WorldWideScience

Sample records for cations exert synergistic

  1. Combination of Tramadol with Minocycline Exerted Synergistic Effects on a Rat Model of Nerve Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Peng Mei

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is a refractory clinical problem. Certain drugs, such as tramadol, proved useful for the treatment of neuropathic pain by inhibiting the activity of nociceptive neurons. Moreover, studies indicated that suppression or modulation of glial activation could prevent or reverse neuropathic pain, for example with the microglia inhibitor minocycline. However, few present clinical therapeutics focused on both neuronal and glial participation when treating neuropathic pain. Therefore, the present study hypothesized that combination of tramadol with minocycline as neuronal and glial activation inhibitor may exert some synergistic effects on spinal nerve ligation (SNL-induced neuropathic pain. Intrathecal tramadol or minocycline relieved SNL-induced mechanical allodynia in a dose-dependent manner. SNL-induced spinal dorsal horn Fos or OX42 expression was downregulated by intrathecal tramadol or minocycline. Combination of tramadol with minocycline exerted powerful and synergistic effects on SNL-induced neuropathic pain also in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the drug combination enhanced the suppression effects on SNL-induced spinal dorsal horn Fos and OX42 expression, compared to either drug administered alone. These results indicated that combination of tramadol with minocycline could exert synergistic effects on peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain; thus, a new strategy for treating neuropathic pain by breaking the interaction between neurons and glia bilaterally was also proposed.

  2. Arsenic trioxide exerts synergistic effects with cisplatin on non-small cell lung cancer cells via apoptosis induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yawei

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite multidisciplinary treatment, lung cancer remains a highly lethal disease due to poor response to chemotherapy. The identification of therapeutic agents with synergistic effects with traditional drugs is an alternative for lung cancer therapy. In this study, the synergistic effects of arsenic trioxide (As2O3 with cisplatin (DDP on A549 and H460 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells were explored. Methods A549 and H460 human lung cancer cells were treated with As2O3 and/or DDP. Cell growth curves, cell proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis of human cancer cell lines were determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiahiazo (-z-y1-3,5-di-phenytetrazoliumromide (MTT method, clonogenic assay, and flow cytometry (FCM. Apoptosis was further assessed by TUNEL staining. Cell cycle and apoptosis related protein p21, cyclin D1, Bcl-2, bax, clusterin, and caspase-3 were detected by western blot. Results MTT and clonogenic assay showed As2O3 within 10-2 μM to 10 μM exerted inhibition on the proliferation of NSCLC cells, and 2.5 μM As2O3 exerted synergistic inhibition on proliferation with 3 μg/ml DDP. The combination indices (CI for A549 and H460 were 0.5 and 0.6, respectively, as confirmed by the synergism of As2O3 with DDP. FCM showed As2O3 did not affect the cell cycle. The G0/G1 fraction ranged from 57% to 62% for controlled A549 cells and cells treated with As2O3 and/or DDP. The G0/G1 fraction ranged from 37% to 42% for controlled H460 cells and cells treated with As2O3 and/or DDP. FCM and TUNEL staining illustrated that the combination of As2O3 and DDP provoked synergistic effects on apoptosis induction based on the analysis of the apoptosis index. Western blotting revealed that the expression of cell cycle related protein p21 and cyclin D1 were not affected by the treatments, whereas apoptosis related protein bax, Bcl-2, and clusterin were significantly regulated by As2O3 and/or DDP treatments compared with controls. The

  3. Human gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor exert a synergistic blockade on the replication of herpes simplex virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduchi, E; Alonso, M A; Carrasco, L

    1989-03-01

    The replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is not inhibited in either HeLa or HEp-2 cells treated with human alpha interferon (HuIFN-alpha), particularly when high multiplicities of infection are used. However, HuIFN-gamma partially inhibits HSV-1 translation in HEp-2 cells infected at low multiplicities. Under these conditions, the transcription of genes alpha 22, TK, and gamma 0 is greatly diminished. The combined addition of human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and HuIFN-gamma to HEp-2 cells exerts a synergistic inhibition of HSV-1 translation. Cells treated with both cytokines continue synthesizing cellular proteins, even 20 h after HSV-1 infection. As little as 10 U of IFN-gamma per ml blocked HSV-1 DNA replication, provided that TNF was also present in the medium. Analyses of HSV-1 gene transcription suggest that the action of both TNF and IFN-gamma blocked a step that comes at or prior to early HSV-1 gene expression. This early step in HSV-1 replication inhibited by TNF and IFN-gamma occurs after virus attachment and entry into cells, since the internalization of radioactive HSV-1 virion particles was not blocked by the presence of the two cytokines. Therefore, we conclude that the synergistic action of TNF plus IFN-gamma affects a step in HSV-1 replication that comes after virus entry but before or at the transcription of immediate-early genes.

  4. Curcumin Sensitizes Silymarin to Exert Synergistic Anticancer Activity in Colon Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Amanda; Adeyeni, Temitope; San, KayKay; Heuertz, Rita M.; Ezekiel, Uthayashanker R.

    2016-01-01

    We studied combinatorial interactions of two phytochemicals, curcumin and silymarin, in their action against cancer cell proliferation. Curcumin is the major component of the spice turmeric. Silymarin is a bioactive component of milk thistle used as a protective supplement against liver disease. We studied antiproliferative effects of curcumin alone, silymarin alone and combinations of curcumin and silymarin using colon cancer cell lines (DLD-1, HCT116, LoVo). Curcumin inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas silymarin showed significant inhibition only at the highest concentrations assessed. We found synergistic effects when colon cancer cells were treated with curcumin and silymarin together. The combination treatment led to inhibition of colon cancer cell proliferation and increased apoptosis compared to single compound treated cells. Combination treated cells exhibited marked cell rounding and membrane blebbing of apoptotic cells. Curcumin treated cells showed 3-fold more caspase3/7 activity whereas combination treated cells showed 5-fold more activity compared to control and silymarin treated cells. When DLD-1 cells were pre-exposed to curcumin, followed by treatment with silymarin, the cells underwent a high amount of cell death. The pre-exposure studies indicated curcumin sensitization of silymarin effect. Our results indicate that combinatorial treatments using phytochemicals are effective against colorectal cancer. PMID:27390600

  5. Synergistic Interaction and Gelation in Cationic Guar Gum-Sodium Alginate System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Dong-bao; Li Li-hua; Li Qing; Yang Xiao-zhen

    2004-01-01

    The synergistic interaction between the cationic guar gum (the ammonium hydroxy-propyl-trimethyl chloride of guar gum) and sodium alginate has been studied. The effects of the mass ratio of them, mixed temperature, balk salt ion concentration, incubation time and pH value on gelation were investigated. It has been observed that there was a gel strength maximum when the mass ratio was 0.6, the mixed temperature was 70℃, the balk salt ion concentration was 1.0 mol·L-1,the incubation time was 30 min and the pH value was 8. Interaction between molecules of these two polysaccharides was investigated by FT-IR spectrometry.

  6. Methotrexate and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside exert synergistic anticancer action against human breast cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-liang CHENG; Tian-yan ZHOU; Bo LI; Meng-yao LI; Liang LI; Zai-quan LI; Wei LU

    2013-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the influences of methotrexate (MTX) on the anticancer actions and pharmacokinetics of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICA riboside) in human breast cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma.Methods:Human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 were examined.The cell proliferation was assessed using a sulforhodamine B assay.Western blotting and radioactivity assays were used to analyze the phosphorylation of AMPK.The DNA synthesis was analyzed with BrdU incorporation.Nude mice bearing MCF-7 cell xenografts were used to for in vivo study.MTX (50 mg/kg,ip,per week) and AICA riboside (200 mg/kg,ip,every other day) were administered the animals for 2 weeks.The concentrations of AICA riboside and its active metabolite AICA ribotide in the plasma and tumors were measured with HPLC.Results:Synergistic cytotoxicity in vitro was observed with MTX (0.1,0.5,and 1 μmol/L) combined with AICA riboside (0.25-1 mmol/L)in MCF-7 cells,and with MTX (0.5 and 1 μmol/L) combined with AICA riboside (0.5 and 1 mmol/L) in HepG2 cells.MTX (1 μmol/L) significantly enhanced the AICA riboside-induced AMPK activation and BrdU incorporation in both MCF-7 and HepG2 cells.Co-treatment with MTX and AICA riboside exerted more potent inhibition on the tumor growth in nude mice than either drug alone.After injection of AICA riboside (200 mg/kg,iv) in nude mice bearing MCF-7 xenografts,MTX (50 mg/kg,iv) significantly increased the concentrations of AICA riboside and its active metabolite AICA ribotide in tumors.Conclusion:MTX and AICA riboside exert synergistic anticancer action against MCF-7 and HepG2 cells in vitro and in vivo.MTX increases the concentration of AICA riboside and its active metabolite AICA ribotide in tumors in vivo.

  7. Combination of gefitinib and DNA methylation inhibitor decitabine exerts synergistic anti-cancer activity in colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-feng Lou

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in the treatment of human colon cancer, the chemotherapy efficacy against colon cancer is still unsatisfactory. In the present study, effects of concomitant inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and DNA methyltransferase were examined in human colon cancer cells. We demonstrated that decitabine (a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor synergized with gefitinib (an EGFR inhibitor to reduce cell viability and colony formation in SW1116 and LOVO cells. However, the combination of the two compounds displayed minimal toxicity to NCM460 cells, a normal human colon mucosal epithelial cell line. The combination was also more effective at inhibiting the AKT/mTOR/S6 kinase pathway. In addition, the combination of decitabine with gefitinib markedly inhibited colon cancer cell migration. Furthermore, gefitinib synergistically enhanced decitabine-induced cytotoxicity was primarily due to apoptosis as shown by Annexin V labeling that was attenuated by z-VAD-fmk, a pan caspase inhibitor. Concomitantly, cell apoptosis resulting from the co-treatment of gefitinib and decitabine was accompanied by induction of BAX, cleaved caspase 3 and cleaved PARP, along with reduction of Bcl-2 compared to treatment with either drug alone. Interestingly, combined treatment with these two drugs increased the expression of XIAP-associated factor 1 (XAF1 which play an important role in cell apoptosis. Moreover, small interfering RNA (siRNA depletion of XAF1 significantly attenuated colon cancer cells apoptosis induced by the combination of the two drugs. Our findings suggested that gefitinib in combination with decitabine exerted enhanced cell apoptosis in colon cancer cells were involved in mitochondrial-mediated pathway and induction of XAF1 expression. In conclusion, based on the observations from our study, we suggested that the combined administration of these two drugs might be considered as a novel therapeutic regimen for treating colon

  8. HDAC inhibitor L-carnitine and proteasome inhibitor bortezomib synergistically exert anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbiao Huang

    Full Text Available Combinations of proteasome inhibitors and histone deacetylases (HDAC inhibitors appear to be the most potent to produce synergistic cytotoxicity in preclinical trials. We have recently confirmed that L-carnitine (LC is an endogenous HDAC inhibitor. In the current study, the anti-tumor effect of LC plus proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (velcade, Vel was investigated both in cultured hepatoma cancer cells and in Balb/c mice bearing HepG2 tumor. Cell death and cell viability were assayed by flow cytometry and MTS, respectively. Gene, mRNA expression and protein levels were detected by gene microarray, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. The effect of Vel on the acetylation of histone H3 associated with the p21(cip1 gene promoter was examined by using ChIP assay and proteasome peptidase activity was detected by cell-based chymotrypsin-like (CT-like activity assay. Here we report that (i the combination of LC and Vel synergistically induces cytotoxicity in vitro; (ii the combination also synergistically inhibits tumor growth in vivo; (iii two major pathways are involved in the synergistical effects of the combinational treatment: increased p21(cip1 expression and histone acetylation in vitro and in vivo and enhanced Vel-induced proteasome inhibition by LC. The synergistic effect of LC and Vel in cancer therapy should have great potential in the future clinical trials.

  9. Combination of temozolomide and Taxol exerts a synergistic inhibitory effect on Taxol‑resistant glioma cells via inhibition of glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ding-Guo; Chen, Han-Min; Liao, Sheng-Fang; Zhao, Tian-Zhi

    2015-11-01

    Malignant gliomas, which comprise the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor, are associated with a poor prognosis and quality of life. Paclitaxel (Taxol) and temozolomide (TMZ) are Food and Drug Administration‑approved anticancer agents, which are known to have therapeutic applications in various malignancies. However, similar to other chemotherapeutic agents, the development of resistance to TMZ and Taxol is common. The aim of the present study was to investigate the regulation of glucose metabolism by TMZ and Taxol in glioma cells. The results demonstrated that glioma cells exhibit decreased glucose uptake and lactate production in response to treatment with TMZ; however, glucose metabolism was increased in response to Taxol treatment. Following analysis of TMZ‑ and Taxol‑resistant cell lines, it was reported that glucose metabolism was decreased in the TMZ‑resistant cells, but was increased in the Taxol‑resistant cells. Notably, a combination of TMZ and Taxol exerted synergistic inhibitory effects on Taxol‑resistant glioma cells. However, the synergistic phenotype was not observed following treatment with a combination of 5‑fluorouracil and Taxol. Furthermore, restoration of glucose metabolism by overexpression of glucose transporter 1 in Taxol‑resistant cells resulted in regained resistance to Taxol. Therefore, the present study proposes a novel mechanism accounting for the synergistic effects of Taxol and TMZ co‑treatment, which may contribute to the development of therapeutic strategies for overcoming chemoresistance in patients with cancer.

  10. Ionic Liquid Synergistic Cation-Exchange System for the Selective Extraction of Lanthanum(III) Using 2-Thenoyltrifluoroacetone and 18-Crown-6

    OpenAIRE

    Hirayama, Naoki; Okamura, Hiroyuki; Kidani, Keiji; Imura, Hisanori

    2008-01-01

    A novel synergistic extraction system was investigated for the possible selective separation of light lanthanoids using an ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, as an extraction solvent and 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone and 18-crown-6 as extractants. Trivalent lanthanum was efficiently extracted as a cationic ternary complex by the cation-exchange process, whereas europium and lutetium showed relatively low extractability without forming respective ternary ...

  11. A traditional Chinese medicine formulation consisting of Rhizoma Corydalis and Rhizoma Curcumae exerts synergistic anti-tumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian-Li; He, Tong-Chuan; Li, Ying-Bo; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2009-11-01

    Synergy analysis of anticancer agents is an important approach to determining the ratio and/or dose of drugs for clinical combination therapy. However, this method is rarely used to evaluate the composition of traditional Chinese medicine formulation. 'Yanhusuo San' (YHSS), which consists of yanhusuo (Rhizoma Corydalis) and Ezhu (Rhizoma Curcumae), has been an archaic Chinese medicine prescription since the Song dynasty (960-1279 AD). We previously demonstrated that either yanhusuo or ezhu has strong anticancer effect. Herein, we sought to determine the possible synergic effect between these two Chinese herbs. We measured the IC50 of each herb extract and both extracts at different ratios of doses by MTT assay. Isobologram and combination index (CI) analyses were used to evaluate the synergistic effect of yanhusuo and ezhu in different fixed ratios. Our results indicated that a combination of two herbal extracts exhibits the strongest anticancer cell proliferation effect at the ratio of 3:2 (ezhu to yanhusuo; referred to as E3Y2). Using Boyden Chamber assay, flow cytometry, and fluorescence microscopy analysis, we found that E3Y2 could markedly reduce the cell invasion ability and induce cytochrome c release rather than single use, but E3Y2 could not influence the cell cycle distribution. When the levels of ERK1/2, p-ERK1/2 and p-Rb were determined by Western blot analysis, we found that the E3Y2 significantly suppresses the level of p-ERK. Thus, our studies provide a plausible molecular basis of the synergistic anti-tumor effect of ezhu and yanhusuo. PMID:19787224

  12. Escin exerts synergistic anti-inflammatory effects with low doses of glucocorticoids in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Wenyu; Zhang, Leiming; Sun, Fang; Jiang, Na; Fan, Huaying; Wang, Tian; Li, Zhen; He, Jie; Fu, Fenghua

    2011-02-15

    Escin, a natural mixture of triterpenoid saponins isolated from the seed of the horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum), had been demonstrated to possess anti-edematous and anti-inflammatory effects. The present study was designed to investigate whether escin exhibits synergistic anti-inflammatory effects when combined with glucocorticoids. The carrageenan-induced paw edema and pleuritis in bilaterally adrenalectomized rats were used to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of escin and glucocorticoid alone or combined. The carrageenan-induced paw edema was inhibited only when escin and corticosterone (Cort) were administered together. Co-administration of escin with Cort significantly reduced the volume of exudates and the number of white blood cells of exudates in bilaterally adrenalectomized rats with pleuritis, but treatment with escin or Cort alone at a suboptimal concentration did not show any effect on the pleuritis rats. After the murine macrophagic RAW264.7 cells stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), they were treated with escin, Cort or escin and Cort. Then nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) of cell culture supernatants were analyzed. Escin or Cort markedly reduced the content of NO, TNF-α and IL-1β secreted by LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells. The combination of suboptimal concentrations of escin with Cort, which alone could not markedly inhibit the release of inflammatory factors, inhibited the secretion of NO, TNF-α and IL-1β in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells. The findings suggest escin can synergize with glucocorticoids to enhance their anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:20850956

  13. Synergistic effect between cationic gemini surfactant and chloride ion for the corrosion inhibition of steel in sulphuric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu Lingguang [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China)], E-mail: lgqiu@ahu.edu.cn; Wu Yun; Wang Yimin; Jiang Xia [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China)

    2008-02-15

    Corrosion inhibition of cold rolled steel in 0.5 mol L{sup -1} sulphuric acid by a quaternary ammonium gemini surfactant, l,3-propane-bis(dimethyl dodecylammonium bromide) (designated as 12-3-12), in the absence and presence of chloride ions was investigated at different temperatures. The results revealed significant synergistic effect between gemini 12-3-12 and chloride ions for the corrosion protection of cold rolled steel in sulphuric acid, and that the novel composite inhibitor system containing cationic gemini surfactant and chloride ions was efficient and low-cost for steel corrosion inhibition in sulphuric acid medium, even when concentration of 12-3-12 was as low as 1 x 10{sup -6} mol L{sup -1}. By fitting the obtained experimental data with Langmuir adsorption model and Arrhenius equation, some thermodynamic and kinetic parameters such as adsorption free energy, the apparent activation energy, and the pre-exponential factor were estimated. The adsorption mechanism of the gemini surfactant onto steel surface in acid medium in the absence and presence of chloride ions was also discussed, respectively.

  14. Synergistic enhancement of tolerance mechanisms in response to photoactivation of cationic tetra (N-methylpyridyl) porphyrins in tomato plantlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaumot, Damien; Issawi, Mohammad; Da Silva, Anne; Leroy-Lhez, Stephanie; Sol, Vincent; Riou, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic treatment (APDT) is largely used in medical domain and could be envisaged as a farming practice against crop pathogens such as bacteria and fungi that generate drops in agricultural yields. Thus, as a prerequisite for this potential application, we studied the effect of water-soluble anionic (TPPS and Zn-TPPS) and cationic (TMPyP and Zn-TMPyP) porphyrins tested on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plantlets grown in vitro under a 16 h photoperiod. First of all, under dark conditions, none of the four porphyrins inhibited germination and induced cytotoxic effects on tomato plantlets as etiolated development was not altered. The consequences of porphyrin long-term photoactivation (14 days) were thus studied on in vitro-grown tomato plantlets at phenotypic and molecular levels. Cationic porphyrins especially Zn-TMPyP were the most efficient photosensitizers and dramatically altered growth without killing plantlets. Indeed, tomato plantlets were rescued after cationic porphyrins treatment. To gain insight, the different molecular ways implied in the plantlet tolerance to photoactivated Zn-TMPyP, lipid peroxidation, antioxidative molecules (total thiols, proline, ascorbate), and ROS detoxification enzymes were evaluated. In parallel to an increase in lipid peroxidation and hydrogen peroxide production, antioxidative molecules and enzymes (guaiacol peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase) were up-regulated in root apparatus in response to photoactivated Zn-TMPyP. This study showed that tomato plantlets could overcome the pressure triggered by photoactivated cationic porphyrin by activating antioxidative molecule and enzyme arsenal and confining Zn-TMPyP into cell wall and/or apoplasm, suggesting that APDT directed against tomato pathogens could be envisaged in the future. PMID:26854612

  15. In vitro anti-Acanthamoeba synergistic effect of chlorhexidine and cationic carbosilane dendrimers against both trophozoite and cyst forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredero-Bermejo, I; Sánchez-Nieves, J; Soliveri, J; Gómez, R; de la Mata, F J; Copa-Patiño, J L; Pérez-Serrano, J

    2016-07-25

    Acanthamoeba sp. are the causative agents of severe illnesses in humans such as Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) and granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE). Medical therapy is not yet well established. Treatments of AK last for several months and generate toxicity, resistances appear due to the cysts stage and recurrences can occur. In this study has been demonstrated that the combination of chlorhexidine digluconate (CLX) and carbosilane dendrimers containing ammonium or guanidine moieties has in vitro synergistic effect against Acanthamoeba polyphaga. This synergy provokes an important reduction in the minimal trophozoite amoebicidal concentration (MTAC) of CLX, which means a reduction of their toxic effects on human cells. Moreover, some CLX/dendrimer combinations show important activity against the cyst resistance stage. PMID:27173821

  16. Mild Hyperthermia Synergistically Enhances Killing Of Malignant Cells By The Cationic Photosensitizer EDKC: Implications For A "Selective Photo-Hyperthermic Therapy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oseroff, A. R.; Ohuoha, D.; Ara, G.

    1988-02-01

    Cationic dyes such as EDKC, which preferentially accumulate in malignant cell mitochondria, permit selective photodamage and dark toxicity to these organelles. The resultant inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation and decrease in intracellular ATP should strongly potentiated thermal injury, even at temperatures which are relatively innocuous by themselves. In human squamous carcinoma (FaDu), murine melanoma (B-16) or non-malignant monkey kidney (CV-1) cells, we examined the effect of combining treatment with EDKC ± light together with mild, 42°C hyperthermia. Heat alone for up to 60 min had no effect on any of the cell lines, and EDKC + light + heat was not toxic to the non-malignant CV-1 cells. Hyperthermia synergistically enhanced photodamage in malignant cells, with survival decreasing more than 200-fold after 20 min of heat to B-16 cells or 60 min to FaDu cells. The heating also increased dark toxicity of the dye, decreasing survival of FaDu cells by more than 10-fold after treatment with 10-7 M EDKC and 60 minutes at 42°C. The sequence of application of light and heat was important, with much greater synergy for heat after irradiation.

  17. Azithromycin Synergizes with Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides to Exert Bactericidal and Therapeutic Activity Against Highly Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacterial Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Lin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance poses an increasingly grave threat to the public health. Of pressing concern, rapid spread of carbapenem-resistance among multidrug-resistant (MDR Gram-negative rods (GNR is associated with few treatment options and high mortality rates. Current antibiotic susceptibility testing guiding patient management is performed in a standardized manner, identifying minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC in bacteriologic media, but ignoring host immune factors. Lacking activity in standard MIC testing, azithromycin (AZM, the most commonly prescribed antibiotic in the U.S., is never recommended for MDR GNR infection. Here we report a potent bactericidal action of AZM against MDR carbapenem-resistant isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Acinetobacter baumannii. This pharmaceutical activity is associated with enhanced AZM cell penetration in eukaryotic tissue culture media and striking multi-log-fold synergies with host cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide LL-37 or the last line antibiotic colistin. Finally, AZM monotherapy exerts clear therapeutic effects in murine models of MDR GNR infection. Our results suggest that AZM, currently ignored as a treatment option, could benefit patients with MDR GNR infections, especially in combination with colistin.

  18. Synergistic effect of mixed cationic and anionic surfactants on the corrosion inhibitor behavior of mild steel in 3.5% NaCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javadian, Soheila, E-mail: Javadian_s@modares.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-175, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yousefi, Ali [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-175, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Neshati, Jaber [Corrosion Department, Coating Research Center, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), P.O. Box 18745-4163, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    The corrosion inhibition characteristics of cation-rich and anion-rich catanionic mixtures of cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), as corrosion inhibitor of mild steel (MS), in aqueous solution of 3.5% NaCl were investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), potentiodynamic polarization and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Solutions of CTAB/SDS mixtures showed more appropriate inhibition properties compared to the solutions of the individual surfactants, due to strong adsorption on the metal surface and formation of a protective film. Potentiodynamic polarization investigations indicated that the inhibitors studied were mixed type inhibitors. Adsorption of the inhibitors on the mild steel surface obeyed the Flory–Huggins adsorption isotherm. Furthermore, the values of the adsorption free energy (ΔG°{sub ads}) in both mixtures decreased compared with a single surfactant which is attributed to stronger interactions in mixtures.

  19. Expanding exertion gaming

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, Joe; Mueller, Florian ‘Floyd’; Benford, Steve; Pijnappel, Sebastiaan

    2016-01-01

    While exertion games - digital games where the outcome is determined by physical exertion - are of growing interest in HCI, we believe the current health and fitness focus in the research of exertion games limits the opportunities this field has to offer. In order to broaden the agenda on exertion games, we link the existing fields of sports and interactive entertainment (arguing these fields have much to offer) by presenting four of our own designs as case studies. Using our experiences with...

  20. Exertional Leg Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Sathish; Finnoff, Jonathan T

    2016-02-01

    Exertional leg pain is a common condition seen in runners and the general population. Given the broad differential diagnosis of this complaint, this article focuses on the incidence, anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and management of common causes that include medial tibial stress syndrome, tibial bone stress injury, chronic exertional compartment syndrome, arterial endofibrosis, popliteal artery entrapment syndrome, and entrapment of the common peroneal, superficial peroneal, and saphenous nerves. Successful diagnosis of these conditions hinges on performing a thorough history and physical examination followed by proper diagnostic testing and appropriate management. PMID:26616179

  1. Exertion injuries in female athletes.

    OpenAIRE

    Orava, S.; Hulkko, A; Jormakka, E.

    1981-01-01

    Because sports injuries in men form most of the available statistics, the reportage of injuries in female athletes is sparse. We describe exertion injuries and disorders in 281 women athletes, all of which hampered athletic training or performances. Sixty per cent of the injuries occurred to girls ages between 12-19 years, and about forty-eight per cent were track and field athletes. The most common sites of injury were the ankle, foot, heel and leg. Osteochondritic disorders were the most ty...

  2. CHARACTERISTICS OF BENTONITE AND ITS SYNERGISTIC RETENTION EFFECT WITH CPAM ON WHEAT STRAW PULP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na Liu; Wenxia Liu

    2004-01-01

    The various properties of bentonite samples with different sources and their synergistic retention effect with CPAM on wheat straw pulps were investigated.The investigated properties of bentonite included adsorptive capacity based on methylene blue,cation-exchange capacity, swelling volume, colloidal volume, particle size and charge properties. The results show that particle size is the most important properties of bentonite for its synergistic retention effect with CPAM. Using Wyoming type sodium bentonite without drying after modification can obtain the excellent furnishes retention.

  3. Quantifying synergistic mutual information

    CERN Document Server

    Griffith, Virgil

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying cooperation among random variables in predicting a single target random variable is an important problem in many biological systems with 10s to 1000s of co-dependent variables. We review the prior literature of information theoretical measures of synergy and introduce a novel synergy measure, entitled *synergistic mutual information* and compare it against the three existing measures of cooperation. We apply all four measures against a suite of binary circuits to demonstrate our measure alone quantifies the intuitive concept of synergy across all examples.

  4. Exertion injuries in female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orava, S; Hulkko, A; Jormakka, E

    1981-12-01

    Because sports injuries in men form most of the available statistics, the reportage of injuries in female athletes is sparse. We describe exertion injuries and disorders in 281 women athletes, all of which hampered athletic training or performances. Sixty per cent of the injuries occurred to girls ages between 12-19 years, and about forty-eight per cent were track and field athletes. The most common sites of injury were the ankle, foot, heel and leg. Osteochondritic disorders were the most typical injuries in the series, and the chronic medical tibial syndrome was the injury that needed surgical treatment most frequently. Overuse injuries seem to differ very little from each other in the events included in this survey. PMID:6797496

  5. The Design of Networked Exertion Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Vetere

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Incorporating physical activity and exertion into pervasive gaming applications can provide health and social benefits. Prior research has resulted in several prototypes of pervasive games that encourage exertion as interaction form; however, no detailed critical account of the various approaches exists. We focus on networked exertion games and detail some of our work while identifying the remaining issues towards providing a coherent framework. We outline common lessons learned and use them as the basis for generalizations for the design of networked exertion games. We propose possible directions of further investigation, hoping to provide guidance for future work to facilitate greater awareness and exposure of exertion games and their benefits.

  6. The Synergistic Engineering Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    The Synergistic Engineering Environment (SEE) is a system of software dedicated to aiding the understanding of space mission operations. The SEE can integrate disparate sets of data with analytical capabilities, geometric models of spacecraft, and a visualization environment, all contributing to the creation of an interactive simulation of spacecraft. Initially designed to satisfy needs pertaining to the International Space Station, the SEE has been broadened in scope to include spacecraft ranging from those in low orbit around the Earth to those on deep-space missions. The SEE includes analytical capabilities in rigid-body dynamics, kinematics, orbital mechanics, and payload operations. These capabilities enable a user to perform real-time interactive engineering analyses focusing on diverse aspects of operations, including flight attitudes and maneuvers, docking of visiting spacecraft, robotic operations, impingement of spacecraft-engine exhaust plumes, obscuration of instrumentation fields of view, communications, and alternative assembly configurations. .

  7. Curcumin Sensitizes Silymarin to Exert Synergistic Anticancer Activity in Colon Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, Amanda; Adeyeni, Temitope; San, KayKay; Heuertz, Rita M.; Ezekiel, Uthayashanker R.

    2016-01-01

    We studied combinatorial interactions of two phytochemicals, curcumin and silymarin, in their action against cancer cell proliferation. Curcumin is the major component of the spice turmeric. Silymarin is a bioactive component of milk thistle used as a protective supplement against liver disease. We studied antiproliferative effects of curcumin alone, silymarin alone and combinations of curcumin and silymarin using colon cancer cell lines (DLD-1, HCT116, LoVo). Curcumin inhibited colon cancer ...

  8. Gender and contraction mode on perceived exertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincivero, D M; Polen, R R; Byrd, B N

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine perceived exertion responses during concentric and eccentric elbow flexor contractions between young adult men and women. Thirty healthy young adults participated in two experimental sessions. During the first session, subjects performed five concentric isokinetic maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) of elbow flexion, followed by nine, randomly-ordered sub-maximal contractions (10-90% MVC). The same procedures were repeated during the second session, with the exception that eccentric contractions were performed. Subjects rated their perceived exertion following the sub-maximal contractions with the Borg category-ratio scale. Perceived exertion was significantly (p<0.05) less than equivalent values on the CR-10 scale at intensities greater than, and equal to, 30% MVC. A three-factor interaction between 30-40% MVC indicated that perceived exertion increased more during the eccentric, than concentric, contractions in women, while the opposite pattern was evident for the men. There were no significant contraction mode or gender differences. Power function modeling revealed that perceived exertion increased in a negatively accelerating manner, except for the men performing eccentric exercise. Perceived exertion increases in a similar non-linear manner between men and women during concentric contractions, while men exhibited a statistically linear pattern during eccentric contractions. PMID:20148376

  9. Synergistic neurotrophic effects of piracetam and thiotriazoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Gromova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the synergy between the nootropic drug piracetam and the metabolic agent thiotriazoline that maintains energy metabolism and survival of neurons and other types of cells. Piracetam, a nootropic drug, a chemical pyrrolidone derivative, is used in neurological, psychiatric, and narcological practice. There is evidence on the positive effect of piracetam in elderly and senile patients with coronary heart disease. This drug is supposed to stimulate redox processes, to enhance glucose utilization, and to improve regional blood flow in the ischemic brain regions. Due to its action, the drug activates glycolytic processes and elevates ATP concentrations in brain tissue. Thiotriazoline is a compound that has antioxidant, anti-ischemic properties. The co-administration of piracetam and thiothriazoline is an innovation area in the treatment of stroke and other brain damages, especially in insulin resistance and high blood glucose levels. The paper considers the neurobiological properties of thiotriazoline and piracetam, which synergistically exert neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects.

  10. Does heavy physical exertion trigger myocardial infarction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallqvist, J; Möller, J; Ahlbom, A;

    2000-01-01

    To study possible triggering of first events of acute myocardial infarction by heavy physical exertion, the authors conducted a case-crossover analysis (1993-1994) within a population-based case-referent study in Stockholm County, Sweden (the Stockholm Heart Epidemiology Program). Interviews were...... carried out with 699 myocardial infarction patients after onset of the disease. These cases represented 47 percent of all cases in the study base, and 70 percent of all nonfatal cases. The relative risk from vigorous exertion was 6.1 (95% confidence interval: 4.2, 9.0). The rate difference was 1.5 per...

  11. Dissection of a Single Rat Muscle-Tendon Complex Changes Joint Moments Exerted by Neighboring Muscles: Implications for Invasive Surgical Interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, H.; Baan, G.C.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate mechanical functioning of a single skeletal muscle, active within a group of (previously) synergistic muscles. For this purpose, we assessed wrist angle-active moment characteristics exerted by a group of wrist flexion muscles in the rat for three conditions:

  12. Exertion and acute coronary artery injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, A; Black, M M; Gensini, G

    1975-12-01

    Twelve cases of myocardial infarction as related to strenuous exertion are presented with the pathological findings in several of these cases. Three cases with coronary arteriography are also presented. The pathology of coronary arteriosclerotic plaques and the vulnerability to acute injury is reviewed and discussed. It is concluded that strenuous exertion can cause acute injury to coronary artery plaques due to the unusual stressful whip-like action to which coronary arteries are subject. These injuries may initiate as cracks in the plaques or subintimal hemorrhages and proceed to coronary occlusion and ultimate myocardial infarction. With this concept in mind we use the term of "crack in the plaque" (Black's Crack in the Plaque) to account for the sudden appearance of clinical coronary artery disease appearing during or shortly after exertion, or other stressful situations in patients without previous existing evidence of clinical coronary artery disease. This could also account for exacerbation of symptoms or death occurring after exertion in previously quiescent asymptomatic known coronary artery disease subjects. This concept may explain some of the puzzling features of coronary disease.

  13. Physical exertion may cause high troponin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agewall, Stefan; Tjora, Solve

    2011-11-15

    It is important to measure troponin levels when acute myocardial infarct is suspected. Many other factors that affect the heart can cause an increase in troponin levels, for example extreme physical exertion. Recent studies have shown that more normal physical activity can also lead to increase in troponin levels in healthy individuals.

  14. Silica ecosystem for synergistic biotransformation

    OpenAIRE

    Mutlu, Baris R.; Sakkos, Jonathan K.; Sujin Yeom; Wackett, Lawrence P.; Alptekin Aksan

    2016-01-01

    Synergistical bacterial species can perform more varied and complex transformations of chemical substances than either species alone, but this is rarely used commercially because of technical difficulties in maintaining mixed cultures. Typical problems with mixed cultures on scale are unrestrained growth of one bacterium, which leads to suboptimal population ratios, and lack of control over bacterial spatial distribution, which leads to inefficient substrate transport. To address these issues...

  15. Modulatory role of bivalent cations on reward system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechifor, M; Chelărescu, D

    2008-01-01

    Bivalent cations (Ca, Mg, Zn, Mn etc.) modulate activity of reward system (RS). At physiologic levels they may influence all components of RS. There are influenced behavioral reactions at physiological stimuli and all essential elements of drug dependence (compulsive intake of substance, craving, reinforcement, withdrawal syndrom, relapse and reinstatement of intake) The fact that some cations (e.g. calcium) enhance some of the aspects of drug dependence and others (e.g. magnesium, zinc) decrease intensity of this process show that ratio between intra- and extracellular in the brain of these cations is important for the function of RS. Among actions of different cations at the level of RS there are important differences. Their mecahanism of action are common in part and specific in other. It is important the fact that modulatory action appear at physiologic cation concentrations (that could be reached at therapeutic doses). Modulatory action is related to ratio between concetrations of different bivalent cations and is exerted both in normal or pathologic conditions.

  16. Effect of defect state on photon synergistic process in KLu2F7:Yb3+, Er3+ nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Wenjuan; Lu, Wei; Qi, Yushuang; Yu, Xue; Zhou, Dacheng; Yang, Yong; Qiu, Jianbei; Xu, Xuhui

    2016-10-01

    The synergistic effect appeared due to the cooperative dual-wavelength excitation by near-infrared (NIR) and ultraviolet (UV) light in rare-earth doped nano-particles (NPs) is very important to improve solar cell efficiency. Herein, we studied the synergistic effect combined with the energy levels of Er3+ ions and the defect states in KLu2F7 NPs. The introduction of Ce3+ ions in KLu2F7:16%Yb3+, 2%Er3+ NPs results in significant improvement of synergistic effect by producing more vacancy defects (VK‧) which serves as shallow traps. We verify unambiguously that the control of the defects distribution exerts a facile approach to promote the synergistic effect with the assistance of Ce3+ ions doping.

  17. The effect of the alkali metal cation on the electrocatalytic oxidation of formate on platinum

    OpenAIRE

    Previdello, B.; E. Machado; Varela, H.

    2014-01-01

    Non-covalent interactions between hydrated alkali metal cations and adsorbed oxygenated species on platinum might considerably inhibit some electrocatalytic reactions. We report in this communication the effect exerted by electrolyte alkali metal cations on the electro-oxidation of formate ions on platinum. The system was investigated by means of cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry in the presence of an electrolyte containing Li+, Na+, or K+. As already observed for other systems, the ge...

  18. Synergistic ototoxicity due to noise exposure and aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongzhe; Steyger, Peter S

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic exposure to high intensity and/or prolonged noise causes temporary or permanent threshold shifts in auditory perception, reflected by reversible or irreversible damage in the cochlea. Aminoglycoside antibiotics, used for treating or preventing life-threatening bacterial infections, also induce cytotoxicity in the cochlea. Combined noise and aminoglycoside exposure, particularly in neonatal intensive care units, can lead to auditory threshold shifts greater than simple summation of the two insults. The synergistic toxicity of acoustic exposure and aminoglycoside antibiotics is not limited to simultaneous exposures. Prior acoustic insult which does not result in permanent threshold shifts potentiates aminoglycoside ototoxicity. In addition, exposure to subdamaging doses of aminoglycosides aggravates noise-induced cochlear damage. The mechanisms by which aminoglycosides cause auditory dysfunction are still being unraveled, but likely include the following: 1) penetration into the endolymphatic fluid of the scala media, 2) permeation of nonselective cation channels on the apical surface of hair cells, and 3) generation of toxic reactive oxygen species and interference with other cellular pathways. Here we discuss the effect of combined noise and aminoglycoside exposure to identify pivotal synergistic events that can potentiate ototoxicity, in addition to a current understanding of aminoglycoside trafficking within the cochlea. Preventing the ototoxic synergy of noise and aminoglycosides is best achieved by using non-ototoxic bactericidal drugs, and by attenuating perceived noise intensity when life-saving aminoglycoside therapy is required.

  19. Ion exchange behaviour of polymeric zirconium cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polymeric zirconium cations formed in weakly acid solutions (pH2) are taken up strongly into macroporous cation exchange resins, while uptake into normal cation exchange resins (pore diameter about 1 nm) is low. Macroporous cation exchange resins loaded with polymeric Zr cations are shown to function as ligand exchange sorbents. (Authors)

  20. The definition of exertion-related cardiac events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, M; Thompson, P D

    2011-02-01

    Vigorous physical activity increases the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) but there is no standard definition as to what constitutes an exertion-related cardiac event, specifically the time interval between physical exertion and cardiac event. A systematic review of studies related to exertion-related cardiac events was performed and the time interval between exertion and the event or the symptoms leading to the event was looked for in all the articles selected for inclusion. A total of 12 of 26 articles "suggested" or "defined" exertion-related events as those events whose symptoms started during or within 1 h of exertion. Others used definitions of 0.5 h, 2 h, "during exertion", "during or immediately post exertion" and "during or within several hours after exertion". It is suggested, therefore, that the definition of an exertion-related cardiac event be established as a cardiac event in which symptoms started during or within 1 h of physical exertion.

  1. Large Neutral Amino Acid Supplementation Exerts Its Effect through Three Synergistic Mechanisms: Proof of Principle in Phenylketonuria Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danique van Vliet

    Full Text Available Phenylketonuria (PKU was the first disorder in which severe neurocognitive dysfunction could be prevented by dietary treatment. However, despite this effect, neuropsychological outcome in PKU still remains suboptimal and the phenylalanine-restricted diet is very demanding. To improve neuropsychological outcome and relieve the dietary restrictions for PKU patients, supplementation of large neutral amino acids (LNAA is suggested as alternative treatment strategy that might correct all brain biochemical disturbances caused by high blood phenylalanine, and thereby improve neurocognitive functioning.As a proof-of-principle, this study aimed to investigate all hypothesized biochemical treatment objectives of LNAA supplementation (normalizing brain phenylalanine, non-phenylalanine LNAA, and monoaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations in PKU mice.C57Bl/6 Pah-enu2 (PKU mice and wild-type mice received a LNAA supplemented diet, an isonitrogenic/isocaloric high-protein control diet, or normal chow. After six weeks of dietary treatment, blood and brain amino acid and monoaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations were assessed.In PKU mice, the investigated LNAA supplementation regimen significantly reduced blood and brain phenylalanine concentrations by 33% and 26%, respectively, compared to normal chow (p<0.01, while alleviating brain deficiencies of some but not all supplemented LNAA. Moreover, LNAA supplementation in PKU mice significantly increased brain serotonin and norepinephrine concentrations from 35% to 71% and from 57% to 86% of wild-type concentrations (p<0.01, respectively, but not brain dopamine concentrations (p = 0.307.This study shows that LNAA supplementation without dietary phenylalanine restriction in PKU mice improves brain biochemistry through all three hypothesized biochemical mechanisms. Thereby, these data provide proof-of-concept for LNAA supplementation as a valuable alternative dietary treatment strategy in PKU. Based on these results, LNAA treatment should be further optimized for clinical application with regard to the composition and dose of the LNAA supplement, taking into account all three working mechanisms of LNAA treatment.

  2. Lentinan exerts synergistic apoptotic effects with paclitaxel in A549 cells via activating ROS-TXNIP-NLRP3 inflammasome

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Wei; Gu, Jun; Qi, Jun; Zeng, Xiao-Ning; Ji, Juan; Chen, Zheng-Zhen; Sun, Xiu-Lan

    2015-01-01

    Paclitaxel is generally used to treat cancers in clinic as an inhibitor of cell division. However, the acquired resistance in tumours limits its clinical efficacy. Therefore, the aim of this study was to detect whether co-treatment with lentinan enhanced the anti-cancer effects of paclitaxel in A549 cells. We found that the combination of paclitaxel and lentinan resulted in a significantly stronger inhibition on A549 cell proliferation than paclitaxel treatment alone. Co-treatment with paclit...

  3. Silica ecosystem for synergistic biotransformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Baris R.; Sakkos, Jonathan K.; Yeom, Sujin; Wackett, Lawrence P.; Aksan, Alptekin

    2016-06-01

    Synergistical bacterial species can perform more varied and complex transformations of chemical substances than either species alone, but this is rarely used commercially because of technical difficulties in maintaining mixed cultures. Typical problems with mixed cultures on scale are unrestrained growth of one bacterium, which leads to suboptimal population ratios, and lack of control over bacterial spatial distribution, which leads to inefficient substrate transport. To address these issues, we designed and produced a synthetic ecosystem by co-encapsulation in a silica gel matrix, which enabled precise control of the microbial populations and their microenvironment. As a case study, two greatly different microorganisms: Pseudomonas sp. NCIB 9816 and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 were encapsulated. NCIB 9816 can aerobically biotransform over 100 aromatic hydrocarbons, a feat useful for synthesis of higher value commodity chemicals or environmental remediation. In our system, NCIB 9816 was used for biotransformation of naphthalene (a model substrate) into CO2 and the cyanobacterium PCC 7942 was used to provide the necessary oxygen for the biotransformation reactions via photosynthesis. A mathematical model was constructed to determine the critical cell density parameter to maximize oxygen production, and was then used to maximize the biotransformation rate of the system.

  4. Acute leg compartment syndrome after exertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mišović Sidor

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of a 22-year old soldier, with a history of pain in the leg during heavy exercise, which desisted at rest, was presented. One day before admission, the patient had felt an extreme exertion-induced pain in his right leg which had not lessened at rest. At the same time, the patient noticed persistent severe leg edema. On physical examination, the intracompartmental pressure was 62 mmHg (>30 mmHg. The patient was urgently operated on, and fasciotomy according to Mubarak was used. At second surgery, the debridement of the muscles of the posterior group of the leg, and the evacuation of hemathoma from the anterior and lateral group of the right leg muscles were perfomed. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. Fasciotomy wounds were closed within 14 days of the surgery. The complete physical treatment was done. Follow-up examinations 1, 3, and 6 months afterwards were satisfactory. The soldier completed his compulsory military service without any sequelae. Laboratory results were normal. Overlooked, unrecognized or surgically untreated compartment syndrome can cause severe damage, including even the loss of the extremity.

  5. Statistical metamodeling for revealing synergistic antimicrobial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiang Chia; Chen, Chia Hsiang; Gau, Vincent; Zhang, Donna D; Liao, Joseph C; Wang, Fei-Yue; Wong, Pak Kin

    2010-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens are becoming drug resistant faster than we can develop new antimicrobials. To address this threat in public health, a metamodel antimicrobial cocktail optimization (MACO) scheme is demonstrated for rapid screening of potent antibiotic cocktails using uropathogenic clinical isolates as model systems. With the MACO scheme, only 18 parallel trials were required to determine a potent antimicrobial cocktail out of hundreds of possible combinations. In particular, trimethoprim and gentamicin were identified to work synergistically for inhibiting the bacterial growth. Sensitivity analysis indicated gentamicin functions as a synergist for trimethoprim, and reduces its minimum inhibitory concentration for 40-fold. Validation study also confirmed that the trimethoprim-gentamicin synergistic cocktail effectively inhibited the growths of multiple strains of uropathogenic clinical isolates. With its effectiveness and simplicity, the MACO scheme possesses the potential to serve as a generic platform for identifying synergistic antimicrobial cocktails toward management of bacterial infection in the future. PMID:21124958

  6. Statistical metamodeling for revealing synergistic antimicrobial interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang Chia Chen

    Full Text Available Many bacterial pathogens are becoming drug resistant faster than we can develop new antimicrobials. To address this threat in public health, a metamodel antimicrobial cocktail optimization (MACO scheme is demonstrated for rapid screening of potent antibiotic cocktails using uropathogenic clinical isolates as model systems. With the MACO scheme, only 18 parallel trials were required to determine a potent antimicrobial cocktail out of hundreds of possible combinations. In particular, trimethoprim and gentamicin were identified to work synergistically for inhibiting the bacterial growth. Sensitivity analysis indicated gentamicin functions as a synergist for trimethoprim, and reduces its minimum inhibitory concentration for 40-fold. Validation study also confirmed that the trimethoprim-gentamicin synergistic cocktail effectively inhibited the growths of multiple strains of uropathogenic clinical isolates. With its effectiveness and simplicity, the MACO scheme possesses the potential to serve as a generic platform for identifying synergistic antimicrobial cocktails toward management of bacterial infection in the future.

  7. SYNERGISTIC WOOD PRESERVATIVES FOR REPLACEMENT OF CCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the potential synergistic combinations of environmentally-safe biocides as wood preservatives. These wood preservatives could be potential replacements for the heavy-metal based CCA.Didecyldimethylammonium chloride [DDAC] was...

  8. Asialoglycoprotein receptor and liposome synergistically mediate the gene transfer into primary rat hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李崇辉; 温守明; 翟海峰; 孙曼霁

    1999-01-01

    Gene transfer into primary rat hepatocytes was performed by employing cationic liposome as DNA carrier and the specific ligand of hepatic asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR), asialofetuin, as liver-targeting ligand. The resuits showed that asialofetuin, when added to the gene transfer complexes, could significantly increase the hepatocyte transfeetion efficiency, and alleviate the cellular toxicity of Lipofectin. Several synthetic ligands of ASGPR (galactosyl albumin) could also increase the transfection efficiency of hepatocyte like asialofetuin. It was proved that ASGPR and cationic liposome could synergistically mediate the gene transfer into primary rat hepatoeytes. This novel gene delivery system provided a safer, more simple and efficient gene transfer method for primary hepatocytes, and showed prospecting application in hepatic gene therapy.

  9. Liquid-solid extraction of cationic metals by cationic amphiphiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the field of selective separation for recycling of spent nuclear fuel, liquid-liquid extraction processes are widely used (PUREX, DIAMEX..) in industrial scale. In order to guarantee a sustainable nuclear energy for the forthcoming generations, alternative reprocessing techniques are under development. One of them bases on the studies from Heckmann et al in the 80's and consists in selectively precipitating actinides from aqueous waste solutions by cationic surfactants (liquid-solid extraction). This technique has some interesting advantages over liquid-liquid extraction techniques, because several steps are omitted like stripping or solvent washing. Moreover, the amount of waste is decreased considerably, since no contaminated organic solvent is produced. In this thesis, we have carried out a physico-chemical study to understand the specific interactions between the metallic cations with the cationic surfactant. First, we have analysed the specific effect of the different counter-ions (Cl-, NO3-, C2O42-) and then the effect of alkaline cations on the structural properties of the surfactant aggregation in varying thermodynamical conditions. Finally, different multivalent cations (Cu2+, Zn2+, UO22+, Fe3+, Nd3+, Eu3+, Th4+) were considered; we have concluded that depending on the anionic complex of these metals formed in acidic media, we can observe either an adsorption at the micellar interface or not. This adsorption has a large influence of the surfactant aggregation properties and determines the limits of the application in term of ionic strength, temperature and surfactant concentration. (author)

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of Zirconia Nanocrystallites by Cationic Surfactant and Anionic Surfactant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Study on nanomaterials has attracted great interests in recent years. In this article,zirconia nanocrystallites of different structures have been successfully synthesized via hydrothermal methods with cationic surfactant (CTAB) and anionic surfactant (SDS), respectively. Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC-TG), X-ray Diffractometer (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-vis) and N2 adsorption-desorption analyses are used for their structure characteristics. The results show that the cationic surfactant has a distinctive direction effect on the formation of zirconia nanocrystallites, while the anionic surfactant has a self-assembly synergistic effect on them. The sample synthesized with the cationic surfactant presents good dispersion with the main phase of tetragonal zirconia, and the average nanocryst al size is around 15nm after calcination at 500 ℃. While the sample synthesized with the anionic surfactant exhibits a worm-like mesoporous structure with pure tetragonal phase after calcination at 500 ℃ and with good thermal stability.

  11. Using Ratings of Perceived Exertion in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Kristen M.

    2013-01-01

    Ratings of perceived exertion have been shown to be a valid method of monitoring physical activity intensity for both adults and children. As such, this subjective method may serve as an alternative to objective measurements for assessing students' performance on national standards 2 and 4. The OMNI-Child perceived exertion scales were…

  12. Synergistic effect of a biosurfactant and protamine on gene transfection efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoh, Yoshikazu; Furuno, Tadahide; Hirashima, Naohide; Kitamoto, Dai; Nakanishi, Mamoru

    2013-04-11

    Several barriers need to be overcome to ensure successful gene transfection, including passing of the foreign gene through the plasma membrane, escape of this material from lysosomal degradation, and its translocation into the nucleus. We previously showed that the biosurfactant mannosylerythritol lipid-A (MEL-A) enhanced the efficiency of gene transfection mediated by cationic liposomes by facilitating rapid delivery of foreign genes into target cells through membrane fusion between liposomes and the plasma membrane. Moreover, using MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes, the foreign gene was efficiently delivered into the nucleus because it was released directly into the cytosol and thus escaped lysosomal degradation. Here we investigated the effect of pre-condensation of plasmid DNA by a cationic polymer, protamine, on gene transfection. We found that the efficiency of pre-condensed DNA transfection mediated by MEL-A-containing OH liposomes was >10 times higher than that of non-condensed DNA transfection. In contrast, the efficiency of pre-condensed DNA transfection mediated by OH liposomes was only 1.5 times higher than that of non-condensed DNA transfection. MEL-A did not influence plasmid DNA encapsulation by cationic liposomes, but it greatly accelerated the nuclear delivery of pre-condensed plasmid DNA. Our findings indicate that MEL-A and protamine synergistically accelerate the nuclear delivery of foreign gene and consequently promote gene transfection efficiency. PMID:23422688

  13. Cationic speciation in nonaqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electronic spectra of solutions of d transition elements in the superacids HF, H2SO4, HSO3F, and CF3SO3H and in chloroaluminate melts indicate that in acidic monaqueous media the elements are present as solvated cations, whereas in basic media the speciation is anionic, the same situation as in aqueous solutions. Further, in very highly acidic media, cations in very low oxidation states are stable (e.g., Ti2+), but these disproportionate on addition of base to the system. In this paper spectra, where available, of U, Np, and Pu in oxidation states III and IV in aqueous media, in protonic superacids, and in chloroaluminates are presented to postulate cationic speciation of these early actinides in highly acidic media

  14. Synergistic effects of elevated homocysteine level and abnormal blood lipids on the onset of stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Hao; Zhenzhen Cheng; Qiang Wu; Shuzhang Li; Liming Chen; Xiaoyong Sai; Zhefeng Liu; Guang Yang; Rongzeng Yan; Lili Wang; Caiyun Fu; Xuan Xu

    2013-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia and abnormal blood lipids are independent risk factors for stroke. However, whether both factors exert a synergistic effect in the onset of stroke remains unclear. The present study is a retrospective analysis of 2 089 cases of stroke and 2 089 control cases of simple inter-vertebral disk protrusion using a paired multivariate logistic regression method. Adjusting for known confounding variables including the patients’ age, gender, smoking status, alcohol consumption status, patient and family medical history, and clinical biochemical indices, elevated homocysteine level was related to the onset of stroke. Patients with elevated homocysteine levels and abnormal blood lipids showed a 40.9%increase in the risk for stroke compared to patients with normal ho-mocysteine levels and blood lipids (odds ratio 1.409;95%confidence interval 1.127-1.761). These results indicate that elevated homocysteine and abnormal blood lipids exert synergistic effects in the onset of stroke. Patients with elevated homocysteine levels and abnormal blood lipids are predis-posed to stroke.

  15. Modelling synergistic effects of appetite regulating hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Julie Berg; Ritz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We briefly reviewed one definition of dose addition, which is applicable within the framework of generalized linear models. We established how this definition of dose addition corresponds to effect addition in case only two doses per compound are considered for evaluating synergistic effects. The....... The link between definitions was exemplified for an appetite study where two appetite hormones were studied....

  16. Research progress in cation-π interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Cation-π interaction is a potent intermolecular interaction between a cation and an aromatic system,which has been viewed as a new kind of binding force,as being compared with the classical interactions(e.g. hydrogen bonding,electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions). Cation-π interactions have been observed in a wide range of biological contexts. In this paper,we present an overview of the typical cation-π interactions in biological systems,the experimental and theoretical investigations on cation-π interactions,as well as the research results on cation-π interactions in our group.

  17. Research progress in cation-π interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG JiaGao; LUO XiaoMin; YAN XiuHua; LI Zhong; TANG Yun; JIANG HuaLiang; ZHU WeiLiang

    2008-01-01

    Cation-π interaction is a potent intermolecular interaction between a cation and an aromatic system, which has been viewed as a new kind of binding force, as being compared with the classical interac-tions (e.g. hydrogen bonding, electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions). Cation-π interactions have been observed in a wide range of biological contexts. In this paper, we present an overview of the typi-cal cation-π interactions in biological systems, the experimental and theoretical investigations on cation-π interactions, as well as the research results on cation-π interactions in our group.

  18. In vitro synergistic activities of essential oils and surfactants in combination with cosmetic preservatives against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrone, Vania; Campana, Raffaella; Vittoria, Emanuela; Baffone, Wally

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate possible synergistic antimicrobial interactions between common cosmetic preservatives and selected essential oils or surfactants. The antimicrobial efficacy of six essential oils, three surfactants and five preservatives against Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 43387 was assessed by a broth micro-dilution assay. MICs for individual and combined antimicrobials were determined and then transformed to fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) indexes. All essential oils exhibited antibacterial activity; among surfactants, bacteria resulted most susceptible to the cationic agent. Synergy was observed when essential oils of eucalyptus and mint were combined with methylparaben against P. aeruginosa, while essential oils of mint, oregano and sage combined with propylparaben and imidazolidinyl urea acted against S. aureus. Many binary mixtures of preservatives and surfactants produced synergistic activity with the most effective interactions involving the cationic and amphoteric compounds under study. FIC indexes demonstrated synergistic effects when preservatives were combined with either essential oils or surfactants against both bacterial strains. These results highlight the potential usefulness of essential oils and surfactants to enhance the activities of conventional biocides. This kind of study should contribute to the selection and optimization of preservative systems for cosmetic preparations.

  19. Tripodal Receptors for Cation and Anion Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuswandi, Bambang; Nuriman,; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2006-01-01

    This review discusses different types of artificial tripodal receptors for the selectiverecognition and sensing of cations and anions. Examples on the relationship between structure andselectivity towards cations and anions are described. Furthermore, their applications as potentiometricion sensing

  20. Features definition exchange cations in sedimentary rocks.

    OpenAIRE

    Bilec'ka V.A.

    2008-01-01

    The research method of determination of exchange cations in calcareous sedimentary rocks of different extractants, the influence of the ratio between the solid and liquid phases on extrusion exchange cations.

  1. Features definition exchange cations in sedimentary rocks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilec'ka V.A.

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The research method of determination of exchange cations in calcareous sedimentary rocks of different extractants, the influence of the ratio between the solid and liquid phases on extrusion exchange cations.

  2. Adsorption of mixed cationic-nonionic surfactant and its effect on bentonite structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaxin Zhang; Yan Zhao; Yong Zhu; Huayong Wu; Hongtao Wang; Wenjing Lu

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption of cationic-nordonic mixed surfactant onto bentonite and its effect on bentonite structure were investigated.The objective was to improve the understanding of surfactant behavior on clay mineral for its possible use in remediation technologies of soil and groundwater contaminated by toxic organic compounds.The cationic surfactant used was hexadecylpyridinium bromide(HDPB),and the nonionic suffactant was Triton X-100(TX100).Adsorption of TX100 was enhanced significantly by the addition of HDPB,but this enhancement decreased with an increase in the fraction of the cationic surfactant.Part of HDPB was replaced by TX100 which decreased the adsorption of HDPB.However,the total adsorbed amount of the mixed surfactant was still increased substantially,indicating the synergistic effect between the cationic and nonionic surfactants.The surfactant-modified bentonite was characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area measurement,Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy,and thermogravimetric-derivative thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyses.Surfactant intercalation was found to decrease the bentonite specific surface area,pore volume,and surface roughness and irregularities,as calculated by nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms.The co-adsorption of the cationic and nonionic surfactants increased the ordering conformation of the adsorbed surfactants on bentonite,but decreased the thermal stability of the organobentonite system.

  3. Modulation of pyridinium cationic lipid-DNA complex properties by pyridinium gemini surfactants and its impact on lipoplex transfection properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vishnu Dutt; Lees, Julia; Hoffman, Nicholas E; Brailoiu, Eugen; Madesh, Muniswamy; Wunder, Stephanie L; Ilies, Marc A

    2014-02-01

    The study presents the effects of blending a cationic gemini surfactant into cationic lipid bilayers and its impact on the plasmid DNA compaction and delivery process. Using nanoDSC, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential, and electrophoretic mobility measurements, together with transfection (2D- and 3D-) and viability assays, we identified the main physicochemical parameters of the lipid bilayers, liposomes, and lipoplexes that are affected by the gemini surfactant addition. We also correlated the cationic bilayer composition with the dynamics of the DNA compaction process and with transfection efficiency, cytotoxicity, and the internalization mechanism of the resultant nucleic acid complexes. We found that the blending of gemini surfactant into the cationic bilayers fluidized the supramolecular assemblies, reduced the amount of positive charge required to fully compact the plasmid DNA and, in certain cases, changed the internalization mechanism of the lipoplexes. The transfection efficiency of select ternary lipoplexes derived from cationic gemini surfactants and lipids was several times superior to the transfection efficiency of corresponding binary lipoplexes, also surpassing standard transfection systems. The overall impact of gemini surfactants into the formation and dynamic of cationic bilayers was found to depend heavily on the presence of colipids, their nature, and amount present in lipoplexes. The study confirmed the possibility of combining the specific properties of pyridinium gemini surfactants and cationic lipids synergistically to obtain efficient synthetic transfection systems with negligible cytotoxicity useful for therapeutic gene delivery. PMID:24377350

  4. Synergistic effects in mixed Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, A.; Holler, B.M.; Molin, Søren;

    2006-01-01

    the pathways governing development of more complex heterogeneous communities. In this study, we established a laboratory model where biofilm-stimulating effects due to interactions between genetically diverse strains of Escherichia coli were monitored. Synergistic induction of biofilm formation resulting from...... the cocultivation of 403 undomesticated E. coli strains with a characterized E. coli K-12 strain was detected at a significant frequency. The survey suggests that different mechanisms underlie the observed stimulation, yet synergistic development of biofilm within the subset of E. coli isolates (n = 56) exhibiting...... the strongest effects was most often linked to conjugative transmission of natural plasmids carried by the E. coli isolates (70%). Thus, the capacity of an isolate to promote the biofilm through cocultivation was (i) transferable to the K-12 strain, (ii) was linked with the acquisition of conjugation genes...

  5. Cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, David; Bowman, Mark P; Zawacky, Steven R; Van Buskirk, Ellor J; Kamarchik, Peter

    2013-07-30

    A cationic electrodepositable coating composition is disclosed. The present invention in directed to a cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising a lignin-containing cationic salt resin, that comprises (A) the reaction product of: lignin, an amine, and a carbonyl compound; (B) the reaction product of lignin, epichlorohydrin, and an amine; or (C) combinations thereof.

  6. Synergistic modeling of call center operations

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    We synergistically apply queueing theory, integer programming, and stochastic simulation to determine an optimal staffing policy for a repair call handling center. A stationary Markovian queueing model is employed to determine minimal staffing levels for a sequence of time intervals with varying call volumes and mean handling times. These staffing requirements populate an integer program model for determining the mix of call agent shifts that will achieve service quality standards at minimum ...

  7. Culture and neuroscience: additive or synergistic?

    OpenAIRE

    Losin, Elizabeth A. Reynolds; DAPRETTO, MIRELLA; Iacoboni, Marco

    2010-01-01

    The investigation of cultural phenomena using neuroscientific methods—cultural neuroscience (CN)—is receiving increasing attention. Yet it is unclear whether the integration of cultural study and neuroscience is merely additive, providing additional evidence of neural plasticity in the human brain, or truly synergistic, yielding discoveries that neither discipline could have achieved alone. We discuss how the parent fields to CN: cross-cultural psychology, psychological anthropology and cogni...

  8. Organometallic cation-exchanged phyllosilicates

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming, Shay

    1991-01-01

    Organotin (IV) complexes formed between 0 01 M dimethyltin dichloride solutions prepared at pH 2 6 and 4 0, and trimethyltin chloride prepared at pH 3 4, with Na- 119 montmori 1lonite clay have been characterised using Sn Mflssbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and water sorption isotherms Following cation exchange, Mttssbauer spectroscopy identified two tin species in the dimethyltin (IV)-exchanged clay prepared at pH 2 6 A cis specie...

  9. Aromatic Amino Acids-Guanidinium Complexes through Cation-π Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Trujillo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Continuing with our interest in the guanidinium group and the different interactions than can establish, we have carried out a theoretical study of the complexes formed by this cation and the aromatic amino acids (phenylalanine, histidine, tryptophan and tyrosine using DFT methods and PCM-water solvation. Both hydrogen bonds and cation-π interactions have been found upon complexation. These interactions have been characterized by means of the analysis of the molecular electron density using the Atoms-in-Molecules approach as well as the orbital interactions using the Natural Bond Orbital methodology. Finally, the effect that the cation-π and hydrogen bond interactions exert on the aromaticity of the corresponding amino acids has been evaluated by calculating the theoretical NICS values, finding that the aromatic character was not heavily modified upon complexation.

  10. Persulfate activation during exertion of total oxidant demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teel, Amy L; Elloy, Farah C; Watts, Richard J

    2016-09-01

    Total oxidant demand (TOD) is a parameter that is often measured during in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) treatability studies. The importance of TOD is based on the concept that the oxidant demand created by soil organic matter and other reduced species must be overcome before contaminant oxidation can proceed. TOD testing was originally designed for permanganate ISCO, but has also recently been applied to activated persulfate ISCO. Recent studies have documented that phenoxides activate persulfate; because soil organic matter is rich in phenolic moieties, it may activate persulfate rather than simply exerting TOD. Therefore, the generation of reactive oxygen species was investigated in three soil horizons of varied soil organic carbon content over 5-day TOD testing. Hydroxyl radical may have been generated during TOD exertion, but was likely scavenged by soil organic matter. A high flux of reductants + nucleophiles (e.g. alkyl radicals + superoxide) was generated as TOD was exerted, resulting in the rapid destruction of the probe compound hexachloroethane and the common groundwater contaminant trichloroethylene (TCE). The results of this research document that, unlike permanganate TOD, contaminant destruction does occur as TOD is exerted in persulfate ISCO systems and is promoted by the activation of persulfate by soil organic matter. Future treatability studies for persulfate ISCO should consider contaminant destruction as TOD is exerted, and the potential for persulfate activation by soil organic matter. PMID:27269993

  11. Comparative study of proteasome inhibitory, synergistic antibacterial, synergistic anticandidal, and antioxidant activities of gold nanoparticles biosynthesized using fruit waste materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Jayanta Kumar; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the biological synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) generated using the aqueous extracts of outer oriental melon peel (OMP) and peach. The synthesized OMP-AuNPs and peach extract (PE)-AuNPs were characterized by ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The surface plasmon resonance spectra were obtained at 545 nm and 540 nm for OMP-AuNPs and PE-AuNPs, respectively. The estimated absolute crystallite size of the synthesized AuNPs was calculated to be 78.11 nm for OMP-AuNPs and 39.90 nm for PE-AuNPs based on the Scherer equation of the X-ray powder diffraction peaks. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results revealed the involvement of bioactive compounds present in OMP and peach extracts in the synthesis and stabilization of synthesized AuNPs. Both the OMP-AuNPs and PE-AuNPs showed a strong antibacterial synergistic activity when combined with kanamycin (9.38–20.45 mm inhibition zones) and rifampicin (9.52–25.23 mm inhibition zones), and they also exerted a strong synergistic anticandidal activity (10.09–15.47 mm inhibition zones) when combined with amphotericin B against five pathogenic Candida species. Both the OMP-AuNPs and PE-AuNPs exhibited a strong antioxidant potential in terms of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydraxyl radical scavenging, nitric oxide scavenging, 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) radical scavenging, and a reducing power, along with a strong proteasome inhibitory potential that could be useful in cancer drug delivery and cancer treatments. The PE-AuNPs showed comparatively higher activity than OMP-AuNPs, which could be attributed to the presence of rich bioactive compounds in the PE that acted as reducing and capping agents in the synthesis of PE-AuNPs. Overall, the results of the current investigation

  12. Type I Interferons Exert Anti-tumor Effect via Reversing Immunosuppression Mediated by Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, Peishun; Chen, Qing; Jiang, Jingting; Xu, Chunliang; Zhang, Jimin; Zheng, Chunxing; Jiang, Menghui; Velletri, Tania; Cao, Wei; Huang, Yin; Yang, Qian; Han, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Liying; Wei, Lixin; Rabson, Arnold B.; Chin, Y. Eugene; Wang, Ying; Shi, Yufang

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are strongly immunosuppressive via producing nitric oxide (NO) and known to migrate into tumor sites to promote tumor growth, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely elusive. Here, we found that IFNα-secreting MSCs showed more dramatic inhibition effect on tumor progression than that of IFNα alone. Interestingly, IFNα-primed MSCs could also effectively suppress tumor growth. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that both IFNα and IFNβ (type I IFNs) reversed the immunosuppressive effect of MSCs on splenocyte proliferation. This effect of type I IFNs was exerted through inhibiting iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) expression in IFNγ and TNFα-stimulated MSCs. Notably, only NO production was inhibited by IFNα; production of other cytokines or chemokines tested was not suppressed. Furthermore, IFNα promoted the switch from Stat1 homodimers to Stat1-Stat2 heterodimers. Studies using the luciferase reporter system and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that IFNα suppressed iNOS transcription through inhibiting the binding of Stat1 to iNOS promoter. Therefore, the synergistic anti-tumor effects of type I IFNs and MSCs were achieved by inhibiting NO production. This study provides essential information for understanding the mechanisms of MSC-mediated immunosuppression and for the development of better clinical strategies using IFNs and MSCs for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27109100

  13. Disulphide cross linked pullulan based cationic polymer for improved gene delivery and efflux pump inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S, Priya S; R, Rekha M

    2016-10-01

    Multidrug resistance is a hurdle to successful cancer chemotherapy. Over expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a prime contributing factor for drug resistance. In this study, a disulphide cross-linked pullulan-based cationic polymer (PPSS) was synthesized to act simultaneously as gene delivery vehicle and efflux pump inhibitor. The PPSS nanoplexes were of size p53/PPSS/DOX nanoplexes was attributed to the synergistic effect of P-gp inhibition and p53 transfection efficiency. Therefore, this multifunctional polymeric system may have significant promise for therapeutic application against cancer drug resistance. PMID:27459414

  14. Use of laser induced photoacoustic spectroscopy (LIPAS) to determine equilibrium constants of cation-cation complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser Induced PhotoAcoustic Spectroscopy (LIPAS) is a relatively new, photothermal technique to examine solutions. Studies in the past have shown it to be more sensitive than conventional absorption spectroscopy, while, yielding the same information thus allowing lower concentrations to be used. This study is using LIPAS to examine solutions to determine the equilibrium constants of cation-cation complexes. It has been found that actinyl(V) cations form cation-cation complexes with a variety of cations, including actinyl(VI) cations. The radioactive nature of the actinide elements requires special handling techniques and also require limits be placed on the amount of material that can be used. The sensitivity of some oxidation states of the actinides to oxygen also presents a problem. Preliminary results will be presented for actinyl(V)-actinyl(VI) cation-cation complexes that were studied using a remote LIPAS system incorporating fiber optics for transmission of laser signals

  15. Forces exerted by jumping children: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moes, C.C.M.; Bakker, H.E.

    1998-01-01

    This article reports on a pilot study of the loads exerted vertically by children when jumping. The subjects of the study were 17 children, aged from two to twelve years. Measurements were made using video recordings and a force-plate. The influence of the stiffness of the base and of jumping with a

  16. Muscle localization of Tc-99m MDP after exertion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valk, P.

    1984-09-01

    Very high muscle uptake of Tc-99m MDP was seen two days after the start of a program of vigorous weight-lifting exercises. Localization of Tc-99m bone tracer in muscle that has been damaged by exertion may be a more common phenomenon than is recognized at present.

  17. The Free Tricoordinated Silyl Cation Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čičak, H.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available As the importance and abundance of silicon in our environment is large, it has been thought that silicon might take the place of carbon in forming a host of similar compounds and silicon-based life. However, until today there is no experimental evidence for such a hypothesis and carbon is still unique among the elements in the vast number and variety of compounds it can form. Also, the corresponding derivatives of the two elements show considerable differences in their chemical properties.The essential debate concerning organosilicon chemistry relates to the existence of the free planar tricoordinated silyl cations in condensed phase (R3Si+, in analogy to carbocations (R3C+ which have been known and characterized as free species. Although silyl cations are thermodynamically more stable than their carbon analogs, they are very reactive due to their high inherent electrophilicity and the ability of hypervalent coordination. On the other hand, stabilization by inductive and hyperconjugative effects and larger steric effects of carbocations make them less sensitive to solvation or other environmental effects than silyl cations. Hence, observation of free silyl cations in the condensed phase proved extremely difficult and the actual problem is the question of the degree of the (remaining silyl cation character.The first free silyl cation, trimesitylsilyl cation, and in analogy with it tridurylsilyl cation, were synthesized by Lambert et al. Free silyl cations based on analogy to aromatic ions (homocyclopropenylium and tropylium have also been prepared. However, in these silyl cations the cationic character is reduced by internal π -conjugation. Čičak et al. prepared some silyl-cationic intermediates (Me3Si--CH≡CR+in solid state. With the help of quantum-mechanical calculations it was concluded that these adducts have much more silyl cation than carbocation character.

  18. Ionothermal synthesis and electrochemical properties of a selenidostannate containing the mixed cations of Na+ and enH+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Cheng-Feng; Li, Jian-Rong; Shen, Nan-Nan; Huang, Xiao-Ying

    2016-06-01

    In this report, by taking advantages of the competitive and synergistic effects of mixed-cations under the ionothermal conditions, a novel selenidostannate compound containing the mixed cations, namely (enH)3Na[Sn3Se7]2·1.5Me2NH·1.5H2O (1, en=ethylenediamine, Me2NH=dimethylamine) was obtained in the presence of the ionic liquid (IL) [DAMS]I (4-N,N-Dimethylamino-4‧-N‧-methylstilbazolium iodide) with a bulky and more structurally rigid organic cation as the main solvent and en as the auxiliary solvent. The compound features anionic [Sn3Se7]n2n- layers that are interconnected by sodium ions to form a three-dimensional (3D) structure. The syntheses, structure, thermal, optical and electrochemical properties of 1 were investigated. 1 showed good thermal stability and a Na+ ion storage property without capacity fading over 150 cycles.

  19. Chitosan-Pectin Synergistic Interaction and Gelation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Mixed gels of chitosan-pectin were prepared by varying the ratio of constituents in the presence of NaCl. Mixed gel at 3% of total polysaccharide concentration with addtion of 12% NaCl showed a synergistic maximum when the ratio of chitosan to pectin was 60 : 40. The effect of the polysaccharide concentration,the preparation temperature(Tp), the time of incubation, balk salt concentration, the molecular weight and the degree of deacetylation of chitosan on gelation have been studied. Interaction mechanism between molecules of both polysaccharides was investigated by FT-IR spectrometry.

  20. Combined treatment of xenon and hypothermia in newborn rats--additive or synergistic effect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemmen Sabir

    Full Text Available Breathing the inert gas Xenon (Xe enhances hypothermic (HT neuroprotection after hypoxia-ischemia (HI in small and large newborn animal models. The underlying mechanism of the enhancement is not yet fully understood, but the combined effect of Xe and HT could either be synergistic (larger than the two effects added or simply additive. A previously published study, using unilateral carotid ligation followed by hypoxia in seven day old (P7 rats, showed that the combination of mild HT (35°C and low Xe concentration (20%, both not being neuroprotective alone, had a synergistic effect and was neuroprotective when both were started with a 4 h delay after a moderate HI insult. To examine whether another laboratory could confirm this finding, we repeated key aspects of the study.After the HI-insult 120 pups were exposed to different post-insult treatments: three temperatures (normothermia (NT NT37°C, HT35°C, HT32°C or Xe concentrations (0%, 20% or 50% starting either immediately or with a 4 h delay. To assess the synergistic potency of Xe-HT, a second set (n = 101 of P7 pups were exposed to either HT35°C+Xe0%, NT+Xe20% or a combination of HT35°C+Xe20% starting with a 4 h delay after the insult. Brain damage was analyzed using relative hemispheric (ligated side/unligated side brain tissue area loss after seven day survival.Immediate HT32°C (p = 0.042, but not HT35°C significantly reduced brain injury compared to NT37°C. As previously shown, adding immediate Xe50% to HT32°C increased protection. Neither 4 h-delayed Xe20%, nor Xe50% at 37°C significantly reduced brain injury (p>0.050. In addition, neither 4 h-delayed HT35°C alone, nor HT35°C+Xe20% reduced brain injury. We found no synergistic effect of the combined treatments in this experimental model.Combining two treatments that individually were ineffective (delayed HT35°C and delayed Xe20% did not exert neuroprotection when combined, and therefore did not show a synergistic

  1. Structural Change of Biomolecules and Application of Synergistic Interaction by Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is expected that motivation and basic technologies for the future R and D plans can be provided from the results of this study. This study has been done to develop fundamentals for radiation applications based on the existing radiation technology, and to establish technical basis for enhancing efficacy of radiation utilization by studying the simultaneous application of ionizing radiation with another factor. Application of radiation technology together with the existing technologies to enhance the physical, chemical, biological characteristics through structural changes of biomolecules will exert a favorable influence on the creation of de novo scientific and industrial values. A theoretical model for the combined action of ionizing radiation with another factor can make it possible to predict a prior the maximum value of synergistic interaction and the conditions for it. Furthermore, the results of this study give a clues for establishment of fundamental theories associated with positive efficacy of radiation applications

  2. Afrikaans Syllabification Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilla Fick

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to English, automatic hyphenation by computer of Afrikaans words is a problem that still needs to be addressed, since errors are still often encountered in printed text. An initial step in this task is the ability to automatically syllabify words. Since new words are created continuously by joining words, it is necessary to develop an “intelligent” technique for syllabification. As a first phase of the research, we consider only the orthographic information of words, and disregard both syntactic and morphological information. This approach allows us to use machine-learning techniques such as artificial neural networks and decision trees that are known for their pattern recognition abilities. Both these techniques are trained with isolated patterns consisting of input patterns and corresponding outputs (or targets that indicate whether the input pattern should be split at a certain position, or not. In the process of compiling a list of syllabified words from which to generate training data for the  syllabification problem, irregular patterns were identified. The same letter patterns are split differently in different words and complete words that are spelled identically are split differently due to meaning. We also identified irregularities in and between  the different dictionaries that we used. We examined the influence range of letters that are involved in irregularities. For example, for their in agter-ente and vaste-rente we have to consider three letters to the left of r to be certain where the hyphen should be inserted. The influence range of the k in verstek-waarde and kleinste-kwadrate is four to the left and three to the right. In an analysis of letter patterns in Afrikaans words we found that the letter e has the highest frequency overall (16,2% of all letters in the word list. The frequency of words starting with s is the highest, while the frequency of words ending with e is the highest. It is important to

  3. Measurement and Relation between Received and Exerted Violence against Partner

    OpenAIRE

    Moral de la Rubia, José; López Rosales, Fuensanta

    2014-01-01

    A female victimization model is often assumed in the study of couple violence, even in general population. In Mexico, a questionnaire of couple violence has been developed. This instrument evaluates suffered and exerted violence. The aims of this paper were to contrast the factor structure of this questionnaire, calculate its internal consistency, describe its distributions, compare means of violence between both sexes and between persons who live or not with their partners, and study the rel...

  4. Cation-selective transporters are critical to the AMPK-mediated antiproliferative effects of metformin in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hao; Zhang, Yunhui; Han, Tianxiang Kevin; Everett, Ruth S; Thakker, Dhiren R

    2016-05-01

    The antidiabetic drug metformin exerts antineoplastic effects against breast cancer and other cancers. One mechanism by which metformin is believed to exert its anticancer effect involves activation of its intracellular target, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is also implicated in the antidiabetic effect of metformin. It is proposed that in cancer cells, AMPK activation leads to inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the downstream pS6K that regulates cell proliferation. Due to its hydrophilic and cationic nature, metformin requires cation-selective transporters to enter cells and activate AMPK. This study demonstrates that expression levels of cation-selective transporters correlate with the antiproliferative and antitumor efficacy of metformin in breast cancer. Metformin uptake and antiproliferative activity were compared between a cation-selective transporter-deficient human breast cancer cell line, BT-20, and a BT-20 cell line that was engineered to overexpress organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3), a representative of cation-selective transporters and a predominant transporter in human breast tumors. Metformin uptake was minimal in BT-20 cells, but increased by >13-fold in OCT3-BT20 cells, and its antiproliferative potency was >4-fold in OCT3-BT20 versus BT-20 cells. This increase in antiproliferative activity was associated with greater AMPK phosphorylation and decreased pS6K phosphorylation in OCT3-BT20 cells. In vitro data were corroborated by in vivo observations of significantly greater antitumor efficacy of metformin in xenograft mice bearing OCT3-overexpressing tumors versus low transporter-expressing wildtype tumors. Collectively, these findings establish a clear relationship between cation-selective transporter expression, the AMPK-mTOR-pS6K signaling cascade, and the antiproliferative activity of metformin in breast cancer. PMID:26669511

  5. Cation-selective transporters are critical to the AMPK-mediated antiproliferative effects of metformin in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hao; Zhang, Yunhui; Han, Tianxiang Kevin; Everett, Ruth S; Thakker, Dhiren R

    2016-05-01

    The antidiabetic drug metformin exerts antineoplastic effects against breast cancer and other cancers. One mechanism by which metformin is believed to exert its anticancer effect involves activation of its intracellular target, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is also implicated in the antidiabetic effect of metformin. It is proposed that in cancer cells, AMPK activation leads to inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the downstream pS6K that regulates cell proliferation. Due to its hydrophilic and cationic nature, metformin requires cation-selective transporters to enter cells and activate AMPK. This study demonstrates that expression levels of cation-selective transporters correlate with the antiproliferative and antitumor efficacy of metformin in breast cancer. Metformin uptake and antiproliferative activity were compared between a cation-selective transporter-deficient human breast cancer cell line, BT-20, and a BT-20 cell line that was engineered to overexpress organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3), a representative of cation-selective transporters and a predominant transporter in human breast tumors. Metformin uptake was minimal in BT-20 cells, but increased by >13-fold in OCT3-BT20 cells, and its antiproliferative potency was >4-fold in OCT3-BT20 versus BT-20 cells. This increase in antiproliferative activity was associated with greater AMPK phosphorylation and decreased pS6K phosphorylation in OCT3-BT20 cells. In vitro data were corroborated by in vivo observations of significantly greater antitumor efficacy of metformin in xenograft mice bearing OCT3-overexpressing tumors versus low transporter-expressing wildtype tumors. Collectively, these findings establish a clear relationship between cation-selective transporter expression, the AMPK-mTOR-pS6K signaling cascade, and the antiproliferative activity of metformin in breast cancer.

  6. Using the synergistic principles for economic development management

    OpenAIRE

    Romanova, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Methodological problems of development of the synergy as a science were researched. The synergistic approach to social-economic system research and its peculiarities were analyzed. The principles of synergistic development of an economy were substantiated. The role of chaos in appearance of dissipative structures on the way to self-organization was researched.

  7. Synergistic solvent extraction of Lutetium(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synergism in the extraction of Lu(III) from thiocyanate solutions has been investigated using mixtures of bis-2-ethylhexyl sulfoxide (B2EHSO) and 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (HTTA) or di-n-octyl sulfoxide (DOSO) or tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in benzene. For comparison, the synergistic extraction of Lu(III) from perchlorate solutions has also been investigated with a mixture of B2EHSO and HTTA. These extraction data have been analyzed theoretically with the aid of a computer by taking into account complexation of the metal in the aqueous phase by inorganic ligands and plausible complexation in the organic phase. The equilibrium constant of the various product species have been deduced by non-linear regression analysis. (author) 18 refs.; 6 figs.; 5 tabs

  8. Localization versus delocalization in diamine radical cations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouwer, A.M.; Wiering, P.G.; Zwier, J.M.;

    1997-01-01

    The optical absorption spectrum of the radical cation of 1,4-diphenylpiperazine 2a shows a strong transition in the near-IR, and only a weak band at 445 nm, in the region where aniline radical cations normally absorb strongly. This indicates that the charge and spin are delocalized over the two...

  9. Tripodal Receptors for Cation and Anion Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David N. Reinhoudt

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses different types of artificial tripodal receptors for the selectiverecognition and sensing of cations and anions. Examples on the relationship between structure andselectivity towards cations and anions are described. Furthermore, their applications as potentiometricion sensing are emphasised, along with their potential applications in optical sensors or optodes.

  10. Design of hemocompatible and antifouling PET sheets with synergistic zwitterionic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanfang; Shen, Jian; Yuan, Jiang

    2016-10-15

    Zwitterionic surface has been proven to be a good candidate for improving hemocompatible and antibiofouling properties. However, it can only passively repel the adsorption of microbes and is unable to kill the adherent or trapped microbes. The purpose of our study is to develop a facile method based on synergy "repel and kill" strategy and prepare dual antifouling and antibacterial surface. Herein, the poly(2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) was first constructed via surface-initiated activators regenerated by electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization (ARGET-ATRP) method, followed by partial quaternization in order to form polycarboxybetaine and polysulfobetaine. The conversion rates of PDMAEMA to polyzwitterions were evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis (XPS). Surface characterizations by ATR-FTIR, XPS, and AFM demonstrated that zwitterionic polymer brushes were successfully grafted. The remained PDMAEMA(weak cationic) and formed zwitterions(neutral) endowed the surface with the synergetic antibacterial and antifouling properties. The resulting PET sheets showed outstanding antifouling property featured by the reduced adhesion of 3T3 fibroblast cells and E. coli. Additionally, these sheets displayed excellent hemocompatibility such as non-cytotoxicity, repelled protein adsorption, reduced platelet adhesion, and prolonged blood blotting time. These synergistic surfaces with neutral zwitterions and weak cations are promising for biomedical applications. PMID:27442148

  11. Role of liposome and peptide in the synergistic enhancement of transfection with a lipopolyplex vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munye, Mustafa M.; Ravi, Jascindra; Tagalakis, Aristides D.; McCarthy, David; Ryadnov, Maxim G.; Hart, Stephen L.

    2015-03-01

    Lipopolyplexes are of widespread interest for gene therapy due to their multifunctionality and high transfection efficiencies. Here we compared the biological and biophysical properties of a lipopolyplex formulation with its lipoplex and polyplex equivalents to assess the role of the lipid and peptide components in the formation and function of the lipopolyplex formulation. We show that peptide efficiently packaged plasmid DNA forming spherical, highly cationic nanocomplexes that are taken up efficiently by cells. However, transgene expression was poor, most likely due to endosomal degradation since the polyplex lacks membrane trafficking properties. In addition the strong peptide-DNA interaction may prevent plasmid release from the complex and so limit plasmid DNA availability. Lipid/DNA lipoplexes, on the other hand, produced aggregated masses that showed poorer cellular uptake than the polyplex but contrastingly greater levels of transgene expression. This may be due to the greater ability of lipoplexes relative to polyplexes to promote endosomal escape. Lipopolyplex formulations formed spherical, cationic nanocomplexes with efficient cellular uptake and significantly enhanced transfection efficiency. The lipopolyplexes combined the optimal features of lipoplexes and polyplexes showing optimal cell uptake, endosomal escape and availability of plasmid for transcription, thus explaining the synergistic increase in transfection efficiency.

  12. Synthesis and Bioactivities of Kanamycin B-Derived Cationic Amphiphiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosso, Marina Y; Shrestha, Sanjib K; Green, Keith D; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2015-12-10

    Cationic amphiphiles derived from aminoglycosides (AGs) have been shown to exhibit enhanced antimicrobial activity. Through the attachment of hydrophobic residues such as linear alkyl chains on the AG backbone, interesting antibacterial and antifungal agents with a novel mechanism of action have been developed. Herein, we report the design and synthesis of seven kanamycin B (KANB) derivatives. Their antibacterial and antifungal activities, along with resistance/enzymatic, hemolytic, and cytotoxicity assays were also studied. Two of these compounds, with a C12 and C14 aliphatic chain attached at the 6″-position of KANB through a thioether linkage, exhibited good antibacterial and antifungal activity, were poorer substrates than KANB for several AG-modifying enzymes, and could delay the development of resistance in bacteria and fungi. Also, they were both relatively less hemolytic than the known membrane targeting antibiotic gramicidin and the known antifungal agent amphotericin B and were not toxic at their antifungal MIC values. Their oxidation to sulfones was also demonstrated to have no effect on their activities. Moreover, they both acted synergistically with posaconazole, an azole currently used in the treatment of human fungal infections. PMID:26592740

  13. Icaritin synergistically enhances the radiosensitivity of 4T1 breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsheng Hong

    Full Text Available Icaritin (ICT is a hydrolytic form of icariin isolated from plants of the genus Epimedium. This study was to investigate the radiosensitization effect of icaritin and its possible underlying mechanism using murine 4T1 breast cancer cells. The combination of Icaritin at 3 µM or 6 µM with 6 or 8 Gy of ionizing radiation (IR in the clonogenic assay yielded an ER (enhancement ratio of 1.18 or 1.28, CI (combination index of 0.38 or 0.19 and DRI (dose reducing index of 2.51 or 5.07, respectively. These strongly suggest that Icaritin exerted a synergistic killing (? effect with radiation on the tumor cells. This effect might relate with bioactivities of ICT: 1 exert an anti-proliferative effect in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which is different from IR killing effect but likely work together with the IR effect; 2 suppress the IR-induced activation of two survival paths, ERK1/2 and AKT; 3 induce the G2/M blockage, enhancing IR killing effect; and 4 synergize with IR to enhance cell apoptosis. In addition, ICT suppressed angiogenesis in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM assay. Taken together, ICT is a new radiosensitizer and can enhance anti-cancer effect of IR or other therapies.

  14. Beyond interfacial anion/cation pairing: The role of Cu(I) coordination chemistry in additive-controlled copper plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We study synergistic and antagonistic ensemble effects of various polymeric suppressor additives and MPS relevant for copper electroplating. ► Type-I suppressors (e.g. PEGs) show a purely antagonistic interaction with MPS. ► Type-II suppressors (e.g. PEIs) show a purely synergistic interaction with MPS. ► Hybrid suppressors (e.g. Imep) reveal both synergistic and antagonistic effects depending on the MPS concentration. ► We identify a combination of Cu(I) coordination chemistry and an inner salt formation as key to the understanding of the suppressing mode of polymeric leveler additives. - Abstract: This study reinvestigates the electrochemical characteristics of three different suppressor additives that are used in context of industrial copper plating (Damascene, Through-Silicon-Via). It is the particular aim of this contribution to further substantiate our recently introduced classification scheme of suppressor chemistries that relies on their antagonistic and synergistic interplay with MPS (mercaptopropane sulfonic acid/sulfonate). The latter appears as intermediate species in the course of copper electrodeposition in the presence of SPS (bis-(sodium-sulfopropyl)-disulfide). Both the linear sweep voltammetry and potential transient experiments reveal a purely antagonistic interaction between PAG (polyalkylene glycol) based suppressor ensembles and the SPS (MPS precursor) which is rationalized in terms of the coordinative dissolution of a hyper-branched PAG-Cu(I)-Cl coordination network by the MPS. Such purely antagonistic suppressor/MPS interplay is our criterion for a so-called type-I suppressor. A purely synergistic suppressor/MPS interaction is observed for the PEI (polyethylene-imine) which can be considered as a prototypical type-II suppressor. Beyond classical interfacial anion/cation pairing the partly protonated, poly-cationic PEI is capable to form MPS-stabilized Cu(I) adducts. Their suppressing effect relies on an in situ hyper

  15. Cationic Bolaamphiphiles for Gene Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Amelia Li Min; Lim, Alisa Xue Ling; Zhu, Yiting; Yang, Yi Yan; Khan, Majad

    2014-05-01

    Advances in medical research have shed light on the genetic cause of many human diseases. Gene therapy is a promising approach which can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to treat genetic diseases at its most fundamental level. In general, nonviral vectors are preferred due to reduced risk of immune response, but they are also commonly associated with low transfection efficiency and high cytotoxicity. In contrast to viral vectors, nonviral vectors do not have a natural mechanism to overcome extra- and intracellular barriers when delivering the therapeutic gene into cell. Hence, its design has been increasingly complex to meet challenges faced in targeting of, penetration of and expression in a specific host cell in achieving more satisfactory transfection efficiency. Flexibility in design of the vector is desirable, to enable a careful and controlled manipulation of its properties and functions. This can be met by the use of bolaamphiphile, a special class of lipid. Unlike conventional lipids, bolaamphiphiles can form asymmetric complexes with the therapeutic gene. The advantage of having an asymmetric complex lies in the different purposes served by the interior and exterior of the complex. More effective gene encapsulation within the interior of the complex can be achieved without triggering greater aggregation of serum proteins with the exterior, potentially overcoming one of the great hurdles faced by conventional single-head cationic lipids. In this review, we will look into the physiochemical considerations as well as the biological aspects of a bolaamphiphile-based gene delivery system.

  16. Cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts bearing phosphine ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Endo, Koji; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of highly active catalysts and the success of ionic liquid immobilized systems have accelerated attention to a new class of cationic metathesis catalysts. We herein report the facile syntheses of cationic ruthenium catalysts bear-ing bulky phosphine ligands. Simple ligand exchange using silver(I) salts of non-coordinating or weakly coordinating anions pro-vided either PPh3 or chelating Ph2P(CH2)nPPh2 (n = 2 or 3) ligated cationic catalysts. The structures of these newly reported...

  17. NEBIVOLOL IN TREATMENT OF STABLE EXERTIONAL ANGINA PECTORIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Gavrilov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate antianginal and antiischemic efficiency of nebivolol in patients with stable angina pectoris.Material and methods. 100 patients with ischemic heart disease showing stable exertional angina pectoris and having no contraindications to beta-blockers were studied. After 5-7 days of control period 50 randomly selected patients began to take nebivolol in initial dose of 5mg once daily and 50 patients started to take metoprolol in initial dose of 50 mg twice daily. Duration of treatment was 8 weeks. Efficiency of treatment was assessed according to the results of control treadmill assessment and control daily ECG monitoring.Results. 56-day therapy with nebivolol at a dose of 7,5 mg per day results in increase in duration of treadmill test before angina or ST depression (p<0.05. Antianginal and antiischemic effect of nebivolol 7.5 mg once daily is rather similar with that of metoprolol in average daily dose of 175 mg. Nebivolol compared to metoprolol significantly (p<0.05 more effectively reduces the number of silent myocardial ischemia.Conclusion. Nebivolol is an efficient antianginal and antiischemic drug for patients with stable exertional angina pectoris.

  18. Physical exertion and working efficiency of reforestation workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Michael D

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to quantify the physical exertion during tree planting work and to examine the relationships between exertion, task efficiency, and productivity. Methods Heart rate (HR was monitored on 34 tree planters while they worked. HR data was collected for a complete working day on 19 subjects and for shorter periods of time on 15 subjects. Video of work tasks was recorded on 22 subjects (video was recorded on 7 of the subjects for whom HR was monitored through a full working day and analyzed for working pace and proportion of time spent on each task. Results HR during a full day (9.0 ± 1.2 hours of tree planting work was 115.2 ± 8.8 beats.min-1, and working HR was 128.2 ± 15.6 beats.min-1 for 82.5 ± 6.8% of the work day. Mean work pace was 452 ± 174 trees.h-1, and the proportion of time spent planting each tree was 53 ± 8% of the working time. Significant (P Conclusions Tree planters work at approximately 65% of age-predicted HRmax, and maintain HR at approximately 59% of HRmax throughout the entire working day. Productivity in these workers appears to be related to effort rather than to experience or task efficiency per se.

  19. Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome in a High School Soccer Player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Bresnahan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS is a relatively rare condition that affects young adult athletes and often causes them to present to the emergency department. If left untreated, those who continue to compete at high levels may experience debilitating leg pain. Physicians may have difficulty differentiating CECS from other syndromes of the lower leg such as medial tibial stress syndrome, stress fractures, and popliteal artery entrapment. The gold standard for diagnosing CECS is intramuscular compartment pressure monitoring before and/or after 10 minutes of exercise. Some patients may choose to stop participation in sports in order to relieve their pain, which otherwise does not respond well to nonoperative treatments. In patients who wish to continue to participate in sports and live an active life, fasciotomy provides relief in 80% or more. The typical athlete can return to training in about 8 weeks. This is a case of a high school soccer player who stopped competing due to chronic exertional compartment syndrome. She had a fascial hernia, resting intramuscular pressure of 30 mmHg, and postexercise intramuscular pressure of 99 mmHg. Following fasciotomy she experienced considerable life improvement and is once again training and playing soccer without symptoms.

  20. Synergistic smart fuel for microstructure mediated measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James A.; Kotter, Dale K.; Ali, Randall A.; Garrett, Steven L.

    2014-02-01

    Advancing the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants requires enhancing our basic understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The two most significant issues limiting the effectiveness and lifespan of the fuel are the loss of thermal conductivity of the fuel and the mechanical strength of both fuel and cladding. The core of a nuclear reactor presents an extremely harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to elevated temperatures and large fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles from radioactive decay processes. The majority of measurements are made in reactors using "radiation hardened" sensors and materials. A different approach has been pursued in this research that exploits high temperatures and materials that are robust with respect to ionizing radiation. This synergistically designed thermoacoustic sensor will be self-powered, wireless, and provide telemetry. The novel sensor will be able to provide reactor process information even if external electrical power and communication are unavailable. In addition, the form-factor for the sensor is identical to the existing fuel rods within reactors and contains no moving parts. Results from initial proof of concept experiments designed to characterize porosity, surface properties and monitor gas composition will be discussed.

  1. Synergistic smart fuel for microstructure mediated measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advancing the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants requires enhancing our basic understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The two most significant issues limiting the effectiveness and lifespan of the fuel are the loss of thermal conductivity of the fuel and the mechanical strength of both fuel and cladding. The core of a nuclear reactor presents an extremely harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to elevated temperatures and large fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles from radioactive decay processes. The majority of measurements are made in reactors using 'radiation hardened' sensors and materials. A different approach has been pursued in this research that exploits high temperatures and materials that are robust with respect to ionizing radiation. This synergistically designed thermoacoustic sensor will be self-powered, wireless, and provide telemetry. The novel sensor will be able to provide reactor process information even if external electrical power and communication are unavailable. In addition, the form-factor for the sensor is identical to the existing fuel rods within reactors and contains no moving parts. Results from initial proof of concept experiments designed to characterize porosity, surface properties and monitor gas composition will be discussed

  2. Synergistic Smart Fuel For Microstructure Mediated Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James A. Smith; Dale K. Kotter; Steven L. Garrett; Randall A. Ali

    2013-07-01

    Advancing the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants requires enhancing our basic understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The two most significant issues limiting the effectiveness and lifespan of the fuel are the loss of thermal conductivity of the fuel and the mechanical strength of both fuel and cladding. The core of a nuclear reactor presents an extremely harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to elevated temperatures and large fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles from radioactive decay processes. The majority of measurements are made in reactors using “radiation hardened” sensors and materials. A different approach has been pursued in this research that exploits high temperatures and materials that are robust with respect to ionizing radiation. This synergistically designed thermoacoustic sensor will be self-powered, wireless, and provide telemetry. The novel sensor will be able to provide reactor process information even if external electrical power and communication are unavailable. In addition, the form-factor for the sensor is identical to the existing fuel rods within reactors and contains no moving parts. Results from initial proof of concept experiments designed to characterize porosity, surface properties and monitor gas composition will be discussed.

  3. Synergistic smart fuel for microstructure mediated measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James A.; Kotter, Dale K. [Idaho National Laboratory, Fuel Performance and Design, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, Idaho, 83415-6188 (United States); Ali, Randall A. [Graduate Program in Acoustics and Applied Research Laboratory, Penn State University, P. . Box 30, M/S 3520D, State College, PA 16804-0030 (United States); Garrett, Steven L. [Graduate Program in Acoustics and Applied Research Laboratory, Penn State University, P.O. Box 30, M/S 3520D, State College, PA 16804-0030 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    Advancing the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants requires enhancing our basic understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The two most significant issues limiting the effectiveness and lifespan of the fuel are the loss of thermal conductivity of the fuel and the mechanical strength of both fuel and cladding. The core of a nuclear reactor presents an extremely harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to elevated temperatures and large fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles from radioactive decay processes. The majority of measurements are made in reactors using 'radiation hardened' sensors and materials. A different approach has been pursued in this research that exploits high temperatures and materials that are robust with respect to ionizing radiation. This synergistically designed thermoacoustic sensor will be self-powered, wireless, and provide telemetry. The novel sensor will be able to provide reactor process information even if external electrical power and communication are unavailable. In addition, the form-factor for the sensor is identical to the existing fuel rods within reactors and contains no moving parts. Results from initial proof of concept experiments designed to characterize porosity, surface properties and monitor gas composition will be discussed.

  4. Combination of miRNA499 and miRNA133 exerts a synergic effect on cardiac differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, Federica; Altomare, Claudia; Cervio, Elisabetta; Barile, Lucio; Rocchetti, Marcella; Ciuffreda, Maria Chiara; Malpasso, Giuseppe; Copes, Francesco; Mura, Manuela; Danieli, Patrizia; Viarengo, Gianluca; Zaza, Antonio; Gnecchi, Massimiliano

    2015-04-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that miRNA are involved in cardiac development, stem cell maintenance, and differentiation. In particular, it has been shown that miRNA133, miRNA1, and miRNA499 are involved in progenitor cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes. However, it is unknown whether different miRNA may act synergistically to improve cardiac differentiation. We used mouse P19 cells as a cardiogenic differentiation model. miRNA499, miRNA1, or miRNA133 were transiently over-expressed in P19 cells individually or in different combinations. The over-expression of miRNA499 alone increased the number of beating cells and the association of miRNA499 with miRNA133 exerted a synergistic effect, further increasing the number of beating cells. Real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that the combination of miRNA499 + 133 enhanced the expression of cardiac genes compared with controls. Western blot and immunocytochemistry for connexin43 and cardiac troponin T confirmed these findings. Importantly, caffeine responsiveness, a clear functional parameter of cardiac differentiation, was increased by miRNA499 in association with miRNA133 and was directly correlated with the activation of the cardiac troponin I isoform promoter. Cyclic contractions were reversibly abolished by extracellular calcium depletion, nifedipine, ryanodine, and IP3R blockade. Finally, we demonstrated that the use of miRNA499 + 133 induced cardiac differentiation even in the absence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Our results show that the areas spontaneously contracting possess electrophysiological and pharmacological characteristics compatible with true cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. The translational relevance of our findings was reinforced by the demonstration that the over-expression of miRNA499 and miRNA133 was also able to induce the differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells toward the cardiac lineage. PMID:25534971

  5. Toxic effect of metal cation binary mixtures to the seaweed Gracilaria domingensis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Luiz Fernando; Stevani, Cassius Vinicius; Zambotti-Villela, Leonardo; Yokoya, Nair Sumie; Colepicolo, Pio

    2014-01-01

    The macroalga Gracilaria domingensis is an important resource for the food, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and biotechnology industries. G. domingensis is at a part of the food web foundation, providing nutrients and microelements to upper levels. As seaweed storage metals in the vacuoles, they are considered the main vectors to magnify these toxic elements. This work describes the evaluation of the toxicity of binary mixtures of available metal cations based on the growth rates of G. domingensis over a 48-h exposure. The interactive effects of each binary mixture were determined using a toxic unit (TU) concept that was the sum of the relative contribution of each toxicant and calculated using the ratio between the toxicant concentration and its endpoint. Mixtures of Cd(II)/Cu(II) and Zn(II)/Ca(II) demonstrated to be additive; Cu(II)/Zn(II), Cu(II)/Mg(II), Cu(II)/Ca(II), Zn(II)/Mg(II), and Ca(II)/Mg(II) mixtures were synergistic, and all interactions studied with Cd(II) were antagonistic. Hypotheses that explain the toxicity of binary mixtures at the molecular level are also suggested. These results represent the first effort to characterize the combined effect of available metal cations, based on the TU concept on seaweed in a total controlled medium. The results presented here are invaluable to the understanding of seaweed metal cation toxicity in the marine environment, the mechanism of toxicity action and how the tolerance of the organism.

  6. Cation locations and dislocations in zeolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Luis James

    The focus of this dissertation is the extra-framework cation sites in a particular structural family of zeolites, chabazite. Cation sites play a particularly important role in the application of these sieves for ion exchange, gas separation, catalysis, and, when the cation is a proton, acid catalysis. Structural characterization is commonly performed through the use of powder diffraction and Rietveld analysis of powder diffraction data. Use of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance, in the study of the local order of the various constituent nuclei of zeolites, complements well the long-range order information produced by diffraction. Recent developments in solid state NMR techniques allow for increased study of disorder in zeolites particularly when such phenomena test the detection limits of diffraction. These two powerful characterization techniques, powder diffraction and NMR, offer many insights into the complex interaction of cations with the zeolite framework. The acids site locations in SSZ-13, a high silica chabazite, and SAPO-34, a silicoaluminophosphate with the chabazite structure, were determined. The structure of SAPO-34 upon selective hydration was also determined. The insensitivity of X-rays to hydrogen was avoided through deuteration of the acid zeolites and neutron powder diffraction methods. Protons at inequivalent positions were found to have different acid strengths in both SSZ-13 and SAPO-34. Other light elements are incorporated into zeolites in the form of extra-framework cations, among these are lithium, sodium, and calcium. Not amenable by X-ray powder diffraction methods, the positions of such light cations in fully ion-exchanged versions of synthetic chabazite were determined through neutron powder diffraction methods. The study of more complex binary cation systems were conducted. Powder diffraction and solid state NMR methods (MAS, MQMAS) were used to examine cation site preferences and dislocations in these mixed-akali chabazites

  7. Cycloaliphatic epoxide resins for cationic UV - cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces the cyclo - aliphatic epoxide resins used for the various applications of radiation curing and their comparison with acrylate chemistry. Radiation curable coatings and inks are pre - dominantly based on acrylate chemistry but over the last few years, cationic chemistry has emerged successfully with the unique properties inherent with cyclo - aliphatic epoxide ring structures. Wide variety of cationic resins and diluents, the formulation techniques to achieve the desired properties greatly contributes to the advancement of UV - curing technology

  8. Cations and activated sludge floc structure

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Chul

    2002-01-01

    This research was designed to investigate the effect of cations on activated sludge characteristics and also to determine their influence on digestion performance. For this purpose, cations in solution and in floc were evaluated along with various activated sludge characteristics and the collected waste activated sludge underwent both anaerobic and aerobic digestion. It was found that large amounts of biopolymer (protein + polysaccharide) remained in the effluent of WWTP that received high in...

  9. Test procedure for cation exchange chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this test plan is to demonstrate the synthesis of inorganic antimonate ion exchangers and compare their performance against the standard organic cation exchangers. Of particular interest is the degradation rate of both inorganic and organic cation exchangers. This degradation rate will be tracked by determining the ion exchange capacity and thermal stability as a function of time, radiation dose, and chemical reaction

  10. Silica-based cationic bilayers as immunoadjuvants

    OpenAIRE

    Carmona-Ribeiro Ana M; da Costa Maria; Faquim-Mauro Eliana; Santana Mariana RA; Lincopan Nilton

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Silica particles cationized by dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) bilayer were previously described. This work shows the efficiency of these particulates for antigen adsorption and presentation to the immune system and proves the concept that silica-based cationic bilayers exhibit better performance than alum regarding colloid stability and cellular immune responses for vaccine design. Results Firstly, the silica/DODAB assembly was characterized at 1 mM NaCl, pH 6...

  11. Synergistic Antimicrobial Effect of Tribulus terrestris and Bitter Almond Extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Hamid Abtahi; Ali Ghazavi; Masode Karimi

    2014-01-01

    Background: The antimicrobial effects of the extracts of different kinds of plants have been demonstrated in several studies. However, no study has been conducted so far on the synergistic effects of two herbal extracts on their germicidal effects. In this study, in addition to antibacterial effects of the aqueous, methanol or ethanol extracts of Tribulus terrestris and bitter almond on some bacteria, the synergistic effects of the extracts of these two plants were also evaluated. Material...

  12. Synergistic effect of propolis and antibiotics on the Salmonella Typhi

    OpenAIRE

    Orsi Ricardo de Oliveira; Sforcin José Maurício; Funari Silvia Regina Cunha; Fernandes Junior Ary; Bankova Vassya

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this work was to investigate a possible synergistic effect between ethanolic extracts of propolis from Brazil and Bulgaria and some antibiotics (Amoxicillin, Ampicillin and Cefalexin) against Salmonella Typhi. Brazilian and Bulgarian propolis showed an antibacterial action, but the sample from Bulgaria was shown to be more efficient. Both samples showed a similar synergistic effect with these antibiotics. One may conclude that the propolis samples show an important antibacterial a...

  13. Mice Perceive Synergistic Umami Mixtures as Tasting Sweet

    OpenAIRE

    Saites, Louis N.; Goldsmith, Zachary; Densky, Jaron; Guedes, Vivian A.; Boughter, John D

    2015-01-01

    Previous electrophysiological investigation shows that combinations of compounds classified by humans as umami-tasting, such as glutamate salts and 5′-ribonucleotides, elicit synergistic responses in neurons throughout the rodent taste system and produce a pattern that resembles responses to sweet compounds. The current study tested the hypothesis that a synergistic mixture of monopotassium glutamate (MPG) and inositol monophosphate (IMP) possesses perceptual similarity to sucrose in mice. We...

  14. Methylprednisolone exerts neuroprotective effects by regulating autophagy and apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Gao; Shu-rui Chen; Meng-yao Wu; Kai Gao; Yuan-long Li; Hong-yu Wang; Chen-yuan Li; Hong Li

    2016-01-01

    Methylprednisolone markedly reduces autophagy and apoptosis after secondary spinal cord injury. Here, we investigated whether pretreat-ment of cells with methylprednisolone would protect neuron-like cells from subsequent oxidative damagevia suppression of autophagy and apoptosis. Cultured N2a cells were pretreated with 10 µM methylprednisolone for 30 minutes, then exposed to 100 µM H2O2 for 24 hours. Inverted phase contrast microscope images, MTT assay, lfow cytometry and western blot results showed that, compared to cells ex-posed to 100 µM H2O2 alone, cells pretreated with methylprednisolone had a signiifcantly lower percentage of apoptotic cells, maintained a healthy morphology, and showed downregulation of autophagic protein light chain 3B and Beclin-1 protein expression. These ifndings indicate that methylprednisolone exerted neuroprotective effects against oxidative damage by suppressing autophagy and apoptosis.

  15. DCP-LA Exerts an Antiaging Action on the Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the possibility for the linoleic acid derivative 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA) as an antiaging compound for the skin by assaying senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal), a biomarker of senescence and cell viability. The nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) increased in SA-β-Gal-positive cells in cultured human fibroblasts and mouse keratinocytes, and DCP-LA significantly inhibited the effect of SNP. Moreover, SNP induced cell death in cultured mouse keratinocytes, and DCP-LA significantly prevented NO stress-induced death of keratinocytes. Taken together, these results indicate that DCP-LA exerts an antiaging action on the skin. PMID:27310436

  16. DCP-LA Exerts an Antiaging Action on the Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the possibility for the linoleic acid derivative 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA) as an antiaging compound for the skin by assaying senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal), a biomarker of senescence and cell viability. The nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) increased in SA-β-Gal-positive cells in cultured human fibroblasts and mouse keratinocytes, and DCP-LA significantly inhibited the effect of SNP. Moreover, SNP induced cell death in cultured mouse keratinocytes, and DCP-LA significantly prevented NO stress-induced death of keratinocytes. Taken together, these results indicate that DCP-LA exerts an antiaging action on the skin.

  17. Spinal cord stimulation exerts neuroprotective effects against experimental Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiko Shinko

    Full Text Available In clinical practice, deep brain stimulation (DBS is effective for treatment of motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD. However, the mechanisms have not been understood completely. There are some reports that electrical stimulation exerts neuroprotective effects on the central nervous system diseases including cerebral ischemia, head trauma, epilepsy and PD, although there are a few reports on neuroprotective effects of spinal cord stimulation (SCS. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of high cervical SCS on PD model of rats. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats received hour-long SCS (2, 50 or 200 Hz with an epidural electrode at C1-2 level for 16 consecutive days. At 2 days after initial SCS, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA was injected into the right striatum of rats. Behavioral evaluations of PD symptoms were employed, including cylinder test and amphetamine-induced rotation test performed at 1 and 2 weeks after 6-OHDA injection. Animals were subsequently euthanized for immunohistochemical investigations. In order to explore neurotrophic and growth factor upregulation induced by SCS, another cohort of rats that received 50 Hz SCS was euthanized at 1 and 2 weeks after lesion for protein assays. Behavioral tests revealed that the number of amphetamine-induced rotations decreased in SCS groups. Immunohistochemically, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-positive fibers in the striatum were significantly preserved in SCS groups. TH-positive neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta were significantly preserved in 50 Hz SCS group. The level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF was upregulated by SCS at 1 week after the lesion. These results suggest that high cervical SCS exerts neuroprotection in PD model of rats, at least partially by upregulation of VEGF. SCS is supposed to suppress or delay PD progression and might become a less invasive option for PD patients, although further preclinical and clinical investigations are needed to confirm the

  18. Preparation, characterization, and evaluation of antitumor effect of Brucea javanica oil cationic nanoemulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting-Ting; Mu, Li-Qiu; Dai, Wei; Wang, Chuan-Bang; Liu, Xin-Yi; Xiang, Da-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare Brucea javanica oil cationic nanoemulsions (BJO-CN) with BJO as drug as well as oil phase and chitosan as cationic inducer, to explore the practical suitability of using cationic nanoemulsions for oral delivery of mixed oil, and to test its bioavailability and antitumor effect. BJO-CN was prepared by chitosan solution stirring method and then characterized physicochemically. The obtained BJO-CN had a spherical morphology with a positive zeta potential of 18.9 mV and an average particle size of 42.36 nm, showing high colloidal stability. The drug loading of BJO-CN was 91.83 mg·mL(-1), determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with precolumn derivatization. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed that, compared with BJO emulsion (BJO-E) (the dosage of BJO-CN and BJO-E was equal to 505 mg·kg(-1), calculated by oleic acid), BJO-CN exhibited a significant increase in the area under the plasma drug concentration-time curve over the period of 24 hours and relative bioavailability was 1.6-fold. Furthermore, the antitumor effect of BJO-CN in the orthotopic mouse model of lung cancer was evaluated by recording the median survival time and the weight of lung tissue with tumor, hematoxylin and eosin staining, and immunohistochemical technique. Results of anticancer experiments illustrated that, even though the administrated dosage in the BJO-CN group was half of that in the BJO-E group, BJO-CN exhibited similar antitumor effect to BJO-E. Moreover, BJO-CN had good synergistic effect in combination therapy with vinorelbine. These results suggested that cationic nanoemulsions are an effective and promising delivery system to enhance the oral bioavailability and anticancer effect of BJO. PMID:27330293

  19. Innate cation sensitivity in a semiconducting polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althagafi, Talal M; Algarni, Saud A; Grell, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Water-gated organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) using the hole transporting semiconducting polymer, poly(2,5-bis(3-hexadecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) (PBTTT), show an innate response of their threshold voltage to the addition of divalent metal cations to the gating water, without deliberately introducing an ion-sensitive component. A similar threshold response is shown for several divalent cations, but is absent for monovalent cations. Response is absent for transistors using the inorganic semiconductor ZnO, or the similar organic semiconductor poly(3-hexylthiophene) (rrP3HT), instead of PBTTT. We assign innate cation sensitivity to residues of the organometallic Pd(0) complex used as catalyst in PBTTT synthesis which bears strong resemblance to typical metal chelating agents. Organometallic Pd(0) residues are absent from ZnO, and also from rrP3HT which is polymerised with a different type of catalyst. However, when Pd(0) complex is deliberately added to rrP3HT casting solutions, resulting OTFTs also display threshold response to a divalent cation. PMID:27343580

  20. Screeninq on Synergist of Bacillus thuringiensis Wettable Powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donghua GE; Xiaohong ZHANG; Ziyan NANGONG; Ping SONG; Qinying WANG; Keqiang CAO

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] This study aimed to screen the best synergistic material for Bt wettable powder and evaluate their synergistic effect. [Method] The synergism of six different kinds of additives for Bacillus thuringiensis wettable powder (Bt WP) on the 2^nd instar larvae of Plutella xylostella was tested by method of leaf dipping in labora- tory. [Result] The mixtures of Bt with 0.1% ZnCl2, 0.5% ZnCl2, 1.0% ZnCl2, 1.0% MgCI2, 0.5% boric acid, 1.0% boric acid, 0.5% citric acid or 1.0% citric acid all ex- hibited synergistic effect, in which the synergistic effect of mixture containing 0.5% boric acid was the highest, with 17.2 synergistic ratio; followed by the mixture containing 1.0% ZnCl2, with 15.6 synergistic ratio. Moreover, addition of 0.5% boric acid could shorten the median lethal time of Bt wettable powder by about 10 h. After the mixtures of Bt with 0.5% boracic acid or 1.0% ZnCl2 was stored for 15 d at room temperature, toxicities of the two mixtures did not change significantly. [Conclusion] Boracic acid as the synergist of Bt wettable powder could not only increase insecti- cidal effect of Bt, but also accelerate its insecticidal rate. So, boracic acid could improve the disadvantages of Bt wettable powder such as poor insecticidal effect and slow insecticidal speed in a certain degree.

  1. Transplantation of Human Neural Stem Cells in a Parkinsonian Model Exerts Neuroprotection via Regulation of the Host Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Fu-Xing; Bao, Xin-Jie; Sun, Xi-Cai; Wu, Jun; Bai, Qing-Ran; Chen, Guo; Li, Xue-Yuan; Zhou, Qiang-Yi; Yang, Yuan-Fan; Shen, Qin; Wang, Ren-Zhi

    2015-11-05

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons and consequent dopamine (DA) deficit, and current treatment still remains a challenge. Although neural stem cells (NSCs) have been evaluated as appealing graft sources, mechanisms underlying the beneficial phenomena are not well understood. Here, we investigate whether human NSCs (hNSCs) transplantation could provide neuroprotection against DA depletion by recruiting endogenous cells to establish a favorable niche. Adult mice subjected to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) were transplanted with hNSCs or vehicle into the striatum. Behavioral and histological analyses demonstrated significant neurorescue response observed in hNSCs-treated animals compared with the control mice. In transplanted animals, grafted cells survived, proliferated, and migrated within the astrocytic scaffold. Notably, more local astrocytes underwent de-differentiation, acquiring the properties of NSCs or neural precursor cells (NPCs) in mice given hNSCs. Additionally, we also detected significantly higher expression of host-derived growth factors in hNSCs-transplanted mice compared with the control animals, together with inhibition of local microglia and proinflammatory cytokines. Overall, our results indicate that hNSCs transplantation exerts neuroprotection in MPTP-insulted mice via regulating the host niche. Harnessing synergistic interaction between the grafts and host cells may help optimize cell-based therapies for PD.

  2. Forging Colloidal Nanostructures via Cation Exchange Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Among the various postsynthesis treatments of colloidal nanocrystals that have been developed to date, transformations by cation exchange have recently emerged as an extremely versatile tool that has given access to a wide variety of materials and nanostructures. One notable example in this direction is represented by partial cation exchange, by which preformed nanocrystals can be either transformed to alloy nanocrystals or to various types of nanoheterostructures possessing core/shell, segmented, or striped architectures. In this review, we provide an up to date overview of the complex colloidal nanostructures that could be prepared so far by cation exchange. At the same time, the review gives an account of the fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic parameters governing these types of reactions, as they are currently understood, and outlines the main open issues and possible future developments in the field. PMID:26891471

  3. Effect of radiation exerted to creep rate of resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the high performance composite materials which became to be manufactured by the progress of working techniques and the improvement of material performance is fiber-reinforced plastics (FRP). Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP) are used as space and aircraft material, and glass fiber-reinforced plastics (GFRP) are expected as the structural material for superconducting magnets in nuclear fusion. In these materials, the use for long term must be considered, and the creep characteristics, of resin should be taken as one of the design factors. Therefore, the effect that radiation exerted to the stress relaxation of epoxy resin was measured, and its mechanism was investigated. The sample was bisphenol F system epoxy. The measurements of DSC, dynamic viscoelasticity and stress relaxation were carried out. The stress relaxation in bisphenol F system epoxy resin occurred down to 10 % of the initial stress only at 3 MGy. This is the dose far lower than the life in the radiation resistance of this resin. It is considered that the stress relaxation of the resin was caused by the change in molecular structure instead of the cut of molecular chain, as energy was given to the microscopic region by the interaction with radiation. (K.I.)

  4. Selective Mitochondrial Targeting Exerts Anxiolytic Effects In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaumer, Markus; Asara, John M; Teplytska, Larysa; Murphy, Michael P; Logan, Angela; Turck, Christoph W; Filiou, Michaela D

    2016-06-01

    Current treatment strategies for anxiety disorders are predominantly symptom-based. However, a third of anxiety patients remain unresponsive to anxiolytics highlighting the need for more effective, mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. We have previously compared high vs low anxiety mice and identified changes in mitochondrial pathways, including oxidative phosphorylation and oxidative stress. In this work, we show that selective pharmacological targeting of these mitochondrial pathways exerts anxiolytic effects in vivo. We treated high anxiety-related behavior (HAB) mice with MitoQ, an antioxidant that selectively targets mitochondria. MitoQ administration resulted in decreased anxiety-related behavior in HAB mice. This anxiolytic effect was specific for high anxiety as MitoQ treatment did not affect the anxiety phenotype of C57BL/6N and DBA/2J mouse strains. We furthermore investigated the molecular underpinnings of the MitoQ-driven anxiolytic effect and found that MitoQ treatment alters the brain metabolome and that the response to MitoQ treatment is characterized by distinct molecular signatures. These results indicate that a mechanism-driven approach based on selective mitochondrial targeting has the potential to attenuate the high anxiety phenotype in vivo, thus paving the way for translational implementation as long-term MitoQ administration is well-tolerated with no reported side effects in mice and humans. PMID:26567514

  5. Multiple Mechanisms of Anti-Cancer Effects Exerted by Astaxanthin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Astaxanthin (ATX is a xanthophyll carotenoid which has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA as food colorant in animal and fish feed. It is widely found in algae and aquatic animals and has powerful anti-oxidative activity. Previous studies have revealed that ATX, with its anti-oxidative property, is beneficial as a therapeutic agent for various diseases without any side effects or toxicity. In addition, ATX also shows preclinical anti-tumor efficacy both in vivo and in vitro in various cancer models. Several researches have deciphered that ATX exerts its anti-proliferative, anti-apoptosis and anti-invasion influence via different molecules and pathways including signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ. Hence, ATX shows great promise as chemotherapeutic agents in cancer. Here, we review the rapidly advancing field of ATX in cancer therapy as well as some molecular targets of ATX.

  6. Formwork pressure exerted by self-consolidating concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omran, Ahmed Fathy

    Self-consolidating concrete (SCC) is an emerging technology that utilizes flowable concrete that eliminates the need for consolidation. The advantages of SCC lie in a remarkable reduction of the casting time, facilitating the casting of congested and complex structural elements, possibility to reduce labor demand, elimination of mechanical vibrations and noise, improvement of surface appearance, producing a better and premium concrete product. The research focussed on capturing existing knowledge and making recommendations for current practice. An experimental program was undertaken at the Universite de Sherbrooke to evaluate the lateral pressure developed by SCC mixtures. A portable devise (UofS2 pressure column) for measuring and predicting lateral pressure and its rate of decay of SCC was developed and validated. The UofS2 pressure column is cast with 0.5 m high fresh concrete and air pressure is introduced from the top to simulate casting depth up to 13 m. Then, develop and implement test method for field evaluation of relevant plastic and thixotropic properties of SCC that affect formwork pressure were done. Portable vane (PV) test based on the hand-held vane test method used to determine the undrained shear strength property of clay soil was the first setup as well as the inclined plane (IP) test. The IP device involves slumping a small concrete cylinder on a horizontal plate and then lifting up the plate at different durations of rest until the slumped sample starts to move. Identifying role of material constituents, mix design, concrete placement characteristics (casting rate, waiting periods between lifts, and casting depth), temperature, and formwork characteristics that have major influence on formwork pressure exerted by SCC were evaluated in laboratory and validated by actual field measurements. Relating the maximum lateral pressure and its rate of decay to the plastic properties of SCC were established. In the analytical part of the research

  7. Basic research on solvent extraction of actinide cations with diamide compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Yuji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-11-01

    Newly synthesized 4 diamide compounds were tested for solvent extraction of actinide cations. It is obvious that N,N`-dimethyl-N,N`-dihexyl-3-oxapentanediamide (DMDHOPDA) can extract Eu(III), Th(IV), U(VI), Np(V), and Am(III) into organic solvent. Other 3 diamides hardly extract actinide ions, which is supposed that the reasons come from the difference of their chemical structures. In the synergistic extraction with a diamide and thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA), all diamides work as a extractant. Furthermore, by examining extracted species, it was confirmed that there are 4 kinds of chemical species of actinides with diamide and TTA. Finally, the mutual separation method of actinide (III), (IV), (V) and (VI) ions by solvent extraction using DMDHOPDA and TTA were developed. (author). 147 refs.

  8. Cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crivello, J.V.

    1992-10-01

    The objectives of this project are to design and synthesize novel monomers which orginate from renewable biological sources and to carry out their rapid, efficient, pollution-free and energy efficient cationic polymerization to useful products under the influence of ultraviolet light or heat. A summary of the results of the past year's research on cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources is presented. Three major areas of investigation corresponding to the different classes of naturally occurring starting materials were investigated; epoxidized terpenes and natural rubber and vinyl ethers from alcohols and carbohydrates.

  9. Mixed cation effect in sodium aluminosilicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, John C.;

    , network structure, and the resistances associated with the deformation processes in mixed cation glasses by partially substituting magnesium for calcium and calcium for lithium in sodium aluminosilicate glasses. We use Raman and 27Al NMR spectroscopies to obtain insights into the structural...... and topological features of these glasses and we use AFM to quantify the resistances associated with each deformation process under Vickers indentation. We demonstrate that the mixed cation effect manifests itself as a maximum in the amount of bonded tetrahedral units and as a minimum in liquid fragility index...

  10. Cation Effect on Copper Chemical Mechanical Polishing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liang-Yong; LIU Bo; SONG Zhi-Tang; FENG Song-Lin

    2009-01-01

    We examine the effect of cations in solutions containing benzotriazole (BTA) and H2O2 on copper chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). On the base of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and material removal rate (MRR) results, it is found that ammonia shows the highest MRR as well as good surface after CMP, while KOH demon-strates the worst performance. These results reveal a mechanism that sma//molecules with lone-pairs rather than molecules with steric effect and common inorganic cations are better for copper CMP process, which is indirectly confirmed by open circuit potential (OCP).

  11. Dissection of a single rat muscle-tendon complex changes joint moments exerted by neighboring muscles: implications for invasive surgical interventions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huub Maas

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate mechanical functioning of a single skeletal muscle, active within a group of (previously synergistic muscles. For this purpose, we assessed wrist angle-active moment characteristics exerted by a group of wrist flexion muscles in the rat for three conditions: (i after resection of the upper arm skin; (ii after subsequent distal tenotomy of flexor carpi ulnaris muscle (FCU; and (iii after subsequent freeing of FCU distal tendon and muscle belly from surrounding tissues (MT dissection. Measurements were performed for a control group and for an experimental group after recovery (5 weeks from tendon transfer of FCU to extensor carpi radialis (ECR insertion. To assess if FCU tenotomy and MT dissection affects FCU contributions to wrist moments exclusively or also those of neighboring wrist flexion muscles, these data were compared to wrist angle-moment characteristics of selectively activated FCU. FCU tenotomy and MT dissection decreased wrist moments of the control group at all wrist angles tested, including also angles for which no or minimal wrist moments were measured when activating FCU exclusively. For the tendon transfer group, wrist flexion moment increased after FCU tenotomy, but to a greater extent than can be expected based on wrist extension moments exerted by selectively excited transferred FCU. We conclude that dissection of a single muscle in any surgical treatment does not only affect mechanical characteristics of the target muscle, but also those of other muscles within the same compartment. Our results demonstrate also that even after agonistic-to-antagonistic tendon transfer, mechanical interactions with previously synergistic muscles do remain present.

  12. Competitive and synergistic effects in pH dependent phosphate adsorption in soils: LCD modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Liping; Vega, Flora Alonso; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H

    2011-10-01

    The pH dependency of soluble phosphate in soil was measured for six agricultural soils over a pH range of 3-10. A mechanistic model, the LCD (ligand charge distribution) model, was used to simulate this change, which considers phosphate adsorption to metal (hydr)oxides in soils under the influence of natural organic matter (NOM) and polyvalent cations (Ca(2+), Al(3+), and Fe(3+)). For all soils except one, the description in the normal pH range 5-8 is good. For some soils at more extreme pH values (for low P-loading soils at low pH and for high P-loading soils at high pH), the model over predicts soluble P. The calculation shows that adsorption is the major mechanism controlling phosphate solubility in soils, except at high pH in high P-loading soils where precipitation of calcium phosphate may take place. NOM and polyvalent cations have a very strong effect on the concentration level of P. The pattern of pH dependency of soluble P in soils differs greatly from the pH effects on phosphate adsorption to synthetic metal (hydr)oxides in a monocomponent system. According to the LCD model, the pH dependency in soil is mainly caused by the synergistic effects of Ca(2+) adsorption to oxides. Adsorption of Al(3+) to NOM adsorbed plays an important role only at a pH < 4.5. Presence of NOM coating strongly competes with phosphate for the adsorption and is an important factor to consider in modeling phosphate adsorption in natural samples.

  13. Synergistic effects of prostaglandin E1 and lithium in a rat model of cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong RAN; Bo GAO; Rui SHENG; Li-sha ZHANG; Hui-lin ZHANG; Zhen-lun GU; Zheng-hong QIN

    2008-01-01

    Aim:Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are important regulators of cellular survival and exert neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemia.Both prostaglandin El (PGEI) and lithium have been reported to protect neurons against ischemic injury.The present study was undertaken to examine if lithium could potentiate the neuroprotection of PGE 1 against cerebral ischemia,and if the synergetic effects take place at the level of HSPs.Methods:Brain ischemia was induced by a permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) in rats.Rats were pretreated with subcutaneous injection of lithium for 2 d and a single intravenous administration of PGEI immediately after ischemic insult.Cerebrocortical blood flow of each group was closely monitored prior to onset of ischemia,5 min,15 rain,30 min and 60 min after surgical operation.Body temperature was measured before,5 min,2 h and 24 h after the onset of pMCAO.The infarct volume,brain edema and motor behavior deficits were analyzed 24 h after ischemic insult.Cytoprotective HSP70 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the striatum of the ipsilateral hemisphere were detected by immunoblotting.Brain sections from the striatum of the ipsilateral hemisphere were double-labeled with the anti-HSP70 antibody and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI).Results:Treatment with PGEI (8 and 16 ~tg/kg,iv) or lithium (0.5 mEq/kg,sc) alone reduced infarct volume,neurological deficits and brain edema induced by focal cerebral ischemia in rats.Moreover,a greater neuroprotection was observed when PGEI and lithium were given together.Co-administration of PGE1 and lithium significantly upregulated cytoprotective HSP70 and HO-1 protein levels.Conclusion:Lithium and PGEI may exert synergistic effects in treatment of cerebral ischemia and thus may have potential clinical value for the treatment of stroke.

  14. Synergistic Potentials of Coffee on Injured Pancreatic Islets and Insulin Action via KATP Channel Blocking in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Youn Hee; Hong, Bin Na; Rodriguez, Isabel; Ji, Min Gun; Kim, Keonwoo; Kim, Ung-Jin; Kang, Tong Ho

    2015-06-17

    Pancreatic islets (PIs) are damaged under diabetic conditions, resulting in decreased PI size. This study examined the regenerative effects of coffee and its components (caffeine, CFI; trigonelline, TRG; chlorogenic acid, CGA) on zebrafish larval PIs and β-cells damaged by administration of alloxan (AX). In addition, the influence of coffee and its active components on KATP channels was investigated using diazoxide (DZ) as a KATP channel activator. PI size and fluorescence intensity were significantly increased in the coffee-treated group relative to the no-treatment group (P coffee exerted significant regenerative effects on pancreatic β-cells (p = 0.006). Treatment with TRG and CGA rescued PI damage, and the combination of TRG/CGA had a synergistic effect. In conclusion, the results indicate that coffee has beneficial effects on AX-damaged PIs and may also be useful as a blocker of pancreatic β-cell K(+) channels.

  15. Qualitative dimensions of exertional dyspnea in adults with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quon, Bradley S; Wilkie, Sabrina S; Ramsook, Andrew H; Schaeffer, Michele R; Puyat, Joseph H; Wilcox, Pearce G; Guenette, Jordan A

    2016-08-01

    No studies of cystic fibrosis (CF) have systematically characterized the evolution of the qualitative dimensions of exertional dyspnea. Adults with CF (n = 25) and control individuals matched for sex, age, and body mass index (n = 25) underwent cardiopulmonary cycle exercise testing with a detailed evaluation of ventilatory and dyspnea responses. The qualitative dimensions of dyspnea were examined during each exercise stage by having subjects select phrases that best described their breathing (i.e., "work/effort," "unsatisfied inspiration," and "unsatisfied expiration"). Subjects also selected phrases that described the quality of their breathing at peak exercise using an established 15-item questionnaire, which was then clustered into different categories. Subjects with CF had greater ventilatory requirements, higher end-inspiratory and end-expiratory lung volumes (% total lung capacity), and an earlier inflection/plateau in tidal volume during exercise compared with control subjects. Increased work/effort was the dominant qualitative descriptor in both groups throughout exercise. Unsatisfied inspiration was selected by 48% of subjects with CF and 40% of controls at some point during exercise. The onset of unsatisfied inspiration in these subjects occurred at a significantly lower relative exercise intensity in subjects with CF vs. controls (72 ± 21 vs. 94 ± 11% Wmax, P < 0.01). Chest tightness was the only qualitative descriptor cluster that was selected more frequently by subjects with CF vs. controls (36 vs. 0%, respectively, P < 0.05) at peak exercise. Therapeutic interventions that reduce ventilatory requirements and improve lung volumes may delay the onset of distressing sensations such as unsatisfied inspiration and chest tightness in adults with CF. PMID:27311438

  16. Exercise exerts neuroprotective effects on Parkinson's disease model of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajiri, Naoki; Yasuhara, Takao; Shingo, Tetsuro; Kondo, Akihiko; Yuan, Wenji; Kadota, Tomohito; Wang, Feifei; Baba, Tanefumi; Tayra, Judith Thomas; Morimoto, Takamasa; Jing, Meng; Kikuchi, Yoichiro; Kuramoto, Satoshi; Agari, Takashi; Miyoshi, Yasuyuki; Fujino, Hidemi; Obata, Futoshi; Takeda, Isao; Furuta, Tomohisa; Date, Isao

    2010-01-15

    Recent studies demonstrate that rehabilitation ameliorates physical and cognitive impairments of patients with stroke, spinal cord injury, and other neurological diseases and that rehabilitation also has potencies to modulate brain plasticity. Here we examined the effects of compulsive exercise on Parkinson's disease model of rats. Before 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 20 microg) lesion into the right striatum of female SD rats, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was injected to label the proliferating cells. Subsequently, at 24 h after the lesion, the rats were forced to run on the treadmill (5 days/week, 30 min/day, 11 m/min). As behavioral evaluations, cylinder test was performed at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks and amphetamine-induced rotational test was performed at 2 and 4 weeks with consequent euthanasia for immunohistochemical investigations. The exercise group showed better behavioral recovery in cylinder test and significant decrease in the number of amphetamine-induced rotations, compared to the non-exercise group. Correspondingly, significant preservation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive fibers in the striatum and TH-positive neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) was demonstrated, compared to the non-exercise group. Additionally, the number of migrated BrdU- and Doublecortin-positive cells toward the lesioned striatum was increased in the exercise group. Furthermore, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor increased in the striatum by exercise. The results suggest that exercise exerts neuroprotective effects or enhances the neuronal differentiation in Parkinson's disease model of rats with subsequent improvement in deteriorated motor function. PMID:19900418

  17. Cation Selectivity in Biological Cation Channels Using Experimental Structural Information and Statistical Mechanical Simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin John Finnerty

    Full Text Available Cation selective channels constitute the gate for ion currents through the cell membrane. Here we present an improved statistical mechanical model based on atomistic structural information, cation hydration state and without tuned parameters that reproduces the selectivity of biological Na+ and Ca2+ ion channels. The importance of the inclusion of step-wise cation hydration in these results confirms the essential role partial dehydration plays in the bacterial Na+ channels. The model, proven reliable against experimental data, could be straightforwardly used for designing Na+ and Ca2+ selective nanopores.

  18. Water adsorption on free cobalt cluster cations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.M. Kiawi; J.M. Bakker; J. Oomens; W.J. Buma; Z. Jamshidi; L. Visscher; L.B.F.M. Waters

    2015-01-01

    Cationic cobalt clusters complexed with water Con+-​H2O (n = 6-​20) are produced through laser ablation and investigated via IR multiple photon dissocn. (IR-​MPD) spectroscopy in the 200-​1700 cm-​1 spectral range. All spectra exhibit a resonance close to the 1595 cm-​1 frequency of the free water b

  19. Simultaneous anion and cation mobility in polypyrrole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Steen; Bay, Lasse; Vidanapathirana, K.;

    2003-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) polymer films permanently doped with large, immobile anion dodecyl benzene sulfonate (DBS) have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry in order to clarify the roles of cations and anions in the aqueous electrolyte as mobile ions in the film. Aqueous solutions of 0.05-0.1 M alk...

  20. Resonance raman studies of phenylcyclopropane radical cations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godbout, J.T.; Zuilhof, H.; Heim, G.; Gould, I.R.; Goodman, J.L.; Dinnocenzo, J.P.; Myers Kelley, A.

    2000-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of the radical cations of phenylcyclopropane and trans-1-phenyl-2-methylcyclopropane are reported. A near-UV pump pulse excites a photosensitizer which oxidizes the species of interest, and a visible probe pulse delayed by 35 ns obtains the spectrum of the radical ion. The tr

  1. Anionic/cationic complexes in hair care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Lenick, Tony

    2011-01-01

    The formulation of cosmetic products is always more complicated than studying the individual components in aqueous solution. This is because there are numerous interactions between the components, which make the formulation truly more than the sum of the parts. This article will look at interactions between anionic and cationic surfactants and offer insights into how to use these interactions advantageously in making formulations.

  2. Evolving synergistic combinations of targeted immunotherapies to combat cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melero, Ignacio; Berman, David M; Aznar, M Angela; Korman, Alan J; Pérez Gracia, José Luis; Haanen, John

    2015-08-01

    Immunotherapy has now been clinically validated as an effective treatment for many cancers. There is tremendous potential for synergistic combinations of immunotherapy agents and for combining immunotherapy agents with conventional cancer treatments. Clinical trials combining blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA4) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1) may serve as a paradigm to guide future approaches to immuno-oncology combination therapy. In this Review, we discuss progress in the synergistic design of immune-targeting combination therapies and highlight the challenges involved in tailoring such strategies to provide maximal benefit to patients. PMID:26205340

  3. A multifunctional upconverting nanoparticle incorporated polycationic hydrogel for near-infrared triggered and synergistic treatment of drug-resistant bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Meili; Li, Zhenhua; Zhou, Li; Dong, Kai; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-03-01

    Recently, antibiotic drug-resistant therapies have become very important due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. The development of novel antibacterial materials has received significant attention. Here, quaternized chitosan hydrogels incorporated with NaYF4:Er/Yb/Mn@photosensitizer-doped silica (UCNPs/MB) were synthesized for effective killing of both gram-positive oxacillin-resistant S. aureus (DR-S. aureus) and gram-negative kanamyclin-resistant E. coli (DR-E. coli) bacteria upon near-infrared (NIR) laser irradiation. In this system, the cationic macroporous nature of the hydrogel acts as a molecular ‘anion sponge’, which sucks the outer part of the anionic microbe membrane into the gel interior voids and causes microbe membrane disruption. By incorporating UCNPs/MB-doped silica into the hydrogel, we have combined photodynamic therapy (PDT) with quaternized chitosan to obtain a high therapeutic index via a synergistic effect. In vitro experiments have demonstrated that our system had excellent antibacterial efficiency to both DR-S. aureus and DR-E. coli bacteria. More importantly, our new synergistic treatment modality provided an excellent therapy platform for drug-resistant bacteria, which could improve antimicrobial efficiency.

  4. Interactions in surfactant/pollutant/soil mineral systems. Adsorption of 2-naphthol on clay minerals in the presence of cationic tensides. Wechselwirkungen in Tensid/Schadstoff/Bodenmineralsystemen. Adsorption von 2-Naphtol an Schichtsilikaten in Gegenwart von Kationtensid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klumpp, E.; Heitmann, H.; Schwuger, M.J. (Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physikalische Chemie)

    Pollutant adsorption on soil components (layer silicates) is influenced by cationic surface-active substances. They produce synergistic effects at low concentrations due to the formation of hydrophobic adsorbate layers and antagonistic effects at higher concentrations due to the simultaneous formation of micelles in the solution. The latter compete with the hydrophobic adsorbate layers for pollutant molecules. At low cationic surfactant concentrations the charge density of the adsorbent is an important parameter for the formation of coherent hydrophobic zones due to surfactant adsorption. (orig.).

  5. Cationic lipids and cationic ligands induce DNA helix denaturation: detection of single stranded regions by KMnO4 probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, T K; Gopal, Vijaya; Rao, N Madhusudhana

    2003-09-25

    Cationic lipids and cationic polymers are widely used in gene delivery. Using 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) as a cationic lipid, we have investigated the stability of the DNA in DOTAP:DNA complexes by probing with potassium permanganate (KMnO4). Interestingly, thymidines followed by a purine showed higher susceptibility to cationic ligand-mediated melting. Similar studies performed with other water-soluble cationic ligands such as polylysine, protamine sulfate and polyethyleneimine also demonstrated melting of the DNA but with variations. Small cations such as spermine and spermidine and a cationic detergent, cetyl trimethylammonium bromide, also rendered the DNA susceptible to modification by KMnO4. The data presented here provide direct proof for melting of DNA upon interaction with cationic lipids. Structural changes subsequent to binding of cationic lipids/ligands to DNA may lead to instability and formation of DNA bubbles in double-stranded DNA.

  6. Synergistic interaction of levetiracetam with gabapentin in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model – a type II isobolographic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wlaz Aleksandra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at characterizing the anticonvulsant effects of levetiracetam in combination with gabapentin, in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model. Herein, psychomotor seizures were evoked in male albino Swiss mice by a current (32 mA, 6 Hz, 3 s stimulus duration delivered via ocular electrodes. Type II isobolographic analysis was used to characterize the anticonvulsant interactions between the drugs in combination, for fixed-ratios of 1:1, 1:2, 1:5 and 1:10. The type II isobolographic analysis revealed that the combinations of levetiracetam with gabapentin for the fixed-ratios of 1:5 and 1:10 were supra-additive (synergistic; P<0.05 in terms of seizure suppression, while the combinations for the fixed-ratios of 1:1 and 1:2 were additive in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model. We conclude that, as the combinations of levetiracetam with gabapentin for the fixed-ratios of 1:5 and 1:10 exerted supra-additive (synergistic interaction in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model, this may be considered as particularly favorable combinations in further clinical practice.

  7. Stability of strong species interactions resist the synergistic effects of local and global pollution in kelp forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura J Falkenberg

    Full Text Available Foundation species, such as kelp, exert disproportionately strong community effects and persist, in part, by dominating taxa that inhibit their regeneration. Human activities which benefit their competitors, however, may reduce stability of communities, increasing the probability of phase-shifts. We tested whether a foundation species (kelp would continue to inhibit a key competitor (turf-forming algae under moderately increased local (nutrient and near-future forecasted global pollution (CO(2. Our results reveal that in the absence of kelp, local and global pollutants combined to cause the greatest cover and mass of turfs, a synergistic response whereby turfs increased more than would be predicted by adding the independent effects of treatments (kelp absence, elevated nutrients, forecasted CO(2. The positive effects of nutrient and CO(2 enrichment on turfs were, however, inhibited by the presence of kelp, indicating the competitive effect of kelp was stronger than synergistic effects of moderate enrichment of local and global pollutants. Quantification of physicochemical parameters within experimental mesocosms suggests turf inhibition was likely due to an effect of kelp on physical (i.e. shading rather than chemical conditions. Such results indicate that while forecasted climates may increase the probability of phase-shifts, maintenance of intact populations of foundation species could enable the continued strength of interactions and persistence of communities.

  8. Ellagitannins as synergists of ACV on the replication of ACV-resistant strains of HSV 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhelmova-Ilieva, N; Jacquet, R; Quideau, S; Galabov, A S

    2014-10-01

    The plant-derived polyphenolic compounds castalagin, vescalagin and grandinin (C-glucosidic ellagitannins containing nonahydroxyterphenoyl) manifested a strong inhibitory effect on the replication of acyclovir-resistant strains of herpes simplex viruses (HSV) type 1 and 2 in MDBK cells in focus forming units (i.e., microscopically registered microplaques) reduction assay and in two variants of cytopathic effect inhibition test. The effect on the acyclovir (ACV)-resistant herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) strain was markedly higher compared to that on the ACV-resistant herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). The three compounds showed comparable levels of antiviral activity against ACV-resistant HSV strains, in contrast with previous results where castalagin exerted the highest degree of activity against wild type HSV strains (Vilhelmova et al., 2011). Combinations of ellagitannins and ACV were tested on the ACV-resistant strains of both HSV-1 and 2 and produced synergistic effects that were revealed by applying the three-dimensional approach of Prichard and Shipman (1990). The ellagitannin(s)-ACV combination applied against ACV-resistant HSV-1 produced a much stronger synergistic effect compared to the effect observed against ACV-resistant HSV-2. The study of the effects of the combination ellagitannin(s)-ACF on intact cell monolayers did not show any toxicity resulting from interaction between the two substances. Altogether, the results obtained in this study demonstrate the highly promising potential of these plant polyphenols as antiherpetic agents.

  9. Synergistic antiproliferative and anticholesterogenic effects of linalool, 1,8-cineole, and simvastatin on human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenak Kladniew, Boris; Polo, Mónica; Montero Villegas, Sandra; Galle, Marianela; Crespo, Rosana; García de Bravo, Margarita

    2014-05-01

    Monoterpenes are naturally occurring plant hydrocarbons with multiple effects on the mevalonate pathway (MP), while statins competitively inhibit hydroxymethylglutarylcoenzyme-A reductase (HMGCR), the rate-limiting enzyme in the MP. Monoterpenes and statins proved capable of inhibiting both proliferation and cholesterogenesis. In the present study we assess the in vitro antiproliferative and anticholesterogenic effects of two monoterpenes: linalool and 1,8-cineole-either alone, in combination with each other, or combined individually with simvastatin-on liver-derived (HepG2) and extrahepatic (A549) cell lines. The three compounds alone inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent fashion, while their pairwise combination produced synergistic antiproliferative effects in both cell lines. Incorporation experiments with [(14)C]acetate revealed that linalool and 1,8-cineole inhibited the MP, probably at different points, resulting in a reduction in cholesterogenesis and an accumulation of other MP intermediates and products. Linalool or 1,8-cineole, either together or individually with simvastatin, synergistically inhibited cholesterol synthesis. At low concentrations both monoterpenes inhibited steps specifically involved in cholesterol synthesis, whereas at higher concentrations HMGCR levels became down-regulated. Added exogenous mevalonate failed to reverse the inhibition of proliferation exerted by linalool and 1,8-cineole, suggesting that HMGCR inhibition alone is not responsible for the antiproliferative activity of those agents. This work demonstrates that monoterpenes in combination with each other, or individually in combination with simvastatin synergistically inhibits proliferation and cholesterogenesis in the human cell lines investigated, thus contributing to a clearer understanding of the action of essential-oil components, and their combination with the statins, in the targeting of specific points within a complex metabolic pathway.

  10. VALIDATION OF ADULT OMNI PERCEIVED EXERTION SCALES FOR ELLIPTICAL ERGOMETRY12

    Science.gov (United States)

    MAYS, RYAN J.; GOSS, FREDRIC L.; SCHAFER, MARK A.; KIM, KEVIN H.; NAGLE-STILLEY, ELIZABETH F.; ROBERTSON, ROBERT J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary This investigation examined the validity of newly developed Adult OMNI Elliptical Ergometer Ratings of Perceived Exertion Scales. Sixty men and women performed a graded exercise test on an elliptical ergometer. Oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rate (HR) and ratings of perceived exertion were recorded each stage from the Borg 15 Category Scale and two different OMNI scales. One scale employed an elliptical ergometer format of the OMNI Picture System of Perceived Exertion. The second scale modified verbal, numerical, and pictorial descriptors at the low end of the response range. Concurrent and construct validity were established by the positive relation between ratings of perceived exertion from each OMNI scale with VO2, HR and Borg Scale ratings of perceived exertion (men, r = .94–.97; women, r = .93–.98). Validity was established for both OMNI scales, indicating either metric can be used to estimate ratings of perceived exertion during partial weight bearing exercise. PMID:21319623

  11. Synergistic interaction of PMAP-36 and PRW4 with aminoglycoside antibiotics and their antibacterial mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zeyun; Zhang, Licong; Wang, Jue; Wei, Dandan; Shi, Baoming; Shan, Anshan

    2014-12-01

    The antimicrobial peptide PMAP-36 is a highly cationic and amphipathic α-helical peptide. PRW4 is a truncated analog that replaces paired lysine residues with tryptophan along the N-terminal and deletes the C-terminal hydrophobic tail of PMAP-36. Studies on the two peptides have already been performed. However, whether there is a synergistic effect with antibiotics has not been investigated, and the study of the antibacterial mechanism of the peptides is inadequate. In this study, antibiotic-peptide combinations were tested against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, and the confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSCM) and DNA gel retardation were measured. The results indicated synergy between the peptides and gentamicin when tested against E. coli [fractional lethal concentration (FLC) peptides and gentamicin against S. aureus (0.5 peptides against E. coli and S. aureus (1 DNA binding suggest that PMAP-36 was able to translocate across the bacterial membranes and interact with intracellular DNA, but PRW4 presented no DNA-binding ability. These results indicate that the combination of PMAP-36 and PRW4 with aminoglycosides may provide useful information for clinical application, and the antibacterial mechanism of peptides likely does not solely involve cytoplasmic-membrane permeabilization.

  12. Exertional heat stroke in a young military trainee: is it preventable?

    OpenAIRE

    Wijerathne, Buddhika T. B.; Pilapitiya, Senaka D.; Vijitharan, Vadivel; Farah, Mohammed M. F.; Wimalasooriya, Yashodhara V. M.; Siribaddana, Sisira H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition with exertional heat stroke occurring frequently among soldiers and athletes. Because of its common occurrence, many military trainees practice preventive measures prior to any activity requiring severe exertion. Although it is said to be common in practice, different presentations of heat stroke are scarcely described in literature. Case Presentation We describe a case of an exertional heat stroke in a 23-year-old male Sinhalese soldier ...

  13. Combined Use of Metformin and Everolimus Is Synergistic in the Treatment of Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunshan; Wei, Junmin; Li, Li; Fan, Cong; Sun, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Everolimus inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and leads to decreased protein synthesis and decreased cancer cell proliferation in many experimental systems. Adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activators such as metformin have similar actions in keeping with the TSC2/1 pathway linking activation of AMPK to inhibition of mTOR. Histopathological and biochemical studies of breast cancer show frequent dysregulation of the AMPK and the mTOR pathway. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus and metformin in the treatment of breast cancer cells. This study evaluated the in vitro and in vivo effects of everolimus alone or in combination with metformin on breast cancer cells. MTT assay was used to quantify the inhibitory effect of the drugs on breast cancer cells in vitro. SCID mice injected with HCC1428 cells followed by different treatments were used to assess the in vivo efficacy of different agents. Data showed that the combination of everolimus and metformin exerted synergistic inhibitory effects on the growth of breast cancer cells both in culture and in a mouse xenograft model. Further, this combination abrogated S6 and 4EBP1phosphorylation. Collectively, we suggest that the combination of everolimus and metformin may be an effective regimen for treatment of breast cancer, hence warranting further evaluation of the combination in the clinic. PMID:26351208

  14. Celecoxib and octreotide synergistically ameliorate portal hypertension via inhibition of angiogenesis in cirrhotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jin-Hang; Wen, Shi-Lei; Feng, Shi; Yang, Wen-Juan; Lu, Yao-Yao; Tong, Huan; Liu, Rui; Tang, Shi-Hang; Huang, Zhi-Yin; Tang, Ying-Mei; Yang, Jin-Hui; Xie, Hui-Qi; Tang, Cheng-Wei

    2016-10-01

    Abnormal angiogenesis is critical for portal hypertension in cirrhosis. Except for etiological treatment, no efficient medication or regime has been explored to treat the early stage of cirrhosis when angiogenesis is initiated or overwhelming. In this study, we explored an anti-angiogenesis effort through non-cytotoxic drugs octreotide and celecoxib to treat early stage of cirrhotic portal hypertension in an animal model. Peritoneal injection of thioacetamide (TAA) was employed to induce liver cirrhosis in rats. A combination treatment of celecoxib and octreotide was found to relieve liver fibrosis, portal venous pressure, micro-hepatic arterioportal fistulas, intrahepatic and splanchnic angiogenesis. Celecoxib and octreotide exerted their anti-angiogenesis effect via an axis of cyclooxygenase-2/prostaglandin E2/EP-2/somatostatin receptor-2, which consequently down-regulated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK)-hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α)-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) integrated signaling pathways. In conclusions, combination of celecoxib and octreotide synergistically ameliorated liver fibrosis and portal hypertension of the cirrhotic rats induced by TAA via the inhibition of intrahepatic and extrahepatic angiogenesis. The potential mechanisms behind the regimen may due to the inactivation of p-ERK-HIF-1α-VEGF signaling pathway. PMID:27380212

  15. Synergistic antimicrobial activity between pentacyclic triterpenoids and antibiotics against Staphylococcus aureus strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navaratnam Parasakthi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been considerable effort to discover plant-derived antibacterials against methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA which have developed resistance to most existing antibiotics, including the last line of defence, vancomycin. Pentacyclic triterpenoid, a biologically diverse plant-derived natural product, has been reported to show anti-staphylococcal activities. The objective of this study is to evaluate the interaction between three pentacyclic triterpenoid and standard antibiotics (methicillin and vancomycin against reference strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Methods and Results The activity of the standard antibiotics and compounds on reference methicillin-sensitive and resistant strains of S. aureus were determined using the macrodilution broth method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of the compounds was compared with that of the standard antibiotics. The interaction between any two antimicrobial agents was estimated by calculating the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC index of the combination. The various combinations of antibiotics and compounds reduced the MIC to a range of 0.05 to 50%. Conclusion Pentacyclic triterpenoids have shown anti-staphylococcal activities and although individually weaker than common antibiotics produced from bacteria and fungi, synergistically these compounds may use different mechanism of action or pathways to exert their antimicrobial effects, as implicated in the lowered MICs. Therefore, the use of current antibiotics could be maintained in their combination with plant-derived antibacterial agents as a therapeutic option in the treatment of S. aureus infections.

  16. Synergistic photosensitized removal of Cr(VI) and Rhodamine B dye on amorphous TiO2 under visible light irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Am-TiO2 was prepared at room temperature. ► Am-TiO2 exhibited more significant synergistic effect than commercial P25-TiO2. ► Heat pretreatment of Am-TiO2 led to decreased synergistic activity. ► Specific surface area dominates the synergistic degradation dynamics. ► Am-TiO2 can be simply reused with negligible loss of activity. -- Abstract: Amorphous TiO2 (Am-TiO2) was prepared at room temperature by hydrolysis of Ti(OBu)4 in water without addition of strong acids or organic solvents. Results from XRD and TEM revealed that the as-prepared Am-TiO2 was composed of amorphous structure. For the simultaneous photosensitized removal of Cr(VI) and zwitterionic Rhodamine B (RhB) dye, Am-TiO2 exhibited more significant synergistic effect than commercial P25-TiO2. The removal efficiencies for RhB and Cr(VI) after 100 min visible light irradiation were 97.8% and 53.5% on Am-TiO2, respectively. While 88.2% RhB and 42.1% Cr(VI) were removed on P25-TiO2. Decreased synergistic activities as well as smaller surface areas were observed when Am-TiO2 was pretreated at high temperatures (200–700 °C). Thus, it was the larger specific surface area rather than better crystallinity dominated the synergistic degradation dynamics under visible light irradiation with lower pH (2), greater catalyst loading amount (2 g/L), proper RhB/Cr(VI) ratios (1:8) and higher light intensity (500 W). Better synergistic performance was also obtained on Am-TiO2 than P25-TiO2 when Cr(VI) coexists with cationic dyes, while negligible difference was observed in the presence of anionic dyes. Superior stability and simplicity of Am-TiO2 was also exhibited in the cyclic runs

  17. Cation-cation interactions, magnetic communication and reactivity of the pentavalent uraniumion [U(NR)2]+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Liam P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schelter, Eric J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boncella, James M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yang, Ping [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gsula, Robyn L [NON LANL; Scott, Brian L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Joe D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiplinger, Jacqueline L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The dimeric bis(imido) uranium complex [{l_brace}U(NtBu)2(I)(tBu2bpy){r_brace}2] (see picture; U green, N blue, I red) has cation-cation interactions between [U(NR)2]+ ions. This f1-f1 system also displays f orbital communication between uranium(V) centers at low temperatures, and can be oxidized to generate uranium(VI) bis(imido) complexes.

  18. Abdominal and internal intercostal motoneurones are strong synergists for expiration but are not synergists for Group I monosynaptic afferent inputs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ford, Tim W; Meehan, Claire Francesca; Kirkwood, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Internal intercostal and abdomininal motoneurones are strongly co-activated during expiration (Saywell et al. 2007; Road et al. 2013). We investigated whether that synergy was paralleled by synergistic Group I reflex excitation. Intracellular recordings were made from motoneurones of the internal......, 9 being in Group B Dist motoneurones. The complete absence of heteronymous monosynaptic Group I reflex excitation between muscles that are synergistically activated in expiration leads us to conclude that such connections from muscle spindle afferents of the thoracic nerves have little role...

  19. Biocompatible Double-Membrane Hydrogels from Cationic Cellulose Nanocrystals and Anionic Alginate as Complexing Drugs Codelivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ning; Gèze, Annabelle; Wouessidjewe, Denis; Huang, Jin; Dufresne, Alain

    2016-03-23

    A biocompatible hydrogel with a double-membrane structure is developed from cationic cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) and anionic alginate. The architecture of the double-membrane hydrogel involves an external membrane composed of neat alginate, and an internal composite hydrogel consolidates by electrostatic interactions between cationic CNC and anionic alginate. The thickness of the outer layer can be regulated by the adsorption duration of neat alginate, and the shape of the inner layer can directly determine the morphology and dimensions of the double-membrane hydrogel (microsphere, capsule, and filmlike shapes). Two drugs are introduced into the different membranes of the hydrogel, which will ensure the complexing drugs codelivery and the varied drugs release behaviors from two membranes (rapid drug release of the outer hydrogel, and prolonged drug release of the inner hydrogel). The double-membrane hydrogel containing the chemically modified cellulose nanocrystals (CCNC) in the inner membrane hydrogel can provide the sustained drug release ascribed to the "nano-obstruction effect" and "nanolocking effect" induced by the presence of CCNC components in the hydrogels. Derived from natural polysaccharides (cellulose and alginate), the novel double-membrane structure hydrogel material developed in this study is biocompatible and can realize the complexing drugs release with the first quick release of one drug and the successively slow release of another drug, which is expected to achieve the synergistic release effects or potentially provide the solution to drug resistance in biomedical application.

  20. Carbon dioxide and nisin act synergistically on Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Lilian; Chen, Y.H.; Chikindas, M.L.;

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the synergistic action of carbon dioxide and nisin on Listeria monocytogenes Scott A wild-type and nisin-resistant (Nis(r)) cells grown in broth at 4 degrees C. Carbon dioxide extended the lag phase and decreased the specific growth rate of both strains, but to a greater degree...

  1. Contrast-induced nephrotoxicity: possible synergistic effect of stress hyperglycemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, David H

    2010-07-01

    Oxidative stress on the renal tubules has been implicated as a mechanism of injury in both stress hyperglycemia and contrast-induced nephrotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the combination of these effects has a synergistic effect on accentuating renal tubular apoptosis and therefore increasing the risk of contrast-induced nephrotoxicity.

  2. Synergistic antitumor efficiency of docetaxel and curcumin against lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haitao Yin; Rui Guo; Yong Xu; Yulong Zheng; Zhibo Hou; Xinzheng Dai; Zhengdong Zhang; Donghui Zheng; Hua'e Xu

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin (Cum),the principal polyphenolic curcuminoid,obtained from the turmeric rhizome Curcuma longa,is recently reported to have potential antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo.Docetaxel (Doc) is considered as first-line chemotherapy for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.Here we report for the first time that Cum could synergistically enhance the in vitro and in vivo antitumor efficacy of Doc against lung cancer.In the current study,combination index (CI) is calculated in both in vitro and in vivo studies to determine the interaction between Cum and Doc.In the in vitro cytotoxicity test,media-effect analysis clearly indicated a synergistic interaction between Cum and Doc in certain concentrations.Moreover,in vivo evaluation further demonstrated the superior anticancer efficacy of Cum + Doc compared with Doc alone by intravenous delivery in an established A549 transplanted xenograft model.Results showed that Cum synergistically increased the efficacy of Doc immediately after 4 days of the initial treatment.Additionally,simultaneous administration of Cum and Doc showed little toxicity to normal tissues including bone marrow and liver at the therapeutic doses.Therefore,in vitro and in vivo evaluations demonstrated the satisfying synergistic antitumor efficacy of Cum and Doc against lung cancer and the introduction of Cum in traditional chemotherapy is a most promising way to counter the spread of nonsmall cell lung cancer.

  3. Synergistic activity of rabbit granulocyte peptides against Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Lehrer, R I; Szklarek, D; Ganz, T; Selsted, M E

    1986-01-01

    Rabbit granulocytes contain six antimicrobial peptides that are structurally homologous to the human neutrophil "defensins." NP-5, a rabbit defensin, lacks significant activity against Candida albicans. Nevertheless, its addition to submicromolar concentrations of rabbit NP-1, NP-2, or NP-3a potentiates their candidacidal effect. Thus, granulocyte defensins can act synergistically against potential pathogens.

  4. "Synergistic selection": a Darwinian frame for the evolution of complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corning, Peter A; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2015-04-21

    Non-Darwinian theories about the emergence and evolution of complexity date back at least to Lamarck, and include those of Herbert Spencer and the "emergent evolution" theorists of the later nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In recent decades, this approach has mostly been espoused by various practitioners in biophysics and complexity theory. However, there is a Darwinian alternative - in essence, an economic theory of complexity - proposing that synergistic effects of various kinds have played an important causal role in the evolution of complexity, especially in the "major transitions". This theory is called the "synergism hypothesis". We posit that otherwise unattainable functional advantages arising from various cooperative phenomena have been favored over time in a dynamic that the late John Maynard Smith characterized and modeled as "synergistic selection". The term highlights the fact that synergistic "wholes" may become interdependent "units" of selection. We provide some historical perspective on this issue, as well as a brief explication of the underlying theory and the concept of synergistic selection, and we describe two relevant models. PMID:25681798

  5. The Effect of Exertion and Sex on Vertical Ground Reaction Force Variables and Landing Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David R; Pennuto, Anthony P; Trigsted, Stephanie M

    2016-06-01

    Bell, DR, Pennuto, AP, and Trigsted, SM. The effect of exertion and sex on vertical ground reaction force variables and landing mechanics. J Strength Cond Res 30(6): 1661-1669, 2016-The purpose of this investigation was to determine how exertion and sex affected a variety of vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) parameters during a jump-landing task, including peak VGRF, peak VGRF asymmetry, loading rate, and loading rate asymmetry. Additionally, we wanted to determine whether landing mechanics changed after exertion as measured by the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS). Forty recreationally active participants (20 men and 20 women) completed jump landings from a 30-cm-high box onto force plates before and after repeated bouts of an exercise circuit until a specific rating of perceived exertion was achieved. Three-way (sex × time × limb) analyses of variance were used to analyze variables pre-exertion to postexertion. No significant 3-way interactions were observed for peak VGRF (p = 0.31) or loading rate (p = 0.14). Time by sex interactions were observed for peak VGRF (p = 0.02) and loading rate (p = 0.008). Post hoc analysis revealed that men increased landing force and loading rate after exertion while women did not. Landing mechanics, as assessed by total LESS score, were worse after exertion (p errors for knee flexion landing. Women may be more resistant to exertion compared with men and use different joint controls' strategies to cope with VGRF after exertion. However, VGRF asymmetry is not affected by sex and exertion. Limiting peak VGRF and addressing landing postures, especially after exertion, should be components of injury prevention strategies. PMID:26562710

  6. Synergistic antitumor effect of a human papillomavirus DNA vaccine harboring E6E7 fusion gene and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Fan, Lei; Ma, Wei; Xiao, Huan

    2016-09-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as the primary etiological factor in cervical cancer as well as in subsets of anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. The two HPV viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, are uniquely and consistently expressed in all HPV-infected cells and are therefore promising targets for therapeutic vaccination. In order to achieve a synergistic antitumor and anti-angiogenesis effect, we designed and constructed a novel DNA vaccine that can express the HPV 16 E6E7 fusion protein and VEGFR2 in the same reading frame. A series of DNA plasmids encoding E6E7, VEGFR2 and their conjugates were constructed and injected into mice. The resultant humoral and cellular immune responses were detected by ELISA and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT), respectively. To evaluate the antitumor efficacy of these plasmids, tumor-bearing mice expressing the E6E7 fusion protein were constructed. After injection into the tumor-bearing mouse model, the plasmid harboring the E6E7 fusion gene and VEGFR2 showed stronger inhibition of tumor growth than the plasmid expressing E6E7 or VEGFR2 alone, which indicated that the combination of E6E7 and VEGFR2 could exert a synergistic antitumor effect. These observations emphasize the potential of a synergistic antitumor and anti-angiogenesis strategy using a DNA vaccine, which could be a promising approach for tumor immunotherapy. PMID:27515281

  7. Structurally Distinct Cation Channelrhodopsins from Cryptophyte Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govorunova, Elena G; Sineshchekov, Oleg A; Spudich, John L

    2016-06-01

    Microbial rhodopsins are remarkable for the diversity of their functional mechanisms based on the same protein scaffold. A class of rhodopsins from cryptophyte algae show close sequence homology with haloarchaeal rhodopsin proton pumps rather than with previously known channelrhodopsins from chlorophyte (green) algae. In particular, both aspartate residues that occupy the positions of the chromophore Schiff base proton acceptor and donor, a hallmark of rhodopsin proton pumps, are conserved in these cryptophyte proteins. We expressed the corresponding polynucleotides in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells and studied electrogenic properties of the encoded proteins with whole-cell patch-clamp recording. Despite their lack of residues characteristic of the chlorophyte cation channels, these proteins are cation-conducting channelrhodopsins that carry out light-gated passive transport of Na(+) and H(+). These findings show that channel function in rhodopsins has evolved via multiple routes. PMID:27233115

  8. Radiation chemistry of aromatic dimer radical cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    π-π Interactions of aromatic molecules are paid attention much in many fields, especially biology, chemistry, and applied physics, represented as protein, DNA, electron donor-accepter complexes, charge transfers, and self assembly molecules. Aromatic molecules including benzene rings are the simplest case to study the π-π interactions. To interpret the charge resonance (CR) structure in the dimer radical cations, spectroscopic and ESR methods have been carried out. The spectroscopic study on the dimer radical ion of molecules with two chromophores would be profitable to identify the electronic and configurational properties. In this article, dynamics of the dimer radical cation of benzenes, polystyrenes, and resist polymers is described on the basis of direct observation of CR band by the nanosecond pulse radiolysis and low temperature γ-radiolysis methods. (author)

  9. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles exert different cytotoxic effects on cells grown in monolayer cell culture versus as multicellular spheroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theumer, Anja; Gräfe, Christine; Bähring, Franziska [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Jena University Hospital, Erlanger Allee 101, 07747 Jena (Germany); Bergemann, Christian [Chemicell GmbH, Eresburgstrasse 22–23, 12103 Berlin (Germany); Hochhaus, Andreas [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Jena University Hospital, Erlanger Allee 101, 07747 Jena (Germany); Clement, Joachim H., E-mail: joachim.clement@med.uni-jena.de [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Jena University Hospital, Erlanger Allee 101, 07747 Jena (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) with human blood–brain barrier-forming endothelial cells (HBMEC) in two-dimensional cell monolayers as well as in three-dimensional multicellular spheroids. The precise nanoparticle localisation and the influence of the NP on the cellular viability and the intracellular Akt signalling were studied in detail. Long-term effects of different polymer-coated nanoparticles (neutral fluidMAG-D, anionic fluidMAG-CMX and cationic fluidMAG-PEI) and the corresponding free polymers on cellular viability of HBMEC were investigated by real time cell analysis studies. Nanoparticles exert distinct effects on HBMEC depending on the nanoparticles' surface charge and concentration, duration of incubation and cellular context. The most severe effects were caused by PEI-coated nanoparticles. Concentrations above 25 µg/ml led to increased amounts of dead cells in monolayer culture as well as in multicellular spheroids. On the level of intracellular signalling, context-dependent differences were observed. Monolayer cultures responded on nanoparticle incubation with an increase in Akt phosphorylation whereas spheroids on the whole show a decreased Akt activity. This might be due to the differential penetration and distribution of PEI-coated nanoparticles.

  10. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles exert different cytotoxic effects on cells grown in monolayer cell culture versus as multicellular spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) with human blood–brain barrier-forming endothelial cells (HBMEC) in two-dimensional cell monolayers as well as in three-dimensional multicellular spheroids. The precise nanoparticle localisation and the influence of the NP on the cellular viability and the intracellular Akt signalling were studied in detail. Long-term effects of different polymer-coated nanoparticles (neutral fluidMAG-D, anionic fluidMAG-CMX and cationic fluidMAG-PEI) and the corresponding free polymers on cellular viability of HBMEC were investigated by real time cell analysis studies. Nanoparticles exert distinct effects on HBMEC depending on the nanoparticles' surface charge and concentration, duration of incubation and cellular context. The most severe effects were caused by PEI-coated nanoparticles. Concentrations above 25 µg/ml led to increased amounts of dead cells in monolayer culture as well as in multicellular spheroids. On the level of intracellular signalling, context-dependent differences were observed. Monolayer cultures responded on nanoparticle incubation with an increase in Akt phosphorylation whereas spheroids on the whole show a decreased Akt activity. This might be due to the differential penetration and distribution of PEI-coated nanoparticles

  11. Differential effect of HOE642 on two separate monovalent cation transporters in the human red cell membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernhardt, Ingolf; Weiss, Erwin; Robinson, Hannah C;

    2007-01-01

    Residual K(+) fluxes in red blood cells can be stimulated in conditions of low ionic strength. Previous studies have identified both the non-selective, voltage-dependent cation (NSVDC) channel and the K(+)(Na(+))/H(+) exchanger as candidate pathways mediating this effect, although it is possible...... showed that HOE642 exerted differential effects on the NSVDC channel and the K(+)(Na(+))/H(+) exchanger, confirming that the salt loss observed in low ionic strength solutions represents contributions from at least two independent ion transport pathways. The findings are discussed in the context of red...... blood cell apoptosis (eryptosis) and disease....

  12. Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Mark; Horwitz, E. Philip

    2003-01-01

    An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

  13. Cation Permeability in Soybean Aleurone Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Noda, Hiroko; Fukuda, Mitsuru

    1998-01-01

    The permeation of water and ions into bean seeds is essential for processing and cooking of beans. The permeability of cations, K, Na, Ca, and Mg ions, into soybean seed tissue, especially aleurone layer, during water uptake was investigated to characterize the ion permeation into soybeans. Aleurone layers and seed coats contained relatively high concentration of endogenous K and Ca ions, and endogenous Ca ion, respectively. The amounts of Ca ion entered seed coats and aleurone layers were gr...

  14. Low cation coordination in oxide melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, Lawrie [State University of New York, Stony Brook; Benmore, Chris J [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Du, Jincheng [University of North Texas; Weber, Richard [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Neuefeind, Joerg C [ORNL; Tumber, Sonia [Materials Development, Inc., Evanston, IL; Parise, John B [Stony Brook University (SUNY)

    2014-01-01

    The complete set of Faber-Ziman partial pair distribution functions for a rare earth oxide liquid were measured for the first time by combining aerodynamic levitation, neutron diffraction, high energy x-ray diffraction and isomorphic substitution using Y2 O3 and Ho2 O3 melts. The average Y- O coordination is measured to be 5.5(2), which is significantly less than the octahedral coordination of crystalline Y2 O3 (or Ho2 O3 ). Investigation of high temperature La2 O3 , ZrO2 , SiO2 , and Al2 O3 melts by x-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations also show lower-than-crystal cation- oxygen coordination. These measurements suggest a general trend towards lower M-O coordination compared to their crystalline counterparts. It is found that this coordination number drop is larger for lower field strength, larger radius cations and is negligible for high field strength (network forming) cations. These findings have broad implications for predicting the local structure and related physical properties of metal-oxide melts and oxide glasses.

  15. Low Cation Coordination in Oxide Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, L. B.; Benmore, C. J.; Weber, J. K. R.; Du, J.; Neuefeind, J.; Tumber, S. K.; Parise, J. B.

    2014-04-01

    The complete set of partial pair distribution functions for a rare earth oxide liquid are measured by combining aerodynamic levitation, neutron and x-ray diffraction on Y2O3, and Ho2O3 melts at 2870 K. The average Y-O (or Ho-O) coordination of these isomorphic melts is measured to be 5.5(2), which is significantly less than the octahedral coordination of crystalline Y2O3 (or Ho2O3). Investigation of La2O3, ZrO2, and Al2O3 melts by x-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations also show lower-than-crystal cation-oxygen coordination. These measurements suggest a general trend towards lower coordination compared to their crystalline counterparts. It is found that the coordination drop is larger for lower field strength, larger radius cations and is negligible for high field strength (network forming) cations, such as SiO2. These findings have broad implications for predicting the local structure and related physical properties of metal-oxide melts and oxide glasses.

  16. Limited data speaker identification

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H S Jayanna; S R Mahadeva Prasanna

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, the task of identifying the speaker using limited training and testing data is addressed. Speaker identification system is viewed as four stages namely, analysis, feature extraction, modelling and testing. The speaker identification performance depends on the techniques employed in these stages. As demonstrated by different experiments, in case of limited training and testing data condition, owing to less data, existing techniques in each stage will not provide good performance. This work demonstrates the following: multiple frame size and rate (MFSR) analysis provides improvement in the analysis stage, combination of mel frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC), its temporal derivatives $(\\Delta,\\Delta \\Delta)$, linear prediction residual (LPR) and linear prediction residual phase (LPRP) features provides improvement in the feature extraction stage and combination of learning vector quantization (LVQ) and gaussian mixture model – universal background model (GMM–UBM) provides improvement in the modelling stage. The performance is further improved by integrating the proposed techniques at the respective stages and combining the evidences from them at the testing stage. To achieve this, we propose strength voting (SV), weighted borda count (WBC) and supporting systems (SS) as combining methods at the abstract, rank and measurement levels, respectively. Finally, the proposed hierarchical combination (HC) method integrating these three methods provides significant improvement in the performance. Based on these explorations, this work proposes a scheme for speaker identification under limited training and testing data.

  17. Self-Regulating Cycling Using the Children's OMNI Scale of Perceived Exertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Robert J.; Goss, Fredric L.; Bell, Jill A.; Dixon, Curt B.; Gallagher, Kara I.; Lagally, Kristen M.; Timmer, Jeffrey M.; Abt, Kristie L.; Gallagher, Jere D.; Thompkins, Taylor

    2002-01-01

    Investigated whether normal children could self-regulate intermittent cycle ergometer exercise using a prescribed target rating of perceived exertion (RPE), discriminate between target RPEs, and produce intermittent target RPEs in ascending and descending sequences. RPE was estimated using the Children's OMNI Scale of Perceived Exertion. Overall,…

  18. Alkali cation specific adsorption onto fcc(111) transition metal electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, J N; McCrum, I T; Janik, M J

    2014-07-21

    The presence of alkali cations in electrolyte solutions is known to impact the rate of electrocatalytic reactions, though the mechanism of such impact is not conclusively determined. We use density functional theory (DFT) to examine the specific adsorption of alkali cations to fcc(111) electrode surfaces, as specific adsorption may block catalyst sites or otherwise impact surface catalytic chemistry. Solvation of the cation-metal surface structure was investigated using explicit water models. Computed equilibrium potentials for alkali cation adsorption suggest that alkali and alkaline earth cations will specifically adsorb onto Pt(111) and Pd(111) surfaces in the potential range of hydrogen oxidation and hydrogen evolution catalysis in alkaline solutions.

  19. 3-Bromopyruvate antagonizes effects of lactate and pyruvate, synergizes with citrate and exerts novel anti-glioma effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, S M; El-Magd, R M Abou; Shishido, Y; Chung, S P; Diem, T H; Sakai, T; Watanabe, H; Kagami, S; Fukui, K

    2012-02-01

    Oxidative stress-energy depletion therapy using oxidative stress induced by D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) and energy depletion induced by 3-bromopyruvate (3BP) was reported recently (El Sayed et al., Cancer Gene Ther., 19, 1-18, 2012). Even in the presence of oxygen, cancer cells oxidize glucose preferentially to produce lactate (Warburg effect) which seems vital for cancer microenvironment and progression. 3BP is a closely related structure to lactate and pyruvate and may antagonize their effects as a novel mechanism of its action. Pyruvate exerted a potent H(2)O(2) scavenging effect to exogenous H(2)O(2), while lactate had no scavenging effect. 3BP induced H(2)O(2) production. Pyruvate protected against H(2)O(2)-induced C6 glioma cell death, 3BP-induced C6 glioma cell death but not against DAO/D-serine-induced cell death, while lactate had no protecting effect. Lactate and pyruvate protected against 3BP-induced C6 glioma cell death and energy depletion which were overcome with higher doses of 3BP. Lactate and pyruvate enhanced migratory power of C6 glioma which was blocked by 3BP. Pyruvate and lactate did not protect against C6 glioma cell death induced by other glycolytic inhibitors e.g. citrate (inhibitor of phosphofructokinase) and sodium fluoride (inhibitor of enolase). Serial doses of 3BP were synergistic with citrate in decreasing viability of C6 glioma cells and spheroids. Glycolysis subjected to double inhibition using 3BP with citrate depleted ATP, clonogenic power and migratory power of C6 glioma cells. 3BP induced a caspase-dependent cell death in C6 glioma. 3BP was powerful in decreasing viability of human glioblastoma multiforme cells (U373MG) and C6 glioma in a dose- and time-dependent manner. PMID:22318356

  20. Crosslinking reaction in the cationic polymerization of 1,3-pentadiene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭宇行; 张文传; 肖潮萍; 刘佳林; 寸琳锋; 郑朝辉; 邓建国; 关英; 刘莉

    1999-01-01

    The cationic polymerization of 1,3-pentadiene (PD) initiated by AlCl3 in n-hexane was carried out. Effects of arenes, alkyl halides and ethers on the gel formation resulting from crosslinking reaction were investigated. The erosslinking was reduced by various arenes through a chain transfer mechanism. Alkyl halides such as tert-butyl chloride and allyl chloride could complex with AlCl3 to generate an initiating system giving rise to a gel-free polymerization, while benzyl chloride reduced the formation of gel by chain transfer. Ethers exerted two effects on the polymerization system: giving a complex initiating system with AlCl3 to produce a relatively high molecular weight polymer, or reducing crosslinking by lowering activity of carbocations.

  1. Synergistic interaction between selective drugs in cell populations models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Doldán-Martelli

    Full Text Available The design of selective drugs and combinatorial drug treatments are two of the main focuses in modern pharmacology. In this study we use a mathematical model of chimeric ligand-receptor interaction to show that the combination of selective drugs is synergistic in nature, providing a way to gain optimal selective potential at reduced doses compared to the same drugs when applied individually. We use a cell population model of proliferating cells expressing two different amounts of a target protein to show that both selectivity and synergism are robust against variability and heritability in the cell population. The reduction in the total drug administered due to the synergistic performance of the selective drugs can potentially result in reduced toxicity and off-target interactions, providing a mechanism to improve the treatment of cell-based diseases caused by aberrant gene overexpression, such as cancer and diabetes.

  2. Neutral Complex Extraction and Synergistic Extraction of Macrolide Antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on the theory of reactive extraction, new solvent systems were developed to replace butylacetate for extraction of macrolide antibiotics (erythromycin, kitasamycin, spiramycin meleumycin etc.). A new neutral complex solvent extraction system, fatty alcohol-kerosene (marked by E1), was used for extraction of erythromycin, one of the macrolide antibiotics. The extraction equilibrium equation is obtained, and the extraction distribution is as follows The effects of several parameters on extraction equilibrium were investigated. Furthermore, a new synergistic extraction system (marked by E2) was developed, in which another solvent was used as synergistic agent to replace the diluent kerosene in the neutral complex extraction system. Based on these new extraction systems, an improved process for extraction of erythromycin was developed, showing remarkable advantages in technology and economics owing to its low solvent consumption of 3kg per billion unit compared with 9-10 for butylacetate. The recovery process of solvent from raffinate may be eliminated.

  3. Synergistic growth effect among bacteria recovered from root canal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Moreira Júnior

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the ecological relationships between bacterial species that colonize infected root canals. Root canal bacteria recovered from one patient with pulp canal necrosis were evaluated in vitro for synergistic and antagonistic activities determined by mono and co-culture growth kinetics and the production of bacteriocin-like substances using the double layer diffusion method. Peptostreptococcus prevotii triggered a significant increase of Fusobacterium nucleatum growth, while the former bacteria did not affect the growth of P. prevotii. The bacterial species did not produce antagonism activity against itself or against any of the other two species. Despite many studies have demonstrated the capability of root canal microorganisms to produce antagonistic substances, these in vitro experimental tests show the synergistic effect of P. prevotii on the growth of F. nucleatum.

  4. Modelling of Amperometric Biosensor Used for Synergistic Substrates Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dainius Simelevicius

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the operation of an amperometric biosensor producing a chemically amplified signal is modelled numerically. The chemical amplification is achieved by using synergistic substrates. The model is based on non-stationary reaction-diffusion equations. The model involves three layers (compartments: a layer of enzyme solution entrapped on the electrode surface, a dialysis membrane covering the enzyme layer and an outer diffusion layer which is modelled by the Nernst approach. The equation system is solved numerically by using the finite difference technique. The biosensor response and sensitivity are investigated by altering the model parameters influencing the enzyme kinetics as well as the mass transport by diffusion. The biosensor action was analyzed with a special emphasis to the effect of the chemical amplification. The simulation results qualitatively explain and confirm the experimentally observed effect of the synergistic substrates conversion on the biosensor response.

  5. Modelling of amperometric biosensor used for synergistic substrates determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simelevicius, Dainius; Baronas, Romas; Kulys, Juozas

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the operation of an amperometric biosensor producing a chemically amplified signal is modelled numerically. The chemical amplification is achieved by using synergistic substrates. The model is based on non-stationary reaction-diffusion equations. The model involves three layers (compartments): a layer of enzyme solution entrapped on the electrode surface, a dialysis membrane covering the enzyme layer and an outer diffusion layer which is modelled by the Nernst approach. The equation system is solved numerically by using the finite difference technique. The biosensor response and sensitivity are investigated by altering the model parameters influencing the enzyme kinetics as well as the mass transport by diffusion. The biosensor action was analyzed with a special emphasis to the effect of the chemical amplification. The simulation results qualitatively explain and confirm the experimentally observed effect of the synergistic substrates conversion on the biosensor response. PMID:22666066

  6. Synergistic impacts of habitat loss and fragmentation on model ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Lewis J; Newbold, Tim; Purves, Drew W; Tittensor, Derek P; Harfoot, Michael B J

    2016-09-28

    Habitat loss and fragmentation are major threats to biodiversity, yet separating their effects is challenging. We use a multi-trophic, trait-based, and spatially explicit general ecosystem model to examine the independent and synergistic effects of these processes on ecosystem structure. We manipulated habitat by removing plant biomass in varying spatial extents, intensities, and configurations. We found that emergent synergistic interactions of loss and fragmentation are major determinants of ecosystem response, including population declines and trophic pyramid shifts. Furthermore, trait-mediated interactions, such as a disproportionate sensitivity of large-sized organisms to fragmentation, produce significant effects in shaping responses. We also show that top-down regulation mitigates the effects of land use on plant biomass loss, suggesting that models lacking these interactions-including most carbon stock models-may not adequately capture land-use change impacts. Our results have important implications for understanding ecosystem responses to environmental change, and assessing the impacts of habitat fragmentation.

  7. Synergistic Interaction of Environmental Temperature and Microwaves: Prediction and Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple mathematical model of simultaneous combined action of environmental agents has been proposed to describe the synergistic interaction of microwave and high ambient temperature treatment on animal heating. The model suggests that the synergism is caused by the additional effective damage arising from an interaction of sublesions induced by each agent. These sublesions are considered to be ineffective if each agent is taken individually. The additional damage results in a higher body temperature increment when compared with that expected for an independent action of each agent. The model was adjusted to describe the synergistic interaction, to determine its greatest value and the condition under which it can be achieved. The prediction of the model was shown to be consistent with experimental data on rabbit heating. The model appears to be appropriate and the conclusions are valid

  8. Comprehension of synergistic mechanisms for uranium extraction from phosphate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium VI is commonly extracted from phosphoric ores by a well-known process exploiting the synergistic mixture of two extractant molecules: HDEHP and TOPO. In the field of liquid-liquid extraction, synergistic combinations are common but the mechanisms at the origin of the synergy are not well understood. A multi-scale approach has been used to describe these mechanisms, combining two different descriptions: the molecular scale focuses on the ion point of view, while the supramolecular scale focuses on extractants' aggregation. These two approaches have been rationalized by molecular dynamics computations. The results allow describing the synergy through the structure of the complexes and aggregates. With the same approach, some bifunctional compounds, combining the two extracting sites in one molecule, have been studied and compared to the HDEHP/TOPO system in order to identify the origin of their increased capacities in extraction and selectivity. (author)

  9. Synergistic antibacterial activity of Curcumin with antibiotics against Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teow, Sin-Yeang; Ali, Syed Atif

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated the synergistic antibacterial activity of Curcumin with 8 different antibiotic groups. Two reference, one clinical and ten environmental strains of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) were tested. Disc diffusion assay with 25 μg/mL Curcumin demonstrated synergism in combination with a majority of tested antibiotics against S. aureus. However, checkerboard micro dilution assay only showed synergism, fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) indifferent interactions but no antagonism was observed. In time-kill curve, appreciable reduction of bacterial cells was also observed in combination therapy (Curcumin + antibiotics) compared to monotherapy (Curcumin or antibiotic(s) alone). The antibiotics with higher synergistic interaction with Curcumin are arranged in a decreasing order: Amikacin > Gentamicin > Ciprofloxacin.

  10. Synergistic Combination of Electrolysis and Electroporation for Tissue Ablation

    OpenAIRE

    Stehling, Michael K.; Guenther, Enric; Mikus, Paul; Klein, Nina; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Electrolysis, electrochemotherapy with reversible electroporation, nanosecond pulsed electric fields and irreversible electroporation are valuable non-thermal electricity based tissue ablation technologies. This paper reports results from the first large animal study of a new non-thermal tissue ablation technology that employs “Synergistic electrolysis and electroporation” (SEE). The goal of this pre-clinical study is to expand on earlier studies with small animals and use the pig liver to es...

  11. Robust, synergistic regulation of human gene expression using TALE activators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeder, Morgan L; Linder, Samantha J; Reyon, Deepak; Angstman, James F; Fu, Yanfang; Sander, Jeffry D; Joung, J Keith

    2013-03-01

    Artificial activators designed using transcription activator-like effector (TALE) technology have broad utility, but previous studies suggest that these monomeric proteins often exhibit low activities. Here we demonstrate that TALE activators can robustly function individually or in synergistic combinations to increase expression of endogenous human genes over wide dynamic ranges. These findings will encourage applications of TALE activators for research and therapy, and guide design of monomeric TALE-based fusion proteins.

  12. Synergistic Antimicrobial Effect of Tribulus terrestris and Bitter Almond Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Abtahi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The antimicrobial effects of the extracts of different kinds of plants have been demonstrated in several studies. However, no study has been conducted so far on the synergistic effects of two herbal extracts on their germicidal effects. In this study, in addition to antibacterial effects of the aqueous, methanol or ethanol extracts of Tribulus terrestris and bitter almond on some bacteria, the synergistic effects of the extracts of these two plants were also evaluated. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, water, methanol and ethanol extracts of seeds were screened against some bacterial strains. Seeds were extracted by percolation method. Aliquots of the extracts at variable concentrations were then incubated with different bacterial strains, and the antimicrobial activities of the extracts from seeds were determined by MIC. Three antibiotics were used as reference compounds for antibacterial activities. Seeds extract inhibited significantly the growth of the tested bacterial strains. Results: The greatest synergistic effect of T. terrestris and bitter almond extracts is detected in methanol and aqueous extracts. Among the bacterial strains tested, Staphylococcus aureus was most susceptibility. Conclusion: The results showed the highest antibacterial effect in the combination of methanol extract of T. terrestris and the aqueous extract of the bitter almond.

  13. Synergistic combination dry powders for inhaled antimicrobial therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Desmond; Lee, Sie Huey; Teo, Jeanette; Ng, Wai Kiong; Chan, Hak-Kim; Tan, Reginald B. H.

    2013-06-01

    Combination products play an important role in medicine as they offer improved clinical effectiveness, enhanced patient adherence, and reduced administrative costs. In combination antimicrobial therapy, the desired outcome is to extend the antimicrobial spectrum and to achieve a possible synergistic effect. However, adverse antagonistic species may sometimes emerge from such combinations, leading to treatment failure. Therefore, it is crucial to screen the drug candidates for compatibility and possible antagonistic interactions. This work aims to develop a novel synergistic dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulation for antimicrobial combination therapy via the pulmonary route. Binary and ternary combinations were prepared via spray drying on a BUCHI® Nano Spray Dryer B-90. All powders were within the respirable size range, and were consisted of spherical particles that were slightly corrugated. The powers yielded fine particle fractions (of the loaded dose) of over 40% when dispersed using an Aerolizer® DPI at 60 L/min. Time-kill studies carried out against common respiratory tract pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumonia and Acinetobacter baumannii at 1x the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) over 24 hours revealed no antagonistic behavior for both combinations. While the interactions were generally found to be indifferent, a favorable synergistic effect was detected in the binary combination when it was tested against Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria.

  14. Clarithromycin Synergistically Enhances Thalidomide Cytotoxicity in Myeloma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xu-Hua; Shao, Jing-Jing; Mei, Jian-Gang; Li, Han-Qing; Cao, Hong-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Clarithromycin (CAM) is a macrolide antibiotic that is widely used in the treatment of respiratory tract infections, sexually transmitted diseases and infections caused by the Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium avium complex. Recent studies showed that CAM was highly effective against multiple myeloma (MM) when used in combination with immunomodulatory drugs and dexamethasone. However, the related mechanism is still unknown. As 3 immunomodulatory agents are all effective in the respective regimen, we postulated that CAM might enhance the effect of immunomodulatory drugs. We evaluated the interaction effects of CAM and thalidomide on myeloma cells. Taking into consideration that thalidomide did not affect the proliferation of myeloma cells in vitro, we cocultured myeloma cells with peripheral blood monocytes and evaluated the effects of CAM and thalidomide on the cocultured cell model. Data showed that thalidomide and CAM synergistically inhibited the proliferation of the cells. On this same model, we also found that thalidomide and CAM synergistically decreased the secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6. This might be caused by the effect of the 2 drugs on inhibiting the activation of ERK1/2 and AKT. These data suggest that the efficacy of CAM against MM was partly due to its synergistic action with the immunomodulatory agents.

  15. Complex Macromolecular Architectures by Living Cationic Polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Alghamdi, Reem D.

    2015-05-01

    Poly (vinyl ether)-based graft polymers have been synthesized by the combination of living cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers with other living or controlled/ living polymerization techniques (anionic and ATRP). The process involves the synthesis of well-defined homopolymers (PnBVE) and co/terpolymers [PnBVE-b-PCEVE-b-PSiDEGVE (ABC type) and PSiDEGVE-b-PnBVE-b-PSiDEGVE (CAC type)] by sequential living cationic polymerization of n-butyl vinyl ether (nBVE), 2-chloroethyl vinyl ether (CEVE) and tert-butyldimethylsilyl ethylene glycol vinyl ether (SiDEGVE), using mono-functional {[n-butoxyethyl acetate (nBEA)], [1-(2-chloroethoxy) ethyl acetate (CEEA)], [1-(2-(2-(t-butyldimethylsilyloxy)ethoxy) ethoxy) ethyl acetate (SiDEGEA)]} or di-functional [1,4-cyclohexanedimethanol di(1-ethyl acetate) (cHMDEA), (VEMOA)] initiators. The living cationic polymerizations of those monomers were conducted in hexane at -20 0C using Et3Al2Cl3 (catalyst) in the presence of 1 M AcOEt base.[1] The PCEVE segments of the synthesized block terpolymers were then used to react with living macroanions (PS-DPE-Li; poly styrene diphenyl ethylene lithium) to afford graft polymers. The quantitative desilylation of PSiDEGVE segments by n-Bu4N+F- in THF at 0 °C led to graft co- and terpolymers in which the polyalcohol is the outer block. These co-/terpolymers were subsequently subjected to “grafting-from” reactions by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of styrene to afford more complex macromolecular architectures. The base assisted living cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers were also used to synthesize well-defined α-hydroxyl polyvinylether (PnBVE-OH). The resulting polymers were then modified into an ATRP macro-initiator for the synthesis of well-defined block copolymers (PnBVE-b-PS). Bifunctional PnBVE with terminal malonate groups was also synthesized and used as a precursor for more complex architectures such as H-shaped block copolymer by “grafting-from” or

  16. Aggregate Formed by a Cationic Fluorescence Probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN, Juan; SANG, Da-Yong; JI, Guo-Zhen

    2007-01-01

    The aggregation behavior of a cationic fluorescence probe 10-(4,7,10,13,16-pentaoxa-1-azacyclooctadecyl-methyl)anthracen-9-ylmethyl dodecanoate (1) was observed and studied by a fluorescence methodology in acidic and neutral conditions. By using the Py scale, differences between simple aggregates and micelles have been discussed. The stability of simple aggregates was discussed in terms of hydrophobic interaction and electrostatic repulsion. The absence of excimer emission of the anthrancene moiety of probe 1 in neutral condition was attributed to the photoinduced electron transfer mechanism instead of photodimerization.

  17. Synchrony and exertion during dance independently raise pain threshold and encourage social bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarr, Bronwyn; Launay, Jacques; Cohen, Emma; Dunbar, Robin

    2015-10-01

    Group dancing is a ubiquitous human activity that involves exertive synchronized movement to music. It is hypothesized to play a role in social bonding, potentially via the release of endorphins, which are analgesic and reward-inducing, and have been implicated in primate social bonding. We used a 2 × 2 experimental design to examine effects of exertion and synchrony on bonding. Both demonstrated significant independent positive effects on pain threshold (a proxy for endorphin activation) and in-group bonding. This suggests that dance which involves both exertive and synchronized movement may be an effective group bonding activity. PMID:26510676

  18. Modelling of marine base cation emissions, concentrations and deposition in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Werner

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Base cations exert a large impact on various geochemical and geophysical processes both in the atmosphere and at the Earth surface. One of the essential roles of these compounds is impact on surface pH causing an increase in alkalinity and neutralizing the effects of acidity generated by sulphur and nitrogen deposition. During recent years anthropogenic emissions of base cations in the UK have decreased substantially, by about 70%, 78%, 75% and 48% for Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+ and K+, respectively, over the period 1990–2006. For the island regions, such as the UK, the main source of base cation particles is the aerosol produced from the sea surface. Here, the sea salt aerosol (SSA emissions are calculated with parameterisations proposed by Mårtensson et al. (2003 for ultra fine particles, Monahan et al. (1986 for fine particles and Smith and Harisson (1998 for coarse particles continuously with a 0.1 μm size step using WRF-modelled wind speed data at a 5 km × 5 km grid square resolution with a 3 h time step for two selected years 2003 and 2006. SSA production has been converted into base cation emissions, with the assumption that the chemical composition of the particle emitted from the sea surface is equal to the chemical composition of sea water, and used as input data in the Fine Resolution Atmospheric Multi-pollutant Exchange Model (FRAME. FRAME model annual mean concentrations and total wet deposition at a 5 km × 5 km grid resolution, are compared with concentrations in air and wet deposition from the National Monitoring Network and measurements based estimates of UK deposition budget. The correlation coefficient for wet deposition achieves high values (R = 0.8 for Na+ and Mg2+, whereas for Ca2+ the correlation is poor (R < 0.3. Base cation concentrations are also represented well, with some overestimations on the west coast and underestimations in the

  19. Modelling of base cation emissions, concentrations and deposition in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Werner

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Base cations exerts a large impact on various geochemical and geophysical processes both in the atmosphere and at the Earth surface. One of the essential roles of these compounds is impact on surface pH causing an increase in alkalinity and neutralizing the effects of acidity generated by sulphur and nitrogen deposition. During recent years anthropogenic emissions of base cations in the UK have decreased substantially, by about 70% for Na+, 78% for Mg2+, 75% for Ca2+ and about 48% for K+ for the period 1990–2006. For the island regions, such as the is UK, the main source of base cation particles is the aerosol produced from the sea surface. Here, the sea salt aerosol (SSA emissions are calculated with parameterisations proposed by Maårtensson et al. (2003; ultra fine particles, Monahan et al. (1986; fine particles and Smith and Harisson (1998; coarse particles continuously with a 0.1 μ m size step using WRF-modelled wind speed data at a 5 km × 5 km grid square resolution with a 3 h time step for two selected years 2003 and 2006. SSA production has been converted into base cation emissions, with the assumption that the chemical composition of the particle emitted from the sea surface is equal to the chemical composition of sea water, and used as input data in the Fine Resolution Atmospheric Multi-pollutant Exchange Model (FRAME. FRAME model results, yearly mean concentrations and total wet deposition at a 5 km × 5 km grid resolution, are compared with concentrations in air and wet deposition from the National Monitoring Network and measurements based estimates of UK deposition budget. The correlation coefficient for wet deposition achieves high values for Na+ and Mg2+, and for Ca2+ there is significant scattering. Base cation concentration is also represented well, with some overestimations on the west coast and underestimations in the centre of the land.

  20. Protection of oxidative hair color fading from shampoo washing by hydrophobically modified cationic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y; Foltis, L; Moore, D J; Rigoletto, R

    2009-01-01

    The fading of oxidative color in hair as a result of daily shampoo washing activities has become a common problem and a source of frequent complaints by consumers. The fading occurs primarily through hair dye solubility in water. One aspect of the current study investigates the physical and chemical factors that influence hair color fading during the washing process. This is accomplished by testing hair dye dissolution in water from dyed hair samples with variation of surfactant type, pH, and hair type. Furthermore, a new approach to preventing color fading is developed aiming to provide an effective barrier function for hair dye from dissolving into water. The preliminary investigation of a series of polymers with various functional groups indicates that polymers with hydrophobically modified and cationic functionalities are most effective in preventing hair dye dissolution in water. It is also evident that a synergistic effect of the polymer's hydrophobic moieties and cationic charges are important on hair color protection during shampoo washing processes. A primary example of a polymer within this category is a cationic terpolymer of vinylpyrrolidone, dimethylaminopropyl methacrylamide, and methacryloylaminopropyl lauryldimonium chloride (INCI: Polyquaternium-55). The color protection benefit of this polymer is evaluated using newly developed methodologies for evaluating hair color changes, such as hair color fading tests through multiple shampoo washes with mannequin heads and hair tresses, both derived from human hair, colorimetry, and quantitative digital image analysis. In addition, new infrared spectroscopic imaging techniques are used to detect the hair dye deposition behavior inside hair fibers both with and without the color protection treatment. Both visual and instrumental measurement results indicate that Polyquaternium-55 provides a high level of color protection when formulated in a hair color protection regimen with up to 50% color protection. This

  1. Synergistic effects of leucine and resveratrol on insulin sensitivity and fat metabolism in adipocytes and mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruckbauer Antje

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sirtuins are important regulators of glucose and fat metabolism, and sirtuin activation has been proposed as a therapeutic target for insulin resistance and diabetes. We have shown leucine to increase mitochondrial biogenesis and fat oxidation via Sirt1 dependent pathways. Resveratrol is a widely recognized activator of Sirt; however, the biologically-effective high concentrations used in cell and animal studies are generally impractical or difficult to achieve in humans. Accordingly, we sought to determine whether leucine would exhibit synergy with low levels of resveratrol on sirtuin-dependent outcomes in adipocytes and in diet-induced obese (DIO mice. Methods 3T3-L1 mouse adipocytes were treated with Leucine (0.5 mM, β-hydroxy-β-methyl butyrate (HMB (5 μM or Resveratrol (200 nM alone or in combination. In addition, diet-induced obese mice were treated for 6-weeks with low (2 g/kg diet or high (10 g/kg diet dose HMB, Leucine (24 g/kg diet; 200% of normal level or low (12.5 mg/kg diet or high (225 mg/kg diet dose resveratrol, alone or as combination with leucine-resveratrol or HMB-resveratrol. Results Fatty acid oxidation, AMPK, Sirt1 and Sirt3 activity in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and in muscle cells, were significantly increased by the combinations compared to the individual treatments. Similarly, 6-week feeding of low-dose resveratrol combined with either leucine or its metabolite HMB to DIO mice increased adipose Sirt1 activity, muscle glucose and palmitate uptake (measured via PET/CT, insulin sensitivity (HOMAIR, improved inflammatory stress biomarkers (CRP, IL-6, MCP-1, adiponectin and reduced adiposity comparable to the effects of high dose resveratrol, while low-dose resveratrol exerted no independent effect. Conclusion These data demonstrate that either leucine or its metabolite HMB may be combined with a low concentration of resveratrol to exert synergistic effects on Sirt1-dependent outcomes; this may result in more

  2. Synergistic enhancement of iron oxide nanoparticle and gadolinium for dual-contrast MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fan [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health - NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Center for Molecular Imaging and Translational Medicine, School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Huang, Xinglu [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health - NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Qian, Chunqi [Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Center for Molecular Imaging and Translational Medicine, School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zhu, Lei [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health - NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Center for Molecular Imaging and Translational Medicine, School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Hida, Naoki [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health - NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Niu, Gang, E-mail: niug@mail.nih.gov [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health - NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Chen, Xiaoyuan, E-mail: shawn.chen@nih.gov [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health - NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MR contrast agents exert influence on T{sub 1} or T{sub 2} relaxation time of the surrounding tissue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combined use of iron oxide and Gd-DTPA can improve the sensitivity/specificity of lesion detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dual contrast MRI enhances the delineation of tumor borders and small lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of DC-MRI can come from the high paramagnetic susceptibility of Gd{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of DC-MRI can also come from the distinct pharmacokinetic distribution of SPIO and Gd-DTPA. -- Abstract: Purpose: The use of MR contrast agents allows accurate diagnosis by exerting an influence on the longitudinal (T{sub 1}) or transverse (T{sub 2}) relaxation time of the surrounding tissue. In this study, we combined the use of iron oxide (IO) particles and nonspecific extracellular gadolinium chelate (Gd) in order to further improve the sensitivity and specificity of lesion detection. Procedures: With a 7-Tesla scanner, pre-contrasted, IO-enhanced and dual contrast agent enhanced MRIs were performed in phantom, normal animals, and animal models of lymph node tumor metastases and orthotopic brain tumor. For the dual-contrast (DC) MRI, we focused on the evaluation of T{sub 2} weighted DC MRI with IO administered first, then followed by the injection of a bolus of gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Results: Based on the C/N ratios and MRI relaxometry, the synergistic effect of coordinated administration of Gd-DTPA and IO was observed and confirmed in phantom, normal liver and tumor models. At 30 min after administration of Feridex, Gd-DTPA further decreased T{sub 2} relaxation in liver immediately after the injection. Additional administration of Gd-DTPA also immediately increased the signal contrast between tumor and brain parenchyma and maximized the C/N ratio to -4.12 {+-} 0.71. Dual contrast MRI also enhanced the

  3. Cationic Antimicrobial Polymers and Their Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Carmona-Ribeiro

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cationic compounds are promising candidates for development of antimicrobial agents. Positive charges attached to surfaces, particles, polymers, peptides or bilayers have been used as antimicrobial agents by themselves or in sophisticated formulations. The main positively charged moieties in these natural or synthetic structures are quaternary ammonium groups, resulting in quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs. The advantage of amphiphilic cationic polymers when compared to small amphiphilic molecules is their enhanced microbicidal activity. Besides, many of these polymeric structures also show low toxicity to human cells; a major requirement for biomedical applications. Determination of the specific elements in polymers, which affect their antimicrobial activity, has been previously difficult due to broad molecular weight distributions and random sequences characteristic of radical polymerization. With the advances in polymerization control, selection of well defined polymers and structures are allowing greater insight into their structure-antimicrobial activity relationship. On the other hand, antimicrobial polymers grafted or self-assembled to inert or non inert vehicles can yield hybrid antimicrobial nanostructures or films, which can act as antimicrobials by themselves or deliver bioactive molecules for a variety of applications, such as wound dressing, photodynamic antimicrobial therapy, food packing and preservation and antifouling applications.

  4. Cobalt 60 cation exchange with mexican clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mexican clays can be used to remove radioactive elements from contaminated aqueous solutions. Cation exchange experiments were performed with 60 Co radioactive solution. In the present work the effect of contact time on the sorption of Co 2+ was studied. The contact time in hydrated montmorillonite was from 5 to 120 minutes and in dehydrated montmorillonite 5 to 1400 minutes. The Co 2+ uptake value was, in hydrated montmorillonite, between 0.3 to 0.85 m eq/g and in dehydrated montmorillonite, between 0.6 to 1.40 m eq/g. The experiments were done in a pH 5.1 to 5.7 and normal conditions. XRD patterns were used to characterize the samples. The crystallinity was determined by X-ray Diffraction and it was maintained before and after the cation exchange. DTA thermo grams showed the temperatures of the lost humidity and crystallization water. Finally, was observed that dehydrated montmorillonite adsorb more cobalt than hydrated montmorillonite. (Author)

  5. Photodissociation of Cerium Oxide Nanocluster Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, S T; Ard, S G; Dye, B E; Schaefer, H F; Duncan, M A

    2016-04-21

    Cerium oxide cluster cations, CexOy(+), are produced via laser vaporization in a pulsed nozzle source and detected with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The mass spectrum displays a strongly preferred oxide stoichiometry for each cluster with a specific number of metal atoms x, with x ≤ y. Specifically, the most prominent clusters correspond to the formula CeO(CeO2)n(+). The cluster cations are mass selected and photodissociated with a Nd:YAG laser at either 532 or 355 nm. The prominent clusters dissociate to produce smaller species also having a similar CeO(CeO2)n(+) formula, always with apparent leaving groups of (CeO2). The production of CeO(CeO2)n(+) from the dissociation of many cluster sizes establishes the relative stability of these clusters. Furthermore, the consistent loss of neutral CeO2 shows that the smallest neutral clusters adopt the same oxidation state (IV) as the most common form of bulk cerium oxide. Clusters with higher oxygen content than the CeO(CeO2)n(+) masses are present with much lower abundance. These species dissociate by the loss of O2, leaving surviving clusters with the CeO(CeO2)n(+) formula. Density functional theory calculations on these clusters suggest structures composed of stable CeO(CeO2)n(+) cores with excess oxygen bound to the surface as a superoxide unit (O2(-)). PMID:27035210

  6. Cationic liposomes formulated with DMPC and a gemini surfactant traverse the cell membrane without causing a significant bio-damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanutti, E; Papacci, F; Sennato, S; Bombelli, C; Viola, I; Bonincontro, A; Bordi, F; Mancini, G; Gigli, G; Risuleo, G

    2014-10-01

    Cationic liposomes have been intensively studied both in basic and applied research because of their promising potential as non-viral molecular vehicles. This work was aimed to gain more information on the interactions between the plasmamembrane and liposomes formed by a natural phospholipid and a cationic surfactant of the gemini family. The present work was conducted with the synergistic use of diverse experimental approaches: electro-rotation measurements, atomic force microscopy, ζ-potential measurements, laser scanning confocal microscopy and biomolecular/cellular techniques. Electro-rotation measurements pointed out that the interaction of cationic liposomes with the cell membrane alters significantly its dielectric and geometric parameters. This alteration, being accompanied by significant changes of the membrane surface roughness as measured by atomic force microscopy, suggests that the interaction with the liposomes causes locally substantial modifications to the structure and morphology of the cell membrane. However, the results of electrophoretic mobility (ζ-potential) experiments show that upon the interaction the electric charge exposed on the cell surface does not vary significantly, pointing out that the simple adhesion on the cell surface of the cationic liposomes or their fusion with the membrane is to be ruled out. As a matter of fact, confocal microscopy images directly demonstrated the penetration of the liposomes inside the cell and their diffusion within the cytoplasm. Electro-rotation experiments performed in the presence of endocytosis inhibitors suggest that the internalization is mediated by, at least, one specific pathway. Noteworthy, the liposome uptake by the cell does not cause a significant biological damage. PMID:25017801

  7. Effect of the alkaline cation size on the conductivity in gel polymer electrolytes and their influence on photo electrochemical solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, T M W J; Fernando, H D N S; Furlani, M; Albinsson, I; Dissanayake, M A K L; Ratnasekera, J L; Mellander, B-E

    2016-04-28

    The nature and concentration of cationic species in the electrolyte exert a profound influence on the efficiency of nanocrystalline dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). A series of DSSCs based on gel electrolytes containing five alkali iodide salts (LiI, NaI, KI, RbI and CsI) and polyacrylonitrile with plasticizers were fabricated and studied, in order to investigate the dependence of solar cell performance on the cation size. The ionic conductivity of electrolytes with relatively large cations, K(+), Rb(+) and Cs(+), was higher and essentially constant, while for the electrolytes containing the two smaller cations, Na(+) and Li(+), the conductivity values were lower. The temperature dependence of conductivity in this series appears to follow the Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher equation. The sample containing the smallest cation shows the lowest conductivity and the highest activation energy of ∼36.5 meV, while K(+), Rb(+) and Cs(+) containing samples show an activation energy of ∼30.5 meV. DSSCs based on the gel electrolyte and a TiO2 double layer with the N719 dye exhibited an enhancement in the open circuit voltage with increasing cation size. This can be attributed to the decrease in the recombination rate of electrons and to the conduction band shift resulting from cation adsorption by TiO2. The maximum efficiency value, 3.48%, was obtained for the CsI containing cell. The efficiencies shown in this study are lower compared to values reported in the literature, and this can be attributed to the use of a single salt and the absence of other additives, since the focus of the present study was to analyze the cation effect. The highest short circuit current density of 9.43 mA cm(-2) was shown by the RbI containing cell. The enhancement of the solar cell performance with increasing size of the cation is discussed in terms of the effect of the cations on the TiO2 anode and ion transport in the electrolyte. In liquid electrolyte based DSSCs, the short circuit current density

  8. Physical exercise at the workplace reduces perceived physical exertion during healthcare work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Markus Due; Sundstrup, Emil; Brandt, Mikkel;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High physical exertion during work is a risk factor for musculoskeletal pain and long-term sickness absence. Physical exertion (RPE) reflects the balance between physical work demands and physical capacity of the individual. Thus, increasing the physical capacity through physical...... exercise may decrease physical exertion during work. This study investigates the effect of workplace-based versus home-based physical exercise on physical exertion during work (WRPE) among healthcare workers. METHODS: 200 female healthcare workers (age: 42.0, body mass index: 24.1, average pain intensity......: 3.1 on a scale of 0 to 10, average WRPE: 3.6 on a scale of 0 to 10) from 18 departments at three participating hospitals. Participants were randomly allocated at the cluster level to 10 weeks of: (1) workplace physical exercise (WORK) performed in groups during working hours for 5×10 minutes per...

  9. Stiffness and thickness of fascia do not explain chronic exertional compartment syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Hansen, Philip; Stål, Per;

    2011-01-01

    Chronic exertional compartment syndrome is diagnosed based on symptoms and elevated intramuscular pressure and often is treated with fasciotomy. However, what contributes to the increased intramuscular pressure remains unknown....

  10. A Thermodynamic Model of Monovalent Cation Homeostasis in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Susanne; Fröhlich, Martina; Lichtenberg-Fraté, Hella; Shabala, Sergey; Shabala, Lana; Klipp, Edda

    2016-01-01

    Cationic and heavy metal toxicity is involved in a substantial number of diseases in mammals and crop plants. Therefore, the understanding of tightly regulated transporter activities, as well as conceiving the interplay of regulatory mechanisms, is of substantial interest. A generalized thermodynamic description is developed for the complex interplay of the plasma membrane ion transporters, membrane potential and the consumption of energy for maintaining and restoring specific intracellular cation concentrations. This concept is applied to the homeostasis of cation concentrations in the yeast cells of S. cerevisiae. The thermodynamic approach allows to model passive ion fluxes driven by the electrochemical potential differences, but also primary or secondary active transport processes driven by the inter- play of different ions (symport, antiport) or by ATP consumption (ATPases). The model-confronted with experimental data-reproduces the experimentally observed potassium and proton fluxes induced by the external stimuli KCl and glucose. The estimated phenomenological constants combine kinetic parameters and transport coefficients. These are in good agreement with the biological understanding of the transporters thus providing a better understanding of the control exerted by the coupled fluxes. The model predicts the flux of additional ion species, like e.g. chloride, as a potential candidate for counterbalancing positive charges. Furthermore, the effect of a second KCl stimulus is simulated, predicting a reduced cellular response for cells that were first exposed to a high KCl stimulus compared to cells pretreated with a mild KCl stimulus. By describing the generalized forces that are responsible for a given flow, the model provides information and suggestions for new experiments. Furthermore, it can be extended to other systems such as e.g. Candida albicans, or selected plant cells.

  11. A Thermodynamic Model of Monovalent Cation Homeostasis in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Gerber

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cationic and heavy metal toxicity is involved in a substantial number of diseases in mammals and crop plants. Therefore, the understanding of tightly regulated transporter activities, as well as conceiving the interplay of regulatory mechanisms, is of substantial interest. A generalized thermodynamic description is developed for the complex interplay of the plasma membrane ion transporters, membrane potential and the consumption of energy for maintaining and restoring specific intracellular cation concentrations. This concept is applied to the homeostasis of cation concentrations in the yeast cells of S. cerevisiae. The thermodynamic approach allows to model passive ion fluxes driven by the electrochemical potential differences, but also primary or secondary active transport processes driven by the inter- play of different ions (symport, antiport or by ATP consumption (ATPases. The model-confronted with experimental data-reproduces the experimentally observed potassium and proton fluxes induced by the external stimuli KCl and glucose. The estimated phenomenological constants combine kinetic parameters and transport coefficients. These are in good agreement with the biological understanding of the transporters thus providing a better understanding of the control exerted by the coupled fluxes. The model predicts the flux of additional ion species, like e.g. chloride, as a potential candidate for counterbalancing positive charges. Furthermore, the effect of a second KCl stimulus is simulated, predicting a reduced cellular response for cells that were first exposed to a high KCl stimulus compared to cells pretreated with a mild KCl stimulus. By describing the generalized forces that are responsible for a given flow, the model provides information and suggestions for new experiments. Furthermore, it can be extended to other systems such as e.g. Candida albicans, or selected plant cells.

  12. Ground state of naphthyl cation: Singlet or triplet?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Achintya Kumar; Vaval, Nayana, E-mail: np.vaval@ncl.res.in; Pal, Sourav, E-mail: s.pal@ncl.res.in [Physical Chemistry Division, CSIR-National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008 (India); Manohar, Prashant U. [Department of Chemistry, BITS Pilani, Pilani Campus (India)

    2014-03-21

    We present a benchmark theoretical investigation on the electronic structure and singlet-triplet(S-T) gap of 1- and 2-naphthyl cations using the CCSD(T) method. Our calculations reveal that the ground states of both the naphthyl cations are singlet, contrary to the results obtained by DFT/B3LYP calculations reported in previous theoretical studies. However, the triplet states obtained in the two structural isomers of naphthyl cation are completely different. The triplet state in 1-naphthyl cation is (π,σ) type, whereas in 2-naphthyl cation it is (σ,σ{sup ′}) type. The S-T gaps in naphthyl cations and the relative stability ordering of the singlet and the triplet states are highly sensitive to the basis-set quality as well as level of correlation, and demand for inclusion of perturbative triples in the coupled-cluster ansatz.

  13. Influence of interlayer cations on organic intercalation of montmorillonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Limei; Liao, Libing; Lv, Guocheng

    2015-09-15

    The influence of the types of interlayer cations on organic intercalation of montmorillonite (Mt) was studied in this paper. The distribution of Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+) and Fe(3+) in montmorillonite interlayer, their interaction with structure layers and the effect of interlayer cations on the basal spacing of Mt, the amount of binding water for different interlayer cations and the binding force between them were investigated systematically. 1-Hexadecy1-3-methylimidazolium chloride monohydrate (C16mimCl) was intercalated into montmorillonites with different interlayer cations. The influence of interlayer cations on organic intercalation was investigated. Molecular dynamics (MD) modeling was used to speculate the interlayer microstructures of the organically intercalated Mt with different interlayer cations. These simulations help to predict the microstructure of organo-Mt and guide their relevant engineering applications. PMID:26001131

  14. Accidents leading to over-exertion back injuries among nursing personnel

    OpenAIRE

    Engkvist, Inga-Lill

    1999-01-01

    The overall aim of the present thesis was to contribute to the knowledge of occupational accidents leading to over-exertion back injuries among nursing personnel, which can be used for developing effective preventive strategies. Different combinations of factors and events were assumed to determine the type of accident process leading to an over-exertion injury. The first study used the Swedish Occupational Injury Register (ISA) to investigate the occurrence of reported ...

  15. Synchrony and exertion during dance independently raise pain threshold and encourage social bonding.

    OpenAIRE

    Tarr, B; Launay, JP; Cohen, EEA; Dunbar, RIM

    2015-01-01

    Group dancing is a ubiquitous human activity that involves exertive synchronized movement to music. It is hypothesized to play a role in social bonding, potentially via the release of endorphins, which are analgesic and reward-inducing, and have been implicated in primate social bonding. We used a 2 × 2 experimental design to examine effects of exertion and synchrony on bonding. Both demonstrated significant independent positive effects on pain threshold (a proxy for endorphin activation) and...

  16. Prolonged mental exertion does not alter neuromuscular function of the knee extensors

    OpenAIRE

    Pageaux, Benjamin; Marcora, Samuele; Lepers, Romuald

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Purpose: The aim of this study was to test the hypotheses that prolonged mental exertion i) reduces maximal muscle activation and ii) increases the extent of central fatigue induced by subsequent endurance exercise. Methods: Neuromuscular function of the knee extensor muscles was assessed in 10 male subjects in two different conditions: i) before and after prolonged mental exertion leading to mental fatigue; ii) before and after an easy cognitive task (control). Both c...

  17. Autophagy enhancement contributes to the synergistic effect of vitamin D in temozolomide-based glioblastoma chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    BAK, DONG-HO; KANG, SEONG HEE; CHOI, DU RI; GIL, MI NA; YU, KWANG SIK; JEONG, JI HEUN; LEE, NAM-SEOB; LEE, JE-HUN; JEONG, YOUNG-GIL; KIM, DONG KWAN; KIM, DO-KYUNG; KIM, JWA-JIN; HAN, SEUNG-YUN

    2016-01-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ), an alkylating agent, is recommended as the initial treatment for high-grade glioblastoma. TMZ is widely used, but its short half-life and the frequency of tumor resistance limit its therapeutic efficacy. In the present study, the anticancer effect of vitamin D (VD) combined with TMZ upon glioblastoma was determined, and the underlying mechanism of this effect was identified. Through cell viability, clonogenic and wound healing assays, the current study demonstrated that treatment of a C6 glioblastoma cell line with TMZ and VD resulted in significantly increased in vitro antitumor effects compared with either VD or TMZ alone. Autophagy, hypothesized to be the dominant mechanism underlying TMZ-based tumor cell death, was maximally activated in TMZ and VD co-treated C6 cells. This was demonstrated by ultrastructural observations of autophagosomes, increased size and number of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) puncta and increased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II. However, the extent of apoptosis was not significantly different between cells treated with TMZ and VD and those treated with TMZ alone. Addition of the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine markedly inhibited the anticancer effect of TMZ and VD treatment, indicating that the chemosensitizing effect of VD in TMZ-based glioblastoma therapy is generated through enhancement of cytotoxic autophagy. TMZ and VD co-treatment also significantly inhibited tumor progression and prolonged survival duration in rat glioblastoma orthotopic xenograft models when compared with TMZ treatment alone. These in vivo results are concordant with the aforementioned in vitro results, together revealing that the combined use of TMZ and VD exerts synergistic antitumor effects on rat models of glioblastoma and may represent an effective therapeutic strategy. PMID:27313664

  18. NLLSS: Predicting Synergistic Drug Combinations Based on Semi-supervised Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Ren, Biao; Chen, Ming; Wang, Quanxin; Zhang, Lixin; Yan, Guiying

    2016-07-01

    Fungal infection has become one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired infections with high mortality rates. Furthermore, drug resistance is common for fungus-causing diseases. Synergistic drug combinations could provide an effective strategy to overcome drug resistance. Meanwhile, synergistic drug combinations can increase treatment efficacy and decrease drug dosage to avoid toxicity. Therefore, computational prediction of synergistic drug combinations for fungus-causing diseases becomes attractive. In this study, we proposed similar nature of drug combinations: principal drugs which obtain synergistic effect with similar adjuvant drugs are often similar and vice versa. Furthermore, we developed a novel algorithm termed Network-based Laplacian regularized Least Square Synergistic drug combination prediction (NLLSS) to predict potential synergistic drug combinations by integrating different kinds of information such as known synergistic drug combinations, drug-target interactions, and drug chemical structures. We applied NLLSS to predict antifungal synergistic drug combinations and showed that it achieved excellent performance both in terms of cross validation and independent prediction. Finally, we performed biological experiments for fungal pathogen Candida albicans to confirm 7 out of 13 predicted antifungal synergistic drug combinations. NLLSS provides an efficient strategy to identify potential synergistic antifungal combinations. PMID:27415801

  19. Bespoke cationic nano-objects via RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerisation

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, M.; Penfold, NJW; Lovett, JR; Warren, NJ; Douglas, CWI; Doroshenko, N; Verstraete, P; Smets, J; Armes, SP

    2016-01-01

    A range of cationic diblock copolymer nanoparticles are synthesised via polymerisation-induced self-assembly (PISA) using a RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerisation formulation. The cationic character of these nanoparticles can be systematically varied by utilising a binary mixture of two macro-CTAs, namely non-ionic poly(glycerol monomethacrylate) (PGMA) and cationic poly[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl]trimethylammonium chloride (PQDMA), with poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate) (PHPMA) being selected...

  20. Development of Recombinant Cationic Polymers for Gene Therapy Research

    OpenAIRE

    Canine, Brenda F.; Hatefi, Arash

    2010-01-01

    Cationic polymers created through recombinant DNA technology have the potential to fill a void in the area of gene delivery. The recombinant cationic polymers to be discussed here are amino acid based polymers synthesized in E.coli with the purpose to not only address the major barriers to efficient gene delivery but offer safety, biodegradability, targetability and cost-effectiveness. This review helps the readers to get a better understanding about the evolution of recombinant cationic poly...

  1. Synergistic myoprotection of L-arginine and adenosine in a canine model of global myocardial ischaemic reperfusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Lei; DIAN Ke; CHEN Hui-jiao; AN Qi; JIA Meng-xing; YANG Ping-liang; WANG Wei; DENG Shuo-zeng; LIU Jin

    2007-01-01

    Background Endogenous nitric oxide and adenosine increase simultaneously to keep the balance of energy demand and supply when the oxygen supply is insufficient, which suggests that nitric oxide and adenosine might exert a synergistic myoprotection during tissue hypoxia. In this study, we tested this hypothesis utilizing a canine model of prolonged global myocardial ischaemic reperfusion injury.Methods In this double blind, controlled study, the hearts of 24 anaesthetized mongrel dogs were arrested for 2 hours with aortic cross clamping and blood cardioplegia. The treatment groups were those supplemented with 2 mmol/L L-arginine (ARG), supplemented with 1 mmol/L adenosine (ADO), ARG + ADO supplemented with both, and no supplementation (control) (n=6 in each group). Haemodynamics, biochemical indices, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content and myeloperoxidase activities of myocardium were determined to evaluate myocardial injury. Statistical comparison was performed by two way ANOVA.Results Although the requirements for inotropic supports were higher, the cardiac outputs were lower in control group than in ARG, ADO and the combination groups. Plasma cardiac troponin I levels were higher and the areas of hydropic changes were larger in control group than in ARG and ADO groups. Combination of arginine and adenosine provided further myoprotection with respect to better cardiac performance, lower release of cardiac troponin I, and smaller areas of hydropic changes compared with ARG and ADO groups. ATP content was higher, but myeloperoxidase activities of myocardium were significantly lower in the combination group than in control, ARG and ADO groups (P<0.05).Conclusions Combination of L-arginine and adenosine provides synergistic myoprotection in a canine model of global myocardial ischaemia. Thus, the combination is recommended when the heart is exposed to a prolonged ischaemia during cardiac surgery.

  2. Synergistic action of gravity and temperature on the motor system within the lifespan: a "Baby Astronaut" hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meigal, Alexander Yu

    2013-03-01

    Here we describe GATO (gravity, age, thermoregulation, and oxygenation) hypothesis (or a "Baby Astronaut" hypothesis) which we suggest to explain synergistic effect of these factors on the motor system. Taken separately, microgravity (in spaceflight, G~0), the early age, heat and hypoxia exert identical effect on the motor system. We posit that synergy of these factors originate from their synchronicity during intrauterine immersion (analog microgravity) of the fetus in warm hypoxic condition. We further postulate three successive motor adaptive strategies, driven lifelong by gravity as the key factor. The first by age, fetal/microgravity (FM)-strategy, induced by the intrauterine immersion of the fetus, is based on domination of fast type muscle fibers. After birth, thought to be analog for landing from orbit, newborn is subjected to combined influence of cooler ambient temperature, normoxia, and 1G Earth gravity, which cooperatively form a slower GE-strategy. Eventually, healthy ageing results in further domination of slow type muscle fibers that forms the slowest (SL)-strategy. Our hypothesis implies that specific sensory conditions may substitute for each other owing to their synergistic action on the motor system. According to GATO hypothesis heating and hypoxia may be considered as "pro-microgravity" factors, while cold and hyperoxia - as "pro-gravity" ones. As such, cold may act as a partial "surrogate" for gravity, estimated as ~0.2G. That may have potential to elaborate countermeasures for muscle atrophy in astronauts either on-board in long-term spaceflight or for post-flight rehabilitation. Based on GATO hypothesis, predictions on muscle remodeling caused by illumination, sound/noise, and gravidity are discussed.

  3. Synergistic action of gravity and temperature on the motor system within the lifespan: a "Baby Astronaut" hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meigal, Alexander Yu

    2013-03-01

    Here we describe GATO (gravity, age, thermoregulation, and oxygenation) hypothesis (or a "Baby Astronaut" hypothesis) which we suggest to explain synergistic effect of these factors on the motor system. Taken separately, microgravity (in spaceflight, G~0), the early age, heat and hypoxia exert identical effect on the motor system. We posit that synergy of these factors originate from their synchronicity during intrauterine immersion (analog microgravity) of the fetus in warm hypoxic condition. We further postulate three successive motor adaptive strategies, driven lifelong by gravity as the key factor. The first by age, fetal/microgravity (FM)-strategy, induced by the intrauterine immersion of the fetus, is based on domination of fast type muscle fibers. After birth, thought to be analog for landing from orbit, newborn is subjected to combined influence of cooler ambient temperature, normoxia, and 1G Earth gravity, which cooperatively form a slower GE-strategy. Eventually, healthy ageing results in further domination of slow type muscle fibers that forms the slowest (SL)-strategy. Our hypothesis implies that specific sensory conditions may substitute for each other owing to their synergistic action on the motor system. According to GATO hypothesis heating and hypoxia may be considered as "pro-microgravity" factors, while cold and hyperoxia - as "pro-gravity" ones. As such, cold may act as a partial "surrogate" for gravity, estimated as ~0.2G. That may have potential to elaborate countermeasures for muscle atrophy in astronauts either on-board in long-term spaceflight or for post-flight rehabilitation. Based on GATO hypothesis, predictions on muscle remodeling caused by illumination, sound/noise, and gravidity are discussed. PMID:23287049

  4. Crosstalk between Wnt/β-catenin and estrogen receptor signaling synergistically promotes osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhong Gao

    Full Text Available Osteogenic differentiation from mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs are initiated and regulated by a cascade of signaling events. Either Wnt/β-catenin or estrogen signaling pathway has been shown to play an important role in regulating skeletal development and maintaining adult tissue homeostasis. Here, we investigate the potential crosstalk and synergy of these two signaling pathways in regulating osteogenic differentiation of MPCs. We find that the activation of estrogen receptor (ER signaling by estradiol (E2 or exogenously expressed ERα in MPCs synergistically enhances Wnt3A-induced early and late osteogenic markers, as well as matrix mineralization. The E2 or ERα-mediated synergy can be effectively blocked by ERα antagonist tamoxifen. E2 stimulation can enhance endochondral ossification of Wnt3A-transduced mouse fetal limb explants. Furthermore, exogenously expressed ERα significantly enhances the maturity and mineralization of Wnt3A-induced subcutaneous and intramuscular ectopic bone formation. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that E2 does not exert any detectable effect on β-catenin/Tcf reporter activity. However, ERα expression is up-regulated within the first 48h in AdWnt3A-transduced MPCs, whereas ERβ expression is significantly inhibited within 24h. Moreover, the key enzyme for the biosynthesis of estrogens aromatase is modulated by Wnt3A in a biphasic manner, up-regulated at 24h but reduced after 48h. Our results demonstrate that, while ER signaling acts synergistically with Wnt3A in promoting osteogenic differentiation, Wnt3A may crosstalk with ER signaling by up-regulating ERα expression and down-regulating ERβ expression in MPCs. Thus, the signaling crosstalk and synergy between these two pathways should be further explored as a potential therapeutic approach to combating bone and skeletal disorders, such as fracture healing and osteoporosis.

  5. Hydration Structure of the Quaternary Ammonium Cations

    KAUST Repository

    Babiaczyk, Wojtek Iwo

    2010-11-25

    Two indicators of the hydropathicity of small solutes are introduced and tested by molecular dynamics simulations. These indicators are defined as probabilities of the orientation of water molecules\\' dipoles and hydrogen bond vectors, conditional on a generalized distance from the solute suitable for arbitrarily shaped molecules. Using conditional probabilities, it is possible to distinguish features of the distributions in close proximity of the solute. These regions contain the most significant information on the hydration structure but cannot be adequately represented by using, as is usually done, joint distance-angle probability densities. Our calculations show that using our indicators a relative hydropathicity scale for the interesting test set of the quaternary ammonium cations can be roughly determined. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  6. Univalent-cation-elicited acidification by yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotyk, A; Georghiou, G

    1994-08-01

    Addition of univalent cations to sugar-metabolizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Lodderomyces elongisporus brought about a powerful acidification of the external medium with rates up to nearly 20 nmol H+ per min per mg dry wt. in S. cerevisiae, over 15 nmol in S. pombe, and 4.7 nmol in L. elongisporus. These rates were as much as 20 times, 5.5 times and 10.3 times, respectively. higher than in the absence of K+. Use of galactose-induced cells, of H(+)-ATPase-deficient mutants and observations over the entire growth curve indicated that the K+ effect on H+ extrusion is not connected with the H(+)-ATPase function as such but rather depends on metabolic reactions producing ATP. The effect has apparently nothing to do with the electrical potential across the plasma membrane. PMID:7804140

  7. Retention of Cationic Starch onto Cellulose Fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missaoui, Mohamed; Mauret, Evelyne; Belgacem, Mohamed Naceur

    2008-08-01

    Three methods of cationic starch titration were used to quantify its retention on cellulose fibres, namely: (i) the complexation of CS with iodine and measurement of the absorbency of the ensuing blue solution by UV-vis spectroscopy; (ii) hydrolysis of the starch macromolecules followed by the conversion of the resulting sugars to furan-based molecules and quantifying the ensuing mixture by measuring their absorbance at a Ι of 490 nm, using the same technique as previous one and; finally (iii) hydrolysis of starch macromolecules by trifluoro-acetic acid and quantification of the sugars in the resulting hydrolysates by high performance liquid chromatography. The three methods were found to give similar results within the range of CS addition from 0 to 50 mg per g of cellulose fibres.

  8. Capturing dynamic cation hopping in cubic pyrochlores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks Hinojosa, Beverly; Asthagiri, Aravind; Nino, Juan C.

    2011-08-01

    In direct contrast to recent reports, density functional theory predicts that the most stable structure of Bi2Ti2O7 pyrochlore is a cubic Fd3¯m space group by accounting for atomic displacements. The displaced Bi occupies the 96g(x,x,z) Wyckoff position with six equivalent sites, which create multiple local minima. Using nudged elastic band method, the transition states of Bi cation hopping between equivalent minima were investigated and an energy barrier between 0.11 and 0.21 eV was determined. Energy barriers associated with the motion of Bi between equivalent sites within the 96g Wyckoff position suggest the presence of dielectric relaxation in Bi2Ti2O7.

  9. Interaction of actinide cations with synthetic polyelectrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binding of Am+3, Th+4 and UO2+2 to polymaleic acid, polyethylenemaleic acid and polymethylvinylethermaleic acid has been measured by a solvent extraction technique at 250C and either 0.02 or 0.10 M ionic strength. The solutions were buffered over a pH range such that the percent of carboxylate groups ionized ranged from 25 to 74%. The binding was described by two constants, β1 and β2, which were evaluated after correction for complexation of the actinide cations by acetate and hydrolysis. For comparable degrees of ionization, all three polyelectrolytes showed similar binding strengths. In general, these results indicated that the binding of actinides to these synthetic polyelectrolytes is basically similar to that of natural polyelectrolytes such as humic and fulvic acids. (orig.)

  10. Antiviral effect of cationic compounds on bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Huong eChatain-Ly

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The antiviral activity of several cationic compounds - cetytrimethylammonium (CTAB, chitosan, nisin and lysozyme - was investigated on the bacteriophage c2 (DNA head and non-contractile tail infecting Lactococcus strains and the bacteriophage MS2 (F-specific RNA infecting E.coli. Firstly, these activities were evaluated in a phosphate buffer pH 7- 10 mM. The CTAB had a virucidal effect on the Lactococcus bacteriophages, but not on the MS2. After 1 min of contact with 0.125 mM CTAB, the c2 population was reduced from 6 log(pfu/mL to 1,5 log(pfu/mL and completely deactivated at 1 mM. On the contrary, chitosan inhibited the MS2 more than it did the bacteriophages c2. No antiviral effect was observed for the nisin or the lysozyme on bacteriophages after 1 min of treatment. A 1 and 2.5 log reduction was respectively observed for nisin and lysozyme when the treatment time increased (5 or 10 min. These results showed that the antiviral effect depended both on the virus and structure of the antimicrobial compounds. The antiviral activity of these compounds was also evaluated in different physico-chemical conditions and in complex matrices. The antiviral activity of CTAB was impaired in acid pH and with an increase of the ionic strength. These results might be explained by the electrostatic interactions between cationic compounds and negatively charged particles such as bacteriophages or other compounds in a matrix. Milk proved to be protective suggesting the components of food could interfere with antimicrobial compounds.

  11. Effects of local and global network connectivity on synergistic epidemics

    CERN Document Server

    Broder-Rodgers, David; Taraskin, Sergei N

    2015-01-01

    The effects of local and global connectivity on the spread of synergistic susceptible-infected-removed epidemics were studied in lattice models with infinite- and finite-range rewiring (small-world and small-world-like models). Several effects were found numerically and supported analytically within a simple model: (i) rewiring enhanced resilience to epidemics with strong constructive synergy on networks with high local connectivity; (ii) rewiring enhanced spread of epidemics with destructive or weak constructive synergy on networks with arbitrary local connectivity; (iii) rewiring enhanced spread of epidemics, independent of synergy, in networks with low local connectivity.

  12. Synergistic Effects of Gold Nanocages in Hyperthermia and Radiotherapy Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ai-Wei; Guo, Wei-Hua; Qi, Ya-Fei; Wang, Jian-Zhen; Ma, Xiang-Xing; Yu, De-Xin

    2016-12-01

    Gold nanocages (GNCs) are a promising material that not only converts near infrared (NIR) light to heat for the ablation of tumors but also acts as a radiosensitizer. The combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy has a synergistic effect that can lead to significant tumor cell necrosis. In the current study, we synthesized GNCs that offered the combined effects of hyperthermia and radiotherapy. This combination strategy resulted in increased tumor cell apoptosis and significant tumor tissue necrosis. We propose that GNCs can be used for clinical treatment and to potentially overcome resistance to radiotherapy by clearly increasing the antitumor effect. PMID:27255899

  13. Synergistic Effects of Gold Nanocages in Hyperthermia and Radiotherapy Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ai-wei; Guo, Wei-hua; Qi, Ya-fei; Wang, Jian-zhen; Ma, Xiang-xing; Yu, De-xin

    2016-06-01

    Gold nanocages (GNCs) are a promising material that not only converts near infrared (NIR) light to heat for the ablation of tumors but also acts as a radiosensitizer. The combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy has a synergistic effect that can lead to significant tumor cell necrosis. In the current study, we synthesized GNCs that offered the combined effects of hyperthermia and radiotherapy. This combination strategy resulted in increased tumor cell apoptosis and significant tumor tissue necrosis. We propose that GNCs can be used for clinical treatment and to potentially overcome resistance to radiotherapy by clearly increasing the antitumor effect.

  14. Role of extracellular cations in cell motility, polarity, and chemotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soll D

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available David R Soll1, Deborah Wessels1, Daniel F Lusche1, Spencer Kuhl1, Amanda Scherer1, Shawna Grimm1,21Monoclonal Antibody Research Institute, Developmental Studies, Hybridoma Bank, Department of Biology, University of Iowa, Iowa City; 2Mercy Medical Center, Surgical Residency Program, Des Moines, Iowa, USAAbstract: The concentration of cations in the aqueous environment of free living organisms and cells within the human body influence motility, shape, and chemotaxis. The role of extracellular cations is usually perceived to be the source for intracellular cations in the process of homeostasis. The role of surface molecules that interact with extracellular cations is believed to be that of channels, transporters, and exchangers. However, the role of Ca2+ as a signal and chemoattractant and the discovery of the Ca2+ receptor have demonstrated that extracellular cations can function as signals at the cell surface, and the plasma membrane molecules they interact with can function as bona fide receptors that activate coupled signal transduction pathways, associated molecules in the plasma membrane, or the cytoskeleton. With this perspective in mind, we have reviewed the cationic composition of aqueous environments of free living cells and cells that move in multicellular organisms, most notably humans, the range of molecules interacting with cations at the cell surface, the concept of a cell surface cation receptor, and the roles extracellular cations and plasma membrane proteins that interact with them play in the regulation of motility, shape, and chemotaxis. Hopefully, the perspective of this review will increase awareness of the roles extracellular cations play and the possibility that many of the plasma membrane proteins that interact with them could also play roles as receptors.Keywords: extracellular cations, chemotaxis, transporters, calcium, receptors

  15. The Effect of Hydration on the Cation-π Interaction Between Benzene and Various Cations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    VIKASH DHINDHWAL; N SATHYAMURTHY

    2016-10-01

    The effect of hydration on cation-π interaction in Mq+ BmWn (B = benzene; W = water; Mq+ =Na⁺, K⁺, Mg²⁺, Ca²⁺, Al³⁺, 0 ≤ n,m ≤ 4, 1≤ m + n ≤ 4) complexes has been investigated using ab initio quantum chemical methods. Interaction energy values computed at the MP2 level of theory using the 6-31G(d,p) basis set reveal a qualitative trend in the relative affinity of different cations for benzene and water in these complexes. The π–cloud thickness values for benzene have also been estimated for these systems.

  16. Crystal structure of channelrhodopsin, a light-gated cation channel - all cations lead through the monomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hideaki E; Nureki, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Channelrhodopsin (ChR) is a light-gated cation channel derived from green algae. Since the inward flow of cations triggers the neuron firing, neurons expressing ChRs can be optically controlled even within freely moving mammals. Although ChR has been broadly applied to neuro-science research, little is known about its molecular mechanisms. We determined the crystal structure of chimeric ChR at 2.3 Å resolution and revealed its molecular architecture. The integration of structural, electrophysio-logical, and computational analyses provided insight into the molecular basis for the channel function of ChR, and paved the way for the principled design of ChR variants with novel properties. PMID:27493541

  17. In vivo toxicity of cationic micelles and liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Kristina Bram; Northeved, Helle; Ek, Pramod Kumar;

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated toxicity of nanocarriers comprised of cationic polymer and lipid components often used in gene and drug delivery, formulated as cationic micelles and liposomes. Rats were injected intravenously with 10, 25 or 100 mg/kg and sacrificed after 24 or 48 h, or 24 h after the las...

  18. Stable polyfluorinated cycloalkenyl cations and their NMR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New stable 1-methoxyperfluoro-2-ethylcyclobutenyl, 1-methoxyperfluoro-2-methylcyclo-pentenyl, and 1-methoxyperfluoro-2-ethylcyclohexenyl cations were obtained by the action of antimony pentafluoride on the corresponding olefins. The distribution of the charges in the investigated polyfluorinated cycloalkenyl cations was investigated by 13C NMR method

  19. Photodynamic Inactivation of Bacteria and Biofilms Using Cationic Bacteriochlorins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerovich, G. A.; Tiganova, I. G.; Makarova, E. A.; Meerovich, I. G.; Romanova Ju., M.; Tolordova, E. R.; Alekseeva, N. V.; Stepanova, T. V.; Yu, Koloskova; Luk'anets, E. A.; Krivospitskaya, N. V.; Sipailo, I. P.; Baikova, T. V.; Loschenov, V. B.; Gonchukov, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work is devoted to the study of two new synthetic bacteriochlorins with four and eight cationic substitutes as the photosensitizers in the photodynamic process. The spectral and antibacterial properties of these photosensitizers in saline solution were investigated. It is shown, that the aggregation ability decreases and the antibacterial efficiency grows as the cationic substitute number increases.

  20. Effects of metallic cations in the beryl flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beryl zeta potential in microelectrophoretic cell is studied in the presence of neutral electrolyte, cations of calcium, magnesium and iron. The petroleum sulfonate is used how collector in Hallimond tube. Hydroxy complex of metallic cations seems activate the ore and precipitates of colloidal metallic hidroxies seems lower him when added to the mixture. (M.A.C.)

  1. Physical exertion as a trigger of myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittleman, M A; Siscovick, D S

    1996-05-01

    The data reviewed in this article indicate that physical exertion can trigger the onset of nonfatal myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death. In addition, it is clear that although the relative risk associated with heavy exertion may be high, the absolute risk is actually quite small. It also is clear that regular exercise reduces the risk of triggering of myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death by isolated bouts of exertion. Thus, these data provide further support for encouragement of regular exercise, as recommended by the American Heart Association. Such a program is likely to lower the overall risk of myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death because it may lower the baseline risk and also decrease the relative risk that an episode of exertion will trigger a myocardial infarction or sudden cardiac death. Specific recommendations for patients with a history of myocardial infarction or angina are complex. Patients with coronary artery disease have the same relative risk of myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death as those with no such history. Because of their elevated and variable baseline risk, however, specific recommendations regarding the risks and benefits of heavy physical exertion must be provided by their individual physicians, acting on recommended guidelines for exercise in such patients.

  2. Relationships between recall of perceived exertion and blood lactate concentration in a judo competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, M A; Salvador, A; González-Bono, E G; Sanchís, C; Suay, F

    2001-06-01

    Relationships between perceived exertion and blood lactate have usually been studied in laboratory or training contexts but not in competition, the most important setting in which sports performance is evaluated. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between psychological and physiological indices of the physical effort in a competition setting, taking into account the duration of effort. For this, we employed two Ratings of Perceived Exertion (RPE and CR-10) and lactic acid plasma concentration as a biological marker of the effort performed. 13 male judo fighters who participated in a sports club competition provided capillary blood samples to assay lactate concentrations and indicated on scale their Recall of Perceived Exertion in the total competition and again in just the Last Fight to compare the usefulness of RPE and CR-10 in assessing discrete bouts of effort and a whole session. Analysis showed that perceived exertion or the effort made during the whole competition was positively and significantly related to maximal lactate concentration and lactate increase in competition, thus extending the validity of this scale to sports contests. The Recall of Perceived Exertion scores were not significantly correlated with the duration of effort.

  3. Exertional responses to sprint interval training: a comparison of 30-sec. and 60-sec. conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Marcus W; Greeley, Samuel J

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of sprint interval training on rating of perceived exertion. 20 healthy participants (11 men, 9 women; M age = 23 yr.) completed a maximal cycle ergometer test and two high-intensity interval training cycling sessions. Each session utilized the same work-to-rest ratio (1:1), work intensity (90% max), recovery intensity (10% work intensity), and session duration (16 min.). Trials differed on duration of the interval segment, with a 30-sec. trial and a 60-sec. trial. Sessions required the same amount of total work over the duration of the trial. Rating of perceived exertion assessed before, during, and after exercise were higher for the 60-sec. trial than the 30-sec. trial despite no difference in total work. High intensity interval training trials utilizing the same total external work but differing in interval length produced different ratings of perceived exertion. Perceived exertion is significantly higher for sessions of exercise that utilize longer work intervals. These findings suggest that shorter intervals may produce more favorable exertional responses that could positively affect future behavior.

  4. Synergistic antioxidant activity of green tea with some herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dheeraj P Jain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases, cancer, arthritis, etc. are caused by free radicals that are byproducts of metabolic pathways. Selected plants namely Vitis vinifera, Phyllanthus emblica L., Punica granatum, Cinnamomum cassia, Ginkgo biloba L., and Camellia sinensis Linn. are reported to produce antioxidant property. This study is undertaken to support the hypothesis that formulation of a polyherbal combination of these plants shows a synergistic effect with green tea. The extracts of each drug were characterized by phytochemical studies and tests for phenolics and flavonoids. In vitro antioxidant activity for individual drug and its combination was determined by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, superoxide, and nitric oxide free radical scavenging methods. Our results suggest that a combination of all these herbs with green tea can synergistically enhance antioxidant activity and thus lower doses of each herb with green tea may be used. Antioxidant potential of polyherbal combination was also comparable to that of standard ascorbic acid. Studies showed that selected individual plants contained abundant quantity of phenolics and flavonoids and their polyherbal combination with green tea was found to produce best antioxidant activity among all individual extracts. This will help in avoiding undesirable side effects due to higher doses of single herb.

  5. Synergistic Effects of PPARγ Ligands and Retinoids in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahito Shimizu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. The activation of PPARs by their specific ligands is regarded as one of the promising strategies to inhibit cancer cell growth. However, recent clinical trials targeting several common cancers showed no beneficial effect when PPAR ligands are used as a monotherapy. Retinoid X receptors (RXRs, which play a critical role in normal cell proliferation as a master regulator for nuclear receptors, preferentially form heterodimers with PPARs. A malfunction of RXRα due to phosphorylation by the Ras/MAPK signaling pathway is associated with the development of certain types of human malignancies. The activation of PPARγ/RXR heterodimer by their respective ligands synergistically inhibits cell growth, while inducing apoptosis in human colon cancer cells when the phosphorylation of RXRα was inhibited. We herein review the synergistic antitumor effects produced by the combination of the PPAR, especially PPARγ, ligands plus other agents, especially retinoids, in a variety of human cancers. We also focus on the phosphorylation of RXRα because the inhibition of RXRα phosphorylation and the restoration of its physiological function may activate PPAR/RXR heterodimer and, therefore, be a potentially effective and critical strategy for the inhibition of cancer cell growth.

  6. Synergistic impacts of habitat loss and fragmentation on model ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Lewis J; Newbold, Tim; Purves, Drew W; Tittensor, Derek P; Harfoot, Michael B J

    2016-09-28

    Habitat loss and fragmentation are major threats to biodiversity, yet separating their effects is challenging. We use a multi-trophic, trait-based, and spatially explicit general ecosystem model to examine the independent and synergistic effects of these processes on ecosystem structure. We manipulated habitat by removing plant biomass in varying spatial extents, intensities, and configurations. We found that emergent synergistic interactions of loss and fragmentation are major determinants of ecosystem response, including population declines and trophic pyramid shifts. Furthermore, trait-mediated interactions, such as a disproportionate sensitivity of large-sized organisms to fragmentation, produce significant effects in shaping responses. We also show that top-down regulation mitigates the effects of land use on plant biomass loss, suggesting that models lacking these interactions-including most carbon stock models-may not adequately capture land-use change impacts. Our results have important implications for understanding ecosystem responses to environmental change, and assessing the impacts of habitat fragmentation. PMID:27655763

  7. A NEW SYNERGIST FOR INTUMESCENT FLAME RETARDANT POLYPROPYLENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Wu; Bao-jun Qu

    2002-01-01

    The synergistic effects of silicotungstic acid (SiW12) as a catalyst in the phosphorus-nitrogen compounds AM-based intumescent flame-retardant (IFR) polypropylene (PP) were studied using the limiting oxygen index (LOI), the UL-94test, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), real time Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS). TheLOI data show that SiW12 added to PP/IFR systems has a synergistic FR effect with an IFR additive named AM. The TGAdata show that SiW12 apparently increases the thermal stability of the PP/IFR systems at high temperature (T > 500 ℃). TheFTIR results provide the positive evidence that IFR can improve the thermal stability of PP and SiW12 can induce a higherrate of formation of phosphoric acid and its derivatives. The LRS measurements provide useful information on thecarbonaceous microstructures. In short, a suitable amount of SiW12 (1.5 wt%) exertssynergistic effects with the IFR byincreasing the LOI value and the thermal stability at high temperature and promoting the formation of charred structures onthe burning PP surface.

  8. Synergistic interactions between PBDEs and PCBs in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellacani, C; Tagliaferri, S; Caglieri, A; Goldoni, M; Giordano, G; Mutti, A; Costa, L G

    2014-04-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants. Exposure to these chemicals has been associated with developmental neurotoxicity, endocrine dysfunction, and reproductive disorders. Humans and wildlife are generally exposed to a mixture of these environmental pollutants, highlighting the need to evaluate the potential effects of combined exposures. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of the combined exposure to two PBDEs and two PCBs in a human neuronal cell line. 2,2',4,4'-Tetrabromodiphenyl ether, 2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether, PCB-126 (3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl; a dioxin-like PCB), and PCB-153 (2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl; a non-dioxin-like PCB) were chosen, because their concentrations are among the highest in human tissues and the environment. The results suggest that the nature of interactions is related to the PCB structure. Mixtures of PCB-153 and both PBDEs had a prevalently synergistic effect. In contrast, mixtures of each PBDE congener with PCB-126 showed additive effects at threshold concentrations, and synergistic effects at higher concentrations. These results emphasize the concept that the toxicity of xenobiotics may be affected by possible interactions, which may be of significance given the common coexposures to multiple contaminants. PMID:22434561

  9. Synergistic impacts of habitat loss and fragmentation on model ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Drew W.; Tittensor, Derek P.; Harfoot, Michael B. J.

    2016-01-01

    Habitat loss and fragmentation are major threats to biodiversity, yet separating their effects is challenging. We use a multi-trophic, trait-based, and spatially explicit general ecosystem model to examine the independent and synergistic effects of these processes on ecosystem structure. We manipulated habitat by removing plant biomass in varying spatial extents, intensities, and configurations. We found that emergent synergistic interactions of loss and fragmentation are major determinants of ecosystem response, including population declines and trophic pyramid shifts. Furthermore, trait-mediated interactions, such as a disproportionate sensitivity of large-sized organisms to fragmentation, produce significant effects in shaping responses. We also show that top-down regulation mitigates the effects of land use on plant biomass loss, suggesting that models lacking these interactions—including most carbon stock models—may not adequately capture land-use change impacts. Our results have important implications for understanding ecosystem responses to environmental change, and assessing the impacts of habitat fragmentation. PMID:27655763

  10. Arsenic and major cation hydrogeochemistry of the Central Victorian (Australia) surface waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khawar SULTAN; Kim DOWLING

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on the major cations(Ca, Mg, Na and K) and arsenic(As) compositions of surface waters collected from major creeks, rivers and lakes in Central Victoria (Australia). The surface waters were found to be neutral to alkaline (pH 6.7-9.4),oxidised (average redox potential (Eh) about 130 mV) and showed variable concentrations of dissolved ions (EC, about 51-4386 μS/cm). The concen- trations of dissolved major cations in surface waters were found to be in the order of Na>>Mg>Ca>K and in soils the contents of metals followed an order of abundance as: Ca>Mg>>K>Na. While Na was the least abundant in soils, it registered the highest dissolved cation in surface waters. Of the four major cations, the average concentration ofNa(98.7 mg/L) was attributed to the weathering of feldspars and atmospheric input. Relatively highly dissolved concentrations of Na and Mg compared with the world average values of rivers reflected the weathering of rock and soil minerals within the catchments.The As soil level is naturally high(linked to lithology) as reflected by high background soil values and mining operations are also considered to be a contributory factor. Under relatively alkaline-oxidative conditions low mobility of dissolved As (average about 7.9 μg/L) was observed in most of the surface waters with a few higher values(>15 μg/L) around a sewage disposal site and mine tailings.Arsenic in soils is slowly released into water under alkaline and/or lower Eh conditions. The efficient sink of Fe, Al and Mn oxides acts as a barrier against the As release under near neutral-oxidising conditions. High As content (average about 28.3 mg/kg) in soils was found to be associated with Fe-hydroxides as revealed by XRD and SEM analysis. The dissolved As concentration was found to be below the recommended maximum levels for recreational water in all surface waters(lakes and rivers) in the study area. Catchment lithology exerted the fundamental control on surface water chemistry

  11. Arsenic and major cation hydrogeochemistry of the Central Victorian (Australia) surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Khawar; Dowling, Kim

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on the major cations (Ca, Mg, Na and K) and arsenic (As) compositions of surface waters collected from major creeks, rivers and lakes in Central Victoria (Australia). The surface waters were found to be neutral to alkaline (pH 6.7-9.4), oxidised (average redox potential (Eh) about 130 mV) and showed variable concentrations of dissolved ions (EC, about 51-4386 microS/cm). The concentrations of dissolved major cations in surface waters were found to be in the order of Na>Mg>Ca>K and in soils the contents of metals followed an order of abundance as: Ca>Mg>K>Na. While Na was the least abundant in soils, it registered the highest dissolved cation in surface waters. Of the four major cations, the average concentration of Na (98.7 mg/L) was attributed to the weathering of feldspars and atmospheric input. Relatively highly dissolved concentrations of Na and Mg compared with the world average values of rivers reflected the weathering of rock and soil minerals within the catchments. The As soil level is naturally high (linked to lithology) as reflected by high background soil values and mining operations are also considered to be a contributory factor. Under relatively alkaline-oxidative conditions low mobility of dissolved As (average about 7.9 microg/L) was observed in most of the surface waters with a few higher values (> 15 microg/L) around a sewage disposal site and mine tailings. Arsenic in soils is slowly released into water under alkaline and/or lower Eh conditions. The efficient sink of Fe, Al and Mn oxides acts as a barrier against the As release under near neutral-oxidising conditions. High As content (average about 28.3 mg/kg) in soils was found to be associated with Fe-hydroxides as revealed by XRD and SEM analysis. The dissolved As concentration was found to be below the recommended maximum levels for recreational water in all surface waters (lakes and rivers) in the study area. Catchment lithology exerted the fundamental control on surface

  12. Do Cation-π Interactions Exist in Bacteriorhodopsin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Kun-Sheng; WANG Guang-Yu; HE Jin-An

    2001-01-01

    Metal ions are essential to the structure and physiological functions of bacteriorhodopsin. Experimental evidence suggests the existence of specific cation binding to the negatively charged groups of Asp85 and Asp212 via an electrostatic interaction. However, only using electrostatic force is not enough to explain the role of the metal cations because the carboxylate of Asp85 is well known to be protonated in the M intermediate. Considering the presence of some aromatic amino acid residues in the vicinity of the retinal pocket, the existence of cation-π interactions between the metal cation and aromatic amino acid residues is suggested. Obviously, introduction of this kind of interaction is conducive to understanding the effects of the metal cations and aromatic amino acid residues inside the protein on the structural stability and proton pumping of bacteriorhodopsin.

  13. Investigation on the Synergistic Complexation of Ni(II with 1,10-Phenanthroline and Dithizone at Hexane-Water Interface Using Centrifugal Liquid Membrane-Spectrophotometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoki Yulizar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Complex formation of Ni(II and 1,10-phenanthroline (C12H8N2/Phen with the addition of dithizone (C13H12N4S/HDz at the hexane-water interface has been studied by direct measurement spectrophotometry using the centrifugal liquid membrane (CLM method. Ni(II ion with Phen formed a cationic complex of Ni(C12H8N222+ or NiPhen22+. That complex dissolved in the aqueous phase and had two UV absorption spectrum maxima wavelengths, max 270 and 292 nm. Observation of complex formation was performed variations of pH and ligand concentration. The pH caused protonation that affected the amount of the formed complex. With the variations of ligand concentrations, the greater was the concentration of ligands the greater was the formed complex. Based on the Batch method, the HDz ligand addition into the NiPhen22+ cationic complex produced ion association complex of Ni(C13H11N4S2(C12H8N2 or NiDz2Phen at max 403 nm, and is extracted in the organic phase. Measurement results using CLM method showed that NiDz2Phen complex was formed at hexane-water interface with max 523 nm. Comparison of Phen with HDz ligand concentrations affected the initial formation rate of NiDz2Phen complex. The greater concentration of Phen ligand increased the initial rate of formation for synergistic complex. The obtained data using CLM method indicated that the synergistic complex formation rate constant of NiDz2Phen at the interface, k was 0.30 s-1.

  14. Design Strategies for Balancing Exertion Games: A Study of Three Approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Møller; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2016-01-01

    In sports, if players' physical and technical abilities are mismatched, the competition is often uninteresting for them. With the emergence of exertion games, this could be changing. Player balancing, known from video games, allows players with different skill levels to compete, however, it is un......In sports, if players' physical and technical abilities are mismatched, the competition is often uninteresting for them. With the emergence of exertion games, this could be changing. Player balancing, known from video games, allows players with different skill levels to compete, however...... these three approaches is used to investigate the qualities and challenges within each approach and explore how the player experience is affected by them. Based on these findings, we suggest four design strategies for balancing exertion games, so that players will stay engaged in the game and contain...... the feeling of a fair competition, even if they have mismatched skills....

  15. Prediction of radiation pressure force exerted on moving particles by the two-level skeletonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiao-Min; Gou, Ming-Jiang; Sheng, Xin-Qing

    2014-04-21

    A fast full-wave method for computing radiation pressure force (RPF) exerted by shaped light beams on moving particles is presented. The problem of evaluating RPF exerted on a moving particle by a single excitation beam is converted into that of computing RPF's exerted on a static particle by multiple beams. The discretization of different beams leads to distinct right hand sides (RHS's) for the matrix system. To avoid solving each RHS by the brute-force manner, the algorithm conducts low-rank decomposition on the excitation matrix consisting of all RHS's to figure out the so-called skeleton light beams by interpolative decomposition (ID). The peak memory requirement of the skeletonization is a bottle-neck if the particle is large. A two-level skeletonization scheme is proposed to solve this problem. Some numerical experiments on arbitrarily shaped homogeneous particles are performed to illustrate the performance and capability of the developed method. PMID:24787885

  16. Acute liver failure due to non-exertional heatstroke after sauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erarslan, Elife; Yüksel, Ilhami; Haznedaroglu, Serap

    2012-01-01

    Acute liver failure is defined as rapid loss of liver function that patients without previously recognized liver disease sustain a liver damage. Acute liver failure due to non-exertional heatstroke has rarely been reported. We reported here an unusual case of heat stroke induced acute liver failure (ALF) after sauna. A 63 year old man without previously recognized liver and other systemic disease was admitted for loss of consciousness and impaired liver function after sauna. Despite intensive supportive care, ALF developed. Liver transplantation was planned but the patient died on the sixth day of hospitalization. Non-exertional heatstroke induced ALF is a rare and serious condition. ALF caused by non-exertional heatstroke which requires liver transplantation for definitive solution should be kept in mind in early period.

  17. PVDF membranes containing hybrid nanoparticles for adsorbing cationic dyes: physical insights and mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Maya; Madras, Giridhar; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2016-07-01

    In this study, Fe (iron) and Ag (silver) based adsorbents were synthesized using solution combustion and in situ reduction techniques. The synthesized adsorbents were comprehensively characterized by different techniques including electron microscopy, BET, XRD, Zeta potential etc. Three chlorinated cationic dyes used were malachite green, methyl violet and pyronin Y. These dyes were adsorbed on various synthesized adsorbents [iron III oxide (Fe2O3)], iron III oxide decorated silver nanoparticles by combustion synthesis technique [Fe2O3–Ag(C)] and iron III oxide decorated silver nanoparticles using in situ reduction, [Fe2O3–Ag (S)]. The isotherm and the adsorption kinetics have been studied systematically. The kinetic data can be explained by the pseudo second order model and the adsorption equilibrium followed Langmuir isotherm. The equilibrium and kinetics results suggest that Fe2O3–Ag(S) nanoparticles showed the maximum adsorption among all the adsorbents. Hence, Polyvinylidene fluoride based membranes containing Fe2O3–Ag(S) nanoparticles were prepared via phase inversion (precipitation immersion using DMF/water) technique. The adsorption kinetics were studied in detail and it was observed that the composite membrane showed synergistic improvement in dye adsorption. Such membranes can be used for water purification.

  18. Effects of fitness and self-confidence on time perception during exertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Human physical and psychological features influence perceptions of the environment during activity. If during exercise an individual over-estimates time, they may interpret this as spending longer than necessary under a potentially aversive state of exertion. This may in turn decrease one’s sense of exercise success and tendency to persevere with exercise. We tested if experimentally manipulating sense of exercise self-efficacy would affect time perception during standardised physical exertion. Method: Exercise Self-Efficacy (ESE of 18 -73 year olds (N=51 was measured before and after an exercise challenge of moderate intensity. Height, weight and body fat composition were measured before participants were randomly allocated to one of three groups. After a 4-minute treadmill fitness test, participants were presented with either bogus feedback about their performance (positive or negative or no feedback (control. Before and during exercise, participants estimated a prescribed 2-minute time interval. Ratings of perceived exertion were also measured periodically. Results: Feedback on performance had no significant effect on time perception, even when controlling for individual exertion level. Reported ESE was also unaffected by whether someone received positive, negative or no feedback. Age was again found to be significantly correlated with VO2max, r(51 = .62, p < .001, but in contrast to prior findings, estimates of general fitness such as VO2max, BMI and waist circumference were unrelated to changes in time perception due to exertion. Conclusions: These findings failed to support prior findings and anecdotal evidence suggesting that exertion might alter one’s perception of time. We also failed to find any support for effects on ESE when participants were given explicit performance feedback. Finally, participants’ physical characteristics appear to be unrelated to time perception whilst exercising at moderate intensity.

  19. Antimicrobial potential of lycosin-I, a cationic and amphiphilic peptide from the venom of the spider Lycosa singorensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, H; Ding, X; Meng, S; Liu, C; Wang, H; Xia, L; Liu, Z; Liang, S

    2013-07-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are significant components of the innate immune system and play indispensable roles in the resistance to bacterial infection. Here, we investigated the antimicrobial activity of lycosin-I, a 24-residue cationic anticancer peptide derived from Lycosa singorensis with high structural similarity to several cationic and amphiphilic antimicrobial peptides. The antimicrobial activity of lycosin-I against 27 strains of microbes including bacteria and fungi was examined and compared with that of the Xenopus-derived AMP magainin 2 using a microdilution assay. Lycosin-I inhibited the growth of most microorganisms at low micromolar concentrations, and was a more potent inhibitor than magainin 2. Lycosin-I showed rapid, selective and broad-spectrum bactericidal activity and a synergistic effect with traditional antibiotics. In vivo, it showed potent bactericidal activity in a mouse thigh infection model. High Mg2+ concentrations reduced the antibacterial effect of lycosin-I, implying that the peptide might directly interact with the bacterial cell membrane. Uptake of the fluorogenic dye SYTOX and changes in the surface of lycosin-Itreated bacterial cells observed by scanning electron microscopy confirmed that lycosin-I permeabilized the cell membrane, resulting in the rapid bactericidal effect. Taken together, our findings indicate that lycosin-I is a promising peptide with the potential for the development of novel antibacterial agents.

  20. Micellization behavior of mixtures of amphiphilic promazine hydrochloride and cationic aniline hydrochloride in aqueous and electrolyte solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rub, Malik Abdul; Azum, Naved; Asiri, Abdullah M. [King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Khan, Farah [Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh (India); Al-Sehemi, Abdullah G. [Research Center for Advanced Materials Science, King Khalid University, Abha (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-10-15

    We studied the influence of cationic hydrotrope aniline hydrochloride on the micellization behavior of cationic amphiphilic phenothiazine drug promazine hydrochloride in the presence and absence of 50mmol kg{sup -1} NaCl. The experimental critical micelle concentration (CMC) values came out to be lower than ideal CMC (CMCid) values, signifying attractive interactions between the two components in mixed micelles. NaCl further decreases the CMC of pure PMZ and aniline hydrochloride as well as their mixture due to screening of the electrostatic repulsion among the polar head groups. The bulk properties of solution were examined by using different theoretical models for justification and comparison of results. The micellar mole fraction of aniline hydrochloride (X{sup Rub}{sub ,} X{sup M}{sub 1}, X{sup Rod}{sub 1} and X{sup id}{sub 1}) was evaluated by different proposed models, showing greater contribution of hydrotrope in mixed micelle. The negative values of interaction parameter (β) indicate synergistic interactions and negative values of β further decrease by the addition of salt in mixed systems. From the CMC values as a function of temperature, various thermodynamic properties have been evaluated and discussed in detail.

  1. Nanocarriers for DNA Vaccines: Co-Delivery of TLR-9 and NLR-2 Ligands Leads to Synergistic Enhancement of Proinflammatory Cytokine Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Poecheim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Adjuvants enhance immunogenicity of vaccines through either targeted antigen delivery or stimulation of immune receptors. Three cationic nanoparticle formulations were evaluated for their potential as carriers for a DNA vaccine, and muramyl dipeptide (MDP as immunostimulatory agent, to induce and increase immunogenicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen encoding plasmid DNA (pDNA. The formulations included (1 trimethyl chitosan (TMC nanoparticles, (2 a squalene-in-water nanoemulsion, and (3 a mineral oil-in-water nanoemulsion. The adjuvant effect of the pDNA-nanocomplexes was evaluated by serum antibody analysis in immunized mice. All three carriers display a strong adjuvant effect, however, only TMC nanoparticles were capable to bias immune responses towards Th1. pDNA naturally contains immunostimulatory unmethylated CpG motifs that are recognized by Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR-9. In mechanistic in vitro studies, activation of TLR-9 and the ability to enhance immunogenicity by simultaneously targeting TLR-9 and NOD-like receptor 2 (NLR-2 was determined by proinflammatory cytokine release in RAW264.7 macrophages. pDNA in combination with MDP was shown to significantly increase proinflammatory cytokine release in a synergistic manner, dependent on NLR-2 activation. In summary, novel pDNA-Ag85A loaded nanoparticle formulations, which induce antigen specific immune responses in mice were developed, taking advantage of the synergistic combinations of TLR and NLR agonists to increase the adjuvanticity of the carriers used.

  2. Synergistic Apoptosis-Inducing Antileukemic Effects of Arsenic Trioxide and Mucuna macrocarpa Stem Extract in Human Leukemic Cells via a Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Hung Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to examine the potential of enhancing the antileukemic activity of arsenic trioxide (ATO by combining it with a folk remedy, crude methanolic extract of Mucuna macrocarpa (CMEMM. Human leukemia cells HL-60, Jurkat, and Molt-3 were treated with various doses of ATO, CMEMM, and combinations thereof for 24 and 48 h. Results indicated that the combination of 2.5 μM ATO and 50 μg/mL CMEMM synergistically inhibited cell proliferation in HL-60 and Jurkat cell lines. Apoptosis triggered by ATO/CMEMM treatment was confirmed by accumulation of cells in the sub-G1 phase in cell cycle analyses, characteristic apoptotic nuclear fragmentation, and increased percentage of annexin V-positive apoptotic cells. Such combination treatments also led to elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. The antioxidants N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, butylated hydroxytoluene, and α-tocopherol prevented cells from ATO/CMEMM-induced apoptosis. The ATO/CMEMM-induced activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 can be blocked by NAC. In summary, these results suggest that ATO/CMEMM combination treatment exerts synergistic apoptosis-inducing effects in human leukemic cells through a ROS-dependent mechanism and may provide a promising antileukemic approach in the future.

  3. Cardiac risk of coronary patients after reintegration into occupations with heavy physical exertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, R; Habel, F; Heiermann, M; Jäkel, R; Sinn, R

    2005-04-01

    The job related reintegration of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) is a central part of cardiac rehabilitation. However, specific occupational demands like jobs with heavy physical exertion (> 6 METs) could increase the cardiovascular risk because the relative risk for acute myocardial infarction (MI) and cardiac death is temporarily elevated after vigorous exertion ("hazard period"). Thus, in 2001 any male patient with proven CAD who performed a job with heavy exertion until the occurrence of an index event (MI/ACS, any interventional or surgical revascularization measure) received a questionnaire after an average of 20 months. Complete data were available in 108 from 119 included patients (90.8%), aged 51.8+/-7.8 years. Ejection fraction was 61.5+/-13.1% and the functional capacity at the time of hospital discharge averaged 130.1+/-31.2 W. 75% of the patients had a previous MI and 59.3% underwent bypass surgery. During follow-up the previous job with heavy exertion was performed over a cumulated time of 74 years. The aim of the study was to compare the observed and the expected incidence of MI and cardiac death with and without job performance. The expected ("basal") risk for MI and cardiac death without heavy physical exertion was determined from pooled study results and assumed to be 5.2% per year. The combined risk due to performing an occupation with strenuous exertion can be calculated from time periods with and without working hours and amounts to 11.9%. There could be expected 0.119 . 74=8.8 cardiac events related to the job. In contrast, 5 MIs (4 NSTEMI, 1 STEMI) were observed (6.8%). The relative risk for an expected event compared to the basal risk without heavy exertion was 2.3 (95% CI: 0.7-7.4). The relative risk for the observed cardiac events amounts to 1.3 (95% CI: 0.4-4.8). The lower observed risk is probably due to the high grade of physical fitness in this patient group. In spite of several limitations, our study showed no convincing

  4. Repurposing Cationic Amphiphilic Antihistamines for Cancer Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Anne-Marie; Dehlendorff, Christian; Vind, Anna C.;

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide. In search for new NSCLC treatment options, we screened a cationic amphiphilic drug (CAD) library for cytotoxicity against NSCLC cells and identified several CAD antihistamines as inducers of lysosomal cell death. We the...... of loratadine, astemizole and ebastine sensitized NSCLC cells to chemotherapy and reverted multidrug resistance in NSCLC, breast and prostate cancer cells. Thus, CAD antihistamines may improve the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy...... then performed a cohort study on the effect of CAD antihistamine use on mortality of patients diagnosed with non-localized cancer in Denmark between 1995 and 2011. The use of the most commonly prescribed CAD antihistamine, loratadine, was associated with significantly reduced all-cause mortality among patients...... with non-localized NSCLC or any non-localized cancer when compared with use of non-CAD antihistamines and adjusted for potential confounders. Of the less frequently described CAD antihistamines, astemizole showed a similar significant association with reduced mortality as loratadine among patients with any...

  5. Repurposing Cationic Amphiphilic Antihistamines for Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Marie Ellegaard

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide. In search for new NSCLC treatment options, we screened a cationic amphiphilic drug (CAD library for cytotoxicity against NSCLC cells and identified several CAD antihistamines as inducers of lysosomal cell death. We then performed a cohort study on the effect of CAD antihistamine use on mortality of patients diagnosed with non-localized cancer in Denmark between 1995 and 2011. The use of the most commonly prescribed CAD antihistamine, loratadine, was associated with significantly reduced all-cause mortality among patients with non-localized NSCLC or any non-localized cancer when compared with use of non-CAD antihistamines and adjusted for potential confounders. Of the less frequently described CAD antihistamines, astemizole showed a similar significant association with reduced mortality as loratadine among patients with any non-localized cancer, and ebastine use showed a similar tendency. The association between CAD antihistamine use and reduced mortality was stronger among patients with records of concurrent chemotherapy than among those without such records. In line with this, sub-micromolar concentrations of loratadine, astemizole and ebastine sensitized NSCLC cells to chemotherapy and reverted multidrug resistance in NSCLC, breast and prostate cancer cells. Thus, CAD antihistamines may improve the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy.

  6. Repurposing Cationic Amphiphilic Antihistamines for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellegaard, Anne-Marie; Dehlendorff, Christian; Vind, Anna C; Anand, Atul; Cederkvist, Luise; Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Nylandsted, Jesper; Stenvang, Jan; Mellemgaard, Anders; Østerlind, Kell; Friis, Søren; Jäättelä, Marja

    2016-07-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide. In search for new NSCLC treatment options, we screened a cationic amphiphilic drug (CAD) library for cytotoxicity against NSCLC cells and identified several CAD antihistamines as inducers of lysosomal cell death. We then performed a cohort study on the effect of CAD antihistamine use on mortality of patients diagnosed with non-localized cancer in Denmark between 1995 and 2011. The use of the most commonly prescribed CAD antihistamine, loratadine, was associated with significantly reduced all-cause mortality among patients with non-localized NSCLC or any non-localized cancer when compared with use of non-CAD antihistamines and adjusted for potential confounders. Of the less frequently described CAD antihistamines, astemizole showed a similar significant association with reduced mortality as loratadine among patients with any non-localized cancer, and ebastine use showed a similar tendency. The association between CAD antihistamine use and reduced mortality was stronger among patients with records of concurrent chemotherapy than among those without such records. In line with this, sub-micromolar concentrations of loratadine, astemizole and ebastine sensitized NSCLC cells to chemotherapy and reverted multidrug resistance in NSCLC, breast and prostate cancer cells. Thus, CAD antihistamines may improve the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27333030

  7. Therapeutic potential of cationic steroid antibacterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmi, Chanaz; Brunel, Jean M

    2007-08-01

    Antibiotics were one of the great health successes of the 20th century. Antibiotics, both naturally derived and synthetic, have resulted in huge decreases in both morbidity and mortality from bacterial infections. As a consequence, the 'antibiotic age' has changed public expectations about the results of infectious disease. However, this has led to high levels of inappropriate prescribing, where antibiotics may be administered to fulfil patient expectations rather than for clinical benefit. Along with unwise uses in agriculture and elsewhere, this has contributed to recent rises in numbers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. As a result, many commentators have described this as the end of the antibiotic age and the term 'superbug' has entered the common vocabulary for multi-drug-resistant bacteria such as vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, multi-drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and multi-drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this context, an attractive approach for the development of antibacterial agents is the use of a new class of cationic steroidal compounds mimicking polymyxin activities. The permeabilization properties of these agents of the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria are reported in this review, as well as a discussion of literature results. PMID:17685865

  8. Mixed hemimicelles solid-phase extraction based on sodium dodecyl sulfate-coated nano-magnets for selective adsorption and enrichment of illegal cationic dyes in food matrices prior to high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ping; Liang, Zhi-an; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Jian; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Qing-qiong; Zheng, Chun-hao; Luo, Li-Ni; Lin, Zi-hao; Zhu, Fang; Zhang, Xue-wu

    2016-03-11

    In this study, mixed hemimicelles solid-phase extraction (MHSPE) based on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) coated nano-magnets Fe3O4 was investigated as a novel method for the extraction and separation of four banned cationic dyes, Auramine O, Rhodamine B, Basic orange 21 and Basic orange 22, in condiments prior to HPLC detection. The main factors affecting the extraction of analysts, such as pH, surfactant and adsorbent concentrations and zeta potential were studied and optimized. Under optimized conditions, the proposed method was successful applied for the analysis of banned cationic dyes in food samples such as chili sauce, soybean paste and tomato sauce. Validation data showed the good recoveries in the range of 70.1-104.5%, with relative standard deviations less than 15%. The method limits of determination/quantification were in the range of 0.2-0.9 and 0.7-3μgkg(-1), respectively. The selective adsorption and enrichment of cationic dyes were achieved by the synergistic effects of hydrophobic interactions and electrostatic attraction between mixed hemimicelles and the cationic dyes, which also resulted in the removal of natural pigments interferences from sample extracts. When applied to real samples, RB was detected in several positive samples (chili powders) within the range from 0.042 to 0.177mgkg(-1). These results indicate that magnetic MHSPE is an efficient and selective sample preparation technique for the extraction of banned cationic dyes in a complex matrix. PMID:26877180

  9. Synergistic antitumor activity of triple-regulated oncolytic adenovirus with VSTM1 and daunorubicin in leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiao; Yao, Qiu-Mei; Li, Jin-Lan; Chang, Yan; Li, Ting; Han, Wen-Ling; Wu, Hong-Ping; Li, Lin-Fang; Qian, Qi-Jun; Ruan, Guo-Rui

    2016-10-01

    V-set and transmembrane domain-containing 1 (VSTM1), which is downregulated in bone marrow cells from leukemia patients, may provide a diagnostic and treatment target. Here, a triple-regulated oncolytic adenovirus was constructed to carry a VSTM1 gene expression cassette, SG611-VSTM1, and contained the E1a gene with a 24-nucleotide deletion within the CR2 region under control of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter, E1b gene directed by the hypoxia response element, and VSTM1 gene controlled by the cytomegalovirus promoter. Real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot analyses showed that SG611-VSTM1 expressed VSTM1 highly efficiently in the human leukemic cell line K562 compared with SG611. In Cell Counting Kit-8 and flow cytometric assays, SG611-VSTM1 exhibited more potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in leukemic cells compared with SG611 and exerted synergistic cytotoxicity with low-dose daunorubicin (DNR) in vitro. In xenograft models, SG611-VSTM1 intratumorally injected at a dose of 1 × 10(9) plaque forming units combined with intraperitoneally injected low-dose DNR displayed significantly stronger antitumor effects than either treatment alone. Histopathologic examination revealed that SG611-VSTM1 induced apoptosis of leukemic cells. These results implicate an important role for VSTM1 in the pathogenesis of leukemia, and SG611-VSTM1 may be a promising agent for enhancing chemosensitivity in leukemia therapy. PMID:27472927

  10. Synergistic effects of crizotinib and radiotherapy in experimental EML4–ALK fusion positive lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with chromosomal rearrangements of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene (ALK) are sensitive to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor crizotinib. We aimed to investigate the effects of combined radiotherapy and crizotinib in ALK-positive vs. wild type NSCLC models. Material and methods: Clonogenic survival, proliferation and apoptosis of cells exposed to crizotinib and radiotherapy (photon and carbon ions) were evaluated in ALK mutation positive (ALK+; H3122) and negative (ALK−; A549 and LLC) NSCLC lines. The syngeneic mouse (LLC) and human (H3122) xenograft tumor models were further studied in vivo. Tumor growth kinetics, microvascular density (MVD), perfusion and proliferation were assessed. Results: Crizotinib exerted potent and selective anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in ALK+ H3122 cells which were augmented by radiotherapy. The synergistic effect of this combination in ALK+ NSCLC was confirmed by isobologram analysis. Crizotinib also sensitized H3122 cells to particle therapy with carbon ions. In H3122 xenografts, dual combination was most effective in reducing tumor proliferation, MVD and perfusion. In contrast, in the LLC model, crizotinib led only to a transient tumor growth inhibition and combined treatment was inferior to radiotherapy alone. Conclusions: Crizotinib elicits beneficial effects in combination with radiotherapy only in ALK-positive NSCLC

  11. Cisplatin and ultra-violet-C synergistically down-regulate receptor tyrosine kinases in human colorectal cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawaguchi Junji

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platinum-containing anti-cancer drugs such as cisplatin are widely used for patients with various types of cancers, however, resistance to cisplatin is observed in some cases. Whereas we have recently reported that high dose UV-C (200 J/m² induces colorectal cancer cell proliferation by desensitization of EGFR, which leads oncogenic signaling in these cells, in this study we investigated the combination effect of low dose cisplatin (10 μM and low dose UV-C (10 J/m² on cell growth and apoptosis in several human colorectal cancer cells, SW480, DLD-1, HT29 and HCT116. Results The combination inhibited cell cycle and colony formation, while either cisplatin or UV-C alone had little effect. The combination also induced apoptosis in these cells. In addition, the combination caused the downregulation of EGFR and HER2. Moreover, UV-C alone caused the transient internalization of the EGFR, but with time EGFR recycled back to the cell surface, while cisplatin did not affect its localization. Surprisingly, the combination caused persistent internalization of the EGFR, which results in the lasting downregulation of the EGFR. Conclusions The combination of low dose cisplatin and low dose UV-C synergistically exerted anti-cancer effect by down-regulating RTK, such as EGFR and HER2. These findings may provide a novel strategy for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer.

  12. Competitive Effects of 2+ and 3+ Cations on DNA Compaction

    CERN Document Server

    Tongu, C; Yoshikawa, Y; Zinchenko, A A; Chen, N; Yoshikawa, K

    2016-01-01

    By using single-DNA observation with fluorescence microscopy, we observed the effects of divalent and trivalent cations on the higher-order structure of giant DNA (T4 DNA with 166 kbp). It was found that divalent cations, such as Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), inhibit DNA compaction induced by a trivalent cation, spermidine (SPD(3+)). On the other hand, in the absence of SPD(3+), divalent cations cause the shrinkage of DNA. These experimental observations are inconsistent with the well-established Debye-Huckel scheme regarding the shielding effect of counter ions, which is given as the additivity of contributions of cations with different valences. We interpreted the competition between 2+ and 3+ cations in terms of the change in the translational entropy of the counter ions before and after the folding transition of DNA. For the compaction with SPD(3+), we considered the increase in translational entropy due to the ion-exchange of the intrinsic monovalent cations condensing on a highly-charged polyelectrolyte, double-st...

  13. Cations bind only weakly to amides in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okur, Halil I; Kherb, Jaibir; Cremer, Paul S

    2013-04-01

    We investigated salt interactions with butyramide as a simple mimic of cation interactions with protein backbones. The experiments were performed in aqueous metal chloride solutions using two spectroscopic techniques. In the first, which provided information about contact pair formation, the response of the amide I band to the nature and concentration of salt was monitored in bulk aqueous solutions via attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It was found that molar concentrations of well-hydrated metal cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Li(+)) led to the rise of a peak assigned to metal cation-bound amides (1645 cm(-1)) and a decrease in the peak associated with purely water-bound amides (1620 cm(-1)). In a complementary set of experiments, the effect of cation identity and concentration was investigated at the air/butyramide/water interface via vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy. In these studies, metal ion-amide binding led to the ordering of the adjacent water layer. Such experiments were sensitive to the interfacial partitioning of cations in either a contact pair with the amide or as a solvent separated pair. In both experiments, the ordering of the interactions of the cations was: Ca(2+) > Mg(2+) > Li(+) > Na(+) ≈ K(+). This is a direct cationic Hofmeister series. Even for Ca(2+), however, the apparent equilibrium dissociation constant of the cation with the amide carbonyl oxygen was no tighter than ∼8.5 M. For Na(+) and K(+), no evidence was found for any binding. As such, the interactions of metal cations with amides are far weaker than the analogous binding of weakly hydrated anions.

  14. Herd Clustering: A synergistic data clustering approach using collective intelligence

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Kachun

    2014-10-01

    Traditional data mining methods emphasize on analytical abilities to decipher data, assuming that data are static during a mining process. We challenge this assumption, arguing that we can improve the analysis by vitalizing data. In this paper, this principle is used to develop a new clustering algorithm. Inspired by herd behavior, the clustering method is a synergistic approach using collective intelligence called Herd Clustering (HC). The novel part is laid in its first stage where data instances are represented by moving particles. Particles attract each other locally and form clusters by themselves as shown in the case studies reported. To demonstrate its effectiveness, the performance of HC is compared to other state-of-the art clustering methods on more than thirty datasets using four performance metrics. An application for DNA motif discovery is also conducted. The results support the effectiveness of HC and thus the underlying philosophy. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Synergistic effects of anethole and ibuprofen in acute inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski-Rebecca, Edirlene S; Rocha, Bruno A; Wiirzler, Luiz A M; Cuman, Roberto K N; Velazquez-Martinez, Carlos A; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar A

    2015-12-01

    This study assessed the effect of the combination of anethole and ibuprofen in comparison with monotherapy by either drug alone, using two in vivo inflammatory models, namely the pleurisy and paw edema in rats. We also measured the levels of the TNF protein in plasma, and the ability of anethole to inhibit, in vitro, the activity of the cyclooxygenase 1 and cyclooxygenase 2 enzymes. The test drugs (anethole; ibuprofen; anethole + ibuprofen), at different doses, were administered once (p.o.) 60 min before the induction of the inflammatory response. The association of anethole + ibuprofen inhibited the development of the inflammatory response in both models used. This effect can be partially explained by the inhibitory action on the production of TNF and of COX isoforms. The isobologram analysis evidenced a synergistic effect between ibuprofen and anethole, because the combination of drugs showed a higher inhibitory potential than either drug alone.

  16. Synergistic transmembrane alignment of the antimicrobial heterodimer PGLa/magainin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremouilhac, Pierre; Strandberg, Erik; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Ulrich, Anne S

    2006-10-27

    The antimicrobial activity of amphipathic alpha-helical peptides is usually attributed to the formation of pores in bacterial membranes, but direct structural information about such a membrane-bound state is sparse. Solid state (2)H-NMR has previously shown that the antimicrobial peptide PGLa undergoes a concentration-dependent realignment from a surface-bound S-state to a tilted T-state. The corresponding change in helix tilt angle from 98 to 125 degrees was interpreted as the formation of PGLa/magainin heterodimers residing on the bilayer surface. Under no conditions so far, has an upright membrane-inserted I-state been observed in which a transmembrane helix alignment would be expected. Here, we have demonstrated that PGLa is able to assume such an I-state in a 1:1 mixture with magainin 2 at a peptide-to-lipid ratio as low as 1:100 in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol model membranes. This (2)H-NMR analysis is based on seven orientational constraints from Ala-3,3,3-d(3) substituted in a non-perturbing manner for four native Ala residues as well as two Ile and one Gly. The observed helix tilt of 158 degrees is rationalized by the formation of heterodimers. This structurally synergistic effect between the two related peptides from the skin of Xenopus laevis correlates very well with their known functional synergistic mode of action. To our knowledge, this example of PGLa is the first case where an alpha-helical antimicrobial peptide is directly shown to assume a transmembrane state that is compatible with the postulated toroidal wormhole pore structure. PMID:16877761

  17. Synergistic Antitumor Efficacy of Oncolytic Adenovirus Combined with Chemotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yue-min; QIAN Qi-jun; SONG San-tai; JIANG Ze-fei; ZHANG Qi; QU Yi-mei; SU Chang-qing; ZHAO Chuan-hua; LI Zhi-qiang; GE Fei-jiao

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Chemotherapy is an effective means of treating breast cancer, and cancer-specific replicative adenovirus is also a promising antitumor agent in recent years. Our investigation aims to demonstrate that CNHK300 can mediate selective antitumor efficacy and produce synergistic cytotoxicity with chemotherapy on HER-2 over-expressing breast cancer. Methods: We engineered the telomerase-dependent replicative adenovirus CNHK300 by placing the E1A gene under the control of the human hTERT promoter. By analysis of E1A expression, we proved the fidelity of hTERT promoter in adenovirus genome and the selective expression of E1A in telomerase-positive breast cancer cells but not in normal fibroblast cells. By proliferation test, we further showed efficient replication of CNHK300 in breast cancer cells with apparently attenuated proliferation in normal fibroblast cells. Finally, we demonstrated by MTT methods that CNHK300 virus caused potent cytolysis and produced synergistic cytotoxicity with chemotherapy in breast cancer cells with attenuated cytotoxicity on normal cells. Results: In this virus, the E1A gene is successfully placed under the control of the human hTERT promoter. CNHK300 virus replicated as efficiently as the wild-type adenovirus and caused intensive cell killing in HER-2 over-expressing breast cancer cells in vitro. In contrast, telomerase-negative normal fibroblast cells, which expressed no hTERT activity, were not able to support CNHK300 replication. Combined treatment of CNHK300 with paclitaxel improved cytotoxicity on cancer cells. Conclusion: We conclude that CNHK300 can produce selective antitumor efficacy and enhance the in vitro response of chemotherapy on HER-2 overexpressing breast cancer.

  18. Synergistic interactions of lipids and myelin basic protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yufang; Doudevski, Ivo; Wood, Denise; Moscarello, Mario; Husted, Cynthia; Genain, Claude; Zasadzinski, Joseph A.; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2004-09-01

    This report describes force measurements and atomic force microscope imaging of lipid-protein interactions that determine the structure of a model membrane system that closely mimics the myelin sheath. Our results suggest that noncovalent, mainly electrostatic and hydrophobic, interactions are responsible for the multilamellar structure and stability of myelin. We find that myelin basic protein acts as a lipid coupler between two apposed bilayers and as a lipid "hole-filler," effectively preventing defect holes from developing. From our protein-mediated-adhesion and force-distance measurements, we develop a simple quantitative model that gives a reasonably accurate picture of the molecular mechanism and adhesion of bilayer-bridging proteins by means of noncovalent interactions. The results and model indicate that optimum myelin adhesion and stability depend on the difference between, rather than the product of, the opposite charges on the lipid bilayers and myelin basic protein, as well as on the repulsive forces associated with membrane fluidity, and that small changes in any of these parameters away from the synergistically optimum values can lead to large changes in the adhesion or even its total elimination. Our results also show that the often-asked question of which membrane species, the lipids or the proteins, are the "important ones" may be misplaced. Both components work synergistically to provide the adhesion and overall structure. A better appreciation of the mechanism of this synergy may allow for a better understanding of stacked and especially myelin membrane structures and may lead to better treatments for demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. lipid-protein interactions | myelin membrane structure | membrane adhesion | membrane regeneration/healing | demyelinating diseases

  19. Synergistic Antibacterial Effect between Silibinin and Antibiotics in Oral Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Soo Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Silibinin is a composition of the silymarin group as a hepatoprotective agent, and it exhibits various biological activities, including antibacterial activity. In this study, the antibacterial activities of silibinin were investigated in combination with two antimicrobial agents against oral bacteria. Silibinin was determined with MIC and MBC values ranging from 0.1 to 3.2 and 0.2 to 6.4 μg/mL, ampicillin from 0.125 to 64 and 0.5 to 64 μg/mL, gentamicin from 2 to 256 and 4 to 512 μg/mL, respectively. The ranges of MIC50 and MIC90 were 0.025–0.8 μg/mL and 0.1–3.2 μg/mL, respectively. The antibacterial activities of silibinin against oral bacteria were assessed using the checkerboard and time-kill methods to evaluate the synergistic effects of treatment with ampicillin or gentamicin. The results were evaluated showing that the combination effects of silibinin with antibiotics were synergistic (FIC index <0.5 against all tested oral bacteria. Furthermore, a time-kill study showed that the growth of the tested bacteria was completely attenuated after 2–6 h of treatment with the MBC of silibinin, regardless of whether it was administered alone or with ampicillin or gentamicin. These results suggest that silibinin combined with other antibiotics may be microbiologically beneficial and not antagonistic.

  20. Competitive Solvation of the Imidazolium Cation by Water and Methanol

    CERN Document Server

    Chaban, Vitaly

    2014-01-01

    Imidazolium-based ionic liquids are widely used in conjunction with molecular liquids for various applications. Solvation, miscibility and similar properties are of fundamental importance for successful implementation of theoretical schemes. This work reports competitive solvation of the 1,3-dimethylimidazolium cation by water and methanol. Employing molecular dynamics simulations powered by semiempirical Hamiltonian (electronic structure level of description), the local structure nearly imidazolium cation is described in terms of radial distribution functions. Although water and methanol are chemically similar, water appears systematically more successful in solvating the 1,3-dimethylimidazolium cation. This result fosters construction of future applications of the ternary ion-molecular systems.

  1. Pyridine radical cation and its fluorine substituted derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondybey, V.E.; English, J.H.; Shiley, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    The spectra and relaxation of the pyridine cation and of several of its fluorinated derivatives are studied in low temperature Ne matrices. The ions are generated by direct photoionization of the parent compounds. Of the compounds studied, laser induced → and → fluorescence is observed only for the 2, 6‐difluoropyridine cation. The analysis of the spectrum indicates that the ion is planar both in the and states. The large variety in the spectroscopic and relaxation behavior of fluoropyridine radical cations is explained in terms of their electronic structure and of the differential shifts of the individual electronic states caused by the fluorine substitution.

  2. Synergistic and complete reversal of the multidrug resistance of mitoxantrone hydrochloride by three-in-one multifunctional lipid-sodium glycocholate nanocarriers based on simultaneous BCRP and Bcl-2 inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Guixia; Zhang, Tianhong; Zhang, Peng; Sun, Jin; He, Zhonggui

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a severe obstacle to successful chemotherapy due to its complicated nature that involves multiple mechanisms, such as drug efflux by transporters (P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein, BCRP) and anti-apoptotic defense (B-cell lymphoma, Bcl-2). To synergistically and completely reverse MDR by simultaneous inhibition of pump and non-pump cellular resistance, three-in-one multifunctional lipid-sodium glycocholate (GcNa) nanocarriers (TMLGNs) have been designed for controlled co-delivery of water-soluble cationic mitoxantrone hydrochloride (MTO), cyclosporine A (CsA – BCRP inhibitor), and GcNa (Bcl-2 inhibitor). GcNa and dextran sulfate were incorporated as anionic compounds to enhance the encapsulation efficiency of MTO (up to 97.8%±1.9%) and sustain the release of cationic MTO by electrostatic interaction. The results of a series of in vitro and in vivo investigations indicated that the TMLGNs were taken up by the resistant cancer cells by an endocytosis pathway that escaped the efflux induced by BCRP, and the simultaneous release of CsA with MTO further efficiently inhibited the efflux of the released MTO by BCRP; meanwhile GcNa induced the apoptosis process, and an associated synergistic antitumor activity and reversion of MDR were achieved because the reversal index was almost 1.0. PMID:27601896

  3. Synergistic and complete reversal of the multidrug resistance of mitoxantrone hydrochloride by three-in-one multifunctional lipid-sodium glycocholate nanocarriers based on simultaneous BCRP and Bcl-2 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Guixia; Zhang, Tianhong; Zhang, Peng; Sun, Jin; He, Zhonggui

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a severe obstacle to successful chemotherapy due to its complicated nature that involves multiple mechanisms, such as drug efflux by transporters (P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein, BCRP) and anti-apoptotic defense (B-cell lymphoma, Bcl-2). To synergistically and completely reverse MDR by simultaneous inhibition of pump and non-pump cellular resistance, three-in-one multifunctional lipid-sodium glycocholate (GcNa) nanocarriers (TMLGNs) have been designed for controlled co-delivery of water-soluble cationic mitoxantrone hydrochloride (MTO), cyclosporine A (CsA - BCRP inhibitor), and GcNa (Bcl-2 inhibitor). GcNa and dextran sulfate were incorporated as anionic compounds to enhance the encapsulation efficiency of MTO (up to 97.8%±1.9%) and sustain the release of cationic MTO by electrostatic interaction. The results of a series of in vitro and in vivo investigations indicated that the TMLGNs were taken up by the resistant cancer cells by an endocytosis pathway that escaped the efflux induced by BCRP, and the simultaneous release of CsA with MTO further efficiently inhibited the efflux of the released MTO by BCRP; meanwhile GcNa induced the apoptosis process, and an associated synergistic antitumor activity and reversion of MDR were achieved because the reversal index was almost 1.0. PMID:27601896

  4. Total Ionizing Dose and Synergistic Effect of Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xing-yao; Li, Yu-dong; He, Cheng-fa; Wen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Magetoresistive Random Access Memory (MRAM) was irradiated by 60Co {\\gamma}-rays and electron beam. The test of synergistic effect was performed under additional magnetic field when irradiation. We analyzed Total Ionizing Dose (TID) and synergistic damage mechanism of MRAM. DC, AC and function parameters of the memory were tested in radiation and annealing by Very Large Scale Integrated circuit (VLSI) test system. The radiation sensitive parameters were obtained through analyzing the data. Because magnetic field imposed on MRAM when the test of synergistic effect, Shallow Trench Isolation (STI) leakage or Frenkel-Poole emission of synergistic effect was smaller than that of TID, and radiation damage of synergistic effect was lower than that of TID.

  5. [Characteristics of non-exertional heat-related illness in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Yasufumi

    2012-06-01

    This report shows characteristics of non-exertional heat-related illness in Japan. The findings are similar to those of previous reports in heatwaves of Europe and The United States. Eldery people with pre-existing diseases, homeless, living alone, poverty are independent risk factors of heatstoke and are strongly associated with severity and mortality. PMID:22690607

  6. Saving the Seneca Outdoor Recreation Program: A Case Study in Exerting Political Influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Clare

    1998-01-01

    This case study demonstrates the process of exerting political influence in faculty's systematic efforts to save the outdoor recreation program at Seneca College (Ontario). A chart and explanatory list present a seven-stage plan for influencing political decision-making. (SAS)

  7. Effect of Carbohydrate Ingestion on Ratings of Perceived Exertion during a Marathon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utter, Alan C.; Kang, Jie; Robertson, Robert J.; Nieman, David C.; Chaloupka, Edward C.; Suminski, Richard R.; Piccinni, Cristiana R.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the effects of carbohydrate substrate availability on ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and hormonal regulation during a competitive marathon. Data on marathon runners randomly assigned to receive carbohydrate or placebo indicated that those who ingested carbohydrate rather than placebo beverages were able to run at a higher…

  8. Coordination of strength exertion during the chair-rise movement in very old people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindemann, Ulrich; Muche, Rainer; Stuber, Michael; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Hauer, Klaus; Becker, Clemens

    2007-01-01

    Background. Changes in performance of standing up from a chair have been related to measures of strength or power. However, the sit-to-stand (STS) transfer requires that the individual exerts forces with appropriate magnitude and timing. These coordinative aspects have received less attention. This

  9. Implicit theories about willpower predict the activation of a rest goal following self-control exertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Job, Veronika; Bernecker, Katharina; Miketta, Stefanie; Friese, Malte

    2015-10-01

    Past research indicates that peoples' implicit theories about the nature of willpower moderate the ego-depletion effect. Only people who believe or were led to believe that willpower is a limited resource (limited-resource theory) showed lower self-control performance after an initial demanding task. As of yet, the underlying processes explaining this moderating effect by theories about willpower remain unknown. Here, we propose that the exertion of self-control activates the goal to preserve and replenish mental resources (rest goal) in people with a limited-resource theory. Five studies tested this hypothesis. In Study 1, individual differences in implicit theories about willpower predicted increased accessibility of a rest goal after self-control exertion. Furthermore, measured (Study 2) and manipulated (Study 3) willpower theories predicted an increased preference for rest-conducive objects. Finally, Studies 4 and 5 provide evidence that theories about willpower predict actual resting behavior: In Study 4, participants who held a limited-resource theory took a longer break following self-control exertion than participants with a nonlimited-resource theory. Longer resting time predicted decreased rest goal accessibility afterward. In Study 5, participants with an induced limited-resource theory sat longer on chairs in an ostensible product-testing task when they had engaged in a task requiring self-control beforehand. This research provides consistent support for a motivational shift toward rest after self-control exertion in people holding a limited-resource theory about willpower. PMID:26075793

  10. Exertional dyspnoea in chronic heart failure: the role of the lung and respiratory mechanical factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Bruno-Pierre; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Laveneziana, Pierantonio

    2016-09-01

    Exertional dyspnoea is among the dominant symptoms in patients with chronic heart failure and progresses relentlessly as the disease advances, leading to reduced ability to function and engage in activities of daily living. Effective management of this disabling symptom awaits a better understanding of its underlying physiology.Cardiovascular factors are believed to play a major role in dyspnoea in heart failure patients. However, despite pharmacological interventions, such as vasodilators or inotropes that improve central haemodynamics, patients with heart failure still complain of exertional dyspnoea. Clearly, dyspnoea is not determined by cardiac factors alone, but likely depends on complex, integrated cardio-pulmonary interactions.A growing body of evidence suggests that excessively increased ventilatory demand and abnormal "restrictive" constraints on tidal volume expansion with development of critical mechanical limitation of ventilation, contribute to exertional dyspnoea in heart failure. This article will offer new insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms of exertional dyspnoea in patients with chronic heart failure by exploring the potential role of the various constituents of the physiological response to exercise and particularly the role of abnormal ventilatory and respiratory mechanics responses to exercise in the perception of dyspnoea in patients with heart failure. PMID:27581831

  11. Exertion of forces by children performing a free-style jump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moes, C.C.M.; Visser, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    This research project focuses on the force characteristics and force/time relationships of loads exerted by jumping children. The current study is an experimental research into children jumping on both hard and soft substrates. The hard substrate is obtained by using a force plate. For the soft subs

  12. Fluoxetine Exerts Age-Dependent Effects on Behavior and Amygdala Neuroplasticity in the Rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.R. Homberg; J.D.A. Olivier; T. Blom; T. Arentsen; C. van Brunschot; P. Schipper; G. Korte-Bouws; G. van Luijtelaar; L. Reneman

    2011-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) Prozac (R) (fluoxetine) is the only registered antidepressant to treat depression in children and adolescents. Yet, while the safety of SSRIs has been well established in adults, serotonin exerts neurotrophic actions in the developing brain and there

  13. Fluoxetine exerts age-dependent effects on behavior and amygdala neuroplasticity in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homberg, J.R.; Olivier, J.D.A.; Blom, T.; Arentsen, T.; Brunschot, C. van; Schipper, P.; Korte-Bouws, G.A.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Reneman, L.

    2011-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) Prozac(R) (fluoxetine) is the only registered antidepressant to treat depression in children and adolescents. Yet, while the safety of SSRIs has been well established in adults, serotonin exerts neurotrophic actions in the developing brain and thereb

  14. Fluoxetine exerts age-dependent effects on behavior and amygdala neuroplasticity in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homberg, Judith R; Olivier, Jocelien D A; Blom, Tom; Arentsen, Tim; van Brunschot, Chantal; Schipper, Pieter; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien; van Luijtelaar, Gilles; Reneman, Liesbeth

    2011-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) Prozac® (fluoxetine) is the only registered antidepressant to treat depression in children and adolescents. Yet, while the safety of SSRIs has been well established in adults, serotonin exerts neurotrophic actions in the developing brain and thereby

  15. Implicit theories about willpower predict the activation of a rest goal following self-control exertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Job, Veronika; Bernecker, Katharina; Miketta, Stefanie; Friese, Malte

    2015-10-01

    Past research indicates that peoples' implicit theories about the nature of willpower moderate the ego-depletion effect. Only people who believe or were led to believe that willpower is a limited resource (limited-resource theory) showed lower self-control performance after an initial demanding task. As of yet, the underlying processes explaining this moderating effect by theories about willpower remain unknown. Here, we propose that the exertion of self-control activates the goal to preserve and replenish mental resources (rest goal) in people with a limited-resource theory. Five studies tested this hypothesis. In Study 1, individual differences in implicit theories about willpower predicted increased accessibility of a rest goal after self-control exertion. Furthermore, measured (Study 2) and manipulated (Study 3) willpower theories predicted an increased preference for rest-conducive objects. Finally, Studies 4 and 5 provide evidence that theories about willpower predict actual resting behavior: In Study 4, participants who held a limited-resource theory took a longer break following self-control exertion than participants with a nonlimited-resource theory. Longer resting time predicted decreased rest goal accessibility afterward. In Study 5, participants with an induced limited-resource theory sat longer on chairs in an ostensible product-testing task when they had engaged in a task requiring self-control beforehand. This research provides consistent support for a motivational shift toward rest after self-control exertion in people holding a limited-resource theory about willpower.

  16. Citrus-derived flavonoid naringenin exerts uterotrophic effects in female mice at human relevant doses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinholt, Vibeke Miller; Svendsen, Gitte Winkel; Dragsted, Lars Ove;

    2004-01-01

    ingestion of 400-760 ml of orange juice (Erlund et al. 2001). This could be taken to suggests that ingestion of orange juice and other citrus fruits and juices may give rise to sufficiently high tissue levels of naringenin in man to exert a biological effect....

  17. Hydrocortisone Infusion Exerts Dose- and Sex-Dependent Effects on Attention to Emotional Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitberg, Alaina; Drevets, Wayne C.; Wood, Suzanne E.; Mah, Linda; Schulkin, Jay; Sahakian, Barbara J.; Erickson, Kristine

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoid administration has been shown to exert complex effects on cognitive and emotional processing. In the current study we investigated the effects of glucocorticoid administration on attention towards emotional words, using an Affective Go/No-go task on which healthy humans have shown an attentional bias towards positive as compared to…

  18. Respiratory and immune response to maximal physical exertion following exposure to secondhand smoke in healthy adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas D Flouris

    Full Text Available We assessed the cardiorespiratory and immune response to physical exertion following secondhand smoke (SHS exposure through a randomized crossover experiment. Data were obtained from 16 (8 women non-smoking adults during and following a maximal oxygen uptake cycling protocol administered at baseline and at 0-, 1-, and 3- hours following 1-hour of SHS set at bar/restaurant carbon monoxide levels. We found that SHS was associated with a 12% decrease in maximum power output, an 8.2% reduction in maximal oxygen consumption, a 6% increase in perceived exertion, and a 6.7% decrease in time to exhaustion (P<0.05. Moreover, at 0-hours almost all respiratory and immune variables measured were adversely affected (P<0.05. For instance, FEV(1 values at 0-hours dropped by 17.4%, while TNF-α increased by 90.1% (P<0.05. At 3-hours mean values of cotinine, perceived exertion and recovery systolic blood pressure in both sexes, IL4, TNF-α and IFN-γ in men, as well as FEV(1/FVC, percent predicted FEV(1, respiratory rate, and tidal volume in women remained different compared to baseline (P<0.05. It is concluded that a 1-hour of SHS at bar/restaurant levels adversely affects the cardiorespiratory and immune response to maximal physical exertion in healthy nonsmokers for at least three hours following SHS.

  19. Fluoxetine Exerts Age-Dependent Effects on Behavior and Amygdala Neuroplasticity in the Rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homberg, J.R.; Olivier, J.D.A.; Blom, T.; Arentsen, T.; Brunschot, C. van; Schipper, P.; Korte-Bouws, G.A.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Reneman, L.

    2011-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) Prozac® (fluoxetine) is the only registered antidepressant to treat depression in children and adolescents. Yet, while the safety of SSRIs has been well established in adults, serotonin exerts neurotrophic actions in the developing brain and thereby

  20. Physiological responses and perceptions of exertion in a step aerobics session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, R; Wilson, J; Aitchison, T; Grant, S

    1999-06-01

    The aims of this study were to establish the cardiovascular and metabolic demands of a university step aerobics session entitled 'Uni-Step' performed at three step heights, and to evaluate the use of heart rate and ratings of perceived exertion for the estimation of exercise intensity during this mode. Ten female participants in step aerobics (mean VO2max = 47.7, s = 6.8 ml.kg-1.min-1) performed a 40-min Uni-Step routine on steps of height 6, 8 and 10 inches (15.2, 20.3 and 25.4 cm). Oxygen uptake, heart rate and ratings of perceived exertion were recorded throughout each test. Maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) and maximum heart rate were measured using a continuous treadmill protocol. The mean intensities were 45.6%, 51.6% and 56.2% VO2max for the 6-, 8- and 10-inch steps respectively. The mean percent heart rate reserves were 57.2%, 63.6% and 70.1% at these three heights respectively. Correlations indicated a weak relationship between %VO2max and ratings of perceived exertion for the 6- and 8-inch steps (r = 0.61 and 0.66 respectively) but a stronger one for the 10-inch step (r = 0.79). Uni-Step performed on the two highest steps was of a sufficient relative intensity to improve or maintain the cardiovascular fitness of participants in this study. The lowest step may be useful for participants of lower fitness. Heart rate overestimated the metabolic cost of Uni-Step at all three step heights and therefore caution is advised if used to predict intensity. Low correlations between %VO2max and ratings of perceived exertion at the two lower step heights indicate that ratings of perceived exertion may have limited utility in prescribing training intensity. PMID:10404498

  1. Modulating macrophage polarization with divalent cations in nanostructured titanium implant surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-Ho; Kim, Youn-Jeong; Jang, Je-Hee; Park, Jin-Woo

    2016-02-01

    Nanoscale topographical modification and surface chemistry alteration using bioactive ions are centrally important processes in the current design of the surface of titanium (Ti) bone implants with enhanced bone healing capacity. Macrophages play a central role in the early tissue healing stage and their activity in response to the implant surface is known to affect the subsequent healing outcome. Thus, the positive modulation of macrophage phenotype polarization (i.e. towards the regenerative M2 rather than the inflammatory M1 phenotype) with a modified surface is essential for the osteogenesis funtion of Ti bone implants. However, relatively few advances have been made in terms of modulating the macrophage-centered early healing capacity in the surface design of Ti bone implants for the two important surface properties of nanotopography and and bioactive ion chemistry. We investigated whether surface bioactive ion modification exerts a definite beneficial effect on inducing regenerative M2 macrophage polarization when combined with the surface nanotopography of Ti. Our results indicate that nanoscale topographical modification and surface bioactive ion chemistry can positively modulate the macrophage phenotype in a Ti implant surface. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that chemical surface modification using divalent cations (Ca and Sr) dramatically induces the regenerative M2 macrophage phenotype of J774.A1 cells in nanostructured Ti surfaces. In this study, divalent cation chemistry regulated the cell shape of adherent macrophages and markedly up-regulated M2 macrophage phenotype expression when combined with the nanostructured Ti surface. These results provide insight into the surface engineering of future Ti bone implants that are harmonized between the macrophage-governed early wound healing process and subsequent mesenchymal stem cell-centered osteogenesis function.

  2. Isomerization of propargyl cation to cyclopropenyl cation: Mechanistic elucidations and effects of lone pair donors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zodinpuia Pachuau; Kiew S Kharnaior; R H Duncan Lyngdoh

    2013-03-01

    This ab initio study examines two pathways (one concerted and the other two-step) for isomerization of the linear propargyl cation to the aromatic cyclopropenyl cation, also probing the phenomenon of solvation of this reaction by simple lone pair donors (NH3, H2O, H2S and HF) which bind to the substrate at two sites. Fully optimized geometries at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level were used, along with single point QCISD(T)/6-311+G(d,p) and accurate G3 level calculations upon the DFT optimized geometries. For the unsolvated reaction, the two-step second pathway is energetically favoured over the one-step first pathway. Lone pair donor affinity for the various C3H$^{+}_{3}$ species follows the uniform order NH3 > H2S>H2O>HF. The activation barriers for the solvated isomerizations decrease in the order HF>H2O>H2S>NH3 for both pathways. The number of lone pairs on the donor heteroatom as well as the heteroatom electronegativity are factors related to both these trends. Compared to the unsolvated cases, the solvated reactions have transition states which are usually ‘later’ in position along the reaction coordinate, validating the Hammond postulate.

  3. Regulation of TRP-like muscarinic cation current in gastrointestinal smooth muscle with special reference to PLC/InsP3/Ca2+ system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexander V ZHOLOS

    2006-01-01

    Acetylcholine,the main enteric excitatory neuromuscular transmitter,evokes membrane depolarization and contraction of gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells by activating G protein-coupled muscarinic receptors.Although the cholinergic excitation is generally underlined by the multiplicity of ion channel effects,the primary event appears to be the opening of cation-selective channels;among them the 60 pS channel has been recently identified as the main target for the acetylcholine action in gastrointestinal myocytes.The evoked cation current,termed mICAT,causes either an oscillatory or a more sustained membrane depolarization response,which in turn leads to increases of the open probability of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels.thus providing Ca2+ entry in parallel with Ca2+ release for intracellular Ca2+ concentration rise and contraction.In recent years there have been several significant developments in our understanding of the signaling processes underlying mIcAT generation.They have revealed important synergistic interactions between M2 and M3 receptor subtypes,single channel mechanisms,and the involvement of TRPC-encoded proteins as essential components of native muscarinic cation channels.This review summarizes these recent findings and in particular discusses the roles of the phospholipase C/InsP3/intracellular Ca2+ release system in the mICAT physiological regulation.

  4. DFT study on the cycloreversion of thietane radical cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Luis R; Pérez-Ruiz, Raúl; Argüello, Juan E; Miranda, Miguel A

    2011-06-01

    The molecular mechanism of the cycloreversion (CR) of thietane radical cations has been analyzed in detail at the UB3LYP/6-31G* level of theory. Results have shown that the process takes place via a stepwise mechanism leading to alkenes and thiobenzophenone; alternatively, formal [4+2] cycloadducts are obtained. Thus, the CR of radical cations 1a,b(•+) is initiated by C2-C3 bond breaking, giving common intermediates INa,b. At this stage, two reaction pathways are feasible involving ion molecule complexes IMCa,b (i) or radical cations 4a,b(•+) (ii). Calculations support that 1a(•+) follows reaction pathway ii (leading to the formal [4+2] cycloadducts 5a). By contrast, 1b(•+) follows pathway i, leading to trans-stilbene radical cation (2b(•+)) and thiobenzophenone.

  5. Degradation Mechanism of Cationic Red X-GRL by Ozonation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Rong ZHAO; Xin Hua XU; Hui Xiang SHI; Da Hui WANG

    2003-01-01

    The degradation mechanism of Cationic Red X-GRL was investigated when the intermediates, the nitrate ion and the pH were analyzed in the ozonation. The degradation of the Cationic Red X-GRL includes the de-auxochrome stage, the decolour stage, and the decomposition of fragment stage. During the degradation process, among the six nitrogen atoms of Cationic Red X-GRL, one is transferred into a nitrate ion, one becomes the form of an amine compound, and the rest four are transformed into two molecules of nitrogen. In the course of the ozonation of Cationic Red X-GRL, the direct attack of ozone is the main decolour effect.

  6. Condensation of nonstochiometric DNA/polycation complexes by divalent cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budker, Vladimir; Trubetskoy, Vladimir; Wolff, Jon A

    2006-12-15

    This study found that divalent cations induced the further condensation of partially condensed DNA within nonstochiometric polycation complexes. The addition of a few mmol of a divalent cation such as calcium reduced by half the inflection point at which DNA became fully condensed by poly-L-lysine (PLL) and a variety of other polycations. The effect on DNA condensation was initially observed using a new method, which is based on the concentration-dependent self-quenching of fluorescent moieties (e.g., rhodamine) covalently linked to the DNA backbone at relatively high densities. Additional analyses, which employed ultracentrifugation, dynamic light scattering, agarose gel electrophoresis, and atomic force microscopy, confirmed the effect of divalent cations. These results provide an additional accounting of the process by which divalent cations induce greater chromatin compaction that is based on the representation of chromatin fibers as a nonstoichiometric polyelectrolyte complex. They also offer a new approach to assemble nonviral vectors for gene therapy.

  7. Prior physical exertion modulates allocentric distance perception: a demonstration of task-irrelevant cross-modal transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, E. V.; Ward, N.S.; Kuppuswamy, A.

    2016-01-01

    Physical exertion has been previously shown to influence distance perception in the egocentric framework. In this study, we show that physical exertion influences allocentric distance perception. Twenty healthy volunteers made allocentric line length estimates following varying levels of physical exertion. Each participant was presented with 30 different line lengths ranging from 1 to 12 cm, and each length was presented three times. Each line presentation was preceded by the participant exer...

  8. Sulfometuron incorporation in cationic micelles adsorbed on montmorillonite

    OpenAIRE

    Mishael, Y. G.; Undabeytia López, Tomás; Rytwo, Giora; Papahadjopoulos Sternberg, B.; Rubin, Baruch; Nir, Shlomo

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the interactions between alkylammonium cations present as monomers and micelles and a clay mineral, montmorillonite, to develop slow release formulations of anionic herbicides, such as sulfometuron (SFM) whose leaching in soils is an environmental and economic problem. In the proposed formulation the herbicide is incorporated in positively charged micelles of quaternary amine cations, which in turn adsorb on the negatively charged clay. The adsorption o...

  9. Microscopic Theory of Cation Exchange in CdSe Nanocrystals

    OpenAIRE

    Ott, Florian D.; Spiegel, Leo L.; Norris, David J.; Erwin, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Although poorly understood, cation-exchange reactions are increasingly used to dope or transform colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots). We used density-functional theory and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to develop a microscopic theory that explains structural, optical, and electronic changes observed experimentally in Ag-cation-exchanged CdSe nanocrystals. We find that Coulomb interactions, both between ionized impurities and with the polarized nanocrystal surface, play a key...

  10. Migration of Cations and Anions in Amorphous Polymer Electrolytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.A.Stolwijk; S.H.Obeidi; M.Wiencierz

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Polymer electrolytes are used as ion conductors in batteries and fuel cells.Simple systems consist of a polymer matrix complexing an inorganic salt and are fully amorphous at the temperatures of interest.Both cations and anions are mobile and contribute to charge transport.Most studies on polymer electrolytes use the electrical conductivity to characterize the ion mobility.However,conductivity measurements cannot discriminate between cations and anions.This paper reports some recent results fr...

  11. Mercury release from deforested soils triggered by base cation enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farella, N; Lucotte, M; Davidson, R; Daigle, S

    2006-09-01

    The Brazilian Amazon has experienced considerable colonization in the last few decades. Family agriculture based on slash-and-burn enables millions of people to live in that region. However, the poor nutrient content of most Amazonian soils requires cation-rich ashes from the burning of the vegetation biomass for cultivation to be successful, which leads to forest ecosystem degradation, soil erosion and mercury contamination. While recent studies have suggested that mercury present in soils was transferred towards rivers upon deforestation, little is known about the dynamics between agricultural land-use and mercury leaching. In this context, the present study proposes an explanation that illustrates how agricultural land-use triggers mercury loss from soils. This explanation lies in the competition between base cations and mercury in soils which are characterized by a low adsorption capacity. Since these soils are naturally very poor in base cations, the burning of the forest biomass suddenly brings high quantities of base cations to soils, destabilizing the previous equilibrium amongst cations. Base cation enrichment triggers mobility in soil cations, rapidly dislocating mercury atoms. This conclusion comes from principal component analyses illustrating that agricultural land-use was associated with base cation enrichment and mercury depletion. The overall conclusions highlight a pernicious cycle: while soil nutrient enrichment actually occurs through biomass burning, although on a temporary basis, there is a loss in Hg content, which is leached to rivers, entering the aquatic chain, and posing a potential health threat to local populations. Data presented here reflects three decades of deforestation activities, but little is known about the long-term impact of such a disequilibrium. These findings may have repercussions on our understanding of the complex dynamics of deforestation and agriculture worldwide. PMID:16781764

  12. Synthesis and characterisation of cationically modified phospholipid polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Andrew L; Berwick, James; Davies, Martyn C; Roberts, Clive J; Wang, Jin-Hai; Small, Sharon; Dunn, Anthony; O'Byrne, Vincent; Redman, Richard P; Jones, Stephen A

    2004-07-01

    Phospholipid-like copolymers based on 2-(methacryloyloxyethyl) phosphorylcholine were synthesised using monomer-starved free radical polymerisation methods and incorporating cationic charge in the form of the choline methacrylate monomer in amounts varying from 0 to 30 wt%, together with a 5 wt% silyl cross-linking agent in order to render them water-insoluble once thermally cured. Characterisation using a variety of techniques including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, high-pressure liquid chromatography and gel permeation chromatography showed the cationic monomer did not interfere with the polymerisation and that the desired amount of charge had been incorporated. Gravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry methods were used to evaluate the water contents of polymer membranes cured at 70 degrees C, which was seen to increase with increasing cation content, producing materials with water contents ranging from 50% to 98%. Surface plasmon resonance indicated that the coatings swelled rapidly in water, the rate and extent of swelling increasing with increasing cation level. Dynamic contact angle showed that coatings of all the polymers possessed a hydrophobic surface when dry in air, characteristic of the alkyl chains expressed at the surface (>100 degrees advancing angle). Rearrangement of the hydrophilic groups to the surface occurred once wet, to produce highly wettable surfaces with a decrease in advancing angle with increasing cation content. Atomic force microscopy showed all polymer films to be smooth with no features in topographical or phase imaging. Mechanical properties of the dry films were also unaffected by the increase in cation content.

  13. Complexation Between Cationic Diblock Copolymers and Plasmid DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seyoung; Reineke, Theresa; Lodge, Timothy

    Deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA), as polyanions, can spontaneously bind with polycations to form polyelectrolyte complexes. When the polycation is a diblock copolymer with one cationic block and one uncharged hydrophilic block, the polyelectrolyte complexes formed with plasmid DNA (pDNA) are often colloidally stable, and show great promise in the field of polymeric gene therapy. While the resulting properties (size, stability, and toxicity to biological systems) of the complexes have been studied for numerous cationic diblocks, the fundamentals of the pDNA-diblock binding process have not been extensively investigated. Herein, we report how the cationic block content of a diblock influences the pDNA-diblock interactions. pDNA with 7164 base pairs and poly(2-deoxy-2-methacrylamido glucopyranose)-block-poly(N-(2-aminoethyl) methacrylamide) (PMAG-b-PAEMA) are used as the model pDNA and cationic diblock, respectively. To vary the cationic block content, two PMAG-b-PAEMA copolymers with similar PMAG block lengths but distinct PAEMA block lengths and a PAEMA homopolymer are utilized. We show that the enthalpy change from pDNA-diblock interactions is dependent on the cationic diblock composition, and is closely associated with both the binding strength and the pDNA tertiary structure.

  14. Tunable states of interlayer cations in two-dimensional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K.; Numata, K. [Department of Environmental Sciences, Tokyo Gakugei University, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Dai, W. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Hunger, M. [Institute of Chemical Technology, University of Stuttgart, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-03-31

    The local state of cations inside the Ångstrom-scale interlayer spaces is one of the controlling factors for designing sophisticated two-dimensional (2D) materials consisting of 2D nanosheets. In the present work, the molecular mechanism on how the interlayer cation states are induced by the local structures of the 2D nanosheets is highlighted. For this purpose, the local states of Na cations in inorganic 2D materials, in which the compositional fluctuations of a few percent are introduced in the tetrahedral and octahedral units of the 2D nanosheets, were systematically studied by means of {sup 23}Na magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and {sup 23}Na multiple-quantum MAS (MQMAS) NMR spectroscopy. In contrast with an uniform distribution of Na cations expected so far, various well-defined cation states sensitive to the local structures of the 2D nanosheets were identified. The tunability of the interlayer cation states along with the local structure of the 2D nanosheets, as the smallest structural unit of the 2D material, is discussed.

  15. Synergistic activity of troxacitabine (Troxatyl™ and gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leblond Lorraine

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gemcitabine, a deoxycytidine nucleoside analog, is the current standard chemotherapy used as first-line treatment for patients with locally advanced or metastatic cancer of the pancreas, and extends life survival by 5.7 months. Advanced pancreatic cancer thus remains a highly unmet medical need and new therapeutic agents are required for this patient population. Troxacitabine (Troxatyl™ is the first unnatural L-nucleoside analog to show potent preclinical antitumor activity and is currently under clinical investigation. Troxacitabine was recently evaluated as a first-line therapy in 54 patients with advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas and gave comparable overall results to those reported with gemcitabine in recently published randomized trials. Methods The human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines, AsPC-1, Capan-2, MIA PaCa-2 and Panc-1, were exposed to troxacitabine or gemcitabine alone or in combination, for 72 h, and the effects on cell growth were determined by electronic particle counting. Synergistic efficacy was determined by the isobologram and combination-index methods of Chou and Talalay. Mechanistic studies addressed incorporation of troxacitabine into DNA and intracellular levels of troxacitabine and gemcitabine metabolites. For in vivo studies, we evaluated the effect of both drugs, alone and in combination, on the growth of established human pancreatic (AsPC-1 tumors implanted subcutaneously in nude mice. Statistical analysis was calculated by a one-way ANOVA with Dunnett as a post-test and the two-tailed unpaired t test using GraphPad prism software. Results Synergy, evaluated using the CalcuSyn Software, was observed in all four cell-lines at multiple drug concentrations resulting in combination indices under 0.7 at Fa of 0.5 (50% reduction of cell growth. The effects of drug exposures on troxacitabine and gemcitabine nucleotide pools were analyzed, and although gemcitabine reduced phosphorylation of

  16. Radiation pressure cross section exerted on homogenous dielectric spherical particle by zeroth order Mathieu beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafiq, A.; Belafhal, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a full calculation of radiation pressure cross section and optical forces exerted by linearly polarized zeroth order Mathieu beams on homogenous dielectric spherical particle in the framework of generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT). In this theory, the scattered fields are dependent upon the Mie scattering coefficients and the beam shape coefficients. So a new optical property such as force and torque appears by changing the beam profile and the nature of particle. In this way, this work is devoted to the analysis of both transverse and longitudinal optical forces exerted on a simple dielectric spherical particle by zeroth order Mathieu beams and zeroth order Bessel (which is a particular case of the first beam). Thus, through numerical simulations, we show that zeroth order Mathieu beams can't trap this particle but Bessel beam presents some dimensional stable equilibrium points.

  17. Incidental Finding of Inferior Vena Cava Atresia Presenting with Deep Venous Thrombosis following Physical Exertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini Koppisetty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inferior vena cava atresia (IVCA is a rare but well described vascular anomaly. It is a rare risk factor for deep venous thrombosis (DVT, found in approximately 5% of cases of unprovoked lower extremity (LE DVT in patients <30 years of age. Affected population is in the early thirties, predominantly male, often with a history of major physical exertion and presents with extensive or bilateral DVTs. Patients with IVC anomalies usually develop compensatory circulation through the collateral veins with enlarged azygous/hemizygous veins. Despite the compensatory circulation, the venous drainage of the lower limbs is often insufficient leading to venous stasis and thrombosis. We describe a case of extensive and bilateral deep venous thrombosis following physical exertion in a thirty-six-year-old male patient with incidental finding of IVCA on imaging.

  18. Angina and exertional myocardial ischemia in diabetic and nondiabetic patients: assessment by exercise thallium scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease are thought to have painless myocardial ischemia more often than patients without diabetes. We studied 50 consecutive patients with diabetes and 50 consecutive patients without diabetes, all with ischemia, on exercise thallium scintigraphy to show the reliability of angina as a marker for exertional ischemia. The two groups had similar clinical characteristics, treadmill test results, and extent of infarction and ischemia, but only 7 patients with diabetes compared with 17 patients without diabetes had angina during exertional ischemia. In diabetic patients the extent of retinopathy, nephropathy, or peripheral neuropathy was similar in patients with and without angina. Angina is an unreliable index of myocardial ischemia in diabetic patients with coronary artery disease. Given the increased cardiac morbidity and mortality in such patients, periodic objective assessments of the extent of ischemia are warranted

  19. Fostering body movement in children through an exertion interface as an educational tool

    OpenAIRE

    Casta??er Balcells, Marta; Camerino Foguet, Oleguer; Landry, Pascal; Par??s, Narc??s, 1966-

    2011-01-01

    We present an exertion interface called the Interactive Slide (Soler, Ferrer, Par??s, 2009), a large inflatable slide augmented with virtual reality technology that offers the possibility to children to move freely in a large and diverse spatial area. Diversity of motor skills actions that children do while playing were analyzed with observational methodology and sequential analysis through temporal pattern detection (T-patterns) to obtain behavior motor responses. The results reveal that the...

  20. Acute exertional medial compartment syndrome of the foot in a teenager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan R. Kelsey, MD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute compartment syndrome is an emergent condition characterized by increased pressure in a noncompliant fascial compartment, resulting in ischemia of the muscles and nerves. It is most commonly caused by a traumatic etiology but rarely can be caused by an atraumatic etiology, resulting in a confusing clinical scenario. We present a case of a 15-year-old sedentary teenager diagnosed with acute exertional medial compartment syndrome of the foot, initially diagnosed with MRI, following two days of rugby practice.

  1. Acute Hepatic Failure as a Leading Manifestation in Exertional Heat Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Qi Jin; Erzhen Chen; Jie Jiang; Yiming Lu

    2012-01-01

    Background. Acute hepatic failure (AHF) is uncommon as a leading symptom in patients with exertional heat stroke (EHS). Which stage to perform the liver transplantation for severe hepatic failure in EHS is still obscure at clinical setting. The conservative management has been reported to be successful in treating heat-stroke-associated AHF even in the presence of accepted criteria for emergency liver transplantation. Case Presentation. Here, we reported a 35-year-old male who presented with ...

  2. Fucoxanthin: A Marine Carotenoid Exerting Anti-Cancer Effects by Affecting Multiple Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Sangeetha Ravi Kumar; Masashi Hosokawa; Kazuo Miyashita

    2013-01-01

    Fucoxanthin is a marine carotenoid exhibiting several health benefits. The anti-cancer effect of fucoxanthin and its deacetylated metabolite, fucoxanthinol, is well documented. In view of its potent anti-carcinogenic activity, the need to understand the underlying mechanisms has gained prominence. Towards achieving this goal, several researchers have carried out studies in various cell lines and in vivo and have deciphered that fucoxanthin exerts its anti-proliferative and cancer preventing ...

  3. Defining the Focus of Attention: Effects of Attention on Perceived Exertion and Fatigue.

    OpenAIRE

    Keith eLohse; SHERWOOD, DAVID E.

    2011-01-01

    This manuscript presents two experiments designed to explore the effects of attention on perceived exertion and time to failure in a fatiguing athletic task. There were two major motivating factors for these experiments. First, there are few studies evaluating attentional focus effects in endurance tasks and, second, there is a lack of integration between studies of attentional focus as external/internal (e.g., Wulf, 2007a) compared to associative/dissociative (e.g., Stevinson and Biddle, 199...

  4. Acute Exertional Rhabdomyolysis and Triceps Compartment Syndrome During a High School Football Camp

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, John Y.; Laidler, Matthew; Fiala, Steven C.; Hedberg, Katrina

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acute exertional rhabdomyolysis has been infrequently reported among adolescents. In August 2010, several high school football players from one team developed rhabdomyolysis and triceps compartment syndrome following an upper arm exercise held in a non-air-conditioned wrestling room. Purpose: To confirm the diagnoses, characterize the spectrum of illnesses, and determine the factors contributing to rhabdomyolysis and triceps compartment syndromes. Study Design: Descriptive epidemi...

  5. Neuropathogenic Escherichia coli K1 does not exhibit proteolytic activities to exert its pathogenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, Junaid; Rajani, Mehak; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Background Proteases are well-known virulence factors that promote survival, pathogenesis and immune evasion of many pathogens. Several lines of evidence suggest that the blood–brain barrier permeability is a prerequisite in microbial invasion of the central nervous system. Because proteases are frequently associated with vascular permeability by targeting junctional proteins, here it is hypothesized that neuropathogenic Escherichia coli K1 exhibit proteolytic activities to exert its pathogen...

  6. Unexplained exertional dyspnea caused by low ventricular filling pressures: results from clinical invasive cardiopulmonary exercise testing

    OpenAIRE

    Oldham, William M.; Lewis, Gregory D.; Opotowsky, Alexander R.; Waxman, Aaron B.; Systrom, David M.

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether low ventricular filling pressures are a clinically relevant etiology of unexplained dyspnea on exertion, a database of 619 consecutive, clinically indicated invasive cardiopulmonary exercise tests (iCPETs) was reviewed to identify patients with low maximum aerobic capacity (V̇o2max) due to inadequate peak cardiac output (Qtmax) with normal biventricular ejection fractions and without pulmonary hypertension (impaired: n = 49, V̇o2max = 53% predicted [interquartile range (I...

  7. Effect of Stimulant Medication Use by Children with ADHD on Heart Rate and Perceived Exertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Anthony D.; Woodruff, Megan E.; Horn, Mary P.; Marjerrison, Andrea D.; Cole, Andrew S.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of stimulant medication use by children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on the rating of perceived exertion (RPE)--heart rate (HR) relationship was examined. Children with ADHD (n = 20; 11.3 [plus or minus] 1.8 yrs) and children without ADHD (n = 25; 11.2 [plus or minus] 2.1 yrs) were studied. Children with ADHD…

  8. n-3 Polyunsaturated fatty acids exert immunomodulatory effects on lymphocytes by targeting plasma membrane molecular organization

    OpenAIRE

    Shaikh, Saame Raza; Jolly, Christopher A.; Chapkin, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Fish oil, enriched in bioactive n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), has therapeutic value for the treatment of inflammation-associated disorders. The effects of n-3 PUFAs are pleiotropic and complex; hence, an understanding of their cellular targets and molecular mechanisms of action remains incomplete. Here we focus on recent data indicating n-3 PUFAs exert immunosuppressive effects on the function of effector and regulatory CD4+ T cells. In addition, we also present emerging evidence th...

  9. Exertional dyspnoea in chronic heart failure: the role of the lung and respiratory mechanical factors

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno-Pierre Dubé; Piergiuseppe Agostoni; Pierantonio Laveneziana

    2016-01-01

    Exertional dyspnoea is among the dominant symptoms in patients with chronic heart failure and progresses relentlessly as the disease advances, leading to reduced ability to function and engage in activities of daily living. Effective management of this disabling symptom awaits a better understanding of its underlying physiology. Cardiovascular factors are believed to play a major role in dyspnoea in heart failure patients. However, despite pharmacological interventions, such as vasodilators o...

  10. The effects of exertion on the postural stability in young soccer players

    OpenAIRE

    Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Almeida, Gabriel Peixoto Leão; dos Santos, Ciro Veronese; Venturini, André Manrique; Astur, Diego da Costa; Cohen, Moises

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE : Analyze the effects of physical exertion during a soccer match on the functional capacity and stability of the lower limbs of young soccer players. METHODS : We analyzed 10 soccer players who underwent functional capacity assessment of the lower limbs by a Hop Test protocol and evaluation of the level of postural stability in the Biodex Stability System (Biodex, Inc., Shirley, NY) before and immediately after a friendly game lasting 45 minutes. RESULTS : After the match, there was...

  11. Validity of Borg Ratings of Perceived Exertion During Active Video Game Play

    OpenAIRE

    Pollock, Brandon S; Jacob E. Barkley; POTENZINI, NICK; DESALVO, RENEE M.; BUSER, STACEY L.; OTTERSTETTER, RONALD; JUVANCIC-HELTZEL, JUDITH A.

    2013-01-01

    During physically interactive video game play (e.g., Nintendo Wii), users are exposed to potential distracters (e.g., video, music), which may decrease their ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) throughout game play. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the association between RPE scores and heart rate while playing the Nintendo Wii. Healthy adults (N = 13, 53.5 ± 5.4 years old) participated in two exercise sessions using the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus. During each session participant...

  12. Exertional rhabdomyolysis after spinning: case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramme, Austin J; Vira, Shaleen; Alaia, Michael J; VAN DE Leuv, Jonathan; Rothberg, Robert C

    2016-06-01

    Spinning is a popular indoor stationary cycling program that uses group classes as a motivational tool. Exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER) is frequently reported in athletes and military recruits; however, infrequently it has been reported after spinning class. ER is diagnosed by clinical history, physical exam, and laboratory values. Hydration, electrolyte management, and pain control are key components to treatment of this condition. Severe cases can be complicated by acute renal failure, compartment syndrome, arrhythmia, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. We describe three cases of admission due to rhabdomyolysis after spinning. The diagnosis, admission criteria, and medical treatment of ER are presented in the context of a literature review. A retrospective review of three cases with review of the current literature. The medical and laboratory records of three patient cases were reviewed. A search of the PubMed database was used to perform a comprehensive review of exertional rhabdomyolysis. Our institution's IRB reviewed this study. We report three cases of exertional rhabdomyolysis after spinning and describe the diagnostic workup and medical management of these patients. The diagnosis of ER is made by clinical history, physical exam, and laboratory values. The disease spectrum ranges from mild to severe with the potential of serious complications in some patients. We demonstrate three cases of ER in deconditioned individuals who presented to the emergency department for evaluation. Careful medical management and patient monitoring resulted in improved patient symptomatology and eventual return to physical activity.

  13. Activity limitation and exertional dyspnea in adult asthmatic patients: What do we know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, François; Garcia, Gilles; Ninane, Vincent; Laveneziana, Pierantonio

    2016-08-01

    Limitation of activity is the most cited symptom described by uncontrolled asthma patients. Assessment of activity limitation can be undertaken through several ways, more or less complex, subjective or objective. Yet little is known about the link between patients sensations and objective measurements. The present review reports the current knowledge regarding activity limitation and symptom perception (i.e., exertional dyspnea) in adult patients with asthma. This work is based on references indexed by PubMed, irrespective of the year of publication. Overall, patients with stable asthma do not have a more sedentary lifestyle than healthy subjects. However, during a cycle ergometric test, the maximal load is reduced when FEV1, FVC and muscle strengths are decreased. Additionally, during the six-minute walking test, mild asthma patients walk less than healthy subjects even if the minimal clinically important difference is not reached. The major complaint of asthma patients when exercising is dyspnea that is mainly related to the inspiratory effort and also to dynamic hyperinflation in some circumstances. Finally, the administration of bronchodilator does not improve the ventilatory pattern and the exercise capacity of asthma patients and little is known on its effect on exertional dyspnea. The present review allows to conclude that until now there is no gold standard test allowing the objective assessment of "activity limitation and exertional dyspnea" in asthma patients. PMID:27492522

  14. Exertional Myopathy in a Juvenile Green Sea Turtle (Chelonia mydas Entangled in a Large Mesh Gillnet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianne E. Phillips

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A juvenile female green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas was found entangled in a large mesh gillnet in Pamlico Sound, NC, and was weak upon presentation for treatment. Blood gas analysis revealed severe metabolic acidosis and hyperlactatemia. Plasma biochemistry analysis showed elevated aspartate aminotransferase and creatine kinase, marked hypercalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and hyperkalemia. Death occurred within 24 hours of presentation despite treatment with intravenous and subcutaneous fluids and sodium bicarbonate. Necropsy revealed multifocal to diffuse pallor of the superficial and deep pectoral muscles. Mild, multifocal, and acute myofiber necrosis was identified by histopathological examination. While histological changes in the examined muscle were modest, the acid-base, mineral, and electrolyte abnormalities were sufficiently severe to contribute to this animal’s mortality. Exertional myopathy in reptiles has not been well characterized. Sea turtle mortality resulting from forced submergence has been attributed to blood gas derangements and seawater aspiration; however, exertional myopathy may also be an important contributing factor. If possible, sea turtles subjected to incidental capture and entanglement that exhibit weakness or dull mentation should be clinically evaluated prior to release to minimize the risk of delayed mortality. Treatment with appropriate fluid therapy and supportive care may mitigate the effects of exertional myopathy in some cases.

  15. Effects of the Visual Exercise Environments on Cognitive Directed Attention, Energy Expenditure and Perceived Exertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Rogerson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Green exercise research often reports psychological health outcomes without rigorously controlling exercise. This study examines effects of visual exercise environments on directed attention, perceived exertion and time to exhaustion, whilst measuring and controlling the exercise component. Participants completed three experimental conditions in a randomized counterbalanced order. Conditions varied by video content viewed (nature; built; control during two consistently-ordered exercise bouts (Exercise 1: 60% VO2peakInt for 15-mins; Exercise 2: 85% VO2peakInt to voluntary exhaustion. In each condition, participants completed modified Backwards Digit Span tests (a measure of directed attention pre- and post-Exercise 1. Energy expenditure, respiratory exchange ratio and perceived exertion were measured during both exercise bouts. Time to exhaustion in Exercise 2 was also recorded. There was a significant time by condition interaction for Backwards Digit Span scores (F2,22 = 6.267, p = 0.007. Scores significantly improved in the nature condition (p < 0.001 but did not in the built or control conditions. There were no significant differences between conditions for either perceived exertion or physiological measures during either Exercise 1 or Exercise 2, or for time to exhaustion in Exercise 2. This was the first study to demonstrate effects of controlled exercise conducted in different visual environments on post-exercise directed attention. Via psychological mechanisms alone, visual nature facilitates attention restoration during moderate-intensity exercise.

  16. Synergistic Combination of Electrolysis and Electroporation for Tissue Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehling, Michael K; Guenther, Enric; Mikus, Paul; Klein, Nina; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Electrolysis, electrochemotherapy with reversible electroporation, nanosecond pulsed electric fields and irreversible electroporation are valuable non-thermal electricity based tissue ablation technologies. This paper reports results from the first large animal study of a new non-thermal tissue ablation technology that employs "Synergistic electrolysis and electroporation" (SEE). The goal of this pre-clinical study is to expand on earlier studies with small animals and use the pig liver to establish SEE treatment parameters of clinical utility. We examined two SEE methods. One of the methods employs multiple electrochemotherapy-type reversible electroporation magnitude pulses, designed in such a way that the charge delivered during the electroporation pulses generates the electrolytic products. The second SEE method combines the delivery of a small number of electrochemotherapy magnitude electroporation pulses with a low voltage electrolysis generating DC current in three different ways. We show that both methods can produce lesion with dimensions of clinical utility, without the need to inject drugs as in electrochemotherapy, faster than with conventional electrolysis and with lower electric fields than irreversible electroporation and nanosecond pulsed ablation. PMID:26866693

  17. Synergistic Combination of Electrolysis and Electroporation for Tissue Ablation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael K Stehling

    Full Text Available Electrolysis, electrochemotherapy with reversible electroporation, nanosecond pulsed electric fields and irreversible electroporation are valuable non-thermal electricity based tissue ablation technologies. This paper reports results from the first large animal study of a new non-thermal tissue ablation technology that employs "Synergistic electrolysis and electroporation" (SEE. The goal of this pre-clinical study is to expand on earlier studies with small animals and use the pig liver to establish SEE treatment parameters of clinical utility. We examined two SEE methods. One of the methods employs multiple electrochemotherapy-type reversible electroporation magnitude pulses, designed in such a way that the charge delivered during the electroporation pulses generates the electrolytic products. The second SEE method combines the delivery of a small number of electrochemotherapy magnitude electroporation pulses with a low voltage electrolysis generating DC current in three different ways. We show that both methods can produce lesion with dimensions of clinical utility, without the need to inject drugs as in electrochemotherapy, faster than with conventional electrolysis and with lower electric fields than irreversible electroporation and nanosecond pulsed ablation.

  18. Synergistic, ultrafast mass storage and removal in artificial mixed conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Chin; Fu, Lijun; Maier, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Mixed conductors—single phases that conduct electronically and ionically—enable stoichiometric variations in a material and, therefore, mass storage and redistribution, for example, in battery electrodes. We have considered how such properties may be achieved synergistically in solid two-phase systems, forming artificial mixed conductors. Previously investigated composites suffered from poor kinetics and did not allow for a clear determination of such stoichiometric variations. Here we show, using electrochemical and chemical methods, that a melt-processed composite of the ‘super-ionic’ conductor RbAg4I5 and the electronic conductor graphite exhibits both a remarkable silver excess and a silver deficiency, similar to those found in single-phase mixed conductors, even though such behaviour is not possible in the individual phases. Furthermore, the kinetics of silver uptake and release is very fast. Evaluating the upper limit set by interfacial ambipolar diffusion reveals chemical diffusion coefficients that are even higher than those achieved for sodium chloride in bulk liquid water. These results could potentially stimulate systematic research into powerful, even mesoscopic, artificial mixed conductors.

  19. Synergistic effects of iron and temperature on Antarctic plankton assemblages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Rose

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron availability and temperature are important limiting factors for the biota in many areas of the world ocean, and both have been predicted to change in future climate scenarios. However, the impacts of combined changes in these two key factors on microbial trophic dynamics and nutrient cycling are unknown. We examined the relative effects of iron addition (+1 nM and increased temperature (+4°C on plankton assemblages of the Ross Sea, Antarctica, a region characterized by annual algal blooms and an active microbial community. Increased iron and temperature individually had consistently significant but relatively minor positive effects on total phytoplankton abundance, phytoplankton and microzooplankton community composition, as well as photosynthetic parameters and nutrient drawdown. Unexpectedly, increased iron had a consistently negative impact on microzooplankton abundance, most likely a secondary response to changes in phytoplankton community composition. When iron and temperature were increased in concert, the resulting interactive effects were greatly magnified. This synergy between iron and temperature increases would not have been predictable by examining the effects of each variable individually. Our results suggest the possibility that if iron availability increases under future climate regimes, the impacts of predicted temperature increases on plankton assemblages in polar regions could be significantly enhanced. Such synergistic and antagonistic interactions between individual climate change variables highlight the importance of multivariate studies for marine global change experiments.

  20. A multi-functional nanoplatform for tumor synergistic phototherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huijuan; Jiao, Xiaojing; Chen, Qianqian; Ji, Yandan; Zhang, Xiaoge; Zhu, Xing; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2016-02-01

    Phototherapy, which mainly includes photothermal treatment (PTT) and photodynamic treatment (PDT), is a photo-initiated, noninvasive and effective approach for cancer treatment. The high accumulation of photosensitizers (PSs) in a targeted tumor is still a major challenge for efficient light conversion, to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and local hyperthermia. In this study, a simple and efficient hyaluronic acid (HA)-modified nanoplatform (HA-TiO2@MWCNTs) with high tumor-targeting ability, excellent phototherapy efficiency, low light-associated side effects and good water solubility was developed. It could be an effective carrier to load hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME), owing to the tubular conjugate structure. Apart from this, the as-prepared TiO2@MWCNTs nanocomposites could also be used as PSs for tumor PTT and PDT. Those results in vitro and in vivo showed that the anti-tumor effect of this system-mediated PTT/PDT were significantly better than those of single treatment manner. In addition, this drug delivery system could realize high ratio of drug loading, sustained drug release, prolonged circulation in vivo and active targeted accumulation in tumor. These results suggest that HA-TiO2@MWCNTs/HMME has high potential for tumor synergistic phototherapy as a smart theranostic nanoplatform.

  1. A dual drug regimen synergistically blocks human parainfluenza virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Benjamin; Dirr, Larissa; El-Deeb, Ibrahim M.; Altmeyer, Ralf; Guillon, Patrice; von Itzstein, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Human parainfluenza type-3 virus (hPIV-3) is one of the principal aetiological agents of acute respiratory illness in infants worldwide and also shows high disease severity in the elderly and immunocompromised, but neither therapies nor vaccines are available to treat or prevent infection, respectively. Using a multidisciplinary approach we report herein that the approved drug suramin acts as a non-competitive in vitro inhibitor of the hPIV-3 haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN). Furthermore, the drug inhibits viral replication in mammalian epithelial cells with an IC50 of 30 μM, when applied post-adsorption. Significantly, we show in cell-based drug-combination studies using virus infection blockade assays, that suramin acts synergistically with the anti-influenza virus drug zanamivir. Our data suggests that lower concentrations of both drugs can be used to yield high levels of inhibition. Finally, using NMR spectroscopy and in silico docking simulations we confirmed that suramin binds HN simultaneously with zanamivir. This binding event occurs most likely in the vicinity of the protein primary binding site, resulting in an enhancement of the inhibitory potential of the N-acetylneuraminic acid-based inhibitor. This study offers a potentially exciting avenue for the treatment of parainfluenza infection by a combinatorial repurposing approach of well-established approved drugs.

  2. Synergistic effect of fragrant herbs in Japanese scent sachets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yumi; Ito, Michiho

    2015-02-01

    The sedative activity of eight aromatic natural medicines that are traditionally used in Japanese scent sachets was examined using an open field test with mice. Galangal (Kaempferia galanga), patchouli (Pogostemon cablin), sandalwood (Santalum album), spikenard (Nardostachys chinensis), cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia), clove (Syzygium aromaticum), star anise (Illicium verum), and borneol (Dryobalanops aromatica) distilled oils were used. These natural medicines have various pharmacological effects. For example, galangal has insecticidal activity and clove extracts possess strong total antioxidant activity. Aromatherapy, a well-known complementary medicine system that uses inhalation, has recently attracted much attention. The sedative activity of inhaled aromatic compounds or essential oils has been examined by measuring the spontaneous motor activity of mice in an open field test. The galangal, patchouli, sandalwood, spikenard, and borneol oils showed significant sedative effects. The effect was stronger for a mixture of the five oils than for any of the single oils. This suggests that the oil mixture may have synergistic activity. Sedative activity was not observed when inactive oils (cinnamon, clove, and star anise) were added to the mixture of the five active oils. PMID:25671383

  3. Arl13b and the exocyst interact synergistically in ciliogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seixas, Cecília; Choi, Soo Young; Polgar, Noemi; Umberger, Nicole L; East, Michael P; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Moreiras, Hugo; Ghossoub, Rania; Benmerah, Alexandre; Kahn, Richard A; Fogelgren, Ben; Caspary, Tamara; Lipschutz, Joshua H; Barral, Duarte C

    2016-01-15

    Arl13b belongs to the ADP-ribosylation factor family within the Ras superfamily of regulatory GTPases. Mutations in Arl13b cause Joubert syndrome, which is characterized by congenital cerebellar ataxia, hypotonia, oculomotor apraxia, and mental retardation. Arl13b is highly enriched in cilia and is required for ciliogenesis in multiple organs. Nevertheless, the precise role of Arl13b remains elusive. Here we report that the exocyst subunits Sec8, Exo70, and Sec5 bind preferentially to the GTP-bound form of Arl13b, consistent with the exocyst being an effector of Arl13b. Moreover, we show that Arl13b binds directly to Sec8 and Sec5. In zebrafish, depletion of arl13b or the exocyst subunit sec10 causes phenotypes characteristic of defective cilia, such as curly tail up, edema, and abnormal pronephric kidney development. We explored this further and found a synergistic genetic interaction between arl13b and sec10 morphants in cilia-dependent phenotypes. Through conditional deletion of Arl13b or Sec10 in mice, we found kidney cysts and decreased ciliogenesis in cells surrounding the cysts. Moreover, we observed a decrease in Arl13b expression in the kidneys from Sec10 conditional knockout mice. Taken together, our results indicate that Arl13b and the exocyst function together in the same pathway leading to functional cilia.

  4. Synergistic effects of resistance training and protein intake: practical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; Cholewa, Jason Michael; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Zhi, X I A; Magagnin, Daiane; de Sá, Rafaele Bis Dal Ponte; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Teixeira, Tamiris da Silva; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy

    2014-10-01

    Resistance training is a potent stimulus to increase skeletal muscle mass. The muscle protein accretion process depends on a robust synergistic action between protein intake and overload. The intake of protein after resistance training increases plasma amino acids, which results in the activation of signaling molecules leading to increased muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and muscle hypertrophy. Although both essential and non-essential amino acids are necessary for hypertrophy, the intake of free L-leucine or high-leucine whole proteins has been specifically shown to increase the initiation of translation that is essential for elevated MPS. The literature supports the use of protein intake following resistance-training sessions to enhance MPS; however, less understood are the effects of different protein sources and timing protocols on MPS. The sum of the adaptions from each individual training session is essential to muscle hypertrophy, and thus highlights the importance of an optimal supplementation protocol. The aim of this review is to present recent findings reported in the literature and to discuss the practical application of these results. In that light, new speculations and questions will arise that may direct future investigations. The information and recommendations generated in this review should be of benefit to clinical dietitians as well as those engaged in sports.

  5. Intermuscular pressure between synergistic muscles correlates with muscle force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Lars; Siebert, Tobias; Leichsenring, Kay; Blickhan, Reinhard; Böl, Markus

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between muscle force generated during isometric contractions (i.e. at a constant muscle-tendon unit length) and the intermuscular (between adjacent muscles) pressure in synergistic muscles. Therefore, the pressure at the contact area of the gastrocnemius and plantaris muscle was measured synchronously to the force of the whole calf musculature in the rabbit species Oryctolagus cuniculus Similar results were obtained when using a conductive pressure sensor, or a fibre-optic pressure transducer connected to a water-filled balloon. Both methods revealed a strong linear relationship between force and pressure in the ascending limb of the force-length relationship. The shape of the measured force-time and pressure-time traces was almost identical for each contraction (r=0.97). Intermuscular pressure ranged between 100 and 700 mbar (70,000 Pa) for forces up to 287 N. These pressures are similar to previous (intramuscular) recordings within skeletal muscles of different vertebrate species. Furthermore, our results suggest that the rise in intermuscular pressure during contraction may reduce the force production in muscle packages (compartments). PMID:27489217

  6. A dual drug regimen synergistically blocks human parainfluenza virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Benjamin; Dirr, Larissa; El-Deeb, Ibrahim M; Altmeyer, Ralf; Guillon, Patrice; von Itzstein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Human parainfluenza type-3 virus (hPIV-3) is one of the principal aetiological agents of acute respiratory illness in infants worldwide and also shows high disease severity in the elderly and immunocompromised, but neither therapies nor vaccines are available to treat or prevent infection, respectively. Using a multidisciplinary approach we report herein that the approved drug suramin acts as a non-competitive in vitro inhibitor of the hPIV-3 haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN). Furthermore, the drug inhibits viral replication in mammalian epithelial cells with an IC50 of 30 μM, when applied post-adsorption. Significantly, we show in cell-based drug-combination studies using virus infection blockade assays, that suramin acts synergistically with the anti-influenza virus drug zanamivir. Our data suggests that lower concentrations of both drugs can be used to yield high levels of inhibition. Finally, using NMR spectroscopy and in silico docking simulations we confirmed that suramin binds HN simultaneously with zanamivir. This binding event occurs most likely in the vicinity of the protein primary binding site, resulting in an enhancement of the inhibitory potential of the N-acetylneuraminic acid-based inhibitor. This study offers a potentially exciting avenue for the treatment of parainfluenza infection by a combinatorial repurposing approach of well-established approved drugs. PMID:27053240

  7. Synergistic health effects between chemical pollutants and electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoigt, Gérard; Sta, Chaima; Goujon, Eric; Souguir, Dalila; El Ferjani, Ezzeddine

    2015-01-01

    Humans and ecosystems are exposed to highly variable and unknown cocktail of chemicals and radiations. Although individual chemicals are typically present at low concentrations, they can interact with each other resulting in additive or potentially synergistic mixture effects. This was also observed with products obtained by radiation actions such as sunlight or electromagnetic fields that can change the effects of chemicals, such as pesticides, and metal trace elements on health. Concomitant presence of various pesticides and their transformation products adds further complexity to chemical risk assessment since chronic inflammation is a key step for cancer promotion. Degradation of a parent molecule can produce several by-products which can trigger various toxic effects with different impacts on health and environment. For instance, the cocktail of sunlight irradiated sulcotrione pesticide has a greater cytotoxicity and genotoxicity than parent molecule, sulcotrione, and questions about the impact of photochemical process on environment. Adjuvants were shown to modify the biological features of pesticides. Addition of other elements, metals or biological products, can differently enhance cell toxicity of pesticides or electromagnetic radiations suggesting a synergy in living organisms. Electromagnetic fields spreading, pesticide by-products and mixtures monitoring become greater for environmental contamination evaluations.

  8. Intermuscular pressure between synergistic muscles correlates with muscle force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Lars; Siebert, Tobias; Leichsenring, Kay; Blickhan, Reinhard; Böl, Markus

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between muscle force generated during isometric contractions (i.e. at a constant muscle-tendon unit length) and the intermuscular (between adjacent muscles) pressure in synergistic muscles. Therefore, the pressure at the contact area of the gastrocnemius and plantaris muscle was measured synchronously to the force of the whole calf musculature in the rabbit species Oryctolagus cuniculus Similar results were obtained when using a conductive pressure sensor, or a fibre-optic pressure transducer connected to a water-filled balloon. Both methods revealed a strong linear relationship between force and pressure in the ascending limb of the force-length relationship. The shape of the measured force-time and pressure-time traces was almost identical for each contraction (r=0.97). Intermuscular pressure ranged between 100 and 700 mbar (70,000 Pa) for forces up to 287 N. These pressures are similar to previous (intramuscular) recordings within skeletal muscles of different vertebrate species. Furthermore, our results suggest that the rise in intermuscular pressure during contraction may reduce the force production in muscle packages (compartments).

  9. Synergistic, ultrafast mass storage and removal in artificial mixed conductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Chin; Fu, Lijun; Maier, Joachim

    2016-08-11

    Mixed conductors-single phases that conduct electronically and ionically-enable stoichiometric variations in a material and, therefore, mass storage and redistribution, for example, in battery electrodes. We have considered how such properties may be achieved synergistically in solid two-phase systems, forming artificial mixed conductors. Previously investigated composites suffered from poor kinetics and did not allow for a clear determination of such stoichiometric variations. Here we show, using electrochemical and chemical methods, that a melt-processed composite of the 'super-ionic' conductor RbAg4I5 and the electronic conductor graphite exhibits both a remarkable silver excess and a silver deficiency, similar to those found in single-phase mixed conductors, even though such behaviour is not possible in the individual phases. Furthermore, the kinetics of silver uptake and release is very fast. Evaluating the upper limit set by interfacial ambipolar diffusion reveals chemical diffusion coefficients that are even higher than those achieved for sodium chloride in bulk liquid water. These results could potentially stimulate systematic research into powerful, even mesoscopic, artificial mixed conductors. PMID:27510217

  10. Synergistic Two-Photon Absorption Enhancement in Photosynthetic Light Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuo-Mei; Chen, Yu-Wei; Gao, Ting-Fong

    2012-06-01

    The grand scale fixation of solar energies into chemical substances by photosynthetic reactions of light-harvesting organisms provides Earth's other life forms a thriving environment. Scientific explorations in the past decades have unraveled the fundamental photophysical and photochemical processes in photosynthesis. Higher plants, green algae, and light-harvesting bacteria utilize organized pigment-protein complexes to harvest solar power efficiently and the resultant electronic excitations are funneled into a reaction center, where the first charge separation process takes place. Here we show experimental evidences that green algae (Chlorella vulgaris) in vivo display a synergistic two-photon absorption enhancement in their photosynthetic light harvesting. Their absorption coefficients at various wavelengths display dramatic dependence on the photon flux. This newly found phenomenon is attributed to a coherence-electronic-energy-transfer-mediated (CEETRAM) photon absorption process of light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes of green algae. Under the ambient light level, algae and higher plants can utilize this quantum mechanical mechanism to create two entangled electronic excitations adjacently in their light-harvesting networks. Concerted multiple electron transfer reactions in the reaction centers and oxygen evolving complexes can be implemented efficiently by the coherent motion of two entangled excitons from antennae to the charge separation reaction sites. To fabricate nanostructured, synthetic light-harvesting apparatus, the paramount role of the CEETRAM photon absorption mechanism should be seriously considered in the strategic guidelines.

  11. Synergistic Smart Fuel For In-pile Nuclear Reactor Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James A. Smith; Dale K. Kotter; Randall A. Ali; Steven L . Garrett

    2013-10-01

    In March 2011, an earthquake of magnitude 9.0 on the Richter scale struck Japan with its epicenter on the northeast coast, near the Tohoku region. In addition to the immense physical destruction and casualties across the country, several nuclear power plants (NPP) were affected. It was the Fukushima Daiichi NPP that experienced the most severe and irreversible damage. The earthquake brought the reactors at Fukushima to an automatic shutdown and because the power transmission lines were damaged, emergency diesel generators (EDGs) were activated to ensure that there was continued cooling of the reactors and spent fuel pools. The situation was being successfully managed until the tsunami hit about forty-five minutes later with a maximum wave height of approximately 15 m. The influx of water submerged the EDGs, the electrical switchgear, and dc batteries, resulting in the total loss of power to the reactors.2 At this point, the situation became critical. There was a loss of the sensors and instrumentation within the reactor that could have provided valuable information to guide the operators to make informed decisions and avoid the unfortunate events that followed. In the light of these events, we have developed and tested a potential self-powered thermoacoustic system, which will have the ability to serve as a temperature sensor and can transmit data independently of electronic networks. Such a device is synergistic with the harsh environment of the nuclear reactor as it utilizes the heat from the nuclear fuel to provide the input power.

  12. Synergistic Combination of Electrolysis and Electroporation for Tissue Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehling, Michael K; Guenther, Enric; Mikus, Paul; Klein, Nina; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Electrolysis, electrochemotherapy with reversible electroporation, nanosecond pulsed electric fields and irreversible electroporation are valuable non-thermal electricity based tissue ablation technologies. This paper reports results from the first large animal study of a new non-thermal tissue ablation technology that employs "Synergistic electrolysis and electroporation" (SEE). The goal of this pre-clinical study is to expand on earlier studies with small animals and use the pig liver to establish SEE treatment parameters of clinical utility. We examined two SEE methods. One of the methods employs multiple electrochemotherapy-type reversible electroporation magnitude pulses, designed in such a way that the charge delivered during the electroporation pulses generates the electrolytic products. The second SEE method combines the delivery of a small number of electrochemotherapy magnitude electroporation pulses with a low voltage electrolysis generating DC current in three different ways. We show that both methods can produce lesion with dimensions of clinical utility, without the need to inject drugs as in electrochemotherapy, faster than with conventional electrolysis and with lower electric fields than irreversible electroporation and nanosecond pulsed ablation.

  13. A Synergistic Consequence Assessment Modeling Strategy for Emergency Operations Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, maintaining emergency preparedness and response capabilities is a high priority. A synergistic strategy has emerged for conducting consequence assessment modeling at the Hanford Site Emergency Operation Center (EOC). This strategy involves employing a two-pronged modeling approach. The first prong involves the use of fast, reliable, and locally hosted models to provide timely and conservative projections of the affected area and potential impacts. A key model used for this purpose is the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory?s APGEMS model. The second prong involves the use of sophisticated modeling resources that have greater functionality and flexibility but take longer to initialize, conduct a simulation, and deliver output products. This capability is provided by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC). The Hanford EOC?s consequence assessment team has found it to be constructive to use both the APGEMS and NARAC models in their emergency preparedness training and exercises. Experience gained with the NARAC system has allowed Hanford EOC personnel to provide NARAC with constructive feedback on model usability, the appropriateness of some default modeling assumptions, and documentation needs. As a result of the synergism associated with using both modeling systems, the Hanford EOC is better positioned to efficiently assess potential consequences during an emergency response event and NARAC is better poised to provide improved modeling support for the Hanford region and other Department of Energy sites

  14. USMB-induced synergistic enhancement of aminoglycoside antibiotics in biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronan, Evan; Edjiu, Narbeh; Kroukamp, Otini; Wolfaardt, Gideon; Karshafian, Raffi

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the effect of combining antibiotics with ultrasound and microbubbles (USMB) toward the eradication of biofilms. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms were treated with the antibiotics gentamicin sulfate or streptomycin sulfate, or a combination of USMB with the respective antibiotics. Biofilm structure was quantified using confocal laser scanning microscopy with COMSTAT analysis, while activity was measured as whole-biofilm CO2 production in a continuous-flow biofilm model. The combined antibiotic-USMB treatment significantly impacted biofilm biomass, thickness and surface roughness compared to antibiotics alone (p<0.05). USMB exposure caused the formation of craters (5-20μm in diameter) in the biofilms, and when combined with gentamicin, activity was significantly lower, compared to gentamicin, USMB or untreated controls, respectively. Interestingly, the CO2 production rate following combined streptomycin-USMB treatment was higher than after streptomycin alone, but significantly lower than USMB alone and untreated control. These results show strong evidence of a synergistic effect between antibiotics and USMB, although the varied response to different antibiotics emphasize the need to optimize the USMB exposure conditions to maximize this synergism and ultimately transfer this technology into clinical or industrial practice. PMID:27111871

  15. Space Operations Analysis Using the Synergistic Engineering Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angster, Scott; Brewer, Laura

    2002-01-01

    The Synergistic Engineering Environment has been under development at the NASA Langley Research Center to aid in the understanding of the operations of spacecraft. This is accomplished through the integration of multiple data sets, analysis tools, spacecraft geometric models, and a visualization environment to create an interactive virtual simulation of the spacecraft. Initially designed to support the needs of the International Space Station, the SEE has broadened the scope to include spacecraft ranging from low-earth orbit to deep space missions. Analysis capabilities within the SEE include rigid body dynamics, kinematics, orbital mechanics, and payload operations. This provides the user the ability to perform real-time interactive engineering analyses in areas including flight attitudes and maneuvers, visiting vehicle docking scenarios, robotic operations, plume impingement, field of view obscuration, and alternative assembly configurations. The SEE has been used to aid in the understanding of several operational procedures related to the International Space Station. This paper will address the capabilities of the first build of the SEE, present several use cases of the SEE, and discuss the next build of the SEE.

  16. Determination of the Critical Micelle Concentration of Cationic Surfactants: An Undergraduate Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xirong; Yang, Jinghe; Zhang, Wenjuan; Zhang, Zhenyu; An, Zesheng

    1999-01-01

    A novel method based on the catalytic effect of micelles exerted by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB), respectively, on the indicator reaction between H2O2 and bromopyrogallol red (BPR), a triphenylmethane dye, was developed for undergraduates to determine the critical micelle concentration (cmc) of CTAB and CPB. The indicator reaction was monitored by a fixed-time kinetic-spectrophotometric technique. Under the experimental conditions the cmc values of CTAB and CPB were (4.8 ± 0.3) x 10-4 mol/L and (4.5 ± 0.3) x 10-4mol/L, which were close to the literature values of 9.2 x 10-4 mol/L and 9.0 x 10-4 mol/L, respectively. Detailed discussion on the selection of experimental conditions was made to minimize the effect of electrolytes on the cmc's of surfactants and to maintain the high accuracy of the experimental data. As an undergraduate physicochemical laboratory experiment the present method had several attractive features. The procedure is simple and easy to perform, does not require special equipment, and does not need expensive or toxic reagents. In addition, it is a versatile method that can be applied to a wide variety of both anionic and cationic surfactants.

  17. Mechanisms Underlying the Delayed Activation of the Cap1 Transcription Factor in Candida albicans following Combinatorial Oxidative and Cationic Stress Important for Phagocytic Potency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Iaroslava; Patterson, Miranda J.; Znaidi, Sadri; Kaloriti, Despoina; da Silva Dantas, Alessandra; Herrero-de-Dios, Carmen M.; d’Enfert, Christophe; Brown, Alistair J. P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Following phagocytosis, microbes are exposed to an array of antimicrobial weapons that include reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cationic fluxes. This is significant as combinations of oxidative and cationic stresses are much more potent than the corresponding single stresses, triggering the synergistic killing of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans by “stress pathway interference.” Previously we demonstrated that combinatorial oxidative plus cationic stress triggers a dramatic increase in intracellular ROS levels compared to oxidative stress alone. Here we show that activation of Cap1, the major regulator of antioxidant gene expression in C. albicans, is significantly delayed in response to combinatorial stress treatments and to high levels of H2O2. Cap1 is normally oxidized in response to H2O2; this masks the nuclear export sequence, resulting in the rapid nuclear accumulation of Cap1 and the induction of Cap1-dependent genes. Here we demonstrate that following exposure of cells to combinatorial stress or to high levels of H2O2, Cap1 becomes trapped in a partially oxidized form, Cap1OX-1. Notably, Cap1-dependent gene expression is not induced when Cap1 is in this partially oxidized form. However, while Cap1OX-1 readily accumulates in the nucleus and binds to target genes following high-H2O2 stress, the nuclear accumulation of Cap1OX-1 following combinatorial H2O2 and NaCl stress is delayed due to a cationic stress-enhanced interaction with the Crm1 nuclear export factor. These findings define novel mechanisms that delay activation of the Cap1 transcription factor, thus preventing the rapid activation of the stress responses vital for the survival of C. albicans within the host. PMID:27025253

  18. Synergistic self-assembly of scaffolds and building blocks for directed synthesis of organic nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dergunov, Sergey [ORNL; Richter, Andrew G [ORNL; Kim, Mariya D. [Saint Louis University; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh [ORNL; Urban, Volker S [ORNL; Pinkhassik, Eugene [University of Memphis

    2013-01-01

    Surfactants and hydrophobic monomers spontaneously assemble into vesicles containing monomers within the bilayer. The joint action of monomers and surfactants is essential in this synergistic self-assembly. Polymerization in the bilayer formed hollow polymer nanocapsules.

  19. Physicochemical Mechanisms of Synergistic Biological Action of Combinations of Aromatic Heterocyclic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim P. Evstigneev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of synergistic biological effects observed in the simultaneous use of aromatic heterocyclic compounds in combination are reviewed, and the specific biological role of heteroassociation of aromatic molecules is discussed.

  20. Simulation of synergistic effects on lateral PNP bipolar transistors induced by neutron and gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chenhui, E-mail: wangchenhui@nint.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Irradiation Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, P.O.Box 69-10, Xi' an 710024 (China); Bai, Xiaoyan; Chen, Wei; Yang, Shanchao; Liu, Yan; Jin, Xiaoming [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Irradiation Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, P.O.Box 69-10, Xi' an 710024 (China); Ding, Lili [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Irradiation Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, P.O.Box 69-10, Xi' an 710024 (China); Department of Information Engineering, Padova University, Via Gradenigo 6/B, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    With semiconductor device simulation software TCAD, numerical simulations of ionizing/displacement synergistic effects on 6 kinds of lateral PNP bipolar transistors induced by the mixed irradiation of neutron and gamma are carried out by means of changing the minority carrier lifetimes, adding charged traps to the oxide layer and increasing the surface recombination velocity in Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. The results indicate that ionizing/displacement synergistic effects on the lateral PNP bipolar transistors are not a simple sum of total ionizing dose effects and displacement effects, and total ionizing dose effects can enhance neutron displacement damages, leading to greater gain degradation. The physical mechanisms of ionizing/displacement synergistic effects are analyzed based on the results. The positive charge in the oxide layer and Si/SiO{sub 2} interface traps induced by gamma irradiation can enhance the recombination processes of carriers in the bulk defects induced by neutron irradiation, and this is the main cause of ionizing/displacement synergistic effects on the lateral PNP bipolar transistors. - Highlights: • Numerical simulation methods of ionizing/displacement synergistic effects induced by the mixed irradiation of neutron and gamma are established with semiconductor device simulation software TCAD. • Ionizing/displacement synergistic effects between the lateral PNP bipolar transistors with different neutral base widths and base doping concentrations are compared. • The difference between ionizing/displacement synergistic effects and the simple sum of total ionizing dose effects and displacement effects is analyzed. • The physical mechanisms of ionizing/displacement synergistic effects are explained.

  1. Network target for screening synergistic drug combinations with application to traditional Chinese medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Ningbo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multicomponent therapeutics offer bright prospects for the control of complex diseases in a synergistic manner. However, finding ways to screen the synergistic combinations from numerous pharmacological agents is still an ongoing challenge. Results In this work, we proposed for the first time a “network target”-based paradigm instead of the traditional "single target"-based paradigm for virtual screening and established an algorithm termed NIMS (Network target-based Identification of Multicomponent Synergy to prioritize synergistic agent combinations in a high throughput way. NIMS treats a disease-specific biological network as a therapeutic target and assumes that the relationship among agents can be transferred to network interactions among the molecular level entities (targets or responsive gene products of agents. Then, two parameters in NIMS, Topology Score and Agent Score, are created to evaluate the synergistic relationship between each given agent combinations. Taking the empirical multicomponent system traditional Chinese medicine (TCM as an illustrative case, we applied NIMS to prioritize synergistic agent pairs from 63 agents on a pathological process instanced by angiogenesis. The NIMS outputs can not only recover five known synergistic agent pairs, but also obtain experimental verification for synergistic candidates combined with, for example, a herbal ingredient Sinomenine, which outperforms the meet/min method. The robustness of NIMS was also showed regarding the background networks, agent genes and topological parameters, respectively. Finally, we characterized the potential mechanisms of multicomponent synergy from a network target perspective. Conclusions NIMS is a first-step computational approach towards identification of synergistic drug combinations at the molecular level. The network target-based approaches may adjust current virtual screen mode and provide a systematic paradigm for facilitating the

  2. Strategically Oriented Accounting System as Demonstration of Synergistic Development of Economic Accounting

    OpenAIRE

    Iryna Boyarko

    2015-01-01

    The article is aimed to show scientific theoretical foundation of the essence of strategically oriented accounting system and identification of its core attributes as demonstration of synergistic development of economic accounting in the contemporary economy. There is explained the meaning of synergistic development of accounting and set the importance of achieving systematic and functional integration and innovation in this process – the basic attributes of strategically oriented accountin...

  3. Analysis of Defined Combinations of Monoclonal Antibodies in Anthrax Toxin Neutralization Assays and Their Synergistic Action

    OpenAIRE

    Ngundi, Miriam M.; Meade, Bruce D.; Little, Stephen F.; Quinn, Conrad P.; Corbett, Cindi R; Brady, Rebecca A.; Burns, Drusilla L.

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies against the protective antigen (PA) component of anthrax toxin play an important role in protection against disease caused by Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we examined defined combinations of PA-specific monoclonal antibodies for their ability to neutralize anthrax toxin in cell culture assays. We observed additive, synergistic, and antagonistic effects of the antibodies depending on the specific antibody combination examined and the specific assay used. Synergistic toxin-neut...

  4. Synergistic effects of combinations of antibiotics on coagulase negative staphylococcal (CoNS) biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Cerca, Nuno; Cerca, Filipe; Martins, Silvia; Pier, Gerald B.; Oliveira, Rosário; Azeredo, Joana

    2005-01-01

    Background. Previous studies examining synergistic effects of antibiotics against CoNS biofilms often relied on drug concentrations higher than the peak serum (PS) concentration, as determined by MIC assays, therefore having little clinical applicability. Other studies investigated synergistic effects of a wide range of antibiotics, however many are not routinely used in a clinical setting. Dicloxacillin is the major antibiotic used in Portugal to treat staphylococci infections...

  5. Simulation of synergistic effects on lateral PNP bipolar transistors induced by neutron and gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With semiconductor device simulation software TCAD, numerical simulations of ionizing/displacement synergistic effects on 6 kinds of lateral PNP bipolar transistors induced by the mixed irradiation of neutron and gamma are carried out by means of changing the minority carrier lifetimes, adding charged traps to the oxide layer and increasing the surface recombination velocity in Si/SiO2 interface. The results indicate that ionizing/displacement synergistic effects on the lateral PNP bipolar transistors are not a simple sum of total ionizing dose effects and displacement effects, and total ionizing dose effects can enhance neutron displacement damages, leading to greater gain degradation. The physical mechanisms of ionizing/displacement synergistic effects are analyzed based on the results. The positive charge in the oxide layer and Si/SiO2 interface traps induced by gamma irradiation can enhance the recombination processes of carriers in the bulk defects induced by neutron irradiation, and this is the main cause of ionizing/displacement synergistic effects on the lateral PNP bipolar transistors. - Highlights: • Numerical simulation methods of ionizing/displacement synergistic effects induced by the mixed irradiation of neutron and gamma are established with semiconductor device simulation software TCAD. • Ionizing/displacement synergistic effects between the lateral PNP bipolar transistors with different neutral base widths and base doping concentrations are compared. • The difference between ionizing/displacement synergistic effects and the simple sum of total ionizing dose effects and displacement effects is analyzed. • The physical mechanisms of ionizing/displacement synergistic effects are explained

  6. Synergistic Antimicrobial Activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia against Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Amber Farooqui; Adnan Khan; Ilaria Borghetto; Kazmi, Shahana U.; Salvatore Rubino; Bianca Paglietti

    2015-01-01

    Synergistic combinations of antimicrobial agents with different mechanisms of action have been introduced as more successful strategies to combat infections involving multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria. In this study, we investigated synergistic antimicrobial activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia which are commonly used plants with different antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial susceptibility of 350 Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains belonging to 10 different bacterial species, ...

  7. The synergistic apoptotic interaction of panaxadiol and epigallocatechin gallate in human colorectal cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Guang-Jian; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Qi, Lian-Wen; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Calway, Tyler; He, Tong-Chuan; Du, Wei; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2012-01-01

    Panaxadiol (PD) is a purified sapogenin of ginseng saponins, which exhibits anticancer activity. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a major catechin in green tea, is a strong botanical antioxidant. In this study, we investigated the possible synergistic anticancer effects of PD and EGCG on human colorectal cancer cells and explored the potential role of apoptosis in the synergistic activities. Effects of selected compounds on HCT-116 and SW-480 human colorectal cancer cells were evaluated by an...

  8. Photodynamic therapy with a cationic functionalized fullerene rescues mice from fatal wound infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zongshun; Dai, Tianhong; Huang, Liyi; Kurup, Divya B; Tegos, George P; Jahnke, Ashlee; Wharton, Tim; Hamblin, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Aims Fullerenes are under intensive study for potential biomedical applications. We have previously reported that a C60 fullerene functionalized with three dimethylpyrrolidinium groups (BF6) is a highly active broad-spectrum antimicrobial photosensitizer in vitro when combined with white-light illumination. We asked whether this high degree of in vitro activity would translate into an in vivo therapeutic effect in two potentially lethal mouse models of infected wounds. Materials & methods We used stable bioluminescent bacteria and a low light imaging system to follow the progress of the infection noninvasively in real time. An excisional wound on the mouse back was contaminated with one of two bioluminescent Gram-negative species, Proteus mirabilis (2.5 × 107 cells) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5 × 106 cells). A solution of BF6 was placed into the wound followed by delivery of up to 180 J/cm2 of broadband white light (400–700 nm). Results In both cases there was a light-dose-dependent reduction of bioluminescence from the wound not observed in control groups (light alone or BF6 alone). Fullerene-mediated photodynamic therapy of mice infected with P. mirabilis led to 82% survival compared with 8% survival without treatment (p < 0.001). Photodynamic therapy of mice infected with highly virulent P. aeruginosa did not lead to survival, but when photodynamic therapy was combined with a suboptimal dose of the antibiotic tobramycin (6 mg/kg for 1 day) there was a synergistic therapeutic effect with a survival of 60% compared with a survival of 20% with tobramycin alone (p < 0.01). Conclusion These data suggest that cationic fullerenes have clinical potential as an antimicrobial photosensitizer for superficial infections where red light is not needed to penetrate tissue. PMID:21143031

  9. A covalent attraction between two molecular cation TTF·~+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The optimized structure of the tetrathiafulvalence radical-cation dimer(TTF·+-TTF·+) with all-real frequencies is obtained at MP2/6-311G level,which exhibits the attraction between two molecular cation TTF·+.The new attraction interaction is a 20-center-2-electron intermolecular covalent π /π bonding with a telescope shape.The covalent π /π bonding has the bonding energy of about -21 kcal·mol-1 and is concealed by the Coulombic repulsion between two TTF·+ cations.This intermolecular covalent attraction also influences the structure of the TTF·+ subunit,i.e.,its molecular plane is bent by an angle θ=5.6°.This work provides new knowledge on intermolecular interaction.

  10. Cationic lipids delay the transfer of plasmid DNA to lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattiaux, R; Jadot, M; Laurent, N; Dubois, F; Wattiaux-De Coninck, S

    1996-10-14

    Plasmid 35S DNA, naked or associated with different cationic lipid preparations was injected to rats. Subcellular distribution of radioactivity in the liver one hour after injection, was established by centrifugation methods. Results show that at that time, 35S DNA has reached lysosomes. On the contrary, when 35S DNA was complexed with lipids, radioactivity remains located in organelles whose distribution after differential and isopycnic centrifugation, is clearly distinct from that of arylsulfatase, lysosome marker enzyme. Injection of Triton WR 1339, a specific density perturbant of lysosomes, four days before 35S DNA injection causes a density decrease of radioactivity bearing structures, apparent one hour after naked 35S DNA injection but visible only after more than five hours, when 35S DNA associated with a cationic lipid is injected. These observations show that cationic lipids delay the transfer to lysosomes, of plasmid DNA taken up by the liver.

  11. Cationization of Alpha-Cellulose to Develop New Sustainable Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Moral

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Papermaking has been using high quantities of retention agents, mainly cationic substances and organic compounds such as polyamines. The addition of these agents is related to economic and environmental issues, increasing contamination of the effluents. The aim of this work is to develop a cationic polymer for papermaking purposes based on the utilization of alpha-cellulose. The cationization of mercerized alpha-cellulose with 3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyltrimethylammonium chloride (CHPTAC is governed by a pseudo-second-order reaction. The initial amorphous fraction of cellulose is reacted with CHPTAC until the equilibrium value of nitrogen substitution is reached. Nitrogen is incorporated as a quaternary ammonium group in the polymer. Also, the kinetic constant increased with decreasing crystallinity index, showing the importance of the previous alkalization stage. The use of modified natural polysaccharides is a sustainable alternative to synthetic, nonbiodegradable polyelectrolytes and thus is desirable with a view to developing new products and new processes.

  12. Theoretical Studies on the Interactions of Cations with Diazine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xing; WU Wen-Peng; ZHANG Jing-Lai; CAO Ze-Xing

    2006-01-01

    Density functional theory and MP2 calculations have been used to determine the geometries, stabilities, binding energies, and dissociative properties of cation-diazine complexes Mn+-C4H4N2 (Mn+ = Li+, B+, Al+, Be2+, Mg2+, Ca2+). The calculated results indicate that most complexes are stable except the π complexes of Ca2+-pyridazine, Ca2+-pyrazine, Al+-pyrimidine and Al+-pyrimidine. The σ complexes are generally much more stable than their π counterparts. Among the π complexes, the cation-pyrazine π complexes have slightly higher stability. The nature of the ion-molecule interactions has been discussed by the natural bond orbital analysis and frontier molecular orbital interactions. In these σ complexes, there is stronger covalent interaction between B+ and diazine. In the selected π complexes, B+ and Be2+ have stronger covalent interaction with diazine, while the other cations mainly have electrostatic interaction with diazine.

  13. Surface hopping investigation of the relaxation dynamics in radical cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assmann, Mariana; Matsika, Spiridoula, E-mail: smatsika@temple.edu [Department of Chemistry, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122 (United States); Weinacht, Thomas [Department of Physics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States)

    2016-01-21

    Ionization processes can lead to the formation of radical cations with population in several ionic states. In this study, we examine the dynamics of three radical cations starting from an excited ionic state using trajectory surface hopping dynamics in combination with multiconfigurational electronic structure methods. The efficiency of relaxation to the ground state is examined in an effort to understand better whether fragmentation of cations is likely to occur directly on excited states or after relaxation to the ground state. The results on cyclohexadiene, hexatriene, and uracil indicate that relaxation to the ground ionic state is very fast in these systems, while fragmentation before relaxation is rare. Ultrafast relaxation is facilitated by the close proximity of electronic states and the presence of two- and three-state conical intersections. Examining the properties of the systems in the Franck-Condon region can give some insight into the subsequent dynamics.

  14. Strong and specific effects of cations on lysozyme chloride solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénas, Philippe; Legrand, Laurent; Riès-Kautt, Madeleine

    2002-10-01

    The influence of salt nature and concentration on tetragonal lysozyme chloride crystal solubility is presented for a set of mono-, di- and trivalent cations (Cs(+), Rb(+), Mn(2+), Co(2+) and Yb(3+)). The results show that cations have as strong an effect on protein solubility as anions and that they present their own particular effects as co-ions. Indeed, after decreasing at low ionic strength, lysozyme solubility increases with high concentration of polyvalent cations, probably due to co-ion binding and therefore the concomitant increase of the net charge of the protein-salt complex. These new results are discussed in order to progress in the understanding of the crystallisation process at the atomic level. PMID:12351866

  15. A covalent attraction between two molecular cation TTF·~+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG FangFang; WANG Yi; WANG BingQiang; WANG YinFeng; MA Fang; Li ZhiRu

    2009-01-01

    The optimized structure of the tetrathiafulvalence radical-cation dimer (TTF·~+-TTF·~+) with all-real frequencies is obtained at MP2/6-311G level,which exhibits the attraction between two molecular cation TTF·~+.The new attraction interaction is a 20-center-2-electron intermolecular covalent π/π bonding with a telescope shape.The covalent π/π bonding has the bonding energy of about-21 kcal·mol~(-1) and is concealed by the Coulombic repulsion between two TTF·~+ cations.This intermolecular covalent attraction also influences the structure of the TTF·~+ subunit,I.e.,its molecular plane is bent by an angle θ=5.6°.This work provides new knowledge on intermolecular interaction.

  16. Low-Temperature Cationic Rearrangement in a Bulk Metal Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Man-Rong; Retuerto, Maria; Stephens, Peter W; Croft, Mark; Sheptyakov, Denis; Pomjakushin, Vladimir; Deng, Zheng; Akamatsu, Hirofumi; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Sánchez-Benítez, Javier; Saouma, Felix O; Jang, Joon I; Walker, David; Greenblatt, Martha

    2016-08-16

    Cationic rearrangement is a compelling strategy for producing desirable physical properties by atomic-scale manipulation. However, activating ionic diffusion typically requires high temperature, and in some cases also high pressure in bulk oxide materials. Herein, we present the cationic rearrangement in bulk Mn2 FeMoO6 at unparalleled low temperatures of 150-300 (o) C. The irreversible ionic motion at ambient pressure, as evidenced by real-time powder synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction, and second harmonic generation, leads to a transition from a Ni3 TeO6 -type to an ordered-ilmenite structure, and dramatic changes of the electrical and magnetic properties. This work demonstrates a remarkable cationic rearrangement, with corresponding large changes in the physical properties in a bulk oxide at unprecedented low temperatures. PMID:27203790

  17. Synergistic activation of cardiac genes by myocardin and Tbx5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunbo Wang

    Full Text Available Myocardial differentiation is associated with the activation and expression of an array of cardiac specific genes. However, the transcriptional networks that control cardiac gene expression are not completely understood. Myocardin is a cardiac and smooth muscle-specific expressed transcriptional coactivator of Serum Response Factor (SRF and is able to potently activate cardiac and smooth muscle gene expression during development. We hypothesize that myocardin discriminates between cardiac and smooth muscle specific genes by associating with distinct co-factors. Here, we show that myocardin directly interacts with Tbx5, a member of the T-box family of transcription factors involved in the Holt-Oram syndrome. Tbx5 synergizes with myocardin to activate expression of the cardiac specific genes atrial natriuretic factor (ANF and alpha myosin heavy chain (α-MHC, but not that of smooth muscle specific genes SM22 or smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC. We found that this synergistic activation of shared target genes is dependent on the binding sites for Tbx5, T-box factor-Binding Elements (TBEs. Myocardin and Tbx5 physically interact and their interaction domains were mapped to the basic domain and the coil domain of myocardin and Tbx5, respectively. Our analysis demonstrates that the Tbx5G80R mutation, which leads to the Holt-Oram syndrome in humans, failed to synergize with myocardin to activate cardiac gene expression. These data uncover a key role for Tbx5 and myocardin in establishing the transcriptional foundation for cardiac gene activation and suggest that the interaction of myocardin and Tbx5 maybe involved in cardiac development and diseases.

  18. Microbial Reverse Electrodialysis Cells for Synergistically Enhanced Power Production

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Younggy

    2011-07-01

    A new type of bioelectrochemical system for producing electrical power, called a microbial reverse-electrodialysis cell (MRC), was developed to increase voltages and power densities compared to those generated individually by microbial fuel cells (MFCs) or reverse electrodialysis (RED) systems. In RED systems, electrode overpotentials create significant energy losses due to thermodynamically unfavorable electrode reactions, and therefore a large number of stacked cells must be used to have significant energy recovery. This results in high capital costs for the large number of membranes, and increases energy losses from pumping water through a large number of cells. In an MRC, high overpotentials are avoided through oxidation of organic matter by exoelectrogenic bacteria on the anode and oxygen reduction on the cathode. An MRC containing only five pairs of RED cells, fed solutions typical of seawater (600 mM NaCl) and river water (12 mM NaCl) at 0.85 mL/min, produced up to 3.6 W/m2 (cathode surface area) and 1.2-1.3 V with acetate as a substrate. Pumping accounted for <2% of the produced power. A higher flow rate (1.55 mL/min) increased power densities up to 4.3 W/m2. COD removal was 98% with a Coulombic efficiency of 64%. Power production by the individual components was substantially lower with 0.7 W/m2 without salinity driven energy, and <0.015 W/m2 with reduced exoelectrogenic activity due to substrate depletion. These results show that the combination of an MFC and a RED stack synergistically increases performance relative to the individual systems, producing a new type of system that can be used to more efficiently capture salinity driven energy from seawater and river water. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  19. Synergistic Antimycobacterial Actions of Knowltonia vesicatoria (L.f Sims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoinette Labuschagné

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Euclea natalensis A.DC., Knowltonia vesicatoria (L.f Sims, and Pelargonium sidoides DC. are South African plants traditionally used to treat tuberculosis. Extracts from these plants were used in combination with isoniazid (INH to investigate the possibility of synergy with respect to antimycobacterial activity. The ethanol extract of K. vesicatoria was subjected to fractionation to identify the active compounds. The activity of the Knowltonia extract remained superior to the fractions with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of 625.0 μg/mL against Mycobacterium smegmatis and an MIC of 50.00 μg/mL against M. tuberculosis. The K. vesicatoria extract was tested against two different drug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis, which resulted in an MIC of 50.00 μg/mL on both strains. The combination of K. vesicatoria with INH exhibited the best synergistic antimycobacterial activity with a fractional inhibitory concentration index of 0.25 (a combined concentration of 6.28 μg/mL. A fifty percent inhibitory concentration of this combination against U937 cells was 121.0 μg/mL. Two compounds, stigmasta-5,23-dien-3-ol (1 and 5-(hydroxymethylfuran-2(5H-one (2, were isolated from K. vesicatoria as the first report of isolation for both compounds from this plant and the first report of antimycobacterial activity. Compound (1 was active against drug-sensitive M. tuberculosis with an MIC of 50.00 μg/mL.

  20. Modeling cation exchange using EQ3/6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geochemical modeling codes must be able to predict solid-solution and ion-exchange behavior of zeolites and smectites in order to design and assess strategies for containing and cleaning up toxic and/or radioactive wastes. Cation-exchange and solid-solution models have been implemented in the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling package and used to predict the composition of clinoptilolite under a variety of conditions. Published free energies of cation exchange on clinoptilolite at 25 degrees C were combined with the calorimetric data for clinoptilolite to derive free energies of formation of the component end members of a solid solution in which mixing is allowed only on the exchange site. The solid-solution model and component end-member data were incorporated into EQ3/6 and its data base. An option to treat cation exchange independently of the solid-solution model was also developed and implemented in EQ3/6. This option allows the user to model mixed-phase exchangers, multisite exchangers, and systems in which the exchanger is not in overall equilibrium with the solution. Two open-quotes idealclose quotes cation-exchange conventions [Vanselow (mole fraction) and Gapon (equivalent fraction)] are currently implemented in the code. A description of the cation-exchange models and their implementation into EQ3/6 is presented, and the relationship between the exchange formalisms and the solid-solution models is discussed. The advantages and limitations of the models and currently available thermodynamic data are addressed by comparing cation-exchange compositions of clinoptilolites with (1) published binary exchange data; (2) compositions of coexisting clinoptilolites and formation waters at Yucca Mountain; and (3) experimental sorption isotherms of Cs and Sr on zeolitized tuff

  1. THE APPLICATION OF CATIONIC POLYACRYLAMIDE AS DRAINAGE AND RETENTION AIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Wang; Kefu Chen; Fushan Chen; Chuanshan Zhao; Rendang Yang

    2004-01-01

    Cationic polyacrylamide (CPAM) which was prepared through complex initiation system in laboratory and cationic polyacrylamide (Ciba) were used as retention and drainage aids for bleached wheat straw pulp. The influences of (polydiallyldimethlammonium chloride) PDADMAC and PDADMAC/CPAM on Zeta potential and drainability of pulp was investigated. The dual drainage and retention systems such as CPAM/modified bentonite, CPAM/colloidal SiO2,as well as their comparison between the two systems were discussed, and the optimal dosages of additives were determined. The results showed that: the complex systems can further enhance filler retention,drainability of pulp and strength properties of paper.

  2. Cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources. Annual performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crivello, J.V.

    1992-10-01

    The objectives of this project are to design and synthesize novel monomers which orginate from renewable biological sources and to carry out their rapid, efficient, pollution-free and energy efficient cationic polymerization to useful products under the influence of ultraviolet light or heat. A summary of the results of the past year`s research on cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources is presented. Three major areas of investigation corresponding to the different classes of naturally occurring starting materials were investigated; epoxidized terpenes and natural rubber and vinyl ethers from alcohols and carbohydrates.

  3. Radiation-induced cationic curing of vinyl ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently there has been an increasing interest in nonacrylate radiation-curable coatings. Vinyl ethers are particularly reactive under cationic polymerization reaction conditions. The high efficiency of the photoacid initiators combined with the high reactivity of vinyl ether monomers makes this a potentially very useful system. This chapter discusses the preparation of vinyl ethers, introduces vinyl ether-functional monomers and oligomers, describes radiation-induced cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers, and discusses various coating systems. Throughout the chapter, an emphasis is placed on radiation-curable coating applications. 64 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs

  4. The effects of acclimatization on blood clotting parameters in exertional heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesić Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Exertional heat stress is a common problem in military services. Considering the coagulation abnormalities are of major importance in development of severe heat stroke, we wanted to examine changes in hemostatic parameters in soldiers during exertional heat stress test as well as the effects of a 10-day passive or active acclimatization in a climatic chamber. Methods. A total of 40 male soldiers with high aerobic capacity performed exertional heat stress test (EHST either in cool [20ºC, 16ºC wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT], or hot (40ºC, 29ºC, (WBGT environment, unacclimatized (U or after 10 days of passive (P or active (A acclimatization. Physiological strain was measured by tympanic temperatures (Tty and heart rates (HR. Platelet count (PC, antithrombin III (AT, and prothrombin time (PT were assessed in blood samples collected before and immediately after the EHST. Results. EHST in hot conditions induced physiological heat stress (increase in Tty and HR, with a significant increase in prothrombin time in the groups U and A. Platelet counts were significantly higher after the EHST compared to the basic levels in all the investigated groups, regardless environmental conditions and acclimatization state. Antithrombin levels were not affected by EHST whatsoever. Conclusion. In the trained soldiers, physiological heat stress caused mild changes in some serum parameters of blood clotting such as prothrombin time, while others such as antithrombin levels were not affected. Platelet counts were increased after EHST in all groups. A 10-day passive or active acclimatization in climatic chamber showed no effect on parameters investigated.

  5. Antibacterial activities of selected Cameroonian spices and their synergistic effects with antibiotics against multidrug-resistant phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fankam Aimé G

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR phenotypes is a major public health problem today in the treatment of bacterial infections. The present study was designed to evaluate the antibacterial activities of the methanol extracts of eleven Cameroonian spices on a panel of twenty nine Gram negative bacteria including MDR strains. Methods The phytochemical analysis of the extracts was carried out by standard tests meanwhile the liquid micro-broth dilution was used for all antimicrobial assays. Results Phytochemical analysis showed the presence of alkaloids, phenols and tannins in all plants extracts. The results of the antibacterial assays indicated that all tested extracts exert antibacterial activities, with the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values varying from 32 to 1024 μg/ml. The extracts from Dichrostachys glomerata, Beilschmiedia cinnamomea, Aframomum citratum, Piper capense, Echinops giganteus, Fagara xanthoxyloïdes and Olax subscorpioïdea were the most active. In the presence of efflux pump inhibitor, PAßN, the activity of the extract from D. glomerata significantly increased on 69.2% of the tested MDR bacteria. At MIC/5, synergistic effects were noted with the extract of D. glomerata on 75% of the tested bacteria for chloramphenicol (CHL, tetracycline (TET and norfloxacin (NOR. With B. cinnamomea synergy were observed on 62.5% of the studied MDR bacteria with CHL, cefepime (FEP, NOR and ciprofloxacin (CIP and 75% with erythromycin (ERY. Conclusion The overall results provide information for the possible use of the studied extracts of the spices in the control of bacterial infections involving MDR phenotypes.

  6. The endoplasmic reticulum exerts control over organelle streaming during cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano, Giovanni; Renna, Luciana; Brandizzi, Federica

    2014-03-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming is crucial for cell homeostasis and expansion but the precise driving forces are largely unknown. In plants, partial loss of cytoplasmic streaming due to chemical and genetic ablation of myosins supports the existence of yet-unknown motors for organelle movement. Here we tested a role of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as propelling force for cytoplasmic streaming during cell expansion. Through quantitative live-cell analyses in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana cells and mutants with compromised ER structure and streaming, we demonstrate that cytoplasmic streaming undergoes profound changes during cell expansion and that it depends on motor forces co-exerted by the ER and the cytoskeleton.

  7. Motorcycle racer with unilateral forearm flexor and extensor chronic exertional compartment syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkes, Michiel B; Teijink, Joep A; Scheltinga, Marc R

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a case of a 26-year-old man, a motorcycle racer, who presented with progressive pain, weakness and swelling of his right forearm and loss of power in his index finger, experienced during motor racing. Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) of both flexor and extensor compartments of his forearm was diagnosed by dynamic intracompartmental muscle pressure measurements. After fasciotomies, all symptoms were resolved and the patient was able to improve on his preinjury racing skills, without any limitations. A literature review and a surgical 'how-to' for correct release of the extensor and deep flexor compartments of the forearm are provided. PMID:27080851

  8. Exertional esophageal pH-metry and manometry in recurrent chest pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jacek; Budzyński

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic efficacy of 24-h and exertional esophageal pH-metry and manometry in patients with recurrent chest pain. METHODS: The study included 111 patients (54% male) with recurrent angina-like chest pain, non-respon- sive to therapy with proton pump inhibitors. Sixty-five (59%) had non-obstructive lesions in coronary artery angiography, and in 46 (41%) significant coronary artery narrowing was found. In all patients, 24-h esophageal pH-metry and manometry, and treadmill stress test...

  9. High-Output Heart Failure from a Hepatic Hemangioma With Exertion-Induced Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Aaron A H; Nelson, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Patients with hepatic hemangiomas have been known to have high-output heart failure as a result of left-to-right arteriovenous shunting. We report a patient with a hepatic hemangioma that presented with high-output heart failure with hypoxia on exertion. After embolization of the hemangioma, the patient's hypoxia resolved and ejection fraction improved. In the absence of cardiopulmonary pathophysiology, we presume that our patient's hemangioma was causing a right-to-left shunt as opposed to an expected left-to-right shunt.

  10. Optical measurement of torque exerted on an elongated object by a non-circular laser beam

    CERN Document Server

    Parkin, S J; Heckenberg, N R; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, H; Parkin, Simon J.; Nieminen, Timo A.; Heckenberg, Norman R.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a scheme to measure the optical torque, exerted by a laser beam on a phase object, by measuring the orbital angular momentum of the transmitted beam. The experiment is a macroscopic simulation of a situation in optical tweezers, as orbital angular momentum has been widely used to apply torque to microscopic objects. A hologram designed to generate LG02 modes and a CCD camera are used to detect the orbital component of the beam. Experimental results agree with theoretical numerical calculations, and the strength of the orbital component suggest its usefulness in optical tweezers for micromanipulation.

  11. Alpha-fetoprotein, identified as a novel marker for the antioxidant effect of placental extract, exhibits synergistic antioxidant activity in the presence of estradiol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Yeon Choi

    Full Text Available Placenta, as a reservoir of nutrients, has been widely used in medical and cosmetic materials. Here, we focused on the antioxidant properties of placental extract and attempted to isolate and identify the main antioxidant factors. Porcine placental extracts were prepared through homogenization or acid hydrolysis, and their antioxidant activity was investigated in the human keratinocyte HaCaT cell line. Treatment with homogenized placental extract (H-PE increased the cell viability of H2O2-treated HaCaT cells more than two-fold. H-PE treatment suppressed H2O2-induced apoptotic and necrotic cell death and decreased intracellular ROS levels in H2O2-treated HaCaT cells. The antioxidant factors in H-PE were found to be thermo-unstable and were thus expected to include proteins. The candidate antioxidant proteins were fractionated with cation-exchange, anion-exchange, and size-exclusion chromatography, and the antioxidant properties of the chromatographic fractions were investigated. We obtained specific antioxidant fractions that suppressed ROS generation and ROS-induced DNA strand breaks. From silver staining and MALDI-TOF analyses, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP precursor was identified as a main marker for the antioxidant effect of H-PE. Purified AFP or ectopically expressed AFP exhibited synergistic antioxidant activity in the presence of estradiol. Taken together, our data suggest that AFP, a serum glycoprotein produced at high levels during fetal development, is a novel marker protein for the antioxidant effect of the placenta that exhibits synergistic antioxidant activity in the presence of estradiol.

  12. Crystal structure of channelrhodopsin, a light-gated cation channel – all cations lead through the monomer –

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, Hideaki E.; Nureki, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Channelrhodopsin (ChR) is a light-gated cation channel derived from green algae. Since the inward flow of cations triggers the neuron firing, neurons expressing ChRs can be optically controlled even within freely moving mammals. Although ChR has been broadly applied to neuro-science research, little is known about its molecular mechanisms. We determined the crystal structure of chimeric ChR at 2.3 Å resolution and revealed its molecular architecture. The integration of structural, electrophys...

  13. Physical exertion in simple reaction time and continuous attention of sport participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsorbatzoudis, H; Barkoukis, V; Danis, A; Grouios, G

    1998-04-01

    To investigate the effect of physical exertion on simple reaction time and continuous attention of sport participants, an experiment was conducted with 46 male university students and 12 male cyclists. The subjects were assigned to three experimental and two control groups. The subjects of the experimental groups were asked to perform, following a 5-min, period of warming up, a high intensity exercise protocol for 5 min., on a mechanically braked cycle ergometer (Group A) or a moderate intensity exercise protocol for 30 min, on the same cycle ergometer (Groups B and C). Shortly before and immediately after the physical exercise subjects of all groups were asked to perform a test of simple reaction time and continuous attention. The subjects of the control groups were asked to perform at rest both tests of the simple reaction time and the continuous attention twice, with a 10-min. and a 35-min. interval between the first and second attempts, respectively. The results did not support the notion that exercise of moderate or high intensity influences significantly the cognitive performance of aerobically trained or untrained subjects. The results are discussed in the light of the current research findings concerning exertion and human psychomotor performance. PMID:9638756

  14. Dual Effects Exerted in Vitro by Micromolar Concentrations of Deoxynivalenol on Undifferentiated Caco-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Manda

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of crops used for food and feed production with Fusarium mycotoxins, such as deoxynivalenol (DON, raise important health and economic issues all along the food chain. Acute exposure to high DON concentrations can alter the intestinal barrier, while chronic exposure to lower doses may exert more subtle effects on signal transduction pathways, leading to disturbances in cellular homeostasis. Using real-time cellular impedance measurements, we studied the effects exerted in vitro by low concentrations of DON (0.37–1.50 μM, relevant for mycotoxin-contaminated food, on the proliferation of undifferentiated Caco-2 cells presenting a tumorigenic phenotype. A 1.5 μM concentration of DON maintained cell adherence of non-proliferating Caco-2 cells, whilst arresting the growth of actively proliferating cells compared with control Caco-2 cells in vitro. At 0.37 μM, DON enhanced Caco-2 cell metabolism, thereby triggering a moderate increase in cell proliferation. The results of the current study suggested that low concentrations of DON commonly detected in food may either limit or sustain the proliferation of colon cancer cells, depending on their proliferation status and on DON concentration. Soluble factors released by Lactobacillus strains can partially counteract the inhibitory action of DON on actively proliferating colon cancer cells. The study also emphasized that real-time cellular impedance measurements were a valuable tool for investigating the dynamics of cellular responses to xenobiotics.

  15. Dual effects exerted in vitro by micromolar concentrations of deoxynivalenol on undifferentiated caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manda, Gina; Mocanu, Mihaela Andreea; Marin, Daniela Eliza; Taranu, Ionelia

    2015-02-01

    Contamination of crops used for food and feed production with Fusarium mycotoxins, such as deoxynivalenol (DON), raise important health and economic issues all along the food chain. Acute exposure to high DON concentrations can alter the intestinal barrier, while chronic exposure to lower doses may exert more subtle effects on signal transduction pathways, leading to disturbances in cellular homeostasis. Using real-time cellular impedance measurements, we studied the effects exerted in vitro by low concentrations of DON (0.37-1.50 μM), relevant for mycotoxin-contaminated food, on the proliferation of undifferentiated Caco-2 cells presenting a tumorigenic phenotype. A 1.5 μM concentration of DON maintained cell adherence of non-proliferating Caco-2 cells, whilst arresting the growth of actively proliferating cells compared with control Caco-2 cells in vitro. At 0.37 μM, DON enhanced Caco-2 cell metabolism, thereby triggering a moderate increase in cell proliferation. The results of the current study suggested that low concentrations of DON commonly detected in food may either limit or sustain the proliferation of colon cancer cells, depending on their proliferation status and on DON concentration. Soluble factors released by Lactobacillus strains can partially counteract the inhibitory action of DON on actively proliferating colon cancer cells. The study also emphasized that real-time cellular impedance measurements were a valuable tool for investigating the dynamics of cellular responses to xenobiotics.

  16. Curcumin exerts antitumor effects in retinoblastoma cells by regulating the JNK and p38 MAPK pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoming; Zhong, Jingtao; Yan, Li; Li, Jie; Wang, Hui; Wen, Yan; Zhao, Yu

    2016-09-01

    Curcumin, a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound present in turmeric (Curcuma longa), exerts antitumor effects in various types of malignancy. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for the effects of curcumin on retinoblastoma (RB) cells have not been fully explored. In the present study, the molecular mechanisms by which curcumin exerts its anticancer effects in RB Y79 cells were investigated. The results showed that curcumin reduced cell viability in Y79 cells. Curcumin induced G1 phase arrest through downregulating the expression of cyclin D3 and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)2/6 and upregulating the expression of CDK inhibitor proteins p21 and p27. Curcumin-induced apoptosis of Y79 cells occurred through the activation of caspases-9/-3. Moreover, flow cytometric analysis showed that curcumin induced mitochondrial membrane potential (∆Ψm) collapse in Y79 cells. We also found that curcumin induced the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). JNK and p38 MAPK inhibitors significantly suppressed curcumin‑induced activation of caspases-9/-3 and inhibited the apoptosis of Y79 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that curcumin induced the apoptosis of Y79 cells through the activation of JNK and p38 MAPK pathways. These findings provide a novel treatment strategy for human RB. PMID:27432244

  17. Ursodeoxycholic Acid (UDCA) Exerts Anti-Atherogenic Effects by Inhibiting RAGE Signaling in Diabetic Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jihwa; An, Shung Hyun; Kang, Sang Won; Kwon, Kihwan

    2016-01-01

    A naturally occurring bile acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), is known to alleviate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress at the cellular level. However, the detailed action mechanisms of UDCA in atherosclerosis are not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated whether UDCA exerts anti-atherogenic activity in diabetic atherosclerosis by targeting ER stress and "receptor for advanced glycation endproduct" (RAGE) signaling. UDCA markedly reduced ER stress, RAGE expression, and pro-inflammatory responses [including NF-κB activation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production] induced in endothelial cells (ECs) by high glucose (HG). In particular, UDCA inhibited HG-induced ROS production by increasing the Nrf2 level. In macrophages, UDCA also blocked HG-induced RAGE and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and inhibited foam cell formation via upregulation of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, ABCA1 and ABCG1. In the diabetic mouse model, UDCA inhibited atheromatous plaque formation by decreasing ER stress, and the levels of RAGE and adhesion molecules. In conclusion, UDCA exerts an anti-atherogenic activity in diabetic atherosclerosis by targeting both ER stress and RAGE signaling. Our work implicates UDCA as a potential therapeutic agent for prevention or treatment of diabetic atherosclerosis. PMID:26807573

  18. Dual Effects Exerted in Vitro by Micromolar Concentrations of Deoxynivalenol on Undifferentiated Caco-2 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manda, Gina; Mocanu, Mihaela Andreea; Marin, Daniela Eliza; Taranu, Ionelia

    2015-01-01

    Contamination of crops used for food and feed production with Fusarium mycotoxins, such as deoxynivalenol (DON), raise important health and economic issues all along the food chain. Acute exposure to high DON concentrations can alter the intestinal barrier, while chronic exposure to lower doses may exert more subtle effects on signal transduction pathways, leading to disturbances in cellular homeostasis. Using real-time cellular impedance measurements, we studied the effects exerted in vitro by low concentrations of DON (0.37–1.50 μM), relevant for mycotoxin-contaminated food, on the proliferation of undifferentiated Caco-2 cells presenting a tumorigenic phenotype. A 1.5 μM concentration of DON maintained cell adherence of non-proliferating Caco-2 cells, whilst arresting the growth of actively proliferating cells compared with control Caco-2 cells in vitro. At 0.37 μM, DON enhanced Caco-2 cell metabolism, thereby triggering a moderate increase in cell proliferation. The results of the current study suggested that low concentrations of DON commonly detected in food may either limit or sustain the proliferation of colon cancer cells, depending on their proliferation status and on DON concentration. Soluble factors released by Lactobacillus strains can partially counteract the inhibitory action of DON on actively proliferating colon cancer cells. The study also emphasized that real-time cellular impedance measurements were a valuable tool for investigating the dynamics of cellular responses to xenobiotics. PMID:25690693

  19. Diorcinol D Exerts Fungicidal Action against Candida albicans through Cytoplasm Membrane Destruction and ROS Accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    Full Text Available Candida albicans, which is the most common human fungal pathogen, causes high mortality among immunocompromised patients. Antifungal drug resistance becomes a major challenge for the management of Candida infection. Diorcinol D (DD, a diphenyl ether derivative isolated from an endolichenic fungus, exerted fungicidal action against Candida species. In this study, we investigated the possible mechanism of its antifungal activity. The change of membrane dynamics and permeability suggested that the cell membrane was disrupted by the treatment of DD. This was further supported by the evidences of intracellular glycerol accumulation, alteration of cell ultrastructure, and down-regulation of genes involved in cell membrane synthesis. In addition, the treatment of C. albicans with DD resulted in the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which caused the dysfunction of mitochondria. These altogether suggested that DD exerted its antifungal activity through cytoplasmic membrane destruction and ROS accumulation. This finding is helpful to uncover the underlying mechanisms for the diphenyl ether derivatives and provides a potential application in fighting clinical fungal infections.

  20. Exertional dyspnoea in COPD: the clinical utility of cardiopulmonary exercise testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Denis E; Elbehairy, Amany F; Faisal, Azmy; Webb, Katherine A; Neder, J Alberto; Mahler, Donald A

    2016-09-01

    Activity-related dyspnoea is often the most distressing symptom experienced by patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and can persist despite comprehensive medical management. It is now clear that dyspnoea during physical activity occurs across the spectrum of disease severity, even in those with mild airway obstruction. Our understanding of the nature and source of dyspnoea is incomplete, but current aetiological concepts emphasise the importance of increased central neural drive to breathe in the setting of a reduced ability of the respiratory system to appropriately respond. Since dyspnoea is provoked or aggravated by physical activity, its concurrent measurement during standardised laboratory exercise testing is clearly important. Combining measurement of perceptual and physiological responses during exercise can provide valuable insights into symptom severity and its pathophysiological underpinnings. This review summarises the abnormal physiological responses to exercise in COPD, as these form the basis for modern constructs of the neurobiology of exertional dyspnoea. The main objectives are: 1) to examine the role of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in uncovering the physiological mechanisms of exertional dyspnoea in patients with mild-to-moderate COPD; 2) to examine the escalating negative sensory consequences of progressive respiratory impairment with disease advancement; and 3) to build a physiological rationale for individualised treatment optimisation based on CPET. PMID:27581832

  1. Progesterone exerts neuroprotective effects against Aβ-induced neuroinflammation by attenuating ER stress in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yang; Wang, Xiaomin; Sun, Shuang; Xue, Gai; Li, Jianli; Hou, Yanning

    2016-04-01

    The deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) and neuroinflammation are critical pathological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Astrocytes are considered the principal immunoregulatory cells in the brain. Neurosteroid progesterone (PG) exerts neuromodulatory properties, particularly its potential therapeutic function in ameliorating AD. However, the role of PG and the neuroprotective mechanism involving in the regulation of neuroinflammation in astrocytes warrant further investigation. In this study, we found that Aβ significantly increased the processing of neuroinflammatory responses in astrocytes. The processing is induced by an increase activity of PERK/elF2ɑ-dependent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Additionally, the inhibition of ER stress activation by Salubrinal significantly suppressed the Aβ-induced neuroinflammatory responses in astrocytes. While the treatment of astrocytes with Aβ caused an increase of neuroinflammatory responses, PG significantly inhibited Aβ-induced neuroinflammatory cytokine production by suppressing ER stress activation together with attenuating PERK/elF2ɑ signalling. Taken together, these results indicate that PG exerts a neuroprotective effect against Aβ-induced neuroinflammatory responses, and significantly suppresses ER stress activation, which is an important mediator of the neurotoxic events occurring in Aβ-induced neuroinflammatory responses in astrocytes. These neuroprotective mechanisms may facilitate the development of therapies to ameliorate AD. PMID:26878478

  2. Exertional dyspnea as initial manifestation of Takayasu's arteritis – A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bachmann Lucas M

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Takayasu's arteritis is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease that usually affects the aorta, its primary branches and occasionally the pulmonary and coronary arteries. Female gender in reproductive age and Asian origin are known factors associated with higher disease prevalence. The clinical manifestations vary considerably and are typically caused by limb or organ ischemia illness and fever. The estimated incidence rate in the western world is 2.6 cases per million persons per year. Occasionally, exertional dyspnea can be the sole primary clinical manifestation of Takayasu's arteritis. Case presentation We report the case of a 57-year-old woman who was referred to our institution with increasing exertional dyspnea caused by pulmonary artery involvement in Takayasu's arteritis. In a review of the literature we discuss demographic data, clinical and radiographic findings and available therapeutic options. Conclusions Dyspnea due to pulmonary artery involvement can be the initial symptom of Takayasu's arteritis. Simple clinical tests, including a complete pulse-status and blood pressure measuring at both arms can lead to the right diagnosis and should always be done beyond the auscultation of the heart and lungs in patients with dyspnea.

  3. Planar Homotropenylium Cation : A Transition State with Reversed Aromaticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibson, Christopher M.; Havenith, Remco W. A.; Fowler, Patrick W.; Jenneskens, Leonardus W.

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the equilibrium structure of the homoaromatic C-s homotropenylium cation, C8H9+ (1), which supports a pinched diatropic ring current, the C(2)v transition state (2) for inversion of the methylene bridge of 1 is antiaromatic and supports a two-lobe paratropic pi current, as detected by

  4. Inward Cationic Diffusion and Percolation Transition in Glass-Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedsklaer, Morten Mattrup; Yue, Yuanzheng; Mørup, Steen

    2010-01-01

    We show the quantitative correlation between the degree of crystallization and the cationic diffusion extent in iron-containing diopside glass–ceramics at the glass transition temperature. We find a critical degree of crystallization, above which the diffusion extent sharply drops with the degree...

  5. Cationic zinc enolates as highly active catalysts for acrylate polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Logan E; Zhu, Hongping; Hlavinka, Mark L; Hagadorn, John R; Chen, Eugene Y-X

    2006-11-22

    Unprecedented cationic zinc enolates have been generated by a novel activation route involving the amido to imino ligand transformation with B(C6F5)3, structurally characterized, and utilized as highly active catalysts for the production of high molecular weight polyacrylates at ambient temperature. PMID:17105289

  6. Cationic amphiphilic non-hemolytic polyacrylates with superior antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punia, Ashish; He, Edward; Lee, Kevin; Banerjee, Probal; Yang, Nan-Loh

    2014-07-01

    Acrylic copolymers with appropriate compositions of counits having cationic charge with 2-carbon and 6-carbon spacer arms can show superior antibacterial activities with concomitant very low hemolytic effect. These amphiphilic copolymers represent one of the most promising synthetic polymer antibacterial systems reported. PMID:24854366

  7. Biosorption of radiocesium by deinococcus radiodurans influenced by cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deinococcus radiodurans has a strong ability to withstand high doses of radiation, which makes it as an ideal candidate for bioremediation of sites contaminated with radionuclides and toxic chemicals. However, no data is available on whether D. radiodurans has a specific sorption capacity to radiocesium for bioremediation purpose. The radiocesium biosorption capacity of live cells of D. radiodurans in the presence of other interfering cations was investigated. The maximum biosorption capacity of radiocesium by D. radiodurans in equilibrium state was about 2,100 kBq/kg (fresh weight basis). Among the tested monovalent cations, NH4+ had the strongest antagonism on 134Cs biosorption for D. radiodurans. However, this antagonism could only be observed at a concentration as high as 100 mmol/L. Divalent cations, such as Ca2+ and Pb2+ could reduced the biosorption of radiocesium by D. radiodurans. Al3+ and Cr3+ were cytotoxic to D. radiodurans cells, the growth of D. radiodurans cells was inhibited when the concentrations of these cations were greater than 1 mmol/L. (authors)

  8. Cation Hydration Constants by Proton NMR: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Studies the polarization effect on water by cations and anions. Describes an experiment to illustrate the polarization effect of sodium, lithium, calcium, and strontium ions on the water molecule in the hydration spheres of the ions. Analysis is performed by proton NMR. (MVL)

  9. Versatile cation transport in imidazolium based polymerized ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Christopher; Segalman, Rachel

    Polymerized ionic liquids (PIL) with tethered imidazolium groups are able to conduct a diverse array of cations relevant for energy applications. The well-known complexation of imidazolium with transition metals is exploited to bind ions such as H +, Li+, Cu2+, and Ni2+ by doping the neutral PIL with the appropriate Cation-TFSI- salt. Conductivities were first determined via AC impedance indicating that H+ salts lead to the highest conductivity (due to low ion mass and potential Grotthus mechanism) followed by Cu2+, Li+, Ag+, and Ni2+. The equilibrium constant for imidazolium complexation is larger for Cu2+ relative to Li-, Ag-, and Ni-imidazolium complexes leading to greater salt dissociation and higher conductivities. For LiTFSI and CuTFSI2 salts, metallic lithium or copper electrodes were employed in battery cells to pass a steady DC current and confirm that the cations are in fact carrying current. Interestingly, the divalent Cu2+ also ionically crosslinks the polymer leading to a plateau in the viscosity. Thus, divalent ions provide an unique route to high conductivity, high modulus polymeric electrolytes. Future studies involving ZnTFSI2 and MgTFSI2 for battery applications are proposed to examine how versatile the PIL platform is for cation transport.

  10. Denatured Thermodynamics of Proteins in Weak Cation-exchange Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Rong; CHEN Guo-Liang

    2003-01-01

    The thermostability of some proteins in weak cation-exchange chromatography was investigated at 20-80 ℃. The results show that there is a fixed thermal denaturation transition temperature for each protein. The appearance of the thermal transition temperature indicates that the conformations of the proteins are destroyed seriously. The thermal behavior of the proteins in weak cation-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatographies were compared in a wide temperature range. It was found that the proteins have a higher thermostability in a weak cation-exchange chromatography system. The thermodynamic parameters(ΔH0, ΔS0) of those proteins were determined by means of Vant Hoff relationship(lnk-1/T). According to standard entropy change(ΔS0), the conformational change of the proteins was judged in the chromatographic process. The linear relationships between ΔH0 and ΔS0 can be used to evaluate "compensation temperature"(β) at the protein denaturation and identify the identity of the protein retention mechanism in weak cation-exchange chromatography.

  11. Metal Cations in G-Quadruplex Folding and Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Debmalya; Mirihana Arachchilage, Gayan; Basu, Soumitra

    2016-09-01

    This review is focused on the structural and physico-chemical aspects of metal cation coordination to G-Quadruplexes (GQ) and their effects on GQ stability and conformation. G-Quadruplex structures are non-canonical secondary structures formed by both DNA and RNA. G-quadruplexes regulate a wide range of important biochemical processes. Besides the sequence requirements, the coordination of monovalent cations in the GQ is essential for its formation and determines the stability and polymorphism of GQ structures. The nature, location and dynamics of the cation coordination and their impact on the overall GQ stability are dependent on several factors such as the ionic radii, hydration energy and the bonding strength to the O6 of guanines. The intracellular monovalent cation concentration and the localized ion concentrations determine the formation of GQs and can potentially dictate their regulatory roles. A wide range of biochemical and biophysical studies on an array of GQ enabling sequences have generated at a minimum the knowledge base that allows us to often predict the stability of GQs in presence of the physiologically relevant metal ions, however, prediction of conformation of such GQs is still out of the realm.

  12. Structure and Reactivity of the Cysteine Methyl Ester Radical Cation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osburn, S.; Steill, J. D.; Oomens, J.; O' Hair, R. A. J.; Van Stipdonk, M.; Ryzhov, V.

    2011-01-01

    The structure and reactivity of the cysteine methyl ester radical cation, CysOMe(center dot+), have been examined in the gas phase using a combination of experiment and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. CysOMe(center dot+) undergoes rapid ion molecule reactions with dimethyl disulfide, a

  13. Cationic Organic/Inorganic Hybrids and Their Swelling Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E. S. Dragan; L. Ghimici; M. Cazacu

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Specific properties of poly(dimethylsiloxanes), such as low glass transition temperature, low surface energy, good insulating properties, biological and chemical inertness, high diffusion coefficient of gases, make them very attractive for practical applications in the daily life. However, there is a great interest last time in the preparation of ionic organic/inorganic materials with new properties for new applications. Quaternary ammonium salt(QAS) groups included in siloxane copolymers could induce new interesting properties such as:permanent fungicidal and bactericidal properties, which make them very attractive as materials for sanitary applications, improved selectivity coefficients of the gas-separation membranes, ion-exchange properties and so forth. So far, QAS groups have been located in the side chain[1,2]. Our interest was focused on the preparation of some novel cationic polysiloxane copolymers containing QAS groups of both integral type and pendent type[3,4]. Our objectives for the present study concern the synthesis of some cationic organic/siloxane hybrid materials with swelling properties controlled by both the nature of cationic organic component and the ratio between the organic and inorganic counterparts. Such cationic hybrid materials could be of interest for the preparation of new stimuli-responsive hydrogels[5,6].

  14. Cation exchange interaction between antibiotic ciprofloxacin and montmorillonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chih-Jen [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Li, Zhaohui, E-mail: li@uwp.edu [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Geosciences, University of Wisconsin - Parkside, Kenosha, WI 53144 (United States); Jiang, Wei-Teh, E-mail: atwtj@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Liu, Chia-Chuan [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2010-11-15

    Exploring the interactions between antibiotics and soils/minerals is of great importance in resolving their fate, transport, and elimination in the environment due to their frequent detection in wastewater, river water, sewage sludge and soils. This study focused on determining the adsorption properties and mechanisms of interaction between antibiotic ciprofloxacin and montmorillonite (SAz-1), a swelling dioctahedral mineral with Ca{sup 2+} as the main interlayer cation. In acidic and neutral aqueous solutions, a stoichiometric exchange between ciprofloxacin and interlayer cations yielded an adsorption capacity as high as 330 mg/g, corresponding to 1.0 mmol/g. When solution pH was above its pK{sub a2} (8.7), adsorption of ciprofloxacin was greatly reduced due to the net repulsion between the negatively charged clay surfaces and the ciprofloxacin anion. The uptake of ciprofloxacin expanded the basal spacing (d{sub 001}) of montmorillonite from 15.04 to 17.23 A near its adsorption capacity, confirming cation exchange within the interlayers in addition to surface adsorption. Fourier transform infrared results further suggested that the protonated amine group of ciprofloxacin in its cationic form was electrostatically attracted to negatively charged sites of clay surfaces, and that the carboxylic acid group was hydrogen bonded to the basal oxygen atoms of the silicate layers. The results indicate that montmorillonite is an effective sorbent to remove ciprofloxacin from water.

  15. Cation exchange interaction between antibiotic ciprofloxacin and montmorillonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exploring the interactions between antibiotics and soils/minerals is of great importance in resolving their fate, transport, and elimination in the environment due to their frequent detection in wastewater, river water, sewage sludge and soils. This study focused on determining the adsorption properties and mechanisms of interaction between antibiotic ciprofloxacin and montmorillonite (SAz-1), a swelling dioctahedral mineral with Ca2+ as the main interlayer cation. In acidic and neutral aqueous solutions, a stoichiometric exchange between ciprofloxacin and interlayer cations yielded an adsorption capacity as high as 330 mg/g, corresponding to 1.0 mmol/g. When solution pH was above its pKa2 (8.7), adsorption of ciprofloxacin was greatly reduced due to the net repulsion between the negatively charged clay surfaces and the ciprofloxacin anion. The uptake of ciprofloxacin expanded the basal spacing (d001) of montmorillonite from 15.04 to 17.23 A near its adsorption capacity, confirming cation exchange within the interlayers in addition to surface adsorption. Fourier transform infrared results further suggested that the protonated amine group of ciprofloxacin in its cationic form was electrostatically attracted to negatively charged sites of clay surfaces, and that the carboxylic acid group was hydrogen bonded to the basal oxygen atoms of the silicate layers. The results indicate that montmorillonite is an effective sorbent to remove ciprofloxacin from water.

  16. Fusion Pore Diameter Regulation by Cations Modulating Local Membrane Anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doron Kabaso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The fusion pore is an aqueous channel that is formed upon the fusion of the vesicle membrane with the plasma membrane. Once the pore is open, it may close again (transient fusion or widen completely (full fusion to permit vesicle cargo discharge. While repetitive transient fusion pore openings of the vesicle with the plasma membrane have been observed in the absence of stimulation, their frequency can be further increased using a cAMP-increasing agent that drives the opening of nonspecific cation channels. Our model hypothesis is that the openings and closings of the fusion pore are driven by changes in the local concentration of cations in the connected vesicle. The proposed mechanism of fusion pore dynamics is considered as follows: when the fusion pore is closed or is extremely narrow, the accumulation of cations in the vesicle (increased cation concentration likely leads to lipid demixing at the fusion pore. This process may affect local membrane anisotropy, which reduces the spontaneous curvature and thus leads to the opening of the fusion pore. Based on the theory of membrane elasticity, we used a continuum model to explain the rhythmic opening and closing of the fusion pore.

  17. Two different cationic positions in Cu-SSZ-13?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Zhu, Haiyang; Lee, Jong H.; Peden, Charles HF; Szanyi, Janos

    2012-04-18

    H2-TPR and FTIR were used to characterize the Cu ions present in Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite at different ion exchange levels. The results obtained are consistent with the presence of Cu ions in two distinct cationic positions of the SSZ-13 framework.

  18. Two different cationic positions in Cu-SSZ-13?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hun Kwak, Ja; Zhu, Haiyang; Lee, Jong H; Peden, Charles H F; Szanyi, János

    2012-05-16

    H(2)-TPR and FTIR were used to characterize the nature of the Cu ions present in the Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite at different ion exchange levels. The results obtained are consistent with the presence of Cu ions at two distinct cationic positions in the SSZ-13 framework. PMID:22473309

  19. Metal Cations in G-Quadruplex Folding and Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Debmalya; Mirihana Arachchilage, Gayan; Basu, Soumitra

    2016-01-01

    This review is focused on the structural and physicochemical aspects of metal cation coordination to G-Quadruplexes (GQ) and their effects on GQ stability and conformation. G-quadruplex structures are non-canonical secondary structures formed by both DNA and RNA. G-quadruplexes regulate a wide range of important biochemical processes. Besides the sequence requirements, the coordination of monovalent cations in the GQ is essential for its formation and determines the stability and polymorphism of GQ structures. The nature, location, and dynamics of the cation coordination and their impact on the overall GQ stability are dependent on several factors such as the ionic radii, hydration energy, and the bonding strength to the O6 of guanines. The intracellular monovalent cation concentration and the localized ion concentrations determine the formation of GQs and can potentially dictate their regulatory roles. A wide range of biochemical and biophysical studies on an array of GQ enabling sequences have generated at a minimum the knowledge base that allows us to often predict the stability of GQs in the presence of the physiologically relevant metal ions, however, prediction of conformation of such GQs is still out of the realm. PMID:27668212

  20. Copper cation removal in an electrokinetic cell containing zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed-Ali, Omar H; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E

    2011-01-30

    Zeolites are used in environmental remediation of soil or water to immobilize or remove toxic materials by cation exchange. An experiment was conducted to test the use a low electric field to direct the toxic cations towards the zeolite. An electrokinetic cell was constructed using carbon electrodes. Synthetic Linde Type A (LTA) zeolite was placed in the cell. Copper(II) chloride dissolved in water was used as a contaminant. The Cu(2+) concentration was measured for ten hours with and without an applied electric field. The removal of the Cu(2+) ions was accelerated by the applied field in the first two hours. For longer time, the electric field did not improve the removal rate of the Cu(2+) ions. The presence of zeolite and applied electric field complicates the chemistry near the cathode and causes precipitation of Cu(2+) ions as copper oxide on the surface of the zeolite. With increased electric field the zeolite farther away from the cathode had little cation exchange due to the higher drift velocity of the Cu(2+) ions. The results also show that, in the LTA Zeolite A pellets, the cation exchange of Cu is limited to a shell of several tens of micrometers. PMID:21109348

  1. Peak metamorphic temperatures from cation diffusion zoning in garnet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smit, Matthijs Arjen; Scherer, Erik; Mezger, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    A model that relates the characteristic diffusion length and average cooling rate to peak temperature was developed for chemical diffusion in spherical geometries on the basis of geospeedometry principles and diffusion theory. The model is quantitatively evaluated for cation diffusion profiles in...

  2. Gene delivery by cationic lipid vectors : overcoming cellular barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuhorn, Inge S; Engberts, Jan B F N; Hoekstra, Dirk

    2007-01-01

    Non-viral vectors such as cationic lipids are capable of delivering nucleic acids, including genes, siRNA or antisense RNA into cells, thus potentially resulting in their functional expression. These vectors are considered as an attractive alternative for virus-based delivery systems, which may suff

  3. Cr/nanodiamond composite plating with cobalt cation additive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Viet-Hue NGUYEN; Thi-Nam HOANG; Ngoc-Phong NGUYEN; Sik-Chol KWON; Man KIM; Joo-Yul LEE

    2009-01-01

    The effect of cationic additive on Cr/nanodiamond plating was studied. Chromium plating was performed in Sargent bath. Morphology of deposit was observed by scanning electron microscope(SEM); microhardness by hardness tester; wear rate by tribometer; amount of diamond in deposit by combustion method and passivity by potentiodynamic scan. Experimental results show that in the presence of cobalt cation, the amount of nanodiamond particle in the deposit is increased. With increasing diamond particle amount, the metallurgical, mechanical and electrochemical properties of Cr/nanodiamond deposit are improved. However, this improvement seems to be constrained. In the presence of 10 g/L of nanodiamond powder and 2.5 g/L of cobalt cation in the bath, the amount of diamond particle in deposit is increased by 4 times; and wear rate of Cr-Co/nanodiamond deposit is decreased by 2-3 times as compared with pure Cr/deposit. The passive current of Cr-Co/nanodiamond composite deposit is decreased from 18 to 8 ìA. The morphology of Cr/nanodiamond is smooth remarkably in the presence of cobalt cation.

  4. New cation-exchange membranes for hyperfiltration processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velden, van der P.M.; Smolders, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    A new route for the preparation of cation exchange membranes from polystyrene-polyisoprene-polystyrene (SIS) block copolymers has been studied, using N-chlorosulfonyl isocyanate. At temperatures of 0° to 20°C, N-chlorosulfonyl isocyanate reacts readily with the olefin group in polyisoprenes, resulti

  5. Fibrin solubilizing properties of certain anionic and cationic detergents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, S

    1989-08-15

    The fibrinolytic (fibrin dissolving) properties of several anionic, cationic, nonionic and zwitterionic detergents were assessed in an in vitro fibrin agarose assay. Of the 4 anionic detergents tested, only sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was found to be fibrinolytic. SDS was fibrinolytic either in the absence or presence of factor XIII. Four other cationic detergents were found to possess similar fibrinolytic properties. These cationic detergents were cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), mix alkyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (MTAB), hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HTAB) and cetylpyridium chloride (CPC). The nonionic (digitonin, triton X-100/tween 20) and zeitterionic (CHAPS, zeittergent 3-08) detergents were not fibrinolytic. Detergents mediated fibrinolysis, unlike that of tissue type plasminogen activator and urokinase, was independent of the presence of plasminogen. Non-detergents such as polyethylene glycol and highly charged compounds such as poly-1-lysine and poly-1-glutamic acid were not fibrinolytic. Fibrinolytic activity was observed for SDS and the cationic detergents at concentrations ranging from 0.1-10 percent. The effects of these fibrinolytic detergents (SDS, CTAB, MTAB, HTAB and CPC) on clot formation and on pre-formed clots were then assessed, using freshly drawn human venous blood. Incorporation of these detergents into blood inhibited the formation of clots in a concentration dependent manner. The detergents were also able to dissolve pre-formed clots in a similar fashion. SDS was found to be most potent in these properties. PMID:2510356

  6. Cationic polymers for nuclaic acid delivery to tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, H.K. de

    2007-01-01

    In the field of cancer gene therapy, the use of gene carrier systems is considered indispensable. Cationic polymers are able to effectively condense plasmid DNA to nano-sized particles, further referred to as polyplexes. Compared to free DNA, polyplexes have shown improved nuclease-resistance, a mor

  7. Predictive model of cationic surfactant binding to humic substances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishiguro, M.; Koopal, L.K.

    2011-01-01

    The humic substances (HS) have a high reactivity with other components in the natural environment. An important factor for the reactivity of HS is their negative charge. Cationic surfactants bind strongly to HS by electrostatic and specific interaction. Therefore, a surfactant binding model is devel

  8. Interactions between liposomes and cations in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruso, Juan M; Besada, Lina; Martínez-Landeira, Pablo; Seoane, Laura; Prieto, Gerardo; Sarmiento, Félix

    2003-05-01

    An investigation on the dependence of electrophoretic mobilities of unilamellar vesicles of phosphatidylcholine-cholesterol-phosphatidylinositol (PC-Chol-PI) on the concentration of several cations with variations in the relation charge/radius in the range Na+, K+, Cs+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Ba2+, Al3+, and La3+ has been realized. Plots of zeta potential against ion concentration exhibit a maximum for all the cations under study, the position of the maximum is greatly affected by the charge of the ion. From the feature of these plots two phenomenon were observed: an initial binding of cations into the slipping plane for ion concentration below the maximum and a phenomenon of vesicle association for concentration above the maximum. To confirm these observations measurements on dynamic light scattering were performed to obtain the corresponding size distribution of the liposomes at different ion concentrations. Finally the ability of the Stern isotherm to describe the adsorption of the cations to vesicles was tested by two methods. The two main parameters of the theory: the total number of adsorption sites per unit area, N1, and the equilibrium constant, K; (and consequently the free energy of adsorption, deltaG0ads) were calculated for the different ions, showing good agreement. The equilibrium constants of adsorption have been found to obey a linear relationship with ion radius the slope of which decreases with the ion charge.

  9. Photo-fragmentation spectroscopy of benzylium and 1-phenylethyl cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Féraud, Géraldine; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.jouvet@univ-amu.fr [Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moleculaires, UMR CNRS 7345, Aix-Marseille Université, Avenue Escadrille Normandie-Niémen, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Soorkia, Satchin [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay, CNRS UMR 8214, Université Paris Sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2014-01-14

    The electronic spectra of cold benzylium (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}-CH{sub 2}{sup +}) and 1-phenylethyl (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}-CH-CH{sub 3}{sup +}) cations have been recorded via photofragment spectroscopy. Benzylium and 1-phenylethyl cations produced from electrosprayed benzylamine and phenylethylamine solutions, respectively, were stored in a cryogenically cooled quadrupole ion trap and photodissociated by an OPO laser, scanned in parts of the UV and visible regions (600–225 nm). The electronic states and active vibrational modes of the benzylium and 1-phenylethyl cations as well as those of their tropylium or methyl tropylium isomers have been calculated with ab initio methods for comparison with the spectra observed. Sharp vibrational progressions are observed in the visible region while the absorption features are much broader in the UV. The visible spectrum of the benzylium cation is similar to that obtained in an argon tagging experiment [V. Dryza, N. Chalyavi, J. A. Sanelli, and E. J. Bieske, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 204304 (2012)], with an additional splitting assigned to Fermi resonances. The visible spectrum of the 1-phenylethyl cation also shows vibrational progressions. For both cations, the second electronic transition is observed in the UV, around 33 000 cm{sup −1} (4.1 eV) and shows a broadened vibrational progression. In both cases the S{sub 2} optimized geometry is non-planar. The third electronic transition observed around 40 000 cm{sup −1} (5.0 eV) is even broader with no apparent vibrational structures, which is indicative of either a fast non-radiative process or a very large change in geometry between the excited and the ground states. The oscillator strengths calculated for tropylium and methyl tropylium are weak. Therefore, these isomeric structures are most likely not responsible for these absorption features. Finally, the fragmentation pattern changes in the second and third electronic states: C{sub 2}H{sub 2} loss becomes predominant at higher

  10. Synergistic effect of all-trans-retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide on growth inhibition and apoptosis in human hepatoma, breast cancer, and lung cancer cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Le-Min Lin; Bao-Xin Li; Jian-Bing Xiao; Dan-Hua Lin; Bao-Feng Yang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) on arsenic trioxide (As2O3)-induced apoptosis of human hepatoma, breast cancer, and lung cancer cells in an attempt to find a better combination therapy for solid tumors.METHODS: Human hepatoma cell lines HepG2, Hep3B,human breast cancer cell line MCF-7, and human lung adenocarcinoma cell line AGZY-83-a were treated with As2O3 together with ATRA. Cell survival fraction was determined by MTT assay, cell viability and apoptosis were measured by annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and PI staining, and intracellular glutathione (GSH)and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities were determined using commercial kits.RESULTS: Cytotoxicity of ATRA was low. ATRA (0.1, 1,and 10 μmol/L) could synergistically potentiate As2O3 to exert a dose-dependent inhibition of growth and to induce apoptosis in each of the cell lines. HepG2 and Hep3B with low intracellular GSH or GST activities were remarkably sensitive to As2O3 or As2O3+ATRA, while AGZY-83-a with higher GSH or GST activities was less sensitive to As2O3or As2O3+ATRA. Treatment with 2 μmol/L As2O3 for 72 h significantly decreased intracellular GSH and GST levels in each of the cell lines, and 1 μmol/L ATRA alone reduced minimal intracellular GSH and GST levels. ATRA potentiated the effect of As2O3 on intracellular GSH levels, but intracellular GST levels were not significantly affected by the combination of As2O3 and ATRA for 72 h as compared to As2O3 alone.CONCLUSION: ATRA can strongly potentiate As2O3-induced growth-inhibition and apoptosis in each of the cell lines, and two drugs can produce a significant synergic effect. The sensitivity to As2O3 or As2O3+ATRA is inversely proportional to intracellular GSH or GST levels in each of the cell lines. The GSH redox system may be the possible mechanism by which ATRA synergistically potentiates As2O3 to exert a dose-dependent inhibition of growth and to induce apoptosis.

  11. Maximal dynamic grip force and wrist torque: the effects of gender, exertion direction, angular velocity, and wrist angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jonathan L; Jung, Myung-Chul; Bashford, Gregory R; Hallbeck, M Susan

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of gender, exertion direction, angular velocity and wrist angle on simultaneous grip force and wrist torque under the isokinetic condition. The study used 20 participants (10 males and 10 females) and included 6 angular velocities (15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 degrees /s) and 2 wrist exertion directions (flexion and extension) over the wrist range of motion of 70 degrees flexion to 60 degrees extension in 5 degrees increments. Similar to other studies, males and flexion exertion produced larger forces than females and extension exertion, respectively. However, the largest forces were generated at near extreme flexion of the wrist and the dependent variable of angular velocity was not practically significant. These results can contribute to the evaluation of cumulative trauma syndromes, but there is a need for more research on the dynamic measures of the hand and wrist complex and for standard development for dynamic force measurement. PMID:16442072

  12. Synergistic effects of Chinese herbal medicine: a comprehensive review of methodology and current research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Zhou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine is an important part of primary health care in Asian countries that has utilised complex herbal formulations (consisting 2 or more medicinal herbs for treating diseases over thousands of years. There seems to be a general assumption that the synergistic therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal medicine derive from the complex interactions between the multiple bioactive components within the herbs and/or herbal formulations. However, evidence to support these synergistic effects remains weak and controversial due to several reasons, including the very complex nature of Chinese herbal medicine, misconceptions about synergy, methodological challenges to study design. In this review, we clarify the definition of synergy, identify common errors in synergy research and describe current methodological approaches to test for synergistic interaction. We discuss the strengthen and weakness of these models in the context of Chinese herbal medicine and summarise the current status of synergy research in CHM. Despite the availability of some scientific data to support the synergistic effects of multi-herbal and/or herb-drug combinations, the level of evidence remains low and the clinical relevancy of most of these findings is undetermined. There remain significant challenges in the development of suitable methods for synergistic studies of complex herbal combinations.

  13. Synergistic effect of ionizing radiation on chemical disinfectant treatments for reduction of natural microflora on seafood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether combined treatments would produce synergistic disinfection effects on seafood products such as mussel and squid compared with single treatments. We investigated the bactericidal effects of chlorine and ionizing radiation on the natural microflora of mussel and squid. Total aerobic bacteria initially ranged from 102 to 104 Log CFU/g. More than 100 ppm of chlorine and irradiation at 1 kGy were sufficient to reduce the total aerobic bacteria on mussel and squid to a level lower than detection limit (10 CFU/g). Synergistic effects against natural microflora were observed for all combined treatment. These results suggest that a significant synergistic benefit results from combine chlorine-ionizing radiation treatment against natural microflora on mussel and squid. - Highlights: ► Synergistic effect of combined treatments of chlorine and irradiation was tested using seafood. ► Synergistic effect against natural microflora was observed for all combined treatments. ► Therefore, it is recommended that industry use the combined treatment for better effect.

  14. Pyrethroid resistance in Phytoseiulus macropilis (Acari: Phytoseiidae): cross-resistance, stability and effect of synergists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Maria Cristina Vitelli; Sato, Mario Eidi

    2016-01-01

    Phytoseiulus macropilis Banks (Acari: Phytoseiidae) is an effective predator of Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae). The objectives of this research were to study the stability of fenpropathrin resistance and the cross-resistance relationships with different pyrethroids, and also to evaluate the effect of synergists [piperonyl butoxide (PBO), diethyl maleate (DEM) and S,S,S-tributyl phosphorotrithioate (DEF)] on fenpropathrin resistant and susceptible strains of this predaceous mite. The stability of fenpropathrin resistance was studied under laboratory conditions, using P. macropilis populations with initial frequencies of 75 and 50% of resistant mites. The percentages of fenpropathrin resistant mites were evaluated monthly for a period of up to 12 months. A trend toward decreased resistance frequencies was observed only during the first 3-4 months. After this initial decrease, the fenpropathrin resistance was shown to be stable, maintaining constant resistance frequencies (around 30%) until the end of the evaluation period. Toxicity tests carried out using fenpropathrin resistant and susceptible strains of P. macropilis indicated strong positive cross-resistance between fenpropathrin and the pyrethroids bifenthrin and deltamethrin. Bioassays with the synergists DEM, DEF and PBO were also performed. The maximum synergism ratio (SR = LC50 without synergist/LC50 with synergist) detected for the three evaluated synergists (PBO, DEM, DEF) was 5.86 (for DEF), indicating low influence of enzyme detoxification processes in fenpropathrin resistance. PMID:26530989

  15. Functional mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for highly controllable drug release and synergistic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yin-Jia; Zeng, Xuan; Cheng, Dong-Bing; Xu, Xiao-Ding; Zhang, Xian-Zheng; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; He, Feng

    2016-09-01

    Synergistic therapy involving two or more therapeutic agents with different anticancer mechanisms represents a promising approach to eradicate chemotherapy-refractory cancers. However, the preparation of a synergistic therapy platform generally involves complicated procedures to encapsulate different therapeutic agents and thereby increases the purification difficulty. In this work, we reported a simple but robust strategy to prepare a highly controllable drug delivery system (DDS) for synergistic cancer therapy. To construct this robust DDS, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) were employed as a nanoplatform to encapsulate anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). After using a tumor-targeting cellular membrane-penetrating peptide (TCPP) and a mitochondria-targeting therapeutic peptide (TPP) to seal the surface pores via disulfide bonds, these newly developed MSNs can target cancer cells, penetrate cell membrane and rapidly release anticancer drug and mitochondria-targeted peptide in cytoplasm, inducing a remarkable synergistic anticancer effect. The new design concept reported here will promote the development of targeted and smart DDSs for synergistic cancer therapy. PMID:27182657

  16. Mechanistic Study of the Synergistic Antibacterial Activity of Combined Silver Nanoparticles and Common Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hua; McShan, Danielle; Zhang, Ying; Sinha, Sudarson S; Arslan, Zikri; Ray, Paresh C; Yu, Hongtao

    2016-08-16

    A combination of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and an antibiotic can synergistically inhibit bacterial growth, especially against the drug-resistant bacteria Salmonella typhimurium. However, the mechanism for the synergistic activity is not known. This study chooses four classes of antibiotics, β-lactam (ampicillin and penicillin), quinolone (enoxacin), aminoglycoside (kanamycin and neomycin), and polykeptide (tetracycline) to explore their synergistic mechanism when combined with AgNPs against the multidrug-resistant bacterium Salmonella typhimurium DT 104. Enoxacin, kanamycin, neomycin, and tetracycline show synergistic growth inhibition against the Salmonella bacteria when combined with AgNPs, while ampicillin and penicillin do not. UV-vis and Raman spectroscopy studies reveal that all these four synergistic antibiotics can form complexes with AgNPs, while ampicillin and penicillin do not. The presence of tetracycline enhances the binding of Ag to Salmonella by 21% and Ag(+) release by 26% in comparison to that without tetracycline, while the presence of penicillin does not enhance the binding of Ag or Ag(+) release. This means that AgNPs first form a complex with tetracycline. The tetracycline-AgNPs complex interacts more strongly with the Salmonella cells and causes more Ag(+) release, thus creating a temporal high concentration of Ag(+) near the bacteria cell wall that leads to growth inhibition of the bacteria. These findings agree with the recent findings that Ag(+) release from AgNPs is the agent causing toxicity. PMID:27390928

  17. Synergistic antimicrobial activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, Amber; Khan, Adnan; Borghetto, Ilaria; Kazmi, Shahana U; Rubino, Salvatore; Paglietti, Bianca

    2015-01-01

    Synergistic combinations of antimicrobial agents with different mechanisms of action have been introduced as more successful strategies to combat infections involving multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria. In this study, we investigated synergistic antimicrobial activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia which are commonly used plants with different antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial susceptibility of 350 Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains belonging to 10 different bacterial species, was tested against Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia extracts. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by agar dilution and microbroth dilution assays. Plant extracts were tested for synergistic antimicrobial activity with different antimicrobial agents by checkerboard titration, Etest/agar incorporation assays, and time kill kinetics. Extract treated and untreated bacteria were subjected to transmission electron microscopy to see the effect on bacterial cell morphology. Camellia sinensis extract showed higher antibacterial activity against MDR S. Typhi, alone and in combination with nalidixic acid, than to susceptible isolates." We further explore anti-staphylococcal activity of Juglans regia that lead to the changes in bacterial cell morphology indicating the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria as possible target of action. The synergistic combination of Juglans regia and oxacillin reverted oxacillin resistance of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains in vitro. This study provides novel information about antimicrobial and synergistic activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia against MDR pathogens.

  18. Synergistic antimicrobial activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Farooqui

    Full Text Available Synergistic combinations of antimicrobial agents with different mechanisms of action have been introduced as more successful strategies to combat infections involving multidrug resistant (MDR bacteria. In this study, we investigated synergistic antimicrobial activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia which are commonly used plants with different antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial susceptibility of 350 Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains belonging to 10 different bacterial species, was tested against Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia extracts. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs were determined by agar dilution and microbroth dilution assays. Plant extracts were tested for synergistic antimicrobial activity with different antimicrobial agents by checkerboard titration, Etest/agar incorporation assays, and time kill kinetics. Extract treated and untreated bacteria were subjected to transmission electron microscopy to see the effect on bacterial cell morphology. Camellia sinensis extract showed higher antibacterial activity against MDR S. Typhi, alone and in combination with nalidixic acid, than to susceptible isolates." We further explore anti-staphylococcal activity of Juglans regia that lead to the changes in bacterial cell morphology indicating the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria as possible target of action. The synergistic combination of Juglans regia and oxacillin reverted oxacillin resistance of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA strains in vitro. This study provides novel information about antimicrobial and synergistic activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia against MDR pathogens.

  19. Synergistic antimicrobial activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, Amber; Khan, Adnan; Borghetto, Ilaria; Kazmi, Shahana U; Rubino, Salvatore; Paglietti, Bianca

    2015-01-01

    Synergistic combinations of antimicrobial agents with different mechanisms of action have been introduced as more successful strategies to combat infections involving multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria. In this study, we investigated synergistic antimicrobial activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia which are commonly used plants with different antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial susceptibility of 350 Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains belonging to 10 different bacterial species, was tested against Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia extracts. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by agar dilution and microbroth dilution assays. Plant extracts were tested for synergistic antimicrobial activity with different antimicrobial agents by checkerboard titration, Etest/agar incorporation assays, and time kill kinetics. Extract treated and untreated bacteria were subjected to transmission electron microscopy to see the effect on bacterial cell morphology. Camellia sinensis extract showed higher antibacterial activity against MDR S. Typhi, alone and in combination with nalidixic acid, than to susceptible isolates." We further explore anti-staphylococcal activity of Juglans regia that lead to the changes in bacterial cell morphology indicating the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria as possible target of action. The synergistic combination of Juglans regia and oxacillin reverted oxacillin resistance of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains in vitro. This study provides novel information about antimicrobial and synergistic activity of Camellia sinensis and Juglans regia against MDR pathogens. PMID:25719410

  20. Self-assembly and supramolecular liquid crystals based on organic cation encapsulated polyoxometalate hybrid reverse micelles and pyridine derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shengyan; Sun, Hang; Yan, Yi; Zhang, Hui; Li, Wen; Wu, Lixin

    2011-09-15

    The controlled self-assembly of multi-components in one system represents the capability integrating intermolecular interactions and functions of components and is believed the key procedure leading to multifunctional materials finally. In pursuing this goal, we used a double-chain cationic surfactant with a benzoic acid group at the end of one tail to encapsulate Keggin-type polyanion clusters via electrostatic interaction, obtaining uniform supramolecular hybrid reverse micelles, which served as hydrogen-bonding donors. Five pyridine derivatives containing conjugated and non-conjugated groups were chosen as hydrogen-bonding acceptors to bind with reverse micelles. Through mixing with these components according to chemical stoichiometry, the hybrid reverse micelle changed to a new self-assembly precursor through intermolecular hydrogen bonding. The as-prepared reverse micelles bearing conjugated pyridine groups exhibit supramolecular liquid crystal properties, which were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, polarizing optical microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The length and number of the alky chain in the pyridine derivatives, as well as the charges of polyoxometalates were also studied with regard to the liquid crystal structure. The synergistic effect of among three components was analyzed, and the liquid crystal properties could be conveniently adjusted through the modification of the hydrogen-bonding acceptor components.

  1. EEG signatures of arm isometric exertions in preparation, planning and execution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasseroleslami, Bahman; Lakany, Heba; Conway, Bernard A

    2014-04-15

    The electroencephalographic (EEG) activity patterns in humans during motor behaviour provide insight into normal motor control processes and for diagnostic and rehabilitation applications. While the patterns preceding brisk voluntary movements, and especially movement execution, are well described, there are few EEG studies that address the cortical activation patterns seen in isometric exertions and their planning. In this paper, we report on time and time-frequency EEG signatures in experiments in normal subjects (n=8), using multichannel EEG during motor preparation, planning and execution of directional centre-out arm isometric exertions performed at the wrist in the horizontal plane, in response to instruction-delay visual cues. Our observations suggest that isometric force exertions are accompanied by transient and sustained event-related potentials (ERP) and event-related (de-)synchronisations (ERD/ERS), comparable to those of a movement task. Furthermore, the ERPs and ERD/ERS are also observed during preparation and planning of the isometric task. Comparison of ear-lobe-referenced and surface Laplacian ERPs indicates the contribution of superficial sources in supplementary and pre-motor (FC(z)), parietal (CP(z)) and primary motor cortical areas (C₁ and FC₁) to ERPs (primarily negative peaks in frontal and positive peaks in parietal areas), but contribution of deep sources to sustained time-domain potentials (negativity in planning and positivity in execution). Transient and sustained ERD patterns in μ and β frequency bands of ear-lobe-referenced and surface Laplacian EEG indicate the contribution of both superficial and deep sources to ERD/ERS. As no physical displacement happens during the task, we can infer that the underlying mechanisms of motor-related ERPs and ERD/ERS patterns do not only depend on change in limb coordinate or muscle-length-dependent ascending sensory information and are primary generated by motor preparation, direction

  2. Drilling fluids formulation with cationic hydro-soluble polymers as inhibitors reactive shales; Formulacao de fluidos de perfuracao contendo polimeros cationicos hidrossoluveis como inibidores de formacoes reativas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Carlos Eduardo C. de; Nascimento, Regina Sandra V. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Sa, Carlos Henrique [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2004-07-01

    Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), having different molecular weight, and a copolymer with acrylamide were evaluated as shale inhibitor additive for water based drilling fluid, as well as the compatibility of these polycations with others additives present in the drilling fluid and the testing results for these fluids were compared with those for formulations with commercial cationic polymers from drilling fluids additives suppliers. The ability of the polymers and KCl systems in inhibiting the clay's dispersion were evaluated with hot rolling tests. The others additives, like viscosifier and fluid loss control agent, had their added amount systematically optimized by rheological and filtration tests. All cationic polymers and the electrolyte were able to inhibit the swelling and dispersion of clay and the results showed a synergistic increase in clay inhibition for the combination of polymer and KCl over either additive alone. The results suggested that greater polymer adsorption, implies in lower content of water in clays and better inhibition of swelling and dispersion of the clay. The polycations were compatible with the other additives in drilling fluids and the fluids formulated with these polymers were able to inhibit efficiently the dispersion and disintegration of clay and to keep the cuttings and barite in suspension. (author)

  3. Synergistic extraction of uranium from Korean black shale ore leach liquors using amine with phosphorous based extractant systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synergistic extraction of uranium using amine combined with phosphorous based extractant systems was described. The present study focused on the continuous extraction processing of uranium to form precipitation under higher pH conditions and higher aqueous phase ratios. To address this, synergistic extraction studies were carried out with P-based extractants as synergists and investigations were done with better pairs with an amine-based extractant system. Finally, all of the developed synergistic extraction methodologies were compared with each other. This showed that Alamine 336 and D2EHPA was the best pair for uranium extraction, offering as much separation as possible from other associated metals. (author)

  4. Promoting synergistic research and education in genomics and bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jack Y; Yang, Mary Qu; Zhu, Mengxia Michelle; Arabnia, Hamid R; Deng, Youping

    2008-01-01

    scientific achievements by bridging these two very important disciplines into an interactive and attractive forum. Keeping this objective in mind, Biocomp 2007 aims to promote interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary education and research. 25 high quality peer-reviewed papers were selected from 400+ submissions for this supplementary issue of BMC Genomics. Those papers contributed to a wide-range of important research fields including gene expression data analysis and applications, high-throughput genome mapping, sequence analysis, gene regulation, protein structure prediction, disease prediction by machine learning techniques, systems biology, database and biological software development. We always encourage participants submitting proposals for genomics sessions, special interest research sessions, workshops and tutorials to Professor Hamid R. Arabnia (hra@cs.uga.edu) in order to ensure that Biocomp continuously plays the leadership role in promoting inter/multidisciplinary research and education in the fields. Biocomp received top conference ranking with a high score of 0.95/1.00. Biocomp is academically co-sponsored by the International Society of Intelligent Biological Medicine and the Research Laboratories and Centers of Harvard University--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Indiana University--Purdue University, Georgia Tech--Emory University, UIUC, UCLA, Columbia University, University of Texas at Austin and University of Iowa etc. Biocomp--Worldcomp brings leading scientists together across the nation and all over the world and aims to promote synergistic components such as keynote lectures, special interest sessions, workshops and tutorials in response to the advances of cutting-edge research.

  5. Pharmacology of the human cell voltage-dependent cation channel. Part II: inactivation and blocking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennekou, Poul; Barksmann, Trine L.; Kristensen, Berit I.;

    2004-01-01

    Human red cells; Nonselective voltage-dependent cation channel; NSVDC channel; Thiol group reagents......Human red cells; Nonselective voltage-dependent cation channel; NSVDC channel; Thiol group reagents...

  6. Locked-in syndrome caused by the pressure exerted by the sound gun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Belin Ozer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 19-year-old male patient who wounded himself with a gun in the cranial region had a Glasgow coma scale of 3E. At posttraumatic day 7, locked-in syndrome was considered upon detection of vertical eye movements, meaningful winks, and quadriplegia. Apart from the classical view, computed tomography (CT and postmortem examination of the brain showed an infarct area in the cerebellum. However, vertebrobasilar artery system was normal. In this case report, we would like to present that unlike cases with ischemia, specific CT findings may not be evident in posttraumatic cases and ischemia may occur in the cerebellum as a result of the pressure exerted by a sound gun.

  7. Effects of Perceived Fitness Level of Exercise Partner on Intensity of Exertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G.   Plante

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Social comparison theory was used to examine if exercising with a research confederate posing as either high fit or low fit would increase the exertion in exercising. Approach: 91 college students were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: Biking alone, biking with a high fit confederate, or biking with a low fit confederate. All participants were instructed to complete 20 min of exercise at 60-70% of their maximum target heart rate. Results: Results indicated that participants in the high fit condition exercised harder than those in the low fit condition. However, no mood differences emerged between conditions. Conclusion: Social comparison theory predicts exercise outcome such that participants gravitate towards the behavior (high fit or low fit of those around them.

  8. Endogenous IFN-β signaling exerts anti-inflammatory actions in experimentally induced focal cerebral ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inácio, Ana R; Liu, Yawei; Clausen, Bettina H;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interferon (IFN)-β exerts anti-inflammatory effects, coupled to remarkable neurological improvements in multiple sclerosis, a neuroinflammatory condition of the central nervous system. Analogously, it has been hypothesized that IFN-β, by limiting inflammation, decreases neuronal death...... strength tests, and cerebral infarct volumes were given by lack of neuronal nuclei immunoreactivity. RESULTS: Here, we report alterations in local and systemic inflammation in IFN-β knockout (IFN-βKO) mice over 8 days after induction of focal cerebral ischemia. Notably, IFN-βKO mice showed a higher number...... endogenous IFN-β signaling did not affect the infarct volume. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that endogenous IFN-β signaling attenuates local inflammation, regulates peripheral immune cells, and, thereby, may contribute positively to stroke outcome....

  9. Acute Hepatic Failure as a Leading Manifestation in Exertional Heat Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Jin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acute hepatic failure (AHF is uncommon as a leading symptom in patients with exertional heat stroke (EHS. Which stage to perform the liver transplantation for severe hepatic failure in EHS is still obscure at clinical setting. The conservative management has been reported to be successful in treating heat-stroke-associated AHF even in the presence of accepted criteria for emergency liver transplantation. Case Presentation. Here, we reported a 35-year-old male who presented with very high transaminases, hyperbilirubinemia, significant prolongation of the prothrombin time, and coma. No other causes for AHF could be identified but physical exhaustion and hyperthermia. Although the current patient fulfilled London criteria for emergency liver transplantation, he spontaneously recovered under conservative treatment including intravenous fluids, cooling, diuretics as mannitol, and hepatocyte growth-promoting factors. Conclusions. Meticulous supportive management could be justified in some selected cases of AHF due to EHS.

  10. Fgf8-Related Secondary Organizers Exert Different Polarizing Planar Instructions along the Mouse Anterior Neural Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Enriquez, Ivan; Partanen, Juha; Martinez, Salvador; Echevarria, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Early brain patterning depends on proper arrangement of positional information. This information is given by gradients of secreted signaling molecules (morphogens) detected by individual cells within the responding tissue, leading to specific fate decisions. Here we report that the morphogen FGF8 exerts initially a differential signal activity along the E9.5 mouse neural tube. We demonstrate that this polarizing activity codes by RAS-regulated ERK1/2 signaling and depends on the topographical location of the secondary organizers: the isthmic organizer (IsO) and the anterior neural ridge (anr) but not on zona limitans intrathalamica (zli). Our results suggest that Sprouty2, a negative modulator of RAS/ERK pathway, is important for regulating Fgf8 morphogenetic signal activity by controlling Fgf8-induced signaling pathways and positional information during early brain development. PMID:22792203

  11. Fgf8-related secondary organizers exert different polarizing planar instructions along the mouse anterior neural tube.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Crespo-Enriquez

    Full Text Available Early brain patterning depends on proper arrangement of positional information. This information is given by gradients of secreted signaling molecules (morphogens detected by individual cells within the responding tissue, leading to specific fate decisions. Here we report that the morphogen FGF8 exerts initially a differential signal activity along the E9.5 mouse neural tube. We demonstrate that this polarizing activity codes by RAS-regulated ERK1/2 signaling and depends on the topographical location of the secondary organizers: the isthmic organizer (IsO and the anterior neural ridge (anr but not on zona limitans intrathalamica (zli. Our results suggest that Sprouty2, a negative modulator of RAS/ERK pathway, is important for regulating Fgf8 morphogenetic signal activity by controlling Fgf8-induced signaling pathways and positional information during early brain development.

  12. Recording forces exerted on the bowel wall during colonoscopy: in vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogramadzi, S; Virk, G S; Bell, G D; Rowland, R S; Hancock, J

    2005-12-01

    A novel system for distributed force measurement between the bowel wall and the shaft of a colonoscope is presented. The system, based on the piezoresistive method, involves the integration of soft miniature transducers to a colonoscope to enable a wide range of forces to be sensed. The attached sensing sheath does not restrict the propulsion of the colonoscope nor notably alter its flexibility. The addition of the sensor sheath increases the colonoscope diameter by 15-20% depending on the type of the colonoscope (adult or paediatric). The transducer's accuracy is +/-20 grammes if it is not subjected to extensive static forces. Under large static force conditions the errors may increase to +/-50 grammes. The tactile force measuring sensors have provided preliminary results from experiments on a model of the large bowel. The force measurements confirm the predictions on the location and magnitude of the forces and that most of the forces are exerted whilst the instrument is looping. PMID:17518409

  13. A 29-Year-Old Man With Nonproductive Cough, Exertional Dyspnea, and Chest Discomfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpenny, Darragh; Suh, James; Garofano, Suzette; Alpert, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    A 29-year-old man presented with a 5-month history of worsening dry cough, exertional dyspnea, chest tightness, and palpitations. He had been treated by his primary care physician with trials of guaifenesin/codeine, azithromycin, albuterol, and omeprazole without improvement. He denied wheezing, fever, sweats, anorexia, joint pain, swelling, or rash. He had no past medical history. He denied a history of tobacco smoking or IV drug use. He kept no pets, worked as a manager in an office environment, and had no history of occupational inhalational exposure. He reported using aerosolized insect spray to eradicate bed bugs in his house shortly before the cough began but did not report any acute symptoms when using the spray. PMID:26324141

  14. Recording forces exerted on the bowel wall during colonoscopy: in vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogramadzi, S; Virk, G S; Bell, G D; Rowland, R S; Hancock, J

    2005-12-01

    A novel system for distributed force measurement between the bowel wall and the shaft of a colonoscope is presented. The system, based on the piezoresistive method, involves the integration of soft miniature transducers to a colonoscope to enable a wide range of forces to be sensed. The attached sensing sheath does not restrict the propulsion of the colonoscope nor notably alter its flexibility. The addition of the sensor sheath increases the colonoscope diameter by 15-20% depending on the type of the colonoscope (adult or paediatric). The transducer's accuracy is +/-20 grammes if it is not subjected to extensive static forces. Under large static force conditions the errors may increase to +/-50 grammes. The tactile force measuring sensors have provided preliminary results from experiments on a model of the large bowel. The force measurements confirm the predictions on the location and magnitude of the forces and that most of the forces are exerted whilst the instrument is looping.

  15. Coenzyme Q10 Administration Increases Brain Mitochondrial Concentrations and Exerts Neuroprotective Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Russell T.; Yang, Lichuan; Browne, Susan; Baik, Myong; Flint Beal, M.

    1998-07-01

    Coenzyme Q10 is an essential cofactor of the electron transport chain as well as a potent free radical scavenger in lipid and mitochondrial membranes. Feeding with coenzyme Q10 increased cerebral cortex concentrations in 12- and 24-month-old rats. In 12-month-old rats administration of coenzyme Q10 resulted in significant increases in cerebral cortex mitochondrial concentrations of coenzyme Q10. Oral administration of coenzyme Q10 markedly attenuated striatal lesions produced by systemic administration of 3-nitropropionic acid and significantly increased life span in a transgenic mouse model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. These results show that oral administration of coenzyme Q10 increases both brain and brain mitochondrial concentrations. They provide further evidence that coenzyme Q10 can exert neuroprotective effects that might be useful in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Thrombomodulin exerts cytoprotective effect on low-dose UVB-irradiated HaCaT cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is an endothelial cell surface anticoagulant glycoprotein that performs antimetastatic, angiogenic, adhesive, and anti-inflammatory functions in various tissues. It is also expressed in epidermal keratinocytes. We found that a physiological dose (10 mJ/cm2) of mid-wavelength ultraviolet irradiation (UVB) significantly induced TM expression via the p38mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/cyclic AMP response element (CRE) signaling pathway in the epidermal keratinocyte cell line HaCaT; this shows that TM regulates the survival of HaCaT cells. SB203580, a p38MAPK inhibitor, significantly decreased TM expression and the viability of cells exposed to UVB. Furthermore, overexpression of TM markedly increased cell viability, and it was abrogated by TM small interfering RNA (siRNA), suggesting that TM may play an important role in exerting cytoprotective effect on epidermal keratinocytes against low-dose UVB.

  17. Effect of resistance exercise performed to volitional failure on ratings of perceived exertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Ligia M; McBride, Jeffrey M; Paul, Judith A; Alley, Jessica R; Carson, Lauren T; Goodman, Courtney L

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the effect of resistance exercise performed to volitional failure on ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) using power as an indication of fatigue. 12 male participants (M age = 21.9 yr., SD = 1.3) performed one set of back squats at three different intensities (50%, 70%, and 90% of one repetition maximum) for both a pre-determined number of repetitions (3) and to volitional failure. RPE was significantly different between sets at 50%, 70%, and 90% when performed to a pre-determined number of repetitions, but not during volitional failure. A decrease in power between the first and the last repetitions in the volitional failure sets suggests that fatigue may confound the relationship between RPE and intensity. PMID:24665804

  18. Exertional myopathy in a grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) captured by leghold snare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattet, Marc; Stenhouse, Gordon; Bollinger, Trent

    2008-10-01

    We diagnosed exertional myopathy (EM) in a grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) that died approximately 10 days after capture by leghold snare in west-central Alberta, Canada, in June 2003. The diagnosis was based on history, post-capture movement data, gross necropsy, histopathology, and serum enzyme levels. We were unable to determine whether EM was the primary cause of death because autolysis precluded accurate evaluation of all tissues. Nevertheless, comparison of serum aspartate aminotransferase and creatine kinase concentrations and survival between the affected bear and other grizzly bears captured by leghold snare in the same research project suggests EM also occurred in other bears, but that it is not generally a cause of mortality. We propose, however, occurrence of nonfatal EM in grizzly bears after capture by leghold snare has potential implications for use of this capture method, including negative effects on wildlife welfare and research data.

  19. 'Too much of a coincidence': identical twins with exertional heatstroke in the same race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R; Jones, N; Martin, D; Kipps, C

    2016-01-01

    This report discusses a unique case of monozygotic male twins who both collapsed with exertional heat stroke (EHS) during the same marathon in relatively cool conditions. The twins were official race pacers in a popular city marathon held in the early spring in the UK. Both recovered uneventfully due to the prompt recognition of EHS and use of aggressive cooling measures, which prevented life-threatening complications. The case illustrates that EHS is a complex illness with a possible genetic predisposition, which can occur among runners even in cooler conditions. This link is explored together with the influence of their role as race pacers and the additional backpack worn in the development of EHS. PMID:26851253

  20. Star-like superalkali cations featuring planar pentacoordinate carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jin-Chang; Tian, Wen-Juan; Wang, Ying-Jin; Zhao, Xue-Feng; Wu, Yan-Bo; Zhai, Hua-Jin; Li, Si-Dian

    2016-06-28

    Superalkali cations, known to possess low vertical electron affinities (VEAs), high vertical detachment energies, and large highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy gaps, are intriguing chemical species. Thermodynamically, such species need to be the global minima in order to serve as the promising targets for experimental realization. In this work, we propose the strategies of polyhalogenation and polyalkalination for designing the superalkali cations. By applying these strategies, the local-minimum planar pentacoordinate carbon (ppC) cluster CBe5 can be modified to form a series of star-like superalkali ppC or quasi-ppC CBe5X5 (+) (X = F, Cl, Br, Li, Na, K) cations containing a CBe5 moiety. Polyhalogenation and polyalkalination on the CBe5 unit may help eliminate the high reactivity of bare CBe5 molecule by covering the reactive Be atoms with noble halogen anions and alkali cations. Computational exploration of the potential energy surfaces reveals that the star-like ppC or quasi-ppC CBe5X5 (+) (X = F, Cl, Br, Li, Na, K) clusters are the true global minima of the systems. The predicted VEAs for CBe5X5 (+) range from 3.01 to 3.71 eV for X = F, Cl, Br and 2.12-2.51 eV for X = Li, Na, K, being below the lower bound of the atomic ionization potential of 3.89 eV in the periodic table. Large HOMO-LUMO energy gaps are also revealed for the species: 10.76-11.07 eV for X = F, Cl, Br and 4.99-6.91 eV for X = Li, Na, K. These designer clusters represent the first series of superalkali cations with a ppC center. Bonding analyses show five Be-X-Be three-center two-electron (3c-2e) σ bonds for the peripheral bonding, whereas the central C atom is associated with one 6c-2e π bond and three 6c-2e σ bonds, rendering (π and σ) double aromaticity. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the CBe5 motif is robust in the clusters. As planar hypercoordination carbon species are often thermodynamically

  1. Star-like superalkali cations featuring planar pentacoordinate carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jin-Chang; Tian, Wen-Juan; Wang, Ying-Jin; Zhao, Xue-Feng; Wu, Yan-Bo; Zhai, Hua-Jin; Li, Si-Dian

    2016-06-01

    Superalkali cations, known to possess low vertical electron affinities (VEAs), high vertical detachment energies, and large highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy gaps, are intriguing chemical species. Thermodynamically, such species need to be the global minima in order to serve as the promising targets for experimental realization. In this work, we propose the strategies of polyhalogenation and polyalkalination for designing the superalkali cations. By applying these strategies, the local-minimum planar pentacoordinate carbon (ppC) cluster CBe5 can be modified to form a series of star-like superalkali ppC or quasi-ppC CBe5X5+ (X = F, Cl, Br, Li, Na, K) cations containing a CBe5 moiety. Polyhalogenation and polyalkalination on the CBe5 unit may help eliminate the high reactivity of bare CBe5 molecule by covering the reactive Be atoms with noble halogen anions and alkali cations. Computational exploration of the potential energy surfaces reveals that the star-like ppC or quasi-ppC CBe5X5+ (X = F, Cl, Br, Li, Na, K) clusters are the true global minima of the systems. The predicted VEAs for CBe5X5+ range from 3.01 to 3.71 eV for X = F, Cl, Br and 2.12-2.51 eV for X = Li, Na, K, being below the lower bound of the atomic ionization potential of 3.89 eV in the periodic table. Large HOMO-LUMO energy gaps are also revealed for the species: 10.76-11.07 eV for X = F, Cl, Br and 4.99-6.91 eV for X = Li, Na, K. These designer clusters represent the first series of superalkali cations with a ppC center. Bonding analyses show five Be-X-Be three-center two-electron (3c-2e) σ bonds for the peripheral bonding, whereas the central C atom is associated with one 6c-2e π bond and three 6c-2e σ bonds, rendering (π and σ) double aromaticity. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the CBe5 motif is robust in the clusters. As planar hypercoordination carbon species are often thermodynamically unstable and

  2. Social variables exert selective pressures in the evolution and form of primate mimetic musculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Anne M; Li, Ly; Waller, Bridget M; Micheletta, Jerome

    2016-04-01

    Mammals use their faces in social interactions more so than any other vertebrates. Primates are an extreme among most mammals in their complex, direct, lifelong social interactions and their frequent use of facial displays is a means of proximate visual communication with conspecifics. The available repertoire of facial displays is primarily controlled by mimetic musculature, the muscles that move the face. The form of these muscles is, in turn, limited by and influenced by phylogenetic inertia but here we use examples, both morphological and physiological, to illustrate the influence that social variables may exert on the evolution and form of mimetic musculature among primates. Ecomorphology is concerned with the adaptive responses of morphology to various ecological variables such as diet, foliage density, predation pressures, and time of day activity. We present evidence that social variables also exert selective pressures on morphology, specifically using mimetic muscles among primates as an example. Social variables include group size, dominance 'style', and mating systems. We present two case studies to illustrate the potential influence of social behavior on adaptive morphology of mimetic musculature in primates: (1) gross morphology of the mimetic muscles around the external ear in closely related species of macaque (Macaca mulatta and Macaca nigra) characterized by varying dominance styles and (2) comparative physiology of the orbicularis oris muscle among select ape species. This muscle is used in both facial displays/expressions and in vocalizations/human speech. We present qualitative observations of myosin fiber-type distribution in this muscle of siamang (Symphalangus syndactylus), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), and human to demonstrate the potential influence of visual and auditory communication on muscle physiology. In sum, ecomorphologists should be aware of social selective pressures as well as ecological ones, and that observed morphology might

  3. The effects of physical exertion on decision-making performance of Australian football umpires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Kasey; Larkin, Paul; O'Connor, Donna

    2016-08-01

    Decision-making is a key component of an umpire's in-game performance, with each decision potentially having a direct impact on the result of the game. Additionally, umpires have to be physically fit to ensure they keep up with the gameplay. While research has identified the decision-making demands and running demands of umpires separately, few have explored the relationship between them. The aim of this investigation was to examine the relationship between physical exertion and decision-making performance of Australian football umpires at the sub-elite and junior levels. A total of 18 Australian football umpires (sub-elite, n = 10; junior n = 8) performed 10 × 300 m runs, with each repetition immediately followed by a video-based decision-making test, then 1 min of recovery. A Mann-Whitney U assessment indicated a significant difference between the sub-elite and junior level umpires for decision-making accuracy (U = 13.00, z = -2.43, P = 0.016, r = -0.5). However, there was no significant difference in response time (U = 28.00, z = -1.07, P = 0.315, r = -0.25). The sub-elite umpires completed the running efforts in significantly less time than the junior umpires (P running times for either skill level (P > 0.05). This suggests decision-making performance may not be affected by physical exertion. Therefore, it may be suggested coaches of football umpires allocate more time to the decision-making development of their umpires instead of focusing largely on the physical fitness side, as is currently the trend. PMID:26654891

  4. Reliability and Validity of the OMNI-Vibration Exercise Scale of Perceived Exertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Pedro J.; Santos-Lozano, Alejandro; Santin-Medeiros, Fernanda; Robertson, Robert J.; Garatachea, Nuria

    2012-01-01

    This study examined reliability and concurrent validity of the newly developed OMNI-vibration exercise scale (OMNI-VIBRO) to measure Ratings of Perceived Exertion (RPE) during vibration exercise in twenty recreationally active students (12 males and 8 females). The criterion variables were muscle activity of the Vastus Medialis (VM), Vastus Lateralis (VL), Biceps Femoris (BF), and Medial Gastrocnemius (MG) muscles, as well as accelerations (12.5, 20.2, 30.9, 36.3, 60.1, and 88.4 m·s-2). RPE was registered during the final of each 30 s condition. Each participant attended two laboratory testing sessions. Positive linear regression coefficients (p < 0.001) were found between RPE (OMNI-VIBRO) and acceleration (r = 0.976) and muscle activity of lower-body muscles (r = 0.942). Between session (test-retest), reliability of RPE (OMNI-VIBRO) was good (ICC: 0.790. 95% CI: 0.699-0.854). Conclusions: findings provided concurrent validation of the OMNI-VIBRO to measure RPE for the active muscle and overall body in recreationally active students performing lower-body vibration exercise. Key pointsThe pictorial-verbal category scale of perception of exertion (OMNI-VIBRO) during lower body vibration exercise on a vibration platform showed good concurrent validity.The OMNI-VIBRO method in conjunction with WBV exercise would allow coaches, fitness professionals, or health-care personnel to assess the intensity that corresponds to the level of the vibratory stimulus.The OMNI-VIBRO could be a useful tool of measuring the different intensities of a vibratory-training session and altering the vibratory stimulus in a periodized fashion. PMID:24149351

  5. Different selective effects on rhizosphere bacteria exerted by genetically modified versus conventional potato lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Cavalcante Franco Dias

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In this study, we assessed the actively metabolizing bacteria in the rhizosphere of potato using two potato cultivars, i.e. the genetically-modified (GM cultivar Modena (having tubers with altered starch content and the near-isogenic non-GM cultivar Karnico. To achieve our aims, we pulse-labelled plants at EC90 stage with (13C-CO2 and analysed their rhizosphere microbial communities 24 h, 5 and 12 days following the pulse. In the analyses, phospholipid fatty acid/stable isotope probing (PLFA-SIP as well as RNA-SIP followed by reverse transcription and PCR-DGGE and clone library analysis, were used to determine the bacterial groups that actively respond to the root-released (13C labelled carbonaceous compounds. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The PLFA-SIP data revealed major roles of bacteria in the uptake of root-released (13C carbon, which grossly increased with time. Gram-negative bacteria, including members of the genera Pseudomonas and Burkholderia, were strong accumulators of the (13C-labeled compounds at the two cultivars, whereas Gram-positive bacteria were lesser responders. PCR-DGGE analysis of cDNA produced from the two cultivar types showed that these had selected different bacterial, alpha- and betaproteobacterial communities at all time points. Moreover, an effect of time was observed, indicating dynamism in the structure of the active bacterial communities. PCR-DGGE as well as clone library analyses revealed that the main bacterial responders at cultivar Karnico were taxonomically affiliated with the genus Pseudomonas, next to Gluconacetobacter and Paracoccus. Cultivar Modena mainly attracted Burkholderia, next to Moraxella-like (Moraxellaceae family and Sphingomonas types. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on the use of Pseudomonas and Burkholderia as proxies for differentially-selected bacterial genera, we conclude that the selective forces exerted by potato cultivar Modena on the active bacterial populations differed

  6. ASSESSMENT OF SUBJECTIVE PERCEIVED EXERTION AT THE ANAEROBIC THRESHOLD WITH THE BORG CR-10 SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio R. Zamunér

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anaerobic threshold (AT with a graphic visual method for estimating the intensity of ventilatory and metabolic exertion and to determine the ratings of perceived exertion (RPE on the Borg CR-10 scale during a continuous ramp type exercise test (CT-R. Forty healthy, physically active and sedentary young women (age 23.1 ± 3.52 years were divided into two groups according to their fitness level: active group (AG and sedentary group (SG and were submitted to a CT-R on a cycloergometer with 20 to 25 W/min increments. Shortly before the end of each one-minute period, the subjects were asked to rate dyspnea (RPE-D and leg fatigue (RPE-L on the Borg CR-10 scale. After the AT was determined with the graphic visual method, the score that the volunteers gave on the Borg CR10 scale was verified. Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney and Spearman correlation tests with the significance level set at 5%. The mean ratings of RPE-L and RPE-D at the AT level were not significantly different between groups (p > 0.05. Significant correlations were found between VO2, heart rate (HR, power output and RPE for both groups. The muscular and respiratory RPE, according to the Borg CR-10 scale, were correlated with the AT, suggesting that scores close to 5, which correspond to a "strong" perception, may be used as parameters for quantifying aerobic exercise intensity for active and sedentary individuals. The similar perception of exercise intensity, which corresponded to the AT of different individuals, makes it possible to prescribe exercise at an intensity equivalent to the AT by means of the RPE.

  7. The effects of physical exertion on decision-making performance of Australian football umpires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Kasey; Larkin, Paul; O'Connor, Donna

    2016-08-01

    Decision-making is a key component of an umpire's in-game performance, with each decision potentially having a direct impact on the result of the game. Additionally, umpires have to be physically fit to ensure they keep up with the gameplay. While research has identified the decision-making demands and running demands of umpires separately, few have explored the relationship between them. The aim of this investigation was to examine the relationship between physical exertion and decision-making performance of Australian football umpires at the sub-elite and junior levels. A total of 18 Australian football umpires (sub-elite, n = 10; junior n = 8) performed 10 × 300 m runs, with each repetition immediately followed by a video-based decision-making test, then 1 min of recovery. A Mann-Whitney U assessment indicated a significant difference between the sub-elite and junior level umpires for decision-making accuracy (U = 13.00, z = -2.43, P = 0.016, r = -0.5). However, there was no significant difference in response time (U = 28.00, z = -1.07, P = 0.315, r = -0.25). The sub-elite umpires completed the running efforts in significantly less time than the junior umpires (P decision-making performance and running times for either skill level (P > 0.05). This suggests decision-making performance may not be affected by physical exertion. Therefore, it may be suggested coaches of football umpires allocate more time to the decision-making development of their umpires instead of focusing largely on the physical fitness side, as is currently the trend.

  8. Stress management skills, cortisol awakening response, and post-exertional malaise in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Daniel L; Lattie, Emily G; Antoni, Michael H; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Czaja, Sara; Perdomo, Dolores; Klimas, Nancy G

    2014-11-01

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is characterized in part by debilitating fatigue typically exacerbated by cognitive and/or physical exertion, referred to as post-exertional malaise (PEM). In a variety of populations, the cortisol awakening response (CAR) has stood out as a marker of endocrine dysregulation relevant to the experience of fatigue, and may therefore be particularly relevant in CFS. This is the first study to examine PEM and the CAR in a sample of individuals with CFS. The CAR has also been established as a stress-sensitive measure of HPA axis functioning. It follows that better management of stress could modulate the CAR, and in turn PEM. In this cross-sectional study, we hypothesized that greater Perceived Stress Management Skills (PSMS) would relate to lower reports of PEM, via the impact of PSMS on the CAR. A total of 117 adults (72% female) with a CFS diagnosis completed self-report measures of PSMS and PEM symptomatology and a two-day protocol of saliva collection. Cortisol values from awakening and 30 min post-awakening were used to compute the CAR. Regression analyses revealed that greater PSMS related to greater CAR and greater CAR related to less PEM severity. Bootstrapped analyses revealed an indirect effect of PSMS on PEM via the CAR, such that greater PSMS related to less PEM, via a greater CAR. Future research should examine these trends longitudinally and whether interventions directed at improving stress management skills are accompanied by improved cortisol regulation and less PEM in individuals with CFS. PMID:25049069

  9. Camphene, a Plant Derived Monoterpene, Exerts Its Hypolipidemic Action by Affecting SREBP-1 and MTP Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioanna Vallianou

    Full Text Available The control of hyperlipidemia plays a central role in cardiovascular disease. Previously, we have shown that camphene, a constituent of mastic gum oil, lowers cholesterol and triglycerides (TG in the plasma of hyperlipidemic rats without affecting HMG-CoA reductase activity, suggesting that its hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic effects are associated with a mechanism of action different than that of statins. In the present study, we examine the mechanism by which camphene exerts its hypolipidemic action. We evaluated the effect of camphene on the de novo synthesis of cholesterol and TG from [14C]-acetate in HepG2 cells, along with the statin mevinolin. Camphene inhibited the biosynthesis of cholesterol in a concentration-dependent manner, and a maximal inhibition of 39% was observed at 100 μM while mevinolin nearly abolished cholesterol biosynthesis. Moreover, treatment with camphene reduced TG by 34% and increased apolipoprotein AI expression. In contrast, mevinolin increased TG by 26% and had a modest effect on apolipoprotein AI expression. To evaluate the mode of action of camphene, we examined its effects on the expression of SREBP-1, which affects TG biosynthesis and SREBP-2, which mostly affects sterol synthesis. Interestingly, camphene increased the nuclear translocation of the mature form of SREBP-1 while mevinolin was found to increase the amount of the mature form of SREBP-2. The effect of camphene is most likely regulated through SREBP-1 by affecting MTP levels in response to a decrease in the intracellular cholesterol. We propose that camphene upregulates SREBP-1 expression and MTP inhibition is likely to be a probable mechanism whereby camphene exerts its hypolipidemic effect.

  10. Fluoxetine exerts age-dependent effects on behavior and amygdala neuroplasticity in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith R Homberg

    Full Text Available The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI Prozac® (fluoxetine is the only registered antidepressant to treat depression in children and adolescents. Yet, while the safety of SSRIs has been well established in adults, serotonin exerts neurotrophic actions in the developing brain and thereby may have harmful effects in adolescents. Here we treated adolescent and adult rats chronically with fluoxetine (12 mg/kg at postnatal day (PND 25 to 46 and from PND 67 to 88, respectively, and tested the animals 7-14 days after the last injection when (norfluoxetine in blood plasma had been washed out, as determined by HPLC. Plasma (norfluoxetine levels were also measured 5 hrs after the last fluoxetine injection, and matched clinical levels. Adolescent rats displayed increased behavioral despair in the forced swim test, which was not seen in adult fluoxetine treated rats. In addition, beneficial effects of fluoxetine on wakefulness as measured by electroencephalography in adults was not seen in adolescent rats, and age-dependent effects on the acoustic startle response and prepulse inhibition were observed. On the other hand, adolescent rats showed resilience to the anorexic effects of fluoxetine. Exploratory behavior in the open field test was not affected by fluoxetine treatment, but anxiety levels in the elevated plus maze test were increased in both adolescent and adult fluoxetine treated rats. Finally, in the amygdala, but not the dorsal raphe nucleus and medial prefrontal cortex, the number of PSA-NCAM (marker for synaptic remodeling immunoreactive neurons was increased in adolescent rats, and decreased in adult rats, as a consequence of chronic fluoxetine treatment. No fluoxetine-induced changes in 5-HT(1A receptor immunoreactivity were observed. In conclusion, we show that fluoxetine exerts both harmful and beneficial age-dependent effects on depressive behavior, body weight and wakefulness, which may relate, in part, to differential

  11. Synergistic antibacterial activity of Salvia officinalis and Cichorium intybus extracts and antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanović, Olgica D; Stanojević, Dragana D; Comić, Ljiljana R

    2012-01-01

    Synergistic activity of Salvia officinalis and Cichorium intybus extracts and commonly used antibiotics, amoxicillin and chloramphenicol, were evaluated. Interactions between plant extracts and antibiotics were tested by checkerboard method and interpreted as FIC index. Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and clinical isolates Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis were used. Salvia officinalis showed better synergistic capacity than Cichorium intybus. Synergistic interactions were observed between amoxicillin and acetone or ethyl acetate extract of Salvia officinalis and between chloramphenicol and ethyl acetate extract of Salvia officinalis. In the presence of sub-inhibitory concentration (1/4 MIC to 1/32 MIC) of sage extracts, the MIC values of antibiotics were decreased by 2- to 10-fold. Synergism was observed against all test bacteria, except Escherichia coli. The combinations of acetone and ethyl acetate extract from Cichorium intybus and antibiotics resulted in additive and indifferent effects against tested bacteria.

  12. Mathematical description, optimization and prediction of synergistic interaction of fluoride and xylitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petin, Vladislav G; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kritsky, Roman O; Komarova, Ludmila N

    2008-06-01

    The potential ability of various physical or chemical agents to enhance their effect when they are applied simultaneously with each other is well-known. The purpose of this study was to adjust a simple mathematical model to describe, optimize and predict a synergistic interaction between fluoride and xylitol on acid production by mutans streptococci. The model suggests that the synergism is caused by the additional effective damage arising from an interaction of sublesions induced by each agent. These sublesions are considered to be ineffective when each agent is used individually. The predictions of the model were verified by comparison with experimental data published by other researchers. It was shown that the model describes the experimental data, predicts the greatest value of the synergistic effect and the condition under which it can be achieved. The synergistic effect appeared to decline with any deviation from the optimal value of the ratio of effective damages produced by each agent alone. PMID:18367232

  13. COMBINATION OF MORPHINE AND GABAPENTIN LEADS TO SYNERGISTIC EFFECTS IN A RAT MODEL OF POSTOPERATIVE PAIN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papathanasiou, Theodoros; Juul, Rasmus Vestergaard; Heegaard, Anne-Marie;

    nervous system might lead to synergistic effects, thus minimizing the necessary morphine dose and correspondingly its side effects. In a blinded, randomized, 16 arms study, the pharmacodynamic interactions of morphine and gabapentin were evaluated. In the plantar incision model in the rat, a series...... of hindpaw withdrawal thresholds, after subcutaneous administration of morphine (0, 1, 3 and 7 mg/kg), gabapentin (0, 10, 30 and 100 mg/kg) or their combination (9 combinations of the above doses) were obtained using an electronic von Frey device. Surface of synergistic interaction (SSI) analysis was used...... doses. Combination of morphine and gabapentin resulted in synergistic antihyperalgesic effects in a preclinical model of postoperative pain. This might indicate that there is a high potential for gabapentin and morphine to be used in the clinic, in order to optimize postoperative pain management...

  14. Synergistic effects of iron powder on intumescent flame retardant polypropylene system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of iron powder as a synergistic agent on the flame retardancy of intumescent flame retardant polypropylene composites (IFR-PP were studied. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and cone calorimeter (CONE were used to evaluate the synergistic effects of iron powder (Fe. The TGA data showed that Fe could enhance the thermal stability of the IFR-PP systems at high temperature and effectively increase the char residue formation. The CONE results revealed that Fe and IFR could clearly change the decomposition behavior of PP and form a char layer on the surface of the composites, consequently resulting in efficient reduction of the flammability parameters, such as heat release rate (HRR, mass loss (ML, Mass loss rate (MLR, total heat release (THR, carbon monoxide and so on. Thus, a suitable amount of Fe plays a synergistic effect in the flame retardancy of IFR composites.

  15. Synergistic effect of ionizing radiation on chemical disinfectant treatments for reduction of natural microflora on seafood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunjoo; Ha, Ji-Hyoung; Lee, Ju-Woon; Jo, Cheorun; Ha, Sang-Do

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether combined treatments would produce synergistic disinfection effects on seafood products such as mussel and squid compared with single treatments. We investigated the bactericidal effects of chlorine and ionizing radiation on the natural microflora of mussel and squid. Total aerobic bacteria initially ranged from 102 to 104 Log CFU/g. More than 100 ppm of chlorine and irradiation at 1 kGy were sufficient to reduce the total aerobic bacteria on mussel and squid to a level lower than detection limit (10 CFU/g). Synergistic effects against natural microflora were observed for all combined treatment. These results suggest that a significant synergistic benefit results from combine chlorine-ionizing radiation treatment against natural microflora on mussel and squid.

  16. GPR119 Agonist AS1269574 Activates TRPA1 Cation Channels to Stimulate GLP-1 Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepurny, Oleg G; Holz, George G; Roe, Michael W; Leech, Colin A

    2016-06-01

    GPR119 is a G protein-coupled receptor expressed on intestinal L cells that synthesize and secrete the blood glucose-lowering hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). GPR119 agonists stimulate the release of GLP-1 from L cells, and for this reason there is interest in their potential use as a new treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus. AS1269574 is one such GPR119 agonist, and it is the prototype of a series of 2,4,6 trisubstituted pyrimidines that exert positive glucoregulatory actions in mice. Here we report the unexpected finding that AS1269574 stimulates GLP-1 release from the STC-1 intestinal cell line by directly promoting Ca(2+) influx through transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) cation channels. These GPR119-independent actions of AS1269574 are inhibited by TRPA1 channel blockers (AP-18, A967079, HC030031) and are not secondary to intracellular Ca(2+) release or cAMP production. Patch clamp studies reveal that AS1269574 activates an outwardly rectifying membrane current with properties expected of TRPA1 channels. However, the TRPA1 channel-mediated action of AS1269574 to increase intracellular free calcium concentration is not replicated by GPR119 agonists (AR231453, oleoylethanolamide) unrelated in structure to AS1269574. Using human embryonic kidney-293 cells expressing recombinant rat TRPA1 channels but not GPR119, direct TRPA1 channel activating properties of AS1269574 are validated. Because we find that AS1269574 also acts in a conventional GPR119-mediated manner to stimulate proglucagon gene promoter activity in the GLUTag intestinal L cell line, new findings reported here reveal the surprising capacity of AS1269574 to act as a dual agonist at two molecular targets (GPR119/TRPA1) important to the control of L-cell function and type 2 diabetes mellitus drug discovery research. PMID:27082897

  17. The effect of insecticide synergists on the response of scabies mites to pyrethroid acaricides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cielo Pasay

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Permethrin is the active component of topical creams widely used to treat human scabies. Recent evidence has demonstrated that scabies mites are becoming increasingly tolerant to topical permethrin and oral ivermectin. An effective approach to manage pesticide resistance is the addition of synergists to counteract metabolic resistance. Synergists are also useful for laboratory investigation of resistance mechanisms through their ability to inhibit specific metabolic pathways. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine the role of metabolic degradation as a mechanism for acaricide resistance in scabies mites, PBO (piperonyl butoxide, DEF (S,S,S-tributyl phosphorotrithioate and DEM (diethyl maleate were first tested for synergistic activity with permethrin in a bioassay of mite killing. Then, to investigate the relative role of specific metabolic pathways inhibited by these synergists, enzyme assays were developed to measure esterase, glutathione S-transferase (GST and cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (cytochrome P450 activity in mite extracts. A statistically significant difference in median survival time of permethrin-resistant Sarcoptes scabiei variety canis was noted when any of the three synergists were used in combination with permethrin compared to median survival time of mites exposed to permethrin alone (p<0.0001. Incubation of mite homogenates with DEF showed inhibition of esterase activity (37%; inhibition of GST activity (73% with DEM and inhibition of cytochrome P450 monooxygenase activity (81% with PBO. A 7-fold increase in esterase activity, a 4-fold increase in GST activity and a 2-fold increase in cytochrome P450 monooxygenase activity were observed in resistant mites compared to sensitive mites. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate the potential utility of synergists in reversing resistance to pyrethroid-based acaricides and suggest a significant role of metabolic mechanisms in mediating pyrethroid resistance in

  18. The Influence of Cationization on the Dyeing Performance of Cotton Fabrics with Direct Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Shahin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of cationic modification of cotton fabrics, using cationic agent (Chromatech 9414 on direct dyeing characteristics was studied in this work. Cationization of cotton fabric at different conditions (pH, cationic agent concentration, temperature and time was investigated and the optimum conditions were determined . Nitrogen content of cotton samples pretreated with cationic agent was indicated. The results showed that increasing cationic agent concentration lead to higher nitrogen content on cotton fabric . The cationized cotton fabrics were dyed with two direct dyes (C.I. Direct Yellow 142 - C.I. Direct red 224 and the results were compared to untreated cotton fabrics. The parameters which may affect the dyeing process such as dye concn., addition of salt, time and temperature of dyeing were studied. The dyeing results illustrate that cationization improves the fabric dyeability compared to the uncationized cotton and the magnitude of increase in colour depth depends on the nitrogen content of the cationized cotton fabric .The results also refer to possibility of dyeing cationized cotton fabric with direct dyes without addition of electrolytes to give colour strength higher than that achieved on uncationized cotton using conventional dyeing method .Another important advantage of cationic treatment is in the saving of dye concn., energy ,dyeing time , rinse water and subsequently saving of waste water treatment , and finally minimizes the environmental pollution . The changes in surface morphology of fibres after cationization were identified by various methods such as wettability and scanning with the electron microscope. Different fastness properties were evaluated.

  19. Gene vectors based on DOEPC/DOPE mixed cationic liposomes : a physicochemical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz-Ubeda, Monica; Rodriguez-Pulido, Alberto; Nogales, Aurora; Llorca, Oscar; Quesada-Perez, Manuel; Martin-Molina, Alberto; Aicart, Emilio; Junquera, Elena

    2011-01-01

    A double approach, experimental and theoretical, has been followed to characterize from a physicochemical standpoint the compaction process of DNA by means of cationic colloidal aggregates. The colloidal vectors are cationic liposomes constituted by a mixture of a novel cationic lipid, 1,2-dioleoyl-

  20. Structure of heavy cation molecules: from experiment to simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Auwer, C.; Fillaux, C.; Guilbaud, P.; Guillaumont, D.; Moisy, P. [CEA Marcoule DEN/DRCP/SCPS, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Conradson, S.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Di Giandomenico, V.; Le Naour, C.; Simoni, E. [IPN Orsay, 91405 Orsay (France); Hennig, C. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, ROBL at ESRF, 38043 Grenoble (France)

    2008-07-01

    For industrial, environmental and public health purposes, actinide chemistry has been the subject of considerable efforts since the 50's. Aqueous redox chemistry, ionic selective recognition, uptake by specific biomolecules or compartments of the geosphere are some of the major fields of investigation. The physical-chemical properties of the actinide elements strongly depend on the 5f/6d electronic configuration. X-ray photons are an ideal spectroscopic tool for structure and bonding in actinide molecules. At high photon energies, actinide Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) is a structural probe of the cation coordination sphere. Furthermore, coupling EXAFS with molecular dynamics or quantum chemical calculations leads to a better description of the 'cation in its close environment', like polyhedron, disorder, solvent effects etc.. (authors)

  1. Characterisation of heavy cations from dysprosium to plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For industrial, environmental and public health purposes, actinide chemistry has been the subject of considerable efforts since the 50's. Aqueous redox chemistry, ionic selective recognition, uptake by specific biomolecules or compartments of the geosphere are some of the major fields of investigation. The physical-chemical properties of the actinide and lanthanide elements strongly depend on the frontier orbital electronic configuration. This paper is divided in two parts. In the first one, coupling XAS with molecular dynamics allows to take into account solvent and disorder effects while fitting the EXAFS data of aqueous uranyl and dysprosium cations. In the second one EXAFS structural parameters of oxo-cations from protactinium to plutonium are compared to quantum chemical calculations. (authors)

  2. Two cationic peroxidases from cell walls of Araucaria araucana seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, A; Cardemil, L

    1995-05-01

    We have previously reported the purification and partial characterization of two cationic peroxidases from the cell walls of seeds and seedlings of the South American conifer, Araucaria araucana. In this work, we have studied the amino acid composition and NH2-terminal sequences of both enzymes. We also compare the data obtained from these analyses with those reported for other plant peroxidases. The two peroxidases are similar in their amino acid compositions. Both are particularly rich in glycine, which comprises more than 30% of the amino acid residues. The content of serine is also high, ca 17%. The two enzymes are different in their content of arginine, alanine, valine, phenylalanine and threonine. Both peroxidases have identical NH2-terminal sequences, indicating that the two proteins are genetically related and probably are isoforms of the same kind of peroxidase. The amino acid composition and NH2-terminal sequence analyses showed marked differences from the cationic peroxidases from turnip and horseradish. PMID:7786490

  3. Cation conductivity monitoring in cycling plants. A new approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Randy C. [Swan Analytical USA, Wheeling, IL (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Due to substantial fuel costs, environmental issues, and economic impact, there has been increased pressure in recent years to reduce start-up times for all units, particularly combined cycle units. Any shortening of the time between start-up and reaching full load is of paramount importance. Cation conductivity is still the decisive measurement for the start-up of the steam turbine and the focus is now on how fast the cation conductivity results are available and how reliable they are. The time necessary to obtain correct and representative analysis values is greatly influenced by the design of the sampling and monitoring system. Employing various measures for the optimization of continuous monitoring equipment and employing optimally designed analyzers can reduce the response time of the instrumentation by more than half, thus providing significant economic rewards. The costs of the improvements are negligible compared to the benefits of reducing the time operating in bypass mode.

  4. Microstructure characterization and cation distribution of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Y.M., E-mail: ymabbas@live.com [Suez Canal University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Ismailia (Egypt); Mansour, S.A.; Ibrahim, M.H. [Suez Canal University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Ismailia (Egypt); Ali, Shehab E., E-mail: shehab_physics@yahoo.com [Suez Canal University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Ismailia (Egypt)

    2011-11-15

    Nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite has been synthesized using two different methods: ceramic and co-precipitation techniques. The nanocrystalline ferrite phase has been formed after 3 h of sintering at 1000 deg. C. The structural and microstructural evolutions of the nanophase have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction and the Rietveld method. The refinement result showed that the type of the cationic distribution over the tetrahedral and octahedral sites in the nanocrystalline lattice is partially an inverse spinel. The transmission electronic microscope analysis confirmed the X-ray results. The magnetic properties of the samples were characterized using a vibrating sample magnetometer. - Highlights: > The refinement result showed that the cationic distribution over the sites in the lattice is partially an inverse spinel. > The transmission electronic microscope analysis confirmed the X-ray results. > The magnetic properties of the samples were characterized using a vibrating sample magnetometer.

  5. Aggregation behavior of quaternary salt based cationic surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aggregation behavior of pure cationic surfactants (quaternary salts) in water has been studied by electrical conductivity (at 293.15-333.15K), surface tension, dye solubilization and viscosity measurements (at 303.15K). Critical micelle concentrations (CMCs), degree of counter ion dissociation (β), aggregation number and sphere-to-rod transition for cationic surfactants are reported. Using law of mass action model, the thermodynamic parameters, viz. Gibbs energy (ΔGm-bar ), enthalpy (ΔHm-bar ) and entropy (ΔSm-bar ) were evaluated. The plots of differential conductivity (dk/dc)T,P, versus the total surfactant concentration enables us to determine the CMC values more precisely than the conventional method. Surfactants with longer hydrocarbon chain are adapted to rodlike micelle better than to a spherical micelle. The data are explained in terms of molecular characteristics of surfactants viz. nonpolar chain length, polar head group size and counter ion

  6. Structure of ionic liquids with cationic silicon-substitutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Boning; Shirota, Hideaki; Lall-Ramnarine, Sharon; Castner, Edward W.

    2016-09-01

    Significantly lower viscosities result when a single alkyl carbon is replaced by a silicon atom on the side chain of an ionic liquid cation. To further explore this effect, we compare liquid structure factors measured using high-energy X-ray scattering and calculated using molecular dynamics simulations. Four ionic liquids are studied that each has a common anion, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ( NTf2 - ). The four cations for this series of NTf2 - -anion ionic liquids are 1-methyl-3-trimethylsilylmethylimidazolium (Si-mim+), 1-methyl-3-neopentylimidazolium (C-mim+), 1-methyl-3-pentamethyldisiloxymethylimidazolium (SiOSi-mim+), and 1-methyl-1-trimethylsilylmethylpyrrolidinium (Si-pyrr+). To achieve quantitative agreement between the structure factors measured using high-energy X-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations, new transferable parameters for silicon were calibrated and added to the existing force fields.

  7. Mobility of alkali cations in polypyrrole-dodecyl sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupila, E.L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Turku, 20500 Turku (Finland); Kankare, J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Turku, 20500 Turku (Finland)

    1995-03-01

    Due to the immobility of the large dodecyl sulfate anion, the mobile ions in polypyrrole-dodecyl sulfate are small ions from the solution. Virgin PP-dodecyl sulfate does not contain other ionic species, but already the first reduction causes the incorporation of cations into the membrane. Using in situ AC conductimetry on a double-band platinum electrode, we show that the insertion of cations from the solution into the PP membrane proceeds as a non-conducting zone advancing from the solution interface toward the substrate. The model allows to estimate ion mobilities in the membrane giving 8.6x10{sup -7}cm{sup 2}s{sup -1}V{sup -1} for K{sup +}. (orig.)

  8. Removal of both cationic and anionic contaminants by amphoteric starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Huanlong; Zhong, Songxiong; Lin, Qintie; Yao, Xiaosheng; Liang, Zhuoying; Yang, Muqun; Yin, Guangcai; Liu, Qianjun; He, Hongfei

    2016-03-15

    A novel amphoteric starch incorporating quaternary ammonium and phosphate groups was applied to investigate the efficiency and mechanism of cationic and anionic contaminant treatment. Its flocculation abilities for kaolin suspension and copper-containing wastewater were evaluated by turbidity reduction and copper removal efficiency, respectively. And the kinetics of formation, breakage and subsequent re-formation of aggregates were monitored using a Photometric Dispersion Analyzer (PDA) and characterized by flocculation index (FI). The results showed that amphoteric starch possessed the advantages of being lower-dosages-consuming and being stronger in shear resistance than cationic starch, and exhibited a good flocculation efficiency over a wide pH range from 3.0 to 11.0. PMID:26794754

  9. Sulfonated polyvinyl chloride fibers for cation-exchange microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; Lee, Hian Kee

    2009-09-18

    Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) fiber was derivatized by concentrated sulfuric acid to yield sulfonated PVC (PVC-SO3H). The PVC-SO3H fiber had dual properties as a sorbent, based on cation-exchange and hydrophobicity. In the present study, the novel fiber was used directly as an individual device for extraction purposes in the cation-exchange microextraction of anaesthetics, followed by high-performance liquid chromatography-UV analysis. The results demonstrated that this PVC-SO3H fiber-based microextraction afforded convenient operation and cost-effective application to basic analytes. The limits of detection for four anaesthetics ranged from 1.2 to 6.0 ng/mL. No carryover (because of its disposable usage), and no loss of sorbent phase (which normally occurs in stir-bar sorptive extraction) during extraction were observed.

  10. In vitro synergistic antibacterial activity of Salvia officinalis L. and some preservatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojević Dragana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the antibacterial activity of aqueous extracts of the species Salvia officinalis L. and its synergistic action with the preservatives sodium nitrite, sodium benzoate and potassium sorbate in vitro against selected food spoiling bacteria. Synergism was assessed by the checkerboard assay method and quantitatively represented by the FIC index. Synergistic action was established for aqueous extract/sodium benzoate, aqueous extract/potassium sorbate, aqueous extract/sodium nitrite combinations. Synergism was detected in relation to: Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Bacillus subtilis and Proteus sp. Synergism was established at plant extract and preservative concentrations corresponding up to 1/8 MIC values.

  11. DNA damage in human lymphocytes due to synergistic interaction between ionizing radiation and pesticide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological risks may arise from the possibility of the synergistic interaction between harmful factors such as ionizing radiation and pesticide. The effect of pesticide on radiation-induced DNA damage in human in human blood lymphocytes was evaluated by the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay. The lymphocytes, with or without pretreatment of the pesticide, were exposed to 2.0 Gy of gamma ray. Significantly increased tail moment, which was a marker of DNA strand breaks in SCGE assay, showed an excellent dose-response relationship. The present study confirms that the pesticide has the cytotoxic effect on lymphocytes and that it interacts synergistically with ionizing radiationon DNA damage, as well

  12. Synergistic convergence and split pons in horizontal gaze palsy and progressive scoliosis in two sisters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Nitin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Synergistic convergence is an ocular motor anomaly where on attempted abduction or on attempted horizontal gaze, both the eyes converge. It has been related to peripheral causes such as congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles (CFEOM, congenital cranial dysinnervation syndrome, ocular misinnervation or rarely central causes like horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis, brain stem dysplasia. We hereby report the occurrence of synergistic convergence in two sisters. Both of them also had kyphoscoliosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI brain and spine in both the patients showed signs of brain stem dysplasia (split pons sign differing in degree (younger sister had more marked changes.

  13. The synthesis and synergistic antifungal effects of chalcones against drug resistant Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Hua; Dong, Huai-Huai; Zhao, Fei; Wang, Jie; Yan, Fang; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Jin, Yong-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    To identify effective and low toxicity synergistic antifungal compounds, 24 derivatives of chalcone were synthesized to restore the effectiveness of fluconazole against fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC80) and the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) of the antifungal synergist fluconazole were measured against fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans. This was done via methods established by the clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI). Of the synthesized compounds, 2'-hydroxy-4'-methoxychalcone (8) exhibited the most potent in vitro (FICI=0.007) effects. The structure activity relationship of the compounds are then discussed. PMID:27210436

  14. Structure, spectra and dynamics of alkali cation microhydration clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, Franziska

    2005-01-01

    The main focus of this work was the theoretical investigation of alkali cation microhydration clusters with sodium, potassium, and caesium as central ion and up to 24 water molecules per cluster. Structures were obtained applying global geometry optimisation, using a specialised version of genetic algorithms and the common TIP4P/OPLS model potential. The global and most important local minimum energy structures have been investigated and the results obtained constitute a first complete and sy...

  15. Identification of bilinear systems using differential evolution algorithm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saban Ozer; Hasan Zorlu

    2011-06-01

    In this work, a novel identification method based on differential evolution algorithm has been applied to bilinear systems and its performance has been compared to that of genetic algorithm. Box–Jenkins system and different type bilinear systems have been identified using differential evolution and genetic algorithms. The simulation results have shown that bilinear systems can be successfully and efficiently identified using these algorithms.

  16. THE CHARACTERISTICS OF HIGH MOLECULAR WEIGHT CATIONIC POLYACRYLAMIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongjie Zhang; Huiren Hu; Fushan Chen

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the cationic polyacrylamide (CPAM)with high molecular weight was prepared in aqueous solution through a complex initiator system. The CPAM was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C NMR), and the charge density of the CPAM was determined by colloid titration. The results obtained indicated that the copolymerization technology used in the experiment was successful.

  17. Collectins and Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides of the Respiratory Epithelia

    OpenAIRE

    Grubor, B.; Meyerholz, D. K.; Ackermann, M R

    2006-01-01

    The respiratory epithelium is a primary site for the deposition of microorganisms that are acquired during inspiration. The innate immune system of the respiratory tract eliminates many of these potentially harmful agents preventing their colonization. Collectins and cationic antimicrobial peptides are antimicrobial components of the pulmonary innate immune system produced by respiratory epithelia, which have integral roles in host defense and inflammation in the lung. Synthesis and secretion...

  18. Natural zeolite reactivity towards ozone: The role of compensating cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Chemical and thermal treatment enhances catalytic activity of natural zeolite. ► Modified natural zeolite exhibits high stability after thermal treatment. ► Reducing the compensating cation content leads to an increase on ozone abatement. ► Surface active atomic oxygen was detected using the DRIFT technique. ► The highest reactivity toward ozone was performed by NH4Z3 zeolite sample. - Abstract: Among indoor pollutants, ozone is recognised to pose a threat to human health. Recently, low cost natural zeolites have been applied as alternative materials for ozone abatement. In this work, the effect of compensating cation content of natural zeolite on ozone removal is studied. A Chilean natural zeolite is used here as starting material. The amount of compensating cations in the zeolite framework was modified by ion exchange using an ammonium sulphate solution (0.1 mol L−1). Characterisation of natural and modified zeolites were performed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption at 77 K, elemental analysis, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), thermogravimetric analysis coupled with mass spectroscopy (TGA-MS), and temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia (NH3-TPD). Ozone adsorption and/or decomposition on natural and modified zeolites were studied by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Results show that the zeolite compensating cation content affects ozone interaction with zeolite active sites. Ammonium ion-exchange treatments followed by thermal out-gassing at 823 K, reduces ozone diffusion resistance inside the zeolite framework, increasing ozone abatement on zeolite surface active sites. Weak and strong Lewis acid sites of zeolite surface are identified here as the main active sites responsible of ozone removal.

  19. Natural zeolite reactivity towards ozone: The role of compensating cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes, Hector, E-mail: hvaldes@ucsc.cl [Laboratorio de Tecnologias Limpias (F. Ingenieria), Universidad Catolica de la Santisima Concepcion, Alonso de Ribera 2850, Concepcion (Chile); Alejandro, Serguei; Zaror, Claudio A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica (F. Ingenieria), Universidad de Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical and thermal treatment enhances catalytic activity of natural zeolite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modified natural zeolite exhibits high stability after thermal treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reducing the compensating cation content leads to an increase on ozone abatement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface active atomic oxygen was detected using the DRIFT technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The highest reactivity toward ozone was performed by NH4Z3 zeolite sample. - Abstract: Among indoor pollutants, ozone is recognised to pose a threat to human health. Recently, low cost natural zeolites have been applied as alternative materials for ozone abatement. In this work, the effect of compensating cation content of natural zeolite on ozone removal is studied. A Chilean natural zeolite is used here as starting material. The amount of compensating cations in the zeolite framework was modified by ion exchange using an ammonium sulphate solution (0.1 mol L{sup -1}). Characterisation of natural and modified zeolites were performed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption at 77 K, elemental analysis, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), thermogravimetric analysis coupled with mass spectroscopy (TGA-MS), and temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia (NH{sub 3}-TPD). Ozone adsorption and/or decomposition on natural and modified zeolites were studied by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Results show that the zeolite compensating cation content affects ozone interaction with zeolite active sites. Ammonium ion-exchange treatments followed by thermal out-gassing at 823 K, reduces ozone diffusion resistance inside the zeolite framework, increasing ozone abatement on zeolite surface active sites. Weak and strong Lewis acid sites of zeolite surface are identified here as the main active sites responsible of ozone removal.

  20. Proton and sodium cation affinities of harpagide: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colas, Cyril; Bouchonnet, Stéphane; Rogalewicz-Gilard, Françoise; Popot, Marie-Agnès; Ohanessian, Gilles

    2006-06-15

    The aim of this work was to estimate the proton and sodium cation affinities of harpagide (Har), an iridoid glycoside responsible for the antiinflammatory properties of the medicinal plant Harpagophytum. Monte Carlo conformational searches were performed at the semiempirical AM1 level to determine the most stable conformers for harpagide and its protonated and Na+-cationized forms. The 10 oxygen atoms of the molecule were considered as possible protonation and cationization sites. Geometry optimizations were then refined at the DFT B3LYP/6-31G level from the geometries of the most stable conformers found. Final energetics were obtained at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p)//B3LYP/6-31G level. The proton and sodium ion affinities of harpagide have been estimated at 223.5 and 66.0 kcal/mol, respectively. Since harpagide mainly provides HarNa+ ions in electrospray experiments, the DeltarG298 associated with the reaction of proton/sodium exchange between Har and methanol, MeOHNa+ + HarH+ --> MeOH2+ + HarNa+ (1), has been calculated; it has been estimated to be 1.9 kcal/mol. Complexing a methanol molecule to each reagent and product of reaction 1 makes the reaction become exothermic by 1.7 kcal/mol. These values are in the limit of the accuracy of the method and do not allow us to conclude definitely whether the reaction is endo- or exothermic, but, according to these very small values, the cation exchange reaction is expected to proceed easily in the final stages of the ion desolvation process. PMID:16759142