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Sample records for cationic lipid-based transduction

  1. Drug loading to lipid-based cationic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcanti, Leide P. [ESRF, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, B.P. 220, F-38043 Grenoble CDX 09 (France)]. E-mail: cavalcanti@esrf.fr; Konovalov, Oleg [ESRF, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, B.P. 220, F-38043 Grenoble CDX 09 (France); Torriani, Iris L. [UNICAMP/LNLS (Brazil); Haas, Heinrich [Munich Biotech AG, Neuried (Germany)

    2005-08-15

    Lipid-based cationic nanoparticles are a new promising option for tumor therapy, because they display enhanced binding and uptake at the neo-angiogenic endothelial cells, which a tumor needs for its nutrition and growth. By loading suitable cytotoxic compounds to the cationic carrier, the tumor endothelial and consequently also the tumor itself can be destroyed. For the development of such novel anti-tumor agents, the control of drug loading and drug release from the carrier matrix is essential. We have studied the incorporation of the hydrophobic anti-cancer agent Paclitaxel (PXL) into a variety of lipid matrices by X-Ray reflectivity measurements. Liposome suspensions from cationic and zwitterionic lipids, comprising different molar fractions of Paclitaxel, were deposited on planar glass substrates. After drying at controlled humidity, well ordered, oriented multilayer stacks were obtained, as proven by the presence of bilayer Bragg peaks to several orders in the reflectivity curves. The presence of the drug induced a decrease of the lipid bilayer spacing, and with an excess of drug, also Bragg peaks of drug crystals could be observed. From the results, insight into the solubility of Paclitaxel in the model membranes was obtained and a structural model of the organization of the drug in the membrane was derived. Results from subsequent pressure/area-isotherm and grazing incidence diffraction (GID) measurements performed with drug/lipid Langmuir monolayers were in accordance with these conjectures.

  2. Drug loading to lipid-based cationic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Leide P.; Konovalov, Oleg; Torriani, Iris L.; Haas, Heinrich

    2005-08-01

    Lipid-based cationic nanoparticles are a new promising option for tumor therapy, because they display enhanced binding and uptake at the neo-angiogenic endothelial cells, which a tumor needs for its nutrition and growth. By loading suitable cytotoxic compounds to the cationic carrier, the tumor endothelial and consequently also the tumor itself can be destroyed. For the development of such novel anti-tumor agents, the control of drug loading and drug release from the carrier matrix is essential. We have studied the incorporation of the hydrophobic anti-cancer agent Paclitaxel (PXL) into a variety of lipid matrices by X-Ray reflectivity measurements. Liposome suspensions from cationic and zwitterionic lipids, comprising different molar fractions of Paclitaxel, were deposited on planar glass substrates. After drying at controlled humidity, well ordered, oriented multilayer stacks were obtained, as proven by the presence of bilayer Bragg peaks to several orders in the reflectivity curves. The presence of the drug induced a decrease of the lipid bilayer spacing, and with an excess of drug, also Bragg peaks of drug crystals could be observed. From the results, insight into the solubility of Paclitaxel in the model membranes was obtained and a structural model of the organization of the drug in the membrane was derived. Results from subsequent pressure/area-isotherm and grazing incidence diffraction (GID) measurements performed with drug/lipid Langmuir monolayers were in accordance with these conjectures.

  3. Nanomedicine for cancer: lipid-based nanostructures for drug delivery and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namiki, Yoshihisa; Fuchigami, Teruaki; Tada, Norio; Kawamura, Ryo; Matsunuma, Satoshi; Kitamoto, Yoshitaka; Nakagawa, Masaru

    2011-10-18

    Recent advances in nanotechnology, materials science, and biotechnology have led to innovations in the field of nanomedicine. Improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer are urgently needed, and it may now be possible to achieve marked improvements in both of these areas using nanomedicine. Lipid-coated nanoparticles containing diagnostic or therapeutic agents have been developed and studied for biomedical applications and provide a nanomedicine strategy with great potential. Lipid nanoparticles have cationic headgroups on their surfaces that bind anionic nucleic acids and contain hydrophobic drugs at the lipid membrane and hydrophilic drugs inside the hollow space in the interior. Moreover, researchers can design nanoparticles to work in combination with external stimuli such as magnetic field, light, and ionizing radiation, which adds further utility in biomedical applications. In this Account, we review several examples of lipid-based nanoparticles and describe their potential for cancer treatment and diagnosis. (1) The development of a lipid-based nanoparticle that included a promoter-enhancer and transcriptional activator greatly improved gene therapy. (2) The addition of a radiosensitive promoter to lipid nanoparticles was sufficient to confer radioisotope-activated expression of the genes delivered by the nanoparticles. (3) We successfully tailored lipid nanoparticle composition to increase gene transduction in scirrhous gastric cancer cells. (4) When lipophilic photosensitizing molecules were incorporated into lipid nanoparticles, those particles showed an increased photodynamic cytotoxic effect on the target cancer. (5) Coating an Fe(3)O(4) nanocrystal with lipids proved to be an efficient strategy for magnetically guided gene-silencing in tumor tissues. (6) An Fe(16)N(2)/lipid nanocomposite displayed effective magnetism and gene delivery in cancer cells. (7) Lipid-coated magnetic hollow capsules carried aqueous anticancer drugs and delivered

  4. Impact of Lentiviral Vector-Mediated Transduction on the Tightness of a Polarized Model of Airway Epithelium and Effect of Cationic Polymer Polyethylenimine

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    Stefano Castellani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lentiviral (LV vectors are promising agents for efficient and long-lasting gene transfer into the lung and for gene therapy of genetically determined pulmonary diseases, such as cystic fibrosis, however, they have not been evaluated for cytotoxicity and impact on the tightness of the airway epithelium. In this study, we evaluated the transduction efficiency of a last-generation LV vector bearing Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP gene as well as cytotoxicity and tight junction (TJ integrity in a polarized model of airway epithelial cells. High multiplicities of infection (MOI showed to be cytotoxic, as assessed by increase in propidium iodide staining and decrease in cell viability, and harmful for the epithelial tightness, as demonstrated by the decrease of transepithelial resistance (TER and delocalization of occludin from the TJs. To increase LV efficiency at low LV:cell ratio, we employed noncovalent association with the polycation branched 25ߙkDa polyethylenimine (PEI. Transduction of cells with PEI/LV particles resulted in 2.5–3.6-fold increase of percentage of GFP-positive cells only at the highest PEI:LV ratios (1×107 PEI molecules/transducing units with 50 MOI LV as compared to plain LV. At this dose PEI/LV transduction resulted in 6.5±2.4% of propidium iodide-positive cells. On the other hand, PEI/LV particles did not determine any alteration of TER and occludin localization. We conclude that PEI may be useful for improving the efficiency of gene transfer mediated by LV vectors in airway epithelial cells, in the absence of high acute cytotoxicity and alteration in epithelial tightness.

  5. Hybrid lipid-based nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayani, Yasaman

    Biological membranes serve several important roles, such as structural support of cells and organelles, regulation of ionic and molecular transport, barriers to non-mediated transport, contact between cells within tissues, and accommodation of membrane proteins. Membrane proteins and other vital biomolecules incorporated into the membrane need a lipid membrane to function. Due to importance of lipid bilayers and their vital function in governing many processes in the cell, the development of various models as artificial lipid membranes that can mimic cell membranes has become a subject of great interest. Using different models of artificial lipid membranes, such as liposomes, planar lipid bilayers and supported or tethered lipid bilayers, we are able to study many biophysical processes in biological membranes. The ability of different molecules to interact with and change the structure of lipid membranes can be also investigated in artificial lipid membranes. An important application of lipid bilayer-containing interfaces is characterization of novel membrane proteins for high throughput drug screening studies to investigate receptor-drug interactions and develop biosensor systems. Membrane proteins need a lipid bilayer environment to preserve their stability and functionality. Fabrication of materials that can interact with biomolecules like proteins necessitates the use of lipid bilayers as a mimic of cell membranes. The objective of this research is to develop novel hybrid lipid-based nanostructures mimicking biological membranes. Toward this aim, two hybrid biocompatible structures are introduced: lipid bilayer-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and hydrogel-anchored liposomes with double-stranded DNA anchors. These structures have potential applications in biosensing, drug targeting, drug delivery, and biophysical studies of cell membranes. In the first developed nanostructure, lipid molecules are covalently attached to the surfaces of MWCNTs, and

  6. Lipid-based antifungal agents: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, S; Rex, J H

    2001-03-01

    Immunocompromised patients are well known to be predisposed to developing invasive fungal infections. These infections are usually difficult to diagnose and more importantly, the resulting mortality rate is high. The limited number of antifungal agents available and their high rate of toxicity are the major factors complicating the issue. However, the development of lipid-based formulations of existing antifungal agents has opened a new era in antifungal therapy. The best examples are the lipid-based amphotericin B preparations, amphotericin B lipid complex (ABLC; Abelcet), amphotericin B colloidal dispersion (ABCD; Amphotec or Amphocil), and liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome). These formulations have shown that antifungal activity is maintained while toxicity is reduced. This progress is followed by the incorporation of nystatin into liposomes. Liposomal nystatin formulation is under development and studies of it have provided encouraging data. Finally, lipid-based formulations of hamycin, miconazole, and ketoconazole have been developed but remain experimental. Advances in technology of liposomes and other lipid formulations have provided promising new tools for management of fungal infections.

  7. Actinide cation-cation complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoyer, Nancy Jane [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO2+) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO2+; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO2+ cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO2+•UO22+, was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO2+ species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO2+ have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO2+ cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe3+ and Cr3+ and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO2+•UO22+, NpO2+•Th4+, PuO2+•UO22+, and PuO2+•Th4+ at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 ± 0.2, 1.8 ± 0.9, 2.2 ± 1.5, and ~0.8 M-1.

  8. Lipid-based cochleates: a promising formulation platform for oral and parenteral delivery of therapeutic agents.

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    Rao, Ravi; Squillante, Emilio; Kim, Kwon H

    2007-01-01

    Cochleates are lipid-based supramolecular assemblies that display great potential as delivery systems for systemic delivery of drugs, including peptides, proteins, vaccines, oligonucleotides, and genes. This is mainly attributed to their high stability and biocompatibility and their ability to deliver both hydrophilic and lipophilic drugs. Cochleates have a unique multilayered spiral structure, which is composed of a negatively charged phospholipid and a divalent cation, and can encapsulate diverse drug molecules of various shapes and sizes while minimizing toxicity associated with polymeric materials present in micro- and nanoparticle systems. This review describes current technological advances in the preparation methods, physicochemical characterization, and potential applications of cochleates as a drug delivery system for systemic delivery of various types of therapeutic agents.

  9. Quantitation of signal transduction.

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    Krauss, S; Brand, M D

    2000-12-01

    Conventional qualitative approaches to signal transduction provide powerful ways to explore the architecture and function of signaling pathways. However, at the level of the complete system, they do not fully depict the interactions between signaling and metabolic pathways and fail to give a manageable overview of the complexity that is often a feature of cellular signal transduction. Here, we introduce a quantitative experimental approach to signal transduction that helps to overcome these difficulties. We present a quantitative analysis of signal transduction during early mitogen stimulation of lymphocytes, with steady-state respiration rate as a convenient marker of metabolic stimulation. First, by inhibiting various key signaling pathways, we measure their relative importance in regulating respiration. About 80% of the input signal is conveyed via identifiable routes: 50% through pathways sensitive to inhibitors of protein kinase C and MAP kinase and 30% through pathways sensitive to an inhibitor of calcineurin. Second, we quantify how each of these pathways differentially stimulates functional units of reactions that produce and consume a key intermediate in respiration: the mitochondrial membrane potential. Both the PKC and calcineurin routes stimulate consumption more strongly than production, whereas the unidentified signaling routes stimulate production more than consumption, leading to no change in membrane potential despite increased respiration rate. The approach allows a quantitative description of the relative importance of signal transduction pathways and the routes by which they activate a specific cellular process. It should be widely applicable.

  10. Transductive Ordinal Regression

    CERN Document Server

    Seah, Chun-Wei; Ong, Yew-Soon

    2011-01-01

    Ordinal regression is commonly formulated as a multi-class problem with ordinal constraints. The challenge of designing accurate classifiers for ordinal regression generally increases with the number of classes involved, due to the large number of labeled patterns that are needed. The availability of ordinal class labels, however, are often costly to calibrate or difficult to obtain. Unlabeled patterns, on the other hand, often exist in much greater abundance and are freely available. To take benefits from the abundance of unlabeled patterns, we present a novel transductive learning paradigm for ordinal regression in this paper, namely Transductive Ordinal Regression (TOR). The key challenge of the present study lies in the precise estimation of both the ordinal class label of the unlabeled data and the decision functions of the ordinal classes, simultaneously. The core elements of the proposed TOR include an objective function that caters to several commonly used loss functions casted in transductive setting...

  11. 14. Enzymes as Biocatalysts for Lipid-based Bioproducts Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheong, Ling-Zhi; Guo, Zheng; Fedosov, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    Bioproducts are materials, chemicals and energy derived from renewable biological resources such as agriculture, forestry, and biologically-derived wastes. To date, the use of enzymes as biocatalysts for lipid-based bioproducts processing has shown marked increase. This is mainly due to the fact ...... is beneficial both for students and scientists working both in the academia and industry...

  12. Recent developments in oral lipid-based drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, N.; Rades, T.; Müllertz, A.

    2013-01-01

    and characterization of LbDDS. In particular, the lack of standardized test protocols can be identified as the major obstacles for the broader application of LbDDS. This review seeks to summarize recent approaches in the field of lipid-based drug delivery that try to elucidate some critical steps in their development......The increasing number of poorly water-soluble drugs in development in the pharmaceutical industry has sparked interest in novel drug delivery options such as lipid-based drug delivery systems (LbDDS). Several LbDDS have been marketed successfully and have shown superior and more reliable...... bioavailability compared to conventional formulations. However, some reluctance in the broader application of LbDDS still appears, despite the growing commercial interest in lipids as a drug delivery platform. This reluctance might at least in part be related to the complexity associated with the development...

  13. Recent developments in oral lipid-based drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, N.; Rades, T.; Müllertz, A.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing number of poorly water-soluble drugs in development in the pharmaceutical industry has sparked interest in novel drug delivery options such as lipid-based drug delivery systems (LbDDS). Several LbDDS have been marketed successfully and have shown superior and more reliable...... bioavailability compared to conventional formulations. However, some reluctance in the broader application of LbDDS still appears, despite the growing commercial interest in lipids as a drug delivery platform. This reluctance might at least in part be related to the complexity associated with the development...... and characterization of LbDDS. In particular, the lack of standardized test protocols can be identified as the major obstacles for the broader application of LbDDS. This review seeks to summarize recent approaches in the field of lipid-based drug delivery that try to elucidate some critical steps in their development...

  14. Lipid Based Nanosystems for Curcumin: Past, Present and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Aditya P; Mills, Tom; Norton, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin is one of the principle bioactive compounds used in the ayurvedic medicine system that has the history of over 5000 years for human use. Curcumin an "Indian Gold" is used to treat simple ailments like the common cold to severe life threatening diseases like cancer, and HIV. Though its contribution is immense for the health protection and disease prevention, its clinical use is limited due to its susceptible nature to alkaline pH, high temperature, presence of oxygen and light. Hence it becomes extremely difficult to maintain its bioactivity during processing, storage and consumption. Recent advancements in the application of nanotechnology to curcumin offer an opportunity to enhance its stability, bioactivity and to overcome its pharmacokinetic mismatch. This in turn helps to bridge the gaps that exist between its bench top research data to its clinical findings. Among the various types of nano/micro delivery systems, lipid based delivery systems are well studied and are the best suited delivery systems to enhance the stability and pharmacokinetic profile of curcumin both for pharma and the food application. In the current review, effort will be made to recapitulate the work done in the past to use lipid based delivery systems (liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, and emulsions) to enhance the application of curcumin for health promotion and disease prevention. Further, future prospects for the utilization of these lipid-based delivery systems will be discussed in detail.

  15. siRNA delivery into tumor cells by lipid-based nanoparticles composed of hydroxyethylated cholesteryl triamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Tsukasa; Ohno, Hiroaki; Fujii, Nobutaka; Maitani, Yoshie

    2013-02-25

    Previously, we reported that cationic nanoparticles (NP) composed of cholesteryl diamine (OH-Chol, (3S)-N-(2-(2-hydroxyethylamino)ethyl)cholesteryl-3-carboxamide) and Tween 80 could deliver plasmid DNA (pDNA) and small interfering RNA (siRNA) with high transfection efficiency into various tumor cells. In this study, to facilitate the endosomal escape of siRNA transfected by lipid-based nanoparticles, we synthesized new cationic cholesteryl triamine (OH-N-Chol, (3S)-N-(2-(2-(2-hydroxyethylamino)ethylamino)ethyl)cholesteryl-3-carboxamide) with an ethylenimine extension and prepared cationic nanoparticles (NP-N) composed of cholesteryl triamine and Tween 80. Although NP-N/siRNA complex (NP-N nanoplex) after mixing NP-N with siRNA was >350 nm in size, the vortex-mixing during the nanoplex formation decreased it to about 200 nm, which was an injectable size. NP-N nanoplex was mainly internalized by macropinocytosis-mediated endocytosis, as was NP nanoplex, and showed higher gene knockdown efficiency than NP nanoplex in human cervical carcinoma SiHa cells. From these results, cationic nanoparticles composed of OH-N-Chol and Tween 80 may have potential as a gene vector for siRNA transfection to tumor cells.

  16. A highlight on lipid based nanocarriers for transcutaneous immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Maha; Abdel-Hamid, Sameh; Alyoussef, Abdullah A

    2015-01-01

    Transcutaneous vaccination has become a widely used technique for providing immunity against several types of pathogens, taking advantage of the immune components found in the skin. The success in the field of vaccination has not only relied on the type of antigen and adjuvant delivered, but also on how they are delivered. In this regard, particulate carriers, especially nanoparticles have evoked considerable interest, owing to the desirable properties that they impart to the substance being delivered. The presentation of antigens by the nanoparticles mimics the presentation of the immunogen by the pathogen; hence, it creates a similar immune response. Furthermore, nanoparticles protect the antigen from degradation and allow its prolonged release, which maximizes its exposure to the immune cells. The most commonly used materials for the formulation of nanoparticles are either polymer-based or lipid based. This review will focus on the lipid based nanocarriers, either vesicular such as liposomes, transfersomes, and ethosomes, or non-vesicular such as cubosomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, nano-structured lipid carriers, solid in oil nanodispersions, lipoplexes, and hybrid polymeric-lipidic systems. The applications of these carriers in the field of transcutaneous immunization will be discussed in this review as well.

  17. In vitro digestion testing of lipid-based delivery systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devraj, Ravi; Williams, Hywel D; Warren, Dallas B

    2012-01-01

    In vitro digestion testing is of practical importance to predict the fate of drugs administered in lipid-based delivery systems. Calcium ions are often added to digestion media to increase the extent of digestion of long-chain triglycerides (LCTs), but the effects they have on phase behaviour...... of the products of digestion, and consequent drug solubilization, are not well understood. This study investigates the effect of calcium and bile salt concentrations on the rate and extent of in vitro digestion of soybean oil, as well as the solubilizing capacity of the digestion products for two poorly water......-soluble drugs, fenofibrate and danazol. In the presence of higher concentrations of calcium ions, the solubilization capacities of the digests were reduced for both drugs. This effect is attributed to the formation of insoluble calcium soaps, visible as precipitates during the digestions. This reduces...

  18. Lipid-based nanocarriers for oral peptide delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhigao; Conejos-Sánchez, Inmaculada; Griffin, Brendan T; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M; Alonso, María J

    2016-11-15

    This article is aimed to overview the lipid-based nanostructures designed so far for the oral administration of peptides and proteins, and to analyze the influence of their composition and physicochemical (particle size, zeta potential) and pharmaceutical (drug loading and release) properties, on their interaction with the gastro-intestinal environment, and the subsequent PK/PD profile of the associated drugs. The ultimate goal has been to highlight and comparatively analyze the key factors that may be determinant of the success of these nanocarriers for oral peptide delivery. The article ends with some prospects on the challenges to be addressed for the intended commercial success of these delivery vehicles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Advances in lipid-based platforms for RNAi therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsini, Sara; Ciani, Laura; Ristori, Sandra; Fortunato, Angelo; Arcangeli, Annarosa

    2014-02-27

    Sequence-specific gene silencing, known as RNA interference (RNAi), is a natural process that can be exploited for knocking-down specific genes involved in the insurgence/development of pathological processes. In 2001 the discovery that small interfering RNA (siRNA) can induce gene silencing without immunoresponse turned RNAi into a promising technique for the control of post-transcriptional gene expression. Nowadays, the major challenge remains infusion in vivo. Therefore, vehicles providing protection and selective transport are to be developed for efficient systemic delivery. The most used vectors are lipid-based, offering a wide range of biocompatible formulations. Here their application in molecular medicine is discussed, especially with regard to recent clinical trials where conventional therapies have failed. The role played by extended physicochemical characterization for the success of RNAi therapeutics is also evidenced.

  20. The Deleterious Effects of Oxidative and Nitrosative Stress on Palmitoylation, Membrane Lipid Rafts and Lipid-Based Cellular Signalling: New Drug Targets in Neuroimmune Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Gerwyn; Walder, Ken; Puri, Basant K; Berk, Michael; Maes, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative and nitrosative stress (O&NS) is causatively implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, chronic fatigue syndrome, schizophrenia and depression. Many of the consequences stemming from O&NS, including damage to proteins, lipids and DNA, are well known, whereas the effects of O&NS on lipoprotein-based cellular signalling involving palmitoylation and plasma membrane lipid rafts are less well documented. The aim of this narrative review is to discuss the mechanisms involved in lipid-based signalling, including palmitoylation, membrane/lipid raft (MLR) and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) functions, the effects of O&NS processes on these processes and their role in the abovementioned diseases. S-palmitoylation is a post-translational modification, which regulates protein trafficking and association with the plasma membrane, protein subcellular location and functions. Palmitoylation and MRLs play a key role in neuronal functions, including glutamatergic neurotransmission, and immune-inflammatory responses. Palmitoylation, MLRs and n-3 PUFAs are vulnerable to the corruptive effects of O&NS. Chronic O&NS inhibits palmitoylation and causes profound changes in lipid membrane composition, e.g. n-3 PUFA depletion, increased membrane permeability and reduced fluidity, which together lead to disorders in intracellular signal transduction, receptor dysfunction and increased neurotoxicity. Disruption of lipid-based signalling is a source of the neuroimmune disorders involved in the pathophysiology of the abovementioned diseases. n-3 PUFA supplementation is a rational therapeutic approach targeting disruptions in lipid-based signalling.

  1. Integrins mediating bone signal transduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Chuanglong; WANG Yuanliang; YANG Lihua; ZHANG Jun

    2004-01-01

    Integrin-mediated adhesions play critical roles in diverse cell functions. Integrins offers a platform on which mechanical stimuli, cytoskeletal organization, biochemical signals can concentrate. Mechanical stimuli transmitted by integrins influence the cytoskeleton, in turn, the cytoskeleton influences cell adhesion via integrins, then cell adhesion results in a series of signal transduction cascades. In skeleton, integrins also have a key role for bone resoption by osteoclasts and reformation by osteoblasts. In present review, the proteins involved in integrin signal transduction and integrin signal transduction pathways were discussed, mainly on the basic mechanisms of integrin signaling and the roles of integrins in bone signal transduction, which may give insight into new therapeutic agents to all kinds of skeletal diseases and new strategies for bone tissue engineering.

  2. Lipid-based amphotericin B in the treatment of cryptococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viviani, M A; Rizzardini, G; Tortorano, A M; Fasan, M; Capetti, A; Roverselli, A M; Gringeri, A; Suter, F

    1994-01-01

    Amphotericin B is the only antifungal drug which, despite its dose-limiting toxicity, can be given intravenously when an aggressive treatment is required. In an attempt to reduce the drug toxicity while retaining its therapeutic efficacy, new formulations of amphotericin B have been developed. The most promising have employed lipid vehicles such as liposomes. Three lipid-based amphotericin B formulations have been developed by pharmaceutical companies and are under active clinical investigation. Efficacy and safety data of these derivatives in animals and humans are reviewed, with particular concern to cryptococcal infection. The authors' experience with a small unilamellar liposomal amphotericin B formulation, AmBisome, in the primary therapy of cryptococcosis is reported. Nine AIDS patients affected with cryptococcosis, seven of whom had meningitis, were given AmBisome (3 mg/kg/day) for 3-6 weeks. Complete response was obtained in six patients, marked improvement in two, and failure in one. AmBisome was well tolerated and shortened the time to clinical and mycological response suggesting a further improvement in the management of cryptococcosis in AIDS patients.

  3. Molecular basis of mechanosensory transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Peter G.; Walker, Richard G.

    2001-09-01

    Mechanotransduction - a cell's conversion of a mechanical stimulus into an electrical signal - reveals vital features of an organism's environment. From hair cells and skin mechanoreceptors in vertebrates, to bristle receptors in flies and touch receptors in worms, mechanically sensitive cells are essential in the life of an organism. The scarcity of these cells and the uniqueness of their transduction mechanisms have conspired to slow molecular characterization of the ensembles that carry out mechanotransduction. But recent progress in both invertebrates and vertebrates is beginning to reveal the identities of proteins essential for transduction.

  4. Specially-Made Lipid-Based Assemblies for Improving Transmembrane Gene Delivery: Comparison of Basic Amino Acid Residue Rich Periphery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qian; Yue, Dong; Nie, Yu; Xu, Xianghui; He, Yiyan; Zhang, Shiyong; Wagner, Ernst; Gu, Zhongwei

    2016-06-06

    Cationic lipid based assemblies provide a promising platform for effective gene condensation into nanosized particles, and the peripheral properties of the assemblies are vital for complexation and interaction with physical barriers. Here, we report three cationic twin head lipids, and each of them contains a dioleoyl-glutamate hydrophobic tail and a twin polar head of lysine, arginine, or histidine. Such lipids were proven to self-assemble in aqueous solution with well-defined nanostructures and residual amino-, guanidine-, or imidazole-rich periphery, showing strong buffering capacity and good liquidity. The assemblies with arginine (RL) or lysine (KL) periphery exhibited positive charges (∼+35 mV) and complete condensation of pDNA into nanosized complexes (∼120 nm). In contrast, assemblies composed of histidine-rich lipids (HL) showed relatively low cationic electric potential (∼+10 mV) and poor DNA binding ability. As expected, the designed RL assemblies with guanidine-rich periphery enhanced the in vitro gene transfection up to 190-fold as compared with the golden standard PEI25k and Lipofectamine 2000, especially in the presence of serum. Meanwhile, interaction with cell and endo/lysosome membrane also revealed the superiority of RL complexes, that the guanidine-rich surface efficiently promoted transmembrane process in cellular internalization and endosomal disruption. More importantly, RL complexes also succeeded beyond others in vivo with significantly (∼7-fold) enhanced expression in HepG2 tumor xenografts in mice, as well as stronger green fluorescence protein imaging in isolated tumors and tumor frozen sections.

  5. Meeting Report: Teaching Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, IJsbrand; Thomas, Geraint

    2006-01-01

    In July, 2005, the European Institute of Chemistry and Biology at the campus of the University of Bordeaux, France, hosted a focused week of seminars, workshops, and discussions around the theme of "teaching signal transduction." The purpose of the summer school was to offer both junior and senior university instructors a chance to reflect on the…

  6. Applications of lipid based formulation technologies in the delivery of biotechnology-based therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, Lissinda H; Marais, Etienne B; Mohammed, Faruq; Kotzé, Awie F

    2014-01-01

    In the last decades several new biotechnologically-based therapeutics have been developed due to progress in genetic engineering. A growing challenge facing pharmaceutical scientists is formulating these compounds into oral dosage forms with adequate bioavailability. An increasingly popular approach to formulate biotechnology-based therapeutics is the use of lipid based formulation technologies. This review highlights the importance of lipid based drug delivery systems in the formulation of oral biotechnology based therapeutics including peptides, proteins, DNA, siRNA and vaccines. The different production procedures used to achieve high encapsulation efficiencies of the bioactives are discussed, as well as the factors influencing the choice of excipient. Lipid based colloidal drug delivery systems including liposomes and solid lipid nanoparticles are reviewed with a focus on recent advances and updates. We further describe microemulsions and self-emulsifying drug delivery systems and recent findings on bioactive delivery. We conclude the review with a few examples on novel lipid based formulation technologies.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL LIPID BASED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM FOR RALOXIFENE HYDROCHLORIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaykumar Nekkanti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Lipid-based delivery systems are becoming increasingly popular as carriers of drugs due to their ability to overcome barriers to oral absorption. The objective of the present study was to prepare novel lipid-based formulation of a sparingly soluble drug, Raloxifene hydrochloride (RLX to increase its saturation solubility and dissolution velocity for enhancing bioavailability while reducing systemic variability. Lipid-based formulations were prepared using melt solubilization technique. The liquid formulations were converted into a solid intermediate by adsorbing onto an inert carrier and blended with excipients for encapsulation. The solid state properties, surface morphology and in-vitro release characteristics of the lipid formulations were investigated and compared with commercial formulation. The characterization of lipid formulations using Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM indicated that the drug is completely enveloped in the lipid core. The dissolution characteristics of lipid based formulation filled in hard gelatin capsules showed faster rate of drug dissolution as compared to commercial tablet formulation (Fiona®. The in-vitro release studies in fed state simulated intestinal fluid (FeSSIF and fasted state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIF media indicated that, the variability in fed and fasted conditions was significantly reduced with lipid based formulation. The results from this study suggest the potential use of lipid based formulation a means of improving solubility, dissolution and concomitantly the bioavailability of a sparingly soluble drug like RLX.

  8. Gibberellin Signal Transduction in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu-Min Fan; Xiaoyan Feng; Yu Wang; Xing Wang Deng

    2007-01-01

    In the past decade, significant knowledge has accumulated regarding gibberellin (GA) signal transduction in rice as a result of studies using multiple approaches, particularly molecular genetics. The present review highlights the recent developments in the identification of GA signaling pathway components, the discovery of GA-induced destruction of GA signaling represser (DELLA protein), and the possible mechanism underlying the regulation of GA-responsive gene expression in rice.

  9. Folate-targeted gadolinium-lipid-based nanoparticles as a bimodal contrast agent for tumor fluorescent and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Taro; Kawano, Kumi; Shiraishi, Kouichi; Yokoyama, Masayuki; Maitani, Yoshie

    2014-01-01

    To enhance tumor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals via the selective accumulation of contrast agents, we prepared folate-modified gadolinium-lipid-based nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents. Folate-modified nanoparticles were comprised of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-lipid, gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid lipid, cationic cholesterol derivatives, folate-conjugated PEG-lipid, and Cy7-PEG-lipid. Folate receptor-mediated cellular nanoparticle association was examined in KB cells, which overexpress the folate receptor. The biodistribution of nanoparticles after their intravenous injection into KB tumor-bearing mice was measured. Mice were imaged through in vivo fluorescence imaging and MRI 24 h after nanoparticle injection, and the intensity enhancement of the tumor MRI signal was evaluated. Increased cellular association of folate-modified nanoparticles was inhibited by excess free folic acid, indicating that nanoparticle association was folate receptor-mediated. Irrespective of folate modification, the amount of nanoparticles in blood 24 h after injection was ca. 10% of the injected dose. Compared with non-modified nanoparticles, folate-modified nanoparticles exhibited significant accumulation in tumor tissues without altering other biodistribution, as well as enhanced tumor fluorescence and MRI signal intensity. The results support the feasibility of MRI- and in vivo fluorescence imaging-based tumor visualization using folate-modified nanoparticles and provide opportunities to develop folate targeting-based imaging applications.

  10. Sensory Transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Austin L.; Ramot, Daniel; Goodman, Miriam B.

    The roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans has a well-defined and comparatively simple repertoire of sensory-guided behaviors, all of which rely on its ability to detect chemical, mechanical or thermal stimuli. In this chapter, we review what is known about the ion channels that mediate sensation in this remarkable model organism. Genetic screens for mutants defective in sensory-guided behaviors have identified genes encoding channel proteins, which are likely transducers of chemical, thermal, and mechanical stimuli. Such classical genetic approaches are now being coupled with molecular genetics and in vivo cellular physiology to elucidate how these channels are activated in specific sensory neurons. The ion channel superfamilies implicated in sensory transduction in C. elegans - CNG, TRP, and DEG/ENaC - are conserved across phyla and also appear to contribute to sensory transduction in other organisms, including vertebrates. What we learn about the role of these ion channels in C. elegans sensation is likely to illuminate analogous processes in other animals, including humans.

  11. Comparative assessment of lipid based nano-carrier systems for dendritic cell based targeting of tumor re-initiating cells in gynecological cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Arpit; Mishra, Dinesh K; Jain, Subodh K; Srivastava, Rupesh K; Lohiya, Nirmal K; Mishra, Pradyumna K

    2016-11-01

    We aimed to identify an optimum nano-carrier system to deliver tumor antigen to dendritic cells (DCs) for efficient targeting of tumor reinitiating cells (TRICs) in gynecological malignancies. Different lipid based nano-carrier systems i.e. liposomes, ethosomes and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNPs) were examined for their ability to activate DCs in allogeneic settings. Out of these three, the most optimized formulation was subjected for cationic and mannosylated surface modification and pulsed with DCs for specific targeting of tumor cells. In both allogeneic and autologous trials, SLNPs showed a strong ability to activate DCs and orchestrate specific immune responses for targeting TRICs in gynecological malignancies. Our findings suggest that the mannosylated form of SLNPs is a suitable molecular vector for DC based therapeutics. DCs pulsed with mannosylated SLNPs may be utilized as adjuvant therapy for specific removal of TRICs to benefit patients from tumor recurrence.

  12. Cell-specific targeting of lipid-based carriers for ODN and DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartsch, M; Weeke-Klimp, AH; Meijer, DKF; Scherphof, GL; Kamps, JAAM

    2005-01-01

    It is well recognized that there is an urgent need for non-toxic systemically applicable vectors for biologically active nucleotides to fully exploit the current potential of molecular medicine in gene therapy. Cell-specific targeting of non-viral lipid-based carriers for ODN and DNA is a prerequisi

  13. Toward the establishment of standardized in vitro tests for lipid-based formulations, part 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Hywel D; Sassene, Philip; Kleberg, Karen

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Recent studies have shown that digestion of lipid-based formulations (LBFs) can stimulate both supersaturation and precipitation. The current study has evaluated the drug, formulation and dose-dependence of the supersaturation - precipitation balance for a range of LBFs. METHODS: Type I,...

  14. Calibrating passive sampling and passive dosing techniques to lipid based concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Philipp; Schmidt, Stine Nørgaard; Annika, A.

    2011-01-01

    coated vials and with Head Space Solid Phase Microextraction (HS-SPME) yielded lipid based concentrations that were in good agreement with each other, but about a factor of two higher than measured lipid-normalized concentrations in the organisms. Passive dosing was applied to bioconcentration...

  15. Lipid-based liquid biofuels from autotrophic microalgae: energetic and environmental performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, L.

    2013-01-01

    Commercial cultivation of autotrophic microalgae for food production dates back to the 1950s. Autotrophic microalgae have also been proposed as a source for lipid-based liquid biofuels. As yet, there is no commercial production of such biofuels and estimated near-term prices are far in excess of

  16. Targeted multifunctional lipid-based nanocarriers for image-guided drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. Koning (Gerben); G.C. Krijger (Gerard )

    2007-01-01

    textabstractLipid-based nanocarriers have proven successful in the delivery of mainly chemotherapeutic agents, and currently they are being applied clinically in the treatment of various types of cancer. These drug delivery systems achieve increased therapeutic efficacy by altering the pharmacokinet

  17. Lipid-based liquid biofuels from autotrophic microalgae: energetic and environmental performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, L.

    2013-01-01

    Commercial cultivation of autotrophic microalgae for food production dates back to the 1950s. Autotrophic microalgae have also been proposed as a source for lipid-based liquid biofuels. As yet, there is no commercial production of such biofuels and estimated near-term prices are far in excess of fos

  18. Polymer-enhanced adenoviral transduction of CAR-negative bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasman, Laura M; Barua, Sutapa; Lu, Ping; Rege, Kaushal; Voelkel-Johnson, Christina

    2009-01-01

    The application of adenoviral gene therapy for cancer is limited by immune clearance of the virus as well as poor transduction efficiency, since the protein used for viral entry (CAR) serves physiological functions in adhesion and is frequently decreased among cancer cells. Cationic polymers have been used to enhance adenoviral gene delivery, but novel polymers with low toxicity are needed to realize this approach. We recently identified polymers that were characterized by high transfection efficiency of plasmid DNA and a low toxicity profile. In this study we evaluated the novel cationic polymer EGDE-3,3' for its potential to increase adenoviral transduction of the CAR-negative bladder cancer cell line TCCSUP. The amount of adenovirus required to transduce 50-60% of the cells was reduced 100-fold when Ad.GFP was preincubated with the EGDE-3,3' polymer. Polyethyleneimine (pEI), a positively charged polymer currently used as a standard for enhancing adenoviral transduction, also increased infectivity, but transgene expression was consistently higher with EGDE-3,3'. In addition, EGDE-3,3'-supplemented transduction of an adenovirus expressing an apoptosis inducing transgene, Ad.GFP-TRAIL, significantly enhanced the amount of cell death. Thus, our results indicate that novel biocompatible polymers may be useful in improving the delivery of adenoviral gene therapy.

  19. Vectofusin-1, a new viral entry enhancer, strongly promotes lentiviral transduction of human hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenard, David; Ingrao, Dina; Seye, Ababacar; Buisset, Julien; Genries, Sandrine; Martin, Samia; Kichler, Antoine; Galy, Anne

    2013-05-07

    Gene transfer into hCD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs) using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based lentiviral vectors (LVs) has several promising therapeutic applications. Yet, efficiency, safety, and cost of LV gene therapy could be ameliorated by enhancing target cell transduction levels and reducing the amount of LV used on the cells. Several transduction enhancers already exist such as fibronectin fragments and cationic compounds, but all present limitations. In this study, we describe a new transduction enhancer called Vectofusin-1, which is a short cationic peptide, active on several LV pseudotypes. Vectofusin-1 is used as a soluble additive to safely increase the frequency of transduced HSCs and to augment the level of transduction to one or two copies of vector per cell in a vector dose-dependent manner. Vectofusin-1 acts at the entry step by promoting the adhesion and the fusion between viral and cellular membranes. Vectofusin-1 is therefore a promising additive that could significantly ameliorate hCD34(+) cell-based gene therapy.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e90; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.17; published online 7 May 2013.

  20. Cellular semiotics and signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruni, Luis Emilio

    2007-01-01

    to the processes of sign interpretation and transmission between organisms of the same or different species). In Biosemiotics it is customary to recognise the cell as the most elementary integration unit for semiosis. Therefore intra and intercellular communication constitute the departure point for the study......Semiosis, the processes of production, communication and interpretation of signs - coding and de-coding - takes place within and between organisms. The term "endosemiosis" refers to the processes of interpretation and sign transmission inside an organism (as opposed to "exosemiosis", which refers...... considering semiotic logic in order to construct our understanding of living phenomena. Given the central integrating role of signal transduction in physiological and ecological studies, this chapter outlines its semiotic implications. The multi-modality and modularity of signal molecules and relative...

  1. Role of extracellular cations in cell motility, polarity, and chemotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soll D

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available David R Soll1, Deborah Wessels1, Daniel F Lusche1, Spencer Kuhl1, Amanda Scherer1, Shawna Grimm1,21Monoclonal Antibody Research Institute, Developmental Studies, Hybridoma Bank, Department of Biology, University of Iowa, Iowa City; 2Mercy Medical Center, Surgical Residency Program, Des Moines, Iowa, USAAbstract: The concentration of cations in the aqueous environment of free living organisms and cells within the human body influence motility, shape, and chemotaxis. The role of extracellular cations is usually perceived to be the source for intracellular cations in the process of homeostasis. The role of surface molecules that interact with extracellular cations is believed to be that of channels, transporters, and exchangers. However, the role of Ca2+ as a signal and chemoattractant and the discovery of the Ca2+ receptor have demonstrated that extracellular cations can function as signals at the cell surface, and the plasma membrane molecules they interact with can function as bona fide receptors that activate coupled signal transduction pathways, associated molecules in the plasma membrane, or the cytoskeleton. With this perspective in mind, we have reviewed the cationic composition of aqueous environments of free living cells and cells that move in multicellular organisms, most notably humans, the range of molecules interacting with cations at the cell surface, the concept of a cell surface cation receptor, and the roles extracellular cations and plasma membrane proteins that interact with them play in the regulation of motility, shape, and chemotaxis. Hopefully, the perspective of this review will increase awareness of the roles extracellular cations play and the possibility that many of the plasma membrane proteins that interact with them could also play roles as receptors.Keywords: extracellular cations, chemotaxis, transporters, calcium, receptors

  2. Architectures and representations for string transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chrupala, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    String transduction problems are ubiquitous in natural language processing: they include transliteration, grapheme-to-phoneme conversion, text normalization and translation. String transduction can be reduced to the simpler problems of sequence labeling by expressing the target string as a sequence

  3. Human hematopoietic cell culture, transduction, and analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Wirthlin, Louisa; Kohn, Donald B;

    2008-01-01

    This unit provides methods for introducing genes into human hematopoietic progenitor cells. The Basic Protocol describes isolation of CD34(+) cells, transduction of these cells with a retroviral vector on fibronectin-coated plates, assaying the efficiency of transduction, and establishing long...

  4. Sentra, a database of signal transduction proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltsev, N.; Marland, E.; Yu, G. X.; Bhatnagar, S.; Lusk, R.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2002-01-01

    Sentra (http://www-wit.mcs.anl.gov/sentra) is a database of signal transduction proteins with the emphasis on microbial signal transduction. The database was updated to include classes of signal transduction systems modulated by either phosphorylation or methylation reactions such as PAS proteins and serine/threonine kinases, as well as the classical two-component histidine kinases and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins. Currently, Sentra contains signal transduction proteins from 43 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes as well as sequences from SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL. Signal transduction proteins are annotated with information describing conserved domains, paralogous and orthologous sequences, and conserved chromosomal gene clusters. The newly developed user interface supports flexible search capabilities and extensive visualization of the data.

  5. SENTRA, a database of signal transduction proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Souza, M.; Romine, M. F.; Maltsev, N.; Mathematics and Computer Science; PNNL

    2000-01-01

    SENTRA, available via URL http://wit.mcs.anl.gov/WIT2/Sentra/, is a database of proteins associated with microbial signal transduction. The database currently includes the classical two-component signal transduction pathway proteins and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, but will be expanded to also include other classes of signal transduction systems that are modulated by phosphorylation or methylation reactions. Although the majority of database entries are from prokaryotic systems, eukaroytic proteins with bacterial-like signal transduction domains are also included. Currently SENTRA contains signal transduction proteins in 34 complete and almost completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes, as well as sequences from 243 organisms available in public databases (SWISS-PROT and EMBL). The analysis was carried out within the framework of the WIT2 system, which is designed and implemented to support genetic sequence analysis and comparative analysis of sequenced genomes.

  6. Advanced drug delivery to the lymphatic system: lipid-based nanoformulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Khan A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Arshad Ali Khan, Jahanzeb Mudassir, Noratiqah Mohtar, Yusrida Darwis School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Minden, Penang, Malaysia Abstract: The delivery of drugs and bioactive compounds via the lymphatic system is complex and dependent on the physiological uniqueness of the system. The lymphatic route plays an important role in transporting extracellular fluid to maintain homeostasis and in transferring immune cells to injury sites, and is able to avoid first-pass metabolism, thus acting as a bypass route for compounds with lower bioavailability, ie, those undergoing more hepatic metabolism. The lymphatic route also provides an option for the delivery of therapeutic molecules, such as drugs to treat cancer and human immunodeficiency virus, which can travel through the lymphatic system. Lymphatic imaging is useful in evaluating disease states and treatment plans for progressive diseases of the lymph system. Novel lipid-based nanoformulations, such as solid lipid nanoparticles and nanostructured lipid carriers, have unique characteristics that make them promising candidates for lymphatic delivery. These formulations are superior to colloidal carrier systems because they have controlled release properties and provide better chemical stability for drug molecules. However, multiple factors regulate the lymphatic delivery of drugs. Prior to lymphatic uptake, lipid-based nanoformulations are required to undergo interstitial hindrance that modulates drug delivery. Therefore, uptake and distribution of lipid-based nanoformulations by the lymphatic system depends on factors such as particle size, surface charge, molecular weight, and hydrophobicity. Types of lipid and concentration of the emulsifier are also important factors affecting drug delivery via the lymphatic system. All of these factors can cause changes in intermolecular interactions between the lipid nanoparticle matrix and the incorporated drug, which in turn affects

  7. SOLID LIPID NANOPARTICLES AND NANO LIPID CARRIERS: AS NOVEL SOLID LIPID BASED DRUG CARRIER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish B. Singhal

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Interest in lipid based drug delivery has developed over the past decade fuelled by a better understanding of the multiple roles lipids may play in enhancing oral bioavailability. Moreover, the emergence of novel excipients with acceptable regulatory and safety profiles coupled with advances in formulation technologies have greatly improved the potential for successful lipid based formulations. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN introduced in 1991 represent an alternative carrier system to traditional colloidal carriers, such as emulsions, liposomes and polymeric micro- and nanoparticles. SLN combine advantages of the traditional systems but avoid some of their major disadvantages. This paper reviews the present state of the art regarding production techniques for SLN/ nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC, drug incorporation method and types, stability. The potential of SLN/NLC to be exploited for the different administration routes is also highlighted.

  8. Pharmacokinetic aspects and in vitro–in vivo correlation potential for lipid-based formulations

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Lipid-based formulations have been an attractive choice among novel drug delivery systems for enhancing the solubility and bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs due to their ability to keep the drug in solubilized state in the gastrointestinal tract. These formulations offer multiple advantages such as reduction in food effect and inter-individual variability, ease of preparation, and the possibility of manufacturing using common excipients available in the market. Despite these advantages,...

  9. Characterising Lipid Lipolysis and Its Implication in Lipid-Based Formulation Development

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Nicky; Holm, René; Rades, Thomas; Müllertz, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Facing the increasing number of poorly water-soluble drugs, pharmaceutical scientists are required to break new grounds for the delivery of these pharmaceutically problematic drugs. Lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS) have received increased interest as a novel drug delivery platform during the last decades and several successfully marketed products have shown the potential for LBDDS. However, there exists a discrepancy between the clear need for innovative delivery forms and their rati...

  10. Oral and transdermal drug delivery systems: role of lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Rajabalaya, Rajan; Musa,Muhammad Nuh; Kifli, Nurolaini; Sheba R. David

    2017-01-01

    Rajan Rajabalaya, Muhammad Nuh Musa, Nurolaini Kifli, Sheba R David PAPRSB Institute of Health Sciences, Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Brunei Darussalam Abstract: Liquid crystal (LC) dosage forms, particularly those using lipid-based lyotropic LCs (LLCs), have generated considerable interest as potential drug delivery systems. LCs have the physical properties of liquids but retain some of the structural characteristics of crystalline solids. They are compatible with hydrophobic and hydrophi...

  11. Enhanced bioavailability of nerve growth factor with phytantriol lipid-based crystalline nanoparticles in cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bu M

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Meng Bu,1,2 Jingling Tang,3 Yinghui Wei,4 Yanhui Sun,1 Xinyu Wang,1 Linhua Wu,2 Hongzhuo Liu1 1School of Pharmacy, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmacy, the Second Affiliated Hospital, 3School of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People’s Republic of China; 4College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Supplementation of exogenous nerve growth factor (NGF into the cochlea of deafened animals rescues spiral ganglion cells from degeneration. However, a safe and potent delivery of therapeutic proteins, such as NGF, to spiral ganglion cells remains one of the greatest challenges. This study presents the development of self-assembled cubic lipid-based crystalline nanoparticles to enhance inner ear bioavailability of bioactive NGF via a round window membrane route.Methods: A novel nanocarrier-entrapped NGF was developed based on phytantriol by a liquid precursor dilution, with Pluronic® F127 and propylene glycol as the surfactant and solubilizer, respectively. Upon dilution of the liquid lipid precursors, monodispersed submicron-sized particles with a slight negative charge formed spontaneously.Results: Biological activity of entrapped NGF was assessed using pheochromocytoma cells with NGF-loaded reservoirs to induce significant neuronal outgrowth, similar to that seen in free NGF-treated controls. Finally, a 3.28-fold increase in inner ear bioavailability was observed after administration of phytantriol lipid-based crystalline nanoparticles as compared to free drug, contributing to an enhanced drug permeability of the round window membrane. Conclusion: Data presented here demonstrate the potential of lipid-based crystalline nanoparticles to improve the outcomes of patients bearing cochlear implants. Keywords: nerve growth factor, lipid-based crystalline nanoparticles, PC12 cells, inner ear drug

  12. Considerations in developing lipid-based nutrient supplements for prevention of undernutrition: experience from the International Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplements (iLiNS) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimond, Mary; Zeilani, Mamane; Jungjohann, Svenja; Brown, Kenneth H; Ashorn, Per; Allen, Lindsay H; Dewey, Kathryn G

    2015-12-01

    The International Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplements (iLiNS) Project began in 2009 with the goal of contributing to the evidence base regarding the potential of lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) to prevent undernutrition in vulnerable populations. The first project objective was the development of acceptable LNS products for infants 6-24 months and for pregnant and lactating women, for use in studies in three countries (Burkina Faso, Ghana and Malawi). This paper shares the rationale for a series of decisions in supplement formulation and design, including those related to ration size, ingredients, nutrient content, safety and quality, and packaging. Most iLiNS supplements have a daily ration size of 20 g and are intended for home fortification of local diets. For infants, this ration size is designed to avoid displacement of breast milk and to allow for dietary diversity including any locally available and accessible nutrient-dense foods. Selection of ingredients depends on acceptability of flavour, micronutrient, anti-nutrient and essential fatty acid contents. The nutrient content of LNS designed to prevent undernutrition reflects the likelihood that in many resource-poor settings, diets of the most nutritionally vulnerable individuals (infants, young children, and pregnant and lactating women) are likely to be deficient in multiple micronutrients and, possibly, in essential fatty acids. During ingredient procurement and LNS production, safety and quality control procedures are required to prevent contamination with toxins or pathogens and to ensure that the product remains stable and palatable over time. Packaging design decisions must include consideration of product protection, stability, convenience and portion control.

  13. Transduction of chemical into electrical energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachmansohn, D

    1976-01-01

    The paper recalls some fundamental notions, developed by Otto Meyerhof, which were used in the analysis of the transduction of chemical into mechanical energy during muscular contraction. These notions formed the basis of the approach to the analysis of the transduction of chemical into electrical energy, i.e., the very principle underlying nerve and muscle excitability and bioelectricity. Instrumental for this purpose was the use, since 1937, of electric organs of fish, a tissue highly specialized for bioelectrogenesis.

  14. Regulation of Cation Balance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyert, Martha S.; Philpott, Caroline C.

    2013-01-01

    All living organisms require nutrient minerals for growth and have developed mechanisms to acquire, utilize, and store nutrient minerals effectively. In the aqueous cellular environment, these elements exist as charged ions that, together with protons and hydroxide ions, facilitate biochemical reactions and establish the electrochemical gradients across membranes that drive cellular processes such as transport and ATP synthesis. Metal ions serve as essential enzyme cofactors and perform both structural and signaling roles within cells. However, because these ions can also be toxic, cells have developed sophisticated homeostatic mechanisms to regulate their levels and avoid toxicity. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have characterized many of the gene products and processes responsible for acquiring, utilizing, storing, and regulating levels of these ions. Findings in this model organism have often allowed the corresponding machinery in humans to be identified and have provided insights into diseases that result from defects in ion homeostasis. This review summarizes our current understanding of how cation balance is achieved and modulated in baker’s yeast. Control of intracellular pH is discussed, as well as uptake, storage, and efflux mechanisms for the alkali metal cations, Na+ and K+, the divalent cations, Ca2+ and Mg2+, and the trace metal ions, Fe2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, and Mn2+. Signal transduction pathways that are regulated by pH and Ca2+ are reviewed, as well as the mechanisms that allow cells to maintain appropriate intracellular cation concentrations when challenged by extreme conditions, i.e., either limited availability or toxic levels in the environment. PMID:23463800

  15. Novel Nanostructured Solid Materials for Modulating Oral Drug Delivery from Solid-State Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dening, Tahnee J; Rao, Shasha; Thomas, Nicky; Prestidge, Clive A

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS) have gained significant attention in recent times, owing to their ability to overcome the challenges limiting the oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs...

  16. Cation-cation interaction in neptunyl(V) compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krot, N.N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physical Chemistry (Russian Federation); Saeki, Masakatsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The original manuscript was prepared by Professor N.N. Krot of Institute of Physical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, in 1997. Saeki tried to translate that into Japanese and to add some new data since 1997. The contents include the whole picture of cation-cation interactions mainly in 5-valence neptunium compounds. Firstly, characteristic structures of neptunium are summarized of the cation-cation bonding in compounds. Secondly, it is mentioned how the cation-cation bonding affects physical and chemical properties of the compounds. Then, characterization-methods for the cation-cation bonding in the compounds are discussed. Finally, the cation-cation interactions in compounds of other actinide-ions are shortly reviewed. (author)

  17. Lipid-based formulations for oral administration of poorly water-soluble drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Holm, René; Müllertz, Anette

    2013-01-01

    Lipid-based drug delivery systems have shown great potentials in oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs, primarily for lipophilic drugs, with several successfully marketed products. Pre-dissolving drugs in lipids, surfactants, or mixtures of lipids and surfactants omits the dissolving....../dissolution step, which is a potential rate limiting factor for oral absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs. Lipids not only vary in structures and physiochemical properties, but also in their digestibility and absorption pathway; therefore selection of lipid excipients and dosage form has a pronounced effect...

  18. Lipid-Based Nanovectors for Targeting of CD44-Overexpressing Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Arpicco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronic acid (HA is a naturally occurring glycosaminoglycan that exists in living systems, and it is a major component of the extracellular matrix. The hyaluronic acid receptor CD44 is found at low levels on the surface of epithelial, haematopoietic, and neuronal cells and is overexpressed in many cancer cells particularly in tumour initiating cells. HA has been therefore used as ligand attached to HA-lipid-based nanovectors for the active targeting of small or large active molecules for the treatment of cancer. This paper describes the different approaches employed for the preparation, characterization, and evaluation of these potent delivery systems.

  19. The cornucopia of intestinal chemosensory transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul P Bertrand

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemosensory transduction mechanisms that the gastrointestinal (GI tract uses to detect chemical and nutrient stimuli are poorly understood. The GI tract is presented with a wide variety of stimuli including potentially harmful chemicals or toxins as well as 'normal' stimuli including nutrients, bacteria and mechanical forces. Sensory transduction is at its simplest the conversion of these stimuli into a neural code in afferent nerves. Much of the information encoded is used by the enteric nervous system (ENS to generate local reflexes while complementary information is sent to the central nervous system (CNS via afferents or by release of hormones to affect behaviour. This review focuses on the chemosensory transduction mechanisms present in the GI tract. It examines the expression and localisation of the machinery for chemosensory transduction. It summarises the types of cells which might be involved in detecting stimuli and releasing neuroactive transmitters. Finally, it highlights the idea that chemosensory transduction mechanisms in the GI tract utilise many overlapping and complementary mechanisms for detecting and transducing stimuli into reflex action.

  20. Coating with spermine-pullulan polymer enhances adenoviral transduction of mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Li; Yao, Xinglei; Faiola, Francesco; Liu, Bojun; Zhang, Tianyuan; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Gao, Jian-Qing; Zhao, Robert Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells with multilineage potential, which makes them attractive tools for regenerative medicine applications. Efficient gene transfer into MSCs is essential not only for basic research in developmental biology but also for therapeutic applications involving gene-modification in regenerative medicine. Adenovirus vectors (Advs) can efficiently and transiently introduce an exogenous gene into many cell types via their primary receptors, the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptors, but not into MSCs, which are deficient in coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptors expression. To overcome this problem, we developed an Adv coated with a spermine-pullulan (SP) cationic polymer and investigated its physicochemical properties and internalization mechanisms. We demonstrated that the SP coating could enhance adenoviral transduction of MSCs without detectable cytotoxicity or effects on differentiation. Our results argue in favor of the potentiality of the SP-coated Adv as a prototype vector for efficient and safe transduction of MSCs. PMID:28008251

  1. Bioinformatics analyses for signal transduction networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Research in signaling networks contributes to a deeper understanding of organism living activities. With the development of experimental methods in the signal transduction field, more and more mechanisms of signaling pathways have been discovered. This paper introduces such popular bioin-formatics analysis methods for signaling networks as the common mechanism of signaling pathways and database resource on the Internet, summerizes the methods of analyzing the structural properties of networks, including structural Motif finding and automated pathways generation, and discusses the modeling and simulation of signaling networks in detail, as well as the research situation and tendency in this area. Now the investigation of signal transduction is developing from small-scale experiments to large-scale network analysis, and dynamic simulation of networks is closer to the real system. With the investigation going deeper than ever, the bioinformatics analysis of signal transduction would have immense space for development and application.

  2. In Vivo Precipitation of Poorly Soluble Drugs from Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sassene, P J; Michaelsen, M H; Mosgaard, M D

    2016-01-01

    Precipitation of poorly water-soluble drugs from lipid-based drug delivery systems (LbDDS) has been studied extensively during in vitro lipolysis but has never been shown in vivo. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate if drug precipitation can occur from LbDDS during transit of the g......Precipitation of poorly water-soluble drugs from lipid-based drug delivery systems (LbDDS) has been studied extensively during in vitro lipolysis but has never been shown in vivo. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate if drug precipitation can occur from LbDDS during transit...... of the gastrointestinal tract in vivo. Rats were administered 300 μL of either of two LbDDS (LbDDS I and LbDDS II) loaded with danazol or fenofibrate (or paracetamol to assess gastric emptying). The rats were euthanized at various time points after administration of both LbDDS containing either drug, and the contents...... time points. Fenofibrate precipitation was absent in the stomach initially after administration of LbDDS I, but was evident in the stomach 90 min after dosing. No crystalline fenofibrate was observed in the intestine. Danazol and fenofibrate precipitation was evident in the stomach following...

  3. Comparison of histological, genetic, metabolomics, and lipid-based methods for sex determination in marine mussels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Adam; Yeung, Wai Ho; Craft, John; Brown, Margaret; Kennedy, Jill; Bignell, John; Stentiford, Grant D; Viant, Mark R

    2007-10-15

    Omics technologies are increasingly being used to monitor organismal responses to environmental stressors. Previous studies have shown that species identification, an appreciation of life history traits, and organism phenotype (e.g., gender) are essential for the accurate interpretation of omics data from field samples. As marine mussels are increasingly being used in ecotoxicogenomics and monitoring, a technique to determine mussel gender throughout their annual reproductive cycle is urgently needed. This study examines four methods for sex determination in the two mussel species found in the United Kingdom, Mytilus edulis and Mytilus galloprovincialis, and their hybrid. Each of these methods-histology, a lipid-based assay, a new reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics-initially was evaluated using sexually mature ("ripe") mussels whose gender was clearly distinguishable using histology. The methods subsequently were tested on spawned ("spent") mussels. For ripe animals, all techniques yielded high classification accuracies: histology, 100%; RT-PCR, 94.6%; lipid analysis, 90.6%; and metabolomics, 89.5%. The gender of spent animals, however, could not be determined by histology (0%) or lipid analysis (55.6%), but RT-PCR (100%) and metabolomics (88.9%) both proved to be successful. In addition, the RT-PCR, metabolomics, and lipid-based methods identified animals of mixed sex. Our findings highlight the application of a novel RT-PCR method as a robust technique for gender determination of ripe and spent mussels.

  4. Recent Advances in Lipid-Based Vesicles and Particulate Carriers for Topical and Transdermal Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shashank; Patel, Niketkumar; Shah, Mansi K; Khatri, Pinak; Vora, Namrata

    2017-02-01

    In the recent decade, skin delivery (topical and transdermal) has gained an unprecedented popularity, especially due to increased incidences of chronic skin diseases, demand for targeted and patient compliant delivery, and interest in life cycle management strategies among pharmaceutical companies. Literature review of recent publications indicates that among various skin delivery systems, lipid-based delivery systems (vesicular carriers and lipid particulate systems) have been the most successful. Vesicular carriers consist of liposomes, ultradeformable liposomes, and ethosomes, while lipid particulate systems consist of lipospheres, solid lipid nanoparticles, and nanostructured lipid carriers. These systems can increase the skin drug transport by improving drug solubilization in the formulation, drug partitioning into the skin, and fluidizing skin lipids. Considering that lipid-based delivery systems are regarded as safe and efficient, they are proving to be an attractive delivery strategy for the pharmaceutical as well as cosmeceutical drug substances. However, development of these delivery systems requires comprehensive understanding of physicochemical characteristics of drug and delivery carriers, formulation and process variables, mechanism of skin delivery, recent technological advancements, specific limitations, and regulatory considerations. Therefore, this review article encompasses recent research advances addressing the aforementioned issues.

  5. Purinergic mechanosensory transduction and visceral pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burnstock Geoffrey

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this review, evidence is presented to support the hypothesis that mechanosensory transduction occurs in tubes and sacs and can initiate visceral pain. Experimental evidence for this mechanism in urinary bladder, ureter, gut, lung, uterus, tooth-pulp and tongue is reviewed. Potential therapeutic strategies are considered for the treatment of visceral pain in such conditions as renal colic, interstitial cystitis and inflammatory bowel disease by agents that interfere with mechanosensory transduction in the organs considered, including P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptor antagonists that are orally bioavailable and stable in vivo and agents that inhibit or enhance ATP release and breakdown.

  6. Energy transduction in lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poolman, Bert

    In the discovery of some general principles of energy transduction, lactic acid bacteria have played an important role. In this review, the energy transducing processes of lactic acid bacteria are discussed with the emphasis on the major developments of the past 5 years. This work not only includes

  7. Inhibitors targeting two-component signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takafumi; Okada, Ario; Gotoh, Yasuhiro; Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2008-01-01

    A two-component signal transduction system (TCS) is an attractive target for antibacterial agents. In this chapter, we review the TCS inhibitors developed during the past decade and introduce novel drug discovery systems to isolate the inhibitors of the YycG/YycF system, an essential TCS for bacterial growth, in an effort to develop a new class of antibacterial agents.

  8. Toward the establishment of standardized in vitro tests for lipid-based formulations, part 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Hywel D; Sassene, Philip; Kleberg, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The Lipid Formulation Classification System Consortium looks to develop standardized in vitro tests and to generate much-needed performance criteria for lipid-based formulations (LBFs). This article highlights the value of performing a second, more stressful digestion test to identify LBFs near...... a performance threshold and to facilitate lead formulation selection in instances where several LBF prototypes perform adequately under standard digestion conditions (but where further discrimination is necessary). Stressed digestion tests can be designed based on an understanding of the factors that affect LBF...... performance, including the degree of supersaturation generated on dispersion/digestion. Stresses evaluated included decreasing LBF concentration (↓LBF), increasing bile salt, and decreasing pH. Their capacity to stress LBFs was dependent on LBF composition and drug type: ↓LBF was a stressor to medium...

  9. Characterising lipid lipolysis and its implication in lipid-based formulation development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, Nicky; Holm, Rene; Rades, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    . Unlike conventional formulations, LBDDS are susceptible to digestion in the gastrointestinal tract, the interplay of delivery system, drug and physiology ultimately effecting drug disposition. In vitro lipolysis has become an important technique to mimic the enzymatic degradation. For the better......Facing the increasing number of poorly water-soluble drugs, pharmaceutical scientists are required to break new grounds for the delivery of these pharmaceutically problematic drugs. Lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS) have received increased interest as a novel drug delivery platform during...... understanding of how LBDDS promote drug delivery, in vitro lipolysis requires advanced characterisation methods. In this review, the physiological background of lipid digestion is followed by a thorough summary of the techniques that are currently used to characterise in vitro lipolysis. It would be desirable...

  10. Calibrating passive sampling and passive dosing techniques to lipid based concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Philipp; Schmidt, Stine Nørgaard; Annika, A.

    2011-01-01

    external partitioning standards in vegetable or fish oil for the complete calibration of equilibrium sampling techniques without additional steps. Equilibrium in tissue sampling in three different fish yielded lipid based PCB concentrations in good agreement with those determined using total extraction...... and lipid normalization. These results support the validity of the in tissue sampling technique, while at the same time confirming that the fugacity capacity of these lipid-rich fish tissues for PCBs was dominated by the lipid fraction. Equilibrium sampling of PCB contaminated lake sediments with PDMS......Equilibrium sampling into various formats of the silicone polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is increasingly used to measure the exposure of hydrophobic organic chemicals in environmental matrices, and passive dosing from silicone is increasingly used to control and maintain their exposure in laboratory...

  11. Growth Mechanism of Lipid-Based Nanodiscs -- a Model Membrane for Studying Kinetics of Particle Coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieh, Mu-Ping; Dizon, Anthony; Li, Ming; Hu, Andrew; Fan, Tai-Hsi

    2012-02-01

    Lipid-based nanodiscs composed of long- and short- chain lipids [namely, dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC), dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) and dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC)] constantly form at high lipid concentrations and at low temperatures (i.e., below the melting transition temperature of DMPC, TM). The initial size of these nanodiscs (at high total lipid concentration, CL> 20 wt.%) is relatively uniform and of similar dimension (according to dynamic light scattering and small angle neutron scattering experiments), seemingly independent of thermal history. Upon dilution, the nanodiscs slowly coalesce and grow in size with time irreversibly. Our preliminary result shows that the growth rate strongly depends on several parameters such as charge density, CL and temperature. We have also found that the nanodisc coalescence is a reaction limit instead of diffusion limit process through a time-resolved study.

  12. Calibrating passive sampling and passive dosing techniques to lipid based concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Philipp; Schmidt, Stine Nørgaard; Annika, A.;

    2011-01-01

    towards equilibrium partitioning concentrations in lipids (Clipid,partitioning). The first approach proceeds in two steps; (i) the concentration in the PDMS (CPDMS ) is determined and (ii) multiplied with recently determined lipid to PDMS partition ratios (Klipid,PDMS). The second approach applies...... external partitioning standards in vegetable or fish oil for the complete calibration of equilibrium sampling techniques without additional steps. Equilibrium in tissue sampling in three different fish yielded lipid based PCB concentrations in good agreement with those determined using total extraction...... and lipid normalization. These results support the validity of the in tissue sampling technique, while at the same time confirming that the fugacity capacity of these lipid-rich fish tissues for PCBs was dominated by the lipid fraction. Equilibrium sampling of PCB contaminated lake sediments with PDMS...

  13. Advanced Strategies in Immune Modulation of Cancer Using Lipid-Based Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahy, Shoshy; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Landesman-Milo, Dalit; Ng, Brandon D.; Peer, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Immunotherapy has a great potential in advancing cancer treatment, especially in light of recent discoveries and therapeutic interventions that lead to complete response in specific subgroups of melanoma patients. By using the body’s own immune system, it is possible not only to specifically target and eliminate cancer cells while leaving healthy cells unharmed but also to elicit long-term protective response. Despite the promise, current immunotherapy is limited and fails in addressing all tumor types. This is probably due to the fact that a single treatment strategy is not sufficient in overcoming the complex antitumor immunity. The use of nanoparticle-based system for immunotherapy is a promising strategy that can simultaneously target multiple pathways with the same kinetics to enhance antitumor response. Here, we will highlight the recent advances in the field of cancer immunotherapy that utilize lipid-based nanoparticles as delivery vehicles and address the ongoing challenges and potential opportunities. PMID:28220118

  14. Clinical studies with oral lipid based formulations of poorly soluble compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fatouros, Dimitrios; Karpf, Ditte M; Nielsen, Flemming S

    2007-01-01

    of these properties on the in vivo performance of the formulation. Equally important is the effect of concurrent food intake on the bioavailability of poorly soluble compounds. The effect of food on the bioavailability of compounds formulated in lipid and surfactant based formulations is also reviewed.......This work is an attempt to give an overview of the clinical data available on lipid based formulations. Lipid and surfactant based formulations are recognized as a feasible approach to improve bioavailability of poorly soluble compounds. However not many clinical studies have been published so far....... Several drug products intended for oral administration have been marketed utilizing lipid and surfactant based formulations. Sandimmune((R)) and Sandimmune Neoral((R)) (cyclosporin A, Novartis), Norvir((R)) (ritonavir), and Fortovase((R)) (saquinavir) have been formulated in self-emulsifying drug delivery...

  15. Impact of gastrointestinal lipolysis on oral lipid-based formulations and bioavailability of lipophilic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrière, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Oil-in-water emulsions are common vehicles for lipids as nutrients and for the delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs. Enhancing oral bioavailability of these drugs using lipid-based formulations (LBF) or self-emulsifying drug delivery systems is one of the current challenges in pharmaceutical industry. Many of the compounds found in LBF (acylglycerols, surfactants with esterified fatty acids, …) are however potential substrates for digestive enzymes. Their digestion (or lipolysis) in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is critical for drug dissolution and absorption: it can be beneficial (drug solubilization/dispersion) or deleterous (drug precipitation) depending on the drug-LBF association. A better understanding of the fate of LBF in the GI tract is therefore required to engineer efficient lipid-based drug delivery systems. In vitro models for testing simultaneously LBF digestion and drug dispersion are in development to predict drug solubilization and bioavailability, select the best drug-LBF association and obtain better in vitro-in vivo correlations. So far, research in this area has focused on LBF lipolysis under intestinal conditions because the small intestine is the main target for drug delivery and absorption, as well as the main site of digestion by pancreatic enzymes. Lipolysis however starts within the stomach through the action of gastric lipase, the first enzyme involved in fat digestion in humans. In vitro digestion experiments show that most LBFs are submitted to gastric lipolysis, and therefore, both intragastric and intestinal digestions are critical for the fate of LBF and drug solubility.

  16. Signal transduction immunohistochemistry - Methods and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Alexander E. Kalyuzhny statement that immunohistochemical detection of labile, low abundance and short-lived signal transduction molecules appears to be a very challenging task actually captures the same reader’s feeling. Each of us daily using immunohistochemical protocols to reveal targets either useful for research or diagnostic aims will surely wonder by which tricky techniques it is possible to overcome the preservation and unmasking of those labile antigens involved in signal transduction. Well, by seventheen chapters grouped in five parts Prof. Alexander E. Kalyuzhny is presenting an invaluable technical and methodological source of hints to satisfy our needs: to overcome troubleshottings if we are already in the field or to orientate those entering the field....

  17. Energy Harvesting By Optimized Piezo Transduction Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Boban, Bijo; Satheesh, U; Devaprakasam, D

    2014-01-01

    We report generation of electrical energy from nonlinear mechanical noises available in the ambient environment using optimized piezo transduction mechanisms. Obtaining energy from an ambient vibration has been attractive for remotely installed standalone microsystems and devices. The mechanical noises in the ambient environment can be converted to electrical energy by a piezo strip based on the principle of piezoelectric effect. In this work, we have designed and developed a standalone energy harvesting module based on piezo transduction mechanisms. Using this designed module we harvested noise energy and stored electrical energy in a capacitor. Using NI-PXI workstation with a LabVIEW programming, the output voltage of the piezo strip and voltage of the capacitor were measured and monitored. In this paper we discuss about the design, development, implementation, performance and characteristics of the energy harvesting module.

  18. Targeted delivery of in situ PCR-amplified Sleeping Beauty transposon genes to cancer cells with lipid-based nanoparticle-like protocells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kun; Fu, Duo; Yu, Dongli; Cui, Changhao; Wang, Li; Guo, Zhaoming; Mao, Chuanbin

    2017-03-01

    A Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system is made of a transposon plasmid (containing gene encoding a desired functional or therapeutic protein) and a transposase plasmid (encoding an enzyme capable of cutting and pasting the gene into the host cell genome). It is a kind of natural, nonviral gene delivery vehicle, which can achieve efficient genomic insertion, providing long-term transgenic expression. However, before the SB transposon system could play a role in promoting gene expression, it has to be delivered efficiently first across cell membrane and then into cell nuclei. Towards this end, we used a nanoparticle-like lipid-based protocell, a closed bilayer of the neutral lipids with the DNA encapsulated inside, to deliver the SB transposon system to cancer cells. The SB transposon system was amplified in situ inside the protocells by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) process, realizing more efficient loading and delivery of the target gene. To reach a high transfection efficiency, we introduced two targeting moieties, folic acid (FA) as a cancer cell-targeting motif and Dexamethasone (DEX) as a nuclear localization signaling molecule, into the protocells. As a result, the FA enabled the modified targeting protocells to deliver the DNA into the cancer cells with an increased efficiency and the DEX promoted the DNA to translocate to cell nuclei, eventually leading to the increased chromosome insertion efficiency of the SB transposon. In vivo study strongly suggested that the transfection efficiency of FA-modified protocells in the tumor tissue was much higher than that in other tissues, which was consistent with the in vitro results. Our studies implied that with the targeting ligand modification, the protocells could be utilized as an efficient targeting gene carrier. Since the protocells were made of neutral lipids without cationic charges, the cytotoxicity of protocells was significantly lower than that of traditional cationic gene carriers such as cationic

  19. Optical racetrack resonator transduction of nanomechanical cantilevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, V T K; Diao, Z; Freeman, M R; Hiebert, W K

    2014-02-07

    Optomechanical transduction has demonstrated its supremacy in probing nanomechanical displacements. In order to apply nano-optomechanical systems (NOMS) as force and mass sensors, knowledge about the transduction responsivity (i.e. the change in measured optical transmission with nanomechanical displacement) and its tradeoffs with system design is paramount. We compare the measured responsivities of NOMS devices with varying length, optomechanical coupling strength gom, and optical cavity properties. Cantilever beams 1.5 to 5 μm long are fabricated 70 to 160 nm from a racetrack resonator optical cavity and their thermomechanical (TM) noise signals are measured. We derive a generic expression for the transduction responsivity of the NOMS in terms of optical and mechanical system parameters such as finesse, optomechanical coupling constant, and interaction length. The form of the expression holds direct insight as to how these parameters affect the responsivity. With this expression, we obtain the optomechanical coupling constants using only measurements of the TM noise power spectra and optical cavity transmission slopes. All optical pump/probe operation is also demonstrated in our side-coupled cantilever-racetrack NOMS. Finally, to assess potential operation in a gas sensing environment, the TM noise signal of a device is measured at atmospheric pressure.

  20. A biosensor for urea from succinimide-modified acrylic microspheres based on reflectance transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulianas, Alizar; Heng, Lee Yook; Ahmad, Musa

    2011-01-01

    New acrylic microspheres were synthesised by photopolymerisation where the succinimide functional group was incorporated during the microsphere preparation. An optical biosensor for urea based on reflectance transduction with a large linear response range to urea was successfully developed using this material. The biosensor utilized succinimide-modified acrylic microspheres immobilized with a Nile blue chromoionophore (ETH 5294) for optical detection and urease enzyme was immobilized on the surface of the microspheres via the succinimide groups. No leaching of the enzyme or chromoionophore was observed. Hydrolysis of the urea by urease changes the pH and leads to a color change of the immobilized chromoionophore. When the color change was monitored by reflectance spectrophotometry, the linear response range of the biosensor to urea was from 0.01 to 1,000 mM (R2 = 0.97) with a limit of detection of 9.97 μM. The biosensor response showed good reproducibility (relative standard deviation = 1.43%, n = 5) with no interference by major cations such as Na+, K+, NH4+ and Mg2+. The use of reflectance as a transduction method led to a large linear response range that is better than that of many urea biosensors based on other optical transduction methods.

  1. A Biosensor for Urea from Succinimide-Modified Acrylic Microspheres Based on Reflectance Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Ahmad

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available New acrylic microspheres were synthesised by photopolymerisation where the succinimide functional group was incorporated during the microsphere preparation. An optical biosensor for urea based on reflectance transduction with a large linear response range to urea was successfully developed using this material. The biosensor utilized succinimide-modified acrylic microspheres immobilized with a Nile blue chromoionophore (ETH 5294 for optical detection and urease enzyme was immobilized on the surface of the microspheres via the succinimide groups. No leaching of the enzyme or chromoionophore was observed. Hydrolysis of the urea by urease changes the pH and leads to a color change of the immobilized chromoionophore. When the color change was monitored by reflectance spectrophotometry, the linear response range of the biosensor to urea was from 0.01 to 1,000 mM (R2 = 0.97 with a limit of detection of 9.97 mM. The biosensor response showed good reproducibility (relative standard deviation = 1.43%, n = 5 with no interference by major cations such as Na+, K+, NH4+ and Mg2+. The use of reflectance as a transduction method led to a large linear response range that is better than that of many urea biosensors based on other optical transduction methods.

  2. Pharmacokinetic aspects and in vitro–in vivo correlation potential for lipid-based formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivacharan Kollipara

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Lipid-based formulations have been an attractive choice among novel drug delivery systems for enhancing the solubility and bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs due to their ability to keep the drug in solubilized state in the gastrointestinal tract. These formulations offer multiple advantages such as reduction in food effect and inter-individual variability, ease of preparation, and the possibility of manufacturing using common excipients available in the market. Despite these advantages, very few products are available in the present market, perhaps due to limited knowledge in the in vitro tests (for prediction of in vivo fate and lack of understanding of the mechanisms behind pharmacokinetic and biopharmaceutical aspects of lipid formulations after oral administration. The current review aims to provide a detailed understanding of the in vivo processing steps involved after oral administration of lipid formulations, their pharmacokinetic aspects and in vitro in vivo correlation (IVIVC perspectives. Various pharmacokinetic and biopharmaceutical aspects such as formulation dispersion and lipid digestion, bioavailability enhancement mechanisms, impact of excipients on efflux transporters, and lymphatic transport are discussed with examples. In addition, various IVIVC approaches towards predicting in vivo data from in vitro dispersion/precipitation, in vitro lipolysis and ex vivo permeation studies are also discussed in detail with help of case studies.

  3. Pharmacokinetic aspects and in vitro-in vivo correlation potential for lipid-based formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollipara, Sivacharan; Gandhi, Rajesh Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Lipid-based formulations have been an attractive choice among novel drug delivery systems for enhancing the solubility and bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs due to their ability to keep the drug in solubilized state in the gastrointestinal tract. These formulations offer multiple advantages such as reduction in food effect and inter-individual variability, ease of preparation, and the possibility of manufacturing using common excipients available in the market. Despite these advantages, very few products are available in the present market, perhaps due to limited knowledge in the in vitro tests (for prediction of in vivo fate) and lack of understanding of the mechanisms behind pharmacokinetic and biopharmaceutical aspects of lipid formulations after oral administration. The current review aims to provide a detailed understanding of the in vivo processing steps involved after oral administration of lipid formulations, their pharmacokinetic aspects and in vitro in vivo correlation (IVIVC) perspectives. Various pharmacokinetic and biopharmaceutical aspects such as formulation dispersion and lipid digestion, bioavailability enhancement mechanisms, impact of excipients on efflux transporters, and lymphatic transport are discussed with examples. In addition, various IVIVC approaches towards predicting in vivo data from in vitro dispersion/precipitation, in vitro lipolysis and ex vivo permeation studies are also discussed in detail with help of case studies.

  4. Biopharmaceutical modeling of drug supersaturation during lipid-based formulation digestion considering an absorption sink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillhart, Cordula; Imanidis, Georgios; Griffin, Brendan T; Kuentz, Martin

    2014-12-01

    In vitro lipolysis is widely utilized for predicting in vivo performance of oral lipid-based formulations (LBFs). However, evaluation of LBFs in the absence of an absorption sink may have limited in vivo relevance. This study aimed at employing biopharmaceutical modeling to simulate LBF digestion and drug supersaturation in a continuous absorptive environment. Three fenofibrate-loaded LBFs were characterized in vitro (dispersion and lipolysis) and drug precipitation was monitored using in-line Raman spectroscopy. In vitro data were combined with pharmacokinetic data derived from an in vivo study in pigs to simulate intestinal LBF transit. This biopharmaceutical model allowed calculation of lipolysis-triggered drug supersaturation while drug and lipolysis products are absorbed from the intestine. The biopharmaceutical model predicted that, in a continuous absorption environment, fenofibrate supersaturation was considerably lower compared to in vitro lipolysis (non-sink). Hence, the extensive drug precipitation observed in vitro was predicted to be unlikely in vivo. The absorption of lipolysis products increased drug supersaturation, but drug precipitation was unlikely for highly permeable drugs. Biopharmaceutical modeling is a valuable approach for predicting LBFs performance in vivo. In the absence of in vitro tools simulating absorptive conditions, modeling strategies should be further considered.

  5. Why Fish Oil Fails: A Comprehensive 21st Century Lipids-Based Physiologic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Peskin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The medical community suffered three significant fish oil failures/setbacks in 2013. Claims that fish oil’s EPA/DHA would stop the progression of heart disease were crushed when The Risk and Prevention Study Collaborative Group (Italy released a conclusive negative finding regarding fish oil for those patients with high risk factors but no previous myocardial infarction. Fish oil failed in all measures of CVD prevention—both primary and secondary. Another major 2013 setback occurred when fish oil’s DHA was shown to significantly increase prostate cancer in men, in particular, high-grade prostate cancer, in the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT analysis by Brasky et al. Another monumental failure occurred in 2013 whereby fish oil’s EPA/DHA failed to improve macular degeneration. In 2010, fish oil’s EPA/DHA failed to help Alzheimer’s victims, even those with low DHA levels. These are by no means isolated failures. The promise of fish oil and its so-called active ingredients EPA / DHA fails time and time again in clinical trials. This lipids-based physiologic review will explain precisely why there should have never been expectation for success. This review will focus on underpublicized lipid science with a focus on physiology.

  6. Spray drying of lipid-based systems loaded with Camellia sinensis polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secolin, Vanessa A; Souza, Claudia R F; Oliveira, Wanderley P

    2017-03-01

    In this work, spray-dried lipid systems based on soy phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol and lauroyl polyoxylglycerides for entrapping Green tea polyphenols were produced. The aim was to study the effects of the encapsulating composition and spray drying conditions on the system performance and physicochemical product properties. The spray dryer powder production yield falls around 50.7 ± 2.8%, which is typical for lab scale spray dryers. Wrinkled and rounded particles, with low surface porosities were generated, independent of the drying carriers (trehalose or lactose) used. The product showed high encapsulation efficiency of Green tea polyphenols, which was promptly redispersible in water. It presented low density, and good compressive and flow properties. The results herein reported confirm the feasibility of the entrapment of Green tea polyphenols in lipid-based compositions by spray drying in presence of the drying carriers evaluated. The spray-dried microparticles show high potential to be used as additive in food, nutraceutical and pharmaceutical products.

  7. Assembling nanoparticle coatings to improve the drug delivery performance of lipid based colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simovic, Spomenka; Barnes, Timothy J.; Tan, Angel; Prestidge, Clive A.

    2012-02-01

    Lipid based colloids (e.g. emulsions and liposomes) are widely used as drug delivery systems, but often suffer from physical instabilities and non-ideal drug encapsulation and delivery performance. We review the application of engineered nanoparticle layers at the interface of lipid colloids to improve their performance as drug delivery systems. In addition we focus on the creation of novel hybrid nanomaterials from nanoparticle-lipid colloid assemblies and their drug delivery applications. Specifically, nanoparticle layers can be engineered to enhance the physical stability of submicron lipid emulsions and liposomes, satbilise encapsulated active ingredients against chemical degradation, control molecular transport and improve the dermal and oral delivery characteristics, i.e. increase absorption, bioavailability and facilitate targeted delivery. It is feasible that hybrid nanomaterials composed of nanoparticles and colloidal lipids are effective encapsulation and delivery systems for both poorly soluble drugs and biological drugs and may form the basis for the next generation of medicines. Additional pre-clinical research including specific animal model studies are required to advance the peptide/protein delivery systems, whereas the silica lipid hybrid systems have now entered human clinical trials for poorly soluble drugs.

  8. Oral and transdermal drug delivery systems: role of lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabalaya, Rajan; Musa, Muhammad Nuh; Kifli, Nurolaini; David, Sheba R

    2017-01-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) dosage forms, particularly those using lipid-based lyotropic LCs (LLCs), have generated considerable interest as potential drug delivery systems. LCs have the physical properties of liquids but retain some of the structural characteristics of crystalline solids. They are compatible with hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds of many different classes and can protect even biologicals and nucleic acids from degradation. This review, focused on research conducted over the past 5 years, discusses the structural evaluation of LCs and their effects in drug formulations. The structural classification of LLCs into lamellar, hexagonal and micellar cubic phases is described. The structures of these phases are influenced by the addition of surfactants, which include a variety of nontoxic, biodegradable lipids; these also enhance drug solubility. LLC structure influences drug localization, particle size and viscosity, which, in turn, determine drug delivery properties. Through several specific examples, we describe the applications of LLCs in oral and topical drug formulations, the latter including transdermal and ocular delivery. In oral LLC formulations, micelle compositions and the resulting LLC structures can determine drug solubilization and stability as well as intestinal transport and absorption. Similarly, in topical LLC formulations, composition can influence whether the drug is retained in the skin or delivered transdermally. Owing to their enhancement of drug stability and promotion of controlled drug delivery, LLCs are becoming increasingly popular in pharmaceutical formulations.

  9. Oral and transdermal drug delivery systems: role of lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabalaya, Rajan; Musa, Muhammad Nuh; Kifli, Nurolaini; David, Sheba R

    2017-01-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) dosage forms, particularly those using lipid-based lyotropic LCs (LLCs), have generated considerable interest as potential drug delivery systems. LCs have the physical properties of liquids but retain some of the structural characteristics of crystalline solids. They are compatible with hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds of many different classes and can protect even biologicals and nucleic acids from degradation. This review, focused on research conducted over the past 5 years, discusses the structural evaluation of LCs and their effects in drug formulations. The structural classification of LLCs into lamellar, hexagonal and micellar cubic phases is described. The structures of these phases are influenced by the addition of surfactants, which include a variety of nontoxic, biodegradable lipids; these also enhance drug solubility. LLC structure influences drug localization, particle size and viscosity, which, in turn, determine drug delivery properties. Through several specific examples, we describe the applications of LLCs in oral and topical drug formulations, the latter including transdermal and ocular delivery. In oral LLC formulations, micelle compositions and the resulting LLC structures can determine drug solubilization and stability as well as intestinal transport and absorption. Similarly, in topical LLC formulations, composition can influence whether the drug is retained in the skin or delivered transdermally. Owing to their enhancement of drug stability and promotion of controlled drug delivery, LLCs are becoming increasingly popular in pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:28243062

  10. Lipids-based nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) for improved oral bioavailability of sirolimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qin; Hu, Xiongwei; Ma, Yuhua; Xie, Yunchang; Lu, Yi; Qi, Jianping; Xiang, Li; Li, Fengqian; Wu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    The main purpose of this study was to improve the oral bioavailability of sirolimus (SRL), a poorly water-soluble immunosuppressant, by encapsulating into lipids-based nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs). SRL-loaded NLCs (SRL-NLCs) were prepared by a high-pressure homogenization method with glycerol distearates (PRECIROL ATO-5) as the solid lipid, oleic acid as the liquid lipids, and Tween 80 as the emulsifier. The SRL-NLCs prepared under optimum conditions was spherical in shape with a mean particle size of about 108.3 nm and an entrapment efficiency of 99.81%. In vitro release of SRL-NLCs was very slow, about 2.15% at 12 h, while in vitro lipolysis test showed fast digestion of the NLCs within 1 h. Relative oral bioavailability of SRL-NLCs in Beagle dogs was 1.81-folds that of the commercial nanocrystalline sirolimus tablets Rapamune®. In conclusion, the NLCs show potential to improve the oral bioavailability of SRL.

  11. Binary lipids-based nanostructured lipid carriers for improved oral bioavailability of silymarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangguan, Mingzhu; Lu, Yi; Qi, Jianping; Han, Jin; Tian, Zhiqiang; Xie, Yunchang; Hu, Fuqiang; Yuan, Hailong; Wu, Wei

    2014-02-01

    The main purpose of this study was to prepare binary lipids-based nanostructured lipid carriers to improve the oral bioavailability of silymarin, a poorly water-soluble liver protectant. Silymarin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers were prepared by the method of high-pressure homogenization with glycerol distearates (Precirol ATO-5) and oleic acid as the solid and liquid lipids, respectively, and lecithin (Lipoid E 100) and Tween-80 as the emulsifiers. The silymarin-nanostructured lipid carrier prepared under optimum conditions was spherical in shape with mean particle size of ∼78.87 nm, entrapment efficiency of 87.55%, loading capacity of 8.32%, and zeta potential of -65.3 mV, respectively. In vitro release of silymarin-nanostructured lipid carriers was very limited even after 12 h, while in vitro lipolysis showed fast digestion of nanostructured lipid carriers within 1 h. Relative oral bioavailability of silymarin-nanostructured lipid carriers in Beagle dogs was 2.54- and 3.10-fold that of marketed Legalon® and silymarin solid dispersion pellets, respectively. It was concluded that nanostructured lipid carriers were potential drug delivery systems to improve the bioavailability of silymarin. Other than improved dissolution, alternative mechanisms such as facilitated absorption as well as lymphatic transport may contribute to bioavailability enhancement.

  12. Advanced stable lipid-based formulations for a patient-centric product design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Karin; Saurugger, Eva-Maria; Kienberger, Diana; Lopes, Diogo; Haack, Detlev; Köberle, Martin; Stehr, Michael; Lochmann, Dirk; Zimmer, Andreas; Salar-Behzadi, Sharareh

    2016-01-30

    Multiparticulate dosage forms are a recent strategy to meet the special needs of children, elderly people and patients suffering from dysphagia. Our study presents a novel and cost-efficient approach for the manufacturing of a taste-masked multiparticulate system with a stable immediate release profile by applying lipid-based excipients in a solvent-free hot melt coating process. The thermosensitive N-acetylcysteine (N-ac) was used as model drug and hot-melt coated with a mixture of tripalmitin and polysorbate 65. A predictive in vitro method for the evaluation of the taste masking efficiency was developed based on the deprotonation of the carboxyl group of N-ac and the decline of pH, responsible for the unpleasant sour taste of the compound. The method was confirmed using in vivo studies. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray scattering experiments revealed polymorphic transformation and its dependency on transformation time, temperature and emulsifier concentration. During the process, the coating was transformed almost completely into the stable β-polymorph, leading to an unaltered dissolution profile during storage. A statistical design was conducted that revealed the critical process parameters affecting the taste masking efficiency and drug release. This study shows the successful application of solvent-free hot-melt coating in the development of a taste-masked and stable formulation.

  13. Electromechanical Energy Transduction for Hybrid Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy Vanja, Sridhar; Kelly, Michael W.; Caruso, A. N.

    2010-03-01

    Hybrid vehicle technology seeks to reduce the total energy consumption used for vehicle locomotion by recovering and reutilizing kinetic energy that is otherwise unrecovered or dissipated in conventional vehicle deceleration. The goal of the work is to determine the transduction mechanisms that work towards a Carnot efficiency without considering constraints or limitations placed by cost or materials. Specifically, this talk will present ideal thermodynamic models of energy exchange between mechanical, electrostatic, electromechanical and electrochemical devices with a goal of projecting an ideal hybrid vehicle.

  14. Brassinosteroid signal transduction: An emerging picture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qiaomei; MA Ligeng

    2003-01-01

    Steroid hormones play essential roles in animal growth and development. Steroid signaling in animal system is focused on the direct gene regulation response mediated by its nuclear receptors. Recently, steroid hormones are also found in plants. Identification of BRI1 - a critical component of the plasma-membrane steroid receptor complex, and the related signal transduction pathway mediated by the membrane receptor have revealed an elementary picture of BR signaling from the cell surface perception to the activation of BR-responsive nuclear genes.

  15. Automated modelling of signal transduction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aach John

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intracellular signal transduction is achieved by networks of proteins and small molecules that transmit information from the cell surface to the nucleus, where they ultimately effect transcriptional changes. Understanding the mechanisms cells use to accomplish this important process requires a detailed molecular description of the networks involved. Results We have developed a computational approach for generating static models of signal transduction networks which utilizes protein-interaction maps generated from large-scale two-hybrid screens and expression profiles from DNA microarrays. Networks are determined entirely by integrating protein-protein interaction data with microarray expression data, without prior knowledge of any pathway intermediates. In effect, this is equivalent to extracting subnetworks of the protein interaction dataset whose members have the most correlated expression profiles. Conclusion We show that our technique accurately reconstructs MAP Kinase signaling networks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This approach should enhance our ability to model signaling networks and to discover new components of known networks. More generally, it provides a method for synthesizing molecular data, either individual transcript abundance measurements or pairwise protein interactions, into higher level structures, such as pathways and networks.

  16. Engineering key components in a synthetic eukaryotic signal transduction pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Antunes, Mauricio S; Kevin J Morey; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Bowen, Tessa A.; Smith, J. Jeff; Webb, Colleen T.; Hellinga, Homme W.; Medford, June I.

    2009-01-01

    Signal transduction underlies how living organisms detect and respond to stimuli. A goal of synthetic biology is to rewire natural signal transduction systems. Bacteria, yeast, and plants sense environmental aspects through conserved histidine kinase (HK) signal transduction systems. HK protein components are typically comprised of multiple, relatively modular, and conserved domains. Phosphate transfer between these components may exhibit considerable cross talk between the otherwise apparent...

  17. Tools for Early Prediction of Drug Loading in Lipid-Based Formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Identification of the usefulness of lipid-based formulations (LBFs) for delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs is at date mainly experimentally based. In this work we used a diverse drug data set, and more than 2,000 solubility measurements to develop experimental and computational tools to predict the loading capacity of LBFs. Computational models were developed to enable in silico prediction of solubility, and hence drug loading capacity, in the LBFs. Drug solubility in mixed mono-, di-, triglycerides (Maisine 35-1 and Capmul MCM EP) correlated (R2 0.89) as well as the drug solubility in Carbitol and other ethoxylated excipients (PEG400, R2 0.85; Polysorbate 80, R2 0.90; Cremophor EL, R2 0.93). A melting point below 150 °C was observed to result in a reasonable solubility in the glycerides. The loading capacity in LBFs was accurately calculated from solubility data in single excipients (R2 0.91). In silico models, without the demand of experimentally determined solubility, also gave good predictions of the loading capacity in these complex formulations (R2 0.79). The framework established here gives a better understanding of drug solubility in single excipients and of LBF loading capacity. The large data set studied revealed that experimental screening efforts can be rationalized by solubility measurements in key excipients or from solid state information. For the first time it was shown that loading capacity in complex formulations can be accurately predicted using molecular information extracted from calculated descriptors and thermal properties of the crystalline drug. PMID:26568134

  18. Assembly of the transmembrane domain of E. coli PhoQ histidine kinase: implications for signal transduction from molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmin, Thomas; Soto, Cinque S; Clinthorne, Graham; DeGrado, William F; Dal Peraro, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    The PhoQP two-component system is a signaling complex essential for bacterial virulence and cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance. PhoQ is the histidine kinase chemoreceptor of this tandem machine and assembles in a homodimer conformation spanning the bacterial inner membrane. Currently, a full understanding of the PhoQ signal transduction is hindered by the lack of a complete atomistic structure. In this study, an atomistic model of the key transmembrane (TM) domain is assembled by using molecular simulations, guided by experimental cross-linking data. The formation of a polar pocket involving Asn202 in the lumen of the tetrameric TM bundle is crucial for the assembly and solvation of the domain. Moreover, a concerted displacement of the TM helices at the periplasmic side is found to modulate a rotation at the cytoplasmic end, supporting the transduction of the chemical signal through a combination of scissoring and rotational movement of the TM helices.

  19. Assembly of the transmembrane domain of E. coli PhoQ histidine kinase: implications for signal transduction from molecular simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lemmin

    Full Text Available The PhoQP two-component system is a signaling complex essential for bacterial virulence and cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance. PhoQ is the histidine kinase chemoreceptor of this tandem machine and assembles in a homodimer conformation spanning the bacterial inner membrane. Currently, a full understanding of the PhoQ signal transduction is hindered by the lack of a complete atomistic structure. In this study, an atomistic model of the key transmembrane (TM domain is assembled by using molecular simulations, guided by experimental cross-linking data. The formation of a polar pocket involving Asn202 in the lumen of the tetrameric TM bundle is crucial for the assembly and solvation of the domain. Moreover, a concerted displacement of the TM helices at the periplasmic side is found to modulate a rotation at the cytoplasmic end, supporting the transduction of the chemical signal through a combination of scissoring and rotational movement of the TM helices.

  20. Quantifying efficient information transduction of biochemical signaling cascades

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Cells can be considered as systems that utilize changes in thermodynamic entropy as information. Therefore, they serve as useful models for investigating the relationships between entropy production and information transmission, i.e., signal transduction. Based on the hypothesis that cells apply a chemical reaction cascade for the most efficient transduction of information, we adopted a coding design that minimizes the number of bits per concentration of molecules that are employed for information transduction. As a result, the average rate of entropy production is uniform across all cycles in a cascade reaction. Thus, the entropy production rate can be a valuable measure for the quantification of intracellular signal transduction.

  1. Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems in Cancer Therapy: What Is Available and What Is Yet to Come

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingchoncharoen, Phatsapong; Kalinowski, Danuta S.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death in many countries around the world. However, the efficacy of current standard treatments for a variety of cancers is suboptimal. First, most cancer treatments lack specificity, meaning that these treatments affect both cancer cells and their normal counterparts. Second, many anticancer agents are highly toxic, and thus, limit their use in treatment. Third, a number of cytotoxic chemotherapeutics are highly hydrophobic, which limits their utility in cancer therapy. Finally, many chemotherapeutic agents exhibit short half-lives that curtail their efficacy. As a result of these deficiencies, many current treatments lead to side effects, noncompliance, and patient inconvenience due to difficulties in administration. However, the application of nanotechnology has led to the development of effective nanosized drug delivery systems known commonly as nanoparticles. Among these delivery systems, lipid-based nanoparticles, particularly liposomes, have shown to be quite effective at exhibiting the ability to: 1) improve the selectivity of cancer chemotherapeutic agents; 2) lower the cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs to normal tissues, and thus, reduce their toxic side effects; 3) increase the solubility of hydrophobic drugs; and 4) offer a prolonged and controlled release of agents. This review will discuss the current state of lipid-based nanoparticle research, including the development of liposomes for cancer therapy, different strategies for tumor targeting, liposomal formulation of various anticancer drugs that are commercially available, recent progress in liposome technology for the treatment of cancer, and the next generation of lipid-based nanoparticles. PMID:27363439

  2. Simulating the digestion of lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS): overview of in vitro lipolysis models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolko, Katarina; Zvonar, Alenka; Gašperlin, Mirjana

    2014-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in the pharmaceutical science is the improvement of oral bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. Lately, one of the most attractive approaches has been formulation of lipid based drug delivery systems. However, the emerging popularity of these systems in the last decade has brought to light the need for efficient methods for their in vitro evaluation that would serve as their in vivo behaviour prediction tool. Because lipids are subject to lipid digestion and multiple absorption pathways in vivo, simple dissolution tests are not predictive enough when testing lipid based delivery systems. To assert these needs, the in vitro lipolysis model has been developed, utilizing pancreatic enzymes, bile and phospholipids in a temperature controlled chamber to simulate in vivo digestion. However, with very variable physiological conditions in gastrointestinal tract, this model has not been yet standardised and experiments vary among different laboratories. This review discusses in vivo events following oral application of lipid based delivery, in vitro lipolysis models to emulate them and their future perspectives.

  3. Trends in the Assessment of Drug Supersaturation and Precipitation In Vitro Using Lipid-Based Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillhart, Cordula; Kuentz, Martin

    2016-09-01

    The generation of drug supersaturation close to the absorptive site is an important mechanism of how several formulation technologies enhance oral absorption and bioavailability. Lipid-based formulations belong to the supersaturating drug delivery systems although this is not the only mechanism of how drug absorption is promoted in vivo. Different methods to determine drug supersaturation and precipitation from lipid-based formulations are described in the literature. Experimental in vitro setups vary according to their complexity and proximity to the in vivo conditions and, therefore, some tests are used for early formulation screening, while others better qualify for a later stage of development. The present commentary discusses this rapidly evolving field of in vitro testing with a special focus on the advancements in analytical techniques and new approaches of mechanistic modeling. The importance of considering a drug absorption sink is particularly emphasized. This commentary should help formulators in the pharmaceutical industry as well as in academia to make informed decisions on how to conduct in vitro tests for lipid-based delivery systems and to decide on the implications of experimental results. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Bayesian Analysis of a Lipid-Based Physiologically Based Toxicokinetic Model for a Mixture of PCBs in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan F. Sasso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A lipid-based physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK model has been developed for a mixture of six polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs in rats. The aim of this study was to apply population Bayesian analysis to a lipid PBTK model, while incorporating an internal exposure-response model linking enzyme induction and metabolic rate. Lipid-based physiologically based toxicokinetic models are a subset of PBTK models that can simulate concentrations of highly lipophilic compounds in tissue lipids, without the need for partition coefficients. A hierarchical treatment of population metabolic parameters and a CYP450 induction model were incorporated into the lipid-based PBTK framework, and Markov-Chain Monte Carlo was applied to in vivo data. A mass balance of CYP1A and CYP2B in the liver was necessary to model PCB metabolism at high doses. The linked PBTK/induction model remained on a lipid basis and was capable of modeling PCB concentrations in multiple tissues for all dose levels and dose profiles.

  5. In vitro digestion kinetics of excipients for lipid-based drug delivery and introduction of a relative lipolysis half life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Yvonne E; Imanidis, Georgios; Kuentz, Martin

    2012-10-01

    Lipid-based drug delivery systems are widely used for enhancing the solubility of poorly water soluble drugs in the gastro-intestinal tract. Following oral intake, lipid systems undergo digestion in the stomach as well as the intestine. Lipolysis is here a complex process at the oil/water interface, influenced by numerous factors. To study the digestibility of nine excipients often used in lipid-based drug delivery systems. In addition, we introduced a mathematical model to describe in vitro lipolysis kinetics. A relative lipolysis half life was defined using the reference excipient medium-chain triglycerides. Using pH-stat equipment, the NaOH consumption was determined in an in vitro lipolysis assay. We identified two classes of excipients. Some additives were partially hydrolysed, whereas other excipients displayed complete lipolysis. For the latter class, a simplified mathematical model provided a good first approximation of initial lipolysis kinetics. Digestion characterization of excipients is important for the development of lipid-based delivery systems. The applied kinetic model and the concept of a relative lipolysis half life seemed to be promising tools for comparing in vitro lipolysis results.

  6. Genetics of auditory mechano-electrical transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Nicolas; Petit, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The hair bundles of cochlear hair cells play a central role in the auditory mechano-electrical transduction (MET) process. The identification of MET components and of associated molecular complexes by biochemical approaches is impeded by the very small number of hair cells within the cochlea. In contrast, human and mouse genetics have proven to be particularly powerful. The study of inherited forms of deafness led to the discovery of several essential proteins of the MET machinery, which are currently used as entry points to decipher the associated molecular networks. Notably, MET relies not only on the MET machinery but also on several elements ensuring the proper sound-induced oscillation of the hair bundle or the ionic environment necessary to drive the MET current. Here, we review the most significant advances in the molecular bases of the MET process that emerged from the genetics of hearing.

  7. Nonequilibrium phase transitions in biomolecular signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric; Krishnamurthy, Supriya; Fontana, Walter; Krakauer, David

    2011-11-01

    We study a mechanism for reliable switching in biomolecular signal-transduction cascades. Steady bistable states are created by system-size cooperative effects in populations of proteins, in spite of the fact that the phosphorylation-state transitions of any molecule, by means of which the switch is implemented, are highly stochastic. The emergence of switching is a nonequilibrium phase transition in an energetically driven, dissipative system described by a master equation. We use operator and functional integral methods from reaction-diffusion theory to solve for the phase structure, noise spectrum, and escape trajectories and first-passage times of a class of minimal models of switches, showing how all critical properties for switch behavior can be computed within a unified framework.

  8. Striatal Signal Transduction and Drug Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philibin, Scott D.; Hernandez, Adan; Self, David W.; Bibb, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Drug addiction is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by loss of control over motivated behavior. The need for effective treatments mandates a greater understanding of the causes and identification of new therapeutic targets for drug development. Drugs of abuse subjugate normal reward-related behavior to uncontrollable drug-seeking and -taking. Contributions of brain reward circuitry are being mapped with increasing precision. The role of synaptic plasticity in addiction and underlying molecular mechanisms contributing to the formation of the addicted state are being delineated. Thus we may now consider the role of striatal signal transduction in addiction from a more integrative neurobiological perspective. Drugs of abuse alter dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in medium spiny neurons of the striatum. Dopamine receptors important for reward serve as principle targets of drugs abuse, which interact with glutamate receptor signaling critical for reward learning. Complex networks of intracellular signal transduction mechanisms underlying these receptors are strongly stimulated by addictive drugs. Through these mechanisms, repeated drug exposure alters functional and structural neuroplasticity, resulting in transition to the addicted biological state and behavioral outcomes that typify addiction. Ca2+ and cAMP represent key second messengers that initiate signaling cascades, which regulate synaptic strength and neuronal excitability. Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are fundamental mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity that are dysregulated by drugs of abuse. Increased understanding of the regulatory mechanisms by which protein kinases and phosphatases exert their effects during normal reward learning and the addiction process may lead to novel targets and pharmacotherapeutics with increased efficacy in promoting abstinence and decreased side effects, such as interference with natural reward, for drug addiction. PMID

  9. Striatal signal transduction and drug addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott D. Philibin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Drug addiction is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by loss of control over motivated behavior. The need for effective treatments mandates a greater understanding of the causes and identification of new therapeutic targets for drug development. Drugs of abuse subjugate normal reward-related behavior to uncontrollable drug-seeking and -taking. Contributions of brain reward circuitry are being mapped with increasing precision. The role of synaptic plasticity in addiction and underlying molecular mechanisms contributing to the formation of the addicted state are being delineated. Thus we may now consider the role of striatal signal transduction in addiction from a more integrative neurobiological perspective. Drugs of abuse alter dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in medium spiny neurons of the striatum. Dopamine receptors important for reward serve as principle targets of drugs abuse, which interact with glutamate receptor signaling critical for reward learning. Complex networks of intracellular signal transduction mechanisms underlying these receptors are strongly stimulated by addictive drugs. Through these mechanisms, repeated drug exposure alters functional and structural neuroplasticity, resulting in transition to the addicted biological state and behavioral outcomes that typify addiction. Ca2+ and cAMP represent key second messengers that initiate signaling cascades, which regulate synaptic strength and neuronal excitability. Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are fundamental mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity that are dysregulated by drugs of abuse. Increased understanding of the regulatory mechanisms by which protein kinases and phosphatases exert their effects during normal reward learning and the addiction process may lead to novel targets and pharmacotherapeutics with increased efficacy in promoting abstinence and decreased side effects, such as interference with natural reward, for drug

  10. Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplements Increase Energy and Macronutrient Intakes from Complementary Food among Malawian Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsworth, Jaimie; Kumwenda, Chiza; Arimond, Mary; Maleta, Kenneth; Phuka, John; Rehman, Andrea M; Vosti, Stephen A; Ashorn, Ulla; Filteau, Suzanne; Dewey, Kathryn G; Ashorn, Per; Ferguson, Elaine L

    2016-02-01

    Low intakes of good-quality complementary foods (CFs) contribute to undernutrition and consequently negatively affect health, growth, and development. Lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNSs) are designed to ensure dietary adequacy in micronutrients and essential fatty acids and to provide some energy and high-quality protein. In populations in which acute energy deficiency is rare, the dose-dependent effect of LNSs on CF intakes is unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the difference in energy and macronutrient intakes from CF between a control (no supplement) group and 3 groups that received 10, 20, or 40 g LNS/d. We collected repeated interactive 24-h dietary recalls from caregivers of rural Malawian 9- to 10-mo-old infants (n = 748) to estimate dietary intakes (LNS and all non-breast-milk foods) of energy and macronutrients and their dietary patterns. All infants were participating in a 12-mo randomized controlled trial to investigate the efficacy of various doses of LNS for preventing undernutrition. Dietary energy intakes were significantly higher among infants in the LNS intervention groups than in the control group (396, 406, and 388 kcal/d in the 10-, 20-, and 40-g LNS/d groups, respectively, compared with 345 kcal/d; each pairwise P energy intakes between groups who were administered the different LNS doses (10 g LNS/d compared with 20 g LNS/d: P = 0.72; 10 g LNS/d compared with 40 g LNS/d: P ≥ 0.67; 20 g LNS/d compared with 40 g LNS/d: P = 0.94). Intakes of protein and fat were significantly higher in the LNS intervention groups than in the control group. No significant intergroup differences were found in median intakes of energy from non-LNS CFs (357, 347, and 296 kcal/d in the 10-, 20-, and 40-g LNS/d groups, respectively, compared with 345 kcal/d in the control group; P = 0.11). LNSs in doses of 10-40 g/d increase intakes of energy and macronutrients among 9- to 10-mo-old Malawian infants, without displacing locally available CFs

  11. 50years of oral lipid-based formulations: Provenance, progress and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Orlagh M; Crum, Matthew F; McEvoy, Claire L; Trevaskis, Natalie L; Williams, Hywel D; Pouton, Colin W; Charman, William N; Bergström, Christel A S; Porter, Christopher J H

    2016-06-01

    Lipid based formulations (LBF) provide well proven opportunities to enhance the oral absorption of drugs and drug candidates that sit close to, or beyond, the boundaries of Lipinski's 'rule-of-five' chemical space. Advantages in permeability, efflux and presystemic metabolism are evident; however, the primary benefit is in increases in dissolution and apparent intestinal solubility for lipophilic, poorly water soluble drugs. This review firstly details the inherent advantages of LBF, their general properties and classification, and provides a brief retrospective assessment of the development of LBF over the past fifty years. More detailed analysis of the ability of LBF to promote intestinal solubilisation, supersaturation and absorption is then provided alongside review of the methods employed to assess formulation performance. Critical review of the ability of simple dispersion and more complex in vitro digestion methods to predict formulation performance subsequently reveals marked differences in the correlative ability of in vitro tests, depending on the properties of the drug involved. Notably, for highly permeable low melting drugs e.g. fenofibrate, LBF appear to provide significant benefit in all cases, and sustained ongoing solubilisation may not be required. In other cases, and particularly for higher melting point drugs such as danazol, where re-dissolution of crystalline precipitate drug is likely to be slow, correlations with ongoing solubilisation and supersaturation are more evident. In spite of their potential benefits, one limitation to broader use of LBF is low drug solubility in the excipients employed to generate formulations. Techniques to increase drug lipophilicity and lipid solubility are therefore explored, and in particular those methods that provide for temporary enhancement including lipophilic ionic liquid and prodrug technologies. The transient nature of these lipophilicity increases enhances lipid solubility and LBF viability, but

  12. Cationic polymers and porous materials

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Yu

    2017-04-27

    According to one or more embodiments, cationic polymers may be produced which include one or more monomers containing cations. Such cationic polymers may be utilized as structure directing agents to form mesoporous zeolites. The mesoporous zeolites may include micropores as well as mesopores, and may have a surface area of greater than 350 m2/g and a pore volume of greater than 0.3 cm3/g. Also described are core/shell zeolites, where at least the shell portion includes a mesoporous zeolite material.

  13. Synthetic cation-selective nanotube: Permeant cations chaperoned by anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A.; Gordon, Dan; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2011-01-01

    The ability to design ion-selective, synthetic nanotubes which mimic biological ion channels may have significant implications for the future treatment of bacteria, diseases, and as ultrasensitive biosensors. We present the design of a synthetic nanotube made from carbon atoms that selectively allows monovalent cations to move across and rejects all anions. The cation-selective nanotube mimics some of the salient properties of biological ion channels. Before practical nanodevices are successfully fabricated it is vital that proof-of-concept computational studies are performed. With this in mind we use molecular and stochastic dynamics simulations to characterize the dynamics of ion permeation across a single-walled (10, 10), 36 Å long, carbon nanotube terminated with carboxylic acid with an effective radius of 5.08 Å. Although cations encounter a high energy barrier of 7 kT, its height is drastically reduced by a chloride ion in the nanotube. The presence of a chloride ion near the pore entrance thus enables a cation to enter the pore and, once in the pore, it is chaperoned by the resident counterion across the narrow pore. The moment the chaperoned cation transits the pore, the counterion moves back to the entrance to ferry another ion. The synthetic nanotube has a high sodium conductance of 124 pS and shows linear current-voltage and current-concentration profiles. The cation-anion selectivity ratio ranges from 8 to 25, depending on the ionic concentrations in the reservoirs.

  14. FCJ-124 Interactive Environments as Fields of Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristoph Brunner

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a critical inquiry of interactive environments as fields of transduction. It is argued that Gilbert Simondon’s concepts of individuation, transduction, in-formation, the preindividual, and the associated milieu enable a processual thinking of the analysis and design of interactive technologies as technogenetic emergence. These concepts offer a way for interaction design to understand interactive environments through the dynamics between fields of transduction and fields of experience in relational and affective terms. The article analyses the way in which two technological assemblages, Voz Alta and the Impossible Room, provide different experiential fields experimenting with the transductive power of digital and interactive media. We emphasise the potential for creating new modes of experience. Our aim is to underline the necessary convergences between practices of design and thought; to enable affectively engaging fields of transduction.

  15. Transductive versions of the LASSO and the Dantzig Selector

    CERN Document Server

    Alquier, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Transductive methods are useful in prediction problems when the training dataset is composed of a large number of unlabeled observations and a smaller number of labeled observations. In this paper, we propose an approach for developing transductive prediction procedures that are able to take advantage of the sparsity in the high dimensional linear regression. More precisely, we define transductive versions of the LASSO and the Dantzig Selector . These procedures combine labeled and unlabeled observations of the training dataset to produce a prediction for the unlabeled observations. We propose an experimental study of the transductive estimators, that shows that they improve the LASSO and Dantzig Selector in many situations, and particularly in high dimensional problems when the predictors are correlated. We then provide non-asymptotic theoretical guarantees for these estimation methods. Interestingly, our theoretical results show that the Transductive LASSO and Dantzig Selector satisfy sparsity inequalities ...

  16. An intimate link: two-component signal transduction systems and metal transport systems in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kamna; Senadheera, Dilani B; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved various strategies to contend with high concentrations of environmental heavy metal ions for rapid, adaptive responses to maintain cell viability. Evidence gathered in the past two decades suggests that bacterial two-component signal transduction systems (TCSTSs) are intimately involved in monitoring cation accumulation, and can regulate the expression of related metabolic and virulence genes to elicit adaptive responses to changes in the concentration of these ions. Using examples garnered from recent studies, we summarize the cross-regulatory relationships between metal ions and TCSTSs. We present evidence of how bacterial TCSTSs modulate metal ion homeostasis and also how metal ions, in turn, function to control the activities of these signaling systems linked with bacterial survival and virulence.

  17. Cationic Nitrogen Doped Helical Nanographenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun; Feng, Xinliang; Berger, Reinhard; Popov, Alexey A; Weigand, Jan J; Vincon, Ilka; Machata, Peter; Hennersdorf, Felix; Zhou, Youjia; Fu, Yubin

    2017-09-13

    Herein, we report on the synthesis of a series of novel cationic nitrogen doped nanographenes (CNDN) by rhodium catalyzed annulation reactions. This powerful method allows for the synthesis of cationic nanographenes with non-planar, axial chiral geometries. Single-crystal X-ray analysis reveals helical and cove-edged structures. Compared to their all-carbon analogues, the CNDN exhibit energetically lower lying frontier orbitals with a reduced optical energy gap and an electron accepting behavior. All derivatives show quasi reversible reductions in cyclic voltammetry. Depending on the number of nitrogen dopant, in situ spectroelectrochemistry proves the formation of neutral radicals (one nitrogen dopant) or radical cations (two nitrogen dopants) upon reduction. The developed synthetic protocol paves the way for the design and synthesis of expanded nanographenes or even graphene nanoribbons containing cationic nitrogen doping. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. The Membrane and Lipids as Integral Participants in Signal Transduction: Lipid Signal Transduction for the Non-Lipid Biochemist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyster, Kathleen M.

    2007-01-01

    Reviews of signal transduction have often focused on the cascades of protein kinases and protein phosphatases and their cytoplasmic substrates that become activated in response to extracellular signals. Lipids, lipid kinases, and lipid phosphatases have not received the same amount of attention as proteins in studies of signal transduction.…

  19. Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Maria Teresa; Lee, Jiwoong

    2017-01-01

    and KCN, are selectively bound to the catalyst, providing exceptionally high enantioselectivities for kinetic resolutions, elimination reactions (fluoride base), and Strecker synthesis (cyanide nucleophile). Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis was recently expanded to silicon-based reagents, enabling...... solvents, thus increasing their applicability in synthesis. The expansion of this concept to chiral polyethers led to the emergence of asymmetric cation-binding catalysis, where chiral counter anions are generated from metal salts, particularly using BINOL-based polyethers. Alkali metal salts, namely KF...

  20. Transduction mechanism of carbon nanotubes in solid-contact ion-selective electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Gastón A; Macho, Santiago; Bobacka, Johan; Rius, F Xavier

    2009-01-15

    Porous carbon materials and carbon nanotubes were recently used as solid contacts in ion-selective electrodes (ISE), and the signal transduction mechanism of these carbon-based materials is therefore of great interest. In this work the ion-to-electron transduction mechanism of carbon nanotubes is studied by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are deposited on glassy carbon (GC) disk electrodes by repetitive spraying, resulting in SWCNT layers with thicknesses of 10, 35, and 50 mum. The impedance spectra of these GC/SWCNT electrodes in contact with aqueous electrolyte solution show a very small resistance and a large bulk capacitance that is related to a large effective double layer at the SWCNT/electrolyte interface. Interestingly, the impedance response of GC/SWCNT is very similar to that of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) film electrodes studied earlier under the same experimental conditions. The same equivalent circuit is valid for both types of materials. The reason is that both materials can be described schematically as an asymmetric capacitor where one side is formed by electronic charge (electrons/holes) in the SWCNT wall or along the conjugated polymer chain of PEDOT and the other side is formed by ions (anions/cations) in the solution (or in the ion-selective membrane when used as a solid contact in ISE).

  1. Dissolution of Lipid-Based Matrices in Simulated Gastrointestinal Solutions to Evaluate Their Potential for the Encapsulation of Bioactive Ingredients for Foods

    OpenAIRE

    Yves Raymond; Champagne, Claude P.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the study was to compare the dissolution of chocolate to other lipid-based matrices suitable for the microencapsulation of bioactive ingredients in simulated gastrointestinal solutions. Particles having approximately 750 μm or 2.5 mm were prepared from the following lipid-based matrices: cocoa butter, fractionated palm kernel oil (FPKO), chocolate, beeswax, carnauba wax, and paraffin. They were added to solutions designed to simulate gastric secretions (GS) or duodenum secretions ...

  2. Mechanisms of UV-induced signal transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulms, D.; Schwarz, T. [Univ. Muenster, Muenster (Germany). Ludwing Boltzmann Inst. for Cell Biology and Immunobiology of the Skin

    2002-04-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UV) causes a variety of biological effects that can be either beneficial or harmful for human health. To exert these effects on a cellular basis, UV uses a variety of signaling pathways. DNA is the major chromophore for UVB. Thus, nuclear DNA damage has been detected to be a major mediator of numerous UVB effects, and experimental reduction of DNA damage is associated with a loss of these effects. On the other hand, UV has been found to utilize molecular components within the cytoplasm or at the cell membrane for signaling. UV can directly activate cell surface receptors, kinases, and transcription factors. The nuclear and extranuclear signaling pathways are generated independently and have been recently recognized to be not mutually exclusive but to contribute to various UV effects in an independent and additive way. Further knowledge of how these signaling pathways relate to each other will certainly increase our understanding of how UV acts as a pathogen. The following review will briefly discuss current aspects of the mechanisms involved in UV-induced signal transduction. (author)

  3. Glycosphingolipid–Protein Interaction in Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Russo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glycosphingolipids (GSLs are a class of ceramide-based glycolipids essential for embryo development in mammals. The synthesis of specific GSLs depends on the expression of distinctive sets of GSL synthesizing enzymes that is tightly regulated during development. Several reports have described how cell surface receptors can be kept in a resting state or activate alternative signalling events as a consequence of their interaction with GSLs. Specific GSLs, indeed, interface with specific protein domains that are found in signalling molecules and which act as GSL sensors to modify signalling responses. The regulation exerted by GSLs on signal transduction is orthogonal to the ligand–receptor axis, as it usually does not directly interfere with the ligand binding to receptors. Due to their properties of adjustable production and orthogonal action on receptors, GSLs add a new dimension to the control of the signalling in development. GSLs can, indeed, dynamically influence progenitor cell response to morphogenetic stimuli, resulting in alternative differentiation fates. Here, we review the available literature on GSL–protein interactions and their effects on cell signalling and development.

  4. Glycosphingolipid–Protein Interaction in Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Domenico; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; D’Angelo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are a class of ceramide-based glycolipids essential for embryo development in mammals. The synthesis of specific GSLs depends on the expression of distinctive sets of GSL synthesizing enzymes that is tightly regulated during development. Several reports have described how cell surface receptors can be kept in a resting state or activate alternative signalling events as a consequence of their interaction with GSLs. Specific GSLs, indeed, interface with specific protein domains that are found in signalling molecules and which act as GSL sensors to modify signalling responses. The regulation exerted by GSLs on signal transduction is orthogonal to the ligand–receptor axis, as it usually does not directly interfere with the ligand binding to receptors. Due to their properties of adjustable production and orthogonal action on receptors, GSLs add a new dimension to the control of the signalling in development. GSLs can, indeed, dynamically influence progenitor cell response to morphogenetic stimuli, resulting in alternative differentiation fates. Here, we review the available literature on GSL–protein interactions and their effects on cell signalling and development. PMID:27754465

  5. Combination of adenovirus and cross-linked low molecular weight PEI improves efficiency of gene transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Jianfeng; Zhao Dong; Zhong Zhirong; Zhang Zhirong; Gong Tao; Sun Xun, E-mail: xunsun22@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Drug Targeting and Novel Drug Delivery Systems, Ministry of Education, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610041 (China)

    2010-03-12

    Recombinant adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene therapy is an exciting novel strategy in cancer treatment. However, poor infection efficiency with coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) down-regulated cancer cell lines is one of the major challenges for its practical and extensive application. As an alternative method of viral gene delivery, a non-viral carrier using cationic materials could compensate for the limitation of adenovirus. In our study, adenovectors were complexed with a new synthetic polymer PEI-DEG-bis-NPC (PDN) based on polyethylenimine (PEI), and then the properties of the vehicle were characterized by measurement of size distribution, zeta potential and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Enhancement of gene transduction by Ad/PDN complexes was observed in both CAR-overexpressing cell lines (A549) and CAR-lacking cell lines (MDCK, CHO, LLC), as a result of facilitating binding and cell uptake of adenoviral particles by the cationic component. Ad/PDN complexes also promoted the inhibition of tumor growth in vivo and prolonged the survival time of tumor-bearing mice. These data suggest that a combination of viral and non-viral gene delivery methods may offer a new approach to successful cancer gene therapy.

  6. The sensory transduction pathways in bacterial chemotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Barry L.

    1989-01-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis is a useful model for investigating in molecular detail the behavioral response of cells to changes in their environment. Peritrichously flagellated bacteria such as coli and typhimurium swim by rotating helical flagella in a counterclockwise direction. If flagellar rotation is briefly reversed, the bacteria tumble and change the direction of swimming. The bacteria continuously sample the environment and use a temporal sensing mechanism to compare the present and immediate past environments. Bacteria respond to a broad range of stimuli including changes in temperature, oxygen concentration, pH and osmotic strength. Bacteria are attracted to potential sources of nutrition such as sugars and amino acids and are repelled by other chemicals. In the methylation-dependent pathways for sensory transduction and adaptation in E. coli and S. typhimurium, chemoeffectors bind to transducing proteins that span the plasma membrane. The transducing proteins are postulated to control the rate of autophosphorylation of the CheA protein, which in turn phosphorylates the CheY protein. The phospho-CheY protein binds to the switch on the flagellar motor and is the signal for clockwise rotation of the motor. Adaptation to an attractant is achieved by increasing methylation of the transducing protein until the attractant stimulus is cancelled. Responses to oxygen and certain sugars involve methylation-independent pathways in which adaption occurs without methylation of a transducing protein. Taxis toward oxygen is mediated by the electron transport system and changes in the proton motive force. Recent studies have shown that the methylation-independent pathway converges with the methylation-dependent pathway at or before the CheA protein.

  7. The transduction properties of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Richard D

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intercostal muscles are richly innervated by mechanoreceptors. In vivo studies of cat intercostal muscle have shown that there are 3 populations of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors: primary muscle spindles (1°, secondary muscle spindles (2° and Golgi tendon organs (GTO. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanical transduction properties of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors in response to controlled length and velocity displacements of the intercostal space. Mechanoreceptors, recorded from dorsal root fibers, were localized within an isolated intercostal muscle space (ICS. Changes in ICS displacement and the velocity of ICS displacement were independently controlled with an electromagnetic motor. ICS velocity (0.5 – 100 μm/msec to a displacement of 2,000 μm and displacement (50–2,000 μm at a constant velocity of 10 μm/msec parameters encompassed the full range of rib motion. Results Both 1° and 2° muscle spindles were found evenly distributed within the ICS. GTOs were localized along the rib borders. The 1° spindles had the greatest discharge frequency in response to displacement amplitude followed by the 2° afferents and GTOs. The 1° muscle spindles also possessed the greatest discharge frequency in response to graded velocity changes, 3.0 spikes·sec-1/μm·msec-1. GTOs had a velocity response of 2.4 spikes·sec-1/μm·msec-1 followed by 2° muscle spindles at 0.6 spikes·sec-1/μm·msec-1. Conclusion The results of this study provide a systematic description of the mechanosenitivity of the 3 types of intercostal muscle mechanoreceptors. These mechanoreceptors have discharge properties that transduce the magnitude and velocity of intercostal muscle length.

  8. Assessment of novel oral lipid-based formulations of amphotericin B using an in vitro lipolysis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Fady; Gershkovich, Pavel; Sivak, Olena; Wasan, Ellen K; Wasan, Kishor M

    2012-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the intraluminal processing of novel oral lipid-based formulations of amphotericin B using an in vitro lipolysis model. Amphotericin B (AmB) was formulated in three lipid-based formulations consisting of different lipid components: iCo-009, iCo-010 and iCo-011. Various lipid loads (0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 g) were digested using the lipolysis model to assess AmB distribution among the lipolysis phases. The duration of lipolysis was comparable among the three formulations except for 2 g load of iCo-009 which had a significantly longer lipolysis than iCo-010 and iCo-011. The lipid components of iCo-009 experienced lower extent of lipolysis as compared to other formulations. Amphotericin B concentration in the aqueous phases was the highest with iCo-010 which also had the lowest sediment recovery. Amphotericin B levels in the undigested lipid layers were comparable between iCo-009 and iCo-010 and were higher than with iCo-011. Given the observation that iCo-010 had the highest aqueous micellar solubilization and the lowest sediment recovery of AmB among the tested formulations, these results could potentially be used to interpret and predict the in vivo performance of AmB- SEDDS formulations in future studies. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Cell-Specific Promoters Enable Lipid-Based Nanoparticles to Deliver Genes to Specific Cells of the Retina In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhong; Rajala, Ammaji; Cao, Binrui; Ranjo-Bishop, Michelle; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Mao, Chuanbin; Rajala, Raju V S

    2016-01-01

    Non-viral vectors, such as lipid-based nanoparticles (liposome-protamine-DNA complex [LPD]), could be used to deliver a functional gene to the retina to correct visual function and treat blindness. However, one of the limitations of LPD is the lack of cell specificity, as the retina is composed of seven types of cells. If the same gene is expressed in multiple cell types or is absent from one desired cell type, LPD-mediated gene delivery to every cell may have off-target effects. To circumvent this problem, we have tested LPD-mediated gene delivery using various generalized, modified, and retinal cell-specific promoters. We achieved retinal pigment epithelium cell specificity with vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2), rod cell specificity with mouse rhodopsin, cone cell specificity with red/green opsin, and ganglion cell specificity with thymocyte antigen promoters. Here we show for the first time that cell-specific promoters enable lipid-based nanoparticles to deliver genes to specific cells of the retina in vivo. This work will inspire investigators in the field of lipid nanotechnology to couple cell-specific promoters to drive expression in a cell- and tissue-specific manner.

  10. pH-Cleavable Nucleoside Lipids: A New Paradigm for Controlling the Stability of Lipid-Based Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oumzil, Khalid; Benizri, Sébastien; Tonelli, Giovanni; Staedel, Cathy; Appavoo, Ananda; Chaffanet, Max; Navailles, Laurence; Barthélémy, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    Lipid-based delivery systems are an established technology with considerable clinical acceptance and several applications in human. Herein, we report the design, synthesis and evaluation of novel orthoester nucleoside lipids (ONLs) for the modulation of liposome stability. The ONLs contain head groups with 3'-orthoester nucleoside derivatives featuring positive or negative charges. The insertion of the orthoester function in the NL structures allows the formation of pH-sensitive liposomes. ONL-based liposomes can be hydrolyzed to provide nontoxic products, including nucleoside derivatives and hexadecanol. To allow the release to be tunable at different hydrolysis rates, the charge of the polar head structure is modulated, and the head group can be released at a biologically relevant pH. Crucially, when ONLs are mixed with natural phosphocholine lipids (PC), the resultant liposome evolves toward the formation of a hexadecanol/PC lamellar system. Biological evaluation shows that stable nucleic acid lipid particles (SNALPs) formulated with ONLs and siRNAs can effectively enter into tumor cells and release their nucleic acid payload in response to an intracellular acidic environment. This results in a much higher antitumor activity than conventional SNALPs. The ability to use pH-cleavable nucleolipids to control the stability of lipid-based delivery systems represents a promising approach for the intracellular delivery of drug cargos.

  11. The Precipitation Behavior of Poorly Water-Soluble Drugs with an Emphasis on the Digestion of Lipid Based Formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Jamal; Rades, Thomas; Boyd, Ben

    2016-03-01

    An increasing number of newly discovered drugs are poorly water-soluble and the use of natural and synthetic lipids to improve the oral bioavailability of these drugs by utilizing the digestion pathway in-vivo has proved an effective formulation strategy. The mechanisms responsible for lipid digestion and drug solubilisation during gastrointestinal transit have been explored in detail, but the implications of drug precipitation beyond the potential adverse effect on bioavailability have received attention only in recent years. Specifically, these implications are that different solid forms of drug on precipitation may affect the total amount of drug absorbed in-vivo through their different physico-chemical properties, and the possibility that the dynamic environment of the small intestine may afford re-dissolution of precipitated drug if present in a high-energy form. This review describes the events that lead to drug precipitation during the dispersion and digestion of lipid based formulations, common methods used to inhibit precipitation, as well as conventional and newly emerging characterization techniques for studying the solid state form of the precipitated drug. Moreover, selected case studies are discussed where drug precipitation has ensued from the digestion of lipid based formulations, as well as the apparent link between drug ionisability and altered solid forms on precipitation, culminating in a discussion about the importance of the solid form on precipitation with relevance to the total drug absorbed.

  12. Signal transduction in the footsteps of goethe and schiller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Karlheinz; Lindquist, Jonathan A; Entschladen, Frank; Serfling, Edgar; Thiel, Gerald; Kieser, Arnd; Giehl, Klaudia; Ehrhardt, Christina; Feller, Stephan M; Ullrich, Oliver; Schaper, Fred; Janssen, Ottmar; Hass, Ralf

    2009-02-04

    The historical town of Weimar in Thuringia, the "green heart of Germany" was the sphere of Goethe and Schiller, the two most famous representatives of German literature's classic era. Not yet entirely as influential as those two cultural icons, the Signal Transduction Society (STS) has nevertheless in the last decade established within the walls of Weimar an annual interdisciplinary Meeting on "Signal Transduction - Receptors, Mediators and Genes", which is well recognized as a most attractive opportunity to exchange results and ideas in the field.The 12th STS Meeting was held from October 28 to 31 and provided a state-of-the-art overview of various areas of signal transduction research in which progress is fast and discussion lively. This report is intended to share with the readers of CCS some highlights of the Meeting Workshops devoted to specific aspects of signal transduction.

  13. Signal Transduction in the Footsteps of Goethe and Schiller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feller Stephan M

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The historical town of Weimar in Thuringia, the "green heart of Germany" was the sphere of Goethe and Schiller, the two most famous representatives of German literature's classic era. Not yet entirely as influential as those two cultural icons, the Signal Transduction Society (STS has nevertheless in the last decade established within the walls of Weimar an annual interdisciplinary Meeting on "Signal Transduction – Receptors, Mediators and Genes", which is well recognized as a most attractive opportunity to exchange results and ideas in the field. The 12th STS Meeting was held from October 28 to 31 and provided a state-of-the-art overview of various areas of signal transduction research in which progress is fast and discussion lively. This report is intended to share with the readers of CCS some highlights of the Meeting Workshops devoted to specific aspects of signal transduction.

  14. Transduction mechanisms and their applications in micromechanical devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elwenspoek, M.; Blom, F.R.; Bouwstra, S.; Lammerink, T.S.J.; Pol, van de F.C.M.; Tilmans, H.A.C.; Popma, Th.J.A.; Fluitman, J.H.J.

    1989-01-01

    Transduction mechanisms and their applications in micromechanical actuators and resonating sensors are presented. They include piezoelectric, dielectric, electro-thermo-mechanic, opto-thermo-mechanic, and thermo-pneumatic mechanisms. Advantages and disadvantages with respect to technology and perfor

  15. Differential effects of bitter compounds on the taste transduction channels TRPM5 and IP3 receptor type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gees, Maarten; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Luyten, Tomas; Parys, Jan B; Nilius, Bernd; Bultynck, Geert; Voets, Thomas; Talavera, Karel

    2014-05-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 5 (TRPM5) is a Ca(2+)-activated nonselective cation channel involved in the transduction of sweet, bitter, and umami tastes. We previously showed that TRPM5 is a locus for the modulation of taste perception by temperature changes, and by quinine and quinidine, 2 bitter compounds that suppress gustatory responses. Here, we determined whether other bitter compounds known to modulate taste perception also affect TRPM5. We found that nicotine inhibits TRPM5 currents with an effective inhibitory concentration of ~1.3mM at -50 mV. This effect may contribute to the inhibitory effect of nicotine on gustatory responses in therapeutic and experimental settings, where nicotine is often employed at millimolar concentrations. In addition, it implies the existence of a TRPM5-independent pathway for the detection of nicotine bitterness. Nicotine seems to act from the extracellular side of the channel, reducing the maximal whole-cell conductance and inducing an acceleration of channel closure that leads to a negative shift of the activation curve. TRPM5 currents were unaffected by nicotine's metabolite cotinine, the intensive sweetener saccharin or by the bitter xanthines caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline. We also tested the effects of bitter compounds on another essential element of the sweet taste transduction pathway, the type 3 IP3 receptor (IP3R3). We found that IP3R3-mediated Ca(2+) flux is slightly enhanced by nicotine, not affected by saccharin, modestly inhibited by caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline, and strongly inhibited by quinine. Our results demonstrate that bitter compounds have differential effects on key elements of the sweet taste transduction pathway, suggesting for heterogeneous mechanisms of bitter-sweet taste interactions.

  16. Falsification of the ionic channel theory of hair cell transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Michelangelo

    2013-11-01

    The hair cell provides the transduction of mechanical vibrations in the balance and acoustic sense of all vertebrates that swim, walk, or fly. The current theory places hair cell transduction in a mechanically controlled ion channel. Although the theory of a mechanical input modulating the flow of ions through an ion pore has been a useful tool, it is falsified by experimental data in the literature and can be definitively falsified by a proposed experiment.

  17. One-component systems dominate signal transduction in prokaryotes

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrich, Luke E; Koonin, Eugene V.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2005-01-01

    Two-component systems that link environmental signals to cellular responses are viewed as the primary mode of signal transduction in prokaryotes. By analyz-ing information encoded by 145 prokaryotic genomes, we found that the majority of signal transduction systems consist of a single protein that contains input and output domains but lacks phosphotransfer domains typical of two-component systems. One-component systems are evolutionarily older, more widely distributed among bacteria and archa...

  18. Serotonin Signal Transduction in Two Groups of Autistic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0820 TITLE: Serotonin Signal Transduction in Two...Report 3. DATES COVERED 15 September 2011-14 September 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Serotonin Signal Transduction in Two Groups of Autistic Patients...the arena of serotonin sensitivity, from those cells obtained from autistic subjects with normal serum serotonin . This was not the case, as the

  19. Modeling Signal Transduction and Lipid Rafts in Immune Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Ashok

    2011-03-01

    Experimental evidence increasingly suggests that lipid rafts are nanometer sized cholesterol dependent dynamic assemblies enriched in sphingolipids and associated proteins. Lipid rafts are dynamic structures that break-up and reform on a relatively short time-scale, and are believed to facilitate the interactions of raft-associated proteins. The role of these rafts in signaling has been controversial, partly due to controversies regarding the existence and nature of the rafts themselves. Experimental evidence has indicated that in several cell types, especially T cells, rafts do influence signal transduction and T cell activation. Given the emerging consensus on the biophysical character of lipid rafts, the question can be asked as to what roles they possibly play in signal transduction. Here we carry out simulations of minimal models of the signal transduction network that regulates Src-family kinase dynamics in T cells and other cell types. By separately treating raft-based biochemical interactions, we find that rafts can indeed putatively play an important role in signal transduction, and in particular may affect the sensitivity of signal transduction. This illuminates possible functional consequences of membrane heterogeneities on signal transduction and points towards mechanisms for spatial control of signaling by cells.

  20. Engineering key components in a synthetic eukaryotic signal transduction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Mauricio S; Morey, Kevin J; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Bowen, Tessa A; Smith, J Jeff; Webb, Colleen T; Hellinga, Homme W; Medford, June I

    2009-01-01

    Signal transduction underlies how living organisms detect and respond to stimuli. A goal of synthetic biology is to rewire natural signal transduction systems. Bacteria, yeast, and plants sense environmental aspects through conserved histidine kinase (HK) signal transduction systems. HK protein components are typically comprised of multiple, relatively modular, and conserved domains. Phosphate transfer between these components may exhibit considerable cross talk between the otherwise apparently linear pathways, thereby establishing networks that integrate multiple signals. We show that sequence conservation and cross talk can extend across kingdoms and can be exploited to produce a synthetic plant signal transduction system. In response to HK cross talk, heterologously expressed bacterial response regulators, PhoB and OmpR, translocate to the nucleus on HK activation. Using this discovery, combined with modification of PhoB (PhoB-VP64), we produced a key component of a eukaryotic synthetic signal transduction pathway. In response to exogenous cytokinin, PhoB-VP64 translocates to the nucleus, binds a synthetic PlantPho promoter, and activates gene expression. These results show that conserved-signaling components can be used across kingdoms and adapted to produce synthetic eukaryotic signal transduction pathways.

  1. Research progress in cation-π interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG JiaGao; LUO XiaoMin; YAN XiuHua; LI Zhong; TANG Yun; JIANG HuaLiang; ZHU WeiLiang

    2008-01-01

    Cation-π interaction is a potent intermolecular interaction between a cation and an aromatic system, which has been viewed as a new kind of binding force, as being compared with the classical interac-tions (e.g. hydrogen bonding, electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions). Cation-π interactions have been observed in a wide range of biological contexts. In this paper, we present an overview of the typi-cal cation-π interactions in biological systems, the experimental and theoretical investigations on cation-π interactions, as well as the research results on cation-π interactions in our group.

  2. Research progress in cation-π interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Cation-π interaction is a potent intermolecular interaction between a cation and an aromatic system,which has been viewed as a new kind of binding force,as being compared with the classical interactions(e.g. hydrogen bonding,electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions). Cation-π interactions have been observed in a wide range of biological contexts. In this paper,we present an overview of the typical cation-π interactions in biological systems,the experimental and theoretical investigations on cation-π interactions,as well as the research results on cation-π interactions in our group.

  3. EDITORIAL: Special section on signal transduction Special section on signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvartsman, Stanislav

    2012-08-01

    This special section of Physical Biology focuses on multiple aspects of signal transduction, broadly defined as the study of the mechanisms by which cells communicate with their environment. Mechanisms of cell communication involve detection of incoming signals, which can be chemical, mechanical or electromagnetic, relaying these signals to intracellular processes, such as cytoskeletal networks or gene expression systems, and, ultimately, converting these signals to responses such as cell differentiation or death. Given the multiscale nature of signal transduction systems, they must be studied at multiple levels, from the identities and structures of molecules comprising signal detection and interpretation networks, to the systems-level properties of these networks. The 11 papers in this special section illustrate some of the most exciting aspects of signal transduction research. The first two papers, by Marie-Anne Félix [1] and by Efrat Oron and Natalia Ivanova [2], focus on cell-cell interactions in developing tissues, using vulval patterning in worm and cell fate specification in mammalian embryos as prime examples of emergent cell behaviors. Next come two papers from the groups of Julio Saez-Rodriguez [3] and Kevin Janes [4]. These papers discuss how the causal relationships between multiple components of signaling systems can be inferred using multivariable statistical analysis of empirical data. An authoritative review by Zarnitsyna and Zhu [5] presents a detailed discussion of the sequence of signaling events involved in T-cell triggering. Once the structure and components of the signaling systems are determined, they can be modeled using approaches that have been successful in other physical sciences. As two examples of such approaches, reviews by Rubinstein [6] and Kholodenko [7], present reaction-diffusion models of cell polarization and thermodynamics-based models of gene regulation. An important class of models takes the form of enzymatic networks

  4. Lipid-based nanosystems for CD44 targeting in cancer treatment: recent significant advances, ongoing challenges and unmet needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Thais Leite; Hillaireau, Hervé; Vergnaud, Juliette; Fattal, Elias

    2016-07-01

    Extensive experimental evidence demonstrates the important role of hyaluronic acid (HA)-CD44 interaction in cell proliferation and migration, inflammation and tumor growth. Taking advantage of this interaction, the design of HA-modified nanocarriers has been investigated for targeting CD44-overexpressing cells with the purpose of delivering drugs to cancer or inflammatory cells. The effect of such modification on targeting efficacy is influenced by several factors. In this review, we focus on the impact of HA-modification on the characteristics of lipid-based nanoparticles. We try to understand how these modifications influence particle physicochemical properties, interaction with CD44 receptors, intracellular trafficking pathways, toxicity, complement/macrophage activation and pharmacokinetics. Our aim is to provide insight in tailoring particle modification by HA in order to design more efficient CD44-targeting lipid nanocarriers.

  5. Lipid-based nutrient supplements do not affect efavirenz but lower plasma nevirapine concentrations in Ethiopian adult HIV patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdissa, A; Olsen, Mette Frahm; Yilma, D

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNSs) are increasingly used in HIV programmes in resource-limited settings. However, the possible effects of LNSs on the plasma concentrations of antiretroviral drugs have not been assessed. Here, we aimed to assess the effects of LNSs on plasma...... efavirenz and nevirapine trough concentrations in Ethiopian adult HIV-infected patients. METHODS: The effects of LNSs were studied in adults initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) in a randomized trial. Patients with body mass index (BMI) > 17 kg/m(2) (n = 282) received daily supplementation of an LNS.......9; -0.9 μg/mL; P = 0.01), respectively, compared with the group not receiving supplements. There were no differences between groups with respect to efavirenz plasma concentrations. The CYP2B6 516 G>T polymorphism was associated with a 5 μg/mL higher plasma efavirenz concentration compared with the wild...

  6. A transduction path method of solid state sensor analysis and investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Dubay, Curtis L.

    1984-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This paper proposes a "transduction path" method of analysis for solid state sensors. It is based upon the idea that a sensor represents a transduction path from some input measurand to an electrical output. The transduction path may consist of one or more transduction or modification principles drawn from all fields of science. Also proposed is a "transduction path diagram" which provides a graphical representation of a transductio...

  7. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of amphotericin B following oral administration of three lipid-based formulations to rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Fady; Gershkovich, Pavel; Sivak, Olena; Wasan, Ellen K; Wasan, Kishor M

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of amphotericin B (AmB) in rats following oral administration of three lipid-based formulations (iCo-009, iCo-010 and iCo-011). The lipid-based formulations were administered to rats at a dose of 10 mg/kg and blood samples were withdrawn at predose, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h, after which the animals were sacrificed and the body organs were collected for AmB quantification using a validated HPLC method. Plasma pharmacokinetics parameters were determined using non-compartmental analysis. The disappearance of AmB from plasma was the slowest following the administration of iCo-010 with MRT of 63 h followed by iCo-009 then iCo-011 (36 and 27 h). The AUC(0-24h) of iCo-009 and iCo-010 was 1.5-2-fold higher than that of iCo-011. The kidney exposure was comparable between iCo-009 and iCo-010 and was higher than that of iCo-011. The lung exposure was the highest following iCo-010 administration as compared to that of iCo-009. The distribution of AmB from plasma to tissues resulted in a high accumulation of AmB overtime with slow back-distribution to plasma. The pharmacokinetics profiles varied among the three formulations, despite the similarity in lipid composition between iCo-010 and iCo-011 and the presence of Peceol® as a common component in the formulations. The administration of oral iCo-010 could lead to higher steady state concentrations in the tissues after multiple dosing, which could lead to enhanced eradication of tissue borne fungal and parasitic infections.

  8. Phase Transitions of Isotropic to Anisotropic Biocompatible Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems Overcoming Insoluble Benznidazole Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Streck

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies reported low benznidazole (BNZ loading in conventional emulsions due to the weak interaction of the drug with the most common oils used to produce foods or pharmaceuticals. In this study, we focused on how the type of surfactant, surfactant-to-oil ratio w/w (SOR and oil-to-water ratio w/w (OWR change the phase behavior of different lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS produced by emulsion phase inversion. The surfactant mixture composed of soy phosphatidylcholine and sodium oleate (1:7, w/w, hydrophilic lipophilic balance = 16 stabilized medium chain triglyceride in water. Ten formulations with the clear aspect or less turbid dispersions (five with the SOR ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 and five with the OWR from 0.06 to 0.4 were selected from the phase behavior diagram to assess structural features and drug-loading capacity. The rise in the SOR induced the formation of distinct lipid-based drug delivery systems (nanoemulsions and liquid crystal lamellar type that were identified using rheological measurements and cross-polarized light microscopy images. Clear dispersions of small and narrow droplet-sized liquid-like nanoemulsions, Newtonian flow-type, were produced at SOR from 0.5 to 1.5 and OWR from 0.12 to 0.4, while clear liquid or gel-like liquid crystals were produced at SOR from 1.5 to 2.5. The BNZ loading was improved according to the composition and type of LBDDS produced, suggesting possible drug location among surfactant layers. The cell viability assays proved the biocompatibility for all of the prepared nanoemulsions at SOR less than 1.5 and liquid crystals at SOR less than 2.5, demonstrating their promising features for the oral or parenteral colloidal delivery systems containing benznidazole for Chagas disease treatment.

  9. Formulation and physiological and biopharmaceutical issues in the development of oral lipid-based drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasan, K M

    2001-04-01

    The rapidly increasing availability of drug receptor structural characteristics has permitted the receptor-guided synthesis of potential new drug molecules. This synthesis strategy frequently results in the creation of polycyclic and highly hydrophobic compounds, with attendant poor oral bioavailability resulting from low solubility and slow dissolution rate in the primarily aqueous contents of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In an attempt to improve the solubility-limited bioavailabiliy associated with these compounds, formulators have turned to the use of lipid excipients in which the compounds can be solubilized prior to oral administration. This new class of excipients presents the pharmaceutical scientist with a number of new challenges at all stages of the formulation development process, beginning with the excipient selection and stability assessment of the prototype formulation, up to and including scale-up and mass production of the final market-image product. The interaction of lipid-based formulations with the gastrointestinal system and associated digestive processes presents additional challenges and opportunities that will be understood more fully as we begin to unravel the intricacies of the GI processing of lipid excipients. For example, an increasing body of evidence has shown that certain lipids are capable of inhibiting both presystemic drug metabolism and drug efflux by the gut wall mediated by p-glycoprotein (PGP). And, it is well known that lipids are capable of enhancing lymphatic transport of hydrophobic drugs, thereby reducing drug clearance resulting from hepatic first-pass metabolism. This review addresses the current state of knowledge regarding oral lipid-based formulation development and scale-up issues and the physiological and biopharmaceutical aspects pertinent to the development of an orally bioavailable and efficacious dosage form.

  10. Phase Transitions of Isotropic to Anisotropic Biocompatible Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems Overcoming Insoluble Benznidazole Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streck, Letícia; Sarmento, Víctor H V; Machado, Paula R L; Farias, Kleber J S; Fernandes-Pedrosa, Matheus F; da Silva-Júnior, Arnóbio Antônio

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies reported low benznidazole (BNZ) loading in conventional emulsions due to the weak interaction of the drug with the most common oils used to produce foods or pharmaceuticals. In this study, we focused on how the type of surfactant, surfactant-to-oil ratio w/w (SOR) and oil-to-water ratio w/w (OWR) change the phase behavior of different lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS) produced by emulsion phase inversion. The surfactant mixture composed of soy phosphatidylcholine and sodium oleate (1:7, w/w, hydrophilic lipophilic balance = 16) stabilized medium chain triglyceride in water. Ten formulations with the clear aspect or less turbid dispersions (five with the SOR ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 and five with the OWR from 0.06 to 0.4) were selected from the phase behavior diagram to assess structural features and drug-loading capacity. The rise in the SOR induced the formation of distinct lipid-based drug delivery systems (nanoemulsions and liquid crystal lamellar type) that were identified using rheological measurements and cross-polarized light microscopy images. Clear dispersions of small and narrow droplet-sized liquid-like nanoemulsions, Newtonian flow-type, were produced at SOR from 0.5 to 1.5 and OWR from 0.12 to 0.4, while clear liquid or gel-like liquid crystals were produced at SOR from 1.5 to 2.5. The BNZ loading was improved according to the composition and type of LBDDS produced, suggesting possible drug location among surfactant layers. The cell viability assays proved the biocompatibility for all of the prepared nanoemulsions at SOR less than 1.5 and liquid crystals at SOR less than 2.5, demonstrating their promising features for the oral or parenteral colloidal delivery systems containing benznidazole for Chagas disease treatment.

  11. Lipid-based delivery of combinations of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides for the in vitro inhibition of HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, C; Yelle, J; Sauvé, G; Thierry, A G

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated a new approach to AIDS therapy by using combinations of oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs), delivered with a lipid-based carrier system, that target different HIV viral genome sites. We identified some of the factors that seem to influence the effectiveness of a combination strategy in cell cultures including ODN concentrations, type of infection (acute vs chronic), backbone modification of the ODN, and the number of sequences. When delivered by the DLS carrier system, some advantages of using a combination of ODNs over treatment with only one ODN could be observed in acute infection assays but not in the chronic infection model. These results suggest that in the acute infection model, the 3 different antisense ODNs in the "cocktail" might block an early step of virus replication by combined inhibitory effects. Various combinations of phosphorothioate-modified (PS) and unmodified oligonucleotides delivered by the DLS system were compared for their antiviral activity in a long-term acute assay using HIV-1 (IIIB strain)-infected MOLT-3 cells. The most effective combination had 3 phosphorothioate antisense ODNs: Srev, SDIS, and SPac (>99% inhibition at 100 pM). However, the additive effect determined when using ODN combinations was rather low, revealing the high level of nonsequence specificity in HIV-1 cell culture models. Data illustrated the high sequence nonspecific activity of ODNs, especially when comparing activity of antisense ODNs with activity of random control sequence ODNs. The latter exhibited an inhibitory effect similar to that of antisense ODNs under our experimental conditions. Nevertheless, we demonstrated that it is possible to achieve high anti-HIV activity by using, in combination, picomolar range concentrations of antisense oligonucleotides complexed to a lipid-based carrier system such as the DLS system, without increasing cell toxicity.

  12. Phase Transitions of Isotropic to Anisotropic Biocompatible Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems Overcoming Insoluble Benznidazole Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streck, Letícia; Sarmento, Víctor H. V.; Machado, Paula R. L.; Farias, Kleber J. S.; Fernandes-Pedrosa, Matheus F.; da Silva-Júnior, Arnóbio Antônio

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies reported low benznidazole (BNZ) loading in conventional emulsions due to the weak interaction of the drug with the most common oils used to produce foods or pharmaceuticals. In this study, we focused on how the type of surfactant, surfactant-to-oil ratio w/w (SOR) and oil-to-water ratio w/w (OWR) change the phase behavior of different lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS) produced by emulsion phase inversion. The surfactant mixture composed of soy phosphatidylcholine and sodium oleate (1:7, w/w, hydrophilic lipophilic balance = 16) stabilized medium chain triglyceride in water. Ten formulations with the clear aspect or less turbid dispersions (five with the SOR ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 and five with the OWR from 0.06 to 0.4) were selected from the phase behavior diagram to assess structural features and drug-loading capacity. The rise in the SOR induced the formation of distinct lipid-based drug delivery systems (nanoemulsions and liquid crystal lamellar type) that were identified using rheological measurements and cross-polarized light microscopy images. Clear dispersions of small and narrow droplet-sized liquid-like nanoemulsions, Newtonian flow-type, were produced at SOR from 0.5 to 1.5 and OWR from 0.12 to 0.4, while clear liquid or gel-like liquid crystals were produced at SOR from 1.5 to 2.5. The BNZ loading was improved according to the composition and type of LBDDS produced, suggesting possible drug location among surfactant layers. The cell viability assays proved the biocompatibility for all of the prepared nanoemulsions at SOR less than 1.5 and liquid crystals at SOR less than 2.5, demonstrating their promising features for the oral or parenteral colloidal delivery systems containing benznidazole for Chagas disease treatment. PMID:27376278

  13. Lipid-based oral delivery systems for skin deposition of a potential chemopreventive DIM derivative: characterization and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boakye, Cedar H A; Patel, Ketan; Patel, Apurva R; Faria, Henrique A M; Zucolotto, Valtencir; Safe, Stephen; Singh, Mandip

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the oral route as a viable potential for the skin deposition of a novel diindolylmethane derivative (DIM-D) for chemoprevention activity. Various lipid-based oral delivery systems were optimized and compared for enhancing DIM-D's oral bioavailability and skin deposition. Preformulation studies were performed to evaluate the log P and solubility of DIM-D. Microsomal metabolism, P-glycoprotein efflux, and caco-2 monolayer permeability of DIM-D were determined. Comparative evaluation of the oral absorption and skin deposition of DIM-D-loaded various lipid-based formulations was performed in rats. DIM-D showed pH-dependent solubility and a high log P value. It was not a strong substrate of microsomal degradation and P-glycoprotein. SMEDDs comprised of medium chain triglycerides, monoglycerides, and kolliphor-HS15 (36.70 ± 0.42 nm). SNEDDs comprised of long chain triglycerides, cremophor RH40, labrasol, and TPGS (84.00 ± 14.14 nm). Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) consisted of compritol, miglyol, and surfactants (116.50 ± 2.12 nm). The blank formulations all showed >70 % cell viability in caco-2 cells. Differential Scanning Calorimetry confirmed the amorphization of DIM-D within the lipid matrices while Atomic Force Microscopy showed particle size distribution similar to the dynamic light scattering data. DIM-D also showed reduced permeation across caco-2 monolayer that was enhanced (p drug, SMEDDs, and NLC, respectively, at 2 h following oral administration and shows a viable potential for use in skin cancer chemoprevention. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  14. Tripodal Receptors for Cation and Anion Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuswandi, Bambang; Nuriman,; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2006-01-01

    This review discusses different types of artificial tripodal receptors for the selectiverecognition and sensing of cations and anions. Examples on the relationship between structure andselectivity towards cations and anions are described. Furthermore, their applications as potentiometricion sensing

  15. Heavy metal cations permeate the TRPV6 epithelial cation channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Gergely; Danko, Tamas; Bergeron, Marc J; Balazs, Bernadett; Suzuki, Yoshiro; Zsembery, Akos; Hediger, Matthias A

    2011-01-01

    TRPV6 belongs to the vanilloid family of the transient receptor potential channel (TRP) superfamily. This calcium-selective channel is highly expressed in the duodenum and the placenta, being responsible for calcium absorption in the body and fetus. Previous observations have suggested that TRPV6 is not only permeable to calcium but also to other divalent cations in epithelial tissues. In this study, we tested whether TRPV6 is indeed also permeable to cations such as zinc and cadmium. We found that the basal intracellular calcium concentration was higher in HEK293 cells transfected with hTRPV6 than in non-transfected cells, and that this difference almost disappeared in nominally calcium-free solution. Live cell imaging experiments with Fura-2 and NewPort Green DCF showed that overexpression of human TRPV6 increased the permeability for Ca(2+), Ba(2+), Sr(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and interestingly also for La(3+) and Gd(3+). These results were confirmed using the patch clamp technique. (45)Ca uptake experiments showed that cadmium, lanthanum and gadolinium were also highly efficient inhibitors of TRPV6-mediated calcium influx at higher micromolar concentrations. Our results suggest that TRPV6 is not only involved in calcium transport but also in the transport of other divalent cations, including heavy metal ions, which may have toxicological implications.

  16. Theory and modeling of cylindrical thermo-acoustic transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Lihong, E-mail: lhtong@ecjtu.edu.cn [School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, East China Jiaotong University, Nanchang, Jiangxi (China); Lim, C.W. [Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR (China); Zhao, Xiushao; Geng, Daxing [School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, East China Jiaotong University, Nanchang, Jiangxi (China)

    2016-06-03

    Models both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are proposed and the corresponding acoustic pressure solutions are obtained. The acoustic pressure for an individual carbon nanotube (CNT) as a function of input power is investigated analytically and it is verified by comparing with the published experimental data. Further numerical analysis on the acoustic pressure response and characteristics for varying input frequency and distance are also examined both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions. Through detailed theoretical and numerical studies on the acoustic pressure solution for thinfilm-solid cylindrical transduction, it is concluded that a solid with smaller thermal conductivity favors to improve the acoustic performance. In general, the proposed models are applicable to a variety of cylindrical thermo-acoustic devices performing in different gaseous media. - Highlights: • Theory and modeling both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are proposed. • The modeling is verified by comparing with the published experimental data. • Acoustic response characteristics of cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are predicted by the proposed model.

  17. Nonreciprocal Radio Frequency Transduction in a Parametric Mechanical Artificial Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pu; Zhang, Liang; Zhou, Jingwei; Tian, Tian; Yin, Peiran; Duan, Changkui; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-07-01

    Generating nonreciprocal radio frequency transduction plays important roles in a wide range of research and applications, and an aspiration is to integrate this functionality into microcircuits without introducing a magnetic field, which, however, remains challenging. By designing a 1D artificial lattice structure with a neighbor interaction engineered parametrically, we predicted a nonreciprocity transduction with a large unidirectionality. We then experimentally demonstrated the phenomenon on a nanoelectromechanical chip fabricated by conventional complementary metal-silicon processing. A unidirectionality with isolation as high as 24 dB is achieved, and several different transduction schemes are realized by programing the control voltage topology. Apart from being used as a radio frequency isolator, the system provides a way to build a practical on-chip programmable device for broad research and applications in the radio frequency domain.

  18. Gene Expression Pattern of Signal Transduction in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Huiyu; JIE Shenghua; GUO Tiannan; HUANG Shi'ang

    2006-01-01

    To explore the transcriptional gene expression profiles of signaling pathway in Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a series of cDNA microarray chips were tested. The results showed that differentially expressed genes related to singal transduction in CML were screened out and the genes involved in Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K), Ras-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and other signaling pathway genes simultaneously. The results also showed that most of these genes were up-expression genes , which suggested that signal transduction be overactivated in CML. Further analysis of these differentially expressed signal transduction genes will be helpful to understand the molecular mechanism of CML and find new targets of treatment.

  19. Microenvironment Dependent Photobiomodulation on Function-Specific Signal Transduction Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timon Cheng-Yi Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular photobiomodulation on a cellular function has been shown to be homeostatic. Its function-specific pathway mechanism would be further discussed in this paper. The signal transduction pathways maintaining a normal function in its function-specific homeostasis (FSH, resisting the activation of many other irrelative signal transduction pathways, are so sparse that it can be supposed that there may be normal function-specific signal transduction pathways (NSPs. A low level laser irradiation or monochromatic light may promote the activation of partially activated NSP and/or its redundant NSP so that it may induce the second-order phase transition of a function from its dysfunctional one far from its FSH to its normal one in a function-specific microenvironment and may also induce the first-order functional phase transition of the normal function from low level to high level.

  20. The development of taste transduction and taste chip technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; LIU Qingjun; XU Ying; CAI Hua; QIN Lifeng; WANG Lijiang; WANG Ping

    2005-01-01

    The intrinsic perception process of taste is obviously far less known than those of vision, audition, touch and olfaction. Despite that taste cells utilize a variety of sensory mechanisms to translate plenty of gustatory sensations such as sour, sweet, bitter, salty and umami into cellular signals, gustatory perception mechanisms are still under exploration due to the lack of effective methods on cellular and molecular level. Recently the development of molecular biological and electrophysiological studies has promoted exploration of olfactory and gustatory transduction and coding mechanisms dramatically. Based on the studies of artificial olfaction, artificial taste and cell-based biosensor in our laboratory, this paper reviews the current research on taste transduction mechanism. We introduce the recent advances in cell chip that combined biology with microelectronics, discuss taste cell chip as well as its potential of prospective application in taste transduction mechanism in detail and propose the research trends of taste chip in future.

  1. Phosphoinositide pathway and the signal transduction network in neural development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincenza Rita Lo Vasco

    2012-01-01

    The development of the nervous system is under the strict control of a number of signal transduction pathways,often interconnected.Among them,the phosphoinositide (PI) pathway and the related phospholipase C (PI-PLC) family of enzymes have been attracting much attention.Besides their well-known role in the regulation of intracellular calcium levels,PI-PLC enzymes interact with a number of molecules belonging to further signal transduction pathways,contributing to a specific and complex network in the developing nervous system.In this review,the connections of PI signalling with further transduction pathways acting during neural development are discussed,with special regard to the role of the PI-PLC family of enzymes.

  2. Cell cycle and cell signal transduction in marine phytoplankton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jingwen; JIAO Nianzhi; CAI Huinong

    2006-01-01

    As unicellular phytoplankton, the growth of a marine phytoplankton population results directly from the completion of a cell cycle, therefore, cell-environment communication is an important way which involves signal transduction pathways to regulate cell cycle progression and contribute to growth, metabolism and primary production and respond to their surrounding environment in marine phytoplankton. Cyclin-CDK and CaM/Ca2+ are essentially key regulators in control of cell cycle and signal transduction pathway, which has important values on both basic research and applied biotechnology. This paper reviews progress made in this research field, which involves the identification and characterization of cyclins and cell signal transduction system, cell cycle control mechanisms in marine phytoplankton cells, cell cycle proteins as a marker of a terminal event to estimate the growth rate of phytoplankton at the species level, cell cycle-dependent toxin production of toxic algae and cell cycle progression regulated by environmental factors.

  3. Expression of SMAD signal transduction molecules in the pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorson, Michael; Hougaard, D.; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2001-01-01

    Members of the TGF-beta superfamily of cytokines have been implicated in pancreatic cancer, pancreatitis and in regulation and differentiation of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine cells. Different TGF-beta members signal through phosphorylation of different signal transduction proteins, which eve...... is known to transduce signals from receptors binding bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) these results indicate a previously unknown role of BMP-like ligands in islet function.......Members of the TGF-beta superfamily of cytokines have been implicated in pancreatic cancer, pancreatitis and in regulation and differentiation of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine cells. Different TGF-beta members signal through phosphorylation of different signal transduction proteins, which...

  4. On the Monadic Second-Order Transduction Hierarchy

    CERN Document Server

    Blumensath, Achim

    2010-01-01

    We compare classes of finite relational structures via monadic second-order transductions. More precisely, we study the preorder C <= K :iff C is a subset of tau(K) for some transduction tau. If we only consider classes of incidence structures we can completely describe the resulting hierarchy. It is linear of order type omega + 3. Each level can be characterised in terms of a suitable variant of tree-width. Canonical representatives of the various levels are: the class of all trees of height n, for each n in N, of all paths, of all trees, and of all grids.

  5. One-component systems dominate signal transduction in prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Luke E.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2009-01-01

    Two-component systems that link environmental signals to cellular responses are viewed as the primary mode of signal transduction in prokaryotes. By analyz-ing information encoded by 145 prokaryotic genomes, we found that the majority of signal transduction systems consist of a single protein that contains input and output domains but lacks phosphotransfer domains typical of two-component systems. One-component systems are evolutionarily older, more widely distributed among bacteria and archaea, and display a greater diversity of domains than two-component systems. PMID:15680762

  6. Coating with spermine-pullulan polymer enhances adenoviral transduction of mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan L

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Li Wan,1,* Xinglei Yao,1–3,* Francesco Faiola,3 Bojun Liu,4 Tianyuan Zhang,2 Yasuhiko Tabata,5 Hiroyuki Mizuguchi,6 Shinsaku Nakagawa,7 Jian-Qing Gao,2 Robert Chunhua Zhao1 1Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, School of Basic Medicine Peking Union Medical College, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Center of Excellence in Tissue Engineering Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 2Institute of Pharmaceutics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 3State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 4YouAn Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 5Department of Biomaterials, Field of Tissue Engineering, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto, 6Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, Osaka, 7Department of Biotechnology and Therapeutics, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are adult stem cells with multilineage potential, which makes them attractive tools for regenerative medicine applications. Efficient gene transfer into MSCs is essential not only for basic research in developmental biology but also for therapeutic applications involving gene-modification in regenerative medicine. Adenovirus vectors (Advs can efficiently and transiently introduce an exogenous gene into many cell types via their primary receptors, the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptors, but not into MSCs, which are deficient in coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptors expression. To overcome this problem, we developed an Adv coated with a spermine-pullulan (SP cationic polymer and investigated its physicochemical properties and internalization mechanisms. We demonstrated that the SP

  7. Next generation macrocyclic and acyclic cationic lipids for gene transfer: Synthesis and in vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubeli, Emile; Maginty, Amanda B; Abdul Khalique, Nada; Raju, Liji; Abdulhai, Mohamad; Nicholson, David G; Larsen, Helge; Pungente, Michael D; Goldring, William P D

    2015-10-01

    Previously we reported the synthesis and in vitro evaluation of four novel, short-chain cationic lipid gene delivery vectors, characterized by acyclic or macrocyclic hydrophobic regions composed of, or derived from, two 7-carbon chains. Herein we describe a revised synthesis of an expanded library of related cationic lipids to include extended chain analogues, their formulation with plasmid DNA (pDNA) and in vitro delivery into Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO-K1) cells. The formulations were evaluated against each other based on structural differences in the hydrophobic domain and headgroup. Structurally the library is divided into four sets based on lipids derived from two 7- or two 11-carbon hydrophobic chains, C7 and C11 respectively, which possess either a dimethylamine or a trimethylamine derived headgroup. Each set includes four cationic lipids based on an acyclic or macrocyclic, saturated or unsaturated hydrophobic domain. All lipids were co-formulated with the commercial cationic lipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EPC) in a 1:1 molar ratio, along with one of two distinct neutral co-lipids, cholesterol or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) in an overall cationic-to-neutral lipid molar ratio of 3:2. Binding of lipid formulations with DNA, and packing morphology associated with the individual lipid-DNA complexes were characterized by gel electrophoresis and small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXD), respectively. As a general trend, lipoplex formulations based on mismatched binary cationic lipids, composed of a shorter C7 lipid and the longer lipid EPC (C14), were generally associated with higher transfection efficiency and lower cytotoxicity than their more closely matched C11/EPC binary lipid formulation counterparts. Furthermore, the cyclic lipids gave transfection levels as high as or greater than their acyclic counterparts, and formulations with cholesterol exhibited higher transfection and lower cytotoxicity than those

  8. Toward the Establishment of Standardized In Vitro Tests for Lipid-Based Formulations. 5. Lipolysis of Representative Formulations by Gastric Lipase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakala-N'Goma, Jean-Claude; Williams, Hywel D.; Sassene, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Lipid-based formulations (LBF) are substrates for digestive lipases and digestion can significantly alter their properties and potential to support drug absorption. LBFs have been widely examined for their behaviour in the presence of pancreatic enzymes. Here, the impact of gastric lipase...

  9. Feeding behaviors during home-based treatment of moderate acute malnutrition using corn-soy blends or lipid-based nutrient supplements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iuel-Brockdorff, Ann-Sophie Julie D; Ouedraogo, Albertine; Ritz, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Feeding behaviors have an important impact on children's nutritional status and are essential to consider when implementing nutrition programs. The objective of this study was to explore and compare feeding behaviors related to supplementary feeding with corn-soy blends (CSB) and lipid-based nutr...

  10. Lipid-Based Formulations Can Enable the Model Poorly Water-Soluble Weakly Basic Drug Cinnarizine to Precipitate in an Amorphous-Salt Form during in Vitro Digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Jamal; Rades, Thomas; Boyd, Ben J

    2016-01-01

    The tendency for poorly water-soluble weakly basic drugs to precipitate in a noncrystalline form during the in vitro digestion of lipid-based formulations (LBFs) was linked to an ionic interaction between drug and fatty acid molecules produced upon lipid digestion. Cinnarizine was chosen as a mod...

  11. Developmental outcomes among 18-month-old Malawians after a year of complementary feeding with lipid-based nutrient supplements or corn-soy flour

    Science.gov (United States)

    The major aim of this trial was to compare the development of 18-month-old infants who received complementary feeding for 1 year with either lipid-based nutrient supplements or micronutrient-fortified corn-soy porridge. Our secondary aim was to determine the socio-economic factors associated with de...

  12. Toward the establishment of standardized in vitro tests for lipid-based formulations, part 3: understanding supersaturation versus precipitation potential during the in vitro digestion of type I, II, IIIA, IIIB and IV lipid-based formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Hywel D; Sassene, Philip; Kleberg, Karen; Calderone, Marilyn; Igonin, Annabel; Jule, Eduardo; Vertommen, Jan; Blundell, Ross; Benameur, Hassan; Müllertz, Anette; Pouton, Colin W; Porter, Christopher J H

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that digestion of lipid-based formulations (LBFs) can stimulate both supersaturation and precipitation. The current study has evaluated the drug, formulation and dose-dependence of the supersaturation - precipitation balance for a range of LBFs. Type I, II, IIIA/B LBFs containing medium-chain (MC) or long-chain (LC) lipids, and lipid-free Type IV LBF incorporating different doses of fenofibrate or tolfenamic acid were digested in vitro in a simulated intestinal medium. The degree of supersaturation was assessed through comparison of drug concentrations in aqueous digestion phases (APDIGEST) during LBF digestion and the equilibrium drug solubility in the same phases. Increasing fenofibrate or tolfenamic acid drug loads (i.e., dose) had negligible effects on LC LBF performance during digestion, but promoted drug crystallization (confirmed by XRPD) from MC and Type IV LBF. Drug crystallization was only evident in instances when the calculated maximum supersaturation ratio (SR(M)) was >3. This threshold SR(M) value was remarkably consistent across all LBF and was also consistent with previous studies with danazol. The maximum supersaturation ratio (SR(M)) provides an indication of the supersaturation 'pressure' exerted by formulation digestion and is strongly predictive of the likelihood of drug precipitation in vitro. This may also prove effective in discriminating the in vivo performance of LBFs.

  13. Empirical Properties of Multilingual Phone-To-Word Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    EMPIRICAL PROPERTIES OF MULTILINGUAL PHONE-TO-WORD TRANSDUCTION Geoffrey Zweig Microsoft Research gzweig@microsoft.com Jon Nedel U.S. Department of...69–88, 2002. [2] G. Saon, G. Zweig , and D. Povey, “Anatomy of an extremely fast LVCSR decoder,” in Interspeech, 2005. [3] S. Ortmanns, H. Ney, and A

  14. Exploring signal transduction networks using mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, L.A.T.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics can be used to answer a diversity of biological questions. In this thesis, we describe the application of several MS-based proteomics approaches to get insight into several aspects of signal transduction. In Chapter 2, quantitative global phosphoproteomics are

  15. Signal transduction by the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Skov, S; Bregenholt, S;

    1999-01-01

    Ligation of cell surface major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) proteins by antibodies, or by their native counter receptor, the CD8 molecule, mediates transduction of signals into the cells. MHC-I-mediated signaling can lead to both increased and decreased activity of the MHC-I-expressing cell...

  16. Coordinate gene regulation by fimbriae-induced signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Klemm, Per

    2001-01-01

    of Ag43 production. No effect was observed in an oxyR mutant. We conclude that fimbriae expression per se constitutes a signal transduction mechanism that affects a number of unrelated genes via the thiol-disulfide status of OxyR. Thus, phase variation in fimbrial expression is coordinated...

  17. Diffusion wave and signal transduction in biological live cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Tian You

    2012-01-01

    Transduction of mechanical stimuli into biochemical signals is a fundamental subject for cell physics. In the experiments of FRET signal in cells a wave propagation in nanoscope was observed. We here develop a diffusion wave concept and try to give an explanation to the experimental observation. The theoretical prediction is in good agreement to result of the experiment.

  18. Signal transduction by growth factor receptors: signaling in an instant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Joern; Akimov, Vyacheslav; Blagoev, Blagoy;

    2007-01-01

    -out by mass spectrometry-based proteomics has allowed exciting views on the very early events in signal transduction. Activation profiles of regulated phosphorylation sites on epidermal growth factor receptor and downstream signal transducers showed different kinetics within the first ten seconds...

  19. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-09-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies.

  20. Cell biology symposium: Membrane trafficking and signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    In general, membrane trafficking is a broad group of processes where proteins and other large molecules are distributed throughout the cell as well as adjacent extracellular spaces. Whereas signal transduction is a process where signals are transmitted through a series of chemical or molecular event...

  1. Polylysine modification of adenoviral fiber protein enhances muscle cell transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouri, K; Feero, W G; Myerburg, M M; Wickham, T J; Kovesdi, I; Hoffman, E P; Clemens, P R

    1999-07-01

    Adenoviral vectors (ADVs) are used widely for gene delivery to different tissues including muscle. One particularly promising use for ADVs is in the transfer of the dystrophin gene to the muscle of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). However, studies in different animal models of DMD suggest that ADVs inefficiently transduce mature skeletal muscle. In this article we test whether AdZ.F(pK7), a genetically modified ADV that expresses a polylysine moiety on the end of the fiber protein, could enhance transduction of muscle cells and circumvent the maturation-dependent loss of muscle infectivity by ADVs. The efficiency of transduction was tested at different levels of muscle maturation. In vitro, AdZ.F(pK7) showed a higher level of transduction at all stages of differentiation including myoblasts, myotubes, and single muscle fibers. In vivo, mature skeletal muscle was transduced fourfold better by AdZ.F(pK7) than by the unmodifled vector (AdZ.F). Together, these observations demonstrate improved ADV transduction of skeletal muscle by modifying ADV tropism, and provide a proof-of-principle that modification of ADVs to target muscle-specific molecules could result in tissue-specific transfer of skeletal muscle tissue as well.

  2. Mitogen-activated protein kinase and abscisic acid signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S.; Testerink, C.; Wang, M.

    1998-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is a classical plant hormone, responsible for regulation of abscission, diverse aspects of plant and seed development, stress responses and germination. It was found that ABA signal transduction in plants can involve the activity of type 2C-phosphatases (PP2C), c

  3. The Free Tricoordinated Silyl Cation Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čičak, H.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available As the importance and abundance of silicon in our environment is large, it has been thought that silicon might take the place of carbon in forming a host of similar compounds and silicon-based life. However, until today there is no experimental evidence for such a hypothesis and carbon is still unique among the elements in the vast number and variety of compounds it can form. Also, the corresponding derivatives of the two elements show considerable differences in their chemical properties.The essential debate concerning organosilicon chemistry relates to the existence of the free planar tricoordinated silyl cations in condensed phase (R3Si+, in analogy to carbocations (R3C+ which have been known and characterized as free species. Although silyl cations are thermodynamically more stable than their carbon analogs, they are very reactive due to their high inherent electrophilicity and the ability of hypervalent coordination. On the other hand, stabilization by inductive and hyperconjugative effects and larger steric effects of carbocations make them less sensitive to solvation or other environmental effects than silyl cations. Hence, observation of free silyl cations in the condensed phase proved extremely difficult and the actual problem is the question of the degree of the (remaining silyl cation character.The first free silyl cation, trimesitylsilyl cation, and in analogy with it tridurylsilyl cation, were synthesized by Lambert et al. Free silyl cations based on analogy to aromatic ions (homocyclopropenylium and tropylium have also been prepared. However, in these silyl cations the cationic character is reduced by internal π -conjugation. Čičak et al. prepared some silyl-cationic intermediates (Me3Si--CH≡CR+in solid state. With the help of quantum-mechanical calculations it was concluded that these adducts have much more silyl cation than carbocation character.

  4. The sugarcane signal transduction (SUCAST catalogue: prospecting signal transduction in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucia Mendes Souza

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available EST sequencing has enabled the discovery of many new genes in a vast array of organisms, and the utility of this approach to the scientific community is greatly increased by the establishment of fully annotated databases. The present study aimed to identify sugarcane ESTs sequenced in the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST project (http://sucest.lad.ic.unicamp.br that corresponded to signal transduction components. We also produced a sugarcane signal transduction (SUCAST catalogue (http://sucest.lad.ic.unicamp.br/private/mining-reports/QG/QG-mining.htm that covered the main categories and pathways. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs encoding enzymes for hormone (gibberellins, ethylene, auxins, abscisic acid and jasmonic acid biosynthetic pathways were found and tissue specificity was inferred from their relative frequency of occurrence in the different libraries. Whenever possible, transducers of hormones and plant peptide signaling were catalogued to the respective pathway. Over 100 receptors were found in sugarcane, which contains a large family of Ser/Thr kinase receptors and also photoreceptors, histidine kinase receptors and their response regulators. G-protein and small GTPases were analyzed and compared to known members of these families found in mammalian and plant systems. Major kinase and phosphatase pathways were mapped, with special attention being given to the MAP kinase and the inositol pathway, both of which are well known in plants.O sequenciamento de ESTs (etiquetas de sequencias transcritas tem possibilitado a descoberta de muitos novos genes em uma ampla variedade de organismos. Um aumento do aproveitamento desta informação pela comunidade científica tem sido possível graças ao desenvolvimento de base de dados contendo seqüências completamente anotadas. O trabalho aqui relatado teve como objetivo a identificação de ESTs de cana de açúcar seqüenciadas através do projeto SUCEST (http://sucest.lad.ic. unicamp.br que

  5. Lipid-based formulations and drug supersaturation: harnessing the unique benefits of the lipid digestion/absorption pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Hywel D; Trevaskis, Natalie L; Yeap, Yan Yan; Anby, Mette U; Pouton, Colin W; Porter, Christopher J H

    2013-12-01

    Drugs with low aqueous solubility commonly show low and erratic absorption after oral administration. Myriad approaches have therefore been developed to promote drug solubilization in the gastrointestinal (GI) fluids. Here, we offer insight into the unique manner by which lipid-based formulations (LBFs) may enhance the absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs via co-stimulation of solubilization and supersaturation. Supersaturation provides an opportunity to generate drug concentrations in the GI tract that are in excess of the equilibrium crystalline solubility and therefore higher than that achievable with traditional formulations. Incorporation of LBF into lipid digestion and absorption pathways provides multiple drivers of supersaturation generation and the potential to enhance thermodynamic activity and absorption. These drivers include 1) formulation dispersion, 2) lipid digestion, 3) interaction with bile and 4) lipid absorption. However, high supersaturation ratios may also stimulate drug precipitation and reduce exposure where re-dissolution limits absorption. The most effective formulations are likely to be those that generate moderate supersaturation and do so close to the site of absorption. LBFs are particularly well suited to these criteria since solubilization protects against high supersaturation ratios, and supersaturation initiation typically occurs in the small intestine, at the absorptive membrane.

  6. A microstructural study of water effects in lipid-based pharmaceutical formulations for liquid filling of capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Alexandra H E; Kokubo, Tohru; Dujovny, Gabriela; Jones, Brian; Scialdone, Claudio; Bravo, Roberto; Kuentz, Martin

    2016-07-30

    Water is known to exhibit pronounced effects on lipid-based formulations (LBFs) and much research has focused on aqueous dispersion and dilution behavior regarding biopharmaceutical performance. From a product quality perspective, it is also critical to study a range of lower water amounts in formulations with respect to capsule filling. The present work addressed the need for a better understanding of LBF microstructure by taking percolation theory into account. The effects of increasing amounts of water on LBFs were analyzed by conductivity, water activity, time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance, and diffusing wave spectroscopy. Results were interpreted using percolation theory and preliminary mechanical tests were conducted on gelatin and hypromellose (HPMC) capsule shells. For both LBF systems, increasing water amounts led to marked changes in the microstructure of the formulations. Percolation laws could be fitted adequately to the data and thresholds were identified for the formation of continuous water channels (ϕwc~0.02-0.06). A new theoretical model was proposed for water activity. The preliminary shell material studies showed that the threshold for generating water channels in the formulation could be correlated to mechanical changes of the capsule shell that were relatively more pronounced in the case of gelatin. This mechanistic study demonstrated the importance of understanding and monitoring of microstructural changes occurring in LBFs with increasing amounts of water, which will help to design quality into the final dosage form.

  7. High-Throughput Lipolysis in 96-Well Plates for Rapid Screening of Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosgaard, Mette D; Sassene, Philip J; Mu, Huiling; Rades, Thomas; Müllertz, Anette

    2017-04-01

    The high-throughput in vitro intestinal lipolysis model (HTP) applicable for rapid and low-scale screening of lipid-based drug delivery systems (LbDDSs) was optimized and adjusted as to be conducted in 96-well plates (HTP-96). Three different LbDDSs (I-III) loaded with danazol or cinnarizine were used as model systems. The distributions of cinnarizine and danazol in the aqueous and precipitated digestion phases generated during lipolysis in HTP-96 were compared with previously published data obtained from HTP. The final HTP-96 setup resulted in the same rank order as the original HTP model with regard to solubilization in the aqueous phase during digestion: LbDDS III > LbDDS II > LbDDS I for danazol and LbDDS III ≈ LbDDS II ≈ LbDDS I for cinnarizine. HTP-96 is a useful model for fast performance assessment of LbDDS in a small scale. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Preventative lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) and young child feeding practices: findings from qualitative research in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesorogol, Carolyn; Jean-Louis, Sherlie; Green, Jamie; Iannotti, Lora

    2015-12-01

    To prevent undernutrition in an urban slum in Haiti, a lipid-based nutrient supplement (LNS) was introduced through a randomised control trial. Food supplementation for young child nutrition has a long history in Haiti, but there is little empirical information regarding the effects of supplementation on young child feeding practices. One of the concerns raised by supplementation is that it may disrupt other positive feeding practices such as breastfeeding and use of other complementary foods, with negative consequences for child nutrition. We conducted 29 in-depth interviews with mother-baby pairs from the three comparison groups: control, 3-month LNS supplementation and 6-month LNS supplementation. Findings from those in the LNS groups indicated high acceptance and satisfaction with LNS and perceptions that it positively affects child health and development. LNS was integrated into and enhanced ongoing complementary feeding practices. The effects of LNS use on duration and perceived quantity of breastfeeding were variable, but generally, breastfeeding was maintained during and after the intervention. Interviews generated insights into beliefs regarding infant and young child feeding practices such as introduction and use of complementary foods, and breastfeeding duration, exclusivity and cessation. Implications for the use of LNS in public health nutrition programmes are discussed.

  9. Novel Nanostructured Solid Materials for Modulating Oral Drug Delivery from Solid-State Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dening, Tahnee J; Rao, Shasha; Thomas, Nicky; Prestidge, Clive A

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS) have gained significant attention in recent times, owing to their ability to overcome the challenges limiting the oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs. Despite the successful commercialization of several LBDDS products over the years, a large discrepancy exists between the number of poorly water-soluble drugs displaying suboptimal in vivo performances and the application of LBDDS to mitigate their various delivery challenges. Conventional LBDDS, including lipid solutions and suspensions, emulsions, and self-emulsifying formulations, suffer from various drawbacks limiting their widespread use and commercialization. Accordingly, solid-state LBDDS, fabricated by adsorbing LBDDS onto a chemically inert solid carrier material, have attracted substantial interest as a viable means of stabilizing LBDDS whilst eliminating some of the various limitations. This review describes the impact of solid carrier choice on LBDDS performance and highlights the importance of appropriate solid carrier material selection when designing hybrid solid-state LBDDS. Specifically, emphasis is placed on discussing the ability of the specific solid carrier to modulate drug release, control lipase action and lipid digestion, and enhance biopharmaceutical performance above the original liquid-state LBDDS. To encourage the interested reader to consider their solid carrier choice on a higher level, various novel materials with the potential for future use as solid carriers for LBDDS are described. This review is highly significant in guiding future research directions in the solid-state LBDDS field and fostering the translation of these delivery systems to the pharmaceutical marketplace.

  10. Signal transduction pathways in liver and the influence of hepatitis C virus infection on their activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Magdalena M Dabrowska; Anatol Panasiuk; Robert Flisiak

    2009-01-01

    In liver, the most intensively studied transmembrane and intracellular signal transduction pathways are the Janus kinase signal transduction pathway, the mitogen-activated protein kinases signal transduction pathway, the transforming growth factor b signal transduction pathway, the tumor necrosis factor a signal transduction pathway and the recently discovered sphingolipid signal transduction pathway. All of them are activated by many different cytokines and growth factors. They regulate specific cell mechanisms such as hepatocytes proliferation, growth, differentiation, adhesion, apoptosis, and synthesis and degradation of the extracellular matrix. The replication cycle of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is intracellular and requires signal transduction to the nucleus to regulate transcription of its genes. Moreover, HCV itself, by its structural and nonstructural proteins, could influence the activity of the second signal messengers. Thus, the inhibition of the transmembrane and intracellular signal transduction pathways could be a new therapeutic target in chronic hepatitis C treatment.

  11. DMPD: LPS/TLR4 signal transduction pathway. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18304834 LPS/TLR4 signal transduction pathway. Lu YC, Yeh WC, Ohashi PS. Cytokine. ...2008 May;42(2):145-51. Epub 2008 Mar 4. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show LPS/TLR4 signal transduction path...way. PubmedID 18304834 Title LPS/TLR4 signal transduction pathway. Authors Lu YC, Yeh WC, Ohashi PS. Publica

  12. Afrikaans Syllabification Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilla Fick

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to English, automatic hyphenation by computer of Afrikaans words is a problem that still needs to be addressed, since errors are still often encountered in printed text. An initial step in this task is the ability to automatically syllabify words. Since new words are created continuously by joining words, it is necessary to develop an “intelligent” technique for syllabification. As a first phase of the research, we consider only the orthographic information of words, and disregard both syntactic and morphological information. This approach allows us to use machine-learning techniques such as artificial neural networks and decision trees that are known for their pattern recognition abilities. Both these techniques are trained with isolated patterns consisting of input patterns and corresponding outputs (or targets that indicate whether the input pattern should be split at a certain position, or not. In the process of compiling a list of syllabified words from which to generate training data for the  syllabification problem, irregular patterns were identified. The same letter patterns are split differently in different words and complete words that are spelled identically are split differently due to meaning. We also identified irregularities in and between  the different dictionaries that we used. We examined the influence range of letters that are involved in irregularities. For example, for their in agter-ente and vaste-rente we have to consider three letters to the left of r to be certain where the hyphen should be inserted. The influence range of the k in verstek-waarde and kleinste-kwadrate is four to the left and three to the right. In an analysis of letter patterns in Afrikaans words we found that the letter e has the highest frequency overall (16,2% of all letters in the word list. The frequency of words starting with s is the highest, while the frequency of words ending with e is the highest. It is important to

  13. In vivo biodistribution, biocompatibility, and efficacy of sorafenib-loaded lipid-based nanosuspensions evaluated experimentally in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaomei; Zhang, Bo; Gong, Xiaowei; Wang, Tianqi; Liu, Yongjun; Zhang, Na

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide. In this study, sorafenib-loaded lipid-based nanosuspensions (sorafenib-LNS) were first developed as an intravenous injectable formulation to increase the efficacy of sorafenib against HCC. LNS were used as nanocarriers for sorafenib owing to their desired features in increasing the solubility and dissolution velocity, improving the bioavailability of sorafenib. Sorafenib-LNS were prepared by nanoprecipitation and consisted of spherical particles with a uniform size distribution (164.5 nm, polydispersity index =0.202) and negative zeta potential (−11.0 mV). The drug loading (DL) was 10.55%±0.16%. Sorafenib-LNS showed higher in vitro cytotoxicity than sorafenib against HepG2 cells (P<0.05) and Bel-7402 cells (P<0.05). The in vivo biodistribution, biocompatibility, and antitumor efficacy of sorafenib-LNS were evaluated in H22-bearing liver cancer xenograft murine model. The results showed that sorafenib-LNS (9 mg/kg) exhibited significantly higher antitumor efficacy by reducing the tumor volume compared with the sorafenib oral group (18 mg/kg, P<0.05) and sorafenib injection group (9 mg/kg, P<0.05). Furthermore, the results of the in vivo biodistribution experiments demonstrated that sorafenib-LNS injected into H22 tumor-bearing mice exhibited increased accumulation in the tumor tissue, which was confirmed by in vivo imaging. In the current experimental conditions, sorafenib-LNS did not show significant toxicity both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that sorafenib-LNS are a promising nanomedicine for treating HCC. PMID:27307733

  14. Silica encapsulated lipid-based drug delivery systems for reducing the fed/fasted variations of ziprasidone in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dening, Tahnee J; Rao, Shasha; Thomas, Nicky; Prestidge, Clive A

    2016-04-01

    Ziprasidone is a poorly water-soluble antipsychotic drug that demonstrates low fasted state oral bioavailability and a clinically significant two-fold increase in absorption when dosed postprandially. Owing to significant compliance challenges faced by schizophrenic patients, a novel oral formulation of ziprasidone that demonstrates improved fasted state absorption and a reduced food effect is of major interest, and is therefore the aim of this research. Three lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS) were developed and investigated: (a) a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS), (b) a solid SNEDDS formulation, and (c) silica-lipid hybrid (SLH) microparticles. SNEDDS was developed using Capmul MCM® and Tween 80®, and solid SNEDDS was fabricated by spray-drying SNEDDS with Aerosil 380® silica nanoparticles as the solid carrier. SLH microparticles were prepared in a similar manner to solid SNEDDS using a precursor lipid emulsion composed of Capmul MCM® and soybean lecithin. The performance of the developed formulations was evaluated under simulated digesting conditions using an in vitro lipolysis model, and pure (unformulated) ziprasidone was used as a control. While pure ziprasidone exhibited the lowest rate and extent of drug solubilization under fasting conditions and a significant 2.4-fold increase in drug solubilization under fed conditions, all three LBDDS significantly enhanced the extent of drug solubilization under fasting conditions between 18- and 43-folds in comparison to pure drug. No significant difference in drug solubilization for the fed and fasted states was observed for the three LBDDS systems. To highlight the potential of LBDDS, mechanism(s) of action and various performance characteristics are discussed. Importantly, LBDDS are identified as an appropriate formulation strategy to explore further for the improved oral delivery of ziprasidone.

  15. Stability indicating RP-HPLC method for the estimation of Decitabine in bulk drug and lipid based Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yub Raj Neupane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our present work was to develop and validate a reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC method for the determination of Decitabine (DCB. The developed method was further applied to observe the degradation of DCB under various stress conditions. Methods: Chromatographic separation was achieved on C18, 250 × 4.6 mm, particle size 5 μm, Agilent column, using ammonium acetate (0.01M as mobile phase with flow rate of 1mL/min and injection volume was 20 μL. Quantification was carried out with UV detector at 230 nm with a linear calibration curve in the concentration range of 10–100 μg/mL based on peak area. Thus, developed method was validated for linearity, accuracy, precision, and robustness. Results: Linearity was found to be in the range between 10–100 μg/mL with a significantly higher value of correlation coefficient r2 = 0.9994. The limits of detection (LOD and the limits of quantification (LOQ were found to be 1.92μg/mL and 5.82 μg/mL respectively. Moreover, validated method was applied to study the degradation profile of DCB under various stress degradation conditions. Examination of different stress conditions on degradation of DCB showed that its degradation was highly susceptible to oxidative condition as 31.24% of drug was degraded. In acidic and alkaline conditions, the drug was degraded by 21.03% and 12.16% respectively, while thermal and photolytic condition causes least degradation, i.e. 0.21% and 0.3% respectively. Conclusion: The proposed method was found to be sensitive, specific and was successfully applied for the estimation of DCB in bulk drug, and lipid based nanoparticles.

  16. Molecular methods for the study of signal transduction in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Irving, Helen R.

    2013-09-03

    Novel and improved analytical methods have led to a rapid increase in our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying plant signal transduction. Progress has been made both at the level of single-component analysis and in vivo imaging as well as at the systems level where transcriptomics and particularly phosphoproteomics afford a window into complex biological responses. Here we review the role of the cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP in plant signal transduction as well as the discovery and biochemical and biological characterization of an increasing number of complex multi-domain nucleotide cyclases that catalyze the synthesis of cAMP and cGMP from ATP and GTP, respectively. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  17. A PKD Channel-based Biosensor for Taste Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunsheng; Du, Liping; Hu, Liang; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Luhang; Wang, Ping

    2011-09-01

    This study describes a micro electrode array (MEA)-based biosensor for taste transduction using heterologous expressed taste polycystic kidney disease-like (PKD) channels as molecular sensors. Taste PKD1L3/2L1 channels were expressed on the plasma membrane of human embryo kidney (HEK)-293 cells [1]. Then the cells were cultured on the surface of MEA chip [2] to record the responses of PKD channels to sour stimulations by monitoring membrane potential. The results indicate this MEA-based biosensor can record the special off-responses of PKD channels to sour stimulation in a non-invasive manner for a long term. It may provide an alternative tool for the research of taste transduction, especially for the characterization of taste ion channels.

  18. The new sideway of CNTF signal transduction pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The action of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on intercellular free Ca2+ concentrations [Ca2+]I induced by glutamate (Glu) in primary cultured hippocampal neurons were detected with Fura2/AM,a Ca2+-sensitive fluorophore,and the morphological influence of G-protein on it was ob- jected. Glu could induce rapid increase of [Ca2+]I in hippo- campal neurons. CNTF had no significant action on [Ca2+]I in resting hippocampal neurons. However,after incubation of CNTF for 5 min,the increase of [Ca2+]I in hippocampal neurons rapidly induced by Glu was inhibited. Pretussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G protein could block the action. These results indicate that a new non-genomic rapid sideway might exist in the upper stream of CNTF signal transduction pathway,which was related to Ca2+ signal transduction.

  19. Role of the phosphoinositide signal transduction pathway in the endometrium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincenza Rita Lo Vasco

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of calcium concentration triggers physiological events in all cell types. Unregulated elevation in calcium concentrations is often cytotoxic.In fact, uncontrolled calcium levels alter proteins’ function, apoptosis regulation, as well as proliferation, secretion and contraction.Calcium levels are tightly regulated.A great interest was paid to signal transduction pathways for their role in mammalian reproduction.The role of phosphoinositide(PI) signal transduction pathway and related phosphoinositide-specific phospholipaseC(PI-PLC) enzymes in the regulation of calcium levels was actively studied and characterized.However, the role of PI signaling andPI-PLC enzymes in the endometrium is far to be completely highlighted.In the present review the role ofPI, the expression of selectedPI-PLC enzymes and the crosstalk with further signaling systems in the endometrium will be discussed.

  20. Study of spatial signal transduction in bistable switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qi; Yao, Cheng-Gui; Tang, Jun; Liu, Li-Wei

    2016-10-01

    Bistable switch modules are among the most important fundamental motifs in signal-transduction pathways. To better understand their spatial signal transduction, we model the diffusion process in the one-dimensional (1-D) domain. We find that when none of the elements diffuse, the response of the system exhibits a spatial switch-like property. However, when one of the elements is highly diffusible, the response of the system does not show any spatial switching behavior. Furthermore, we observe that the spatial responses of the system are more sensitive to the time constant of the switch when none of the elements are diffusible. Further, a slow loop keeps the system in the high steady state more positions than that in the fast loop. Finally, we consolidate our numerical results analytically by performing a mathematical method.

  1. Maxwell's demon in biochemical signal transduction with feedback loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Sosuke; Sagawa, Takahiro

    2015-06-23

    Signal transduction in living cells is vital to maintain life itself, where information transfer in noisy environment plays a significant role. In a rather different context, the recent intensive research on 'Maxwell's demon'-a feedback controller that utilizes information of individual molecules-have led to a unified theory of information and thermodynamics. Here we combine these two streams of research, and show that the second law of thermodynamics with information reveals the fundamental limit of the robustness of signal transduction against environmental fluctuations. Especially, we find that the degree of robustness is quantitatively characterized by an informational quantity called transfer entropy. Our information-thermodynamic approach is applicable to biological communication inside cells, in which there is no explicit channel coding in contrast to artificial communication. Our result could open up a novel biophysical approach to understand information processing in living systems on the basis of the fundamental information-thermodynamics link.

  2. Tuning piezoresistive transduction in nanomechanical resonators by geometrical asymmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llobet, J.; Sansa, M.; Lorenzoni, M.; Pérez-Murano, F., E-mail: francesc.perez@csic.es [Institut de Microelectrònica de Barcelona (IMB-CNM CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Borrisé, X. [Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia (ICN2), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra Spain (Spain); San Paulo, A. [Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid (IMM-CSIC), 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-08-17

    The effect of geometrical asymmetries on the piezoresistive transduction in suspended double clamped beam nanomechanical resonators is investigated. Tapered silicon nano-beams, fabricated using a fast and flexible prototyping method, are employed to determine how the asymmetry affects the transduced piezoresistive signal for different mechanical resonant modes. This effect is attributed to the modulation of the strain in pre-strained double clamped beams, and it is confirmed by means of finite element simulations.

  3. Post-translational modification of PII signal transduction proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Mike eMerrick

    2015-01-01

    The PII proteins constitute one of the most widely distributed families of signal transduction proteins in nature. They are pivotal players in the control of nitrogen metabolism in bacteria and archaea, and are also found in the plastids of plants. Quite remarkably PII proteins control the activities of a diverse range of enzymes, transcription factors and membrane transport proteins, and in all known cases they achieve their regulatory effect by direct interaction with their target. PII prot...

  4. Identification of photoperception and light signal transduction pathways in citrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Quecini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies employing model species have elucidated several aspects of photoperception and light signal transduction that control plant development. However, the information available for economically important crops is scarce. Citrus genome databases of expressed sequence tags (EST were investigated in order to identify genes coding for functionally characterized proteins responsible for light-regulated developmental control in model plants. Approximately 176,200 EST sequences from 53 libraries were queried and all bona fide and putative photoreceptor gene families were found in citrus species. We have identified 53 orthologs for several families of transcriptional regulators and cytoplasmic proteins mediating photoreceptor-induced responses although some important Arabidopsis phytochrome- and cryptochrome-signaling components are absent from citrus sequence databases. The main gene families responsible for phototropin-mediated signal transduction were present in citrus transcriptome, including general regulatory factors (14-3-3 proteins, scaffolding elements and auxin-responsive transcription factors and transporters. A working model of light perception, signal transduction and response-eliciting in citrus is proposed based on the identified key components. These results demonstrate the power of comparative genomics between model systems and economically important crop species to elucidate several aspects of plant physiology and metabolism.

  5. An Electrokinetic Model of Transduction in the Semicircular Canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Dennis P.

    1970-01-01

    Transduction in the semicircular canal was studied by focusing an infrared beam on either side of exposed ampullae from the posterior canals of Rana pipiens. The direction of fluid movement resulting from a stimulus was inferred by observing the polarity of the change in afferent impulse mean rate relative to the spontaneous value. On the basis of the accepted functional polarization of this receptor, the results indicate that fluid moved toward the warmer side of the ampulla. Convection and thermal reception were shown to be unlikely explanations for these results. Morover, cupular displacements toward the warmer side would not be expected. Because thermo-osmosis can cause fluid to move toward the warmer side in a gelatin membrane, the results can be interpreted as evidence that thermo-osmosis occurred in the gelatinous cupula and influenced the transduction mechanism. Thermo-osmosis of liquids appears to be due to an electric field that is set up in a charged membrane; hence, the hair cells might have detected an electric field that occurred in the cupula during thermo-osmosis. Electroreception might be an important link in the transduction of physiological stimuli also. Rotational stimuli could result in weak electric fields in the cupula by the mechanoelectric effect. Cupular displacements could be important for large stimuli, but extrapolations to threshold stimuli suggest displacements of angstrom amplitudes. Therefore, electroreception by the hair cells could be an explanation of the great sensitivity that has been observed in the semicircular canal and other labyrinthine receptors. PMID:5496906

  6. State-time spectrum of signal transduction logic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNamara, Aidan; Terfve, Camille; Henriques, David; Peñalver Bernabé, Beatriz; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio

    2012-08-01

    Despite the current wealth of high-throughput data, our understanding of signal transduction is still incomplete. Mathematical modeling can be a tool to gain an insight into such processes. Detailed biochemical modeling provides deep understanding, but does not scale well above relatively a few proteins. In contrast, logic modeling can be used where the biochemical knowledge of the system is sparse and, because it is parameter free (or, at most, uses relatively a few parameters), it scales well to large networks that can be derived by manual curation or retrieved from public databases. Here, we present an overview of logic modeling formalisms in the context of training logic models to data, and specifically the different approaches to modeling qualitative to quantitative data (state) and dynamics (time) of signal transduction. We use a toy model of signal transduction to illustrate how different logic formalisms (Boolean, fuzzy logic and differential equations) treat state and time. Different formalisms allow for different features of the data to be captured, at the cost of extra requirements in terms of computational power and data quality and quantity. Through this demonstration, the assumptions behind each formalism are discussed, as well as their advantages and disadvantages and possible future developments.

  7. The Hippo signal transduction network in skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackerhage, Henning; Del Re, Dominic P; Judson, Robert N; Sudol, Marius; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2014-08-05

    The discovery of the Hippo pathway can be traced back to two areas of research. Genetic screens in fruit flies led to the identification of the Hippo pathway kinases and scaffolding proteins that function together to suppress cell proliferation and tumor growth. Independent research, often in the context of muscle biology, described Tead (TEA domain) transcription factors, which bind CATTCC DNA motifs to regulate gene expression. These two research areas were joined by the finding that the Hippo pathway regulates the activity of Tead transcription factors mainly through phosphorylation of the transcriptional coactivators Yap and Taz, which bind to and activate Teads. Additionally, many other signal transduction proteins crosstalk to members of the Hippo pathway forming a Hippo signal transduction network. We discuss evidence that the Hippo signal transduction network plays important roles in myogenesis, regeneration, muscular dystrophy, and rhabdomyosarcoma in skeletal muscle, as well as in myogenesis, organ size control, and regeneration of the heart. Understanding the role of Hippo kinases in skeletal and heart muscle physiology could have important implications for translational research. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Signal Transduction Pathways of TNAP: Molecular Network Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Négyessy, László; Györffy, Balázs; Hanics, János; Bányai, Mihály; Fonta, Caroline; Bazsó, Fülöp

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing body of evidence pointing on the involvement of tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) in brain function and diseases like epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease, our understanding about the role of TNAP in the regulation of neurotransmission is severely limited. The aim of our study was to integrate the fragmented knowledge into a comprehensive view regarding neuronal functions of TNAP using objective tools. As a model we used the signal transduction molecular network of a pyramidal neuron after complementing with TNAP related data and performed the analysis using graph theoretic tools. The analyses show that TNAP is in the crossroad of numerous pathways and therefore is one of the key players of the neuronal signal transduction network. Through many of its connections, most notably with molecules of the purinergic system, TNAP serves as a controller by funnelling signal flow towards a subset of molecules. TNAP also appears as the source of signal to be spread via interactions with molecules involved among others in neurodegeneration. Cluster analyses identified TNAP as part of the second messenger signalling cascade. However, TNAP also forms connections with other functional groups involved in neuronal signal transduction. The results indicate the distinct ways of involvement of TNAP in multiple neuronal functions and diseases.

  9. Key cancer cell signal transduction pathways as therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Roberto; Melisi, Davide; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2006-02-01

    Growth factor signals are propagated from the cell surface, through the action of transmembrane receptors, to intracellular effectors that control critical functions in human cancer cells, such as differentiation, growth, angiogenesis, and inhibition of cell death and apoptosis. Several kinases are involved in transduction pathways via sequential signalling activation. These kinases include transmembrane receptor kinases (e.g., epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR); or cytoplasmic kinases (e.g., PI3 kinase). In cancer cells, these signalling pathways are often altered and results in a phenotype characterized by uncontrolled growth and increased capability to invade surrounding tissue. Therefore, these crucial transduction molecules represent attractive targets for cancer therapy. This review will summarize current knowledge of key signal transduction pathways, that are altered in cancer cells, as therapeutic targets for novel selective inhibitors. The most advanced targeted agents currently under development interfere with function and expression of several signalling molecules, including the EGFR family; the vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors; and cytoplasmic kinases such as Ras, PI3K and mTOR.

  10. Identification of a cardiac specific protein transduction domain by in vivo biopanning using a M13 phage peptide display library in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliha Zahid

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A peptide able to transduce cardiac tissue specifically, delivering cargoes to the heart, would be of significant therapeutic potential for delivery of small molecules, proteins and nucleic acids. In order to identify peptide(s able to transduce heart tissue, biopanning was performed in cell culture and in vivo with a M13 phage peptide display library. METHODS AND RESULTS: A cardiomyoblast cell line, H9C2, was incubated with a M13 phage 12 amino acid peptide display library. Internalized phage was recovered, amplified and then subjected to a total of three rounds of in vivo biopanning where infectious phage was isolated from cardiac tissue following intravenous injection. After the third round, 60% of sequenced plaques carried the peptide sequence APWHLSSQYSRT, termed cardiac targeting peptide (CTP. We demonstrate that CTP was able to transduce cardiomyocytes functionally in culture in a concentration and cell-type dependent manner. Mice injected with CTP showed significant transduction of heart tissue with minimal uptake by lung and kidney capillaries, and no uptake in liver, skeletal muscle, spleen or brain. The level of heart transduction by CTP also was greater than with a cationic transduction domain. CONCLUSIONS: Biopanning using a peptide phage display library identified a peptide able to transduce heart tissue in vivo efficiently and specifically. CTP could be used to deliver therapeutic peptides, proteins and nucleic acid specifically to the heart.

  11. Advancements in Anion Exchange Membrane Cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturgeon, Matthew R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Long, Hai [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Park, Andrew M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pivovar, Bryan S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Anion-exchange membrane fuel cells (AME-FCs) are of increasingly popular interest as they enable the use of non-Pt fuel cell catalysts, the primary cost limitation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Benzyltrimethyl ammonium (BTMA) is the standard cation that has historically been utilized as the hydroxide conductor in AEMs. Herein we approach AEMs from two directions. First and foremost we study the stability of several different cations in a hydroxide solution at elevated temperatures. We specifically targeted BTMA and methoxy and nitro substituted BTMA. We've also studied the effects of adding an akyl spacer units between the ammonium cation and the phenyl group. In the second approach we use computational studies to predict stable ammonium cations, which are then synthesized and tested for stability. Our unique method to study cation stability in caustic conditions at elevated temperatures utilizes Teflon Parr reactors suitable for use under various temperatures and cation concentrations. NMR analysis was used to determine remaining cation concentrations at specific time points with GCMS analysis verifying product distribution. We then compare the experimental results with calculated modeling stabilities. Our studies show that the electron donating methoxy groups slightly increase stability (compared to that of BTMA), while the electron withdrawing nitro groups greatly decrease stability in base. These results give insight into possible linking strategies to be employed when tethering a BTMA like ammonium cation to a polymeric backbone; thus synthesizing an anion exchange membrane.

  12. Transduction in Streptomyces hygroscopicus mediated by the temperate bacteriophage SH10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süss, F; Klaus, S

    1981-01-01

    The temperate actinophage SH10 mediates generalized transduction in Streptomyces hygroscopicus at low frequency. The efficiency of transduction depends on the average phage input, age of outgrowing spores of the recipient and on the selective marker. The highest EOT was found for the auxotrophic mutants 21(phe-) and 5(try-) (4.2 x 10(-6) and 2.7 x 10(-6), respectively). Transduction of the thermosensitive mutant NG14-216 ts 35 was two orders of magnitude lower (2.5 x 10(-8)). The transductant colonies segregated into stable and unstable clones. Stable transductants were never found to be lysogenic for phage SH10.

  13. Rationalizing the selection of oral lipid based drug delivery systems by an in vitro dynamic lipolysis model for improved oral bioavailability of poorly water soluble drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Arik; Hoffman, Amnon

    2008-07-02

    As a consequence of modern drug discovery techniques, there has been a consistent increase in the number of new pharmacologically active lipophilic compounds that are poorly water soluble. A great challenge facing the pharmaceutical scientist is making these molecules into orally administered medications with sufficient bioavailability. One of the most popular approaches to improve the oral bioavailability of these molecules is the utilization of a lipid based drug delivery system. Unfortunately, current development strategies in the area of lipid based delivery systems are mostly empirical. Hence, there is a need for a simplified in vitro method to guide the selection of a suitable lipidic vehicle composition and to rationalize the delivery system design. To address this need, a dynamic in vitro lipolysis model, which provides a very good simulation of the in vivo lipid digestion process, has been developed over the past few years. This model has been extensively used for in vitro assessment of different lipid based delivery systems, leading to enhanced understanding of the suitability of different lipids and surfactants as a delivery system for a given poorly water soluble drug candidate. A key goal in the development of the dynamic in vitro lipolysis model has been correlating the in vitro data of various drug-lipidic delivery system combinations to the resultant in vivo drug profile. In this paper, we discuss and review the need for this model, its underlying theory, practice and limitations, and the available data accumulated in the literature. Overall, the dynamic in vitro lipolysis model seems to provide highly useful initial guidelines in the development process of oral lipid based drug delivery systems for poorly water soluble drugs, and it predicts phenomena that occur in the pre-enterocyte stages of the intestinal absorption cascade.

  14. Cationic Lipid-Nucleic Acid Complexes for Gene Delivery And Silencing: Pathways And Mechanisms for Plasmid Dna And Sirna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewert, K.K.; Zidovska, A.; Ahmad, A.; Bouxsein, N.F.; Evans, H.M.; McAllister, C.S.; Samuel, C.E.; Safinya, C.R.; /SLAC

    2012-07-17

    Motivated by the promises of gene therapy, there is great interest in developing non-viral lipid-based vectors for therapeutic applications due to their low immunogenicity, low toxicity, ease of production, and the potential of transferring large pieces of DNA into cells. In fact, cationic liposome (CL) based vectors are among the prevalent synthetic carriers of nucleic acids (NAs) currently used in gene therapy clinical trials worldwide. These vectors are studied both for gene delivery with CL-DNA complexes and gene silencing with CL-siRNA (short interfering RNA) complexes. However, their transfection efficiencies and silencing efficiencies remain low compared to those of engineered viral vectors. This reflects the currently poor understanding of transfection-related mechanisms at the molecular and self-assembled levels, including a lack of knowledge about interactions between membranes and double stranded NAs and between CL-NA complexes and cellular components. In this review we describe our recent efforts to improve the mechanistic understanding of transfection by CL-NA complexes, which will help to design optimal lipid-based carriers of DNA and siRNA for therapeutic gene delivery and gene silencing.

  15. Cation diffusion in the natural zeolite clinoptilolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, A.; White, K.J. [Science Research Institute, Chemistry Division, Cockcroft Building, University of Salford, Salford (United Kingdom)

    1999-12-14

    The natural zeolite clinoptilolite is mined commercially in many parts of the world. It is a selective exchanger for the ammonium cation and this has prompted its use in waste water treatment, swimming pools and in fish farming. It is also used to scavenge radioisotopes in nuclear waste clean-up. Further potential uses for clinoptilolite are in soil amendment and remediation. The work described herein provides thermodynamic data on cation exchange processes in clinoptilolite involving the NH{sub 4}, Na, K, Ca, and Mg cations. The data includes estimates of interdiffusion coefficients together with free energies, entropies and energies of activation for the cation exchanges studied. Suggestions are made as to the mechanisms of cation-exchanges involved.

  16. Exploring Transduction Mechanisms of Protein Transduction Domains (PTDs in Living Cells Utilizing Single-Quantum Dot Tracking (SQT Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Suzuki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific protein domains known as protein transduction domains (PTDs can permeate cell membranes and deliver proteins or bioactive materials into living cells. Various approaches have been applied for improving their transduction efficacy. It is, therefore, crucial to clarify the entry mechanisms and to identify the rate-limiting steps. Because of technical limitations for imaging PTD behavior on cells with conventional fluorescent-dyes, how PTDs enter the cells has been a topic of much debate. Utilizing quantum dots (QDs, we recently tracked the behavior of PTD that was derived from HIV-1 Tat (TatP in living cells at the single-molecule level with 7-nm special precision. In this review article, we initially summarize the controversy on TatP entry mechanisms; thereafter, we will focus on our recent findings on single-TatP-QD tracking (SQT, to identify the major sequential steps of intracellular delivery in living cells and to discuss how SQT can easily provide direct information on TatP entry mechanisms. As a primer for SQT study, we also discuss the latest findings on single particle tracking of various molecules on the plasma membrane. Finally, we discuss the problems of QDs and the challenges for the future in utilizing currently available QD probes for SQT. In conclusion, direct identification of the rate-limiting steps of PTD entry with SQT should dramatically improve the methods for enhancing transduction efficiency.

  17. Structural Insights into Divalent Cation Modulations of ATP-Gated P2X Receptor Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Kasuya

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available P2X receptors are trimeric ATP-gated cation channels involved in physiological processes ranging widely from neurotransmission to pain and taste signal transduction. The modulation of the channel gating, including that by divalent cations, contributes to these diverse physiological functions of P2X receptors. Here, we report the crystal structure of an invertebrate P2X receptor from the Gulf Coast tick Amblyomma maculatum in the presence of ATP and Zn2+ ion, together with electrophysiological and computational analyses. The structure revealed two distinct metal binding sites, M1 and M2, in the extracellular region. The M1 site, located at the trimer interface, is responsible for Zn2+ potentiation by facilitating the structural change of the extracellular domain for pore opening. In contrast, the M2 site, coupled with the ATP binding site, might contribute to regulation by Mg2+. Overall, our work provides structural insights into the divalent cation modulations of P2X receptors.

  18. Design of lipid-based delivery systems for improving lymphatic transport and bioavailability of delta-tocopherol and nobiletin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chunxin

    Lymphatic drug transport can confer bioavailability advantage by avoiding the first-pass metabolism normally observed in the portal vein hepatic route. It was reported that long chain lipid-based delivery systems can stimulate the formation of chylomicron and thus promote the lymphatic transport of drugs. In this study, a novel delta-tocopherol (delta-T) loaded Solid Lipid Nanoparticle (SLN) system was developed to investigate its effect on promoting the lymphatic transport of delta-T. The delta-T SLN was prepared with hot melt emulsification method by using glyceryl behenate (compritol RTM888) as the lipid phase and lecithin (PC75) as the emulsifier. Formula configuration, processing condition and loading capacity were carefully optimized. Physicochemical properties (particle size, surface charge, morphology) were also characterized. Moreover, excellent stability of the developed delta-T SLN in the gastrointestinal environment was observed by using an in vitro digestion model. Further investigations of the SLN in stimulating delta-T lymphatic transport were performed on mice without cannulation. Compared with the control group (delta-T corn oil dispersion), much lower delta-T levels in both blood and liver indicated reduced portal vein and hepatic transport of delta-T in the form of SLN. On the other hand, significantly higher concentrations of delta-T were observed in thymus, a major lymphatic tissue, indicating improved lymphatic transport of delta-T with the SLN delivery system. Finally, the far less excreted delta-T level in feces further confirmed improved lymphatic transport and overall bioavailability of delta-T by using SLN system. Nobiletin (NOB), one of most abundant polymethoxyflavones (PMFs) found in Citrus genus, has a low solubility in both water and oil at ambient temperatures. Thus it tends to form crystals when the loading exceeds its saturation level in the carrier system. This character greatly impaired its bioavailability and application. To

  19. Outcomes associated with conventional versus lipid-based formulations of amphotericin B in propensity-matched groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell RS

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Rebecca S Campbell,1 Paresh Chaudhari,2 Harlen D Hays,1 Robert J Taylor,1 Brian H Nathanson,3 Samuel A Bozzette,1 David Horn4 1Cerner Research, Culver City, CA, USA; 2Astellas Scientific and Medical Affairs, Inc., Northbrook, IL, USA; 3OptiStatim, LLC, Longmeadow, MA, USA; 4David Horn LLC, Doylestown, PA, USA Background: Lipid-based formulations of amphotericin B (LF-AMB are indicated for treatment of invasive fungal infections in patients intolerant to conventional amphotericin B (CAB or with refractory infections. Physicians still may choose to administer CAB to such patients. We described the use of CAB and LF-AMB in this population and quantified differences in post-amphotericin B length of stay (LOS among survivors and hospital mortality in matched patients. Methods: Data were extracted from Health Facts (Cerner Corporation, Kansas City, MO, USA for a retrospective cohort analysis. Inpatients aged ≥18 years with evidence of fungal infection and with orders for LF-AMB or CAB on  ≥2 days from January 2001 to June 2010 were identified. Patients were required to have renal insufficiency or other relative contraindications to use of CAB, exposure to nephrotoxic agents, or evidence of a CAB-refractory infection. Multilevel (hierarchical mixed-effects logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with initial exposure to LF-AMB versus CAB. Multivariate adjustment of outcomes was done using propensity score matching. Results: 655 patients were identified: 322 patients initiated therapy with CAB and 333 initiated treatment with LF-AMB. Compared to those initiating CAB, patients initiating LF-AMB had greater acuity and underlying disease severity. In unadjusted analyses, hospital mortality was significantly higher in the LF-AMB group (32.2% versus 23.7%; P = 0.02. After propensity score matching and covariate adjustment, mortality equalized and observed differences in LOS after amphotericin B initiation decreased. Conclusion

  20. Elucidation of the outer membrane proteome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium utilising a lipid-based protein immobilization technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appleton Hazel

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium is a major cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. The outer membrane proteins expressed by S. Typhimurium mediate the process of adhesion and internalisation within the intestinal epithelium of the host thus influencing the progression of disease. Since the outer membrane proteins are surface-exposed, they provide attractive targets for the development of improved antimicrobial agents and vaccines. Various techniques have been developed for their characterisation, but issues such as carryover of cytosolic proteins still remain a problem. In this study we attempted to characterise the surface proteome of S. Typhimurium using Lipid-based Protein Immobilisation technology in the form of LPI™ FlowCells. No detergents are required and no sample clean up is needed prior to downstream analysis. The immobilised proteins can be digested with proteases in multiple steps to increase sequence coverage, and the peptides eluted can be characterised directly by liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS and identified from mass spectral database searches. Results In this study, 54 outer membrane proteins, were identified with two or more peptide hits using a multi-step digest approach. Out of these 28 were lipoproteins, nine were involved in transport and three with enzyme activity These included the transporters BtuB which is responsible for the uptake of vitamin B12, LamB which is involved in the uptake of maltose and maltodextrins and LolB which is involved in the incorporation of lipoproteins in the outer membrane. Other proteins identified included the enzymes MltC which may play a role in cell elongation and division and NlpD which is involved in catabolic processes in cell wall formation as well as proteins involved in virulence such as Lpp1, Lpp2 and OmpX. Conclusion Using a multi-step digest approach the LPI™ technique enables the incorporation of a

  1. Cationic Bolaamphiphiles for Gene Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Amelia Li Min; Lim, Alisa Xue Ling; Zhu, Yiting; Yang, Yi Yan; Khan, Majad

    2014-05-01

    Advances in medical research have shed light on the genetic cause of many human diseases. Gene therapy is a promising approach which can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to treat genetic diseases at its most fundamental level. In general, nonviral vectors are preferred due to reduced risk of immune response, but they are also commonly associated with low transfection efficiency and high cytotoxicity. In contrast to viral vectors, nonviral vectors do not have a natural mechanism to overcome extra- and intracellular barriers when delivering the therapeutic gene into cell. Hence, its design has been increasingly complex to meet challenges faced in targeting of, penetration of and expression in a specific host cell in achieving more satisfactory transfection efficiency. Flexibility in design of the vector is desirable, to enable a careful and controlled manipulation of its properties and functions. This can be met by the use of bolaamphiphile, a special class of lipid. Unlike conventional lipids, bolaamphiphiles can form asymmetric complexes with the therapeutic gene. The advantage of having an asymmetric complex lies in the different purposes served by the interior and exterior of the complex. More effective gene encapsulation within the interior of the complex can be achieved without triggering greater aggregation of serum proteins with the exterior, potentially overcoming one of the great hurdles faced by conventional single-head cationic lipids. In this review, we will look into the physiochemical considerations as well as the biological aspects of a bolaamphiphile-based gene delivery system.

  2. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  3. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  4. Characterization of the ABA signal transduction pathway in Vitis vinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boneh, Uri; Biton, Iris; Schwartz, Amnon; Ben-Ari, Giora

    2012-05-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates many key processes in plants including the response to abiotic stress. ABA signal transduction consists of a double-negative regulatory mechanism, whereby ABA-bound PYR/RCARs inhibit PP2C activity, and PP2Cs inactivate SnRK2s. We studied and analyzed the various genes participating in the ABA signaling cascade of the grape (Vitis vinifera). The grape ABA signal transduction consists of at least six SnRK2s. Yeast two-hybrid system was used to test direct interactions between core components of grape ABA signal transduction. We found that a total of forty eight interactions can occur between the various components. Exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) and abiotic stresses such as drought, high salt concentration and cold, were applied to vines growing in a hydroponic system. These stresses regulated the expression of various grape SnRK2s as well as ABFs in leaves and roots. Based on the interactions between SnRK2s and its targets and the expression pattern, we suggest that VvSnRK2.1 and VvSnRK2.6, can be considered the major VvSnRK2 candidates involved in the stomata response to abiotic stress. Furthermore, we found that the expression pattern of the two grape ABF genes indicates organ specificity of these genes. The key role of ABA signaling in response to abiotic stresses makes the genes involve in this signaling potential candidates for manipulation in programs designed to improve fruit tree performance in extreme environments.

  5. Signaling transduction pathways involved in basophil adhesion and histamine release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sha, Quan; Poulsen, Lars K.; Gerwien, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about basophil with respect to the different signaling transduction pathways involved in spontaneous, cytokine or anti-IgE induced adhesion and how this compares to IgE-dependent and IgE-independent mediator secretion. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the roles...... of beta1 and beta2 integrins in basophil adhesion as well as hosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), src-kinases and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 in basophil adhesion and histamine release (HR)....

  6. [Regulation of plant height by gibberellins biosynthesis and signal transduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lingzhu; Cheng, Jianhui; Li, Lin; Wu, Jiang

    2012-02-01

    Plant height is one of the most important agronomic traits that could affect both crop yield and quality. Among all the hormones, gibberellins are crucial to regulate plant height. Cloning and molecular mechanism research of the plant height genes associated gibberellins have extremely important value for the regulation of crop growth and agricultural production, and have been widely used in rice, wheat and other grain crops breeding. In order to promote utilization of gibberellins in fruit trees, flowers and other horticultural crops breeding, we reviewed the regulation of plant height by gibberellins biosynthesis and signal transduction at the molecular level in this paper.

  7. Myosin individualized: single nucleotide polymorphisms in energy transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieben Eric D

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosin performs ATP free energy transduction into mechanical work in the motor domain of the myosin heavy chain (MHC. Energy transduction is the definitive systemic feature of the myosin motor performed by coordinating in a time ordered sequence: ATP hydrolysis at the active site, actin affinity modulation at the actin binding site, and the lever-arm rotation of the power stroke. These functions are carried out by several conserved sub-domains within the motor domain. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs affect the MHC sequence of many isoforms expressed in striated muscle, smooth muscle, and non-muscle tissue. The purpose of this work is to provide a rationale for using SNPs as a functional genomics tool to investigate structurefunction relationships in myosin. In particular, to discover SNP distribution over the conserved sub-domains and surmise what it implies about sub-domain stability and criticality in the energy transduction mechanism. Results An automated routine identifying human nonsynonymous SNP amino acid missense substitutions for any MHC gene mined the NCBI SNP data base. The routine tested 22 MHC genes coding muscle and non-muscle isoforms and identified 89 missense mutation positions in the motor domain with 10 already implicated in heart disease and another 8 lacking sequence homology with a skeletal MHC isoform for which a crystallographic model is available. The remaining 71 SNP substitutions were found to be distributed over MHC with 22 falling outside identified functional sub-domains and 49 in or very near to myosin sub-domains assigned specific crucial functions in energy transduction. The latter includes the active site, the actin binding site, the rigid lever-arm, and regions facilitating their communication. Most MHC isoforms contained SNPs somewhere in the motor domain. Conclusions Several functional-crucial sub-domains are infiltrated by a large number of SNP substitution sites suggesting these

  8. Deciphering Parameter Sensitivity in the BvgAS Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapder, Tarunendu; Talukder, Srijeeta; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Banik, Suman K.

    2016-01-01

    To understand the switching of different phenotypic phases of Bordetella pertussis, we propose an optimized mathematical framework for signal transduction through BvgAS two-component system. The response of the network output to the sensory input has been demonstrated in steady state. An analysis in terms of local sensitivity amplification characterizes the nature of the molecular switch. The sensitivity analysis of the model parameters within the framework of various correlation coefficients helps to decipher the contribution of the modular structure in signal propagation. Once classified, the model parameters are tuned to generate the behavior of some novel strains using simulated annealing, a stochastic optimization technique. PMID:26812153

  9. Bio-inspired signal transduction with heterogeneous networks of nanoscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Javier; Manzanares, José A.; Mafé, Salvador

    2012-02-01

    Networks of single-electron transistors mimic some of the essential properties of neuron populations, because weak electrical signals trigger network oscillations with a frequency proportional to the input signal. Input potentials representing the pixel gray level of a grayscale image can then be converted into rhythms and the image can be recovered from these rhythms. Networks of non-identical nanoscillators complete the noisy transduction more reliably than identical ones. These results are important for signal processing schemes and could support recent studies suggesting that neuronal variability enhances the processing of biological information.

  10. Coordinate gene regulation by fimbriae-induced signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Klemm, Per

    2001-01-01

    whether fimbriae expression can affect expression of other genes, Analysis of gene expression in two E.coli strains, differing in the fim locus, indicated the flu gene to be affected. The flu gene encodes the antigen 43 (Ag43) surface protein, specifically involved in bacterial aggregation...... of Ag43 production. No effect was observed in an oxyR mutant. We conclude that fimbriae expression per se constitutes a signal transduction mechanism that affects a number of unrelated genes via the thiol-disulfide status of OxyR. Thus, phase variation in fimbrial expression is coordinated...

  11. Deciphering Parameter Sensitivity in the BvgAS Signal Transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarunendu Mapder

    Full Text Available To understand the switching of different phenotypic phases of Bordetella pertussis, we propose an optimized mathematical framework for signal transduction through BvgAS two-component system. The response of the network output to the sensory input has been demonstrated in steady state. An analysis in terms of local sensitivity amplification characterizes the nature of the molecular switch. The sensitivity analysis of the model parameters within the framework of various correlation coefficients helps to decipher the contribution of the modular structure in signal propagation. Once classified, the model parameters are tuned to generate the behavior of some novel strains using simulated annealing, a stochastic optimization technique.

  12. Deciphering Parameter Sensitivity in the BvgAS Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapder, Tarunendu; Talukder, Srijeeta; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Banik, Suman K

    2016-01-01

    To understand the switching of different phenotypic phases of Bordetella pertussis, we propose an optimized mathematical framework for signal transduction through BvgAS two-component system. The response of the network output to the sensory input has been demonstrated in steady state. An analysis in terms of local sensitivity amplification characterizes the nature of the molecular switch. The sensitivity analysis of the model parameters within the framework of various correlation coefficients helps to decipher the contribution of the modular structure in signal propagation. Once classified, the model parameters are tuned to generate the behavior of some novel strains using simulated annealing, a stochastic optimization technique.

  13. Solar-powered nanomechanical transduction from crystalline molecular rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, Sven O; Cole, Jacqueline M

    2013-06-25

    A photoinduced solid-state SO₂ isomerism drives a larger mechanical change (benzene-ring rotation) in a neighbouring ion (i.e., the system acts as a solar-powered molecular transducer). The ring rotation and SO₂ photoisomerisation are observed using in situ X-ray crystallography and are controllable, reproducible, and metastable at low temperatures. This discovery presents a new range of materials for solar-energy-based molecular transduction. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Roles of lipid turnover in transmembrane signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, B R

    1991-11-01

    Cells of higher organisms respond to external stimuli with a cascade of intracellular biochemical events initiated by binding of a hormone, growth factor, or neurotransmitter to a specific cell surface receptor. Previously well-characterized signal transduction pathways involve cyclic nucleotides as intracellular second messengers. Over the past decade, increasing attention has been focused on other signaling pathways in which membrane lipids serve as second messengers or their precursors. This review describes current understanding of these pathways and points to recent discoveries likely to open new frontiers in the coming decade.

  15. Antiviral effect of HPMPC (Cidofovir®), entrapped in cationic liposomes: in vitro study on MDBK cell and BHV-1 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korvasová, Zina; Drašar, Lukáš; Mašek, Josef; Turánek Knotigová, Pavlína; Kulich, Pavel; Matiašovic, Ján; Kovařčík, Kamil; Bartheldyová, Eliška; Koudelka, Štěpán; Škrabalová, Michaela; Miller, Andrew D; Holý, Antonín; Ledvina, Miroslav; Turánek, Jaroslav

    2012-06-10

    We designed and synthesised a series of new cationic lipids based on spermine linked to various hydrophobic anchors. These lipids could be potentially useful for the preparation of stable cationic liposomes intended for the construction of drug targeting systems applicable in the field of anticancer/antiviral therapy, vaccine carriers, and vectors for the gene therapy. Low in vitro toxicity was found for these compounds, especially for LD1, in several cell lines. The delivery of both a fluorescence marker (calcein) and antiviral drugs into cells has been achieved owing to a large extent of internalization of cationic liposomes (labelled by Lyssamine-Rhodamine PE or fluorescein-PE) as demonstrated by fluorescent microscopy and quantified by flow cytometry. The bovine herpes virus type 1 (BHV-1) virus infection in vitro model using MDBK cells was employed to study the effect of the established antiviral drug HPMPC (Cidofovir®) developed by Prof. A. Holý. Inhibition of BHV-1 virus replication was studied by quantitative RT-PCR and confirmed by both Hoffman modulation contrast microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. We found that in vitro antiviral activity of HPMPC was significantly improved by formulation in cationic liposomes, which decreased the viral replication by about 2 orders of magnitude.

  16. Cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts bearing phosphine ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Koji; Grubbs, Robert H

    2016-02-28

    The discovery of highly active catalysts and the success of ionic liquid immobilized systems have accelerated attention to a new class of cationic metathesis catalysts. We herein report the facile syntheses of cationic ruthenium catalysts bearing bulky phosphine ligands. Simple ligand exchange using silver(i) salts of non-coordinating or weakly coordinating anions provided either PPh3 or chelating Ph2P(CH2)nPPh2 (n = 2 or 3) ligated cationic catalysts. The structures of these newly reported catalysts feature unique geometries caused by ligation of the bulky phosphine ligands. Their activities and selectivities in standard metathesis reactions were also investigated. These cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts reported here showed moderate activity and very similar stereoselectivity when compared to the second generation ruthenium dichloride catalyst in ring-closing metathesis, cross metathesis, and ring-opening metathesis polymerization assays.

  17. Cation locations and dislocations in zeolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Luis James

    The focus of this dissertation is the extra-framework cation sites in a particular structural family of zeolites, chabazite. Cation sites play a particularly important role in the application of these sieves for ion exchange, gas separation, catalysis, and, when the cation is a proton, acid catalysis. Structural characterization is commonly performed through the use of powder diffraction and Rietveld analysis of powder diffraction data. Use of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance, in the study of the local order of the various constituent nuclei of zeolites, complements well the long-range order information produced by diffraction. Recent developments in solid state NMR techniques allow for increased study of disorder in zeolites particularly when such phenomena test the detection limits of diffraction. These two powerful characterization techniques, powder diffraction and NMR, offer many insights into the complex interaction of cations with the zeolite framework. The acids site locations in SSZ-13, a high silica chabazite, and SAPO-34, a silicoaluminophosphate with the chabazite structure, were determined. The structure of SAPO-34 upon selective hydration was also determined. The insensitivity of X-rays to hydrogen was avoided through deuteration of the acid zeolites and neutron powder diffraction methods. Protons at inequivalent positions were found to have different acid strengths in both SSZ-13 and SAPO-34. Other light elements are incorporated into zeolites in the form of extra-framework cations, among these are lithium, sodium, and calcium. Not amenable by X-ray powder diffraction methods, the positions of such light cations in fully ion-exchanged versions of synthetic chabazite were determined through neutron powder diffraction methods. The study of more complex binary cation systems were conducted. Powder diffraction and solid state NMR methods (MAS, MQMAS) were used to examine cation site preferences and dislocations in these mixed-akali chabazites

  18. Cationized Carbohydrate Gas-Phase Fragmentation Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bythell, Benjamin J.; Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Wagoner, Ashley R.; Guan, Shanshan; Rabus, Jordan M.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the fragmentation chemistry of cationized carbohydrates using a combination of tandem mass spectrometry, regioselective labeling, and computational methods. Our model system is D-lactose. Barriers to the fundamental glyosidic bond cleavage reactions, neutral loss pathways, and structurally informative cross-ring cleavages are investigated. The most energetically favorable conformations of cationized D-lactose were found to be similar. In agreement with the literature, larger group I cations result in structures with increased cation coordination number which require greater collision energy to dissociate. In contrast with earlier proposals, the B n -Y m fragmentation pathways of both protonated and sodium-cationized analytes proceed via protonation of the glycosidic oxygen with concerted glycosidic bond cleavage. Additionally, for the sodiated congeners our calculations support sodiated 1,6-anhydrogalactose B n ion structures, unlike the preceding literature. This affects the subsequent propensity of formation and prediction of B n /Y m branching ratio. The nature of the anomeric center (α/β) affects the relative energies of these processes, but not the overall ranking. Low-energy cross-ring cleavages are observed for the metal-cationized analytes with a retro-aldol mechanism producing the 0,2 A 2 ion from the sodiated forms. Theory and experiment support the importance of consecutive fragmentation processes, particularly for the protonated congeners at higher collision energies.

  19. Cationized Carbohydrate Gas-Phase Fragmentation Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bythell, Benjamin J.; Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Wagoner, Ashley R.; Guan, Shanshan; Rabus, Jordan M.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the fragmentation chemistry of cationized carbohydrates using a combination of tandem mass spectrometry, regioselective labeling, and computational methods. Our model system is D-lactose. Barriers to the fundamental glyosidic bond cleavage reactions, neutral loss pathways, and structurally informative cross-ring cleavages are investigated. The most energetically favorable conformations of cationized D-lactose were found to be similar. In agreement with the literature, larger group I cations result in structures with increased cation coordination number which require greater collision energy to dissociate. In contrast with earlier proposals, the B n -Y m fragmentation pathways of both protonated and sodium-cationized analytes proceed via protonation of the glycosidic oxygen with concerted glycosidic bond cleavage. Additionally, for the sodiated congeners our calculations support sodiated 1,6-anhydrogalactose B n ion structures, unlike the preceding literature. This affects the subsequent propensity of formation and prediction of B n /Y m branching ratio. The nature of the anomeric center (α/β) affects the relative energies of these processes, but not the overall ranking. Low-energy cross-ring cleavages are observed for the metal-cationized analytes with a retro-aldol mechanism producing the 0,2 A 2 ion from the sodiated forms . Theory and experiment support the importance of consecutive fragmentation processes, particularly for the protonated congeners at higher collision energies.

  20. Mechanical transduction mechanisms of RecA-like molecular motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jung-Chi

    2011-12-01

    A majority of ATP-dependent molecular motors are RecA-like proteins, performing diverse functions in biology. These RecA-like molecular motors consist of a highly conserved core containing the ATP-binding site. Here I examined how ATP binding within this core is coupled to the conformational changes of different RecA-like molecular motors. Conserved hydrogen bond networks and conformational changes revealed two major mechanical transduction mechanisms: (1) intra-domain conformational changes and (2) inter-domain conformational changes. The intra-domain mechanism has a significant hydrogen bond rearrangement within the domain containing the P-loop, causing relative motion between two parts of the protein. The inter-domain mechanism exhibits little conformational change in the P-loop domain. Instead, the major conformational change is observed between the P-loop domain and an adjacent domain or subunit containing the arginine finger. These differences in the mechanical transduction mechanisms may link to the underlying energy surface governing a Brownian ratchet or a power stroke.

  1. Dual-transduction-mode sensing approach for chemical detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liang (Frank); Swensen, James S.

    2012-11-01

    Smart devices such as electronic nose have been developed for application in many fields like national security, defense, environmental regulation, health care, pipeline monitoring and food analysis. Despite a large array of individual sensors, these devices still lack the ability to identify a target at a very low concentration out of a mixture of odors, limited by a single type of transduction as the sensing response to distinguish one odor from another. Here, we propose a new sensor architecture empowering each individual sensor with multi-dimensional transduction signals. The resolving power of our proposed electronic nose is thereby multiplied by a set of different and independent variables which synergistically will provide a unique combined fingerprint for each analyte. We demonstrate this concept using a Light Emitting Organic Field-Effect Transistor (LEOFET). Sensing response has been observed on both electrical and optical output signals from a green LEOFET upon exposure to an explosive taggant, with optical signal exhibiting much higher sensitivity. This new sensor architecture opens a field of devices for smart detection of chemical and biological targets.

  2. Gravity perception and signal transduction in single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, I.; Wolke, A.; Briegleb, W.; Ivanova, K.

    Cellular signal processing in multi-, as well as in unicellular organisms, has to rely on fundamentally similar mechanisms. Free-living single cells often use the gravity vector for their spatial orientation (gravitaxis) and show distinct gravisensitivities. In this investigation the gravisensitive giant ameboid cell Physarum polycephalum (Myxomycetes, acellular slime molds) is used. Its gravitaxis and the modulation of its intrinsic rhythmic contraction activity by gravity was demonstrated in 180 °turn experiments and in simulated, as well as in actual, near-weightlessness studies (fast-rotating clinostat; Spacelab D1, IML-1). The stimulus perception was addressed in an IML-2 experiment, which provided information on the gravireceptor itself by the determination of the cell's acceleration-sensitivity threshold. Ground-based experiments designed to elucidate the subsequent steps in signal transduction leading to a motor response, suggest that an acceleration stimulus induces changes in the level of second messenger, adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), indicating also that the acceleration-stimulus signal transduction chain of Physarum uses an ubiquitous second messenger pathway.

  3. Spatial regulation and the rate of signal transduction activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizar N Batada

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Of the many important signaling events that take place on the surface of a mammalian cell, activation of signal transduction pathways via interactions of cell surface receptors is one of the most important. Evidence suggests that cell surface proteins are not as freely diffusible as implied by the classic fluid mosaic model and that their confinement to membrane domains is regulated. It is unknown whether these dynamic localization mechanisms function to enhance signal transduction activation rate or to minimize cross talk among pathways that share common intermediates. To determine which of these two possibilities is more likely, we derive an explicit equation for the rate at which cell surface membrane proteins interact based on a Brownian motion model in the presence of endocytosis and exocytosis. We find that in the absence of any diffusion constraints, cell surface protein interaction rate is extremely high relative to cytoplasmic protein interaction rate even in a large mammalian cell with a receptor abundance of a mere two hundred molecules. Since a larger number of downstream signaling events needs to take place, each occurring at a much slower rate than the initial activation via association of cell surface proteins, we conclude that the role of co-localization is most likely that of cross-talk reduction rather than coupling efficiency enhancement.

  4. Receptor domains of two-component signal transduction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Julie; Koteva, Kalinka; Wright, Gerard

    2011-05-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems are found ubiquitously in prokaryotes, and in archaea, fungi, yeast and some plants, where they regulate physiologic and molecular processes at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Two-component systems sense changes in environmental conditions when a specific ligand binds to the receptor domain of the histidine kinase sensory component. The structures of many histidine kinase receptors are known, including those which sense extracellular and cytoplasmic signals. In this review, we discuss the basic architecture of two-component signalling circuits, including known system ligands, structure and function of both receptor and signalling domains, the chemistry of phosphotransfer, and cross-talk between different two-component pathways. Given the importance of these systems in regulating cellular responses, many biochemical techniques have been developed for their study and analysis. We therefore also review current methods used to study two-component signalling, including a new affinity-based proteomics approach used to study inducible resistance to the antibiotic vancomycin through the VanSR two-component signal transduction system.

  5. Fetus Sound Stimulation: Cilia Memristor Effect of Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Jankovic-Raznatovic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This experimental study evaluates fetal middle cerebral artery (MCA circulation after the defined prenatal acoustical stimulation (PAS and the role of cilia in hearing and memory and could explain signal transduction and memory according to cilia optical-acoustical properties. Methods. PAS was performed twice on 119 no-risk term pregnancies. We analyzed fetal MCA circulation before, after first and second PAS. Results. Analysis of the Pulsatility index basic (PIB and before PAS and Pulsatility index reactive after the first PAS (PIR 1 shows high statistical difference, representing high influence on the brain circulation. Analysis of PIB and Pulsatility index reactive after the second PAS (PIR 2 shows no statistical difference. Cilia as nanoscale structure possess magnetic flux linkage that depends on the amount of charge that has passed between two-terminal variable resistors of cilia. Microtubule resistance, as a function of the current through and voltage across the structure, leads to appearance of cilia memory with the “memristor” property. Conclusion. Acoustical and optical cilia properties play crucial role in hearing and memory processes. We suggest that fetuses are getting used to sound, developing a kind of memory patterns, considering acoustical and electromagnetically waves and involving cilia and microtubules and try to explain signal transduction.

  6. Optical Microresonators for Sensing and Transduction: A Materials Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heylman, Kevin D; Knapper, Kassandra A; Horak, Erik H; Rea, Morgan T; Vanga, Sudheer K; Goldsmith, Randall H

    2017-08-01

    Optical microresonators confine light to a particular microscale trajectory, are exquisitely sensitive to their microenvironment, and offer convenient readout of their optical properties. Taken together, this is an immensely attractive combination that makes optical microresonators highly effective as sensors and transducers. Meanwhile, advances in material science, fabrication techniques, and photonic sensing strategies endow optical microresonators with new functionalities, unique transduction mechanisms, and in some cases, unparalleled sensitivities. In this progress report, the operating principles of these sensors are reviewed, and different methods of signal transduction are evaluated. Examples are shown of how choice of materials must be suited to the analyte, and how innovations in fabrication and sensing are coupled together in a mutually reinforcing cycle. A tremendously broad range of capabilities of microresonator sensors is described, from electric and magnetic field sensing to mechanical sensing, from single-molecule detection to imaging and spectroscopy, from operation at high vacuum to in live cells. Emerging sensing capabilities are highlighted and put into context in the field. Future directions are imagined, where the diverse capabilities laid out are combined and advances in scalability and integration are implemented, leading to the creation of a sensor unparalleled in sensitivity and information content. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Fetus sound stimulation: cilia memristor effect of signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic-Raznatovic, Svetlana; Dragojevic-Dikic, Svetlana; Rakic, Snezana; Nikolic, Branka; Plesinac, Snezana; Tasic, Lidija; Perisic, Zivko; Sovilj, Mirjana; Adamovic, Tatjana; Koruga, Djuro

    2014-01-01

    This experimental study evaluates fetal middle cerebral artery (MCA) circulation after the defined prenatal acoustical stimulation (PAS) and the role of cilia in hearing and memory and could explain signal transduction and memory according to cilia optical-acoustical properties. PAS was performed twice on 119 no-risk term pregnancies. We analyzed fetal MCA circulation before, after first and second PAS. Analysis of the Pulsatility index basic (PIB) and before PAS and Pulsatility index reactive after the first PAS (PIR 1) shows high statistical difference, representing high influence on the brain circulation. Analysis of PIB and Pulsatility index reactive after the second PAS (PIR 2) shows no statistical difference. Cilia as nanoscale structure possess magnetic flux linkage that depends on the amount of charge that has passed between two-terminal variable resistors of cilia. Microtubule resistance, as a function of the current through and voltage across the structure, leads to appearance of cilia memory with the "memristor" property. Acoustical and optical cilia properties play crucial role in hearing and memory processes. We suggest that fetuses are getting used to sound, developing a kind of memory patterns, considering acoustical and electromagnetically waves and involving cilia and microtubules and try to explain signal transduction.

  8. Advances in NF-κB Signaling Transduction and Transcription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms for NF-κB signaling transduction and transcription have been the most attractive subjects for both basic research and pharmaceutical industries due to its important roles in both physiological and pathogenesis, particularly the close association of dysregulated NF-κB with tumorgenesis and inflammation. Several novel intracellular molecular events that regulate NF-κB activity have been described recently, including the discovery of an alternative signaling pathway that appears inducing a specific subset genes involved in adoptive immune response. Multi-level and multi-dimensional regulation of NF-κB activity by phosphorylation and acetylation modifications have unveiled and became the hottest targets for potentially tissue specific molecular interventions. Another emerging mechanism for NF-κB-responsive gene's regulation where NF-κB participates the transcriptional regulation independent of its cognate regulatory binding site within the target gene's promoter but facilitating the transaction activity of other involved transcription factors,that implicated an novel transcriptional activities for NF-κB. Thus, the current review will focus on these recent progresses that have been made on NF-κB signaling transduction and transcription. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004; 1(6):425-435.

  9. Advances in NF-κB Signaling Transduction and Transcription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weihua Xiao

    2004-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms for NF-κB signaling transduction and transcription have been the most attractive subjects for both basic research and pharmaceutical industries due to its important roles in both physiological and pathogenesis, particularly the close association of dysregulated NF-κB with tumorgenesis and inflammation. Several novel intracellular molecular events that regulate NF-κB activity have been described recently, including the discovery of an alternative signaling pathway that appears inducing a specific subset genes involved in adoptive immune response. Multi-level and multi-dimensional regulation of NF-κB activity by phosphorylation and acetylation modifications have unveiled and became the hottest targets for potentially tissue specific molecular interventions. Another emerging mechanism for NF-κB-responsive gene's regulation where NF-κB participates the transcriptional regulation independent of its cognate regulatory binding site within the target gene's promoter but facilitating the transaction activity of other involved transcription factors,that implicated an novel transcriptional activities for NF-κB. Thus, the current review will focus on these recent progresses that have been made on NF-κB signaling transduction and transcription. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(6):425-435.

  10. Divalent cation shrinks DNA but inhibits its compaction with trivalent cation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongu, Chika; Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Zinchenko, Anatoly; Chen, Ning; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2016-05-01

    Our observation reveals the effects of divalent and trivalent cations on the higher-order structure of giant DNA (T4 DNA 166 kbp) by fluorescence microscopy. It was found that divalent cations, Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), inhibit DNA compaction induced by a trivalent cation, spermidine (SPD(3+)). On the other hand, in the absence of SPD(3+), divalent cations cause the shrinkage of DNA. As the control experiment, we have confirmed the minimum effect of monovalent cation, Na(+) on the DNA higher-order structure. We interpret the competition between 2+ and 3+ cations in terms of the change in the translational entropy of the counterions. For the compaction with SPD(3+), we consider the increase in translational entropy due to the ion-exchange of the intrinsic monovalent cations condensing on a highly charged polyelectrolyte, double-stranded DNA, by the 3+ cations. In contrast, the presence of 2+ cation decreases the gain of entropy contribution by the ion-exchange between monovalent and 3+ ions.

  11. Cloning and first functional characterization of a plant cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leng, Q.; Mercier, R.W.; Yao, W.; Berkowitz, G.A.

    1999-11-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (cng) non-selective cation channels have been cloned from a number of animal systems. These channels are characterized by direct gating upon cAMO or cGMO binding to the intracellular portion of the channel protein, which leads to an increase in channel conductance. Animal cng channels are involved in signal transduction systems; they translate stimulus-induced changes in cytosolic cyclic nucleotide into altered cell membrane potential and/or cation flux as part of a signal cascade pathway. Putative plant homologs of animal cng channels have been identified. However, functional characterization (i.e., demonstration of cyclic-nucleotide-dependent ion currents) of a plant cng channel has not yet been accomplished. The authors report the cloning and first functional characterization of a plant member of this family of ion channels. The Arabidopsis cDNA AtCNGC2 encodes a polypeptide with deduced homology to the {alpha}-subunit of animal channels, and facilitates cyclic nucleotide-dependent cation currents upon expression in a number of heterologous systems. AtCNGC2 expression in a yeast mutant lacking a low-affinity K{sup +} uptake system complements growth inhibition only when lipophilic nucleotides are present in the culture medium. Voltage clamp analysis indicates that Xenopus lawvis oocytes injected with AtCNGC2 cRNA demonstrate cyclic-nucleotide-dependent, inward-rectifying K{sup +} currents. Human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) transfected with AtCNGC2 cDNA demonstrate increased permeability to Ca{sup 2+} only in the presence of lipophilic cyclic nucleotides. The evidence presented here supports the functional classification of AtCNGC2 as a cyclic-nucleotide-gated cation channel, and presents the first direct evidence identifying a plant member of this ion channel family.

  12. Genetic Analysis of Gravity Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Patrick; Strohm, Allison; Barker, Richard; Su, Shih-Heng

    Like most other plant organs, roots use gravity as a directional guide for growth. Specialized cells within the columella region of the root cap (the statocytes) sense the direction of gravity through the sedimentation of starch-filled plastids (amyloplasts). Amyloplast movement and/or pressure on sensitive membranes triggers a gravity signal transduction pathway within these cells, which leads to a fast transcytotic relocalization of plasma-membrane associated auxin-efflux carrier proteins of the PIN family (PIN3 and PIN7) toward the bottom membrane. This leads to a polar transport of auxin toward the bottom flank of the cap. The resulting lateral auxin gradient is then transmitted toward the elongation zones where it triggers a curvature that ultimately leads to a restoration of vertical downward growth. Our laboratory is using strategies derived from genetics and systems biology to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that modulate gravity sensing and signal transduction in the columella cells of the root cap. Our previous research uncovered two J-domain-containing proteins, ARG1 and ARL2, as contributing to this process. Mutations in the corresponding paralogous genes led to alterations of root and hypocotyl gravitropism accompanied by an inability for the statocytes to develop a cytoplasmic alkalinization, relocalize PIN3, and transport auxin laterally, in response to gravistimulation. Both proteins are associated peripherally to membranes belonging to various compartments of the vesicular trafficking pathway, potentially modulating the trafficking of defined proteins between plasma membrane and endosomes. MAR1 and MAR2, on the other end, are distinct proteins of the plastidic outer envelope protein import TOC complex (the transmembrane channel TOC75 and the receptor TOC132, respectively). Mutations in the corresponding genes enhance the gravitropic defects of arg1. Using transformation-rescue experiments with truncated versions of TOC132 (MAR2), we have shown

  13. Genetic analysis of gravity signal transduction in roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Patrick; Strohm, Allison; Baldwin, Katherine

    To grow downward into the soil, roots use gravity as a guide. Specialized cells, named stato-cytes, enable this directional growth response by perceiving gravity. Located in the columella region of the cap, these cells sense a reorientation of the root within the gravity field through the sedimentation of, and/or tension/pressure exerted by, dense amyloplasts. This process trig-gers a gravity signal transduction pathway that leads to a fast alkalinization of the cytoplasm and a change in the distribution of the plasma membrane-associated auxin-efflux carrier PIN3. The latter protein is uniformly distributed within the plasma membrane on all sides of the cell in vertically oriented roots. However, it quickly accumulates at the bottom side upon gravis-timulation. This process correlates with a preferential transport of auxin to the bottom side of the root cap, resulting in a lateral gradient across the tip. This gradient is then transported to the elongation zone where it promotes differential cellular elongation, resulting in downward curvature. We isolated mutations that affect gravity signal transduction at a step that pre-cedes cytoplasmic alkalinization and/or PIN3 relocalization and lateral auxin transport across the cap. arg1 and arl2 mutations identify a common genetic pathway that is needed for all three gravity-induced processes in the cap statocytes, indicating these genes function early in the pathway. On the other hand, adk1 affects gravity-induced PIN3 relocalization and lateral auxin transport, but it does not interfere with cytoplasmic alkalinization. ARG1 and ARL2 encode J-domain proteins that are associated with membranes of the vesicular trafficking path-way whereas ADK1 encodes adenosine kinase, an enzyme that converts adenosine derived from nucleic acid metabolism and the AdoMet cycle into AMP, thereby alleviating feedback inhibi-tion of this important methyl-donor cycle. Because mutations in ARG1 (and ARL2) do not completely eliminate

  14. siRNA脂质纳米输送载体的研究进展%Lipid-based siRNA Delivery Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董文娟; 周银键; 梁伟

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a specific gene-silencing mechanism triggered by small interfering RNA (siRNA). The application of RNAi in the clinic requires the development of safe and effective delivery systems. Efforts have been dedicated to the development of lipid-based systems in siRNA deliveries. Many of the lipid-based delivery vehicles' self-assemble with siRNA are through electrostatic interactions with charged amines. Electrostatic interactions must be stable enough to sustain the nucleic payload in the carrier en route, but must allow dissociation, to execute therapeutic activity, at the delivery site. Internalization of lipid-based siRNA delivery systems into cells typically occurs through endocytosis; accordingly, delivery requires materials that can facilitate endosomal escape. The size of the carrier is important as carriers <100 nm in diameter have been reported to have higher accumulation levels in tumours, hepatocytes and inflamed tissue. To reduce RES uptake and increase circulation time, carriers have been modified on the surface with polyethyleneglycol. Herein, we review basic requirements for building lipid-based siRNA delivery systems.%siRNA能高效且特异地阻断内源性同源基因的表达即RNA干涉(RNAi).RNAi在临床中的应用需要开发安全有效的输送系统,脂质纳米输送载体是一种具有发展潜力的siRNA输送系统.siRNA-脂质复合物的形成主要通过静电相互作用,静电作用必须足够强以至于载体在运输过程中不释放siRNA,而载体到达治疗部位时,解聚释放出siRNA.载体的粒径应小于100 nm,以利于细胞的摄取和透过特定部位的血管开窗.为了减少网状内皮系统(RES)的摄取和延长载体的循环时间,载体的表面由聚乙二醇修饰.本文主要综述了构建siRNA输送载体的基本要求.

  15. Multidrug resistance and retroviral transduction potential in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, M D; Gram, G J; Jensen, P B

    1999-01-01

    for the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV-1) receptor or had specificity for the amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-A) receptor were used for transduction of five SCLC cell lines differing by a range of MDR mechanisms. Transduction efficiencies in these cell lines were compared by calculating the percentage...... of blue colonies after X-Gal staining of the cells grown in soft agar. All examined SCLC cell lines were transducible with either vector. Transduction efficiencies varied from 5.7% to 33.5% independent of the presence of MDR. These results indicate that MDR does not severely impair transduction of SCLC...

  16. Analysis of the gravitaxis signal transduction chain in Euglena gracilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Adeel

    Abstract Euglena gracilis is a photosynthetic, eukaryotic flagellate. It can adapt autotrophic and heterotrophic mode of growth and respond to different stimuli, this makes it an organism of choice for different research disciplines. It swims to reach a suitable niche by employing different stimuli such as oxygen, light, gravity and different chemicals. Among these stimuli light and gravity are the most important. Phototaxis (locomotion under light stimulus) and gravitaxis (locomotion under gravity stimulus) synergistically help cells to attain an optimal niche in the environment. However, in the complete absence of light or under scarcity of detectable light, cells can totally depend on gravity to find its swimming path. Therefore gravity has certain advantages over other stimuli.Unlike phototatic signal transduction chain of Euglena gracilis no clear primary gravity receptor has been identified in Euglena cells so far. However, there are some convincing evidence that TRP like channels act as a primary gravity receptor in Euglena gracilis.Use of different inhibitors gave rise to the involvement of protein kinase and calmodulin proteins in signal transduction chain of Euglena gracilis. Recently, specific calmodulin (Calmodulin 2) and protein kinase (PKA) have been identified as potential candidates of gravitactic signal transduction chain. Further characterization and investigation of these candidates was required. Therefore a combination of biochemical and genetic techniques was employed to localize proteins in cells and also to find interacting partners. For localization studies, specific antibodies were raised and characterized. Specificity of antibodies was validated by knockdown mutants, Invitro-translated proteins and heterologously expressed proteins. Cell fractionation studies, involving separation of the cell body and flagella for western blot analysis and confocal immunofluorescence studies were performed for subcellular localization. In order to find

  17. Sensory Transduction of the CO2 Response of Guard Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Eduardo Zeiger

    2003-06-30

    Stomata have a key role in the regulation of gas exchange and intercellular CO2 concentrations of leaves. Guard cells sense internal and external signals in the leaf environment and transduce these signals into osmoregulatory processes that control stomatal apertures. This research proposal addresses the characterization of the sensory transduction of the CO2 signal in guard cells. Recent studies have shown that in Vicia leaves kept at constant light and temperature in a growth chamber, changes in ambient CO2 concentrations cause large changes in guard cell zeaxanthin that are linear with CO2-dependent changes in stomatal apertures. Research proposed here will test the hypothesis that zeaxanthin function as a transducer of CO2 signals in guard cells. Three central aspects of this hypothesis will be investigated: CO2 sensing by the carboxylation reaction of Rubisco in the guard cell chloroplast, which would modulate zeaxanthin concentrations via changes in lumen pH; transduction of the CO2 signal by zeaxanthin via a transducing cascade that controls guard cell osmoregulation; and blue light dependence of the CO2 signal transduction by zeaxanthin, required for the formation of an isomeric form of zeaxanthin that is physiologically active as a transducer. The role of Rubisco in CO2 sensing will be investigated in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 in the Arabidopsis mutants R100 and rca-, which have reduced rates of Rubisco-dependent carboxylation. The role of zeaxanthin as a CO2 transducer will be studied in npq1, a zeaxanthin-less mutant. The blue light-dependence of CO2 sensing will be studied in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 under red light. Arabidopsis mutants will also be used in further studies of an acclimation of the stomatal response to CO2, and a possible role of the xanthophyll cycle of the guard cell chloroplast in acclimations of the stomatal response to CO2. Studies on the osmoregulatory role of sucrose in

  18. Formulation and characterization of lipid-based drug delivery system of raloxifene-microemulsion and self-microemulsifying drug delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetal Thakkar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Raloxifene, a second-generation selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM used to prevent osteoporosis in postmenopausal women is administered orally in the form of a tablet. The absolute bioavailability of the drug is only 2% because of extensive hepatic first-pass metabolism. Lipid-based formulations are reported to reduce the first-pass metabolism by promoting its lymphatic uptake. Materials and Methods : In the present investigation, microemulsion and Self-Microemulsifying Drug Delivery System (SMEDDS formulations of Raloxifene were prepared. The prepared formulations were characterized for drug loading, size, transparency, zeta potential, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM and in vitro intestinal permeability. Results : The results indicated that high drug loading, optimum size and desired zeta potential and transparency could be achieved with both SMEDDS and microemulsion. The TEM studies indicated the absence of aggregation with both the systems. The in vitro intestinal permeability results showed that the permeation of the drug from the microemulsion and SMEDDs was significantly higher than that obtained from the drug dispersion and marketed formulation. Conclusion : Lipid based formulations such as microemulsion and Self Microemulsifying drug delivery systems are expected to increase the oral bioavailability as evidenced by the increased intestinal permeation.

  19. Dissolution of Lipid-Based Matrices in Simulated Gastrointestinal Solutions to Evaluate Their Potential for the Encapsulation of Bioactive Ingredients for Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the study was to compare the dissolution of chocolate to other lipid-based matrices suitable for the microencapsulation of bioactive ingredients in simulated gastrointestinal solutions. Particles having approximately 750 μm or 2.5 mm were prepared from the following lipid-based matrices: cocoa butter, fractionated palm kernel oil (FPKO, chocolate, beeswax, carnauba wax, and paraffin. They were added to solutions designed to simulate gastric secretions (GS or duodenum secretions (DS at 37°C. Paraffin, carnauba wax, and bees wax did not dissolve in either the GS or DS media. Cocoa butter, FPKO, and chocolate dissolved in the DS medium. Cocoa butter, and to a lesser extent chocolate, also dissolved in the GS medium. With chocolate, dissolution was twice as fast as that with small particles (750 μm as compared to the larger (2.5 mm ones. With 750 μm particle sizes, 90% dissolution of chocolate beads was attained after only 60 minutes in the DS medium, while it took 120 minutes for 70% of FPKO beads to dissolve in the same conditions. The data are discussed from the perspective of controlled release in the gastrointestinal tract of encapsulated ingredients (minerals, oils, probiotic bacteria, enzymes, vitamins, and peptides used in the development of functional foods.

  20. Dissolution of Lipid-Based Matrices in Simulated Gastrointestinal Solutions to Evaluate Their Potential for the Encapsulation of Bioactive Ingredients for Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Yves; Champagne, Claude P

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the study was to compare the dissolution of chocolate to other lipid-based matrices suitable for the microencapsulation of bioactive ingredients in simulated gastrointestinal solutions. Particles having approximately 750 μm or 2.5 mm were prepared from the following lipid-based matrices: cocoa butter, fractionated palm kernel oil (FPKO), chocolate, beeswax, carnauba wax, and paraffin. They were added to solutions designed to simulate gastric secretions (GS) or duodenum secretions (DS) at 37°C. Paraffin, carnauba wax, and bees wax did not dissolve in either the GS or DS media. Cocoa butter, FPKO, and chocolate dissolved in the DS medium. Cocoa butter, and to a lesser extent chocolate, also dissolved in the GS medium. With chocolate, dissolution was twice as fast as that with small particles (750 μm) as compared to the larger (2.5 mm) ones. With 750 μm particle sizes, 90% dissolution of chocolate beads was attained after only 60 minutes in the DS medium, while it took 120 minutes for 70% of FPKO beads to dissolve in the same conditions. The data are discussed from the perspective of controlled release in the gastrointestinal tract of encapsulated ingredients (minerals, oils, probiotic bacteria, enzymes, vitamins, and peptides) used in the development of functional foods.

  1. Monocyte Signal Transduction Receptors in Active and Latent Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Druszczynska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms that promote either resistance or susceptibility to TB disease remain insufficiently understood. Our aim was to compare the expression of cell signaling transduction receptors, CD14, TLR2, CD206, and β2 integrin LFA-1 on monocytes from patients with active TB or nonmycobacterial lung disease and healthy individuals with M.tb latency and uninfected controls to explain the background of the differences between clinical and subclinical forms of M.tb infection. A simultaneous increase in the expression of the membrane bound mCD14 receptor and LFA-1 integrin in patients with active TB may be considered a prodrome of breaking immune control by M.tb bacilli in subjects with the latent TB and absence of clinical symptoms.

  2. Piezoelectric Multilayer-Stacked Hybrid Actuation/Transduction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A novel full piezoelectric multilayer stacked hybrid actuation/transduction system. The system demonstrates significantly-enhanced electromechanical performance by utilizing the cooperative contributions of the electromechanical responses of multilayer stacked negative and positive strain components. Both experimental and theoretical studies indicate that for this system, the displacement is over three times that of a same-sized conventional flextensional actuator/transducer. The system consists of at least 2 layers which include electromechanically active components. The layers are arranged such that when electric power is applied, one layer contracts in a transverse direction while the second layer expands in a transverse direction which is perpendicular to the transverse direction of the first layer. An alternate embodiment includes a third layer. In this embodiment, the outer two layers contract in parallel transverse directions while the middle layer expands in a transverse direction which is perpendicular to the transverse direction of the outer layers.

  3. Simulation of signal transduction in model multiprotein systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Julius

    2009-03-01

    To simulate the dynamics of multiprotein machines, I have developed a method called multiconformer Brownian dynamics (mcBD). In this method, proteins rotate and translate via Brownian motion while their conformations are varied among a prestored set of structures on a simplified energy landscape, taking into account inter-protein interactions. As an example, I build a simple model of a G-protein coupled receptor/G-protein complex, and show that ligand binding causes conformational shifts, which induce GDP to leave, GTP to bind, and the complex to dissociate. The two proteins couple their fast fluctuations together into large-scale coordinated functional motions, resulting in signal transduction. I vary the shapes, electrostatics, and energy landscapes of the proteins independently and examine the impact this has on the system's function. In one result, increasing the binding between proteins improves the fidelity of communication, but at the expense of overall switching frequency.

  4. Perspective: Adhesion Mediated Signal Transduction in Bacterial Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthy, Sudha; Keklak, Julia; Klein, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    During the infection process, pathogenic bacteria undergo large-scale transcriptional changes to promote virulence and increase intrahost survival. While much of this reprogramming occurs in response to changes in chemical environment, such as nutrient availability and pH, there is increasing evidence that adhesion to host-tissue can also trigger signal transduction pathways resulting in differential gene expression. Determining the molecular mechanisms of adhesion-mediated signaling requires disentangling the contributions of chemical and mechanical stimuli. Here we highlight recent work demonstrating that surface attachment drives a transcriptional response in bacterial pathogens, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli), and discuss the complexity of experimental design when dissecting the specific role of adhesion-mediated signaling during infection. PMID:26901228

  5. Melusin Promotes a Protective Signal Transduction Cascade in Stressed Hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorge, Matteo; Brancaccio, Mara

    2016-01-01

    Melusin is a chaperone protein selectively expressed in heart and skeletal muscles. Melusin expression levels correlate with cardiac function in pre-clinical models and in human patients with aortic stenosis. Indeed, previous studies in several animal models indicated that Melusin plays a broad cardioprotective role in different pathological conditions. Chaperone proteins, besides playing a role in protein folding, are also able to facilitate supramolecular complex formation and conformational changes due to activation/deactivation of signaling molecules. This role sets chaperone proteins as crucial regulators of intracellular signal transduction pathways. In particular Melusin activates AKT and ERK1/2 signaling, protects cardiomyocytes from apoptosis and induces a compensatory hypertrophic response in several pathological conditions. Therefore, selective delivery of the Melusin gene in heart via cardiotropic adenoviral associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9), may represent a new promising gene-therapy approach for different cardiac pathologies. PMID:27672636

  6. Signal Transduction Model of Magnetic Sensing in Cryptochrome Mediated Photoreception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Phillise Tiffeny

    While migratory birds have long been known to use the Earth's magnetic field for navigation, the precise biophysical mechanism behind this magnetic sense remains unconfirmed. A leading theory of magnetoreception suggests a chemical compass model with a yet undetermined molecular reaction site and unknown magnetically sensitive reactants. The cryptochrome photoreceptor has emerged as a promising candidate site. This investigation numerically models the first order kinetics of cryptochrome mediated photoreception, in order to evaluate its ability to function as a magnetic sensor and transduce orientation information along a neural pathway. A signal-to-noise ratio is defined to quantify the threshold for the functioning of a cryptochrome-based chemical compass. The model suggests that a flavin-superoxide radical pair in cryptochrome functions as the chemical reactants for magnetoreception. Such a cryptochrome-based signal transduction model reasonably predicts the general light intensity and wavelength effects that have been experimentally observed in migratory birds.

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Two-Component Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschiedrich, Christopher P; Keidel, Victoria; Szurmant, Hendrik

    2016-09-25

    Two-component systems (TCS) comprising sensor histidine kinases and response regulator proteins are among the most important players in bacterial and archaeal signal transduction and also occur in reduced numbers in some eukaryotic organisms. Given their importance to cellular survival, virulence, and cellular development, these systems are among the most scrutinized bacterial proteins. In the recent years, a flurry of bioinformatics, genetic, biochemical, and structural studies have provided detailed insights into many molecular mechanisms that underlie the detection of signals and the generation of the appropriate response by TCS. Importantly, it has become clear that there is significant diversity in the mechanisms employed by individual systems. This review discusses the current knowledge on common themes and divergences from the paradigm of TCS signaling. An emphasis is on the information gained by a flurry of recent structural and bioinformatics studies.

  8. Signal Transduction and Intracellular Trafficking by the Interleukin 36 Receptor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Siddhartha S.; Singh, Divyendu; Raymond, Ernest L.; Ganesan, Rajkumar; Caviness, Gary; Grimaldi, Christine; Woska, Joseph R.; Mennerich, Detlev; Brown, Su-Ellen; Mbow, M. Lamine; Kao, C. Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Improper signaling of the IL-36 receptor (IL-36R), a member of the IL-1 receptor family, has been associated with various inflammation-associated diseases. However, the requirements for IL-36R signal transduction remain poorly characterized. This work seeks to define the requirements for IL-36R signaling and intracellular trafficking. In the absence of cognate agonists, IL-36R was endocytosed and recycled to the plasma membrane. In the presence of IL-36, IL-36R increased accumulation in LAMP1+ lysosomes. Endocytosis predominantly used a clathrin-mediated pathway, and the accumulation of the IL-36R in lysosomes did not result in increased receptor turnover. The ubiquitin-binding Tollip protein contributed to IL-36R signaling and increased the accumulation of both subunits of the IL-36R. PMID:26269592

  9. MAPK Assays in Arabidopsis MAMP-PRR Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hoo Sun; Sheen, Jen

    2017-01-01

    Activation of MAPK (Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase) cascades after MAMP (Microbe-Associated Molecular Pattern) perception through PRR (Pattern Recognition Receptor) is one of the first conserved responses when plants encounter microbial organisms. Phosphorylation of various cellular factors in the MAMP-PRR pathway by MAPK cascades is critical for broad-spectrum plant innate immunity. Measurement of MAPK activation and identification of MAPK phosphorylation targets in the MAMP-PRR signal transduction pathway are essential to understand how plants reprogram their cellular processes to cope with unfavorable microbial attack. Here, we describe detailed protocols of three assays measuring MAPK activity after MAMP perception: (1) immune-blotting analysis with anti-phospho ERK1/2 antibody; (2) in-gel kinase assay using a general substrate myelin basic protein (MBP); (3) an in vitro kinase assay to evaluate phosphorylation of MAPK substrate candidates during MAMP-PRR signaling based on a protoplast expression system.

  10. Modeling of biological doses and mechanical effects on bone transduction

    CERN Document Server

    Rieger, Romain; Jennane, Rachid; 10.1016/j.jtbi.2011.01.003

    2012-01-01

    Shear stress, hormones like parathyroid and mineral elements like calcium mediate the amplitude of stimulus signal which affects the rate of bone remodeling. The current study investigates the theoretical effects of different metabolic doses in stimulus signal level on bone. The model was built considering the osteocyte as the sensing center mediated by coupled mechanical shear stress and some biological factors. The proposed enhanced model was developed based on previously published works dealing with different aspects of bone transduction. It describes the effects of physiological doses variations of Calcium, Parathyroid Hormone, Nitric Oxide and Prostaglandin E2 on the stimulus level sensed by osteocytes in response to applied shear stress generated by interstitial fluid flow. We retained the metabolic factors (Parathyroid Hormone, Nitric Oxide, and Prostaglandin E2) as parameters of bone cell mechanosensitivity because stimulation/inhibition of induced pathways stimulates osteogenic response in vivo. We t...

  11. Molecular biology of thermosensory transduction in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Ichiro; Mori, Ikue

    2015-10-01

    As the environmental temperature prominently influences diverse biological aspects of the animals, thermosensation and the subsequent information processing in the nervous system has attracted much attention in biology. Thermotaxis in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is an ideal behavioral paradigm by which to address the molecular mechanism underlying thermosensory transduction. Molecular genetic analysis in combination with other physiological and behavioral studies revealed that sensation of ambient temperature is mediated mainly by cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling in thermosensory neurons. The information of the previously perceived temperature is also stored within the thermosensory neurons, and the consequence of the comparison between the past and the present temperature is conveyed to the downstream interneurons to further regulate the motor-circuits that encode the locomotion.

  12. The mechanism of signal transduction by two-component systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casino, Patricia; Rubio, Vicente; Marina, Alberto

    2010-12-01

    Two-component systems, composed of a homodimeric histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR), are major signal transduction devices in bacteria. Typically the signal triggers HK autophosphorylation at one His residue, followed by phosphoryl transfer from the phospho-His to an Asp residue in the RR. Signal extinction frequently involves phospho-RR dephosphorylation by a phosphatase activity of the HK. Our understanding of these reactions and of the determinants of partner specificity among HK-RR couples has been greatly increased by recent crystal structures and biochemical experiments on HK-RR complexes. Cis-autophosphorylation (one subunit phosphorylates itself) occurs in some HKs while trans-autophosphorylation takes place in others. We review and integrate this new information, discuss the mechanism of the three reactions and propose a model for transmembrane signaling by these systems. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Determinants of specificity in two-component signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgornaia, Anna I; Laub, Michael T

    2013-04-01

    Maintaining the faithful flow of information through signal transduction pathways is critical to the survival and proliferation of organisms. This problem is particularly challenging as many signaling proteins are part of large, paralogous families that are highly similar at the sequence and structural levels, increasing the risk of unwanted cross-talk. To detect environmental signals and process information, bacteria rely heavily on two-component signaling systems comprised of sensor histidine kinases and their cognate response regulators. Although most species encode dozens of these signaling pathways, there is relatively little cross-talk, indicating that individual pathways are well insulated and highly specific. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that enforce this specificity. Further, we highlight recent studies that have revealed how these mechanisms evolve to accommodate the introduction of new pathways by gene duplication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Signal transduction in Mimosa pudica: biologically closed electrical circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Alexander G; Foster, Justin C; Markin, Vladislav S

    2010-05-01

    Biologically closed electrical circuits operate over large distances in biological tissues. The activation of such circuits can lead to various physiological and biophysical responses. Here, we analyse the biologically closed electrical circuits of the sensitive plant Mimosa pudica Linn. using electrostimulation of a petiole or pulvinus by the charged capacitor method, and evaluate the equivalent electrical scheme of electrical signal transduction inside the plant. The discharge of a 100 microF capacitor in the pulvinus resulted in the downward fall of the petiole in a few seconds, if the capacitor was charged beforehand by a 1.5 V power supply. Upon disconnection of the capacitor from Ag/AgCl electrodes, the petiole slowly relaxed to the initial position. The electrical properties of the M. pudica were investigated, and an equivalent electrical circuit was proposed that explains the experimental data.

  15. Reactive oxygen species mediate insulin signal transduction in mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoue, Takeshi; Goto, Motomitsu; Tominaga, Takashi; Sugiyama, Mariko; Tsunekawa, Taku; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Banno, Ryoichi; Suga, Hidetaka; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Arima, Hiroshi

    2016-04-21

    In the hypothalamus, several reports have implied that ROS mediate physiological effects of insulin. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of insulin-induced ROS production and the effect of ROS on insulin signal transduction in mouse hypothalamic organotypic cultures. Insulin increased intracellular ROS, which were suppressed by NADPH oxidase inhibitor. H2O2 increased phospho-insulin receptor β (p-IRβ) and phospho-Akt (p-Akt) levels. Insulin-induced increases in p-IRβ and p-Akt levels were attenuated by ROS scavenger or NADPH oxidase inhibitor. Our data suggest that insulin-induced phosphorylation of IRβ and Akt is mediated via ROS which are predominantly produced by NADPH oxidase in mouse hypothalamus.

  16. Signal transduction pathway profiling of individual tumor samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Carsten

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal transduction pathways convey information from the outside of the cell to transcription factors, which in turn regulate gene expression. Our objective is to analyze tumor gene expression data from microarrays in the context of such pathways. Results We use pathways compiled from the TRANSPATH/TRANSFAC databases and the literature, and three publicly available cancer microarray data sets. Variation in pathway activity, across the samples, is gauged by the degree of correlation between downstream targets of a pathway. Two correlation scores are applied; one considers all pairs of downstream targets, and the other considers only pairs without common transcription factors. Several pathways are found to be differentially active in the data sets using these scores. Moreover, we devise a score for pathway activity in individual samples, based on the average expression value of the downstream targets. Statistical significance is assigned to the scores using permutation of genes as null model. Hence, for individual samples, the status of a pathway is given as a sign, + or -, and a p-value. This approach defines a projection of high-dimensional gene expression data onto low-dimensional pathway activity scores. For each dataset and many pathways we find a much larger number of significant samples than expected by chance. Finally, we find that several sample-wise pathway activities are significantly associated with clinical classifications of the samples. Conclusion This study shows that it is feasible to infer signal transduction pathway activity, in individual samples, from gene expression data. Furthermore, these pathway activities are biologically relevant in the three cancer data sets.

  17. Prolactin receptor and signal transduction to milk protein genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djiane, J.; Daniel, N.; Bignon, C. [Unite d`Endocrinologie Moleculaire, Jouy en Josas (France)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    After cloning of the mammary gland prolactin (PRL) receptor cDNA, a functional assay was established using co-transfection of PRL receptor cDNA together with a milk protein promoter/chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) construct in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Different mutants of the PRL receptor were tested in this CAT assay to delimit the domains in the receptor necessary for signal transduction to milk protein genes. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, high numbers of PRL receptor are expressed. By metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, expressed PRL receptor was identified as a single species of 100 kDa. Using these cells, we analyzed the effects of PRL on intracellular free Ca{sup ++} concentration. PRL stimulates Ca{sup ++} entry and induces secondary Ca{sup ++} mobilization. The entry of Ca{sup ++} is a result of an increase in K{sup +} conductance that hyperpolarizes the membranes. We have also analyzed tyrosine phosphorylation induced by PRL. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, PRL induced a very rapid and transient tyrosine phosphorylation of a 100-kDa protein which is most probably the PRL receptor. The same finding was obtained in mammary membranes after PRL injection to lactating rabbits. Whereas tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and lavendustin were without effect, PRL stimulation of milk protein gene promoters was partially inhibited by 2 {mu}M herbimycin in CHO cells co-transfected with PRL receptor cDNA and the {Beta} lactoglobulin CAT construct. Taken together these observations indicate that the cytoplasmic domain of the PRL receptor interacts with one or several tyrosine kinases, which may represent early postreceptor events necessary for PRL signal transduction to milk protein genes. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Aptamer modification improves the adenoviral transduction of malignant glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Zheng, Xiaojing; Di, BingYan; Wang, Dongyang; Zhang, Yaling; Xia, Haibin; Mao, Qinwen

    2013-12-01

    Adenovirus has shown increasing promise in the gene-viral therapy for glioblastoma, a treatment strategy that relies on the delivery of viruses or transgenes into tumor cells. However, targeting of adenovirus to human glioblastoma remains a challenge due to the low expression level of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in glioma cells. Aptamers are small and highly structured single-stranded oligonucleotides that bind at high affinity to a target molecule, and are good candidates for targeted imaging and therapy. In this study, to construct an aptamer-modified Ad5, we first genetically modified the HVR5 of Ad hexon by biotin acceptor peptide (BAP), which would be metabolically biotinylated during production in HEK293 cells, and then attached the biotin labeled aptamer to the modified Ad through avidin–biotin binding. The aptamers used in this study includes AS1411 and GBI-10. The former is a DNA aptamer that can bind to nucleolin, a nuclear matrix protein found on the surface of cancer cells. The latter is a DNA aptamer that can recognize the extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C on the surface of human glioblastoma cells. To examine if aptamer-modification of the hexon protein could improve the adenoviral transduction efficiency, a glioblastoma cell line, U251, was transduced with aptamer-modified Ads. The transduction efficiency of AS1411- or GBI-10-modified Ad was approximately 4.1-fold or 5.2-fold higher than that of the control. The data indicated that aptamer modified adenovirus would be a useful tool for cancer gene therapy.

  19. Transductive multi-view zero-shot learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yanwei; Hospedales, Timothy M; Xiang, Tao; Gong, Shaogang

    2015-11-01

    Most existing zero-shot learning approaches exploit transfer learning via an intermediate semantic representation shared between an annotated auxiliary dataset and a target dataset with different classes and no annotation. A projection from a low-level feature space to the semantic representation space is learned from the auxiliary dataset and applied without adaptation to the target dataset. In this paper we identify two inherent limitations with these approaches. First, due to having disjoint and potentially unrelated classes, the projection functions learned from the auxiliary dataset/domain are biased when applied directly to the target dataset/domain. We call this problem the projection domain shift problem and propose a novel framework, transductive multi-view embedding, to solve it. The second limitation is the prototype sparsity problem which refers to the fact that for each target class, only a single prototype is available for zero-shot learning given a semantic representation. To overcome this problem, a novel heterogeneous multi-view hypergraph label propagation method is formulated for zero-shot learning in the transductive embedding space. It effectively exploits the complementary information offered by different semantic representations and takes advantage of the manifold structures of multiple representation spaces in a coherent manner. We demonstrate through extensive experiments that the proposed approach (1) rectifies the projection shift between the auxiliary and target domains, (2) exploits the complementarity of multiple semantic representations, (3) significantly outperforms existing methods for both zero-shot and N-shot recognition on three image and video benchmark datasets, and (4) enables novel cross-view annotation tasks.

  20. Efficient gene transfection using novel cationic polymers poly(hydroxyalkylene imines).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaliauskiene, Lolita; Bernadisiute, Ula; Vareikis, Ausvydas; Makuska, Ricardas; Volungeviciene, Ieva; Petuskaite, Agne; Riauba, Laurynas; Lagunavicius, Arunas; Zigmantas, Sarunas

    2010-09-15

    A series of novel cationic polymers poly(hydroxyalkylene imines) were synthesized and tested for their ability to transfect cells in vitro and in vivo. Poly(hydroxyalkylene imines), in particular, poly(2-hydroxypropylene imine) (pHP), poly(2-hydroxypropylene imine ethylene imine) (pHPE), and poly(hydroxypropylene imine propylene imine) (pHPP) were synthesized by polycondensation reaction from 1,3-diamino-2-propanol and the appropriate dibromide. Electron microscopic examination demonstrated that the resulting polymers condensed DNA into toroid shape complexes of 100-150 nm in size. Transfection studies showed that all three polymers were able to deliver genetic material into the cell, with pHP being superior to pHPP and pHPE. pHP acted as an efficient gene delivery agent in a variety of different cell lines and outcompeted most of the widely used polymer or lipid based transfection reagents. Intravenous administration of pHP-DNA polyplexes in mice followed by the reporter gene analysis showed that the reagent was suitable for in vivo applications. In summary, the results indicate that pHP is a new efficient reagent for gene delivery in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Membrane penetrating peptides greatly enhance baculovirus transduction efficiency into mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hong-Zhang [Institute of Biotechnology, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan, ROC (China); Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wu, Carol P. [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chao, Yu-Chan, E-mail: mbycchao@imb.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, Catherine Yen-Yen, E-mail: liucat_2@yahoo.com [Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Ligation of CTP with GP64 enhances baculovirus transduction into mammalian cells. {yields} Fusion of PTD with VP39 enhances baculovirus transduction into mammalian cells. {yields} CTP and PTD-carrying viruses improve the transduction of co-transduced baculoviruses. {yields} Virus entry and gene expression can be separate events in different cell types. -- Abstract: The baculovirus group of insect viruses is widely used for foreign gene introduction into mammalian cells for gene expression and protein production; however, the efficiency of baculovirus entry into mammalian cells is in general still low. In this study, two recombinant baculoviruses were engineered and their ability to improve viral entry was examined: (1) cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP) was fused with baculovirus envelope protein, GP64, to produce a cytoplasmic membrane penetrating baculovirus (vE-CTP); and (2) the protein transduction domain (PTD) of HIV TAT protein was fused with the baculovirus capsid protein VP39 to form a nuclear membrane penetrating baculovirus (vE-PTD). Transduction experiments showed that both viruses had better transduction efficiency than vE, a control virus that only expresses EGFP in mammalian cells. Interestingly, vE-CTP and vE-PTD were also able to improve the transduction efficiency of a co-transduced baculovirus, resulting in higher levels of gene expression. Our results have described new routes to further enhance the development of baculovirus as a tool for gene delivery into mammalian cells.

  2. Roles of ABA Signal Transduction during Higher Plant Seed Development and Germination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao Hongbo; Liang Zongsuo; Shao Mingan

    2003-01-01

    ABA is one of the 5 phytohormones in higher plants, which is also the most important hormone that regulates higher plants in response to environmental stress, by ABA signal transduction. Understanding ABA signal transduction at the molecular level is crucial to biology and ecology, and rational breeding complied with corresponding eco-environmental changes.Great advancements have taken place over the past 10 years by application of the 4rabidopsis experimental system. Many components involved in ABA signal transduction have been isolated and identified and a clear overall picture of gene expression and control for this transduction has become an Accepted fact. On the basis of the work in our laboratory, in conjunction with the data available at the moment, the authors have attempted to integrate ABA signal transduction pathways into a common one and give some insights into the relationship between ABA signal transduction and other hormone signal transduction pathways, with an emphasis upon the ABA signal transduction during higher plant seed development. A future challenge in this field is that different experimental systems are applied and various receptors and genes need to be characterized through the utilization of microarray chips.

  3. Cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crivello, J.V.

    1992-10-01

    The objectives of this project are to design and synthesize novel monomers which orginate from renewable biological sources and to carry out their rapid, efficient, pollution-free and energy efficient cationic polymerization to useful products under the influence of ultraviolet light or heat. A summary of the results of the past year's research on cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources is presented. Three major areas of investigation corresponding to the different classes of naturally occurring starting materials were investigated; epoxidized terpenes and natural rubber and vinyl ethers from alcohols and carbohydrates.

  4. Metalated Nitriles: Cation-Controlled Cyclizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Fraser F.; Wei, Yunjing; Liu, Wang; Zhang, Zhiyu

    2008-01-01

    Judicious choice of cation allows the selective cyclization of substituted γ-hydroxynitriles to trans- or cis-decalins and trans- or cis-bicyclo[5.4.0]-undecanes. The stereoselectivities are consistent with deprotonations generating two distinctly different metalated nitriles: an internally coordinated nitrile anion with BuLi, and a C-magnesiated nitrile with i-PrMgCl. Employing cations to control the geometry of metalated nitriles permits stereodivergent cyclizations with complete control over the stereochemistry of the quaternary, nitrile-bearing carbon. PMID:17579448

  5. Cation Effect on Copper Chemical Mechanical Polishing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liang-Yong; LIU Bo; SONG Zhi-Tang; FENG Song-Lin

    2009-01-01

    We examine the effect of cations in solutions containing benzotriazole (BTA) and H2O2 on copper chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). On the base of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and material removal rate (MRR) results, it is found that ammonia shows the highest MRR as well as good surface after CMP, while KOH demon-strates the worst performance. These results reveal a mechanism that sma//molecules with lone-pairs rather than molecules with steric effect and common inorganic cations are better for copper CMP process, which is indirectly confirmed by open circuit potential (OCP).

  6. Cation Effect on Copper Chemical Mechanical Polishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang-Yong; Liu, Bo; Song, Zhi-Tang; Feng, Song-Lin

    2009-02-01

    We examine the effect of cations in solutions containing benzotriazole (BTA) and H2O2 on copper chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). On the base of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and material removal rate (MRR) results, it is found that ammonia shows the highest MRR as well as good surface after CMP, while KOH demonstrates the worst performance. These results reveal a mechanism that small molecules with lone-pairs rather than molecules with steric effect and common inorganic cations are better for copper CMP process, which is indirectly confirmed by open circuit potential (OCP).

  7. Cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crivello, J.V.

    1992-10-01

    The objectives of this project are to design and synthesize novel monomers which orginate from renewable biological sources and to carry out their rapid, efficient, pollution-free and energy efficient cationic polymerization to useful products under the influence of ultraviolet light or heat. A summary of the results of the past year's research on cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources is presented. Three major areas of investigation corresponding to the different classes of naturally occurring starting materials were investigated; epoxidized terpenes and natural rubber and vinyl ethers from alcohols and carbohydrates.

  8. The Role of Cgrp-Receptor Component Protein (Rcp in Cgrp-Mediated Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Prado

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP is a 17-kDa intracellular peripheral membrane protein required for signal transduction at CGRP receptors. To determine the role of RCP in CGRP-mediated signal transduction, RCP was depleted from NIH3T3 cells using antisense strategy. Loss of RCP protein correlated with loss of cAMP production by CGRP in the antisense cells. In contrast, loss of RCP had no effect on CGRP-mediated binding; therefore RCP is not acting as a chaperone for the CGRP receptor. Instead, RCP is a novel signal transduction molecule that couples the CGRP receptor to the cellular signal transduction machinery. RCP thus represents a prototype for a new class of signal transduction proteins that are required for regulation of G protein-coupled receptors.

  9. Cationic dialkylarylphosphates: a new family of bio-inspired cationic lipids for gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Corre, Stéphanie S; Belmadi, Nawal; Berchel, Mathieu; Le Gall, Tony; Haelters, Jean-Pierre; Lehn, Pierre; Montier, Tristan; Jaffrès, Paul-Alain

    2015-01-28

    In this work that aims to synthesize and evaluate new cationic lipids as vectors for gene delivery, we report the synthesis of a series of cationic lipids in which a phosphate functional group acts as a linker to assemble on a molecular scale, two lipid chains and one cationic polar head. The mono or dicationic moiety is connected to the phosphate group by an aryl spacer. In this work, two synthesis strategies were evaluated. The first used the Atherton-Todd coupling reaction to introduce a phenolic derivative to dioleylphosphite. The second strategy used a sequential addition of lipid alcohol and a phenolic derivative on POCl3. The two methods are efficient, but the latter allows larger yields. Different polar head groups were introduced, thus producing amphiphilic compounds possessing either one permanent (N-methyl-imidazolium, pyridinium, trimethylammonium) or two permanent cationic charges. All these cationic lipids were formulated as liposomal solutions and characterized (size and zeta potential). They formed stable liposomal solutions both in water (at pH 7.0) and in a weakly acidic medium (at pH 5.5). Finally, this new generation of cationic lipids was used to deliver DNA into various human-derived epithelial cells cultured in vitro. Compared with Lipofectamine used as a reference commercial lipofection reagent, some cationic dialkylarylphosphates were able to demonstrate potent gene transfer abilities, and noteworthily, monocationic derivatives were much more efficient than dicationic analogues.

  10. Cation Selectivity in Biological Cation Channels Using Experimental Structural Information and Statistical Mechanical Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, Justin John; Peyser, Alexander; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Cation selective channels constitute the gate for ion currents through the cell membrane. Here we present an improved statistical mechanical model based on atomistic structural information, cation hydration state and without tuned parameters that reproduces the selectivity of biological Na+ and Ca2+ ion channels. The importance of the inclusion of step-wise cation hydration in these results confirms the essential role partial dehydration plays in the bacterial Na+ channels. The model, proven reliable against experimental data, could be straightforwardly used for designing Na+ and Ca2+ selective nanopores.

  11. Transduction for pheromones in the main olfactory epithelium is mediated by the Ca2+ -activated channel TRPM5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Fabián; Delgado, Ricardo; López, Roberto; Bacigalupo, Juan; Restrepo, Diego

    2014-02-26

    Growing evidence suggests that the main olfactory epithelium contains a subset of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) responding to pheromones. One candidate subpopulation expresses the calcium activated cation channel TRPM5 (transient receptor potential channel M5). Using GFP driven by the TRPM5 promoter in mice, we show that this subpopulation responds to putative pheromones, urine, and major histocompatibility complex peptides, but not to regular odors or a pheromone detected by other species. In addition, this subpopulation of TRPM5-GFP+ OSNs uses novel transduction. In regular OSNs, odorants elicit activation of the cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel, leading to Ca2+ gating of Cl- channels; in TRPM5-GFP+ OSNs, the Ca2+ -activated Cl- ANO2 (anoctamin 2) channel is not expressed, and pheromones elicit activation of the CNG channel leading to Ca2+ gating of TRPM5. In conclusion, we show that OSNs expressing TRPM5 respond to pheromones, but not to regular odors through the opening of CNG channels leading to Ca2+ gating of TRPM5.

  12. Controlled Cationic Polymerization of N-Vinylcarbazol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuyken, O.; Rieß, G.; Loontjens, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Cationic polymerization of N-Vinylcarbazol (NVC) was initiated with 1-iodo-1-(2-methylpropyloxy)ethane in the presence of N(n-Bu)4ClO4 and without addition of this activator. Furthermore, 1-chloro-1-(2-methylpropyloxy) ethane, with and without activator has been applied as initiator for NVC. These i

  13. Anionic/cationic complexes in hair care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Lenick, Tony

    2011-01-01

    The formulation of cosmetic products is always more complicated than studying the individual components in aqueous solution. This is because there are numerous interactions between the components, which make the formulation truly more than the sum of the parts. This article will look at interactions between anionic and cationic surfactants and offer insights into how to use these interactions advantageously in making formulations.

  14. Resonance raman studies of phenylcyclopropane radical cations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godbout, J.T.; Zuilhof, H.; Heim, G.; Gould, I.R.; Goodman, J.L.; Dinnocenzo, J.P.; Myers Kelley, A.

    2000-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of the radical cations of phenylcyclopropane and trans-1-phenyl-2-methylcyclopropane are reported. A near-UV pump pulse excites a photosensitizer which oxidizes the species of interest, and a visible probe pulse delayed by 35 ns obtains the spectrum of the radical ion. The tr

  15. Mixed cation effect in sodium aluminosilicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, John C.

    , network structure, and the resistances associated with the deformation processes in mixed cation glasses by partially substituting magnesium for calcium and calcium for lithium in sodium aluminosilicate glasses. We use Raman and 27Al NMR spectroscopies to obtain insights into the structural...

  16. Simultaneous anion and cation mobility in polypyrrole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Steen; Bay, Lasse; Vidanapathirana, K.;

    2003-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) polymer films permanently doped with large, immobile anion dodecyl benzene sulfonate (DBS) have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry in order to clarify the roles of cations and anions in the aqueous electrolyte as mobile ions in the film. Aqueous solutions of 0.05-0.1 M...... alkali metal chlorides as well as BaCl2, NaBr and (CH3CH2CH2)(4)NBr were used to investigate the effects of both the ionic charge, size and shape. In 1: 1 electrolytes using small ions only three peaks are present: a sharp cathodic peak at ca. - 0.6 V vs, SCE representing both the insertion of cations...... complicating reproducibility when employing PPy(DBS) polymers as actuators. When the cation is doubly charged, it enters the film less readily, and anions dominate the mobility. Using a large and bulky cation switches the mechanism to apparently total anion motion. The changes in area of the three peaks...

  17. Cationic lipids and cationic ligands induce DNA helix denaturation: detection of single stranded regions by KMnO4 probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, T K; Gopal, Vijaya; Rao, N Madhusudhana

    2003-09-25

    Cationic lipids and cationic polymers are widely used in gene delivery. Using 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) as a cationic lipid, we have investigated the stability of the DNA in DOTAP:DNA complexes by probing with potassium permanganate (KMnO4). Interestingly, thymidines followed by a purine showed higher susceptibility to cationic ligand-mediated melting. Similar studies performed with other water-soluble cationic ligands such as polylysine, protamine sulfate and polyethyleneimine also demonstrated melting of the DNA but with variations. Small cations such as spermine and spermidine and a cationic detergent, cetyl trimethylammonium bromide, also rendered the DNA susceptible to modification by KMnO4. The data presented here provide direct proof for melting of DNA upon interaction with cationic lipids. Structural changes subsequent to binding of cationic lipids/ligands to DNA may lead to instability and formation of DNA bubbles in double-stranded DNA.

  18. Dendritic Cells Stimulated by Cationic Liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitor, Micaela Tamara; Bergami-Santos, Patrícia Cruz; Cruz, Karen Steponavicius Piedade; Pinho, Mariana Pereira; Barbuto, José Alexandre Marzagão; De La Torre, Lucimara Gaziola

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy of cancer aims to harness the immune system to detect and destroy cancer cells. To induce an immune response against cancer, activated dendritic cells (DCs) must present tumor antigens to T lymphocytes of patients. However, cancer patients' DCs are frequently defective, therefore, they are prone to induce rather tolerance than immune responses. In this context, loading tumor antigens into DCs and, at the same time, activating these cells, is a tempting goal within the field. Thus, we investigated the effects of cationic liposomes on the DCs differentiation/maturation, evaluating their surface phenotype and ability to stimulate T lymphocytes proliferation in vitro. The cationic liposomes composed by egg phosphatidylcholine, 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane and 1,2-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (50/25/25% molar) were prepared by the thin film method followed by extrusion (65 nm, polydispersity of 0.13) and by the dehydration-rehydration method (95% of the population 107 nm, polydispersity of 0.52). The phenotypic analysis of dendritic cells and the analysis of T lymphocyte proliferation were performed by flow cytometry and showed that both cationic liposomes were incorporated and activated dendritic cells. Extruded liposomes were better incorporated and induced higher CD86 expression for dendritic cells than dehydrated-rehydrated vesicles. Furthermore, dendritic cells which internalized extruded liposomes also provided stronger T lymphocyte stimulation. Thus, cationic liposomes with a smaller size and polydispersity seem to be better incorporated by dendritic cells. Hence, these cationic liposomes could be used as a potential tool in further cancer immunotherapy strategies and contribute to new strategies in immunotherapy.

  19. Development of a high-throughput in vitro intestinal lipolysis model for rapid screening of lipid-based drug delivery systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosgaard, Mette D; Sassene, Philip; Mu, Huiling

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a high-throughput in vitro intestinal lipolysis (HTP) model, without any means of pH-stat-titration, to enable a fast evaluation of lipid-based drug delivery systems (LbDDS). MATERIAL AND METHOD: The HTP model was compared to the traditionally used dynamic in vitro lipolysis...... (DIVL) model with regard to the extent of lipid digestion and drug distribution of two poorly soluble model drugs (cinnarizine and danazol), during digestion of three LbDDS (LbDDS I-III). RESULT: The HTP model was able to maintain pH around 6.5 during digestion, without the addition of Na......OH to neutralize the free fatty acids (FFAs), due to an increased buffer capacity. Cinnarizine was primarily located in the aqueous phase during digestion of all three LbDDS and did not differ significantly between the two models. The distribution of danazol varied from formulation to formulation...

  20. Comparative physical-chemical characterization of encapsulated lipid-based isotretinoin products assessed by particle size distribution and thermal behavior analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Carla Aiolfi, E-mail: carlaaiolfi@usp.br [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil); Menaa, Farid [Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg 97080 (Germany); Fluorotronics, Inc., 1425 Russ Bvld, San Diego Technology Incubator, San Diego, CA 92101 (United States); Menaa, Bouzid, E-mail: bouzid.menaa@gmail.com [Fluorotronics, Inc., 1425 Russ Bvld, San Diego Technology Incubator, San Diego, CA 92101 (United States); Quenca-Guillen, Joyce S. [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil); Matos, Jivaldo do Rosario [Department of Fundamental Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil); Mercuri, Lucildes Pita [Department of Exact and Earth Sciences, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Diadema, SP 09972-270 (Brazil); Braz, Andre Borges [Department of Engineering of Mines and Oil, Polytechnical School, University of Sao Paulo, SP 05508-900 (Brazil); Rossetti, Fabia Cristina [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP 14015-120 (Brazil); Kedor-Hackmann, Erika Rosa Maria; Santoro, Maria Ines Rocha Miritello [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil)

    2010-06-10

    Isotretinoin is the drug of choice for the management of severe recalcitrant nodular acne. Nevertheless, some of its physical-chemical properties are still poorly known. Hence, the aim of our study consisted to comparatively evaluate the particle size distribution (PSD) and characterize the thermal behavior of the three encapsulated isotretinoin products in oil suspension (one reference and two generics) commercialized in Brazil. Here, we show that the PSD, estimated by laser diffraction and by polarized light microscopy, differed between the generics and the reference product. However, the thermal behavior of the three products, determined by thermogravimetry (TGA), differential thermal (DTA) analyses and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), displayed no significant changes and were more thermostable than the isotretinoin standard used as internal control. Thus, our study suggests that PSD analyses in isotretinoin lipid-based formulations should be routinely performed in order to improve their quality and bioavailability.

  1. Enhanced gastrointestinal absorption of N{sub 3}-O-toluyl-fluorouracil by cationic solid lipid nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Donghua; Liu Chunxi; Zou Weiwei; Zhang Na, E-mail: zhangnancy9@sdu.edu.c [Shandong University, The School of Pharmaceutical Science (China)

    2010-03-15

    This study was aimed to prepare N{sub 3}-O-toluyl-fluorouracil (TFu) loaded cationic solid lipid nanoparticles (TFu-SLNs) and evaluate the potential of a novel lipid-based drug delivery system to enhance the oral absorption of TFu. TFu-SLNs were prepared by the film dispersion-ultrasonication method, using hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide as cationic tenside. The formulation and manufacture parameters were optimized concerning the drug encapsulation efficiency and the particle size. The in vitro release characteristics, in vivo pharmacokinetic properties and bioavailability, and in situ intestinal absorption features were investigated. The morphology of TFu-SLNs was approximately spherical and the mean particle size was 178.8 {+-} 9.99 nm; the zeta potential was +19.54 {+-} 0.32 mV. The mean entrapment efficiency and drug loading were 71.03 {+-} 1.19% and 3.57 {+-} 0.08%, respectively. The release behaviors of TFu from TFu-SLNs in PBS were fitted to the bioexponential model, while in artificial gastric juice, artificial intestinal juice and artificial gastric juice (2 h) followed by artificial intestinal juice (2-48 h) were fitted to the Weibull equation. The results of the pharmacokinetic studies in mice showed that the bioavailability of TFu-SLNs was significantly increased compared with that of the TFu suspensions after oral administration. The absorption of TFu-SLNs in intestine of rat was fitted to first-order kinetics with passive diffusion mechanism and the main segments of TFu-SLNs absorbed in intestine were duodenum and jejunum for the bioadhesion mediated by electrostatic interaction between the positively charged colloidal particles and the negatively charged mucosal surface. These results indicated that cationic SLNs would offer a promising delivery system for the facilitation of the bioavailability of poorly oral absorption drugs by enhancing the bioadhesion between the absorption mucosal surface and the drug carriers.

  2. Iodine status of young Burkinabe children receiving small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements and iodised salt: a cluster-randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Sonja Y; Abbeddou, Souheila; Yakes Jimenez, Elizabeth; Ouédraogo, Jean-Bosco; Brown, Kenneth H

    2015-12-14

    The objective of the present study was to assess the impact of providing small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements (SQ-LNS) on the I status of young Burkinabe children. In total, thirty-four communities were assigned to intervention (IC) or non-intervention cohorts (NIC). IC children were randomly assigned to receive 20 g lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS)/d containing 90 µg I with 0 or 10 mg Zn from 9 to 18 months of age, and NIC children received no SQ-LNS. All the children were exposed to iodised salt through the national salt iodization programme. Spot urinary iodine (UI), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and total thyroxine (T4) in dried blood spots as well as plasma thyroglobulin (Tg) concentrations were assessed at 9 and 18 months of age among 123 IC and fifty-six NIC children. At baseline and at 18 months, UI, TSH and T4 did not differ between cohorts. Tg concentration was higher in the NIC v. IC at baseline, but this difference did not persist at 18 months of age. In both cohorts combined, the geometric mean of UI was 339·2 (95% CI 298·6, 385·2) µg/l, TSH 0·8 (95% CI 0·7, 0·8) mU/l, T4 118 (95 % CI 114, 122) nmol/l and Tg 26·0 (95% CI 24·3, 27·7) µg/l at 18 months of age. None of the children had elevated TSH at 18 months of age. Marginally more children in NIC (8·9%) had low T4 (15 ppm). A reduction of SQ-LNS I content could be considered in settings with similarly successful salt iodisation programmes.

  3. Magnetofection Enhances Lentiviral-Mediated Transduction of Airway Epithelial Cells through Extracellular and Cellular Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Stefano; Orlando, Clara; Carbone, Annalucia; Di Gioia, Sante; Conese, Massimo

    2016-11-23

    Gene transfer to airway epithelial cells is hampered by extracellular (mainly mucus) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers. Magnetofection has been used to increase retention time of lentiviral vectors (LV) on the cellular surface. In this study, magnetofection was investigated in airway epithelial cell models mimicking extracellular and cellular barriers. Bronchiolar epithelial cells (H441 line) were evaluated for LV-mediated transduction after polarization onto filters and dexamethasone (dex) treatment, which induced hemicyst formation, with or without magnetofection. Sputum from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients was overlaid onto cells, and LV-mediated transduction was evaluated in the absence or presence of magnetofection. Magnetofection of unpolarized H441 cells increased the transduction with 50 MOI (multiplicity of infection, i.e., transducing units/cell) up to the transduction obtained with 500 MOI in the absence of magnetofection. Magnetofection well-enhanced LV-mediated transduction in mucus-layered cells by 20.3-fold. LV-mediated transduction efficiency decreased in dex-induced hemicysts in a time-dependent fashion. In dome-forming cells, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) localization at the cell borders was increased by dex treatment. Under these experimental conditions, magnetofection significantly increased LV transduction by 5.3-fold. In conclusion, these results show that magnetofection can enhance LV-mediated gene transfer into airway epithelial cells in the presence of extracellular (sputum) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers, representing CF-like conditions.

  4. NO, nitrotyrosine, and cyclic GMP in signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafy, K. A.; Krumenacker, J. S.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, the role of nitric oxide (NO) in biology has evolved from being recognized as an environmental pollutant to an endogenously produced substance involved in cell communication and signal transduction. NO is produced by a family of enzymes called nitric oxide synthases (NOSs), which can be stimulated by a variety of factors that mediate responses to various stimuli. NO can initiate its biological effects through activation of the heterodimeric enzyme, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), or through several other chemical reactions. Activation of sGC results in the production of 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), an intracellular second messenger signaling molecule, which can subsequently mediate such diverse physiological events such as vasodilatation and immunomodulation. Chemically reactive NO can affect physiological changes through modifications to cellular proteins, one of which is tyrosine nitration. The demonstration that NO is involved in so many biological pathways indicates the importance of this endogenously produced substance, and suggests that there is much more to be discovered about its role in biology in years to come.

  5. Genetic Basis of Ethylene Perception and Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ziqiang Zhu; Hongwei Guo

    2008-01-01

    Ethylene is a simple gaseous hormone in plants. It plays important roles in plant development and stress tolerance. In the presence of ethylene treatment, all ethylene receptors are in an activated form, which can physically interact with CTR1 and consequently recruit CTR1 protein to endoplasmic reticulum membrane to activate it. Activated CTR1 suppresses the downstream signal transduction by an unknown mechanism. Upon binding to its receptors, ethylene will inactivate the receptor/CTR1 module and in turn alleviate their inhibitory effect on two positive regulators acting downstream of CTRI: EIN2 and EIN3. Genetic study reveals that EIN2 is an essential component in the ethylene signaling pathway but its biochemical function remains a mystery. EIN3 is a plant-specific transcription factor and its protein abundance in the nucleus is rapidly induced upon ethylene treatment. In the absence of ethylene signal, EIN3 protein is degraded by an SCF complex containing one of the two F-box proteins EBF1/EBF2 in a 26S proteasome-dependent manner. EIN3 can bind to the promoter sequences of a number of downstream components, such as ERFs, which in turn bind to a GCC box,a cis-element found in many ethylene-regulated defense genes. Ethylene has been shown to also regulate many other hormones' signaling pathways including auxin, abscisic acid and jasmonic acid, implying the existence of complicated signaling networks in the growth, development and defense responses of various plants.

  6. Mannotriose regulates learning and memory signal transduction in the hippocampus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lina Zhang; Weiwei Dai; Xueli Zhang; Zhangbin Gong; Guoqin Jin

    2013-01-01

    Rehmannia is a commonly used Chinese herb, which improves learning and memory. However, the crucial components of the signal transduction pathway associated with this effect remain elusive. Pri-mary hippocampal neurons were cultured in vitro, insulted with high-concentration (1 × 10-4 mol/L) cor-ticosterone, and treated with 1 × 10-4 mol/L mannotriose. Thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay and western blot analysis showed that hippocampal neuron survival rates and protein levels of glucocorti-coid receptor, serum and glucocorticoid-regulated protein kinase, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor were al dramatical y decreased after high-concentration corticosterone-induced injury. This effect was reversed by mannotriose, to a similar level as RU38486 and donepezil. Our findings indicate that mannotriose could protect hippocampal neurons from high-concentration corticosterone-induced injury. The mechanism by which this occurred was associated with levels of glucocorticoid receptor protein, serum and glucocorticoid-regulated protein kinase, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

  7. ROPs in the spotlight of plant signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berken, A

    2006-11-01

    Small guanine nucleotide binding proteins of the Rho family called ROP play a crucial role as regulators of signal transduction in plants. They participate in pathways that influence growth and development, and the adaptation of plants to various environmental situations. As members of the Ras superfamily, ROPs function as molecular switches cycling between a GDP-bound 'off' and a GTP-bound 'on' state in a strictly regulated manner. Latest research provided fascinating new insights into ROP regulation by novel guanine nucleotide exchange factors, unconventional GTPase activating proteins, and guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors, which apparently organize localized ROP activation. Important progress has also been made concerning signaling components upstream and downstream of the ROP cycle involving receptor-like serine/threonine kinases and effectors that can manipulate cytoskeletal dynamics, intracellular calcium levels, H2O2 production and further cellular targets. This review outlines the fast developing knowledge on ROP GTPases highlighting their specific features, regulation and roles in a cellular signaling context.

  8. Phosphoproteomics-based systems analysis of signal transduction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko eKozuka-Hata

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal transduction systems coordinate complex cellular information to regulate biological events such as cell proliferation and differentiation. Although the accumulating evidence on widespread association of signaling molecules has revealed essential contribution of phosphorylation-dependent interaction networks to cellular regulation, their dynamic behavior is mostly yet to be analyzed. Recent technological advances regarding mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics have enabled us to describe the comprehensive status of phosphorylated molecules in a time-resolved manner. Computational analyses based on the phosphoproteome dynamics accelerate generation of novel methodologies for mathematical analysis of cellular signaling. Phosphoproteomics-based numerical modeling can be used to evaluate regulatory network elements from a statistical point of view. Integration with transcriptome dynamics also uncovers regulatory hubs at the transcriptional level. These omics-based computational methodologies, which have firstly been applied to representative signaling systems such as the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway, have now opened up a gate for systems analysis of signaling networks involved in immune response and cancer.

  9. BowTieBuilder: modeling signal transduction pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schröder Adrian

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensory proteins react to changing environmental conditions by transducing signals into the cell. These signals are integrated into core proteins that activate downstream target proteins such as transcription factors (TFs. This structure is referred to as a bow tie, and allows cells to respond appropriately to complex environmental conditions. Understanding this cellular processing of information, from sensory proteins (e.g., cell-surface proteins to target proteins (e.g., TFs is important, yet for many processes the signaling pathways remain unknown. Results Here, we present BowTieBuilder for inferring signal transduction pathways from multiple source and target proteins. Given protein-protein interaction (PPI data signaling pathways are assembled without knowledge of the intermediate signaling proteins while maximizing the overall probability of the pathway. To assess the inference quality, BowTieBuilder and three alternative heuristics are applied to several pathways, and the resulting pathways are compared to reference pathways taken from KEGG. In addition, BowTieBuilder is used to infer a signaling pathway of the innate immune response in humans and a signaling pathway that potentially regulates an underlying gene regulatory network. Conclusion We show that BowTieBuilder, given multiple source and/or target proteins, infers pathways with satisfactory recall and precision rates and detects the core proteins of each pathway.

  10. Signal transduction around thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP in atopic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuepper Michael

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP, a novel interleukin-7-like cytokine, triggers dendritic cell-mediated inflammatory responses ultimately executed by T helper cells of the Th2 subtype. TSLP emerged as a central player in the development of allergic symptoms, especially in the airways, and is a prime regulatory cytokine at the interface of virus- or antigen-exposed epithelial cells and dendritic cells (DCs. DCs activated by epithelium-derived TSLP can promote naïve CD4+ T cells to adopt a Th2 phenotype, which in turn recruite eosinophilic and basophilic granulocytes as well as mast cells into the airway mucosa. These different cells secrete inflammatory cytokines and chemokines operative in inducing an allergic inflammation and atopic asthma. TSLP is, thus, involved in the control of both an innate and an adaptive immune response. Since TSLP links contact of allergen with the airway epithelium to the onset and maintainance of the asthmatic syndrome, defining the signal transduction underlying TSLP expression and function is of profound interest for a better understandimg of the disease and for the development of new therapeutics.

  11. Post-translational modification of PII signal transduction proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike eMerrick

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The PII proteins constitute one of the most widely distributed families of signal transduction proteins in nature. They are pivotal players in the control of nitrogen metabolism in bacteria and archaea, and are also found in the plastids of plants. Quite remarkably PII proteins control the activities of a diverse range of enzymes, transcription factors and membrane transport proteins, and in all known cases they achieve their regulatory effect by direct interaction with their target. PII proteins in the Proteobacteria and the Actinobacteria are subject to post-translational modification by uridylylation or adenylylation respectively, whilst in some Cyanobacteria they can be modified by phosphorylation. In all these cases the protein’s modification state is influenced by the cellular nitrogen status and is thought to regulate its activity. However in many organisms there is no evidence for modification of PII proteins and indeed the ability of these proteins to respond to the cellular nitrogen status is fundamentally independent of post-translational modification. In this review we explore the role of post-translational modification in PII proteins in the light of recent studies.

  12. Signal transduction in cells of the immune system in microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Kathrin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Life on Earth developed in the presence and under the constant influence of gravity. Gravity has been present during the entire evolution, from the first organic molecule to mammals and humans. Modern research revealed clearly that gravity is important, probably indispensable for the function of living systems, from unicellular organisms to men. Thus, gravity research is no more or less a fundamental question about the conditions of life on Earth. Since the first space missions and supported thereafter by a multitude of space and ground-based experiments, it is well known that immune cell function is severely suppressed in microgravity, which renders the cells of the immune system an ideal model organism to investigate the influence of gravity on the cellular and molecular level. Here we review the current knowledge about the question, if and how cellular signal transduction depends on the existence of gravity, with special focus on cells of the immune system. Since immune cell function is fundamental to keep the organism under imnological surveillance during the defence against pathogens, to investigate the effects and possible molecular mechanisms of altered gravity is indispensable for long-term space flights to Earth Moon or Mars. Thus, understanding the impact of gravity on cellular functions on Earth will provide not only important informations about the development of life on Earth, but also for therapeutic and preventive strategies to cope successfully with medical problems during space exploration.

  13. Modulation of signal transduction by tea catechins and related phytochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Masahito [Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center and Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, HHSC-1509, 701 West 168 Street, NY 10032-2704 (United States); Weinstein, I. Bernard [Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center and Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, HHSC-1509, 701 West 168 Street, NY 10032-2704 (United States)]. E-mail: ibw1@columbia.edu

    2005-12-11

    Epidemiologic studies in human populations and experimental studies in rodents provide evidence that green tea and its constituents can inhibit both the development and growth of tumors at a variety of tissue sites. In addition, EGCG, a major biologically active component of green tea, inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in a variety of cancer cell lines. The purpose of this paper is to review evidence that these effects are mediated, at least in part, through inhibition of the activity of specific receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and related downstream pathways of signal transduction. We also review evidence indicating that the antitumor effects of the related polyphenolic phytochemicals resveratrol, genistein, curcumin, and capsaicin are exerted via similar mechanisms. Some of these agents (EGCG, genistein, and curcumin) appear to directly target specific RTKs, and all of these compounds cause inhibition of the activity of the transcription factors AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B, thus inhibiting cell proliferation and enhancing apoptosis. Critical areas of future investigation include: (1) identification of the direct molecular target(s) of EGCG and related polyphenolic compounds in cells; (2) the in vivo metabolism and bioavailability of these compounds; (3) the ancillary effects of these compounds on tumor-stromal interactions; (4) the development of synergistic combinations with other antitumor agents to enhance efficacy in cancer prevention and therapy, and also minimize potential toxicities.

  14. Rewiring the specificity of two-component signal transduction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerker, Jeffrey M; Perchuk, Barrett S; Siryaporn, Albert; Lubin, Emma A; Ashenberg, Orr; Goulian, Mark; Laub, Michael T

    2008-06-13

    Two-component signal transduction systems are the predominant means by which bacteria sense and respond to environmental stimuli. Bacteria often employ tens or hundreds of these paralogous signaling systems, comprised of histidine kinases (HKs) and their cognate response regulators (RRs). Faithful transmission of information through these signaling pathways and avoidance of detrimental crosstalk demand exquisite specificity of HK-RR interactions. To identify the determinants of two-component signaling specificity, we examined patterns of amino acid coevolution in large, multiple sequence alignments of cognate kinase-regulator pairs. Guided by these results, we demonstrate that a subset of the coevolving residues is sufficient, when mutated, to completely switch the substrate specificity of the kinase EnvZ. Our results shed light on the basis of molecular discrimination in two-component signaling pathways, provide a general approach for the rational rewiring of these pathways, and suggest that analyses of coevolution may facilitate the reprogramming of other signaling systems and protein-protein interactions.

  15. Evolution of two-component signal transduction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, Emily J; Laub, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    To exist in a wide range of environmental niches, bacteria must sense and respond to a variety of external signals. A primary means by which this occurs is through two-component signal transduction pathways, typically composed of a sensor histidine kinase that receives the input stimuli and then phosphorylates a response regulator that effects an appropriate change in cellular physiology. Histidine kinases and response regulators have an intrinsic modularity that separates signal input, phosphotransfer, and output response; this modularity has allowed bacteria to dramatically expand and diversify their signaling capabilities. Recent work has begun to reveal the molecular basis by which two-component proteins evolve. How and why do orthologous signaling proteins diverge? How do cells gain new pathways and recognize new signals? What changes are needed to insulate a new pathway from existing pathways? What constraints are there on gene duplication and lateral gene transfer? Here, we review progress made in answering these questions, highlighting how the integration of genome sequence data with experimental studies is providing major new insights.

  16. The Evolution of Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, Emily J.; Laub, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    To exist in a wide range of environmental niches, bacteria must sense and respond to a myriad of external signals. A primary means by which this occurs is through two-component signal transduction pathways, typically comprised of a histidine kinase that receives the input stimuli and a response regulator that effects an appropriate change in cellular physiology. Histidine kinases and response regulators have an intrinsic modularity that separates signal input, phosphotransfer, and output response; this modularity has allowed bacteria to dramatically expand and diversify their signaling capabilities. Recent work has begun to reveal the molecular basis by which two-component proteins evolve. How and why do orthologous signaling proteins diverge? How do cells gain new pathways and recognize new signals? What changes are needed to insulate a new pathway from existing pathways? What constraints are there on gene duplication and lateral gene transfer? Here, we review progress made in answering these questions, highlighting how the integration of genome sequence data with experimental studies is providing major new insights. PMID:22746333

  17. The interleukin-4 receptor: signal transduction by a hematopoietin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, A D; Pierce, J H

    1994-02-01

    Over the last several years, the receptors for numerous cytokines have been molecularly characterized. Analysis of their amino acid sequences shows that some of these receptors bear certain motifs in their extracellular domains that define a family of receptors called the Hematopoietin receptor superfamily. Significant advances in characterizing the structure, function, and mechanisms of signal transduction have been made for several members of this family. The purpose of this review is to discuss the recent advances made for one of the family members, the interleukin (IL) 4 receptor. Other receptor systems have recently been reviewed elsewhere. The IL-4 receptor consists of, at the minimum, the cloned 140 kDa IL-4-binding chain with the potential for associating with other chains. The IL-4 receptor transduces its signal by activating a tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates cellular substrates, including the receptor itself, and the 170 kDa substrate called 4PS. Phosphorylated 4PS interacts with the SH2 domain of the enzyme PI-3'-kinase and increases its enzymatic activity. These early events in the IL-4 receptor initiated signaling pathway may trigger a series of signals that will ultimately lead to an IL-4 specific biologic outcome.

  18. Glycation & the RAGE axis: targeting signal transduction through DIAPH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhtman, Alexander; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2017-02-01

    The consequences of chronic disease are vast and unremitting; hence, understanding the pathogenic mechanisms mediating such disorders holds promise to identify therapeutics and diminish the consequences. The ligands of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) accumulate in chronic diseases, particularly those characterized by inflammation and metabolic dysfunction. Although first discovered and reported as a receptor for advanced glycation end products (AGEs), the expansion of the repertoire of RAGE ligands implicates the receptor in diverse milieus, such as autoimmunity, chronic inflammation, obesity, diabetes, and neurodegeneration. Areas covered: This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the ligand families of RAGE and data from human subjects and animal models on the role of the RAGE axis in chronic diseases. The recent discovery that the cytoplasmic domain of RAGE binds to the formin homology 1 (FH1) domain, DIAPH1, and that this interaction is essential for RAGE ligand-stimulated signal transduction, is discussed. Finally, we review therapeutic opportunities targeting the RAGE axis as a means to mitigate chronic diseases. Expert commentary: With the aging of the population and the epidemic of cardiometabolic disease, therapeutic strategies to target molecular pathways that contribute to the sequelae of these chronic diseases are urgently needed. In this review, we propose that the ligand/RAGE axis and its signaling nexus is a key factor in the pathogenesis of chronic disease and that therapeutic interruption of this pathway may improve quality and duration of life.

  19. Decoding the phosphorylation code in Hedgehog signal transduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongbin Chen; Jin Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays pivotal roles in embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis,and its deregulation leads to numerous human disorders including cancer.Binding of Hh to Patched (Ptc),a twelve-transmembrane protein,alleviates its inhibition of Smoothened (Smo),a seven-transmembrane protein related to G-proteincoupled receptors (GPCRs),leading to Smo phosphorylation and activation.Smo acts through intracellular signaling complexes to convert the latent transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci)/Gli from a truncated repressor to a fulllength activator,leading to derepression/activation of Hh target genes.Increasing evidence suggests that phosphorylation participates in almost every step in the signal relay from Smo to Ci/Gli,and that differential phosphorylation of several key pathway components may be crucial for translating the Hh morphogen gradient into graded pathway activities.In this review,we focus on the multifaceted roles that phosphorylation plays in Hh signal transduction,and discuss the conservation and difference between Drosophila and mammalian Hh signaling mechanisms.

  20. Nanomechanical motion transduction with a scalable localized gap plasmon architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxworthy, Brian J.; Aksyuk, Vladimir A.

    2016-12-01

    Plasmonic structures couple oscillating electromagnetic fields to conduction electrons in noble metals and thereby can confine optical-frequency excitations at nanometre scales. This confinement both facilitates miniaturization of nanophotonic devices and makes their response highly sensitive to mechanical motion. Mechanically coupled plasmonic devices thus hold great promise as building blocks for next-generation reconfigurable optics and metasurfaces. However, a flexible approach for accurately batch-fabricating high-performance plasmomechanical devices is currently lacking. Here we introduce an architecture integrating individual plasmonic structures with precise, nanometre features into tunable mechanical resonators. The localized gap plasmon resonators strongly couple light and mechanical motion within a three-dimensional, sub-diffraction volume, yielding large quality factors and record optomechanical coupling strength of 2 THz.nm-1. Utilizing these features, we demonstrate sensitive and spatially localized optical transduction of mechanical motion with a noise floor of 6 fm.Hz-1/2, representing a 1.5 orders of magnitude improvement over existing localized plasmomechanical systems.

  1. Independent adsorption of monovalent cations and cationic polymers at PE/PG lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomich, Daria A.; Nesterenko, Alexey M.; Kostritskii, Andrei Yu; Kondinskaia, Diana A.; Ermakov, Yuri A.; Gurtovenko, Andrey A.

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic cationic polymers constitute a wide class of polymeric biocides. Commonly their antimicrobial effect is associated to their interaction with bacterial membranes. In the present study we analyze the interaction of various cationic polymers with model bacterial membranes comprised of a mixture of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). We describe a polymer-membrane interaction as a process of modification of the surface charge. It is well known that small monovalent inorganic cations (Na+, K+) cannot overcharge the surface of a bilayer containing anionic lipids. In contrast, polycations are able to overcharge anionic membranes and demonstrate a very large input to the electric field distribution at the membrane-water interface. We aimed here to study the electrostatic effects associated with the interaction of polycations of different types with a model lipid membrane whose composition closely resembles that of bacterial membranes (PE:PG = 1:4). Four different cationic polymers (polyvinylamine, polyallylamine, poly-L-lysine and polyethylenimine) were adsorbed at a model PE/PG bilayer in MD simulations. Adsorption of sodium cations was inspected separately for PE/PG bilayers of different composition and cation’s binding parameters were determined. From computational experiments and consequent theoretical analysis we concluded that sodium adsorption at anionic binding sites does not depend on the presence of polycations. Therefore, we hypothesize that antimicrobial activity of the studied cationic polymers should depend on the ionic composition of the medium.

  2. THE CATIONIC ADDITIVES USED IN COATED INK-JET PAPER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongmei Yu; Chuanshan Zhao; Kefu Chen

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of several different cationic additives on the viscosity 、zeta potential and printing properties of the ink-jet coating. The cationic additives have greatly improved sheet's gloss and printabilities.

  3. Bithiophene radical cation: Resonance Raman spectroscopy and molecular orbital calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grage, M.M.-L.; Keszthelyi, T.; Offersgaard, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrum of the photogenerated radical cation of bithiophene is reported. The bithiophene radical cation was produced via a photoinduced electron transfer reaction between excited bithiophene and the electron acceptor fumaronitrile in a room temperature acetonitrile solution a...

  4. Ion dynamics in cationic lipid bilayer systems in saline solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miettinen, Markus S; Gurtovenko, Andrey A; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    mixture of cationic dimyristoyltrimethylammoniumpropane (DMTAP) and zwitterionic (neutral) dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) lipids. Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, we address the effects of bilayer composition (cationic to zwitterionic lipid fraction) and of NaCl electrolyte...

  5. Top-Down CMOS-NEMS Polysilicon Nanowire with Piezoresistive Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marigó, Eloi; Sansa, Marc; Pérez-Murano, Francesc; Uranga, Arantxa; Barniol, Núria

    2015-07-14

    A top-down clamped-clamped beam integrated in a CMOS technology with a cross section of 500 nm × 280 nm has been electrostatic actuated and sensed using two different transduction methods: capacitive and piezoresistive. The resonator made from a single polysilicon layer has a fundamental in-plane resonance at 27 MHz. Piezoresistive transduction avoids the effect of the parasitic capacitance assessing the capability to use it and enhance the CMOS-NEMS resonators towards more efficient oscillator. The displacement derived from the capacitive transduction allows to compute the gauge factor for the polysilicon material available in the CMOS technology.

  6. Modeling Signal Transduction Networks: A comparison of two Stochastic Kinetic Simulation Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettigrew, Michel F.; Resat, Haluk

    2005-09-15

    Simulations of a scalable four compartment reaction model based on the well known epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signal transduction system are used to compare two stochastic algorithms ? StochSim and the Gibson-Gillespie. It is concluded that the Gibson-Gillespie is the algorithm of choice for most realistic cases with the possible exception of signal transduction networks characterized by a moderate number (< 100) of complex types, each with a very small population, but with a high degree of connectivity amongst the complex types. Keywords: Signal transduction networks, Stochastic simulation, StochSim, Gillespie

  7. Top-Down CMOS-NEMS Polysilicon Nanowire with Piezoresistive Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marigó, Eloi; Sansa, Marc; Pérez-Murano, Francesc; Uranga, Arantxa; Barniol, Núria

    2015-01-01

    A top-down clamped-clamped beam integrated in a CMOS technology with a cross section of 500 nm × 280 nm has been electrostatic actuated and sensed using two different transduction methods: capacitive and piezoresistive. The resonator made from a single polysilicon layer has a fundamental in-plane resonance at 27 MHz. Piezoresistive transduction avoids the effect of the parasitic capacitance assessing the capability to use it and enhance the CMOS-NEMS resonators towards more efficient oscillator. The displacement derived from the capacitive transduction allows to compute the gauge factor for the polysilicon material available in the CMOS technology. PMID:26184222

  8. Active Learning for Transductive Support Vector Machines with Applications to Text Classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a novel active learning approach for transductive support vector machines with applications to text classification. The concept of the centroid of the support vectors is proposed so that the selective sampling based on measuring the distance from the unlabeled samples to the centroid is feasible and simple to compute. With additional hypothesis, active learning offers better performance with comparison to regular inductive SVMs and transductive SVMs with random sampling,and it is even competitive to transductive SVMs on all available training data. Experimental results prove that our approach is efficient and easy to implement.

  9. Production of sulfonated cation-exchangers from petroleum asphaltites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokonova, Yu.V.; Pol' kin, G.B.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Vinogradov, M.V.

    1982-02-10

    Continuing our studies of the preparation of products of practical value from asphaltite, a new by-product of oil refining, we obtained sulfonated cation-exchangers from a mixture of asphaltite and acid tar. It is shown that these cation-exchangers have good kinetic properties and are superior in thermal and thermohydrolytic stability to the commercial cation-exchange resin KU-2.

  10. Asymmetric Aminalization via Cation-Binding Catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Sang Yeon; Liu, Yidong; Oh, Joong Suk

    2017-01-01

    Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis, in principle, can generate "chiral" anionic nucleophiles, where the counter cations are coordinated within chiral environments. Nitrogen-nucleophiles are intrinsically basic, therefore, its use as nucleophiles is often challenging and limiting the scope...... of the reaction. Particularly, a formation of configurationally labile aminal centers with alkyl substituents has been a formidable challenge due to the enamine/imine equilibrium of electrophilic substrates. Herein, we report enantioselective nucleophilic addition reactions of potassium phthalimides to Boc......-protected alkyl- and aryl-substituted α-amido sulfones. In-situ generated imines smoothly reacted with the nitrogen nucleophiles to corresponding aminals with good to excellent enantioselectivitiy under mild reaction conditions. In addition, transformation of aminal products gave biologically relevant...

  11. The adjuvant mechanism of cationic dimethyldioctadecylammonium liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Karen Smith; Agger, Else Marie; Foged, Camilla

    2007-01-01

    Cationic liposomes are being used increasingly as efficient adjuvants for subunit vaccines but their precise mechanism of action is still unknown. Here, we investigated the adjuvant mechanism of cationic liposomes based on the synthetic amphiphile dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA). The liposomes...... concentrations. This efficient adsorption onto the liposomes led to an enhanced uptake of OVA by BM-DCs as assessed by flow cytometry and confocal fluorescence laser-scanning microscopy. This was an active process, which was arrested at 4 degrees and by an inhibitor of actin-dependent endocytosis, cytochalasin D....... In vivo studies confirmed the observed effect because adsorption of OVA onto DDA liposomes enhanced the uptake of the antigen by peritoneal exudate cells after intraperitoneal injection. The liposomes targeted antigen preferentially to antigen-presenting cells because we only observed a minimal uptake...

  12. Cation Permeability in Soybean Aleurone Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Noda, Hiroko; Fukuda, Mitsuru

    1998-01-01

    The permeation of water and ions into bean seeds is essential for processing and cooking of beans. The permeability of cations, K, Na, Ca, and Mg ions, into soybean seed tissue, especially aleurone layer, during water uptake was investigated to characterize the ion permeation into soybeans. Aleurone layers and seed coats contained relatively high concentration of endogenous K and Ca ions, and endogenous Ca ion, respectively. The amounts of Ca ion entered seed coats and aleurone layers were gr...

  13. New insights into transduction pathways that regulate boar sperm function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado de Llera, A; Martin-Hidalgo, D; Gil, M C; Garcia-Marin, L J; Bragado, M J

    2016-01-01

    Detailed molecular mechanisms mediating signal transduction cascades that regulate boar sperm function involving Ser/Thr and tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins have been reviewed previously. Therefore, this review will focus in those kinase pathways identified recently (boar spermatozoa that regulate different functional spermatozoa processes. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cell energy sensor kinase that was first identified in mammalian spermatozoa in 2012, and since then it has emerged as an essential regulator of boar sperm function. Signaling pathways leading to AMPK activation in boar sperm are highlighted in this review (PKA, CaMKKα/β, and PKC as well as Ca(2+) and cAMP messengers as upstream regulators). Interestingly, stimuli considered as cell stress (hyperosmotic stress, inhibition of mitochondrial activity, absence of intracellular Ca(2+)) markedly activate AMPK in boar spermatozoa. Moreover, AMPK plays a remarkable and necessary regulatory role in mammalian sperm function, controlling essential boar sperm functional processes such as motility, viability, mitochondrial membrane potential, organization and fluidity of plasma membrane, and outer acrosome membrane integrity. These mentioned processes are all required under fluctuating environment of spermatozoa when transiting through the female reproductive tract to achieve fertilization. An applied role of AMPK in artificial insemination techniques is also suggested as during boar seminal doses preservation at 17 °C, physiological levels of AMPK activity markedly increase (maximum on Day 7) and result essential to maintain the aforementioned fundamental sperm processes. Moreover, regulation of sperm function exerted by the glycogen synthase kinase 3 and Src family kinase pathways is summarized.

  14. Computational study of noise in a large signal transduction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruohonen Keijo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biochemical systems are inherently noisy due to the discrete reaction events that occur in a random manner. Although noise is often perceived as a disturbing factor, the system might actually benefit from it. In order to understand the role of noise better, its quality must be studied in a quantitative manner. Computational analysis and modeling play an essential role in this demanding endeavor. Results We implemented a large nonlinear signal transduction network combining protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinase, phospholipase A2, and β isoform of phospholipase C networks. We simulated the network in 300 different cellular volumes using the exact Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm and analyzed the results in both the time and frequency domain. In order to perform simulations in a reasonable time, we used modern parallel computing techniques. The analysis revealed that time and frequency domain characteristics depend on the system volume. The simulation results also indicated that there are several kinds of noise processes in the network, all of them representing different kinds of low-frequency fluctuations. In the simulations, the power of noise decreased on all frequencies when the system volume was increased. Conclusions We concluded that basic frequency domain techniques can be applied to the analysis of simulation results produced by the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm. This approach is suited not only to the study of fluctuations but also to the study of pure noise processes. Noise seems to have an important role in biochemical systems and its properties can be numerically studied by simulating the reacting system in different cellular volumes. Parallel computing techniques make it possible to run massive simulations in hundreds of volumes and, as a result, accurate statistics can be obtained from computational studies.

  15. Signal transduction molecule patterns indicating potential glioblastoma therapy approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruceru ML

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Maria Linda Cruceru,1 Ana-Maria Enciu,1,2,7 Adrian Claudiu Popa,1,3 Radu Albulescu,2,4,7 Monica Neagu,2,7 Cristiana Pistol Tanase,2,7 Stefan N Constantinescu5–7 1Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Bucharest, Romania; 2Victor Babes National Institute of Pathology, Bucharest, Romania; 3Army Centre for Medical Research, Bucharest, Romania; 4National Institute for Chemical Pharmaceutical R&D, Bucharest, Romania; 5de Duve Institute, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium; 6Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Brussels, Belgium; 7Operational Sectorial Programme for Competitive Economic Growth Canbioprot at Victor Babes National Institute of Pathology, Bucharest, Romania Purpose: The expression of an array of signaling molecules, along with the assessment of real-time cell proliferation, has been performed in U87 glioma cell line and in patients’ glioblastoma established cell cultures in order to provide a better understanding of cellular and molecular events involved in glioblastoma pathogenesis. Experimental therapy was performed using a phosphatydylinositol-3´-kinase (PI3K inhibitor. Patients and methods: xMAP technology was employed to assess expression levels of several signal transduction molecules and real-time xCELLigence platform for cell behavior. Results: PI3K inhibition induced the most significant effects on global signaling pathways in patient-derived cell cultures, especially on members of the mitogen-activated protein-kinase family, P70S6 serine-threonine kinase, and cAMP response element-binding protein expression and further prevented tumor cell proliferation. Conclusion: The PI3K pathway might be a prime target for glioblastoma treatment. Keywords: personalized medicine, PI3K inhibitor, targeted therapy, xCELLigence, xMAP analysis

  16. Transduction-like gene transfer in the methanogen Methanococcus voltae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertani, G.

    1999-01-01

    Strain PS of Methanococcus voltae (a methanogenic, anaerobic archaebacterium) was shown to generate spontaneously 4.4-kbp chromosomal DNA fragments that are fully protected from DNase and that, upon contact with a cell, transform it genetically. This activity, here called VTA (voltae transfer agent), affects all markers tested: three different auxotrophies (histidine, purine, and cobalamin) and resistance to BES (2-bromoethanesulfonate, an inhibitor of methanogenesis). VTA was most effectively prepared by culture filtration. This process disrupted a fraction of the M. voltae cells (which have only an S-layer covering their cytoplasmic membrane). VTA was rapidly inactivated upon storage. VTA particles were present in cultures at concentrations of approximately two per cell. Gene transfer activity varied from a minimum of 2 x 10(-5) (BES resistance) to a maximum of 10(-3) (histidine independence) per donor cell. Very little VTA was found free in culture supernatants. The phenomenon is functionally similar to generalized transduction, but there is no evidence, for the time being, of intrinsically viral (i.e., containing a complete viral genome) particles. Consideration of VTA DNA size makes the existence of such viral particles unlikely. If they exist, they must be relatively few in number;perhaps they differ from VTA particles in size and other properties and thus escaped detection. Digestion of VTA DNA with the AluI restriction enzyme suggests that it is a random sample of the bacterial DNA, except for a 0.9-kbp sequence which is amplified relative to the rest of the bacterial chromosome. A VTA-sized DNA fraction was demonstrated in a few other isolates of M. voltae.

  17. Signal transduction through the IL-4 and insulin receptor families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L M; Keegan, A; Frankel, M; Paul, W E; Pierce, J H

    1995-07-01

    Activation of tyrosine kinase-containing receptors and intracellular tyrosine kinases by ligand stimulation is known to be crucial for mediating initial and subsequent events involved in mitogenic signal transduction. Receptors for insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) contain cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domains that undergo autophosphorylation upon ligand stimulation. Activation of these receptors also leads to pronounced and rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) in cells of connective tissue origin. A related substrate, designated 4PS, is similarly phosphorylated by insulin and IGF-1 stimulation in many hematopoietic cell types. IRS-1 and 4PS possess a number of tyrosine phosphorylation sites that are within motifs that bind specific SH2-containing molecules known to be involved in mitogenic signaling such as PI-3 kinase, SHPTP-2 (Syp) and Grb-2. Thus, they appear to act as docking substrates for a variety of signaling molecules. The majority of hematopoietic cytokines bind to receptors that do not possess intrinsic kinase activity, and these receptors have been collectively termed as members of the hematopoietin receptor superfamily. Despite their lack of tyrosine kinase domains, stimulation of these receptors has been demonstrated to activate intracellular kinases leading to tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple substrates. Recent evidence has demonstrated that activation of different members of the Janus family of tyrosine kinases is involved in mediating tyrosine phosphorylation events by specific cytokines. Stimulation of the interleukin 4 (IL-4) receptor, a member of the hematopoietin receptor superfamily, is thought to result in activation of Jak1, Jak3, and/or Fes tyrosine kinases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Second-chance signal transduction explains cooperative flagellar switching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry G Zot

    Full Text Available The reversal of flagellar motion (switching results from the interaction between a switch complex of the flagellar rotor and a torque-generating stationary unit, or stator (motor unit. To explain the steeply cooperative ligand-induced switching, present models propose allosteric interactions between subunits of the rotor, but do not address the possibility of a reaction that stimulates a bidirectional motor unit to reverse direction of torque. During flagellar motion, the binding of a ligand-bound switch complex at the dwell site could excite a motor unit. The probability that another switch complex of the rotor, moving according to steady-state rotation, will reach the same dwell site before that motor unit returns to ground state will be determined by the independent decay rate of the excited-state motor unit. Here, we derive an analytical expression for the energy coupling between a switch complex and a motor unit of the stator complex of a flagellum, and demonstrate that this model accounts for the cooperative switching response without the need for allosteric interactions. The analytical result can be reproduced by simulation when (1 the motion of the rotor delivers a subsequent ligand-bound switch to the excited motor unit, thereby providing the excited motor unit with a second chance to remain excited, and (2 the outputs from multiple independent motor units are constrained to a single all-or-none event. In this proposed model, a motor unit and switch complex represent the components of a mathematically defined signal transduction mechanism in which energy coupling is driven by steady-state and is regulated by stochastic ligand binding. Mathematical derivation of the model shows the analytical function to be a general form of the Hill equation (Hill AV (1910 The possible effects of the aggregation of the molecules of haemoglobin on its dissociation curves. J Physiol 40: iv-vii.

  19. Controlling chemistry with cations: photochemistry within zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, V; Shailaja, J; Kaanumalle, Lakshmi S; Sunoj, R B; Chandrasekhar, J

    2003-08-21

    The alkali ions present in the supercages of zeolites X and Y interact with included guest molecules through quadrupolar (cation-pi), and dipolar (cation-carbonyl) interactions. The presence of such interactions can be inferred through solid-state NMR spectra of the guest molecules. Alkali ions, as illustrated in this article, can be exploited to control the photochemical and photophysical behaviors of the guest molecules. For example, molecules that rarely phosphoresce can be induced to do so within heavy cation-exchanged zeolites. The nature (electronic configuration) of the lowest triplet state of carbonyl compounds can be altered with the help of light alkali metal ions. This state switch (n pi*-pi pi*) helps to bring out reactivity that normally remains dormant. Selectivity obtained during the singlet oxygen oxidation of olefins within zeolites illustrates the remarkable control that can be exerted on photoreactions with the help of a confined medium that also has active sites. The reaction cavities of zeolites, like enzymes, are not only well-defined and confined, but also have active sites that closely guide the reactant molecule from start to finish. The examples provided here illustrate that zeolites are far more useful than simple shape-selective catalysts.

  20. Limited data speaker identification

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H S Jayanna; S R Mahadeva Prasanna

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, the task of identifying the speaker using limited training and testing data is addressed. Speaker identification system is viewed as four stages namely, analysis, feature extraction, modelling and testing. The speaker identification performance depends on the techniques employed in these stages. As demonstrated by different experiments, in case of limited training and testing data condition, owing to less data, existing techniques in each stage will not provide good performance. This work demonstrates the following: multiple frame size and rate (MFSR) analysis provides improvement in the analysis stage, combination of mel frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC), its temporal derivatives $(\\Delta,\\Delta \\Delta)$, linear prediction residual (LPR) and linear prediction residual phase (LPRP) features provides improvement in the feature extraction stage and combination of learning vector quantization (LVQ) and gaussian mixture model – universal background model (GMM–UBM) provides improvement in the modelling stage. The performance is further improved by integrating the proposed techniques at the respective stages and combining the evidences from them at the testing stage. To achieve this, we propose strength voting (SV), weighted borda count (WBC) and supporting systems (SS) as combining methods at the abstract, rank and measurement levels, respectively. Finally, the proposed hierarchical combination (HC) method integrating these three methods provides significant improvement in the performance. Based on these explorations, this work proposes a scheme for speaker identification under limited training and testing data.

  1. Multidrug resistance and retroviral transduction potential in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, M D; Gram, G J; Jensen, P B

    1999-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major problem in the successful treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). New treatment strategies are needed, such as gene therapy specifically targeting the MDR cells in the tumor. Retroviral LacZ gene-containing vectors that were either pseudotyped...... for the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV-1) receptor or had specificity for the amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-A) receptor were used for transduction of five SCLC cell lines differing by a range of MDR mechanisms. Transduction efficiencies in these cell lines were compared by calculating the percentage...... of blue colonies after X-Gal staining of the cells grown in soft agar. All examined SCLC cell lines were transducible with either vector. Transduction efficiencies varied from 5.7% to 33.5% independent of the presence of MDR. These results indicate that MDR does not severely impair transduction of SCLC...

  2. Postaggregative Differentiation Induction by Cyclic AMP in Dictyostelium : Intracellular Transduction Pathway and Requirement for Additional Stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, Pauline; Lookeren Campagne, Michiel M. van; Driel, Roel van; Spek, Wouter; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Pinas, Johan

    1986-01-01

    Cyclic AMP induces postaggregative differentiation in aggregation competent cells of Dictyostelium by interacting with cell surface cAMP receptors. We investigated the transduction pathway of this response and additional requirements for the induction of postaggregative differentiation. Optimal indu

  3. Transduction of plasmid DNA in Streptomyces spp. and related genera by bacteriophage FP43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenney, M A; Baltz, R H

    1988-05-01

    A segment (hft) of bacteriophage FP43 DNA cloned into plasmid pIJ702 mediated high-frequency transduction of the resulting plasmid (pRHB101) by FP43 in Streptomyces griseofuscus. The transducing particles contained linear concatemers of plasmid DNA. Lysates of FP43 prepared on S. griseofuscus containing pRHB101 also transduced many other Streptomyces species, including several that restrict plaque formation by FP43 and at least two that produce restriction endonucleases that cut pRHB101 DNA. Transduction efficiencies in different species were influenced by the addition of anti-FP43 antiserum to the transduction plates, the temperature for cell growth before transduction, the multiplicity of infection, and the host on which the transducing lysate was prepared. FP43 lysates prepared on S. griseofuscus(pRHB101) also transduced species of Streptoverticillium, Chainia, and Saccharopolyspora.

  4. Enhanced transduction of polymer photonic crystal band-edge lasers via additional layer deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Cameron; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Buss, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We present the concept of enhanced transduction for polymer photonic crystal lasers by deposition of an additional polymer layer with selective gas response. We report a significant increase in sensitivity to changes in gas concentration....

  5. Effects of electrode surface structure on the mechanoelectrical transduction of IPMC sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmre, Viljar; Pugal, David; Kim, Kwang

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates the effects of electrode surface structure on the mechanoelectrical transduction of IPMC sensors. A physics-based mechanoelectrical transduction model was developed that takes into account the electrode surface profile (shape) by describing the polymer-electrode interface as a Koch fractal structure. Based on the model, the electrode surface effects were experimentally investigated in case of IPMCs with Pd-Pt electrodes. IPMCs with different electrode surface structures were fabricated through electroless plating process by appropriately controlling the synthesis parameters and conditions. The changes in the electrode surface morphology and the corresponding effects on the IPMC mechanoelectrical transduction were examined. Our experimental results indicate that increasing the dispersion of Pd particles near the membrane surface, and thus the polymer-electrode interfacial area, leads to a higher peak mechanoelectrically induced voltage of IPMC. However, the overall effect of the electrode surface structure is relatively low compared to the electromechanical transduction, which is in good agreement with theoretical prediction.

  6. SELF-ADAPTIVE CONTROLS OF A COMPLEX CELLULAR SIGNALING TRANSDUCTION SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong; ZHOU Zhiyuan; DAI Rongyang; LUO Bo; ZHENG Xiaoli; YANG Wenli; HE Tao; WU Minglu

    2004-01-01

    In cells, the interactions of distinct signaling transduction pathways originating from cross-talkings between signaling molecules give rise to the formation of signaling transduction networks, which contributes to the changes (emergency) of kinetic behaviors of signaling system compared with single molecule or pathway. Depending on the known experimental data, we have constructed a model for complex cellular signaling transduction system, which is derived from signaling transduction of epidermal growth factor receptor in neuron. By the computational simulating methods, the self-adaptive controls of this system have been investigated. We find that this model exhibits a relatively stable selfadaptive system, especially to over-stimulation of agonist, and the amplitude and duration of signaling intermediates in it could be controlled by multiple self-adaptive effects, such as "signal scattering", "positive feedback", "negative feedback" and "B-Raf shunt". Our results provide an approach to understanding the dynamic behaviors of complex biological systems.

  7. The MiST2 database: a comprehensive genomics resource on microbial signal transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrich, Luke E.; Igor B Zhulin

    2009-01-01

    The MiST2 database (http://mistdb.com) identifies and catalogs the repertoire of signal transduction proteins in microbial genomes. Signal transduction systems regulate the majority of cellular activities including the metabolism, development, host-recognition, biofilm production, virulence, and antibiotic resistance of human pathogens. Thus, knowledge of the proteins and interactions that comprise these communication networks is an essential component to furthering biomedical discovery. Thes...

  8. The psychobiology of mind-body communication: the complex, self-organizing field of information transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, E L

    1996-01-01

    The current information revolution in molecular biology has important implications for an new understanding of the phenomenology of mind, memory and behavior as a complex, self-organizing field of information transduction. This paper traces the pathways of information transduction in life processes from the molecular-genetic level to the dynamics of mind and behavior together with suggestions for future research exploring the psychobiology of mind-body communication and its implications for the psychotherapeutic arts of the future.

  9. Alkali cation specific adsorption onto fcc(111) transition metal electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, J N; McCrum, I T; Janik, M J

    2014-07-21

    The presence of alkali cations in electrolyte solutions is known to impact the rate of electrocatalytic reactions, though the mechanism of such impact is not conclusively determined. We use density functional theory (DFT) to examine the specific adsorption of alkali cations to fcc(111) electrode surfaces, as specific adsorption may block catalyst sites or otherwise impact surface catalytic chemistry. Solvation of the cation-metal surface structure was investigated using explicit water models. Computed equilibrium potentials for alkali cation adsorption suggest that alkali and alkaline earth cations will specifically adsorb onto Pt(111) and Pd(111) surfaces in the potential range of hydrogen oxidation and hydrogen evolution catalysis in alkaline solutions.

  10. [Antioxidant activity of cationic whey protein isolate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    titova, M E; Komolov, S A; Tikhomirova, N A

    2012-01-01

    The process of lipid peroxidation (LPO) in biological membranes of cells is carried out by free radical mechanism, a feature of which is the interaction of radicals with other molecules. In this work we investigated the antioxidant activity of cationic whey protein isolate, obtained by the cation-exchange chromatography on KM-cellulose from raw cow's milk, in vitro and in vivo. In biological liquids, which are milk, blood serum, fetal fluids, contains a complex of biologically active substances with a unique multifunctional properties, and which are carrying out a protective, antimicrobial, regenerating, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, regulatory and others functions. Contents of the isolate were determined electrophoretically and by its biological activity. Cationic whey protein isolate included lactoperoxidase, lactoferrin, pancreatic RNase, lysozyme and angeogenin. The given isolate significantly has an antioxidant effect in model experimental systems in vitro and therefore may be considered as a factor that can adjust the intensity of lipid oxidation. In model solutions products of lipid oxidation were obtained by oxidation of phosphatidylcholine by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of a source of iron. The composition of the reaction mixture: 0,4 mM H2O2; 50 mcM of hemin; 2 mg/ml L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine from soybean (Sigma, German). Lipid peroxidation products were formed during the incubation of the reaction mixture for two hours at 37 degrees C. In our studies rats in the adaptation period immediately after isolation from the nest obtained from food given orally native cationic whey protein isolate at the concentration three times higher than in fresh cow's milk. On the manifestation of the antioxidant activity of cationic whey protein isolate in vivo evidence decrease of lipid peroxidation products concentration in the blood of rats from the experimental group receipt whey protein isolate in dos 0,6 mg/g for more than 20% (pwhey protein isolate has an

  11. Cell volume-regulated cation channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Considering the enormous turnover rates of ion channels when compared to carriers it is quite obvious that channel-mediated ion transport may serve as a rapid and efficient mechanism of cell volume regulation. Whenever studied in a quantitative fashion the hypertonic activation of non-selective cation channels is found to be the main mechanism of regulatory volume increase (RVI). Some channels are inhibited by amiloride (and may be related to the ENaC), others are blocked by Gd(3) and flufenamate (and possibly linked to the group of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels). Nevertheless, the actual architecture of hypertonicity-induced cation channels remains to be defined. In some preparations, hypertonic stress decreases K(+) channel activity so reducing the continuous K(+) leak out of the cell; this is equivalent to a net gain of cell osmolytes facilitating RVI. The hypotonic activation of K(+) selective channels appears to be one of the most common principles of regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and, in most instances, the actual channels involved could be identified on the molecular level. These are BKCa (or maxi K(+)) channels, IK(Ca) and SK(Ca) channels (of intermediate and small conductance, respectively), the group of voltage-gated (Kv) channels including their Beta (or Kv ancilliary) subunits, two-pore K(2P) channels, as well as inwardly rectifying K(+) (Kir) channels (also contributing to K(ATP) channels). In some cells, hypotonicity activates non-selective cation channels. This is surprising, at first sight, because of the inside negative membrane voltage and the sum of driving forces for Na(+) and K(+) diffusion across the cell membrane rather favouring net cation uptake. Some of these channels, however, exhibit a P(K)/P(Na) significantly higher than 1, whereas others are Ca(++) permeable linking hypotonic stress to the activation of Ca(++) dependent ion channels. In particular, the latter holds for the group of TRPs which are specialised in the

  12. Sentra : a database of signal transduction proteins for comparative genome analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Souza, M.; Glass, E. M.; Syed, M. H.; Zhang, Y.; Rodriguez, A.; Maltsev, N.; Galerpin, M. Y.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago; NIH

    2007-01-01

    Sentra (http://compbio.mcs.anl.gov/sentra), a database of signal transduction proteins encoded in completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes, has been updated to reflect recent advances in understanding signal transduction events on a whole-genome scale. Sentra consists of two principal components, a manually curated list of signal transduction proteins in 202 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes and an automatically generated listing of predicted signaling proteins in 235 sequenced genomes that are awaiting manual curation. In addition to two-component histidine kinases and response regulators, the database now lists manually curated Ser/Thr/Tyr protein kinases and protein phosphatases, as well as adenylate and diguanylate cyclases and c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases, as defined in several recent reviews. All entries in Sentra are extensively annotated with relevant information from public databases (e.g. UniProt, KEGG, PDB and NCBI). Sentra's infrastructure was redesigned to support interactive cross-genome comparisons of signal transduction capabilities of prokaryotic organisms from a taxonomic and phenotypic perspective and in the framework of signal transduction pathways from KEGG. Sentra leverages the PUMA2 system to support interactive analysis and annotation of signal transduction proteins by the users.

  13. Signal transduction pathways in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and biotechnological implications under abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z X; Li, H C; Wei, Y P; Chu, W Y; Chong, Y L; Long, X H; Liu, Z P; Qin, S; Shao, H B

    2015-06-01

    Cyanobacteria have developed various response mechanisms in long evolution to sense and adapt to external or internal changes under abiotic stresses. The signal transduction system of a model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 includes mainly two-component signal transduction systems of eukaryotic-type serine/threonine kinases (STKs), on which most have been investigated at present. These two-component systems play a major role in regulating cell activities in cyanobacteria. More and more co-regulation and crosstalk regulations among signal transduction systems had been discovered due to increasing experimental data, and they are of great importance in corresponding to abiotic stresses. However, mechanisms of their functions remain unknown. Nevertheless, the two signal transduction systems function as an integral network for adaption in different abiotic stresses. This review summarizes available knowledge on the signal transduction network in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and biotechnological implications under various stresses, with focuses on the co-regulation and crosstalk regulations among various stress-responding signal transduction systems.

  14. Efficient lentiviral gene transfer to canine repopulating cells using an overnight transduction protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Peter A; Keyser, Kirsten A; Peterson, Laura J; Neff, Tobias; Thomasson, Bobbie M; Thompson, Jesse; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2004-05-15

    The use of lentiviral vectors for the transduction of hematopoietic stem cells has evoked much interest owing to their ability to stably integrate into the genome of nondividing cells. However, published large animal studies have reported highly variable gene transfer rates of typically less than 1%. Here we report the use of lentiviral vectors for the transduction of canine CD34(+) hematopoietic repopulating cells using a very short, 18-hour transduction protocol. We compared lentiviral transduction of hematopoietic repopulating cells from either stem cell factor (SCF)- and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-primed marrow or mobilized peripheral blood in a competitive repopulation assay in 3 dogs. All dogs engrafted rapidly within 9 days. Transgene expression was detected in all lineages (B cells, T cells, granulocytes, and red blood cells as well as platelets) indicating multilineage engraftment of transduced cells, with overall long-term marking levels of up to 12%. Gene transfer levels in mobilized peripheral blood cells were slightly higher than in primed marrow cells. In conclusion, we show efficient lentiviral transduction of canine repopulating cells using an overnight transduction protocol. These results have important implications for the design of stem cell gene therapy protocols, especially for those diseases in which the maintenance of stem cells in culture is a major limitation.

  15. Lipid-based nutrient supplements do not affect the risk of malaria or respiratory morbidity in 6- to 18-month-old Malawian children in a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is evidence to support the use of lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNSs) to promote child growth and development in low-income countries, but there is also a concern regarding the safety of using iron-fortified products in malaria-endemic areas. The objective of this study was to test the hyp...

  16. Changes in serum phosphate and potassium and their effects on mortality in malnourished African HIV-infected adults starting antiretroviral therapy and given vitamins and minerals in lipid-based nutritional supplements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehman, Andrea Mary; Woodd, Susannah Louise; Heimburger, Douglas Corbett

    2017-01-01

    Malnourished HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) are at high risk of early mortality, some of which may be attributed to altered electrolyte metabolism. We used data from a randomised controlled trial of electrolyte-enriched lipid-based nutritional supplements to assess th...

  17. Effect of supplementation with a lipid-based nutrient supplement on the micronutrient status of children aged 6–18 months living in the rural region of Intibucá, Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) have been effective in the treatment of acute malnutrition among children. We evaluated the use of LNS supplementation for improving the micronutrient status of young children. Methods: A 12-month randomised controlled trial was conducted among chil...

  18. Cationic Polyamidoamine Dendrimers as Modulators of EGFR Signaling In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Saghir; Al-Zaid, Bashayer; El-Hashim, Ahmed Z; Chandrasekhar, Bindu; Attur, Sreeja; Yousif, Mariam H M; Benter, Ibrahim F

    2015-01-01

    Cationic polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers are branch-like spherical polymers being investigated for a variety of applications in nanomedicine including nucleic acid drug delivery. Emerging evidence suggests they exhibit intrinsic biological and toxicological effects but little is known of their interactions with signal transduction pathways. We previously showed that the activated (fragmented) generation (G) 6 PAMAM dendrimer, Superfect (SF), stimulated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase signaling-an important signaling cascade that regulates cell growth, survival and apoptosis- in cultured human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells. Here, we firstly studied the in vitro effects of Polyfect (PF), a non-activated (intact) G6 PAMAM dendrimer, on EGFR tyrosine kinase signaling via extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in cultured HEK 293 cells and then compared the in vivo effects of a single administration (10mg/kg i.p) of PF or SF on EGFR signaling in the kidneys of normal and diabetic male Wistar rats. Polyfect exhibited a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of EGFR, ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation in HEK-293 cells similar to AG1478, a selective EGFR inhibitor. Administration of dendrimers to non-diabetic or diabetic animals for 24h showed that PF inhibited whereas SF stimulated EGFR phosphorylation in the kidneys of both sets of animals. PF-mediated inhibition of EGFR phosphorylation as well as SF or PF-mediated apoptosis in HEK 293 cells could be significantly reversed by co-treatment with antioxidants such as tempol implying that both these effects involved an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism. These results show for the first time that SF and PF PAMAM dendrimers can differentially modulate the important EGFR signal transduction pathway in vivo and may represent a novel class of EGFR modulators. These findings could have important clinical implications for the use of PAMAM dendrimers

  19. Interaction between alginates and manganese cations: identification of preferred cation binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerichs, N; Wingender, J; Flemming, H-C; Mayer, C

    2004-04-01

    Algal and bacterial alginates have been studied by means of 13C NMR spectroscopy in presence of paramagnetic manganese ions in order to reveal the nature of their interaction with bivalent cations. It is found that the mannuronate blocks bind manganese cations externally near their carboxylate groups, while guluronate blocks show the capability to integrate Mn2+ into pocket-like structures formed by adjacent guluronate residues. In alternating mannuronate-guluronate blocks, manganese ions preferentially locate in a concave structure formed by guluronate-mannuronate pairs. Partial acetylation of the alginate generally reduces its capability to interact with bivalent cations, however, the selectivity of the binding geometry is conserved. The results may serve as a hint for the better understanding of the alginate gelation in presence of calcium ions.

  20. Induction of morphogenesis in Geodermatophilus by inorganic cations and by organic nitrogenous cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, E E; Wolfe, R S

    1974-01-01

    Morphogenesis of Geodermatophilus strain 22-68 involves two stages, a motile rod (R form) and an irregularly shaped cluster of coccoid cells (C form). A variety of mono- and divalent cations have been found to induce R-form to C-form morphogenesis and to maintain the organism in the C form. Concentration optima for all cations exceeded 100 mM. Results indicated that uptake of cations was accompanied by extrusion of intracellular protons, causing an increase in intracellular pH. A variety of organic amines also induced morphogenesis. Organic amines were taken up in the dissociated free base form, causing the intracellular pH to rise. None of these compounds was utilized as a carbon or nitrogen source.

  1. Signal transduction, receptors, mediators and genes: younger than ever - the 13th meeting of the Signal Transduction Society focused on aging and immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klotz Lars-Oliver

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The 13th meeting of the Signal Transduction Society was held in Weimar, from October 28 to 30, 2009. Special focus of the 2009 conference was "Aging and Senescence", which was co-organized by the SFB 728 "Environmentally-Induced Aging Processes" of the University of Düsseldorf and the study group 'Signal Transduction' of the German Society for Cell Biology (DGZ. In addition, several other areas of signal transduction research were covered and supported by different consortia associated with the Signal Transduction Society including the long-term associated study groups of the German Society for Immunology and the Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and for instance the SFB/Transregio 52 "Transcriptional Programming of Individual T Cell Subsets" located in Würzburg, Mainz and Berlin. The different research areas that were introduced by outstanding keynote speakers attracted more than 250 scientists, showing the timeliness and relevance of the interdisciplinary concept and exchange of knowledge during the three days of the scientific program. This report gives an overview of the presentations of the conference.

  2. Signaling transduction pathways involved in basophil adhesion and histamine release

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Background Little is known about basophil with respect to the different signaling transduction pathways involved in spontaneous, cytokine or anti-IgE induced adhesion and how this compares to IgE-dependent and IgE-independent mediator secretion. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the roles of β1 andβ2 integrins in basophil adhesion as well as hosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), src-kinases and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 in basophil adhesion and histamine release (HR). Methods Basophils (purity of 10%-50%) were preincubated with anti-CD29 or anti-CD18 blocking antibodies before used for adhesion study. Basophils were preincubated with the pharmacological inhibitors wortmannin, PP1, PD98059 before used for adhesion and HR study. Cell adherence to bovine serum albumin (BSA) or fibronectin (Fn) was monitored using cell associated histamine as a basophil marker and the histamine was measured by the glass fiber assay.Results Basophil spontaneous adhesion to Fn was inhibited by anti-CD29. Interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induced adhesion to BSA was inhibited by anti-CD18. Wortmannin at 1 μmol/L and PP1 at 20 μmol/L strongly interfered with, whereas PD98059 at 50 μmol/L weakly inhibited basophil spontaneous adhesion to Fn. One μmol/L wortmannin strongly inhibited IL-3, IL-5, GM-CSF and anti-IgE induced adhesion to BSA. PP1 at 20 μmol/L partly inhibited anti-IgE induced adhesion. Fifty μmol/L PD98059 marginally inhibited IL-5, weakly inhibited anti-IgE, partly inhibited GM-CSF induced adhesion. Wortmannin, PP1 and PD98059 inhibited anti-IgE (1:100 or 1:1000) induced basophil HR in a dose dependent manner. They inhibited calcium ionophore A23187 (10 μmol/L, 5 μmol/L) induced basophil HR in a dose dependent manner, but to different extend with PP1 being the most efficient.Conclusions Basophil spontaneous adhesion to Fn is mediated by β1-integrins whereas cytokine induced adhesion

  3. Full Piezoelectric Multilayer-Stacked Hybrid Actuation/Transduction Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ji; Jiang, Xiaoning; Zu, Tian-Bing

    2011-01-01

    The Stacked HYBATS (Hybrid Actuation/Transduction system) demonstrates significantly enhanced electromechanical performance by using the cooperative contributions of the electromechanical responses of multilayer, stacked negative strain components and positive strain components. Both experimental and theoretical studies indicate that, for Stacked HYBATS, the displacement is over three times that of a same-sized conventional flextensional actuator/transducer. The coupled resonance mode between positive strain and negative strain components of Stacked HYBATS is much stronger than the resonance of a single element actuation only when the effective lengths of the two kinds of elements match each other. Compared with the previously invented hybrid actuation system (HYBAS), the multilayer Stacked HYBATS can be designed to provide high mechanical load capability, low voltage driving, and a highly effective piezoelectric constant. The negative strain component will contract, and the positive strain component will expand in the length directions when an electric field is applied on the device. The interaction between the two elements makes an enhanced motion along the Z direction for Stacked-HYBATS. In order to dominate the dynamic length of Stacked-HYBATS by the negative strain component, the area of the cross-section for the negative strain component will be much larger than the total cross-section areas of the two positive strain components. The transverse strain is negative and longitudinal strain positive in inorganic materials, such as ceramics/single crystals. Different piezoelectric multilayer stack configurations can make a piezoelectric ceramic/single-crystal multilayer stack exhibit negative strain or positive strain at a certain direction without increasing the applied voltage. The difference of this innovation from the HYBAS is that all the elements can be made from one-of-a-kind materials. Stacked HYBATS can provide an extremely effective piezoelectric

  4. Neural transduction in Xenopus laevis lateral line system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelioff, D; Honrubia, V

    1978-03-01

    1. The process of neural excitation in hair cell systems was studied in an in vitro preparation of the Xenopus laevis (African clawed toad) lateral line organ. A specially designed stimulus chamber was used to apply accurately controlled pressure, water movement, or electrical stimuli, and to record the neural responses of the two afferent fibers innervating each organ or stitch. The objective of the study was to determine the characteristics of the neural responses to these stimuli, and thus gain insight into the transduction process. 2. A sustained deflection of the hair cell cilia due to a constant flow of water past the capula resulted in a maintained change in the mean firing rate (MFR) of the afferent fibers. The data also demonstrated that the neural response was proportional to the velocity of the water flow and indicated that both deflection and movement of the cilia were the effective physiological stimuli for this hair cell system. 3. The preparations responded to sinusoidal water movements (past the capula) over the entire frequency range of the stimulus chamber, 0.1-130 Hz, and were most sensitive between 10 and 40 Hz. The variation of the MFR and the percent modulation indicated that the average dynamic range of each organ was 23.5 dB. 4. The thresholds, if any, for sustained pressure changes and for sinusoidal pressure variations in the absence of water movements were very high. Due to the limitations of the stimulus chamber it was not possible to generate pressure stimuli of sufficient magnitude to elicit a neural response without also generating suprathreshold water-movement stimuli. Sustained pressures had no detectable effect on the neural response to water-movement stimuli. 5. The preparations were very sensitive to electrical potentials applied across the toad skin on which the hair cells were located. Potentials which made the ciliated surfaces of the hair cells positive with respect to their bases increased the MFR of the fibers, whereas

  5. Cationic niosomes an effective gene carrier composed of novel spermine-derivative cationic lipids: effect of central core structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opanasopit, Praneet; Leksantikul, Lalita; Niyomtham, Nattisa; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Yingyongnarongkul, Boon-Ek

    2017-05-01

    Cationic niosomes formulated from Span 20, cholesterol (Chol) and novel spermine-based cationic lipids of multiple central core structures (di(oxyethyl)amino, di(oxyethyl)amino carboxy, 3-amino-1,2-dioxypropyl and 2-amino-1,3-dioxypropyl) were successfully prepared for improving transfection efficiency in vitro. The niosomes composed of spermine cationic lipid with central core structure of di(oxyethyl)amino revealed the highest gene transfection efficiency. To investigate the factors affecting gene transfection and cell viability including differences in the central core structures of cationic lipids, the composition of vesicles, molar ratio of cationic lipids in formulations and the weight ratio of niosomes to DNA. Cationic niosomes composed of nonionic surfactants (Span20), cholesterol and spermine-based cationic lipids of multiple central core structures were formulated. Gene transfection and cell viability were evaluated on a human cervical carcinoma cell line (HeLa cells) using pDNA encoding green fluorescent protein (pEGFP-C2). The morphology, size and charge were also characterized. High transfection efficiency was obtained from cationic niosomes composed of Span20:Chol:cationic lipid at the molar ratio of 2.5:2.5:0.5 mM. Cationic lipids with di(oxyethyl)amino as a central core structure exhibited highest transfection efficiency. In addition, there was also no serum effect on transfection efficiency. These novel cationic niosomes may constitute a good alternative carrier for gene transfection.

  6. Complex Macromolecular Architectures by Living Cationic Polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Alghamdi, Reem D.

    2015-05-01

    Poly (vinyl ether)-based graft polymers have been synthesized by the combination of living cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers with other living or controlled/ living polymerization techniques (anionic and ATRP). The process involves the synthesis of well-defined homopolymers (PnBVE) and co/terpolymers [PnBVE-b-PCEVE-b-PSiDEGVE (ABC type) and PSiDEGVE-b-PnBVE-b-PSiDEGVE (CAC type)] by sequential living cationic polymerization of n-butyl vinyl ether (nBVE), 2-chloroethyl vinyl ether (CEVE) and tert-butyldimethylsilyl ethylene glycol vinyl ether (SiDEGVE), using mono-functional {[n-butoxyethyl acetate (nBEA)], [1-(2-chloroethoxy) ethyl acetate (CEEA)], [1-(2-(2-(t-butyldimethylsilyloxy)ethoxy) ethoxy) ethyl acetate (SiDEGEA)]} or di-functional [1,4-cyclohexanedimethanol di(1-ethyl acetate) (cHMDEA), (VEMOA)] initiators. The living cationic polymerizations of those monomers were conducted in hexane at -20 0C using Et3Al2Cl3 (catalyst) in the presence of 1 M AcOEt base.[1] The PCEVE segments of the synthesized block terpolymers were then used to react with living macroanions (PS-DPE-Li; poly styrene diphenyl ethylene lithium) to afford graft polymers. The quantitative desilylation of PSiDEGVE segments by n-Bu4N+F- in THF at 0 °C led to graft co- and terpolymers in which the polyalcohol is the outer block. These co-/terpolymers were subsequently subjected to “grafting-from” reactions by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of styrene to afford more complex macromolecular architectures. The base assisted living cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers were also used to synthesize well-defined α-hydroxyl polyvinylether (PnBVE-OH). The resulting polymers were then modified into an ATRP macro-initiator for the synthesis of well-defined block copolymers (PnBVE-b-PS). Bifunctional PnBVE with terminal malonate groups was also synthesized and used as a precursor for more complex architectures such as H-shaped block copolymer by “grafting-from” or

  7. Heart imaging with cationic complexes of technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutsch, E.; Bushong, W.; Glavan, K.A.; Elder, R.C.; Sodd, V.J.; Scholz, K.L.; Fortman, D.L.; Lukes, S.J.

    1981-10-02

    The cationic technetium-99 complex trans-(99TC(dmpe)2Cl2)+, where dmpe is bis(1,2-dimethylphosphino)ethane or (CH3)2P-CH2-P(CH3)2, has been prepared and characterized by single-crystal, x-ray structural analysis. The technetium-99m analog, trans-(99mTc(dmpe) 2Cl2)+, has also been prepared and shown to yield excellent gamma-ray images of the heart. The purposeful design, characterization, and synthesis of this technetium-99m radiopharmaceutical represents a striking application of fundamental inorganic chemistry to a problem in applied nuclear medicine.

  8. Aggregate Formed by a Cationic Fluorescence Probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN, Juan; SANG, Da-Yong; JI, Guo-Zhen

    2007-01-01

    The aggregation behavior of a cationic fluorescence probe 10-(4,7,10,13,16-pentaoxa-1-azacyclooctadecyl-methyl)anthracen-9-ylmethyl dodecanoate (1) was observed and studied by a fluorescence methodology in acidic and neutral conditions. By using the Py scale, differences between simple aggregates and micelles have been discussed. The stability of simple aggregates was discussed in terms of hydrophobic interaction and electrostatic repulsion. The absence of excimer emission of the anthrancene moiety of probe 1 in neutral condition was attributed to the photoinduced electron transfer mechanism instead of photodimerization.

  9. Provision of lipid-based nutrient supplements to Honduran children increases their dietary macro- and micronutrient intake without displacing other foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flax, Valerie L; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Reinhart, Greg A; Bentley, Margaret E

    2015-12-01

    Inadequate energy intake and poor diet quality are important causes of chronic child undernutrition. Strategies for improving diet quality using lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) are currently being tested in several countries. To date, information on children's dietary intakes during LNS use is available only from Africa. In this study, we collected 24-h dietary recalls at baseline, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months on Honduran children (n = 298) participating in a cluster-randomised trial of LNS. Generalised estimating equations were used to examine differences in number of servings of 12 food groups in the LNS and control arms, and multi-level mixed effects models were used to compare macro- and micronutrient intakes. Models accounted for clustering and adjusted for child's age, season and breastfeeding status. Mean daily servings of 12 food groups did not differ by study arm at baseline and remained similar throughout the study with the exception of groups that were partially or entirely supplied by LNS (nuts and nut butters, fats, and sweets). Baseline intakes of energy, fat, carbohydrates, protein, folate and vitamin A, but not vitamin B12, iron and zinc were lower in the LNS than control arm. The change in all macro- and micronutrients from baseline to each study visit was larger for the LNS arm than the control, except for carbohydrates from baseline to 9 months. These findings indicate that LNS improved the macro- and micronutrient intakes of young non-malnourished Honduran children without replacing other foods in their diet.

  10. Transient Supersaturation Supports Drug Absorption from Lipid-Based Formulations for Short Periods of Time, but Ongoing Solubilization Is Required for Longer Absorption Periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum, Matthew F; Trevaskis, Natalie L; Pouton, Colin W; Porter, Christopher J H

    2017-02-06

    The current studies sought to explore the impact of drug supersaturation and precipitation during the dispersion and digestion of lipid-based formulations (LBFs), on in vivo absorption using a coupled in vitro digestion-in vivo perfusion absorption model. Fenofibrate absorption was evaluated from a number of LBFs with different solubilization and supersaturation capacities, and conditions at the absorptive membrane manipulated by changing perfusion conditions, intestine segment lengths, and by the conduct of experiments in the presence or absence of suspended/precipitated drug. LBF dispersion and digestion resulted in varying periods of supersaturation across the different formulations. Even fleeting (5-10 min) periods of supersaturation were able to drive flux across a perfused 10 cm intestinal segment for up to 60 min, although over longer infusion periods (60-80 min) flux dropped in the absence of ongoing drug solubilization and supersaturation. In contrast, the presence or absence of precipitated/suspended drug, had little impact on drug flux. When perfused intestinal segment lengths were extended, the role of initial supersaturation was attenuated and ongoing solubilization conditions became the primary driver of absorptive flux. The data suggest that for highly permeable drugs such as fenofibrate, a short period of supersaturation at the absorptive membrane may be sufficient to drive absorptive drug flux in spite of significant drug precipitation on formulation dispersion or digestion in vitro. In contrast, where longer periods of absorption are required, for example, at higher doses, the requirement for ongoing solubilization and supersaturation becomes more apparent.

  11. A new in vitro lipid digestion - in vivo absorption model to evaluate the mechanisms of drug absorption from lipid-based formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum, Matthew F; Trevaskis, Natalie L; Williams, Hywel D; Pouton, Colin W; Porter, Christopher J H

    2016-04-01

    In vitro lipid digestion models are commonly used to screen lipid-based formulations (LBF), but in vitro-in vivo correlations are in some cases unsuccessful. Here we enhance the scope of the lipid digestion test by incorporating an absorption 'sink' into the experimental model. An in vitro model of lipid digestion was coupled directly to a single pass in situ intestinal perfusion experiment in an anaesthetised rat. The model allowed simultaneous real-time analysis of the digestion and absorption of LBFs of fenofibrate and was employed to evaluate the influence of formulation digestion, supersaturation and precipitation on drug absorption. Formulations containing higher quantities of co-solvent and surfactant resulted in higher supersaturation and more rapid drug precipitation in vitro when compared to those containing higher quantities of lipid. In contrast, when the same formulations were examined using the coupled in vitro lipid digestion - in vivo absorption model, drug flux into the mesenteric vein was similar regardless of in vitro formulation performance. For some drugs, simple in vitro lipid digestion models may underestimate the potential for absorption from LBFs. Consistent with recent in vivo studies, drug absorption for rapidly absorbed drugs such as fenofibrate may occur even when drug precipitation is apparent during in vitro digestion.

  12. Feeding behaviors during home-based treatment of moderate acute malnutrition using corn-soy blends or lipid-based nutrient supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuel-Brockdorf, Ann-Sophie; Ouedraogo, Albertine; Ritz, Christian; Draebel, Tania Aase; Ashorn, Per; Filteau, Suzanne; Michaelsen, Kim F

    2016-12-02

    Feeding behaviors have an important impact on children's nutritional status and are essential to consider when implementing nutrition programs. The objective of this study was to explore and compare feeding behaviors related to supplementary feeding with corn-soy blends (CSB) and lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) based on best practice feeding behaviors. The study was conducted as part of a randomized controlled trial assessing the effectiveness of new formulations of CSB and LNS and comprised 1,546 children from 6 to 23 months. The study included a mixed methods approach using questionnaires, focus group discussions and home visits and interviews with a subsample of 20 caretakers of trial participants. We found that LNS, compared to CSB, were more likely to be mixed into other foods (OR [95% CI] 1.7 [1.3-2.2], p = feeding style (mean difference in percentage points [95% CI] 23% [6%:40%], p = .01). CSB were more likely to be fed using a forced feeding style (mean difference in percentage points [95% CI] 18% [3%:33%], p = .02) and were often observed to be served unprepared. The main differences in feeding behaviors between the two diet groups were linked to how and when supplements were served. Educational instructions should therefore be adapted according to the supplement provided; when providing CSB, efforts should be made to promote an encouraging feeding style, and emphasis should be made to ensure preparations are made according to recommendations.

  13. The use of quasi-isothermal modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry for the characterization of slow crystallization processes in lipid-based solid self-emulsifying systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otun, Sarah O; Meehan, Elizabeth; Qi, Sheng; Craig, Duncan Q M

    2015-04-01

    Slow or incomplete crystallization may be a significant manufacturing issue for solid lipid-based dosage forms, yet little information is available on this phenomenon. In this investigation we suggest a novel means by which slow solidification may be monitored in Gelucire 44/14 using quasi-isothermal modulated temperature DSC (QiMTDSC). Conventional linear heating and cooling DSC methods were employed, along with hot stage microscopy (HSM), for basic thermal profiling of Gelucire 44/14. QiMTDSC experiments were performed on cooling from the melt, using a range of incremental decreases in temperature and isothermal measurement periods. DSC and HSM highlighted the main (primary) crystallization transition; solid fat content analysis and kinetic analysis were used to profile the solidification process. The heat capacity profile from QiMTDSC indicated that after an initial energetic primary crystallisation, the lipid underwent a slower period of crystallization which continued to manifest at much lower temperatures than indicated by standard DSC. We present evidence that Gelucire 44/14 undergoes an initial crystallization followed by a secondary, slower process. QIMTDSC appears to be a promising tool in the investigation of this secondary crystallization process.

  14. The role of lipid-based nano delivery systems on oral bioavailability enhancement of fenofibrate, a BCS II drug: comparison with fast-release formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Tengfei; Qi, Jianping; Lu, Yi; Wang, Kai; Tian, Zhiqiang; Hu, Kaili; Yin, Zongning; Wu, Wei

    2014-09-24

    The aim of this study was to compare various formulations solid dispersion pellets (SDP), nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) and a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) generally accepted to be the most efficient drug delivery systems for BCS II drugs using fenofibrate (FNB) as a model drug. The size and morphology of NLCs and SMEDDS was characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Their release behaviors were investigated in medium with or without pancreatic lipase. The oral bioavailability of the various formulations was compared in beagle dogs using commercial Lipanthyl® capsules (micronized formulation) as a reference. The release of FNB from SDP was much faster than that from NLCs and SMEDDS in medium without lipase, whereas the release rate from NLCs and SMEDDS was increased after adding pancreatic lipase into the release medium. However, NLCs and SMEDDS increased the bioavailability of FNB to 705.11% and 809.10%, respectively, in comparison with Lipanthyl® capsules, although the relative bioavailability of FNB was only 366.05% after administration of SDPs. Thus, lipid-based drug delivery systems (such as NLCs and SMEDDS) may have more advantages than immediate release systems (such as SDPs and Lipanthyl® capsules).

  15. Plasmid Transduction Using Bacteriophage Φadh for Expression of CC Chemokines by Lactobacillus gasseri ADH▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damelin, Leonard H.; Mavri-Damelin, Demetra; Klaenhammer, Todd R.; Tiemessen, Caroline T.

    2010-01-01

    Vaginal mucosal microfloras are typically dominated by Gram-positive Lactobacillus species, and colonization of vaginal mucosa by exogenous microbicide-secreting Lactobacillus strains has been proposed as a means of enhancing this natural mucosal barrier against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We asked whether an alternative strategy could be utilized whereby anti-HIV molecules are expressed within the cervicovaginal milieu by endogenous vaginal Lactobacillus populations which have been engineered in situ via transduction. In this study, we therefore investigated the feasibility of utilizing transduction for the expression of two HIV coreceptor antagonists, the CC chemokines CCL5 and CCL3, in a predominant vaginal Lactobacillus species, Lactobacillus gasseri. Modifying a previously established transduction model, which utilizes L. gasseri ADH and its prophage Φadh, we show that mitomycin C induction of L. gasseri ADH transformants containing pGK12-based plasmids with CCL5 and CCL3 expression and secretion cassettes (under the control of promoters P6 and P59, respectively) and a 232-bp Φadh cos site fragment results in the production of transducing particles which contain 8 to 9 copies of concatemeric plasmid DNA. High-frequency transduction for these particles (almost 6 orders of magnitude greater than that for pGK12 alone) was observed, and transductants were found to contain recircularized expression plasmids upon subsequent culture. Importantly, transductants produced CC chemokines at levels comparable to those produced by electroporation-derived transformants. Our findings therefore lend support to the potential use of transduction in vaginal Lactobacillus species as a novel strategy for the prevention of HIV infection across mucosal membranes. PMID:20418431

  16. Plasmid transduction using bacteriophage Phi(adh) for expression of CC chemokines by Lactobacillus gasseri ADH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damelin, Leonard H; Mavri-Damelin, Demetra; Klaenhammer, Todd R; Tiemessen, Caroline T

    2010-06-01

    Vaginal mucosal microfloras are typically dominated by Gram-positive Lactobacillus species, and colonization of vaginal mucosa by exogenous microbicide-secreting Lactobacillus strains has been proposed as a means of enhancing this natural mucosal barrier against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We asked whether an alternative strategy could be utilized whereby anti-HIV molecules are expressed within the cervicovaginal milieu by endogenous vaginal Lactobacillus populations which have been engineered in situ via transduction. In this study, we therefore investigated the feasibility of utilizing transduction for the expression of two HIV coreceptor antagonists, the CC chemokines CCL5 and CCL3, in a predominant vaginal Lactobacillus species, Lactobacillus gasseri. Modifying a previously established transduction model, which utilizes L. gasseri ADH and its prophage Phiadh, we show that mitomycin C induction of L. gasseri ADH transformants containing pGK12-based plasmids with CCL5 and CCL3 expression and secretion cassettes (under the control of promoters P6 and P59, respectively) and a 232-bp Phiadh cos site fragment results in the production of transducing particles which contain 8 to 9 copies of concatemeric plasmid DNA. High-frequency transduction for these particles (almost 6 orders of magnitude greater than that for pGK12 alone) was observed, and transductants were found to contain recircularized expression plasmids upon subsequent culture. Importantly, transductants produced CC chemokines at levels comparable to those produced by electroporation-derived transformants. Our findings therefore lend support to the potential use of transduction in vaginal Lactobacillus species as a novel strategy for the prevention of HIV infection across mucosal membranes.

  17. A Lipid Based Antigen Delivery System Efficiently Facilitates MHC Class-I Antigen Presentation in Dendritic Cells to Stimulate CD8(+) T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Mithun; Mazumder, Saumyabrata; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Choudhury, Somsubhra Thakur; Sabur, Abdus; Shadab, Md; Bhattacharya, Pradyot; Ali, Nahid

    2016-06-02

    The most effective strategy for protection against intracellular infections such as Leishmania is vaccination with live parasites. Use of recombinant proteins avoids the risks associated with live vaccines. However, due to low immunogenicity, they fail to trigger T cell responses particularly of CD8(+) cells requisite for persistent immunity. Previously we showed the importance of protein entrapment in cationic liposomes and MPL as adjuvant for elicitation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses for long-term protection. In this study we investigated the role of cationic liposomes on maturation and antigen presentation capacity of dendritic cells (DCs). We observed that cationic liposomes were taken up very efficiently by DCs and transported to different cellular sites. DCs activated with liposomal rgp63 led to efficient presentation of antigen to specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, lymphoid CD8(+) T cells from liposomal rgp63 immunized mice demonstrated better proliferative ability when co-cultured ex vivo with stimulated DCs. Addition of MPL to vaccine enhanced the antigen presentation by DCs and induced more efficient antigen specific CD8(+) T cell responses when compared to free and liposomal antigen. These liposomal formulations presented to CD8(+) T cells through TAP-dependent MHC-I pathway offer new possibilities for a safe subunit vaccine.

  18. A Lipid Based Antigen Delivery System Efficiently Facilitates MHC Class-I Antigen Presentation in Dendritic Cells to Stimulate CD8+ T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Mithun; Mazumder, Saumyabrata; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Choudhury, Somsubhra Thakur; Sabur, Abdus; Shadab, Md.; Bhattacharya, Pradyot; Ali, Nahid

    2016-06-01

    The most effective strategy for protection against intracellular infections such as Leishmania is vaccination with live parasites. Use of recombinant proteins avoids the risks associated with live vaccines. However, due to low immunogenicity, they fail to trigger T cell responses particularly of CD8+ cells requisite for persistent immunity. Previously we showed the importance of protein entrapment in cationic liposomes and MPL as adjuvant for elicitation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses for long-term protection. In this study we investigated the role of cationic liposomes on maturation and antigen presentation capacity of dendritic cells (DCs). We observed that cationic liposomes were taken up very efficiently by DCs and transported to different cellular sites. DCs activated with liposomal rgp63 led to efficient presentation of antigen to specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, lymphoid CD8+ T cells from liposomal rgp63 immunized mice demonstrated better proliferative ability when co-cultured ex vivo with stimulated DCs. Addition of MPL to vaccine enhanced the antigen presentation by DCs and induced more efficient antigen specific CD8+ T cell responses when compared to free and liposomal antigen. These liposomal formulations presented to CD8+ T cells through TAP-dependent MHC-I pathway offer new possibilities for a safe subunit vaccine.

  19. Electronic absorptions of the benzylium cation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryza, Viktoras; Chalyavi, Nahid; Sanelli, Julian A.; Bieske, Evan J.

    2012-11-01

    The electronic transitions of the benzylium cation (Bz+) are investigated over the 250-550 nm range by monitoring the photodissociation of mass-selected C7H7+-Arn (n = 1, 2) complexes in a tandem mass spectrometer. The Bz+-Ar spectrum displays two distinct band systems, the S1←S0 band system extending from 370 to 530 nm with an origin at 19 067 ± 15 cm-1, and a much stronger S3←S0 band system extending from 270 to 320 nm with an origin at 32 035 ± 15 cm-1. Whereas the S1←S0 absorption exhibits well resolved vibrational progressions, the S3←S0 absorption is broad and relatively structureless. Vibronic structure of the S1←S0 system, which is interpreted with the aid of time-dependent density functional theory and Franck-Condon simulations, reflects the activity of four totally symmetric ring deformation modes (ν5, ν6, ν9, ν13). We find no evidence for the ultraviolet absorption of the tropylium cation, which according to the neon matrix spectrum should occur over the 260 - 275 nm range [A. Nagy, J. Fulara, I. Garkusha, and J. Maier, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 50, 3022 (2011)], 10.1002/anie.201008036.

  20. Photodissociation of Cerium Oxide Nanocluster Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, S T; Ard, S G; Dye, B E; Schaefer, H F; Duncan, M A

    2016-04-21

    Cerium oxide cluster cations, CexOy(+), are produced via laser vaporization in a pulsed nozzle source and detected with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The mass spectrum displays a strongly preferred oxide stoichiometry for each cluster with a specific number of metal atoms x, with x ≤ y. Specifically, the most prominent clusters correspond to the formula CeO(CeO2)n(+). The cluster cations are mass selected and photodissociated with a Nd:YAG laser at either 532 or 355 nm. The prominent clusters dissociate to produce smaller species also having a similar CeO(CeO2)n(+) formula, always with apparent leaving groups of (CeO2). The production of CeO(CeO2)n(+) from the dissociation of many cluster sizes establishes the relative stability of these clusters. Furthermore, the consistent loss of neutral CeO2 shows that the smallest neutral clusters adopt the same oxidation state (IV) as the most common form of bulk cerium oxide. Clusters with higher oxygen content than the CeO(CeO2)n(+) masses are present with much lower abundance. These species dissociate by the loss of O2, leaving surviving clusters with the CeO(CeO2)n(+) formula. Density functional theory calculations on these clusters suggest structures composed of stable CeO(CeO2)n(+) cores with excess oxygen bound to the surface as a superoxide unit (O2(-)).

  1. Antibacterial Activity of Geminized Amphiphilic Cationic Homopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Xuefeng; Yu, Danfeng; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Guang; Cui, Yingxian; Sun, Keji; Wang, Jinben; Yan, Haike

    2015-12-22

    The current study is aimed at investigating the effect of cationic charge density and hydrophobicity on the antibacterial and hemolytic activities. Two kinds of cationic surfmers, containing single or double hydrophobic tails (octyl chains or benzyl groups), and the corresponding homopolymers were synthesized. The antimicrobial activity of these candidate antibacterials was studied by microbial growth inhibition assays against Escherichia coli, and hemolysis activity was carried out using human red blood cells. It was interestingly found that the homopolymers were much more effective in antibacterial property than their corresponding monomers. Furthermore, the geminized homopolymers had significantly higher antibacterial activity than that of their counterparts but with single amphiphilic side chains in each repeated unit. Geminized homopolymers, with high positive charge density and moderate hydrophobicity (such as benzyl groups), combine both advantages of efficient antibacterial property and prominently high selectivity. To further explain the antibacterial performance of the novel polymer series, the molecular interaction mechanism is proposed according to experimental data which shows that these specimens are likely to kill microbes by disrupting bacterial membranes, leading them unlikely to induce resistance.

  2. Transition-Metal Hydride Radical Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue; Shaw, Anthony P; Estes, Deven P; Norton, Jack R

    2016-08-10

    Transition-metal hydride radical cations (TMHRCs) are involved in a variety of chemical and biochemical reactions, making a more thorough understanding of their properties essential for explaining observed reactivity and for the eventual development of new applications. Generally, these species may be treated as the ones formed by one-electron oxidation of diamagnetic analogues that are neutral or cationic. Despite the importance of TMHRCs, the generally sensitive nature of these complexes has hindered their development. However, over the last four decades, many more TMHRCs have been synthesized, characterized, isolated, or hypothesized as reaction intermediates. This comprehensive review focuses on experimental studies of TMHRCs reported through the year 2014, with an emphasis on isolated and observed species. The methods used for the generation or synthesis of TMHRCs are surveyed, followed by a discussion about the stability of these complexes. The fundamental properties of TMHRCs, especially those pertaining to the M-H bond, are described, followed by a detailed treatment of decomposition pathways. Finally, reactions involving TMHRCs as intermediates are described.

  3. Cationic Antimicrobial Polymers and Their Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Carmona-Ribeiro

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cationic compounds are promising candidates for development of antimicrobial agents. Positive charges attached to surfaces, particles, polymers, peptides or bilayers have been used as antimicrobial agents by themselves or in sophisticated formulations. The main positively charged moieties in these natural or synthetic structures are quaternary ammonium groups, resulting in quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs. The advantage of amphiphilic cationic polymers when compared to small amphiphilic molecules is their enhanced microbicidal activity. Besides, many of these polymeric structures also show low toxicity to human cells; a major requirement for biomedical applications. Determination of the specific elements in polymers, which affect their antimicrobial activity, has been previously difficult due to broad molecular weight distributions and random sequences characteristic of radical polymerization. With the advances in polymerization control, selection of well defined polymers and structures are allowing greater insight into their structure-antimicrobial activity relationship. On the other hand, antimicrobial polymers grafted or self-assembled to inert or non inert vehicles can yield hybrid antimicrobial nanostructures or films, which can act as antimicrobials by themselves or deliver bioactive molecules for a variety of applications, such as wound dressing, photodynamic antimicrobial therapy, food packing and preservation and antifouling applications.

  4. Double Solvent Sensing Method for Improving Sensitivity and Accuracy of Hg(II) Detection Based on Different Signal Transduction of a Tetrazine-Functionalized Pillared Metal-Organic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Sayed Ali Akbar; Masoomi, Mohammad Yaser; Morsali, Ali

    2017-08-21

    To design a robust, π-conjugated, low-cost, and easy to synthesize metal-organic framework (MOF) for cation sensing by the photoluminescence (PL) method, 4,4'-oxybis(benzoic acid) (H2OBA) has been used in combination with 3,6-di(pyridin-4-yl)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (DPT) as a tetrazine-functionalized spacer to construct [Zn(OBA)(DPT)0.5]·DMF (TMU-34(-2H)). The tetrazine motif is a π-conjugated, water-soluble/stable fluorophore with relatively weak σ-donating Lewis basic sites. These characteristics of tetrazine make TMU-34(-2H) a good candidate for cation sensing. Because of hydrogen bonding between tetrazine moieties and water molecules, TMU-34(-2H) shows different PL emissions in water and acetonitrile. Cation sensing in these two solvents revealed that TMU-34(-2H) can selectively detect Hg(2+) in water (by 243% enhancement) and in acetonitrile (by 90% quenching). The contribution of electron-donating/accepting characteristics along with solvation effects on secondary interactions of the tetrazine motifs inside the TMU-34(-2H) framework results in different signal transductions. Improved sensitivity and accuracy of detection were obtained using the double solvent sensing method (DSSM), in which different signal transductions of TMU-34(-2H) in water and acetonitrile were combined simultaneously to construct a double solvent sensing curve and formulate a sensitivity factor. Calculation of sensitivity factors for all of the tested cations demonstrated that it is possible to detect Hg(2+) by DSSM with ultrahigh sensitivity. Such a tremendous distinction in the Hg(2+) sensitivity factor is visualizable in the double solvent sensing curve. Thus, by application of DSSM instead of one-dimensional sensing, the interfering effects of other cations are completely eliminated and the sensitivity toward Hg(II) is highly improved. Strong interactions between Hg(2+) and the nitrogen atoms of the tetrazine groups along with easy accessibility of Hg(2+) to the tetrazine groups lead

  5. Nature as a source of inspiration for cationic lipid synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labas, Romain; Beilvert, Fanny; Barteau, Benoit; David, Stéphanie; Chèvre, Raphaël; Pitard, Bruno

    2010-02-01

    Synthetic gene delivery systems represent an attractive alternative to viral vectors for DNA transfection. Cationic lipids are one of the most widely used non-viral vectors for the delivery of DNA into cultured cells and are easily synthesized, leading to a large variety of well-characterized molecules. This review discusses strategies for the design of efficient cationic lipids that overcome the critical barriers of in vitro transfection. A particular focus is placed on natural hydrophilic headgroups and lipophilic tails that have been used to synthesize biocompatible and non-toxic cationic lipids. We also present chemical features that have been investigated to enhance the transfection efficiency of cationic lipids by promoting the escape of lipoplexes from the endosomal compartment and DNA release from DNA-liposome complexes. Transfection efficiency studies using these strategies are likely to improve the understanding of the mechanism of cationic lipid-mediated gene delivery and to help the rational design of novel cationic lipids.

  6. Efficient protection and transfection of small interfering RNA by cationic shell-crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuefei; Fang, Huafeng; Zhang, Ke; Shrestha, Ritu; Wooley, Karen L; Taylor, John-Stephen A

    2013-04-01

    Despite the great potential of small interfering RNA (siRNA) as a therapeutic agent, progress in this area has been hampered by a lack of efficient biocompatible transfection agents. Recently, cationic shell-crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticles (cSCKs) were found to possess lower cytotoxicity and better transfection ability for phosphorothioate ODNs and plasmid DNA than the commonly used cationic lipid-based agent Lipofectamine. To determine the usefulness of cSCKs for siRNA transfection, a small library of cSCKs with varying percentage of primary and tertiary amines was assessed for its ability to bind to siRNA, inhibit siRNA degradation in human serum, and to transfect HeLa and mouse macrophage cell lines. The silencing efficiency in HeLa cells was greatest with the cSCK with 100% primary amines (pa100) as determined by their viability following transfection with cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic siRNAs. cSCK-pa100 showed greater silencing efficiency than Lipofectamine 2000 in the HeLa cells, as well in 293T and human bronchial epithelial (HEK) cells, but was comparable in human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells and human mammary epithelial (MCF10a) cells. cSCK-pa100 also showed greater silencing of iNOS expression than Lipofectamine 2000 in a mouse macrophage cell line, and provided greater protection from serum degradation, demonstrating its potential usefulness as an siRNA transfection agent. The siRNA silencing of iNOS at lower concentrations of siRNA could be enhanced by complexation with the fusogenic GALA peptide, which was shown to enhance endosomal escape following uptake.

  7. Oxysterols stimulate Sonic hedgehog signal transduction and proliferation of medulloblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Ryan B; Scott, Matthew P

    2006-05-30

    Sterol synthesis is required for Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signal transduction. Errors in Shh signal transduction play important roles in the formation of human tumors, including medulloblastoma (MB). It is not clear which products of sterol synthesis are necessary for Shh signal transduction or how they act. Here we show that cholesterol or specific oxysterols are the critical products of sterol synthesis required for Shh pathway signal transduction in MB cells. In MB cells, sterol synthesis inhibitors reduce Shh target gene transcription and block Shh pathway-dependent proliferation. These effects of sterol synthesis inhibitors can be reversed by exogenous cholesterol or specific oxysterols. We also show that certain oxysterols can maximally activate Shh target gene transcription through the Smoothened (Smo) protein as effectively as the known Smo full agonist, SAG. Thus, sterols are required and sufficient for Shh pathway activation. These results suggest that oxysterols may be critical regulators of Smo, and thereby Shh signal transduction. Inhibition of Shh signaling by sterol synthesis inhibitors may offer a novel approach to the treatment of MB and other Shh pathway-dependent human tumors.

  8. Suppression of tumorigenicity and metastatic potential of melanoma cells by transduction of interferon gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lykhova A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate an inhibitory effect of baculovirus-mediated transduction of the murine interferon-beta gene on mouse melanoma in vitro and in vivo. Methods. Studies were performed on B16 mouse melanoma (MM-4 cell line. Transduction, immunocytochemical and tumor cell biology approaches have been used in this study. Results. Transduction of MM-4 cells by the recombinant baculovirus with IFN-beta gene is accompanied by morphological changes of tumor cells, suppression of cell proliferation, significant inhibition of platting efficiency of cells and their colonies formation in semisolid agar. Moreover, transduction of melanoma MM-4 cells by the baculovirus IFN-transgene leads to inhibition of tumorigenicity and metastatic ability of the cells in vivo. The intravenous administration of recombinant baculovirus vector with IFN gene inhibits growth of metastases induced in the lungs of mice by intravenously injected tumor cells. Conclusions. Transduction of mouse melanoma cells by the recombinant baculovirus with murine IFN-beta gene inhibits their proliferative potential, tumorigenicity and metastatic activity.

  9. Discovery of intramolecular signal transduction network based on a new protein dynamics model of energy dissipation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Wei Ma

    Full Text Available A novel approach to reveal intramolecular signal transduction network is proposed in this work. To this end, a new algorithm of network construction is developed, which is based on a new protein dynamics model of energy dissipation. A key feature of this approach is that direction information is specified after inferring protein residue-residue interaction network involved in the process of signal transduction. This enables fundamental analysis of the regulation hierarchy and identification of regulation hubs of the signaling network. A well-studied allosteric enzyme, E. coli aspartokinase III, is used as a model system to demonstrate the new method. Comparison with experimental results shows that the new approach is able to predict all the sites that have been experimentally proved to desensitize allosteric regulation of the enzyme. In addition, the signal transduction network shows a clear preference for specific structural regions, secondary structural types and residue conservation. Occurrence of super-hubs in the network indicates that allosteric regulation tends to gather residues with high connection ability to collectively facilitate the signaling process. Furthermore, a new parameter of propagation coefficient is defined to determine the propagation capability of residues within a signal transduction network. In conclusion, the new approach is useful for fundamental understanding of the process of intramolecular signal transduction and thus has significant impact on rational design of novel allosteric proteins.

  10. Neuro-protective effects of CNTF on hippocampal neurons via an unknown signal transduction pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In our previous study, we proposed that there may be an unknown pathway in the upper stream of the known signal transduction pathway of Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) that mediates the neuro-protective function of CNTF. In the present experiment, we observed that the neuro-protective function of the non-classic signal transduction pathway in a L-NMDA (a glutamic acid ion type receptor atagonist) induced hippocampal neuron injury model, using primary culture rat hippocampal neurons, continuous photography and gp130 immunohistochemical assay. The results showed that L-NMDA induced injurious reaction of hippocampal neurons, and CNTF was able to inhibit the toxic action of L-NMDA on hippocampal neurons. Additionally, when JAK/STATs in the known classic signal transduction pathway of CNTF were blocked by PTPi-2, the protective effect of CNTF against L-NMDA injury still existed. L-NMDA caused a rapid increase in the concentration of hippocampal intracellular free [Ca2+]i. CNTF was able to attenuate L-NMDA-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i, and blocking JAK/STATs in the known classic signal trans- duction pathway of CNTF did not affect L-NMDA- induced elevation of [Ca2+]i, indicating that, apart from the known classic signal transduction pathway, there may be some other transduction pathways for CNTF to exert the protective effect on hippocampal neurons, and this pathway is related to [Ca2+].

  11. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, Gareth W.; Smith, Gina A.; Abdul-Zani, Izma; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Mughal, Nadeem A.; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Kearney, Mark T.; Zachary, Ian C.; Tomlinson, Darren C.; Harrison, Michael A.; Wheatcroft, Stephen B.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A–VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor–ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145) promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes. PMID:27044325

  12. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth W. Fearnley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A–VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor–ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145 promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes.

  13. The role of the CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP) in adrenomedullin receptor signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, M A; Evans-Bain, B; Oliver, K R; Dickerson, I M

    2001-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are usually thought to act as monomer receptors that bind ligand and then interact with G proteins to initiate signal transduction. In this study we report an intracellular peripheral membrane protein named the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-receptor component protein (RCP) required for signal transduction at the G protein-coupled receptor for adrenomedullin. Cell lines were made that expressed an antisense construct of the RCP cDNA, and in these cells diminished RCP expression correlated with loss of adrenomedullin signal transduction. In contrast, loss of RCP did not diminish receptor density or affinity, therefore RCP does not appear to act as a chaperone protein. Instead, RCP represents a novel class of protein required to couple the adrenomedullin receptor to the cellular signal transduction pathway. A candidate adrenomedullin receptor named the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) has been described, which forms high affinity adrenomedullin receptors when co-expressed with the accessory protein receptor-activity modifying protein 2 (RAMP2). RCP co-immunoprecipitated with CRLR and RAMP2, indicating that a functional adrenomedullin receptor is composed of at least three proteins: the ligand binding protein (CRLR), an accessory protein (RAMP2), and a coupling protein for signal transduction (RCP).

  14. MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction regulates the actin cytoskeleton through the downregulation of WAVE2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C-L; Ueno, M; Liu, D; Masuya, D; Nakano, J; Yokomise, H; Nakagawa, T; Miyake, M

    2006-10-19

    Motility-related protein-1 (MRP-1/CD9) is involved in cell motility. We studied the change in the actin cytoskeleton, and the expression of actin-related protein (Arp) 2 and Arp3 and the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) family according to MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction into HT1080 cells. The frequency of cells with lamellipodia was significantly lower in MRP-1/CD9-transfected HT1080 cells than in control HT1080 cells (PMRP-1/CD9 gene transduction affected the subcellular localization of Arp2 and Arp3 proteins. Furthermore, MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction induced a downregulation of WAVE2 expression (PMRP-1/CD9 monoclonal antibody inhibited downregulation of WAVE2 in MRP-1/CD9-transfected HT1080 cells (PMRP-1/CD9 gene transduction. Furthermore, downregulation of WAVE2 by transfection of WAVE2-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) mimicked the morphological effects of MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction and suppressed cell motility. However, transfection of each siRNA for Wnt1, Wnt2b1 or Wnt5a did not affect WAVE2 expression. Transfection of WAVE2-specific siRNA also did not affect expressions of these Wnts. These results indicate that MRP-1/CD9 regulates the actin cytoskeleton by downregulating of the WAVE2, through the Wnt-independent signal pathway.

  15. Analysis of nitrated proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involved in mating signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Lee, Na Young; Cho, Kyung-Cho; Lee, Min Young; Choi, Do-Young; Park, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration (PTN) is a PTM that regulates signal transduction and inflammatory responses, and is related to neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. The cellular function of PTN remains unclear because the low stoichiometry of PTN limits the identification and quantification of nitrated peptides. Effective enrichment is an important aspect of PTN analysis. In this study, we analyzed the in vivo nitroproteome elicited by mating signal transduction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a novel chemical enrichment method followed by LC-MS/MS. Nitroproteome profiling successfully identified changes in the nitration states of 14 proteins during mating signal transduction in S. cerevisiae, making this the first reported in vivo nitroproteome in yeast. We investigated the biological functions of these nitroproteins and their relationships to mating signal transduction in S. cerevisiae using a protein-protein interaction network. Our results suggest that PTN and denitration may be involved in nonreactive nitrogen species-mediated signal transduction and can provide clues for understanding the functional roles of PTN in vivo.

  16. [Progress of studies on effects of acupuncture on cellular signal transduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian; Li, Zhong-ren

    2011-04-01

    In order to elucidate the underlying mechanism of acupuncture in regulating different physiological functional activities at cellular level, abundant researches have been conducted on cellular signal transduction activities. The present article preliminarily analyzes acupuncture stimulation induced various cellular signaling pathways from the afferent physical signals of the regional mechanical stimulation at the acupoint, activation of receptors of the cellular membrane such as Guanine nucleotide binding protein coupled receptors, etc., intracellular second messenger molecules including cAMP, Ca2+, inositol triphosphate, diacyl glycerol, etc., signal transduction pathways as mitogen-activated protein kinase, Janus kinase-signal transduction and transcription activator, nitrogen oxide-cyclic guanylic acid, etc., to the extremely complicated cellular signal transduction networks. In addition, the present paper also makes a discussion on the present developing situation of acupuncture research. It is possible that the connective tissue of the body surface will become a key point in the future research on acupuncture remedy. More attention should be paid to the interrelation among various intracellular signaling pathways and the network of cellular signal transduction in the research on acupuncture therapy for regulating a variety of physiological effects.

  17. Two-component signal transduction pathways regulating growth and cell cycle progression in a bacterium: a system-level analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skerker, Jeffrey M; Prasol, Melanie S; Perchuk, Barrett S; Biondi, Emanuele G; Laub, Michael T

    2005-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems, comprised of histidine kinases and their response regulator substrates, are the predominant means by which bacteria sense and respond to extracellular signals...

  18. Optomechanical Transduction and Characterization of a Silica Microsphere Pendulum via Evanescent Light

    CERN Document Server

    Madugani, Ramgopal; Ward, Jonathan M; Le, Vu H; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2015-01-01

    Transduction of the motion of a micron- or nano-sized object to an optical signal is essential for optomechanical systems. Here, we study the optical response of a cantilever-like, silica, microsphere pendulum, evanescently coupled to a ?ber taper. In this system, the optical coupling element also acts as the mechanical motion transducer and the pendulum's oscillations modulate the optical whispering gallery modes (WGMs) both dispersively and dissipatively. This unique mechanism leads to an experimentally-observable, asymmetric response function of the transduction spectrum. This phenomenon is explained by using coupled mode theory with Fourier transforms. The optomechanical transduction and its relation to the external coupling gap is experimentally investigated in depth and shows good agreement with the theory. A deep understanding of this mechanism is necessary in order to explore cooling and trapping of a micropendulum system.

  19. Evaluating the Role of Wnt Signal Transduction in Promoting the Development of the Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard M. Eisenberg

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Wnts are a family of secreted signaling proteins that are encoded by 19 distinct genes in the vertebrate genome. These molecules initiate several signal transduction pathways: the canonical Wnt, Wnt/Ca2+, and Wnt/planar cell polarity pathways. Wnt proteins have major impact on embryonic development, tumor progression, and stem cell differentiation. Wnt signal transduction also influences the formation of the heart, yet many issues concerning the involvement of Wnt regulation in initiating cardiac development remain unresolved. In this review, we will examine the published record to discern (a what has been shown by experimental studies on the participation of Wnt signaling in cardiogenesis, and (b what are the important questions that need to be addressed to understand the importance and function of Wnt signal transduction in facilitating the development of the heart.

  20. Gene expression, signal transduction pathways and functional networks associated with growth of sporadic vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sass, Hjalte Christian Reeberg; Borup, Rehannah; Alanin, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine global gene expression in relation to Vestibular schwannomas (VS) growth rate and to identify signal transduction pathways and functional molecular networks associated with growth. Repeated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior to surgery determined...... of signal transduction pathways and functional molecular networks associated with tumor growth. In total 109 genes were deregulated in relation to tumor growth rate. Genes associated with apoptosis, growth and cell proliferation were deregulated. Gene ontology included regulation of the cell cycle, cell...... differentiation and proliferation, among other functions. Fourteen pathways were associated with tumor growth. Five functional molecular networks were generated. This first study on global gene expression in relation to vestibular schwannoma growth rate identified several genes, signal transduction pathways...

  1. Postaggregative differentiation induction by cyclic AMP in Dictyostelium: intracellular transduction pathway and requirement for additional stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, P; Van Lookeren Campagne, M M; Van Driel, R; Spek, W; Van Haastert, P J; Pinas, J

    1986-11-01

    Cyclic AMP induces postaggregative differentiation in aggregation competent cells of Dictyostelium by interacting with cell surface cAMP receptors. We investigated the transduction pathway of this response and additional requirements for the induction of postaggregative differentiation. Optimal induction of postaggregative gene expression requires that vegetative cells are first exposed to 2-4 hr of nanomolar cAMP pulses, and subsequently for 4-6 hr to steady-state cAMP concentrations in the micromolar range. Cyclic AMP pulses, which are endogenously produced before and during aggregation, induce full responsiveness to cAMP as a morphogen. The transduction pathway from the cell surface cAMP receptor to postaggregative gene expression may involve Ca2+ ions as intracellular messengers. A cAMP-induced increase in intracellular cAMP or cGMP levels is not involved in the transduction pathway.

  2. Analysis of a signal transduction pathway involved in leaf epidermis differentiation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip W. Becraft

    2005-05-23

    The major objective of this study was to identify and analyze signal transduction factors that function with the CR4 receptor kinase. We pursued this analysis in Arabidopsis. Analysis of other members of the ACR4 related receptor (CRR) family produced biochemical evidence consistent with some of them functioning in ACR4 signal transduction. Yeast 2-hybrid identified six proteins that interact with the cytoplasmic domain of ACR4, representing putative downstream signal transduction components. The interactions for all 6 proteins were verified by in vitro pull down assays. Five of the interacting proteins were phosphorylated by ACR4. We also identified candidate interactors with the extracellular TNFR domain. We hypothesize this may be the ligand binding domain for ACR4. In one approach, yeast 2-hybrid was again used and five candidate proteins identified. Nine additional candidates were identified in a genome wide scan of Arabidopsis amino acid sequences that threaded onto the TNF structure.

  3. Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xingguo; HUANG Wei; WU Qingyu

    2006-01-01

    Two-component systems are signal transduction systems which enable bacteria to regulate cellular functions in response to changing environmental conditions. The unicellular Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has become a model organism for a range of biochemical and molecular biology studies aiming at investigating environmental stress response. The publication of the complete genome sequence of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 provided a tremendous stimulus for research in this field, and at least 80 open reading frames were identified as members of the two-component signal transduction systems in this single species of cyanobacteria. To date, functional roles have been determined for only a limited number of such proteins. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the two-component signal transduction systems in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and describes recent achievements in elucidating the functional roles of these systems.

  4. Bacterial signal transduction networks via connectors and development of the inhibitors as alternative antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2017-09-01

    Bacterial cells possess a signal transduction system that differs from those described in higher organisms, including human cells. These so-called two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs) consist of a sensor (histidine kinase, HK) and a response regulator, and are involved in cellular functions, such as virulence, drug resistance, biofilm formation, cell wall synthesis, cell division. They are conserved in bacteria across all species. Although TCSs are often studied and characterized individually, they are assumed to interact with each other and form signal transduction networks within the cell. In this review, I focus on the formation of TCS networks via connectors. I also explore the possibility of using TCS inhibitors, especially HK inhibitors, as alternative antimicrobial agents.

  5. The progress of olfactory transduction and biomimetic olfactory-based biosensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU ChunSheng; WANG LiJiang; ZHOU Jun; ZHAO LuHang; WANG Ping

    2007-01-01

    Olfaction is a very important sensation for all animals. Recently great progress has been made in the research of olfactory transduction. Especially the novel finding of the gene superfamily encoding olfactory receptors has led to rapid advances in olfactory transduction. These advances also promoted the research of biomimetic olfactory-based biosensors and some obvious achievements have been obtained due to their potential commercial prospects and promising industrial applications. This paper briefly introduces the biological basis of olfaction, summarizes the progress of olfactory signal transduction in the olfactory neuron, the olfactory bulb and the olfactory cortex, outlines the latest developments and applications of biomimetic olfactory-based biosensors. Finally, the olfactory biosensor based on light addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS) is addressed in detail based on our recent work and the research trends of olfactory biosensors in future are discussed.

  6. [Acupuncture-moxibustion and mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction pathways].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, Shen; Zhong-Ren, Li

    2012-03-01

    The Literatures on mechanism of acupuncture from the aspect of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction pathways are analyzed in this paper. And the result shows that many acupuncture effects are closely related with the regulation of MAPK signal transduction pathway. However, the current studies only cover limited aspects, and there problems still existed in the experiment designation. Acupuncture and electroacupuncture are often adopted for the treatment group, while moxibustion is not applied for most of them. There are not unified wave model, frequency and stimulation period for electroacupuncture. And the studies still remain in simple confirmation and proper inference. In the future, the domain of researches should be further wid ened and the experiment designation further perfected. Therefore, the therapeutic effect of acupuncture in clinic will be greatly improved through researches on MAPK signal transduction pathway and the production mechanism of acupuncture effect.

  7. Biodistribution and tissue toxicity of amphotericin B in mice following multiple dose administration of a novel oral lipid-based formulation (iCo-009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershkovich, Pavel; Sivak, Olena; Wasan, Ellen K; Magil, Alex B; Owen, David; Clement, John G; Wasan, Kishor M

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the biodistribution and toxicity of amphotericin B (AMB) following multiple dose administration of an oral lipid-based formulation (iCo-009). BALB/c female mice were used. ICo-009 was administered twice daily for 5 days at doses of 2.5-20 mg/kg. Untreated animals, oral vehicle or intravenous Fungizone® (1 or 2 mg/kg) served as control groups. The animals were sacrificed 12 h following the last administration of AMB, and blood and multiple tissues were harvested for drug analysis and histopathological evaluation. Plasma or tissue samples were analysed for concentrations of AMB or creatinine by means of HPLC-UV. A dose-dependent accumulation of AMB in liver, spleen, kidney and lung tissues was found. The concentration of the drug in all these organs exceeded the corresponding concentrations in plasma at the same dose. The concentrations of AMB in heart and brain were similar to the corresponding concentrations in plasma. Creatinine concentrations were elevated above normal concentrations in the 2 mg/kg Fungizone® group only. Histopathological analysis of kidney and liver tissues revealed a normal pattern in all treated groups, except the 2 mg/kg Fungizone® group. No gastrointestinal toxicity was found in this study. A multiple dose treatment regimen with iCo-009 in mice results in a gradual accumulation of AMB in tissues. Despite significant concentrations of AMB, no kidney or liver toxicity of orally administered AMB was detected in this study. Furthermore, multiple oral administration of iCo-009 or of vehicle control did not induce gastrointestinal toxicity.

  8. Efficacy of an oral and tropically stable lipid-based formulation of Amphotericin B (iCo-010) in an experimental mouse model of systemic candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Fady; Sivak, Olena; Wasan, Ellen K; Bartlett, Karen; Wasan, Kishor M

    2013-10-29

    An oral lipid based formulation that exhibits tropical stability (iCo-010) was developed to enhance the absorption of orally administered amphotericin B (AmB). iCo-010 has previously shown high efficacy in an acute model of systemic candidiasis in rats, directing the focus of this study to be its efficacy in a chronic model of systemic candidiasis in mice. Mice were infected with 0.6 to 1×108 CFUs of Candida albicans ATCC 18804 strain by tail vein injection and were left for three days to develop the infection after which time treatment was initiated. The infected animals were assigned to the following treatment groups: no treatment (control) or iCo-010 at 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg administered by oral gavage once daily (QD) for 5 consecutive days. The animals were sacrificed 7 days after the last dose and the concentration of AmB and the fungal burden were assessed within the liver, kidneys, heart, lungs, spleen and brain. Although the infection was relatively low (~ 60-100 CFUs/ 1 ml tissue homogenate) in the liver, lungs and heart, the infection level was very high (70 000 CFUs / 1 ml tissue homogenate) in the kidney tissues for the control group. The highest concentrations of AmB were recovered in the kidneys and the spleen. The fungal burden in the tissues was lowered by 69-96% in the treatment groups when compared to the control group. Oral iCo-010 is an effective treatment of systemic candidiasis in the mouse model.

  9. Characterization of pegylated liposomal mitomycin C lipid-based prodrug (Promitil®) by high sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaohui; Patil, Yogita; Ohana, Patricia; Amitay, Yasmine; Shmeeda, Hilary; Gabizon, Alberto; Barenholz, Yechezkel

    2017-01-03

    The effect of a lipidated prodrug of mitomycin C (MLP) on the membrane of a pegylated liposome formulation (PL-MLP), also known as Promitil®, was characterized through high-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and cryo-TEM. The thermodynamic analysis demonstrated that MLP led to the formation of heterogeneous domains in the membrane plane of PL-MLP. MLP concentrated in prodrug-rich domains, arranged in high-ordered crystal-like structures, as suggested by the sharp and high enthalpy endotherm in the 1st heating scanning. After thiolytic cleavage of mitomycin C from MLP by dithiotreitol (DTT) treatment, the crystal-like prodrug domain disappears and a homogeneous membrane with stronger lipid interactions and higher phase transition temperature compared with the blank (MLP-free) liposomes is observed by DSC. In parallel, the rod-like discoid liposomes and the "kissing liposomes" seen by cryo-TEM in the PL-MLP formulation disappear, and liposome mean size and polydispersity increase after DTT treatment. Both MLP and the residual post-cleavage lipophilic moiety of the prodrug increased rigidity of the liposome membrane as indicated by DSC. These results confirm that MLP is inserted in the PL-MLP liposome membrane via its lipophilic anchor, and its mitomycin C moiety located mainly at the region of the phospholipid glycerol backbone and polar head-group. We hypothesize that Π-Π stacking between the planar aromatic rings of the mitomycin C moieties leads to the formation of prodrug-rich domains with highly ordered structure on the PL-MLP liposome membrane. This thermodynamically stable conformation may explain the high stability of the PL-MLP formulation. These results also provide us with an interesting example of the application of high sensitivity DSC in understanding the composition-structure-behavior dynamics of liposomal nanocarriers having a lipid-based drug as pharmaceutical ingredient.

  10. Thiamin and Riboflavin in Human Milk: Effects of Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplementation and Stage of Lactation on Vitamer Secretion and Contributions to Total Vitamin Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Daniela; Shahab-Ferdows, Setareh; Adair, Linda S; Bentley, Margaret E; Flax, Valerie L; Jamieson, Denise J; Ellington, Sascha R; Tegha, Gerald; Chasela, Charles S; Kamwendo, Debbie; Allen, Lindsay H

    2016-01-01

    While thiamin and riboflavin in breast milk have been analyzed for over 50 years, less attention has been given to the different forms of each vitamin. Thiamin-monophosphate (TMP) and free thiamin contribute to total thiamin content; flavin adenine-dinucleotide (FAD) and free riboflavin are the main contributors to total riboflavin. We analyzed milk collected at 2 (n = 258) or 6 (n = 104), and 24 weeks (n = 362) from HIV-infected Malawian mothers within the Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals and Nutrition (BAN) study, randomly assigned at delivery to lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) or a control group, to investigate each vitamer's contribution to total milk vitamin content and the effects of supplementation on the different thiamin and riboflavin vitamers at early and later stages of lactation, and obtain insight into the transport and distribution of these vitamers in human milk. Thiamin vitamers were derivatized into thiochrome-esters and analyzed by high-performance liquid-chromatography-fluorescence-detection (HPLC-FLD). Riboflavin and FAD were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid-chromatography-tandem-mass-spectrometry (ULPC-MS/MS). Thiamin-pyrophosphate (TPP), identified here for the first time in breast milk, contributed 1.9-4.5% to total thiamin. Free thiamin increased significantly from 2/6 to 24 weeks regardless of treatment indicating an active transport of this vitamer in milk. LNS significantly increased TMP and free thiamin only at 2 weeks compared to the control: median 170 versus 151 μg/L (TMP), 13.3 versus 10.5 μg/L (free thiamin, pmilk. The continuous presence of FAD in breast milk suggests an active transport and secretion system for this vitamer or possibly formation of this co-enymatic form in the mammary gland.

  11. Liposomal systems as viable drug delivery technology for skin cancer sites with an outlook on lipid-based delivery vehicles and diagnostic imaging inputs for skin conditions'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Naseem; Khan, Riaz A

    2016-10-01

    Skin cancer is among one of the most common human malignancies wide-spread world-over with mortality statistics rising continuously at an alarming rate. The increasing frequency of these malignancies has marked the need for adopting effective treatment plan coupled with better and site-specific delivery options for the desired therapeutic agent's availability at the affected site. The concurrent delivery approaches to cancerous tissues are under constant challenge and, as a result, are evolving and gaining advancements in terms of delivery modes, therapeutic agents and site-specificity of the therapeutics delivery. The lipid-based liposomal drug delivery is an attractive and emerging option, and which is meticulously shaping up beyond a threshold level to a promising, and viable route for the effective delivery of therapeutic agents and other required injuctions to the skin cancer. An update on liposomal delivery of chemotherapeutic agents, natural-origin compounds, photosensitizer, and DNA repair enzymes as well as other desirable and typical delivery modes employed in drug delivery and in the treatment of skin cancers is discussed in details. Moreover, liposomal delivery of nucleic acid-based therapeutics, i.e., small interfering RNA (siRNA), mRNA therapy, and RGD-linked liposomes are among the other promising novel technology under constant development. The current clinical applicability, viable clinical plans, future prospects including transport feasibility of delivery vesicles and imaging techniques in conjunction with the therapeutic agents is also discussed. The ongoing innovations in liposomal drug delivery technology for skin cancers hold promise for further development of the methodology for better, more effective and site-specific delivery as part of the better treatment plan by ensuring faster drug transport, better and full payload delivery with enough and required concentration of the dose. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution after intravenous administration of a single dose of amphotericin B cochleates, a new lipid-based delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segarra, Ignacio; Movshin, Diane A; Zarif, Leila

    2002-08-01

    Model independent pharmacokinetic analysis of intravenous (iv) amphotericin B cochleates (CAMB), a new lipid-based drug delivery system, in mice (0.625 mg/kg) shows a two-phase disposition profile in blood [area under the curve of concentration versus time from time zero to infinity (AUC(0-infinity)) = 1.01 microg. h/mL, half-life (t((1/2))) = 11.68 h, volume of distribution at steady state (V(ss)) = 9.59 L/kg, clearance (CL) = 10.36 mL/min/kg and mean residence time from time 0 to infinity (MRT(0-infinity)) = 15.41 h). In target tissues, maximum time (t(max)) ranged from 2 min (spleen and lung) to 10 min (liver) and lungs presented the highest AMB concentration (16.4 microg. h/g) followed by liver (8.56 microg/g), and spleen (6.63 microg/g). In addition, liver and spleen presented the longest elution half-life (75.03 and 66.71 h, respectively), MRT(0-infinity) (98.4 and 86.3 h, respectively), and AMB exposure:liver AUC(0-infinity) = 474 and 116.4 microg. h/g for the spleen. The large V(ss) and the extensive tissue AUC indicate large and efficient ability of cochleates to penetrate and deliver AMB. Differences in tissue uptake mechanism and pharmacokinetic data suggest a crucial role of macrophages in CAMB clearance from blood as well as an essential role of the liver and the spleen in AMB distribution to target tissues.

  13. Responsive feeding and child interest in food vary when rural Malawian children are fed lipid-based nutrient supplements or local complementary food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flax, Valerie L; Mäkinen, Samppa; Ashorn, Ulla; Cheung, Yin Bun; Maleta, Kenneth; Ashorn, Per; Bentley, Margaret E

    2013-07-01

    Caregiver and child behaviours during feeding have been used to measure responsiveness, which has been recognised as important for child growth and development. The aims of this study were to understand how caregiver and child behaviours differ when feeding lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) vs. local complementary food and to detect associations between behaviours and child interest in food. Sixteen moderately underweight 6-17-month-old Malawian children receiving 50 g/day of supplementary LNS for 12 weeks were videotaped during LNS (n = 32) and local complementary feeding (n = 28) episodes. Behaviours were coded at the level of the intended bite (1674 total bites). The analysis used regression models adjusted for within-subject correlation. Caregivers were less likely to allow children to self-feed and more likely to use physical pressure during LNS vs. complementary food bites. Positive caregiver verbalization was infrequent and did not differ by type of food. Higher odds of accepting a bite were associated with the bite containing LNS, odds ratio (OR) 3.05; 90% confidence interval (CI) (1.98, 4.71), the child self-feeding, OR 5.70; 90% CI (2.77, 11.69), and positive caregiver verbalization, OR 2.46; 90% CI (1.26, 4.80), while lower odds of acceptance were associated with negative child verbalization during feeding, OR 0.27; 90% CI (0.17, 0.42). In this sample, caregivers used more responsive feeding practices during bites of local complementary food and were more controlling when feeding LNS. Responsive caregiver behaviours predicted child acceptance of food. These results could be used to design interventions in Malawi to improve responsive feeding practices in general and during LNS use.

  14. Preparation and in vitro and in vivo characterization of cyclosporin A-loaded, PEGylated chitosan-modified, lipid-based nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Zhao, Zhi-Liang; Wei, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Jin-Hua

    2013-01-01

    A new cyclosporin A-loaded, PEGylated chitosan-modified lipid-based nanoparticle was developed to improve upon the formulation of cyclosporin A. PEGylated chitosan, synthesized in three steps using mild reaction conditions, was used to modify the nanoparticles. Cyclosporin A-loaded, PEGylated chitosan-modified nanoparticles were prepared using an emulsification/solvent evaporation method. The drug content and encapsulation efficiency of the cyclosporin A-loaded, PEGylated chitosan-modified nanoparticles were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. The average size of the nanoparticles was determined by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The pharmacokinetic behavior of the nanoparticles was investigated in rabbits after intravenous injection. Cyclosporin A concentrations in a whole blood sample were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography using tamoxifen as the internal standard. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using the 3p87 software program. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance confirmed the structure of PEGylated chitosan. The drug content and encapsulation efficiency of the cyclosporin A-loaded, PEGylated chitosan-modified nanoparticles were 37.04% and 69.22%, respectively. The average size of the nanoparticles was 89.4 nm. The nanoparticles released 30% cyclosporin A-loaded in 48 hours in vitro, with no initial burst release. The mode of release in vitro was prone to bulk erosion. The in vivo results showed the biological half-life of the elimination phase (t(1/2β)) of the nanoparticles was 21 times longer than that of the cyclosporin A solution, and the area under the curve for the nanoparticles was 25.8 times greater than that of the cyclosporin A solution. Modification of PEGylated chitosan prolonged the retention time of the nanoparticles in the circulatory system and improved the bioavailability of cyclosporin A.

  15. Cation-π interaction of the univalent silver cation with meso-octamethylcalix[4]pyrrole: Experimental and theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polášek, Miroslav; Kvíčala, Jaroslav; Makrlík, Emanuel; Křížová, Věra; Vaňura, Petr

    2017-02-01

    By using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), it was proven experimentally that the univalent silver cation Ag+ forms with meso-octamethylcalix[4]pyrrole (abbrev. 1) the cationic complex species 1·Ag+. Further, applying quantum chemical DFT calculations, four different conformations of the resulting complex 1·Ag+ were derived. It means that under the present experimental conditions, this ligand 1 can be considered as a macrocyclic receptor for the silver cation.

  16. Effects of pergolide mesylate on transduction efficiency of PEP-1-catalase protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Eun Jeong; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Young Nam; Kim, So Mi [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Soon Sung [Department of Food Science and Nutrition and RIC Center, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Tae-Cheon [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyeok Yil [Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Duk-Soo [Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan-Si 330-090 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sung-Woo [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyu Hyung; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Hyun Sook, E-mail: wazzup@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Soo Young, E-mail: sychoi@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} We studied effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on in vitro and in vivo transduction of PEP-1-catalase. {yields} PEP-1-catatase inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation. {yields} PM enhanced the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells and skin tissue. {yields} PM increased anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catalase. {yields} PM stimulated therapeutic action of anti-oxidant enzyme catalase in oxidative-related diseases. -- Abstract: The low transduction efficiency of various proteins is an obstacle to their therapeutic application. However, protein transduction domains (PTDs) are well-known for a highly effective tool for exogenous protein delivery to cells. We examined the effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT human keratinocytes and mice skin and on the anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catatase against 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation using Western blot and histological analysis. PM enhanced the time- and dose-dependent transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells without affecting the cellular toxicity. In a mouse edema model, PEP-1-catalase inhibited the increased expressions of inflammatory mediators and cytokines such as cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-6 and -1{beta}, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} induced by TPA. On the other hand, PM alone failed to exert any significant anti-inflammatory effects. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of co-treatment with PEP-1-catalase and PM was more potent than that of PEP-1-catalase alone. Our results indicate that PM may enhance the delivery of PTDs fusion therapeutic proteins to target cells and tissues and has potential to increase their therapeutic effects of such drugs against various diseases.

  17. Ephrin A2 receptor targeting does not increase adenoviral pancreatic cancer transduction in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael A van Geer; Conny T Bakker; Naoya Koizumi; Hiroyuki Mizuguchi; John G Wesseling; Ronald PJ Oude Elferink; Piter J Bosma

    2009-01-01

    AIM:To generate an adenoviral vector specifically targeting the EphA2 receptor (EphA2R) highly expressed on pancreatic cancer cells in vivo.METHODS:YSA,a small peptide ligand that binds the EphA2R with high affinity,was inserted into the HI loop of the adenovirus serotype 5 fiber knob.To further increase the specificity of this vector,binding sites for native adenoviral receptors,the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and integrin,were ablated from the viral capsid.The ablated retargeted adenoviral vector was produced on 293T cells.Specific targeting of this novel adenoviral vector to pancreatic cancer was investigated on established human pancreatic cancer cell lines.Upon demonstrating specific in vitro targeting,in vivo targeting to subcutaneous growing human pancreatic cancer was tested by intravenous and intraperitoneal administration of the ablated adenoviral vector.RESULTS:Ablation of native cellular binding sites reduced adenoviral transduction at least 100-fold.Insertion of the YSA peptide in the HI loop restored adenoviral transduction of EphA2R-expressing cells but not of cells lacking this receptor.YSA-mediated transduction was inhibited by addition of synthetic YSA peptide.The transduction specificity of the ablated retargeted vector towards human pancreatic cancer cells was enhanced almost 10-fold in vitro.In a subsequent in vivo study in a nude (nu/nu) mouse model however,no increased adenoviral targeting to subcutaneously growing human pancreas cancer nodules was seen upon injection into the tail vein,nor upon injection into the peritoneum.CONCLUSION:Targeting the EphA2 receptor increases specificity of adenoviral transduction of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro but fails to enhance pancreatic cancer transduction in vivo.

  18. Repurposing Cationic Amphiphilic Antihistamines for Cancer Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Anne-Marie; Dehlendorff, Christian; Vind, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide. In search for new NSCLC treatment options, we screened a cationic amphiphilic drug (CAD) library for cytotoxicity against NSCLC cells and identified several CAD antihistamines as inducers of lysosomal cell death. We...... then performed a cohort study on the effect of CAD antihistamine use on mortality of patients diagnosed with non-localized cancer in Denmark between 1995 and 2011. The use of the most commonly prescribed CAD antihistamine, loratadine, was associated with significantly reduced all-cause mortality among patients...... with non-localized NSCLC or any non-localized cancer when compared with use of non-CAD antihistamines and adjusted for potential confounders. Of the less frequently described CAD antihistamines, astemizole showed a similar significant association with reduced mortality as loratadine among patients with any...

  19. Electron spectra of radical cations of heteroanalogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrushenko, K.B.; Turchaninov, V.K.; Vokin, A.I.; Ermikov, A.F.; Frolov, Yu.L.

    1985-12-01

    Radical cation spectra of indazole and benzothiophene in the visible region were obtained by laser photolysis during the reaction of photoexcited quinones with these compounds in acetonitrile. The charge transfer bands of the complexes of the test compounds with p-chloranil and 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane in dioxane were recorded on a Specord M-40. Photoelectron spectra were obtained on a ES-3201 electron spectrometer. The He(I) resonance band (21.21 eV) was used for excitation. Measurements were carried out in the 60-120/sup 0/C range. The energy scale was calibrated form the first ionization potentials of Ar (15.76 eV) and chlorobenzene (9.06 eV). The error in the determination of the ionization potentials for the first four photoelectron bands was 0.05 eV.

  20. Structural and cytotoxic studies of cationic thiosemicarbazones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinniah, Saravana Kumar; Sim, Kae Shin; Ng, Seik Weng; Tan, Kong Wai

    2017-06-01

    Schiff bases from the thiosemicarbazones family with variable N4 substituents are known to show enhanced growth inhibitory properties. In view of these facts and as a part of our continuous interest in cationic Schiff bases, we have developed several Schiff base ligands from (3-formyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)methyltriphenylphosphonium (T) in present study. The compounds were characterized by various spectroscopic methods (infrared spectra, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, HRESIMS and X-ray crystallography). Three of the N4 substituents, namely P(tsc)T, FP(tsc)T and EP(tsc)T exerted strong growth inhibitory properties by inhibiting the highly metastasis prostate cancer growth (PC-3). The thiosemicarbazone with ethylphenyl (EP) moiety displayed most potent activity against all cell lines tested. The MTT data obtained from analysis establishes that phenyl substituent enhances the growth inhibitory properties of the compound. The result affirms that EP(tsc)T would serve as a lead scaffold for rational anticancer agent development.

  1. Heart imaging with cationic complexes of technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutsch, E. (Univ. of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH); Bushong, W.; Glavan, K.A.; Elder, R.C.; Sodd, V.J.; Scholz, K.L.; Fortman, D.L.; Lukes, S.J.

    1981-10-02

    The cationic technetium-99 complex trans-(/sup 99/Tc(dmpe)/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/)/sup +/, where dmpe is bis(1,2-dimethylphosphino)ethane or (CH/sub 3/)/sub 2/P-CH/sub 2/CH/sub 2/-P(CH/sub 3/)/sub 2/, has been prepared and characterized by single-crystal, x-ray structural analysis. The technetium-99m analog, trans-(/sup 99m/Tc (dmpe)/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/)/sup +/, has also been prepared and shown to yield excellent gamma-ray images of the heart. The purposeful design, characterization, and synthesis of this technetium-99m radiopharmaceutical represents a striking application of fundamental inorganic chemistry to a problem in applied nuclear medicine.

  2. Retention of Cationic Starch onto Cellulose Fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missaoui, Mohamed; Mauret, Evelyne; Belgacem, Mohamed Naceur

    2008-08-01

    Three methods of cationic starch titration were used to quantify its retention on cellulose fibres, namely: (i) the complexation of CS with iodine and measurement of the absorbency of the ensuing blue solution by UV-vis spectroscopy; (ii) hydrolysis of the starch macromolecules followed by the conversion of the resulting sugars to furan-based molecules and quantifying the ensuing mixture by measuring their absorbance at a Ι of 490 nm, using the same technique as previous one and; finally (iii) hydrolysis of starch macromolecules by trifluoro-acetic acid and quantification of the sugars in the resulting hydrolysates by high performance liquid chromatography. The three methods were found to give similar results within the range of CS addition from 0 to 50 mg per g of cellulose fibres.

  3. Capturing dynamic cation hopping in cubic pyrochlores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks Hinojosa, Beverly; Asthagiri, Aravind; Nino, Juan C.

    2011-08-01

    In direct contrast to recent reports, density functional theory predicts that the most stable structure of Bi2Ti2O7 pyrochlore is a cubic Fd3¯m space group by accounting for atomic displacements. The displaced Bi occupies the 96g(x,x,z) Wyckoff position with six equivalent sites, which create multiple local minima. Using nudged elastic band method, the transition states of Bi cation hopping between equivalent minima were investigated and an energy barrier between 0.11 and 0.21 eV was determined. Energy barriers associated with the motion of Bi between equivalent sites within the 96g Wyckoff position suggest the presence of dielectric relaxation in Bi2Ti2O7.

  4. Hydration Structure of the Quaternary Ammonium Cations

    KAUST Repository

    Babiaczyk, Wojtek Iwo

    2010-11-25

    Two indicators of the hydropathicity of small solutes are introduced and tested by molecular dynamics simulations. These indicators are defined as probabilities of the orientation of water molecules\\' dipoles and hydrogen bond vectors, conditional on a generalized distance from the solute suitable for arbitrarily shaped molecules. Using conditional probabilities, it is possible to distinguish features of the distributions in close proximity of the solute. These regions contain the most significant information on the hydration structure but cannot be adequately represented by using, as is usually done, joint distance-angle probability densities. Our calculations show that using our indicators a relative hydropathicity scale for the interesting test set of the quaternary ammonium cations can be roughly determined. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  5. Predicting Organic Cation Sorption Coefficients: Accounting for Competition from Sorbed Inorganic Cations Using a Simple Probe Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolin, William C; Goyetche, Reaha; Carter, Katherine; Medina, John; Vasudevan, Dharni; MacKay, Allison A

    2017-06-06

    With the increasing number of emerging contaminants that are cationic at environmentally relevant pH values, there is a need for robust predictive models of organic cation sorption coefficients (Kd). Current predictive models fail to account for the differences in the identity, abundance, and affinity of surface-associated inorganic exchange ions naturally present at negatively charged receptor sites on environmental solids. To better understand how organic cation sorption is influenced by surface-associated inorganic exchange ions, sorption coefficients of 10 organic cations (including eight pharmaceuticals and two simple probe organic amines) were determined for six homoionic forms of the aluminosilicate mineral, montmorillonite. Organic cation sorption coefficients exhibited consistent trends for all compounds across the various homoionic clays with sorption coefficients (Kd) decreasing as follows: Kd(Na(+)) > Kd(NH4(+)) ≥ Kd(K(+)) > Kd(Ca(2+)) ≥ Kd(Mg(2+)) > Kd(Al(3+)). This trend for competition between organic cations and exchangeable inorganic cations is consistent with the inorganic cation selectivity sequence, determined for exchange between inorganic ions. Such consistent trends in competition between organic and inorganic cations suggested that a simple probe cation, such as phenyltrimethylammonium or benzylamine, could capture soil-to-soil variations in native inorganic cation identity and abundance for the prediction of organic cation sorption to soils and soil minerals. Indeed, sorption of two pharmaceutical compounds to 30 soils was better described by phenyltrimethylammonium sorption than by measures of benzylamine sorption, effective cation exchange capacity alone, or a model from the literature (Droge, S., and Goss, K. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2013, 47, 14224). A hybrid approach integrating structural scaling factors derived from this literature model of organic cation sorption, along with phenyltrimethylammonium Kd values, allowed for

  6. Genome-wide identification and comparative analysis of the cation proton antiporters family in pear and four other Rosaceae species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongsheng; Qi, Kaijie; Liu, Xing; Yin, Hao; Wang, Peng; Chen, Jianqing; Wu, Juyou; Zhang, Shaoling

    2016-08-01

    The monovalent cation proton antiporters (CPAs) play essential roles in plant nutrition, development, and signal transduction by regulating ion and pH homeostasis of the cell. The CPAs of plants include the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, K(+) efflux antiporter, and cation/H(+) exchanger families. However, currently, little is known about the CPA genes in Rosaceae species. In this study, 220 CPA genes were identified from five Rosaceae species (Pyrus bretschneideri, Malus domestica, Prunus persica, Fragaria vesca, and Prunus mume), and 53 of which came from P. bretschneideri. Phylogenetic, structure, collinearity, and gene expression analyses were conducted on the entire CPA genes of pear. Gene expression data showed that 35 and 37 CPA genes were expressed in pear fruit and pollen tubes, respectively. The transcript analysis of some CPA genes under abiotic stress conditions revealed that CPAs may play an important role in pollen tubes growth. The results presented here will be useful in improving understanding of the complexity of the CPA gene family and will promote functional characterization in future studies.

  7. Antiviral effect of cationic compounds on bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Huong eChatain-Ly

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The antiviral activity of several cationic compounds - cetytrimethylammonium (CTAB, chitosan, nisin and lysozyme - was investigated on the bacteriophage c2 (DNA head and non-contractile tail infecting Lactococcus strains and the bacteriophage MS2 (F-specific RNA infecting E.coli. Firstly, these activities were evaluated in a phosphate buffer pH 7- 10 mM. The CTAB had a virucidal effect on the Lactococcus bacteriophages, but not on the MS2. After 1 min of contact with 0.125 mM CTAB, the c2 population was reduced from 6 log(pfu/mL to 1,5 log(pfu/mL and completely deactivated at 1 mM. On the contrary, chitosan inhibited the MS2 more than it did the bacteriophages c2. No antiviral effect was observed for the nisin or the lysozyme on bacteriophages after 1 min of treatment. A 1 and 2.5 log reduction was respectively observed for nisin and lysozyme when the treatment time increased (5 or 10 min. These results showed that the antiviral effect depended both on the virus and structure of the antimicrobial compounds. The antiviral activity of these compounds was also evaluated in different physico-chemical conditions and in complex matrices. The antiviral activity of CTAB was impaired in acid pH and with an increase of the ionic strength. These results might be explained by the electrostatic interactions between cationic compounds and negatively charged particles such as bacteriophages or other compounds in a matrix. Milk proved to be protective suggesting the components of food could interfere with antimicrobial compounds.

  8. NET-SYNTHESIS: a software for synthesis, inference and simplification of signal transduction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachalo, Sema; Zhang, Ranran; Sontag, Eduardo; Albert, Réka; DasGupta, Bhaskar

    2008-01-15

    We present a software for combined synthesis, inference and simplification of signal transduction networks. The main idea of our method lies in representing observed indirect causal relationships as network paths and using techniques from combinatorial optimization to find the sparsest graph consistent with all experimental observations. We illustrate the biological usability of our software by applying it to a previously published signal transduction network and by using it to synthesize and simplify a novel network corresponding to activation-induced cell death in large granular lymphocyte leukemia. NET-SYNTHESIS is freely downloadable from http://www.cs.uic.edu/~dasgupta/network-synthesis/

  9. Quasi steady-state approximations in complex intracellular signal transduction networks - a word of caution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Gram; Bersani, A.M.; Bersani, E.

    2008-01-01

    Enzyme reactions play a pivotal role in intracellular signal transduction. Many enzymes are known to possess Michaelis-Menten (MM) kinetics and the MM approximation is often used when modeling enzyme reactions. However, it is known that the MM approximation is only valid at low enzyme concentrati......Enzyme reactions play a pivotal role in intracellular signal transduction. Many enzymes are known to possess Michaelis-Menten (MM) kinetics and the MM approximation is often used when modeling enzyme reactions. However, it is known that the MM approximation is only valid at low enzyme...

  10. Cancer classification through filtering progressive transductive support vector machine based on gene expression data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinguo; Chen, Dan

    2017-08-01

    Traditional supervised classifiers neglect a large amount of data which not have sufficient follow-up information, only work with labeled data. Consequently, the small sample size limits the advancement of design appropriate classifier. In this paper, a transductive learning method which combined with the filtering strategy in transductive framework and progressive labeling strategy is addressed. The progressive labeling strategy does not need to consider the distribution of labeled samples to evaluate the distribution of unlabeled samples, can effective solve the problem of evaluate the proportion of positive and negative samples in work set. Our experiment result demonstrate that the proposed technique have great potential in cancer prediction based on gene expression.

  11. Regulation of apoptotic signal transduction pathways by the heat shock proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Zhengyu; ZHAO; Xia; WEI; Yuquan

    2004-01-01

    The study about apoptotic signal transductions has become a project to reveal the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis. Heat shock proteins (hsps), which play an important role in cell growth and apoptosis, have attracted great attentions. A lot of researches have showed there is a hsps superfamily including hsp90, hsp70, hsp60 and hsp27, etc., which regulates the biological behaviors of cells, particularly apoptotic signal transduction in Fas pathway, JNK/SAPK pathway and caspases pathway at different levels, partly by the function of molecular chaperone.

  12. Targeting two-component signal transduction: a novel drug discovery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Ario; Gotoh, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Takafumi; Furuta, Eiji; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2007-01-01

    We have developed two screening systems for isolating inhibitors that target bacterial two-component signal transduction: (1) a differential growth assay using a temperature-sensitive yycF mutant (CNM2000) of Bacillus subtilis, which is supersensitive to histidine kinase inhibitors, and (2) a high-throughput genetic system for targeting the homodimerization of histidine kinases essential for the bacterial two-component signal transduction. By using these methods, we have been able to identify various types of inhibitors that block the autophosphorylation of histidine kinases with different modes of actions.

  13. [Signal transduction and drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis--A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanshan; Feng, Yi; Zhang, Zhe

    2015-08-04

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection kills two million people every year, and the chemotherapy has led to significant amount of drug resistance. Signal transduction systems are used by bacteria to survive or adapt to their living environment, but the relationship to drug resistance is not well understood. In this article, we introduced the two-component signal transduction systems of M. tuberculosis and analyzed their relationship with drug resistance. We identified five two-component system pairs involved in the formation of drug resistance. Therefore, these two-component systems are good targeting sites for small biochemical drugs to target so as to reverse the drug resistance and virulence.

  14. The Role of Cgrp-Receptor Component Protein (Rcp) in Cgrp-Mediated Signal Transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Prado, M.A.; B. Evans-Bain; Santi, S. L.; Dickerson, I M

    2001-01-01

    The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-receptor component protein (RCP) is a 17-kDa intracellular peripheral membrane protein required for signal transduction at CGRP receptors. To determine the role of RCP in CGRP-mediated signal transduction, RCP was depleted from NIH3T3 cells using antisense strategy. Loss of RCP protein correlated with loss of cAMP production by CGRP in the antisense cells. In contrast, loss of RCP had no effect on CGRP-mediated binding; therefore RCP is not acting as...

  15. In vivo determination of mouse olfactory mucus cation concentrations in normal and inflammatory states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil Selvaraj

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Olfaction is impaired in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS. The study has two aims: (1 to determine whether changes in cation concentration occur in the olfactory mucus of mice with CRS, which may affect chemo-electrical transduction, (2 and to examine whether these alterations are physiologically significant in humans. STUDY DESIGN: Animal study in mice and translational study in humans. METHODS: Inflammation was induced by sensitization and chronic exposure of 16 C57BL/6 mice to Aspergillus fumigatus. The control group included 16 untreated mice. Ion-selective microelectrodes were used to measure free cation concentrations in the olfactory mucus of 8 mice from each treatment group, while the remaining mice were sacrificed for histology. To validate the findings in the animal model, olfactory threshold was measured in 11 healthy human participants using Sniffin' Sticks before and after nasal irrigation with solutions that were composed of either of the cation concentrations. RESULTS: In 8 mice, olfactory mucus of chronically inflamed mice had lower [Na(+] (84.8±4.45 mM versus 93.73±3.06 mM, p = 0.02, and higher [K(+] (7.2±0.65 mM versus 5.7±0.20 mM, p = 0.04 than controls. No difference existed in [Ca(2+] (0.50±0.12 mM versus 0.54±0.06 mM, p = 0.39. In humans, rinsing with solutions replicating ion concentrations of the mouse mucosa with chronic inflammation caused a significant elevation in the median olfactory threshold (9.0 to 4.8, p = 0.003 but not with the control solution (8.3 to 7.8, p = 0.75. CONCLUSION: Chronic inflammation elevates potassium and lowers sodium ion concentration in mice olfactory mucus. Nasal irrigation with a corresponding solution induced olfactory threshold shift in humans.

  16. The Effect of Hydration on the Cation-π Interaction Between Benzene and Various Cations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    VIKASH DHINDHWAL; N SATHYAMURTHY

    2016-10-01

    The effect of hydration on cation-π interaction in Mq+ BmWn (B = benzene; W = water; Mq+ =Na⁺, K⁺, Mg²⁺, Ca²⁺, Al³⁺, 0 ≤ n,m ≤ 4, 1≤ m + n ≤ 4) complexes has been investigated using ab initio quantum chemical methods. Interaction energy values computed at the MP2 level of theory using the 6-31G(d,p) basis set reveal a qualitative trend in the relative affinity of different cations for benzene and water in these complexes. The π–cloud thickness values for benzene have also been estimated for these systems.

  17. A mixed method study exploring adherence to and acceptability of small quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements (SQ-LNS) among pregnant and lactating women in Ghana and Malawi

    OpenAIRE

    Klevor, Moses K.; Adu-Afarwuah, Seth; Ashorn, Per; Arimond, Mary; Dewey, Kathryn G; Lartey, Anna; Maleta, Kenneth; Phiri, Nozgechi; Pyykkö, Juha; Zeilani, Mamane; Ashorn, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Background Supplementing pregnant and lactating mothers with small quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements (SQ-LNS) has resulted in improvements in birth outcomes in some low-income settings. In order to be effective, SQ-LNS must be consumed regularly over sustained periods. Methods The objective was to assess and compare acceptability of and adherence to SQ-LNS consumption among pregnant and lactating women in Ghana and Malawi throughout 12 months of supplementation. We enrolled women befo...

  18. How mobile are sorbed cations in clays and clay rocks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmi, T; Kosakowski, G

    2011-02-15

    Diffusion of cations and other contaminants through clays is of central interest, because clays and clay rocks are widely considered as barrier materials for waste disposal sites. An intriguing experimental observation has been made in this context: Often, the diffusive flux of cations at trace concentrations is much larger and the retardation smaller than expected based on their sorption coefficients. So-called surface diffusion of sorbed cations has been invoked to explain the observations but remains a controversial issue. Moreover, the corresponding surface diffusion coefficients are largely unknown. Here we show that, by an appropriate scaling, published diffusion data covering a broad range of cations, clays, and chemical conditions can all be modeled satisfactorily by a surface diffusion model. The average mobility of sorbed cations seems to be primarily an intrinsic property of each cation that follows inversely its sorption affinity. With these surface mobilities, cation diffusion coefficients can now be estimated from those of water tracers. In pure clays at low salinities, surface diffusion can reduce the cation retardation by a factor of more than 1000.

  19. In vivo toxicity of cationic micelles and liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Kristina Bram; Northeved, Helle; Ek, Pramod Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated toxicity of nanocarriers comprised of cationic polymer and lipid components often used in gene and drug delivery, formulated as cationic micelles and liposomes. Rats were injected intravenously with 10, 25 or 100 mg/kg and sacrificed after 24 or 48 h, or 24 h after the last...

  20. Interactions between cationic liposomes and drugs or biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA MARIA CARMONA-RIBEIRO

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple uses for synthetic cationic liposomes composed of dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB bilayer vesicles are presented. Drugs or biomolecules can be solubilized or incorporated in the cationic bilayers. The cationic liposomes themselves can act as antimicrobial agents causing death of bacteria and fungi at concentrations that barely affect mammalian cells in culture. Silica particles or polystyrene microspheres can be functionalized by coverage with DODAB bilayers or phospholipid monolayers. Negatively charged antigenic proteins can be carried by the cationic liposomes which generate a remarkable immunoadjuvant action. Nucleotides or DNA can be physically adsorbed to the cationic liposomes to be transferred to mammalian cells for gene therapy. An overview of the interactions between DODAB vesicles and some biomolecules or drugs clearly points out their versatility for useful applications in a near future.

  1. Interactions between cationic liposomes and drugs or biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Ribeiro, A M

    2000-01-01

    Multiple uses for synthetic cationic liposomes composed of dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) bilayer vesicles are presented. Drugs or biomolecules can be solubilized or incorporated in the cationic bilayers. The cationic liposomes themselves can act as antimicrobial agents causing death of bacteria and fungi at concentrations that barely affect mammalian cells in culture. Silica particles or polystyrene microspheres can be functionalized by coverage with DODAB bilayers or phospholipid monolayers. Negatively charged antigenic proteins can be carried by the cationic liposomes which generate a remarkable immunoadjuvant action. Nucleotides or DNA can be physically adsorbed to the cationic liposomes to be transferred to mammalian cells for gene therapy. An overview of the interactions between DODAB vesicles and some biomolecules or drugs clearly points out their versatility for useful applications in a near future.

  2. Do Cation-π Interactions Exist in Bacteriorhodopsin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Kun-Sheng; WANG Guang-Yu; HE Jin-An

    2001-01-01

    Metal ions are essential to the structure and physiological functions of bacteriorhodopsin. Experimental evidence suggests the existence of specific cation binding to the negatively charged groups of Asp85 and Asp212 via an electrostatic interaction. However, only using electrostatic force is not enough to explain the role of the metal cations because the carboxylate of Asp85 is well known to be protonated in the M intermediate. Considering the presence of some aromatic amino acid residues in the vicinity of the retinal pocket, the existence of cation-π interactions between the metal cation and aromatic amino acid residues is suggested. Obviously, introduction of this kind of interaction is conducive to understanding the effects of the metal cations and aromatic amino acid residues inside the protein on the structural stability and proton pumping of bacteriorhodopsin.

  3. FASEB summer research conference on signal transduction in plants. Final report, June 16, 1996--June 21, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomax, T.L.; Quatrano, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    This is the program from the second FASEB conference on Signal Transduction in Plants. Topic areas included the following: environmental signaling; perception and transduction of light signals; signaling in plant microbe interactions; signaling in plant pathogen interactions; cell, cell communication; cytoskeleton, plasma membrane, and cellwall continuum; signaling molecules in plant growth and development I and II. A list of participants is included.

  4. FASEB summer research conference on signal transduction in plants. Final report, June 16, 1996--June 21, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomax, T.L.; Quatrano, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    This is the program from the second FASEB conference on Signal Transduction in Plants. Topic areas included the following: environmental signaling; perception and transduction of light signals; signaling in plant microbe interactions; signaling in plant pathogen interactions; cell, cell communication; cytoskeleton, plasma membrane, and cellwall continuum; signaling molecules in plant growth and development I and II. A list of participants is included.

  5. Hair cell mechano-transduction : Its influence on the gross mechanical characteristics of a hair cell sense organ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanNetten, Sietse M.

    1997-01-01

    The complex mechanical behaviour of a hair cell bundle appears to be a direct consequence of the gating forces on the individual transduction channels. The mechanical molecular interactions involved in transduction channel gating, therefore, also bear a reciprocal influence, via the hair bundles; on

  6. DMPD: Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15379975 Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor...-4. Palsson-McDermott EM, O'Neill LA. Immunology. 2004 Oct;113(2):153-62. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Signal... transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. PubmedID 15379975 Title Signal

  7. Transduction of the MPG-tagged fusion protein into mammalian cells and oocytes depends on amiloride-sensitive endocytic pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheon Yong-Pil

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MPG is a cell-permeable peptide with proven efficiency to deliver macromolecular cargoes into cells. In this work, we examined the efficacy of MPG as an N-terminal tag in a fusion protein to deliver a protein cargo and its mechanism of transduction. Results We examined transduction of MPG-EGFP fusion protein by live imaging, flow cytometry, along with combination of cell biological and pharmacological methods. We show that MPG-EGFP fusion proteins efficiently enter various mammalian cells within a few minutes and are co-localized with FM4-64, a general marker of endosomes. The transduction of MPG-EGFP occurs rapidly and is inhibited at a low temperature. The entry of MPG-EGFP is inhibited by amiloride, but cytochalasin D and methyl-β-cyclodextrin did not inhibit the entry, suggesting that macropinocytosis is not involved in the transduction. Overexpression of a mutant form of dynamin partially reduced the transduction of MPG-EGFP. The partial blockade of MPG-EGFP transduction by a dynamin mutant is abolished by the treatment of amiloride. MPG-EGFP transduction is also observed in the mammalian oocytes. Conclusion The results show that the transduction of MPG fusion protein utilizes endocytic pathway(s which is amiloride-sensitive and partially dynamin-dependent. Collectively, the MPG fusion protein could be further developed as a novel tool of "protein therapeutics", with potentials to be used in various cell systems including mammalian oocytes.

  8. Hair cell mechano-transduction : Its influence on the gross mechanical characteristics of a hair cell sense organ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanNetten, SM

    1997-01-01

    The complex mechanical behaviour of a hair cell bundle appears to be a direct consequence of the gating forces on the individual transduction channels. The mechanical molecular interactions involved in transduction channel gating, therefore, also bear a reciprocal influence, via the hair bundles; on

  9. IRMPD Action Spectroscopy of Alkali Metal Cation-Cytosine Complexes: Effects of Alkali Metal Cation Size on Gas Phase Conformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, B.; Wu, R.R.; Polfer, N.C.; Berden, G.; Oomens, J.; Rodgers, M.T.

    2013-01-01

    The gas-phase structures of alkali metal cation-cytosine complexes generated by electrospray ionization are probed via infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. IRMPD action spectra of five alkali metal cation-cytosine complexes exhibit both simi

  10. PathFinder: mining signal transduction pathway segments from protein-protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jiong

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A Signal transduction pathway is the chain of processes by which a cell converts an extracellular signal into a response. In most unicellular organisms, the number of signal transduction pathways influences the number of ways the cell can react and respond to the environment. Discovering signal transduction pathways is an arduous problem, even with the use of systematic genomic, proteomic and metabolomic technologies. These techniques lead to an enormous amount of data and how to interpret and process this data becomes a challenging computational problem. Results In this study we present a new framework for identifying signaling pathways in protein-protein interaction networks. Our goal is to find biologically significant pathway segments in a given interaction network. Currently, protein-protein interaction data has excessive amount of noise, e.g., false positive and false negative interactions. First, we eliminate false positives in the protein-protein interaction network by integrating the network with microarray expression profiles, protein subcellular localization and sequence information. In addition, protein families are used to repair false negative interactions. Then the characteristics of known signal transduction pathways and their functional annotations are extracted in the form of association rules. Conclusion Given a pair of starting and ending proteins, our methodology returns candidate pathway segments between these two proteins with possible missing links (recovered false negatives. In our study, S. cerevisiae (yeast data is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of our method.

  11. A mathematical model of the mating signal transduction pathway in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Ivan Milac

    1998-09-14

    Outline of two major goals in my proposal for this fellowship. First goal having no previous training in biology, was to become knowledgeable of the paradigms, experimental techniques, and current research interests of molecular biology. Second goal was to construct a mathematical model of the mating signal transduction pathway in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  12. Beacon Editor: Capturing Signal Transduction Pathways Using the Systems Biology Graphical Notation Activity Flow Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmarakeby, Haitham; Arefiyan, Mostafa; Myers, Elijah; Li, Song; Grene, Ruth; Heath, Lenwood S

    2017-08-28

    The Beacon Editor is a cross-platform desktop application for the creation and modification of signal transduction pathways using the Systems Biology Graphical Notation Activity Flow (SBGN-AF) language. Prompted by biologists' requests for enhancements, the Beacon Editor includes numerous powerful features for the benefit of creation and presentation.

  13. Intracellular signal transduction by the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor of Xenopus melanotrope cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurk, MJ van den; Cruijsen, P.M.; Schoeber, J.P.H.; Scheenen, W.J.J.M.; Roubos, E.W.; Jenks, B.G.

    2008-01-01

    The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is expressed in various types of endocrine pituitary cell, but the intracellular mechanism this G protein-coupled receptor uses in these cells is not known. In the present study we investigated possible intracellular signal transduction pathway(s)

  14. Molecular insights into the mechanism of sensing and signal transduction of the thermosensor DesK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballering, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325784876

    2016-01-01

    The ability to sense and respond to environmental signals is essential for cell survival. Unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying signaling processes remains a challenge, however. This thesis provides molecular insights into the mechanism of sensing and signal transduction of the thermosensor

  15. The efficiency of expressing human neprilysin by using lentiviral vector transduction in neural stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄文

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the transduction efficiency of expressing human neprilysin by using lentiviral(Lenti-NEP) in mouse embryonic neural stem cells(NSC) in vitro. Methods Primary NSC were harvested from C57BL/6J pregnant mouse at embryonic day

  16. Investigation of the charge effect on the electrochemical transduction in a quinone-based DNA sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisberg, S.; Piro, B.; Noel, V.

    2008-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism involved in the electrochemical transduction process of a conducting polymer-based DNA sensor, peptide nucleic acids (PNA) were used. PNA are DNA analogues having similar hybridization properties but are neutral. This allows to discriminate the electrostatic effect of D...

  17. Signal transduction events in aluminum-induced cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, some of the signal transduction events involved in AlCl3-induced cell death in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were elucidated. Cells treated with 100 ¿M AlCl3 showed typical features of programmed cell death (PCD) such as nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation.

  18. Signal transduction events in aluminum-induced cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, some of the signal transduction events involved in AlCl3-induced cell death in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were elucidated. Cells treated with 100 ¿M AlCl3 showed typical features of programmed cell death (PCD) such as nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation.

  19. NA+ AS COUPLING ION IN ENERGY TRANSDUCTION IN EXTREMOPHILIC BACTERIA AND ARCHAEA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelmans, G.; Poolman, B.; Konings, W.N

    1995-01-01

    For microoganisms to live under extreme physical conditions requires important adaptations of the cells. In many organisms the use of Na+ instead of protons as coupling ion in energy transduction is associated with such adaptation. This review focuses on the enzymes that are responsible for the gene

  20. Efficient transduction of neurons using Ross River glycoprotein-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsson, J; Nielsen, T Tolstrup; Staflin, K

    2006-01-01

    , including the possibility to establish stable producer cell lines. After injection of RRV-LV expressing green fluorescent protein into different structures in the rat brain we found efficient transduction of both neurons and glial cells. By using two cell-type-specific promoters, neuron-specific enolase...

  1. Decitabine suspends human CD34+ cell differentiation and proliferation during lentiviral transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Naoya; Hsieh, Matthew M; Platner, Charlotte; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Tisdale, John F

    2014-01-01

    Efficient ex vivo transduction of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) is encumbered by differentiation which reduces engraftment. We hypothesized that inhibiting DNA methyltransferase with decitabine would block differentiation of transduced CD34+ cells under cytokine stimulation and thus improve transduction efficiency for engrafting HSCs. Human CD34+ cells in cytokine-containing media were treated with or without decitabine for 24 or 48 hours, and then these cells were transduced with a GFP-expressing lentiviral vector. Utilizing decitabine pre-treatment for 48 hours, we observed an equivalent percentage of successfully transduced cells (GFP-positivity) and a higher percentage of cells that retained CD34 positivity, compared to no decitabine exposure. Cell proliferation was inhibited after decitabine exposure. Similar results were observed among CD34+ cells from six different donors. Repopulating activity was evaluated by transplantation into NOD/SCID/IL2Rγnull mice and demonstrated an equivalent percentage of GFP-positivity in human cells from decitabine-treated samples and a trend for higher human cell engraftment (measured 20-24 weeks after transplantation), compared to no decitabine exposure. In conclusion, ex vivo decitabine exposure inhibits both differentiation and proliferation in transduced human CD34+ cells and modestly increases the engraftment ability in xenograft mice, while the transduction efficiency is equivalent in decitabine exposure, suggesting improvement of lentiviral transduction for HSCs.

  2. Decitabine suspends human CD34+ cell differentiation and proliferation during lentiviral transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Uchida

    Full Text Available Efficient ex vivo transduction of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs is encumbered by differentiation which reduces engraftment. We hypothesized that inhibiting DNA methyltransferase with decitabine would block differentiation of transduced CD34+ cells under cytokine stimulation and thus improve transduction efficiency for engrafting HSCs. Human CD34+ cells in cytokine-containing media were treated with or without decitabine for 24 or 48 hours, and then these cells were transduced with a GFP-expressing lentiviral vector. Utilizing decitabine pre-treatment for 48 hours, we observed an equivalent percentage of successfully transduced cells (GFP-positivity and a higher percentage of cells that retained CD34 positivity, compared to no decitabine exposure. Cell proliferation was inhibited after decitabine exposure. Similar results were observed among CD34+ cells from six different donors. Repopulating activity was evaluated by transplantation into NOD/SCID/IL2Rγnull mice and demonstrated an equivalent percentage of GFP-positivity in human cells from decitabine-treated samples and a trend for higher human cell engraftment (measured 20-24 weeks after transplantation, compared to no decitabine exposure. In conclusion, ex vivo decitabine exposure inhibits both differentiation and proliferation in transduced human CD34+ cells and modestly increases the engraftment ability in xenograft mice, while the transduction efficiency is equivalent in decitabine exposure, suggesting improvement of lentiviral transduction for HSCs.

  3. Anaerobic toxicity of cationic silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitipour, Alireza; Thiel, Stephen W. [Biomedical, Chemical, and Environmental Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Scheckel, Kirk G. [USEPA, Office of Research and Development, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Tolaymat, Thabet, E-mail: tolaymat.thabet@epa.gov [USEPA, Office of Research and Development, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag{sup +} under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged polyvinylpyrrolidone coated AgNPs (PVP-AgNPs) and (3) positively charged branched polyethyleneimine coated AgNPs (BPEI-AgNPs). The AgNPs investigated in this experiment were similar in size (10–15 nm), spherical in shape, but varied in surface charge which ranged from highly negative to highly positive. While, at AgNPs concentrations lower than 5 mg L{sup −1}, the anaerobic decomposition process was not influenced by the presence of the nanoparticles, there was an observed impact on the diversity of the microbial community. At elevated concentrations (100 mg L{sup −1} as silver), only the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity similar in magnitude to that of Ag{sup +}. Both citrate and PVP-AgNPs did not exhibit toxicity at the 100 mg L{sup −1} as measured by biogas evolution. These findings further indicate the varying modes of action for nanoparticle toxicity and represent one of the few studies that evaluate end-of-life management concerns with regards to the increasing use of nanomaterials in our everyday life. These findings also highlight some of the concerns with a one size fits all approach to the evaluation of environmental health and safety concerns associated with the use of nanoparticles. - Highlights: • At concentrations -1 the anaerobic decomposition process was not impacted. • An impact on the microbial community at concentrations -1 were observed. • At high concentrations (100 mg L{sup −1}), the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity. • Toxicity was demonstrated without the presence of oxidative dissolution of silver. • A one size fits all approach for the evaluation of NPs may not be accurate.

  4. Lipid-based liquid crystalline nanoparticles as oral drug delivery vehicles for poorly water-soluble drugs: cellular interaction and in vivo absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng N

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ni Zeng,1,3,* Xiaoling Gao,2,* Quanyin Hu,1 Qingxiang Song,2 Huimin Xia,1 Zhongyang Liu,1 Guangzhi Gu,1 Mengyin Jiang,1,4 Zhiqing Pang,1 Hongzhuan Chen,2 Jun Chen,1 Liang Fang3 1Key Laboratory of Smart Drug Delivery, Ministry of Education and PLA, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai, 2Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 3Department of Pharmaceutical Science, School of Pharmacy, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, 4School of Pharmacy, Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jinan, Shandong People's Republic of China, *These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Lipid-based liquid crystalline nanoparticles (LCNPs have attracted growing interest as novel drug-delivery systems for improving the bioavailability of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs. However, their cellular interaction and in vivo behavior have not been fully developed and characterized.Methods: In this study, self-assembled LCNPs prepared from soy phosphatidylcholine and glycerol dioleate were developed as a platform for oral delivery of paclitaxel. The particle size of empty LCNPs and paclitaxel-loaded LCNPs was around 80 nm. The phase behavior of the liquid crystalline matrix was characterized using crossed polarized light microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering, and showed both reversed cubic and hexagonal phase in the liquid crystalline matrix. Transmission electron microscopy and cryofield emission scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed an inner winding water channel in LCNPs and a "ball-like"/"hexagonal" morphology.Results: Cellular uptake of LCNPs in Caco-2 cells was found to be concentration-dependent and time-dependent, with involvement of both clathrin and caveolae/lipid raft-mediated endocytosis. Under confocal laser scanning microscopy, soy phosphatidylcholine was observed to segregate from the internalized LCNPs and

  5. Prenatal Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplements Do Not Affect Pregnancy or Childbirth Complications or Cesarean Delivery in Bangladesh: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Effectiveness Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mridha, Malay K; Matias, Susana L; Paul, Rina Rani; Hussain, Sohrab; Sarker, Mostofa; Hossain, Mokbul; Peerson, Janet M; Vosti, Stephen A; Dewey, Kathryn G

    2017-09-01

    Background: Pregnancy and childbirth complications and cesarean delivery are common in Bangladesh.Objective: We evaluated the effect of lipid-based nutrient supplements for pregnant and lactating women (LNS-PL) on pregnancy and childbirth complications and cesarean delivery.Methods: We conducted the Rang-Din Nutrition Study, a cluster-randomized controlled effectiveness trial within a community health program in rural Bangladesh. We enrolled 4011 pregnant women in early pregnancy. Women in 48 clusters received iron and folic acid (IFA; 60 mg Fe + 400 μg folic acid/d) and women in 16 clusters received LNS-PL (20 g/d, 118 kcal) containing essential fatty acids and 22 vitamins and minerals. Pregnancy and childbirth complications and the cesarean delivery rate were secondary outcomes of the study.Results: Women in the LNS-PL group did not differ significantly from the IFA group with respect to mean systolic blood pressure at 36 wk gestation (113 and 112 mm Hg; P = 0.17), diastolic blood pressure at 36 wk gestation (68.9 and 68.7 mmHg; P = 0.88), or mean total number of pregnancy and childbirth complications (0.32 and 0.31; P = 0.86). They also did not differ significantly with respect to the prevalence of high blood pressure at 36 wk (1.74% and 2.03%; P = 0.62), antepartum hemorrhage (0.83% and 1.39%; P = 0.21), prolonged labor (8.34% and 8.79%; P = 0.68), early rupture of membranes (9.30% and 8.45%; P = 0.43), convulsions (1.57% and 1.08%; P = 0.24), high blood pressure in labor (1.54% and 1.19%; P = 0.46), obstructed labor (2.83% and 2.91%; P = 0.90), any complications during pregnancy or childbirth (35.9% and 37.1%; P = 0.64), episiotomy (6.31% and 6.44%; P = 0.90), or cesarean delivery (15.6% and 14.2%; P = 0.48).Conclusion: Compared with IFA, antenatal LNS-PL did not increase or decrease pregnancy and childbirth complications or cesarean delivery among women in rural Bangladesh. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01715038. © 2017 American

  6. Plasma Micronutrient Concentrations Are Altered by Antiretroviral Therapy and Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplements in Lactating HIV-Infected Malawian Women123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flax, Valerie L; Adair, Linda S; Allen, Lindsay H; Shahab-Ferdows, Setarah; Hampel, Daniela; Chasela, Charles S; Tegha, Gerald; Daza, Eric J; Corbett, Amanda; Davis, Nicole L; Kamwendo, Deborah; Kourtis, Athena P; van der Horst, Charles M; Jamieson, Denise J; Bentley, Margaret E

    2015-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the influence of antiretroviral therapy with or without micronutrient supplementation on the micronutrient concentrations of HIV-infected lactating women in resource-constrained settings. Objective: We examined associations of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) with concentrations of selected micronutrients in HIV-infected Malawian women at 24 wk postpartum. Methods: Plasma micronutrient concentrations were measured in a subsample (n = 690) of Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals, and Nutrition (BAN) study participants who were randomly assigned at delivery to receive HAART, LNS, HAART+LNS, or no HAART/no LNS (control). HAART consisted of protease inhibitor–based triple therapy. LNS (140 g/d) met energy and micronutrient requirements of lactation. Multivariable linear regression tested the association of HAART and LNS, plus their interaction, with micronutrient concentrations, controlling for season, baseline viral load, and baseline CD4 count. Results: We found significant HAART by LNS interactions for folate (P = 0.051), vitamin B-12 (P < 0.001), and transferrin receptors (TfRs) (P = 0.085). HAART was associated with lower folate (with LNS: −27%, P < 0.001; without LNS: −12%, P = 0.040) and higher TfR concentrations (with LNS: +14%, P = 0.004; without LNS: +28%, P < 0.001), indicating iron deficiency. LNS increased folate (with HAART: +17%, P = 0.037; without HAART: +39%, P < 0.001) and decreased TfR concentrations (with HAART only: −12%, P = 0.023). HAART was associated with lower vitamin B-12 concentrations only when LNS was present (−18%, P = 0.001), whereas LNS increased vitamin B-12 only when no HAART was present (+27%, P < 0.001). HAART, but not LNS, was associated with higher retinol-binding protein (RBP; +10%, P = 0.007). We detected no association of HAART or LNS with selenium, ferritin, or hemoglobin. Conclusion: The association of HAART with lower folate, iron

  7. Hydrogen motion in proton sponge cations: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horbatenko, Yevhen; Vyboishchikov, Sergei F

    2011-04-18

    This work presents a study of intramolecular NHN hydrogen bonds in cations of the following proton sponges: 2,7-bis(trimethylsilyl)-1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (1), 1,6-diazabicyclo[4.4.4.]tetradecane (2), 1,9-bis(dimethylamino)dibenzoselenophene (3), 1,9-bis(dimethylamino)dibenzothiophene (4), 4,5-bis(dimethylamino)fluorene (5), quino[7,8-h]quinoline (6) 1,2-bis(dimethylamino)benzene (7), and 1,12-bis(dimethylamino)benzo[c]phenantrene (8). Three different patterns were found for proton motion: systems with a single-well potential (cations 1-2), systems with a double-well potential and low proton transfer barrier, ΔEe (cations 3-5), and those with a double-well potential and a high barrier (cations 6-8). Tests of several density functionals indicate that the PBEPBE functional reproduces the potential-energy surface (PES) obtained at the MP2 level well, whereas the B3LYP, MPWB1K, and MPW1B95 functionals overestimate the barrier. Three-dimensional PESs were constructed and the vibrational Schrödinger equation was solved for selected cases of cation 1 (with a single-well potential), cation 4 (with a ΔEe value of 0.1 kcal mol(-1) at the MP2 level), and cations 6 (ΔEe = 2.4 kcal mol(-1)) and 7 (ΔEe=3.4 kcal mol(-1)). The PES is highly anharmonic in all of these cases. The analysis of the three-dimensional ground-state vibrational wave function shows that the proton is delocalized in cations 1 and 4, but is rather localized around the energy minima for cation 7. Cation 6 is an intermediate case, with two weakly pronounced maxima and substantial tunneling. This allows for classification of proton sponge cations into those with localized and those with delocalized proton behavior, with the borderline between them at ΔEe values of about 1.5 kcal mol(-1). The excited vibrational states of proton sponge cations with a low barrier can be described within the framework of a simple particle-in-a-box model. Each cation can be assigned an effective box width.

  8. Engineering fusogenic molecules to achieve targeted transduction of enveloped lentiviral vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Pin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lentiviral vectors with broad tropism are one of the most promising gene delivery systems capable of efficiently delivering genes of interest into both dividing and non-dividing cells while maintaining long-term transgene expression. However, there are needs for developing lentiviral vectors with the capability to deliver genes to specific cell types, thus reducing the "off-target" effect of gene therapy. In the present study, we investigated the possibility of engineering the fusion-active domain of a fusogenic molecule (FM with the aim to improve targeted transduction of lentiviral vectors co-displaying an anti-CD20 antibody (αCD20 and a FM. Results Specific mutations were introduced into the fusion domain of a binding-deficient Sindbis virus glycoprotein to generate several mutant FMs. Lentiviral vectors incorporated with αCD20 and one of the engineered FMs were successfully produced and demonstrated to be able to preferentially deliver genes to CD-20-expressing cells. Lentiviral vectors bearing engineered FMs exhibited 8 to 17-fold enhanced transduction towards target cells as compared to the parental FM. Different levels of enhancement were observed for the different engineered FMs. A pH-dependent study of vector transduction showed that the broader pH range of the engineered FM is a possible mechanism for the resulted increase in transduction efficiency. Conclusion The fusion domain of Sindbis virus glycoprotein is amenable for engineering and the engineered proteins provide elevated capacity to mediate lentiviral vectors for targeted transduction. Our data suggests that application of such an engineering strategy can optimize the two-molecular targeting method of lentiviral vectors for gene delivery to predetermined cells.

  9. Enrichment of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells facilitates transduction for stem cell gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kismet; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Romero, Zulema; Campo-Fernandez, Beatriz; Kaufman, Michael L; Cooper, Aaron R; Masiuk, Katelyn; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-05-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy for sickle cell disease has the potential to treat this illness without the major immunological complications associated with allogeneic transplantation. However, transduction efficiency by β-globin lentiviral vectors using CD34-enriched cell populations is suboptimal and large vector production batches may be needed for clinical trials. Transducing a cell population more enriched for HSC could greatly reduce vector needs and, potentially, increase transduction efficiency. CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells, comprising ∼1%-3% of all CD34(+) cells, were isolated from healthy cord blood CD34(+) cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and transduced with a lentiviral vector expressing an antisickling form of beta-globin (CCL-β(AS3) -FB). Isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells were able to generate progeny over an extended period of long-term culture (LTC) compared to the CD34(+) cells and required up to 40-fold less vector for transduction compared to bulk CD34(+) preparations containing an equivalent number of CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells. Transduction of isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells was comparable to CD34(+) cells measured by quantitative PCR at day 14 with reduced vector needs, and average vector copy/cell remained higher over time for LTC initiated from CD34(+) /38(-) cells. Following in vitro erythroid differentiation, HBBAS3 mRNA expression was similar in cultures derived from CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells or unfractionated CD34(+) cells. In vivo studies showed equivalent engraftment of transduced CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells when transplanted in competition with 100-fold more CD34(+) /CD38(+) cells. This work provides initial evidence for the beneficial effects from isolating human CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells to use significantly less vector and potentially improve transduction for HSC gene therapy.

  10. Specificity in stress response: epidermal keratinocytes exhibit specialized UV-responsive signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Makoto; Gazel, Alix; Pintucci, Giuseppe; Shuck, Alyssa; Shifteh, Shiva; Ginsburg, Dov; Rao, Laxmi S; Kaneko, Takehiko; Freedberg, Irwin M; Tamaki, Kunihiko; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2003-10-01

    UV light, a paradigmatic initiator of cell stress, invokes responses that include signal transduction, activation of transcription factors, and changes in gene expression. Consequently, in epidermal keratinocytes, its principal and frequent natural target, UV regulates transcription of a distinctive set of genes. Hypothesizing that UV activates distinctive epidermal signal transduction pathways, we compared the UV-responsive activation of the JNK and NFkappaB pathways in keratinocytes, with the activation of the same pathways by other agents and in other cell types. Using of inhibitors and antisense oligonucleotides, we found that in keratinocytes only UVB/UVC activate JNK, while in other cell types UVA, heat shock, and oxidative stress do as well. Keratinocytes express JNK-1 and JNK-3, which is unexpected because JNK-3 expression is considered brain-specific. In keratinocytes, ERK1, ERK2, and p38 are activated by growth factors, but not by UV. UVB/UVC in keratinocytes activates Elk1 and AP1 exclusively through the JNK pathway. JNKK1 is essential for UVB/UVC activation of JNK in keratinocytes in vitro and in human skin in vivo. In contrast, in HeLa cells, used as a control, crosstalk among signal transduction pathways allows considerable laxity. In parallel, UVB/UVC and TNFalpha activate the NFkappaB pathway via distinct mechanisms, as shown using antisense oligonucleotides targeted against IKKbeta, the active subunit of IKK. This implies a specific UVB/UVC responsive signal transduction pathway independent from other pathways. Our results suggest that in epidermal keratinocytes specific signal transduction pathways respond to UV light. Based on these findings, we propose that the UV light is not a genetic stress response inducer in these cells, but a specific agent to which epidermis developed highly specialized responses.

  11. The signal transduction mechanisms on the intestinal mucosa of rat following irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, J. H.; Kim, S. S.; Lee, K. J.; Lee, J. S. [Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1997-06-01

    Phospholipase C(PLC) isozymes play significant roles in signal transduction mechanism. The exact mechanisms of these signal transduction following irradiation, however, were not clearly documented. Thus, this study was planned to determine the biological significance of PLC, ras oncoprotein, EGFR, and PKC in damage and regeneration of rat intestinal mucosa following irradiation. Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated to entire body with a single dose of 8Gy. The rats were divided into 5 groups according to the sacrifice days after irradiation. The expression of PLC, ras oncoprotein, EGRF PKC in each group were examined by the immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. The histopathologic findings were observed using H and E stain, and the mitoses for the evidence of regeneration were counted using the light microscopy and PCNA kit. The phosphoinositide(PI) hydrolyzing activity assay was also done for the indirect evaluation of PLC-{gamma}1 activity. In the immunohistochemistry, the expression of PLC-{beta} was negative for all groups. The expression of PLC-{gamma}1 was highest in the group III followed by group II in the proliferative zone of mucosa. The expression of PKC-{delta}1 was strongly positive in group I followed by group II in the damaged surface epithelium. The above findings were also confirmed in the immunoblotting study. In the immunoblotting study, the expressions of PLC-{beta}, PLC-{gamma}1, and PLC-{delta}1 were the same as the results of immunohistochemistry. The expression of ras oncoprotein was weakly positive in groups II, III and IV and the expression of PKC was weakly positive in the group II and III. PLC-{gamma}1 mediated signal transduction including ras oncoprotein, EGFR, and PKC play a significant role in mucosal regeneration after irradiation. PLC-{delta}1 mediated signal transduction might have an important role in mucosal damage after irradiation. Further studies will be necessary to confirm the signal transduction mediating the PLC

  12. Towards the systematic discovery of signal transduction networks using phosphorylation dynamics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yachie Nozomu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphorylation is a ubiquitous and fundamental regulatory mechanism that controls signal transduction in living cells. The number of identified phosphoproteins and their phosphosites is rapidly increasing as a result of recent mass spectrometry-based approaches. Results We analyzed time-course phosphoproteome data obtained previously by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry with the stable isotope labeling using amino acids in cell culture (SILAC method. This provides the relative phosphorylation activities of digested peptides at each of five time points after stimulating HeLa cells with epidermal growth factor (EGF. We initially calculated the correlations between the phosphorylation dynamics patterns of every pair of peptides and connected the strongly correlated pairs to construct a network. We found that peptides extracted from the same intracellular fraction (nucleus vs. cytoplasm tended to be close together within this phosphorylation dynamics-based network. The network was then analyzed using graph theory and compared with five known signal-transduction pathways. The dynamics-based network was correlated with known signaling pathways in the NetPath and Phospho.ELM databases, and especially with the EGF receptor (EGFR signaling pathway. Although the phosphorylation patterns of many proteins were drastically changed by the EGF stimulation, our results suggest that only EGFR signaling transduction was both strongly activated and precisely controlled. Conclusions The construction of a phosphorylation dynamics-based network provides a useful overview of condition-specific intracellular signal transduction using quantitative time-course phosphoproteome data under specific experimental conditions. Detailed prediction of signal transduction based on phosphoproteome dynamics remains challenging. However, since the phosphorylation profiles of kinase-substrate pairs on the specific pathway were localized in the dynamics

  13. Conditional Dicer substrate formation via shape and sequence transduction with small conditional RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochrein, Lisa M; Schwarzkopf, Maayan; Shahgholi, Mona; Yin, Peng; Pierce, Niles A

    2013-11-20

    RNA interference (RNAi) mediated by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) enables knockdown of a gene of choice, executing the logical operation: silence gene Y. The fact that the siRNA is constitutively active is a significant limitation, making it difficult to confine knockdown to a specific locus and time. To achieve spatiotemporal control over silencing, we seek to engineer small conditional RNAs (scRNAs) that mediate 'conditional RNAi' corresponding to the logical operation: if gene X is transcribed, silence independent gene Y. By appropriately selecting gene X, knockdown of gene Y could then be restricted in a tissue- and time-specific manner. To implement the logic of conditional RNAi, our approach is to engineer scRNAs that, upon binding to mRNA 'detection target' X, perform shape and sequence transduction to form a Dicer substrate targeting independent mRNA 'silencing target' Y, with subsequent Dicer processing yielding an siRNA targeting mRNA Y for destruction. Toward this end, here we design and experimentally validate diverse scRNA mechanisms for conditional Dicer substrate formation. Test tube studies demonstrate strong OFF/ON conditional response, with at least an order of magnitude increase in Dicer substrate production in the presence of the cognate mRNA detection target. By appropriately dimensioning and/or chemically modifying the scRNAs, only the product of signal transduction, and not the reactants or intermediates, is efficiently processed by Dicer, yielding siRNAs. These mechanism studies explore diverse design principles for engineering scRNA signal transduction cascades including reactant stability vs metastability, catalytic vs noncatalytic transduction, pre- vs post-transcriptional transduction, reactant and product molecularity, and modes of molecular self-assembly and disassembly.

  14. The influence of cationic lipid type on in-vitro release kinetic profiles of antisense oligonucleotide from cationic nanoemulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagigit, Tal; Nassar, Taher; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Lambert, Gregory; Benita, Simon

    2008-09-01

    Novel formulations of cationic nanoemulsions based on three different lipids were developed to strengthen the attraction of the polyanionic oligonucleotide (ODN) macromolecules to the cationic moieties on the oil nanodroplets. These formulations were developed to prolong the release of the ODN from the nanoemulsion under appropriate physiological dilutions as encountered in the eye following topical application. Increasing the concentration of the new cationic lipid exhibiting two cationic amine groups (AOA) in the emulsion from 0.05% to 0.4% did not alter markedly the particle size or zeta potential value of the blank cationic nanoemulsion. The extent of ODN association did not vary significantly when the initial concentration of ODN remained constant at 10 microM irrespective of the cationic lipid nature. However, the zeta potential value dropped consistently with the low concentrations of 0.05% and 0.1% of AOA in the emulsions suggesting that an electrostatic attraction occurred between the cationic lipids and the polyanionic ODN molecules at the o/w interface. Only the nanoemulsion prepared with N-[1-(2,3-dioleoyloxy)propyl]-N,N,N-trimethylammonium salts (DOTAP) remained physically stable over time. DOTAP cationic lipid nanoemulsion was the most efficient formulation capable of retaining the ODN despite the high dilution of 1:100 with simulated tear solution (STS). Less than 10% of the ODN was exchanged in contrast to 40-50% with the other cationic nanoemulsions. The in-vitro release kinetic behavior of ODN exchange with physiological anions present in the STS appears to be complex and difficult to characterize using mathematical fitting model equations. Further pharmacokinetic studies are needed to verify our kinetic assumptions and confirm the in-vitro ODN release profile from DOTAP cationic nanoemulsions.

  15. Repurposing Cationic Amphiphilic Antihistamines for Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Marie Ellegaard

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide. In search for new NSCLC treatment options, we screened a cationic amphiphilic drug (CAD library for cytotoxicity against NSCLC cells and identified several CAD antihistamines as inducers of lysosomal cell death. We then performed a cohort study on the effect of CAD antihistamine use on mortality of patients diagnosed with non-localized cancer in Denmark between 1995 and 2011. The use of the most commonly prescribed CAD antihistamine, loratadine, was associated with significantly reduced all-cause mortality among patients with non-localized NSCLC or any non-localized cancer when compared with use of non-CAD antihistamines and adjusted for potential confounders. Of the less frequently described CAD antihistamines, astemizole showed a similar significant association with reduced mortality as loratadine among patients with any non-localized cancer, and ebastine use showed a similar tendency. The association between CAD antihistamine use and reduced mortality was stronger among patients with records of concurrent chemotherapy than among those without such records. In line with this, sub-micromolar concentrations of loratadine, astemizole and ebastine sensitized NSCLC cells to chemotherapy and reverted multidrug resistance in NSCLC, breast and prostate cancer cells. Thus, CAD antihistamines may improve the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy.

  16. Cationic Noncovalent Interactions: Energetics and Periodic Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, M T; Armentrout, P B

    2016-05-11

    In this review, noncovalent interactions of ions with neutral molecules are discussed. After defining the scope of the article, which excludes anionic and most protonated systems, methods associated with measuring thermodynamic information for such systems are briefly recounted. An extensive set of tables detailing available thermodynamic information for the noncovalent interactions of metal cations with a host of ligands is provided. Ligands include small molecules (H2, NH3, CO, CS, H2O, CH3CN, and others), organic ligands (O- and N-donors, crown ethers and related molecules, MALDI matrix molecules), π-ligands (alkenes, alkynes, benzene, and substituted benzenes), miscellaneous inorganic ligands, and biological systems (amino acids, peptides, sugars, nucleobases, nucleosides, and nucleotides). Hydration of metalated biological systems is also included along with selected proton-based systems: 18-crown-6 polyether with protonated peptides and base-pairing energies of nucleobases. In all cases, the literature thermochemistry is evaluated and, in many cases, reanchored or adjusted to 0 K bond dissociation energies. Trends in these values are discussed and related to a variety of simple molecular concepts.

  17. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN CATIONIC POLYELECTROLYTE AND PULP FINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Orblin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Papermaking pulps are a mixture of fibres, fibre fragments, and small cells (parenchyma or ray cells, usually called pulp fines. The interactions between pulp fines and a cationic copolymer of acrylamide and acryloxyethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride were investigated based on solid-liquid isotherms prepared under different turbulence, and subsequent advanced surface characterization using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS. The surface charge and surface area of pulp fine substrates were measured by methylene blue sorption-XPS analysis and nitrogen adsorption combined with mercury porosimetry, respectively. The driving force behind polyelectrolyte adsorption was the amount of the surface anionic charge, whereas surface area appeared to be of less importance. Based on a comparison of solid-liquid and XPS sorption isotherms, different polyelectrolyte conformations were suggested, depending on the types of fines: A flatter conformation and partial cell-wall penetration of polyelectrolytes on kraft fines from freshly prepared pulp, and a more free conformation with extended loops and tails on lignocellulosic fines from recycled pulp. Additionally, ToF-SIMS imaging proved that recycled pulp fines contained residual de-inking chemicals (primarily palmitic acid salts that possibly hinder the electrostatic interactions with polyelectrolytes.

  18. Cation Defects and Conductivity in Transparent Oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Exarhos, Gregory J.; Windisch, Charles F.; Ferris, Kim F.; Owings, Robert R.

    2007-10-24

    High quality doped zinc oxide and mixed transition metal spinel oxide films have been deposited by means of sputter deposition from metal and metal oxide targets, and by spin casting from aqueous or alcoholic precursor solutions. Deposition conditions and post-deposition processing are found to alter cation oxidation states and their distributions in both oxide materials resulting in marked changes to both optical transmission and electrical response. For ZnO, partial reduction of the neat or doped material by hydrogen treatment of the heated film or by electrochemical processing renders the oxide n-type conducting. Continued reduction was found to diminish conductivity. In contrast, oxidation of the infrared transparent p-type spinel conductors typified by NiCo2O4 was found to increase conductivity. The disparate behavior of these two materials is caused in part by the sign of the charge carrier and by the existence of two different charge transport mechanisms that are identified as free carrier conduction and polaron hopping. While much work has been reported concerning structure/property relationships in the free carrier conducting oxides, there is a significantly smaller body of information on transparent polaron conductors. In this paper, we identify key parameters that promote conductivity in mixed metal spinel oxides and compare their behavior with that of the free carrier TCO’s.

  19. Inactivation of Heparin by Cationically Modified Chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Lorkowska-Zawicka

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to evaluate the ability of N-(2-hydroxypropyl-3-tri methylammonium chitosan chloride (HTCC, the cationically modified chitosan, to form biologically inactive complexes with unfractionated heparin and thereby blocking its anticoagulant activity. Experiments were carried out in rats in vivo and in vitro using the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT and prothrombin time (PT tests for evaluation of heparin anticoagulant activity. For the first time we have found that HTCC effectively neutralizes anticoagulant action of heparin in rat blood in vitro as well as in rats in vivo. The effect of HTCC on suppression of heparin activity is dose-dependent and its efficacy can be comparable to that of protamine-the only agent used in clinic for heparin neutralization. HTCC administered i.v. alone had no direct effect on any of the coagulation tests used. The potential adverse effects of HTCC were further explored using rat experimental model of acute toxicity. When administered i.p. at high doses (250 and 500 mg/kg body weight, HTCC induced some significant dose-dependent structural abnormalities in the liver. However, when HTCC was administered at low doses, comparable to those used for neutralization of anticoagulant effect of heparin, no histopathological abnormalities in liver were observed.

  20. Radical Cations and Acid Protection during Radiolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce J. Mincher; Christopher A. Zarzana; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2016-09-01

    Ligand molecules for used nuclear fuel separation schemes are exposed to high radiation fields and high concentrations of acid. Thus, an understanding of the complex interactions between extraction ligands, diluent, and acid is critical to understanding the performance of a separation process. The diglycolamides are ligands with important structural similarities to CMPO; however, previous work has shown that their radiolytic degradation has important mechanistic differences from CMPO. The DGAs do not enjoy radioprotection by HNO3 and the kinetics of DGA radiolytic degradation are different. CMPO degrades with pseudo-zero-order kinetics in linear fashion with absorbed dose while the DGAs degrade in pseudo-first-order, exponential fashion. This suggests that the DGAs degrade by simple reaction with some product of direct diluent radiolysis, while CMPO degradation is probably multi-step, with a slow step that is not dependent on the CMPO concentration, and mitigated by HNO3. It is thus believed that radio-protection and the zero-order radiolytic degradation kinetics are related, and that these phenomena are a function of either the formation of strong acid complexes with CMPO and/or to the presence of the CMPO phenyl ring. Experiments to test both these hypotheses have been designed and partially conducted. This report summarizes findings related to these phenomena for FY16, in satisfaction of milestone M3FT-16IN030104053. It also reports continued kinetic measurements for the reactions of the dodecane radical cation with solvent extraction ligands.

  1. Competitive Effects of 2+ and 3+ Cations on DNA Compaction

    CERN Document Server

    Tongu, C; Yoshikawa, Y; Zinchenko, A A; Chen, N; Yoshikawa, K

    2016-01-01

    By using single-DNA observation with fluorescence microscopy, we observed the effects of divalent and trivalent cations on the higher-order structure of giant DNA (T4 DNA with 166 kbp). It was found that divalent cations, such as Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), inhibit DNA compaction induced by a trivalent cation, spermidine (SPD(3+)). On the other hand, in the absence of SPD(3+), divalent cations cause the shrinkage of DNA. These experimental observations are inconsistent with the well-established Debye-Huckel scheme regarding the shielding effect of counter ions, which is given as the additivity of contributions of cations with different valences. We interpreted the competition between 2+ and 3+ cations in terms of the change in the translational entropy of the counter ions before and after the folding transition of DNA. For the compaction with SPD(3+), we considered the increase in translational entropy due to the ion-exchange of the intrinsic monovalent cations condensing on a highly-charged polyelectrolyte, double-st...

  2. Neutron diffraction investigations of kesterites: cation order and disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schorr, Susan [Free University Berlin, Institute of Geological Sciences (Germany); Tovar, Michael [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie (Germany); Levcenco, Sergej; Napetrov, Alexander; Arushanov, Ernest [Academy of Sciences of Moldova Republic, Institute of Applied Physics, Chisinau (Moldova)

    2010-07-01

    The quaternary chalcogenides Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} and Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} have newly attracted attention as possible absorber materials in thin film solar cells. They crystallize in the kesterite type (space group I anti 4) or stannite type structure (space group I anti 42m), which are described as an ordered distribution of the cations on different structural sites. Cation disorder may cause site defects and hence influences the electronic properties of the material. Thus the degree of cation order/disorder plays a crucial role and was therefor in the focus of the presented investigations. A differentiation between the isoelectronic cations Cu{sup +} and Zn{sup 2+} is not possible using X-ray diffraction due to their similar scattering power. But their neutron scattering lengths are different, thus neutron diffraction opens the possibility to determine the cation distribution in these compounds. A simultaneous Rietveld analysis of neutron and X-ray powder diffraction data revealed that in dependence on the thermal history of the samples cation disorder appears. The correlation trend between cation order/disorder and the sample growth method (solid state synthesis, Bridgman method) are discussed.

  3. Cation exchange properties of zeolites in hyper alkaline aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tendeloo, Leen; de Blochouse, Benny; Dom, Dirk; Vancluysen, Jacqueline; Snellings, Ruben; Martens, Johan A; Kirschhock, Christine E A; Maes, André; Breynaert, Eric

    2015-02-03

    Construction of multibarrier concrete based waste disposal sites and management of alkaline mine drainage water requires cation exchangers combining excellent sorption properties with a high stability and predictable performance in hyper alkaline media. Though highly selective organic cation exchange resins have been developed for most pollutants, they can serve as a growth medium for bacterial proliferation, impairing their long-term stability and introducing unpredictable parameters into the evolution of the system. Zeolites represent a family of inorganic cation exchangers, which naturally occur in hyper alkaline conditions and cannot serve as an electron donor or carbon source for microbial proliferation. Despite their successful application as industrial cation exchangers under near neutral conditions, their performance in hyper alkaline, saline water remains highly undocumented. Using Cs(+) as a benchmark element, this study aims to assess the long-term cation exchange performance of zeolites in concrete derived aqueous solutions. Comparison of their exchange properties in alkaline media with data obtained in near neutral solutions demonstrated that the cation exchange selectivity remains unaffected by the increased hydroxyl concentration; the cation exchange capacity did however show an unexpected increase in hyper alkaline media.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide Neutralization by Cationic-Amphiphilic Polymers through Pseudoaggregate Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Haldar, Jayanta

    2016-03-14

    Synthetic polymers incorporating the cationic charge and hydrophobicity to mimic the function of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been developed. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind to bacterial membranes that generally contain negatively charged phospholipids and cause membrane disintegration resulting in cell death; however, cationic-amphiphilic antibacterial polymers with endotoxin neutralization properties, to the best of our knowledge, have not been reported. Bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cause sepsis that is responsible for a great amount of mortality worldwide. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers can also bind to negatively charged and hydrophobic LPS and cause detoxification. Hence, we envisaged that cationic-amphiphilic polymers can have both antibacterial as well as LPS binding properties. Here we report synthetic amphiphilic polymers with both antibacterial as well as endotoxin neutralizing properties. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines in human monocytes caused by LPS stimulation were inhibited by >80% when coincubated with these polymers. These reductions were found to be dependent on concentration and, more importantly, on the side-chain chemical structure due to variations in the hydrophobicity profiles of these polymers. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind and cause LPS neutralization and detoxification. Investigations of polymer interaction with LPS using fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that these polymers bind but neither dissociate nor promote LPS aggregation. We show that polymer binding to LPS leads to sort of a pseudoaggregate formation resulting in LPS neutralization/detoxification. These findings provide an unusual mechanism of LPS neutralization using novel synthetic cationic-amphiphilic polymers.

  5. Atmospheric CO2 enrichment facilitates cation release from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, L; Zhu, J; Chen, G; Zheng, X; Oh, N-H; Rufty, T W; Richter, D deB; Hu, S

    2010-03-01

    Atmospheric CO(2) enrichment generally stimulates plant photosynthesis and nutrient uptake, modifying the local and global cycling of bioactive elements. Although nutrient cations affect the long-term productivity and carbon balance of terrestrial ecosystems, little is known about the effect of CO(2) enrichment on cation availability in soil. In this study, we present evidence for a novel mechanism of CO(2)-enhancement of cation release from soil in rice agricultural systems. Elevated CO(2) increased organic C allocation belowground and net H(+) excretion from roots, and stimulated root and microbial respiration, reducing soil redox potential and increasing Fe(2+) and Mn(2+) in soil solutions. Increased H(+), Fe(2+), and Mn(2+) promoted Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) release from soil cation exchange sites. These results indicate that over the short term, elevated CO(2) may stimulate cation release from soil and enhance plant growth. Over the long-term, however, CO(2)-induced cation release may facilitate cation losses and soil acidification, negatively feeding back to the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems.

  6. Cations bind only weakly to amides in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okur, Halil I; Kherb, Jaibir; Cremer, Paul S

    2013-04-01

    We investigated salt interactions with butyramide as a simple mimic of cation interactions with protein backbones. The experiments were performed in aqueous metal chloride solutions using two spectroscopic techniques. In the first, which provided information about contact pair formation, the response of the amide I band to the nature and concentration of salt was monitored in bulk aqueous solutions via attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It was found that molar concentrations of well-hydrated metal cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Li(+)) led to the rise of a peak assigned to metal cation-bound amides (1645 cm(-1)) and a decrease in the peak associated with purely water-bound amides (1620 cm(-1)). In a complementary set of experiments, the effect of cation identity and concentration was investigated at the air/butyramide/water interface via vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy. In these studies, metal ion-amide binding led to the ordering of the adjacent water layer. Such experiments were sensitive to the interfacial partitioning of cations in either a contact pair with the amide or as a solvent separated pair. In both experiments, the ordering of the interactions of the cations was: Ca(2+) > Mg(2+) > Li(+) > Na(+) ≈ K(+). This is a direct cationic Hofmeister series. Even for Ca(2+), however, the apparent equilibrium dissociation constant of the cation with the amide carbonyl oxygen was no tighter than ∼8.5 M. For Na(+) and K(+), no evidence was found for any binding. As such, the interactions of metal cations with amides are far weaker than the analogous binding of weakly hydrated anions.

  7. Competitive Solvation of the Imidazolium Cation by Water and Methanol

    CERN Document Server

    Chaban, Vitaly

    2014-01-01

    Imidazolium-based ionic liquids are widely used in conjunction with molecular liquids for various applications. Solvation, miscibility and similar properties are of fundamental importance for successful implementation of theoretical schemes. This work reports competitive solvation of the 1,3-dimethylimidazolium cation by water and methanol. Employing molecular dynamics simulations powered by semiempirical Hamiltonian (electronic structure level of description), the local structure nearly imidazolium cation is described in terms of radial distribution functions. Although water and methanol are chemically similar, water appears systematically more successful in solvating the 1,3-dimethylimidazolium cation. This result fosters construction of future applications of the ternary ion-molecular systems.

  8. Infrared Spectroscopic Study for the Hydrated Clusters of Pentane Cation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Tomoya; Matsuda, Yoshiyuki; Fujii, Asuka

    2016-06-01

    We performed infrared predissociation spectroscopy of size-selected pentane-water cluster cations, [pentane-(H2O)n]+, n=1-3, generated through the vacuum-ultraviolet photoionization. In the infrared spectra of the di- and tri-hydrated clusters, there appear broad features which spread to the lower frequency region from 2800 cm-1. These broad features are assigned to vibrations of a proton, which is transferred from CH of the pentane cation to the water molecules. These results indicate that the pentane cation has high proton donor ability. We will discuss these results based on theoretical conputations.

  9. Cation Transport in Polymer Electrolytes: A Microscopic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, A.; Heuer, A.

    2007-06-01

    A microscopic theory for cation diffusion in polymer electrolytes is presented. Based on a thorough analysis of molecular dynamics simulations on poly(ethylene) oxide with LiBF4, the mechanisms of cation dynamics are characterized. Cation jumps between polymer chains can be identified as renewal processes. This allows us to obtain an explicit expression for the lithium ion diffusion constant DLi by invoking polymer-specific properties such as the Rouse dynamics. This extends previous phenomenological and numerical approaches. In particular, the chain length dependence of DLi can be predicted and compared with experimental data. This dependence can be fully understood without referring to entanglement effects.

  10. Electrostatic charge confinement using bulky tetraoctylammonium cation and four anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Nadezhda A.; Chaban, Vitaly V.

    2016-04-01

    Thanks to large opposite electrostatic charges, cations and anions establish strong ionic bonds. However, applications of ionic systems - electrolytes, gas capture, solubilization, etc. - benefit from weaker non-covalent bonds. The common approaches are addition of cosolvents and delocalization of electron charge density via functionalization of ions. We report fine tuning of closest-approach distances, effective radii, and cation geometry by different anions using the semi-empirical molecular dynamics simulations. We found that long fatty acid chains employed in the tetraalkylammonium cation are largely inefficient and new substituents must be developed. The reported results foster progress of task-specific ionic liquids.

  11. Pyridine radical cation and its fluorine substituted derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondybey, V.E.; English, J.H.; Shiley, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    The spectra and relaxation of the pyridine cation and of several of its fluorinated derivatives are studied in low temperature Ne matrices. The ions are generated by direct photoionization of the parent compounds. Of the compounds studied, laser induced → and → fluorescence is observed only for the 2, 6‐difluoropyridine cation. The analysis of the spectrum indicates that the ion is planar both in the and states. The large variety in the spectroscopic and relaxation behavior of fluoropyridine radical cations is explained in terms of their electronic structure and of the differential shifts of the individual electronic states caused by the fluorine substitution.

  12. Cationic starches on cellulose surfaces. A study of polyelectrolyte adsorption.

    OpenAIRE

    Steeg, van der, P.A.H.

    1992-01-01

    Cationic starches are used on a large scale in paper industry as wet-end additives. They improve dry strength. retention of fines and fillers, and drainage. Closure of the white water systems in the paper mills hase increased the concentration of detrimental substances. This might be the reason for the poor retention of cationic starches observed in the last few years.The purpose of the research described in this thesis was to obtain a better understanding of the adsorption of cationic starch...

  13. Endomembrane Cation Transporters and Membrane Trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sze, Heven [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Cell Biology & Molecular Genetics

    2017-04-01

    Multicellular, as well as unicellular, organisms have evolved mechanisms to regulate ion and pH homeostasis in response to developmental cues and to a changing environment. The working hypothesis is that the balance of fluxes mediated by diverse transporters at the plasma membrane and in subcellular organelles determines ionic cellular distribution, which is critical for maintenance of membrane potential, pH control, osmolality, transport of nutrients, and protein activity. An emerging theme in plant cell biology is that cells respond and adapt to diverse cues through changes of the dynamic endomembrane system. Yet we know very little about the transporters that might influence the operation of the secretory system in plants. Here we focus on transporters that influence alkali cation and pH homeostasis, mainly in the endomembrane/ secretory system. The endomembrane system of eukaryote cells serves several major functions: i) sort cargo (e.g. enzymes, transporters or receptors) to specific destinations, ii) modulate the protein and lipid composition of membrane domains through remodeling, and iii) determine and alter the properties of the cell wall through synthesis and remodeling. We had uncovered a novel family of predicted cation/H+ exchangers (CHX) and K+ efflux antiporters (KEA) that are prevalent in higher plants, but rare in metazoans. We combined phylogenetic and transcriptomic analyses with molecular genetic, cell biological and biochemical studies, and have published the first reports on functions of plant CHXs and KEAs. CHX studied to date act at the endomembrane system where their actions are distinct from the better-studied NHX (Na/K-H+ exchangers). Arabidopsis thaliana CHX20 in guard cells modulate stomatal opening, and thus is significant for vegetative survival. Other CHXs ensure reproductive success on dry land, as they participate in organizing pollen walls, targeting of pollen tubes to the ovule or promoting

  14. Novel cationic polyelectrolyte coatings for capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duša, Filip; Witos, Joanna; Karjalainen, Erno; Viitala, Tapani; Tenhu, Heikki; Wiedmer, Susanne K

    2016-01-01

    The use of bare fused silica capillary in CE can sometimes be inconvenient due to undesirable effects including adsorption of sample or instability of the EOF. This can often be avoided by coating the inner surface of the capillary. In this work, we present and characterize two novel polyelectrolyte coatings (PECs) poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl trimethylammonium iodide) (PMOTAI) and poly(3-methyl-1-(4-vinylbenzyl)-imidazolium chloride) (PIL-1) for CE. The coated capillaries were studied using a series of aqueous buffers of varying pH, ionic strength, and composition. Our results show that the investigated polyelectrolytes are usable as semi-permanent (physically adsorbed) coatings with at least five runs stability before a short coating regeneration is necessary. Both PECs showed a considerably decreased stability at pH 11.0. The EOF was higher using Good's buffers than with sodium phosphate buffer at the same pH and ionic strength. The thickness of the PEC layers studied by quartz crystal microbalance was 0.83 and 0.52 nm for PMOTAI and PIL-1, respectively. The hydrophobicity of the PEC layers was determined by analysis of a homologous series of alkyl benzoates and expressed as the distribution constants. Our result demonstrates that both PECs had comparable hydrophobicity, which enabled separation of compounds with log Po/w > 2. The ability to separate cationic drugs was shown with β-blockers, compounds often misused in doping. Both coatings were also able to separate hydrolysis products of the ionic liquid 1,5-diazabicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-ene acetate at highly acidic conditions, where bare fused silica capillaries failed to accomplish the separation.

  15. IRMPD action spectroscopy of alkali metal cation-cytosine complexes: effects of alkali metal cation size on gas phase conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Wu, R R; Polfer, N C; Berden, G; Oomens, J; Rodgers, M T

    2013-10-01

    The gas-phase structures of alkali metal cation-cytosine complexes generated by electrospray ionization are probed via infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. IRMPD action spectra of five alkali metal cation-cytosine complexes exhibit both similar and distinctive spectral features over the range of ~1000-1900 cm(-1). The IRMPD spectra of the Li(+)(cytosine), Na(+)(cytosine), and K(+)(cytosine) complexes are relatively simple but exhibit changes in the shape and shifts in the positions of several bands that correlate with the size of the alkali metal cation. The IRMPD spectra of the Rb(+)(cytosine) and Cs(+)(cytosine) complexes are much richer as distinctive new IR bands are observed, and the positions of several bands continue to shift in relation to the size of the metal cation. The measured IRMPD spectra are compared to linear IR spectra of stable low-energy tautomeric conformations calculated at the B3LYP/def2-TZVPPD level of theory to identify the conformations accessed in the experiments. These comparisons suggest that the evolution in the features in the IRMPD action spectra with the size of the metal cation, and the appearance of new bands for the larger metal cations, are the result of the variations in the intensities at which these complexes can be generated and the strength of the alkali metal cation-cytosine binding interaction, not the presence of multiple tautomeric conformations. Only a single tautomeric conformation is accessed for all five alkali metal cation-cytosine complexes, where the alkali metal cation binds to the O2 and N3 atoms of the canonical amino-oxo tautomer of cytosine, M(+)(C1).

  16. Membrane Guanylate Cyclase, A Multimodal Transduction Machine: History, Present and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rameshwar K Sharma

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A sequel to these authors’ earlier comprehensive reviews which covered the field of mammalian membrane guanylate cyclase (MGC from its origin to the year 2010, this article contains 13 parts. The first is HISTORICAL and covers MGC from the year 1963-1987, summarizing its colorful developmental stages from its passionate pursuit to its consolidation. The second deals with the establishment of its BIOCHEMICAL IDENTITY. MGC becomes the transducer of a hormonal signal and founder of the peptide hormone receptor family, and creates the notion that hormone signal transduction is its sole physiological function. The third defines its EXPANSION. The discovery of ROS-GC subfamily is made and it links ROS-GC with the physiology of PHOTOTRANSDUCTION. Parts 4 to 7 cover its BIOCHEMISTRY and PHYSIOLOGY. The noteworthy events are that augmented by GCAPs, ROS-GC proves to be a transducer of the free Ca2+ signals generated within neurons; ROS-GC becomes a two-component transduction system and establishes itself as a source of cyclic GMP, the second messenger of phototransduction. Part 8 demonstrates how this knowledge begins to be TRANSLATED into the diagnosis and providing the molecular definition of retinal dystrophies. Part 9 discusses a striking property of ROS-GC where it becomes a [Ca2+]i bimodal switch and transcends its signaling role in other neural transduction processes. In this course, discovery of the first CD-GCAP (Ca2+-dependent guanylate cycles activator, the S100B protein, is made. It extends the role of ROS-GC transduction system beyond the photoreceptor cells to the signaling processes in the synapse region between photoreceptor and cone ON-bipolar cells; in Part 10, discovery of ANOTHER CD-GCAP, NC, is made and its linkage with signaling of the inner plexiform layer neurons is established. Part 11 discusses linkage of the ROS-GC transduction system with other sensory transduction processes: Pineal gland, Olfaction and Gustation. In the

  17. Synthesis and characterization of the first 2 d neptunyl structure stabilized by side-on cation-cation interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Miro, Pere; Ma, Dongxia; Cramer, Christopher J.; Gagliardi, Laura [Department of Chemistry, Supercomputing Institute and Chemical Theory Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Sigmon, Ginger E.; Burns, Peter C. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2013-02-25

    A new 2 D sheet structure containing a side-on cation-cation interaction (CCI) has been synthesized and characterized. Unprecedentedly, no chelating ligands between the cations are present. The nature of the side-on interaction and ligand effects has been explored by using a variety of quantum chemical methods. The spin-orbit-coupled ground state mixes singlet, triplet, and quintet-pure spin states. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Cation-Cation Interactions in [(UO2)2(OH)n](4-n) Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odoh, Samuel O.; Govind, Niranjan; Schreckenbach, Georg; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2013-10-07

    The structures and bonding of gas-phase [(UO2)2(OH)n]4-n (n=2-6) complexes have been studied using density functional theory (DFT), MP2 and CCSD(T) methods with particular emphasis on ground state structures featuring cation-cation interactions (CCIs) between the uranyl groups. An interesting trend is observed in the stabilities of members of this series of complexes. The structures of [(UO2)2(OH)2]2+, [(UO2)2(OH)4] and [(UO2)2(OH)6]2- featuring CCIs are found at higher energies (by 3-20 kcal/mol) in comparison to their conventional μ2-dihydroxo structures. In contrast, the CCI structures of [(UO2)2(OH)3]+ and [(UO2)2(OH)5]- are respectively almost degenerate with and lower in energy than the structures with the μ2-dihydroxo format. The origin of this trend lies in the ‘symmetry’-based need to balance the coordination numbers and effective atomic charges of each uranium center. The calculated IR vibrational frequencies provide signature probes that can be used in differentiating the lowenergy structures and in experimentally confirming the existence of the structures featuring CCIs. Analysis of the bonding in the structures of [(UO2)2(OH)3]+ and [(UO2)2(OH)5]- shows that the CCIs and bridging hydroxo between the dioxo-uranium units are mainly electrostatic in nature.

  19. Isomerization of propargyl cation to cyclopropenyl cation: Mechanistic elucidations and effects of lone pair donors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zodinpuia Pachuau; Kiew S Kharnaior; R H Duncan Lyngdoh

    2013-03-01

    This ab initio study examines two pathways (one concerted and the other two-step) for isomerization of the linear propargyl cation to the aromatic cyclopropenyl cation, also probing the phenomenon of solvation of this reaction by simple lone pair donors (NH3, H2O, H2S and HF) which bind to the substrate at two sites. Fully optimized geometries at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level were used, along with single point QCISD(T)/6-311+G(d,p) and accurate G3 level calculations upon the DFT optimized geometries. For the unsolvated reaction, the two-step second pathway is energetically favoured over the one-step first pathway. Lone pair donor affinity for the various C3H$^{+}_{3}$ species follows the uniform order NH3 > H2S>H2O>HF. The activation barriers for the solvated isomerizations decrease in the order HF>H2O>H2S>NH3 for both pathways. The number of lone pairs on the donor heteroatom as well as the heteroatom electronegativity are factors related to both these trends. Compared to the unsolvated cases, the solvated reactions have transition states which are usually ‘later’ in position along the reaction coordinate, validating the Hammond postulate.

  20. Cation binding to 15-TBA quadruplex DNA is a multiple-pathway cation-dependent process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnikov, Roman V; Sponer, Jiri; Rassokhina, Olga I; Kopylov, Alexei M; Tsvetkov, Philipp O; Makarov, Alexander A; Golovin, Andrey V

    2011-12-01

    A combination of explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation (30 simulations reaching 4 µs in total), hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach and isothermal titration calorimetry was used to investigate the atomistic picture of ion binding to 15-mer thrombin-binding quadruplex DNA (G-DNA) aptamer. Binding of ions to G-DNA is complex multiple pathway process, which is strongly affected by the type of the cation. The individual ion-binding events are substantially modulated by the connecting loops of the aptamer, which play several roles. They stabilize the molecule during time periods when the bound ions are not present, they modulate the route of the ion into the stem and they also stabilize the internal ions by closing the gates through which the ions enter the quadruplex. Using our extensive simulations, we for the first time observed full spontaneous exchange of internal cation between quadruplex molecule and bulk solvent at atomistic resolution. The simulation suggests that expulsion of the internally bound ion is correlated with initial binding of the incoming ion. The incoming ion then readily replaces the bound ion while minimizing any destabilization of the solute molecule during the exchange.