductive performance in pregnant heifers and cows. The association between management-related factors and higher BRD occurrence was also estimated. Serum samples, collected from cows and youngstock from 103 dairy cattle herds, were analyzed for antibodies against BHV-1, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV), and Mycoplasma bovis. A questionnaire was used to collect data concerning herd management factors and reproductive performance, as well as the occurrence of clinical signs of respiratory disease in the last two years, as evaluated by the veterinarian or farm manager. Multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) and logistic regression analysis were performed to identify and quantify the risk factors. A low to moderate prevalence (1-49%) of BRSV antibodies among youngstock was associated with a high occurrence of respiratory disease (OR = 6.2, p = 0.010) in cows and in-calf heifers. Employees of the farm may participate in the spread of such disease. Larger herd size, loose-housing of cows, housing youngstock separately from cows until pregnancy, and purchasing new animals were factors possibly related to a high occurrence of respiratory disease symptoms in pregnant heifers and cows. The highest risk of abortions (> 1.3%) and increased insemination index (number of inseminations per pregnancy) (> 1.9) occurred in herds with a moderate prevalence of BHV-1 antibodies (1-49%) in cows. BHV-1 was not associated with acute respiratory disease in adult dairy cattle, however was significantly related to reproductive performance. BRSV possesses the main role in respiratory disease complex in adult dairy cattle.

  6. Association of herd BRSV and BHV-1 seroprevalence with respiratory disease and reproductive performance in adult dairy cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raaperi Kerli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to detect the associations between bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1 status of a herd and respiratory disease (BRD occurrence and reproductive performance in pregnant heifers and cows. The association between management-related factors and higher BRD occurrence was also estimated. Methods Serum samples, collected from cows and youngstock from 103 dairy cattle herds, were analyzed for antibodies against BHV-1, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV, bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV, and Mycoplasma bovis. A questionnaire was used to collect data concerning herd management factors and reproductive performance, as well as the occurrence of clinical signs of respiratory disease in the last two years, as evaluated by the veterinarian or farm manager. Multiple correspondence analysis (MCA and logistic regression analysis were performed to identify and quantify the risk factors. Results A low to moderate prevalence (1-49% of BRSV antibodies among youngstock was associated with a high occurrence of respiratory disease (OR = 6.2, p = 0.010 in cows and in-calf heifers. Employees of the farm may participate in the spread of such disease. Larger herd size, loose-housing of cows, housing youngstock separately from cows until pregnancy, and purchasing new animals were factors possibly related to a high occurrence of respiratory disease symptoms in pregnant heifers and cows. The highest risk of abortions (> 1.3% and increased insemination index (number of inseminations per pregnancy (> 1.9 occurred in herds with a moderate prevalence of BHV-1 antibodies (1-49% in cows. Conclusions BHV-1 was not associated with acute respiratory disease in adult dairy cattle, however was significantly related to reproductive performance. BRSV possesses the main role in respiratory disease complex in adult dairy cattle.

  7. Network analysis of Danish cattle industry trade patterns as an evaluation of risk potential for disease spread

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigras-Poulin, M.; Thompson, R.A.; Chriél, Mariann

    2006-01-01

    Trade patterns of animal movements in a specific industry are complex and difficult to study because there are many stakeholders, premises that are heterogeneously spread over the country, and a highly dynamic flow of animals exists among them. The Danish cattle industry was defined as a network...... premises, (3) the specific premise network, and (4) the overall industry network. When contagious animals are moved from one premise to another, then to a third and so forth, these movements create a path for potential transfer of pathogens. The paths within which pathogens are present identify...... the transmission risks. A network of animal movements should provide information about pathogen transmission and disease spread. The network of the Danish cattle industry network was a directed scale-free graph (the direction of a movement was known), with an in-degree power of 2 an out-degree power of 1...

  8. Farm Community Impacts of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Outbreaks in Cattle and Buffaloes in Karnataka State, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraj, G; Ganeshkumar, B; Nethrayini, K R; Shalini, R; Balamurugan, V; Pattnaik, B; Rahman, H

    2017-06-01

    This study was conducted to assess the impact of Foot-and-mouth Disease (FMD) outbreak in cattle and buffaloes on farming community in Kolar district, Karnataka state, India. Primary data were collected using pre-tested schedule from 178 sample farms using multistage random cluster sample technique. The results revealed that 78% of surveyed villages were affected with FMD. The FMD incidence risk was high across the herd sizes, whereas the mortality risk was high in small herds. In indigenous cattle, the highest loss due to FMD was distress sale (208 USD) followed by other losses, whereas, in Crossbred cattle, the highest loss was mortality loss (515 USD) followed by distress sale (490 USD), milk yield loss (327 USD), treatment cost (38 USD) and extra labour engagement expenses for nursing of FMD-affected bovines (30 USD). In local and upgraded buffaloes, the mean total loss per affected animal was 440 USD and 513 USD, respectively. A very high variability in the loss per animal was observed across the type of losses in the Crossbred cattle, and it may be due to differences in age of the FMD-infected animal, value of the animal, milking stage, lactation levels, herd sizes and labour engagement levels, etc. In local and upgraded buffaloes, the mean total loss per animal was 639 USD and 1008 USD, respectively. The sensitivity analysis for 5% change in price revealed that the mean total loss per animal was positively correlated with price. Further, the social impact elicitation revealed that majority of the livestock owners perceived FMD had caused permanent asset loss, which in turn increased psychological stress of the family. The estimated losses and social impact due to FMD signify the importance of the intervention to control the disease and thus socio-economic gain to the farmer and society at large. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Bovine respiratory disease associated with Histophilus somni and bovine respiratory syncytial virus in a beef cattle feedlot from Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selwyn Arligton Headley

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Bovine respiratory disease (BRD is a complex multifactorial and multi-etiological disease entity that is responsible for the morbidity and mortality particularly in feedlot cattle from North America. Information relative to the occurrence of BRD in Brazil and the associated infectious agents are lacking. This study investigated the participation of infectious agents of BRD in a beef cattle feedlot from Southeastern Brazil. Nasopharyngeal swabs of 11% (10/90 of cattle (n, 450 with clinical manifestations of respiratory distress were analyzed by targeting specific genes of the principal infectious pathogens of BRD. In addition, pulmonary fragments of one the animals that died were collected for histopathological and molecular diagnoses. The nucleic acids of Histophilus somni and bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV were identified in 20% (2/10 of the nasopharyngeal swabs of the animals with respiratory distress; another contained only BRSV RNA. Moreover, the nucleic acids of both infectious agents were amplified from the pulmonary fragments of the animal that died with histopathological evidence of bronchopneumonia and interstitial pneumonia; the nasopharyngeal swab of this animal also contained the nucleic acids of both pathogens. Additionally, all PCR and/or RT-PCR assays designed to detect the specific genes of Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, Mycoplasma bovis, bovine viral diarrhea virus, bovine herpesvirus -1, bovine parainfluenza virus-3, and bovine coronavirus yielded negative results. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the isolates of H. somni circulating in Brazil are similar to those identified elsewhere, while there seem to be diversity between the isolates of BRSV within cattle herds from different geographical locations of Brazil.

  10. Host response to Foot- and Mouth Disease infection in cattle; possible implications for the development of “carriers”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenfeldt, Carolina; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten

    for the presence of viral genomes as well as FMDV-specific antibodies. Viral shedding was measured through qPCR of mouth swabs and oropharyngeal fluid (probang samples). Tissue samples derived from endoscopical collection of biopsies of the dorsal soft palate from live animals at different times post infection...... of FMDV infection in cattle has been performed. During these experiments, bull calves of 4-5 months of age were infected with FMDV O UKG 34/2001, and disease development was monitored for 32 days. Disease progression was monitored through observation of clinical signs, and analysis of serum...

  11. Foot-and-mouth disease virus transmission dynamics and persistence in a herd of vaccinated dairy cattle in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayer, S S; VanderWaal, K; Ranjan, R; Biswal, J K; Subramaniam, S; Mohapatra, J K; Sharma, G K; Rout, M; Dash, B B; Das, B; Prusty, B R; Sharma, A K; Stenfeldt, C; Perez, A; Delgado, A H; Sharma, M K; Rodriguez, L L; Pattnaik, B; Arzt, J

    2018-04-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is an important transboundary disease with substantial economic impacts. Although between-herd transmission of the disease has been well studied, studies focusing on within-herd transmission using farm-level outbreak data are rare. The aim of this study was to estimate parameters associated with within-herd transmission, host physiological factors and FMD virus (FMDV) persistence using data collected from an outbreak that occurred at a large, organized dairy farm in India. Of 1,836 regularly vaccinated, adult dairy cattle, 222 had clinical signs of FMD over a 39-day period. Assuming homogenous mixing, a frequency-dependent compartmental model of disease transmission was built. The transmission coefficient and basic reproductive number were estimated to be between 16.2-18.4 and 67-88, respectively. Non-pregnant animals were more likely to manifest clinical signs of FMD as compared to pregnant cattle. Based on oropharyngeal fluid (probang) sampling and FMDV-specific RT-PCR, four of 36 longitudinally sampled animals (14%) were persistently infected carriers 10.5 months post-outbreak. There was no statistical difference between subclinical and clinically infected animals in the duration of the carrier state. However, prevalence of NSP-ELISA antibodies differed significantly between subclinical and clinically infected animals 12 months after the outbreak with 83% seroprevalence amongst clinically infected cattle compared to 69% of subclinical animals. This study further elucidates within-herd FMD transmission dynamics during the acute-phase and characterizes duration of FMDV persistence and seroprevalence of FMD under natural conditions in an endemic setting. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Characterisation of recent foot-and-mouth disease viruses from African buffalo ( Syncerus caffer )and cattle in Kenya is consistent with independent virus populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nabalayo Wekesa, Sabenzia; Kiprotich Sangula, Abraham; Belsham, Graham

    2015-01-01

    O, A, SAT 1 and SAT 2 were circulating among cattle in Kenya and cause disease, but only SAT 1 and SAT 2 viruses were successfully isolated from clinically normal buffalo. The buffalo isolates were genetically distinct from isolates obtained from cattle. Control efforts should focus primarily......Background Understanding the epidemiology of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), including roles played by different hosts, is essential for improving disease control. The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is a reservoir for the SAT serotypes of FMD virus (FMDV). Large buffalo populations commonly...... intermingle with livestock in Kenya, yet earlier studies have focused on FMD in the domestic livestock, hence the contribution of buffalo to disease in livestock is largely unknown. This study analysed 47 epithelia collected from FMD outbreaks in Kenyan cattle between 2008 and 2012, and 102 probang and serum...

  13. Analyzing the Foot and Mouth Disease outbreak as from 2008 to 2014 in cattle and buffaloes in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekera, Umanga C; Sivasothy, Arumugumam; Wedasingha, Nihal; Thayaparan, Sivapiragasam; Rotewewa, Bandara; Muralithas, Mahalingam; Baumann, Maximilian P O; Punyapornwithaya, Veerasak

    2017-12-01

    Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease that affects all cloven hoofed animals and causes considerable economic losses to cattle and buffalo farmers worldwide. FMD is endemic to Sri Lanka. The objective of this study was to analyze the past situation of FMD from 2008 to 2014 in the country and to identify relevant risk factors associated with the 2014 outbreak. Outbreak data from the Department of Animal Production and Health, Sri Lanka from 2008 to 2014 were used to describe the spatial distribution and to determine associations between the frequency of outbreaks across the country (nine provinces) and factors including vaccination coverage and outbreak year. A questionnaire was used to collect the information on potential risk factors for FMD for the 2014 outbreak from case farms (n=83) and control farms (n=161). Seven focus group (FG) discussions with farmers and five in-depth interviews with veterinarians and livestock officers were conducted. A negative binomial regression model was constructed to determine the relationship between frequencies of outbreaks by province, year, vaccine coverage and bovine numbers per province. A logistic regression model was used to determine the association between potential risk factors and disease status of the farm. There was no association between vaccination coverage and outbreak frequencies at province level (Risk Ratio=1.02; 95% CI=0.09, 1.05). Based on our cases-control study there were five variables significantly associated with the FMD spread: cattle/buffalo contact with nearby villages (Odds Ratio=2.88; 95% CI: 1.23-6.72), cattle/buffalo grazing near water tank areas (OR=3.11;95% CI: 1.21-7.97), animals bought or sold during the outbreak (OR=3.3; 95% CI: 1.39-7.83), being near to a road where animal traders travel (OR=3.44 95% CI: 1.10-10.79), and being fed on the floor instead of feed troughs (OR=2.61,1.08-6.31). The major risk factor identified here was cattle/buffalo movement by means of

  14. Host-response to foot-and-mouth disease in cattle; possible implications for the development of persistently infected "carriers"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenfeldt, Anna Carolina

    General purpose and objectives Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a viral infection of implicit financial importance for countries, such as Denmark, which rely on a significant trade in agricultural products. The disease is highly contagious with rapid spread amongst susceptible animals, causing...... for effective disease control. The main purpose of this PhD-project has been to investigate the host response to FMD infection in cattle, with further objectives of elucidating any detectable differences in the measured immune response between animals that developed into FMDV carriers and those that did not...... of mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines in sequential biopsy samples. Structure of Thesis The first chapter contains general background information on the host response to virus infections, as well as characteristics of FMDV and the pathogenesis of the infection. Detailed aims and objectives...

  15. Pathogens, patterns of pneumonia, and epidemiologic risk factors associated with respiratory disease in recently weaned cattle in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Gerard M; More, Simon J; Sammin, Dónal; Casey, Mìcheàl J; McElroy, Máire C; O'Neill, Rónan G; Byrne, William J; Earley, Bernadette; Clegg, Tracy A; Ball, Hywel; Bell, Colin J; Cassidy, Joseph P

    2017-01-01

    We examined the pathogens, morphologic patterns, and risk factors associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in 136 recently weaned cattle ("weanlings"), 6-12 mo of age, that were submitted for postmortem examination to regional veterinary laboratories in Ireland. A standardized sampling protocol included routine microbiologic investigations as well as polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Lungs with histologic lesions were categorized into 1 of 5 morphologic patterns of pneumonia. Fibrinosuppurative bronchopneumonia (49%) and interstitial pneumonia (48%) were the morphologic patterns recorded most frequently. The various morphologic patterns of pulmonary lesions suggest the involvement of variable combinations of initiating and compounding infectious agents that hindered any simple classification of the etiopathogenesis of the pneumonias. Dual infections were detected in 58% of lungs, with Mannheimia haemolytica and Histophilus somni most frequently recorded in concert. M. haemolytica (43%) was the most frequently detected respiratory pathogen; H. somni was also shown to be frequently implicated in pneumonia in this age group of cattle. Bovine parainfluenza virus 3 (BPIV-3) and Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (16% each) were the viral agents detected most frequently. Potential respiratory pathogens (particularly Pasteurella multocida, BPIV-3, and H. somni) were frequently detected (64%) in lungs that had neither gross nor histologic pulmonary lesions, raising questions regarding their role in the pathogenesis of BRD. The breadth of respiratory pathogens detected in bovine lungs by various detection methods highlights the diagnostic value of parallel analyses in respiratory disease postmortem investigation.

  16. Molecular survey of infectious agents associated with bovine respiratory disease in a beef cattle feedlot in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headley, Selwyn A; Okano, Werner; Balbo, Luciana C; Marcasso, Rogério A; Oliveira, Thalita E; Alfieri, Alice F; Negri Filho, Luiz C; Michelazzo, Mariana Z; Rodrigues, Silvio C; Baptista, Anderson L; Saut, João Paulo E; Alfieri, Amauri A

    2018-03-01

    We investigated the occurrence of infectious pathogens during an outbreak of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in a beef cattle feedlot in southern Brazil that has a high risk of developing BRD. Nasopharyngeal swabs were randomly collected from steers ( n = 23) and assessed for the presence of infectious agents of BRD by PCR and/or RT-PCR assays. These included: Histophilus somni, Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, Mycoplasma bovis, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine coronavirus (BCoV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine alphaherpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), and bovine parainfluenza virus 3 (BPIV-3). Pulmonary sections of one steer that died with clinical BRD were submitted for pathology and molecular testing. The frequencies of the pathogens identified from the nasopharyngeal swabs were: H. somni 39% (9 of 23), BRSV 35% (8 of 23), BCoV 22% (5 of 23), and M. haemolytica 13% (3 of 23). PCR or RT-PCR assays did not identify P. multocida, M. bovis, BoHV-1, BVDV, or BPIV-3 from the nasopharyngeal swabs. Single and concomitant associations of infectious agents of BRD were identified. Fibrinous bronchopneumonia was diagnosed in one steer that died; samples were positive for H. somni and M. haemolytica by PCR. H. somni, BRSV, and BCoV are important disease pathogens of BRD in feedlot cattle in Brazil, but H. somni and BCoV are probably under-reported.

  17. Efficacy of synthetic peptide candidate vaccines against serotype-A foot-and-mouth disease virus in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongwang; Pan, Li; Ding, Yaozhong; Zhou, Peng; Lv, Jianliang; Chen, Haotai; Fang, Yuzhen; Liu, Xinsheng; Chang, Huiyun; Zhang, Jie; Shao, Junjun; Lin, Tong; Zhao, Furong; Zhang, Yongguang; Wang, Yonglu

    2015-02-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remains a major threat to livestock worldwide, especially in developing countries. To improve the efficacy of vaccination against FMD, various types of vaccines have been developed, including synthetic peptide vaccines. We designed three synthetic peptide vaccines, 59 to 87 aa in size, based on immunogenic epitopes in the VP1, 3A, and 3D proteins of the A/HuBWH/CHA/2009 strain of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), corresponding to amino acid positions 129 to 169 of VP1, 21 to 35 of 3A, and 346 to 370 of 3D. The efficacies of the vaccines were evaluated in cattle and guinea pigs challenged with serotype-A FMDV. All of the vaccines elicited the production of virus-neutralizing antibodies. The PB peptide, which contained sequences corresponding to positions 129 to 169 of V P1 and 346 to 370 of 3D, demonstrated the highest levels of immunogenicity and immunoprotection against FMDV. Two doses of 50 μg of the synthetic PB peptide vaccine provided 100% protection against FMDV infection in guinea pigs, and a single dose of 100 μg provided 60% protection in cattle. These findings provide empirical data for facilitating the development of synthetic peptide vaccines against FMD.

  18. The effects of bovine viral diarrhoea virus on cattle reproduction in relation to disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fray, M D; Paton, D J; Alenius, S

    2000-07-02

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is a major reproductive pathogen in cattle. Infection of the bull can lead to a fall in semen quality and the isolation of infectious virus in the ejaculate, while infection in the cow leads to poor conception rates, abortions and congenital defects. BVDV also reduces the animal's resistance to other respiratory and enteric pathogens. The prevalence of BVDV is primarily due to the efficiency with which the virus crosses the placenta of susceptible females. Calves that survive infection during the first trimester of pregnancy are born with a persistent and lifelong infection. These persistently infected (PI) animals represent between 1.0% and 2.0% of the cattle population and continuously shed infectious virus. The availability of reliable diagnostic ELISA and PCR techniques, which can test milk or serum samples for virus or antibodies, has simplified BVDV surveillance and improved the prospects for control. Although PI animals are the principal vectors within and between herds, they can be readily identified and removed. By contrast, cows carrying a PI foetus are particularly problematic. These animals have been compared to 'Trojan Horses' because they are virus-negative and antibody-positive but they deliver PI calves. In general, acutely infected cattle are much less efficient vectors but infections at the onset of puberty have resulted in a localised and persistent infection within the testes. Under these circumstances, virus shedding into the semen may remain undetected. Transmission of BVDV can be controlled through vaccination or eradication. BVDV vaccine technology has been developing over the past 30 years, but currently available vaccines are still of the conventional inactivated or attenuated sort. In general, vaccination has not been applied with sufficient rigor to make a significant impact on the level of circulating virus, unlike the national and regional eradication programmes established in areas such as

  19. Prevalence of bovine dermatophilosis and disease-associated alleles in zebu Goudali cattle and their Italian Simmental crosses ranching in the western highland plateau savannah of Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojong, Bessong Willington; Saccà, Elena; Bessong, Pascal; Piasentier, Edi

    2016-10-01

    Abundance of native pastures makes Cameroon's western highland savannah (WHS) a hotspot for low-input beef-type cattle. Dumbo Ranch is central to cattle seed stock multiplication in WHS and holds that Dermatophilus congolensis infection undermines production. The bovine BoLA-DRB3 has been variously demonstrated as the principal gene of the major histocompatibility locus associated with immunity and resistance to dermatophilosis in cattle. We studied the profile of dermatophilosis prevalence in zebu Goudali (G) and its Simmental composite, SimGoud (SG), at Dumbo Ranch and determined the distribution of a dermatophilosis-associated susceptibility allele of the BoLA-DRB3 gene by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We recorded a 42 % prevalence of dermatophilosis in the studied cohort (337 animals). Dermatophilosis was more common in older cattle than in cattle ≤36 months (p ≤ 0.05). G was more affected compared to SG, because of the prevalence of the disease in the oldest animals and the age distribution of the experimental subjects. No susceptible homozygote was observed. About 85 and 15 % of the cohort carried the homozygous resistant and heterozygous condition, respectively. This genotype distribution was not affected by cattle type. The study confirms the presence of dermatophilosis among G and SG cattle in WHS. However, there was no correlation between the presence of the disease-associated susceptible allele considered and clinical manifestation. Screening for this dermatophilosis resistance-associated allele of BoLA-DRB3 gene appeared not useful for selection of G and SG in WHS.

  20. Scenario planning: The future of the cattle and sheep industries in Scotland and their resiliency to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Lisa A; Auty, Harriet; Bessell, Paul; Duckett, Dominic; Liu, Jiayi; Kyle, Carol; McKee, Annie; Sutherland, Lee-Ann; Reynolds, John; Bronsvoort, Barend M deC; McKendrick, Iain J

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we present a description of foresighting activities undertaken by EPIC, Scotland's Centre of Expertise on Animal Disease Outbreaks, to investigate the future uncertainty of animal health security in the Scottish sheep and cattle sectors. Using scenario planning methodologies, we explored four plausible but provocative long-term futures which identify dynamics underpinning the resilience of these agricultural sectors to animal disease. These scenarios highlight a number of important drivers that influence disease resilience: industry demographics, the role of government support and regulation and the capacity for technological innovation to support the industry to meet local and global market demand. Participants in the scenario planning exercises proposed creative, robust strategies that policy makers could consider implementing now to enhance disease control and industry resilience in multiple, uncertain futures. Using these participant-led strategies as a starting point, we offer ten key questions for policy makers and stakeholders to provoke further discussion about improving resiliency and disease preparedness. We conclude with a brief discussion of the value of scenario planning, not only for the development of futures which will inform disease contingency plans and improve industry resilience, but as a mechanism for dialogue and information sharing between stakeholders and government. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Structured literature review of responses of cattle to viral and bacterial pathogens causing bovine respiratory disease complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissett, G P; White, B J; Larson, R L

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is an economically important disease of cattle and continues to be an intensely studied topic. However, literature summarizing the time between pathogen exposure and clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion is minimal. A structured literature review of the published literature was performed to determine cattle responses (time from pathogen exposure to clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion) in challenge models using common BRD viral and bacterial pathogens. After review a descriptive analysis of published studies using common BRD pathogen challenge studies was performed. Inclusion criteria were single pathogen challenge studies with no treatment or vaccination evaluating outcomes of interest: clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion. Pathogens of interest included: bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1), parainfluenza-3 virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, Pastuerella multocida, and Histophilus somni. Thirty-five studies and 64 trials were included for analysis. The median days to the resolution of clinical signs after BVDV challenge was 15 and shedding was not detected on day 12 postchallenge. Resolution of BHV-1 shedding resolved on day 12 and clinical signs on day 12 postchallenge. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus ceased shedding on day 9 and median time to resolution of clinical signs was on day 12 postchallenge. M. haemolytica resolved clinical signs 8 days postchallenge. This literature review and descriptive analysis can serve as a resource to assist in designing challenge model studies and potentially aid in estimation of duration of clinical disease and shedding after natural pathogen exposure. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  2. Investigation on the status of Johne's disease based on agar gel immunodiffusion, ziehl-neelsen staining and nested PCR approach in two cattle farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Mohan,

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Methods: Paratuberculosis is a chronic disease of ruminant, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map, clinically infected animals produce high level of antibodies in blood and shed detectable amount of Map organisms in feces. Several serological and molecular tests are utilized for detection of antibodies or DNA of the organism in clinical samples. Present study indicates the status of paratuberculosis in two distinct cattle farms with different organizational set-ups viz. organized and unorganized. We used agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID assay for the detection of antibodies in blood. Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN staining of fecal smears was done to observe acid-fast bacilli and Nested PCR targeted to IS900 and f57 sequences, was performed to confirm the pathogen.Results: Sera samples of cattle, from organized farm, did not show any visible precipitating band with AGID assay. However, fecal smears of few cattle (3.57% were positive for acid-fast bacilli. When confirmed with nested PCR, only one fecal sample (0.71% was found positive for Map. In case of unorganized farm, a large number of cattle (38.75% showed precipitating antibodies with AGID assay and the percentage of fecal smears that showed acid-fast bacilli was 26.62%. Nevertheless, fecal samples containing Map DNA was confirmed in 14.37% of fecal sample by nested PCR.Conclusions: An organized farm, with better hygiene and management practices, showed lesser occurrence of paratuberculosis in cattle in comparison to unorganized farm. Not all AGID assays positive cattle might be an efficient shedder of Map and mare detection of acid-fast bacilli in fecal smears did not always indicate the presence of Map organism. Cattle infected with JD were mostly in the age group of six years and above.

  3. Detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus in the breath of infected cattle using a hand-held device to collect aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Laurids Siig; Brehm, Katharina E.; Skov, Julia

    2011-01-01

    Exhaled air of individual cattle infected experimentally with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) was sampled to assess the feasibility of a rapid, non-invasive general screening approach for identifying sources of FMDV infection. The air sampler used was a handheld prototype device employing...

  4. The comparative utility of oral swabs and probang samples for detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus infection in cattle and pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenfeldt, Anna Carolina; Lohse, Louise; Belsham, Graham

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) RNA was measured using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) assays in oralswab and probangsamples collected from cattle and pigs during experimental infections with serotype O FMDV. During acute infection, FMDV RNA was measurable in oralswabs as wel...

  5. Genomic signatures of Mannheimia haemolytica that associate with the lungs of cattle with respiratory disease, an integrative conjugative element, and antibiotic resistance genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Mannheimia haemolytica typically resides in cattle as a commensal member of the upper respiratory tract microbiome. However, some strains can invade their lungs and cause respiratory disease and death, including those with multi-drug resistance. A nucleotide polymorphism typing system ...

  6. Modulation of Cytokine mRNA Expression in Pharyngeal Epithelial Samples obtained from Cattle Infected with Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenfeldt, Anna Carolina; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Stockmarr, Anders

    2012-01-01

    A novel technique of endoscopical collection of small tissue samples was used to obtain sequential tissue samples from the dorsal soft palate (DSP) of individual cattle infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) at different phases of the infection. Levels of mRNA encoding interferon (IFN...

  7. Multiple efficacy studies of an adenovirus-vectored foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A24 subunit vaccine in cattle using direct homologous challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    The safety and efficacy of an experimental, replication-deficient, human adenovirus-vectored foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype A24 Cruzeiro capsid-based subunit vaccine (AdtA24) was examined in eight independent cattle studies. AdtA24 non-adjuvanted vaccine was administered intramuscularl...

  8. Frequency and Pathological Phenotype of Bovine Astrovirus CH13/NeuroS1 Infection in Neurologically-Diseased Cattle: Towards Assessment of Causality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senija Selimovic-Hamza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS has opened up the possibility of detecting new viruses in unresolved diseases. Recently, astrovirus brain infections have been identified in neurologically diseased humans and animals by NGS, among them bovine astrovirus (BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1, which has been found in brain tissues of cattle with non-suppurative encephalitis. Only a few studies are available on neurotropic astroviruses and a causal relationship between BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1 infections and neurological disease has been postulated, but remains unproven. Aiming at making a step forward towards assessing the causality, we collected brain samples of 97 cases of cattle diagnosed with unresolved non-suppurative encephalitis, and analyzed them by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, to determine the frequency and neuropathological distribution of the BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1 and its topographical correlation to the pathology. We detected BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1 RNA or proteins in neurons throughout all parts of the central nervous system (CNS in 34% of all cases, but none were detected in cattle of the control group. In general, brain lesions had a high correlation with the presence of the virus. These findings show that a substantial proportion of cattle with non-suppurative encephalitis are infected with BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1 and further substantiate the causal relationship between neurological disease and astrovirus infections.

  9. Coexisting with wildlife in transfrontier conservation areas in Zimbabwe: cattle owners' awareness of disease risks and perceptions of the role played by wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Garine-Wichatitsky, M; Miguel, E; Mukamuri, B; Garine-Wichatitsky, E; Wencelius, J; Pfukenyi, D M; Caron, A

    2013-05-01

    Diseases transmitted between wildlife and livestock may have significant impacts on local farmers' health, livestock health and productivity, overall national economies, and conservation initiatives, such as Transfrontier Conservation Areas in Southern Africa. However, little is known on local farmers' awareness of the potential risks, and how they perceive the role played by wildlife in the epidemiology of these diseases. We investigated the knowledge base regarding livestock diseases of local cattle owners living at the periphery of conservation areas within the Great Limpopo TFCA and the Kavango-Zambezi TFCA in Zimbabwe, using free-listing and semi-structured questionnaires during dipping sessions. The results suggest that information related to cattle diseases circulates widely between cattle farmers, including between different socio-cultural groups, using English and vernacular languages. Most respondents had an accurate perception of the epidemiology of diseases affecting their livestock, and their perception of the potential role played by wildlife species was usually in agreement with current state of veterinary knowledge. However, we found significant variations in the cultural importance of livestock diseases between sites, and owners' perceptions were not directly related with the local abundance of wildlife. As the establishment of TFCAs will potentially increase the risk of Transboundary Animal Diseases, we recommend an increased participation of communities at a local level in the prioritisation of livestock diseases control and surveillance, including zoonoses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Expression of genes associated with immunity in the endometrium of cattle with disparate postpartum uterine disease and fertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herath Shan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contamination of the uterine lumen with bacteria is ubiquitous in cattle after parturition. Some animals develop endometritis and have reduced fertility but others have no uterine disease and readily conceive. The present study tested the hypothesis that postpartum cattle that develop persistent endometritis and infertility are unable to limit the inflammatory response to uterine bacterial infection. Methods Endometrial biopsies were collected several times during the postpartum period from animals that were subsequently infertile with persistent endometritis (n = 4 or had no clinical disease and conceived to first insemination (n = 4. Quantitative PCR was used to determine the expression of candidate genes in the endometrial biopsies, including the Toll-like receptor (TLR 1 to 10 family of innate immune receptors, inflammatory mediators and their cognate receptors. Selected proteins were examined by immunohistochemistry. Results The expression of genes encoding pro-inflammatory mediators such as interleukins (IL1A, IL1B and IL6, and nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2 were higher during the first week post partum than subsequently. During the first week post partum, there was higher gene expression in infertile than fertile animals of TLR4, the receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharide, and the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL1A and IL1B, and their receptor IL1R2. The expression of genes encoding other Toll-like receptors, transforming growth factor beta receptor 1 (TGFBR1 or prostaglandin E2 receptors (PTGER2 and PTGER4 did not differ significantly between the animal groups. Gene expression did not differ significantly between infertile and fertile animals after the first week postpartum. However, there were higher ratios of IL1A or IL1B mRNA to the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL10, during the first week post partum in the infertile than fertile animals, and the protein products of these genes were mainly localised to the epithelium

  11. Disparity in the nasopharyngeal microbiota between healthy cattle on feed, at entry processing and with respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeineldin, Mohamed; Lowe, James; de Godoy, Maria; Maradiaga, Nidia; Ramirez, Chelsey; Ghanem, Mohamed; Abd El-Raof, Yassein; Aldridge, Brian

    2017-09-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is one of the most serious causes of health and economic problems in the beef production industry, especially in recently weaned, intensely raised and newly transported feedlot cattle. While the importance of upper airway structure and function in the susceptibility of the lower respiratory tract to colonization with potential pathogens is well established, the role of the mucosal microbiota in respirtatory health is less well defined. The objective of this study was to characterize the nasopharyngeal microbiota of feedlot cattle at entry into a commercial feedlot, during initial management processing, and to compare the dynamics of change in these microbial communities between clinically healthy calves and those that develop BRD within the first month after entry. Deep nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from randomly selected healthy calves (n=66) during initial handling and processing at the feedlot, and again at the initial diagnosis of BRD (n=22). Clinically healthy pen matched controls calves (n=10) were sampled at the same time as the BRD affected animals. Genomic DNA was extracted from each sample, and the 16S rRNA gene V1-V3 hypervariable region was amplified and sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq platform. Across all the samples, the predominant bacterial phyla were Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. While the predominant genera were Moraxella, Mycoplasma and Acinetobacter. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) effect size (LEfSe) revealed significant differences in bacterial taxa between healthy and BRD affected calves. Discriminant analysis revealed that the nasopharyngeal microbiota in feedlot calves at entry and in BRD affected calves were distinct from pen matched healthy calves. While the temporal dynamics of this shift were not examined in this study, it is possible that the observed changes in mucosal microbiota are linked to the increased susceptibility of calves to BRD during the first month after entry

  12. Simultaneous detection of five notifiable viral diseases of cattle by single-tube multiplex real-time RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernike, Kerstin; Hoffmann, Bernd; Beer, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Multiplexed real-time PCR (qPCR) assays enable the detection of several target genes in a single reaction, which is applicable for simultaneous testing for the most important viral diseases in samples obtained from ruminants with unspecific clinical symptoms. Here, reverse transcription qPCR (RT-qPCR) systems for the detection of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) and bluetongue virus (BTV) were combined with an internal control system based on the beta-actin gene. Additionally, a background screening for three further major pathogens of cloven-hoofed animals reportable to the World Organisation for Animal Health, namely foot-and-mouth disease virus, epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus, and Rift Valley fever virus, was integrated using the identical fluorophore for the respective RT-qPCR assays. Every pathogen-specific assay had an analytical sensitivity of at least 100 genome copies per reaction within the multiplex approach, and a series of reference samples and clinical specimens obtained from cattle, but also from small ruminants, were detected reliably. The qPCR systems integrated in the background screening were even not influenced by the simultaneous amplification of very high BVDV and BTV genome copy numbers. The newly developed multiplex qPCR allows the specific and sensitive detection of five of the most important diseases of ruminants and could be used in the context of monitoring programs or for differential diagnostics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Defining postpartum uterine disease and the mechanisms of infection and immunity in the female reproductive tract in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, I Martin; Cronin, James; Goetze, Leopold; Donofrio, Gaetano; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim

    2009-12-01

    Uterine microbial disease affects half of all dairy cattle after parturition, causing infertility by disrupting uterine and ovarian function. Infection with Escherichia coli, Arcanobacterium pyogenes, and bovine herpesvirus 4 causes endometrial tissue damage. Toll-like receptors on endometrial cells detect pathogen-associated molecules such as bacterial DNA, lipids, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), leading to secretion of cytokines, chemokines, and antimicrobial peptides. Chemokines attract neutrophils and macrophages to eliminate the bacteria, although persistence of neutrophils is associated with subclinical endometritis and infertility. Cows with uterine infections are less likely to ovulate because they have slower growth of the postpartum dominant follicle in the ovary, lower peripheral plasma estradiol concentrations, and perturbation of hypothalamic and pituitary function. The follicular fluid of animals with endometritis contains LPS, which is detected by the TLR4/CD14/LY96 (MD2) receptor complex on granulosa cells, leading to lower aromatase expression and reduced estradiol secretion. If cows with uterine disease ovulate, the peripheral plasma concentrations of progesterone are lower than those in normal animals. However, luteal phases are often extended in animals with uterine disease, probably because infection switches the endometrial epithelial secretion of prostaglandins from the F series to the E series by a phospholipase A2-mediated mechanism, which would disrupt luteolysis. The regulation of endometrial immunity depends on steroid hormones, somatotrophins, and local regulatory proteins. Advances in knowledge about infection and immunity in the female genital tract should be exploited to develop new therapeutics for uterine disease.

  14. Vitamin C nutrition in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, T

    2012-05-01

    Domestic animals, including ruminants, can synthesize vitamin C (VC) in their liver; as such, the dietary requirement for VC has not been confirmed in these animals. The adequacy of VC has been evaluated by quantifying VC levels in plasma, but the reported values in bovine plasma have been widely variable. Plasma VC concentration is decreased by heat stress, hepatic lesions, fattening, and infectious diseases such as mastitis in cattle. Therefore, VC supplementation is potentially beneficial for cattle with low plasma VC concentration. This review discusses the methods for determination of plasma VC concentration in cattle, VC nutrition, and the efficacy of VC supplementation in calves, dairy cattle, and beef cattle. Additionally I propose a reference range for plasma VC concentration in Japanese Black cattle.

  15. Vitamin C Nutrition in Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Matsui

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Domestic animals, including ruminants, can synthesize vitamin C (VC in their liver; as such, the dietary requirement for VC has not been confirmed in these animals. The adequacy of VC has been evaluated by quantifying VC levels in plasma, but the reported values in bovine plasma have been widely variable. Plasma VC concentration is decreased by heat stress, hepatic lesions, fattening, and infectious diseases such as mastitis in cattle. Therefore, VC supplementation is potentially beneficial for cattle with low plasma VC concentration. This review discusses the methods for determination of plasma VC concentration in cattle, VC nutrition, and the efficacy of VC supplementation in calves, dairy cattle, and beef cattle. Additionally I propose a reference range for plasma VC concentration in Japanese Black cattle.

  16. Absence of heat intolerance (panting) syndrome in foot-and-mouth disease-affected Indian cattle (Bos indicus) is associated with intact thyroid gland function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddur, M S; Rao, S; Chockalingam, A K; Kishore, S; Gopalakrishna, S; Singh, N; Suryanarayana, V V S; Gajendragad, M R

    2011-06-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious and economically important viral disease with high morbidity and reduced productivity of affected animals. We studied the heat intolerance (HI) (panting) syndrome and the effect of FMD virus (FMDV) infection on thyroid gland function in Indian cattle (Bos indicus). Experimental infection with FMDV Asia 1 resulted in a mild form of disease with superficial lesions. Heat intolerance syndrome and its signs were not observed among the recovered animals. Subtle changes in the serum level of thyroid hormones, triiodothyronine (T₃) and thyroxine (T₄) were observed. However, there were no distinct histological changes in the thyroid gland, and FMDV antigens were not detected in the thyroid tissues. Our results thus suggest that the absence of panting syndrome in FMD-affected Bos indicus cattle may be associated with intact thyroid gland function.

  17. Integration of machine learning and meta-analysis identifies the transcriptomic bio-signature of mastitis disease in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Somayeh; Pakdel, Abbas; Ebrahimi, Mansour; Reecy, James M; Fazeli Farsani, Samaneh; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2018-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli (E. coli) are assumed to be among the main agents that cause severe mastitis disease with clinical signs in dairy cattle. Rapid detection of this disease is so important in order to prevent transmission to other cows and helps to reduce inappropriate use of antibiotics. With the rapid progress in high-throughput technologies, and accumulation of various kinds of '-omics' data in public repositories, there is an opportunity to retrieve, integrate, and reanalyze these resources to improve the diagnosis and treatment of different diseases and to provide mechanistic insights into host resistance in an efficient way. Meta-analysis is a relatively inexpensive option with good potential to increase the statistical power and generalizability of single-study analysis. In the current meta-analysis research, six microarray-based studies that investigate the transcriptome profile of mammary gland tissue after induced mastitis by E. coli infection were used. This meta-analysis not only reinforced the findings in individual studies, but also several novel terms including responses to hypoxia, response to drug, anti-apoptosis and positive regulation of transcription from RNA polymerase II promoter enriched by up-regulated genes. Finally, in order to identify the small sets of genes that are sufficiently informative in E. coli mastitis, the differentially expressed gene introduced by meta-analysis were prioritized by using ten different attribute weighting algorithms. Twelve meta-genes were detected by the majority of attribute weighting algorithms (with weight above 0.7) as most informative genes including CXCL8 (IL8), NFKBIZ, HP, ZC3H12A, PDE4B, CASP4, CXCL2, CCL20, GRO1(CXCL1), CFB, S100A9, and S100A8. Interestingly, the results have been demonstrated that all of these genes are the key genes in the immune response, inflammation or mastitis. The Decision tree models efficiently discovered the best combination of the meta-genes as

  18. Investigation on the status of Johne's disease based on agar gel immunodiffusion, ziehl-neelsen staining and nested PCR approach in two cattle farm

    OpenAIRE

    Anand Mohan,; Pranabananda Das,; Neelam Kushwaha,; Kaliaperumal Karthik; Ankush Kiran Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Methods: Paratuberculosis is a chronic disease of ruminant, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map), clinically infected animals produce high level of antibodies in blood and shed detectable amount of Map organisms in feces. Several serological and molecular tests are utilized for detection of antibodies or DNA of the organism in clinical samples. Present study indicates the status of paratuberculosis in two distinct cattle farms with different organizationa...

  19. Characteristics of a foot-and-mouth disease virus with a partial VP1 G-H loop deletion in experimentally infected cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fowler, Veronica; Bashiruddin, John B.; Belsham, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Previous work in cattle illustrated the protective efficacy and negative marker potential of a A serotype foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccine prepared from a virus lacking a significant portion of the VP1 G-H loop (termed A(−)). Since this deletion also includes the arginine-glycine-aspar...... be useful as a tool to understand further the natural pathogenesis, receptor usage and internalisation pathways of FMDV....

  20. Non-capsid proteins to identify foot-and-mouth disease viral circulation in cattle irrespective of vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, I E; Malirat, V; Neitzert, E

    2005-12-01

    The ability of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) to establish subclinical and even persistent infection, the so called carrier state, imposes the need to reliably demonstrate absence of viral circulation, to monitor the progress of control measures, either during eradication programs or after reintroduction of virus in free areas. This demonstration becomes critical in immunized populations, because of the concern that silent viral circulation could be hidden by immunization. This concern originates from the fact that vaccination against foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) protects against clinical disease, but not necessarily against subclinical infection or establishment of the carrier state in cattle. A novel approach, developed and validated at PANAFTOSA during the 1990s, based on an immunoenzymatic system for detection of antibodies against non-capsid proteins (NCP) has proven valuable for monitoring viral circulation within and between herds, irrespective of the vaccination status. Antibodies against NCP are induced during infection but, in principle, not upon vaccination. The validation of this system led to its international recognition as the OIE index test. The fitness of this serosurvey tool to assess viral circulation in systematically vaccinated populations was demonstrated through its extensive application in most regions in South America. The experience attained in these regions supported the incorporation of the "free of FMD with vaccination" provisions into the OIE code. Likewise, it opened the way to alternatives to the "stamping out" policy. The results gave input to an old controversy related to the real epidemiological significance, if any, of carrier animals under the vaccination conditions in South America, and supported the development of recommendations and guidelines that are being implemented for serosurveys that go with control measures in vaccinated populations.

  1. The comparative utility of oral swabs and probang samples for detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus infection in cattle and pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenfeldt, Carolina; Lohse, Louise; Belsham, Graham J

    2013-03-23

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) RNA was measured using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) assays in oral swab and probang samples collected from cattle and pigs during experimental infections with serotype O FMDV. During acute infection, FMDV RNA was measurable in oral swabs as well as in probang samples from both species. FMDV RNA could be detected in oral swabs and probang samples from a time point corresponding to the onset of viremia in directly inoculated animals, whereas animals which were infected through contact exposure had low levels of FMDV RNA in oral swabs before viral RNA could be measured in serum. Analysis of samples collected from cattle persistently infected with FMDV showed that it was not possible to detect FMDV RNA in oral swabs harvested beyond 10 days post infection (dpi), despite the presence of FMDV RNA in probang samples that had been collected as late as 35 dpi. An interesting feature of the persistent infection in the cattle was the apparent decline in the level of FMDV RNA in probang samples after the acute phase of infection, which was followed by a marked rise again (in all the carrier animals) by 28 dpi. Results from this study indicate that qRT-PCR analysis of oral swabs is a useful approach in order to achieve a time efficient and reliable initial diagnosis of acute FMD in cattle and pigs, whereas probang sampling is essential for the detection of cattle that are persistently infected "carriers" of FMDV. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Pig, cattle and poultry farmers with a known interest in research have comparable perspectives on disease prevention and on-farm biosecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laanen, M; Maes, D; Hendriksen, C; Gelaude, P; De Vliegher, S; Rosseel, Y; Dewulf, J

    2014-07-01

    To motivate farmers for the implementation of preventive measures for animal health, it is crucial to understand their perspective on disease prevention and on-farm biosecurity. To study this, an online questionnaire was conducted in which 218 pig, 279 cattle and 61 poultry farmers in Flanders, Belgium have participated. The participants are farmers known for their interest in research and are therefore probably better informed on these topics. Although approximately half of the respondents in all three sectors are convinced of the positive effect of biosecurity on reduction of diseases at their farms, the farmers estimated their own level of knowledge on biosecurity as being rather low. Less than 10% of the farmers in all three sectors were able to give a correct explanation of the term 'biosecurity', even though the participants are likely to be better informed than the average farmer. In general, pig, cattle and poultry farmers share comparable ideas on disease prevention and biosecurity. Cattle farmers perceived animal welfare as more important. Pig farmers indicated stability of the farm more important than farmers in the other sectors. Farmers indicate that little to no barriers are present for taking preventive measures. The often observed absence or limited implementation of biosecurity and disease prevention measures is therefore likely due to insufficient motivation. Across the species, farmers indicate that insufficient information on costs and especially revenues is a major holdback for investments in preventive measures. Not surprisingly, more information on the economic benefits of measures is indicated as the primary interest for taking measures in disease prevention. The veterinarian is seen as the main source of information concerning disease prevention and biosecurity, so it is important that veterinarians have sufficient knowledge on these topics and are able to communicate this to farmers. Especially since farmers indicate that receiving more

  3. Inferring biomarkers for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection and disease progression in cattle using experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magombedze, Gesham; Shiri, Tinevimbo; Eda, Shigetoshi; Stabel, Judy R.

    2017-03-01

    Available diagnostic assays for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) have poor sensitivities and cannot detect early stages of infection, therefore, there is need to find new diagnostic markers for early infection detection and disease stages. We analyzed longitudinal IFN-γ, ELISA-antibody and fecal shedding experimental sensitivity scores for MAP infection detection and disease progression. We used both statistical methods and dynamic mathematical models to (i) evaluate the empirical assays (ii) infer and explain biological mechanisms that affect the time evolution of the biomarkers, and (iii) predict disease stages of 57 animals that were naturally infected with MAP. This analysis confirms that the fecal test is the best marker for disease progression and illustrates that Th1/Th2 (IFN-γ/ELISA antibodies) assays are important for infection detection, but cannot reliably predict persistent infections. Our results show that the theoretical simulated macrophage-based assay is a potential good diagnostic marker for MAP persistent infections and predictor of disease specific stages. We therefore recommend specifically designed experiments to test the use of a based assay in the diagnosis of MAP infections.

  4. A mixed treatment comparison meta-analysis of metaphylaxis treatments for bovine respiratory disease in beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, K M; Theurer, M E; Larson, R L; White, B J; Apley, M

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the effects of antimicrobials approved for parenteral metaphylactic use in feeder and stocker calves on morbidity and mortality for bovine respiratory disease with the use of a mixed treatment comparison meta-analysis. An initial literature review was conducted in April 2016 through Pubmed, Agricola, and CAB (Commonwealth Agricultural Bureau) for randomized controlled trials for metaphylaxis antimicrobial administered parentally to incoming feedlot or stocker calves within 48 h of arrival. The final list of publications included 29 studies, with a total of 37 trials. There were 8 different metaphylactic antimicrobials. Final event outcomes were categorized into bovine respiratory disease (BRD) morbidity cumulative incidence d 1 to ≤ 60 of the feeding period, BRD morbidity cumulative incidence d 1 to closeout of the feeding period, BRD mortality cumulative incidence d 1 to closeout of the feeding period, and BRD retreatment cumulative incidence morbidity d 1 to closeout of the feeding period. Network meta-analysis combined direct and indirect evidence for all the event outcomes to determine mean odds ratio (OR) with 95% credibility intervals (CrIs) for all metaphylactic antimicrobial comparisons. The "upper tier" treatment arms for morbidity d 1 to ≤ 60 included tulathromycin, gamithromycin, and tilmicosin. For BRD mortality cumulative incidence d 1 to closeout and BRD retreatment morbidity d 1 to closeout, classifying the treatment arms into tiers was not possible due to overlapping 95% CrIs. The results of this project accurately identified differences between metaphylactic antimicrobials, and metaphylactic antimicrobial options appear to offer different outcomes on BRD morbidity and mortality odds in feedlot cattle.

  5. The detection of lumpy skin disease virus in samples of experimentally infected cattle using different diagnostic techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.S.M. Tuppurainen

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Lumpy skin disease (LSD is a disease of cattle, primarily in Africa and Madagascar and rarely in the Middle East. It is caused by a capripoxvirus that belongs to the family Poxviridae. The disease is of economic importance in endemic areas. Effective control of LSD requires accurate and rapid laboratory techniques to confirm a tentative clinical diagnosis. Comparative studies on different diagnostic tests used at different stages of the disease have not been done. The aim of this study was to compare several of these tests. Six seronegative bulls, between 11 and 20 months of age, were infected intravenously and kept in an insect-free facility. The course of the infection was monitored. During a 3-month period blood samples and skin biopsies were collected for virus isolation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Skin biopsies were also examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The incubation period in infected animals varied from 4-5 days. The length of the viraemic period did not correlate with the severity of clinical disease. Viraemia was detected from 1-12 days using virus isolation and from 4-11 days using the PCR, which is longer than has previously been reported. Virus was isolated from skin biopsies until Day 39 post infection (p.i. and PCR could demonstrate viral DNA until Day 92 p.i. Transmission electron microscopy of negatively stained skin biopsies detected LSD virus only in one of the four bulls that developed skin lesions until Day 33 p.i. The PCR was a fast and sensitive method to demonstrate viral DNA in blood and skin samples. It could detect viral nucleic acid in skin lesions 53 days longer than virus isolation. Virus isolation from blood and skin samples was sensitive and reliable, but as a single test it may be too time-consuming to use although this depends on how rapidly the diagnosis must be confirmed. In conclusion, this study showed the PCR to be superior in detecting LSD virus from blood and skin samples

  6. Early protection against foot-and-mouth disease virus in cattle using an inactivated vaccine formulated with Montanide ESSAI IMS D 12802 VG PR adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrocchi, V; Pappalardo, J S; Langellotti, C; Smitsaart, E; Fondevila, N; Zamorano, P

    2014-04-17

    Foot and mouth disease is an acute disease of cattle with a broad distribution around the world. Due to the fast spread of FMDV infections, control measures must be applied immediately after an outbreak, such as the use of vaccines that induce fast protection. Previously, it was shown that mice vaccinated with FMD inactivated virus (iFMDV) formulated with Montanide™ ESSAI IMS D 12802 VG PR adjuvant (802-iFMDV) were protected when they were challenged 4 and 7 days post-vaccination (dpv) with homologous virus. In this work, we describe the successful use of this formulation in cattle. In addition, adjuvant Montanide™ IMS 1313 VG NPR was also tested. 802-iFMDV vaccine was able to confer 100% protection against viral challenge at 4 and 7 dpv, while eliciting low antibody levels, at 7 dpv. 1313-iFMDV vaccine induced protection in 60% of cattle. At 4 dpv, 1313-iFMDV vaccinated animals presented increased levels of IFNγ but not of macrophages. At 4 and 7 dpv, macrophages, IFNγ, nasal IgA and IgG1 antibodies against FMDV, and opsonophagocytosis were increased in animals vaccinated with 802-iFMDV indicating that these phenomena could be involved in protection.It is the first time that total protection against FMDV at early stages post-vaccination is reported using a single dose of the formulation iFMDV plus Montanide™ ESSAI D IMS 12802 VG PR adjuvant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of foot-and-mouth disease viruses from Ugandan cattle outbreaks during 2012-2013: Evidence for circulation of multiple serotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Namatovu, Alice; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Belsham, Graham

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotypes circulating in Uganda’s cattle population, both serological and virological analyses of samples from outbreaks that occurred during 2012-2013 were performed. Altogether, 79 sera and 60 oropharyngeal fluid (OP)/tissue/oral swab samples...... were collected from herds with reported FMD outbreaks in seven different Ugandan districts. Overall, 61/79 (77%) of the cattle sera were positive for antibodies against FMDV by PrioCHECK® FMDV NS ELISA and solid phase blocking ELISA detected titres ≥ 80 for serotypes O, SAT 1, SAT 2 and SAT 3 in 41, 45...... used vaccine strain. From the Wakiso district 11 tissue/swab samples were collected; serotype A FMDV, genotype Africa (G-I), was isolated from the epithelial samples. This study shows that within a period of less than one year, FMD outbreaks in Uganda were caused by four different serotypes namely O, A...

  8. Surveillance of emerging diseases in cattle : Application to the Schmallenberg virus epidemic in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, A.M.B.

    2016-01-01

    Animal health surveillance is an essential component to protect animal health, facilitate trade, and protect public health. Reliable surveillance systems are able to rapidly identify outbreaks of emerging animal diseases in previously free areas to enable the implementation of control measures. In

  9. Tools to exploit sequence data to find new markers and disease loci in dairy cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    The decrease in cost of Next-Generation Sequencing has brought the technology into the realm of practical applications in livestock genomics. Recently, the 1000 Bulls Project has heralded the possibility of using full sequence data to improve imputation and detect disease loci within select founder ...

  10. Estimation of the transmission of foot-and-mouth disease virus from infected sheep to cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bravo De Rueda, C.; Jong, de M.C.M.; Eble, P.L.; Dekker, A.

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative role of sheep in the transmission of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is not well known. To estimate the role of sheep in the transmission of FMDV, a direct contact transmission experiment with 10 groups of animals each consisting of 2 infected lambs and 1 contact calf was

  11. Stephanofilariasis (Cascado in Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwitri Endah Estuningsih

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Stephanofilariasis which is called as Cascado is characterized by dermatitis in cattle. This disease is caused by nematode from the genus of Stephanofilaria and transmitted by the fly vector. In general, the disease is characterized by pruritis, loss of hair, ulceration, exudation and haemorrhage depending on the stage of infection. Control of the disease could be done by drug treatment of the infected animals and eradication of the fly vector periodically. The disease easily spreads, therefore farmers and the veterinary officers in the fields should pay attention on this disease.

  12. Sole ulcers in dairy cattle associations with season, cow characteristics, disease, and production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Carsten; Gröhn, Y.T.; Thysen, Iver

    1991-01-01

    foot or more than one foot occurred in 20.0 and 29.7% of cows in lactation 1 and in 23.5 and 24.7% of cows in lactations 2 to 9. The analysis revealed several complicated interactions. Trimming or calving in summer to fall was strongly associated with sole ulcer. Trimming later than 1 to 2 mo after...... calving was positively associated with sole ulcer depending on milk yield, body weight, or season of calving. If lactation 1 cows were treated for disease (limb, metabolic, digestive, or severe reproductive disorders), sole ulcer in more than one foot occurred earlier in lactation. Milk yield in early......Epidemiological associations, expressed as odds ratios between variables obtained from dairy cow records and sole ulcer occurrence at claw trimmings were estimated with logistic regression analysis on data from 2204 and 1124 cows in lactation 1 and lactations 2 to 9, respectively. Sole ulcer in one...

  13. Johne's disease in the eyes of Irish cattle farmers: A qualitative narrative research approach to understanding implications for disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAloon, Conor G; Macken-Walsh, Áine; Moran, Lisa; Whyte, Paul; More, Simon J; O'Grady, Luke; Doherty, Michael L

    2017-06-01

    Bovine Johne's Disease (JD) is a disease characterised by chronic granulomatous enteritis which manifests clinically as a protein-losing enteropathy causing diarrhoea, hypoproteinaemia, emaciation and, eventually death. Some research exists to suggest that the aetiologic pathogen Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis may pose a zoonotic risk. Nationally coordinated control programmes have been introduced in many of the major milk producing countries across the world. However, JD is challenging to control in infected herds owing to limitations of diagnostic tests and the long incubation period of the disease. Internationally, research increasingly recognises that improved understanding of farmers' subjective views and behaviours may inform and enhance disease management strategies and support the identification and implementation of best practice at farm level. The aim of this study was to use qualitative research methods to explore the values and knowledges of farmers relative to the control of JD at farm level. The Biographical Narrative Interpretive Method (BNIM) was used to generate data from both infected and presumed uninfected farms in Ireland. Qualitative analysis revealed that cultural and social capital informed farmers' decisions on whether to introduce control and preventive measures. Cultural capital refers to the pride and esteem farmers associate with particular objects and actions whereas social capital is the value that farmers associate with social relationships with others. On-farm controls were often evaluated by farmers as impractical and were frequently at odds with farmers' knowledge of calf management. Knowledge from farmers of infected herds did not disseminate among peer farmers. Owners of herds believed to be uninfected expressed a view that controls and preventive measures were not worthy of adoption until there was clear evidence of JD in the herd. These findings highlight important barriers and potential aids to prevention and

  14. [The relevance of the trace elements zinc and iron in the milk fever disease of cattle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilig, M; Bäuml, D; Fürll, M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the concentrations of Zn and Fe as well as their relationships to metabolic parameters in milk fever cows. A total of 195 Simmental cows, downer cows and clinically healthy control animals were divided into five groups: a) control group (CG, n = 21), b) all cows with milk fever (MF) (n = 174), c) MF cows without additional diseases (n = 145), d) cows with MF and mastitis (n = 10) and e) cows with retained placenta or endometritis (n = 19). Selenium (Se), zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), calcium (Ca), inorganic phosphorus (Pi), tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα), haptoglobin (Hp), antioxidants (Trolox Equivalent Antioxidative Capacity: TEAC), non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), bilirubin, urea, creatinine, glucose, cholesterol, gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) were analysed in the blood serum. The concentrations of Zn, Fe, Ca, Pi and TEAC were lower in groups b) to e) whereas Hp was higher than in the CG (p ≤ 0.05). In group c), lower Ca and Pi concentrations were found when compared to groups d) and e) (p ≤ 0.05). In group e), Zn concentrations were significantly lower than in group c) (p ≤ 0.05). Zn was negatively correlated with K (CG) and positively correlated with TEAC, Cu, Mn and Fe (groups b and c) and with Mn (group e) (p ≤ 0.05). Fe was positively correlated with Ca (group c), Pi (group c), K (groups b and c) and Mg (groups b-d) as well as with Zn, Cu and Se (groups b and c) (p ≤ 0.05). In groups b) and c), TNFα was increased and negatively correlated with Fe (p ≤ 0.05). AP activity in groups b) and e) was lower than in the CG (p ≤ 0.05). These results and literature data support the hypothesis that Zn and Fe could be engaged in bone metabolism and be involved in the pathogenesis of MF. The concentrations of Hp and TEAC support this interpretation. Control of the Zn and Fe status of cows and Zn supplementation should be included in the

  15. Biosecurity Adoption on Cattle Farms in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Veronica S. Lestari; Sitti Nurani Sirajuddin; Aslina Asnawi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to know biosecurity adoption on beef cattle farms. This research was conducted for a month at Barru regency, South Sulawesi province, which famous asone of beef cattle breeding villages in Indonesia. Sample was choosed through random sampling. Total sampel was 30 beef cattle farmers. Data were collected through observation and interview. Biosecurity measures consisted of 35 indicators which was grouped into 4 namely: management practice, sanitation, disease and disea...

  16. The bovine model for elucidating the role of γδ T cells in controlling infectious diseases of importance to cattle and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Cynthia L; Telfer, Janice C

    2015-07-01

    There are several instances of co-investigation and related discoveries and achievements in bovine and human immunology; perhaps most interesting is the development of the BCG vaccine, the tuberculin skin test and the more recent interferon-gamma test that were developed first in cattle to prevent and diagnosis bovine tuberculosis and then applied to humans. There are also a number of immune-physiological traits that ruminant share with humans including the development of their immune systems in utero which increases the utility of cattle as a model for human immunology. These are reviewed here with a particular focus on the use of cattle to unravel γδ T cell biology. Based on the sheer number of γδ T cells in this γδ T cell high species, it is reasonable to expect γδ T cells to play an important role in protective immune responses. For that reason alone cattle may provide good models for elucidating at least some of the roles γδ T cells play in protective immunity in all species. This includes fundamental research on γδ T cells as well as the responses of ruminant γδ T cells to a variety of infectious disease situations including to protozoan and bacterial pathogens. The role that pattern recognition receptors (PRR) play in the activation of γδ T cells may be unique relative to αβ T cells. Here we focus on that of the γδ T cell specific family of molecules known as WC1 or T19 in ruminants, which are part of the CD163 scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR) family that includes SCART1 and SCART2 expressed on murine γδ T cells. We review the evidence for WC1 being a PRR as well as an activating co-receptor and the role that γδ T cells bearing these receptors play in immunity to leptospirosis and tuberculosis. This includes the generation of memory responses to vaccines, thereby continuing the tradition of co-discovery between cattle and humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Exploring Attitudes and Beliefs towards Implementing Cattle Disease Prevention and Control Measures: A Qualitative Study with Dairy Farmers in Great Britain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marnie L. Brennan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Disease prevention and control practices are frequently highlighted as important to ensure the health and welfare of farmed animals, although little is known as to why not many practices are carried out. The aim of this study was to identify the motivators and barriers of dairy cattle farmers towards the use of biosecurity measures on dairy farms using a health psychology approach. Twenty-five farmers on 24 farms in Great Britain (GB were interviewed using the Theory of Planned Behaviour framework. Results indicated that farmers perceived they had the ability to control what happened on their farms in terms of preventing and controlling disease, and described benefits from being proactive and vigilant. However, barriers were cited in relation to testing inaccuracies, effectiveness and time-efficiency of practices, and disease transmission route (e.g., airborne transmission. Farmers reported they were positively influenced by veterinarians and negatively influenced by the government (Department for Environment Food & Rural Affairs (DEFRA and the general public. Decisions to implement practices were influenced by the perceived severity of the disease in question, if disease was diagnosed on the farm already, or was occurring on other farms. Farmers described undertaking a form of personal risk assessment when deciding if practices were worth doing, which did not always involve building in disease specific factors or opinions from veterinarians or other advisors. These results indicate that further guidance about the intricacies of control and prevention principles in relation to specific animal diseases may be required, with an obvious role for veterinarians. There appears to be an opportunity for farm advisors and herd health professionals to further understand farmer beliefs behind certain attitudes and target communication and advice accordingly to further enhance dairy cattle health and welfare.

  18. Detection and characterization of viruses as field and vaccine strains in feedlot cattle with bovine respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, R W; d'Offay, J M; Landis, C; Miles, D G; Smith, R A; Saliki, J T; Ridpath, J F; Confer, A W; Neill, J D; Eberle, R; Clement, T J; Chase, C C L; Burge, L J; Payton, M E

    2016-06-24

    This study investigated viruses in bovine respiratory disease (BRD) cases in feedlots, including bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine coronaviruses (BoCV) and parainfluenza-3 virus (PI3V). Nasal swabs were collected from 114 cattle on initial BRD treatment. Processing included modified live virus (MLV) vaccination. Seven BRD necropsy cases were included for 121 total cases. Mean number of days on feed before first sample was 14.9 days. Swabs and tissue homogenates were tested by gel based PCR (G-PCR), quantitative-PCR (qPCR) and quantitative real time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) and viral culture. There were 87/114 (76.3%) swabs positive for at least one virus by at least one test. All necropsy cases were positive for at least one virus. Of 121 cases, positives included 18/121 (14.9%) BoHV-1; 19/121 (15.7%) BVDV; 76/121 (62.8%) BoCV; 11/121 (9.1%) BRSV; and 10/121 (8.3%) PI3V. For nasal swabs, G-PCR (5 viruses) detected 44/114 (38.6%); q-PCR and qRT-PCR (4 viruses) detected 81/114 (71.6%); and virus isolation detected 40/114 (35.1%). Most were positive for only one or two tests, but not all three tests. Necropsy cases had positives: 5/7 G-PCR, 5/7 q-PCR and qRT-PCR, and all were positive by cell culture. In some cases, G-PCR and both real time PCR were negative for BoHV-1, BVDV, and PI3V in samples positive by culture. PCR did not differentiate field from vaccines strains of BoHV-1, BVDV, and PI3V. However based on sequencing and analysis, field and vaccine strains of culture positive BoHV-1, BoCV, BVDV, and PI3V, 11/18 (61.1%) of BoHV-1 isolates, 6/17 (35.3%) BVDV isolates, and 1/10 (10.0%) PI3V identified as vaccine. BRSV was only identified by PCR testing. Interpretation of laboratory tests is appropriate as molecular based tests and virus isolation cannot separate field from vaccine strains. Additional testing using sequencing appears appropriate for identifying vaccine

  19. Rapid Communication: Variance component estimates for Charolais-sired fed cattle and relative economic impact of bovine respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, J W; MacNeil, M D; Raymond, R C; McClain, A R; Van Eenennaam, A L

    2016-12-01

    Variance components were estimated and relative economic importance of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) was derived from 3 yr of performance, morbidity, and mortality data collected from a single beef cattle finishing operation. One thousand one hundred eighty nine of 12,812 Charolais-sired calves were treated for BRD during the finishing period. Weaning weight (WW), DMI, days to harvest (D2H), HCW, yield grade (YG), and marbling score determined by image analysis (MARB) were collected to quantify the economic impact associated with treatment for BRD. Observed means and (co)variances for carcass and production traits were used to simulate populations of 10,000 healthy and 10,000 BRD treated calves. A bio-economic model was developed to derive the economic value associated with the incidence and number of treatments for BRD during the finishing period. Carcasses from healthy calves were worth $58.28 more on average compared to calves treated at least once for BRD. Heritability estimates for BRD were 0.15 when the trait was measured as number of treatments (0 to 4), and 0.14 when measured as incidence (0 or 1). The model indicated that D2H had the lowest relative economic importance in this system, with a cost of $1.91 per head for each additional day on feed. Furthermore, the relative economic value of BRD morbidity was approximately 10.65 greater than D2H when recording the BRD phenotype as the number of BRD treatments. The economic values of HCW, WW, and DMI were 11.47, 5.15, and 3.61 times more important than D2H, respectively. This indicates BRD morbidity has the second greatest relative economic value in this system, with a one percent increase in morbidity associated with an average loss of $2.08 per head. These results indicate that BRD morbidity can have an equal or greater economic importance when compared to carcass and production traits during the finishing period. Further, this indicates the opportunity exists to increase the genetic merit for

  20. Unrecognized circulation of SAT 1 foot-and-mouth disease virus in cattle herds around Queen Elizabeth National Park in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhikusooka, Moses Tefula; Ayebazibwe, Chrisostom; Namatovu, Alice; Belsham, Graham J; Siegismund, Hans Redlef; Wekesa, Sabenzia Nabalayo; Balinda, Sheila Nina; Muwanika, Vincent B; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten

    2016-01-06

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is endemic in Uganda in spite of the control measures used. Various aspects of the maintenance and circulation of FMD viruses (FMDV) in Uganda are not well understood; these include the role of the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) as a reservoir for FMDV. To better understand the epidemiology of FMD at the livestock-wildlife-interface, samples were collected from young, unvaccinated cattle from 24 pastoral herds that closely interact with wildlife around Queen Elizabeth National Park in Uganda, and analysed for evidence of FMDV infection. In total, 37 (15%) of 247 serum samples had detectable antibodies against FMDV non-structural proteins (NSPs) using a pan-serotypic assay. Within these 37 sera, antibody titres ≥ 80 against the structural proteins of serotypes O, SAT 1, SAT 2 and SAT 3 were detected by ELISA in 5, 7, 4 and 3 samples, respectively, while neutralizing antibodies were only detected against serotype O in 3 samples. Two FMDV isolates, with identical VP1 coding sequences, were obtained from probang samples from clinically healthy calves from the same herd and are serotype SAT 1 (topotype IV (EA-I)). Based on the VP1 coding sequences, these viruses are distinct from previous cattle and buffalo SAT 1 FMDV isolates obtained from the same area (19-30% nucleotide difference) and from the vaccine strain (TAN/155/71) used within Uganda (26% nucleotide difference). Eight herds had only one or a few animals with antibodies against FMDV NSPs while six herds had more substantial evidence of prior infection with FMDV. There was no evidence for exposure to FMDV in the other ten herds. The two identical SAT 1 FMDV VP1 sequences are distinct from former buffalo and cattle isolates from the same area, thus, transmission between buffalo and cattle was not demonstrated. These new SAT 1 FMDV isolates differed significantly from the vaccine strain used to control Ugandan FMD outbreaks, indicating a need for vaccine matching studies. Only

  1. Shotgun proteomic analysis of plasma from dairy cattle suffering from footrot: characterization of potential disease-associated factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongbo Sun

    Full Text Available The plasma proteome of healthy dairy cattle and those with footrot was investigated using a shotgun LC-MS/MS approach. In total, 648 proteins were identified in healthy plasma samples, of which 234 were non-redundant proteins and 123 were high-confidence proteins; 712 proteins were identified from footrot plasma samples, of which 272 were non-redundant proteins and 138 were high-confidence proteins. The high-confidence proteins showed significant differences between healthy and footrot plasma samples in molecular weight, isoelectric points and the Gene Ontology categories. 22 proteins were found that may differentiate between the two sets of plasma proteins, of which 16 potential differential expression (PDE proteins from footrot plasma involved in immunoglobulins, innate immune recognition molecules, acute phase proteins, regulatory proteins, and cell adhesion and cytoskeletal proteins; 6 PDE proteins from healthy plasma involved in regulatory proteins, cytoskeletal proteins and coagulation factors. Of these PDE proteins, haptoglobin, SERPINA10 protein, afamin precursor, haptoglobin precursor, apolipoprotein D, predicted peptidoglycan recognition protein L (PGRP-L and keratan sulfate proteoglycan (KS-PG were suggested to be potential footrot-associated factors. The PDE proteins PGRP-L and KS-PG were highlighted as potential biomarkers of footrot in cattle. The resulting protein lists and potential differentially expressed proteins may provide valuable information to increase understanding of plasma protein profiles in cattle and to assist studies of footrot-associated factors.

  2. Genomic dairy cattle breeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Thomas; Sandøe, Peter

    2010-01-01

    , unfavourable genetic trends for metabolic, reproductive, claw and leg diseases indicate that these attempts have been insufficient. Today, novel genome-wide sequencing techniques are revolutionising dairy cattle breeding; these enable genetic changes to occur at least twice as rapidly as previously. While......, a number of potential risks are discussed, including detrimental genetic trends for non-measured welfare traits, the increased chance of spreading unfavourable mutations, reduced sharing of information arising from concerns over patents, and an increased monopoly within dairy cattle breeding that may make...... negative effects on animal welfare and to invest in breeding for increased animal welfare. Researchers are encouraged to further investigate the long-term effects of various breeding schemes that rely on genomic breeding values....

  3. Transcriptomic Analysis of Persistent Infection with Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Cattle Suggests Impairment of Apoptosis and Cell-Mediated Immunity in the Nasopharynx.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Eschbaumer

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the mechanisms of persistent foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV infection in cattle, transcriptome alterations associated with the FMDV carrier state were characterized using a bovine whole-transcriptome microarray. Eighteen cattle (8 vaccinated with a recombinant FMDV A vaccine, 10 non-vaccinated were challenged with FMDV A24 Cruzeiro, and the gene expression profiles of nasopharyngeal tissues collected between 21 and 35 days after challenge were compared between 11 persistently infected carriers and 7 non-carriers. Carriers and non-carriers were further compared to 2 naïve animals that had been neither vaccinated nor challenged. At a controlled false-discovery rate of 10% and a minimum difference in expression of 50%, 648 genes were differentially expressed between FMDV carriers and non-carriers, and most (467 had higher expression in carriers. Among these, genes associated with cellular proliferation and the immune response-such as chemokines, cytokines and genes regulating T and B cells-were significantly overrepresented. Differential gene expression was significantly correlated between non-vaccinated and vaccinated animals (biological correlation +0.97, indicating a similar transcriptome profile across these groups. Genes related to prostaglandin E2 production and the induction of regulatory T cells were overexpressed in carriers. In contrast, tissues from non-carrier animals expressed higher levels of complement regulators and pro-apoptotic genes that could promote virus clearance. Based on these findings, we propose a working hypothesis for FMDV persistence in nasopharyngeal tissues of cattle, in which the virus may be maintained by an impairment of apoptosis and the local suppression of cell-mediated antiviral immunity by inducible regulatory T cells.

  4. Estimation of nasal shedding and seroprevalence of organisms known to be associated with bovine respiratory disease in Australian live export cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S Jo; O'Dea, Mark A; Perkins, Nigel; O'Hara, Amanda J

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of organisms known to be associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) was investigated in cattle prior to export. A quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay was used to detect nucleic acids from the following viruses and bacteria in nasal swab samples: Bovine coronavirus (BoCV; Betacoronavirus 1), Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), Bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (BVDV-1), Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), Bovine parainfluenza virus 3 (BPIV-3), Histophilus somni, Mycoplasma bovis, Mannheimia haemolytica, and Pasteurella multocida. Between 2010 and 2012, nasal swabs were collected from 1,484 apparently healthy cattle destined for export to the Middle East and Russian Federation. In addition, whole blood samples from 334 animals were tested for antibodies to BoHV-1, BRSV, BVDV-1, and BPIV-3 using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The nasal prevalence of BoCV at the individual animal level was 40.1%. The nasal and seroprevalence of BoHV-1, BRSV, BVDV-1, and BPIV-3 was 1.0% and 39%, 1.2% and 46%, 3.0% and 56%, and 1.4% and 87%, respectively. The nasal prevalence of H. somni, M. bovis, M. haemolytica, and P. multocida was 42%, 4.8%, 13.4%, and 26%, respectively. Significant differences in nasal and seroprevalence were detected between groups of animals from different geographical locations. The results of the current study provide baseline data on the prevalence of organisms associated with BRD in Australian live export cattle in the preassembly period. This data could be used to develop strategies for BRD prevention and control prior to loading. © 2014 The Author(s).

  5. Prevalence and Quinolone Susceptibilities of Salmonella Isolated from the Feces of Preharvest Cattle Within Feedlots that Used a Fluoroquinolone to Treat Bovine Respiratory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ashley B; Renter, David G; Cernicchiaro, Natalia; Shi, Xiaorong; Nagaraja, Tiruvoor G

    2016-06-01

    Salmonella is an important foodborne pathogen and antimicrobial resistance can be a human health concern. The objectives of this cross-sectional study were to (1) determine the prevalence and quinolone susceptibility of Salmonella in feces of preharvest commercial feedlot cattle and (2) determine if the prevalence and susceptibility of Salmonella isolates were associated with previous fluoroquinolone use within pens. Five feedlots in western Kansas and Texas were selected based on their use of a commercially licensed fluoroquinolone for initial treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Twenty pen floor fecal samples were collected from each of 10 pens from each feedlot during early summer of 2012. Salmonella isolation was performed and microbroth dilution was used to determine susceptibility of isolates to nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin. Prior antimicrobial treatment data were retrieved from feedlots' operational data. Generalized linear mixed models were used to assess associations between Salmonella prevalence and the number of fluoroquinolone treatments within pens while taking into consideration cattle demographic and management factors, as well as the hierarchical structure of the data. Overall, cumulative fecal prevalence of Salmonella was 38.0% (380/1000), but prevalence varied significantly (p fluoroquinolone treatments within a pen. All Salmonella isolates (n = 380) were susceptible to ciprofloxacin, while one isolate exceeded the human breakpoint (≥32 μg/mL) for nalidixic acid. In conclusion, Salmonella fecal prevalence in preharvest cattle was highly variable among feedlots. Nearly all Salmonella isolates were susceptible to quinolones, despite the fact that a fluoroquinolone was used as the primary therapeutic antimicrobial to treat BRD in these feedlot populations.

  6. Identification and characterization of lumpy skin disease virus isolated from cattle in the Republic of North Ossetia-Alania in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salnikov, N; Usadov, T; Kolcov, A; Zhivoderov, S; Morgunov, Y; Gerasimov, V; Gogin, A; Titov, I; Yurkov, S; Malogolovkin, A; Kolbasov, D; Lunitsyn, A

    2018-01-23

    The first notifications of the unknown disease of cattle appeared in September-October 2015 in North Caucasus region of Russia (Republic of North Ossetia-Alania). The clinical signs included watery discharge from eyes, apathy, loss of appetite, salivation, lameness and nodular skin lesions. Capripoxvirus genome was detected by real-time PCR in the tissue samples of sick animals. The aetiological agent was isolated in the primary cell cultures of lamb testis and goat testis, as well as in the continuous MDBK cell culture. Further sequencing of the GPCR gene and phylogenetic analysis showed the close genetic relationship of isolated capripoxvirus with a group of lumpy skin disease virus. Koch's postulates were fulfilled by the experimental infection of four calves with a suspension of tissue samples from sick animals. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus RNA in pharyngeal epithelium biopsy samples obtained from infected cattle: Investigation of possible sites of virus replication and persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenfeldt, Anna Carolina; Belsham, Graham

    2012-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral infection of significant financial importance to the export and trade of agricultural products. The occurrence of persistently infected ‘‘carriers’’ of FMD-virus (FMDV) in ruminant species adds further complications to disease control....... There have been significant discrepancies in reports regarding the pathogenesis of FMDV infection in cattle with specific emphasis on the anatomical sites involved in early and persistent virus replication. In this study, collection of small biopsy samples from the dorsal soft palate (DSP) of live animals...... was used to investigate the level of FMDV RNA present at this site at sequential time points during the infection. Results were compared to measurements of virus excretion in samples of oropharyngeal fluid collected at corresponding time points. Possible sites of virus persistence were investigated through...

  8. Analysis of the acute phase responses of Serum Amyloid A, Haptoglobin and Type 1 Interferon in cattle experimentally infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenfeldt, Carolina; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Stockmarr, Anders

    2011-01-01

    A series of challenge experiments were performed in order to investigate the acute phase responses to foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection in cattle and possible implications for the development of persistently infected "carriers". The host response to infection was investigated through...... periods exceeding 28 days in order to determine the carrier-status of individual animals. The systemic host response to FMDV in infected animals was evaluated in comparison to similar measurements in sera from 6 mock-inoculated control animals.There was a significant increase in serum concentrations...... of both APPs and type 1 IFN in infected animals coinciding with the onset of viremia and clinical disease. The measured parameters declined to baseline levels within 21 days after inoculation, indicating that there was no systemically measurable inflammatory reaction related to the carrier state of FMD...

  9. Persistent Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Infection in the Nasopharynx of Cattle; Tissue-Specific Distribution and Local Cytokine Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M Pacheco

    Full Text Available Tissues obtained post-mortem from cattle persistently infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV were analyzed to characterize the tissue-specific localization of FMDV and partial transcriptome profiles for selected immunoregulatory cytokines. Analysis of 28 distinct anatomic sites from 21 steers infected with FMDV serotype A, O or SAT2, had the highest prevalence of overall viral detection in the dorsal nasopharynx (80.95% and dorsal soft palate (71.43%. FMDV was less frequently detected in laryngeal mucosal tissues, oropharyngeal mucosal sites, and lymph nodes draining the pharynx. Immunomicroscopy indicated that within persistently infected mucosal tissues, FMDV antigens were rarely detectable within few epithelial cells in regions of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT. Transcriptome analysis of persistently infected pharyngeal tissues by qRT-PCR for 14 cytokine genes indicated a general trend of decreased mRNA levels compared to uninfected control animals. Although, statistically significant differences were not observed, greatest suppression of relative expression (RE was identified for IP-10 (RE = 0.198, IFN-β (RE = 0.269, IL-12 (RE = 0.275, and IL-2 (RE = 0.312. Increased relative expression was detected for IL-6 (RE = 2.065. Overall, this data demonstrates that during the FMDV carrier state in cattle, viral persistence is associated with epithelial cells of the nasopharynx in the upper respiratory tract and decreased levels of mRNA for several immunoregulatory cytokines in the infected tissues.

  10. Doenças de bovinos no Sul do Brasil: 6.706 casos Diseases of cattle in southern Brazil: 6.706 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo B. Lucena

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available As doenças que acometem bovinos na região Sul do Brasil foram analisadas através de um estudo dos protocolos de necropsia de 6.706 bovinos examinados pelo Laboratório de Patologia Veterinária da Universidade Federal de Santa (LPV-UFSM, Rio Grande do Sul, de 1964-2008. Desses, 20,9% foram necropsias realizadas no LPV-UFSM e 79,1% foram amostras de tecidos submetidos por veterinários de campo. Dos 6.706 exames, 62,9% tinham diagnóstico conclusivo. A autólise ou material insuficiente foram as principais razões para a ocorrência de casos com diagnóstico inconclusivo. A intoxicação por Senecio spp. foi a principal causa de morte de bovinos neste estudo. As plantas tóxicas e as toxiinfecções juntas, responderam por 22,8% dos casos com diagnóstico conclusivo. As doenças inflamatórias e as parasitoses juntas contribuíram com mais de 30% das doenças de bovinos e a tristeza parasitária bovina foi a principal doença nessa categoria. As demais categorias distribuíram-se na seguinte ordem: neoplasmas e lesões tumoriformes (13,87%, doenças causadas por agentes físicos (2,7%, doenças metabólicas e nutricionais (2,46%, distúrbios circulatórios (1,4%, doenças degenerativas (1,1%, distúrbios do desenvolvimento (0,54%, distúrbios iatrogênicos (0,16%, distúrbios imunogênicos (0,19% e, outros distúrbios (0,21%. A alta prevalência de tumores em bovinos foi atribuída a ingestão crônica de Pteridium aquilinum, uma toxicose comum na região. As principais doenças de bovinos na região estudada estão relacionadas a fatores ambientais resultante do manejo característico de criação predominantemente extensiva adotado na região.The diseases affecting cattle in southern Brazil were studied through a review of the necropsy reports filed at the Laboratório de Patologia Veterinária of the Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (LPV-UFSM, Rio Grande do Sul, and pertaining to the examination of 6.076 cattle during 1964-2008. Of those

  11. Metagenomic characterization of the virome associated with bovine respiratory disease in feedlot cattle identified novel viruses and suggests an etiologic role for influenza D virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Namita; Cernicchiaro, Natalia; Torres, Siddartha; Li, Feng; Hause, Ben M

    2016-08-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the most costly disease affecting the cattle industry. The pathogenesis of BRD is complex and includes contributions from microbial pathogens as well as host, environmental and animal management factors. In this study, we utilized viral metagenomic sequencing to explore the virome of nasal swab samples obtained from feedlot cattle with acute BRD and asymptomatic pen-mates at six and four feedlots in Mexico and the USA, respectively, in April-October 2015. Twenty-one viruses were detected, with bovine rhinitis A (52.7 %) and B (23.7 %) virus, and bovine coronavirus (24.7 %) being the most commonly identified. The emerging influenza D virus (IDV) tended to be significantly associated (P=0.134; odds ratio=2.94) with disease, whereas viruses commonly associated with BRD such as bovine viral diarrhea virus, bovine herpesvirus 1, bovine respiratory syncytial virus and bovine parainfluenza 3 virus were detected less frequently. The detection of IDV was further confirmed using a real-time PCR assay. Nasal swabs from symptomatic animals had significantly more IDV RNA than those collected from healthy animals (P=0.04). In addition to known viruses, new genotypes of bovine rhinitis B virus and enterovirus E were identified and a newly proposed species of bocaparvovirus, Ungulate bocaparvovirus 6, was characterized. Ungulate tetraparvovirus 1 was also detected for the first time in North America to our knowledge. These results illustrate the complexity of the virome associated with BRD and highlight the need for further research into the contribution of other viruses to BRD pathogenesis.

  12. Dermatophilus congolensis infection in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, R F

    1986-06-01

    The history, appearance and clinical course of a low incidence, chronic skin disease in beef cattle is reported. Calves were affected from 3 months of age and the condition persisted into adulthood. The infection was caused by Dermatophilus congolensis and resulted in severe crusting of the skin. Sheep were kept on the farm until 4 years ago. The method of diagnosis is discussed.

  13. The association between calfhood bovine respiratory disease complex and subsequent departure from the herd, milk production, and reproduction in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Aaron P; Larson, Robert L; Cernicchiaro, Natalia; Hanzlicek, Gregg A; Bartle, Steven J; Thomson, Daniel U

    2016-05-15

    OBJECTIVE To describe the frequency of calfhood producer-identified bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) in Holstein replacement heifers on 1 large farm and determine associations between development of BRDC at ≤ 120 days of age (BRDC120) with milk production estimate, calving interval, and risk of departure from the herd (DFH). DESIGN Retrospective, observational study. ANIMALS 14,024 Holstein heifer calves born on 1 farm. PROCEDURES Data were obtained from herd management records. Cox proportional hazard and generalized linear mixed-effects models were used to assess associations for variables of interest (BRDC120 status, demographic data, and management factors) with DFH, milk production estimate, and calving interval. RESULTS Except for the year 2007, animals identified as having BRDC120 were 1.62 to 4.98 times as likely to leave the herd before first calving, compared with those that did not have this designation. Calves identified as having BRDC prior to weaning were 2.62 times as likely to have DFH before first calving as those classified as developing BRDC after weaning. Cows identified as having BRDC120 were 1.28 times as likely to have DFH between the first and second calving as were other cows. The BRDC120 designation was associated with a 233-kg (513-lb) lower 305-day mature equivalent value for first lactation milk production, but was not associated with longer or shorter calving intervals at maturity. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Dairy cattle identified as having BRDC120 had increased risk of DFH before the first or second calving and lower first-lactation milk production estimates, compared with results for cattle without this finding. Further investigation of these associations is warranted.

  14. Characterization of foot-and-mouth disease viruses (FMDVs) from Ugandan cattle outbreaks during 2012-2013: evidence for circulation of multiple serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namatovu, Alice; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Belsham, Graham J; Dhikusooka, Moses T; Wekesa, Sabenzia N; Muwanika, Vincent B; Siegismund, Hans R; Ayebazibwe, Chrisostom

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotypes circulating in Uganda's cattle population, both serological and virological analyses of samples from outbreaks that occurred during 2012-2013 were performed. Altogether, 79 sera and 60 oropharyngeal fluid (OP)/tissue/oral swab samples were collected from herds with reported FMD outbreaks in seven different Ugandan districts. Overall, 61/79 (77%) of the cattle sera were positive for antibodies against FMDV by PrioCHECK FMDV NS ELISA and solid phase blocking ELISA detected titres ≥ 80 for serotypes O, SAT 1, SAT 2 and SAT 3 in 41, 45, 30 and 45 of these 61 seropositive samples, respectively. Virus neutralisation tests detected the highest levels of neutralising antibodies (titres ≥ 45) against serotype O in the herds from Kween and Rakai districts, against SAT 1 in the herd from Nwoya district and against SAT 2 in the herds from Kiruhura, Isingiro and Ntungamo districts. The isolation of a SAT 2 FMDV from Isingiro was consistent with the detection of high levels of neutralising antibodies against SAT 2; sequencing (for the VP1 coding region) indicated that this virus belonged to lineage I within this serotype, like the currently used vaccine strain. From the Wakiso district 11 tissue/swab samples were collected; serotype A FMDV, genotype Africa (G-I), was isolated from the epithelial samples. This study shows that within a period of less than one year, FMD outbreaks in Uganda were caused by four different serotypes namely O, A, SAT 1 and SAT 2. Therefore, to enhance the control of FMD in Uganda, there is need for efficient and timely determination of outbreak virus strains/serotypes and vaccine matching. The value of incorporating serotype A antigen into the imported vaccines along with the current serotype O, SAT 1 and SAT 2 strains should be considered.

  15. Effect Of Gamma Ray Irradiation On Streptococcus Agalactiae Growth For Vaccine Agent Of Mastitis Disease In Dairy Cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeane Tuasikal, B; Sugoro, I; Tjiptosumirat, T; Lina, M

    2003-01-01

    A study has been conducted to determine the effect of gamma ray irradiation to attenuate infectivity of S. agalactiae as dominant bacteria causing mastitis in dairy cattle. The aim of the study is obtaining optimum irradiation dosage to provide radio vaccine for mastitis. S. agalactiae isolate bacteria of which has reach the mid log-phase was cultured and divided into 6 treatment groups of irradiation doses, i.e. 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 kGy. Following irradiation, bacteria were then cultured in BHI agar media for colony counting to determine the LD 50 , resulting 7.5x10 8 ; 5.0x10 7 ; 7.0x10 6 ; 9.5x10 5 ; 1.5x10 4 ; and 3.5x10 3 cell/ml, respectively. Result of this study shows the higher irradiation doses the lower number of bacteria per ml, and LD 50 , which found to be under 0.2 kGy of irradiation dose

  16. The Agersoe cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Withen, K.B.; Brüniche-Olsen, A.; Pedersen, Bo Vest

    2011-01-01

    A phenotypically interesting strain of cattle existed on the small island of Agersoe, on the west coast of Zealand, Denmark, in the beginning of the last decade. The cattle share a great resemblance to the extinct Danish breed, the Island cattle. The objective of this study was to genetically cha...

  17. Breeds of cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buchanan, David S.; Lenstra, Johannes A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067852335

    2015-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview on the different breeds of cattle (Bos taurus and B. indicus). Cattle breeds are presented and categorized according to utility and mode of origin. Classification and phylogeny of breeds are also discussed. Furthermore, a description of cattle breeds is provided.

  18. Doenças do sistema nervoso de bovinos no semiárido nordestino Diseases of the nervous system of cattle in the semiarid of Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glauco J.N. Galiza

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Para determinar as doenças que ocorrem no sistema nervoso de bovinos no semiárido nordestino, foi realizado um estudo retrospectivo em 411 necropsias de bovinos realizadas no Hospital Veterinário da Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Patos, Paraíba, entre janeiro de 2000 a dezembro de 2008. Dos 411 casos analisados 139 (33,81% apresentaram alterações clínicas do sistema nervoso e as fichas foram revisadas para determinar os principais achados referentes à epidemiologia, aos sinais clínicos e às alterações macroscópicas e microscópicas. Em 28 (20,14% casos o diagnóstico foi inconclusivo. As principais enfermidades foram raiva (48,7% dos casos com sinais nervosos, abscessos cerebrais (7,2% incluindo três casos de abscesso da pituitária, febre catarral maligna (6,3%, botulismo (6,3%, alterações congênitas (4,5%, traumatismo (4,5%, tuberculose (2,7%, tétano (2,7%, infecção por herpesvírus bovino-5 (2,7%, encefalomielite não supurativa (2,7%, intoxicação por Prosopis juliflora (2,7%, status spongiosus congênito de causa desconhecida (1,8% e polioencefalomalacia (1,8%. Outras doenças diagnosticadas numa única oportunidade (0,9% foram criptococose, listeriose, encefalite tromboembólica, linfossarcoma, tripanossomíase e babesiose por Babesia bovis.Diseases of the nervous system of cattle in the semiarid region of northeastern Brazil were evaluated by a retrospective study of 411 cattle necropsies performed in the Veterinary Hospital of the Federal University of Campina Grande, Patos, Paraíba, from January 2000 to December 2008. Of the 411 cases analyzed, 139 (33.81% were from cattle that presented nervous signs and the records were reviewed to determine the epidemiological, clinical, and macroscopic and histologic main features. Diagnosis was inconclusive in 28 cases (20.14%. In cases with diagnosis the main diseases were rabies (48.7% of the cases with nervous signs, brain abscesses (7.2% including three cases of

  19. Comparison of single vaccination versus revaccination with a modified-live virus vaccine containing bovine herpesvirus-1, bovine viral diarrhea virus (types 1a and 2a), parainfluenza type 3 virus, and bovine respiratory syncytial virus in the prevention of bovine respiratory disease in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Step, Douglas L; Krehbiel, Clinton R; Burciaga-Robles, Luis O; Holland, Ben P; Fulton, Robert W; Confer, Anthony W; Bechtol, David T; Brister, David L; Hutcheson, John P; Newcomb, Harold L

    2009-09-01

    Objective-To compare effects of administration of a modified-live respiratory virus vaccine once with administration of the same vaccine twice on the health and performance of cattle. Design-Randomized, controlled trial. Animals-612 mixed-breed male cattle with unknown health histories. Procedures-Cattle were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups (single vaccination treatment group [SVAC group] vs revaccination treatment group [REVAC group]) during the preconditioning phase of production. All cattle were given a modified-live respiratory virus vaccine. Eleven days later, REVAC group cattle received a second injection of the same vaccine. During the finishing phase of production, cattle from each treatment group were either vaccinated a third time with the modified-live respiratory virus vaccine or given no vaccine. Health observations were performed daily. Blood and performance variables were measured throughout the experiment. Results-During preconditioning, no significant differences were observed in performance or antibody production between groups. Morbidity rate from bovine respiratory disease was lower for SVAC group cattle; however, days to first treatment for bovine respiratory disease were not different between groups. No significant differences in body weights, daily gains, or dry-matter intake between groups were observed during the finishing phase. Revaccination treatment group cattle had improved feed efficiency regardless of vaccination protocol in the finishing phase. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Vaccination once with a modified-live respiratory virus vaccine was as efficacious as vaccination twice in the prevention of bovine respiratory disease of high-risk cattle, although feed efficiency was improved in REVAC group cattle during the finishing period.

  20. Foot-and-mouth disease virus-associated abortion and vertical transmission following acute infection in cattle under natural conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious and economically important viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals, including domestic as well as more than 70 wild host species. During recent FMD outbreaks in India, spontaneous abortions were reported amongst FMD-affected and asymptomatic cows. T...

  1. Histophilus somni IbpA Fic cytotoxin is conserved in disease strains and most carrier strains from cattle, sheep and bison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekarias, B; O'Toole, D; Lehmann, J; Corbeil, L B

    2011-04-21

    Histophilus somni causes bovine pneumonia, septicemia, myocarditis, thrombotic meningoencephalitis and arthritis, as well as a genital or upper respiratory carrier state in normal animals. However, differences in virulence factors among strains are not well studied. The surface and secreted immunoglobulin binding protein A (IbpA) Fic motif of H. somni causes bovine alveolar type 2 (BAT2) cells to retract, allowing virulent bacteria to cross the alveolar monolayer. Because H. somni IbpA is an important virulence factor, its presence was evaluated in different strains from cattle, sheep and bison to define whether there are syndrome specific markers and whether antigenic/molecular/functional conservation occurs. A few preputial carrier strains lacked IbpA by Western blotting but all other tested disease or carrier strains were IbpA positive. These positive strains had either both IbpA DR1/Fic and IbpA DR2/Fic or only IbpA DR2/Fic by PCR. IbpA Fic mediated cytotoxicity for BAT2 cells and sequence analysis of IbpA DR2/Fic from selected strains revealed conservation of sequence and function in disease and IbpA positive carrier strains. Passive protection of mice against H. somni septicemia with antibody to IbpA DR2/Fic, along with previous data, indicates that the IbpA DR1/Fic and/or DR2/Fic domains are candidate vaccine antigens for protection against many strains of H. somni. Since IbpA DR2/Fic is conserved in most carrier strains, they may be virulent if introduced to susceptible animals at susceptible sites. Conservation of the protective IbpA antigen in all disease isolates tested is encouraging for development of protective vaccines and diagnostic assays. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Major diseases, extensive misuse, and high antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli in large- and small-scale dairy cattle farms in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaidat, Mohammad M; Bani Salman, Alaa E; Davis, Margaret A; Roess, Amira A

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the major diseases, antimicrobial use, and resistance in commensal Escherichia coli in dairy cattle in Jordan. Forty-three (large, n = 21; small, n = 22) farms were surveyed. A validated questionnaire was administered to the herdsmen to elicit information about disease prevalence, antimicrobial knowledge, and antimicrobial use. In addition, fecal samples were collected from 5 lactating animals on each farm. A total of 520 E. coli isolates were tested for resistance to 12 antimicrobials. From the herdsmen's perspective, the diseases that require use of veterinary services in large and small production systems were mastitis (51.2%), metritis (51.2%), and enteritis (39.5%), and the most commonly used antimicrobials were oxytetracycline and streptomycin. Dairy herdsmen (83.7%) reported that it is easy to purchase antimicrobials without a veterinary prescription and 97.7% of them more frequently changed the antimicrobial drug rather than increasing the dose when presented with nonresponse to treatment. Escherichia coli isolates exhibited high resistance to streptomycin (47.5%), tetracycline (45.4%), and ampicillin (34.2%). Less than 10% of isolates were resistant to chloramphenicol, kanamycin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, and ceftriaxone. Overall, 64.6 and 37.1% of the E. coli isolates exhibited resistance to ≥1 antimicrobial and multidrug resistance (resistance to ≥3 antimicrobial classes), respectively. The isolates exhibited 107 antimicrobial resistance profiles. This study indicates that antimicrobials are frequently misused in dairies in Jordan and that resistance among commensal E. coli toward antimicrobials of human and veterinary importance is high. Therefore, educational programs for herdsmen and enacting regulations and guidelines are necessary to promote the judicious use of antimicrobials in dairy animals in Jordan. Copyright © 2018 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A Smartphone-Based Application Improves the Accuracy, Completeness, and Timeliness of Cattle Disease Reporting and Surveillance in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariku Jibat Beyene

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate disease reporting, ideally in near real time, is a prerequisite to detecting disease outbreaks and implementing appropriate measures for their control. This study compared the performance of the traditional paper-based approach to animal disease reporting in Ethiopia to one using an application running on smartphones. In the traditional approach, the total number of cases for each disease or syndrome was aggregated by animal species and reported to each administrative level at monthly intervals; while in the case of the smartphone application demographic information, a detailed list of presenting signs, in addition to the putative disease diagnosis were immediately available to all administrative levels via a Cloud-based server. While the smartphone-based approach resulted in much more timely reporting, there were delays due to limited connectivity; these ranged on average from 2 days (in well-connected areas up to 13 days (in more rural locations. We outline the challenges that would likely be associated with any widespread rollout of a smartphone-based approach such as the one described in this study but demonstrate that in the long run the approach offers significant benefits in terms of timeliness of disease reporting, improved data integrity and greatly improved animal disease surveillance.

  4. Changes in retinal function and morphology are early clinical signs of disease in cattle with bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Heather West Greenlee

    Full Text Available Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE belongs to a group of fatal, transmissible protein misfolding diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs. All TSEs are caused by accumulation of misfolded prion protein (PrPSc throughout the central nervous system (CNS, which results in neuronal loss and ultimately death. Like other protein misfolding diseases including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, TSEs are generally not diagnosed until the onset of disease after the appearance of unequivocal clinical signs. As such, identification of the earliest clinical signs of disease may facilitate diagnosis. The retina is the most accessible part of the central nervous system, and retinal pathology in TSE affected animals has been previously reported. Here we describe antemortem changes in retinal function and morphology that are detectable in BSE inoculated animals several months (up to 11 months prior to the appearance of any other signs of clinical disease. We also demonstrate that differences in the severity of these clinical signs reflect the amount of PrPSc accumulation in the retina and the resulting inflammatory response of the tissue. These results are the earliest reported clinical signs associated with TSE infection and provide a basis for understanding the pathology and evaluating therapeutic interventions.

  5. Diet and fertility in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrujkić Tihomir

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The diet of high-yield dairy cows process a very complex and acute problem. Much new knowledge in the area of production and preparation of feedstuffs, diet technology, and the interactions that occur between the components of the nutritive feed ration are required in order to resolve this problem. It is necessary constantly to coordinate feed norms with genetic potential which is ever changing and advanced. The observed problems must be resolved using multidisciplinary methods so that a diet can yield good health, and that health contribute to better reproduction and possibilities for more successful breeding and improved performance in cattle farming. In certain countries, thanks to their geographic position and climatic conditions which allow rainfall throughout the year, a natural green diet can be applied, which provides large numbers of green mass components, and with additives which can be supplemented relatively easily. This type of diet is not possible in our farms. It is very important to know which feedstuff components are laking for certain categories of cattle. The used ration must be constant and administered to animals of certain age or production characteristics in order to improve production results at cattle farms. A great problem occurs when diet is reduced due to dried grass and the resulting stress in animals. A 50% diet reduction in young cattle often results in the occurrence of respiratory diseases. Following 10-14 days of treatment, the disease disappears in young animals, but the energy deficit leads to the weakening (depression of the immune system. Even a so-called high-energy diet often causes respiratory diseases. A diet deficient in proteins also affects cows after lactation, as opposed to a normative diet, and a reduced protein diet disturbs the microbial activity in the rumen and the synthesis of compounds which are important for both the cow and the calf, making room for the incidence of metabolic diseases, most

  6. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of gamithromycin in pulmonary epithelial lining fluid in naturally occurring bovine respiratory disease in multisource commingled feedlot cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeDonder, K D; Apley, M D; Li, M; Gehring, R; Harhay, D M; Lubbers, B V; White, B J; Capik, S F; KuKanich, B; Riviere, J E; Tessman, R K

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine (i) whether an association exists between individual pharmacokinetic parameters and treatment outcome when feeder cattle were diagnosed with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and treated with gamithromycin (Zactran(®) ) at the label dose and (ii) whether there was a stronger association between treatment outcome and gamithromycin concentration in plasma or in the pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (PELF) effect compartment. The study design was a prospective, blinded, randomized clinical trial utilizing three groups of 60 (362-592 lb) steers/bulls randomly allocated within origin to sham injection or gamithromycin mass medication. Cattle were evaluated daily for signs of BRD by a veterinarian blinded to treatment. Animals meeting the BRD case definition were enrolled and allocated to a sample collection scheme consisting of samples for bacterial isolation (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and nasopharyngeal swabs) and gamithromycin concentration determination (PELF and plasma). Gamithromycin susceptibility of M. haemolytica (n = 287) and P. multocida (n = 257) were determined using broth microdilution with frozen panels containing gamithromycin at concentrations from 0.03 to 16 μg/mL. A two-compartment plasma pharmacokinetic model with an additional compartment for gamithromycin in PELF was developed using rich data sets from published and unpublished studies. The sparse data from our study were then fit to this model using nonlinear mixed effects modeling to estimate individual parameter values. The resulting parameter estimates were used to simulate full time-concentration profiles for each animal in this study. These profiles were analyzed using noncompartmental methods so that PK/PD indices (AUC24 /MIC, AUC∞ /MIC, CMAX /MIC) could be calculated for plasma and PELF (also T>MIC) for each individual. The calculated PK/PD indices were indicative that for both M. haemolytica and P. multocida a higher drug

  7. Rescue of foot-and-mouth disease viruses that are pathogenic for cattle from preserved viral RNA samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belsham, Graham; Jamal, Syed Muhammad; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    replication. Principal Findings: A system has been developed to rescue infectious FMDV from RNA preparations generated from clinical samples obtained under experimental conditions and then applied to samples collected in the ‘‘field’’. Clinical samples from suspect cases of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) were...

  8. Field study on the use of vaccination to control the occurrence of lumpy skin disease in Ethiopian cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molla, Wassie; Frankena, Klaas; Gari, Getachew; Jong, de Mart C.M.

    2017-01-01

    The current study was carried out in central and North-western parts of Ethiopia to assess the efficacy of Kenyan sheep pox virus strain vaccine (KS1 O-180) against natural lumpy skin disease (LSD) infection under field conditions by estimating its effect on the transmission and severity of the

  9. Temporal characterisation of the network of Danish cattle movements and its implication for disease control: 2000–2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mweu, Marshal M.; Fournié, Guillaume; Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq

    2013-01-01

    -world properties in March–April 2001 as well as in 24 other months during the period October 2006 to December 2009. The network was sparsely connected with markets being the key influential holdings. Its vulnerability to removal of markets suggests that targeting highly connected holdings during epidemics should......Social network analysis provides a valuable framework for understanding the dynamics of diseases on networks as well as a means for defining effective control measures. An understanding of the underlying contact pattern for a susceptible population is advisable before embarking on any strategy...

  10. The performance of the Nguni, Afrikander and Bonsmara cattle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    Among the characteristics attributed to indigenous African cattle, especially the zebus and their derivatives are tolerance to climatic stresses, especially to heat, genetic adaptation to poor quality forages and resistance to pest and diseases. As a result of natural selection, indigenous cattle (Sanga breeds) which evolved in.

  11. Effects of Vegetation Microclimate on Larval Cattle Fever Tick Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattle Fever Ticks (CFT), Rhipicephalus annulatus and R. microplus, have been a threat to the livestock industry for many years. These ticks are vectors of cattle fever, a disease produced by the hemoparasite Babesia bovis and B. bigemina. Laboratory research on CFT larval survival has shown that co...

  12. Current prevalence of cattle trypanosomiasis and of its vector in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Livestock diseases especially cattle trypanosomiasis remains a challenge and a call for concern. A Cross sectional study was carried out on the entomological and parasitological prevalence of cattle trypanosomiasis, in the tsetse fly infested zone-Alme in Faro and Deo division, Adamaoua region Cameroon. The aim of this ...

  13. A live vaccine against Neospora caninum abortions in cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. caninum has emerged as a major cause of abortion in dairy and beef cattle and it is estimated to be responsible for losses in excess of a billion dollars annually, in cattle industries worldwide. Yet, after more than 25 years of research on this parasite, the control options for this disease appe...

  14. Recumbence syndrome around calving in cattle: A Study of Risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A recumbency syndrome around calving in cattle was reported in Dar es salaam during the dry season and was thought to be associated with milk fever a disease common in high producing mature dairy cattle and is related to age, dry cow nutrition and general management. This study was conducted to establish the length ...

  15. [Treatment of acute respiratory tract diseases in cattle with Bisolvon in combination with either enrofloxacin, cefquinome, ceftiofur or florfenicol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, H; Philipp, H; Hamel, U; Quirke, J F

    1998-05-01

    The purpose of the present clinical studies was to determine the clinical efficacy of a combined parenteral and oral treatment with Bisolvon in combination with antibiotics in bovines suffering from acute respiratory disease. To this end four trials were conducted in respiratory diseased bovines; a total of 619 animals were evaluated. The animals were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups within each study and were treated either with enrofloxacin, cefquinome, ceftiofur or florfenicol. The Bisolvon group was additionally treated with Bisolvon over 5 consecutive days. Daily clinical examinations were carried out over a period of 6 days. The clinical respiratory score, the primary parameter, representing a summation of the scoring points for the parameters respiratory rate, nasal discharge, spontaneous coughing, lung sounds and grade of dyspnoea and the clinical index score, which additionally included the general parameters fever, demeanour and feed intake, were significantly lower in the Bisolvon groups compared to the controls at all examinations after initiation of therapy in all trials with the exception of day 2 in one study. Lower values correspond to a less severe clinical condition. This consistent result as well as the evaluation of the single parameters are indicative of an acceleration of the recovery of the animals additionally treated with Bisolvon.

  16. The B Cell Response to Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Cattle following Sequential Vaccination with Multiple Serotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, B. Veronica; Kotecha, Abhay; van den Born, Erwin; Stuart, David I.; Hammond, John A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is a highly contagious viral disease. Antibodies are pivotal in providing protection against FMDV infection. Serological protection against one FMDV serotype does not confer interserotype protection. However, some historical data have shown that interserotype protection can be induced following sequential FMDV challenge with multiple FMDV serotypes. In this study, we have investigated the kinetics of the FMDV-specific antibody-secreting cell (ASC) response following homologous and heterologous inactivated FMDV vaccination regimes. We have demonstrated that the kinetics of the B cell response are similar for all four FMDV serotypes tested following a homologous FMDV vaccination regime. When a heterologous vaccination regime was used with the sequential inoculation of three different inactivated FMDV serotypes (O, A, and Asia1 serotypes) a B cell response to FMDV SAT1 and serotype C was induced. The studies also revealed that the local lymphoid tissue had detectable FMDV-specific ASCs in the absence of circulating FMDV-specific ASCs, indicating the presence of short-lived ASCs, a hallmark of a T-independent 2 (TI-2) antigenic response to inactivated FMDV capsid. IMPORTANCE We have demonstrated the development of intraserotype response following a sequential vaccination regime of four different FMDV serotypes. We have found indication of short-lived ASCs in the local lymphoid tissue, further evidence of a TI-2 response to FMDV. PMID:28228594

  17. 78 FR 44521 - Environmental Impact Statement; Proposed Cattle Fever Tick Control Barrier in South Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ...'') carry protozoan parasites that cause babesiosis. The disease and the cattle fever ticks were officially...] Environmental Impact Statement; Proposed Cattle Fever Tick Control Barrier in South Texas AGENCY: Animal and... result from installing game fencing as a barrier to keep animals that carry cattle fever ticks and...

  18. Vaccination of cattle only is sufficient to stop FMDV transmission in mixed populations of sheep and cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bravo De Rueda, C.; Dekker, A.; Eblé, P.L.; Jong, de M.

    2015-01-01

    We quantified the transmission of foot-and-mouth disease virus in mixed cattle-sheep populations and the effect of different vaccination strategies. The (partial) reproduction ratios (R) in groups of non-vaccinated and vaccinated cattle and/or sheep were estimated from (published) transmission

  19. Devising an indicator to detect mid-term abortions in dairy cattle: a first step towards syndromic surveillance of abortive diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Bronner

    Full Text Available Bovine abortion surveillance is essential for human and animal health because it plays an important role in the early warning of several diseases. Due to the limited sensitivity of traditional surveillance systems, there is a growing interest for the development of syndromic surveillance. Our objective was to assess whether, routinely collected, artificial insemination (AI data could be used, as part of a syndromic surveillance system, to devise an indicator of mid-term abortions in dairy cattle herds in France. A mid-term abortion incidence rate (MAIR was computed as the ratio of the number of mid-term abortions to the number of female-weeks at risk. A mid-term abortion was defined as a return-to-service (i.e., a new AI taking place 90 to 180 days after the previous AI. Weekly variations in the MAIR in heifers and parous cows were modeled with a time-dependent Poisson model at the département level (French administrative division during the period of 2004 to 2010. The usefulness of monitoring this indicator to detect a disease-related increase in mid-term abortions was evaluated using data from the 2007-2008 episode of bluetongue serotype 8 (BT8 in France. An increase in the MAIR was identified in heifers and parous cows in 47% (n = 24 and 71% (n = 39 of the departements. On average, the weekly MAIR among heifers increased by 3.8% (min-max: 0.02-57.9% when the mean number of BT8 cases that occurred in the previous 8 to 13 weeks increased by one. The weekly MAIR among parous cows increased by 1.4% (0.01-8.5% when the mean number of BT8 cases occurring in the previous 6 to 12 weeks increased by one. These results underline the potential of the MAIR to identify an increase in mid-term abortions and suggest that it is a good candidate for the implementation of a syndromic surveillance system for bovine abortions.

  20. Evaluation of a quadrivalent inactivated vaccine for the protection of cattle against diseases due to common viral infections : research report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Patel

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Efficacy of an inactivated quadrivalent vaccine containing infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR virus, parainfluenza type 3 (PI3 virus, bovine virus diarrhoea virus (BVDV and bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV was assessed in naive bovine calves to evaluate short-term (4-18 weeks and long-term (24-38 weeks protection following the basic intramuscular vaccination regime of 2 inoculations a month apart. Vaccination was staggered between the long-term and the short-term groups by about 5 months so that both groups, along with a matched group of 6 unvaccinated (control calves, could be challenged at the same time. Sequential challenges at intervals of 3-8 weeks were done in the order: IBR virus (intranasally, IN, PI3 virus (IN and intratracheally, IT, pestiviruses (IN and BRSV (IN and IT. The IBR virus challenge produced febrile rhinotracheitis (FRT in control calves but both the severity and the duration of FRT was significantly reduced in both vaccinated groups. The amount and the duration of IBR virus shed by the vaccinated groups was significantly reduced compared to the control group. Although PI3 virus, pooled pestivirus and BRSV challenges did not result in a noteworthy disease, challenge virus shedding (amount and duration from the upper (all 3 viruses and the lower (BRSV respiratory tracts was significantly reduced in vaccinated groups. After pestivirus challenge, sera and leukocytes from all control calves were infectious for 6-9 days whereas virus was recovered only from leukocytes in vaccinated calves and only for 1.6-2.7 days. Thus a standard course of the quadrivalent vaccine afforded a significant protection against IBR virus, PI3 virus, BVDV and BRSV for at least 6 months.

  1. Mastitis associated transcriptomic disruptions in cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastitis is ranked as the top disease for dairy cattle based on traditional cost analysis. Greater than 100 organisms from a broad phylogenetic spectrum are able to cause bovine mastitis. Transcriptomic characterization facilitates our understanding of host-pathogen relations and provides mechanisti...

  2. Cattle tick vaccine researchers join forces in CATVAC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schetters, T.P.; Bishop, R.; Crampton, M.; Kopáček, Petr; Lew-Tabor, A.; Maritz-Olivier, C.; Miller, R.; Mosqueda, J.; Patarroyo, J.; Rodriguez-Valle, M.; Scoles, G.A.; de la Fuente, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, FEB 24 (2016), s. 105 ISSN 1756-3305 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : CATVAC * vaccine * cattle * tick * Rhipicephalus microplus Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 3.080, year: 2016

  3. Targeting cattle-borne zoonoses and cattle pathogens using a novel trypanosomatid-based delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, G Adam; Wilson, Raymond; Fernando, Anuruddika; Robinson, Ailie; MacGregor, Paula; Kennedy, David; Schaap, Dick; Matthews, Jacqueline B; Matthews, Keith R

    2011-10-01

    Trypanosomatid parasites are notorious for the human diseases they cause throughout Africa and South America. However, non-pathogenic trypanosomatids are also found worldwide, infecting a wide range of hosts. One example is Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) theileri, a ubiquitous protozoan commensal of bovids, which is distributed globally. Exploiting knowledge of pathogenic trypanosomatids, we have developed Trypanosoma theileri as a novel vehicle to deliver vaccine antigens and other proteins to cattle. Conditions for the growth and transfection of T. theileri have been optimised and expressed heterologous proteins targeted for secretion or specific localisation at the cell interior or surface using trafficking signals from Trypanosoma brucei. In cattle, the engineered vehicle could establish in the context of a pre-existing natural T. theileri population, was maintained long-term and generated specific immune responses to an expressed Babesia antigen at protective levels. Building on several decades of basic research into trypanosomatid pathogens, Trypanosoma theileri offers significant potential to target multiple infections, including major cattle-borne zoonoses such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Brucella abortus and Mycobacterium spp. It also has the potential to deliver therapeutics to cattle, including the lytic factor that protects humans from cattle trypanosomiasis. This could alleviate poverty by protecting indigenous African cattle from African trypanosomiasis.

  4. Targeting cattle-borne zoonoses and cattle pathogens using a novel trypanosomatid-based delivery system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Adam Mott

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomatid parasites are notorious for the human diseases they cause throughout Africa and South America. However, non-pathogenic trypanosomatids are also found worldwide, infecting a wide range of hosts. One example is Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum theileri, a ubiquitous protozoan commensal of bovids, which is distributed globally. Exploiting knowledge of pathogenic trypanosomatids, we have developed Trypanosoma theileri as a novel vehicle to deliver vaccine antigens and other proteins to cattle. Conditions for the growth and transfection of T. theileri have been optimised and expressed heterologous proteins targeted for secretion or specific localisation at the cell interior or surface using trafficking signals from Trypanosoma brucei. In cattle, the engineered vehicle could establish in the context of a pre-existing natural T. theileri population, was maintained long-term and generated specific immune responses to an expressed Babesia antigen at protective levels. Building on several decades of basic research into trypanosomatid pathogens, Trypanosoma theileri offers significant potential to target multiple infections, including major cattle-borne zoonoses such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Brucella abortus and Mycobacterium spp. It also has the potential to deliver therapeutics to cattle, including the lytic factor that protects humans from cattle trypanosomiasis. This could alleviate poverty by protecting indigenous African cattle from African trypanosomiasis.

  5. Bracken fern (Pteridium aquilinum) poisoning in cattle in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gava, Aldo; da Silva Neves, Dalmo; Gava, Daniele; de Moura, Saliba Thiago; Schild, Ana Lucia; Riet-Correa, Franklin

    2002-12-01

    Epidemiological data on Pteridium aquilinum intoxication in cattle the state of Santa Catarina were obtained by review of diagnostic records from 1987 to 2001. Of 3,407 necropsied cattle, 244 (7.16%) were diagnosed as intoxicated by Paquilinum; 122 of those were of the hemorrhagic form, 103 had tumors in the upper digestive tract, 19 were cases of chronic hematuria. Annual losses due to this intoxication in this State are estimated at 10,657 cattle. The highest incidence of the hemorrhagic form occurs in 1-3-y-old cattle between March and July, and most cases of tumors of the upper digestive tract affect cattle older than Sy. The highest incidence of digestive tract tumors is at the base of the tongue and pharynx, and the lowest frequency is in the rumen and esophagus. The large economic losses caused PaQuilinum in Santa Catarina call for improved control measures for the disease.

  6. Incidence and economic impact of rabies in the cattle population of Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jibat, Tariku; Mourits, Monique C.M.; Hogeveen, Henk

    2016-01-01

    Rabies is a viral disease that can cause fatal encephalomyelitis both in animals and humans. Although incidences of the disease in cattle have been reported, insight in the economic impact of the disease in livestock remains limited. By affecting cattle in subsistence systems, rabies may have

  7. Anaplasma marginale and A. phagocytophilum in cattle in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M'ghirbi, Youmna; Bèji, Marwa; Oporto, Beatriz; Khrouf, Fatma; Hurtado, Ana; Bouattour, Ali

    2016-10-20

    Tick-borne diseases caused by Anaplasma species put serious constraints on the health and production of domestic cattle in tropical and sub-tropical regions. After recovering from a primary infection, cattle typically become persistent carriers of pathogens and play a critical role in the epidemiology of the disease, acting as reservoirs of the Anaplasma spp. In this study a duplex PCR assay was used for the simultaneous detection of Anaplasma marginale and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in cattle using two primer pairs targeting msp4 and msp2 genes, respectively. We used this method to analyze DNA preparations derived from 328 blood cattle samples that were collected from 80 farms distributed among Tunisia's four bioclimatic zones. The prevalence of the A. marginale infection (24.7 %) was significantly higher and more widespread (in all bioclimatic areas) than that of A. phagocytophilum (0.6 %), which was found in a mixed infection with A. marginale. The duplex PCR assay used proved to be a rapid, specific and inexpensive mean for the simultaneous detection of Anaplasma marginale and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in cattle blood. It allowed us to report the identification of A. phagocytophilum for the first time in cattle in Tunisia and confirm the presence of A. marginale in cattle from several geographical areas of the country. Further epidemiological studies undertaken using this assay will help improve the surveillance of the associated diseases in the regions where they are endemic.

  8. Systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness of commercially available vaccines against bovine herpesvirus, bovine viral diarrhea virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, and parainfluenza type 3 virus for mitigation of bovine respiratory disease complex in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurer, Miles E; Larson, Robert L; White, Brad J

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate and analyze data from controlled studies on the effectiveness of vaccinating cattle with commercially available viral antigen vaccines for mitigation of the effects of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC). Systematic review and meta-analysis. 31 studies comprising 88 trials. Studies that reported the effectiveness of commercially available bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), and parainfluenza type 3 virus (PI3) vaccines for protection of cattle against BRDC or its components were included in the analysis. Studies or trials were categorized as natural exposure or experimental challenge and were further divided by the viral antigen evaluated and vaccine type (modified-live virus [MLV] or inactivated vaccine). Meta-analysis was performed; summary Mantel-Haenszel risk ratios were determined, and Forest plots were generated. In natural exposure trials, beef calves vaccinated with various antigen combinations had a significantly lower BRDC morbidity risk than did nonvaccinated control calves. In trials evaluating BHV-1 and MLV BVDV vaccines in experimental challenge models, vaccinated calves had a lower BRDC morbidity risk than did control calves; however, in experimental challenge trials evaluating MLV BRSV and PI3 vaccines, no significant difference in morbidity or mortality risk was found between vaccinated and control calves. Estimating clinical efficacy from results of experimental challenge studies requires caution because these models differ substantially from those involving natural exposure. The literature provides data but does not provide sufficiently strong evidence to guide definitive recommendations for determining which virus components are necessary to include in a vaccination program for prevention or mitigation of BRDC in cattle.

  9. Recombinant foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) non-structural protein 3A fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) as a candidate probe to identify FMDV-infected cattle in serosurveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotufo, Cecilia M; Bergmann, Ingrid E; Mattion, Nora M; Wilda, Maximiliano; Grigera, Pablo R

    2017-08-01

    Recombinant protein 3A-EGFP, a fusion construct between foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) non-structural protein 3A and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was expressed in BL21-DE3 cells. The identity of the partially purified protein 3A-EGFP was confirmed by its reactivity with sera from cattle infected with FMDV and with a monoclonal antibody specific for FMDV-3ABC (MAb3H7) in Western blot assays. No reactivity was observed with sera from uninfected vaccinated animals. The performance of 3A-EGFP as an antigen in an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was assessed and compared with that of a previously developed and validated capture ELISA that uses a 3ABC recombinant antigen (3ABC ELISA) and has been widely applied for serological surveys in Argentina. Parallel analysis of strongly and weakly positive reference sera from infected animals and 329 serum samples from uninfected vaccinated cattle showed that the 3A-EGFP antigen unequivocally identifies sera from FMDV-infected cattle with similar performance to its 3ABC counterpart. The 3A-EGFP ELISA is simpler and faster to perform than the 3ABC ELISA, since it does not require a capture step with a specific antibody. Moreover, the expression and storage of the recombinant 3A-EGFP is simplified by the absence of residual autoproteolytic activity associated to the 3C sequence. We conclude that the 3A-EGFP ELISA constitutes a promising screening method in serosurveys to determine whether or not animals are infected with FMDV.

  10. Epidemiology of Cryptosporidium infection in cattle in China: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chao; Cao, Xue-Feng; Deng, Lei; Li, Wei; Huang, Xiang-Ming; Lan, Jing-Chao; Xiao, Qi-Cheng; Zhong, Zhi-Jun; Feng, Fan; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Wen-Bo; Guo, Ping; Wu, Kong-Ju; Peng, Guang-Neng

    2017-01-01

    The present review discusses the findings of cryptosporidiosis research conducted in cattle in China and highlights the currently available information on Cryptosporidium epidemiology, genetic diversity, and distribution in China, which is critical to understanding the economic and public health importance of cryptosporidiosis transmission in cattle. To date, 10 Cryptosporidium species have been detected in cattle in China, with an overall infection rate of 11.9%. The highest rate of infection (19.5%) was observed in preweaned calves, followed by that in juveniles (10.69%), postweaned juveniles (9.0%), and adult cattle (4.94%). The dominant species were C. parvum in preweaned calves and C. andersoni in postweaned, juvenile, and adult cattle. Zoonotic Cryptosporidium species (C. parvum and C. hominis) were found in cattle, indicating the possibility of transmission between humans and cattle. Different cattle breeds had significant differences in the prevalence rate and species of Cryptosporidium. This review demonstrates an age-associated, breed-associated, and geographic-related occurrence of Cryptosporidium and provides references for further understanding of the epidemiological characteristics, and for preventing and controlling the disease. © C. Gong et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2017.

  11. Epidemiology of Cryptosporidium infection in cattle in China: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Chao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review discusses the findings of cryptosporidiosis research conducted in cattle in China and highlights the currently available information on Cryptosporidium epidemiology, genetic diversity, and distribution in China, which is critical to understanding the economic and public health importance of cryptosporidiosis transmission in cattle. To date, 10 Cryptosporidium species have been detected in cattle in China, with an overall infection rate of 11.9%. The highest rate of infection (19.5% was observed in preweaned calves, followed by that in juveniles (10.69%, postweaned juveniles (9.0%, and adult cattle (4.94%. The dominant species were C. parvum in preweaned calves and C. andersoni in postweaned, juvenile, and adult cattle. Zoonotic Cryptosporidium species (C. parvum and C. hominis were found in cattle, indicating the possibility of transmission between humans and cattle. Different cattle breeds had significant differences in the prevalence rate and species of Cryptosporidium. This review demonstrates an age-associated, breed-associated, and geographic-related occurrence of Cryptosporidium and provides references for further understanding of the epidemiological characteristics, and for preventing and controlling the disease.

  12. Experimental induction of bacillary hemoglobinuria in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, B G

    1977-10-01

    An open-surgery technique for intrahepatic inoculation of Clostridium haemolyticum spores, suspended in calcium chloride as the hepatic debilitant, was used to produce bacillary hemoglobinuria in cattle. All calves (n=3) died of the disease, and the controls (n=2) given calcium chloride without spores survived. Clinical signs and gross pathologic changes produced by this method resembled those described for the disease in its natural form.

  13. Quantitative single serum-dilution liquid phase competitive blocking ELISA for the assessment of herd immunity and expected protection against foot-and-mouth disease virus in vaccinated cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robiolo, Blanca; La Torre, José; Duffy, Sergio; Leon, Emilio; Seki, Cristina; Torres, Adriana; Mattion, Nora

    2010-06-01

    A single serum-dilution liquid phase ELISA (slpELISA) was standardized to be used for serological evaluation of herd immunity against foot-and-mouth disease. The absorbance value at a dilution 1:64 of each serum sample was interpolated in a standard curve by plotting the antibody titers of six control sera determined by end point dilution liquid phase ELISA (lpELISA), against the absorbance values for the same control sera at 1:64 dilutions. A straight line was obtained by linear regression analysis (r>0.90) in the titer range of 1.40-2.40. The reliability of the antibody titers was confirmed by the simultaneous titration of 60 cattle sera by slpELISA and lpELISA, which showed an acceptable correlation (R(2)>0.87) for viral strains A24/Cruzeiro, A/Argentina/01, O1/Campos and C3/Indaial. Titers obtained by both methods were not significantly different (p>0.05), thus confirming that slpELISA could be used successfully to replace the conventional serial dilution ELISA for the assessment of protection status of cattle in epidemiological studies. In addition, this quantitative slpELISA provides an adequate method for monitoring the effectiveness of vaccination campaigns and is also suitable for the assessment of seroconversion of naive animals during early stages of infection. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Differential expression of genes encoding CD30L and P-selectin in cattle with Johne's disease: Progress toward a diagnostic gene expression signature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Grell, S. N.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2006-01-01

    fertility. Commonly paraTB in cattle is diagnosed by antibody detection by serum enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), by detection of the pathogen by cultivation of individual faecal samples, or by in vitro measurement of cell mediated immune responses using the IFN-gamma test. There is an ongoing...... need for developing new diagnostic approaches as all currently available diagnostic tests for paraTB may fail to detect sub-clinical infection. We used cDNA microarrays to simultaneously measure expression of over 1300 host genes to help identify a subset of gene expression changes that might provide...

  15. Survey for trypanosoma species in cattle from three farms in Iddo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    2014-01-28

    Jan 28, 2014 ... (Rogers et al., 1996; Wilson et al., 1997). Outbreak of diseases, especially trypanosomosis in cattle herds is one of the major problems militating against the cattle industry in the tropics, including. Nigeria (Vanden et al., 2000). The disease in animals usually results in reduced reproduction and quality,.

  16. Systemic immune response and virus persistence after foot-and-mouth disease virus infection of naïve cattle and cattle vaccinated with a homologous adenovirus-vectored vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to investigate host factors associated with the establishment of persistent foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection, the systemic immune response to vaccination and challenge was studied in 47 Holstein steers. Eighteen steers which had received one dose of recombinant FMDV A vaccine t...

  17. Prevalence and Classification of Amphistomes in Cattle and Buffaloes

    OpenAIRE

    Mounier M. Abdel Halium; Fayez A. Salib; Waheed M. Mousa; Emil S. Abdel Massieh

    2014-01-01

    Amphistomes are snail-borne trematodes infect rumens and reticulums capable of causing acute and chronic disease in cattle and buffaloes. A total of 897 of cattle and buffaloes were examined by faecal examinations and by postmortem examinations in Giza and Garbia governourates. The collected Amphistomes were morphologically and histologically classified. We found that the incidence of Amphistomes in totally examined animals was 4.9%. The incidence was higher in the oldest animals(than young),...

  18. Acute phase protein response during acute ruminal acidosis in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danscher, A. M.; Thoefner, M. B.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2011-01-01

    acids. In humans, inflammation has been linked to metabolic diseases. In cattle, studies into the possible links between acid-base changes, inflammation/innate immunity and metabolic disease are warranted as this might improve our understanding of the production disease complexes occurring in particular...

  19. Significance of Neospora caninum in cattle farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Tamara

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neospora caninum is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite which primarily causes diseases in dogs and cattle all over the world. It was first described in Norway in the mid-eighties in dogs, after which, until the present time, clinical neosporosis was proven in sheep, goats, deer, rhinoceroses, horses, and experimental rodents. Antibodies against N. caninum have been found also in the serum of water buffalo, red and gray foxes, coyotes, camels, and felines. Due to the similarity of this Coccidia with Toxoplasma gondi, the neosporosis was for a series of years incorrectly diagnozed as toxoplasmosis. Domestic canines, dogs, are the only real host for N. caninum. Its life cycle covers three stages of development: tachyzoites, tissue cysts and oocysts. Carnivores are infected by ingesting parts of infected tissue which contain tissue cysts with bradyzoites. The dominant pathway of transmission of this cause in cattle is transplacentary infection, but cattle can also be infected by ingestion of feed or water contaminated by sporulated oo-cysts of N. caninum. Bitches can be subclinical carriers of the parasite, when they pass on the cause transplacentarily, which results in more than one litter being born with the infection. Neosporosis today appears as the main cause of abortions and neonatal deaths in dairy cows and fattening cattle in almost all parts of the world, but with the highest incidence in the United States (US, New Zealand, The Netherlands, and Germany. The treatment of this disease has not been fully determined, but medicines used for the treatment of toxoplasmosis have yielded certain good results. There is no verified vaccine that would prevent undesired abortions in cattle. .

  20. Lameness in feedlot cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokka, G L; Lechtenberg, K; Edwards, T; MacGregor, S; Voss, K; Griffin, D; Grotelueschen, D M; Smith, R A; Perino, L J

    2001-03-01

    This article examines the various causes of lameness in feedlot cattle, with an emphasis on clinical signs, treatment, and prevention. Specific conditions are discussed, including interdigital necrobacillosis, laminitis, feedlot injuries, and feedlot lameness associated with Mycoplasma bovis. Immune management of the foot is also reviewed.

  1. Arrested larval development in cattle nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J; Duncan, M

    1987-06-01

    Most economically important cattle nematodes are able to arrest their larval development within the host - entering a period of dormancy or hypobiosis. Arrested larvae have a low death rate, and large numbers can accumulate in infected cattle during the grazing season. Because of this, outbreaks of disease caused by such nematodes can occur at times when recent infection with the parasites could not have occurred, for example during winter in temperature northern climates when cattle are normally housed. The capacity to arrest is a heritable trait. It is seen as an adaptation by the parasite to avoid further development to its free-living stages during times when the climate is unsuitable for free-living survival. But levels of arrestment can vary markedly in different regions, in different cattle, and under different management regimes. Climatic factors, previous conditioning, host immune status, and farm management all seem to affect arrestment levels. In this article, James Armour and Mary Duncan review the biological basis of the phenomenon, and discuss the apparently conflicting views on how it is controlled.

  2. Evaluating wildlife-cattle contact rates to improve the understanding of dynamics of bovine tuberculosis transmission in Michigan, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Michael J; Kay, Shannon L; Pepin, Kim M; Grear, Daniel A; Campa, Henry; VerCauteren, Kurt C

    2016-12-01

    Direct and indirect contacts among individuals drive transmission of infectious disease. When multiple interacting species are susceptible to the same pathogen, risk assessment must include all potential host species. Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is an example of a disease that can be transmitted among several wildlife species and to cattle, although the potential role of several wildlife species in spillback to cattle remains unclear. To better understand the complex network of contacts and factors driving disease transmission, we fitted proximity logger collars to beef and dairy cattle (n=37), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus; n=29), raccoon (Procyon lotor; n=53), and Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana; n=79) for 16 months in Michigan's Lower Peninsula, USA. We determined inter- and intra-species direct and indirect contact rates. Data on indirect contact was calculated when collared animals visited stationary proximity loggers placed at cattle feed and water resources. Most contact between wildlife species and cattle was indirect, with the highest contact rates occurring between raccoons and cattle during summer and fall. Nearly all visits (>99%) to cattle feed and water sources were by cattle, whereas visitation to stored cattle feed was dominated by deer and raccoon (46% and 38%, respectively). Our results suggest that indirect contact resulting from wildlife species visiting cattle-related resources could pose a risk of disease transmission to cattle and deserves continued attention with active mitigation. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Non-inferiority of nitric oxide releasing intranasal spray compared to sub-therapeutic antibiotics to reduce incidence of undifferentiated fever and bovine respiratory disease complex in low to moderate risk beef cattle arriving at a commercial feedlot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev-Shoshani, G; McMullin, B; Nation, N; Church, J S; Dorin, C; Miller, C

    2017-03-01

    Undifferentiated fever, or bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDc), is a challenging multi-factorial health issue caused by viral/bacterial pathogens and stressors linked to the transport and mixing of cattle, negatively impacting the cattle feedlot industry. Common practice during processing at feedlots is administration of antibiotic metaphylaxis to reduce the incidence of BRDc. Nitric oxide (NO) is a naturally occurring nano-molecule with a wide range of physiological attributes. This study evaluated the metaphylactic use of intranasal NO releasing spray (NORS) to control BRDc incidence in calves at low-moderate risk of developing BRDc, arriving at a commercial feedlot as compared to conventional antibiotic metaphylaxis. One thousand and eighty crossbred, multiple-sourced, commingled, commercial, weaned beef calves were screened, enrolled, randomized and treated upon arrival. Animals appearing sick were pulled (from their pen) by blinded pen keepers then assessed for BRDc symptoms; blood samples were taken for haptoglobin quantification and the animals were rescued with an antibiotic. After 35 days both groups showed no significant difference in BRDc incidence (5.2% of animals from NORS group and 3.2% from antibiotic group). Average daily weight gain of animals at day 150 for the NORS cohort was 1.17kg compared to 1.18kg for the antibiotic group (p>0.05). There was no significant difference in mortality in the first 35 days (p=0.7552), however, general mortality over 150 days trended higher in the antibiotic cohort. NORS treatment was shown to be safe, causing neither distress nor adverse effects on the animals. This large randomized controlled study in low-moderate BRDc incidence risk calves demonstrates that NORS treatment, as compared to conventional metaphylactic antibiotics, is non-inferior based on BRDc incidence and other metrics like weight and mortality. These data justify further studies in higher BRDc incidence risk populations to evaluate NORS as

  4. Control of tropical theileriosis (Theileria annulata infection) of cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C G

    1990-04-01

    Tropical bovine theileriosis caused by Theileria annulata and transmitted by ticks of the genus Hyalomma may be controlled by one or more of the following methods: i) management, with particular emphasis on movement control; ii) vector control by application of acaricides, preventing transmission of disease; iii) treatment of clinical disease using specific chemotherapeutics; iv) immunization with live vaccines; and v) the use of cattle resistant to ticks or the disease. Of these the most important and effective control method is the use of a live cell culture vaccine attenuated by prolonged culture in vitro of mononuclear cells persistently infected with macroschizonts of T. annulata. This vaccine, used chiefly in susceptible taurine dairy cattle, can now be complemented by using novel chemotherapeutic naphthoquinones--parvaquone and buparvaquone--which are very effective in treatment of the clinical disease in these valuable cattle.

  5. Seroprevalence of chlamydial infection in cattle in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kim; Sammin, Donal; Harmeyer, Silke; Nath, Mintu; Livingstone, Morag; Longbottom, David

    2012-08-01

    Although few studies have investigated the prevalence of chlamydial infections in cattle, reported prevalence rates vary hugely. In order to assess the prevalence of this infection in cattle in Ireland, serum samples (100 herds, 20 samples/herd) collected for statutory screening for brucellosis were examined by soluble chlamydial antigen indirect ELISA. The assay detects antibodies to the two most common Chlamydiaceae spp. affecting cattle, namely Chlamydia abortus and Chlamydia pecorum. A total of 95 samples from 57 herds were seropositive, representing an observed prevalence rate of 4.75%. The parametric bootstrap estimate of the mean disease prevalence in the population was 6.04% (95%, CI 4.70-7.50). The results suggest the prevalence of chlamydial infection is low in cattle in Ireland. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Oxytetracycline and penicillin-G residues in cattle slaughtered in south-western Nigeria: Implications for livestock disease management and public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hezekiah K. Adesokan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available After the discovery of indiscriminate antibiotic use in ready-for-slaughter cattle in south-western Nigeria, 90 tissue samples from randomly selected slaughtered cattle were evaluated for oxytetracycline and penicillin-G residues using high performance liquid chromatography and the data analysed by one-way Analysis of variance (ANOVA. The findings revealed residues of oxytetracycline (kidney: 9.47 µ/kg ± 3.24 µ/kg; liver: 12.73 µ/kg ± 4.39 µ/kg; muscle: 16.17 µ/kg ± 5.52 µ/kg and penicillin-G (kidney: 6.27 µ/kg ± 2.46 µ/kg; liver: 8.5 µ/kg ± 2.80 µ/kg; muscle: 11.67 µ/kg ± 2.94 µ/kg in all tissues screened. Significantly high levels (oxytetracycline: F = 16.77; penicillin-G: F = 29.38 were, however, found in muscles, followed by liver and then kidney – findings confirming recent antibiotic administration to the animals before slaughter. The dietary intakes through the tissues screened were 0.024% (oxytetracycline and 0.017% (penicillin-G of the acceptable daily intake (ADI. Although the concentrations in the tissues screened were below the maximum residue limits despite recent administration of these antibiotics before slaughter, the lower concentrations are suggestive of the probable low dosages often administered by those involved in indiscriminate use of antibiotics. This therefore raises serious concerns for the livestock industry as well as human health, given the resultant emergence and spread of resistant strains of bacterial pathogens that could ensue from prolonged use of low dosages of antibiotics. Additionally, the lower concentrations of the daily intakes notwithstanding, the plausible exposure to these antibiotics from other food sources is a cause for concern. Since antimicrobial misuse and its consequent effects are not just a problem limited to Nigeria but also a concern in sub-Saharan Africa, the need for national and international stakeholder intervention is emphasised.

  7. Oxytetracycline and penicillin-G residues in cattle slaughtered in south-western Nigeria: Implications for livestock disease management and public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hezekiah K. Adesokan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available After the discovery of indiscriminate antibiotic use in ready-for-slaughter cattle in south-western Nigeria, 90 tissue samples from randomly selected slaughtered cattle were evaluated for oxytetracycline and penicillin-G residues using high performance liquid chromatography and the data analysed by one-way Analysis of variance (ANOVA. The findings revealed residues of oxytetracycline (kidney: 9.47 µ/kg ± 3.24 µ/kg; liver: 12.73 µ/kg ± 4.39 µ/kg; muscle: 16.17 µ/kg ± 5.52 µ/kg and penicillin-G (kidney: 6.27 µ/kg ± 2.46 µ/kg; liver: 8.5 µ/kg ± 2.80 µ/kg; muscle: 11.67 µ/kg ± 2.94 µ/kg in all tissues screened. Significantly high levels (oxytetracycline: F = 16.77; penicillin-G: F = 29.38 were, however, found in muscles, followed by liver and then kidney – findings confirming recent antibiotic administration to the animals before slaughter. The dietary intakes through the tissues screened were 0.024% (oxytetracycline and 0.017% (penicillin-G of the acceptable daily intake (ADI. Although the concentrations in the tissues screened were below the maximum residue limits despite recent administration of these antibiotics before slaughter, the lower concentrations are suggestive of the probable low dosages often administered by those involved in indiscriminate use of antibiotics. This therefore raises serious concerns for the livestock industry as well as human health, given the resultant emergence and spread of resistant strains of bacterial pathogens that could ensue from prolonged use of low dosages of antibiotics. Additionally, the lower concentrations of the daily intakes notwithstanding, the plausible exposure to these antibiotics from other food sources is a cause for concern. Since antimicrobial misuse and its consequent effects are not just a problem limited to Nigeria but also a concern in sub-Saharan Africa, the need for national and international stakeholder intervention is emphasised.

  8. [The prevalence, prevention and treatment of cattle epidemic during the Han-Tang Period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yi

    2013-03-01

    About 21 times of cattle epidemic with rather strong infectivity happened during the Han-Tang Period, including 6 in the Eastern Han Dynasty, 2 in the Jin Dynasty, 4 in the Southern and Northern Dynasties, 8 in the Tang Dynasty and 1in the Five Dynasty. Most of them were spread along the Yellow River and the northern region of the Huai River. The type of cattle epidemic included the acute cattle plague, cattle bovine mange, cattle yellow fever and cattle rotten hoof disease, etc. Its occurrence and prevalence brought a serious influentce on the society of the Han and Tang Dynasties, causing massive mortality of farm cattle, and then the shortage of animal power, and threatening the agriculture, which drew the attention of the governments, physicians, agriculturists, astrologists and Taoists. The medical measures and economic measures were adopted for the prevention and treatment of cattle epidemic. Especially, prescriptions in the books of medicine and agriculture exerted positive effects on the containment of cattle epidemic. On the other hand, its prevalence and the mass mortality of farm cattle, in a way, promoted, to certain extent, the improvement of the government's function of relief, the updating of the methods of agriculture and the creation of new farm tools, and being regarded as a main cause for the technological innovation of agriculture.

  9. Virulence of H5N1 Influenza Virus in Cattle Egrets (Bubulcus Ibis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phuong, Do Quy; Dung, Nguyen Tien; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik

    2011-01-01

    for insect control in households. In this study, six Cattle Egrets were experimentally infected intranasally with highly pathogenic avian influenza (AI) A/duck/Vietnam/40D/04 (H5N1) to investigate a possible epidemiologic role for Cattle Egrets in outbreaks of H5N1 AI in Vietnam. The Cattle Egrets were...... highly susceptible to the infection and either died within a week or had to be euthanized. Five uninfected chickens housed with the inoculated Cattle Egrets from day 1 to day 8 postinfection showed no signs of disease or mortality. This observation was most probably due to the low-level virus shedding...

  10. Brucellosis in camels, cattle and humans: associations and evaluation of serological tests used for diagnosis of the disease in certain nomadic localities in Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, M M; Musa, M T; Bakhiet, M R; Perrett, L

    2010-12-01

    Brucellosis was studied in 2,225 camels, 20 camel nomads and 33 abattoir workers in certain nomadic localities in Sudan, using serum and milk samples. Lymph nodes, testicular tissues and udder tissues from positive camels and hygroma aspirates from three affected cows were used for isolation of Brucella. Serum samples were examined by Rose Bengal plate test (RBPT), modified RBPT (mRBPT), serum agglutination test (SAT) and competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA), and milk by the milk ring test. Overall seroprevalence in camels (milk and serum samples) was 37.5%. The seroprevalence in males was 28.2% and in females 40.1%. Twelve (60%) of the 20 nomads and three (9%) of the 33 abattoir workers had positive antibody titres. Brucella abortus biovar 6 was isolated from two camels and three cows. Two isolates, one from each species, were atypical. The bacteriological findings suggested that camels were infected from cattle, the primary hosts of B. abortus. The mRBPT was suitable for screening camel sera for brucellosis, but the cELISA detected 2.1% more positives. The SAT antibody concentrations ranged between < 13 and 3,282 IU/ml.

  11. Electrocardiographic findings in cattle with theileriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Fartashvand

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Theileriosis is an important protozoal disease of domestic ruminants especially cattle, sheep and goats which is transmitted by various species of Theileria infected ticks. Anemia, electrolytic disorders and vasculitis are amongst the cardiovascular complications of theileriosis. In this study, 90 cows with theileriosis were evaluated by clinical examination, parasitologic tests and electrocardiography. In Theileria infected cattle, after 30 minutes of rest and any treatment, a 30 second ECG was recorded in lead I to determine the types of arrhythmias present. Based on electrocardiographic findings frequently observed arrhythmias included 62 cases of sinus tachycardia, 15 cases of sinus arrhythmia, 6 cases of first degree atrio-ventricular block, 1 case of ventricular extra systole and 1 case of atrial fibrillation. According to the type of arrhythmias, it can be concluded that arrhythmias in cows with theileriosis are functional and nonpathologic.

  12. Genetic health in Czech cattle population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jindřich Čítek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper sums up the studies done in the cattle population in the Czech Republic, concerning the genetic health. As for the congenital defects, umbilical hernia was the most frequently noted disorder. In the 90´s, BLAD became a serious problem in the Czech cattle population. However, strict measures have been efficient, and the frequency of heterozygous sires decreased rapidly. The approach to CVM was not consistent enough, and therefore the decrease was somewhat slow. The recessive alleles of bovine citrullinaemia, DUMPS, glycogen storage disease V and II, and factor XI deficiency were not found. Further, the cytogenetic analysis was done. Robertsonian tranclocation affected 0.50 % of Czech Simmentals, and 3.57 % of beef sires, the Holsteins were not affected. Autosomal aneuploidies were not found, and 2.3 % beef animals carried gonosomal triploidy.

  13. Improvement of indigenous cattle to modern Japanese Black (Wagyu) cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, T.

    2018-02-01

    Wagyu cattle have been improved from indigenous cattle raised in Japan since the country was opened 100 years ago. Characteristics of the breed were formed during that period. Here, the process of the breeding is described, and recent topics about breeding studies are discussed.

  14. 9 CFR 73.5 - Interstate shipment of undiseased cattle from quarantined area; when permitted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.5 Interstate shipment of undiseased cattle... diseased with scabies, may be shipped, transported, or otherwise moved interstate for any purpose upon... have been inspected for scabies by an APHIS or State inspector, that all the infected or exposed herds...

  15. Prevalence and risk factors associated with Theileria parva infection in cattle in three regions of Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerario, Isack I.; Simuunza, Martin C; Chenyambuga, Sebastian W

    2017-01-01

    Ticks and tickborne diseases (TBDs) are serious constraints to cattle production in Tanzania and other tropical and subtropical countries. Among the TBDs, East Coast fever (ECF) is the most important as it causes significant economic losses to the cattle industry in Tanzania. However, control...... region by region in order to reduce losses caused by ticks and ECF in the study area....

  16. Circulating microRNAs in serum from cattle challenged with Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an RNA virus that is often associated with respiratory disease in cattle. MicroRNAs have been proposed as indicators of exposure to respiratory pathogens. The objective of this study was to identify microRNAs in cattle that had been challenged with a non-cytopat...

  17. Dairy cattle mortality in an organized herd in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Hossain

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was conducted to find out the causes and factors affecting the dairy cattle mortality. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of dairy cattle mortality on the Central Cattle Breeding and Dairy Farm (CCBDF in Bangladesh was carried out between 1992 and 2007. Sixteen years of data on mortality of dairy cattle were analyzed for the effects of year, season, age, sex, breed, and etiology on mortality rate. Results: The average overall mortality rate was 5.60% and on average, female cattle (55.71% were found to die more than males (44.29%. Mortality was more in crossbred cattle than in indigenous breed. Higher mortality of cattle was observed in rainy season (37.98% followed by winter (33.03% and summer (28.99%. The major causes of death were diseases of the respiratory tract, mainly pneumonia (39.91%. Tuberculosis was the second most common cause of mortality accounting for 20.58% of deaths. The other major cause of death was disease of the alimentary tract, mainly enteritis (15.58%. Other causes of death occurred in the following frequencies: malnutrition (5.91%, debility (4.43%, hairball (3.35%, tympanitis (2.56%, babesiosis (2.27%, internal haemorrhage (2.16%, black quarter (1.76%, and foot and mouth disease (1.48%. Conclusions: Of the four potential risk factors investigated, age was the most important factor and significantly associated with mortality. During the first month of life, calves had a higher risk of mortality than adults.

  18. Efficacy of four commercially available multivalent modified-live virus vaccines against clinical disease, viremia, and viral shedding in early-weaned beef calves exposed simultaneously to cattle persistently infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus and cattle acutely infected with bovine herpesvirus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro, Manuel F; Walz, Paul H; Passler, Thomas; Palomares, Roberto; Newcomer, Benjamin W; Riddell, Kay P; Gard, Julie; Zhang, Yijing; Galik, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of 4 commercially available multivalent modified-live virus vaccines against clinical disease, viremia, and viral shedding caused by bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV1) in early-weaned beef calves. 54 early-weaned beef steers (median age, 95 days). Calves were randomly assigned to 1 of 5 groups and administered PBSS (group A [control]; n = 11) or 1 of 4 commercially available modified-live virus vaccines that contained antigens against BHV1, BVDV types 1 (BVDV1) and 2 (BVDV2), parainfluenza type 3 virus, and bovine respiratory syncytial virus (groups B [11], C [10], D [11], and E [11]). Forty-five days after vaccination, calves were exposed simultaneously to 6 cattle persistently infected with BVDV and 8 calves acutely infected with BHV1 for 28 days (challenge exposure). For each calf, serum antibody titers against BVDV and BHV1 were determined before vaccination and before and after challenge exposure. Virus isolation was performed on nasal secretions, serum, and WBCs at predetermined times during the 28-day challenge exposure. None of the calves developed severe clinical disease or died. Mean serum anti-BHV1 antibody titers did not differ significantly among the treatment groups at any time and gradually declined during the study. Mean serum anti-BVDV antibody titers appeared to be negatively associated with the incidence of viremia and BVDV shedding. The unvaccinated group (A) had the lowest mean serum anti-BVDV antibody titers. The mean serum anti-BVDV antibody titers for group D were generally lower than those for groups B, C, and E. Results indicated differences in vaccine efficacy for the prevention of BVDV viremia and shedding in early-weaned beef calves.

  19. Factors associated with within-herd transmission of serotype A foot-and-mouth disease virus in cattle, during the 2001 outbreak in Argentina: a protective effect of vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, B P; Perez, A M; Cosentino, B; Rodriguez, L L; König, G A

    2011-10-01

    Argentina suffered an extensive foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) epidemic between July 2000 and January 2002, 3 months after obtaining the official FMD-free without vaccination status conferred by the World Organization for Animal Health. This is one of the largest FMD epidemics controlled by implementation of a systematic mass vaccination campaign in an FMD-free country. In 2000, 124 herds were reported as FMD positive, 2394 herds in 2001 and one in January 2002; the total number of cattle herds in the country at that time was approximately 230 000. Estimates of FMD transmission are important to understand the dynamics of disease spread and for estimating the value for the parameterization of disease transmission models, with the ultimate goals of predicting its spread, assessing and designing control strategies, conducting economic analyses and supporting the decision-making process. In this study, the within-herd coefficient of transmission, β, was computed for herds affected in the 2001 FMD epidemic and categorized as low or high based on the median value of β. A logistic regression model was fitted to identify factors significantly associated with high values of β. Results suggested that the odds of having a high within-herd transmission were significantly associated with time from initial herd infection to disease detection, date of report, vaccination, and time from initial herd infection to herd vaccination. Results presented in this study demonstrate, in quantifiable terms, the protective impact of vaccination in reducing FMD transmission in infected herds. These results will be useful for the parameterization of epidemiological models aimed at quantifying the impact of vaccination and for the design and implementation of FMD emergency vaccination strategies in face of an epidemic. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Genetic diversity, acaricide resistance status and evolutionary potential of a Rhipicephalus microplus population from a disease-controlled cattle farming area in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbertse, Luïse; Baron, Samantha; van der Merwe, Nicolaas A; Madder, Maxime; Stoltsz, Wilhelm H; Maritz-Olivier, Christine

    2016-06-01

    The Southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus is a hematophagous ectoparasite of great veterinary and economic importance. Along with its adaptability, reproductive success and vectoring capacity, R. microplus has been reported to develop resistance to the major chemical classes of acaricides currently in use. In South Africa, the Mnisi community in the Mpumalanga region offers a unique opportunity to study the adaptive potential of R. microplus. The aims of this study therefore included characterising acaricide resistance and determining the level and pattern of genetic diversity for R. microplus in this region from one primary population consisting of 12 communal dip-stations. The level of acaricide resistance was evaluated using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes that contribute to acaricide insensitivity. Additionally, the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) gene fragments of collected individuals were sequenced and a haplotype network was constructed. A high prevalence of alleles attributed to resistance against formamidines (amitraz) in the octopamine/tyramine (OCT/Tyr) receptor (frequency of 0.55) and pyrethroids in the carboxylesterase (frequency of 0.81) genes were observed. Overall, the sampled tick population was homozygous resistant to pyrethroid-based acaricides in the voltage-gated sodium channel (VGS) gene. A total of 11 haplotypes were identified in the Mnisi R. microplus population from ITS2 analysis with no clear population structure. From these allele frequencies it appears that formamidine resistance in the Mnisi community is on the rise, as the R. microplus populations is acquiring or generating these resistance alleles. Apart from rearing multi-resistant ticks to commonly used acaricides in this community these ticks may pose future problems to its surrounding areas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Practices of traditional beef farmers in their production and marketing of cattle in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumba, Chisoni; Häsler, Barbara; Muma, John B; Munyeme, Musso; Sitali, Doreen Chilolo; Skjerve, Eystein; Rich, Karl M

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the practices of traditional cattle farmers in developing countries is an important factor in the development of appropriate, pro-poor disease control policies, and in formulating regional-specific production incentives that can improve productivity. This paper describes the production, husbandry practices, economics, and constraints of traditional cattle farming in Zambia. A cross-sectional study design was used to obtain data from traditional cattle farmers (n = 699) using a structured questionnaire. Data analyses were carried out using SPSS and STATA statistical packages. The results revealed that the majority [65% (95% CI: 59.3-71.1)] of farmers practised a transhumant cattle herding system under communal grazing. In these transhumant herding systems, animal husbandry and management systems were found to be of poor quality, in terms of supplementary feeding, vaccination coverage, deworming, uptake of veterinary services, usage of artificial insemination, and dip tanks all being low or absent. East Coast Fever was the most common disease, affecting 60% (95% CI: 56.4-63.7) of farmers. Cattle sales were low, as farmers only sold a median of two cattle per household per year. Crop farming was found to be the main source of farm income (47%) in agro-pastoralist communities, followed by cattle farming (28%) and other sources (25%). The median cost of production in the surveyed provinces was reported at US$316, while that of revenue from cattle and cattle products sales was estimated at US$885 per herd per year. This translates to an estimated gross margin of US$569, representing 64.3% of revenue.There is considerable diversity in disease distribution, animal husbandry practices, economics, and challenges in traditional cattle production in different locations of Zambia. Therefore, to improve the productivity of the traditional cattle sub-sector, policy makers and stakeholders in the beef value chain must develop fit-for-purpose policies and

  2. Recombinant human adenovirus-5 expressing capsid proteins of Indian vaccine strains of foot-and-mouth disease virus elicits effective antibody response in cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recombinant adenovirus-5 vectored foot-and-mouth disease constructs (Ad5- FMD) were made for three Indian vaccine virus serotypes O,A and Asia 1. Constructs co-expressing foot-and- mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid and viral 3C protease sequences, were evaluated for their ability to induce a neutral...

  3. Causes of postpartum anoestrus in cattle in the tropics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansel, W.; Alila, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    Prolonged postpartum anoestrus is a major cause of economic losses in cattle in most tropical countries. The length of the period from parturition to first oestrus varies greatly in cattle in the tropics and is influenced by many factors, including endocrine events, management, nutrition, heat and humidity, genetic-environmental interactions, diseases and internal and external parasites. Results of recent research on endocrinology of the postpartum cow are particularly relevant to the problem in tropical cattle. Development of a pulsatile pattern of pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion is necessary for induction of the first postpartum oestrus, and many cows undergo a short episode of elevated plasma progesterone levels immediately before the first oestrus. Adrenal corticosteroids inhibit development of the pulsatile pattern of LH secretion. The concept is developed that elevated levels of cortisol, resulting from the stresses of heat, high humidity, malnutrition, parasites and diseases to which tropical cattle are often exposed, contribute to anoestrus. Techniques developed for oestrous cycle synchronization of cyclic cattle have been found to induce first oestrus and a fertile ovulation in a significant percentage of anoestrous lactating beef cattle. These treatments involve short-term (6-7 day) progesterone treatments, followed by single injections of prostaglandin Fsub(2α) and insemination 80 hours later. Some success has also been achieved in shortening the postpartum interval by pulsatile administration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone which, in turn, causes pulsatile release of LH, and by administering progestational compounds for short periods of time. Improved management, particularly oestrus detection and insemination at the optimum time, could contribute greatly to reducing the postpartum interval in tropical cattle. Nutritional factors that result in reduced haemoglobin levels (trace mineral deficiencies and parasite infestations) also cause

  4. Serodiagnosis of brucellosis in cattle and humans in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaha, Hassan; Mohamed, Tarek R; Khoudair, Ramadan M; Ashour, Hossam M

    2009-01-01

    Brucellosis is a serious disease that primarily affects animals, which act as reservoirs for human infection. There is scanty data on brucellosis prevalence in cattle and humans in Mediterranean countries. Control of brucellosis in animals, and thus prevention of human disease, depends on utilizing efficient diagnostic procedures. In order to explore different factors affecting brucellosis prevalence in humans and cattle, we employed multiple serodiagnostic tests to compare brucellosis sero-prevalence in cattle with respect to breed, age, and sex, and to detect sero-positive rates of brucellosis in humans, who had history of contact with animals. 100 blood samples were collected from each of animal and human subjects. Buffered acidified plate antigen, Rose Bengal plate, standard tube agglutination, and Rivanol tests were used. There was no significant difference in brucellosis sero-prevalence between cattle of Friesian and Charolais breeds, or between male and female animals. This is the first study to compare sero-prevalence of brucellosis between Friesian and Charolais breeds. Brucellosis prevalence in more-than-1-year-old cattle was significantly higher than its prevalence in less-than-1-year-old cattle. This can be attributed to animals which were exposed before reaching 1 year of age, but did not seroconvert at the time of testing and remained in an incubatory stage instead. The total sero-prevalence of brucellosis in humans ranged between 5% and 8%, with no significant differences with respect to different seasons of the year. The high prevalence rates of human brucellosis call for more strict application of hygienic measures to prevent the spread of brucellosis from cattle and other livestock to humans.

  5. Bartonella bovis and Candidatus Bartonella davousti in cattle from Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmani, Mustapha; Sambou, Masse; Scandola, Pierre; Raoult, Didier; Fenollar, Florence; Mediannikov, Oleg

    2017-02-01

    In Senegal, domestic ruminants play a vital role in the economy and agriculture and as a food source for people. Bartonellosis in animals is a neglected disease in the tropical regions, and little information is available about the occurrence of this disease in African ruminants. Human bartonellosis due to Bartonella quintana has been previously reported in Senegal. In this study, 199 domestic ruminants, including 104 cattle, 43 sheep, and 52 goats were sampled in villages from the Senegalese regions of Sine Saloum and Casamance. We isolated 29 Bartonella strains, all exclusively from cattle. Molecular and genetic characterization of isolated strains identified 27 strains as Bartonella bovis and two strains as potentially new species. The strains described here represent the first Bartonella strains isolated from domestic ruminants in Senegal and the first putative new Bartonella sp. isolated from cattle in Africa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Season effect in the occurrence of claw diseases in dairy cattle Efeito da sazonalidade sobre a ocorrência de lesões podais em vacas de raças leiteiras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Jorge Facury Filho

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Claw diseases in cattle present different factors which contribute to its occurrence. At the present study, it was evaluated the claw diseases occurrence in cows and heifers from two farms of Minas Gerais state after rainy and dry periods. Cows kept in stables during dry period showed claw diseases more frequently. Claw diseases observed in these animals were heel erosion (group 1, digital dermatitis, interdigital dermatitis, and interdigital hyperplasia (group 2. Grazing cows during all year presented a decrease on the occurrence of claw diseases in the dry period, which demonstrated a relationship among lesions from groups 1 and 3 (sole hemorrhage, white line disease and double sole and the rain rate. Hygienic conditions of installations and paddocks also contributed to the occurrence of claw diseases in the animals.As afecções podais dos bovinos apresentam diversos fatores que predispõem a sua ocorrência. No presente estudo, avaliou-se a ocorrência de lesões podais em vacas e novilhas em duas fazendas em Minas Gerais, após os períodos chuvoso e seco. Vacas estabuladas durante o período seco apresentaram freqüência mais elevada na maioria das lesões infecciosas podais. As patologias podais observada nesses animais foram erosão de talão (grupo1, dermatite digital, dermatite interdigital e hiperplasia interdigital (grupo2. As vacas criadas a pasto o ano todo apresentaram uma diminuição nas ocorrências de lesões no período seco, indicando uma relação entre as lesões do grupo 1 e 3 (hemorragia de sola, doença da linha branca e sola dupla com os índices pluviométricos. As condições higiênicas das instalações e dos piquetes também favoreceram para a ocorrência de lesões podais nos animais.

  7. Effect of mass medication with antibiotics at feedlot entry on the health and growth rate of cattle destined for the Australian domestic market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, P M V

    2004-03-01

    To examine the effectiveness of mass medication with long acting antibiotics at feedlot entry on lot-fed Australian domestic cattle during a period of high risk for bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Systematic allocation at feedlot entry of tilmicosin, long acting oxytetracycline or no antibiotic treatment, to cattle lot fed for the Australian domestic market. Comparisons of growth rate, disease occurrence and mortality were made between the groups at the conclusion of the feeding period. Cattle medicated with tilmicosin at 10 mg/kg body weight on entry to the feedlot grew 0.08 kg/d faster than cattle medicated with oxytetracycline at 20 mg/kg body weight and non-medicated cattle. There was no significant difference in growth rate between oxytetracycline medicated cattle and cattle not medicated with antibiotic at feedlot entry. Cattle medicated with tilmicosin at feedlot entry had 8 fewer cases of disease per 100 animals compared with cattle not medicated with antibiotic at feedlot entry. There was no significant difference in disease occurrence between oxytetracycline medicated cattle and those not medicated with antibiotic at feedlot entry. Mass medication with tilmicosin at feedlot entry of cattle destined for the Australian domestic market may be used to reduce disease occurrence and increase growth rate during periods of high risk for BRD.

  8. 9 CFR 91.5 - Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... surveillance system at slaughter plants: Canada and Mexico. (b) Brucellosis. All cattle over 6 months of age... agrees to share any findings of brucellosis in U.S. origin cattle with APHIS; (v) Cattle exported... a country that does not require cattle from the United States to be tested for brucellosis as...

  9. Inventory analysis of West African cattle breeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belemsaga, D.M.A.; Lombo, Y.; Sylla, S.; Thevenon, S.

    2005-01-01

    The improvement of livestock productivity and the preservation of their genetic diversity to allow breeders to select animals adapted to environmental changes, diseases and social needs, require a detailed inventory and genetic characterization of domesticated animal breeds. Indeed, in developing countries, the notion of breed is not clearly defined, as visual traits are often used and characterization procedures are often subjective. So it is necessary to upgrade the phenotypic approach using genetic information. At CIRDES, a regional centre for subhumid livestock research and development, such studies have been conducted. This paper focuses on cattle breed inventory in seven countries of West Africa as a tool for genetic research on cattle improvement. Data collection was done using a bibliographical study, complemented by in situ investigations. According to phenotypic description and concepts used by indigenous livestock keepers, 13 local cattle breeds were recognized: N'dama, Kouri, the Baoule-Somba group, the Lagoon cattle group, zebu Azawak, zebu Maure, zebu Touareg, zebu Goudali, zebu Bororo, zebu White Fulani, zebu Djelli, zebu Peuhl soudanien and zebu Gobra (Toronke). Nine exotic breeds, (American Brahman, Gir, Girolando, Droughtmaster, Santa Gertrudis, Holstein, Montbeliarde, Jersey and Brown Swiss) and five typical cross-breeds (Holstein x Goudali; Montbeliarde x Goudali; Holstein x Azawak; Brown Swiss x Azawak; and Brown Swiss x zebu peuhl soudanien) were also found. From this initial investigation, the areas of heavy concentration of herds and the most important breeds were described. The review has also indicated the necessity for a balance between improving livestock productivity and the conservation of trypanotolerant breeds at risk of extinction in West Africa. (author)

  10. The genetic architecture of climatic adaptation of tropical cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laercio R Porto-Neto

    Full Text Available Adaptation of global food systems to climate change is essential to feed the world. Tropical cattle production, a mainstay of profitability for farmers in the developing world, is dominated by heat, lack of water, poor quality feedstuffs, parasites, and tropical diseases. In these systems European cattle suffer significant stock loss, and the cross breeding of taurine x indicine cattle is unpredictable due to the dilution of adaptation to heat and tropical diseases. We explored the genetic architecture of ten traits of tropical cattle production using genome wide association studies of 4,662 animals varying from 0% to 100% indicine. We show that nine of the ten have genetic architectures that include genes of major effect, and in one case, a single location that accounted for more than 71% of the genetic variation. One genetic region in particular had effects on parasite resistance, yearling weight, body condition score, coat colour and penile sheath score. This region, extending 20 Mb on BTA5, appeared to be under genetic selection possibly through maintenance of haplotypes by breeders. We found that the amount of genetic variation and the genetic correlations between traits did not depend upon the degree of indicine content in the animals. Climate change is expected to expand some conditions of the tropics to more temperate environments, which may impact negatively on global livestock health and production. Our results point to several important genes that have large effects on adaptation that could be introduced into more temperate cattle without detrimental effects on productivity.

  11. Perspectives of fetal dystocia in cattle and buffalo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govind Narayan Purohit

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We review the causes of fetal dystocia in cows and buffalo. Two fetal causes are distinct fetal oversize and fetal abnormalities. Fetal oversize is common in heifers, cows of beef cattle breeds, prolonged gestations, increased calf birth weight, male calves and perinatal fetal death with resultant emphysema. Fetal abnormalities include monsters, fetal diseases and fetal maldispositions, and it is difficult to deliver such fetuses because of their altered shape. Although monsters are rare in cattle, a large number of monstrosities have been reported in river buffalo; yet also here, overall incidence is low. Diseases of the fetus resulting in dystocia include hydrocephalus, ascites, anasarca and hydrothorax. The most common cause of dystocia in cattle seems to be fetal maldispositions, of which limb flexion and head deviation appear to be the most frequent. We provide a brief description of the management of dystocia from different causes in cattle and buffalo. A case analysis of 192 and 112 dystocia in cattle and buffalo, respectively, at our referral center revealed that dystocia is significantly higher (P<0.05 in first and second parity cows and buffalo, and that dystocia of fetal origin is common in cows (65.62% but less frequent (40.17% in buffalo. In buffalo, the single biggest cause of dystocia was uterine torsion (53.57%. Fetal survival was significantly (P<0.05 higher both in cows and buffalo when delivery was completed within 12 h of second stage of labor.

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of clinical illness for bovine respiratory disease (BRD) diagnosis in beef cattle placed in feedlots: A systematic literature review and hierarchical Bayesian latent-class meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timsit, E; Dendukuri, N; Schiller, I; Buczinski, S

    2016-12-01

    Diagnosis of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in beef cattle placed in feedlots is typically based on clinical illness (CI) detected by pen-checkers. Unfortunately, the accuracy of this diagnostic approach (namely, sensitivity [Se] and specificity [Sp]) remains poorly understood, in part due to the absence of a reference test for ante-mortem diagnosis of BRD. Our objective was to pool available estimates of CI's diagnostic accuracy for BRD diagnosis in feedlot beef cattle while adjusting for the inaccuracy in the reference test. The presence of lung lesions (LU) at slaughter was used as the reference test. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to identify research articles comparing CI detected by pen-checkers during the feeding period to LU at slaughter. A hierarchical Bayesian latent-class meta-analysis was used to model test accuracy. This approach accounted for imperfections of both tests as well as the within and between study variability in the accuracy of CI. Furthermore, it also predicted the Se CI and Sp CI for future studies. Conditional independence between CI and LU was assumed, as these two tests are not based on similar biological principles. Seven studies were included in the meta-analysis. Estimated pooled Se CI and Sp CI were 0.27 (95% Bayesian credible interval: 0.12-0.65) and 0.92 (0.72-0.98), respectively, whereas estimated pooled Se LU and Sp LU were 0.91 (0.82-0.99) and 0.67 (0.64-0.79). Predicted Se CI and Sp CI for future studies were 0.27 (0.01-0.96) and 0.92 (0.14-1.00), respectively. The wide credible intervals around predicted Se CI and Sp CI estimates indicated considerable heterogeneity among studies, which suggests that pooled Se CI and Sp CI are not generalizable to individual studies. In conclusion, CI appeared to have poor Se but high Sp for BRD diagnosis in feedlots. Furthermore, considerable heterogeneity among studies highlighted an urgent need to standardize BRD diagnosis in feedlots. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B

  13. Tackling animal diseases to protect human health: As veterinary science celebrates cattle plague eradication, the inextricable link between human, animal and ecosystem health is increasingly appreciated

    OpenAIRE

    Rinaldi, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Veterinary research is gaining in importance not only because of the economic impact of animal diseases, but also because animals are a fertile reservoir of zoonoses; pathogens that could jump the species barrier and infect humans.

  14. Evaluation of a continuous indicator for syndromic surveillance through simulation. application to vector borne disease emergence detection in cattle using milk yield.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélien Madouasse

    Full Text Available Two vector borne diseases, caused by the Bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses respectively, have emerged in the European ruminant populations since 2006. Several diseases are transmitted by the same vectors and could emerge in the future. Syndromic surveillance, which consists in the routine monitoring of indicators for the detection of adverse health events, may allow an early detection. Milk yield is routinely measured in a large proportion of dairy herds and could be incorporated as an indicator in a surveillance system. However, few studies have evaluated continuous indicators for syndromic surveillance. The aim of this study was to develop a framework for the quantification of both disease characteristics and model predictive abilities that are important for a continuous indicator to be sensitive, timely and specific for the detection of a vector-borne disease emergence. Emergences with a range of spread characteristics and effects on milk production were simulated. Milk yields collected monthly in 48 713 French dairy herds were used to simulate 576 disease emergence scenarios. First, the effect of disease characteristics on the sensitivity and timeliness of detection were assessed: Spatio-temporal clusters of low milk production were detected with a scan statistic using the difference between observed and simulated milk yields as input. In a second step, the system specificity was evaluated by running the scan statistic on the difference between observed and predicted milk yields, in the absence of simulated emergence. The timeliness of detection depended mostly on how easily the disease spread between and within herds. The time and location of the emergence or adding random noise to the simulated effects had a limited impact on the timeliness of detection. The main limitation of the system was the low specificity i.e. the high number of clusters detected from the difference between observed and predicted productions, in the absence of

  15. Role of Pasteurella granulomatis and Dermatobia hominis in the etiology of lechiguana in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladeira, S L; Riet-Correa, F; Pereira, D B; Carter, G R

    1996-07-23

    Attempts were made to reproduce bovine lechiguana, a disease associated with Dermatobia hominis and Pasteurella granulomatis infections. Suspensions of Pasteurella granulomatis were mixed with each of the following: saponin, oil adjuvant, ground Dermatobia hominis, or 5% mucin. Each preparation was inoculated into 6 cattle. Twelve more cattle, 6 of which received dexamethasone, were inoculated with bacterial suspension alone. Abscesses but no lechiguana was produced in all 36 cattle. After abscess regression, 12 cattle were reinoculated with a suspension of mouse-passed P. granulomatis. Only abscesses were produced. The intralymphatic inoculation of P. granulomatis in 6 cattle did not produce the disease. Eleven cattle infected naturally with D. hominis had lesions containing dead larvae. These lesions were inoculated with P. granulomatis. Nine cattle were experimentally infected with larvae of D. hominis that had been contaminated with the bacteria. No lechiguana lesions were produced in these 20 cattle. Six cattle with severe natural D. hominis infection were inoculated in the larval lesions with P. granulomatis. One developed lesions indistinguishable from those of natural lechiguana. The lesions regressed after treatment with chloramphenicol. D. hominis larvae and exudate from lesions caused by the fly were collected from 7 cattle on 3 farms and examined bacteriologically. P. granulomatis was isolated from the larvae and the exudate of a healthy calf from a farm where lechiguana had never been observed. These results suggest that P. granulomatis has a causal role in lechiguana, and that D. hominis may be a carrier of the bacterium. These observations suggest that lechiguana occurs when severe D. hominis lesions are infected with P. granulomatis. The apparent long incubation period, the negative results obtained in the other experiments, and also the infrequent occurrence of the natural disease suggest that lechiguana is a disease for which Koch's postulates are

  16. Survey of smallholder beef cattle production systems in different agro-ecological zones of Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkol, Pok; Sath, Keo; Patel, Mikaela; Windsor, Peter Andrew; Holtenius, Kjell

    2015-10-01

    A survey was conducted to better understand the contribution of farm productivity to rural household income and identify differences in production systems, feeding practices and development constraints to smallholder beef cattle producers in the four agro-ecological zones (AEZs) of Cambodia. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to interview 360 households in the four AEZs: I, the Great Lake Floodplain; II, the Mekong Floodplain; III, the Coastal and IV, the Plateau/Mountainous. In addition, samples of common nutritional resources used for cattle feed were collected for nutrient composition analysis, plus cattle were scored for body condition. Rice farming and cattle production were the most common sources of income in all AEZs. The average cattle herd size was 3.7 (SD = 2.4), but the majority of households raised 1-3 animals. The most common cattle management system was grazing with supplementation, mainly with rice straw and 'cut-and-carry' natural grasses fed during the wet season in all AEZs. The body condition score of all cattle types was 3.2 (SD = 0.8), except for cows in lactation that were 1.8. Major constraints to cattle production in AEZs I, II and III were lack of quality feed resources, capital for cattle production and concerns on breed quality, whereas in AEZ IV, diseases were identified as the main constraint. This survey confirms the importance of cattle to smallholders in the four AEZs. Interventions including farmer education to improve husbandry skills, increase the utilisation of forages and crop residues and address disease issues are necessary to enhance cattle production and rural livelihoods in Cambodia.

  17. Effectiveness and Cost Efficiency of Different Surveillance Components for Proving Freedom and Early Detection of Disease: Bluetongue Serotype 8 in Cattle as Case Study for Belgium, France and the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welby, S; van Schaik, G; Veldhuis, A; Brouwer-Middelesch, H; Peroz, C; Santman-Berends, I M; Fourichon, C; Wever, P; Van der Stede, Y

    2017-12-01

    Quick detection and recovery of country's freedom status remain a constant challenge in animal health surveillance. The efficacy and cost efficiency of different surveillance components in proving the absence of infection or (early) detection of bluetongue serotype 8 in cattle populations within different countries (the Netherlands, France, Belgium) using surveillance data from years 2006 and 2007 were investigated using an adapted scenario tree model approach. First, surveillance components (sentinel, yearly cross-sectional and passive clinical reporting) within each country were evaluated in terms of efficacy for substantiating freedom of infection. Yearly cross-sectional survey and passive clinical reporting performed well within each country with sensitivity of detection values ranging around 0.99. The sentinel component had a sensitivity of detection around 0.7. Secondly, how effective the components were for (early) detection of bluetongue serotype 8 and whether syndromic surveillance on reproductive performance, milk production and mortality data available from the Netherlands and Belgium could be of added value were evaluated. Epidemic curves were used to estimate the timeliness of detection. Sensitivity analysis revealed that expected within-herd prevalence and number of herds processed were the most influential parameters for proving freedom and early detection. Looking at the assumed direct costs, although total costs were low for sentinel and passive clinical surveillance components, passive clinical surveillance together with syndromic surveillance (based on reproductive performance data) turned out most cost-efficient for the detection of bluetongue serotype 8. To conclude, for emerging or re-emerging vectorborne disease that behaves such as bluetongue serotype 8, it is recommended to use passive clinical and syndromic surveillance as early detection systems for maximum cost efficiency and sensitivity. Once an infection is detected and eradicated

  18. A Prime-Boost Vaccination Strategy in Cattle to Prevent Foot-and-Mouth Disease Using a "Single-Cycle" Alphavirus Vector and Empty Capsid Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gullberg, Maria; Lohse, Louise; Bøtner, Anette

    2016-01-01

    vaccinated with these rSFV-FMDV vectors alone, anti-FMDV antibodies were elicited but the immune response was insufficient to give protection against FMDV challenge. However, the prior vaccination with these vectors resulted in a much stronger immune response against FMDV post-challenge and the viremia...... and a large post-challenge boost to the level of anti-FMDV antibodies was observed. This prime-boost system, using reagents that can be generated outside of high-containment facilities, offers significant advantages to achieve control of FMD by vaccination.......Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remains one of the most economically important infectious diseases of production animals globally. Vaccination can successfully control this disease, however, current vaccines are imperfect. They are made using chemically inactivated FMD virus (FMDV) that is produced...

  19. Application of the indirect enzyme-labeled antibody microtest to the detection and surveillance of animal diseases. [Brucellosis, cholera, and trichinosis in cattle and swine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, G.C. Clinard, E.H.; Bartlett, M.L.; Sanders, W.M.

    1976-01-01

    The rapid, indirect enzyme-labeled antibody (ELA) microplate test has been developed as a diagnostic and surveillance tool to aid in the control of animal disease. Data are presented, which illustrate the application of the test to viral (hog cholera), parasitic (trichinosis), and bacterial (brucellosis) diseases of animals. A greater than 95 percent correlation was observed between the hog cholera ELA test and the hog cholera serum neutralization test performed on over 2000 mixed hog cholera positive and negative field samples obtained during the 1976 New Jersey epizootic. Of 56 swine naturally infected with Trichinella spiralis at a level considered dangerous to man, all were ELA positive, while only one of 360 T. spiralis negative packing house sera was ELA positive. Preliminary experiments with bovine brucellosis (Brucella abortus) indicate that the ELA test is more sensitive than other test methods currently in use. ELA procedures should soon become tests of choice for the detection of antibodies to animal disease agents.

  20. Cattle producers' perceptions of biosecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Marnie L; Christley, Robert M

    2013-04-10

    The limited use of biosecurity practices by many in the farming community is likely to be due to a range of factors; further understanding of this issue is required. In this study, attitudes and behaviours of producers relating to selected biosecurity practices and the farming industry were studied by interviewing cattle farmers within a 100 km2 study area in north-west England using an interview-based questionnaire. Most producers appeared to be familiar with the broad concept of the term biosecurity, although risks due to indirect contacts, rather than direct (animal) contacts, were more frequently highlighted. Most producers felt the nominated biosecurity practices were in some way useful, however there was not always agreement between the usefulness of a practice and it being undertaken, and vice versa. In agreement with other studies conducted in the UK, farmers most preferred to obtain information and advice on biosecurity from private veterinarians, but also highlighted DEFRA as a source. This study highlights the importance of understanding the motivators and barriers behind the uptake of biosecurity practices on farms, as perceptions are variable. Further understanding of these issues is needed in order to more effectively communicate information in regards to herd health and disease prevention. By identifying differences in producers' attitudes, programs can be tailored specifically to individuals' needs.

  1. Cattle producers’ perceptions of biosecurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The limited use of biosecurity practices by many in the farming community is likely to be due to a range of factors; further understanding of this issue is required. In this study, attitudes and behaviours of producers relating to selected biosecurity practices and the farming industry were studied by interviewing cattle farmers within a 100 km2 study area in north-west England using an interview-based questionnaire. Results Most producers appeared to be familiar with the broad concept of the term biosecurity, although risks due to indirect contacts, rather than direct (animal) contacts, were more frequently highlighted. Most producers felt the nominated biosecurity practices were in some way useful, however there was not always agreement between the usefulness of a practice and it being undertaken, and vice versa. In agreement with other studies conducted in the UK, farmers most preferred to obtain information and advice on biosecurity from private veterinarians, but also highlighted DEFRA as a source. Conclusions This study highlights the importance of understanding the motivators and barriers behind the uptake of biosecurity practices on farms, as perceptions are variable. Further understanding of these issues is needed in order to more effectively communicate information in regards to herd health and disease prevention. By identifying differences in producers’ attitudes, programs can be tailored specifically to individuals’ needs. PMID:23574789

  2. "Subclinical" laminitis in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermunt, J J

    1992-12-01

    In dairying countries worldwide, the economic importance of lameness in cattle is now recognised. Laminitis is regarded as a major predisposing factor in lameness caused by claw disorders such as white zone lesions, sole ulcer, and heel horn erosion. The existence of subclinical laminitis was first suggested in the late 1970s by Dutch workers describing the symptoms of sole haemorrhages and yellowish-coloured, soft sole horn. In an attempt to clarify some of the confusing and often conflicting terminology, the literature on laminitis is reviewed. Disturbed haemodynamics, in particular repeated or prolonged dilation of arteriovenous anastomoses, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of both equine and bovine laminitis. Some characteristics of the vascular system of the bovine claw which may be of importance in the pathophysiology of the subclinical laminitis syndrome are therefore discussed. Clinical observations suggest that subclinical laminitis is a multifactorial disease. The different factors that are or may be involved in its aetiology vary in complexity and severity according to the management protocol of the animals. The possible involvement of subclinical laminitis in claw lesions is assessed.

  3. Demographics of cattle movements in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon Matthew C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The United Kingdom (UK government has been recording the births, deaths, and movements of cattle for the last decade. Despite reservations about the accuracy of these data, they represent a large and valuable body of information about the demographics of the UK cattle herd and its contact structure. In this article, a range of demographic data about UK cattle, and particularly their movements, are presented, as well as yearly trends in the patterns of movements. Results A clear seasonal pattern is evident in the number of movements of cattle, as are the reductions in movement volume due to foot and mouth disease outbreaks in 2001 and 2007. The distribution of ages of cattle at their time of death is multimodal, and the impact of the over thirty months rule is marked. Most movements occur between agricultural holdings, markets, and slaughterhouses, and there is a non-random pattern to the types of holdings movements occur between. Most animals move only a short distance and a few times in their life. Most movements between any given pair of holdings only occurred once in the last 10 years, but about a third occurred between 2 and 10 times in that period. There is no clear trend to movement patterns in the UK since 2002. Conclusions Despite a substantial number of regulatory interventions during the last decade, movement patterns show no clear trend since 2002. The observed patterns in the repeatability of movements, the types of holdings involved in movements, the distances and frequencies of cattle movements, and the batch sizes involved give an insight into the structure of the UK cattle industry, and could act as the basis for a predictive model of livestock movements in the UK.

  4. Study of citrullinaemia disorder in Khuzestan Holstein cattle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study investigated the occurrence of autosomal recessive genetic disease, citrullinaemia, in Khuzestan native cows and Iranian Holstein cattle. Genomic DNA was isolated from the blood of the cows (n = 330). The polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis was ...

  5. Detection of lipomannan in cattle infected with bovine tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early and rapid detection of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is critical to controlling the spread of this disease in cattle and other animals. In this study, we demonstrate the development of an immunoassay for the direct detection of the bovine bTB biomarker, lipomannan (LM) in serum using a waveguide-...

  6. Assessment of beef cattle fattening practices and its challenges in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    around Mekelle. Accordingly, data was collected from all (N=108) beef cattle fatteners in the study ... straints, such as shortage of feed (100%), shortage of land (78.7%), market problem (75.9%), and diseases ..... height, good body condition and big and stand-high hump, in addition to coat color and sex. According to the ...

  7. Serum antibody to neospora caninum in indigenous African cattle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sera from 78 indigenous cattle were tested, by the indirect fluorescent antibody technique (IFAT), for neosporosis. In vitro cultured Neospora caninum was used as antigen. Antibodies to Neospora at titres 1/640 and above were detected in two samples (2.6%), a titre considered diagnostic for the disease. All the other serum ...

  8. Capsid proteins from field strains of foot-and-mouth disease virus confer a pathogenic phenotype in cattle on an attenuated, cell-culture-adapted virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtner, Anette; Kakker, Naresh K.; Barbezange, Cyril

    2011-01-01

    Chimeric foot-and-mouth disease viruses (FMDVs) have been generated from plasmids containing full-length FMDV cDNAs and characterized. The parental virus cDNA was derived from the cell-culture-adapted O1Kaufbeuren B64 (O1K B64) strain. Chimeric viruses, containing capsid coding sequences derived ...

  9. Complete Genome Sequences of Four Foot-and-Mouth Disease Viruses of Serotype South African Territories 1 (SAT 1), Topotype X, Isolated from Cattle in Nigeria in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbussche, Frank; Mathijs, Elisabeth; Ularamu, Hussaini G; Ehizibolo, David O; Haegeman, Andy; Lefebvre, David; Lazarus, David D; Wungak, Yiltawe S; De Vleeschauwer, Annebel R; Van Borm, Steven; De Clercq, Kris

    2017-10-19

    The complete genome sequences of four foot-and-mouth disease viruses of South African territories 1 (SAT 1) serotype are reported. These viruses originate from an outbreak in Nigeria in 2015 and belong to the novel SAT 1 topotype X from the west and central African virus pool. Copyright © 2017 Vandenbussche et al.

  10. Application of non-structural protein antibody tests in substantiating freedom from foot-and-mouth disease virus infection after emergency vaccination of cattle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paton, D.J.; Clerq, De K.; Greiner, M.; Dekker, A.; Brocchi, E.; Bergmann, I.E.; Sammin, D.J.; Gubbins, S.; Parida, S.

    2006-01-01

    There has been much debate about the use of the so-called ¿vaccinate-to-live¿ policy for the control of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in Europe, according to which, spread of the FMD virus (FMDV) from future outbreaks could be controlled by a short period of ¿emergency¿ vaccination of surrounding

  11. Nutritional strategies to optimize dairy cattle immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordillo, L M

    2016-06-01

    Dairy cattle are susceptible to increased incidence and severity of both metabolic and infectious diseases during the periparturient period. A major contributing factor to increased health disorders is alterations in bovine immune mechanisms. Indeed, uncontrolled inflammation is a major contributing factor and a common link among several economically important infectious and metabolic diseases including mastitis, retained placenta, metritis, displaced abomasum, and ketosis. The nutritional status of dairy cows and the metabolism of specific nutrients are critical regulators of immune cell function. There is now a greater appreciation that certain mediators of the immune system can have a reciprocal effect on the metabolism of nutrients. Thus, any disturbances in nutritional or immunological homeostasis can provide deleterious feedback loops that can further enhance health disorders, increase production losses, and decrease the availability of safe and nutritious dairy foods for a growing global population. This review will discuss the complex interactions between nutrient metabolism and immune functions in periparturient dairy cattle. Details of how either deficiencies or overexposure to macro- and micronutrients can contribute to immune dysfunction and the subsequent development of health disorders will be presented. Specifically, the ways in which altered nutrient metabolism and oxidative stress can interact to compromise the immune system in transition cows will be discussed. A better understanding of the linkages between nutrition and immunity may facilitate the design of nutritional regimens that will reduce disease susceptibility in early lactation cows. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pathogenesis of trypanosome infections in cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, M.; Morrison, W.I.; Emery, D.L.; Akol, G.W.O.; Masake, R.A.; Moloo, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    The potential application of radioisotopes are not discussed in this review of trypanosome pathogenesis in cattle. Initially, structural changes in the lymphoid system are characterized by marked proliferation and germinal centre formation, whereas in long-standing infections the lymphoid organs become depleted. These changes appear associated with immunodepression. Anaemia dominates the clinical disease syndrome in bovine trypanosomiasis. It develops with the onset of parasitaemia and is largely haemolytic, resulting from increased red blood cell destruction by phagocytosis. Several factors may be involved in this process including haemolysins produced by the trypanosome, immunological mechanisms, fever, disseminated intravascular coagulation and an expanded and active mononuclear phagocytic system. During this phase of the disease, cattle respond well to chemotherapy. However, in later phases of the disease, when trypanosomes cannot be detected, the anaemia sometimes persists and animals do not respond to treatment. Concerning the underlying mechanisms responsible for the anaemia, continued red cell destruction combined with some dyshaemopoiesis, associated with a defect in iron metabolism, appears responsible. Widespread tissue degeneration occurs. Organs particularly severely affected include the heart. Death in bovine trypanosomiasis is presumably due to a combination of anaemia, microcirculatory disturbances and myocardial damage. The factors incriminated in tissue damage probably vary with the species of trypanosome involved, although under natural field conditions it is common to find T. congolense, T. vivax and T. brucei in one animal. Likely pathogenic mechanisms in bovine include anoxia as a result of anaemia, microcirculatory disorders and hypersensitivity reactions

  13. Predisposing factors of laminitis in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermunt, J J; Greenough, P R

    1994-01-01

    Laminitis is regarded as a major predisposing factor in lameness caused by claw disorders. Despite intensive study, both by experiment and by clinical observation, knowledge of the precise aetiology and pathogenesis of bovine laminitis is still incomplete. It is often hypothesized that changes in the micro-circulation of the corum (dermis) of the bovine claw contribute significantly to the development of laminitis; arteriovenous anastomoses (AVAs) playing a crucial role. Many factors have been implicated as contributing causes of laminitis in cattle; the disease has a multifactorial aetiology. The cause of laminitis should be considered as a combination of predisposing factors leading to vascular (AVAs in particular) reactivity and inhibition of normal horn synthesis. Nutrition, disease, management and behaviour appear to be closely involved in the pathogenesis of bovine laminitis. The major factors predisposing to laminitis in cattle, as reported or suggested in the literature, are reviewed, including systemic disease, nutrition (barley grain, protein, carbohydrate and fibre), management (housing, bedding and exercise), calving, season, age, growth, genetics, conformation and behaviour.

  14. Sarcocystis infection in slaughtered cattle in Zango abattoir, Zaria, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ifeoma Nancy Obijiaku

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sarcocystis infection is a parasitic zoonosis, which may cause acute and fatal clinical diseases in susceptible cattle. When raw or undercooked infected beef is consumed by man, it could result in intestinal sarcocystosis. Aim: This study aimed at determining the prevalence of Sarcocystis infection in slaughtered cattle in Zaria, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in which oesophagus and diaphragm samples were collected from 200 slaughtered cattle and analysed by pepsin-hydrochloric acid digestion and stained with Giemsa. Histological sections of tissues were prepared and stained with haematoxylin and eosin. Results: Eighty-five (42.5 % were positive for Sarcocystis species. Sarcocysts ranged from 228.8 to 1215 μm in length and 46.93 to 114.40 μm in width. Sarcocysts were all microscopic in nature and 99.0 % had thin cyst wall ( 0.05. Seventy-five (88.2 % and 56 (65.9 % cattle had sarcocysts in the oesophagus and diaphragm respectively. There was a significant difference in the distribution of sarcocysts between the oesophagus and diaphragm (p < 0.05. Conclusion: This study has established in the study area the prevalence of Sarcocystis infection in cattle using tissue digestion method and histology. The identified species were of veterinary and public health importance. [Vet World 2013; 6(6.000: 346-349

  15. Application of non-structural protein antibody tests in substantiating freedom from foot-and-mouth disease virus infection after emergency vaccination of cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paton, D.J.; de Clercq, K.; Greiner, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    There has been much debate about the use of the so-called "vaccinate-to-live" policy for the control of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in Europe, according to which, spread of the FMD virus (FMDV) from future outbreaks could be controlled by a short period of "emergency" vaccination of surrounding...... is circulating or has established persistent infections (vaccinate-to-live), in order to rapidly regain the most favoured trading status of FMD-free without vaccination. The latter approach can be supported by testing vaccinated animals for the presence of antibodies to certain non-structural proteins (NSP...... ELISAs for antibodies to the non-structural proteins of foot-and-mouth disease. Vaccine, in press], this paper examines the ways in which serological testing with NSP ELISAs can be used and interpreted and the effect that this will have on the confidence with which freedom from infection can...

  16. Seroprevalence of Fasciola hepatica in cattle in Estonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersson, Jennifer; Jokelainen, Pikka; Lassen, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Fasciolosis, an infectious disease caused by the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica, affects grazing cattle world-wide. Liver fluke F. hepatica is prevalent and well-documented in cattle in many European countries, but for the Baltic countries such information is limited. This study investigated...... the seroprevalence and distribution of F. hepatica in cattle in Estonia. A total of 2461 individual serum samples from 218 farms distributed throughout all 15 Estonian counties, collected between February 2012 and March 2013, were tested for specific anti-F. hepatica antibodies using an in-house enzyme....... hepatica-positive herds, 14 (6.4%) had an in-herd seroprevalence higher than 25%. With respect to production type, the herd-level seroprevalence was 20.2%, 35.6%, and 36.4% in dairy, mixed, and beef herds, respectively. Animals from the two large islands had higher odds of testing F. hepatica...

  17. Prevalence and Classification of Amphistomes in Cattle and Buffaloes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounier M. Abdel Halium

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Amphistomes are snail-borne trematodes infect rumens and reticulums capable of causing acute and chronic disease in cattle and buffaloes. A total of 897 of cattle and buffaloes were examined by faecal examinations and by postmortem examinations in Giza and Garbia governourates. The collected Amphistomes were morphologically and histologically classified. We found that the incidence of Amphistomes in totally examined animals was 4.9%. The incidence was higher in the oldest animals(than young, in the spring (than other seasons and in Garbia (than Giza. But the incidence was the same in males and females. The collected Amphistomes were classified as Paramphistomum microbothrium, Paramphistomum cervi and Carmyerius gergaerius. We concluded that Amphistomes are prevalent among the examined cattle and buffaloes in Giza and Garbia governorates..

  18. A comparison of the clinical field efficacy and safety of florfenicol and tilmicosin for the treatment of undifferentiated bovine respiratory disease of cattle in western Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoar, B R; Jelinski, M D; Ribble, C S; Janzen, E D; Johnson, J C

    1998-01-01

    We compared the field efficacy of a new antibiotic, florfenicol, with tilmicosin in the treatment of naturally occurring undifferentiated bovine respiratory disease. Beef calves with rectal temperatures greater than 40.5 degrees C and signs compatible with undifferentiated bovine respiratory disease were entered into the trial. Calves were randomly assigned to receive either florfenicol (20 mg/kg bodyweight intramuscularly; 2 injections 48 h apart) or tilmicosin (10 mg/kg bodyweight subcutaneously; 1 injection). Clinical measures of efficacy included mortality, rectal temperature, illness index score, assessment of treatment success or failure, and the number of relapses or reinfections. Performance was assessed based on weight gains from day 0 to day 90. Two hundred and twenty calves entered the trial; 112 received florfenicol and 108 received tilmicosin. Seventeen deaths occurred between day 0 and day 90, but only 10 during the 28-day trial period. Seven calves receiving tilmicosin died, compared with 3 receiving florfenicol (P = 0.20). Of the 220 initial treatments, 45 (20%) were categorized as treatment failures; 27 in the tilmicosin group and 18 in the florfenicol group (P = 0.10). The number of calves experiencing a 2nd relapse was significantly different, with 17 of 30 (57%) calves on tilmicosin compared with 7 of 26 (27%) calves on florfenicol relapsing at least twice (P = 0.02). Average daily gains over 90 days were 1.55 kg/day for florfenicol-treated calves and 1.51 kg/day for tilmicosin-treated calves. No significant adverse reactions were noticed with either drug. Results indicate that florfenicol and tilmicosin are comparable in the treatment of undifferentiated bovine respiratory disease in western Canada. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:9524721

  19. Unrecognized circulation of SAT 1 foot-and-mouth disease virus in cattle herds around Queen Elizabeth National Park in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhikusooka, Moses Tefula; Ayebazibwe, Chrisostom; Namatovu, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is endemic in Uganda in spite of the control measures used. Various aspects of the maintenance and circulation of FMD viruses (FMDV) in Uganda are not well understood; these include the role of the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) as a reservoir for FMDV. To better...... serum samples had detectable antibodies against FMDV non-structural proteins (NSPs) using a pan-serotypic assay. Within these 37 sera, antibody titres ≥ 80 against the structural proteins of serotypes O, SAT 1, SAT 2 and SAT 3 were detected by ELISA in 5, 7, 4 and 3 samples, respectively, while...

  20. 9 CFR 78.12 - Cattle from quarantined areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.12 Cattle from quarantined areas. Not... cattle. Brucellosis reactor cattle may be moved interstate in accordance with § 78.7. (c) Brucellosis exposed cattle. Brucellosis exposed cattle may be moved interstate in accordance with § 78.8(a) or (b). (d...

  1. First confirmation of foot and mouth disease virus serotype SAT-1 in cattle and small ruminants in Ethiopia in 2007/08.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legesse, Yoseph; Asfaw, Yilkal; Sahle, Mesfin; Ayelet, Gelagay; Jenberie, Shiferaw; Negussie, Haileleul

    2013-06-01

    The study was conducted in three regional states of Ethiopia: Amhara, Oromia, and the Southern Nations Nationalities and people regional state from August 2007 to April 2008 with the objective of identifying the foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotypes circulating in the region. Two serotypes were recorded from epithelial tissue and oesophageal-pharyngeal (OP) fluid that were taken from outbreaks in study regions of Ethiopia. Serotype O FMDV was identified in Girar Jarso, Yabello, and Ankesha Guagusa districts while SAT-1 was isolated in Surma and Maji districts from tissue samples and this was the first report of the FMDV serotype in Ethiopia. Similarly, the OP fluid samples were found positive for SAT-1 FMDV in Maji and Surma districts.

  2. Diagnosis of cattle diseases endemic to sub-Saharan Africa: evaluating a low cost decision support tool in use by veterinary personnel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark C Eisler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diagnosis is key to control and prevention of livestock diseases. In areas of sub-Saharan Africa where private practitioners rarely replace Government veterinary services reduced in effectiveness by structural adjustment programmes, those who remain lack resources for diagnosis and might benefit from decision support. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated whether a low-cost diagnostic decision support tool would lead to changes in clinical diagnostic practice by fifteen veterinary and animal health officers undertaking primary animal healthcare in Uganda. The eight diseases covered by the tool included 98% of all bovine diagnoses made before or after its introduction. It may therefore inform proportional morbidity in the area; breed, age and geographic location effects were consistent with current epidemiological understanding. Trypanosomosis, theileriosis, anaplasmosis, and parasitic gastroenteritis were the most common conditions among 713 bovine clinical cases diagnosed prior to introduction of the tool. Thereafter, in 747 bovine clinical cases estimated proportional morbidity of fasciolosis doubled, while theileriosis and parasitic gastroenteritis were diagnosed less commonly and the average number of clinical signs increased from 3.5 to 4.9 per case, with 28% of cases reporting six or more signs compared to 3% beforehand. Anaemia/pallor, weakness and staring coat contributed most to this increase, approximately doubling in number and were recorded in over half of all cases. Finally, although lack of a gold standard hindered objective assessment of whether the tool improved the reliability of diagnosis, informative concordance and misclassification matrices yielded useful insights into its role in the diagnostic process. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The diagnostic decision support tool covered the majority of diagnoses made before or after its introduction, leading to a significant increase in the number of clinical signs

  3. Sexual behaviour in cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    Short duration or weak expression of oestrus are frequently cited as major reasons for poor results when artificial insemination of Bos indicus breeds is attempted. The existing literature on sexual behaviour certainly indicates that oestrus sometimes lasts for only a few hours in Bos indicus, but similar patterns are also reported in Bos taurus animals. The period of sexual receptivity in suckled Hereford or Hereford-dairy cross-breds maintained in small, totally confined groups ranged from 1 to 18 h, with a mean of 4.4 h and a median of 3.5 h. In totally confined Holstein cows the onset of the LH surge always followed the beginning of homosexual activity by 1 or 2 h even when the period of receptivity was very short. Thus, the beginning rather than the end of oestrus should be used for estimating ovulation time. The expression of sexual behaviour is modified by many factors, including environmental conditions, the number of peri-oestrous females in the group and the presence of observers. In Hereford beef, Holstein dairy and probably all other cattle breeds, the variability in duration and intensity of oestrous activity is very large, so generalizations on a typical individual behavioural pattern are not possible. (author). 39 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  4. Comparison of antemortem antimicrobial treatment regimens to antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of postmortem lung isolates from feedlot cattle with bronchopneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Catherine G; Love, Brenda C; Krehbiel, Clint R; Johnson, Nicholas J; Step, Douglas L

    2012-03-01

    A retrospective study was performed to compare the treatment regimens in feedlot cattle that died with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) to the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the microorganisms isolated from lungs. Forty-three cattle submitted by the Willard Sparks Beef Research Center (WSBRC) to the Oklahoma Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory for postmortem examination during 2007 had bronchopneumonia (acute = 16, subacute = 5, or chronic = 22). Lungs from cattle were cultured aerobically (40 cattle) and for Mycoplasma spp. (34 cattle). Susceptibility panels were performed. At least 1 BRD pathogen (Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, Histophilus somni, Mycoplasma bovis, or Arcanobacterium pyogenes) was isolated from 39 cattle, and 77% (30/39) had multiple organisms recovered. Mycoplasmal infections were common (25/34) and a major component of mixed infections (24/25). The majority (60%) of the M. haemolytica, P. multocida, and H. somni isolates were resistant to tetracycline. Most of the H. somni isolates (67%) were susceptible to tilmicosin (Ti), enrofloxacin (En), ceftiofur (Ce), and florfenicol, despite extensive treatment with Ti, En, and Ce (75% of isolates were from cattle that received each antimicrobial once). Most of the M. haemolytica (65%) and P. multocida (79%) isolates were susceptible to En and Ce, despite antemortem treatment of cattle with these antimicrobials. Hence, the current study reports a discrepancy between the antemortem treatment of clinical BRD and the susceptibility patterns of the bacteria isolated from lungs postmortem. Based on these findings, factors other than antimicrobial resistance are playing a role in the death of feedlot cattle with BRD.

  5. Comparative study of biogas from cattle dung and mixture of cattle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper compares the rate of biogas production of cattle dung and a mixture of plantain peels with cattle dung. 18kg of cattle dung mixed with 36kg of water were charged to a digester while 9kg each of cattle dung and plantain peels mixed together with 36kg of water were charged to a separate digester. Both digesters ...

  6. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a rare, degenerative brain disorder. Symptoms usually start around age 60. Memory problems, behavior changes, vision ... during a medical procedure Cattle can get a disease related to CJD called bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) ...

  7. Seasonal incidence of lameness and risk factors associated with thin soles, white line disease, ulcers, and sole punctures in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, A H; Shearer, J K; De Vries, A

    2009-07-01

    Lameness is a multifactorial condition with many causes. In this study, cow lifetime records were used to quantify the incidence of specific lameness-causing lesions and investigate factors associated with those lesions. Of primary interest were the effects of seasonality and the effects of thin soles (TS). Thin sole-induced toe ulcers (TSTU) occurring adjacent to the white line in the apical portion of the weight-bearing surface were distinguished from white line disease (WLD) occurring in the region of the abaxial heel sole junction. Sole (SU), heel (HU), and toe (TU) ulcers; TS; sole punctures (SP); leg injuries (INJ); and other (OTH) lesions (e.g., infectious diseases, laminitis, unclassified hemorrhage) were also considered. Data were collected from May 2004 through October 2007 and included records for 4,915 cows of which 1,861 had at least one recorded lameness event. Of these, 20% were TSTU, 20% OTH, 16% SU, 13% TS, 10% WLD, 8% HU, 6% INJ, 4% SP, and 2% TU. Annual incidence risk for lameness was 49.1%. Overall incidence rate for lameness was 1.41/1,000 cow-days, and rates for all lesions were highest in the summer. As parity increased, so did incidence rates for TS, SU, WLD, HU, and INJ. For TS, TSTU, and WLD, incidence rates were lowest in early lactation (16 to 60 DIM), whereas for SU, HU, TU, incidence rates were highest in mid lactation (61 to 150 DIM). Cox proportional hazard models for TS, TSTU, WLD, SU, HU, TU, and SP included age and year of first calving and milk production capacity. Prior/concurrent lameness events, season, parity, and stage of lactation were included as time-dependent effects. Prior/concurrent TS increased the hazard for all other lesions, particularly TSTU, and HU. Having any other prior claw lesion also increased the hazard for all lesions. Hazard was highest in summer for all lesions except TU. Stage of lactation was a significant effect in hazard of TSTU, which was lowest in mid lactation (61 to 150 DIM).

  8. Differential expression of miRNA-423-5p in serum from cattle challenged with bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an RNA virus that causes respiratory disease in cattle. MicroRNAs have been proposed as indicators of exposure to respiratory pathogens. However, microRNA profiles in cattle exposed to BVDV are currently nonexistent and few studies have been reported; therefore,...

  9. Cattle fever tick, Rhipicephalus annulatus (Acari: Ixodidae), and the quest for discovery of its natural enemies in the Balkan Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattle fever tick, Rhipicephalus annulatus (CFT), is a hard tick native to the Mediterranean region that is invasive in the southwestern USA. The tick is known to develop on cattle and white tailed deer, and it transmits two lethal diseases, piroplasmosis and babesiosis. Extensive use of acaricides...

  10. Characterization of Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Isolated in Organic Waste Products (Cattle Fecal Matter, Manure and, Slurry) from Cattle's Markets in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bako, Evariste; Kagambèga, Assèta; Traore, Kuan Abdoulaye; Bagre, Touwendsida Serge; Ibrahim, Hadiza Bawa; Bouda, Soutongnooma Caroline; Bonkoungou, Isidore Juste Ouindgueta; Kaboré, Saidou; Zongo, Cheikna; Traore, Alfred Sababenejo; Barro, Nicolas

    2017-09-22

    Cattle farming can promote diarrheal disease transmission through waste, effluents or cattle fecal matter. The study aims to characterize the diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) isolated from cattle feces, manure in the composting process and slurry, collected from four cattle markets in Ouagadougou. A total of 585 samples (340 cattle feces, 200 slurries and 45 manures in the composting process) were collected from the four cattle markets between May 2015 and May 2016. A multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), namely 16-plex PCR, was used to screen simultaneously the virulence genes specific for shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC). DEC was detected in 10.76% of samples. ETEC was the most prevalent (9.91%). STEC and EAEC have been observed with the same rate (0.51%). ETEC were detected in 12.64% of cattle feces, in 6.66% of manure in the composting process and in 5% of slurry. STEC were detected in 0.58% of cattle feces and in 2.22% of manure in the composting process. EAEC was detected only in 1% of slurry and in 2.22% of manure in the composting process. ETEC strains were identified based on estIa gene and/or estIb gene and/or elt gene amplification. Of the 58 ETEC, 10.34% contained astA , 17.24% contained elt , 3.44% contained estIa and 79.31% contained estIb . The two positive EAEC strains contained only the aggR gene, and the third was positive only for the pic gene. The results show that effluent from cattle markets could contribute to the spreading of DEC in the environment in Burkina Faso.

  11. Unethical evidence against cattle dignity during loading ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some activities that showed unethical practices against cattle during loading, transportation and off-loading were considered in this paper. Three major cattle market centres (Akinyele, Bodija and Oranyan) in Ibadan metropolis were used. Eighty (80) structured questionnaires were randomly administered to the cattle ...

  12. Pathogenic genotype of major piroplasm surface protein associated with anemia in Theileria orientalis infection in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suhee; Yu, Do-Hyeon; Chae, Jeong-Byoung; Choi, Kyoung-Seong; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol; Park, Bae-Keun; Chae, Joon-Seok; Park, Jinho

    2017-07-27

    Serious disease outbreaks in cattle caused by Theileria orientalis have emerged in the Asia-Pacific region. Genetic variables of the major piroplasm surface protein (MPSP) expressed on the surface of the piroplasm inside T. orientalis-infected erythrocytes are considered to be associated with variation in the pathogenicity of T. orientalis. Our study describes the clinically relevant MPSP types associated with anemia in Theileria-infected cattle. These results revealed that MPSP expression plays an important role in hematological alterations in Theileria-infected cattle, and that MPSP type 1 is strongly associated with bovine anemia, which can be a potential target for the prevention of bovine theileriosis.

  13. Cattle and their colours: A synchronic investigation of cattle colour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Northern Sotho, a separate colour lexicon is distinguished, containing terms which are believed to be used exclusively as colour terms to describe not only the colours, but also the colour patterning found among domestic animals, particularly cattle. According to current literature, the use of these terms is restricted to the ...

  14. Transcriptional profiling of cattle infected with Trypanosoma congolense highlights gene expression signatures underlying trypanotolerance and trypanosusceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naessens Jan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background African animal trypanosomiasis (AAT caused by tsetse fly-transmitted protozoa of the genus Trypanosoma is a major constraint on livestock and agricultural production in Africa and is among the top ten global cattle diseases impacting on the poor. Here we show that a functional genomics approach can be used to identify temporal changes in host peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC gene expression due to disease progression. We also show that major gene expression differences exist between cattle from trypanotolerant and trypanosusceptible breeds. Using bovine long oligonucleotide microarrays and real time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR validation we analysed PBMC gene expression in naïve trypanotolerant and trypanosusceptible cattle experimentally challenged with Trypanosoma congolense across a 34-day infection time course. Results Trypanotolerant N'Dama cattle displayed a rapid and distinct transcriptional response to infection, with a ten-fold higher number of genes differentially expressed at day 14 post-infection compared to trypanosusceptible Boran cattle. These analyses identified coordinated temporal gene expression changes for both breeds in response to trypanosome infection. In addition, a panel of genes were identified that showed pronounced differences in gene expression between the two breeds, which may underlie the phenomena of trypanotolerance and trypanosusceptibility. Gene ontology (GO analysis demonstrate that the products of these genes may contribute to increased mitochondrial mRNA translational efficiency, a more pronounced B cell response, an elevated activation status and a heightened response to stress in trypanotolerant cattle. Conclusion This study has revealed an extensive and diverse range of cellular processes that are altered temporally in response to trypanosome infection in African cattle. Results indicate that the trypanotolerant N'Dama cattle respond more rapidly and with a

  15. Characterization of Genetic Variation in Icelandic Cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars-Erik; Das, Ashutosh; Momeni, Jamal

    Identification of genetic variation in cattle breeds using next-generation sequencing technology has focused on the modern production cattle breeds. We focused on one of the oldest indigenous breeds, the Icelandic cattle breed. Sequencing of two individuals enabled identification of more than 8...... million SNPs and more than one million short indels. Annotation of the genetic variants identified a substantial number of functional SNPs and variants. The number of genetic variants identified in the Icelandic cattle breed is on the same level as previously seen in other studies on Holstein cattle...

  16. Role of cattle in the epidemiology of tick-bite fever in Zimbabwe.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, P J; Mason, P R; Manning, T; Slater, S

    1991-01-01

    Almost 100% of 52 cattle tested from the southern areas of Zimbabwe were found to have antibodies reactive with Rickettsia conorii compared with less than 30% of 120 cattle from the north. Steers artificially infected with R. conorii isolated from Amblyomma hebraeum were found to show no hematological or biochemical signs of disease but did seroconvert. Clinical signs of infection were restricted to regional lymphadenopathy and dermal erythema, edema, and tenderness at the inoculation site. R...

  17. Definition of the Cattle Killer Cell Ig–like Receptor Gene Family: Comparison with Aurochs and Human Counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Nicholas D.; Norman, Paul J.; Guethlein, Lisbeth A.; Ellis, Shirley A.; Williams, Christina; Breen, Matthew; Park, Steven D. E.; Magee, David A.; Babrzadeh, Farbod; Warry, Andrew; Watson, Mick; Bradley, Daniel G.; MacHugh, David E.; Parham, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Under selection pressure from pathogens, variable NK cell receptors that recognize polymorphic MHC class I evolved convergently in different species of placental mammal. Unexpectedly, diversified killer cell Ig–like receptors (KIRs) are shared by simian primates, including humans, and cattle, but not by other species. Whereas much is known of human KIR genetics and genomics, knowledge of cattle KIR is limited to nine cDNA sequences. To facilitate comparison of the cattle and human KIR gene families, we determined the genomic location, structure, and sequence of two cattle KIR haplotypes and defined KIR sequences of aurochs, the extinct wild ancestor of domestic cattle. Larger than its human counterpart, the cattle KIR locus evolved through successive duplications of a block containing ancestral KIR3DL and KIR3DX genes that existed before placental mammals. Comparison of two cattle KIR haplotypes and aurochs KIR show the KIR are polymorphic and the gene organization and content appear conserved. Of 18 genes, 8 are functional and 10 were inactivated by point mutation. Selective inactivation of KIR3DL and activating receptor genes leaves a functional cohort of one inhibitory KIR3DL, one activating KIR3DX, and six inhibitory KIR3DX. Functional KIR diversity evolved from KIR3DX in cattle and from KIR3DL in simian primates. Although independently evolved, cattle and human KIR gene families share important function-related properties, indicating that cattle KIR are NK cell receptors for cattle MHC class I. Combinations of KIR and MHC class I are the major genetic factors associated with human disease and merit investigation in cattle. PMID:25398326

  18. Pain evaluation in dairy cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gleerup, Karina Charlotte Bech; Andersen, Pia Haubro; Munksgaard, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Pain compromises the welfare of animals. A prerequisite for being able to alleviate pain is that we are able to recognize it. Potential behavioural signs of pain were investigated for dairy cattle with the aim of constructing a pain scale for use under production conditions. Forty-three cows were......, piloerection, was also significant but seemed difficult to use as it changed rapidly; p 

  19. Breeding strategies for tick resistance in tropical cattle: a sustainable approach for tick control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyma, K P; Gupta, Jay Prakash; Singh, Veer

    2015-03-01

    About 80 % of world cattle population is under the risk of ticks and tick borne diseases (TTBDs). Losses caused by bovine tick burdens in tropical countries have a tremendous economic impact on production systems. Chemical control of disease has been found to be ineffective and also involving large cost. To reduce our reliance on these chemical products, it is necessary to embark on programs that include habitat management, genetic selection of hosts, and development of a strain capable of inducing host resistance to ticks. Selection for disease resistance provide alternate method for sustainable control of TTBDs. Domestic livestock manifests tick-resistance by skin thickness, coat type, coat color, hair density and skin secretions etc. Zebu cattle have, on average, greater tick resistance than either European cattle or African cattle. Heritability for tick burden in cattle has been shown to range about 0.30, which is sufficient to result in the success of some programs of selection for tick resistance in cattle. To select animals at younger age, to reduce generation interval and to increase genetic gain, marker assisted selection is an important tool. There are also various MHC molecules which are associated with resistance to TTBDs.

  20. Reassessment of the potential economic impact of cattle parasites in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laerte Grisi

    Full Text Available The profitability of livestock activities can be diminished significantly by the effects of parasites. Economic losses caused by cattle parasites in Brazil were estimated on an annual basis, considering the total number of animals at risk and the potential detrimental effects of parasitism on cattle productivity. Estimates in U.S. dollars (USD were based on reported yield losses among untreated animals and reflected some of the effects of parasitic diseases. Relevant parasites that affect cattle productivity in Brazil, and their economic impact in USD billions include: gastrointestinal nematodes - $7.11; cattle tick (Rhipicephalus(Boophilus microplus - $3.24; horn fly (Haematobia irritans - $2.56; cattle grub (Dermatobia hominis - $0.38; New World screwworm fly (Cochliomyia hominivorax - $0.34; and stable fly (Stomoxys calcitrans - $0.34. The combined annual economic loss due to internal and external parasites of cattle in Brazil considered here was estimated to be at least USD 13.96 billion. These findings are discussed in the context of methodologies and research that are required in order to improve the accuracy of these economic impact assessments. This information needs to be taken into consideration when developing sustainable policies for mitigating the impact of parasitism on the profitability of Brazilian cattle producers.

  1. Salmonella Dublin patients in Denmark and their distance to cattle farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, Silvia; Anker, Janus C H; Ethelberg, Steen

    2017-03-01

    The Salmonella serotype Dublin is specifically adapted to cattle but may infect humans leading to severe disease. We described human S. Dublin cases and investigated a potential spatial relation between their addresses and cattle farms in Denmark. We extracted S. Dublin patient surveillance data, 2000-2014, and performed descriptive analyses. We geocoded residential and cattle farm addresses and mapped their incidence by region, province and municipality. We used linear correlation and spatial autocorrelation analysis at the municipality level and calculated the direct network distance from the nearest farm to the residential address of cases and 20,000 randomly selected citizens representing the background population. We identified 484 S. Dublin cases, 57% were male, median age 65 years. Seven patients (1%) acquired their infection abroad. The 30 days all-cause mortality was 13%. Overall, cumulative incidence was 8.0 per 100,000 inhabitants. Cattle farms were located predominantly in the western part of the country. Neither visual inspection nor correlation analysis indicated a relationship between municipalities with high incidences of human cases and cattle farms. Global Moran's Index analysis showed municipalities with high incidence of cases to be randomly distributed. We found equal direct network distances between cattle farms and both addresses of S. Dublin cases and the background population. We found S. Dublin infections in Denmark to affect the elderly, be serious and acquired domestically. Our findings indicate that the risk of infection with S. Dublin in Denmark is independent of living in the proximity to cattle farms.

  2. Integrated Analysis of Environment, Cattle and Human Serological Data: Risks and Mechanisms of Transmission of Rift Valley Fever in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, Marie-Marie; Chevalier, Véronique; Grosbois, Vladimir; Tran, Annelise; Andriamandimby, Soa-Fy; Durand, Benoit; Ravalohery, Jean-Pierre; Andriamamonjy, Seta; Rakotomanana, Fanjasoa; Rogier, Christophe; Heraud, Jean-Michel

    2016-07-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a vector-borne disease affecting ruminants and humans. Madagascar was heavily affected by RVF in 2008-2009, with evidence of a large and heterogeneous spread of the disease. The identification of at-risk environments is essential to optimize the available resources by targeting RVF surveillance in Madagascar. Herein, the objectives of our study were: (i) to identify the environmental factors and areas favorable to RVF transmission to both cattle and human and (ii) to identify human behaviors favoring human infections in Malagasy contexts. First, we characterized the environments of Malagasy communes using a Multiple Factor Analysis (MFA). Then, we analyzed cattle and human serological data collected at national level using Generalized Linear Mixed Models, with the individual serological status (cattle or human) as the response, and MFA factors, as well as other potential risk factors (cattle density, human behavior) as explanatory variables. Cattle and human seroprevalence rates were positively associated to humid environments (p<0.001). Areas with high cattle density were at risk (p<0.01; OR = 2.6). Furthermore, our analysis showed that frequent contact with raw milk contributed to explain human infection (OR = 1.6). Finally, our study highlighted the eastern-coast, western and north-western parts as high-risk areas for RVF transmission in cattle. Our integrated approach analyzing environmental, cattle and human datasets allow us to bring new insight on RVF transmission patterns in Madagascar. The association between cattle seroprevalence, humid environments and high cattle density suggests that concomitant vectorial and direct transmissions are critical to maintain RVF enzootic transmission. Additionally, in the at-risk humid environment of the western, north-western and the eastern-coast areas, suitable to Culex and Anopheles mosquitoes, vectorial transmission probably occurs in both cattle and human. The relative contribution of

  3. Integrated Analysis of Environment, Cattle and Human Serological Data: Risks and Mechanisms of Transmission of Rift Valley Fever in Madagascar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Marie Olive

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever (RVF is a vector-borne disease affecting ruminants and humans. Madagascar was heavily affected by RVF in 2008-2009, with evidence of a large and heterogeneous spread of the disease. The identification of at-risk environments is essential to optimize the available resources by targeting RVF surveillance in Madagascar. Herein, the objectives of our study were: (i to identify the environmental factors and areas favorable to RVF transmission to both cattle and human and (ii to identify human behaviors favoring human infections in Malagasy contexts.First, we characterized the environments of Malagasy communes using a Multiple Factor Analysis (MFA. Then, we analyzed cattle and human serological data collected at national level using Generalized Linear Mixed Models, with the individual serological status (cattle or human as the response, and MFA factors, as well as other potential risk factors (cattle density, human behavior as explanatory variables. Cattle and human seroprevalence rates were positively associated to humid environments (p<0.001. Areas with high cattle density were at risk (p<0.01; OR = 2.6. Furthermore, our analysis showed that frequent contact with raw milk contributed to explain human infection (OR = 1.6. Finally, our study highlighted the eastern-coast, western and north-western parts as high-risk areas for RVF transmission in cattle.Our integrated approach analyzing environmental, cattle and human datasets allow us to bring new insight on RVF transmission patterns in Madagascar. The association between cattle seroprevalence, humid environments and high cattle density suggests that concomitant vectorial and direct transmissions are critical to maintain RVF enzootic transmission. Additionally, in the at-risk humid environment of the western, north-western and the eastern-coast areas, suitable to Culex and Anopheles mosquitoes, vectorial transmission probably occurs in both cattle and human. The relative contribution

  4. Doença granulomatosa sistêmica em bovinos no Rio Grande do Sul associada ao pastoreio de ervilhaca (Vicia spp Systemic granulomatous disease in cattle in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, associated with grazing vetch (Vicia spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio S. L. Barros

    2001-12-01

    adult Holstein cows from two farms in southern Brazil. In one of the farms four out of 42 cows (9.5% and in the other one out of eight cows (12.5% were affected. Clinical signs included, although not consistently, fever, pruritus, thickening and wrinkling of the skin with multifocal plaques of alopecia, conjunctivitis, nasal serous discharge, loss of weight, dramatic drop in milk yield, and diarrhea. The duration of the clinical disease was approximately two weeks. All clinically affected cows died, one was euthanatized; three were necropsied. In each of these animals there was a pattern of systemic lesions consisting of multifocal to coalescing grey-white soft to moderately firm nodules which infiltrated several organs but were particularly prominent in the myocardium, lymph nodes, spleen, adrenal gland and renal cortex. These lesions resulted in enlargement and disruption of the architecture of the invaded organ. Microscopically the lesions consisted of extensive cellular infiltration composed of variabe proportions of epithelioid macrophages, lymphocytes, plasma cells, multinucleated giant cells and eosinophils. Eosinophils numbers were usually large. This granulomatous infiltration caused degeneration and loss of parenchymal cells of affected organs. Intensity of lesions varied among the three cows and among individual organs. This is the first documented report on a systemic granulomatous disease in cattle associated with grazing vetch in Brazil.

  5. Developing Cattle Agribusiness in an Intergrated Coconut Plantation Area

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    Kusuma Diwyanto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Developing an integrated coconut beef cattle system could be prospective in view of both technical and economical aspects. The present agribusiness of coconut plantation as monoculture, has not met sufficient farmer’s income, because each hectare of land, only produces equivalent to 2,500,000 rupiahs per year. Constraints such as plant disease, fluctuation price of coconut and the large areas of old plants need to be solved seriously. Integrated coconut-cattle system (CCS in small holding scale region with Low External Input Sustainable Agriculture (LEISA approach is considered to be economically potential. Additional income is estimated increase 2 – 3 times than traditionally monoculture-based coconut production. About one percent (approximately 30,000 hectare of total coconut plantation can support 30,000 until 100,000 cattle per year. This will contribute mostly (90% of the national requirement of meat. Theoritically, when 10% of whole areas of coconut crop is integrated with cattle production, Indonesia could even export the meat.This program of CCS -based on coconut farming can be made posible, when it is supoported by sufficient fund, technology, supervision and condusive policy.

  6. Seroprevalence of Brucella abortus and Leptospira hardjo in cattle

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    S. Jegaveera Pandian

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to assess the seroprevalence of B. abortus and Leptospira hardjo in the cattle population of Bihar, this work was carried out. Materials and Methods: Randomly selected 450 cattle from nine districts of Bihar were serologically screened for antibodies against L. hardjo and B. abortus. DAS-ELISA for leptospira and AB-ELISA for brucella were carried out. Based on the results prevalence in each district and the state are reported herewith. Results: In this study, it was found that the seroprevalence of L. hardjo was 9.11% and that of B. abortus was 12.2% in Bihar. Indigenous cattle were found to be less susceptible to leptospirosis and brucellosis even though they accounted for 83.11% of the study population. Conclusion: Although there was no acute disease, antibodies detected against L. hardjo and B. abortus in the cattle population indicated the presence of chronic and subclinical infection, which could challenge the fertility of the animals.

  7. Comparative clinicopathological changes in buffalo and cattle following infection by Pasteurella multocida B:2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annas, S; Zamri-Saad, M; Jesse, F F A; Zunita, Z

    2015-11-01

    Haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) is an acute, septicaemic disease of cattle and buffalo of Asia and Africa caused by Pasteurella multocida B:2 or E:2. Buffaloes are believed to be more susceptible than cattle. In this study, 9 buffaloes of 8 months old were divided equally into 3 groups (Groups 1, 3, 5). Similarly, 9 cattle of 8 months old were equally divided into 3 groups (Groups 2, 4, 6). Animals of Groups 1 and 2 were inoculated with PBS while Groups 3 and 4 were inoculated subcutaneously with 10(5) cfu/ml of P. multocida B:2. Animals of Groups 5 and 6 were inoculated intranasally with the same inoculum. Both buffaloes and cattle that were inoculated subcutaneously succumbed to the infection at 16 h and 18 h, respectively. Two buffaloes that were inoculated intranasally (Group 5) succumbed at 68 h while the remaining cattle and buffaloes survived the 72-h study period. Endotoxin was detected in the blood of infected cattle (Group 4) and buffaloes (Groups 3 and 5) prior to the detection of P. multocida B:2 in the blood. The endotoxin was detected in the blood of buffaloes of Group 3 and cattle of Group 4 at 0.5 h post-inoculation while buffaloes of Group 5 and cattle of Group 6 at 1.5 h. On the other hand, bacteraemia was detected at 2.5 h in buffaloes of Group 3 and cattle of Group 4 and at 12 h in buffaloes of Group 5 and cattle of Group 6. Affected cattle and buffaloes showed lesions typical of haemorrhagic septicaemia. These included congestion and haemorrhages in the organs of respiratory, gastrointestinal and urinary tracts with evidence of acute inflammatory reactions. The severity of gross and histopathology lesions in cattle and buffalo calves that succumbed to the infection showed insignificant (p > 0.05) difference. However, inoculated buffalo and cattle that survived the infection showed significantly (p multocida B:2 than buffaloes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Carbon Footprint of Beef Cattle

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    Jim Dyer

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The carbon footprint of beef cattle is presented for Canada, The United States, The European Union, Australia and Brazil. The values ranged between 8 and 22 kg CO2e per kg of live weight (LW depending on the type of farming system, the location, the year, the type of management practices, the allocation, as well as the boundaries of the study. Substantial reductions have been observed for most of these countries in the last thirty years. For instance, in Canada the mean carbon footprint of beef cattle at the exit gate of the farm decreased from 18.2 kg CO2e per kg LW in 1981 to 9.5 kg CO2e per kg LW in 2006 mainly because of improved genetics, better diets, and more sustainable land management practices. Cattle production results in products other than meat, such as hides, offal and products for rendering plants; hence the environmental burden must be distributed between these useful products. In order to do this, the cattle carbon footprint needs to be reported in kg of CO2e per kg of product. For example, in Canada in 2006, on a mass basis, the carbon footprint of cattle by-products at the exit gate of the slaughterhouse was 12.9 kg CO2e per kg of product. Based on an economic allocation, the carbon footprints of meat (primal cuts, hide, offal and fat, bones and other products for rendering were 19.6, 12.3, 7 and 2 kg CO2e per kg of product, respectively.

  9. Selenium in Cattle: A Review

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    Youcef Mehdi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This review article examines the role of selenium (Se and the effects of Se supplementation especially in the bovine species. Selenium is an important trace element in cattle. Some of its roles include the participation in the antioxidant defense the cattle farms. The nutritional requirements of Se in cattle are estimated at 100 μg/kg DM (dry matter for beef cattle and at 300 μg/kg DM for dairy cows. The rations high in fermentable carbohydrates, nitrates, sulfates, calcium or hydrogen cyanide negatively influence the organism’s use of the selenium contained in the diet. The Se supplementation may reduce the incidence of metritis and ovarian cysts during the postpartum period. The increase in fertility when adding Se is attributed to the reduction of the embryonic death during the first month of gestation. A use of organic Se in feed would provide a better transfer of Se in calves relative to mineral Se supplementation. The addition of Se yeasts in the foodstuffs of cows significantly increases the Se content and the percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA in milk compared to the addition of sodium selenite. The enzyme 5-iodothyronine deiodinase is a seleno-dependent selenoprotein. It is one of the last proteins to be affected in the event of Se deficiency. This delay in response could explain the fact that several studies did not show the effect of Se supplementation on growth and weight gain of calves. Enrichment of Se in the diet did not significantly affect the slaughter weight and carcass yield of bulls. The impact and results of Se supplementation in cattle depend on physiological stage, Se status of animals, type and content of Se and types of Se administration. Further studies in Se supplementation should investigate the speciation of Se in food and yeasts, as well as understanding their metabolism and absorption. This constitute a path to exploit in order to explain certain different effects of Se.

  10. Monitoring Lameness in Cattle Using the Vitalimeter

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    Anna Poborská

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The most serious medical illness in breeding dairy cattle include diseases of the limbs, especially the hooves, which is a cause of premature decommissioning of the breeding. This is a crucial economic factor, because it can also significantly reduce the production of milk, and weight. It is therefore very important early detection of lameness. The aim of this study was to monitor the correct movement of dairy cows and subsequent detection of lameness through the automatic scoring system (vitalimeter, which facilitates the search for sick animals.

  11. Susceptibility to tulathromycin in Mannheimia haemolytica isolated from feedlot cattle over a three-year period

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    Trevor W. Alexander

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Mannheimia haemolytica isolated from feedlot cattle were tested for tulathromycin resistance. Cattle were sampled over a three-year period, starting 12 months after approval of tulathromycin for prevention and treatment of bovine respiratory disease. Nasopharyngeal samples from approximately 5,814 cattle were collected when cattle entered feedlots (N = 4 and again from the same cattle after ≥ 60 d on feed. The antimicrobial use history for each animal was recorded. Mannheimia haemolytica was isolated from 796 (13.7% entry samples and 1,038 (20.6% ≥ 60 d samples. Of the cattle positive for M. haemolytica, 18.5%, 2.9%, and 2.4% were administered therapeutic concentrations of tulathromycin, tilmicosin, or tylosin tartrate, respectively. In addition, 13.2% were administered subtherapeutic concentrations of tylosin phosphate in feed. In years one and two, no tulathromycin-resistant M. haemolytica were detected, whereas 5 isolates (0.4% were resistant in year three. These resistant isolates were collected from three cattle originating from a single pen, were all serotype 1, and were genetically related (≥ 89% similarity according to pulsed-field gel electrophoreses patterns. The five tulathromycin-resistant isolates were multi-drug resistant also exhibiting resistance to oxytetracycline, tilmicosin, ampicillin, or penicillin. The macrolide resistance genes erm(42, erm(A, erm(B, erm(F, erm(X and msr(E-mph(E, were not detected in the tulathromycin-resistant M. haemolytica. This study showed that tulathromycin resistance in M. haemolytica from a general population of feedlot cattle in western Canada was low and did not change over a three-year period after tulathromycin was approved for use in cattle.

  12. Syndrome of arachnomelia in Simmental cattle

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    Weppert Myriam

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The syndrome of arachnomelia is an inherited malformation mainly of limbs, back and head in cattle. At present the arachnomelia syndrome has been well known mainly in Brown Swiss cattle. Nevertheless, the arachnomelia syndrome had been observed in the Hessian Simmental population during the decade 1964–1974. Recently, stillborn Simmental calves were observed having a morphology similar to the arachnomelia syndrome. The goal of this work was the characterization of the morphology and genealogy of the syndrome in Simmental to establish the basis for an effective management of the disease. Results The first pathologically confirmed arachnomelia syndrome-cases in the current Simmental population appeared in the year 2005. By 2007, an additional 140 calves with the arachnomelia syndrome were identified. The major pathological findings were malformed bones affecting the head, long bones of the legs and the vertebral column. It could be shown that, with the exception of two cases that were considered as phenocopies, all of the paternal and about two-third of the maternal pedigrees of the affected calves could be traced back to one common founder. Together with the data from experimental matings, the pedigree data support an autosomal recessive mutation being the etiology of the arachnomelia syndrome. The frequency of the mutation in the current population was estimated to be 3.32%. Conclusion We describe the repeated occurrence of the arachnomelia syndrome in Simmental calves. It resembles completely the same defect occurring in the Brown Swiss breed. The mutation became relatively widespread amongst the current population. Therefore, a control system has to be established and it is highly desirable to map the disease and develop a genetic test system.

  13. Current status and its epidemiological consideration of Fasciola and Eurytrema infections in beef cattle of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okajima, Jungo; Shibata, Kazuhiko; Takahashi, Eiichi; Nagafuchi, Tsuneyuki; Okajima, Kazue; Nonaka, Nariaki

    2016-06-01

    To elucidate current status of fasciolosis and eurytremosis in beef cattle of Japan, inspection data of Tokyo Metropolitan Shibaura Slaughterhouse where beef cattle were shipped from all over Japan were analyzed, and questionnaire to farmers was conducted to assess the relationship between recognition of the disease occurrence in one's own farm and attention to the diseases. The occurrence of fasciolosis and eurytremosis in beef cattle gradually decreased from 18.6% to 0.06% and from 0.58% to 0.02% during the period of 1964 to 2010, respectively. When the current data from 2009 to 2012 were analyzed, the occurrence of fasciolosis was recognized in cattle produced and fattened all over Japan, indicating the disease was prevalent nationwide. While, 97.5% of Eurytrema infection were detected in cattle produced in Okinawa, Shimane and Kagoshima, indicating the disease was endemic in these regions. Higher occurrence (>0.7%) of fasciolosis was observed in minor breeds, such as Japanese Shorthorn. Japanese Black showed 0.09% and 0.05% of occurrence for fasciolosis and eurytremosis, respectively, but F1 crossbred with Japanese Black showed lower occurrence (0.007% and 0.002%, respectively). No tendency of occurrence in the age of cattle at slaughter was recognized, indicating the infections may have occurred at the growing and early fattening stage of cattle. The questionnaire survey revealed that farmers experiencing fasciolosis had more knowledge about the disease, however, factors, such as testing parasite infections and use of anti-Fasciola dewormers, were not affected by the recognition of occurrence.

  14. Evaluation of cardiac troponin I alterationsin dairy cattle with septicmetritis

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    majid fartashvand

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Metritis is an important disease in dairy cattle which causes economical loses including decrease in milk yield, increase calving interval, treatment costs and death of ill cases. Septic metritis usually occurs within 2-10 days after parturition, and characterized clinically with sever toxemia associated with purulent odorous uterine discharge with or without retained placenta. In this study, serum levels of cTnI were measured in 50 female Holstein cattle with septicmetritis and compared with normal cows. cTnI of serum in disease and control groups were 0.017 ± 0.008 and 0.005 ± 0.000 ng/dl, respectively. Heart rate, respiratory rate and rectal temperature in disease cases were significantly higher than normal cattle. There was significant correlation with cTnI and heart rate and rectal temperature. Endotoxemia is one of possible reasons of elevation of serum cTnI. Cytokines and endotoxins originated from gram negative bacteria that cause myocardium depression and ventricular dilatation. Furthermore impairment of left ventricle function is a significant effect of septic shock.

  15. Identifying temporal variation in reported births, deaths and movements of cattle in Britain

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    Christley Rob M

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The accuracy of predicting disease occurrence using epidemic models relies on an understanding of the system or population under investigation. At the time of the Foot and Mouth disease (FMD outbreak of 2001, there were limited reports in the literature as to the cattle population structure in Britain. In this paper we examine the temporal patterns of cattle births, deaths, imports and movements occurring within Britain, reported to the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA through the British Cattle Movement service (BCMS during the period 1st January 2002 to 28th February 2005. Results In Britain, the number of reported cattle births exhibit strong seasonality characterised by a large spring peak followed by a smaller autumn peak. Other event types also exhibit strong seasonal trends; both the reported number of cattle slaughtered and "on-farm" cattle deaths increase during the final part of the year. After allowing for seasonal components by smoothing the data, we illustrate that there is very little remaining non-seasonal trend in the number of cattle births, "on-farm" deaths, slaughterhouse deaths, on- and off-movements. However after allowing for seasonal fluctuations the number of cattle imports has been decreasing since 2002. Reporting of movements, births and deaths was more frequent on certain days of the week. For instance, greater numbers of cattle were slaughtered on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Evidence for digit preference was found in the reporting of births and "on-farm" deaths with particular bias towards over reporting on the 1st, 10th and 20th of each month. Conclusion This study provides insight into the population and movement dynamics of the British cattle population. Although the population is in constant flux, seasonal and long term trends can be identified in the number of reported births, deaths and movements of cattle. Incorporating this temporal variation in epidemic

  16. Natural infection of malignant catarrhal fever in Bali cattle: A case study

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    R Damayanti

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Malignant catarrhal fever in Indonesia is caused by Ovine herpes virus 2 and considered as a disease with high mortality rate causing degeneratif and lymphoproliferative disease in cattle, buffalo and other ruminants. A total number of fifteen Bali cattle were naturally infected by Malignant Catarrhal Fever (MCF. Those cattle were meant to be experimental animals of research on infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR, Septicaemia epizootica (SE, and bovine brucellosis. The clinical signs of those animals were sudden high fever, depression, anorexia, corneal opacity, mucopurulent oculo-nasal discharges and diarrhoea. Six of them were dead and the remaining cattle were slaughtered at extremis. On the basis of clinical, gross-pathological and histopathological findings, all cases were shown to be consistent and pathognomonic of MCF cases. These cases were regarded as an outbreak of MCF affecting Bali cattle which occurred during wet season and while in other paddock in that area there were a number of lambing sheep. This result confirms that Bali cattle is a very susceptible animal of MCF and the cases were very likely due to the spread of MCF virus from lambing sheep.

  17. ECONOMIC MODELS OF CATTLE PRICES: How USDA Can Act to Improve Models to Explain Cattle Prices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kingsbury, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    .... In addition, a number of structural changes are occurring in the cattle and beef industry. All these elements, and more, could be considered in developing a logical framework to explain cattle prices and producers' incomes...

  18. Sero-epidemiological survey and risk factors associated with bovine brucellosis among slaughtered cattle in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinseye, Victor O; Adesokan, Hezekiah K; Ogugua, Akwoba J; Adedoyin, Folashade J; Otu, Patricia I; Kwaghe, Ayi V; Kolawole, Noah O; Okoro, Oyinye J; Agada, Charity A; Tade, Adeniyi O; Faleke, Olufemi O; Okeke, Anyanwu L; Akanbi, Ibikunle M; Ibitoye, Mofoluwake M; Dipeolu, Morenike O; Dale, Emma J; Lorraine, Perrett; Taylor, Andrew V; Awosanya, Emmanuel A; Cadmus, Eniola O; Stack, Judy A; Cadmus, Simeon I

    2016-05-12

    Bovine brucellosis is endemic in Nigeria; however, limited data exist on nationwide studies and risk factors associated with the disease. Using a cross-sectional sero-epidemiological survey, we determined the prevalence of and risk factors for brucellosis in slaughtered cattle in three geographical regions of Nigeria. Serum samples from randomly selected unvaccinated cattle slaughtered over a period of 3 years (between December 2010 and September 2013) from northern, southern and south-western Nigeria were tested for antibodies to Brucella abortus using the Rose Bengal test. Data associated with risk factors of brucellosis were analysed by Stata Version 12. In all, 8105 cattle were screened. An overall seroprevalence of 3.9% (315/8105) was recorded by the Rose Bengal test, with 3.8%, 3.4% and 4.0% from the northern, southern and south-western regions, respectively. Bivariate analysis showed that cattle screened in northern Nigeria were less likely to be seropositive for antibodies to Brucella spp. than those from south-western Nigeria (odds ratio = 0.94; 95% confidence interval: 0.73-1.22). However, logistic regression analysis revealed that breed ( p = 0.04) and sex ( p £ 0.0001) of cattle were statistically significant for seropositivity to Brucella spp. The study found that brucellosis was endemic at a low prevalence among slaughtered cattle in Nigeria, with sex and breed of cattle being significant risk factors. Considering the public health implications of brucellosis, we advocate coordinated surveillance for the disease among diverse cattle populations in Nigeria, as is carried out in most developed countries.

  19. Sero-epidemiological survey and risk factors associated with bovine brucellosis among slaughtered cattle in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor O. Akinseye

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bovine brucellosis is endemic in Nigeria; however, limited data exist on nationwide studies and risk factors associated with the disease. Using a cross-sectional sero-epidemiological survey, we determined the prevalence of and risk factors for brucellosis in slaughtered cattle in three geographical regions of Nigeria. Serum samples from randomly selected unvaccinated cattle slaughtered over a period of 3 years (between December 2010 and September 2013 from northern, southern and south-western Nigeria were tested for antibodies to Brucella abortus using the Rose Bengal test. Data associated with risk factors of brucellosis were analysed by Stata Version 12. In all, 8105 cattle were screened. An overall seroprevalence of 3.9% (315/8105 was recorded by the Rose Bengal test, with 3.8%, 3.4% and 4.0% from the northern, southern and south-western regions, respectively. Bivariate analysis showed that cattle screened in northern Nigeria were less likely to be seropositive for antibodies to Brucella spp. than those from south-western Nigeria (odds ratio = 0.94; 95% confidence interval: 0.73–1.22. However, logistic regression analysis revealed that breed ( p = 0.04 and sex ( p £ 0.0001 of cattle were statistically significant for seropositivity to Brucella spp. The study found that brucellosis was endemic at a low prevalence among slaughtered cattle in Nigeria, with sex and breed of cattle being significant risk factors. Considering the public health implications of brucellosis, we advocate coordinated surveillance for the disease among diverse cattle populations in Nigeria, as is carried out in most developed countries. Keywords: Bovine brucellosis, RBT, Epidemiology, Public Health, Nigeria

  20. Antimicrobial resistance status of Enterococcus from Australian cattle populations at slaughter

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Kate E.; Duffy, Lesley L.; Fegan, Narelle; Jordan, David; Mellor, Glen E.

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial agents are used in cattle production systems for the prevention and control of bacterial associated diseases. A consequence of their use is the potential development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis that are resistant to antimicrobials are of increased concern to public health officials throughout the world as they may compromise the ability of various treatment regimens to control disease and infection in human medicine. Australia is a major exporter of beef; however it does not have an ongoing surveillance system for AMR in cattle or foods derived from these animals. This study examined 910 beef cattle, 290 dairy cattle and 300 veal calf faecal samples collected at slaughter for the presence of enterococci. Enterococcus were isolated from 805 (88.5%) beef cattle faeces, 244 (84.1%) dairy cattle faeces and 247 (82.3%) veal calf faeces with a total of 800 enterococci subsequently selected for AMR testing. The results of AMR testing identified high levels of resistance to antimicrobials that are not critically or highly important to human medicine with resistance to flavomycin (80.2%) and lincomycin (85.4–94.2%) routinely observed. Conversely, resistance to antibiotics considered critically or highly important to human medicine such as tigecycline, daptomycin, vancomycin and linezolid was not present in this study. There is minimal evidence that Australian cattle production practices are responsible for disproportionate contributions to AMR development and in general resistance to antimicrobials of critical and high importance in human medicine was low regardless of the isolate source. The low level of antimicrobial resistance in Enterococcus from Australian cattle is likely to result from comprehensive controls around the use of antimicrobials in food-production animals in Australia. Nevertheless, continued monitoring of the effects of all antimicrobial use is required to support Australia

  1. Chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle

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    S. Shekhar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle. Materials and Methods: 27 female cattle (21 arsenic affected and 6 normal were selected for cytogenetical study. The blood samples were collected, incubated, and cultured using appropriate media and specific methods. The samples were analyzed for chromosome number and morphology, relative length of the chromosome, arm ratio, and centromere index of X chromosome and chromosomal abnormalities in arsenic affected cattle to that of normal ones. Results: The diploid number of metaphase chromosomes in arsenic affected cattle as well as in normal cattle were all 2n=60, 58 being autosomes and 2 being sex chromosomes. From the centromeric position, karyotyping studies revealed that all the 29 pair of autosomes was found to be acrocentric or telocentric, and the sex chromosomes (XX were submetacentric in both normal and arsenic affected cattle. The relative length of all the autosome pairs and sex chrosomosome pair was found to be higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle. The mean arm ratio of X-chromosome was higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle, but it is reverse in case of centromere index value of X-chromosome. There was no significant difference of arm ratio and centromere index of X-chromosomes between arsenic affected and normal cattle. No chromosomal abnormalities were found in arsenic affected cattle. Conclusion: The chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle in West Bengal reported for the first time in this present study which may serve as a guideline for future studies in other species. These reference values will also help in comparison of cytological studies of arsenic affected cattle to that of various toxicants.

  2. Most important types of cattle behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Joksimović-Todorović Mirjana; Hristov Slavča; Davidović Vesna; Relić Renata; Stanković Branislav

    2008-01-01

    Behavior of cattle is a simple and easily established indicator of their health condition, production characteristics and welfare, showing whether and how the animal has adapted to the maintenance conditions. Essentially, all forms of cattle behavior are accompanied by certain physiological changes in the organism, and the basic moving forces of behavior are congenital. The moving forces of behavior of cattle are narrowed down to a certain number of biological needs (the need for food, water,...

  3. Compressão medular em bovinos associada à vacinação contra febre aftosa Spinal cord compression in cattle associated whit vaccination against foot and mouth disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luisa Alves Marques

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Relatam-se aspectos etiológicos, epidemiológicos, clínicos e patológicos de surtos de incoordenação motora observados após vacinação contra febre aftosa em bovinos nos estados da Paraíba e de Pernambuco. Os sinais de incoordenação motora foram observados em torno de 45 dias após a vacinação, realizada por via intramuscular nas regiões torácica e lombar e no local da aplicação havia aumento de volume. Um total de 24 animais foi acometido, sendo 6 no estado da Paraíba e 18 no estado de Pernambuco. Seis animais morreram e quatro foram eutanasiados. Nos animais eutanasiados, constataram-se miosite abscedativa com a presença de áreas amareladas irregulares multifocais a coalescentes com líquido esbranquiçado e leitoso na região do músculo Longissimus lumborum esquerdo (dois animais e massa amarelada firme que comprimia a medula espinhal entre as vértebras T11 e T12 (um animal e entre as vértebras L3 e L5 (um animal. Ao exame histológico, havia miosite e paquimeningite piogranulomatosa com áreas multifocais a coalescentes, contendo espaços claros e esféricos centrais de tamanhos variados que correspondem ao adjuvante lipídico da vacina da febre aftosa, removido o processamento para a histologia. Determinou-se o diagnóstico de lesão medular secundária à compressão por granuloma vacinal.This paper reports the etiological, epidemiological, clinic, and pathological features of an outbreak of incoordination observed after vaccination against foot and mouth disease (FMD in cattle in the states of Paraíba and Pernambuco. The signs of incoordination were observed approximately 45 days after vaccination that was applied in the toracic and lumbar region. A lump was found in the local of the vaccination.Twenty-four animals showed this signs, six in Paraíba and 18 in Pernambuco. Six animals died and four were euthanized. At necropsy exam were observed abscedative myositis with yellow irregular areas to multifocal coalescing

  4. Most important types of cattle behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joksimović-Todorović Mirjana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Behavior of cattle is a simple and easily established indicator of their health condition, production characteristics and welfare, showing whether and how the animal has adapted to the maintenance conditions. Essentially, all forms of cattle behavior are accompanied by certain physiological changes in the organism, and the basic moving forces of behavior are congenital. The moving forces of behavior of cattle are narrowed down to a certain number of biological needs (the need for food, water, sexual and other biological needs and congenital urges and instincts, such as the combative and maternal instincts. Cattle are grazing animals and they cannot exhibit all their congenital natural activities of behavior under intensive maintenance conditions. Different internal and external stimuli influence the types of behavior of cattle, changing the motivational activities of their organism. In the course of domestication, certain forms of behavior of cattle have sustained changes, some have adapted to the new conditions, and new ones have appeared as well. The social, reproductive, maternal, and feeding behavior of cattle in closed maintenance conditions has not changed fundamentally, but the model of its manifesting has changed. Furthermore, certain disorders in the behavior of cattle also appear as a consequence of the maintenance conditions, and they can also be of hereditary character. In order to promote welfare, cattle should be enabled to exhibit their natural behavior, but they should also be provided with an environment that has natural characteristics.

  5. Conservation of indigenous cattle genetic resources in Southern Africa's smallholder areas: turning threats into opportunities - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyamushamba, G B; Mapiye, C; Tada, O; Halimani, T E; Muchenje, V

    2017-05-01

    The current review focuses on characterization and conservation efforts vital for the development of breeding programmes for indigenous beef cattle genetic resources in Southern Africa. Indigenous African cattle breeds were identified and characterized using information from refereed journals, conference papers and research reports. Results of this current review reviewed that smallholder beef cattle production in Southern Africa is extensive and dominated by indigenous beef cattle strains adaptable to the local environment. The breeds include Nguni, Mashona, Tuli, Malawi Zebu, Bovino de Tete, Angoni, Landim, Barotse, Twsana and Ankole. These breeds have important functions ranging from provision of food and income to socio-economic, cultural and ecological roles. They also have adaptive traits ranging from drought tolerant, resistance to ticks and tick borne diseases, heat tolerance and resistance to trypanosomosis. Stakeholders in the conservation of beef cattle were also identified and they included farmers, national government, research institutes and universities as well as breeding companies and societies in Southern Africa. Research efforts made to evaluate threats and opportunities of indigenous beef cattle production systems, assess the contribution of indigenous cattle to household food security and income, genetically and phenotypically characterize and conserve indigenous breeds, and develop breeding programs for smallholder beef production are highlighted. Although smallholder beef cattle production in the smallholder farming systems contributes substantially to household food security and income, their productivity is hindered by several constraints that include high prevalence of diseases and parasites, limited feed availability and poor marketing. The majority of the African cattle populations remain largely uncharacterized although most of the indigenous cattle breeds have been identified.

  6. Conservation of indigenous cattle genetic resources in Southern Africa’s smallholder areas: turning threats into opportunities — A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. B. Nyamushamba

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The current review focuses on characterization and conservation efforts vital for the development of breeding programmes for indigenous beef cattle genetic resources in Southern Africa. Indigenous African cattle breeds were identified and characterized using information from refereed journals, conference papers and research reports. Results of this current review reviewed that smallholder beef cattle production in Southern Africa is extensive and dominated by indigenous beef cattle strains adaptable to the local environment. The breeds include Nguni, Mashona, Tuli, Malawi Zebu, Bovino de Tete, Angoni, Landim, Barotse, Twsana and Ankole. These breeds have important functions ranging from provision of food and income to socio-economic, cultural and ecological roles. They also have adaptive traits ranging from drought tolerant, resistance to ticks and tick borne diseases, heat tolerance and resistance to trypanosomosis. Stakeholders in the conservation of beef cattle were also identified and they included farmers, national government, research institutes and universities as well as breeding companies and societies in Southern Africa. Research efforts made to evaluate threats and opportunities of indigenous beef cattle production systems, assess the contribution of indigenous cattle to household food security and income, genetically and phenotypically characterize and conserve indigenous breeds, and develop breeding programs for smallholder beef production are highlighted. Although smallholder beef cattle production in the smallholder farming systems contributes substantially to household food security and income, their productivity is hindered by several constraints that include high prevalence of diseases and parasites, limited feed availability and poor marketing. The majority of the African cattle populations remain largely uncharacterized although most of the indigenous cattle breeds have been identified.

  7. Clinical study of toe ulcer and necrosis of the apex of the distal phalanx in 53 cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kofler, J.

    1999-01-01

    Clinical signs, causative factors, radiographic findings, type and duration of treatment or reason for killing were evaluated in 53 cattle (mean age: 5.3 years) suffering from toe ulcer and/or apical pedal bone necrosis. A total of 78 claws were affected. Four cattle suffered from a toe ulcer in one claw, 35 cattle showed osteolysis of the apex of the distal phalanx in a single claw and 14 cattle in two or three claws per cow. Overtrimming by means of a grinding disc and/or perforation of the sole was diagnosed as the major cause in 27 cattle (49%), laminitis in 30.2% and traumatic injuries in 11.3%. Radiography revealed a varying degree of osteolysis involving up to two-thirds of the pedal bone. Twenty-one cattle (39.6%) showing multiple toe disorders or involvement of one single claw with concurrent internal diseases were destroyed. In 23 cattle, the osteolytic bone was resected using a bone curette or hammer and chisel. Of these, the treatment was successful in 20 animals. The healing period ranged from 16-60 days when one claw was affected and from 43-53 days when two claws were affected. In five cattle, the digit was amputated

  8. Clinical study of toe ulcer and necrosis of the apex of the distal phalanx in 53 cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofler, J

    1999-03-01

    Clinical signs, causative factors, radiographic findings, type and duration of treatment or reason for killing were evaluated in 53 cattle (mean age: 5.3 years) suffering from toe ulcer and/or apical pedal bone necrosis. A total of 78 claws were affected. Four cattle suffered from a toe ulcer in one claw, 35 cattle showed osteolysis of the apex of the distal phalanx in a single claw and 14 cattle in two or three claws per cow. Overtrimming by means of a grinding disc and/or perforation of the sole was diagnosed as the major cause in 27 cattle (49%), laminitis in 30.2% and traumatic injuries in 11.3%. Radiography revealed a varying degree of osteolysis involving up to two-thirds of the pedal bone. Twenty-one cattle (39.6%) showing multiple toe disorders or involvement of one single claw with concurrent internal diseases were destroyed. In 23 cattle, the osteolytic bone was resected using a bone curette or hammer and chisel. Of these, the treatment was successful in 20 animals. The healing period ranged from 16-60 days when one claw was affected and from 43-53 days when two claws were affected. In five cattle, the digit was amputated.

  9. Brucellosis in cattle and micro-scale spatial variability of pastoral household income from dairy production in south western Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nina, Pius Mbuya; Mugisha, Samuel; Leirs, Herwig; Basuta, Gilbert Isabirye; Van Damme, Patrick

    2017-11-01

    Brucellosis in cattle and humans has received world-wide research attention as a neglected and re-emerging zoonotic disease with many routes of transmission. Studies of brucellosis in Uganda have emphasized occupational exposures and also revealed variations in prevalence levels by region and cattle production systems. To date, research linking pastoralist household income from dairy production to brucellosis and its transmission risk pathways do not exist in Uganda. We assessed whether spatial differences in unit milk prices can be explained by brucellosis prevalence in cattle along a distance gradient from Lake Mburo National Park in Uganda. Semi-structured interviews administered to 366 randomly selected household heads were supplemented with serological data on brucellosis in cattle. Statistical analysis included Pearson correlation test, multiple regression and analysis of variance (ANOVA) using SPSS version 17. Serological results showed that 44% of cattle blood samples were sero-positive for brucellosis. The results obtained from interviews put the statistical mean of household reported cattle abortions at 5.39 (5.08-5.70 at 95% CI, n=366). Post-hoc analysis of variance revealed that both sero-positive cattle and reported cattle abortions significantly were much lower when moving outwards from the park boundary (pbrucellosis management practices at the nexus of wildlife and livestock in Uganda. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A survey on biosecurity and management practices in selected Belgian cattle farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, Steven; Cay, Ann Brigitte; Laureyns, Jozef; Dewulf, Jeroen

    2014-11-01

    The shift from cure towards prevention in veterinary medicine involves the implementation of biosecurity, which includes all measures preventing pathogens from entering a herd and reducing the spread of pathogens within a herd. In Belgium no studies have considered the implementation of biosecurity measures in the daily management of cattle farms. Therefore the aim of the study was to map the current application of biosecurity measures in Belgian cattle farms in the prevention of disease transmission within and between farms. Between March 2011 and April 2013 the data were collected as part of a larger cross-sectional study, conducted to identify risk factors for reinfection with BVDV in cattle herds assumed free from BVDV. Questionnaire data from 33 dairy farms, 16 beef farms and 25 mixed (dairy and beef cattle) farms were analyzed using a combination of a linear scoring system, a categorical principal component analysis and a two-step cluster analysis to differentiate these farms based on their biosecurity levels and visit frequencies. Further enhancement of preventive measures considering external and internal biosecurity was still possible for each farm, as none of the farms obtained an overall high biosecurity level. Three groups of cattle farms were differentiated with a biosecurity level varying from low to high-medium, of which the group with the lowest biosecurity level mainly consisted of mixed farms. Animal-to-animal contacts with cattle from other herds were frequently possible as only 12% of the farmers purchasing cattle quarantined purchased animals at least three weeks and contacts over fences on pasture were possible in 70% of the herds. Basic biosecurity measures such as farm-specific protective clothing and boots were present in the majority of the farms, but they were insufficiently or incorrectly used. Cattle farms were very often visited by professional visitors of which the herd veterinarian, the AI technician and the cattle salesman most

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of ?Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos,? a Hemotropic Mycoplasma Identified in Cattle in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Mart?nez-Ocampo, Fernando; Rodr?guez-Camarillo, Sergio D.; Amaro-Estrada, Itzel; Quiroz-Casta?eda, Rosa Estela

    2016-01-01

    We present here the draft genome sequence of the first ?Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos? strain found in cattle in Mexico. This hemotropic mycoplasma causes acute and chronic disease in animals. This genome is a starting point for studying the role of this mycoplasma in coinfections and synergistic mechanisms associated with the disease.

  12. [Laminitis in cattle: a literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischer, C; Ossent, P

    1994-10-01

    Worldwide afflictions of the claws belong to the economically important diseases in dairy cattle. The significance of laminitis has gained importance in the last years since the condition is regarded as the most important predisposing factor for the development of lesions such as sole ulcer, white line disease and heel horn erosion. Apart from the clinical stages (acute, subacute, chronic, chronic-recurrent) there is also a subclinical form of laminitis which does not cause lameness. It is characterized by soft yellowish sole and heel horn with haemorrhages in the sole and along the white line. Laminitis is a multifactorial event in which nutrition, genetic disposition and the perinatal period, combined with the associated diseases of high-yielding cows, have a particular significance. Currently, two principally different hypotheses on the pathogenesis are discussed. The generally accepted theory bases on a disturbance in the microcirculation of the corium. According to the other theory the circulatory disturbances are secondary to changes which occur in the horn producing cells of the stratum basale of the epidermis. The predisposing factors and the pathogenesis of laminitis are discussed in the light of possible therapeutic and prophylactic measures.

  13. Retrospective analysis of cattle poisoning in Argentina (2000-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. García

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: A retrospective analysis (2000 to 2013 of cattle poisoning caused by toxic plants and other compounds was carried out in the Pampas region of Argentina by the Animal Health Group of INTA-EEA, Balcarce. During this period, 1263 reports of diseases of different etiologies (infectious, parasitic, toxic, metabolic and miscellaneous were recorded in cattle, by collecting anamnestic, clinical and pathological information. A toxic etiology was diagnosed in 21.1% of these reports. Iatrogenic poisoning caused by ionophores was the most frequently recorded etiology. Consumption of toxic plants (Wedelia glauca, Solanum glaucophyllum, among others, mycotoxins (Claviceps purpurea, Claviceps paspali, Epichloë coenophiala, among others, and plants producing cyanide and nitrates/nitrites were also commonly diagnosed. The high frequency of toxic episodes and the difficulties in their diagnosis by practitioners in our livestock production systems emphasizes the importance of this report.

  14. Comparison of two 3ABC enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for diagnosis of multiple-serotype foot-and-mouth disease in a cattle population in an area of endemicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bronsvoort, B.M.D.; Sørensen, K.J.; Anderson, J.

    2004-01-01

    . The nonstructural polyprotein 3ABC has recently been proposed as such an antigen, and a number of diagnostic tests are being developed. This paper evaluates the performance of two FMDV tests for antibodies to nonstructural proteins in an unvaccinated cattle population from a region of Cameroon with endemic multiple......-serotype FMD. The CHEKIT-FMD-3ABC bo-ov (CHEKIT) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (Bommeli Diagnostics/Intervet) is a commercially available test that was compared with a competitive 3ABC ELISA (C-ELISA) developed in Denmark. The tests were compared with the virus neutralization test as the "gold...

  15. Emergence of bovine ehrlichiosis in Belgian cattle herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyot, Hugues; Ramery, Eve; O'Grady, Luke; Sandersen, Charlotte; Rollin, Frédéric

    2011-06-01

    Bovine ehrlichiosis is a tick-borne rickettsial disease caused by Anaplasma phagocytophilum. The disease can also be transmitted to humans. Outbreaks in cattle have been described in many European countries. In Belgium, infections caused by A. phagocytophilum have been reported in humans and dogs; however, this paper details the first report of ehrlichiosis in cattle herds in Belgium. The first case described was in a dairy herd located in eastern Belgium. Clinical signs included hyperthermia, polypnea, and swelling of the limbs. The other case was diagnosed in a second, mixed purpose herd in western Belgium. Within the second herd, all of the affected animals came from the same pasture. All animals in that pasture showed recurrent hyperthermia, and some also showed signs of mastitis and late-term abortions. Blood smears and serology revealed the presence of A. phagocytophilum in the majority of animals with pyrexia. Furthermore, the presence of leptospirosis, Neospora caninum, and Q fever antibodies was tested by serological analysis, but all results were negative. Paired serology for Adenovirus, BHV-4, BHV-1, BVD, PI3, and RSV-B did not show any significant seroconversion. Milk samples from cows affected by mastitis revealed minor pathogens. Fecal testing for the presence of Dictyocaulus viviparus in the first herd was negative. Recurrent pyrexia in pastured cattle is a non-specific sign, and can be related to several different pathogens. Bovine ehrlichiosis is transmitted by the tick species Ixodes ricinus which is known to be present throughout Belgium. Belgian practitioners should include ehrlichiosis in their differential diagnosis when confronted with pastured cattle suffering from recurrent pyrexia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Analyses of the correlation between dermal and blood carotenoids in female cattle by optical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Julia; Darvin, Maxim E; Meinke, Martina C; Schweigert, Florian J; Müller, Kerstin E; Lademann, Jürgen

    2013-06-01

    Herd health programs for the maintenance of welfare and productivity in cattle need efficient tools for monitoring the health of individual animals. Recent reports demonstrate that the oxidative status is related to various stress conditions in dairy cows. Biomarkers, among other carotenoids, could serve as indicators of stress originating from the environment (e.g., heat stress or sun radiation) or from the animal itself (e.g., disease). To date, only invasive in vitro tests are available to assess the oxidative status in cattle. The present study compares the results of optical noninvasive in vivo measurements of dermal carotenoids in cattle udder skin using an LED-based miniaturized spectroscopic system (MSS) with those obtained by photometric analysis of beta carotene in whole blood samples using a portable device. Correlations between the concentrations of dermal and blood carotenoids were calculated under consideration of the nutritional status of the animals. Significant correlation (R = 0.86) was found for cattle with a moderate to obese body condition. Thus, the blood and skin concentrations of the marker substance beta carotene are comparable under stable stress conditions of the cattle. This demonstrates that the MSS is suitable for noninvasive assessment of dermal carotenoid concentrations in cattle.

  17. Characterization of promoter sequence of toll-like receptor genes in Vechur cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lakshmi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To analyze the promoter sequence of toll-like receptor (TLR genes in Vechur cattle, an indigenous breed of Kerala with the sequence of Bos taurus and access the differences that could be attributed to innate immune responses against bovine mastitis. Materials and Methods: Blood samples were collected from Jugular vein of Vechur cattle, maintained at Vechur cattle conservation center of Kerala Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, using an acid-citrate-dextrose anticoagulant. The genomic DNA was extracted, and polymerase chain reaction was carried out to amplify the promoter region of TLRs. The amplified product of TLR2, 4, and 9 promoter regions was sequenced by Sanger enzymatic DNA sequencing technique. Results: The sequence of promoter region of TLR2 of Vechur cattle with the B. taurus sequence present in GenBank showed 98% similarity and revealed variants for four sequence motifs. The sequence of the promoter region of TLR4 of Vechur cattle revealed 99% similarity with that of B. taurus sequence but not reveals significant variant in motifregions. However, two heterozygous loci were observed from the chromatogram. Promoter sequence of TLR9 gene also showed 99% similarity to B. taurus sequence and revealed variants for four sequence motifs. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that significant variation in the promoter of TLR2 and 9 genes in Vechur cattle breed and may potentially link the influence the innate immunity response against mastitis diseases.

  18. Major Gross Lesions of Lung in Cattle Slaughtered at Hawassa Municipal Abattoir, Southern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeryehun, Tesfaheywet; Alemu, Biruk

    2017-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted from November 2016 to April 2017, to estimate the prevalence of major gross lung lesions in cattle slaughtered at Hawassa Municipal Abattoir, southern Ethiopia. A total of 563 male cattle were examined by antemortem examination, while postmortem lung lesions were done using standard inspection procedures. Association between prevalence and the explanatory variables was estimated by way of chi-square/Fischer's exact tests using statistical packages for social science (SPSS) software. Upon postmortem examination, 96.6% (544/563) of cattle examined had various gross lung lesions. The most important lesions identified were hydatidosis, emphysema, congestion, and atelectasis with prevalence of 45.3%, 19.2%, 18.1%, and 6.4%, respectively. Based on origins of slaughtered animals, hydatid cyst, emphysema, and congestion were common in cattle that came from Tula area with prevalence of 46.3%, 20.4%, and 20%, respectively. The animals from Arsi-negelle and Hawassa were mostly affected by hydatid cyst with prevalence of 44.4% and 42.5%, respectively. Statistically significant association ( p = .038) was observed between prevalence of atelectasis and body condition of slaughtered cattle. In conclusion, the prevalence of hydatidosis was the major lesion in the lung of slaughtered cattle at Hawassa Municipal Abattoir. Therefore, appropriate disease control strategies should be put in place.

  19. Major Gross Lesions of Lung in Cattle Slaughtered at Hawassa Municipal Abattoir, Southern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesfaheywet Zeryehun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was conducted from November 2016 to April 2017, to estimate the prevalence of major gross lung lesions in cattle slaughtered at Hawassa Municipal Abattoir, southern Ethiopia. A total of 563 male cattle were examined by antemortem examination, while postmortem lung lesions were done using standard inspection procedures. Association between prevalence and the explanatory variables was estimated by way of chi-square/Fischer’s exact tests using statistical packages for social science (SPSS software. Upon postmortem examination, 96.6% (544/563 of cattle examined had various gross lung lesions. The most important lesions identified were hydatidosis, emphysema, congestion, and atelectasis with prevalence of 45.3%, 19.2%, 18.1%, and 6.4%, respectively. Based on origins of slaughtered animals, hydatid cyst, emphysema, and congestion were common in cattle that came from Tula area with prevalence of 46.3%, 20.4%, and 20%, respectively. The animals from Arsi-negelle and Hawassa were mostly affected by hydatid cyst with prevalence of 44.4% and 42.5%, respectively. Statistically significant association (p=.038 was observed between prevalence of atelectasis and body condition of slaughtered cattle. In conclusion, the prevalence of hydatidosis was the major lesion in the lung of slaughtered cattle at Hawassa Municipal Abattoir. Therefore, appropriate disease control strategies should be put in place.

  20. Analyses of the correlation between dermal and blood carotenoids in female cattle by optical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Julia; Darvin, Maxim E.; Meinke, Martina C.; Schweigert, Florian J.; Müller, Kerstin E.; Lademann, Jürgen

    2013-06-01

    Herd health programs for the maintenance of welfare and productivity in cattle need efficient tools for monitoring the health of individual animals. Recent reports demonstrate that the oxidative status is related to various stress conditions in dairy cows. Biomarkers, among other carotenoids, could serve as indicators of stress originating from the environment (e.g., heat stress or sun radiation) or from the animal itself (e.g., disease). To date, only invasive in vitro tests are available to assess the oxidative status in cattle. The present study compares the results of optical noninvasive in vivo measurements of dermal carotenoids in cattle udder skin using an LED-based miniaturized spectroscopic system (MSS) with those obtained by photometric analysis of beta carotene in whole blood samples using a portable device. Correlations between the concentrations of dermal and blood carotenoids were calculated under consideration of the nutritional status of the animals. Significant correlation (R=0.86) was found for cattle with a moderate to obese body condition. Thus, the blood and skin concentrations of the marker substance beta carotene are comparable under stable stress conditions of the cattle. This demonstrates that the MSS is suitable for noninvasive assessment of dermal carotenoid concentrations in cattle.

  1. The Impact of Crossbreeding in The Artificial Insemination Program on Reproductive Performance of Beef Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusuma Diwyanto

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Artificial Insemination (AI in beef cattle in Indonesia is widely practised. Nowadays, the goal of AI program is not clear; whether to produce: composite breed; terminal cross or as a commercial animal. In fact, farmer assisted by inseminator do the grading up toward Simmental or Limousine. In this paper, crossbreeding impact on reproductive performance of beef cattle in Indonesia is discussed. Farmers prefer the crossbred cattle resulted from AI because its male offspring has higher price than that of local breed. However, 50% of the offspring are female and are used as replacement stock. This AI practice resulted bigger cattle that need more feed. In the scarce feed condition, this bigger cattle become skinny and in bad shape. This leads to bad reproductive performance such as high ‘service per conception’ (S/C, 'long calving interval' and 'low calf crop'. Moreover, it produces less milk and results in high mortality rate of the offspring. In good management condition, crossbred cattle shows good performance, but often ‘day open’ is longer, since weaning time is postponed. That is why long calving interval still exists eventhough the S/C is low. Local cattle are very adaptive, resistant to tropical diseases and have high reproductive rate, high quality of leather and good quality of carcass. In scarce feed condition, local cattle are skinny but still can show estrous and get pregnant. In bad condition, they produce very small offsprings that die because of lack of milk from the cow. The availability of feed supply both in quantity and quality is the key factor in AI practices to maintain good body condition of crossbred and to produce good quality of offspring.

  2. [Abomasal ulcers in cattle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hund, Alexandra; Wittek, Thomas

    2017-04-19

    Abomasal ulcers lead to several problems. They cause pain resulting in a decrease in productivity and even the possible loss of the animal. Because they are frequently difficult to diagnose, information on their prevalence is variable. Additionally, therapeutic options are limited. Abomasal ulcers are graded as type 1 through 4, type 1 being a superficial defect and type 2 an ulcer where a large blood vessel has been eroded, leading to substantial blood loss. Types 3 and 4 are perforated abomasal ulcers leading to local and diffuse peritonitis, respectively. Causes of abomasal ulcers are multifactorial, for example, mistakes in feeding that lead to gastrointestinal disturbances or other diseases that induce stress. Ulcers can also result from side effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In principal, the pathophysiological cause is the disturbance of the balance between protective and aggressive mechanisms at the abomasal mucosa due to stress. Clinical symptoms vary and are mostly non-specific. Fecal occult blood tests, hematology and blood chemistry as well as ultrasonographic examination and abdominocentesis can help to establish the diagnosis. Ulcers can be treated symptomatically, surgically and medically. To prevent abomasal ulcers, animals should be kept healthy by providing adequate nutrition and housing as well as early and effective medical care. Stressful management practices, including transport and commingling, should be avoided.

  3. RUMINAL CONDITION BETWEEN MADURA CATTLE AND ONGOLE CROSSBRED CATTLE RAISED UNDER INTENSIVE FEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Umar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Each four young bulls of Madura cattle and Ongole Crossbred (OC cattle were used to study the efficiency of ruminal fermentation by comparing the proportion of Volatile Fatty Acid (VFA of these two breeds which were raised under intensive feeding. All the cattle were in about 1.5 years-old with an average body weight of 147.75 ± 14.57 kg and 167 ± 22.57 kg, for Madura and OC cattle, respectively. They were fed Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum hay, and concentrate feeding consists of pollard, soybean meal and rice bran for 10 weeks. Parameters measured were concentration of VFA at 0, 3 and 6 h post-feeding and pH. The concentration of VFA in both Madura and OC cattle was peaked at 3 h post-feeding, being 136.1 mmol and 158.9 mmol, respectively, and then were decreased at 6 h post-feeding at a level of 58.1 and 98.2 mmol, respectively. The proportion of acetic acid in Madura and OC cattle were 53.33% and 52.0% of total VFA, respectively, while the proportion of propionic acid and butyric acid were 28.80% and 17.87% for Madura cattle, and 30.71% and 17.28% for OC cattle, respectively. In addition, the Acetic/Propionic ratios were 1.85 and 1.69 for Madura and OC cattle, respectively. Rumen pH conditions of both cattle breeds tended to be basic, i.e. Madura cattle was ranged at 8.0-8.4, while the PO cattle was ranged at 7.6-8.4. In conclusion, both cattle breeds (Madura and OC cattle have a similar efficiency to utilize the feeds in the rumen.

  4. RUMINAL CONDITION BETWEEN MADURA CATTLE AND ONGOLE CROSSBRED CATTLE RAISED UNDER INTENSIVE FEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Umar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Each four young bulls of Madura cattle and Ongole Crossbred (OC cattle were used to study theefficiency of ruminal fermentation by comparing the proportion of Volatile Fatty Acid (VFA of thesetwo breeds which were raised under intensive feeding. All the cattle were in about 1.5 years-old with anaverage body weight of 147.75 ± 14.57 kg and 167 ± 22.57 kg, for Madura and OC cattle, respectively.They were fed Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum hay, and concentrate feeding consists of pollard,soybean meal and rice bran for 10 weeks. Parameters measured were concentration of VFA at 0, 3 and 6h post-feeding and pH. The concentration of VFA in both Madura and OC cattle was peaked at 3 h postfeeding,being 136.1 mmol and 158.9 mmol, respectively, and then were decreased at 6 h post-feeding ata level of 58.1 and 98.2 mmol, respectively. The proportion of acetic acid in Madura and OC cattle were53.33% and 52.0% of total VFA, respectively, while the proportion of propionic acid and butyric acidwere 28.80% and 17.87% for Madura cattle, and 30.71% and 17.28% for OC cattle, respectively. Inaddition, the Acetic/Propionic ratios were 1.85 and 1.69 for Madura and OC cattle, respectively. RumenpH conditions of both cattle breeds tended to be basic, i.e. Madura cattle was ranged at 8.0-8.4, while thePO cattle was ranged at 7.6-8.4. In conclusion, both cattle breeds (Madura and OC cattle have a similarefficiency to utilize the feeds in the rumen.

  5. TABLE PREVALENCE OF GIT NEMATODES IN CATTLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    A study was carried out on the prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes infection in naturally infected cattle in Ogbomoso area of Oyo State using standard parasitological techniques. The results indicated that out of the 1000 cattle examined, 30(3%) were infected and parasites identified were Haemonchus contortus.

  6. Enhancement of Cellulose Degradation by Cattle Saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Yasutaka; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Yoshimoto, Ryo; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Aburai, Kenichi; Kanai, Yoshihiro; Ruike, Tatsushi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Sugawara, Fumio; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2015-01-01

    Saccharification of cellulose is a promising technique for producing alternative source of energy. However, the efficiency of conversion of cellulose into soluble sugar using any currently available methodology is too low for industrial application. Many additives, such as surfactants, have been shown to enhance the efficiency of cellulose-to-sugar conversion. In this study, we have examined first whether cattle saliva, as an additive, would enhance the cellulase-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose, and subsequently elucidated the mechanism by which cattle saliva enhanced this conversion. Although cattle saliva, by itself, did not degrade cellulose, it enhanced the cellulase-catalyzed degradation of cellulose. Thus, the amount of reducing sugar produced increased approximately 2.9-fold by the addition of cattle saliva. We also found that non-enzymatic proteins, which were present in cattle saliva, were responsible for causing the enhancement effect. Third, the mechanism of cattle saliva mediated enhancement of cellulase activity was probably similar to that of the canonical surfactants. Cattle saliva is available in large amounts easily and cheaply, and it can be used without further purification. Thus, cattle saliva could be a promising additive for efficient saccharification of cellulose on an industrial scale. PMID:26402242

  7. Establishment and biological characteristics of Piedmontese cattle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-12

    Dec 12, 2011 ... (MDH) ruled out cross-contamination among cell lines. Karyotyping showed that the proportion of cells ... Key words: Piedmontese cattle, fibroblast line, biological characterization. INTRODUCTION. With high-yield ... Piedmontese cattle, originated in Piedmont region of northern Italy, has been distributed in ...

  8. Highly Divergent Hepaciviruses from African Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corman, Victor Max; Grundhoff, Adam; Baechlein, Christine; Fischer, Nicole; Gmyl, Anatoly; Wollny, Robert; Dei, Dickson; Ritz, Daniel; Binger, Tabea; Adankwah, Ernest; Marfo, Kwadwo Sarfo; Annison, Lawrence; Annan, Augustina; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Oppong, Samuel; Becher, Paul; Drosten, Christian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The hepatitis C virus (HCV; genus Hepacivirus) is a highly relevant human pathogen. Unique hepaciviruses (HV) were discovered recently in animal hosts. The direct ancestor of HCV has not been found, but the genetically most closely related animal HVs exist in horses. To investigate whether other peridomestic animals also carry HVs, we analyzed sera from Ghanaian cattle for HVs by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). Nine of 106 specimens from different sampling sites contained HV RNA (8.5%) at median viral loads of 1.6 × 105 copies/ml. Infection seemed unrelated to cattle age and gender. Near-full-genome sequencing of five representative viruses confirmed taxonomic classifications. Cattle HVs formed two distinct phylogenetic lineages that differed by up to 17.7% on the nucleotide level in the polyprotein-encoding region, suggesting cocirculation of different virus subtypes. A conserved microRNA122-binding site in the 5′ internal ribosomal entry site suggested liver tropism of cattle HVs. Phylogenetic analyses suggested the circulation of HVs in cattle for several centuries. Cattle HVs were genetically highly divergent from all other HVs, including HCV. HVs from genetically related equine and bovine hosts were not monophyletic, corroborating host shifts during the evolution of the genus Hepacivirus. Similar to equine HVs, the genetic diversity of cattle HVs was low compared to that of HCV genotypes. This suggests an influence of the human-modified ecology of peridomestic animals on virus diversity. Further studies should investigate the occurrence of cattle HVs in other geographic areas and breeds, virus pathogenicity in cattle, and the potential exposure of human risk groups, such as farmers, butchers, and abattoir workers. IMPORTANCE HCV (genus Hepacivirus) is a major human pathogen, causing liver failure and cancer. Unique hepaciviruses (HVs) were discovered over the last few years in animals, but the direct ancestor of HCV has not been found. The

  9. Dynamical Patterns of Cattle Trade Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajardi, Paolo; Barrat, Alain; Natale, Fabrizio; Savini, Lara; Colizza, Vittoria

    2011-01-01

    Despite their importance for the spread of zoonotic diseases, our understanding of the dynamical aspects characterizing the movements of farmed animal populations remains limited as these systems are traditionally studied as static objects and through simplified approximations. By leveraging on the network science approach, here we are able for the first time to fully analyze the longitudinal dataset of Italian cattle movements that reports the mobility of individual animals among farms on a daily basis. The complexity and inter-relations between topology, function and dynamical nature of the system are characterized at different spatial and time resolutions, in order to uncover patterns and vulnerabilities fundamental for the definition of targeted prevention and control measures for zoonotic diseases. Results show how the stationarity of statistical distributions coexists with a strong and non-trivial evolutionary dynamics at the node and link levels, on all timescales. Traditional static views of the displacement network hide important patterns of structural changes affecting nodes' centrality and farms' spreading potential, thus limiting the efficiency of interventions based on partial longitudinal information. By fully taking into account the longitudinal dimension, we propose a novel definition of dynamical motifs that is able to uncover the presence of a temporal arrow describing the evolution of the system and the causality patterns of its displacements, shedding light on mechanisms that may play a crucial role in the definition of preventive actions. PMID:21625633

  10. Animal diseases caused by orbiviruses, Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, Hafsa; Casal, Jordi; Alba, Anna; Allepuz, Alberto; Cêtre-Sossah, Catherine; Hafsi, Leila; Kount-Chareb, Houria; Bouayed-Chaouach, Nadera; Saadaoui, Hassiba; Napp, Sebastian

    2011-12-01

    Antibodies against bluetongue virus were detected in cattle, sheep, goats, and camels in Algeria in 2008. Antibodies against epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus were detected in cattle, but antibodies against African horse sickness virus were not detected in horses and mules. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease in northern Africa poses a major risk for the European Union.

  11. The nasopharyngeal microbiota of beef cattle before and after transport to a feedlot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Devin B; Timsit, Edouard; Amat, Samat; Abbott, D Wade; Buret, Andre G; Alexander, Trevor W

    2017-03-22

    The nasopharyngeal (NP) microbiota plays an important role in bovine health, comprising a rich and diverse microbial community. The nasopharynx is also the niche for potentially pathogenic agents which are associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD), a serious and costly illness in feedlot cattle. We used 14 beef heifers from a closed and disease-free herd to assess the dynamics of the NP microbiota of cattle that are transported to a feedlot. Cattle were sampled prior to transport to the feedlot (day 0) and at days 2, 7, and 14. The structure of the NP microbiota changed significantly over the course of the study, with the largest shift occurring between day 0 (prior to transport) and day 2 (P Mycoplasma at day 14. The functional potential of the NP microbiota was assessed using PICRUSt, revealing that replication and repair, as well as translation pathways, were more relatively abundant in day 14 samples. These differences were driven mostly by Mycoplasma. Although eight cattle were culture-positive for the BRD-associated bacterium Pasteurella multocida at one or more sampling times, none were culture-positive for Mannheimia haemolytica or Histophilus somni. This study investigated the effect that feedlot placement has on the NP microbiota of beef cattle over a 14-d period. Within two days of transport to the feedlot, the NP microbiota changed significantly, increasing in both phylogenetic diversity and richness. These results demonstrate that there is an abrupt shift in the NP microbiota of cattle after transportation to a feedlot. This may have importance for understanding why cattle are most susceptible to BRD after feedlot placement.

  12. Automated measurement of cattle surface temperature and its correlation with rectal temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HongXiang Kou

    Full Text Available The body temperature of cattle varies regularly with both the reproductive cycle and disease status. Establishing an automatic method for monitoring body temperature may facilitate better management of reproduction and disease control in cattle. Here, we developed an Automatic Measurement System for Cattle's Surface Temperature (AMSCST to measure the temperature of metatarsus by attaching a special shell designed to fit the anatomy of cattle's hind leg. Using AMSCST, the surface temperature (ST on the metatarsus of the hind leg was successively measured during 24 hours a day with an interval of one hour in three tested seasons. Based on ST and rectal temperature (RT detected by AMSCST and mercury thermometer, respectively, a linear mixed model was established, regarding both the time point and seasonal factors as the fixed effects. Unary linear correlation and Bland-Altman analysis results indicated that the temperatures measured by AMSCST were closely correlated to those measured by mercury thermometer (R2 = 0.998, suggesting that the AMSCST is an accurate and reliable way to detect cattle's body temperature. Statistical analysis showed that the differences of STs among the three seasons, or among the different time points were significant (P<0.05, and the differences of RTs among the different time points were similarly significant (P<0.05. The prediction accuracy of the mixed model was verified by 10-fold cross validation. The average difference between measured RT and predicted RT was about 0.10 ± 0.10°C with the association coefficient of 0.644, indicating the feasibility of this model in measuring cattle body temperature. Therefore, an automated technology for accurately measuring cattle body temperature was accomplished by inventing an optimal device and establishing the AMSCST system.

  13. Epidemiological survey of Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus in cattle in East Darfur State, Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Alaa M; Adam, Ibrahim A; Osman, Badreldin T; Aradaib, Imadeldin E

    2015-06-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a tick-borne disease caused by CCHF virus (CCHFV) of the genus Nairovirus in the family Bunyaviridae. CCHFV causes subclinical infection in domestic livestock and an often fatal hemorrhagic illness in humans, with approximately 30% mortality rates. In the present study, a cross-sectional serosurvey was conducted in a total of 282 randomly selected cattle from five localities in East Darfur State, Sudan. The exposure status to CCHF was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of CCHFV-specific IgG antibodies in cattle serum samples. The CCHFV-specific IgG antibodies were detected in 54 out of 282 animals, accounting for a 19.14% prevalence rate. Older cattle (>2 years of age) were approximately five times more likely to be infected with the virus (OR=4.90, CI=1.28-18.98, p-value=0.02). Heavily tick-infested cattle (ticks all over the body) were at 11 times higher at risk compared to tick-free animals (OR=11.11, CI=2.86-43.25, p-value=0.01). Grazing system is another factor affecting CCHF, where cattle grazing on open system were 27 times more at risk compared to other grazing systems (OR=27.22, CI=7.46-99.24, p-value=0.001). There was an association between localities and CCHF cattle (OR=0.24, CI=0.07-0.83, p-value=0.02). This study confirms the exposure of cattle to CCHF in East Darfur and identifies potential risk factors associated with the disease. Further epidemiological studies and improved surveillance are urgently needed to prevent a possible outbreak of CCHF among humans in the Darfur region of Sudan. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Detection, quantifications and pharmacokinetics of toltrazuril sulfone (Ponazuril) in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirikolu, L; Yohn, R; Garrett, E F; Chakkath, T; Ferguson, D C

    2009-06-01

    Toltrazuril sulfone (Ponazuril) is a triazine-based anti-protozoal agent with highly specific actions against apicomplexan group of organisms, which are undergoing intensive investigation. Toltrazuril sulfone may have clinical application in the treatment of Neospora. caninum and other protozoal infections in cattle. To evaluate absorption, distribution, and elimination characteristics of toltrazuril sulfone in cattle, a sensitive validated quantitative high-pressure liquid chromatography method for toltrazuril sulfone in bovine biological fluids was developed. After a single oral dose of toltrazuril sulfone at 5 mg/kg (as 150 mg/g of Marquis; Bayer HealthCare, Shawnee Mission, KS, USA), samples from six cows showed good plasma concentrations of toltrazuril sulfone, which peaked at 4821 ng/mL +/- 916 (SD) at 48 h postadministration. Thereafter, plasma concentration declined to 1950 ng/mL +/- 184 (SD) at 192 h after administration with an average plasma elimination half-life of approximately 58 h. Following oral dose of toltrazuril sulfone, the observed peak plasma concentrations were in relatively close agreement ranging from the lowest 3925 ng/mL to the highest of 6285 ng/mL with the mean peak plasma concentration being 4821 ng/mL. This study shows that toltrazuril sulfone is relatively well absorbed after oral dose in cattle. These results are therefore entirely consistent with and support the reported clinical efficacy of toltrazuril sulfone in the treatment of experimentally induced clinical cases of N. caninum and other protozoal-mediated bovine diseases.

  15. Chemistry and Microbiology Qualities of Hard Candy-Green-Sirih Leaves (Piper betle L.) As Cattle Feed Additive

    OpenAIRE

    Anika Prastyowati; Lorensia Maria Ekawati Purwijantiningsih; Fransiskus Sinung Pranata

    2015-01-01

    Cattle diseases caused by bacterial infection and unqualified feed can decrease production of beef which people consume more in Indonesia. This research objective is to know quality of hard candy as cattle feed additive including chemistry and microbiology characteristics. Research steps consist of material preparation test, making sirih leaf extract, making hard candy, chemistry tests (The levels of water, ashes, reduction sugar, sacarose and atsiri oil, respectively) and microbiology test (...

  16. Evidence of Cryptococcosis in cattle in Zaria Kaduna state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuella N. Akange

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Cryptococcosis is azoonotic infection caused by fungal of the Cryptococcus neoformans complex comprising of C. neoformans and C. gattii.The disease affects humans and animals worldwide causing morbidity and mortality. This work was carried out to determine the occurrence of cryptococcal antigens and factors associated with presence of antigens in cattle in Zaria, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Three hundred and ninety (390 serum samples from cattle of various ages were collected from 11 farms in Zaria, Nigeria. The samples were analysed using alatex agglutination test and lateral flow assay kit which detectsthe polysaccharide capsular antigens of Cryptococcus species. Results:Out of the 390 samples tested 28 (7.17% were found to be positive using the latex agglutination test while only of these 22 (5.64% were positive using the lateral flow assay. There was a strong correlation (r=0.939, p=0.0002 between the results of the latex agglutination test and the lateral flow assay. There was no statistically significant difference (p>0.005 in positivity for cryptococcal antigens between sex, age and sex, though, there was a statistically significant difference (p<0.05 in positivity between management systems i.e. semi-intensive and intensive farming systems. Conclusions: The epidemiological value of this report lies in its demonstration that the risk of cattle and humans infection with cryptococcosis exist in farms in Zaria. The presence of this pathogen among these cattle poses an economic threat to the livestock industry due to the mastitis it causes. It also poses a significant public health threat because of its zoonotic nature and the increasing population of immunocompromised individuals. Large scale studies to determine specific risk factors and the role of the environment and experimental studies to determine what governs the transition from nasal colonisation to infection are recommended. [Vet World 2013; 6(2.000: 64-67

  17. Growing hairs in shorn cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília José Veríssimo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The shearing operation can provide double benefits to the cattle: they can become more heat tolerant and the tick infestation decreases. The cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus causes great losses to dairy cattle, especially to the Holstein cattle because they are very susceptible to this tick. Its control is becoming each day more difficult, owing to the increasing resistance to acaricides they are acquiring. The objective of this work was to study the growing of haircoat following shearing. We made our experiment with 17 animals, 7 females and 10 males. They were shaved on the anterior third (head, neck, dewlap, scapula and arm of one side, at random. The work was performed in two steps: they were shorn for the first time on August 2nd 2012, with a size 10 blade in a clipper Oster model GoldenA5, which left the fur coat 2 mm long. Then we evaluated the hair length growing by collecting fortnightly three sample of hairs in the middle of the scapula, with  electric pliers, modified for this purpose, in both sides of the animals, sheared and non-sheared, until 30 days after this shearing. The three hair samples were put inside a little plastic bag per animal. Meanwhile, as we thought that the animals shearing had to be done closer to the skin, we decided to shear them again (in the same side shorn before, on October 2nd 2012. We changed our procedure using the same machine, but now with a blade size 30, which left the fur coat 1mm thick. After that, we collected again, fortnightly, samples of hairs on both sides during 2 months. The 10 longest hairs in the plastig bag were measured using a graph paper and the average per animal was calculated in each data and blade. A random design was applied for statistical analysis, the hair length of both sides, sheared and non sheared were compared by a two related samples tests – Wilcoxon, in a non parametric test, using the SPSSP 12.0 program, in each data within each blade. Using blade size

  18. Economic assessment of the performance of trypanotolerant cattle breeds in a pastoral production system in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.W. Maichomo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cattle are the major source of food security and income for pastoral farmers in sub-Saharan Africa. However, infectious and parasitic diseases remain a major constraint to improved cattle productivity in the region. The use of animal health economics to support decision-making on cost-effective disease control options is increasingly becoming important in the developing world. Trypano-tolerant indigenous Orma / zebu cattle in a trypanosomosis-endemic area of Kenya were evaluated for economic performance using gross-margin analysis and partial-farm budgeting. Orma / zebu and Sahiwal / zebu cross-bred cattle were exposed to similar husbandry practices and monitored for growth rate, incidence of common infections (trypanosomosis, anaplasmosis, babesiosis, East Coast Fever and helminthosis and the cost of treatment assessed. Interview questionnaires were also used to assess the preference rating of the 2 breeds. Results indicated that incidence of infection was trypanosomosis 3 %, anaplasmosis 58 %, babesiosis 11 %, East Coast Fever 22 % and helminthosis 28 %, with no significant difference between breeds. The Orma / zebu and Sahiwal / zebu breeds had comparable economic benefits, hence a pastoralist in Magadi division is likely to get similar returns from both breeds. This study therefore recommends adoption of not only the Sahiwal / zebu but also the Orma / zebu breed for cattle improvement in trypanosomosis endemic areas and conservation of indigenous genetic resources.

  19. HAEMATOLOGICAL IMPACT OF NATURALLY OCCURING TICK BORNE HAEMOPARASITIC INFECTIONS IN CATTLE OF WEST BENGAL, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apurba Debbarma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Haemoparasites reduces productivity and may lead to high mortality among animals. The present study was carried out to evaluate the heamotological change in cattle of different districts in West Bengal, India affected with naturally occurring tick- borne haemoparasitic diseases (TBHD. A total of 310 cattle blood samples were screened for the presence of haemoparasites from July, 2015 to June, 2016. The blood samples were examined for haemoparasites by making thin blood smear and staining with Giemsa’s stain. The result showed that108 (34.84% cattle were found positive with TBHD, out of which 22.9% were Theileria sp, 5.8% were Babesia sp., 11.93% Anaplasma sp., and 5.8% were having mixed infection, respectively. The positive samples were subjected to estimations of haematological parameters i. e. Haemoglobin concentration (Hb, packed cell volume (PCV, total erythrocyte count (TEC and Total leucocytes count (TLC using standard protocol. The haematological analysis showed statistically a significant (p<0.01 decreased levels of Hb, PCV, TEC and TLC in infected groups of cattle compared to infection free group cattle. This is probably the first systematic report in West Bengal, India. The result showed the haemoparasites have a negative impact on haematological parameters. This study may be useful in disease epidemiological map preparation, parasitic control policy preparation of the study areas.

  20. Doença do armazenamento lisossomal induzida pelo consumo de Sida carpinifolia em bovinos do Rio Grande do Sul Lysosomal storage disease caused by Sida carpinifolia in cattle in Rio Grande do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro M.O Pedroso

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Relata-se a intoxicação natural por Sida carpinifolia (guanxuma, chá-da-índia em bovinos no Rio Grande do Sul. Foram afetados cinco bovinos no período 2001-2008. O quadro clínico foi caracterizado por emagrecimento, incoordenação, dificuldade de locomoção, tremores generalizados, quedas frequentes e morte. Microscopicamente, as principais alterações foram vacuolização dos neurônios de Purkinje do cerebelo, das células acinares do pâncreas e das células foliculares da tireoide. A microscopia eletrônica evidenciou vacúolos com conteúdo finamente granulado e delimitado por membrana. Na lectina-histoquímica, observou-se marcação em neurônios com as lectinas Concanavalia ensiformis (Con-A, Triticum vulgaris (WGA e Succinyl Triticum vulgaris (sWGA.This paper reports the natural poisoning by Sida carpinifolia (guanxuma, chá-da-índia in cattle in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Five cattle were affected in the period 2001-2008. Clinical signs included weight loss, incoordination, walking difficulty, generalized tremors, frequent falls, and death. Microscopically, the main changes were vacuolation of Purkinje neurons in the cerebellum, pancreatic acinar cells, and thyroid follicular cells. Transmission electron microscopy revealed vacuoles bordered by membrane containing finely granular material. Lectin histochemistry showed positive staining in neurons with the lectins Concanavalia ensiformis (Con-A, Triticum vulgaris (WGA, and Succinyl Triticum vulgaris (sWGA.

  1. Genome engineering in cattle: recent technological advancements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongde

    2015-02-01

    Great strides in technological advancements have been made in the past decade in cattle genome engineering. First, the success of cloning cattle by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) or chromatin transfer (CT) is a significant advancement that has made obsolete the need for using embryonic stem (ES) cells to conduct cell-mediated genome engineering, whereby site-specific genetic modifications can be conducted in bovine somatic cells via DNA homologous recombination (HR) and whereby genetically engineered cattle can subsequently be produced by animal cloning from the genetically modified cells. With this approach, a chosen bovine genomic locus can be precisely modified in somatic cells, such as to knock out (KO) or knock in (KI) a gene via HR, a gene-targeting strategy that had almost exclusively been used in mouse ES cells. Furthermore, by the creative application of embryonic cloning to rejuvenate somatic cells, cattle genome can be sequentially modified in the same line of somatic cells and complex genetic modifications have been achieved in cattle. Very recently, the development of designer nucleases-such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9)-has enabled highly efficient and more facile genome engineering in cattle. Most notably, by employing such designer nucleases, genomes can be engineered at single-nucleotide precision; this process is now often referred to as genome or gene editing. The above achievements are a drastic departure from the traditional methods of creating genetically modified cattle, where foreign DNAs are randomly integrated into the animal genome, most often along with the integrations of bacterial or viral DNAs. Here, I review the most recent technological developments in cattle genome engineering by highlighting some of the major achievements in creating genetically engineered

  2. Farmers’ Perceptions and Knowledge of Cattle Adaptation to Heat Stress and Tick Resistance in the Eastern Cape, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyatiya, C. L. F.; Muchenje, V.; Mushunje, A.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the perceptions and knowledge of farmers of heat stress and tick resistance in cattle. A cross-sectional survey was conducted and 110 farmers in four villages in the sour and sweet velds of the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa were interviewed. The associations among area (municipality), gender, age, level of education, employment and religion were computed using Chi-square tests. The majority of the respondents had on average 4 bulls, 4 cows, 4 heifers, 4 calves, and 4 oxen. Milk was considered as the major (28.3%) reason for keeping cattle. Most farmers owned non-descript (72.6%), and Nguni (45.3%) cattle because of their heat tolerance (54.7%), tick resistance (54.7%), and milking ability (28.2%) traits. Excessive panting (56.6%) and disease transmission (76%) were regarded as the major effects of heat stress and tick infestation in cattle, respectively. About 50% of the respondents agreed that hair length influences tick resistance and 47.17% considered coat colour when acquiring cattle. In the sampled areas, ticks were prevalent in the summer season (93%), and 77.36% of the respondents use acaricides every fortnight. Gall sickness was reported to be a major problem in the cattle herds by 36.79% of the respondents. Our results showed that farmers in the two municipalities had knowledge of cattle adaptation to heat stress and tick resistance. PMID:25358328

  3. Farmers’ Perceptions and Knowledge of Cattle Adaptation to Heat Stress and Tick Resistance in the Eastern Cape, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. F. Katiyatiya

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the perceptions and knowledge of farmers of heat stress and tick resistance in cattle. A cross-sectional survey was conducted and 110 farmers in four villages in the sour and sweet velds of the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa were interviewed. The associations among area (municipality, gender, age, level of education, employment and religion were computed using Chi-square tests. The majority of the respondents had on average 4 bulls, 4 cows, 4 heifers, 4 calves, and 4 oxen. Milk was considered as the major (28.3% reason for keeping cattle. Most farmers owned non-descript (72.6%, and Nguni (45.3% cattle because of their heat tolerance (54.7%, tick resistance (54.7%, and milking ability (28.2% traits. Excessive panting (56.6% and disease transmission (76% were regarded as the major effects of heat stress and tick infestation in cattle, respectively. About 50% of the respondents agreed that hair length influences tick resistance and 47.17% considered coat colour when acquiring cattle. In the sampled areas, ticks were prevalent in the summer season (93%, and 77.36% of the respondents use acaricides every fortnight. Gall sickness was reported to be a major problem in the cattle herds by 36.79% of the respondents. Our results showed that farmers in the two municipalities had knowledge of cattle adaptation to heat stress and tick resistance.

  4. Biosecurity aspects of cattle production in Western Uganda, and associations with seroprevalence of brucellosis, salmonellosis and bovine viral diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, C; Boqvist, S; Ståhl, K; Masembe, C; Sternberg-Lewerin, S

    2017-12-06

    Many low-income countries have a human population with a high number of cattle owners depending on their livestock for food and income. Infectious diseases threaten the health and production of cattle, affecting both the farmers and their families as well as other actors in often informal value chains. Many infectious diseases can be prevented by good biosecurity. The objectives of this study were to describe herd management and biosecurity routines with potential impact on the prevalence of infectious diseases, and to estimate the burden of infectious diseases in Ugandan cattle herds, using the seroprevalence of three model infections. Farmer interviews (n = 144) showed that biosecurity measures are rarely practised. Visitors' hand-wash was used by 14%, cleaning of boots or feet by 4 and 79% put new cattle directly into the herd. During the 12 months preceding the interviews, 51% of farmers had cattle that died and 31% had noticed abortions among their cows. Interestingly, 72% were satisfied with the health status of their cattle during the same time period. The prevalence (95% CI) of farms with at least one seropositive animal was 16.7% (11.0;23.8), 23.6% (16.9;31.4), and 53.4% (45.0;61.8) for brucella, salmonella and BVD, respectively. A poisson regression model suggested that having employees looking after the cattle, sharing pasture with other herds, and a higher number of dead cattle were associated with a herd being positive to an increasing number of the diseases. An additive bayesian network model with biosecurity variables and a variable for the number of diseases the herd was positive to resulted in three separate directed acyclic graphs which illustrate how herd characteristics can be grouped together. This model associated the smallest herd size with herds positive to a decreasing number of diseases and having fewer employees. There is potential for improvement of biosecurity practices in Ugandan cattle production. Salmonella, brucella and BVD

  5. Perspectives on the treatment of claw lesions in cattle

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    Shearer JK

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Jan K Shearer,1 Paul J Plummer,1,2 Jennifer A Schleining11Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA; 2Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USAAbstract: Lameness is a leading cause of welfare and culling issues in cattle, with claw lesions accounting for the majority of these issues. Although the treatment of claw lesions in cattle is a daily activity for hoof trimmers, veterinarians, and livestock producers, there is surprisingly little information in the peer-reviewed literature on which to base strong evidence-based conclusions. As a consequence, many treatment modalities used are empirical and, in some cases, may be counterproductive to rapid lesion healing. Furthermore, many of these empirical treatment modalities fail to fully consider the underlying pathogenesis of the disease process and the implications that it has on lesion healing. For example, sole ulcers are largely a consequence of metabolic disorders and mechanical overloading. Therapeutic interventions that fail to address the weight-bearing issues are unlikely to be successful. Likewise, white line disease is believed to be predisposed by rumen acidosis and laminitis, and interventions need to include in them appropriate measures to prevent further cases through nutritional management. The goal of this review paper is to review the pathogenesis of claw lesions in the context of the published literature and allow the reader to arrive at rational treatment interventions based on the best available information. The use of an orthopedic block applied to the healthy claw of a lame foot, judicious use of bandage or wrap, careful selection of parenteral or topical therapy, and a treatment protocol to manage pain and promote recovery are key components of responsible management of lameness disorders in cattle.Keywords: lameness

  6. Genetic diversity and relationship of Yunnan native cattle breeds and introduced beef cattle breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ying; Lian, Lin-Sheng; Wen, Ji-Kun; Shi, Xian-Wei; Zhu, Fang-Xian; Nie, Long; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2004-02-01

    In this study, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was used to estimate genetic diversity and relationship in 134 samples belonging to two native cattle breeds from the Yunnan province of China (DeHong cattle and DiQing cattle) and four introduced beef cattle breeds (Brahman, Simmental, MurryGrey, and ShortHorn). Ten primers were used, and a total of 84 bands were scored, of which 63 bands (75.0%) were polymorphic. The genetic distance matrix was obtained by proportions of shared fragment. The results indicate that the Yunnnan DeHong cattle breed is closely related to the Brahman (Bos indicus), and the Yunnan DiQing cattle breed is closely related to the Simmental, ShortHorn, and MurryGrey (Bos taurus) breeds. Our results imply that Bos indicus and Bos taurus were the two main origins of Yunnan native cattle. The results also provide the basic genetic materials for conservation of cattle resources and crossbreeding of beef cattle breeds in South China.

  7. Euthanasia of Cattle: Practical Considerations and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Keith Shearer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Acceptable methods for the euthanasia of cattle include overdose of an anesthetic, gunshot and captive bolt. The use of anesthetics for euthanasia is costly and complicates carcass disposal. These issues can be avoided by use of a physical method such as gunshot or captive bolt; however, each requires that certain conditions be met to assure an immediate loss of consciousness and death. For example, the caliber of firearm and type of bullet are important considerations when gunshot is used. When captive bolt is used, a penetrating captive bolt loaded with the appropriate powder charge and accompanied by a follow up (adjunctive step to assure death are required. The success of physical methods also requires careful selection of the anatomic site for entry of a “free bullet” or “bolt” in the case of penetrating captive bolt. Disease eradication plans for animal health emergencies necessitate methods of euthanasia that will facilitate rapid and efficient depopulation of animals while preserving their welfare to the greatest extent possible. A portable pneumatic captive bolt device has been developed and validated as effective for use in mass depopulation scenarios. Finally, while most tend to focus on the technical aspects of euthanasia, it is extremely important that no one forget the human cost for those who may be required to perform the task of euthanasia on a regular basis. Symptoms including depression, grief, sleeplessness and destructive behaviors including alcoholism and drug abuse are not uncommon for those who participate in the euthanasia of animals.

  8. Injectable antimicrobials in commercial feedlot cattle and their effect on the nasopharyngeal microbiota and antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Devin B; Timsit, Edouard; Booker, Calvin W; Alexander, Trevor W

    2018-02-01

    Beef cattle in North America that are deemed to be at high risk of developing bovine respiratory disease (BRD) are frequently administered a metaphylactic antibiotic injection to control the disease. Cattle may also receive in-feed antimicrobials to prevent specific diseases and ionophores to improve growth and feed efficiency. Presently, attempts to evaluate the effects that these medications have on antibiotic resistance in the bovine nasopharyngeal microbiota have been focused on culturable bacteria that are associated with BRD. Therefore, we assessed the effects of injectable antibiotics on the nasopharyngeal microbiota of commercial feedlot cattle in Alberta, Canada, through the first 60 d on feed. Although all cattle in the study were also receiving in-feed chlortetracycline and monensin, the administration of a single injection of either oxytetracycline or tulathromycin at feedlot placement altered the nasopharyngeal microbiota in comparison with the cattle receiving only in-feed antibiotics. Oxytetracycline significantly (P Mycoplasma spp. at feedlot exit compared with the in-feed antibiotic only group. The proportion of the tetracycline resistance gene tet(H) was significantly increased following oxytetracycline injection (P < 0.05). Oxytetracycline also reduced both the number of OTUs and the Shannon diversity index in the nasopharyngeal microbiota (P < 0.05). These results demonstrate that in feedlot cattle receiving subtherapeutic in-feed antimicrobials, the administration of a single injection of either oxytetracycline or tulathromycin resulted in measurable changes to the nasopharyngeal microbiota during the first 60 d following feedlot placement. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Commercial aspects of cloning and genetic modification in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, I M; French, A J; Tecirlioglu, R T

    2004-01-01

    A range of potential commercial applications of cloning and genetic modification in cattle has been suggested over the last decade. It includes the rapid multiplication of elite genotypes, production of valuable human proteins, altered production characteristics, increased disease resistance...... and milk with improved nutritional value and processing capabilities. However, an economic return from the sale of product is far from reality in any of these areas. One impediment to achieving economic sustainability is the extremely low efficiency in producing healthy offspring from transferred cloned...... of products at economically sustainable levels, cryopreservation and the progress towards automation of cloning techniques...

  10. Major advances in applied dairy cattle nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastridge, M L

    2006-04-01

    Milk yield per cow continues to increase with a slower rate of increase in dry matter intake; thus, efficiency of ruminal fermentation and digestibility of the dietary components are key factors in improving the efficiency of feed use. Over the past 25 yr, at least 2,567 articles relating to ruminant or dairy nutrition have been published in the Journal of Dairy Science. These studies have provided important advancements in improving feed efficiency and animal health by improving quality of feeds, increasing feedstuff and overall diet digestibility, better defining interactions among feedstuffs in diets, identifying alternative feed ingredients, better defining nutrient requirements, and improving efficiency of ruminal fermentation. The publications are vital in continuing to make advancements in providing adequate nutrition to dairy cattle and for facilitating exchange of knowledge among scientists. Forages have been studied more extensively than any other type of feed. Cereal grains continue to be the primary contributors of starch to diets, and thus are very important in meeting the energy needs of dairy cattle. Processing of cereal grains has improved their use. Feeding by-products contributes valuable nutrients to diets and allows feedstuffs to be used that would otherwise be handled as wastes in landfills. Many of these by-products provide a considerable amount of protein, nonforage fiber, fat, and minerals (sometimes a detriment as in the case of P) to diets. The primary feeding system today is the total mixed ration, with still considerable use of the pasture system. Major improvements have occurred in the use of protein, carbohydrates, and fats in diets. Although advancements have been made in feeding practices to minimize the risk of metabolic diseases, the periparturient period continues to present some of the greatest challenges in animal health. Computers are a must today for diet formulation and evaluation, but fewer software programs are developed by

  11. One-step Multiplex Transgenesis via Sleeping Beauty Transposition in Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrels, Wiebke; Talluri, Thirumala R; Apfelbaum, Ronja; Carratalá, Yanet P; Bosch, Pablo; Pötzsch, Kerstin; Grueso, Esther; Ivics, Zoltán; Kues, Wilfried A

    2016-02-24

    Genetically modified cattle are important for developing new biomedical models and for an improved understanding of the pathophysiology of zoonotic diseases. However, genome editing and genetic engineering based on somatic cell nuclear transfer suffer from a low overall efficiency. Here, we established a highly efficient one-step multiplex gene transfer system into the bovine genome.

  12. Determinants for Treatments in Relation to Udder Health in Danish Dairy Cattle Farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gussmann, Maya Katrin; Græsbøll, Kaare; Kirkeby, Carsten Thure

    Regular cow level registrations in the Danish Cattle Database include registrations about e.g. milk yield, SCC and calvings, but also about diseases and antibiotic treatments of cows. These data could potentially be a useful source of information for the development of herd-specific udder health...

  13. Nuclear-derived techniques improve cattle productivity and milk quality in Cameroon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, Aabha

    2016-01-01

    Increasing agricultural production and improving the quality of milk and meat are key to combating poverty and increasing food security in Africa. Countries such as Cameroon are increasingly turning to innovative, nuclear and nuclear-derived techniques to control and prevent diseases among livestock, and boost cattle and milk production.

  14. Prevalence and pathogenicity of Cryptosporidium andersoni in one herd of beef cattle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kváč, Martin; Vítovec, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 9 (2003), s. 451-457 ISSN 0931-1793 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909; CEZ:MSM 122200002 Keywords : cryptosporidiosis * cattle * Cryptosporidium andersoni Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 0.656, year: 2003

  15. Prevalence and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in dairy cattle in South Bohemia, the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondráčková, Z.; Kváč, Martin; Sak, Bohumil; Květoňová, Dana; Rost, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 165, 1/2 (2009), s. 141-144 ISSN 0304-4017 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP523/07/P117 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Cryptosporidium spp. * cattle * slaughterhouses Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.278, year: 2009

  16. Prevalence of bovine tuberculosis in beef feedlot of Borena cattle by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bovine Tuberculosis. OIE manual of diagnostic tests and vaccines for terrestrial manual. World Health Organization for Animal Health, Paris, France. 2, 4-7. Radostits, O.M., Gay, C.C., Blood, D.C. and Hinchclif, K.W., 2007. Veterinary medicine: a text book of the disease of cattle, sheep, pigs, goats and horses. W.B Saunders,.

  17. Perceptions, circumstances and motivators that influence implementation of zoonotic control programs on cattle farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellis-Iversen, J.; Cook, A.J.; Watson, E.; Nielen, M.; Larkin, L.; Wooldridge, M.; Hogeveen, H.

    2010-01-01

    The implementation of disease control programs on farms requires an act of behavioral change. This study presents a theoretical framework from behavioral science, combined with basic epidemiological principles to investigate and explain the control of zoonotic agents on cattle farms. A pathway to

  18. Seroprevalence of Neospora caninum in aborting dairy cattle in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Václavek, P.; Koudela, Břetislav; Modrý, David; Sedlák, K.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 3 (2003), s. 239-245 ISSN 0304-4017 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : Neospora caninum * abortion * cattle Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.583, year: 2003

  19. Immunisation of smallholder dairy cattle against anaplasmosis and babesiosis in Malawi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Lawrence, J. A.; Kafuwa, P. T.

    1997-01-01

    A field study was conducted in the Southern Region of Malawi to evaluate the possible benefits of immunisation of improved dairy cattle against Anaplasma marginale, Babesia bigemina and Babesia bovis. Friesian crossbred heifers were immunised when they were being reared on Government farms. They ...... disease as compared to only 3/28 vaccinates....

  20. First molecular characterization of Echinococcus granulosus (sensu stricto) genotype 1 among cattle in Sudan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, Mohamed E.; Salim, Bashir; Grobusch, Martin P.; Aradaib, Imadeldin E.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s. l.) is the causative agent of cystic echinococcosis (CE), which is a cosmopolitan zoonotic parasitic disease infecting humans and a wide range of mammalian species including cattle. Currently, little information is available on the genetic diversity

  1. Thermal balance of Nellore cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo Costa, Cíntia Carol; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; Nascimento, Sheila Tavares; Nascimento, Carolina Cardoso Nagib; Neto, Marcos Chiquitelli; de França Carvalho Fonsêca, Vinícius

    2017-04-01

    This work aimed at characterizing the thermal balance of Nellore cattle from the system of indirect calorimetry using a facial mask. The study was conducted at the Animal Biometeorology Laboratory of the São Paulo State University, Jaboticabal, Brazil. Five male Nellore weighing 750 ± 62 kg, at similar ages and body conditions were distributed in four 5 × 5 Latin squares (5 days of records and five schedules) during 20 days. Physiological and environmental measurements were obtained from the indirect calorimetry system using a facial mask. Respiratory parameters, hair coat, skin, and rectal temperature were continuously recorded. From this, metabolic heat production, sensible and latent ways of heat transfer were calculated. Metabolic heat production had an average value of 146.7 ± 0.49 W m-2 and did not change (P > 0.05) over the range of air temperature (24 to 35 °C). Sensible heat flow reached 60.08 ± 0.81 W m-2 when air temperature ranged from 24 to 25 °C, being negligible in conditions of temperature above 33 °C. Most of the heat produced by metabolism was dissipated by cutaneous evaporation when air temperature was greater than 30 °C. Respiratory parameters like respiratory rate and ventilation remained stable (P > 0.05) in the range of temperature studied. Under shade conditions and air temperature range from 24 to 35 °C, metabolic heat production, respiratory rate, and ventilation of mature Nellore cattle remain stable, which is indicative of low energetic cost to the thermoregulation.

  2. The mitochondrial genome of a Texas outbreak strain of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, derived from whole genome sequencing Pacific Biosciences and Illumina reads

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cattle fever tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is one of the most significant medical veterinary pests in the world, vectoring several serious livestock diseases negatively impacting agricultural economies of tropical and subtropical countries around the world. We assembled the complete ...

  3. [Bluetongue disease reaches Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, M; Griot, C; Chaignat, V; Perler, L; Thür, B

    2008-02-01

    Since 2006 bluetongue disease is rapidly spreading across Europe and reached Switzerland in October 2007. In the present article a short overview about the disease and the virus is given, and the first three clinical bluetongue disease cases in cattle, and the respective laboratory findings are presented.

  4. Molecular characterization of Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis isolated from humans, cattle and pigs in the Uganda cattle corridor using VNTR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muwonge, Adrian; Oloya, James; Kankya, Clovice; Nielsen, Sigrun; Godfroid, Jacques; Skjerve, Eystein; Djønne, Berit; Johansen, Tone B

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) cause disease in both human and animals. Their ubiquitous nature makes them both successful microbes and difficult to source track. The precise characterization of MAC species is a fundamental step in epidemiological studies and evaluating of possible reservoirs. This study aimed at identifying and characterizing Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis isolated from human, slaughter cattle and pigs in various parts of the Uganda cattle corridor (UCC) at two temporal points using variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis. A total of 46 M. avium isolates; 31 from 997 pigs, 12 from 43 humans biopsies and three from 61 cattle lesions were identified to subspecies level using IS1245 and IS901 PCR, thereafter characterized using VNTR. Twelve loci from two previously described VNTR methods were used and molecular results were analyzed and interpreted using Bionumerics 6.1. 37 of the isolates were identified as M. avium subsp. hominissuis and four as M. avium subsp. avium, while five could not be differentiated, possibly due to mixed infection. There was distinct clustering that coincides with the temporal and spatial differences of the isolates. The isolates from humans and cattle in the North Eastern parts of the UCC shared identical VNTR genotypes. The panel of loci gave an overall discriminatory power of 0.88. Some loci were absent in several isolates, probably reflecting differences in isolates from Uganda/Africa compared to isolates previously analyzed by these methods in Europe and Asia. The findings indicate a molecular difference between M. avium subsp. hominissuis isolates from pigs in Mubende and cattle and human in the rest of the UCC. Although human and cattle shared VNTR genotypes in the North Eastern parts of the UCC, it is most likely a reflection of a shared environmental source. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. On the History of Cattle Genetic Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleen Felius

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cattle are our most important livestock species because of their production and role in human culture. Many breeds that differ in appearance, performance and environmental adaptation are kept on all inhabited continents, but the historic origin of the diverse phenotypes is not always clear. We give an account of the history of cattle by integrating archaeological record and pictorial or written sources, scarce until 300 years ago, with the recent contributions of DNA analysis. We describe the domestication of their wild ancestor, migrations to eventually all inhabited continents, the developments during prehistory, the antiquity and the Middle Ages, the relatively recent breed formation, the industrial cattle husbandry in the Old and New World and the current efforts to preserve the cattle genetic resources. Surveying the available information, we propose three main and overlapping phases during the development of the present genetic diversity: (i domestication and subsequent wild introgression; (ii natural adaptation to a diverse agricultural habitat; and (iii breed development.

  6. International genomic evaluation methods for dairy cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background Genomic evaluations are rapidly replacing traditional evaluation systems used for dairy cattle selection. Economies of scale in genomics promote cooperation across country borders. Genomic information can be transferred across countries using simple conversion equations, by modifying mult...

  7. Biological control of cattle fever ticks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattle fever ticks (CFT) Rhipicephalus microplus and Rhipicephalus annulatus are invasive livestock pests that are endemic to Mexico and invasive along the Texas – Mexico border. Acaricide resistance, alternate wildlife hosts, and pathogenic landscape forming weeds present challenges for sustainable...

  8. Potential for transmission of infections in networks of cattle farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Volkova

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this analysis is to evaluate how generic properties of networks of livestock farms connected by movements of cattle impact on the potential for spread of infectious diseases. We focus on endemic diseases with long infectious periods in affected cattle, such as bovine tuberculosis. Livestock farm networks provide a rare example of large but fully specified directed contact networks, allowing investigations into how properties of such networks impact the potential for spread of infections within them. Here we quantify the latter in terms of the basic reproduction number, R0, and partition the contributions to R0 from first order moments (mean contact rates and second order moments (variances and covariances of contact rates of the farm contact matrices. We find that the second order properties make a substantial contribution to the magnitude of R0, similarly to that reported for other populations. Importantly, however, we find that the magnitude of these effects depends on exactly how the contacts between farms are defined or weighted. We note that the second order properties of a directed contact network may vary through time even with little change in the mean contact rates or in overall connectedness of the network. Keywords: Basic reproduction number, Infectious disease, Heterogeneity, 20–80 rule, Contact network, Bovine tuberculosis

  9. Mouldy feed, mycotoxins and Shiga toxin - producing Escherichia coli colonization associated with Jejunal Hemorrhage Syndrome in beef cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masson Luke

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both O157 and non-O157 Shiga toxin - producing Escherichia coli (STECs cause serious human disease outbreaks through the consumption of contaminated foods. Cattle are considered the main reservoir but it is unclear how STECs affect mature animals. Neonatal calves are the susceptible age class for STEC infections causing severe enteritis. In an earlier study, we determined that mycotoxins and STECs were part of the disease complex for dairy cattle with Jejunal Hemorrhage Syndrome (JHS. For STECs to play a role in the development of JHS, we hypothesized that STEC colonization should also be evident in beef cattle with JHS. Aggressive medical and surgical therapies are effective for JHS, but rely on early recognition of clinical signs for optimal outcomes suggesting that novel approaches must be developed for managing this disease. The main objective of this study was to confirm that mouldy feeds, mycotoxins and STEC colonization were associated with the development of JHS in beef cattle. Results Beef cattle developed JHS after consuming feed containing several types of mycotoxigenic fungi including Fusarium poae, F. verticillioides, F. sporotrichioides, Penicillium roqueforti and Aspergillus fumigatus. Mixtures of STECs colonized the mucosa in the hemorrhaged tissues of the cattle and no other pathogen was identified. The STECs expressed Stx1 and Stx2, but more significantly, Stxs were also present in the blood collected from the lumen of the hemorrhaged jejunum. Feed extracts containing mycotoxins were toxic to enterocytes and 0.1% of a prebiotic, Celmanax Trademark, removed the cytotoxicity in vitro. The inclusion of a prebiotic in the care program for symptomatic beef calves was associated with 69% recovery. Conclusions The current study confirmed that STECs and mycotoxins are part of the disease complex for JHS in beef cattle. Mycotoxigenic fungi are only relevant in that they produce the mycotoxins deposited in the feed. A

  10. Pesticide residues in brain tissues of dairy cattle in Lembang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indraningsih

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of pesticides to control plant diseases may cause residual formation in crops, its byproduct and environmental. Furthermore, the use of agriculture byproduct as animal feed may cause poisoning or residual formation in animal products. The purpose of this study is to investigate of pesticide residues in brain tissues of dairy cattle in relation to animal feed as a contamination source. Samples consisted of animal feeds (19 samples of fodder and 6 samples of feed, 31 samples of sera and 25 samples of brain tissues of dairy cattle collected from Lembang, West Java. Feeds and fodders were collected from dairy farms located in Lembang. Sera were directly collected from 31 heads of Frisien Holstein (FH cattle from the same location, while brain tissues of FH cattle were collected from a local animal slaughtering house. Pesticide residues were analysed using gas chromatography (GC. Both residues of organochlorines and organophosphates were detected from brain tissues with average residue concentration OP was 22.7 ppb and OC was 5.1 ppb and a total residue was 27.8 ppb. The pesticide residues in brain tissues are new information that should be taken into consideration since the Indonesian consumed this tissues as an oval. Although pesticides residue concentration was low, pathological changes were noted microscopically from the brain tissues including extracellular vacuolisation, focal necrosis, haemorrhages, dilatation of basement membrane without cellular infiltration. Both pesticide residues were also detected in sera, where OP (9.0 ppb was higher than OC (4.9 ppb. These pesticides were also detected in animal feeds consisting fodders and feeds. Residues of OP (12.0 ppb were higher than OC (1.8 ppb in feeds, but residues of OP (16.8 ppb were lower than OC (18.7 ppb in fodders. Although, pesticide residues in sera and brain tissues were below the maximum residue limits (MRL of fat, the presence of pesticides in brain tissues should be taken

  11. Nutrition cattle for a given farm

    OpenAIRE

    PRŮŠA, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    The nutrition of dairy cattle in relation to milk production forms an integral part of bigger businesses with livestock farming. This Bachelor thesis introduces a division of dairy cattle to categories according to the milk production and the number of days during the dry period at the same time. Furthermore, the nutrients needed for the milk production are mentioned. For individual nutrients, there are the standards of individual fodder and needs of the dairy cows in relation to their weight...

  12. Global gene transcriptome analysis in vaccinated cattle revealed a dominant role of IL-22 for protection against bovine tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabin Bhuju

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Bovine tuberculosis (bTB is a chronic disease of cattle caused by Mycobacterium bovis, a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex group of bacteria. Vaccination of cattle might offer a long-term solution for controlling the disease and priority has been given to the development of a cattle vaccine against bTB. Identification of biomarkers in tuberculosis research remains elusive and the goal is to identify host correlates of protection. We hypothesized that by studying global gene expression we could identify in vitro predictors of protection that could help to facilitate vaccine development. Calves were vaccinated with BCG or with a heterologous BCG prime adenovirally vectored subunit boosting protocol. Protective efficacy was determined after M. bovis challenge. RNA was prepared from PPD-stimulated PBMC prepared from vaccinated-protected, vaccinated-unprotected and unvaccinated control cattle prior to M. bovis challenge and global gene expression determined by RNA-seq. 668 genes were differentially expressed in vaccinated-protected cattle compared with vaccinated-unprotected and unvaccinated control cattle. Cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction was the most significant pathway related to this dataset with IL-22 expression identified as the dominant surrogate of protection besides INF-γ. Finally, the expression of these candidate genes identified by RNA-seq was evaluated by RT-qPCR in an independent set of PBMC samples from BCG vaccinated and unvaccinated calves. This experiment confirmed the importance of IL-22 as predictor of vaccine efficacy.

  13. Generation of transgenic cattle expressing human β-defensin 3 as an approach to reducing susceptibility to Mycobacterium bovis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Feng; Wang, Yongsheng; Liu, Guanghui; Ru, Kun; Liu, Xin; Yu, Yuan; Liu, Jun; Wu, Yongyan; Quan, Fusheng; Guo, Zekun; Zhang, Yong

    2016-03-01

    Bovine tuberculosis results from infection with Mycobacterium bovis, a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis family. Worldwide, M. bovis infections result in economic losses in the livestock industry; cattle production is especially hard-hit by this disease. Generating M. bovis-resistant cattle may potentially mitigate the impact of this disease by reducing M. bovis infections. In this study, we used transgenic somatic cell nuclear transfer to generate cattle expressing the gene encoding human β-defensin 3 (HBD3), which confers resistance to mycobacteria in vitro. We first generated alveolar epithelial cells expressing HBD3 under the control of the bovine MUC1 promoter, and confirmed that these cells secreted HBD3 and possessed anti-mycobacterial capacity. We then generated and identified transgenic cattle by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The cleavage and blastocyst formation rates of genetically modified embryos provided evidence that monoclonal transgenic bovine fetal fibroblast cells have an integral reprogramming ability that is similar to that of normal cells. Five genetically modified cows were generated, and their anti-mycobacterial capacities were evaluated. Alveolar epithelial cells and macrophages from these cattle expressed higher levels of HBD3 protein compared with non-transgenic cells and possessed effective anti-mycobacterial capacity. These results suggest that the overall risk of M. bovis infection in transgenic cattle is efficiently reduced, and support the development of genetically modified animals as an effective tool to reduce M. bovis infection. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  14. Morphological characterization ofMadura Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Setiadi

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Morphological characterization of Madura cattle in Madura islands was done as an input for "action plans" of national animals genetic resources management according to the global system ofFAO. Assessments were done in Sumenep District and Pamekasan District, East Java. According to the body measurements, Madura cattle can be classified as a small to medium type with withers height of about 120 cm. Because of potential productivity in the limitation of environmental resources, Madura cattle can be classified as a "superior" cattle . Body measurements of Madura cattle in the present study were relatively the same with those of 50 years ago, indicating that there is no breeding improvement activities except natural selection . The variability of body measurements is relatively narrow . Improving productivity by outbreeding is needed . To conserve the unique germ plasm of the Indonesian genotype, such as Madura cattle and a possibility to improve their productivity by a complete prevention of cross breeding in the Madura islands needs further evaluation .

  15. Magnesium Oxide Induced Metabolic Alkalosis in Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, T.H.; Butler, D.G.; Gartley, C.J.; Dohoo, I.R.

    1983-01-01

    A study was designed to compare the metabolic alkalosis produced in cattle from the use of an antacid (magnesium oxide) and a saline cathartic (magnesium sulphate). Six, mature, normal cattle were treated orally with a magnesium oxide (MgO) product and one week later given a comparable cathartic dose of magnesium sulphate (MgSO4). The mean percent dry matter content of the cattle feces changed significantly (Pmetabolic alkalosis as determined by base excess values. The base excess values remained elevated for 24 hours in the MgO treated group compared to only 12 hours after MgSO4 administration. Following MgO administration, mean hydrogen ion concentration (pH), bicarbonate ion concentration ([HCO3-]) and base excess were 7.44, 33.3 mmol/L and +8.0 respectively compared to 7.38, 27 mmol/L and +3.0 after MgSO4. Since the oral use of MgO in normal cattle causes a greater and more prolonged metabolic alkalosis compared to MgSO4, MgO is contraindicated as a cathartic in normal cattle or in cattle with abomasal abnormalities characterized by pyloric obstruction and metabolic alkalosis. PMID:6883181

  16. Environmental Awareness on Beef Cattle Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M Bamualim

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The acceleration program to meet beef self sufficient in 2010 is expected to increase animal protein consumption of Indonesian people in order to be equal with other countries as well as to improve the livestock farmer’s income. The main objective of the program is to increase cattle population. Since the availability of forage and grassland is limited, beef cattle development is driven to the crop and plantation integration approach by using their by-product as cattle feed. Crop and plantation by-products, generally are considered to be fiber source with high lignocellulose’s and low nutritive value. Feeding high fiber would increase methane gas production, and faeces and grass cultivation also contributed on greenhouse emission. Methane is one of the main greenhouse gases contributed by agriculture sector; increasing beef cattle population using high fiber feed is predicted to increase methane production. Good management is expected to improve productivity and to reduce methane production on livestock. Some efforts could be done such as good feeding management and nutrition manipulation, environment friendly cattle waste management, improving management on roughage cultivation, and improving management on cattle production.

  17. Vaccination with a BCG strain overexpressing Ag85B protects cattle against Mycobacterium bovis challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Rizzi

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of tuberculosis in cattle but also infects other animals, including humans. Previous studies in cattle have demonstrated that the protection induced by BCG is not complete. In order to improve the protection efficacy of BCG, in this study we overexpressed Ag85B in a BCG Pasteur strain, by using an expression system based on the use of an auxotrophic strain for the leucine amino acid, and complementation with leuD. We found that vaccination of cattle with BCG overexpressing Ag85B induced higher production of IL-17 and IL-4 mRNA upon purified protein derivative (PPDB stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs than vaccination with BCG. Moreover, the IL-17 mRNA expression after vaccination negatively correlated with disease severity resulting from a subsequent challenge with M. bovis, suggesting that this cytokine is a potential biomarker of cattle protection against bovine tuberculosis. Importantly, vaccination with the recombinant BCG vaccine protected cattle better than the wild-type BCG Pasteur.

  18. Slaughterhouse survey of cystic echinococcosis in cattle and sheep from the Republic of Moldova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chihai, O; Umhang, G; Erhan, D; Boué, F; Tălămbuţă, N; Rusu, Ş; Zamornea, M

    2016-05-01

    The Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm is responsible for cystic echinococcosis (CE), a zoonotic disease with worldwide distribution. The life cycle of the parasite is mainly domestic and takes place between dogs and livestock species. A slaughterhouse survey was conducted in 2012 in the Republic of Moldova in order to estimate the prevalence of CE. A total of 1525 cattle, 5580 sheep and 12,700 pigs were surveyed. No CE infection was observed in pigs, while prevalence was estimated at 59.3% in cattle and 61.9% in sheep. Infection was significantly higher in animals raised in private households than in those from collective farms. The frequency of infection increased with age in both species. In cattle and in sheep, infection of both the liver and lungs was the most common, while infection in the lungs only was much less frequent. Farm type appears to be an important factor in CE infection in Moldova, due to the extensive farming and the home-slaughtering undertaken in the majority private sector, despite a high prevalence of CE also recorded in the public sector. The low fertility of cysts in cattle (1.1%) compared to sheep (47.6%) confirmed the maintenance of E. granulosus sensu stricto in a dog-sheep life cycle which excludes cattle. Further studies are needed to obtain a complete overview of the parasite's epidemiology in its intermediate and definitive hosts, in order to implement control and preventive measures, with specific attention given to farms in the private sector.

  19. Ecosystems Potency of Small and Outer Islands of Indonesia for Beef Cattle Farming Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismeth Inounu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Indonesian archipelago consists of five main islands and more than seventeen thousand of small islands. These small islands are very effective as natural barrier to the spread of contagious animal diseases. This situation is very advantageous to develop many programs such as beef cattle farming to support beef self sufficient program in 2010. However, there are some constraints in developing of these small islands, namely human resources, natural resources, infrastructure, mean of communications and transportations and lack of intra sector integrated coordination. In taking the advantageous of developing small islands as a screening base and quarantine area, animal production technologies and veterinary science are much needed. The development can be done in integration with transmigration development program so that the beef cattle development could become source of income and job opportunity for the transmigran and local inhabitant as well. Beef cattle farming scheme are recommended by doing cow-calf operation or fattening. Political support from government and legislative are needed in establishment of infrastructure in the area chosen as beef cattle farming location. Besides, it need facilitations in land procurement for beef cattle farming, legal aspect, supports of law enforcement, simple regulation in land used and zone management planning, regulation in controlling beef importation, and credit with minimum interest rate.

  20. Urine N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase activity in healthy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, R; Nakajima, N; Soeta, S; Sato, J; Naito, Y

    1997-11-01

    To measure urine N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) activity of healthy cattle, using 3 substrates (4-methylumbelliferyl-N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminide, sodio-m-cresolsulfonphthaleinyl-N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminid e, and p-nitrophenyl-N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminide), and to determine the relations between the obtained values and age and sex of cattle. 50 healthy lactating Holstein-Friesian cows and 10 healthy Holstein-Friesian steers. Untimed urine samples were collected, and urine NAG activity was measured, using the 3 aforementioned methods. Urine creatinine concentration also was measured, and NAG activity was expressed as units per gram of creatinine (NAG index). Correlations between urine NAG activity and age and sex of cattle were investigated. Furthermore, correlations among data obtained by each of the 3 methods were determined. Urine NAG activity in cows measured by each of the 3 methods was < 3.0 U/L. Urine NAG activity in steers was significantly higher than that in cows. However, there was no significant difference between the sexes in NAG index. There were no significant differences in mean values of NAG activity and index among cows of various age groups. Individual values of urine NAG activity determined by each method correlated significantly with each other. Urine NAG activity and NAG index of healthy cattle will be useful for determining diagnostic criteria of renal disease in cattle.

  1. Development of genome engineering technologies in cattle: from random to specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yum, Soo-Young; Youn, Ki-Young; Choi, Woo-Jae; Jang, Goo

    2018-01-01

    The production of transgenic farm animals (e.g., cattle) via genome engineering for the gain or loss of gene functions is an important undertaking. In the initial stages of genome engineering, DNA micro-injection into one-cell stage embryos (zygotes) followed by embryo transfer into a recipient was performed because of the ease of the procedure. However, as this approach resulted in severe mosaicism and has a low efficiency, it is not typically employed in the cattle as priority, unlike in mice. To overcome the above issue with micro-injection in cattle, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) was introduced and successfully used to produce cloned livestock. The application of SCNT for the production of transgenic livestock represents a significant advancement, but its development speed is relatively slow because of abnormal reprogramming and low gene targeting efficiency. Recent genome editing technologies (e.g., ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR-Cas9) have been rapidly adapted for applications in cattle and great results have been achieved in several fields such as disease models and bioreactors. In the future, genome engineering technologies will accelerate our understanding of genetic traits in bovine and will be readily adapted for bio-medical applications in cattle.

  2. Molecular diagnosis of cattle trypanosomes in Venezuela: evidences of Trypanosoma evansi and Trypanosoma vivax infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Iglesias, J R; Eleizalde, M C; Reyna-Bello, A; Mendoza, M

    2017-06-01

    In South America Trypanosoma evansi has been determined by molecular methods in cattle from Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia and Peru, reason for which the presence of this parasite is not excluded in Venezuelan livestock. Therefore, the aim of this study was to perform parasitological and molecular diagnosis of cattle trypanosomosis in small livestock units from two regions in this country. The parasitological diagnosis was carried out by MHCT and the molecular by PCR using genus-specific ITS1 primers that differentiate T. vivax and T. evansi infections. 47 cattle were evaluated in the "Laguneta de la Montaña" sector, Miranda State, where 3 animals were diagnosed as positive (6.4 %) by MHCT and 14 (30 %) by PCR as Trypanosoma spp., out of which 9 animals resulted positive for T. vivax , 3 for T. evansi and 2 with double infections. Whilst in the "San Casimiro" sector, State of Aragua, out of the 38 cattle evaluated 7 animals were diagnosed as positive (18.4 %) by MHCT and 19 (50 %) by PCR, determining only the presence of T. evansi in this locality. The molecular diagnosis by PCR using ITS1 primers allowed T. evansi detection in cattle field populations, which suggests the possible role of these animals as reservoirs in the epidemiology of the disease caused by T. evansi in Venezuela.

  3. Role of cattle in the epidemiology of tick-bite fever in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, P J; Mason, P R; Manning, T; Slater, S

    1991-02-01

    Almost 100% of 52 cattle tested from the southern areas of Zimbabwe were found to have antibodies reactive with Rickettsia conorii compared with less than 30% of 120 cattle from the north. Steers artificially infected with R. conorii isolated from Amblyomma hebraeum were found to show no hematological or biochemical signs of disease but did seroconvert. Clinical signs of infection were restricted to regional lymphadenopathy and dermal erythema, edema, and tenderness at the inoculation site. Rickettsemia was detectable for at least 32 days postinfection. Our findings indicate that cattle could be involved in the transmission of rickettsias by A. hebraeum and may serve as a reservoir of human tick-bite fever in southern Africa.

  4. Role of cattle in the epidemiology of tick-bite fever in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, P J; Mason, P R; Manning, T; Slater, S

    1991-01-01

    Almost 100% of 52 cattle tested from the southern areas of Zimbabwe were found to have antibodies reactive with Rickettsia conorii compared with less than 30% of 120 cattle from the north. Steers artificially infected with R. conorii isolated from Amblyomma hebraeum were found to show no hematological or biochemical signs of disease but did seroconvert. Clinical signs of infection were restricted to regional lymphadenopathy and dermal erythema, edema, and tenderness at the inoculation site. Rickettsemia was detectable for at least 32 days postinfection. Our findings indicate that cattle could be involved in the transmission of rickettsias by A. hebraeum and may serve as a reservoir of human tick-bite fever in southern Africa. PMID:2007631

  5. Fat-1 transgenic cattle as a model to study the function of ω-3 fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Tao

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been shown to play an important role in health. Enriched with ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate expression of a number of genes with such broad functions as cell proliferation, growth and apoptosis and cell signaling and transduction, these effects, seem to regulate coronary artery disease, hypertension, atherosclerosis, psychiatric disorders and various cancer. In this context, fat-1 transgenic cattle was designed to convert ω-6 to ω-3 fatty acids could form an ideal model to study the effect of ω-3 fatty acids on the above functions. This study focuses on the total genomic difference of gene expression between fat-1 transgenic cattle and wild-type using cDNA microarrays, several genes were found to be overexpressed or suppressed in transgenic cattle relative to wild-type, these discrepancy genes related with lipid metabolism, immunity, inflammation nervous development and fertility.

  6. Distribution of Leptospira serogroups in cattle herds and dogs in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayral, Florence C; Bicout, Dominique J; Pereira, Helena; Artois, Marc; Kodjo, Angeli

    2014-10-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to identify and describe the distribution pattern of Leptospira serogroups in domestic animals in France. The population consisted of cattle herds and dogs with clinically suspected leptospirosis that were tested at the "Laboratoire des Leptospires" between 2008 and 2011. The laboratory database was queried for records of cattle and dogs in which seroreactivity in Leptospira microagglutination tests was consistent with a recent or current infection, excluding vaccine serogroups in dogs. A total of 394 cattle herds and 232 dogs were diagnosed with clinical leptospirosis, and the results suggested infection by the Leptospira serogroup Australis in 43% and 63%, respectively; by the Leptospira serogroup Grippotyphosa in 17% and 9%, respectively; and by the Leptospira serogroup Sejroe in 33% and 6%, respectively. This inventory of infecting Leptospira serogroups revealed that current vaccines in France are not fully capable of preventing the clinical form of the disease. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  7. Hepatic lipidosis in anorectic, lactating holstein cattle: a retrospective study of serum biochemical abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebra, C K; Garry, F B; Getzy, D M; Fettman, M J

    1997-01-01

    The association between hepatic lipidosis (HL) and disease in 59 anorectic, ketotic, lactating Holstein heifers and cows was investigated. Severe HL, as determined by histologic evaluation of liver tissue, was present in 46 animals; only half of these animals required intensive treatment for ketosis, and only half had serum biochemical evidence of liver disease, as determined by the presence of a last value of 2-fold or greater than the upper limit of the reference ranges for at least 2 of the 4 serum tests: gamma-glutamyl transferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and sorbitol dehydrogenase activities and bile acid concentrations. Most cattle with biochemical evidence of liver disease and severe HL had been lactating for 14 or more days. Cows that required intensive treatment inconsistently had serum biochemical evidence of liver disease. Although cattle with severe HL had significantly higher serum bilirubin concentrations and aspartate aminotransferase and sorbitol dehydrogenase activities than cattle with less severe lipidosis, the specificity of abnormally high serum sorbitol dehydrogenase activity or bilirubin concentration for severe lipidosis was only 8%. Abnormally high serum aspartate aminotransferase activity was 83% sensitive and 62% specific for severe lipidosis. Serum glucose and total carbon dioxide concentrations were significantly lower in cattle with severe lipidosis than in those with mild or moderate lipidosis, and low serum glucose or total carbon dioxide concentrations were rare in cattle without severe lipidosis. From these data, we conclude that the use of a single biochemical or histopathologic criterion to define severity of disease or degree of liver compromise in anorectic, ketotic cows results in the misidentification of many animals.

  8. Linking bovine tuberculosis on cattle farms to white-tailed deer and environmental variables using Bayesian hierarchical analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W David Walter

    Full Text Available Bovine tuberculosis is a bacterial disease caused by Mycobacterium bovis in livestock and wildlife with hosts that include Eurasian badgers (Meles meles, brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula, and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus. Risk-assessment efforts in Michigan have been initiated on farms to minimize interactions of cattle with wildlife hosts but research on M. bovis on cattle farms has not investigated the spatial context of disease epidemiology. To incorporate spatially explicit data, initial likelihood of infection probabilities for cattle farms tested for M. bovis, prevalence of M. bovis in white-tailed deer, deer density, and environmental variables for each farm were modeled in a Bayesian hierarchical framework. We used geo-referenced locations of 762 cattle farms that have been tested for M. bovis, white-tailed deer prevalence, and several environmental variables that may lead to long-term survival and viability of M. bovis on farms and surrounding habitats (i.e., soil type, habitat type. Bayesian hierarchical analyses identified deer prevalence and proportion of sandy soil within our sampling grid as the most supported model. Analysis of cattle farms tested for M. bovis identified that for every 1% increase in sandy soil resulted in an increase in odds of infection by 4%. Our analysis revealed that the influence of prevalence of M. bovis in white-tailed deer was still a concern even after considerable efforts to prevent cattle interactions with white-tailed deer through on-farm mitigation and reduction in the deer population. Cattle farms test positive for M. bovis annually in our study area suggesting that the potential for an environmental source either on farms or in the surrounding landscape may contributing to new or re-infections with M. bovis. Our research provides an initial assessment of potential environmental factors that could be incorporated into additional modeling efforts as more knowledge of deer herd

  9. Entomopathogenic Fungi in Flies Associated with Pastured Cattle in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenberg, Tove; Jespersen, Jørgen B.; Jensen, Karl-Martin Vagn

    2001-01-01

    Cattle flies, including Musca autumnalis, Haematobia irritans, and Hydrotaea irritans, are pests of pastured cattle. A 2-year study of the natural occurrence of entomopathogenic fungi in adult cattle flies and other flies associated with pastures showed that the four species included in the Entom......Cattle flies, including Musca autumnalis, Haematobia irritans, and Hydrotaea irritans, are pests of pastured cattle. A 2-year study of the natural occurrence of entomopathogenic fungi in adult cattle flies and other flies associated with pastures showed that the four species included...

  10. Cattle dipping practices in the Philippines and the degradation of coumaphos in a simulated cattle dip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calumpang, S.M.F.; Medina, M.J.B.; Tejada, A.W.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of cattle dip facilities and current practices employed was done. Coumaphos and ethion were the commonly used acaricides in the four respondent stock farms. The behavior of coumaphos in a simulated model cattle dip was monitored using radiotracer techniques. Degradation was rapid, resulting in the formation of potasan metabolite and bound residues in the sediment. A rapid field method for the detection of organophosphate pesticides was used in monitoring the degradation of coumaphos in a cattle dip. The sensitivity of the method is comparable to the conventional HPLC method employed. This rapid field method can easily be used by cattle ranch owners to monitor coumaphos content of the vat facility so that recharging could be made in order to prevent the onset of resistance development in cattle tick. (author)

  11. Studies on the transmission of malignant catarrhal fever in experimental animals: A serial infection of cattle and buffalo by means of whole blood inoculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Wiyono

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF is a fatal disease especially affecting cattle and buffaloes. A study on the serial blood transmission of MCF was conducted by injecting whole blood of MCF animals into 9 experimental animals. Diagnosis of MCF was based on the clinico-pathological fmdings and polymerase chain reaction (PCR test. The disease has successfully, been achieved in six animals of three Bali cattle and three buffaloes but not in a Bali-cross breed and two Bos indicus (Ongole cattle. Wide range of clinical signs and gross-pathological features were observed. The study showed the degree of susceptibility of experimental animals: Bali cattle and buffalo were highly susceptible (3 out of 3 affected with MCF, Bali-cross breed and Bos indicus (Ongole cattle seemed not susceptible to whole blood experimental transmission. It shows that when Bali cattle acted as inoculum donor, buffalo tended to be clinically more severe than Bali cattle. On the other hand, when buffalo acted as inoculum donor, Bali cattle suffered from MCF more severe than buffalo. The diagnosis of MCF by histopathological examination and the PCR test bad positive correlation (100% in the first experiment, while in the second experiment the PCR test tends to be more sensitive. Based on the restriction endonuclease (RE test, the MCF causal agent in this study appeared to be genetically similar in each case. It is concluded that the serial experimental transmission of MCF by means of whole blood inoculation has been successfully achieved in Bali cattle and buffalo but not in Bali-cross breed and Ongole cattle, and there is a positive correlation between the PCR test and histopathological examination with the PCR test tends to be more sensitive.

  12. The great diversity of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in Philippine native cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, S N; Miyasaka, T; Polat, M; Kikuya, M; Matsumoto, Y; Mingala, C N; Villanueva, M A; Salces, A J; Onuma, M; Aida, Y

    2014-12-01

    Bovine leukocyte antigens (BoLA) are extensively used as markers for bovine disease and immunological traits. However, none of the BoLA genes in Southeast Asian breeds have been characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-sequence-based typing (SBT). Therefore, we sequenced exon 2 of the BoLA class II DRB3 gene from 1120 individual cows belonging to the Holstein, Sahiwal, Simbrah, Jersey, Brahman, and Philippine native breeds using PCR-SBT. Several cross-breeds were also examined. BoLA-DRB3 PCR-SBT identified 78 previously reported alleles and five novel alleles. The number of BoLA-DRB3 alleles identified in each breed from the Philippines was higher (71 in Philippine native cattle, 58 in Brahman, 46 in Holstein × Sahiwal, and 57 in Philippine native × Brahman) than that identified in breeds from other countries (e.g., 23 alleles in Japanese Black and 35 in Bolivian Yacumeño cattle). A phylogenetic tree based on the DA distance calculated from the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency showed that Philippine native cattle from different Philippine islands are closely related, and all of them are closely similar to Philippine Brahman cattle but not to native Japanese and Latin American breeds. Furthermore, the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency in Philippine native cattle from Luzon Island, located in the Northern Philippines was different from that in cattle from Iloilo, Bohol, and Leyte Islands, which are located in the Southern Philippines. Therefore, we conclude that Philippine native cattle can be divided into two populations, North and South areas. Moreover, a neutrality test revealed that Philippine native cattle from Leyte showed significantly greater genetic diversity, which may be maintained by balancing selection. This study shows that Asian breeds have high levels of BoLA-DRB3 polymorphism. This finding, especially the identification of five novel BoLA-DRB3 alleles, will be helpful for future SBT studies of BoLA-DRB3 alleles in East Asian cattle.

  13. Use of an Individual-based Model to Control Transmission Pathways of Mycobacterium avium Subsp paratuberculosis Infection in Cattle Herds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Mamun, Mohammad A; Smith, Rebecca L; Schukken, Y. H.; Grohn, Y. T.

    2017-01-01

    Johne’s disease (JD) is a chronic enteric disease in cattle caused by Mycobacterium avian subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). Eradicating JD is a difficult task due to the long incubation period of MAP, inefficient diagnostic tests, and delayed clinical signs. Effective control strategies can help

  14. Use of an Individual-based Model to Control Transmission Pathways of Mycobacterium avium Subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in Cattle Herds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mamun Hossain, Al Shaikh Abdullah; Smith, R.L.; Schukken, Y.H.; Gröhn, Y.T.

    2017-01-01

    Johne's disease (JD) is a chronic enteric disease in cattle caused by Mycobacterium avian subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). Eradicating JD is a difficult task due to the long incubation period of MAP, inefficient diagnostic tests, and delayed clinical signs. Effective control strategies can help

  15. Simulation of the influence of Danish cattle markets on a Foot-and-Mouth epidemic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boklund, Anette; Lastein, D. B.; Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq

    During the epidemic of Foot-and-Mouth disease (FMD) in the United Kingdom in 2001, live animal markets had large influence on the spread of the disease. The culture of and behavior around markets are expected to be different between countries. During the last decade, the number of animals traded...... through markets in Denmark has decreased and only few cattle markets are left. The purpose of this study was to investigate, whether cattle markets would influence the duration, size and economic consequences of a potential FMD epidemic in Denmark. The spread of FMD was simulated using the stochastic...... included a larger area compared to scenarios without markets. Economic results will be described in the final paper. Markets can influence spread of other diseases as well. Little is known about the influence of markets on spread of other diseases. Even though FMD is more contagious than many other...

  16. Cattle genomics and its implications for future nutritional strategies for dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, S; Larkin, D M; Loor, J J

    2013-03-01

    The recently sequenced cattle (Bos taurus) genome unraveled the unique genomic features of the species and provided the molecular basis for applying a systemic approach to systematically link genomic information to metabolic traits. Comparative analysis has identified a variety of evolutionary adaptive features in the cattle genome, such as an expansion of the gene families related to the rumen function, large number of chromosomal rearrangements affecting regulation of genes for lactation, and chromosomal rearrangements that are associated with segmental duplications and copy number variations. Metabolic reconstruction of the cattle genome has revealed that core metabolic pathways are highly conserved among mammals although five metabolic genes are deleted or highly diverged and seven metabolic genes are present in duplicate in the cattle genome compared to their human counter parts. The evolutionary loss and gain of metabolic genes in the cattle genome may reflect metabolic adaptations of cattle. Metabolic reconstruction also provides a platform for better understanding of metabolic regulation in cattle and ruminants. A substantial body of transcriptomics data from dairy and beef cattle under different nutritional management and across different stages of growth and lactation are already available and will aid in linking the genome with metabolism and nutritional physiology of cattle. Application of cattle genomics has great potential for future development of nutritional strategies to improve efficiency and sustainability of beef and milk production. One of the biggest challenges is to integrate genomic and phenotypic data and interpret them in a biological and practical platform. Systems biology, a holistic and systemic approach, will be very useful in overcoming this challenge.

  17. Leptospirosis in Cattle From Markets of Almaty Province, Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirkimbayeva Zhumagul

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the first study of the prevalence of leptospirosis in the cattle at slaughter from a rural area of Kazakhstan. Five hundred and seventy three samples of serum, urine, and kidneys from cattle of Alatau, Kazakh white and Auliyekol breed, aged from 2 to 5 years (unknown vaccination status, from the province of Almaty in the South-Eastern region were collected during four years (March 2010 to October 2013. The serological, bacteriological, and molecular analyses were performed. Serum samples were tested with 14 reference Leptospira serovars by microscopic agglutination test (MAT. MAT results showed that 89 (15.53% serum samples had detectable antibodies against seven serovars of L. interrogans at a dilution of ≥1:100. Serovars: Pomona (38.2%, Tarassovi (27.2%, and Kabula (18.8% were the most prevalent and their titres ranged from 100 to 1200. The spirochetes were detected in 11 samples of urine and nine samples of kidneys under dark-field microscope observation. The pure cultures were obtained from three samples. PCR technique confirmed leptospirosis in 23 out of 89 urine samples from cows, which showed the presence of leptospiral antibodies in microagglutination test. The high disease prevalence in cows indicates the high Leptospira contamination in this area. It was concluded that the bovine leptospirosis is an endemic and locally widespread disease in Kazakhstan, and that it may play a role in zoonotic transmission to humans.

  18. Surto de varíola bovina causada pelo vírus Vaccinia na região da Zona da Mata Mineira Outbreak of exantemal disease caused by Vaccinia virus in human and cattle in Zona da Mata region, Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.I.P. Lobato

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Relata-se um surto de doença exantemática, caracterizada como varíola bovina, acometendo bovinos e seres humanos na Zona da Mata Mineira. Setenta e duas propriedades, distribuídas em 20 municípios localizados na região, foram visitadas para se levantar os aspectos clínicos e epidemiológicos da doença. Detectaram-se 1020 vacas doentes durante a investigação, quando houve queda na produção do leite associada a infecções bacterianas secundárias. Casos humanos foram registrados em 83% das propriedades visitadas. Espécimes clínicos e amostras de soro foram coletados dos animais doentes ou convalescentes. O diagnóstico de laboratório mostrou o envolvimento de um ortopoxvírus, precisamente o Vaccinia virus como agente etiológico do surto.It was investigated an outbreak of exantemal disease in human and cattle in Zona da Mata region, Minas Gerais's State, Brazil. Seventy two farms located in 20 counties locating in this region were visited and disease pattern was studied. 1020 cows got sick in the visited herds and in 83% of them human cases occurred together with disease in animals. Drop in milk production and secondary infection were frequently observed. The disease occurred mainly from may to September. Serum and scars from sick and convalescent animals were collected and laboratory diagnostic showed that an orthopoxvirus, more precisely vaccinia virus was involved in the outbreak.

  19. Greenhouse Gas Emissions From Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podkówka Zbigniew

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cattle produce greenhouse gases (GHG which lead to changes in the chemical composition of the atmosphere. These gases which cause greenhouse effect include: methane (CH4, nitrous oxide (N2O, nitrogen oxides (NOx, sulphur dioxide (SO2, ammonia (NH3, dust particles and non-methane volatile organic compounds, commonly described as other than methane hydrocarbons. Fermentation processes taking place in the digestive tract produce ‘digestive gases’, distinguished from gases which are emitted during the decomposition of manure. Among these digestive gases methane and non-methane volatile organic compounds are of particular relevance importance. The amount of gases produced by cows can be reduced by choosing to rear animals with an improved genetically based performance. A dairy cow with higher production efficiency, producing milk with higher protein content and at the same time reduced fat content emits less GHG into the environment. Increasing the ratio of feed mixtures in a feed ration also reduces GHG emissions, especially of methane. By selection of dairy cows with higher production efficiency and appropriate nutrition, the farm's expected milk production target can be achieved while at the same time, the size of the herd is reduced, leading to a reduction of GHG emissions.

  20. EVALUATION OF VERMICOMPOSTED CATTLE MANURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenko Lončarić

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Vermicompost (lumbripost, biohumus is organic fertilizer or potting medium produced by microbial decomposition of cattle manure using Californian earthworm (Eisenia foetida. Analysing physical, chemical and biological properties confirmed that the vermicompost was stable with significant level of plant nutrients and the concentration of analysed heavy metals below threshold values. The results of vermicompost analyses were 17.85% ash, neutral pH reaction, EC 1.07 dS m-1, 24.6% total C, 2.32% total N and C:N ratio 10.6 indicating vermicompost maturity. Analyses showed significant concentrations (in g kg-1 of total P (11.25, K (6.13, Ca (10 and Mg (8.55 and microelements (in mg kg-1 Fe (9464, Mn (354, Zn (272 and Cu (46. Also, the total concentration of Zn, Cu, Pb (16 mg kg-1 and Cr (42 mg kg-1 was below permitted threshold values indicating that the use of vermicompost as fertilizer or as potting medium would be unrestricted. Biological tests show that (i the vermicompost was stable because measured respiration rate was 1.2 mg CO2-C g-1 compost-C day-1, and (ii the vermicompost did not show any phytotoxic effects because the 14-day growth of lettuce in containers resulted in higher aboveground fresh matter production using vermicompost as a potting medium compared with commercial medium, although the differences were not.

  1. Tick control by small-scale cattle farmers in the central Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    P.J. Masika; A. Sonandi; W. Van Averbeke

    1997-01-01

    A survey conducted in 5 magisterial districts involving rapid rural appraisal and a questionnaire showed participation in state-managed and funded dipping programmes by cattle owners in communal areas of the central Eastern Cape to be nearly complete, with 98 % of livestock owners interviewed participating in all dipping events. Disease control was the main reason for participation, but farmers perceive dipping to have a much broader disease-preventing activity than is really the case. Other ...

  2. Breeding strategies for tick resistance in tropical cattle: a sustainable approach for tick control

    OpenAIRE

    Shyma, K. P.; Gupta, Jay Prakash; Singh, Veer

    2013-01-01

    About 80 % of world cattle population is under the risk of ticks and tick borne diseases (TTBDs). Losses caused by bovine tick burdens in tropical countries have a tremendous economic impact on production systems. Chemical control of disease has been found to be ineffective and also involving large cost. To reduce our reliance on these chemical products, it is necessary to embark on programs that include habitat management, genetic selection of hosts, and development of a strain capable of in...

  3. Therapeutic management of botulism in dairy cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jegaveera Pandian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To report the successful recovery of few dairy cattle from botulism in response to a modified therapeutic strategy. Materials and Methods: Seventy four naturally-occurring clinical cases of bovine botulism encountered during the period of 2012-2014 which were confirmed by mouse lethality test became material for this study. Affected animals were made into three groups based on the treatment modifications made during the course of study. Results and Discussion: With the modified therapeutic regimen, 17 animals recovered after 7-10 days of treatment. Clinical recovery took 2-30 days. Animals which were not given intravenous fluid and calcium recovered uneventfully. Cattle which were already treated with intravenous fluids, calcium borogluconate, and antibiotics did not recover. They were either died or slaughtered for salvage. Conclusion: In cattle with botulism, administration of Vitamin AD3E and activated charcoal aid the clinical recovery. Besides, strictly avoiding anti-clostridial antibiotics, fluid therapy, and calcium therapy may facilitate the clinical recovery. Upon fluid administration, the pulmonary congestion existed in the ailing cattle might have worsened the anoxia. Administration of antibiotics like penicillin, aminoglycosides, and tetracyclines further worsen the neuronal paralysis by increasing the availability of botulinum neurotoxin. Cattle in early botulism have fair chances of recovery with the modified therapy.

  4. The genome landscape of indigenous African cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaemin; Hanotte, Olivier; Mwai, Okeyo Ally; Dessie, Tadelle; Bashir, Salim; Diallo, Boubacar; Agaba, Morris; Kim, Kwondo; Kwak, Woori; Sung, Samsun; Seo, Minseok; Jeong, Hyeonsoo; Kwon, Taehyung; Taye, Mengistie; Song, Ki-Duk; Lim, Dajeong; Cho, Seoae; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Yoon, Duhak; Oh, Sung Jong; Kemp, Stephen; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Kim, Heebal

    2017-02-20

    The history of African indigenous cattle and their adaptation to environmental and human selection pressure is at the root of their remarkable diversity. Characterization of this diversity is an essential step towards understanding the genomic basis of productivity and adaptation to survival under African farming systems. We analyze patterns of African cattle genetic variation by sequencing 48 genomes from five indigenous populations and comparing them to the genomes of 53 commercial taurine breeds. We find the highest genetic diversity among African zebu and sanga cattle. Our search for genomic regions under selection reveals signatures of selection for environmental adaptive traits. In particular, we identify signatures of selection including genes and/or pathways controlling anemia and feeding behavior in the trypanotolerant N'Dama, coat color and horn development in Ankole, and heat tolerance and tick resistance across African cattle especially in zebu breeds. Our findings unravel at the genome-wide level, the unique adaptive diversity of African cattle while emphasizing the opportunities for sustainable improvement of livestock productivity on the continent.

  5. Blocking Babesia bovis vaccine reactions of dairy cattle in milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Combrink

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of 1.16 mg/kg (one third of the recommended dose of diminazene aceturate, administered indiscriminately to cattle on day seven of the unfrozen Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina bivalent live blood vaccine reaction, was an infection and block treatment method of immunisation used successfully with no known adverse effect on the parasites or the development of protective immunity. Continuing with this practice after replacement of the unfrozen vaccine with deep-frozen monovalent B. bovis and B. bigemina live blood vaccines resulted in reports of vaccine failure. Laboratory investigation indicated the harmful effect of block treatment in preventing the development of durable immunity against B. bigemina as opposed to the much lesser effect it had on B. bovis. Consequently the practice was no longer recommended. A B. bovis vaccination attempt aimed at controlling the disease of dairy cows in milk (n = 30 resulted in 20% fatalities during the expected vaccine reaction period. The practice of block treating B. bovis was therefore reinvestigated, this time in a field trial using dairy cattle in milk (n = 11. Using 0.88 mg/kg (one quarter of the recommended dose of diminazene administered on day 12 of the B. bovis vaccine reaction resulted in only two animals (n = 5 testing ≥ 1/80 positive with the indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT although parasites could be demonstrated in three. In the untreated control group, by contrast, five of the vaccinated animals (n = 6 tested ≥ 1/80 positive with IFAT and parasites could be demonstrated in all. The unsatisfactory outcome obtained in this study, combined with that of the earlier investigation, indicated that there are more factors that influence successful vaccination than previously considered. It is therefore concluded that block treatment of the live frozen South African cattle babesiosis vaccines reactions is not recommended.

  6. Trypanosomosis: Potential driver of selection in African cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamarija eSmetko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomosis is a serious cause of reduction in productivity of cattle in tsetse-fly infested areas. Baoule and other local Taurine cattle breeds in Burkina Faso are trypanotolerant. Zebuine cattle, which are also kept there are susceptible to trypanosomosis but bigger in body size. Farmers have continuously been intercrossing Baoule and Zebu animals to increase production and disease tolerance. The aim of this study was to compare levels of zebuine and taurine admixture in genomic regions potentially involved in trypanotolerance with background admixture of composites to identify differences in allelic frequencies of tolerant and non tolerant animals. The study was conducted on 214 animals (90 Baoule, 90 Zebu and 34 composites, genotyped with 25 microsatellites across the genome and with 155 SNPs in 23 candidate regions. Degrees of admixture of composites were analyzed for microsatellite and SNP data separately. Average Baoule admixture based on microsatellites across the genomes of the Baoule-Zebu composites was 0.31, which was smaller than the average Baoule admixture in the trypanosomosis candidate regions of 0.37 (P=0.15. Fixation index FST measured in the overall genome based on microsatellites or with SNPs from candidate regions indicates strong differentiation between breeds. Nine out of 23 regions had FST ≥ 0.20 calculated from haplotypes or individual SNPs. The levels of admixture were significantly different from background admixture, as revealed by microsatellite data, for six out of the nine regions. Five out of the six regions showed an excess of Baoule ancestry. Information about best levels of breed composition would be useful for future breeding activities, aiming at trypanotolerant animals with higher productive capacity.

  7. Blocking Babesia bovis vaccine reactions of dairy cattle in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combrink, Michael P; Carr, Graham; Mans, Ben J; Marais, Frances

    2012-12-06

    The use of 1.16 mg/kg (one third) of the recommended dose of diminazene aceturate, administered indiscriminately to cattle on day seven of the unfrozen Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina bivalent live blood vaccine reaction, was an infection and block treatment method of immunisation used successfully with no known adverse effect on the parasites or the development of protective immunity. Continuing with this practice after replacement of the unfrozen vaccine with deep-frozen monovalent B. bovis and B. bigemina live blood vaccines resulted in reports of vaccine failure. Laboratory investigation indicated the harmful effect of block treatment in preventing the development of durable immunity against B. bigemina as opposed to the much lesser effect it had on B. bovis. Consequently the practice was no longer recommended. A B. bovis vaccination attempt aimed at controlling the disease of dairy cows in milk (n = 30) resulted in 20% fatalities during the expected vaccine reaction period. The practice of block treating B. bovis was therefore reinvestigated, this time in a field trial using dairy cattle in milk (n = 11). Using 0.88 mg/kg (one quarter) of the recommended dose of diminazene administered on day 12 of the B. bovis vaccine reaction resulted in only two animals (n = 5) testing ≥ 1/80 positive with the indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) although parasites could be demonstrated in three. In the untreated control group, by contrast, five of the vaccinated animals (n = 6) tested ≥ 1/80 positive with IFAT and parasites could be demonstrated in all. The unsatisfactory outcome obtained in this study, combined with that of the earlier investigation, indicated that there are more factors that influence successful vaccination than previously considered. It is therefore concluded that block treatment of the live frozen South African cattle babesiosis vaccines reactions is not recommended.

  8. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. Paratuberculosis in Cattle by using Indirect Absorbed ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system and culture in Alborz Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedyeh Teymouri

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Because there is no treatment or cure for Johne's disease, detection of infected cattle and subsequent culling is very important for preventing infection in other cattle. Fecal culture is a standard method for the identification of the disease. However, in Johne's disease, due to prolonged incubation and shedding of the disease, the probability of isolating the responsible agent is very low. To identify the infection, the indirect absorbed ELISA method is used for eradication. This technique is considered as one of the most reliable for identification of the disease worldwide due to its ease of use and low cost. However, for confirmation of ELISA-positive results, culture method has been recommended.

  9. Effects of injectable vitamins A, D, E and C on the health and growth rate of feedlot cattle destined for the Australian domestic market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, P M V; McMeniman, N P; Lean, I J

    2008-03-01

    To examine the effects of injectable vitamins A, D and E at feedlot entry on health and growth rate and the effects of injectable vitamin C at the time of treatment for bovine respiratory disease (BRD) on cattle health. Systematic allocation of 2465 cattle at feedlot entry to: a commercial vitamin A, D and E preparation at the label dose rate; commercial vitamin A, D and E at twice the label dose rate; a formulation with no vitamin D, a lower concentration of vitamin A and a higher concentration of vitamin E; and the oil-based carrier alone at volumes corresponding to the above treatments. Comparisons of growth rate, disease and mortality were made between the groups at the conclusion of the feeding period. In a separate experiment, 176 cattle were alternately administered injectable vitamin C at the time of treatment for BRD, or were not injected with vitamin C, and mortality was compared between the groups. There were no differences between cattle administered vitamin A, D and E at feedlot entry and the controls in growth rate (P=0.11), all diseases (P=0.99), BRD (P=0.60) or mortalities (P=0.95). Cattle treated with the higher vitamin E and lower vitamin A preparation had a higher (P=0.02) incidence of anorexia than the other groups. Fewer cattle treated with 5 g of vitamin C by intramuscular injection at the time of treatment with antibiotics for BRD subsequently died (P=0.04). The routine injection of cattle with vitamins A, D and E at feedlot entry is unlikely to result in improvements in health and growth rate where cattle are provided with these vitamins in their diets at concentrations equal to the National Research Council recommendations. Mortality rate in cattle diagnosed with BRD may be reduced by intramuscular injection of vitamin C at the time of treatment with antibiotics.

  10. The Effects of Cattle Manure and Garlic Rotation on Soil under Continuous Cropping of Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changming; Wang, Yongqi; Ma, Jianxiang; Zhang, Yong; Li, Hao; Zhang, Xian

    2016-01-01

    Continuous cropping of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus L.) can lead to reduced yield and quality. We aimed to determine the effects of cattle manure addition and rotation with green garlic to improve yield and reduce disease incidence in watermelon and to examine the effects on the biological and chemical characteristics of the soil. Field experiments were performed during 2012–2014 on land previously under two years of continuous watermelon cropping in northwest China. We examined three treatment combinations: watermelon and garlic rotation, cattle manure application before watermelon planting, and combined cattle manure addition and crop rotation. Watermelon monoculture was retained as a control. Watermelon yield was significantly higher and disease incidence was lower in the treatments than the control. The populations of soil bacteria and actinomycetes and the bacteria/fungi ratio increased significantly and soil enzyme activities were generally enhanced under treatments. Available nutrients and soil organic matter contents were much higher under experimental treatments than the control. Results suggest both cattle manure application and garlic rotation can ameliorate the negative effects of continuous cropping. The combined treatment of cattle manure addition and green garlic rotation was optimal to increase yield, reduce disease incidence and enhance soil quality. PMID:27258145

  11. The Effects of Cattle Manure and Garlic Rotation on Soil under Continuous Cropping of Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruiping; Mo, Yanling; Liu, Changming; Wang, Yongqi; Ma, Jianxiang; Zhang, Yong; Li, Hao; Zhang, Xian

    2016-01-01

    Continuous cropping of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus L.) can lead to reduced yield and quality. We aimed to determine the effects of cattle manure addition and rotation with green garlic to improve yield and reduce disease incidence in watermelon and to examine the effects on the biological and chemical characteristics of the soil. Field experiments were performed during 2012-2014 on land previously under two years of continuous watermelon cropping in northwest China. We examined three treatment combinations: watermelon and garlic rotation, cattle manure application before watermelon planting, and combined cattle manure addition and crop rotation. Watermelon monoculture was retained as a control. Watermelon yield was significantly higher and disease incidence was lower in the treatments than the control. The populations of soil bacteria and actinomycetes and the bacteria/fungi ratio increased significantly and soil enzyme activities were generally enhanced under treatments. Available nutrients and soil organic matter contents were much higher under experimental treatments than the control. Results suggest both cattle manure application and garlic rotation can ameliorate the negative effects of continuous cropping. The combined treatment of cattle manure addition and green garlic rotation was optimal to increase yield, reduce disease incidence and enhance soil quality.

  12. Does Rhipicephalus microplus tick infestation increase the risk for myiasis caused by Cochliomyia hominivorax in cattle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reck, José; Marks, Fernanda S; Rodrigues, Rogério O; Souza, Ugo A; Webster, Anelise; Leite, Romário C; Gonzales, João Carlos; Klafke, Guilherme M; Martins, João Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The larval phase of Cochliomyia hominivorax (screwworm) is an obligate parasite of vertebrate animals, particularly mammals, and widespread in South America, where it remains one of the most important parasitic diseases of domestic animals. The skin of cattle highly infested by ticks, with cutaneous lesions, exudation of tissue fluid and blood scent seems to produce the ideal environment for fly attraction. However, an association between these parasites was never investigated. The aim of this work was to verify if there is an association between Rhipicephalus microplus tick load and the occurrence of C. hominivorax myiasis in cattle, and to quantify the risk. Sixty bovine (Bos taurus taurus, Angus breed) under field conditions were observed for 24 weeks, during which weekly tick counts and examination for the presence of myiasis were performed. There was a significant association between a high tick burden (24-week mean above 50 ticks per animal) and myiasis occurrence (P=0.0102). The calculated relative risk (RR) for C. hominivorax myiasis occurrence in cattle with high tick burden was 3.85 (CI95%=1.23-12.13); indicating that cattle highly parasitized by R. microplus have about four times more risk of myiasis than those with a low parasite load. As far as we aware, this is the first statistically based evidence of the relationship between R. microplus parasitic load and occurrence of myiasis by C. hominivorax. This result could be useful for the design of integrated control strategies for these parasites and to provide more information for the understanding of cattle tick parasitism in cattle production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Fecal shedding of Salmonella spp among cattle admitted to a veterinary medical teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Kevin J; Divers, Thomas J; McDonough, Patrick L; Warnick, Lorin D

    2009-06-15

    OBJECTIVE- To estimate the prevalence of fecal shedding of Salmonella spp among bovine patients at a veterinary teaching hospital, to identify risk factors for fecal shedding of Salmonella organisms, and to characterize the serotypes. DESIGN- Retrospective cohort study. SAMPLE POPULATION- 5,398 hospitalized cattle. PROCEDURES- Data were collected for all cattle admitted during an 11-year period. Fecal shedding of Salmonella spp was determined by means of standard bacteriologic culture. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify risk factors for shedding of Salmonella spp among patients. RESULTS- The prevalence of Salmonella shedding among clinical suspects was 6.5% (50/768), whereas that among nonsuspects tested through routine surveillance was 2.5% (50/2,020). Among clinical suspect calves, fecal shedding of Salmonella spp was more likely for those admitted in the fall (odds ratio [OR], 5.9), those with septicemia (OR, 3.3), or those with an umbilical hernia (OR, 8.6). Among clinical suspect adult cattle, those with enteritis (OR, 9.9) or metritis (OR, 5.2) were more likely to be shedding Salmonella spp. Among nonsuspect cattle, none of the variables were significant predictors of shedding status. Twenty-one serotypes were detected during the study period, with the most common being Salmonella enterica serotypes Typhimurium (33%), Newport (23%), and Agona (12%). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE- Seasonal and disease risk factors for fecal shedding of Salmonella spp were evident among clinical suspect cattle admitted to a veterinary teaching hospital. In contrast, lack of significant associations among nonsuspect cattle would suggest that targeted screening within this population is not warranted.

  14. Mycobacterium bovis in Burkina Faso: epidemiologic and genetic links between human and cattle isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adama Sanou

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In sub-Saharan Africa, bovine tuberculosis (bTB is a potential hazard for animals and humans health. The goal of this study was to improve our understanding of bTB epidemiology in Burkina Faso and especially Mycobacterium bovis transmission within and between the bovine and human populations.Twenty six M. bovis strains were isolated from 101 cattle carcasses with suspected bTB lesions during routine meat inspections at the Bobo Dioulasso and Ouagadougou slaughterhouses. In addition, 7 M. bovis strains were isolated from 576 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Spoligotyping, RDAf1 deletion and MIRU-VNTR typing were used for strains genotyping. The isolation of M. bovis strains was confirmed by spoligotyping and 12 spoligotype signatures were detected. Together, the spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR data allowed grouping the 33 M. bovis isolates in seven clusters including isolates exclusively from cattle (5 or humans (1 or from both (1. Moreover, these data (genetic analyses and phenetic tree showed that the M. bovis isolates belonged to the African 1 (Af1 clonal complex (81.8% and the putative African 5 (Af5 clonal complex (18.2%, in agreement with the results of RDAf1 deletion typing.This is the first detailed molecular characterization of M. bovis strains from humans and cattle in Burkina Faso. The distribution of the two Af1 and putative Af5 clonal complexes is comparable to what has been reported in neighbouring countries. Furthermore, the strain genetic profiles suggest that M. bovis circulates across the borders and that the Burkina Faso strains originate from different countries, but have a country-specific evolution. The genetic characterization suggests that, currently, M. bovis transmission occurs mainly between cattle, occasionally between cattle and humans and potentially between humans. This study emphasizes the bTB risk in cattle but also in humans and the difficulty to set up proper disease control strategies in Burkina Faso.

  15. Mycobacterium bovis in Burkina Faso: epidemiologic and genetic links between human and cattle isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanou, Adama; Tarnagda, Zekiba; Kanyala, Estelle; Zingué, Dezemon; Nouctara, Moumini; Ganamé, Zakaria; Combary, Adjima; Hien, Hervé; Dembele, Mathurin; Kabore, Antoinette; Meda, Nicolas; Van de Perre, Philippe; Neveu, Dorine; Bañuls, Anne Laure; Godreuil, Sylvain

    2014-10-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is a potential hazard for animals and humans health. The goal of this study was to improve our understanding of bTB epidemiology in Burkina Faso and especially Mycobacterium bovis transmission within and between the bovine and human populations. Twenty six M. bovis strains were isolated from 101 cattle carcasses with suspected bTB lesions during routine meat inspections at the Bobo Dioulasso and Ouagadougou slaughterhouses. In addition, 7 M. bovis strains were isolated from 576 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Spoligotyping, RDAf1 deletion and MIRU-VNTR typing were used for strains genotyping. The isolation of M. bovis strains was confirmed by spoligotyping and 12 spoligotype signatures were detected. Together, the spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR data allowed grouping the 33 M. bovis isolates in seven clusters including isolates exclusively from cattle (5) or humans (1) or from both (1). Moreover, these data (genetic analyses and phenetic tree) showed that the M. bovis isolates belonged to the African 1 (Af1) clonal complex (81.8%) and the putative African 5 (Af5) clonal complex (18.2%), in agreement with the results of RDAf1 deletion typing. This is the first detailed molecular characterization of M. bovis strains from humans and cattle in Burkina Faso. The distribution of the two Af1 and putative Af5 clonal complexes is comparable to what has been reported in neighbouring countries. Furthermore, the strain genetic profiles suggest that M. bovis circulates across the borders and that the Burkina Faso strains originate from different countries, but have a country-specific evolution. The genetic characterization suggests that, currently, M. bovis transmission occurs mainly between cattle, occasionally between cattle and humans and potentially between humans. This study emphasizes the bTB risk in cattle but also in humans and the difficulty to set up proper disease control strategies in Burkina Faso.

  16. The Prevalence of Brucellosis in Cattle, Goats and Humans in Rural Uganda: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R; Nakavuma, J L; Ssajjakambwe, P; Vudriko, P; Musisi, N; Kaneene, J B

    2016-12-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the presence of brucellosis in cattle, goats and humans in farms from south-western Uganda and identify risk factors associated with brucellosis in these three host groups. Data and serum samples were collected from 768 cattle, 315 goats and 236 humans, with 635 samples of bovine milk, from 70 farms in two different study areas in south-western Uganda. Sera from livestock were tested with the Rose Bengal Plate test, using B. abortus and B. melitensis antigens, and human sera were tested with a commercial IgG/IgM lateral flow assay. Milk samples were tested using the OIE-approved milk ring test. Screening tests for brucellosis were positive in 14% of cattle serum, 29% of bovine milk, 17% of goat serum and 11% of human serum samples. There were significant differences in the test prevalence of brucellosis by study site, with levels higher in the study area near Lake Mburo National Park than in the study area near Queen Elizabeth National Park. Multivariable regression models identified risk factors associated with increasing test positivity at the individual and farm levels for cattle, goats and humans. Positive associations were seen between increasing seropositivity of brucellosis in goats, cattle and humans. Results of multivariable analyses suggest that improvements in farm biosecurity and hygiene may reduce the risk of brucellosis on the farm and suggest a role for ticks in bovine brucellosis. Although cattle are the focus of brucellosis control in Uganda, the significant associations between seropositivity in humans and seropositivity in goats suggest that brucellosis in goats may be an important contributor to the epidemiology of the disease on the farm. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. Passive electronic identification with temperature monitoring. [Temperature monitor for cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, D.M.; Bobbett, R.E.; Koelle, A.R.; Landt, J.A.; Sanders, W.M.; Depp, S.W.; Seawright, G.L.

    1976-01-01

    The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) have been supporting an electronic identification and temperature monitoring project at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) since early 1973. The development, so far, indicates that a subdermally-implanted, electronic transponder (having no batteries) can be remotely activated and transmit temperature and identification information back to a receiver in a few tenths of a second. If this electronic identification and temperature monitoring system is developed into a commercially available product line, and is widely accepted by the cattle industry, it will enable them to carry out more extensive management practices. Better management can result in greater efficiency and productivity. The system will also enable regulatory agencies to trace the movements of diseased animals through commerce, and thus assist in disease control measures. Work so far has been concentrated primarily on determining the technical feasibility of the electronic concepts. (auth)

  18. 9 CFR 93.418 - Cattle from Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cattle from Canada. 93.418 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants Canada 8 § 93.418 Cattle from Canada. (a) Health certificates. Cattle intended for importation from Canada must be accompanied by a certificate issued in accordance...

  19. Patterns of trematode infection in gall bladder from cattle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of gall-bladder of slaughtered cattle was carried out to determine variation pattern of trematode infection. A total of 1,240 gall-bladders of cattle were examined for trematode eggs and adult worms between August 2008 and March 2009. Fifty questionnaires were randomly administered to cattle handlers to ...

  20. Species composition and environmental adaptation of indigenous Chinese cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Yahui; Gautier, Mathieu; Ding, Xiangdong; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Yachun; Wang, Xi; Faruque, Md Omar; Li, Junya; Ye, Shaohui; Gou, Xiao; Han, Jianlin; Lenstra, Johannes A; Zhang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Indigenous Chinese cattle combine taurine and indicine origins and occupy a broad range of different environments. By 50 K SNP genotyping we found a discontinuous distribution of taurine and indicine cattle ancestries with extremes of less than 10% indicine cattle in the north and more than 90% in

  1. Indigenous knowledge in cattle breeding in Sierra Leone | Abdul ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted in order to document and preserve valuable indigenous knowledge in cattle breeding and production under traditional cattle production system in Sierra Leone. Data were collected from thirty (30) cattle farms from three locations: Gbindi (16 farms), Sackelereh (7 farms), and Flamansa (7 farms) in ...

  2. 9 CFR 93.427 - Cattle from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cattle from Mexico. 93.427 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants Mexico 10 § 93.427 Cattle from Mexico. (a) Cattle and other ruminants imported from Mexico, except animals being transported in bond for immediate return to Mexico or...

  3. Risk factors associated with anthrax in cattle on smallholdings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biswas, P. K.; Islam, Md Zohorul; Shil, S. K.

    2012-01-01

    Unprecedented high rates of anthrax outbreaks have been observed recently in cattle and humans in Bangladesh, with 607 human cases in 2010. By enrolling 15 case and 15 control cattle smallholdings in the spatial zone in July-September 2010, we conducted a case-control study, data of which were an...... independent risk factors for anthrax in cattle....

  4. Grazing behaviour and diet selection of Barotse cattle on a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grazing behaviour and diet selection of cattle were studied on a communally grazed floodplain and its adjacent wooded uplands in western Zambia to identify the interaction between basic herd management practices, foraging behaviour and body condition of cattle. On average, the cattle spent nine hours and 29 minutes ...

  5. Salmonella in peripheral lymph nodes of healthy cattle at slaughter

    Science.gov (United States)

    To more fully characterize the burden of Salmonella enterica in bovine peripheral lymph nodes (PLN), PLN (n=5,450) were collected from healthy cattle at slaughter in 12 commercial abattoirs that slaughtered feedlot-fattened (FF) cattle exclusively (n=7), cattle removed (or culled) from breeding herd...

  6. 9 CFR 78.7 - Brucellosis reactor cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brucellosis reactor cattle. 78.7... AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS BRUCELLOSIS Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.7 Brucellosis reactor cattle. (a...

  7. 9 CFR 78.8 - Brucellosis exposed cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brucellosis exposed cattle. 78.8... AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS BRUCELLOSIS Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.8 Brucellosis exposed cattle...

  8. Dysbiosis of the Fecal Microbiota in Cattle Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Eve Fecteau

    Full Text Available Johne's disease (JD is a chronic, intestinal infection of cattle, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP. It results in granulomatous inflammation of the intestinal lining, leading to malabsorption, diarrhea, and weight loss. Crohn's disease (CD, a chronic, inflammatory gastrointestinal disease of humans, has many clinical and pathologic similarities to JD. Dysbiosis of the enteric microbiota has been demonstrated in CD patients. It is speculated that this dysbiosis may contribute to the intestinal inflammation observed in those patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the diversity patterns of fecal bacterial populations in cattle infected with MAP, compared to those of uninfected control cattle, using phylogenomic analysis. Fecal samples were selected to include samples from 20 MAP-positive cows; 25 MAP-negative herdmates; and 25 MAP-negative cows from a MAP-free herd. The genomic DNA was extracted; PCR amplified sequenced on a 454 Roche platform, and analyzed using QIIME. Approximately 199,077 reads were analyzed from 70 bacterial communities (average of 2,843 reads/sample. The composition of bacterial communities differed between the 3 treatment groups (P < 0.001; Permanova test. Taxonomic assignment of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs identified 17 bacterial phyla across all samples. Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes constituted more than 95% of the bacterial population in the negative and exposed groups. In the positive group, lineages of Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria increased and those of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes decreased (P < 0.001. Actinobacteria was highly abundant (30% of the total bacteria in the positive group compared to exposed and negative groups (0.1-0.2%. Notably, the genus Arthrobacter was found to predominate Actinobacteria in the positive group. This study indicates that MAP-infected cattle have a different composition of their fecal microbiota than MAP-negative cattle.

  9. Monitoring genetic variability of Bulgarian cattle biodiversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martino Cassandro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aimed to characterize, using 19 microsatellite markers, three native Bulgarian cattle breeds, Iskar, Rhodope Shorthorn and Bulgarian Rhodope and to clarify their population structure. The three breeds own a genetic variability comparable with other European cattle breeds, nevertheless they showed a significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in terms of heterozygote deficiency. Allelic frequencies distribution among breeds was highly significant confirming their genetic uniqueness. The population structure of Rhodope Shorthorn was complex and is probably the cause of its rather high FIS estimate (0.111; Iskar breed structure is also rather fragmented and should be studied more deeply while Bulgarian Rhodope population seemed to be the less variable. Presented results helped to clarify the present situation of Bulgarian cattle biodiversity giving interesting suggestions for their management and conservation.

  10. Protein nutrition of growing cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalupa, W.; Scott, G.C.

    1976-01-01

    In vitro studies on apparent degradation of amino acids by mixed and pure cultures of rumen bacteria demonstrated that (a) amino acids are degraded at differing rates (Arg, Thr>Lys, Phe, Leu, Ile>Val, Met); (b) certain amino acids (Met, Val, Try, Orn) are degraded to greater extents when fermented alone than in conjunction with other amino acids; (c) individual strains of rumen bacteria do not utilize all amino acids; and (d) total ruminal degradation of amino acids is the result of extensive bacterial interaction, and may vary greatly depending on the predominant types of micro-organisms present. Abomasal infusion of a mixture of 10 essential amino acids consistently increased nitrogen retention, but attempts to elucidate primary limiting amino acids were not conclusive. Our data suggested that supplementary methionine alone may not significantly increase nitrogen retention, but methionine must be present in order to obtain responses from other amino acids. Methionine plus lysine plus threonine usually increased nitrogen retention, but the magnitude of responses varied. The classical nitrogen balance technique may lack the sensitivity needed to detect small responses resulting from supplements of single amino acids, or growing cattle, unlike sheep used for wool growth, may not be suffering from specific amino acid deficiencies. Chemical suppression of ruminal degradation of amino acids produced significant increases in nitrogen retention and growth, and improved feed efficiencies. Productivity responses to rumen bypass techniques would seem to depend primarily upon (a) the degree to which dietary protein is degraded in the rumen, and (b) the quantity of absorbable amino acids supplied by the diet in relation to quantities required by the animal. (author)

  11. Brucella seroprevalence of the Kafue lechwe (Kobus leche kafuensis) and Black lechwe (Kobus leche smithemani): exposure associated to contact with cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muma, J B; Munyeme, M; Matope, G; Siamudaala, V M; Munang'andu, H M; Matandiko, W; Godfroid, J; Skjerve, E; Tryland, M

    2011-07-01

    We investigated Brucella seroprevalence in Kafue (Kobus leche kafuensis) and Black (Kobus leche smithemani) lechwe antelopes to assess Brucella infections in relation to presence/absence of cattle interaction on the wetlands. Accordingly, two study populations based on cattle interaction were assesed: Kafue lechwe from Kafue flats which interact with cattle; and the Black lechwe with no known interaction with cattle from the Bangweulu swamps. Fourteen Kafue lechwe and thirty Black lechwe were slaughtered between October and December 2009 using special research licenses obtained from the Zambia wildlife authority to investigate diseases in lechwe antelope. For the purpose of this study, blood was collected and sera separated for Rose Bengal and indirect ELISA tests. Seroprevalence of Brucella in the Kafue lechwe was estimated at 42.9% [95% CI: 15.2-70.5] while that in Black lechwe was 0% [95% CI:0.0-11.6]. On the Kafue flats, cattle were spotted grazing in the same areas as lechwe while there was no evidence of cattle presence on the Bangweulu swamps. These differences in seroprevalence between Kafue lechwe and Black lechwe were assumed to be associated with interaction between Kafue lechwe and Brucella infected cattle, and no such contact existed between cattle and the Black lechwe. Our study suggests that brucellosis in the Kafue lechwe may have originated from cattle but has now established a reservoir in wild animals. It is also important to keep in mind that the Black lechwe can easily become infected with Brucella spp. once cattle are introduced in the surrounding areas. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Biomarker discovery in subclinical mycobacterial infections of cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meetu Seth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bovine tuberculosis is a highly prevalent infectious disease of cattle worldwide; however, infection in the United States is limited to 0.01% of dairy herds. Thus detection of bovine TB is confounded by high background infection with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The present study addresses variations in the circulating peptidome based on the pathogenesis of two biologically similar mycobacterial diseases of cattle. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We hypothesized that serum proteomes of animals in response to either M. bovis or M. paratuberculosis infection will display several commonalities and differences. Sera prospectively collected from animals experimentally infected with either M. bovis or M. paratuberculosis were analyzed using high-resolution proteomics approaches. iTRAQ, a liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry approach, was used to simultaneously identify and quantify peptides from multiple infections and contemporaneous uninfected control groups. Four comparisons were performed: 1 M. bovis infection versus uninfected controls, 2 M. bovis versus M. paratuberculosis infection, 3 early, and 4 advanced M. paratuberculosis infection versus uninfected controls. One hundred and ten differentially elevated proteins (P < or = 0.05 were identified. Vitamin D binding protein precursor (DBP, alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, alpha-1B glycoprotein, fetuin, and serine proteinase inhibitor were identified in both infections. Transthyretin, retinol binding proteins, and cathelicidin were identified exclusively in M. paratuberculosis infection, while the serum levels of alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor (AMBP protein, alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, fetuin, and alpha-1B glycoprotein were elevated exclusively in M. bovis infected animals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The discovery of these biomarkers has significant impact on the elucidation of pathogenesis of two mycobacterial diseases at the cellular and the molecular level and

  13. Neuropathology of organophosphate poisoning in dairy cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulvian Sani

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate pathological changes in brain tissues of Frisien Holstein dairy cattle affected by organophosphate (OP. The study was directed to anticipate spongiform encephalopathy. Samples consisted of animal feeds, sera and brain tissues were collected from Lembang, West Java. Animal feeds (fodders and commercial feed were collected directly from the dairy farms around Lembang. Sera (31 samples were from dairy cattle owned by the local farmers and brain tissues were from the local animal slaughter house. Pesticide residues were analysed following a standard procedure using gas chromatography (GC. There was an interaction between pesticide residues in animal feeds, residue level of pesticides in sera and brain tissues to cause encephalopathy in dairy cattle. Pesticide contamination in animal feeds was regarded as the source of encephalopathy in dairy cattle. The total average of OP residues (16.8 ppb were lower than organochlorines/OC (18.7 ppb in fodder, showing that pesticides were originated from the contaminated soils. On the other hand, the total average of OP residues in commercial feeds (12.0 ppb, sera (85.6 ppb and brain tissues (22.7 ppb were higher than OC (1.8; 16.7; and 5.1 ppb. The OP appears more frequently used for dairy farm activity as insecticides. Histopathological examination for brain tissues of dairy cattle showed that most cattle were diagnosed as encephalopathy with microscopic changes of vacuolation, neuronal necrosis, chromatolysis of neurons and nucleolysis of neurons. The encephalopathy was confirmed in rats intoxicated with chlorpyrifos methyl as severe brain damage with spongiform-like lesions.

  14. Effect of host diversity and species assemblage composition on bovine tuberculosis (bTB) risk in Ethiopian cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sintayehu, Dejene W; Heitkönig, Ignas M A; Prins, Herbert H T; Tessema, Zewdu K; DE Boer, Willem F

    2017-05-01

    Current theories on diversity-disease relationships describe host species diversity and species identity as important factors influencing disease risk, either diluting or amplifying disease prevalence in a community. Whereas the simple term 'diversity' embodies a set of animal community characteristics, it is not clear how different measures of species diversity are correlated with disease risk. We therefore tested the effects of species richness, Pielou's evenness and Shannon's diversity on bovine tuberculosis (bTB) risk in cattle in the Afar Region and Awash National Park between November 2013 and April 2015. We also analysed the identity effect of a particular species and the effect of host habitat use overlap on bTB risk. We used the comparative intradermal tuberculin test to assess the number of bTB-infected cattle. Our results suggested a dilution effect through species evenness. We found that the identity effect of greater kudu - a maintenance host - confounded the dilution effect of species diversity on bTB risk. bTB infection was positively correlated with habitat use overlap between greater kudu and cattle. Different diversity indices have to be considered together for assessing diversity-disease relationships, for understanding the underlying causal mechanisms. We posit that unpacking diversity metrics is also relevant for formulating disease control strategies to manage cattle in ecosystems characterized by seasonally limited resources and intense wildlife-livestock interactions.

  15. [Cattle farmers' perception of the nuisances caused by insects and ticks to cattle in the Canton Jura].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovis, L; Frutschi Mascher, V; Gern, L; Betschart, B; Zinsstag, J

    2008-09-01

    During summer 2005, a survey of 172 farmers from the Canton Jura was carried out to determine their perception of the nuisances caused by insects and ticks to cattle. The presence of ticks was significantly more often spontaneously mentioned by farmers in the Clos-du-Doubs and in the district of Delémont (95% and 72%, respectively) than in Ajoie and in the Franches-Montagnes (29% and 19%, respectively, p insects and ticks and that the perception of their distribution is in accordance with the epidemiological data. An overview of the epidemiology of tick- and insect-related diseases can therefore be established by surveying farmers' perception, but should then be confirmed by a biomedical study. Due to their accurate observations, farmers are key participants at the first level of surveillance systems of animal diseases.

  16. Exploring the virome of cattle with non-suppurative encephalitis of unknown etiology by metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, Daniel; Boujon, Céline L; Truchet, Laura; Selimovic-Hamza, Senija; Oevermann, Anna; Bouzalas, Ilias G; Bruggmann, Rémy; Seuberlich, Torsten

    2016-06-01

    Non-suppurative encephalitis is one of the most frequent pathological diagnosis in cattle with neurological disease, but there is a gap in the knowledge on disease-associated pathogens. In order to identify viruses that are associated with non-suppurative encephalitis in cattle, we used a viral metagenomics approach on a sample set of 16 neurologically-diseased cows. We detected six virus candidates: parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV-5), bovine astrovirus CH13/NeuroS1 (BoAstV-CH13/NeuroS1), bovine polyomavirus 2 (BPyV-2 SF), ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2), bovine herpesvirus 6 (BHV-6) and a novel bovine betaretrovirus termed BoRV-CH15. In a case-control study using PCR, BoAstV-CH13 (p=0.046), BoPV-2 SF (p=0.005) and BoHV-6 (p=4.3E-05) were statistically associated with the disease. These data expand our knowledge on encephalitis-associated pathogens in cattle and point to the value of NGS in resolving complex infection scenarios in a clinical disease setting. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mortality of live export cattle on long-haul voyages: pathologic changes and pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S Jo; O'Dea, Mark A; Perkins, Nigel; Barnes, Anne; O'Hara, Amanda J

    2014-03-01

    The cause of death in 215 cattle on 20 long-haul live export voyages from Australia to the Middle East, Russia, and China was investigated between 2010 and 2012 using gross, histologic, and/or molecular pathology techniques. A quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay was used to detect nucleic acids from viruses and bacteria known to be associated with respiratory disease in cattle: Bovine coronavirus (Betacoronavirus 1), Bovine herpesvirus 1, Bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 and 2, Bovine respiratory syncytial virus, Bovine parainfluenza virus 3, Histophilus somni, Mycoplasma bovis, Mannheimia haemolytica, and Pasteurella multocida. The most commonly diagnosed cause of death was respiratory disease (107/180, 59.4%), followed by lameness (n = 22, 12.2%), ketosis (n = 12, 6.7%), septicemia (n = 11, 6.1%), and enteric disease (n = 10, 5.6%). Two thirds (130/195) of animals from which lung samples were collected had histologic changes and/or positive qRT-PCR results indicative of infectious lung disease: 93 out of 130 (72%) had evidence of bacterial infection, 4 (3%) had viral infection, and 29 (22%) had mixed bacterial and viral infections, and for 4 (3%) the causative organism could not be identified. Bovine coronavirus was detected in up to 13% of cattle tested, and this finding is likely to have important implications for the management and treatment of respiratory disease in live export cattle. Results from the current study indicate that although overall mortality during live export voyages is low, further research into risk factors for developing respiratory disease is required.

  18. Spontaneous poisoning by Ricinus communis (Euphorbiaceae in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel S.C. Albuquerque

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to report cases of spontaneous poisoning of cattle by Ricinus communis (castor beans in Paraíba, a semiarid region of northeastern Brazil. The cases were observed in 2 herds on neighboring properties in 2013. Clinical signs developed within 6-24 h and consisted of weakness, tachycardia, dyspnea, profuse watery diarrhea, dehydration, depression, instability, cramps, permanent lateral recumbency and death within 48-72 h. Of the 60 cattle at risk, 19 were affected and 14 died. Five fully recovered after the course of 12 days. Three animals were necropsied. The main gross lesions were hemopericardium, hemothorax, pulmonary edema, petechial hemorrhages in the epicardium and endocardium, ecchymoses at the papillary muscles and suffusions on the intercostal muscles. Hemorrhages were also observed in the abdominal cavity, spleen and mucosa of the abomasum and small intestine. The rumen content was liquid with a large amount of castor bean seeds. There were circular, whitish and focally diffuse areas in the liver parenchyma. The main microscopic lesions consisted of multifocal coagulative myocardial necrosis with the presence of mononuclear cell infiltration and varying degrees of bleeding between cardiac muscle fibers. The abomasum and small intestine mucosae and submucosa had mild edema and mononuclear and polymorphonuclear inflammatory cell infiltration. The diagnosis of R. communis was based on the history of plant consumption, clinical signs, pathology of the disease and the presence of large amounts of castor bean seeds in the forestomachs.

  19. Protocol for the microbial degradation of coumaphos from cattle dip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulbry, W.; Karns, J.

    1997-01-01

    Insecticide wastes generated from livestock dipping operations are well suited for biodegradation processes since these wastes are concentrated, contained, and have no other significant toxic components. About 400,000 L of cattle dip wastes containing approximately 1500 mg/L of the organophosphate coumaphos are generated yearly along the Mexican border from a USDA program designed to control disease carrying cattle ticks. Use of unlined evaporation pits for the disposal of these wastes has resulted in highly contaminated soils underlying these sites. Previous work has shown that microbial consortia present in selected dip wastes can be induced to mineralize coumaphos. Our laboratory results show that these consortia are able to colonize plastic fibers in trickling biofilters and can be used in these filters to quickly metabolize coumaphos from dip wastes. A field scale biofilter capable of treating 15,000 litre batches of dip waste was used to reduce the coumaphos concentration in two successive 11,000 litre batch trials from 2000 mg/L to 10 mg/L in approximately 14 d. (author)

  20. Invited review: The economic impact and control of paratuberculosis in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, A B; Shalloo, L

    2015-08-01

    Paratuberculosis (also called Johne's disease) is a chronic disease caused by Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) that affects ruminants and other animals. The epidemiology of paratuberculosis is complex and the clinical manifestations and economic impact of the disease in cattle can be variable depending on factors such as herd management, age, infection dose, and disease prevalence, among others. Additionally, considerable challenges are faced in the control of paratuberculosis in cattle, such as the lack of accurate and reliable diagnostic tests. Nevertheless, efforts are directed toward the control of this disease because it can cause substantial economic losses to the cattle industry mainly due to increased premature culling, replacement costs, decreased milk yield, reduced feed conversion efficiency, fertility problems, reduced slaughter values, and increased susceptibility to other diseases or conditions. The variability and uncertainty surrounding the estimations of paratuberculosis prevalence and impact influence the design, implementation, and efficiency of control programs in diverse areas of the world. This review covers important aspects of the economic impact and control of paratuberculosis, including challenges related to disease detection, estimations of the prevalence and economic effects of the disease, and the implementation of control programs. The control of paratuberculosis can improve animal health and welfare, increase productivity, reduce potential market problems, and increase overall business profitability. The benefits that can derive from the control of paratuberculosis need to be communicated to all industry stakeholders to promote the implementation of control programs. Moreover, if the suspected link between Johne's disease in ruminants and Crohn's disease in humans was established, significant economic losses could be expected, particularly for the dairy industry, making the control of this disease a priority across

  1. Implementation of immunohistochemistry on frozen ear notch tissue samples in diagnosis of bovine viral diarrhea virus in persistently infected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedeković Tomislav

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine viral diarrhea is a contagious disease of domestic and wild ruminants and one of the most economically important diseases in cattle. Bovine viral diarrhea virus belongs to the genus Pestivirus, within the family Flaviviridae. The identification and elimination of the persistently infected animals from herds is the initial step in the control and eradication programs. It is therefore necessary to have reliable methods for diagnosis of bovine viral diarrhea virus. One of those methods is immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemistry on formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue is a routine technique in diagnosis of persistently infected cattle from ear notch tissue samples. However, such technique is inappropriate due to complicated tissue fixation process and it requires more days for preparation. On the contrary, immunohistochemistry on frozen tissue was usually applied on organs from dead animals. In this paper, for the first time, the imunohistochemistry on frozen ear notch tissue samples was described. Findings Seventeen ear notch tissue samples were obtained during the period 2008-2009 from persistently infected cattle. Samples were fixed in liquid nitrogen and stored on -20°C until testing. Ear notch tissue samples from all persistently infected cattle showed positive results with good section quality and possibility to determinate type of infected cells. Conclusions Although the number of samples was limited, this study indicated that immunohistochemistry on formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue can be successfully replaced with immunohistochemistry on frozen ear notch tissue samples in diagnosis of persistently infected cattle.

  2. Model of Selective and Non-Selective Management of Badgers (Meles meles) to Control Bovine Tuberculosis in Badgers and Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Graham C; Delahay, Richard J; McDonald, Robbie A; Budgey, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) causes substantial economic losses to cattle farmers and taxpayers in the British Isles. Disease management in cattle is complicated by the role of the European badger (Meles meles) as a host of the infection. Proactive, non-selective culling of badgers can reduce the incidence of disease in cattle but may also have negative effects in the area surrounding culls that have been associated with social perturbation of badger populations. The selective removal of infected badgers would, in principle, reduce the number culled, but the effects of selective culling on social perturbation and disease outcomes are unclear. We used an established model to simulate non-selective badger culling, non-selective badger vaccination and a selective trap and vaccinate or remove (TVR) approach to badger management in two distinct areas: South West England and Northern Ireland. TVR was simulated with and without social perturbation in effect. The lower badger density in Northern Ireland caused no qualitative change in the effect of management strategies on badgers, although the absolute number of infected badgers was lower in all cases. However, probably due to differing herd density in Northern Ireland, the simulated badger management strategies caused greater variation in subsequent cattle bTB incidence. Selective culling in the model reduced the number of badgers killed by about 83% but this only led to an overall benefit for cattle TB incidence if there was no social perturbation of badgers. We conclude that the likely benefit of selective culling will be dependent on the social responses of badgers to intervention but that other population factors including badger and cattle density had little effect on the relative benefits of selective culling compared to other methods, and that this may also be the case for disease management in other wild host populations.

  3. Results of an online questionnaire to survey calf management practices on dairy cattle breeding farms in Austria and to estimate differences in disease incidences depending on farm structure and management practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Jöbstl, Daniela; Arnholdt, Tim; Sturmlechner, Franz; Iwersen, Michael; Drillich, Marc

    2015-08-19

    Calf disease may result in great economic losses. To implement prevention strategies it is important to gain information on management and to point out risk factors. The objective of this internet based survey was to describe calf management practices on registered dairy breeding farms in Austria and to estimate differences in calf disease incidences depending on farm structure and management practices. A total of 1287 questionnaires were finally analysed (response rate 12.2 %). Herd characteristics and regional distribution of farms indicated that this survey gives a good overview on calf management practices on registered dairy farms in Austria. The median number of cows per farm was 20 (interquartile range 13-30). Significant differences regarding farm characteristics and calf management between small and large farms (≤20 vs >20 cows) were present. Only 2.8 % of farmers tested first colostrum quality by use of a hydrometer. Storing frozen colostrum was more prevalent on large farms (80.8 vs 64.2 %). On 85.1 % of the farms, whole milk, including waste milk, was fed to the calves. Milk replacer and waste milk were more often used on large farms. In accordance with similar studies from other countries, calf diarrhoea was indicated as the most prevalent disease. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that herd size was associated with calf diarrhoea and calf respiratory tract disease, with higher risk of disease on large farms. Furthermore, feeding waste milk to the calves was associated with increasing calf diarrhoea incidence on farm. In the final model with calf respiratory tract disease as outcome, respondents from organic farms reported less often a respiratory tract disease incidence of over 10 % compared with conventional farms [odds ratio (OR) 0.40, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.21-0.75] and farmers that housed calves individually or in groups after birth significantly reported more often to have an incidence of respiratory tract

  4. Establishment and biological characteristics of Piedmontese cattle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The transfection efficiencies of pEGFP-N3, pEYFP-N1 and pDsRed1-N1 were between 7.1 and 30.8%; fluorescences were homogenously distributed throughout cytoplasm and nucleus except in some cryptomeric vesicles. Every index of the Piedmontese cattle cell line met the quality control standards of the American Type ...

  5. Linear Classification of Dairy Cattle. Slide Script.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipiorski, James; Spike, Peter

    This slide script, part of a series of slide scripts designed for use in vocational agriculture classes, deals with principles of the linear classification of dairy cattle. Included in the guide are narrations for use with 63 slides, which illustrate the following areas that are considered in the linear classification system: stature, strength,…

  6. (Bunaji) breeds of cattle following artificial insemination

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out to evaluate the fertility rate of white Fulani (Bunaji) and Friesian breeds of cattle following artificial insemination (A. I). Artificial insemination was performed following Oestrus synchronization using prostaglandin F2a (PGF2a) in 368 white Fulani and 230 Friesian cows at West Africa Milk Company ...

  7. Breeding for longevity in Italian Chianina cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forabosco, F.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to evaluate genetic aspects of longevity (LPL) in the Chianina beef cattle population in order to define how to include this trait in selection criteria. The Chianina breed has been raised for over twenty-two centuries in

  8. Cattle breeding goals and production circumstances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, A.F.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis gives the results of a study on the relationship between cattle breeding goals and production circumstances. The relationship between breeding goals and production circumstances mostly arises from the influences of production circumstances on the economic values of

  9. Condensed tannins act against cattle nematodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novobilský, Adam; Mueller-Harvey, Irene; Thamsborg, Stig Milan

    2011-01-01

    The use of natural plant anthelmintics was suggested as a possible alternative control of gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) in ruminants. Direct anthelmintic effects of tannin-containing plants have already been shown in sheep and goat GIN. These anthelmintic properties are mainly associated with ...... extracts. Our results, therefore, indicated that tannin-containing plants could act against cattle nematodes....

  10. Epigenetics and environmental impacts in cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter reviews the major advances in the field of epigenetics as well as the environmental impacts of cattle. Many findings from our own research endeavors related to the topic of this chapter are also introduced. The phenotypic characterization of an animal can be changed through epigenetic ...

  11. Selection for body weight in dairy cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenen, E.P.C.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis deals with selection for body weight (BW) in dairy cattle. The economic efficiency of present breeding schemes might increase further when selection decisions also consider information on BW as BW relates to feed costs and revenues from beef production. However, the practical

  12. On the origin of Indonesian cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusdiantoro Mohamad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Two bovine species contribute to the Indonesian livestock, zebu (Bos indicus and banteng (Bos javanicus, respectively. Although male hybrid offspring of these species is not fertile, Indonesian cattle breeds are supposed to be of mixed species origin. However, this has not been documented and is so far only supported by preliminary molecular analysis. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Analysis of mitochondrial, Y-chromosomal and microsatellite DNA showed a banteng introgression of 10-16% in Indonesian zebu breeds. East-Javanese Madura and Galekan cattle have higher levels of autosomal banteng introgression (20-30% and combine a zebu paternal lineage with a predominant (Madura or even complete (Galekan maternal banteng origin. Two Madura bulls carried taurine Y-chromosomal haplotypes, presumably of French Limousin origin. In contrast, we did not find evidence for zebu introgression in five populations of the Bali cattle, a domestic form of the banteng. CONCLUSIONS: Because of their unique species composition Indonesian cattle represent a valuable genetic resource, which potentially may also be exploited in other tropical regions.

  13. Establishment and biological characteristics of Piedmontese cattle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-12

    Dec 12, 2011 ... Every index of the Piedmontese cattle cell line met the quality control standards of the American Type Culture ... domestic animals. Germ cells, somatic cells, stem cells,. *Corresponding author. ... The suspension were aliquoted into sterile plastic cryovials labeled with species, breed, gender, cryopreser-.

  14. Preweaning Performances of Ndama Cattle | Adeyanju | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data on birth weight, preweaning daily rate of gain and weaning weight of Ndama beef cattle were obtained from routine records kept on the Fashola Livestock Farm between 1959 and 1964 and subjected to least-squares analysis to determine the effect of sex, month, year and sire on the performance characteristics.

  15. Criollo cattle: Heritage genetics for arid landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirty cows and three bulls from the Chinipas region in the state of Chihuahua, Mexico, were introduced onto the US Department of Agriculture – Agricultural Research Service’s Jornada Experimental Range (JER) in 2005. Since then behavioral research has revealed these cattle, most accurately referre...

  16. Archaeal community of cattle digestive system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němcová, Anna; Elhottová, Dana; Gattinger, A.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 48, - (2007), s. 233 ISSN 0009-0646. [Kongres Československé společnosti mikrobiologické /24./. 02.10.2007-05.10.2007, Liberec] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : archaeal community * cattle digestive system Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  17. Aspects of rumen adaptation in dairy cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieho, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    In dairy cattle the nutrient requirements change rapidly around calving. During the dry period nutrients are required for maintenance, recovery from the previous lactation, and fetal growth. After calving, milk production commences and the energy requirements can increase by a factor 3 to ~184 MJ

  18. Determinants Of Cattle Farmers Particiaption In Farmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study focused on determinants of cattle farmers particiaption in farmers organization in Hamadan province of Iran. Data was colleted from 75 randomly selected respondents with the aid of a questionnaire. Data were analyzed using percentage, mean score, analysis of variance and factor analysis. The findings revealed ...

  19. Determinants Of Cattle Farmers Particiaption In Farmers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the activities of the farmer organizations in Hamadan province of Iran. All the members of the cattle-breeding cooperative in Hamadan province (N= 550) were included in the study. By use of simple random method 75 respondents were selected. The study was a descriptive-exploration, survey research. A questionnaire ...

  20. diagnosis of bovine cysticercosis in Kenyan cattle

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total dissection method was used as a gold standard to indicate the absence or prйsence of bovine cysticercosis infection in cattle. The level of agreement between the two methods was, on average, lower in naturally infected animals than in expйrimental calves. This was because in natural infections, there were more li ...

  1. Histophilus somni-induced thrombotic meningoencephalitis in cattle from northern Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selwyn A. Headley

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic meningoencephalitis (TME is a fatal neurological disease of cattle, predominantly from North America, that is caused by Histophilus somni with sporadic descriptions from other countries. This manuscript describes the occurrence of spontaneous TME in cattle from northern Paraná, Brazil. Most cattle had acute neurological manifestations characteristic of brain dysfunction. Hematological and cerebrospinal fluid analyses were not suggestive of bacterial infections of the brain. Histopathology revealed meningoencephalitis with vasculitis and thrombosis of small vessels that contained discrete neutrophilic and/or lymphocytic infiltrates admixed with fibrin at the brainstem, cerebral cortex, and trigeminal nerve ganglion of all animals. All tissues from the central nervous system used during this study were previously characterized as negative for rabies virus by the direct immunofluorescence assay. PCR and RT-PCR assays investigated the participation of infectious agents associated with bovine neurological disease by targeting specific genes of H. somni, Listeria monocytogenes, bovine herpesvirus -1 and -5, bovine viral diarrhea virus, and ovine herpesvirus-2. PCR and subsequent sequencing resulted in partial fragments of the 16S rRNA gene of H. somni from brain sections of all animals with histopathological diagnosis of TME; all other PCR/RT-PCR assays were negative. These findings confirmed the participation of H. somni in the neuropathological disease observed in these animals, extend the geographical distribution of this disease, and support previous findings of H. somni from Brazil.

  2. Serological survey of Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii in cattle (Bos indicus) and water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in ten provinces of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Jenevaldo Barbosa; Nicolino, Rafael Romero; Fagundes, Gisele Maria; Dos Anjos Bomjardim, Henrique; Dos Santos Belo Reis, Alessandra; da Silva Lima, Danillo Henrique; Oliveira, Carlos Magno Chaves; Barbosa, José Diomedes; da Fonseca, Adivaldo Henrique

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of antibodies to Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii among 500 cattle (Bos indicus) and 500 buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) using the indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) technique. Blood samples from were collected from water buffalo and cattle in 10 municipalities in the northern region of Brazil. The frequency of cattle and water buffaloes seropositive for Neospora caninum in Pará state, Brazil, was 55% and 44%, respectively, and the frequency of cattle and water buffaloes seropositive for Toxoplasma gondii was 52% and 39%, respectively. Seropositivity for both N. caninum and T. gondii was detected in 10.6% of the cattle samples and 14.8% of the buffalo samples. The frequency of cattle positive for N. caninum and T. gondii was significantly (p<0.05) higher than that of buffalo in two and three provinces, respectively. Buffaloes had a lower seroprevalence for N. caninum or T. gondii in all of the provinces studied. These results suggest that both species, when exposed to the same risks for N. caninum and T. gondii infection, have a high serological prevalence. Cattle showed a higher probability of being seropositive when exposed to the same risks for N. caninum and T. gondii. Our study, which included an extensive number of blood samples, provides important epidemiological information pertinent to buffalo production in tropical countries that can be used as a basis for disease-management practices in Latin America. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Seroepidemiological survey of bovine brucellosis in cattle under a traditional production system in western Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adugna, K E; Agga, G E; Zewde, G

    2013-12-01

    Bovine brucellosis, an important bacterial zoonosis, is usually associated with intensive systems of production. A cross-sectional study was conducted in western Ethiopia to determine the seroprevalence of bovine brucellosis in cattle undertraditional extensive husbandry. Sera collected from 1,152 cattle originating from 164 herds were screened, using the Rose Bengal test, and all positive sera were then examined, using complement fixation as a confirmatory test. Based on the results of two-step testing, the apparent seroprevalences were 1% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.5%, 1.7%) at the animal level and 4.9% (95% CI: 1.6%, 8.2%) at the herd level. A random-effects binary logistic regression model was used to examine potential risk factors, using 'herd' as a random effect. Herd size (p = 0.009) and abortion (p = 0.015) were significant risk factors for animal-level seropositivity, after controlling for other factors. Although bovine brucellosis was found at a low prevalence in the indigenous cattle population, the disease should be considered in any future expansion of dairy cattle production involving improved breeds.

  4. Detection of asymptomatic renal Leptospira infection in abattoir slaughtered cattle in southeastern Georgia, United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreekumari Rajeev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Leptospirosis is one of the most widespread zoonotic infectious diseases affecting humans and animals. Several animal species, including cattle, can act as potential asymptomatic carriers facilitating zoonotic transmission of Leptospira. This study was conducted to assess the occurrence of asymptomatic renal Leptospira carriers among cattle slaughtered in southeastern Georgia, United States. Methods: A battery of diagnostic tests, including dark field microscopy, direct fluorescent antibody staining, polymerase chain reaction, and culture, were performed on a set of bovine kidneys (n = 37 collected from an abattoir in southeastern Georgia, United States. Virulence of a field isolate obtained from this study was tested in a hamster experimental model. Results: Motile spirochete-like structures were observed by dark field microscopy in 23 (59% out of 37 kidney samples tested. In all, 29 samples (78% were positive by direct fluorescent antibody staining. Only 11 (29.7% samples by polymerase chain reaction and 3 (8.1% by culture were positive for Leptospira sp. The isolates obtained by culture were confirmed as Leptospira borgpetersenii. Hamsters experimentally infected with one of the Leptospira field isolates obtained from this study did not show clinical signs but developed renal infection with interstitial nephritis and tubular necrosis. Conclusions: This study confirms that asymptomatic Leptospira renal infection is present among cattle in the region. Our findings underscore the need for future studies to assess the potential environmental contamination and transmission to humans in contact with infected cattle.

  5. Clinical and pathological study of an outbreak of obstructive urolithiasis in feedlot cattle in southern Brazil

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    Loretti Alexandre Paulino

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology, clinical picture and pathology of an outbreak of urolithiasis in cattle in southern Brazil are described. The disease occurred in August 1999 in a feedlot beef cattle herd. Five out of 1,100 castrated steers were affected. Clinical signs included colic and ventral abdominal distension. White, sand-grain-like mineral deposits precipitated on the preputial hairs. Affected cattle died spontaneously 24-48 hrs after the onset of the clinical signs. Only one animal recovered after perineal urethrostomy. Necropsy findings included calculi blocking the urethral lumen of the distal portion of the penile sigmoid flexure, urinary bladder rupture with leakage of urine into the abdominal cavity and secondary fibrinous peritonitis. Daily water intake was low since water sources were scarce and not readily available. The animals were fed rations high in grains and received limited amounts of roughage. Biochemical analysis revealed that the calculi were composed of ammonium phosphate. A calcium-phosphorus imbalance (0.4:0.6 was detected in the feedlot ration. For the outbreak, it is suggested that contributing factors to urolith formation include insufficient fiber ingestion, low water intake and high dietary levels of phosphorus. No additional cases were observed in that feedlot after preventive measures were established. Similar dietary mismanagement in fattening steers has been associated with obstructive urolithiasis in feedlot beef cattle in other countries.

  6. Prevalence of Coxiella burnetii in cattle at South Korean national breeding stock farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Min-Goo; Ouh, In-Ohk; Lee, Seung-Hun; Kim, Jong Wan; Rhee, Man Hee; Kwon, Oh-Deog; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kwak, Dongmi

    2017-01-01

    This is the first study to evaluate the serologic and molecular prevalence of Coxiella burnetii in cattle at national breeding stock farms in South Korea. These government farms have well-organized biosecurity and management systems to prevent livestock diseases. Of the 736 cattle in this study, 77 tested positive for antibodies against C. burnetii antigens (10.5%, 95% CI: 8.3-12.7) and 11 were positive for a C. burnetti infection on PCR analysis (1.5%, 95% CI: 0.6-2.4). Since the 16S rRNA sequences of C. burnetii from all 11 PCR-positive samples were identical, three representative samples (C-CN-3 from the southern region, C-JJ-9 from Jeju Island, and C-CB-37 from the central region) are described in this paper. These three sequences had 99.3-100% identity to those of C. burnetii deposited in GenBank. These sequences clustered with those from USA, Japan, and Greenland, underscoring the sequence similarity among C. burnetii isolates in these countries. Because C. burnetii was detected in cattle at well-managed national breeding stock farms, cattle at non-government operated farms may be more likely to be exposed to C. burnetii in South Korea. Thus, continuous surveillance and control strategies in animals and humans are required to prevent the transmission of C. burnetii to humans.

  7. Cattle NK Cell Heterogeneity and the Influence of MHC Class I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Alasdair J; Sanderson, Nicholas D; Gubbins, Simon; Ellis, Shirley A; Hammond, John A

    2015-09-01

    Primate and rodent NK cells form highly heterogeneous lymphocyte populations owing to the differential expression of germline-encoded receptors. Many of these receptors are polymorphic and recognize equally polymorphic determinants of MHC class I. This diversity can lead to individuals carrying NK cells with different specificities. Cattle have an unusually diverse repertoire of NK cell receptor genes predicted to encode receptors that recognize MHC class I. To begin to examine whether this genetic diversity leads to a diverse NK cell population, we isolated peripheral NK cells from cattle with different MHC homozygous genotypes. Cytokine stimulation differentially influenced the transcription of five receptors at the cell population level. Using dilution cultures, we found that a further seven receptors were differentially transcribed, including five predicted to recognize MHC class I. Moreover, there was a statistically significant reduction in killer cell lectin-like receptor mRNA expression between cultures with different CD2 phenotypes and from animals with different MHC class I haplotypes. This finding confirms that cattle NK cells are a heterogeneous population and reveals that the receptors creating this diversity are influenced by the MHC. The importance of this heterogeneity will become clear as we learn more about the role of NK cells in cattle disease resistance and vaccination. Copyright © 2015 The Authors.

  8. Prevalence of Fascioliasis in Cattle Slaughtered in Sokoto Metropolitan Abattoir, Sokoto, Nigeria

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    A. A. Magaji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fascioliasis in cattle slaughtered in the Sokoto metropolitan abattoir was investigated. Faeces and bile samples were collected and processed using formal ether concentration technique. Gross lesions from 224 out of 1,313 slaughtered cattle were randomly selected and examined. Out of the 224 cattle examined, 95 (42.41% were males and 129 (57.59% were females. Out of 95 male cattle examined, 27 (28.42% were infected and out of 129 females 35 (27.13% were infected. Based on breed, infection rates were 31 (31.0%, and 31 (25.2% for breeds of Sokoto Gudali and Red Bororo respectively. No infection was recorded in White Fulani breed. Lesions observed were more in males than in females and more in Red Bororo than in Sokoto Gudali. Overall, prevalence of infection with Fasciola was 27.68%. There was no statistically significant association between infection and breed and between infection and sex of the animals sampled (P>0.05. Regular treatment of all animals with an effective flukicide, as well as snail habitat control, tracing source of animals, public enlightenment about the disease, proper abattoir inspection, adequate and clean water supply to animals, and payment of compensation of condemned tissues and organs infested with the parasite by government were suggested.

  9. Molecular detection and characterization of Theileria infection in cattle and yaks from Tibet Plateau Region, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Gege; Li, Youquan; Liu, Junlong; Liu, Zhijie; Yang, Jifei; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Guangyuan; Guan, Guiquan; Luo, Jianxun; Yin, Hong

    2016-07-01

    Theileriosis continues to threaten the livestock industry worldwide, but comprehensive epidemiological surveys for this disease have not been conducted in the Tibet Plateau Region, China. In this study, we screened 154 cattle blood samples from the Tibet Plateau Region (Lhasa, Lhoka, and Tianzhu), China, for detection of Theileria pathogens by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with species-specific primers. The results revealed that the prevalence was 6.9 % (2/29) for Theileria orientalis and 27.6 % (8/29) for Theileria sinensis in Lhasa, 0 % (0/30) for T. orientalis and 26.7 % (8/30) for T. sinensis in Lhoka, and 0 % (0/95) for T. orientalis and 30.5 % (29/95) for T. sinensis in Tianzhu. Interestingly, Theileria luwenshuni, which was a previously reported pathogenic Theileria sp. in sheep and goats, was detected in blood samples from cattle and yaks for the first time, with a prevalence of 10 % (3/30) in Lhoka and 1.1 % (1/95) in Tianzhu. No other Theileria sp. was detected in these samples. T. sinensis and T. orientalis infections were detected in cattle and yaks, and T. luwenshuni was discovered for the first time in cattle and yaks in the Tibet Plateau Region, China.

  10. Global gene expression profile of peripheral blood mononuclear cells challenged with Theileria annulata in crossbred and indigenous cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amod; Gaur, Gyanendra Kumar; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Panigrahi, Manjit; Ghosh, Shrikant; Saravanan, B C; Bhushan, Bharat; Tiwari, Ashok Kumar; Sulabh, Sourabh; Priya, Bhuvana; V N, Muhasin Asaf; Gupta, Jay Prakash; Wani, Sajad Ahmad; Sahu, Amit Ranjan; Sahoo, Aditya Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Bovine tropical theileriosis is an important haemoprotozoan disease associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality particularly in exotic and crossbred cattle. It is one of the major constraints of the livestock development programmes in India and Southeast Asia. Indigenous cattle (Bos indicus) are reported to be comparatively less affected than exotic and crossbred cattle. However, genetic basis of resistance to tropical theileriosis in indigenous cattle is not well documented. Recent studies incited an idea that differentially expressed genes in exotic and indigenous cattle play significant role in breed specific resistance to tropical theileriosis. The present study was designed to determine the global gene expression profile in peripheral blood mononuclear cells derived from indigenous (Tharparkar) and cross-bred cattle following in vitro infection of T. annulata (Parbhani strain). Two separate microarray experiments were carried out each for cross-bred and Tharparkar cattle. The cross-bred cattle showed 1082 differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Out of total DEGs, 597 genes were down-regulated and 485 were up-regulated. Their fold change varied from 2283.93 to -4816.02. Tharparkar cattle showed 875 differentially expressed genes including 451 down-regulated and 424 up-regulated. The fold change varied from 94.93 to -19.20. A subset of genes was validated by qRT-PCR and results were correlated well with microarray data indicating that microarray results provided an accurate report of transcript level. Functional annotation study of DEGs confirmed their involvement in various pathways including response to oxidative stress, immune system regulation, cell proliferation, cytoskeletal changes, kinases activity and apoptosis. Gene network analysis of these DEGs plays an important role to understand the interaction among genes. It is therefore, hypothesized that the different susceptibility to tropical theileriosis exhibited by indigenous and crossbred cattle

  11. Cattle farmers’ perceptions of risk and risk management strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bishu, Kinfe G.; O'Reilly, Seamus; Lahiff, Edward

    2018-01-01

    regression is then used to investigate the relationship between scores and farmers’ characteristics. The results demonstrate that shortage of family labor, high price of fodder, and limited farm income were perceived as the most important risks. Use of veterinary services, parasite control, and loan......This study analyzes cattle farmers’ perceptions of risk and risk management strategies in Tigray, Northern Ethiopia. We use survey data from a sample of 356 farmers based on multistage random sampling. Factor analysis is employed to classify scores of risk and management strategies, and multiple...... utilization were perceived as the most important strategies for managing risks. Livestock disease and labor shortage were perceived as less of a risk by farmers who adopted the practice of zero grazing compared to other farmers, pointing to the potential of this practice for risk reduction. We find strong...

  12. Awareness and attitude toward zoonoses with particular reference to anthrax among cattle owners in selected rural communities of Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikerema, S M; Matope, G; Pfukenyi, D M

    2013-04-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional study to assess cattle owners' awareness, perceptions, and attitudes toward zoonoses, with particular emphasis regarding anthrax. Data on awareness of zoonoses, clinical signs of anthrax in animals and human, its routes of transmission and methods of prevention, the families' consumption habits of anthrax-infected carcasses, and other family activities that increase exposure to anthrax were collected using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. A total of 41.4% (135/326) of the farmers were from high-anthrax-risk districts, whereas 28.5% and 30.1% were from medium- and low-risk districts, respectively. Overall, the level of awareness amongst the farmers for the named zoonoses were rabies (88.7%), anthrax (71.5%), and brucellosis (20.9%). Except for anthrax, awareness of other zoonoses did not differ significantly (p>0.05) among the district categories. Farmers from anthrax high-risk districts were significantly more aware of anthrax compared to those from moderate- (p=0.000) and low- (p=0.000) risk districts. All of the farmers were aware that anthrax occurs in cattle, and 73% indicated the presence of unclotting blood oozing from natural orifices as a consistent finding in cattle that died of anthrax, whereas 86.7% of them indicated the presence of skin lesions as the most common sign of the disease in humans. The good efficacy of human anthrax treatment (58.3%), slaughter of moribund cattle and selling of meat from cattle found dead to unsuspecting consumers (59.8%), reluctance to lose animals (47.9%), and forgetting about anthrax (41.1%) were cited as the major reasons for consuming anthrax-infected carcasses. Given that 75.2% of cattle owners indicated that they would not consume meat from cattle found dead, because they were discouraged by veterinary authorities, introducing meat inspection services is likely to have a positive impact in preventing human anthrax outbreaks in Zimbabwe.

  13. Significance of supplementing microelements in preventing metabolic disorders in cattle

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    Sinovec Zlatan J.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Inadequate diet can result in a series of undesired occurrences in cattle production, marked as nutritive diseases. In a certain number of cases there is a clearly defined deficiency of certain nutritive matter, with a typical clinical picture and recognizable symptoms. In a far greater number of cases, chronic conditions occur as a result of so-called graphic deficits, when the deficiency of certain components is so small that signs of deficiency develop over a longer time period. Such cases are at first accompanied by non-specific symptomatology, detection and prevention are much more difficult, while resulting damages in cattle production are substantial. The work gives a brief survey of the most important microelements added to cattle diet - iron, copper, manganese, zinc, iodine selenium, cobalt, and chromium. In addition to elementary data in connection with the contents of certain microelements in the organism of the animal the physiological role, natural sources, manner and place of resorption in the organism, and mechanisms of elimination, special attention is paid to symptoms of deficiency and sufficiency, and daily requirements in the ruminant diet. The conclusions direct the reader to several possible sources of mineral matter, with special emphasis on organically - bound microelements in the form of chelates - complexes swith one or more stable heterocyclic amino acid rings. Commercial mineral additives are described as proteinates, and bioplexes are mixes of amino acids and peptides. Chelate forms have been demonstrated aas very successful in stress situations and in diseased animals, when the organism exhibits increased needs, and the ability of feed utilization is reduced. Contrary to non-organic forms, which only temporarely increase concentration in blood, chelate forms secure considerably longer maintenance of the necessary concentration. Having in mind also the increased need of damaged tissue for certain amino acids their

  14. Not all cows are epidemiologically equal: quantifying the risks of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) transmission through cattle movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, M Carolyn; Humphry, Roger W; Gunn, George J; Woolhouse, Mark E J

    2014-10-17

    Many economically important cattle diseases spread between herds through livestock movements. Traditionally, most transmission models have assumed that all purchased cattle carry the same risk of generating outbreaks in the destination herd. Using data on bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) in Scotland as a case example, this study provides empirical and theoretical evidence that the risk of disease transmission varies substantially based on the animal and herd demographic characteristics at the time of purchase. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that purchasing pregnant heifers and open cows sold with a calf at foot were associated with an increased risk of beef herds being seropositive for BVDV. Based on the results from a dynamic within-herd simulation model, these findings may be partly explained by the age-related probability of animals being persistently infected with BVDV as well as the herd demographic structure at the time of animal introductions. There was also evidence that an epidemiologically important network statistic, "betweenness centrality" (a measure frequently associated with the potential for herds to acquire and transmit disease), was significantly higher for herds that supplied these particular types of replacement beef cattle. The trends for dairy herds were not as clear, although there was some evidence that open heifers and open lactating cows were associated with an increased risk of BVDV. Overall, these findings have important implications for developing simulation models that more accurately reflect the industry-level transmission dynamics of infectious cattle diseases.

  15. Effect of in-feed Chlortetracycline prophylaxis in beef cattle on levels of 10 antimicrobial resistance genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The majority of antimicrobial products used in food-animal production are administered in-feed to control or prevent disease. These uses are controversial since it has been argued that they have contributed to increased occurrence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Beef cattle are suscep...

  16. Evaluation of fiber-modified adenovirus vector-vaccine against foot-and-mouth diseaes in cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel vaccination approaches against foot-and-mouth-disease (FMD) include the use of a replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 vector (Ad5) that contains the capsid encoding regions of FMD virus (FMDV). An Ad5.A24 has proven effective as a vaccine against FMD in swine and cattle. However, ther...

  17. The use of skin delayed-type hypersensitivity as an adjunct test to diagnose brucellosis in cattle: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bercovich, Z.

    2000-01-01

    Brucellosis, caused by bacteria of the genus Brucella, is a contagious disease that causes economic loss to owners of domestic animals due to loss of progeny and milk yield. Because cattle, sheep, goats, and to a lesser extent pigs are considered to be the source of human brucellosis, serological

  18. A serosurvey for ruminant pestivirus exposure conducted using cattle sera collected for brucellosis surveillance in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four species of ruminant pestivirus are currently circulating in the United States (U.S.): Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) types 1 and 2 (predominant host cattle), Border disease virus (BDV) (predominant host sheep) and the Pronghorn virus (sporadically detected in wild ruminants). A third bovin...

  19. Participatory rural appraisal to investigate constraints in reporting cattle mortalities in the Odi district of North West Province, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.N. Makgatho

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Mortalities in cattle can have severe financial implications for small scale and communal farmers in South Africa. They could also be a measurable indicator for surveillance of animal diseases, such as those listed by the Office International des Epizooties (OIE, or diseases included in the regulations of the South African Animal Diseases Act, 1984 (Act 35 of 1984. In order to prevent further mortalities and for accurate surveillance and monitoring of diseases, it is important that farmers participate in the determination of causes of mortality in their cattle. This paper reports on constraints of the reporting diseases to the state veterinary services, the study area being Odi district, in the North West Province. The method that was followed was based on participatory rural appraisal. The selected cattle owners participated in every phase. They were the ones who first spoke to veterinary services about ways to decrease the diseases and mortalities of their cattle. A questionnaire to verify the facts complemented the survey. A total number of 60 farmers were randomly selected from 12 villages. One farmer withdrew, leaving 59 farmers. Most of the farmers in the study were men (n = 55. The area of study was communal and the farming system traditional and extensive. It was suspected that there was a communication problem and this was proven by the results of the research, as 23 farmers were not even aware that mortalities have to be reported by law. The real problem was that causes of death were not being diagnosed because farmers were not aware that a necropsy could give information on the causes of death. Farmers were keen to receive training in elementary necropsy techniques so as to be able to discuss the cause of death of cattle with the state veterinarian.

  20. Serosurveillance and factors associated with the presence of antibodies against bluetongue virus in dairy cattle in two eco-zones of Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaire, T N; Karki, S; Dhakal, I P; Khanal, D R; Bowen, R A

    2016-12-01

    Cattle play an important role in the epidemiology of bluetongue (BT) by acting as reservoir hosts. However, the status of BT virus (BTV) in dairy cattle in Nepal is unknown. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of BTV antibodies in dairy cattle in two eco-zones of Nepal, and to identify the factors associated with virus exposure. The authors conducted a cross-sectional serosurvey from March 2012 through February 2013 by sampling 131 dairy cattle from seven clusters (villages) in the Chitwan district in the Terai region (southern lowlands) and the Lamjung district in the Hills region (the middle part of Nepal). Of the 131 serum samples tested, 29.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 21.5-37.2) were positive for BTV antibodies. Herd-level seroprevalence was 45.7% (95% CI: 30.9-61.0). Bivariate analysis indicated a positive association between seroconversion to BTV and age, and an association with breed of cattle after controlling for clustering of animals within herds. Based on this model, cattle were more likely to become seropositive as they aged. Crossbred cattle were more likely to be seropositive than those of exotic breeds (odds ratio [OR] = 4.6; 95% CI: 1.5-14.1). The results indicate widespread exposure of dairy cattle to BTV in Nepal. The authors suggest that dairy cattle should be included in the surveillance plan for BTV infection in Nepal and that it is important to educate farmers about the possible impacts of this disease. © OIE (World Organisation for Animal Health), 2016.

  1. Characterization of Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Isolated in Organic Waste Products (Cattle Fecal Matter, Manure and, Slurry from Cattle’s Markets in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evariste Bako

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cattle farming can promote diarrheal disease transmission through waste, effluents or cattle fecal matter. The study aims to characterize the diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC isolated from cattle feces, manure in the composting process and slurry, collected from four cattle markets in Ouagadougou. A total of 585 samples (340 cattle feces, 200 slurries and 45 manures in the composting process were collected from the four cattle markets between May 2015 and May 2016. A multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR, namely 16-plex PCR, was used to screen simultaneously the virulence genes specific for shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC, enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC, enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC. DEC was detected in 10.76% of samples. ETEC was the most prevalent (9.91%. STEC and EAEC have been observed with the same rate (0.51%. ETEC were detected in 12.64% of cattle feces, in 6.66% of manure in the composting process and in 5% of slurry. STEC were detected in 0.58% of cattle feces and in 2.22% of manure in the composting process. EAEC was detected only in 1% of slurry and in 2.22% of manure in the composting process. ETEC strains were identified based on estIa gene and/or estIb gene and/or elt gene amplification. Of the 58 ETEC, 10.34% contained astA, 17.24% contained elt, 3.44% contained estIa and 79.31% contained estIb. The two positive EAEC strains contained only the aggR gene, and the third was positive only for the pic gene. The results show that effluent from cattle markets could contribute to the spreading of DEC in the environment in Burkina Faso.

  2. Immunocontraception for managing feral cattle in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massei, Giovanna; Koon, Ka-Kei; Benton, Steven; Brown, Richard; Gomm, Matt; Orahood, Darcy S; Pietravalle, Stéphane; Eckery, Douglas C

    2015-01-01

    Conflicts between human interests and feral cattle in Hong Kong derive from growing numbers of free-roaming cattle. Public antipathy towards lethal population control led the local authorities to consider fertility control to reduce cattle numbers. This study assessed the potential side effects of the immunocontraceptive GonaCon on individual female cattle and established the effectiveness of GonaCon to induce infertility. We evaluated GonaCon in 34 captive cattle assigned to four groups: Control administered a sham solution; Webbed (surgically sterilized through removal of the oviducts), administered one dose of GonaCon; Webbed, administered one dose of GonaCon and a booster dose three months later, and Treated, administered one dose of GonaCon. The side effects of GonaCon were assessed by monitoring injection site, body weight, body condition, size of lymph nodes, body temperature, and feeding behaviour 1 week and 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after vaccination and by haematological and biochemical variables at vaccination and three months post-vaccination. The effectiveness of GonaCon to cause infertility was monitored by quantifying anti-GnRH antibody titres and by using kits to detect cycling and pregnancy. GonaCon-treated cattle showed no injection site reaction, limping, or abnormal behaviour. No differences were observed in all physiological and welfare indicators between control and vaccinated cattle. All control cattle and 4 of the 12 cattle in the Treated group became pregnant. Cattle administered a booster dose had higher anti-GnRH antibody titres than cattle that received one dose. We concluded that GonaCon does not compromise the animals' welfare and is effective in reducing fertility in cattle. A booster dose is likely to increase the duration of infertility. Further studies are required to assess the feasibility and costs of immunocontraception for controlling free-roaming cattle populations.

  3. Immunocontraception for managing feral cattle in Hong Kong.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Massei

    Full Text Available Conflicts between human interests and feral cattle in Hong Kong derive from growing numbers of free-roaming cattle. Public antipathy towards lethal population control led the local authorities to consider fertility control to reduce cattle numbers. This study assessed the potential side effects of the immunocontraceptive GonaCon on individual female cattle and established the effectiveness of GonaCon to induce infertility. We evaluated GonaCon in 34 captive cattle assigned to four groups: Control administered a sham solution; Webbed (surgically sterilized through removal of the oviducts, administered one dose of GonaCon; Webbed, administered one dose of GonaCon and a booster dose three months later, and Treated, administered one dose of GonaCon. The side effects of GonaCon were assessed by monitoring injection site, body weight, body condition, size of lymph nodes, body temperature, and feeding behaviour 1 week and 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after vaccination and by haematological and biochemical variables at vaccination and three months post-vaccination. The effectiveness of GonaCon to cause infertility was monitored by quantifying anti-GnRH antibody titres and by using kits to detect cycling and pregnancy. GonaCon-treated cattle showed no injection site reaction, limping, or abnormal behaviour. No differences were observed in all physiological and welfare indicators between control and vaccinated cattle. All control cattle and 4 of the 12 cattle in the Treated group became pregnant. Cattle administered a booster dose had higher anti-GnRH antibody titres than cattle that received one dose. We concluded that GonaCon does not compromise the animals' welfare and is effective in reducing fertility in cattle. A booster dose is likely to increase the duration of infertility. Further studies are required to assess the feasibility and costs of immunocontraception for controlling free-roaming cattle populations.

  4. Modelling the role of multi-transmission routes in the epidemiology of bovine tuberculosis in cattle and buffalo populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phepa, Patrick B; Chirove, Faraimunashe; Govinder, Keshlan S

    2016-07-01

    A mathematical model that describes the transmission dynamics of bovine tuberculosis (BTB) in both buffalo and cattle populations is proposed. The model incorporates cross-infection and contaminated environment transmission routes. A full analysis of the model is undertaken. The reproduction number of the entire model is comprised of cross-infection and contaminated parameters. This underscores the importance of including both cross-infection and contaminated environment transmission routes. Crucially our simulations suggest that the disease has a more devastating effect on cattle populations than on buffalo populations when all transmission routes are involved. This has important implications for agriculture and tourism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Emergence of new types of Theileria orientalis in Australian cattle and possible cause of theileriosis outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinyanjui Peter

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Theileria parasites cause a benign infection of cattle in parts of Australia where they are endemic, but have, in recent years, been suspected of being responsible for a number of outbreaks of disease in cattle near the coast of New South Wales. The objective of this study was to identify and characterize the species of Theileria in cattle on six farms in New South Wales where disease outbreaks have occurred, and compare with Theileria from three disease-free farms in Queensland that is endemic for Theileria. Special reference was made to sub-typing of T. orientalis by type-specific PCR and sequencing of the small subunit (SSU rRNA gene, and sequence analysis of the gene encoding a polymorphic merozoite/piroplasm surface protein (MPSP that may be under immune selection. Nucleotide sequencing of SSU rRNA and MPSP genes revealed the presence of four Theileria genotypes: T. orientalis (buffeli, T. orientalis (ikeda, T. orientalis (chitose and T. orientalis type 4 (MPSP or type C (SSU rRNA. The majority of animals showed mixed infections while a few showed single infection. When MPSP nucleotide sequences were translated into amino acids, base transition did not change amino acid composition of the protein product, suggesting possible silent polymorphism. The occurrence of ikeda and type 4 (type C previously not reported to occur and silent mutation is thought to have enhanced parasite evasion of the host immune response causing the outbreak.

  6. Prevention of abortion in cattle following vaccination against bovine herpesvirus 1: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomer, Benjamin W; Cofield, L Grady; Walz, Paul H; Givens, M Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 is ubiquitous in cattle populations and is the cause of several clinical syndromes including respiratory disease, genital disease, and late-term abortions. Control of the virus in many parts of the world is achieved primarily through vaccination with either inactivated or modified-live viral vaccines. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to determine the cumulative efficacy of BoHV-1 vaccination to prevent abortion in pregnant cattle. Germane articles for inclusion in the analysis were identified through four online scientific databases and the examination of three review and ten primary study article reference lists. A total of 15 studies in 10 manuscripts involving over 7500 animals were included in the meta-analysis. Risk ratio effect sizes were used in random effects, weighted meta-analyses to assess the impact of vaccination. Subgroup analyses were performed based on type of vaccine, MLV or inactivated, and the type of disease challenge, experimentally induced compared to field studies. A 60% decrease in abortion risk in vaccinated cattle was demonstrated. The greatest decrease in abortion risk was seen in studies with intentional viral challenge although vaccination also decreased abortion risk in field studies. Both inactivated and modified-live viral vaccines decreased abortion risk. This meta-analysis provides quantitative support for the benefit of bovine herpesvirus 1 vaccination in the prevention of abortion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Infectivity in skeletal muscle of cattle with atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suardi, Silvia; Vimercati, Chiara; Casalone, Cristina; Gelmetti, Daniela; Corona, Cristiano; Iulini, Barbara; Mazza, Maria; Lombardi, Guerino; Moda, Fabio; Ruggerone, Margherita; Campagnani, Ilaria; Piccoli, Elena; Catania, Marcella; Groschup, Martin H; Balkema-Buschmann, Anne; Caramelli, Maria; Monaco, Salvatore; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    The amyloidotic form of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) termed BASE is caused by a prion strain whose biological properties differ from those of typical BSE, resulting in a clinically and pathologically distinct phenotype. Whether peripheral tissues of BASE-affected cattle contain infectivity is unknown. This is a critical issue since the BASE prion is readily transmissible to a variety of hosts including primates, suggesting that humans may be susceptible. We carried out bioassays in transgenic mice overexpressing bovine PrP (Tgbov XV) and found infectivity in a variety of skeletal muscles from cattle with natural and experimental BASE. Noteworthy, all BASE muscles used for inoculation transmitted disease, although the attack rate differed between experimental and natural cases (∼70% versus ∼10%, respectively). This difference was likely related to different prion titers, possibly due to different stages of disease in the two conditions, i.e. terminal stage in experimental BASE and pre-symptomatic stage in natural BASE. The neuropathological phenotype and PrP(res) type were consistent in all affected mice and matched those of Tgbov XV mice infected with brain homogenate from natural BASE. The immunohistochemical analysis of skeletal muscles from cattle with natural and experimental BASE showed the presence of abnormal prion protein deposits within muscle fibers. Conversely, Tgbov XV mice challenged with lymphoid tissue and kidney from natural and experimental BASE did not develop disease. The novel information on the neuromuscular tropism of the BASE strain, efficiently overcoming species barriers, underlines the relevance of maintaining an active surveillance.

  8. Recycled poultry bedding as cattle feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankins, Darrell L; Poore, Matthew H; Capucille, Dawn J; Rogers, Glenn M

    2002-07-01

    Since the 1950s, recycled poultry bedding has been used as an economical feedstuff for beef cattle. It has been extensively studied at several experiment stations around the world with regard to its safety and nutritional aspects. It will continue to be closely scrutinized as the public increases its awareness of agricultural issues. As this study was being prepared, the news media was "spotlighting" bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Currently, in the United States there is a ban on incorporation of mammalian-derived protein feeds into ruminant diets. This has led to a requirement of beef cattle producers signing affidavits indicating that they had met this obligation. Some poultry companies use ruminant meat and bone meal in broiler diets when least-cost formulation indicates that it is economically desirable. This then poses the question of whether feeding RPB to beef cattle should be permitted if the birds had been fed ruminant meat and bone meal. It also raises the question of whether cattle grazing pastures fertilized with RPB are exposed to ruminant meat and bone meal. Because of the importance of pasture fertilization as a waste disposal solution for the poultry industry, it seems that the issue will be quickly resolved by omitting the ruminant meat and bone meal from poultry diets should concerns increase. Use of RPB, like many byproduct feeds, requires a higher level of management expertise than traditional feeds. Despite the potential problems discussed in this study, an informed beef cattle producer can gain a financially competitive edge by using RPB. A simple processing method, deep-stacking under polyethylene sheeting, can produce a safe product that will provide a complete diet when blended with an energy source and supplemented with some long-stem fiber. The diets can be used for both brood cows and stocker calves for extended periods of time, and the practice of feeding RPB is safe for both cattle and consumers [45]. Economic parameters will

  9. Radiography of syndactylous limbs of cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taura, Y.; Takeuchi, A.; Uchino, T.

    1985-01-01

    Fore and hind limbs of 4-month-old Holstein-Friesian cattle ♀ (No.I) and those of 1-month-old Holstein-Friesian×Japanese Black cattle ♀ (No.II) suffering from syndactyly were dissected by means of radiographic examinations. The details were reported as follows. 1. The phalanges of both fore and left hind limbs of No.II cattle were completely fused. But, all the phalanges of left fore limb and proximal phalanges of right fore limb in No.I and the distal phalanges of right hind limb in No.II were normal, the others being of partial synostosis. 2. The distal parforating canal was absent in the metacarpus and the right metatarsus in No.II cattle. Also, in No.II on the distal part of the metacarpal or metatarsal, bone vestiges were noted, not only of the fifth and second metacarpus or metatarsus, but also the mutually jointed phalanges. 3. In No.I cattle, the left fore limb and 4 proximal sesamoid bones and 2 distal sesamoid bones, but the right limb had 4 sesamoid bones and 0 distal one. In No.II cattle, the fore limbs had 2 proximal and 0 distal sesamoid bones, left hind limb had 3 proximal and 0 distal ones, right hind limb had 3 proximal and 1 distal ones. 4. The arteries accommodated the syndactylous deformities. The median and radial arteries were fixed to be descended on to the palmar side of the metacarpus and mutually anastomosed to form a deep palmar arch. arising from the deep palmar arch, two branches (palmar proper digital aa. III and IV) were terminated by the lateral and medial palmar surfaces of the digit, where some anastomosing arches were formed by them. The arteries of the hind limbs were also similar to those of the fore limbs. 5. In radiographic examinations of syndactyly (in No.II) after 7-month feeding, hoof and digital bones were noted to have been developed, but distal phalanges were destructed and left in suspicion of bad prognosis

  10. Prevalence of Ehrlichia ruminantium in adult Amblyomma variegatum collected from cattle in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esemu, Seraphine N; Besong, Willington O; Ndip, Roland N; Ndip, Lucy M

    2013-03-01

    Ehrlichia ruminantium, the etiologic agent of the economically important disease heartwater, is an obligate intracellular bacterium transmitted by ticks of the genus Amblyomma, particularly A. hebraeum and A. variegatum. Although serologic and microscopic evidence of the presence of heartwater have been reported in ruminants in Cameroon, knowledge of E. ruminantium infection in the tick vector, A. variegatum, is lacking. In order to determine the infectivity of A. variegatum ticks by E. ruminantium, we analysed 500 un-engorged A. variegatum ticks collected by hand-picking from predilection sites from 182 cattle [115 ticks from 82 cattle at Société de Développement et d'Exploitation des Productions Animales (SODEPA) Dumbo ranch (SDR) and 385 ticks from 100 cattle at the Upper Farms ranch (UFR)] by amplification of the open reading frame (ORF) 2 of the pCS20 region of E. ruminantium. PCR amplification of the 279 bp fragment of the pCS20 region detected E. ruminantium DNA in 142 (28.4 %) of the 500 ticks with a higher infection rate (47/115; 40.9 %) observed in ticks from SDR and 24.7 % (95/385) of ticks collected from cattle at UFR. Twenty five randomly selected PCR products were sequenced and results indicated that some of the isolates shared homology with one another and to sequences of E. ruminantium in the GenBank. This report represents the first molecular evidence of E. ruminantium infection in A. variegatum ticks in Cameroon and suggests possible exposure of cattle to this pathogen in our environment.

  11. Metabolomic profiling in cattle experimentally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

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    Jeroen De Buck

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of current diagnostics for Johne's disease, a slow, progressing enteritis in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP, is too low to reliably detect all infected animals in the subclinical stage. The objective was to identify individual metabolites or metabolite profiles that could be used as biomarkers of early MAP infection in ruminants. In a monthly follow-up for 17 months, calves infected at 2 weeks of age were compared with aged-matched controls. Sera from all animals were analyzed by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. Spectra were acquired, processed, and quantified for analysis. The concentration of many metabolites changed over time in all calves, but some metabolites only changed over time in either infected or non-infected groups and the change in others was impacted by the infection. Hierarchical multivariate statistical analysis achieved best separation between groups between 300 and 400 days after infection. Therefore, a cross-sectional comparison between 1-year-old calves experimentally infected at various ages with either a high- or a low-dose and age-matched non-infected controls was performed. Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structures Discriminant Analysis (OPLS DA yielded distinct separation of non-infected from infected cattle, regardless of dose and time (3, 6, 9 or 12 months after infection. Receiver Operating Curves demonstrated that constructed models were high quality. Increased isobutyrate in the infected cattle was the most important agreement between the longitudinal and cross-sectional analysis. In general, high- and low-dose cattle responded similarly to infection. Differences in acetone, citrate, glycerol and iso-butyrate concentrations indicated energy shortages and increased fat metabolism in infected cattle, whereas changes in urea and several amino acids (AA, including the branched chain AA, indicated increased protein turnover. In conclusion, metabolomics

  12. Seroprevalence of brucellosis among cattle slaughtered in three municipal abattoirs of Gombe state, Northeastern Nigeria

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    Saleh Mohammed Jajere

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the seroprevalence of bovine brucellosis among cattle slaughtered at three municipal abattoirs of Gombe State, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 blood samples collected from slaughtered cattle of different breeds (Sokoto Gudali - 50, White Fulani - 102, Red bororo – 34, and Crossbreeds - 14, sex (males - 19 and females - 181, and from different locations (Billiri - 30, Yamaltu Deba – 50, and Gombe - 120 were screened for brucellosis using rose bengal plate test (RBPT, serum agglutination test (SAT, and microtiter agglutination test (MAT. Results: Of the 200 serum samples analyzed, 7 (3.5%, 10 (5.0% and 18 (9.0% were positive by RBPT, SAT and MAT, respectively. The results showed no statistically significant association between sex and seropositivity to bovine brucellosis. However, seropositivity of bovine brucellosis was higher in females than in males. Similarly, no statistically significant association was observed between breed and occurrence of bovine brucellosis. Moreover, the prevalence of brucellosis was higher in Sokoto Gudali as compared with the other breeds. Based on the study locations, higher seroprevalence was observed in animals screened from Billiri as compared with those from other locations (p<0.05. Conclusion: The presence of Brucella abortus antigen in the sera of slaughtered cattle in Gombe state poses a significant public health risk. Therefore, it is important to carry out further epidemiological studies on fulani herdsmen and cattle herds in the study area, in order to explore the risk factors associated with the occurrence and perpetuation of brucellosis among cattle herds, ascertain the prevalence and status of the disease among both farms and nomadic herds.

  13. Leptospira infections in cattle at the territory of Belgrade in the period from 2000. to 2010

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    Vojinović Dragica

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Examining of blood samples on leptospirosis were carried out at big public property farms located in four Belgrade municipalities: Palilula, Surcin, Zemun, Obrenovac, as well as in private sector which, besides the above mentioned, included the additional five municipalities: Mladenovac, Grocka, Cukarica, Zvezdara and Lazarevac. Research on leptospira infections in cattle was carried out in the period from 2000. to 2010., at the territory of Belgrade. Serological examination of 123.971 cattle blood samples was done. The number of seropositive animals was 1.132 (0.91%. The biggest number of seropositive samples was noticed at Palilula (498, then in Surcin (245, Obrenovac (183, Zemun (177, and the least, only two in Zvezdara municipality. In the cattle, serovariety Leptospira grippotyphosa found in 459 blood samples (40.54% dominated, then came Leptospira icterohaemorrhagiae 356 (31.44%, Leptospira pomona 258 (22.79%, Leptospira bataviae 53 (4.68% and Leptospira hardjo 6 (0.53%. In cattle blood serums no specific antibodies against L.canicola, L.serjöe and L.australis were determined. Titre height of antibodies against leptospires ranged from 1:100 to 1:300000. Examining of cattle blood serums showed that the percentage of infected aminals ranged from 2.82 to 0%, what globally is not a significant percentage for this infection. Observing the disease course of spreading, it can be noticed that it has been decreasing since 2000. when it was at its peak (2.82%, what can be the result of a continual control, as well as of measures that are conducted with the aim of eradication the zoonosis.

  14. Movement Behaviour of Traditionally Managed Cattle in the Eastern Province of Zambia Captured Using Two-Dimensional Motion Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubaba, Caesar H; Hidano, Arata; Welburn, Susan C; Revie, Crawford W; Eisler, Mark C

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional motion sensors use electronic accelerometers to record the lying, standing and walking activity of cattle. Movement behaviour data collected automatically using these sensors over prolonged periods of time could be of use to stakeholders making management and disease control decisions in rural sub-Saharan Africa leading to potential improvements in animal health and production. Motion sensors were used in this study with the aim of monitoring and quantifying the movement behaviour of traditionally managed Angoni cattle in Petauke District in the Eastern Province of Zambia. This study was designed to assess whether motion sensors were suitable for use on traditionally managed cattle in two veterinary camps in Petauke District in the Eastern Province of Zambia. In each veterinary camp, twenty cattle were selected for study. Each animal had a motion sensor placed on its hind leg to continuously measure and record its movement behaviour over a two week period. Analysing the sensor data using principal components analysis (PCA) revealed that the majority of variability in behaviour among studied cattle could be attributed to their behaviour at night and in the morning. The behaviour at night was markedly different between veterinary camps; while differences in the morning appeared to reflect varying behaviour across all animals. The study results validate the use of such motion sensors in the chosen setting and highlight the importance of appropriate data summarisation techniques to adequately describe and compare animal movement behaviours if association to other factors, such as location, breed or health status are to be assessed.

  15. Sero-epidemiological investigation of bovine toxoplasmosis in traditional and smallholder cattle production systems of Tanga Region, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonman, Luuk B; Wilsmore, T; Swai, Emmanuel S

    2010-04-01

    In view of the worldwide importance of Toxoplasma gondii and the fragmented information on the seroprevalence of the disease in animals in Tanzania, a study, using the modified Eiken latex agglutination test (LAT), was conducted from May 2003 to January 2004 to determine the prevalence of antibody to T. gondii in 130 randomly selected farms comprising 655 cattle. The overall seroprevalence of T.gondii antibodies in cattle and farms were 3.6% and 13%, respectively. Risk factors for animal and herd-level toxoplasmosis seropositivity were tested using multivariable logistic regression to control for confounding factors. Cattle managed under traditional husbandry practises were more likely to be seropositive than those managed under smallholder practises (48% versus 4.7%; p or = 9 cattle were at greater risk of acquiring infection than herds holding fewer animals [animal level, possibly due to the reduced susceptibility of cattle to T.gondii infection as compared to goats and sheep. The high seroprevalence in animals managed by traditional husbandry practise suggests that the parasite is widely distributed in the environment and could pose a public health threat to the people living in those areas.

  16. Detection and molecular characterization of Trypanosoma (Duttonella) vivax in dairy cattle in the state of Sergipe, northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Osires Lustosa Eloi; Macedo, Lucia Oliveira de; Santos, Marcos Antônio Bezerra; Silva, José Augusto Bastos Afonso; Mendonça, Carla Lopes de; Faustino, Maria Aparecida da Gloria; Ramos, Carlos Alberto do Nascimento; Alves, Leucio Câmara; Ramos, Rafael Antonio Nascimento; Carvalho, Gílcia Aparecida de

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma (Duttonella) vivax is an important cause of economic losses among feedlot cattle. These losses are related to the morbidity, mortality, reproductive issues and decreased production. It is known that the clinical signs observed in infections by this protozoon are similar to other hemoparasitosis, which difficult the diagnosis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to detect and molecularly characterize an outbreak of trypanosomiasis caused by T. (D.) vivax in dairy cattle in the municipality of São Miguel Aleixo, state of Sergipe, Brazil. Blood samples from cattle (n = 15) presenting clinical signs compatible with trypanosomiasis were collected and parasitological and molecular evaluated. Among the samples analyzed, 34% (5/15) were positive from blood smears, 60% (9/15) from the buffy coat method and 80% (12/15) from the molecular method. The DNA sequence obtained (659 bp) showed 99% similarity to T. (D.) vivax sequences that are available in the GenBank database. The presence of this protozoon in cattle herds is a problem for producers. Diagnosing trypanosomiasis is problematic because its evolution is similar to that of other parasitic blood diseases. In addition, this is the first report of infection by T. (D.) vivax in cattle in the state of Sergipe, northeastern Brazil.

  17. Prevalence and histopathological finding of thin-walled and thick-walled Sarcocysts in slaughtered cattle of Karaj abattoir, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourollahi-Fard, Saeid R; Kheirandish, Reza; Sattari, Saeid

    2015-06-01

    Sarcocystosis is a zoonotic disease caused by Sarcocystis spp. with obligatory two host life cycle generally alternating between an herbivorous intermediate host and a carnivorous definitive host. Some species of this coccidian parasite can cause considerable morbidity and mortality in cattle. The present study was set to investigate the prevalence of Sarcocystis spp. and type of cyst wall in slaughtered cattle of Karaj abattoir, Iran. For this purpose 125 cattle (88 males and 37 females) were investigated for the presence of macroscopic and microscopic Sarcocystis cysts in muscular tissues. No macroscopic Sarcocystis cysts were found in any of the samples. In light microscopy, 121 out of 125 cattle (96.8 %) had thin-walled cysts of Sarcocystis cruzi, while 43 out of them (34.4 %) had thick-walled Sarcocystis cyst. In this survey, the most infected tissue was esophagus and heart and the less was diaphragm. Thin-walled cysts (S. cruzi) mostly found in heart and skeletal muscle showed the less. However, thick-walled cyst (S. hominis or S. hirsuta) mostly were detected in diaphragm, heart muscle showed no thick-walled cyst. No significant relation was observed between age and sex and the rate of infection. The results showed that Sarcocystis cyst is prevalent in cattle in the North part of Iran and the evaluation of infection potential can be useful when considering control programs.

  18. Prevalence and distribution of Neospora caninum in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and cattle in the Northern Territory of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neverauskas, Claudia E; Nasir, Amar; Reichel, Michael P

    2015-10-01

    The seroprevalence of Neospora caninum infection in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and domestic cattle in the Northern Territory (NT) of Australia has never been determined. A total of 480 serum samples from water buffalo and 192 serum samples from cattle, collected by the NT Government from 1993 through to 2001, at 18 different survey sites throughout the Northern Territory were tested by commercial ELISA for anti-N. caninum antibodies. The water buffalo samples demonstrated a seroprevalence of 88.3% (95% CI ± 2.9%), while 31.8% (±6.1%) of the cattle sera tested positive for N. caninum antibodies. Individual buffalo from the same herd, sampled over years, showed considerable fluctuations in S/P ratios. Overall, seropositivity was consistent across buffalo herds, and showed a slight decline over the years. The study presents evidence for the first time that N. caninum infection in water buffalo in the Northern Territory is a highly endemic and that infection rates are higher than those for cattle. This is important for an understanding of any potential sylvatic life cycle of N. caninum in Northern Australia. This survey also tests cattle from that territory for the first time for evidence of N. caninum infection and makes an important contribution to the understanding of disease management issues for the beef industry in the region. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Toxic myopathy and acute hepatic necrosis in cattle caused by ingestion of Senna obtusifolia (sicklepod; coffee senna) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Fernando Henrique; Zanata, Carina; Damasceno, Everson Dos Santos; de Oliveira, Leonardo Pintar; da Silva, Leilane Aparecida; Colodel, Edson Moleta; Riet-Correa, Franklin

    2014-12-15

    The epidemiological, clinical and pathological findings of field and experimental Senna obtusifolia (sicklepod; coffee senna) poisoning in cattle are described. The low availability of good quality forage and high rate of infestation of pastures by S. obtusifolia were the factors that led to poisonous plant ingestion. In this study, the morbidity ranged between 2% and 27.9%, and the lethality was 100%. For the experimental study, six cattle were fed with the aerial parts of S. obtusifolia collected in three different seasons at 9%-38% of the animal's body weight. The experimental and field diseases were similar. The main clinical signs were diarrhea, reluctance to move, muscular weakness and recumbency. The gross findings included pale discoloration of the skeletal muscle. Microscopically, the affected cattle showed degeneration and necrosis of the skeletal muscles and occasionally of the cardiac muscles. Additionally, two cattle showed centrilobular hepatic necrosis. In this study, S. obtusifolia collected from the same farm showed seasonal variation in toxicity. Poisoning by S. obtusifolia is an important cause of death of cattle in the Central Western region of Brazil. The toxicosis caused by this plant is similar to S. occidentalis poisoning; however, in S. obtusifolia poisoning, acute hepatic necrosis is sometimes present. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Differential Expression of , , and Genes in Various Adipose Tissues and Muscle from Yanbian Yellow Cattle and Yan Yellow Cattle

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    Shuang Ji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between cattle breeds and deposit of adipose tissues in different positions and the gene expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, fatty acid synthase (FASN, and Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACADM, which are associated with lipid metabolism and are valuable for understanding the physiology in fat depot and meat quality. Yanbian yellow cattle and Yan yellow cattle reared under the same conditions display different fat proportions in the carcass. To understand this difference, the expression of PPARγ, FASN, and ACADM in different adipose tissues and longissimus dorsi muscle (LD in these two breeds were analyzed using the Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction method (qRT-PCR. The result showed that PPARγ gene expression was significantly higher in adipose tissue than in LD in both breeds. PPARγ expression was also higher in abdominal fat, in perirenal fat than in the subcutaneous fat (p<0.05 in Yanbian yellow cattle, and was significantly higher in subcutaneous fat in Yan yellow cattle than that in Yanbian yellow cattle. On the other hand, FASN mRNA expression levels in subcutaneous fat and abdominal fat in Yan yellow cattle were significantly higher than that in Yanbian yellow cattle. Interestingly, ACADM gene shows greater fold changes in LD than in adipose tissues in Yan yellow cattle. Furthermore, the expressions of these three genes in lung, colon, kidney, liver and heart of Yanbian yellow cattle and Yan yellow cattle were also investigated. The results showed that the highest expression levels of PPARγ and FASN genes were detected in the lung in both breeds. The expression of ACADM gene in kidney and liver were higher than that in other organs in Yanbian yellow cattle, the comparison was not statistically significant in Yan yellow cattle.

  1. On-Farm Mitigation of Transmission of Tuberculosis from White-Tailed Deer to Cattle: Literature Review and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. David Walter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Animal Industry Division of the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD has been challenged with assisting farmers with modifying farm practices to reduce potential for exposure to Mycobacterium bovis from wildlife to cattle. The MDARD recommendations for on-farm risk mitigation practices were developed from experiences in the US, UK and Ireland and a review of the scientific literature. The objectives of our study were to review the present state of knowledge on M. bovis excretion, transmission, and survival in the environment and the interactions of wildlife and cattle with the intention of determining if the current recommendations by MDARD on farm practices are adequate and to identify additional changes to farm practices that may help to mitigate the risk of transmission. This review will provide agencies with a comprehensive summary of the scientific literature on mitigation of disease transmission between wildlife and cattle and to identify lacunae in published research.

  2. Study on the relationship between milk urea nitrogen (MUN and fertility in dairy cattle houses in Tabriz

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    S Mosaferi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between milk urea nitrogen (MUN level and reproductive performance in high yielding dairy cattle houses in Tabriz, Iran. Among 213 selected dairy cattle, 76 heads (35.7% have MUN 16 mg/dl (mean = 17.46 mg/dl. Our results indicated that MUN level in 81 heads of dairy cattle (total 124 heads with mastitis, dystocia, laminitis, uterine infections or placenta replacement was higher than 16 mg/dl. We only observed a significantly positive association between MUN levels and dystocia (p= 0.032, while the association between MUN levels and incidence of other diseases was not statistically significant. The results of this study indicated that MUN level significantly influences the reproductive parameters including days open, calving to first service, first service conception risk, and number of services per conception (p

  3. Feedlot cattle with calm temperaments have higher average daily gains than cattle with excitable temperaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisinet, B D; Grandin, T; Tatum, J D; O'Connor, S F; Struthers, J J

    1997-04-01

    This study was conducted to assess the effect of temperament on the average daily gains of feedlot cattle. Cattle (292 steers and 144 heifers) were transported to Colorado feedlot facilities. Breeds studied included Braford (n = 177), Simmental x Red Angus (n = 92), Red Brangus (n = 70), Simbrah (n = 65), Angus (n = 18), and Tarentaise x Angus (n = 14). Cattle were temperament rated on a numerical scale (chute score) during routine weighing and processing. Data were separated into two groups based on breed, Brahman cross (> or = 25% Brahman) and nonBrahman breeding. Animals that had Brahman breeding had a higher mean temperament rating (3.45 +/- .09) or were more excitable than animals that had no Brahman influence (1.80 +/- .10); (P < .001). These data also show that heifers have a higher mean temperament rating than steers (P < .05). Temperament scores evaluated for each breed group also showed that increased temperament score resulted in decreased average daily gains (P < .05). These data show that cattle that were quieter and calmer during handling had greater average daily gains than cattle that became agitated during routine handling.

  4. Manufacturing Of Novelty Leather From Cattle Stomach

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    Umme Habiba Bodrun Naher

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of turning cattle stomach into novelty leather and then leather product which would add value to end of cattle. Four pieces of green buffalo stomachs were taken through soaking liming deliming pickling tanning neutralization retanning dyeing and fat liquoring operation. Then mechanical operations like drying and staking operations were also done. Some physical tensile strength stitch tear strength and colour rub fastness and chemical chromic oxide content fat content and pH tests were accomplished .The results of physical tests were poor compared to the grain leather as the composition of raw outer coverings of animals and their stomachs are different. The stomach leathers could be used for making coin purse key case bracelet wrist watch belt ear-ring necklace hair band iPod case etc. as novelty leather product item.

  5. An evaluation of cattle farmers' knowledge of bovine brucellosis in northeast Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, J García; Coelho, A C

    2013-10-01

    Little information is available regarding the connection between the risk of brucellosis infection in cattle and the lack of training and education of cattle producers. A total of 154 cattle farmers from the Vila Real (northern Portugal) municipality were interviewed in person to evaluate their knowledge of bovine brucellosis. Basic knowledge of the zoonotic characteristics and clinical signs of brucellosis infection and cattle management was obtained from 78.6%, 68.8% and 79.9% of the respondents, respectively. The respondents with infected animals in their herds (odds ratio (OR) 5.5; 95% confidence interval 1.6, 19.5) were more likely to have greater knowledge about bovine brucellosis. The study also revealed a relationship (pbrucellosis. Moreover, the knowledge that brucellosis is a zoonotic disease was also influenced by the number of farms already infected with brucellosis (pbovine brucellosis is a zoonotic disease (25.3%) and a foodborne pathogen (21.4%), and the fact that over half (54.5%) of the respondents believed that bovine brucellosis was a treatable infectious disease was associated with the absence of veterinary assistance on the farm (60.4%). Because the eradication of bovine brucellosis has multiple factors, the success of the national eradication program cannot be based only on the sanitary management of infected herds. Successful eradication will only occur with adequate training programs for farmers, including farm biosecurity, legal fulfillment and veterinary public health programs (in which the role of the veterinarian is fundamental). Copyright © 2013 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of cardiac injury biomarkers in cattle with acute clinical mastitis

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    meysam fllah

    2016-05-01

       This study was carried out on 30 Holstein dairy cattle with acute clinical mastitis (ACM and 30 healthy ones. After confirmation of ACM through clinical examination, venous blood samples were collected and cardiac troponin I (cTnI was measured using chemiluminescence assay. Cardiac enzymes activities including CK-MB, AST and LDH were analyzed with special kits and spectrophotometric method. According to the findings mean heart rate (p=0.001, respiratory rate (p=0.026, and rectal temperature (p=0.030 were significantly increased in diseased group. cTnI level was 1.018 ± 0.235 ng/ml in cattle with ACM, which was significantly higher than healthy cattle (0.011±0.006 ng/ml; p=0.000. Other cardiac biomarkers were increased in diseased group, however elevation of serum activities of AST (p=0.047 and CK-MB (p=0.000 were statically significant. Although serum LDH activity in diseased group was higher than control group; but this difference was statistically non-significant (p=0.454. There were significant positive correlations between cTnI concentration with heart rate (p=0.018; r=0.853, respiratory rate (p=0.024; r=0.671, and rectal temperature (p=0.038; r=0.542. Heart rates were significantly correlated with serum activities of CK-MB (p=0.047; r=0.722 and AST (p=0.035; r=0.649. These results indicate some degree of heart damage caused by acute clinical mastitis in dairy cattle.

  7. Investigation of haemoglobin polymorphism in Ogaden cattle

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    Sanjoy Kumar Pal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The Ogaden cattle is one among the tropical cattle breeds (Bos indicus widely distributed in eastern and south eastern part of Ethiopia. The breed has been evolved in arid and semi arid agro-ecological setup, but later on distributed and adapted to the wide agro-ecological zones. Because of its multi-purpose role, the Ogaden cattle have been used for milk, beef, and income generation. Information on the inherent genetic diversity is important in the design of breeding improvement programmes, making rational decisions on sustainable utilization and conservation of Animal Genetic Resources. Limited information is available about genetic variation of Ogaden breed at molecular level. The present investigation was aimed to study the biochemical polymorphism at the Hemoglobin (Hb locus. Materials and Methods: Blood samples collected from 105 Ogaden cattle maintained at Haramaya beef farm by jugular vein puncture were subjected to agarose gel electrophoresis [pH range 8.4-8.5] to study the polymorphic activities of haemoglobin. Results: Three types of phenotypes were detected i.e. a slow moving (AA band, fast moving (BB band and a combination of slow + fast moving bands (AB. The frequency of the fast moving band was less [13 (12.3%] than the slow moving band [57 (54.2%]. Both slow & fast moving phenotype was observed in 35 (33.3% animals. The gene frequency of HBA allele was 0.709 and that of HBB allele 0.291. Conclusion: The distribution of phenotypes was in agreement with codominant single gene inheritance. The Chi-square (χ2 test revealed that the population is under Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.

  8. Experimental Infection of Cattle With a Novel Prion Derived From Atypical H-Type Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Masujin, Kentaro; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Iwamaru, Yoshihumi; Imamura, Morikazu; Matsuura, Yuichi; Arai, Shozo; Fukuda, Shigeo; Murayama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2017-11-01

    H-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (H-BSE) is an atypical form of BSE in cattle. During passaging of H-BSE in transgenic bovinized (TgBoPrP) mice, a novel phenotype of BSE, termed BSE-SW emerged and was characterized by a short incubation time and host weight loss. To investigate the biological and biochemical properties of the BSE-SW prion, a transmission study was conducted in cattle, which were inoculated intracerebrally with brain homogenate from BSE-SW-infected TgBoPrP mice. The disease incubation period was approximately 15 months. The animals showed characteristic neurological signs of dullness, and severe spongiform changes and a widespread, uniform distribution of disease-associated prion protein (PrP Sc ) were observed throughout the brain of infected cattle. Immunohistochemical PrP Sc staining of the brain revealed the presence of intraglial accumulations and plaque-like deposits. No remarkable differences were identified in vacuolar lesion scores, topographical distribution patterns, and staining types of PrP Sc in the brains of BSE-SW- vs H-BSE-infected cattle. PrP Sc deposition was detected in the ganglia, vagus nerve, spinal nerve, cauda equina, adrenal medulla, and ocular muscle. Western blot analysis revealed that the specific biochemical properties of the BSE-SW prion, with an additional 10- to 12-kDa fragment, were well maintained after transmission. These findings indicated that the BSE-SW prion has biochemical properties distinct from those of H-BSE in cattle, although clinical and pathologic features of BSW-SW in cattle are indistinguishable from those of H-BSE. The results suggest that the 2 infectious agents, BSE-SW and H-BSE, are closely related strains.

  9. Field investigation of Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) virus infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of FMD virus serotypes SAT 1 and SAT 2 among Nigerian cattle was determined using Complement Fixation (CF) and Serum Neutralization (SN) Tests in 2000 cattle sera obtained from nine northern states. The disease prevalence by CF and SN were 46.79% and 53.15% respectively. These figures were ...

  10. Prevalence of bluetongue virus antibodies and associated risk factors among cattle in East Darfur State, Western Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khair, Hadia Om; Adam, Ibrahim A; Bushara, Shakir B; Eltom, Kamal H; Musa, Nasreen O; Aradaib, Imadeldin E

    2014-02-07

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an insect-transmitted virus, which causes bluetongue disease (BT) in sheep and a fatal hemorrhagic infection in North American white-tailed deer. However, in cattle the disease is typically asymptomatic and no overt clinical signs of disease appear to be associated with BTV infection. Serological evidence and isolation of different BTV serotypes have been reported in Sudan, however, no information is currently available in regard to previous exposure of Sudanese livestock to BTV infection in East Darfur State, Sudan. To determine the prevalence of BTV antibodies and to identify the potential risk factors associated with BTV infection among cattle in East Darfur State, Sudan. A total of 224 blood samples were collected randomly from five localities in East Darfur State, Sudan. The serum samples were screened for detection of BTV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (c-ELISA). Serological evidence of BTV infection was observed in 150 out of 224 animals accounting for a 67% prevalence rate among cattle in East Darfur State. Older cattle (>2 years of age) were six times more likely to be infected with BTV (OR = 6.62, CI = 2.87-15.26, p-value = 0.01). Regarding animal source (contact with other herds) as a risk factor, it was shown that cattle purchased from market or introduced from other herds were 3 times at higher risk of being infected with BTV (OR = 3.87, CI = 1.07-13.87, p value = 0.03). Exposure of cattle to the insect vector increased the risk of contracting BTV infection by six times compared to non-exposed cattle (OR = 6.44, CI = 1.53-27.08, p value = 0.01). The present study indicated that age, animal source and the intensity of the insect vector are influential risk factors for BTV infection in cattle in the Darfur region. Surveillance for BTV infection should be extended to include other susceptible ruminants and to study the distribution of the insect vectors to better

  11. Demographic model of the Swiss cattle population for the years 2009-2011 stratified by gender, age and production type.

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    Sara Schärrer

    Full Text Available Demographic composition and dynamics of animal and human populations are important determinants for the transmission dynamics of infectious disease and for the effect of infectious disease or environmental disasters on productivity. In many circumstances, demographic data are not available or of poor quality. Since 1999 Switzerland has been recording cattle movements, births, deaths and slaughter in an animal movement database (AMD. The data present in the AMD offers the opportunity for analysing and understanding the dynamic of the Swiss cattle population. A dynamic population model can serve as a building block for future disease transmission models and help policy makers in developing strategies regarding animal health, animal welfare, livestock management and productivity. The Swiss cattle population was therefore modelled using a system of ordinary differential equations. The model was stratified by production type (dairy or beef, age and gender (male and female calves: 0-1 year, heifers and young bulls: 1-2 years, cows and bulls: older than 2 years. The simulation of the Swiss cattle population reflects the observed pattern accurately. Parameters were optimized on the basis of the goodness-of-fit (using the Powell algorithm. The fitted rates were compared with calculated rates from the AMD and differed only marginally. This gives confidence in the fitted rates of parameters that are not directly deductible from the AMD (e.g. the proportion of calves that are moved from the dairy system to fattening plants.

  12. Metagenomic investigation of gastrointestinal microbiome in cattle

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    Minseok Kim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal (GI tract, including the rumen and the other intestinal segments of cattle, harbors a diverse, complex, and dynamic microbiome that drives feed digestion and fermentation in cattle, determining feed efficiency and output of pollutants. This microbiome also plays an important role in affecting host health. Research has been conducted for more than a century to understand the microbiome and its relationship to feed efficiency and host health. The traditional cultivation-based research elucidated some of the major metabolism, but studies using molecular biology techniques conducted from late 1980’s to the late early 2000’s greatly expanded our view of the diversity of the rumen and intestinal microbiome of cattle. Recently, metagenomics has been the primary technology to characterize the GI microbiome and its relationship with host nutrition and health. This review addresses the main methods/techniques in current use, the knowledge gained, and some of the challenges that remain. Most of the primers used in quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction quantification and diversity analysis using metagenomics of ruminal bacteria, archaea, fungi, and protozoa were also compiled.

  13. Pre-pubertal and postpartum anestrus in tropical Zebu cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeygunawardena, H; Dematawewa, C M B

    2004-07-01

    Bos indicus breeds, commonly known as Zebu cattle, have spread from their center of origin in Western Asia into large areas of Asia (including the Asia-Pacific basin), Africa, South and Central America (including the Caribbean islands). The original Zebu genotype, however, has been modified by planned and unplanned cross-breeding programs involving many native and Bos taurus breeds in their new habitats. Though accurate estimates are not available, more than half of the world's cattle population includes a proportion of B. indicus germ plasma. B. indicus native breeds have developed by natural selection over centuries for their ability to survive in rough, harsh tropical environments. Most of these non-described breeds still exhibit high fertility, in terms of calving rates, and disease resistance but they grow very slowly and take well over 3 years to reach puberty and produce only a few liters of milk over a short lactation period. Selection has been carried out in some areas and distinct Zebu breeds have been developed that have moderately high growth rate and milk production. However, they are slow breeders and have extended pre-pubertal and postpartum anestrous periods, compared to their temperate counterparts exposed to similar environment and management. The reproductive biology of B. indicus is similar to that of B. taurus. Most of the proven management, nutritional, hormonal and biotechnological interventions developed through experimentation with B. taurus breeds are equally applicable to B. indicus and their crosses. Zebu breeds predominate in most tropical countries where the majority of the human population lives. If meat and milk production are to be increased in the tropics, Zebu cow productivity, in terms of number of calves produced per lifetime or per unit area of land, must be increased and the time from birth to slaughter must be reduced. This goal could be achieved either by selection within local Zebu populations or through planned cross

  14. Integrated Bali Cattle Development Model Under Oil Palm Plantation

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    Rasali Hakim Matondang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bali cattle have several advantages such as high fertility and carcass percentage, easy adaptation to the new environment as well. Bali cattle productivity has not been optimal yet. This is due to one of the limitation of feed resources, decreasing of grazing and agricultural land. The aim of this paper is to describe Bali cattle development integrated with oil palm plantations, which is expected to improve productivity and increase Bali cattle population. This integration model is carried out by raising Bali cattle under oil palm plantation through nucleus estate scheme model or individual farmers estates business. Some of Bali cattle raising systems have been applied in the integration of palm plantation-Bali cattle. One of the intensive systems can increase daily weight gain of 0.8 kg/head, calfcrop of 35% per year and has the potency for industrial development of feed and organic fertilizer. In the semi-intensive system, it can improve the production of oil palm fruit bunches (PFB more than 10%, increase harvested-crop area to 15 ha/farmer and reduce the amount of inorganic fertilizer. The extensive system can produce calfcrop ³70%, improve ³30% of PFB, increase business scale ³13 cows/farmer and reduce weeding costs ³16%. Integrated Bali cattle development may provide positive added value for both, palm oil business and cattle business.

  15. Analysis of a multi patch dynamical model about cattle brucellosis

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Zhang; Shigui Ruan; Guiquan Sun; Xiangdong Sun; Zhen Jin

    2014-01-01

    The dissemination of cattle brucellosis in Zhejiang province of China can be attributed to the transport of cattle between cities within the province. In this paper,an n-patch dynamical model is proposed to study the effect of cattle dispersal on brucellosis spread. Theoretically, we analyze the dynamical behavior of the muti-patch model. For the 2-patch submodel, sensitivity analyses of the basic reproduction number R0 and the number of the infectious cattle in term of model parameters are c...

  16. Constraints to cattle production in a semiarid pastoral system in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onono, Joshua Orungo; Wieland, Barbara; Rushton, Jonathan

    2013-08-01

    Livestock keeping is the mainstay for the pastoral community while also providing social and cultural value. This study ranked main production constraints and cattle diseases that impacted livelihood and estimated herd prevalence, incidence rate, and impact of diseases on production parameters in a semiarid pastoral district of Narok in Kenya. Data collection employed participatory techniques including listing, pairwise ranking, disease incidence scoring, proportional piling, and disease impact matrix scoring and this was disaggregated by gender. Production constraints with high scores for impact on livelihood included scarcity of water (19%), lack of extension services (15%), presence of diseases (12%), lack of market for cattle and their products (10%), and recurrent cycle of drought (9%). Diseases with high scores for impact on livelihood were East Coast fever (ECF) (22%) and foot and mouth disease (FMD) (21%). High estimated incidence rates were reported for FMD (67%), trypanosomosis (28%), and ECF (15%), while contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) had an incidence rate production in sub-Sahara Africa, its estimated incidence rate in herds was low. This study indicates what issues should be prioritized by livestock policy for pastoral areas.

  17. Prevalence and multilocus genotyping of Cryptosporidium andersoni in dairy cattle and He cattle in Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Meng; Wang, Rongjun; Jing, Bo; Jian, Fuchun; Ning, Changshen; Zhang, Longxian

    2016-10-01

    Cryptosporidium andersoni is the predominant species in post-weaned and adult cattle in China. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and understand the transmission of cattle cryptosporidiosis in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, China, a total of 1827 fecal samples (436 from He cattle and 1391 from dairy cattle) were examined for the presence of C. andersoni-like oocysts by microscopy after Sheather's sugar flotation technique. The overall prevalence of C. andersoni-like was 3.8% (70/1827) and all the C. andersoni-like isolates were identified as C. andersoni at the SSU rRNA locus. Among the C. andersoni isolates, a total of 60 isolates were successfully characterized into eight multilocus sequence typing (MLST) subtypes using MLST analysis at the four microsatellite/minisatellite loci (MS1, MS2, MS3 and MS16), and three new subtypes were identified. The MLST subtype A4,A4,A4,A1 showed a predominance and a wide distribution among the eight MLST subtypes obtained in the investigated areas. The MLST subtypes A2,A4,A2,A1 and A4,A5,A2,A1 showed a unique distribution in the investigated areas. A linkage disequilibrium analysis showed the presence of an epidemic population genetic structure of C. andersoni isolated from dairy and He cattle in Xinjiang. These findings provide new insights into the genetic structure of C. andersoni isolates and are also helpful to explore the infection source of C. andersoni in cattle in Xinjiang, China. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular epidemiology of bovine Babesia spp. and Theileria orientalis parasites in beef cattle from northern and northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirapattharasate, Charoonluk; Adjou Moumouni, Paul Franck; Cao, Shinuo; Iguchi, Aiko; Liu, Mingming; Wang, Guanbo; Zhou, Mo; Vudriko, Patrick; Changbunjong, Tanasak; Sungpradit, Sivapong; Ratanakorn, Parntep; Moonarmart, Walasinee; Sedwisai, Poonyapat; Weluwanarak, Thekhawet; Wongsawang, Witsanu; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Xuan, Xuenan

    2016-02-01

    Beef cattle production represents the largest cattle population in Thailand. Their productivity is constrained by tick-borne diseases such as babesiosis and theileriosis. In this study, we determined the prevalence of Babesia bigemina, Babesia bovis and Theileria orientalis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The genetic markers that were used for detection of the above parasites were sequenced to determine identities and similarity for Babesia spp. and genetic diversity of T. orientalis. Furthermore the risk factors for the occurrence of the above protozoan parasites in beef cattle from northern and northeastern parts of Thailand were assessed. A total of 329 blood samples were collected from beef cattle in 6 provinces. The study revealed that T. orientalis was the most prevalent (30.1%) parasite in beef cattle followed by B. bigemina (13.1%) and B. bovis (5.5%). Overall, 78.7% of the cattle screened were infected with at least one of the above parasites. Co-infection with Babesia spp. and T. orientalis was 30.1%. B. bigemina and T. orientalis were the most prevalent (15.1%) co-infection although triple infection with the three parasites was observed in 3.0% of the samples. Sequencing analysis revealed that B. bigemina RAP1 gene and B. bovis SBP2 gene were conserved among the parasites from different cattle samples. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the T. orientalis MPSP gene from parasites isolated from cattle in north and northeast Thailand was classified into types 5 and 7 as reported previously. Lack of tick control program was the universal risk factor of the oc