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Sample records for cationic lipid bilayer

  1. Biomimetic Cationic Nanoparticles Based on Silica: Optimizing Bilayer Deposition from Lipid Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo T. Ribeiro

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of bilayer coverage on particles is important for a variety of biomedical applications, such as drug, vaccine, and genetic material delivery. This work aims at optimizing the deposition of cationic bilayers on silica over a range of experimental conditions for the intervening medium and two different assemblies for the cationic lipid, namely, lipid films or pre-formed lipid bilayer fragments. The lipid adsorption on silica in situ over a range of added lipid concentrations was determined from elemental analysis of carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen and related to the colloidal stability, sizing, zeta potential, and polydispersity of the silica/lipid nanoparticles. Superior bilayer deposition took place from lipid films, whereas adsorption from pre-formed bilayer fragments yielded limiting adsorption below the levels expected for bilayer adsorption.

  2. Interactions of monovalent salts with cationic lipid bilayers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorná, Šárka; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Vazdar, Mario; Hof, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 160, č. 2013 (2013), s. 341-358 ISSN 1359-6640 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016; GA AV ČR GEMEM/09/E006 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : FLUORESCENCE SOLVENT RELAXATION * MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS * PHOSPHOLIPID-BILAYERS Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.194, year: 2013

  3. Ion dynamics in cationic lipid bilayer systems in saline solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miettinen, Markus S; Gurtovenko, Andrey A; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    at the water-membrane interface to differ qualitatively. Cl(-) ions have well-defined characteristic residence times of nanosecond scale. In contrast, the binding of Na(+) ions to the carbonyl region appears to lack a characteristic time scale, as the residence time distributions displayed power-law features....... As to lateral dynamics, the diffusion of Na(+) ions within the water-membrane interface consists of two qualitatively different modes of motion: very slow diffusion when ions are bound to DMPC, punctuated by fast rapid jumps when detached from the lipids. Overall, the prolonged dynamics of the Na(+) ions...

  4. The action of polyene antibiotics on lipid bilayer membranes in the presence of several cations and anions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zutphen, H. van; Demel, R.A.; Norman, A.W.; Deenen, L.L.M. van

    1971-01-01

    1. 1. Filipin complex, filipin II, filipin III, nystatin, etruscomycin, and pimaricin at concentrations of 10−5 M were able to disrupt bimolecular lipid films containing lecithin and cholesterol in a 1:1 molar ratio. 2. 2. The above antibiotics were not able to disrupt lecithin bilayer

  5. Supported lipid bilayers as templates to design manganese oxide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This work reports on the preparation of nanoclusters of manganese oxide using biotemplating techniques. Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) on quartz using cationic lipid [Dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DOMA)] and mixed systems with neutral phospholipids dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and.

  6. Lipid bilayers decorated with photosensitive ruthenium complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bahreman, Azadeh

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis the thermal- and photo-substitution behavior of polypyridyl ruthenium complexes is described at the surface of lipid bilayers and in homogeneous solutions. It is shown that the successive thermal binding and light-induced unbinding of the cationic ruthenium complex at the surface of

  7. Cationic Au Nanoparticle Binding with Plasma Membrane-like Lipid Bilayers: Potential Mechanism for Spontaneous Permeation to Cells Revealed by Atomistic Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkila, E.; Martinez-Seara, H.; Gurtovenko, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Au nanoparticles interacting with realistic membranes and explicit solvent using a model system that comprises two cellular compartments, extracellular and cytosolic, divided by two asymmetric lipid bilayers. The membrane-AuNP+ binding and membrane reorganization processes are discovered...... to be governed by cooperative effects where AuNP+, counterions, water, and the two membrane leaflets all contribute. On the extracellular side, we find that the nanoparticle has to cross a free energy barrier of about 5 k(B)T prior forming a stable contact with the membrane. This results in a rearrangement......Despite being chemically inert as a bulk material, nanoscale gold can pose harmful side effects to living organisms. In particular, cationic Au nanoparticles (AuNP+) of 2 nm diameter or less permeate readily through plasma membranes and induce cell death. We report atomistic simulations of cationic...

  8. Texture of lipid bilayer domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Uffe Bernchou; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Midtiby, Henrik Skov

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the texture of gel (g) domains in binary lipid membranes composed of the phospholipids DPPC and DOPC. Lateral organization of lipid bilayer membranes is a topic of fundamental and biological importance. Whereas questions related to size and composition of fluid membrane domain...

  9. Alcohol Interactions with Lipid Bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Kondela

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the structural changes to lipid membrane that ensue from the addition of aliphatic alcohols with various alkyl tail lengths. Small angle neutron diffraction from flat lipid bilayers that are hydrated through water vapor has been employed to eliminate possible artefacts of the membrane curvature and the alcohol’s membrane-water partitioning. We have observed clear changes to membrane structure in both transversal and lateral directions. Most importantly, our results suggest the alteration of the membrane-water interface. The water encroachment has shifted in the way that alcohol loaded bilayers absorbed more water molecules when compared to the neat lipid bilayers. The experimental results have been corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations to reveal further details. Namely, the order parameter profiles have been fruitful in correlating the mechanical model of structural changes to the effect of anesthesia.

  10. Computer Simulations of Lipid Bilayers and Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    entitled Computer simulations of lipid bilayers and proteins describes two molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of pure lipid bilayers as well as a study of a transmembrane protein embedded in a lipid bilayer matrix. Below follows a brief overview of the thesis. Chapter 1. This chapter is a short...... introduction, where I briefly describe the basic biological background for the systems studied in Chapters 3, 4 and 5. This is done in a non-technical way to allow the general interested reader to get an impression of the work. Chapter 2, Methods: In this chapter the background for the methods used......, Pressure profile calculations in lipid bilayers: A lipid bilayer is merely $\\sim$5~nm thick, but the lateral pressure (parallel to the bilayer plane) varies several hundred bar on this short distance (normal to the bilayer). These variations in the lateral pressure are commonly referred to as the pressure...

  11. Cholesterol Perturbs Lipid Bilayers Nonuniversally

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Jianjun; Mills, Thalia T.; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Nagle, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Cholesterol is well known to modulate the physical properties of biomembranes. Using modern x-ray scattering methods, we have studied the effects of cholesterol on the bending modulus K C , the thickness D HH , and the orientational order parameter S xray of lipid bilayers. We find that the effects are different for at least three classes of phospholipids characterized by different numbers of saturated hydrocarbon chains. Most strikingly, cholesterol strongly increases K C when both chains of the phospholipid are fully saturated but not at all when there are two monounsaturated chains

  12. Does fluoride disrupt hydrogen bond network in cationic lipid bilayer? Time-dependent fluorescence shift of Laurdan and molecular dynamics simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorná, Šárka; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Vazdar, M.; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jungwirth, Pavel; Hof, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 141, č. 22 (2014), 22D516 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : fluorescence sfifts * Cationic lipids * Hydrogen bond networks Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.952, year: 2014

  13. Lipids, lipid bilayers and vesicles as seen by neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seto, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Lipid molecules self-assemble into bilayers in water with their hydrocarbon chains facing inward due to their amphiphilic nature. The structural and dynamical properties of lipids and lipid bilayers have been studied by neutron scattering intensively. In this article, 3 topics are shown as typical examples. 1) a time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering on uni-lamellar vesicles composed of deuterated and protonated lipids to determine lipid kinetics, 2) small-angle neutron scattering to investigate spontaneous formation of nanopores on uni-lamellar vesicles, and 3) neutron spin echo study to determine bending modulus of lipid bilayers. (author)

  14. DNA nanotechnology: Bringing lipid bilayers into shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howorka, Stefan

    2017-07-01

    Lipid bilayers form the thin and floppy membranes that define the boundary of compartments such as cells. Now, a method to control the shape and size of bilayers using DNA nanoscaffolds has been developed. Such designer materials advance synthetic biology and could find use in membrane research.

  15. The impact of resveratrol in lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Chen; Ghellinck, Alexis de; Fragneto, Giovanna

    knowledge on its probable working mechanism is rare. In this biophysical study, neutron reflectometry was used to investigate the direct impact of resveratrol on lipid membranes with solid supported bilayers. When interacting with di- palmitoyl-phosphatidyl-choline (DPPC) bilayers, resveratrol accumulates...

  16. Supramolecular protein immobilization on lipid bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, R.P.G.; Hendriksen, W.E.; Verheijden, Mark Lloyd; Eelkema, R.; Jonkheijm, Pascal; van Esch, J.H.; Brunsveld, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Protein immobilization on surfaces, and on lipid bilayers specifically, has great potential in biomolecular and biotechnological research. Of current special interest is the immobilization of proteins using supramolecular noncovalent interactions. This allows for a reversible immobilization and

  17. Infrared spectroscopy of fluid lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Marshall C; Cambrea, Lee R; Hovis, Jennifer S

    2005-09-15

    Infrared spectroscopy is a powerful technique for examining lipid bilayers; however, it says little about the fluidity of the bilayer-a key physical aspect. It is shown here that it is possible to both acquire spectroscopic data of supported lipid bilayer samples and make measurements of the membrane fluidity. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FT-IR) is used to obtain the spectroscopic information and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) is used to determine the fluidity of the samples. In the infrared spectra of lipid bilayers composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, the following major peaks were observed; nu(as)(CH3) 2954 cm(-1), nu(s)(CH3) 2870 cm(-1), nu(as)(CH2) 2924 cm(-1), nu(s)(CH2) 2852 cm(-1), nu(C=O) 1734 cm(-1), delta(CH2) 1463-1473 cm(-1), nu(as)(PO2-) 1226 cm(-1), nu(s)(PO2-) 1084 cm(-1), and nu(as)(N+(CH3)3) 973 cm(-1). The diffusion coefficient of the same lipid bilayer was measured to be 3.5 +/- 0.5 micom(2)/s with visual recovery also noted through use of epifluorescence microscopy. FRAP and visual data confirm the formation of a uniform, mobile supported lipid bilayer. The combination of ATR-FT-IR and FRAP provides complementary data giving a more complete picture of fully hydrated model membrane systems.

  18. Alcohol's Effects on Lipid Bilayer Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I.; Andersen, Olaf S.

    2011-01-01

    Alcohols are known modulators of lipid bilayer properties. Their biological effects have long been attributed to their bilayer-modifying effects, but alcohols can also alter protein function through direct protein interactions. This raises the question: Do alcohol's biological actions result predominantly from direct protein-alcohol interactions or from general changes in the membrane properties? The efficacy of alcohols of various chain lengths tends to exhibit a so-called cutoff effect (i.e., increasing potency with increased chain length, which that eventually levels off). The cutoff varies depending on the assay, and numerous mechanisms have been proposed such as: limited size of the alcohol-protein interaction site, limited alcohol solubility, and a chain-length-dependent lipid bilayer-alcohol interaction. To address these issues, we determined the bilayer-modifying potency of 27 aliphatic alcohols using a gramicidin-based fluorescence assay. All of the alcohols tested (with chain lengths of 1–16 carbons) alter the bilayer properties, as sensed by a bilayer-spanning channel. The bilayer-modifying potency of the short-chain alcohols scales linearly with their bilayer partitioning; the potency tapers off at higher chain lengths, and eventually changes sign for the longest-chain alcohols, demonstrating an alcohol cutoff effect in a system that has no alcohol-binding pocket. PMID:21843475

  19. Fragmented state of lipid bilayers in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helfrich, W.; Thimmel, J.; Klösgen, Beate Maria

    1999-01-01

    The bilayers of some typical biological membrane lipids such as PC and DGDG disintegrate in a large excess of water to form an optically invisible dispersive bilayer phase. `Dark bodies' can be reversibly precipitated from it by raising the temperature. The dispersive phase probably consists...... of `knotted sticks', i.e. very thin nodular tubes of bilayer. After reviewing pertinent experimental and theoretical work we report on the discovery of a lower consolute point near room temperature in DGDG/water systems. Its existence shows that the dispersive phase and the dark bodies belong to the same...

  20. Method of fabricating lipid bilayer membranes on solid supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nam-Joon (Inventor); Frank, Curtis W. (Inventor); Glenn, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Cheong, Kwang Ho (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of producing a planar lipid bilayer on a solid support. With this method, a solution of lipid vesicles is first deposited on the solid support. Next, the lipid vesicles are destabilized by adding an amphipathic peptide solution to the lipid vesicle solution. This destabilization leads to production of a planar lipid bilayer on the solid support. The present invention also provides a supported planar lipid bilayer, where the planar lipid bilayer is made of naturally occurring lipids and the solid support is made of unmodified gold or titanium oxide. Preferably, the supported planar lipid bilayer is continuous. The planar lipid bilayer may be made of any naturally occurring lipid or mixture of lipids, including, but not limited to phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinsitol, cardiolipin, cholesterol, and sphingomyelin.

  1. Lipid Bilayer Formation on Organic Electronic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yi

    2018-04-23

    The lipid bilayer is the elemental structure of cell membrane, forming a stable barrier between the interior and exterior of the cell while hosting membrane proteins that enable selective transport of biologically important compounds and cellular recognition. Monitoring the quality and function of lipid bilayers is thus essential and can be performed using electrically active substrates that allow for transduction of signals. Such a promising electronic transducer material is the conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) which has provided a plethora of novel bio transducing architectures. The challenge is however in assembling a bilayer on the conducting polymer surface, which is defect-free and has high mobility. Herein, we investigate the fusion of zwitterionic vesicles on a variety of PEDOT:PSS films, but also on an electron transporting, negatively charged organic semiconductor, in order to understand the surface properties that trigger vesicle fusion. The PEDOT:PSS films are prepared from dispersions containing different concentrations of ethylene glycol included as a formulation additive, which gives a handle to modulate surface physicochemical properties without a compromise on the chemical composition. The strong correlation between the polarity of the surface, the fusion of vesicles and the mobility of the resulting bilayer aides extracting design principles for the development of future conducting polymers that will enable the formation of lipid bilayers.

  2. Light scattering study of irradiated lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monem, A S; Blott, B H; Khalil, W A

    1992-05-01

    Vesicular phospholipid bilayer membranes in the form of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) were irradiated with fast neutron fluences ranging from 10(4) to 10(7) n cm-2. The phase behaviour of both non-irradiated and irradiated GUVs was investigated using an angular light scattering technique. A model independent size distribution of the samples and their optical anisotropy (delta) were determined using a maximum entropy technique and the theory of light scattering from spherical shells composed of anisotropic cylindrical molecules arranged radially in the shells. The structural changes in the lipid bilayer exposed to fission neutrons are discussed on the basis of the damaging mechanisms of fast neutrons to both the hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions of the lipid bilayer.

  3. Lipid Bilayers: Clusters, Domains and Phases

    OpenAIRE

    Ackerman, David G.; Feigenson, Gerald W.

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we discuss the complex mixing behavior of plasma membrane lipids. To do so, we first introduce the plasma membrane and membrane mixtures often used to model its complexity. We then discuss the nature of lipid phase behavior in bilayers and the distinction between these phases and other manifestations of nonrandom mixing found in one-phase mixtures, such as clusters, micelles, and microemulsions. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of Gibbs phase diagrams to the study of ...

  4. The impact of resveratrol in lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Chen; Ghellinck, Alexis de; Fragneto, Giovanna

    mechanism is unspecific. However, there are only few biophysical studies regarding the impact of resveratrol on lipid membranes. Here, results from a neutron reflectometry investigation on solid supported di-palmitoyl-phosphatidyl-choline (DPPC) bilayers with incorporated resveratrol are presented. The data...

  5. Finite element modeling of lipid bilayer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Feng; Klug, William S.

    2006-12-01

    A numerical simulation framework is presented for the study of biological membranes composed of lipid bilayers based on the finite element method. The classic model for these membranes employs a two-dimensional-fluid-like elastic constitutive law which is sensitive to curvature, and subjects vesicles to physically imposed constraints on surface area and volume. This model is implemented numerically via the use of C1-conforming triangular Loop subdivision finite elements. The validity of the framework is tested by computing equilibrium shapes from previously-determined axisymmetric shape-phase diagram of lipid bilayer vesicles with homogeneous material properties. Some of the benefits and challenges of finite element modeling of lipid bilayer systems are discussed, and it is indicated how this framework is natural for future investigation of biologically realistic bilayer structures involving nonaxisymmetric geometries, binding and adhesive interactions, heterogeneous mechanical properties, cytoskeletal interactions, and complex loading arrangements. These biologically relevant features have important consequences for the shape mechanics of nonidealized vesicles and cells, and their study requires not simply advances in theory, but also advances in numerical simulation techniques, such as those presented here.

  6. Vesicle fusion with bilayer lipid membrane controlled by electrostatic interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azusa Oshima

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The fusion of proteoliposomes is a promising approach for incorporating membrane proteins in artificial lipid membranes. In this study, we employed an electrostatic interaction between vesicles and supported bilayer lipid membranes (s-BLMs to control the fusion process. We combined large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs containing anionic lipids, which we used instead of proteoliposomes, and s-BLMs containing cationic lipids to control electrostatic interaction. Anionic LUVs were never adsorbed or ruptured on the SiO2 substrate with a slight negative charge, and selectively fused with cationic s-BLMs. The LUVs can be fused effectively to the target position. Furthermore, as the vesicle fusion proceeds and some of the positive charges are neutralized, the attractive interaction weakens and finally the vesicle fusion saturates. In other words, we can control the number of LUVs fused with s-BLMs by controlling the concentration of the cationic lipids in the s-BLMs. The fluidity of the s-BLMs after vesicle fusion was confirmed to be sufficiently high. This indicates that the LUVs attached to the s-BLMs were almost completely fused, and there were few intermediate state vesicles in the fusion process. We could control the position and amount of vesicle fusion with the s-BLMs by employing an electrostatic interaction.

  7. Mixed Mechanism of Lubrication by Lipid Bilayer Stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boţan, Alexandru; Joly, Laurent; Fillot, Nicolas; Loison, Claire

    2015-11-10

    Although the key role of lipid bilayer stacks in biological lubrication is generally accepted, the mechanisms underlying their extreme efficiency remain elusive. In this article, we report molecular dynamics simulations of lipid bilayer stacks undergoing load and shear. When the hydration level is reduced, the velocity accommodation mechanism changes from viscous shear in hydration water to interlayer sliding in the bilayers. This enables stacks of hydrated lipid bilayers to act as efficient boundary lubricants for various hydration conditions, structures, and mechanical loads. We also propose an estimation for the friction coefficient; thanks to the strong hydration forces between lipid bilayers, the high local viscosity is not in contradiction with low friction coefficients.

  8. Lipid bilayers: clusters, domains and phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, David G; Feigenson, Gerald W

    2015-01-01

    In the present chapter we discuss the complex mixing behaviour of plasma membrane lipids. To do so, we first introduce the plasma membrane and membrane mixtures often used to model its complexity. We then discuss the nature of lipid phase behaviour in bilayers and the distinction between these phases and other manifestations of non-random mixing found in one-phase mixtures, such as clusters, micelles and microemulsions. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of Gibbs phase diagrams to the study of increasingly complex model membrane systems, with a focus on phase coexistence, morphology and their implications for the cell plasma membrane.

  9. Self-spreading method for forming lipid bilayer on a patterned agarose gel: Toward precise lipid bilayer patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimba, Kenta; Shoji, Kazuma; Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Yagi, Tohru

    2017-07-01

    Forming artificial cell membranes is a suitable strategy for studying drug responses of membrane proteins. In order to form lipid bilayer with both mechanical stability and membrane protein functions, hydrogel supported bilayer has attracted attentions. Combinational use of self-extraction method for lipid bilayer formation and agarose gel patterning should realize hydrogel-supported bilayer with any shape and large area. In this study, we aimed to form a lipid bilayer on a patterned agarose gel and to characterize the membrane. First, lipid mixture was attached on an agarose gel, and lipid layers spread on the gel surface. With fluorescent observation, it is suggested that thin lipid layer was formed on the agarose gel, and their distance-dependent changes in spreading velocity was consistent with that in lipid bilayer. Next, the lipid layer was characterized with fluorescence recovery after photo breaching experiment. As a result, it is indicated that lipid molecules in the lipid layer on the agarose showed lateral diffusion, a typical characteristic of lipid bilayer. Taken together, we confirmed that lipid bilayer can be formed on the patterned agarose gel with self-spreading method. The hydrogel-supported bilayer will be a suitable tool for drug discovery.

  10. Effects of carotenoids on lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Quentin R; Mostofian, Barmak; Fuente Gomez, Gabriel; Smith, Jeremy C; Cheng, Xiaolin

    2018-01-31

    Carotenoids have been found to be important in improving the integrity of biomembranes in eukaryotes. However, the molecular details of how carotenoids modulate the physical properties of biomembranes are unknown. To this end, we have conducted a series of molecular dynamics simulations of different biologically-relevant membranes in the presence of carotenoids. The carotenoid effect on the membrane was found to be specific to the identity of the carotenoid and the composition of the membrane itself. Therefore, different classes of carotenoids produce a different effect on the membrane, and different membrane phases are affected differently by carotenoids. It is apparent from our data that carotenoids do trigger the bilayer to become thinner. The mechanism by which this occurs depends on two competing factors, the ability of the lipid tails of opposing monolayers to either (1) compress or (2) interdigitate as the bilayer condenses. Indeed, carotenoids directly influence the physical properties via these two mechanisms, thus compacting the bilayer. However, the degree to which these competing mechanisms are utilized depends on the bilayer phase and the carotenoid identity.

  11. Engineering Lipid Bilayer Membranes for Protein Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Shuja; Dosoky, Noura Sayed; Williams, John Dalton

    2013-01-01

    Lipid membranes regulate the flow of nutrients and communication signaling between cells and protect the sub-cellular structures. Recent attempts to fabricate artificial systems using nanostructures that mimic the physiological properties of natural lipid bilayer membranes (LBM) fused with transmembrane proteins have helped demonstrate the importance of temperature, pH, ionic strength, adsorption behavior, conformational reorientation and surface density in cellular membranes which all affect the incorporation of proteins on solid surfaces. Much of this work is performed on artificial templates made of polymer sponges or porous materials based on alumina, mica, and porous silicon (PSi) surfaces. For example, porous silicon materials have high biocompatibility, biodegradability, and photoluminescence, which allow them to be used both as a support structure for lipid bilayers or a template to measure the electrochemical functionality of living cells grown over the surface as in vivo. The variety of these media, coupled with the complex physiological conditions present in living systems, warrant a summary and prospectus detailing which artificial systems provide the most promise for different biological conditions. This study summarizes the use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) data on artificial biological membranes that are closely matched with previously published biological systems using both black lipid membrane and patch clamp techniques. PMID:24185908

  12. Approaches toward functional fluid supported lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Kevin Chun-I.

    Planar supported lipid bilayers (PSLBs) have attracted immense interest for their properties as model cell membranes and for potential applications in biosensors and lab-on-a-chip devices. Our study covers three aspects of the construction, characterization, and application of functional PSLBs. First, a combination of micro-fabrication, the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique, and fusion of extruded small unilamellar vesicle (E-SUVs) in sequence was used to create polymer-cushioned PSLBs in a microarray format. Random lipo-glycocopolymer mixed with L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine (egg PC) was compressed at the air-water interface and transferred onto the photoresist-patterned substrate by the LB technique to achieve spatially directed deposition. Construction of planar bilayers in an aqueous environment was subsequently completed by vesicle fusion. Epifluorescence microscopy, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), and electrophoresis-relaxation were employed to examine the resulting patterns as well as to verify the two-dimensional mobility of the supported membrane systems. This approach could possibly provide a useful route to create functional arrays of polymer-supported lipid bilayers. Second, we report the formation of fluid planar biomembranes on hydrophilic silica aerogels and xerogels. When the aerogel/xerogel was pre-hydrated and then allowed to incubate in egg PC E-SUV solution, lipid bilayers were formed due to the favorable interaction of vesicles with the hydroxyl-abundant silica surface. FRAP was used to determine the lateral diffusivity of membranes on aerogels. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) was used to monitor the kinetics of the irreversible adsorption and fusion of vesicles into bilayers on xerogel thin films. Finally, we compared the formation of PSLBs with and without incorporation of monosialoganglioside GM1 (GM1) as the antigen for in situ antibody binding. Quantifiable differences were observed in the

  13. Drug loading to lipid-based cationic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalcanti, Leide P.; Konovalov, Oleg; Torriani, Iris L.; Haas, Heinrich

    2005-01-01

    Lipid-based cationic nanoparticles are a new promising option for tumor therapy, because they display enhanced binding and uptake at the neo-angiogenic endothelial cells, which a tumor needs for its nutrition and growth. By loading suitable cytotoxic compounds to the cationic carrier, the tumor endothelial and consequently also the tumor itself can be destroyed. For the development of such novel anti-tumor agents, the control of drug loading and drug release from the carrier matrix is essential. We have studied the incorporation of the hydrophobic anti-cancer agent Paclitaxel (PXL) into a variety of lipid matrices by X-Ray reflectivity measurements. Liposome suspensions from cationic and zwitterionic lipids, comprising different molar fractions of Paclitaxel, were deposited on planar glass substrates. After drying at controlled humidity, well ordered, oriented multilayer stacks were obtained, as proven by the presence of bilayer Bragg peaks to several orders in the reflectivity curves. The presence of the drug induced a decrease of the lipid bilayer spacing, and with an excess of drug, also Bragg peaks of drug crystals could be observed. From the results, insight into the solubility of Paclitaxel in the model membranes was obtained and a structural model of the organization of the drug in the membrane was derived. Results from subsequent pressure/area-isotherm and grazing incidence diffraction (GID) measurements performed with drug/lipid Langmuir monolayers were in accordance with these conjectures

  14. In situ atomic force microscope imaging of supported lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasgaard, Thomas; Leidy, Chad; Ipsen, John Hjorth

    2001-01-01

    In situ AFM images of phospholipase A/sub 2/ (PLA/sub 2/) hydrolysis of mica-supported one- and two-component lipid bilayers are presented. For one-component DPPC bilayers an enhanced enzymatic activity is observed towards preexisting defects in the bilayer. Phase separation is observed in two-co...

  15. Liquid immiscibility in model bilayer lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veatch, Sarah L.

    There is growing evidence that cell plasma membranes are laterally organized into "raft" regions in which particular lipids and proteins are concentrated. These domains have sub-micron dimensions and have been implicated in vital cell functions. Similar liquid domains are observed in model bilayer membrane mixtures that mimick cellular lipid compositions. In model membranes, domains can be large (microns) and can readily form in the absence of proteins. This thesis presents studies of liquid immiscibility in model membrane systems using two experimental methods. By fluorescence microscopy, this thesis documents that miscibility transitions occur in a wide variety of ternary lipid mixtures containing high melting temperature (saturated) lipids, low melting temperature (usually unsaturated) lipids, and cholesterol. I have constructed detailed miscibility phase diagrams for three separate ternary lipid mixtures (DOPC/DPPC/Chol, DOPC/PSM/Chol, and POPC/PSM/Chol). Phase separation is also observed in membranes of lipids extracted from human erythrocytes. NMR experiments probe lipid order and verify the coexistence of a saturated lipid and cholesterol rich liquid ordered (Lo) phase with a more disordered, unsaturated lipid rich liquid crystalline (Lalpha) phase at low temperatures. These experiments also find multiple thermodynamic transitions and lipid organization on different length-scales. This complexity is revealed because fluorescence microscopy and NMR probe lipid order at different length-scales (>1mum vs. ˜100nm). NMR detects small domains (˜80nm) at temperatures just below the miscibility transition, even though micron-scale domains are observed by fluorescent microscopy. NMR does detect large-scale ("100nm) demixing, but at a lower temperature. In addition, it has long been known that >10nm length-scale structure is present in many lipid mixtures containing cholesterol and at least one additional lipid species, though it is shown here that only a subset of

  16. Lipid peroxidation and water penetration in lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conte, Elena; Megli, Francesco Maria; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2012-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation plays a key role in the alteration of cell membrane's properties. Here we used as model systems multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) made of the first two products in the oxidative cascade of linoleoyl lecithin, namely 1-palmitoyl-2-(13-hydroperoxy-9,11-octadecanedienoyl)-lecithin (Hp......PLPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-(13-hydroxy-9,11-octadecanedienoyl)-lecithin (OHPLPC), exhibiting a hydroperoxide or a hydroxy group at position 13, respectively. The two oxidized lipids were used either pure or in a 1:1 molar ratio mixture with untreated 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-lecithin (PLPC). The model membranes...... were doped with spin-labeled lipids to study bilayer alterations by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Two different spin-labeled lipids were used, bearing the doxyl ring at position (n) 5 or 16: γ-palmitoyl-β-(n-doxylstearoyl)-lecithin (n-DSPPC) and n-doxylstearic acid (n-DSA). Small...

  17. Formation of supported lipid bilayers by vesicle fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Tania Kjellerup; Cardenas Gomez, Marite; Wacklin, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    phase-transition temperature of the lipid. We have carefully studied the formation mechanism of supported DPPC bilayers below and above the lipid melting temperature (Tm) by quartz crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy under continuous flow conditions. We also measured the structure of lipid......We have investigated the effect of deposition temperature on supported lipid bilayer formation via vesicle fusion. By using several complementary surface-sensitive techniques, we demonstrate that despite contradicting literature on the subject, high-quality bilayers can be formed below the main...... bilayers formed below or above Tmby neutron reflection and investigated the effect of subsequent cooling to below the Tm. Our results clearly show that a continuous supported bilayer can be formed with high surface coverage below the lipid Tm. We also demonstrate that the high dissipation responses...

  18. Bilayer Deformation, Pores, and Micellation Induced by Oxidized Lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonnoy, Phansiri; Jarerattanachat, Viwan; Karttunen, Mikko; Wong-Ekkabut, Jirasak

    2015-12-17

    The influence of different oxidized lipids on lipid bilayers was investigated with 16 individual 1 μs atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Binary mixtures of lipid bilayers of 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (PLPC) and its peroxide and aldehyde products were performed at different concentrations. In addition, an asymmetrical short chain lipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-decanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (PDPC), was used to compare the effects of polar/apolar groups in the lipid tail on lipid bilayer. Although water defects occurred with both aldehyde and peroxide lipids, full pore formation was observed only for aldehyde lipids. At medium concentrations the pores were stable. At higher concentrations, however, the pores became unstable and micellation occurred. Data analysis shows that aldehyde lipids' propensity for pore formation is due to their shorter and highly mobile tail. The highly polar peroxide lipids are stabilized by strong hydrogen bonds with interfacial water.

  19. Hydrophobic silver nanoparticles trapped in lipid bilayers: Size distribution, bilayer phase behavior, and optical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bothun Geoffrey D

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipid-based dispersion of nanoparticles provides a biologically inspired route to designing therapeutic agents and a means of reducing nanoparticle toxicity. Little is currently known on how the presence of nanoparticles influences lipid vesicle stability and bilayer phase behavior. In this work, the formation of aqueous lipid/nanoparticle assemblies (LNAs consisting of hydrophobic silver-decanethiol particles (5.7 ± 1.8 nm embedded within 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC bilayers is demonstrated as a function of the DPPC/Ag nanoparticle (AgNP ratio. The effect of nanoparticle loading on the size distribution, bilayer phase behavior, and bilayer fluidity is determined. Concomitantly, the effect of bilayer incorporation on the optical properties of the AgNPs is also examined. Results The dispersions were stable at 50°C where the bilayers existed in a liquid crystalline state, but phase separated at 25°C where the bilayers were in a gel state, consistent with vesicle aggregation below the lipid melting temperature. Formation of bilayer-embedded nanoparticles was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence anisotropy, where increasing nanoparticle concentration suppressed the lipid pretransition temperature, reduced the melting temperature, and disrupted gel phase bilayers. The characteristic surface plasmon resonance (SPR wavelength of the embedded nanoparticles was independent of the bilayer phase; however, the SPR absorbance was dependent on vesicle aggregation. Conclusion These results suggest that lipid bilayers can distort to accommodate large hydrophobic nanoparticles, relative to the thickness of the bilayer, and may provide insight into nanoparticle/biomembrane interactions and the design of multifunctional liposomal carriers.

  20. Assembly of RNA nanostructures on supported lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabkowska, Aleksandra P.; Michanek, Agnes; Jaeger, Luc; Rabe, Michael; Chworos, Arkadiusz; Höök, Fredrik; Nylander, Tommy; Sparr, Emma

    2014-12-01

    The assembly of nucleic acid nanostructures with controlled size and shape has large impact in the fields of nanotechnology, nanomedicine and synthetic biology. The directed arrangement of nano-structures at interfaces is important for many applications. In spite of this, the use of laterally mobile lipid bilayers to control RNA three-dimensional nanostructure formation on surfaces remains largely unexplored. Here, we direct the self-assembly of RNA building blocks into three-dimensional structures of RNA on fluid lipid bilayers composed of cationic 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) or mixtures of zwitterionic 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and cationic sphingosine. We demonstrate the stepwise supramolecular assembly of discrete building blocks through specific and selective RNA-RNA interactions, based on results from quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D), ellipsometry, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRF) experiments. The assembly can be controlled to give a densely packed single layer of RNA polyhedrons at the fluid lipid bilayer surface. We show that assembly of the 3D structure can be modulated by sequence specific interactions, surface charge and changes in the salt composition and concentration. In addition, the tertiary structure of the RNA polyhedron can be controllably switched from an extended structure to one that is dense and compact. The versatile approach to building up three-dimensional structures of RNA does not require modification of the surface or the RNA molecules, and can be used as a bottom-up means of nanofabrication of functionalized bio-mimicking surfaces.The assembly of nucleic acid nanostructures with controlled size and shape has large impact in the fields of nanotechnology, nanomedicine and synthetic biology. The directed arrangement of nano-structures at interfaces is important for many applications. In spite of

  1. The radiation effects on lipid bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikigai, Hajime; Matsuura, Tomio; Narita, Noboru; Ozawa, Atsushi.

    1980-01-01

    The Radiation effects on lipid bilayers are studied by the electron spin resonance. Egg lecithin liposomes and human erythrocytes are labeled with spin probes (5 SAL, 12 SAL). Effects of membrane fluidity by X-Ray (or ultraviolet) irradiation are measured by change of the order parameter S. The results obtained are as follows: 1) A similar tendency is observed on the order parameter S between X-Ray irradiated egg lecithin liposomes and human erythrocytes. 2) The rapid changes of the membrane fluidity are observed below 1 krad. The fluctuation of membrane fluidity decreases above 1 krad, consequently the membrane has a tendency changing to a rigid state at low dose area. 3) It is suggested that the more effective radicals are hydroxyl radicals and superoxide radicals. 4) The effects of ultraviolet irradiation with hydrogen peroxide show that hydroxyl radicals lead to changes of membrane fluidity. (author)

  2. Molecular packing and area compressibility of lipid bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, S.H.; King, G.I.

    1985-01-01

    Knowledge of the molecular packing of lipids and water in lipid bilayers is important for understanding bilayer mechanics and thermodynamics. Information on packing is most often obtained from x-ray or neutron diffraction measurements. Given the d spacing, composition, and partial specific volumes of the lipid and water, it is a simple matter to calculate the area per lipid molecule, bilayer thickness, and bilayer mass density. The partial specific volumes are commonly assumed to be those of bulk water and of lipid in excess water regardless of the degree of bilayer hydration. The authors present evidence here that these assumptions should be seriously questioned. At low hydrations, they find the head groups of egg and dioleoyl lecithin to be much less tightly packed than previously thought and the partial specific volume of water to be considerably smaller than 1 ml/g. Because the molecular packing affects the mechanical properties of bilayers, they use the results to reevaluate published experiments concerning the elastic area compressibility modulus of egg lecithin bilayers and the repulsive hydration force between bilayers

  3. Cholesterol Protects the Oxidized Lipid Bilayer from Water Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owen, Michael C; Kulig, Waldemar; Rog, Tomasz

    2018-01-01

    In an effort to delineate how cholesterol protects membrane structure under oxidative stress conditions, we monitored the changes to the structure of lipid bilayers comprising 30 mol% cholesterol and an increasing concentration of Class B oxidized 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC...... in a characteristic reduction in bilayer thickness and increase in area per lipid, thereby increasing the exposure of the membrane hydrophobic region to water. However, cholesterol was observed to help reduce water injury by moving into the bilayer core and forming more hydrogen bonds with the oxPLs. Cholesterol also...... resists altering its tilt angle, helping to maintain membrane integrity. Water that enters the 1-nm-thick core region remains part of the bulk water on either side of the bilayer, with relatively few water molecules able to traverse through the bilayer. In cholesterol-rich membranes, the bilayer does...

  4. Fluid lipid bilayers: Intermonolayer coupling and its thermodynamic manifestations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Lyngs; Miao, Ling; Ipsen, John Hjorth

    1998-01-01

    possesses "in-plane" degrees of freedom that characterize its physical or chemical state. Thermally excitable deformations of a Lipid bilayer in its geometrical conformation further impart to it ''out-of-plane'' degrees of freedom. In this paper we discuss the issue of intermonolayer coupling in terms......A fluid membrane of lipid bilayer consists of two individual molecular monolayers physically opposed to each other. This unique molecular architecture naturally necessitates the need to treat a lipid-bilayer membrane as one entity of two coupled two-dimensional systems (monolayers), each of which...

  5. Droplet shape analysis and permeability studies in droplet lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Sanhita S; Pincus, Alexandra; Guo, Bin; Faris, Gregory W

    2012-05-15

    We apply optical manipulation to prepare lipid bilayers between pairs of water droplets immersed in an oil matrix. These droplet pairs have a well-defined geometry allowing the use of droplet shape analysis to perform quantitative studies of the dynamics during bilayer formation and to determine time-dependent values for the droplet volumes, bilayer radius, bilayer contact angle, and droplet center-line approach velocity. During bilayer formation, the contact angle rises steadily to an equilibrium value determined by the bilayer adhesion energy. When there is a salt concentration imbalance between droplets, there is a measurable change in the droplet volume. We present an analytical expression for this volume change and use this expression to calculate the bilayer permeability to water.

  6. Reducible cationic lipids for gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzer, B; Byk, G; Frederic, M; Airiau, M; Blanche, F; Pitard, B; Scherman, D

    2001-01-01

    One of the main challenges of gene therapy remains the increase of gene delivery into eukaryotic cells. We tested whether intracellular DNA release, an essential step for gene transfer, could be facilitated by using reducible cationic DNA-delivery vectors. For this purpose, plasmid DNA was complexed with cationic lipids bearing a disulphide bond. This reduction-sensitive linker is expected to be reduced and cleaved in the reducing milieu of the cytoplasm, thus potentially improving DNA release and consequently transfection. The DNA--disulphide-lipid complexation was monitored by ethidium bromide exclusion, and the size of complexes was determined by dynamic light scattering. It was found that the reduction kinetics of disulphide groups in DNA--lipid complexes depended on the position of the disulphide linker within the lipid molecule. Furthermore, the internal structure of DNA--lipid particles was examined by small-angle X-ray scattering before and after lipid reduction. DNA release from lipid complexes was observed after the reduction of disulphide bonds of several lipids. Cell-transfection experiments suggested that complexes formed with selected reducible lipids resulted in up to 1000-fold higher reporter-gene activity, when compared with their analogues without disulphide bonds. In conclusion, reduction-sensitive groups introduced into cationic lipid backbones potentially allow enhanced DNA release from DNA--lipid complexes after intracellular reduction and represent a tool for improved vectorization. PMID:11389682

  7. Intermonolayer friction and surface shear viscosity of lipid bilayer membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Otter, Wouter K.; Shkulipa, S.

    2007-01-01

    The flow behavior of lipid bilayer membranes is characterized by a surface viscosity for in-plane shear deformations, and an intermonolayer friction coefficient for slip between the two leaflets of the bilayer. Both properties have been studied for a variety of coarse-grained double-tailed model

  8. Supported lipid bilayers as templates to design manganese oxide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    functions.1 Template directed assemblies of organic– inorganic structures include model bilayer membranes, vesicles and liposomes that have been used extensively to direct organization of the 2D structures.2–12 Among these soft templates, supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) have been gaining importance in recent times.

  9. Structural Dynamics Of The S4 Voltage-Sensor Helix In Lipid Bilayers Lacking Lipid Phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Magnus; Freites, J. Alfredo; Tobias, Douglas J.; White, Stephen H.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channels require lipid phosphates for functioning. The S4 helix, which carries the gating charges in the voltage-sensing domain (VSD), inserts into membranes while being stabilized by a protein-lipid interface in which lipid phosphates play an essential role. To examine the physical basis of the protein-lipid interface in the absence of lipid phosphates, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a KvAP S4 variant (S4mut) in bilayers with and without lipid phosphates. We find that in dioleoyltrimethylammoniumpropane (DOTAP) bilayers lacking lipid phosphates, the gating charges are solvated by anionic counterions and, hence, lack the bilayer support provided by phosphate-containing palmitoyloleoylglycerophosphocholine (POPC) bilayers. The result is a water-permeable bilayer with a significantly smaller deformations around the peptide. Together, these results provide an explanation for the non-functionality of VSDs in terms of a destabilizing protein-lipid interface. PMID:21692541

  10. Pairing of cholesterol with oxidized phospholipid species in lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Loubet, Bastien; Olzynska, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    We claim that (1) cholesterol protects bilayers from disruption caused by lipid oxidation by sequestering conical shaped oxidized lipid species such as 1-palmitoyl-2-azelaoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PZPC) away from phospholipid, because cholesterol and the oxidized lipid have complementary...... shapes and (2) mixtures of cholesterol and oxidized lipids can self-assemble into bilayers much like lysolipid–cholesterol mixtures. The evidence for bilayer protection comes from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. Unimodal size distributions of extruded...... vesicles (LUVETs) made up of a mixture of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and PZPC containing high amounts of PZPC are only obtained when cholesterol is present in high concentrations. In simulations, bilayers containing high amounts of PZPC become porous, unless cholesterol is also present...

  11. Intercalation of small hydrophobic molecules in lipid bilayers containing cholesterol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worcester, D.L.; Hamacher, K.; Kaiser, H.; Kulasekere, R.; Torbet, J.

    1994-01-01

    Partitioning of small hydrophobic molecules into lipid bilayers containing cholesterol has been studied using the 2XC diffractometer at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. Locations of the compounds were determined by Fourier difference methods with data from both deuterated and undeuterated compounds introduced into the bilayers from the vapor phase. Data fitting procedures were developed for determining how well the compounds were localized. The compounds were found to be localized in a narrow region at the center of the hydrophobic layer, between the two halves of the bilayer. The structures are therefore intercalated structures with the long axis of the molecules in the plane of the bilayer

  12. Microporous device for local electric recordings on model lipid bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufeld, Theresa; Schmidt, Christoph F; Steinem, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    A powerful approach for characterizing lipid membranes and embedded proteins is the reconstitution of model lipid bilayers. The extreme fragility of 5 nm thick bilayers is a challenge for device design and requires a trade off of stability against accessibility. We here present a microporous lab-on-chip device that allows us to form stable, solvent-free lipid bilayers from giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) in a geometry that provides a unique set of access possibilities. The device is constructed around a micro-fabricated silicon chip with clusters of 1 µm-diameter pores and provides optical access to the lipid bilayers for high-NA epifluorescence imaging. At the same time, solvent exchange is possible on both sides of the lipid bilayer. Complete coverage can be achieved with GUVs, so that voltages can be applied across the lipid bilayer and single-channel currents can be measured using external or integrated silver/silver chloride electrodes. We describe the micro-fabrication by standard cleanroom techniques and the characterization of the device by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and impedance spectroscopy. In proof-of-concept experiments we demonstrate that the device is capable of low-noise, single-ion-channel recordings. (paper)

  13. Formation of supported lipid bilayers containing phase-segregated domains and their interaction with gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melby, Eric S.; Mensch, Arielle C.; Lohse, Samuel E.; Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya; Murphy, Catherine J.; Hamers, Robert J.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2016-01-01

    The cell membrane represents an important biological interface that nanoparticles may encounter after being released into the environment. Interaction of nanoparticles with cellular membranes may alter membrane structure and function, lead to their uptake into cells, and elicit adverse biological responses. Supported lipid bilayers have proven to be valuable ex vivo models for biological membranes, allowing investigation of their mechanisms of interaction with nanoparticles with a degree of control impossible in living cells. To date, the majority of research on nanoparticle interaction with supported lipid bilayers has employed membranes composed of single or binary mixtures of phospholipids. Cellular membranes contain a wide variety of lipids and exhibit lateral organization. Ordered membrane domains enriched in specific membrane components are referred to as lipid rafts and have not been explored with respect to their interaction with nanoparticles. Here we develop model lipid raft-containing membranes amenable to investigation by a variety of surface-sensitive analytical techniques and demonstrate that lipid rafts influence the extent of nanoparticle attachment to model membranes. We determined conditions that allow reliable formation of bilayers containing rafts enriched in sphingomyelin and cholesterol and confirmed their morphology by structured illumination and atomic force microscopies. We demonstrate that lipid rafts increase attachment of cationic gold nanoparticles to model membranes under near physiological ionic strength conditions (0.1 M NaCl) at pH 7.4. We anticipate that these results will serve as the foundation for and motivate further study of nanoparticle interaction with compositionally varied lipid rafts.

  14. Insight into the interactions, residue snorkeling, and membrane disordering potency of a single antimicrobial peptide into different lipid bilayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Jafari

    Full Text Available Pardaxin, with a bend-helix-bend-helix structure, is a membrane-active antimicrobial peptide that its membrane activity depends on the lipid bilayer composition. Herein, all-atom molecular dynamics (MD simulations were performed to provide further molecular insight into the interactions, structural dynamics, orientation behavior, and cationic residues snorkeling of pardaxin in the DMPC, DPPC, POPC, POPG, POPG/POPE (3:1, and POPG/POPE (1:3 lipid bilayers. The results showed that the C-terminal helix of the peptide was maintained in all six types of the model-bilayers and pardaxin was tilted into the DMPC, DPPC, and POPG/POPE mixed bilayers more than the POPC and POPG bilayers. As well as, the structure of zwitterionic membranes was more affected by the peptide than the anionic bilayers. Taken together, the study demonstrated that the cationic residues of pardaxin snorkeled toward the interface of lipid bilayers and all phenylalanine residues of the peptide played important roles in the peptide-membrane interactions. We hope that this work will provide a better understanding of the interactions of antimicrobial peptides with the membranes.

  15. Hydrophobic matching between melittin and phosphocholine lipid bilayers having different thicknesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, William; Qian, Shuo

    2014-03-01

    The lipid bilayer of the cellular membrane is more than a simple medium that houses proteins with specific function. Instead, it is an elastic medium that plays an active role in the function of the membrane and that both drives the function of membrane proteins and alters its properties in response to their presence. The conceptual simplicity of membrane active peptides makes them attractive model systems for studying membrane-protein interactions. Melittin, a 27 amino acid cationic peptide having a helix-hinge-helix motif, is one of the most extensively studied examples. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements of melittin associated with lipid bilayer vesicles having different hydrocarbon thicknesses showed that the bilayer thickness stretches to match the thickness of the peptide in a manner consistent with a rigid, extended melittin having its helical axis oriented parallel to the bilayer normal. This behavior is surprising considering the helix-hinge-helix motif of the peptide and in contrast to studies indicating that transmembrane helices tilt with respect to the bilayer normal to accommodate differences in hydrophobic thicknesses. Possible sources of the discrepancy will be discussed and explored. This research at SNS and HFIR of ORNL was supported by the US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (ERKP291).

  16. Lipid Bilayer Composition Affects Transmembrane Protein Orientation and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie D. Hickey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sperm membranes change in structure and composition upon ejaculation to undergo capacitation, a molecular transformation which enables spermatozoa to undergo the acrosome reaction and be capable of fertilization. Changes to the membrane environment including lipid composition, specifically lipid microdomains, may be responsible for enabling capacitation. To study the effect of lipid environment on proteins, liposomes were created using lipids extracted from bull sperm membranes, with or without a protein (Na+ K+-ATPase or -amylase. Protein incorporation, function, and orientation were determined. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET confirmed protein inclusion in the lipid bilayer, and protein function was confirmed using a colourometric assay of phosphate production from ATP cleavage. In the native lipid liposomes, ATPase was oriented with the subunit facing the outer leaflet, while changing the lipid composition to 50% native lipids and 50% exogenous lipids significantly altered this orientation of Na+ K+-ATPase within the membranes.

  17. Interaction of alpha-latroinsectotoxin from Latrodectus mactans venom with bilayer lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatursky OYa; Pashkov, V N; Bulgacov, O V; Grishin, E V

    1995-01-26

    alpha-Latroinsectotoxin (LIT) from Latrodectus mactans venom increased the conductance of bilayer lipid membranes (BLM) by inducing channel like activity. The channels formed had a maximal single channel conductance of 5 pS in 10 mM CaCl2 solution. This process occurred more rapidly in symmetrical 10 mM CaCl2 solution than in equimolar KCl or NaCl. The LIT induced conductance showed pronounced rectification, that was dependent upon the face of the BLM to which the LIT was applied. This suggests that the LIT molecules incorporate into the bilayer lipid membrane in an oriented manner. The ion channels formed in bilayer phospholipid membrane by LIT are cation selective. The permeability of divalent cations decreased in the order Ba2+ > Ca2+ > Mg2+ > Cd2+ > Zn2+ (Zn2+ and Cd2+ blocked effectively LIT channels with the ratio of Ca2+trans and Cd2+cis or Zn2+cis of 1:1). Selectivity of LIT to monovalent cations was not high and was Ca2+ sensitive. Our data suggest that LIT has at least two Ca(2+)-binding sites, a high affinity site and low one (pK of binding is 2.4). As a result, the binding kinetics of Ca2+ with the toxin shows a high positive cooperativity (Hill coefficient, (h) = 5.95) and that dimerization might be a prerequisite to channel formation. Temperature dependence of conductance of LIT treated lipid bilayers in 100 mM KCl and 10 mM CaCl2 solutions was also determined: 18.9 +/- 2.11 kJ/mol and 28.537 +/- 1.678 kJ/mol, respectively.

  18. Interface-mediation of lipid bilayer organization and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mize, Hannah E; Blanchard, G J

    2016-06-22

    We report on the morphology and dynamics of planar supported lipid bilayer structures as a function of pH and ionic strength of the aqueous overlayer. Supported lipid bilayers composed of three components (phosphocholine, sphingomyelin and cholesterol) are known to exhibit phase segregation, with the characteristic domain sizes dependent on the amount and identity of each constituent, and the composition of the aqueous overlayer in contact with the bilayer. We report on fluorescence anisotropy decay imaging measurements of a rhodamine chromophore tethered to the headgroup of a phosphoethanolamine, where anisotropy decay images were acquired as a function of solution overlayer pH and ionic strength. The data reveal a two-component anisotropy decay under all conditions, with the faster time constant being largely independent of pH and ionic strength and the slower component depending on pH and ionic strength in different manners. For liposomes of the same composition, a single exponential anisotropy decay was seen. We interpret this difference in terms of bilayer curvature and support surface-bilayer interactions, and the pH and ionic strength dependencies in terms of ionic screening and protonation in the bilayer headgroup region.

  19. Polyglutamine expansion in huntingtin increases its insertion into lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Kimberly B; Schewkunow, Vitali; Sapp, Ellen; Masso, Nicholas; Wanker, Erich E; DiFiglia, Marian; Goldmann, Wolfgang H

    2009-09-25

    An expanded polyglutamine (Q) tract (>37Q) in huntingtin (htt) causes Huntington disease. Htt associates with membranes and polyglutamine expansion in htt may alter membrane function in Huntington disease through a mechanism that is not known. Here we used differential scanning calorimetry to examine the effects of polyQ expansion in htt on its insertion into lipid bilayers. We prepared synthetic lipid vesicles composed of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine and tested interactions of htt amino acids 1-89 with 20Q, 32Q or 53Q with the vesicles. GST-htt1-89 with 53Q inserted into synthetic lipid vesicles significantly more than GST-htt1-89 with 20Q or 32Q. We speculate that by inserting more into cell membranes, mutant huntingtin could increase disorder within the lipid bilayer and thereby disturb cellular membrane function.

  20. Photoinduced electron transfer of chlorophyll in lipid bilayer system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Photoinduced electron transfer from chlorophyll-athrough the interface of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) headgroup of the lipid bilayers was studied with electron magnetic resonance (EMR). The photoproduced radicals were identified with electron spin resonance (ESR) and radical yields of chlorophyll- ...

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Hydrophilic Pores in Lipid Bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leontiadou, Hari; Mark, Alan E.; Marrink, Siewert J.

    Hydrophilic pores are formed in peptide free lipid bilayers under mechanical stress. It has been proposed that the transport of ionic species across such membranes is largely determined by the existence of such meta-stable hydrophilic pores. To study the properties of these structures and understand

  2. Localisation of BODIPY-labelled phosphatidylcholines in lipid bilayers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šachl, Radek; Boldyrev, I.; Johansson, L. B. A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 23 (2010), s. 6027-6034 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/1090 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : phosphatidylcholines * lipid bilayer * electron transfer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.454, year: 2010

  3. Determinants of sodium and calcium adsorption onto neutral lipid bilayers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Javanainen, M.; Melcrová, Adéla; Magarkar, Aniket; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Hof, Martin; Jungwirth, Pavel; Martinez-Seara, Hector

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 46, Suppl 1 (2017), S121 ISSN 0175-7571. [IUPAB congress /19./ and EBSA congress /11./. 16.07.2017-20.07.2017, Edinburgh] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : sodium * calcium * lipid bilayer Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  4. Semiconductor particle mediated photoelectron transfers in bilayer lipid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fendler, J.H.; Baral, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses semiconductor particles in situ generated on the cis surface of glyceryl monooleate (GMO) bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs), that have been used to mediate photoelectric effects. The presence of semiconductors on the BLM surface is addressed. The observed photoelectric effects are rationalized and presented

  5. Formation of Cell Membrane Component Domains in Artificial Lipid Bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tero, Ryugo; Fukumoto, Kohei; Motegi, Toshinori; Yoshida, Miyu; Niwano, Michio; Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi

    2017-12-20

    The lipid bilayer environment around membrane proteins strongly affects their structure and functions. Here, we aimed to study the fusion of proteoliposomes (PLs) derived from cultured cells with an artificial lipid bilayer membrane and the distribution of the PL components after the fusion. PLs, which were extracted as a crude membrane fraction from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, formed isolated domains in a supported lipid bilayer (SLB), comprising phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and cholesterol (Chol), after the fusion. Observation with a fluorescence microscope and an atomic force microscope showed that the membrane fusion occurred selectively at microdomains in the PC + PE + Chol-SLB, and that almost all the components of the PL were retained in the domain. PLs derived from human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK) cells also formed isolated domains in the PC + PE + Chol-SLB, but their fusion kinetics was different from that of the CHO-PLs. We attempted to explain the mechanism of the PL-SLB fusion and the difference between CHO- and HEK-PLs, based on a kinetic model. The domains that contained the whole cell membrane components provided environments similar to that of natural cell membranes, and were thus effective for studying membrane proteins using artificial lipid bilayer membranes.

  6. A Molecular Dynamics Study of the Structural and Dynamical Properties of Putative Arsenic Substituted Lipid Bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Juwita

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell membranes are composed mainly of phospholipids which are in turn, composed of five major chemical elements: carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, and phosphorus. Recent studies have suggested the possibility of sustaining life if the phosphorus is substituted by arsenic. Although this issue is still controversial, it is of interest to investigate the properties of arsenated-lipid bilayers to evaluate this possibility. In this study, we simulated arsenated-lipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-arsenocholine (POAC, lipid bilayers using all-atom molecular dynamics to understand basic structural and dynamical properties, in particular, the differences from analogous 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, (POPC lipid bilayers. Our simulations showed that POAC lipid bilayers have distinct structural and dynamical properties from those of native POPC lipid bilayers. Relative to POPC lipid bilayers, POAC lipid bilayers have a more compact structure with smaller lateral areas and greater order. The compact structure of POAC lipid bilayers is due to the fact that more inter-lipid salt bridges are formed with arsenate-choline compared to the phosphate-choline of POPC lipid bilayers. These inter-lipid salt bridges bind POAC lipids together and also slow down the head group rotation and lateral diffusion of POAC lipids. Thus, it would be anticipated that POAC and POPC lipid bilayers would have different biological implications.

  7. Protein-induced bilayer perturbations: Lipid ordering and hydrophobic coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, Frederic N.R.; Laursen, Ib; Bohr, Henrik; Nielsen, Claus Helix

    2009-01-01

    The host lipid bilayer is increasingly being recognized as an important non-specific regulator of membrane protein function. Despite considerable progress the interplay between hydrophobic coupling and lipid ordering is still elusive. We use electron spin resonance (ESR) to study the interaction between the model protein gramicidin and lipid bilayers of varying thickness. The free energy of the interaction is up to -6 kJ/mol; thus not strongly favored over lipid-lipid interactions. Incorporation of gramicidin results in increased order parameters with increased protein concentration and hydrophobic mismatch. Our findings also show that at high protein:lipid ratios the lipids are motionally restricted but not completely immobilized. Both exchange on and off rate values for the lipid ↔ gramicidin interaction are lowest at optimal hydrophobic matching. Hydrophobic mismatch of few A results in up to 10-fold increased exchange rates as compared to the 'optimal' match situation pointing to the regulatory role of hydrophobic coupling in lipid-protein interactions.

  8. Effect of PEGylation on Drug Entry into Lipid Bilayer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rissanen, S.; Kumorek, M.; Martinez-Seara, H.

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is a polymer commonly used for functionalization of drug molecules to increase their bloodstream lifetime, hence efficacy. However, the interactions between the PEGylated drugs and biomembranes are not clearly understood. In this study, we employed atomic-scale molecular...... dynamics (MD) simulations to consider the behavior of two drug molecules functionalized with PEG (tetraphenylporphyrin used in cancer phototherapy and biochanin A belonging to the isoflavone family) in the presence of a lipid bilayer. The commonly held view is that functionalization of a drug molecule...... with a polymer acts as an entropic barrier, inhibiting the penetration of the drug molecule through a cell membrane. Our results indicate that in the bloodstream there is an additional source of electrostatic repulsive interactions between the PEGylated drugs and the lipid bilayer. Both the PEG chain and lipids...

  9. Novel gramicidin formulations in cationic lipid as broad-spectrum microbicidal agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragioto DA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Danielle AMT Ragioto, Letícia DM Carrasco, Ana M Carmona-Ribeiro Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB is an antimicrobial lipid that can be dispersed as large closed bilayers (LV or bilayer disks (BF. Gramicidin (Gr is an antimicrobial peptide assembling as channels in membranes and increasing their permeability towards cations. In mammalian cells, DODAB and Gr have the drawbacks of Gram-positive resistance and high toxicity, respectively. In this study, DODAB bilayers incorporating Gr showed good antimicrobial activity and low toxicity. Techniques employed were spectroscopy, photon correlation spectroscopy for sizing and evaluation of the surface potential at the shear plane, turbidimetric detection of dissipation of osmotic gradients in LV/Gr, determination of bacterial cell lysis, and counting of colony-forming units. There was quantitative incorporation of Gr and development of functional channels in LV. Gr increased the bilayer charge density in LV but did not affect the BF charge density, with localization of Gr at the BF borders. DODAB/Gr formulations substantially reduce Gr toxicity against eukaryotic cells and advantageously broaden the antimicrobial activity spectrum, effectively killing Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria with occurrence of cell lysis. Keywords: antimicrobial peptides, cationic bilayers, bilayer fragments, dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide, gramicidin A, self-assembly

  10. Observation of undulation motion of lipid bilayers by neutron spin echo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Norifumi L.; Seto, Hideki; Hishida, Mafumi

    2010-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of synthesized phospholipids have been well investigated as model biomembranes. These lipids usually self-assemble into regular stacks of bilayers with a characteristic repeat distance on the order of nm, whereas real biomembrane exist as single bilayers. The key phenomenon in understanding the formation of single isolated bilayers in 'unbinding' of lipid bilayers, in which the inter-bilayer distance of lipid bilayers diverges by the steric interaction due to the membrane undulation. In this paper, we show some results of neutron spin-echo (NSE) experiments to investigate the effect of the steric interaction on unbinding and related phenomena. (author)

  11. Triglyceride Blisters in Lipid Bilayers: Implications for Lipid Droplet Biogenesis and the Mobile Lipid Signal in Cancer Cell Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Duelund, Lars; Pakkanen, Kirsi Inkeri

    2010-01-01

    aggregates of unknown function present in malignant cells, and to the early biogenesis of lipid droplets accommodated between the two leaflets of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The TO aggregates give the bilayer a blister-like appearance, and will hinder the formation of multi-lamellar phases in model......Triglycerides have a limited solubility, around 3%, in phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. Using millisecond-scale course grained molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the model lipid bilayer can accommodate a higher concentration of triolein (TO) than earlier anticipated, by sequestering...... triolein molecules to the bilayer center in the form of a disordered, isotropic, mobile neutral lipid aggregate, at least 17 nm in diameter, which forms spontaneously, and remains stable on at least the microsecond time scale. The results give credence to the hotly debated existence of mobile neutral lipid...

  12. Formation and characterization of artificial lipid bilayers on optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Pauline; Dreesen, Laurent

    Transports across cellular membranes are at the basis of a lot of biological processes such as the transmission of information in neurons. Their characterization is therefore of crucial interest. As they are equivalent to biological membranes, artificial lipid bilayers can be created to study membranes and transmembrane proteins properties or transmembrane transports. The aim of this work is to develop a new method for the fabrication of artificial membranes, based on the use of optical fibers as support for the bilayer, and for their characterization by fluorescence measurements. We use microfluidics on fibers to create two phospholipid monolayers that we approach close enough to form a bilayer. The membrane formation is checked using fluorescein or a fluorescent sodium probe, Tetra (tetramethylammonium) salt (sodium green), whose optical signal depends on sodium concentration.

  13. Manipulating lipid bilayer material properties using biologically active amphipathic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafuzzaman, Md; Lampson, M. A.; Greathouse, D. V.; Koeppe, R. E., II; Andersen, O. S.

    2006-07-01

    Lipid bilayers are elastic bodies with properties that can be manipulated/controlled by the adsorption of amphipathic molecules. The resulting changes in bilayer elasticity have been shown to regulate integral membrane protein function. To further understand the amphiphile-induced modulation of bilayer material properties (thickness, intrinsic monolayer curvature and elastic moduli), we examined how an enantiomeric pair of viral anti-fusion peptides (AFPs)—Z-Gly-D-Phe and Z-Gly-Phe, where Z denotes a benzyloxycarbonyl group, as well as Z-Phe-Tyr and Z-D-Phe-Phe-Gly—alters the function of enantiomeric pairs of gramicidin channels of different lengths in planar bilayers. For both short and long channels, the channel lifetimes and appearance frequencies increase as linear functions of the aqueous AFP concentration, with no apparent effect on the single-channel conductance. These changes in channel function do not depend on the chirality of the channels or the AFPs. At pH 7.0, the relative changes in channel lifetimes do not vary when the channel length is varied, indicating that these compounds exert their effects primarily by causing a positive-going change in the intrinsic monolayer curvature. At pH 4.0, the AFPs are more potent than at pH 7.0 and have greater effects on the shorter channels, indicating that these compounds now change the bilayer elastic moduli. When AFPs of different anti-fusion potencies are compared, the rank order of the anti-fusion activity and the channel-modifying activity is similar, but the relative changes in anti-fusion potency are larger than the changes in channel-modifying activity. We conclude that gramicidin channels are useful as molecular force transducers to probe the influence of small amphiphiles upon lipid bilayer material properties.

  14. Partition, orientation and mobility of ubiquinones in a lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galassi, Vanesa Viviana; Arantes, Guilherme Menegon

    2015-12-01

    Ubiquinone is the universal mobile charge carrier involved in biological electron transfer processes. Its redox properties and biological function depend on the molecular partition and lateral diffusion over biological membranes. However, ubiquinone localization and dynamics within lipid bilayers are long debated and still uncertain. Here we present molecular dynamics simulations of several ubiquinone homologs with variable isoprenoid tail lengths complexed to phosphatidylcholine bilayers. Initially, a new force-field parametrization for ubiquinone is derived from and compared to high level quantum chemical data. Free energy profiles for ubiquinone insertion in the lipid bilayer are obtained with the new force-field. The profiles allow for the determination of the equilibrium location of ubiquinone in the membrane as well as for the validation of the simulation model by direct comparison with experimental partition coefficients. A detailed analysis of structural properties and interactions shows that the ubiquinone polar head group is localized at the water-bilayer interface at the same depth of the lipid glycerol groups and oriented normal to the membrane plane. Both the localization and orientation of ubiquinone head groups do not change significantly when increasing the number of isoprenoid units. The isoprenoid tail is extended and packed with the lipid acyl chains. For ubiquinones with long tails, the terminal isoprenoid units have high flexibility. Calculated ubiquinone diffusion coefficients are similar to that found for the phosphatidylcholine lipid. These results may have further implications for the mechanisms of ubiquinone transport and binding to respiratory and photosynthetic protein complexes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Modification of the CHARMM force field for DMPC lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Högberg, Carl-Johan; Nikitin, Alexei M; Lyubartsev, Alexander P

    2008-11-15

    The CHARMM force field for DMPC lipids was modified in order to improve agreement with experiment for a number of important properties of hydrated lipid bilayer. The modification consists in introduction of a scaling factor 0.83 for 1-4 electrostatic interactions (between atoms separated by three covalent bonds), which provides correct transgauche ratio in the alkane tails, and recalculation of the headgroup charges on the basis of HF/6-311(d,p) ab-initio computations. Both rigid TIP3P and flexible SPC water models were used with the new lipid model, showing similar results. The new model in a 75 ns simulation has shown a correct value of the area per lipid at zero surface tension, as well as good agreement with the experiment for the electron density, structure factor, and order parameters, including those in the headgroup part of lipids. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Nonadditive Compositional Curvature Energetics of Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodt, A. J.; Venable, R. M.; Lyman, E.; Pastor, R. W.

    2016-09-01

    The unique properties of the individual lipids that compose biological membranes together determine the energetics of the surface. The energetics of the surface, in turn, govern the formation of membrane structures and membrane reshaping processes, and thus they will underlie cellular-scale models of viral fusion, vesicle-dependent transport, and lateral organization relevant to signaling. The spontaneous curvature, to the best of our knowledge, is always assumed to be additive. We describe observations from simulations of unexpected nonadditive compositional curvature energetics of two lipids essential to the plasma membrane: sphingomyelin and cholesterol. A model is developed that connects molecular interactions to curvature stress, and which explains the role of local composition. Cholesterol is shown to lower the number of effective Kuhn segments of saturated acyl chains, reducing lateral pressure below the neutral surface of bending and favoring positive curvature. The effect is not observed for unsaturated (flexible) acyl chains. Likewise, hydrogen bonding between sphingomyelin lipids leads to positive curvature, but only at sufficient concentration, below which the lipid prefers negative curvature.

  17. Physisorbed Polymer-Tethered Lipid Bilayer with Lipopolymer Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph A. Naumann

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Physisorbed polymer-tethered lipid bilayers consisting of phospholipids and lipopolymers represent an attractive planar model membrane platform, in which bilayer fluidity and membrane elastic properties can be regulated through lipopolymer molar concentration. Herein we report a method for the fabrication of such a planar model membrane system with a lateral gradient of lipopolymer density. In addition, a procedure is described, which leads to a sharp boundary between regions of low and high lipopolymer molar concentrations. Resulting gradients and sharp boundaries are visualized on the basis of membrane buckling structures at elevated lipopolymer concentrations using epifluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, results from spot photobleaching experiments are presented, which provide insight into the lipid lateral fluidity in these model membrane architectures. The presented experimental data highlight a planar, solid-supported membrane characterized by fascinating length scale-dependent dynamics and elastic properties with remarkable parallels to those observed in cellular membranes.

  18. Predicting proton titration in cationic micelle and bilayer environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Brian H.; Eike, David M.; Murch, Bruce P.; Koenig, Peter H.; Shen, Jana K.

    2014-08-01

    Knowledge of the protonation behavior of pH-sensitive molecules in micelles and bilayers has significant implications in consumer product development and biomedical applications. However, the calculation of pKa's in such environments proves challenging using traditional structure-based calculations. Here we apply all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics with explicit ions and titratable water to calculate the pKa of a fatty acid molecule in a micelle of dodecyl trimethylammonium chloride and liquid as well as gel-phase bilayers of diethyl ester dimethylammonium chloride. Interestingly, the pKa of the fatty acid in the gel bilayer is 5.4, 0.4 units lower than that in the analogous liquid bilayer or micelle, despite the fact that the protonated carboxylic group is significantly more desolvated in the gel bilayer. This work illustrates the capability of all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics in capturing the delicate balance in the free energies of desolvation and Coulombic interactions. It also shows the importance of the explicit treatment of ions in sampling the protonation states. The ability to model dynamics of pH-responsive substrates in a bilayer environment is useful for improving fabric care products as well as our understanding of the side effects of anti-inflammatory drugs.

  19. Non stochastic distribution of single channels in planar lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilnikov, O V; Merzliak, P G; Yuldasheva, L N; Nogueira, R A; Rodrigues, C G

    1995-02-15

    The selectivity of the planar lipid bilayers modified by two channel-forming proteins (alpha-toxin S. aureus and colicin Ia) was examined. It was established that in all cases the value of zero current potential depended on the amount of open ion channels and increased with the number of channels (from one to about 5-7). These facts point out both the interactions among ion channels and their non stochastic distribution on the membrane surface.

  20. A Neutron View of Proteins in Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    Despite the growing number of atomic-resolution membrane protein structures, direct structural information about proteins in their native membrane environment is scarce. This problem is particularly relevant in the case of the highly-charged S1-S4 voltage- sensing domains responsible for nerve impulses, where interactions with the lipid bilayer are critical for the function of voltage-activated potassium channels. We have used neutron diffraction, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the structure and hydration of bilayer membranes containing S1-S4 voltage-sensing domains. Our results show that voltage sensors adopt transmembrane orientations, cause a modest reshaping of the surrounding lipid bilayer, and that water molecules intimately interact with the protein within the membrane. These structural findings reveal that voltage sensors have evolved to interact with the lipid membrane while keeping the energetic and structural perturbations to a minimum, and that water penetrates into the membrane to hydrate charged residues and shape the transmembrane electric field.

  1. Phase behavior of pure lipid bilayers with mismatch interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhengping; Laradji, Mohamed; Guo, Hong

    1992-01-01

    but could instead be described in terms of short-range fluctuations close to a critical point. We have extended the Pink-Green-Chapman model by including hydrophobic mismatch interactions between the lipid acyl-chain conformational states. We used Monte Carlo techniques to examine the phase behavior...... of the extended model and found that it exhibits first-order phase transitions above a critical value of the mismatch parameter. The results are discussed in relation to previous theoretical work as well as experimental measurements on lipid bilayers....

  2. Spatial-resolution limits in mass spectrometry imaging of supported lipid bilayers and individual lipid vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, Anders; Kollmer, Felix; Sohn, Sascha; Höök, Fredrik; Sjövall, Peter

    2010-03-15

    The capabilities of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) with regards to limits in lateral resolution for biological samples are examined using supported lipid bilayers and individual lipid vesicles, both being among the most commonly used cell membrane mimics. Using supported 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayers confined to a SiO(2) substrate by a chemically modified gold surface, the edge of the lipid bilayer was analyzed by imaging TOF-SIMS to assess the lateral resolution. The results using 80 keV Bi(3)(2+) primary ions show that, under optimized conditions, mass spectrometry imaging of specific unlabeled lipid fragments is possible with sub-100 nm lateral resolution. Comparison of the secondary ion yields for the phosphocholine ion (m/z 184) from a POPC bilayer using C(60)(+) or Bi(3)(+) primary ions showed similar results, indicating an advantage of Bi(3)(+) primary ions for high-resolution imaging of lipid membranes, due to their better demonstrated focusing capability. Moreover, using 300 nm vesicles of different lipid composition, the capability to detect and chemically identify individual submicrometer lipid vesicles at separations down to approximately 1 microm is demonstrated.

  3. Lipid-bilayer-assisted two-dimensional self-assembly of DNA origami nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly is a ubiquitous approach to the design and fabrication of novel supermolecular architectures. Here we report a strategy termed ‘lipid-bilayer-assisted self-assembly' that is used to assemble DNA origami nanostructures into two-dimensional lattices. DNA origami structures are electrostatically adsorbed onto a mica-supported zwitterionic lipid bilayer in the presence of divalent cations. We demonstrate that the bilayer-adsorbed origami units are mobile on the surface and self-assembled into large micrometre-sized lattices in their lateral dimensions. Using high-speed atomic force microscopy imaging, a variety of dynamic processes involved in the formation of the lattice, such as fusion, reorganization and defect filling, are successfully visualized. The surface modifiability of the assembled lattice is also demonstrated by in situ decoration with streptavidin molecules. Our approach provides a new strategy for preparing versatile scaffolds for nanofabrication and paves the way for organizing functional nanodevices in a micrometer space. PMID:26310995

  4. Bactericidal catechins damage the lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikigai, H; Nakae, T; Hara, Y; Shimamura, T

    1993-04-08

    The mode of antibacterial action of, the green tea (Camellia sinensis) extracts, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg) and (-)-epicatechin (EC) was investigated. Strong bactericidal EGCg caused leakage of 5,6-carboxyfluorescein from phosphatidylcholine liposomes (PC), but EC with very weak bactericidal activity caused little damage to the membrane. Phosphatidylserine and dicetyl phosphate partially protected the membrane from EGCg-mediated damage when reconstituted into the liposome membrane with PC. EGCg, but not EC, caused strong aggregation and NPN-fluorescence quenching of PC-liposomes and these actions were markedly lowered in the presence of negatively charged lipids. These results show that bactericidal catechins primarily act on and damage bacterial membranes. The observation that Gram-negative bacteria are more resistant to bactericidal catechins than Gram-positive bacteria can be explained to some extent by the presence of negatively charged lipopolysaccharide.

  5. El Tor hemolysin of Vibrio cholerae O1 forms channels in planar lipid bilayer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikigai, H; Ono, T; Iwata, M; Nakae, T; Shimamura, T

    1997-05-15

    We investigated the channel formation by El Tor hemolysin (molecular mass, 65 kDa) of Vibrio cholerae O1 biotype El Tor in planar lipid bilayers. The El Tor hemolysin channel exhibited asymmetric and hyperbolic membrane current with increasing membrane potential, meaning that the channel is voltage dependent. The zero-current membrane potential measured in KCI solution showed that permeability ratio PK+/PCl- was 0.16, indicating that the channel is 6-fold more anion selective over cation. The hemolysin channel frequently flickered in the presence of divalent cations, suggesting that the channel spontaneously opens and closes. These data imply that the El Tor hemolysin damages target cells by the formation of transmembrane channels and, consequently, is the cause of osmotic cytolysis.

  6. Electrodeless QCM-D for lipid bilayer applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Angelika; Zäch, Michael; Svedhem, Sofia; Kasemo, Bengt

    2011-01-15

    An electrodeless quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) setup is used to monitor the formation of supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) on bare quartz crystal sensor surfaces. The kinetic behavior of the formation of a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) SLB on SiO(2) surfaces is discussed and compared for three cases: (i) a standard SiO(2) film deposited onto the gold electrode of a quartz crystal, (ii) an electrodeless quartz crystal with a sputter-coated SiO(2) film, and (iii) an uncoated electrodeless quartz crystal sensor surface. We demonstrate, supported by imaging the SLB on an uncoated electrodeless surface using atomic force microscopy (AFM), that a defect-free, completely covering bilayer is formed in all three cases. Differences in the kinetics of the SLB formation on the different sensor surfaces are attributed to differences in surface roughness. The latter assumption is supported by imaging the different surfaces using AFM. We show furthermore that electrodeless quartz crystal sensors can be used not only for the formation of neutral SLBs but also for positively and negatively charged SLBs. Based on our results we propose electrodeless QCM-D to be a valuable technique for lipid bilayer and related applications providing several advantages compared to electrode-coated surfaces like optical transparency, longer lifetime, and reduced costs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of calcium on direct incorporation of membrane proteins into in-plane lipid bilayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berquand, Alexandre; Levy, Daniel; Gubellini, Francesca; Le Grimellec, Christian; Milhiet, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2007-01-01

    Reconstitution of transmembrane proteins by direct incorporation into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) is a new method to provide suitable samples for high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis of membrane proteins. First experiments have reported successful incorporation of proteins into detergent-destabilized SLBs. Here, we analyzed by AFM the incorporation of membrane proteins in the presence of calcium, a divalent cation functionally important for several membrane proteins. Using lipid-phase-separated membranes, we first show that calcium strongly stabilizes the SLBs decreasing the insertion of low cmc detergents, dodecyl-β-maltoside, dodecyl-β-thiomaltoside, and N-hexadecylphosphocholine (Fos-Choline-16) and further insertion of proteins. However, high yield of protein insertion is recovered in the presence of calcium by increasing the detergent concentration in the solution. These data revealed the importance of the calcium in the structure of SLBs and provided new insights into the mechanism of protein insertion into these model membranes

  8. Interaction of Different Divalent Metal Ions with Lipid Bilayer: Impact on the Encapsulation of Doxorubicin by Lipid Bilayer and Lipoplex Mediated Deintercalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anupam; Adhikari, Chandan; Chakraborty, Anjan

    2017-03-02

    In this article, we investigate the influence of different metal ions (Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , and Zn 2+ ) on binding of an anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) to DMPC bilayer and lipoplex mediated deintercalation of DOX from DOX-DNA complex. Our study reveals that lipid bilayer in the presence of different metal ions displays much higher binding affinity toward DOX than bare lipid bilayer does. Further, this affinity for a particular metal ion increases linearly with metal ion concentration. The steady state and time-resolved fluorescence studies reveal that binding of DOX with lipid bilayer in the presence of different metal ions varies in the order of Ca 2+ > Mg 2+ > Zn 2+ . The rotational relaxation of DOX in the presence of different metal ions takes place in the same order. We explain these phenomena in the light of alteration of the physical properties brought about by metal ions. Moreover, we find that binding pattern of metal ions with lipid head groups influences the intake of DOX in lipid bilayer. We exploit the binding of DOX with bilayer to study the deintercalation of DOX from DOX-DNA complex. We observe that with increase in metal ion concentration the deintercalation increases. Among all metal ions, Ca 2+ appears to be most effective in deintercalation compared to other metal ions. The time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy and circular dichroism measurements indicate that in the presence of Ca 2+ , lipid bilayer offer strongest interaction with DNA while the same is weakest for Zn 2+ . This explains the highest percentage of deintercalation of DOX from drug-DNA complex in the presence of Ca 2+ . Overall the present study demonstrates a new strategy that binding of drug molecules with lipid bilayer and deintercalation of the same from drug-DNA complex can be tuned by modulation of lipid bilayer with different metal ions and their concentration.

  9. Mixed lipid bilayers with locally varying spontaneous curvature and bending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueguen, Guillaume; Destainville, Nicolas; Manghi, Manoel

    2014-08-01

    A model of lipid bilayers made of a mixture of two lipids with different average compositions on both leaflets, is developed. A Landau Hamiltonian describing the lipid-lipid interactions on each leaflet, with two lipidic fields ψ 1 and ψ 2, is coupled to a Helfrich one, accounting for the membrane elasticity, via both a local spontaneous curvature, which varies as C 0 + C 1(ψ 1 - ψ 2/2), and a bending modulus equal to κ 0 + κ 1(ψ 1 + ψ 2)/2. This model allows us to define curved patches as membrane domains where the asymmetry in composition, ψ 1 - ψ 2, is large, and thick and stiff patches where ψ 1 + ψ 2 is large. These thick patches are good candidates for being lipidic rafts, as observed in cell membranes, which are composed primarily of saturated lipids forming a liquid-ordered domain and are known to be thick and flat nano-domains. The lipid-lipid structure factors and correlation functions are computed for globally spherical membranes and planar ones and for a whole set of parameters including the surface tension and the coupling in the two leaflet compositions. Phase diagrams are established, within a Gaussian approximation, showing the occurrence of two types of Structure Disordered phases, with correlations between either curved or thick patches, and an Ordered phase, corresponding to the divergence of the structure factor at a finite wave vector. The varying bending modulus plays a central role for curved membranes, where the driving force κ 1 C 0 (2) is balanced by the line tension, to form raft domains of size ranging from 10 to 100 nm. For planar membranes, raft domains emerge via the cross-correlation with curved domains. A global picture emerges from curvature-induced mechanisms, described in the literature for planar membranes, to coupled curvature- and bending-induced mechanisms in curved membranes forming a closed vesicle.

  10. Formation of supported lipid bilayers of charged E. coli lipids on modified gold by vesicle fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana F. Márquez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a simple way of fusing E. coli lipid vesicles onto a gold surface. Supported lipid bilayers on metal surfaces are interesting for several reasons: transducing a biological signal to an electric readout, using surface analytical tools such as Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR, Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy, Neutron Reflectivity or Electrochemistry. The most widely used method to prepare supported lipid membranes is fusion of preexisting liposomes. It is quite efficient on hydrophilic surfaces such as glass, mica or SiO2, but vesicle fusion on metals and metal oxide surfaces (as gold, titanium oxide or indium tin oxide, remains a challenge, particularly for vesicles containing charged lipids, as is the case of bacterial lipids. We describe a simple method based on modifying the gold surface with a charged mercaptopropionic acid self-assembled monolayer and liposomes partially solubilized with detergent. The formed bilayers were characterized using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM. Some advantages of this protocol are that the stability of the self-assembled monolayer allows for repeated use of the substrate after detergent removal of the bilayer and that the amount of detergent required for optimal fusion can be determined previously using the lipid-detergent solubility curve.

  11. Protein-lipid interactions in bilayer membranes: A lattice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, David A.; Chapman, Dennis

    1979-01-01

    A lattice model has been developed to study the effects of intrinsic membrane proteins upon the thermodynamic properties of a lipid bilayer membrane. We assume that only nearest-neighbor van der Waals and steric interactions are important and that the polar group interactions can be represented by effective pressure—area terms. Phase diagrams, the temperature T0, which locates the gel—fluid melting, the transition enthalpy, and correlations were calculated by mean field and cluster approximations. Average lipid chain areas and chain areas when the lipid is in a given protein environment were obtained. Proteins that have a “smooth” homogeneous surface (“cholesterol-like”) and those that have inhomogeneous surfaces or that bind lipids specifically were considered. We find that T0 can vary depending upon the interactions and that another peak can appear upon the shoulder of the main peak which reflects the melting of a eutectic mixture. The transition enthalpy decreases generally, as was found before, but when a second peak appears departures from this behavior reflect aspects of the eutectic mixture. We find that proteins have significant nonzero probabilities for being adjacent to one another so that no unbroken “annulus” of lipid necessarily exists around a protein. If T0 does not increase much, or decreases, with increasing c, then lipids adjacent to a protein cannot all be all-trans on the time scale (10-7 sec) of our system. Around a protein the lipid correlation depth is about one lipid layer, and this increases with c. Possible consequences of ignoring changes in polar group interactions due to clustering of proteins are discussed. PMID:286996

  12. Anisotropic metal growth on phospholipid nanodiscs via lipid bilayer expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertel, Jana; Keller, Adrian; Prinz, Julia; Schreiber, Benjamin; Hübner, René; Kerbusch, Jochen; Bald, Ilko; Fahmy, Karim

    2016-05-01

    Self-assembling biomolecules provide attractive templates for the preparation of metallic nanostructures. However, the intuitive transfer of the “outer shape” of the assembled macromolecules to the final metallic particle depends on the intermolecular forces among the biomolecules which compete with interactions between template molecules and the metal during metallization. The shape of the bio-template may thus be more dynamic than generally assumed. Here, we have studied the metallization of phospholipid nanodiscs which are discoidal particles of ~10 nm diameter containing a lipid bilayer ~5 nm thick. Using negatively charged lipids, electrostatic adsorption of amine-coated Au nanoparticles was achieved and followed by electroless gold deposition. Whereas Au nanoparticle adsorption preserves the shape of the bio-template, metallization proceeds via invasion of Au into the hydrophobic core of the nanodisc. Thereby, the lipidic phase induces a lateral growth that increases the diameter but not the original thickness of the template. Infrared spectroscopy reveals lipid expansion and suggests the existence of internal gaps in the metallized nanodiscs, which is confirmed by surface-enhanced Raman scattering from the encapsulated lipids. Interference of metallic growth with non-covalent interactions can thus become itself a shape-determining factor in the metallization of particularly soft and structurally anisotropic biomaterials.

  13. Asymmetric dipping of bacteriophage M13 coat protein with increasing lipid bilayer thickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stopar, D.; Koehorst, R.B.M.; Spruijt, R.B.; Hemminga, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge about the vertical movement of a protein with respect to the lipid bilayer plane is important to understand protein functionality in the biological membrane. In this work, the vertical displacement of bacteriophage M13 major coat protein in a lipid bilayer is used as a model system to

  14. Simulation studies of protein-induced bilayer deformations, and lipid-induced protein tilting, on a mesoscopic model for lipid bilayers with embedded proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venturoli, M.; Smit, B.; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena

    2005-01-01

    in membranes, we considered proteins of different hydrophobic length ( as well as different sizes). We studied the cooperative behavior of the lipid-protein system at mesoscopic time-and lengthscales. In particular, we correlated in a systematic way the protein-induced bilayer perturbation, and the lipid......Biological membranes are complex and highly cooperative structures. To relate biomembrane structure to their biological function it is often necessary to consider simpler systems. Lipid bilayers composed of one or two lipid species, and with embedded proteins, provide a model system for biological...... membranes. Here we present a mesoscopic model for lipid bilayers with embedded proteins, which we have studied with the help of the dissipative particle dynamics simulation technique. Because hydrophobic matching is believed to be one of the main physical mechanisms regulating lipid-protein interactions...

  15. Phase diagrams and lipid domains in multicomponent lipid bilayer mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigenson, Gerald W

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the phase behavior of biological membranes is helped by the study of more simple systems. Model membranes that have as few as 3 components exhibit complex phase behavior that can be well described, providing insight for biological membranes. A number of different studies are in agreement on general findings for some compositional phase diagrams, in particular, those that model the outer leaflet of animal cell plasma membranes. These model mixtures include cholesterol, together with one high-melting lipid and one low-melting lipid. An interesting finding is of two categories of such 3-component mixtures, leading to what we term Type I and Type II compositional phase diagrams. The latter have phase regions of macroscopic coexisting domains of [Lalpha+Lbeta+Lo] and of [Lalpha+Lo], with domains resolved under the light microscope. Type I mixtures have the same phase coexistence regions, but the domains seem to be nanoscopic. Type I mixtures are likely to be better models for biological membranes.

  16. High-field NMR studies of molecular recognition and structure-function relationships in antimicrobial piscidins at the water-lipid bilayer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Jones, Shiela M; Nikolayeva, Yelena N; Vollmar, Breanna S; Wagner, Tim J; Gor'kov, Peter L; Brey, William W; Manion, McKenna N; Daugherty, Ken C; Cotten, Myriam

    2006-04-26

    High magnetic field solid-state NMR was performed on amphipathic cationic antimicrobial peptides from fish to characterize their secondary structure and orientation in hydrated phospholipid bilayers. High-resolution distance and orientational restraints on 13C- and 15N-labeled amidated piscidins 1 and 3 provided site-specific information establishing alpha-helicity and an orientation parallel to the membrane surface. Few membrane-bound natural peptides with this topology have been structurally studied at high resolution in the presence of hydrated lipid bilayers. This orientation was foreseen since the partitioning of amphipathic cationic antimicrobial peptides at the water-bilayer interface allows for favorable peptide-lipid interactions, and it may be related to the mechanism of action. The enhanced resolution obtained at 900 MHz evidences a determinant advantage of ultra-high-field NMR for the structural determination of multiple-labeled peptides and proteins.

  17. [Formation of stabile cupola-like lipid bilayer membranes with a mobile plateau Gibbs boundary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, E V; Smirnova, E Iu; Frolov, A V; Iakovenko, E V; Antonov, V F

    1993-01-01

    Stable bilayer lipid membrane with mobile Platear-Gibbs border have been formed. The predominant condition of the formation is the presence of lipid coverage on the teflon surface near the hole. The formation process includes transformation of the initial planar lipid bilayer into cupola-shaped one by bowing of the lipid bilayer due to hydrostatic pressure, movement of the PGb along the teflon surface. The bilayer area estimated by electric capacitance increases from 0.1 x 10(-8) F to 21 x 10(-8) F. Electric conductance of the lipid bilayer has not changed except for the phase transition and membrane collapse. The electric capacitance of the BLM formed from hydrogenated egg lecithin was changed by cooling between 60 degrees and 40 degrees C with the maximum at about phase transition range. The individual membrane sustains several scannings of the temperature without disruption which is an evidence of the stability of the cupola-shaped membranes.

  18. The complex nature of calcium cation interactions with phospholipid bilayers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Melcrová, Adéla; Pokorná, Šárka; Pullanchery, S.; Kohagen, Miriam; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Hof, Martin; Jungwirth, Pavel; Cremer, P. S.; Cwiklik, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, DEC 2016 (2016), č. článku 38035. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-01074S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : FLUORESCENCE SOLVENT RELAXATION * MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS * ALKALINE-EARTH CATIONS Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  19. Theoretical studies of lipid bilayer electroporation using molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Zachary Alan

    Computer simulations of physical, chemical, and biological systems have improved tremendously over the past five decades. From simple studies of liquid argon in the 1960s to fully atomistic simulations of entire viruses in the past few years, recent advances in high-performance computing have continuously enabled simulations to bridge the gap between scientific theory and experiment. Molecular dynamics simulations in particular have allowed for the direct observation of spatial and temporal events which are at present inaccessible to experiments. For this dissertation I employ all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to study the transient, electric field-induced poration (or electroporation) of phospholipid bilayers at MV/m electric fields. Phospholipid bilayers are the dominant constituents of cell membranes and act as both a barrier and gatekeeper to the cell interior. This makes their structural integrity and susceptibility to external perturbations an important topic for study, especially as the density of electromagnetic radiation in our environment is increasing steadily. The primary goal of this dissertation is to understand the specific physical and biological mechanisms which facilitate electroporation, and to connect our simulated observations to experiments with live cells and to continuum models which seek to describe the underlying biological processes of electroporation. In Chapter 1 I begin with a brief introduction to phospholipids and phospholipid bilayers, followed by an extensive overview of electroporation and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. The following chapters will then focus on peer-reviewed and published work we performed, or on existing projects which are currently being prepared for submission. Chapter 2 looks at how external electric fields affect both oxidized and unoxidized lipid bilayers as a function of oxidation concentration and oxidized lipid type. Oxidative damage to cell membranes represents a physiologically relevant

  20. Triglyceride blisters in lipid bilayers: implications for lipid droplet biogenesis and the mobile lipid signal in cancer cell membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Khandelia

    Full Text Available Triglycerides have a limited solubility, around 3%, in phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. Using millisecond-scale course grained molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the model lipid bilayer can accommodate a higher concentration of triolein (TO than earlier anticipated, by sequestering triolein molecules to the bilayer center in the form of a disordered, isotropic, mobile neutral lipid aggregate, at least 17 nm in diameter, which forms spontaneously, and remains stable on at least the microsecond time scale. The results give credence to the hotly debated existence of mobile neutral lipid aggregates of unknown function present in malignant cells, and to the early biogenesis of lipid droplets accommodated between the two leaflets of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The TO aggregates give the bilayer a blister-like appearance, and will hinder the formation of multi-lamellar phases in model, and possibly living membranes. The blisters will result in anomalous membrane probe partitioning, which should be accounted for in the interpretation of probe-related measurements.

  1. Corrugation of Phase-Separated Lipid Bilayers Supported by Nanoporous Silica Xerogel Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goksu, E I; Nellis, B A; Lin, W; Satcher Jr., J H; Groves, J T; Risbud, S H; Longo, M L

    2008-10-30

    Lipid bilayers supported by substrates with nanometer-scale surface corrugations holds interest in understanding both nanoparticle-membrane interactions and the challenges of constructing models of cell membranes on surfaces with desirable properties, e.g. porosity. Here, we successfully form a two-phase (gel-fluid) lipid bilayer supported by nanoporous silica xerogel. Surface topology, diffusion, and lipid density in comparison to mica-supported lipid bilayers were characterized by AFM, FRAP, FCS, and quantitative fluorescence microscopy, respectively. We found that the two-phase lipid bilayer follows the xerogel surface contours. The corrugation imparted on the lipid bilayer results in a lipid density that is twice that on a flat mica surface. In direct agreement with the doubling of actual bilayer area in a projected area, we find that the lateral diffusion coefficient (D) of lipids on xerogel ({approx}1.7 {micro}m{sup 2}/s) is predictably lower than on mica ({approx}4.1 {micro}m{sup 2}/s) by both FRAP and FCS techniques. Furthermore, the gel-phase domains on xerogel compared to mica were larger and less numerous. Overall, our results suggest the presence of a relatively defect-free continuous two-phase bilayer that penetrates approximately midway into the first layer of {approx}50 nm xerogel beads.

  2. Morphogenesis of protrusions from confined lipid bilayers mediated by mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Marino; Staykova, Margarita; Rahimi, Mohammad; Stone, Howard A.

    2012-02-01

    Biological membranes adopt a wide range of shapes that structure and give functionality to cells, compartmentalizing the cytosol, forming organelles, or regulating their area. The formation, stabilization, and remodeling of these structures is generally attributed to localized forces or to biochemical processes (insertion of proteins, active compositional regulation). Noting that in the crowded intra and extra-cellular environments membranes are highly constrained, we explore to what extent can mechanics explain the shape of protrusions out of confined membranes. For this purpose, we developed an in-vitro system coupling a lipid bilayer to the strain-controlled deformation of an elastic sheet (Staykova et al, PNAS 108, 2011). We show that upon contracting the elastic support, tubular or spherical protrusions grow out of the adhered membrane, which can be reversibly controlled with strain and osmolarity without resorting to localized forces or chemical alterations of the bilayer. The morphologies produced by our minimal system are ubiquitous in cells, suggesting mechanics may be a simple and generic organizing principle. We can understand most of our observations in terms of a phase diagram accounting for elasticity, adhesion, and the limited amount of area and volume available.

  3. Quantitative visualization of passive transport across bilayer lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grime, John M. A.; Edwards, Martin A.; Rudd, Nicola C.; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to predict and interpret membrane permeation coefficients is of critical importance, particularly because passive transport is crucial for the effective delivery of many pharmaceutical agents to intracellular targets. We present a method for the quantitative measurement of the permeation coefficients of protonophores by using laser confocal scanning microscopy coupled to microelectrochemistry, which is amenable to precise modeling with the finite element method. The technique delivers well defined and high mass transport rates and allows rapid visualization of the entire pH distribution on both the cis and trans side of model bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs). A homologous series of carboxylic acids was investigated as probe molecules for BLMs composed of soybean phosphatidylcholine. Significantly, the permeation coefficient decreased with acyl tail length contrary to previous work and to Overton's rule. The reasons for this difference are considered, and we suggest that the applicability of Overton's rule requires re-evaluation. PMID:18787114

  4. New optical method for measuring the bending elasticity of lipid bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minetti, C; Dubois, F; Vitkova, V; Bivas, I

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of the elasticity of lipid bilayer structures is fundamental for new developments in biophysics, pharmacology and biomedical research. Lipid vesicles are readily prepared in laboratory conditions and employed for studying the physical properties of lipid membranes. The thermal fluctuation analysis of the shape of lipid vesicles (or flicker spectroscopy) is one of the experimental methods widely used for the measurement of the bending modulus of lipid bilayers. We present direct phase measurements performed on dilute vesicular suspensions by means of a new optical method exploiting holographic microscopy. For the bending constant of phosphatidylcholine bilayers we report the value of 23k B T in agreement with values previously measured by micropipette aspiration, electrodeformation and flicker spectroscopy of giant lipid vesicles. The application of this novel approach for the evaluation of the bending elasticity of lipid membranes opens the way to future developments in the phase measurements on lipid vesicles for the evaluation of their mechanical constants. (paper)

  5. Cationic liposome co-encapsulation of SMAC mimetic and zVAD using a novel lipid bilayer fusion loaded with MLKL-pDNA for tumour inhibition in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dan; Zhao, Linshu; Lin, Junzhong; Zhao, Yun; Zheng, Yu

    2018-01-01

    The increase in multidrug resistance among colon cancer cells presents a challenge for the development of effective therapies. Small-molecule analogues of second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase (SMAC) mimetic in association with mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL)-pDNA and z-VAD-fmk have shown ideal antitumor effects in colon cancer cells in vitro via induction of RIP3-dependent necroptosis. To achieve synergistic antitumor effects in vivo, liposomes loaded with SMAC mimetic, MLKL-pDNA and z-VAD-fmk have been developed using novel lipid fusion methods to co-localise the molecules of interest within the tumour cells. The co-encapsulation liposome (MLKL-zVAD-BV6-LP) had a high entrapment efficiency of approximately 95% for both zVAD and BV6 and was able to condense MLKL-pDNA very well. The vectors showed good biocompatibility, tumour targeting and small-molecule co-localisation. In a CT26 mouse model, the MLKL-zVAD-BV6-LP exhibited a tumour-suppression rate of over 60% in vivo, which was significantly higher than that of both the null-liposome and coadministration groups. Above all, the co-encapsulation system provided a novel approach to combination tumour therapy.

  6. Structural and mechanical properties of cardiolipin lipid bilayers determined using neutron spin echo, small angle neutron and X-ray scattering, and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jianjun; Cheng, Xiaolin; Sharp, Melissa; Ho, Chian-Sing; Khadka, Nawal; Katsaras, John

    2015-01-07

    The detailed structural and mechanical properties of a tetraoleoyl cardiolipin (TOCL) bilayer were determined using neutron spin echo (NSE) spectroscopy, small angle neutron and X-ray scattering (SANS and SAXS, respectively), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We used MD simulations to develop a scattering density profile (SDP) model, which was then utilized to jointly refine SANS and SAXS data. In addition to commonly reported lipid bilayer structural parameters, component distributions were obtained, including the volume probability, electron density and neutron scattering length density. Of note, the distance between electron density maxima DHH (39.4 Å) and the hydrocarbon chain thickness 2DC (29.1 Å) of TOCL bilayers were both found to be larger than the corresponding values for dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers. Conversely, TOCL bilayers have a smaller overall bilayer thickness DB (36.7 Å), primarily due to their smaller headgroup volume per phosphate. SDP analysis yielded a lipid area of 129.8 Å(2), indicating that the cross-sectional area per oleoyl chain in TOCL bilayers (i.e., 32.5 Å(2)) is smaller than that for DOPC bilayers. Multiple sets of MD simulations were performed with the lipid area constrained at different values. The calculated surface tension versus lipid area resulted in a lateral area compressibility modulus KA of 342 mN m(-1), which is slightly larger compared to DOPC bilayers. Model free comparison to experimental scattering data revealed the best simulated TOCL bilayer from which detailed molecular interactions were determined. Specifically, Na(+) cations were found to interact most strongly with the glycerol hydroxyl linkage, followed by the phosphate and backbone carbonyl oxygens. Inter- and intra-lipid interactions were facilitated by hydrogen bonding between the glycerol hydroxyl and phosphate oxygen, but not with the backbone carbonyl. Finally, analysis of the intermediate scattering functions from NSE

  7. Lipid bilayer disruption by oligomeric α-synuclein depends on bilayer charge and accessibility of the hydrophobic core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooijen, Bart; Claessens, Mireille Maria Anna Elisabeth; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    Soluble oligomeric aggregates of α-synuclein have been implicated to play a central role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Disruption and permeabilization of lipid bilayers by α-synuclein oligomers is postulated as a toxic mechanism, but the molecular details controlling the

  8. Phase behavior of supported lipid bilayers: A systematic study by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poursoroush, Asma; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; Laradji, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Solid-supported lipid bilayers are utilized by experimental scientists as models for biological membranes because of their stability. However, compared to free standing bilayers, their close proximity to the substrate may affect their phase behavior. As this is still poorly understood, and few co...

  9. Simulation of gel phase formation and melting in lipid bilayers using a coarse grained model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marrink, SJ; Risselada, J; Mark, AE

    The transformation between a gel and a fluid phase in dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers has been simulated using a coarse grained (CG) model by cooling bilayer patches composed of up to 8000 lipids. The critical step in the transformation process is the nucleation of a gel cluster

  10. A criterion to identify the equilibration time in lipid bilayer simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo D. Porasso

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of establishing a criterion for identifying when a lipid bilayer has reached steady state using the molecular dynamics simulation technique, lipid bilayers of different composition in their liquid crystalline phase were simulated in aqueous solution in presence of CaCl_2 as electrolyte, at different concentration levels. In this regard, we used two different lipid bilayer systems: one composed by 288 DPPC (DiPalmitoylPhosphatidylCholine and another constituted by 288 DPPS (DiPalmitoylPhosphatidylSerine. In this sense, for both type of lipid bilayers, we have studied the temporal evolution of some lipids properties, such as the surface area per lipid, the deuterium order parameter, the lipid hydration and the lipid-calcium coordination. From their analysis, it became evident how each property has a different time to achieve equilibrium. The following order was found, from faster property to slower property: coordination of ions $approx$ deuterium order parameter > area per lipid $approx$ hydration. Consequently, when the hydration of lipids or the mean area per lipid are stable, we can ensure that the lipid membrane has reached the steady state.

  11. Electrostatic control of the dynamics of lipid bilayer self-spreading using a nanogap gate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashimura, Y; Sumitomo, K; Furukawa, K

    2014-01-01

    The electrostatic control of lipid bilayer self-spreading was investigated using a device equipped with a nanogap gate. A series of mixtures containing negatively charged and uncharged lipids were employed to tune the charge of a membrane. We found that when a voltage is applied on a lipid bilayer passing through a nanogap, the effect of a voltage application on the dynamics depended largely on the charge of the membrane. For rich charged lipid compositions (>10 mol%), the self-spreading was electrostatically controlled applying an electric field to the nanogap. The origin of the behaviour is the electrostatic trapping of charged lipids. The trapped lipids close the nanogap gate, thus preventing any lipid molecules from passing through it. For poor charged lipid compositions (∼1 mol%), no electrostatic trapping occurred even when a lipid bilayer reached the nanogap. Instead, we observed the cessation of self-spreading after a sufficient post-passage time interval, indicating that the translational flow force of self-spreading overcomes the trapping force. For uncharged lipid compositions, there was no electrostatic trapping throughout the measurement. The results suggest that the lipid charge plays a vital role in the electrostatic control mechanism and allow us to control lipid bilayer formation both spatially and temporally. (paper)

  12. Cation-π interactions as lipid-specific anchors for phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauffel, Cédric; Yang, Boqian; He, Tao; Roberts, Mary F; Gershenson, Anne; Reuter, Nathalie

    2013-04-17

    Amphitropic proteins, such as the virulence factor phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from Bacillus thuringiensis , often depend on lipid-specific recognition of target membranes. However, the recognition mechanisms for zwitterionic lipids, such as phosphatidylcholine, which is enriched in the outer leaflet of eukaryotic cells, are not well understood. A 500 ns long molecular dynamics simulation of PI-PLC at the surface of a lipid bilayer revealed a strikingly high number of interactions between tyrosines at the interfacial binding site and lipid choline groups with structures characteristic of cation-π interactions. Membrane affinities of PI-PLC tyrosine variants mostly tracked the simulation results, falling into two classes: (i) those with minor losses in affinity, Kd(mutant)/Kd(wild-type) ≤ 5 and (ii) those where the apparent Kd was 50-200 times higher than wild-type. Estimating ΔΔG for these Tyr/PC interactions from the apparent Kd values reveals that the free energy associated with class I is ~1 kcal/mol, comparable to the value predicted by the Wimley-White hydrophobicity scale. In contrast, removal of class II tyrosines has a higher energy cost: ~2.5 kcal/mol toward pure PC vesicles. These higher energies correlate well with the occupancy of the cation-π adducts throughout the MD simulation. Together, these results strongly indicate that PI-PLC interacts with PC headgroups via cation-π interactions with tyrosine residues and suggest that cation-π interactions at the interface may be a mechanism for specific lipid recognition by amphitropic and membrane proteins.

  13. Lytic and non-lytic permeabilization of cardiolipin-containing lipid bilayers induced by cytochrome C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Xu

    Full Text Available The release of cytochrome c (cyt c from mitochondria is an important early step during cellular apoptosis, however the precise mechanism by which the outer mitochondrial membrane becomes permeable to these proteins is as yet unclear. Inspired by our previous observation of cyt c crossing the membrane barrier of giant unilamellar vesicle model systems, we investigate the interaction of cyt c with cardiolipin (CL-containing membranes using the innovative droplet bilayer system that permits electrochemical measurements with simultaneous microscopy observation. We find that cyt c can permeabilize CL-containing membranes by induction of lipid pores in a dose-dependent manner, with membrane lysis eventually observed at relatively high (µM cyt c concentrations due to widespread pore formation in the membrane destabilizing its bilayer structure. Surprisingly, as cyt c concentration is further increased, we find a regime with exceptionally high permeability where a stable membrane barrier is still maintained between droplet compartments. This unusual non-lytic state has a long lifetime (>20 h and can be reversibly formed by mechanically separating the droplets before reforming the contact area between them. The transitions between behavioural regimes are electrostatically driven, demonstrated by their suppression with increasing ionic concentrations and their dependence on CL composition. While membrane permeability could also be induced by cationic PAMAM dendrimers, the non-lytic, highly permeable membrane state could not be reproduced using these synthetic polymers, indicating that details in the structure of cyt c beyond simply possessing a cationic net charge are important for the emergence of this unconventional membrane state. These unexpected findings may hold significance for the mechanism by which cyt c escapes into the cytosol of cells during apoptosis.

  14. A lipid E-MAP identifies Ubx2 as a critical regulator of lipid saturation and lipid bilayer stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Surma, Michal A; Klose, Christian; Peng, Debby

    2013-01-01

    Biological membranes are complex, and the mechanisms underlying their homeostasis are incompletely understood. Here, we present a quantitative genetic interaction map (E-MAP) focused on various aspects of lipid biology, including lipid metabolism, sorting, and trafficking. This E-MAP contains ∼25...... are suppressed by the supplementation of unsaturated FAs. Our results point toward the existence of dedicated bilayer stress responses for membrane homeostasis.......Biological membranes are complex, and the mechanisms underlying their homeostasis are incompletely understood. Here, we present a quantitative genetic interaction map (E-MAP) focused on various aspects of lipid biology, including lipid metabolism, sorting, and trafficking. This E-MAP contains ∼250......) desaturase Ole1p. Loss of Ubx2p affects the transcriptional control of OLE1, resulting in impaired FA desaturation and a severe shift toward more saturated membrane lipids. Both the induction of the unfolded protein response and aberrant nuclear membrane morphologies observed in cells lacking UBX2...

  15. Localized surface plasmon microscopy of submicron domain structures of mixed lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Koyo; Miyazaki, Ryosuke; Terakado, Goro; Okazaki, Takashi; Morigaki, Kenichi; Kano, Hiroshi

    2012-09-01

    We propose scanning localized surface plasmon microscopy of mixed lipid bilayers with submicron domain structures. Our observation technique, which employs localized surface plasmons excited on a flat metal surface as a sensing probe, provides non-label and non-contact imaging with the spatial resolution of ∼ 170 nm. We experimentally show that submicron domain structures of mixed lipid bilayers can be observed. A detailed analysis finds that the domains are classified into two groups.

  16. Experimental and theoretical studies of emodin interacting with a lipid bilayer of DMPC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Antonio R; Duarte, Evandro L; Stassen, Hubert; Lamy, M Teresa; Coutinho, Kaline

    2017-10-01

    Emodin is one of the most abundant anthraquinone derivatives found in nature. It is the active principle of some traditional herbal medicines with known biological activities. In this work, we combined experimental and theoretical studies to reveal information about location, orientation, interaction and perturbing effects of Emodin on lipid bilayers, where we have taken into account the neutral form of the Emodin (EMH) and its anionic/deprotonated form (EM - ). Using both UV/Visible spectrophotometric techniques and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we showed that both EMH and EM - are located in a lipid membrane. Additionally, using MD simulations, we revealed that both forms of Emodin are very close to glycerol groups of the lipid molecules, with the EMH inserted more deeply into the bilayer and more disoriented relative to the normal of the membrane when compared with the EM - , which is more exposed to interfacial water. Analysis of several structural properties of acyl chains of the lipids in a hydrated pure DMPC bilayer and in the presence of Emodin revealed that both EMH and EM - affect the lipid bilayer, resulting in a remarkable disorder of the bilayer in the vicinity of the Emodin. However, the disorder caused by EMH is weaker than that caused by EM - . Our results suggest that these disorders caused by Emodin might lead to distinct effects on lipid bilayers including its disruption which are reported in the literature.

  17. Diffusive nature of xenon anesthetic changes properties of a lipid bilayer: molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Eiji; Akimoto, Takuma; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Hirano, Yoshinori; Yasui, Masato; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2012-08-02

    Effects of general anesthesia can be controllable by the ambient pressure. We perform molecular dynamics simulations for a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine lipid bilayer with or without xenon molecules by changing the pressure to elucidate the mechanism of the pressure reversal of general anesthesia. According to the diffusive nature of xenon molecules in the lipid bilayer, a decrease in the orientational order of the lipid tails, an increase in the area and volume per lipid molecule, and an increase in the diffusivity of lipid molecules are observed. We show that the properties of the lipid bilayer with xenon molecules at high pressure come close to those without xenon molecules at 0.1 MPa. Furthermore, we find that xenon molecules are concentrated in the middle of the lipid bilayer at high pressures by the pushing effect and that the diffusivity of xenon molecules is suppressed. These results suggest that the pressure reversal originates from a jamming and suppression of the diffusivity of xenon molecules in lipid bilayers.

  18. Calculation of the electrostatic potential of lipid bilayers from molecular dynamics simulations: methodological issues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurtovenko, Andrey A; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    of the electrostatic potential from atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations of lipid bilayers. We discuss two slightly different forms of Poisson equation that are normally used to calculate the membrane potential: (i) a classical form when the potential and the electric field are chosen to be zero on one......, for asymmetric lipid bilayers, the second approach is no longer appropriate due to a nonzero net dipole moment across a simulation box with a single asymmetric bilayer. We demonstrate that in this case the electrostatic potential can adequately be described by the classical form of Poisson equation, provided...

  19. The interaction of new piroxicam analogues with lipid bilayers--a calorimetric and fluorescence spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniewska, Jadwiga; Szczęśniak-Sięga, Berenika; Poła, Andrzej; Sroda-Pomianek, Kamila; Malinka, Wiesław; Michalak, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to assess the ability of new piroxicam analogues to interact with the lipid bilayers. The results of calorimetric and fluorescence spectroscopic experiments of two new synthesized analogues of piroxicam, named PR17 and PR18 on the phase behavior of phospholipid bilayers and fluorescence quenching of fluorescent probes (Laurdan and Prodan), which molecular location within membranes is known with certainty, are shown in present work. The presented results revealed that, depending on the details of chemical structure, the studied compounds penetrated the lipid bilayers.

  20. Tuning curvature and stability of monoolein bilayers by designer lipid-like peptide surfactants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anan Yaghmur

    Full Text Available This study reports the effect of loading four different charged designer lipid-like short anionic and cationic peptide surfactants on the fully hydrated monoolein (MO-based Pn3m phase (Q(224. The studied peptide surfactants comprise seven amino acid residues, namely A(6D, DA(6, A(6K, and KA(6. D (aspartic acid bears two negative charges, K (lysine bears one positive charge, and A (alanine constitutes the hydrophobic tail. To elucidate the impact of these peptide surfactants, the ternary MO/peptide/water system has been investigated using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, within a certain range of peptide concentrations (Rbilayer curvature and the stability are modulated by: i the peptide/lipid molar ratio, ii the peptide molecular structure (the degree of hydrophobicity, the type of the hydrophilic amino acid, and the headgroup location, and iii the temperature. The anionic peptide surfactants, A(6D and DA(6, exhibit the strongest surface activity. At low peptide concentrations (R = 0.01, the Pn3m structure is still preserved, but its lattice increases due to the strong electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged peptide molecules, which are incorporated into the interface. This means that the anionic peptides have the effect of enlarging the water channels and thus they serve to enhance the accommodation of positively charged water-soluble active molecules in the Pn3m phase. At higher peptide concentration (R = 0.10, the lipid bilayers are destabilized and the structural transition from the Pn3m to the inverted hexagonal phase (H(2 is induced. For the cationic peptides, our study illustrates how even minor modifications, such as changing the location of the headgroup (A(6K vs. KA(6, affects significantly the peptide's effectiveness. Only KA(6 displays a propensity to promote the formation of H(2, which suggests that KA(6 molecules have a higher degree of

  1. Quantifying the Relationship between Curvature and Electric Potential in Lipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, Dennis S; Lomholt, Michael A; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2016-06-02

    Cellular membranes mediate vital cellular processes by being subject to curvature and transmembrane electrical potentials. Here we build upon the existing theory for flexoelectricity in liquid crystals to quantify the coupling between lipid bilayer curvature and membrane potentials. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that headgroup dipole moments, the lateral pressure profile across the bilayer, and spontaneous curvature all systematically change with increasing membrane potentials. In particular, there is a linear dependence between the bending moment (the product of bending rigidity and spontaneous curvature) and the applied membrane potentials. We show that biologically relevant membrane potentials can induce biologically relevant curvatures corresponding to radii of around 500 nm. The implications of flexoelectricity in lipid bilayers are thus likely to be of considerable consequence both in biology and in model lipid bilayer systems.

  2. Regulation of channel function due to physical energetic coupling with a lipid bilayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashrafuzzaman, Md.; Tseng, C.-Y.; Tuszynski, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Lipid membrane regulation of membrane protein functions has been addressed. • Energetics behind ion channel-membrane coupling phenomena has been investigated. • Charge based interactions stabilize peptide–lipid complex. • Screened Coulomb interaction model explains the energetics. • Van der Waals and electrostatic forces drive peptides and lipids to close proximity. - Abstract: Regulation of membrane protein functions due to hydrophobic coupling with a lipid bilayer has been investigated. An energy formula describing interactions between lipid bilayer and integral ion channels with different structures, which is based on the screened Coulomb interaction approximation, has been developed. Here the interaction energy is represented as being due to charge-based interactions between channel and lipid bilayer. The hydrophobic bilayer thickness channel length mismatch is found to induce channel destabilization exponentially while negative lipid curvature linearly. Experimental parameters related to channel dynamics are consistent with theoretical predictions. To measure comparable energy parameters directly in the system and to elucidate the mechanism at an atomistic level we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the ion channel forming peptide–lipid complexes. MD simulations indicate that peptides and lipids experience electrostatic and van der Waals interactions for short period of time when found within each other’s proximity. The energies from these two interactions are found to be similar to the energies derived theoretically using the screened Coulomb and the van der Waals interactions between peptides (in ion channel) and lipids (in lipid bilayer) due to mainly their charge properties. The results of in silico MD studies taken together with experimental observable parameters and theoretical energetic predictions suggest that the peptides induce ion channels inside lipid membranes due to peptide–lipid physical interactions

  3. Influence of Long-Tailed Alcohols on the Solubilisation of Cationic DHAB Bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan B.F.N. Engberts

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The effects of n-decanol and cetyl alcohol incorporated into cationic di-n-hexadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DHAB bilayers on the packing and the resistance against solubilisation by Triton X-100 have been investigated. Solubilisation experiments revealed that the mismatch between the C10-tail of n-decanol with the DHAB-tails does not affect the structural integrity of the vesicles. On the contrary, upon increasing amounts of cetyl alcohol, of which the tail matches in size with the DHAB-tails, breakdown of the vesicles is promoted, whereas complete solubilisation is strongly hampered. The system is further investigated by DSC and cryo-EM experiments. In addition, the effects of n-decanol and cetyl alcohol embedded into DHAB bilayers on the vesicular rate constants for the decarboxylation of 6-nitrobenzisoxazole-3-carboxylate (6-NBIC suggest that both alcohols affect the structure of the Stern region in an equal manner, leading to a decrease in the catalysis. Therefore, it is concluded that addition of the alcohols leads to changes in properties of the interior of the bilayer, rather than the polar-apolar interface.

  4. In situ atomic force microscope imaging of supported lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasgaard, Thomas; Leidy, Chad; Ipsen, John Hjorth

    2001-01-01

    -component DMPC-DSPC bilayers and a remarkable enhanced hydrolytic activity of the PLA/sub 2/-enzyme for the DMPC-rich phase is seen. Furthermore, in a supported double bilayer system a characteristic ripple structure, most likely related to the formation of the P/sub beta /-ripple phase is observed....

  5. Structure and dynamics of water and lipid molecules in charged anionic DMPG lipid bilayer membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rønnest, A. K.; Peters, G. H.; Hansen, F. Y.; Taub, H.; Miskowiec, A.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the influence of the valency of counter-ions on the structure of freestanding bilayer membranes of the anionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) lipid at 310 K and 1 atm. At this temperature, the membrane is in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The diffusion constant of water as a function of its depth in the membrane has been determined from mean-square-displacement calculations. Also, calculated incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering functions have been compared to experimental results and used to determine an average diffusion constant for all water molecules in the system. On extrapolating the diffusion constants inferred experimentally to a temperature of 310 K, reasonable agreement with the simulations is obtained. However, the experiments do not have the sensitivity to confirm the diffusion of a small component of water bound to the lipids as found in the simulations. In addition, the orientation of the dipole moment of the water molecules has been determined as a function of their depth in the membrane. Previous indirect estimates of the electrostatic potential within phospholipid membranes imply an enormous electric field of 10 8 –10 9 V m −1 , which is likely to have great significance in controlling the conformation of translocating membrane proteins and in the transfer of ions and molecules across the membrane. We have calculated the membrane potential for DMPG bilayers and found ∼1 V (∼2 ⋅ 10 8 V m −1 ) when in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and ∼1.4 V (∼2.8 ⋅ 10 8 V m −1 ) when in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The number of water molecules for a fully hydrated DMPG membrane has been estimated to be 9.7 molecules per lipid in the gel phase and 17.5 molecules in the fluid phase, considerably smaller than inferred experimentally for 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3

  6. Lepromatous leprosy patients produce antibodies that recognise non-bilayer lipid arrangements containing mycolic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Baeza

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements are three-dimensional structures that form when anionic phospholipids with an intermediate structure of the tubular hexagonal phase II are present in a bilayer of lipids. Antibodies that recognise these arrangements have been described in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome and/or systemic lupus erythematosus and in those with preeclampsia; these antibodies have also been documented in an experimental murine model of lupus, in which they are associated with immunopathology. Here, we demonstrate the presence of antibodies against non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements containing mycolic acids in the sera of lepromatous leprosy (LL patients, but not those of healthy volunteers. The presence of antibodies that recognise these non-bilayer lipid arrangements may contribute to the hypergammaglobulinaemia observed in LL patients. We also found IgM and IgG anti-cardiolipin antibodies in 77% of the patients. This positive correlation between the anti-mycolic-non-bilayer arrangements and anti-cardiolipin antibodies suggests that both types of antibodies are produced by a common mechanism, as was demonstrated in the experimental murine model of lupus, in which there was a correlation between the anti-non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements and anti-cardiolipin antibodies. Antibodies to non-bilayer lipid arrangements may represent a previously unrecognised pathogenic mechanism in LL and the detection of these antibodies may be a tool for the early diagnosis of LL patients.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of a lipidic alpha amino acid: solubility and interaction with serum albumin and lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipe, Hugo A L; Coreta-Gomes, Filipe M; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Almeida, Ana R; Peixoto, Andreia F; Pereira, Mariette M; Vaz, Winchil L C; Moreno, Maria J

    2013-04-04

    The lipidic α-amino acid with 11 carbons in the alkyl lateral chain (α-aminotridecanoic acid) was synthesized via multicomponent hydroformylation/Strecker reaction, which is a greener synthetic approach to promote this transformation relative to previously described methods. Its solubility and aggregation behavior in aqueous solutions was characterized, as well as the interaction with lipid bilayers. Lipidic amino acids are very promising molecules in the development of prodrugs with increased bioavailability due to the presence of the two polar functional groups and nonpolar alkyl chain. They are also biocompatible surfactants that may be used in the food and pharmaceutical industry. In this work we have conjugated the lipidic amino acid with a fluorescent polar group (7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl), to mimic drug conjugates, and its association with serum proteins and lipid bilayers was characterized. The results obtained indicate that conjugates of polar molecules with lipidic α-amino acid, via covalent attachment to the amine group, have a relatively high solubility in aqueous solutions due to their negative global charge. They bind to serum albumin with intermediate affinity and show a very high partition coefficient into lipid bilayers in the liquid-disordered state. The attachment of the polar group to the lipidic amino acid increased strongly the aqueous solubility of the amphiphile, although the partition coefficient into lipid membranes was not significantly reduced. Conjugation of polar drugs with lipidic amino acids is therefore an efficient approach to increase their affinity for biomembranes.

  8. Properties of POPC/POPE supported lipid bilayers modified with hydrophobic quantum dots on polyelectrolyte cushions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasinska-Sojka, Marta; Wlodek, Magdalena; Szuwarzynski, Michal; Kereiche, Sami; Kovacik, Lubomir; Warszynski, Piotr

    2017-10-01

    The formation and properties of supported lipid bilayers (SLB) containing hydrophobic nanoparticles (NP) was studied in relation to underlying cushion obtained from selected polyelectrolyte multilayers. Lipid vesicles were formed from zwitterionic 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and negatively charged 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) in phosphate buffer (PBS). As hydrophobic nanoparticles - quantum dots (QD) with size of 3.8nm (emission wavelength of 420nm) were used. Polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) were constructed by the sequential, i.e., layer-by-layer (LbL) adsorption of alternately charged polyelectrolytes from their solutions. Liposomes and Liposome-QDs complexes were studied with Transmission Cryo-Electron Microscopy (Cryo-TEM) to verify the quality of vesicles and the position of QD within lipid bilayer. Deposition of liposomes and liposomes with quantum dots on polyelectrolyte films was studied in situ using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) technique. The fluorescence emission spectra were analyzed for both: suspension of liposomes with nanoparticles and for supported lipid bilayers containing QD on PEM. It was demonstrated that quantum dots are located in the hydrophobic part of lipid bilayer. Moreover, we proved that such QD-modified liposomes formed supported lipid bilayers and their final structure depended on the type of underlying cushion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Real-time detection of lipid bilayer assembly and detergent-initiated solubilization using optical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, V.; Armani, A. M.

    2015-02-01

    The cellular membrane governs numerous fundamental biological processes. Therefore, developing a comprehensive understanding of its structure and function is critical. However, its inherent biological complexity gives rise to numerous inter-dependent physical phenomena. In an attempt to develop a model, two different experimental approaches are being pursued in parallel: performing single cell experiments (top down) and using biomimetic structures (bottom up), such as lipid bilayers. One challenge in many of these experiments is the reliance on fluorescent probes for detection which can create confounds in this already complex system. In the present work, a label-free detection method based on an optical resonant cavity is used to detect one of the fundamental physical phenomena in the system: assembly and solubilization of the lipid bilayer. The evanescent field of the cavity strongly interacts with the lipid bilayer, enabling the detection of the bilayer behavior in real-time. Two independent detection mechanisms confirm the formation and detergent-assisted solubilization of the lipid bilayers: (1) a refractive index change and (2) a material loss change. Both mechanisms can be monitored in parallel, on the same device, thus allowing for cross-confirmation of the results. To verify the proposed method, we have detected the formation of self-assembled phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers from small unilamellar vesicles on the device surface in real-time. Subsequently, we exposed the bilayers to two different detergents (non-ionic Triton X-100 and anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate) to initiate solubilization, and this process was also detected in real-time. After the bilayer solubilization, the device returned to its initial state, exhibiting minimal hysteresis. The experimental wash-off was also collected and analyzed using dynamic light scattering.

  10. Cationic niosomes an effective gene carrier composed of novel spermine-derivative cationic lipids: effect of central core structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opanasopit, Praneet; Leksantikul, Lalita; Niyomtham, Nattisa; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Yingyongnarongkul, Boon-Ek

    2017-05-01

    Cationic niosomes formulated from Span 20, cholesterol (Chol) and novel spermine-based cationic lipids of multiple central core structures (di(oxyethyl)amino, di(oxyethyl)amino carboxy, 3-amino-1,2-dioxypropyl and 2-amino-1,3-dioxypropyl) were successfully prepared for improving transfection efficiency in vitro. The niosomes composed of spermine cationic lipid with central core structure of di(oxyethyl)amino revealed the highest gene transfection efficiency. To investigate the factors affecting gene transfection and cell viability including differences in the central core structures of cationic lipids, the composition of vesicles, molar ratio of cationic lipids in formulations and the weight ratio of niosomes to DNA. Cationic niosomes composed of nonionic surfactants (Span20), cholesterol and spermine-based cationic lipids of multiple central core structures were formulated. Gene transfection and cell viability were evaluated on a human cervical carcinoma cell line (HeLa cells) using pDNA encoding green fluorescent protein (pEGFP-C2). The morphology, size and charge were also characterized. High transfection efficiency was obtained from cationic niosomes composed of Span20:Chol:cationic lipid at the molar ratio of 2.5:2.5:0.5 mM. Cationic lipids with di(oxyethyl)amino as a central core structure exhibited highest transfection efficiency. In addition, there was also no serum effect on transfection efficiency. These novel cationic niosomes may constitute a good alternative carrier for gene transfection.

  11. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pera, H.; Kleijn, J.M.; Leermakers, F.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    To understand how lipid architecture determines the lipid bilayer structure and its mechanics, we implement a molecularly detailed model that uses the self-consistent field theory. This numerical model accurately predicts parameters such as Helfrichs mean and Gaussian bending modulus k c and k ¯ and

  12. Reduction in lateral lipid mobility of lipid bilayer membrane by atmospheric pressure plasma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Tero, Ryugo; Yamashita, Ryuma; Yusa, Kota; Takikawa, Hirofumi

    2016-03-01

    Plasma medicine is an emerging research field in which various applications of electrical discharge, especially in the form of nonequilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure, are examined, for example, the application of plasma to biological targets for various purposes such as selective killing of tumor cells and blood stanching. We have focused on the behavior of an artificial cell membrane system at the solid-liquid interface. To evaluate the lateral lipid mobility, we measured the diffusion coefficient of the supported lipid bilayer (SLB) composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching by confocal laser scanning microscopy. It was found that the diffusion coefficient was decreased by plasma irradiation and that the diffusion coefficient decreasing rate proceeded with increasing plasma power. We investigated the effects of stimulation with an equilibrium chemical, H2O2, on the SLB and confirmed that the diffusion coefficient did not change at least up to a H2O2 concentration of 5 mM. These results indicate that transient active species generated by plasma play critical roles in the reduction in SLB fluidity. The effects of the two generated major oxidized lipid species, hydroxyl- or hydroperoxy-phosphatidylcholine (PC) and acyl-chain-truncated PCs terminated with aldehyde or carboxyl group, on lateral lipid mobility are discussed.

  13. Anomalous swelling of multilamellar lipid bilayers in the transition region by renormalization of curvature elasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callisen, Thomas Hønger; Mortensen, Kell; Ipsen, John Hjorth

    1994-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering is used to determine the temperature dependence of the lamellar repeat distance in an aqueous multilamellar solution of phospholipid bilayers. A thermal anomaly in the swelling behavior is observed at the bilayer phase transition. The anomalous behavior can be suppr......Small-angle neutron scattering is used to determine the temperature dependence of the lamellar repeat distance in an aqueous multilamellar solution of phospholipid bilayers. A thermal anomaly in the swelling behavior is observed at the bilayer phase transition. The anomalous behavior can...... be suppressed by varying the lipid acyl-chain length or by alloying with a molecular stiffening agent. The experimental results are explained in terms of renormalization of the bilayer curvature elasticity and by using a theory of repulsive interlamellar undulation forces....

  14. Mechanics of lipid bilayer junctions affecting the size of a connecting lipid nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voinova Marina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study we report a physical analysis of the membrane mechanics affecting the size of the highly curved region of a lipid nanotube (LNT that is either connected between a lipid bilayer vesicle and the tip of a glass microinjection pipette (tube-only or between a lipid bilayer vesicle and a vesicle that is attached to the tip of a glass microinjection pipette (two-vesicle. For the tube-only configuration (TOC, a micropipette is used to pull a LNT into the interior of a surface-immobilized vesicle, where the length of the tube L is determined by the distance of the micropipette to the vesicle wall. For the two-vesicle configuration (TVC, a small vesicle is inflated at the tip of the micropipette tip and the length of the tube L is in this case determined by the distance between the two interconnected vesicles. An electrochemical method monitoring diffusion of electroactive molecules through the nanotube has been used to determine the radius of the nanotube R as a function of nanotube length L for the two configurations. The data show that the LNT connected in the TVC constricts to a smaller radius in comparison to the tube-only mode and that tube radius shrinks at shorter tube lengths. To explain these electrochemical data, we developed a theoretical model taking into account the free energy of the membrane regions of the vesicles, the LNT and the high curvature junctions. In particular, this model allows us to estimate the surface tension coefficients from R(L measurements.

  15. Development of an automation technique for the establishment of functional lipid bilayer arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J. S.; Perry, M.; Vogel, J.; Vissing, T.; Hansen, C. R.; Geschke, O.; Emnéus, J.; Nielsen, C. H.

    2009-02-01

    In the present work, a technique for establishing multiple black lipid membranes (BLMs) in arrays of micro structured ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) films, and supported by a micro porous material was developed. Rectangular 8 × 8 arrays with apertures having diameters of 301 ± 5 µm were fabricated in ETFE Teflon film by laser ablation using a carbon dioxide laser. Multiple lipid membranes could be formed across the micro structured 8 × 8 array ETFE partitions. Success rates for the establishment of cellulose-supported BLMs across the multiple aperture arrays were above 95%. However, the time course of the membrane thinning process was found to vary considerably between multiple aperture bilayer experiments. An airbrush partition pretreatment technique was developed to increase the reproducibility of the multiple lipid bilayers formation during the time course from the establishment of the lipid membranes to the formation of bilayers. The results showed that multiple lipid bilayers could be reproducible formed across the airbrush-pretreated 8 × 8 rectangular arrays. The ionophoric peptide valinomycin was incorporated into established membrane arrays, resulting in ionic currents that could be effectively blocked by tetraethylammonium. This shows that functional bimolecular lipid membranes were established, and furthermore outlines that the established lipid membrane arrays could host functional membrane-spanning molecules.

  16. Method to disperse lipids as aggregates in oil for bilayers production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudet, Cyrille; In, Martin; Massiera, Gladys

    2016-01-01

    Several techniques to assemble artificial lipid bilayers involve the zipping of monolayers. Their efficiency is determined by the renewal of the saturated monolayers to be zipped and this proceeds by adsorption of lipids dispersed in oil as aggregates. The size of these lipids aggregates is a key parameter to ensure both the stability of the suspension and a fast release of lipids at the interface. We propose a new method inspired from the solvent-shifting nucleation process allowing to control and tune the lipid aggregates size and that improves the production of artificial membranes. It is simpler and faster than current methods starting from a dry lipid film, which are highly sensitive to environmental conditions. This method opens the route to bilayer production processes with new potentialities in membrane composition.

  17. Creating air-stable supported lipid bilayers by physical confinement induced by phospholipase A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chung-Ta; Chao, Ling

    2014-05-14

    Supported lipid bilayer platforms have been used for various biological applications. However, the lipid bilayers easily delaminate and lose their natural structure after being exposed to an air-water interface. In this study, for the first time, we demonstrated that physical confinement can be used instead of chemical modifications to create air-stable membranes. Physical confinement was generated by the obstacle network induced by a peripheral enzyme, phospholipase A2. The enzyme and reacted lipids could be washed away from the obstacle network, which was detergent-resistant and strongly bonded to the solid support. On the basis of these properties, the obstacle framework on the solid support was reusable and lipid bilayers with the desired composition could be refilled and formed in the region confined by the obstacle framework. The results of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) indicate that the diffusivities of the lipid bilayers before drying and after rehydration were comparable, indicating the air stability of the physically confined membrane. In addition, we observed that the obstacles could trap a thin layer of water after the air-water interface passed through the lipid bilayer. Because the obstacles were demonstrated to be several times higher than a typical lipid membrane on a support, the obstacles may act as container walls, which can trap water above the lipid membrane. The water layer may have prevented the air-water interface from directly contacting the lipid membrane and, therefore, buffered the interfacial force, which could cause membrane delamination. The results suggest the possibility of using physical confinement to create air-stable membranes without changing local membrane rigidity or covering the membrane with protecting molecules.

  18. Protons may leak through pure lipid bilayers via a concerted mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Harald L; Voth, Gregory A

    2005-05-01

    Protons are known to permeate pure lipid bilayers at a rate that is anomalous compared to those of other small monovalent cations. The prevailing mechanism via which they cross the membrane is still unclear, and it is unknown how to probe the mechanism directly by experiment. One of the more popular theories assumes the formation of membrane-spanning single-file water wires providing a matrix along which the protons can "hop" over the barrier. However, free energy calculations on such structures (without the presence of an excess proton) suggest that this mechanism alone cannot account for the observed permeation rates. We use the multistate empirical valence bond method to directly study water structures surrounding a (delocalized) excess proton on its way through the membrane. We find that membrane-spanning networks, rather than single-file chains, are formed around the proton. We also find that such structures are considerably stabilized in the presence of the proton, with lifetimes of several hundreds of picoseconds. The observed structures are suggestive of a new, concerted, mechanism and provide some direction for further investigation.

  19. Functional liposomes and supported lipid bilayers: towards the complexity of biological archetypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Debora; Caminati, Gabriella; Baglioni, Piero

    2011-05-21

    This perspective paper provides some illustrative examples on the interplay between information gathered on planar supported lipid bilayers (SLB) and unilamellar lipid vesicles (ULV) to get an integrated description of phenomena occurring at the nanoscale that involve locally bilayered structures. Similarities and differences are underlined and critically compared in terms of biomimetic fidelity and instrumental accessibility to structural and dynamical parameters, focusing on some recent reports that either explicitly address this comparison or introducing some studies that separately investigate the same process in SLB and lipid vesicles. Despite the structural similarity on the nanoscale, the different topology implies radically different characterization techniques that have evolved in sectorial and separated approaches. The quest for increasing levels of compositional complexity for bilayered systems should not result in a loss of structural and dynamical control: this is the central challenge of future research in this area, where the integrated approach highlighted in this contribution would enable improved levels of understanding. © The Owner Societies 2011

  20. Regulation of membrane protein function by lipid bilayer elasticity—a single molecule technology to measure the bilayer properties experienced by an embedded protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbæk, Jens August

    2008-01-01

    -dependent sodium channels, N-type calcium channels and GABAA receptors, it has been shown that membrane protein function in living cells can be regulated by amphiphile induced changes in bilayer elasticity. Using the gramicidin channel as a molecular force transducer, a nanotechnology to measure the elastic......Membrane protein function is generally regulated by the molecular composition of the host lipid bilayer. The underlying mechanisms have long remained enigmatic. Some cases involve specific molecular interactions, but very often lipids and other amphiphiles, which are adsorbed to lipid bilayers......, regulate a number of structurally unrelated proteins in an apparently non-specific manner. It is well known that changes in the physical properties of a lipid bilayer (e.g., thickness or monolayer spontaneous curvature) can affect the function of an embedded protein. However, the role of such changes...

  1. Temperature-controlled structure and kinetics of ripple phases in one- and two-component supported lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasgaard, Thomas; Leidy, Chad; Crowe, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    Temperature-controlled atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to visualize and study the structure and kinetics of ripple phases in one-component dipalmitoylphosphaticlylcholine (DPPC) and two-component dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine-distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC-DSPC) lipid bilayers....... The lipid bilayers are mica-supported double bilayers in which ripple-phase formation occurs in the top bilayer. In one-component DPPC lipid bilayers, the stable and metastable ripple phases were observed. In addition, a third ripple structure with approximately twice the wavelength of the metastable...... ripples was seen. From height profiles of the AFM images, estimates of the amplitudes of the different ripple phases are reported. To elucidate the processes of ripple formation and disappearance, a ripple-phase DPPC lipid bilayer was taken through the pretransition in the cooling and the heating...

  2. Is the tilt of the lipid head group correlated with the number of intermolecular interactions at the bilayer interface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baczynski, Krzysztof; Markiewicz, Michal; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta

    2018-04-10

    Lipid and water molecules comprising the bilayer form an integral entity owing to only weak physical interactions. At the bilayer interface, these interactions chiefly involve hydrogen bonding and charge pairing. Lipid head groups make hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) predominantly with water, whereas inter-lipid H-bonds and charge pairs are less numerous. Both inter-lipid H-bonding and charge pairing depend on the distance and relative orientation of the interacting head groups. In this paper, correlations are analysed between the orientation of the lipid head group and the number of inter-lipid interactions at the interface of a bilayer made of galactolipids, forming direct inter-lipid H-bonds, and of phosphatidylcholines forming inter-lipid charge pairs. The correlations are not strong however, since in both bilayers they show a similar trend. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Antimicrobial peptide alamethicin insertion into lipid bilayer: a QCM-D exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kathleen F; Nagarajan, Ramanathan; Camesano, Terri A

    2014-04-01

    Alamethicin is a 20-amino-acid, α-helical antimicrobial peptide that is believed to kill bacteria through pore formation in the inner membranes. We used quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) to explore the interactions of alamethicin with a supported lipid bilayer. Changes in frequency (Δf) and dissipation (ΔD) measured at different overtones as a function of peptide concentration were used to infer peptide-induced changes in the mass and rigidity of the membrane as well as the orientation of the peptide in the bilayer. The measured Δf were positive, corresponding to a net mass loss from the bilayer, with substantial mass losses at 5 μM and 10 μM alamethicin. The measured Δf at various overtones were equal, indicating that the mass change in the membrane was homogeneous at all depths consistent with a vertical peptide insertion. Such an orientation coupled to the net mass loss was in agreement with cylindrical pore formation and the negligibly small ΔD suggested that the peptide walls of the pores stabilized the surrounding lipid organization. Dynamics of the interactions examined through Δf vs. ΔD plots suggested that the peptides initially inserted into the membrane and caused disordering of the lipids. Subsequently, lipids were removed from the bilayer to create pores and alamethicin caused the remaining lipids to reorder and stabilize within the membrane. Based on model calculations, we concluded that the QCM-D data cannot confirm or rule out whether peptide clusters coexist with pores in the bilayer. We have also proposed a way to calculate the peptide-to-lipid ratio (P/L) in the bilayer from QCM-D data and found the calculated P/L as a function of the peptide concentration to be similar to the literature data for vesicle membranes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The mechanism of detergent solubilization of lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, Dov; Ahyayauch, Hasna; Goñi, Félix M

    2013-07-16

    Multiple data are available on the self-assembly of mixtures of bilayer-forming amphiphiles, particularly phospholipids and micelle-forming amphiphiles, commonly denoted detergents. The structure of such mixed assemblies has been thoroughly investigated, described in phase diagrams, and theoretically rationalized in terms of the balance between the large spontaneous curvature of the curvophilic detergent and the curvophobic phospholipids. In this critical review, we discuss the mechanism of this process and try to explain the actual mechanism involved in solubilization. Interestingly, membrane solubilization by some detergents is relatively slow and the common attribute of these detergents is that their trans-bilayer movement, commonly denoted flip-flop, is very slow. Only detergents that can flip into the inner monolayer cause relatively rapid solubilization of detergent-saturated bilayers. This occurs via the following sequence of events: 1), relatively rapid penetration of detergent monomers into the outer monolayer; 2), trans-membrane equilibration of detergent monomers between the two monolayers; 3), saturation of the bilayer by detergents and consequent permeabilization of the membrane; and 4), transition of the whole bilayer to thread-like mixed micelles. When the detergent cannot flip to the inner monolayer, the outer monolayer becomes unstable due to mass imbalance between the monolayers and inclusion of the curvophilic detergent molecules in a flat surface. Consequently, the outer monolayer forms mixed micellar structures within the outer monolayer. Shedding of these micelles into the aqueous solution results in partial solubilization. The consequent leakage of detergent into the liposome results in trans-membrane equilibration of detergent and subsequent micellization through the rapid bilayer-saturation mechanism. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of the interactions of medicinal plant extracts and drugs with lipid bilayer membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopec, Wojciech; Telenius, Jelena; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2013-01-01

    Several small drugs and medicinal plant extracts, such as the Indian spice extract curcumin, have a wide range of useful pharmacological properties that cannot be ascribed to binding to a single protein target alone. The lipid bilayer membrane is thought to mediate the effects of many such molecu......Several small drugs and medicinal plant extracts, such as the Indian spice extract curcumin, have a wide range of useful pharmacological properties that cannot be ascribed to binding to a single protein target alone. The lipid bilayer membrane is thought to mediate the effects of many...

  6. Quantifying the Relationship Between Curvature and Electric Potential in Lipid Bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dennis Skjøth; Lomholt, Michael Andersen; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Cellular membranes mediate vital cellular processes by being subject to curvature and transmembrane electrical potentials. Here we build upon the existing theory for flexoelectricity in liquid crystals to quantify the coupling between lipid bilayer curvature and membrane potentials. Using molecular...... and spontaneous curvature) and the applied membrane potentials. We show that biologically relevant membrane potentials can induce biologically relevant curva- tures corresponding to radii of around 500nm. The implications of flexoelectricity in lipid bilayers are thus likely to be of considerable consequence both...

  7. A portable lipid bilayer system for environmental sensing with a transmembrane protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuji Kawano

    Full Text Available This paper describes a portable measurement system for current signals of an ion channel that is composed of a planar lipid bilayer. A stable and reproducible lipid bilayer is formed in outdoor environments by using a droplet contact method with a micropipette. Using this system, we demonstrated that the single-channel recording of a transmembrane protein (alpha-hemolysin was achieved in the field at a high-altitude (∼3623 m. This system would be broadly applicable for obtaining environmental measurements using membrane proteins as a highly sensitive sensor.

  8. Evaluating Force Fields for the Computational Prediction of Ionized Arginine and Lysine Side-Chains Partitioning into Lipid Bilayers and Octanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Delin; Forsman, Jan; Woodward, Clifford E

    2015-04-14

    Abundant peptides and proteins containing arginine (Arg) and lysine (Lys) amino acids can apparently permeate cell membranes with ease. However, the mechanisms by which these peptides and proteins succeed in traversing the free energy barrier imposed by cell membranes remain largely unestablished. Precise thermodynamic studies (both theoretical and experimental) on the interactions of Arg and Lys residues with model lipid bilayers can provide valuable clues to the efficacy of these cationic peptides and proteins. We have carried out molecular dynamics simulations to calculate the interactions of ionized Arg and Lys side-chains with the zwitterionic 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) lipid bilayer for 10 widely used lipid/protein force fields: CHARMM36/CHARMM36, SLIPID/AMBER99SB-ILDN, OPLS-AA/OPLS-AA, Berger/OPLS-AA, Berger/GROMOS87, Berger/GROMOS53A6, GROMOS53A6/GROMOS53A6, nonpolarizable MARTINI, polarizable MARTINI, and BMW MARTINI. We performed umbrella sampling simulations to obtain the potential of mean force for Arg and Lys side-chains partitioning from water to the bilayer interior. We found significant differences between the force fields, both for the interactions between side-chains and bilayer surface, as well as the free energy cost for placing the side-chain at the center of the bilayer. These simulation results were compared with the Wimley-White interfacial scale. We also calculated the free energy cost for transferring ionized Arg and Lys side-chains from water to both dry and wet octanol. Our simulations reveal rapid diffusion of water molecules into octanol whereby the equilibrium mole fraction of water in the wet octanol phase was ∼25%. Surprisingly, our free energy calculations found that the high water content in wet octanol lowered the water-to-octanol partitioning free energies for cationic residues by only 0.6 to 0.7 kcal/mol.

  9. Cholesterol Protects the Oxidized Lipid Bilayer from Water Injury: An All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Michael C; Kulig, Waldemar; Rog, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Strodel, Birgit

    2018-03-17

    In an effort to delineate how cholesterol protects membrane structure under oxidative stress conditions, we monitored the changes to the structure of lipid bilayers comprising 30 mol% cholesterol and an increasing concentration of Class B oxidized 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC) glycerophospholipids, namely, 1-palmitoyl-2-(9'-oxo-nonanoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PoxnoPC), and 1-palmitoyl-2-azelaoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PazePC), using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Increasing the content of oxidized phospholipids (oxPLs) from 0 to 60 mol% oxPL resulted in a characteristic reduction in bilayer thickness and increase in area per lipid, thereby increasing the exposure of the membrane hydrophobic region to water. However, cholesterol was observed to help reduce water injury by moving into the bilayer core and forming more hydrogen bonds with the oxPLs. Cholesterol also resists altering its tilt angle, helping to maintain membrane integrity. Water that enters the 1-nm-thick core region remains part of the bulk water on either side of the bilayer, with relatively few water molecules able to traverse through the bilayer. In cholesterol-rich membranes, the bilayer does not form pores at concentrations of 60 mol% oxPL as was shown in previous simulations in the absence of cholesterol.

  10. Regulation of membrane protein function by lipid bilayer elasticity-a single molecule technology to measure the bilayer properties experienced by an embedded protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundbaek, Jens August

    2006-01-01

    Membrane protein function is generally regulated by the molecular composition of the host lipid bilayer. The underlying mechanisms have long remained enigmatic. Some cases involve specific molecular interactions, but very often lipids and other amphiphiles, which are adsorbed to lipid bilayers, regulate a number of structurally unrelated proteins in an apparently non-specific manner. It is well known that changes in the physical properties of a lipid bilayer (e.g., thickness or monolayer spontaneous curvature) can affect the function of an embedded protein. However, the role of such changes, in the general regulation of membrane protein function, is unclear. This is to a large extent due to lack of a generally accepted framework in which to understand the many observations. The present review summarizes studies which have demonstrated that the hydrophobic interactions between a membrane protein and the host lipid bilayer provide an energetic coupling, whereby protein function can be regulated by the bilayer elasticity. The feasibility of this 'hydrophobic coupling mechanism' has been demonstrated using the gramicidin channel, a model membrane protein, in planar lipid bilayers. Using voltage-dependent sodium channels, N-type calcium channels and GABA A receptors, it has been shown that membrane protein function in living cells can be regulated by amphiphile induced changes in bilayer elasticity. Using the gramicidin channel as a molecular force transducer, a nanotechnology to measure the elastic properties experienced by an embedded protein has been developed. A theoretical and technological framework, to study the regulation of membrane protein function by lipid bilayer elasticity, has been established

  11. Variation of thermal conductivity of DPPC lipid bilayer membranes around the phase transition temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssefian, Sina; Rahbar, Nima; Lambert, Christopher R; Van Dessel, Steven

    2017-05-01

    Given their amphiphilic nature and chemical structure, phospholipids exhibit a strong thermotropic and lyotropic phase behaviour in an aqueous environment. Around the phase transition temperature, phospholipids transform from a gel-like state to a fluid crystalline structure. In this transition, many key characteristics of the lipid bilayers such as structure and thermal properties alter. In this study, we employed atomistic simulation techniques to study the structure and underlying mechanisms of heat transfer in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipid bilayers around the fluid-gel phase transformation. To investigate this phenomenon, we performed non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations for a range of different temperature gradients. The results show that the thermal properties of the DPPC bilayer are highly dependent on the temperature gradient. Higher temperature gradients cause an increase in the thermal conductivity of the DPPC lipid bilayer. We also found that the thermal conductivity of DPPC is lowest at the transition temperature whereby one lipid leaflet is in the gel phase and the other is in the liquid crystalline phase. This is essentially related to a growth in thermal resistance between the two leaflets of lipid at the transition temperature. These results provide significant new insights into developing new thermal insulation for engineering applications. © 2017 The Authors.

  12. Selective Interaction of a Cationic Polyfluorene with Model Lipid Membranes: Anionic versus Zwitterionic Lipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Kahveci

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the interaction mechanism between the conjugated polyelectrolyte {[9,9-bis(6'-N,N,N-trimethylammoniumhexyl]fluorene-phenylene}bromide (HTMA-PFP and model lipid membranes. The study was carried out using different biophysical techniques, mainly fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. Results show that despite the preferential interaction of HTMA-PFP with anionic lipids, HTMA-PFP shows affinity for zwitterionic lipids; although the interaction mechanism is different as well as HTMA-PFP’s final membrane location. Whilst the polyelectrolyte is embedded within the lipid bilayer in the anionic membrane, it remains close to the surface, forming aggregates that are sensitive to the physical state of the lipid bilayer in the zwitterionic system. The different interaction mechanism is reflected in the polyelectrolyte fluorescence spectrum, since the maximum shifts to longer wavelengths in the zwitterionic system. The intrinsic fluorescence of HTMA-PFP was used to visualize the interaction between polymer and vesicles via fluorescence microscopy, thanks to its high quantum yield and photostability. This technique allows the selectivity of the polyelectrolyte and higher affinity for anionic membranes to be observed. The results confirmed the appropriateness of using HTMA-PFP as a membrane fluorescent marker and suggest that, given its different behaviour towards anionic and zwitterionic membranes, HTMA-PFP could be used for selective recognition and imaging of bacteria over mammalian cells.

  13. GABA_A receptor function is regulated by lipid bilayer elasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Werge, Thomas; Berthelsen, Camilla

    2006-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid ( DHA) and other polyunsaturated fatty acids ( PUFAs) promote GABA(A) receptor [ (3)H]-muscimol binding, and DHA increases the rate of GABAA receptor desensitization. Triton X-100, a structurally unrelated amphiphile, similarly promotes [ (3)H]-muscimol binding. The mechanism......( s) underlying these effects are poorly understood. DHA and Triton X-100, at concentrations that affect GABAA receptor function, increase the elasticity of lipid bilayers measured as decreased bilayer stiffness using gramicidin channels as molecular force transducers. We have previously shown...... that membrane protein function can be regulated by amphiphile-induced changes in bilayer elasticity and hypothesized that GABAA receptors could be similarly regulated. We therefore studied the effects of four structurally unrelated amphiphiles that decrease bilayer stiffness ( Triton X-100, octyl...

  14. Structural Degradation and Swelling of Lipid Bilayer under the Action of Benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odinokov, Alexey; Ostroumov, Denis

    2015-12-03

    Benzene and other nonpolar organic solvents can accumulate in the lipid bilayer of cellular membranes. Their effect on the membrane structure and fluidity determines their toxic properties and antibiotic action of the organic solvents on the bacteria. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of the interaction of benzene with the dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer. An increase in the membrane surface area and fluidity was clearly detected. Changes in the acyl chain ordering, tilt angle, and overall bilayer thickness were, however, much less marked. The dependence of all computed quantities on the benzene content showed two regimes separated by the solubility limit of benzene in water. When the amount of benzene exceeded this point, a layer of almost pure benzene started to grow between the membrane leaflets. This process corresponds to the nucleation of a new phase and provides a molecular mechanism for the mechanical rupture of the bilayer under the action of nonpolar compounds.

  15. Feeling the hidden mechanical forces in lipid bilayer is an original sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anishkin, Andriy; Loukin, Stephen H; Teng, Jinfeng; Kung, Ching

    2014-06-03

    Life's origin entails enclosing a compartment to hoard material, energy, and information. The envelope necessarily comprises amphipaths, such as prebiotic fatty acids, to partition the two aqueous domains. The self-assembled lipid bilayer comes with a set of properties including its strong anisotropic internal forces that are chemically or physically malleable. Added bilayer stretch can alter force vectors on embedded proteins to effect conformational change. The force-from-lipid principle was demonstrated 25 y ago when stretches opened purified Escherichia coli MscL channels reconstituted into artificial bilayers. This reductionistic exercise has rigorously been recapitulated recently with two vertebrate mechanosensitive K(+) channels (TREK1 and TRAAK). Membrane stretches have also been known to activate various voltage-, ligand-, or Ca(2+)-gated channels. Careful analyses showed that Kv, the canonical voltage-gated channel, is in fact exquisitely sensitive even to very small tension. In an unexpected context, the canonical transient-receptor-potential channels in the Drosophila eye, long presumed to open by ligand binding, is apparently opened by membrane force due to PIP2 hydrolysis-induced changes in bilayer strain. Being the intimate medium, lipids govern membrane proteins by physics as well as chemistry. This principle should not be a surprise because it parallels water's paramount role in the structure and function of soluble proteins. Today, overt or covert mechanical forces govern cell biological processes and produce sensations. At the genesis, a bilayer's response to osmotic force is likely among the first senses to deal with the capricious primordial sea.

  16. Effect of neurosteroids on a model lipid bilayer including cholesterol: An Atomic Force Microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchi, Mattia; Balleza, Daniel; Vena, Giulia; Puia, Giulia; Facci, Paolo; Alessandrini, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    Amphiphilic molecules which have a biological effect on specific membrane proteins, could also affect lipid bilayer properties possibly resulting in a modulation of the overall membrane behavior. In light of this consideration, it is important to study the possible effects of amphiphilic molecule of pharmacological interest on model systems which recapitulate some of the main properties of the biological plasma membranes. In this work we studied the effect of a neurosteroid, Allopregnanolone (3α,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone or Allo), on a model bilayer composed by the ternary lipid mixture DOPC/bSM/chol. We chose ternary mixtures which present, at room temperature, a phase coexistence of liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) domains and which reside near to a critical point. We found that Allo, which is able to strongly partition in the lipid bilayer, induces a marked increase in the bilayer area and modifies the relative proportion of the two phases favoring the Ld phase. We also found that the neurosteroid shifts the miscibility temperature to higher values in a way similarly to what happens when the cholesterol concentration is decreased. Interestingly, an isoform of Allo, isoAllopregnanolone (3β,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone or isoAllo), known to inhibit the effects of Allo on GABAA receptors, has an opposite effect on the bilayer properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of Physical Parameters on the Main Phase Transition of Supported Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, H.M.; Marino, G.; Alessandrini, A.; Facci, P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Supported lipid bilayers composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (POPE) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) were assembled by the vesicle fusion technique on mica and studied by temperature-controlled atomic force microscopy. The role of different physical parameters on the main phase transition was elucidated. Both mixed (POPE/POPG 3:1) and pure POPE bilayers were studied. By increasing the ionic strength of the solution and the incubation temperature, a shift from a decoupled phase transition of the two leaflets, to a coupled transition, with domains in register, was obtained. The observed behavior points to a modulation of the substrate/bilayer and interleaflet coupling induced by the environment and preparation conditions of supported lipid bilayers. The results are discussed in view of the role of different interactions in the system. The influence of the substrate on the lipid bilayers, in terms of interleaflet coupling, can also help us in understanding the possible effect that submembrane elements like the cytoskeleton might have on the structure and dynamics of biomembranes. PMID:19686654

  18. Charged particles interacting with a mixed supported lipid bilayer as a biomimetic pulmonary surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, B; Harb, F; Rieu, J P; Berthier, Y; Tinland, B; Trunfio-Sfarghiu, A-M

    2014-08-01

    This study shows the interactions of charged particles with mixed supported lipid bilayers (SLB) as biomimetic pulmonary surfactants. We tested two types of charged particles: positively charged and negatively charged particles. Two parameters were measured: adsorption density of particles on the SLB and the diffusion coefficient of lipids by FRAPP techniques as a measure of interaction strength between particles and lipids. We found that positively charged particles do not adsorb on the bilayer, probably due to the electrostatic repulsion between positively charged parts of the lipid head and the positive groups on the particle surface, therefore no variation in diffusion coefficient of lipid molecules was observed. On the contrary, the negatively charged particles, driven by electrostatic interactions are adsorbed onto the supported bilayer. The adsorption of negatively charged particles increases with the zeta-potential of the particle. Consecutively, the diffusion coefficient of lipids is reduced probably due to binding onto the lipid heads which slows down their Brownian motion. The results are directly relevant for understanding the interactions of particulate matter with pulmonary structures which could lead to pulmonary surfactant inhibition or deficiency causing severe respiratory distress or pathologies.

  19. Lipid Bilayer – mediated Regulation of Ion Channel Function by Amphiphilic Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbæk, Jens August

    2008-01-01

    that are transforming it into a subject of quantitative science. It is described how the hydrophobic interactions between a membrane protein and the host lipid bilayer provide the basis for a mechanism, whereby protein function is regulated by the bilayer physical properties. The use of gramicidin channels as single-molecule......Drugs that at pico- to nanomolar concentration regulate ion channel function by high-affi nity binding to their cognate receptor often have a “ secondary pharmacology, ” in which the same molecule at low micromolar concentrations regulates a diversity of membrane proteins in an apparently...... nonspecifi c manner. It has long been suspected that this promiscuous regulation of membrane protein function could be due to changes in the physical properties of the host lipid bilayer, but the underlying mechanisms have been poorly understood. Given that pharmacological research often involves drug...

  20. Off-lattice model for the phase behavior of lipid-cholesterol bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Miao, Ling; Ipsen, John Hjorth

    1999-01-01

    and previous approximate theories have suggested that cholesterol incorporated into lipid bilayers has different microscopic effects on lipid-chain packing and conformations and that cholesterol thereby leads to decoupling of the two ordering processes, manifested by a special equilibrium phase, "liquid......-ordered phase," where bilayers are liquid (with translational disorder) but lipid chains are conformationally ordered. We present in this paper a microscopic model that describes this decoupling phenomena and which yields a phase diagram consistent with experimental observations. The model is an off......-lattice model based on a two-dimensional random triangulation algorithm and represents lipid and cholesterol molecules by hard-core particles with internal (spin-type) degrees of freedom that have nearest-neighbor interactions. The phase equilibria described by the model, specifically in terms of phase diagrams...

  1. Study of water diffusion on single-supported bilayer lipid membranes by quasielastic neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bai, M.; Miskowiec, A.; Hansen, F. Y.

    2012-01-01

    High-energy-resolution quasielastic neutron scattering has been used to elucidate the diffusion of water molecules in proximity to single bilayer lipid membranes supported on a silicon substrate. By varying sample temperature, level of hydration, and deuteration, we identify three different types...... of diffusive water motion: bulk-like, confined, and bound. The motion of bulk-like and confined water molecules is fast compared to those bound to the lipid head groups (7-10 H2O molecules per lipid), which move on the same nanosecond time scale as H atoms within the lipid molecules. Copyright (C) EPLA, 2012...

  2. Ultra-high vacuum surface analysis study of rhodopsin incorporation into supported lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Roger; Subramaniam, Varuni; McArthur, Sally L; Bondurant, Bruce; D'Ambruoso, Gemma D; Hall, Henry K; Brown, Michael F; Ross, Eric E; Saavedra, S Scott; Castner, David G

    2008-05-06

    Planar supported lipid bilayers that are stable under ambient atmospheric and ultra-high-vacuum conditions were prepared by cross-linking polymerization of bis-sorbylphosphatidylcholine (bis-SorbPC). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were employed to investigate bilayers that were cross-linked using either redox-initiated radical polymerization or ultraviolet photopolymerization. The redox method yields a more structurally intact bilayer; however, the UV method is more compatible with incorporation of transmembrane proteins. UV polymerization was therefore used to prepare cross-linked bilayers with incorporated bovine rhodopsin, a light-activated, G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). A previous study (Subramaniam, V.; Alves, I. D.; Salgado, G. F. J.; Lau, P. W.; Wysocki, R. J.; Salamon, Z.; Tollin, G.; Hruby, V. J.; Brown, M. F.; Saavedra, S. S. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 5320-5321) showed that rhodopsin retains photoactivity after incorporation into UV-polymerized bis-SorbPC, but did not address how the protein is associated with the bilayer. In this study, we show that rhodopsin is retained in supported bilayers of poly(bis-SorbPC) under ultra-high-vacuum conditions, on the basis of the increase in the XPS nitrogen concentration and the presence of characteristic amino acid peaks in the ToF-SIMS data. Angle-resolved XPS data show that the protein is inserted into the bilayer, rather than adsorbed on the bilayer surface. This is the first study to demonstrate the use of ultra-high-vacuum techniques for structural studies of supported proteolipid bilayers.

  3. Long-Range Ordering of Blunt-Ended DNA Tiles on Supported Lipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avakyan, Nicole; Conway, Justin W; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2017-08-30

    Long-range ordering of DNA crossover tiles with blunt ends on lipid bilayers is investigated using atomic force microscopy. "Blunt-ended" tiles do not have single-stranded complementary ends, and thus instead of assembling via base-pairing, they can interact by π-stacking of their duplex ends. This work demonstrates that the balance of base π-stacking interactions between the ends of DNA duplexes, cholesterol-mediated DNA anchoring, and electrostatic DNA binding to supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) presents an opportunity to build dynamic materials with long-range order on a soft support. The tiles are shown to organize into novel tunable surface packing morphologies on the micrometer scale. This work focuses on three-point star (3PS) tiles that are either unmodified or modified with a cholesterol unit and investigates their interactions on supported lipid bilayers. On fluid bilayers, the cholesterol tiles form extended hexagonal arrays with few defects, while the unmodified tiles do not bind. In contrast, both modified and unmodified tiles bind to gel-phase bilayers and produce arrays of new organized morphologies. With increasing tile concentration, we observe a range of motifs, that progressively favor tile-tile packing over duplex-end π-stacking. These structures can selectively pattern domains of phase-separated lipid bilayers, and the patterning is also observed for four-arm cross-tiles. Dynamic blunt end contacts promote error correction and network reconfiguration to maximize favorable interactions with the substrate and are required for the observed tile organization. These results suggest that small blunt-ended tiles can be used as a platform to organize oligonucleotides, nanoparticles, and proteins into extensive networks at the interface with biologically relevant membrane systems or other soft surface materials for applications in cellular recognition, plasmonics, light harvesting, model systems for membrane protein assemblies, or analytical devices.

  4. Specific domains of Aβ facilitate aggregation on and association with lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Elizabeth A; Owens, Sherry L; Lynch, Michael F; Cucco, Elena M; Umbaugh, C Samuel; Legleiter, Justin

    2013-06-12

    A hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, a late-onset neurodegenerative disease, is the deposition of neuritic amyloid plaques composed of aggregated forms of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). Aβ forms a variety of nanoscale, toxic aggregate species ranging from small oligomers to fibrils. Aβ and many of its aggregate forms strongly interact with lipid membranes, which may represent an important step in several toxic mechanisms. Understanding the role that specific regions of Aβ play in regulating its aggregation and interaction with lipid membranes may provide insights into the fundamental interaction between Aβ and cellular surfaces. We investigated the interaction and aggregation of several Aβ fragments (Aβ1-11, Aβ1-28, Aβ10-26, Aβ12-24, Aβ16-22, Aβ22-35, and Aβ1-40) in the presence of supported model total brain lipid extract (TBLE) bilayers. These fragments represent a variety of chemically unique domains within Aβ, that is, the extracellular domain, the central hydrophobic core, and the transmembrane domain. Using scanning probe techniques, we elucidated aggregate morphologies for these different Aβ fragments in free solution and in the presence of TBLE bilayers. These fragments formed a variety of oligomeric and fibrillar aggregates under free solution conditions. Exposure to TBLE bilayers resulted in distinct aggregate morphologies compared to free solution and changes in bilayer stability dependent on the Aβ sequence. Aβ10-26, Aβ16-22, Aβ22-35, and Aβ1-40 aggregated into a variety of distinct fibrillar aggregates and disrupted the bilayer structure, resulting in altered mechanical properties of the bilayer. Aβ1-11, Aβ1-28, and Aβ12-24 had minimal interaction with lipid membranes, forming only sparse oligomers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Wicking: a rapid method for manually inserting ion channels into planar lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Justin A; Nguyen, Dac A; Leal-Pinto, Edgar; Gordon, Ronald E; Hanss, Basil

    2013-01-01

    The planar lipid bilayer technique has a distinguished history in electrophysiology but is arguably the most technically difficult and time-consuming method in the field. Behind this is a lack of experimental consistency between laboratories, the challenges associated with painting unilamellar bilayers, and the reconstitution of ion channels into them. While there has be a trend towards automation of this technique, there remain many instances where manual bilayer formation and subsequent membrane protein insertion is both required and advantageous. We have developed a comprehensive method, which we have termed "wicking", that greatly simplifies many experimental aspects of the lipid bilayer system. Wicking allows one to manually insert ion channels into planar lipid bilayers in a matter of seconds, without the use of a magnetic stir bar or the addition of other chemicals to monitor or promote the fusion of proteoliposomes. We used the wicking method in conjunction with a standard membrane capacitance test and a simple method of proteoliposome preparation that generates a heterogeneous mixture of vesicle sizes. To determine the robustness of this technique, we selected two ion channels that have been well characterized in the literature: CLIC1 and α-hemolysin. When reconstituted using the wicking technique, CLIC1 showed biophysical characteristics congruent with published reports from other groups; and α-hemolysin demonstrated Type A and B events when threading single stranded DNA through the pore. We conclude that the wicking method gives the investigator a high degree of control over many aspects of the lipid bilayer system, while greatly reducing the time required for channel reconstitution.

  6. Wicking: a rapid method for manually inserting ion channels into planar lipid bilayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin A Costa

    Full Text Available The planar lipid bilayer technique has a distinguished history in electrophysiology but is arguably the most technically difficult and time-consuming method in the field. Behind this is a lack of experimental consistency between laboratories, the challenges associated with painting unilamellar bilayers, and the reconstitution of ion channels into them. While there has be a trend towards automation of this technique, there remain many instances where manual bilayer formation and subsequent membrane protein insertion is both required and advantageous. We have developed a comprehensive method, which we have termed "wicking", that greatly simplifies many experimental aspects of the lipid bilayer system. Wicking allows one to manually insert ion channels into planar lipid bilayers in a matter of seconds, without the use of a magnetic stir bar or the addition of other chemicals to monitor or promote the fusion of proteoliposomes. We used the wicking method in conjunction with a standard membrane capacitance test and a simple method of proteoliposome preparation that generates a heterogeneous mixture of vesicle sizes. To determine the robustness of this technique, we selected two ion channels that have been well characterized in the literature: CLIC1 and α-hemolysin. When reconstituted using the wicking technique, CLIC1 showed biophysical characteristics congruent with published reports from other groups; and α-hemolysin demonstrated Type A and B events when threading single stranded DNA through the pore. We conclude that the wicking method gives the investigator a high degree of control over many aspects of the lipid bilayer system, while greatly reducing the time required for channel reconstitution.

  7. Supported lipid bilayer on nanocrystalline diamond: dual optical and field-effect sensor for membrane disruption

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ang, P.K.; Loh, K.P.; Wohland, T.; Nesládek, Miloš; Van Hove, E.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 1 (2009), s. 109-116 ISSN 1616-301X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : nanocrystalline diamond * biocompatibility * supported lipid bilayers * biosensors * solution gate field effect transistor Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 6.990, year: 2009

  8. Single sodium channels from human ventricular muscle in planar lipid bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wartenberg, H. C.; Wartenberg, J. P.; Urban, B. W.

    2001-01-01

    Sodium channels from human ventricular muscle membrane vesicles were incorporated into planar lipid bilayers and the steady-state behavior of single sodium channels were examined in the presence of batrachotoxin. In symmetrical 500 mM NaCl the averaged single channel conductance was 24.7 +/- 1.3 pS

  9. Bilayer/cytoskeleton interactions in lipid-symmetric erythrocytes assessed by a photoactivable phospholipid analogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, D.; Schlegel, R.A.; Williamson, P.

    1991-01-01

    Two mechanisms have been proposed for maintenance of transbilayer phospholipid asymmetry in the erythrocyte plasma membrane, one involving specific interactions between the aminophospholipids of the inner leaflet of the bilayer and the cytoskeleton, particularly spectrin, and the other involving the aminophospholipid translocase. If the former mechanism is correct, then erythrocytes which have lost their asymmetric distribution of phospholipids should display altered bilayer/cytoskeleton interactions. To test this possibility, normal erythrocytes, erythrocytes from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia or sickle disease, and lipid-symmetric and -asymmetric erythrocyte ghosts were labeled with the radioactive photoactivable analogue of phosphatidylethanolamine, 2-(2-azido-4-nitrobenzoyl)-1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho[ 14 C] ethanolamine ([ 14 C]AzPE), previously shown to label cytoskeletal proteins from the bilayer. The labeling pattern of cytoskeletal proteins in pathologic erythrocytes and lipid-asymmetric erythrocyte ghosts was indistinguishable from normal erythrocytes, indicating that the probe detects no differences in bilayer/cytoskeleton interactions in these cells. In contrast, in lipid-symmetric erythrocyte ghosts, labeling of bands 4.1 and 4.2 and actin, and to a lesser extent ankyrin, by [ 14 C]AzPE was considerably reduced. Significantly, however, labeling of spectrin was unaltered in the lipid-symmetric cells. These results do not support a model in which spectrin is involved in the maintenance of an asymmetric distribution of phospholipids in erythrocytes

  10. Multiplexed microfluidic device for parallel electrophysiological measurements on independent planar lipid bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prokofyev, A.V.; Schulze Greiving-Stimberg, Verena Carolin; Bomer, Johan G.; de Boer, Hans L.; van den Berg, Albert; le Gac, Severine

    2014-01-01

    Bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) are excellent platforms to study ion channels in a functional environment, and for drug screening assays. However, conventional electrophysiological BLM approaches do not meet the requirements for high throughput experiments due to the large volumes utilized, and the

  11. On-Chip Electrophoresis in Supported Lipid Bilayer Membranes Achieved Using Low Potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Weerd, Jasper; Krabbenborg, Sven; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; Huskens, Jurriaan; Jonkheijm, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    A micro supported lipid bilayer (SLB) electrophoresis method was developed, which functions at low potentials and appreciable operating times. To this end, (hydroxymethyl)-ferrocene (FcCH2OH) was employed to provide an electrochemical reaction at the anode and cathode at low applied potential to

  12. Bilayer/cytoskeleton interactions in lipid-symmetric erythrocytes assessed by a photoactivable phospholipid analogue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, D.; Schlegel, R.A. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States)); Williamson, P. (Amherst Coll., MA (United States))

    1991-08-06

    Two mechanisms have been proposed for maintenance of transbilayer phospholipid asymmetry in the erythrocyte plasma membrane, one involving specific interactions between the aminophospholipids of the inner leaflet of the bilayer and the cytoskeleton, particularly spectrin, and the other involving the aminophospholipid translocase. If the former mechanism is correct, then erythrocytes which have lost their asymmetric distribution of phospholipids should display altered bilayer/cytoskeleton interactions. To test this possibility, normal erythrocytes, erythrocytes from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia or sickle disease, and lipid-symmetric and -asymmetric erythrocyte ghosts were labeled with the radioactive photoactivable analogue of phosphatidylethanolamine, 2-(2-azido-4-nitrobenzoyl)-1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho({sup 14}C) ethanolamine (({sup 14}C)AzPE), previously shown to label cytoskeletal proteins from the bilayer. The labeling pattern of cytoskeletal proteins in pathologic erythrocytes and lipid-asymmetric erythrocyte ghosts was indistinguishable from normal erythrocytes, indicating that the probe detects no differences in bilayer/cytoskeleton interactions in these cells. In contrast, in lipid-symmetric erythrocyte ghosts, labeling of bands 4.1 and 4.2 and actin, and to a lesser extent ankyrin, by ({sup 14}C)AzPE was considerably reduced. Significantly, however, labeling of spectrin was unaltered in the lipid-symmetric cells. These results do not support a model in which spectrin is involved in the maintenance of an asymmetric distribution of phospholipids in erythrocytes.

  13. Collective chain dynamics in lipid bilayers by inelastic x-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, T.M.; Chen, P.-J.; Sinn, H.; Alp, E.E.; Chen, S.-H.; Hwang, H.W.

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the application of inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) to lipid bilayers. This technique directly measures the dynamic structure factor S(q,ω) which is the space-time Fourier transform of the electron density correlation function of the measured system. For a multiatomic system, the analysis of S(q,ω) is usually complicated. But for multiple bilayers of lipid, S(q,ω) is dominated by chain-chain correlations within individual bilayers. Thus IXS provides a unique probe for the collective dynamics of lipid chains in a bilayer that cannot be obtained by any other method. IXS of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine + cholesterol at two different concentrations were measured. S(q,ω) was analyzed by three-mode hydrodynamic equations, including a thermal diffusive mode and two propagating acoustic modes. We obtained the dispersion curves for the phonons that represent the collective in-plane excitations of lipid chains. The effect of cholesterol on chain dynamics was detected. Our analysis shows the importance of having a high instrument resolution as well as the requirement of sufficient signal-to-noise ratio to obtain meaningful results from such an IXS experiment. The requirement on signal-to-noise also applies to molecular dynamics simulations.

  14. Stable Free-Standing Lipid Bilayer Membranes in Norland Optical Adhesive 81 Microchannels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marin, Victor; Kieffer, R.Y.; Padmos, Raymond; Aubin-Tam, M.E.

    2016-01-01

    We report a simple, cost-effective, and reproducible method to form free-standing lipid bilayer membranes in microdevices made with Norland Optical Adhesive 81 (NOA81). Surface treatment with either alkylsilane or fluoroalkylsilane enables the self-assembly of stable

  15. The interaction of M13 coat protein with lipid bilayers : a spectroscopic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    In this thesis a small part of the reproductive cycle of the M13 bacteriophage is studied in more detail, namely the interaction of the major coat protein (MW 5240) with lipid bilayers. During the infection process is the major coat protein of M13 bacteriophage stored in the cytoplasm

  16. Photoresponsive Cucurbit[8]uril-Mediated Adhesion of Bacteria on Supported Lipid Bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sankaran, S.; van Weerd, Jasper; Voskuhl, Jens; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; Jonkheijm, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the development of a photoresponsive platform for the presentation of bioactive ligands to study receptor-ligand interactions has been described. For this purpose, supramolecular host-guest chemistry and supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) have been combined in a microfluidic device.

  17. Effect of Ceramide Tail Length on the Structure of Model Stratum Corneum Lipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Timothy C; Hartkamp, Remco; Iacovella, Christopher R; Bunge, Annette L; McCabe, Clare

    2018-01-09

    Lipid bilayers composed of non-hydroxy sphingosine ceramide (CER NS), cholesterol (CHOL), and free fatty acids (FFAs), which are components of the human skin barrier, are studied via molecular dynamics simulations. Since mixtures of these lipids exist in dense gel phases with little molecular mobility at physiological conditions, care must be taken to ensure that the simulations become decorrelated from the initial conditions. Thus, we propose and validate an equilibration protocol based on simulated tempering, in which the simulation takes a random walk through temperature space, allowing the system to break out of metastable configurations and hence become decorrelated from its initial configuration. After validating the equilibration protocol, which we refer to as random-walk molecular dynamics, the effects of the lipid composition and ceramide tail length on bilayer properties are studied. Systems containing pure CER NS, CER NS + CHOL, and CER NS + CHOL + FFA, with the CER NS fatty acid tail length varied within each CER NS-CHOL-FFA composition, are simulated. The bilayer thickness is found to depend on the structure of the center of the bilayer, which arises as a result of the tail-length asymmetry between the lipids studied. The hydrogen bonding between the lipid headgroups and with water is found to change with the overall lipid composition, but is mostly independent of the CER fatty acid tail length. Subtle differences in the lateral packing of the lipid tails are also found as a function of CER tail length. Overall, these results provide insight into the experimentally observed trend of altered barrier properties in skin systems where there are more CERs with shorter tails present. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthesis of novel cationic lipids with fully or partially non-scissile ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Cationic lipids; non-scissile linkages; glycerol backbone; membranes; gene transfection. Cationic lipids are attracting a lot of current attention owing to their applications in gene therapy 1,2. The functional group that links the backbone bearing the polar head group with the hydrocarbon chains of these lipid molecules plays ...

  19. Synthesis of novel cationic lipids with fully or partially non-scissile ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 114; Issue 3. Synthesis of novel cationic lipids with fully or ... Keywords. Cationic lipids; non-scissile linkages; glycerol backbone; membranes; gene transfection. ... have been synthesized. The membrane-forming properties of these new lipids are briefly presented.

  20. SANS study of the unilamellar DMPC vesicles. The fluctuation model of lipid bilayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, M.A.; Zemlyanaya, E.V.; Vinod, A.

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of the separated form-factors model, parameters of the polydispersed unilamellar DMPC vesicle population are analyzed. The neutron scattering length density across the membrane is simulated on the basis of fluctuated model of lipid bilayer. The hydration of vesicle is described by sigmoid distribution function of the water molecules. The results of fitting of the experimental data obtained at the small angle spectrometer SANS-I, PSI (Switzerland) are: average vesicle radius 272±0.4 Armstrong, polydispersity of the radius 27 %, membrane thickness 50.6± Armstrong, thickness of hydrocarbon chain region 21.4±2.8 Armstrong, number of water molecules located per lipid molecule 13±1, and DMPC surface area 59±2 Armstrong 2 . The calculated water distribution function across the bilayer directly explains why lipid membrane is easy penetrated by water molecules

  1. Size dependence of gold nanoparticle interactions with a supported lipid bilayer: A QCM-D study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Christina M; Kamaloo, Elaheh; Waterman, Kellie L; Wang, Kathleen F; Nagarajan, Ramanathan; Camesano, Terri A

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of nanoparticle (NP)-membrane interactions is important to advances in nanomedicine as well as for determining the safety of NPs to humans and the ecosystem. This study focuses on a unique mechanism of cytotoxicity, cell membrane destabilization, which is principally dependent on the nanoparticle nature of the material rather than on its molecular properties. We investigated the interactions of 2, 5, 10, and 40nm gold NPs with supported lipid bilayer (SLB) of L-α-phosphatidylcholine using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Gold NPs were tested both in the absence of and in the presence of polymethacrylic acid (PMAA), used to simulate the natural organic matter (NOM) in the environment. In the absence of PMAA, for all NP sizes, we observed only small mass losses (1 to 6ng) from the membrane. This small lipid removal may be a free energy lowering mechanism to relieve stresses induced by the adsorption of NPs, with the changes too small to affect the membrane integrity. In the presence of PMAA, we observed a net mass increase in the case of smaller NPs. We suggest that the increased adhesion between the NP and the bilayer, promoted by PMAA, causes sufficient NP adsorption on the bilayer to overcompensate for any loss of lipid. The most remarkable observation is the significant mass loss (60ng) for the case of 40nm NPs. We attribute this to the lipid bilayer engulfing the NP and leaving the crystal surface. We propose a simple phenomenological model to describe the competition between the particle-bilayer adhesion energy, the bilayer bending energy, and the interfacial energy at bilayer defect edges. The model shows that the larger NPs, which become more adhesive because of the polymer adsorption, are engulfed by the bilayer and leave the crystal surface, causing large mass loss and membrane disruption. The QCM-D measurements thus offer direct evidence that even if NPs are intrinsically not cytotoxic, they can become cytotoxic

  2. Platelet adhesion on to polyamide microcapsules coated with lipid bilayer membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, K; Ito, Y; Kimura, S; Imanishi, Y

    1989-09-01

    Polyamide microcapsules with diameters of 3-4 microns were coated with lipid bilayer membrane and their interaction with canine platelets was investigated. Platelet adhesion on to the microcapsules was significantly suppressed by the lipid-coating. Coating with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (liquid-crystalline state) reduced platelet adhesion on to the microcapsules to a greater extent than that with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (gel state) at 37 degrees C. The surface properties of the microcapsule in adsorption of plasma proteins were also changed by lipid coating. The amount of gamma-globulin and fibrinogen adsorbed on to the microcapsule was slightly decreased by lipid coating, while the amount of adsorbed albumin was increased. Platelet adhesion on to the lipid-coated microcapsules was suppressed most strongly in the presence of gamma-globulin. Apparently platelet adhesion on to the polyamide microcapsules is controlled by the nature of lipid membrane and gamma-globulin adsorbed on to the microcapsules.

  3. Correlation between cationic lipid-based transfection and cell division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchenbuechler, Inka; Kirchenbuechler, David; Elbaum, Michael, E-mail: michael@elbaum.ac.il

    2016-07-01

    We evaluate the temporal relation between protein expression by cationic lipid-mediated transfection and cell division using time lapse fluorescence microscopy. Detailed image analysis provides new insights on the single cell level while simultaneously achieving appropriate statistics. Earlier evidence by less direct methods such as flow cytometry indicates a primary route for transfection involving nuclear envelope breakdown, but also suggests the existence of a pathway independent of mitosis. We confirm and quantify both mechanisms. We found the timing for successful transfection to be unexpectedly flexible, contrary to assertions of a narrow time window. Specifically, cells dividing more than 24 h after exposure to the transfection medium express the probed protein at a comparable level to cells in a mitotic state during or shortly after transfection. This finding can have a profound impact on the guidance and development of non-viral gene delivery materials. - Highlights: • Cationic lipid-based transfection supports protein expression without cell division. • Protein expression is unrelated to cell cycle status at the time of transfection. • Time-lapse imaging provides direct evaluation without statistical averaging. • Lipoplex dissociation is a likely target for improvement of transfection efficiency.

  4. Mixtures of cationic lipid O-ethylphosphatidylcholine with membrane lipids and DNA: phase diagrams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koynova, Rumiana; MacDonald, Robert C

    2003-10-01

    Ethylphosphatidylcholines are positively charged membrane lipid derivatives, which effectively transfect DNA into cells and are metabolized by the cells. For this reason, they are promising nonviral transfection agents. With the aim of revealing the kinds of lipid phases that may arise when lipoplexes interact with cellular lipids during DNA transfection, temperature-composition phase diagrams of mixtures of the O-ethyldipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine with representatives of the major lipid classes (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, cholesterol) were constructed. Phase boundaries were determined using differential scanning calorimetry and synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The effects of ionic strength and of DNA presence were examined. A large variety of polymorphic and mesomorphic structures were observed. Surprisingly, marked enhancement of the affinity for nonlamellar phases was observed in mixtures with phosphatidylethanolamine and cholesterol as well as with phosphatidylglycerol (previously reported). Because of the potential relevance to transfection, it is noteworthy that such phases form at close to physiological conditions, and in the presence of DNA. All four mixtures exhibit a tendency to molecular clustering in the gel phase, presumably due to the specific interdigitated molecular arrangement of the O-ethyldipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine gel bilayers. It is evident that a remarkably broad array of lipid phases could arise in transfected cells and that these could have significant effects on transfection efficiency. The data may be particularly useful for selecting possible "helper" lipids in the lipoplex formulations, and in searches for correlations between lipoplex structure and transfection activity.

  5. Interaction of DNA with Cationic Lipid Mixtures-Investigation at Langmuir Lipid Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janich, Christopher; Hädicke, André; Bakowsky, Udo; Brezesinski, Gerald; Wölk, Christian

    2017-10-03

    Four different binary lipid mixtures composed of a cationic lipid and the zwitterionic colipids DOPE or DPPC, which show different DNA transfer activities in cell culture models, were investigated at the soft air/water interface to identify transfection efficiency determining characteristics. Langmuir films are useful models to investigate the interaction between DNA and lipid mixtures in a two-dimensional model system by using different surface sensitive techniques, namely, epifluorescence microscopy and infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy. Especially, the effect of adsorbed DNA on the properties of the lipid mixtures has been examined. Distinct differences between the lipid composites were found which are caused by the different colipids of the mixtures. DOPE containing lipid mixtures form fluid monolayers with a uniform distribution of the fluorescent probe in the presence and absence of DNA at physiologically relevant surface pressures. Only at high nonphysiological pressures, the lipid monolayer collapses and phase separation was observed if DNA was present in the subphase. In contrast, DPPC containing lipid mixtures show domains in the liquid condensed phase state in the presence and absence of DNA in the subphase. The adsorption of DNA at the positively charged mixed lipid monolayer induces phase separation which is expressed in the morphology and the point of appearance of these domains.

  6. Brownian dynamics simulations of lipid bilayer membrane with hydrodynamic interactions in LAMMPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Szu-Pei; Young, Yuan-Nan; Peng, Zhangli; Yuan, Hongyan

    Lipid bilayer membranes have been extensively studied by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. Numerical efficiency has been reported in the cases of aggressive coarse-graining, where several lipids are coarse-grained into a particle of size 4 6 nm so that there is only one particle in the thickness direction. Yuan et al. proposed a pair-potential between these one-particle-thick coarse-grained lipid particles to capture the mechanical properties of a lipid bilayer membrane (such as gel-fluid-gas phase transitions of lipids, diffusion, and bending rigidity). In this work we implement such interaction potential in LAMMPS to simulate large-scale lipid systems such as vesicles and red blood cells (RBCs). We also consider the effect of cytoskeleton on the lipid membrane dynamics as a model for red blood cell (RBC) dynamics, and incorporate coarse-grained water molecules to account for hydrodynamic interactions. The interaction between the coarse-grained water molecules (explicit solvent molecules) is modeled as a Lennard-Jones (L-J) potential. We focus on two sets of LAMMPS simulations: 1. Vesicle shape transitions with varying enclosed volume; 2. RBC shape transitions with different enclosed volume.

  7. Probing the position of resveratrol in lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Ghellinck, Alexis; Shen, Chen; Fragneto, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the natural antioxidant resveratrol on the structure of solid supported di-palmitoyl-phosphatidyl-choline (DPPC) bilayers in their fluid state was investigated by neutron reflectometry. Results reveal an accumulation of resveratrol (up to 25%, mol/mol) inside the headgroups...... and they exclude its presence in the hydrophobic core. The presence of resveratrol induces an increase of the average thickness and of the interfacial roughness of the headgroup layer. This may be due to a change of the tilt angle of the phosphocholine headgroups residing next to the resveratrol to a more upright...... orientation and leading to a reduction of the projected area per headgroup. This effect is propagated into the hydrophobic core, where the chain packing is modified despite the absence of resveratrol. When interacting with a DPPC/cholesterol membrane, resveratrol has a similar effect on the neighboring PC...

  8. Surface coating of siRNA-peptidomimetic nano-self-assemblies with anionic lipid bilayers: Enhanced gene silencing and reduced adversed effects in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Xianghui; de Groot, A. M.; Sijts, Alice

    2015-01-01

    giving rise to net anionic liposomes. These complexes and the corresponding liposomes were optimized towards efficient gene silencing and low adverse effects. The optimal anionic liposomes mediated a high silencing effect, which was comparable to that of the control (cationic Lipofectamine 2000), and did...... not display any noticeable cytotoxicity and immunogenicity in vitro. In contrast, the corresponding nanocomplexes mediated a reduced silencing effect with a more narrow safety window. The surface coating with anionic lipid bilayers led to partial decomplexation of the siRNA–peptidomimetic nanocomplex core...

  9. Quantifying Binding of Ethylene Oxide-Propylene Oxide Block Copolymers with Lipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjia; Haman, Karen J; Metzger, Joseph M; Hackel, Benjamin J; Bates, Frank S; Lodge, Timothy P

    2017-11-07

    Block copolymers composed of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) have been widely used in cell membrane stabilization and permeabilization. To explore the mechanism of interaction between PPO-PEO block copolymers and lipid membranes, we have investigated how polymer structure influences the polymer-lipid bilayer association by varying the overall molecular weight, the hydrophobic and hydrophilic block lengths, and the end-group structure systematically, using 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) unilamellar liposomes as model membranes. Pulsed-field-gradient NMR (PFG-NMR) was employed to probe polymer diffusion in the absence and presence of liposomes. The echo decay curves of free polymers in the absence of liposomes are single exponentials, indicative of simple translational diffusion, while in the presence of liposomes, the decays are biexponential, with the slower decay corresponding to polymers bound to liposomes. The binding percentage of polymer to the liposome was quantified by fitting the echo decay curves to a biexponential model. The NMR experiments show that increasing the total molecular weight and hydrophobicity of the polymer can significantly enhance the polymer-lipid bilayer association, as the binding percentage and liposome surface coverage both increase. We hypothesize that the hydrophobic PPO block inserts into the lipid bilayer due to the fact that little molecular exchange between bound and free polymers occurs on the time scale of the diffusion experiments. Additionally, as polymer concentration increases, the liposome surface coverage increases and approaches a limit. These results demonstrate that PFG-NMR is a simple yet powerful method to quantify interactions between polymers and lipid bilayers.

  10. Synthesis of novel cationic lipids with fully or partially non-scissile ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Five novel cationic lipids with fully or partially non-scissile linkage regions between the pseudoglyceryl backbone and the hydrocarbon chains have been synthesized. The membrane-forming properties of these new lipids are briefly presented.

  11. Partial molar volumes of some 1-alkanols in erythrocyte ghosts and lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Y; Miller, K W

    1982-06-08

    The partial molar volumes of 1-heptanol and 1-octanol in red cell ghosts, in egg phosphatidylcholine bilayers, and in water and phosphate buffer have been measured to a precision of better than 4% by using a density meter. In every case, the partial molar volume was independent of concentration in the range studied. In both membranes, the partial molar volume of each alcohol was close to its molar volume whereas in aqueous solution it was considerably less. Comparison of the two membranes suggests that the major contribution to the partial molar volume arises from alcohol-lipid interactions of each case. Further comparison with partial molar volumes in bulk solvents suggests that on average the alcohols retain a hydrogen bond in the lipid bilayer. The magnitude of the volume change in ghosts is some 5 times less than the corresponding area changes previously reported by others [Roth, S. H., & Seeman, P. (1972) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 255, 190-198]. These two observations can only be resolved by assuming either that the bilayer expands anisotropically, experiencing a decrease in thickness with increasing volume, or that conformational changes in membrane-associated proteins can occur at constant volume to increase membrane area. Finally, these data are used to test the critical volume hypothesis of general anesthetic action. A volume change of 0.15% in red cell ghost membranes is found to be associated with anesthesia, which compares with a value of 0.2% predicted previously from pressure reversal of anesthesia studies. In egg phosphatidylcholine bilayers, a volume change of 0.36% is associated with anesthesia. The larger change in the lipid bilayer compared to the biomembrane originates solely in their different membrane/buffer partition coefficients.

  12. Single-component supported lipid bilayers probed using broadband nonlinear optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olenick, Laura L; Chase, Hilary M; Fu, Li; Zhang, Yun; McGeachy, Alicia C; Dogangun, Merve; Walter, Stephanie R; Wang, Hong-Fei; Geiger, Franz M

    2018-01-31

    Broadband SFG spectroscopy is shown to offer considerable advantages over scanning systems in terms of signal-to-noise ratios when probing well-formed single-component supported lipid bilayers formed from zwitterionic lipids with PC headgroups. The SFG spectra obtained from bilayers formed from DOPC, POPC, DLPC, DMPC, DPPC and DSPC show a common peak at ∼2980 cm -1 , which is subject to interference between the C-H and the O-H stretches from the aqueous phase, while membranes having transition temperatures above the laboratory temperature produce SFG spectra with at least two additional peaks, one at ∼2920 cm -1 and another at ∼2880 cm -1 . The results validate spectroscopic and structural data from SFG experiments utilizing asymmetric bilayers in which one leaflet differs from the other in the extent of deuteration. Differences in H 2 O-D 2 O exchange experiments reveal that the lineshapes of the broadband SFG spectra are significantly influenced by interference from OH oscillators in the aqueous phase, even when those oscillators are not probed by the incident infrared light in our broadband setup. In the absence of spectral interference from the OH stretches of the solvent, the alkyl chain terminal methyl group of the bilayer is found to be tilted at an angle of 15° to 35° from the surface normal.

  13. Supported lipid bilayers with controlled curvature via colloidal lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundh, Maria; Manandhar, Michal; Svedhem, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    monitoring (QCM-D) was used to confirm vesicle rupture onto such structured surfaces. Fluorescence microscopy was used to show fluidity of the supported membranes. The formation of confluent SLBs is demonstrated at the nanostructured surfaces from vesicles composed of POPC lipids. However, at surfaces...

  14. Strong influence of periodic boundary conditions on lateral diffusion in lipid bilayer membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camley, Brian A. [Center for Theoretical Biological Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Lerner, Michael G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Earlham College, Richmond, Indiana 47374 (United States); Laboratory of Computational Biology, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Pastor, Richard W. [Laboratory of Computational Biology, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Brown, Frank L. H. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    The Saffman-Delbrück hydrodynamic model for lipid-bilayer membranes is modified to account for the periodic boundary conditions commonly imposed in molecular simulations. Predicted lateral diffusion coefficients for membrane-embedded solid bodies are sensitive to box shape and converge slowly to the limit of infinite box size, raising serious doubts for the prospects of using detailed simulations to accurately predict membrane-protein diffusivities and related transport properties. Estimates for the relative error associated with periodic boundary artifacts are 50% and higher for fully atomistic models in currently feasible simulation boxes. MARTINI simulations of LacY membrane protein diffusion and LacY dimer diffusion in DPPC membranes and lipid diffusion in pure DPPC bilayers support the underlying hydrodynamic model.

  15. Interactions of inertial cavitation bubbles with stratum corneum lipid bilayers during low-frequency sonophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezel, Ahmet; Mitragotri, Samir

    2003-12-01

    Interactions of acoustic cavitation bubbles with biological tissues play an important role in biomedical applications of ultrasound. Acoustic cavitation plays a particularly important role in enhancing transdermal transport of macromolecules, thereby offering a noninvasive mode of drug delivery (sonophoresis). Ultrasound-enhanced transdermal transport is mediated by inertial cavitation, where collapses of cavitation bubbles microscopically disrupt the lipid bilayers of the stratum corneum. In this study, we describe a theoretical analysis of the interactions of cavitation bubbles with the stratum corneum lipid bilayers. Three modes of bubble-stratum corneum interactions including shock wave emission, microjet penetration into the stratum corneum, and impact of microjet on the stratum corneum are considered. By relating the mechanical effects of these events on the stratum corneum structure, the relationship between the number of cavitation events and collapse pressures with experimentally measured increase in skin permeability was established. Theoretical predictions were compared to experimentally measured parameters of cavitation events.

  16. Diffusion mediated coagulation and fragmentation based study of domain formation in lipid bilayer membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Laxminarsimha V., E-mail: laxman@iitk.ac.in [Mechanics and Applied Mathematics Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Roy, Subhradeep [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics (MC 0219), Virginia Tech, 495 Old Turner Street, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Das, Sovan Lal [Mechanics and Applied Mathematics Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2017-01-15

    We estimate the equilibrium size distribution of cholesterol rich micro-domains on a lipid bilayer by solving Smoluchowski equation for coagulation and fragmentation. Towards this aim, we first derive the coagulation kernels based on the diffusion behaviour of domains moving in a two dimensional membrane sheet, as this represents the reality better. We incorporate three different diffusion scenarios of domain diffusion into our coagulation kernel. Subsequently, we investigate the influence of the parameters in our model on the coagulation and fragmentation behaviour. The observed behaviours of the coagulation and fragmentation kernels are also manifested in the equilibrium domain size distribution and its first moment. Finally, considering the liquid domains diffusing in a supported lipid bilayer, we fit the equilibrium domain size distribution to a benchmark solution.

  17. Two-dimensional solid-state NMR reveals two topologies of sarcolipin in oriented lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffy, Jarrod J; Traaseth, Nathaniel J; Mascioni, Alessandro; Gor'kov, Peter L; Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Brey, William W; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2006-09-12

    Sarcolipin (SLN), a 31 amino acid integral membrane protein, regulates SERCA1a and SERCA2a, two isoforms of the sarco(endo)plasmic Ca-ATPase, by lowering their apparent Ca(2+) affinity and thereby enabling muscle relaxation. SLN is expressed in both fast-twitch and slow-twitch muscle fibers with significant expression levels also found in the cardiac muscle. SLN shares approximately 30% identity with the transmembrane domain of phospholamban (PLN), and recent solution NMR studies carried out in detergent micelles indicate that the two polypeptides bind to SERCA in a similar manner. Previous 1D solid-state NMR experiments on selectively (15)N-labeled sites showed that SLN crosses the lipid bilayer with an orientation nearly parallel to the bilayer normal. With a view toward the characterization of SLN structure and its interactions with both lipids and SERCA, herein we report our initial structural and topological assignments of SLN in mechanically oriented DOPC/DOPE lipid bilayers as mapped by 2D (15)N PISEMA experiments. The PISEMA spectra obtained on uniformly (15)N-labeled protein as well as (15)N-Leu, (15)N-Ile and (15)N-Val map the secondary structure of SLN and, simultaneously, reveal that SLN exists in two distinct topologies. Both the major and the minor populations assume an orientation with the helix axis tilted by approximately 23 degrees with respect to the lipid bilayer normal, but vary in the rotation angle about the helix axis by approximately 5 degrees . The existence of the multiple populations in model membranes may be a significant requirement for SLN interaction with SERCA.

  18. Capturing suboptical dynamic structures in lipid bilayer patches formed from free-standing giant unilamellar vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhartia, Tripta; Cornelius, Flemming; Ipsen, John H

    2017-01-01

    treatment with magnesium chloride, they collapse to form planar lipid bilayer (PLB) patches. Rapid GUV collapse onto the mica preserves the lateral organization of freestanding membranes and thus makes it possible to image 'snapshots' of GUVs up to nanometer resolution by high-resolution microscopy...... up a new avenue for quantitative biophysical studies of suboptical dynamic structures in biomembranes, which are local and short-lived. Preparation of GUVs, PLB patches and their imaging takes

  19. Distribution of BODIPY-labelled phosphatidylethanolamines in lipid bilayers exhibiting different curvatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šachl, Radek; Mikhalyov, I.; Gretskaya, N.; Olžyńska, Agnieszka; Hof, Martin; Johansson, B.-A.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 24 (2011), s. 11694-11701 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/1090; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : BODIPY-labelled phosphatidylethanolamines * lipid bilayers * physical chemistry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.573, year: 2011

  20. Correlation between cationic lipid-based transfection and cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchenbuechler, Inka; Kirchenbuechler, David; Elbaum, Michael

    2016-07-01

    We evaluate the temporal relation between protein expression by cationic lipid-mediated transfection and cell division using time lapse fluorescence microscopy. Detailed image analysis provides new insights on the single cell level while simultaneously achieving appropriate statistics. Earlier evidence by less direct methods such as flow cytometry indicates a primary route for transfection involving nuclear envelope breakdown, but also suggests the existence of a pathway independent of mitosis. We confirm and quantify both mechanisms. We found the timing for successful transfection to be unexpectedly flexible, contrary to assertions of a narrow time window. Specifically, cells dividing more than 24h after exposure to the transfection medium express the probed protein at a comparable level to cells in a mitotic state during or shortly after transfection. This finding can have a profound impact on the guidance and development of non-viral gene delivery materials. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Asymmetric distribution of cone-shaped lipids in a highly curved bilayer revealed by a small angle neutron scattering technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Y; Urakami, N; Taniguchi, T; Imai, M

    2011-07-20

    We have investigated the lipid sorting in a binary small unilamellar vesicle (SUV) composed of cone-shaped (1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine: DHPC) and cylinder-shaped (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine: DPPC) lipids. In order to reveal the lipid sorting we adopted a contrast matching technique of small angle neutron scattering (SANS), which extracts the distribution of deuterated lipids in the bilayer quantitatively without steric modification of lipids as in fluorescence probe techniques. First the SANS profile of protonated SUVs at a film contrast condition showed that SUVs have a spherical shape with an inner radius of 190 Å and a bilayer thickness of 40 Å. The SANS profile of deuterated SUVs at a contrast matching condition showed a characteristic scattering profile, indicating an asymmetric distribution of cone-shaped lipids in the bilayer. The characteristic profile was described well by a spherical bilayer model. The fitting revealed that most DHPC molecules are localized in the outer leaflet. Thus the shape of the lipid is strongly coupled with the membrane curvature. We compared the obtained asymmetric distribution of the cone-shaped lipids in the bilayer with the theoretical prediction based on the curvature energy model.

  2. Structure and Dynamics of Glycosphingolipids in Lipid Bilayers: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronak Y. Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycolipids are important constituents of biological membranes, and understanding their structure and dynamics in lipid bilayers provides insights into their physiological and pathological roles. Experimental techniques have provided details into their behavior at model and biological membranes; however, computer simulations are needed to gain atomic level insights. This paper summarizes the insights obtained from MD simulations into the conformational and orientational dynamics of glycosphingolipids and their exposure, hydration, and hydrogen-bonding interactions in membrane environment. The organization of glycosphingolipids in raft-like membranes and their modulation of lipid membrane structure are also reviewed.

  3. Polyunsaturation in cell membranes and lipid bilayers and its effects on membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, S J; Kelly, M B; Yeager, M D; Larkin, J; Ho, C; Stubbs, C D

    1996-03-01

    The effect of variation of the degree of cis-unsaturation on cell membrane protein functioning was investigated using a model lipid bilayer system and protein kinase C (PKC). This protein is a key element of signal transduction. Furthermore it is representative of a class of extrinsic membrane proteins that show lipid dependent interactions with cell membranes. To test for dependence of activity on the phospholipid unsaturation, experiments were devised using a vesicle assay system consisting of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylserine (PS) in which the unsaturation was systematically varied. Highly purified PKC alpha and epsilon were obtained using the baculovirus-insect cell expression system. It was shown that increased PC unsaturation elevated the activity of PKC alpha. By contrast, increasing the unsaturation of PS decreased the activity of PKC alpha, and to a lesser extent PKC epsilon. This result immediately rules out any single lipid bilayer physical parameter, such as lipid order, underlying the effect. It is proposed that while PC unsaturation effects are explainable on the basis of a contribution to membrane surface curvature stress, the effects of PS unsaturation may be due to specific protein-lipid interactions. Overall, the results indicate that altered phospholipid unsaturation in cell membranes that occurs in certain disease states such as chronic alcoholism, or by dietary manipulations, are likely to have profound effects on signal transduction pathways involving PKC and similar proteins.

  4. Hydrogel Micro-/Nanosphere Coated by a Lipid Bilayer: Preparation and Microscopic Probing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Rahni

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The result of polymeric nanogels and lipid vesicles interaction—lipobeads—can be considered as multipurpose containers for future therapeutic applications, such as targeted anticancer chemotherapy with superior tumor response and minimum side effects. In this work, micrometer sized lipobeads were synthesized by two methods: (i mixing separately prepared microgels made of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPA and phospholipid vesicles of micrometer or nanometer size and (ii polymerization within the lipid vesicles. For the first time, a high vacuum scanning electron microscopy was shown to be suitable for a quick validation of the structural organization of wet lipobeads and their constituents without special sample preparation. In particular, the structural difference of microgels prepared by thermal and UV-polymerization in different solvents was revealed and three types of giant liposomes were recognized under high vacuum in conjunction with their size, composition, and method of preparation. Importantly, the substructure of the hydrogel core and multi- and unilamellar constructions of the peripheral lipid part were explicitly distinguished on the SEM images of lipobeads, justifying the spontaneous formation of a lipid bilayer on the surface of microgels and evidencing an energetically favorable structural organization of the hydrogel/lipid bilayer assembly. This key property can facilitate lipobeads’ preparation and decrease technological expenses on their scaled production. The comparison of the SEM imaging with the scanning confocal and atomic force microscopies data are also presented in the discussion.

  5. Cholera toxin B subunit induces local curvature on lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pezeshkian, Weria; Nåbo, Lina J.; Ipsen, John H.

    2017-01-01

    B induces a local membrane curvature that is essential for its clathrin-independent uptake. Using all-atom molecular dynamics, we show that CTxB induces local curvature, with the radius of curvature around 36 nm. The main feature of the CTxB molecular structure that causes membrane bending is the protruding...... alpha helices in the middle of the protein. Our study points to a generic protein design principle for generating local membrane curvature through specific binding to their lipid anchors....

  6. Synthesis, activity, and structure--activity relationship studies of novel cationic lipids for DNA transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byk, G; Dubertret, C; Escriou, V; Frederic, M; Jaslin, G; Rangara, R; Pitard, B; Crouzet, J; Wils, P; Schwartz, B; Scherman, D

    1998-01-15

    We have designed and synthesized original cationic lipids for gene delivery. A synthetic method on solid support allowed easy access to unsymmetrically monofunctionalized polyamine building blocks of variable geometries. These polyamine building blocks were introduced into cationic lipids. To optimize the transfection efficiency in the novel series, we have carried out structure-activity relationship studies by introduction of variable-length lipids, of variable-length linkers between lipid and cationic moiety, and of substituted linkers. We introduce the concept of using the linkers within cationic lipids molecules as carriers of side groups harboring various functionalities (side chain entity), as assessed by the introduction of a library composed of cationic entities, additional lipid chains, targeting groups, and finally the molecular probes rhodamine and biotin for cellular traffic studies. The transfection activity of the products was assayed in vitro on Hela carcinoma, on NIH3T3, and on CV1 fibroblasts and in vivo on the Lewis Lung carcinoma model. Products from the series displayed high transfection activities. Results indicated that the introduction of a targeting side chain moiety into the cationic lipid is permitted. A primary physicochemical characterization of the DNA/lipid complexes was demonstrated with this leading compound. Selected products from the series are currently being developed for preclinical studies, and the labeled lipopolyamines can be used to study the intracellular traffic of DNA/cationic lipid complexes.

  7. Structure and orientation of dynorphin bound to lipid bilayers by 13C solid-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uezono, Takiko; Toraya, Shuichi; Obata, Maki; Nishimura, Katsuyuki; Tuzi, Satoru; Saitô, Hazime; Naito, Akira

    2005-07-01

    Secondary structure and orientation of dynorphin bound to dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer were investigated by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy. For this purpose, 13C NMR spectra of the site-specifically 13C-labeled dynorphin were measured in the membrane-bound state under static, magic angle spinning (MAS), and slow MAS conditions. In the static experiment, magnetically oriented vesicle system (MOVS) induced by dynorphin was successfully used to investigate the orientation of dynorphin bound to the lipid bilayers. It was found that dynorphin adopts an α-helical structure in the N-terminus from Gly 2 to Leu 5 by analyses of the isotropic chemical shifts obtained from the MAS experiments. In contrast, it adopts disordered conformations from the center to the C-terminus and is located on the membrane surface. The static 13C NMR spectra indicated that MOVS-bound dynorphin was oriented to the magnetic field and rotated rapidly about the bilayer normal. Subsequently, we analyzed the 13C chemical shift tensors of carbonyl carbons in the peptide backbone by considering the rotational motion of the N-terminal α-helix. It was revealed that the N-terminal α-helix is inserted into the membrane with the tilt angle of 21° to the bilayer normal. This structure suggests a possibility that dynorphin interacts with the extracellular loop II of the κ-receptor through a helix-helix interaction.

  8. 2D lattice model of a lipid bilayer: Microscopic derivation and thermodynamic exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakobyan, Davit; Heuer, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Based on all-atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of a lipid bilayer we present a systematic mapping on a 2D lattice model. Keeping the lipid type and the chain order parameter as key variables we derive a free energy functional, containing the enthalpic interaction of adjacent lipids as well as the tail entropy. The functional form of both functions is explicitly determined for saturated and polyunsaturated lipids. By studying the lattice model via Monte Carlo simulations it is possible to reproduce the temperature dependence of the distribution of order parameters of the pure lipids, including the prediction of the gel transition. Furthermore, application to a mixture of saturated and polyunsaturated lipids yields the correct phase separation behavior at lower temperatures with a simulation time reduced by approximately 7 orders of magnitude as compared to the corresponding MD simulations. Even the time-dependence of the de-mixing is reproduced on a semi-quantitative level. Due to the generality of the approach we envisage a large number of further applications, ranging from modeling larger sets of lipids, sterols, and solvent proteins to predicting nucleation barriers for the melting of lipids. Particularly, from the properties of the 2D lattice model one can directly read off the enthalpy and entropy change of the 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine gel-to-liquid transition in excellent agreement with experimental and MD results.

  9. Silica nanoparticles for the oriented encapsulation of membrane proteins into artificial bilayer lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadauer, Florian; Geiss, Andreas F; Srajer, Johannes; Siebenhofer, Bernhard; Frank, Pinar; Reiner-Rozman, Ciril; Ludwig, Bernd; Richter, Oliver-M H; Nowak, Christoph; Naumann, Renate L C

    2015-03-03

    An artificial bilayer lipid membrane system is presented, featuring the oriented encapsulation of membrane proteins in a functionally active form. Nickel nitrilo-triacetic acid-functionalized silica nanoparticles, of a diameter of around 25 nm, are used to attach the proteins via a genetically engineered histidine tag in a uniform orientation. Subsequently, the proteins are reconstituted within a phospholipid bilayer, formed around the particles by in situ dialysis to form so-called proteo-lipobeads (PLBs). With a final size of about 50 nm, the PLBs can be employed for UV/vis spectroscopy studies, particularly of multiredox center proteins, because the effects of light scattering are negligible. As a proof of concept, we use cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) from P. denitrificans with the his tag genetically engineered to subunit I. In this orientation, the P side of CcO is directed to the outside and hence electron transfer can be initiated by reduced cytochrome c (cc). UV/vis measurements are used in order to determine the occupancy by CcO molecules encapsulated in the lipid bilayer as well as the kinetics of electron transfer between CcO and cc. The kinetic data are analyzed in terms of the Michaelis-Menten kinetics showing that the turnover rate of CcO is significantly decreased compared to that of solubilized protein, whereas the binding characteristics are improved. The data demonstrate the suitability of PLBs for functional cell-free bioassays of membrane proteins.

  10. Thin-film silica sol-gels doped with ion responsive fluorescent lipid bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, D.Y.; Shea, L.E.; Sinclair, M.B.

    1999-01-12

    A metal ion sensitive, fluorescent lipid-b i layer material (5oA PSIDA/DSPC) was successfully immobilized in a silica matrix using a tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) sol-gel procedure. The sol-gel immobilization method was quantitative in the entrapment of seif-assembled Iipid-bilayers and yielded thin films for facile configuration to optical fiber piatforms. The silica matrix was compatible with the solvent sensitive lipid bilayers and provided physical stabilization as well as biological protection. Immobilization in the silica sol-gel produced an added benefit of improving the bilayer's metal ion sensitivity by up to two orders of magnitude. This enhanced performance was attributed to a preconcentrator effect from the anionic surface of the silica matrix. Thin gels (193 micron thickness) were coupled to a bifurcated fiber optic bundle to produce a metal ion sensor probe. Response times of 10 - 15 minutes to 0.1 M CUCIZ were realized with complete regeneration of the sensor using an ethylenediarninetetraacetic acid (EDTA) solution.

  11. Optimization of cationic lipid mediated gene transfer: structure-function, physico-chemical, and cellular studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrière, Marie; Tranchant, Isabelle; Niore, Pierre-Antoine; Byk, Gerardo; Mignet, Nathalie; Escriou, Virginie; Scherman, Daniel; Herscovici, Jean

    2002-01-01

    The rationale design aimed at the enhancement of cationic lipid mediated gene transfer is discussed. These improvements are based on the straight evaluation of the structure-activity relationship and on the introduction of new structures. Much attention have been given to the supramolecular structures of the lipid/DNA complexes, to the effect of serum on gene transfer and to the intracellular trafficking of the lipoplexes. Finally new avenue using reducible cationic lipids has been discussed.

  12. Photosynthetic Proteins in Supported Lipid Bilayers: Towards a Biokleptic Approach for Energy Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Roth, Johannes S; Han, Xiaojun; Evans, Stephen D

    2015-07-15

    In nature, plants and some bacteria have evolved an ability to convert solar energy into chemical energy usable by the organism. This process involves several proteins and the creation of a chemical gradient across the cell membrane. To transfer this process to a laboratory environment, several conditions have to be met: i) proteins need to be reconstituted into a lipid membrane, ii) the proteins need to be correctly oriented and functional and, finally, iii) the lipid membrane should be capable of maintaining chemical and electrical gradients. Investigating the processes of photosynthesis and energy generation in vivo is a difficult task due to the complexity of the membrane and its associated proteins. Solid, supported lipid bilayers provide a good model system for the systematic investigation of the different components involved in the photosynthetic pathway. In this review, the progress made to date in the development of supported lipid bilayer systems suitable for the investigation of membrane proteins is described; in particular, there is a focus on those used for the reconstitution of proteins involved in light capture. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Stable cupola-shaped bilayer lipid membranes with mobile Plateau-Gibbs border: expansion-shrinkage of membrane due to thermal transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, V F; Shevchenko, E V; Smirnova EYu; Yakovenko, E V; Frolov, A V

    1992-05-01

    Stable bilayer lipid membranes (BLM) with mobile Plateau-Gibbs border (PGB) have been formed. The precondition of the formation was the presence of a lipid coverage on the teflon surface near the hole, where the membrane has been formed. This allowed the movement of the PGB along the teflon surface after transformation of the planar bilayer into a cupola-shaped by bowing of the bilayer due to excess hydrostatic pressure. As a result the giant bilayers were obtained with an area up to two orders larger in magnitude compared with the initial area. Changes in lipid bilayer area depend on the temperature at the phase transition of the lipid. Cooling of the expanded bilayer was followed by a significant shrinkage of the bilayer at temperatures below the main phase transition.

  14. On the freezing behavior and diffusion of water in proximity to single-supported zwitterionic and anionic bilayer lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiec, A.; Buck, Z. N.; Brown, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    We compare the freezing/melting behavior of water hydrating single-supported bilayers of a zwitterionic lipid DMPC with that of an anionic lipid DMPG. For both membranes, the temperature dependence of the elastically scattered neutron intensity indicates distinct water types undergoing...

  15. Exploring the Effects on Lipid Bilayer Induced by Noble Gases via Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junlang; Chen, Liang; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xiaogang; Zeng, Songwei

    2015-11-25

    Noble gases seem to have no significant effect on the anesthetic targets due to their simple, spherical shape. However, xenon has strong narcotic efficacy and can be used clinically, while other noble gases cannot. The mechanism remains unclear. Here, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on phospholipid bilayers with four kinds of noble gases to elucidate the difference of their effects on the membrane. Our results showed that the sequence of effects on membrane exerted by noble gases from weak to strong was Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe, the same order as their relative narcotic potencies as well as their lipid/water partition percentages. Compared with the other three kinds of noble gases, more xenon molecules were distributed between the lipid tails and headgroups, resulting in membrane's lateral expansion and lipid tail disorder. It may contribute to xenon's strong anesthetic potency. The results are well consistent with the membrane mediated mechanism of general anesthesia.

  16. Chemotherapy Drugs Thiocolchicoside and Taxol Permeabilize Lipid Bilayer Membranes by Forming Ion Pores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashrafuzzaman, Md; Tuszynski, J A; Duszyk, M

    2011-01-01

    We report ion channel formation by chemotherapy drugs: thiocolchicoside (TCC) and taxol (TXL) which primarily target tubulin but not only. For example, TCC has been shown to interact with GABA A , nuclear envelope and strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors. TXL interferes with the normal breakdown of microtubules inducing mitotic block and apoptosis. It also interacts with mitochondria and found significant chemotherapeutic applications for breast, ovarian and lung cancer. In order to better understand the mechanisms of TCC and TXL actions, we examined their effects on phospholipid bilayer membranes. Our electrophysiological recordings across membranes constructed in NaCl aqueous phases consisting of TCC or TXL under the influence of an applied transmembrane potential (V) indicate that both molecules induce stable ion flowing pores/channels in membranes. Their discrete current versus time plots exhibit triangular shapes which is consistent with a spontaneous time-dependent change of the pore conductance in contrast to rectangular conductance events usually induced by ion channels. These events exhibit conductance (∼0.01-0.1 pA/mV) and lifetimes (∼5-30 ms) within the ranges observed in e.g., gramicidin A and alamethicin channels. The channel formation probability increases linearly with TCC/TXL concentration and V and is not affected by pH (5.7 - 8.4). A theoretical explanation on the causes of chemotherapy drug induced ion pore formation and the pore stability has also been found using our recently discovered binding energy between lipid bilayer and the bilayer embedded ion channels using gramicidin A channels as tools. This picture of energetics suggests that as the channel forming agents approach to the lipids on bilayer the localized charge properties in the constituents of both channel forming agents (e.g., chemotherapy drugs in this study) and the lipids determine the electrostatic drug-lipid coupling energy through screened Coulomb interactions between

  17. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pera, H; Kleijn, J M; Leermakers, F A M

    2014-02-14

    To understand how lipid architecture determines the lipid bilayer structure and its mechanics, we implement a molecularly detailed model that uses the self-consistent field theory. This numerical model accurately predicts parameters such as Helfrichs mean and Gaussian bending modulus kc and k̄ and the preferred monolayer curvature J(0)(m), and also delivers structural membrane properties like the core thickness, and head group position and orientation. We studied how these mechanical parameters vary with system variations, such as lipid tail length, membrane composition, and those parameters that control the lipid tail and head group solvent quality. For the membrane composition, negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) or zwitterionic, phosphatidylcholine (PC), and -ethanolamine (PE) lipids were used. In line with experimental findings, we find that the values of kc and the area compression modulus kA are always positive. They respond similarly to parameters that affect the core thickness, but differently to parameters that affect the head group properties. We found that the trends for k̄ and J(0)(m) can be rationalised by the concept of Israelachivili's surfactant packing parameter, and that both k̄ and J(0)(m) change sign with relevant parameter changes. Although typically k̄ 0, especially at low ionic strengths. We anticipate that these changes lead to unstable membranes as these become vulnerable to pore formation or disintegration into lipid disks.

  18. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pera, H.; Kleijn, J. M.; Leermakers, F. A. M.

    2014-01-01

    To understand how lipid architecture determines the lipid bilayer structure and its mechanics, we implement a molecularly detailed model that uses the self-consistent field theory. This numerical model accurately predicts parameters such as Helfrichs mean and Gaussian bending modulus k c and k ¯ and the preferred monolayer curvature J 0 m , and also delivers structural membrane properties like the core thickness, and head group position and orientation. We studied how these mechanical parameters vary with system variations, such as lipid tail length, membrane composition, and those parameters that control the lipid tail and head group solvent quality. For the membrane composition, negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) or zwitterionic, phosphatidylcholine (PC), and -ethanolamine (PE) lipids were used. In line with experimental findings, we find that the values of k c and the area compression modulus k A are always positive. They respond similarly to parameters that affect the core thickness, but differently to parameters that affect the head group properties. We found that the trends for k ¯ and J 0 m can be rationalised by the concept of Israelachivili's surfactant packing parameter, and that both k ¯ and J 0 m change sign with relevant parameter changes. Although typically k ¯ 0 m ≫0, especially at low ionic strengths. We anticipate that these changes lead to unstable membranes as these become vulnerable to pore formation or disintegration into lipid disks

  19. Evaporation-induced monolayer compression improves droplet interface bilayer formation using unsaturated lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Guru A; Taylor, Graham J; Basham, Colin M; Brady, Nathan G; Collier, C Patrick; Sarles, Stephen A

    2018-03-01

    In this article, we report on a new experimental methodology to enable reliable formation of droplet interface bilayer (DIB) model membranes with two types of unsaturated lipids that have proven difficult for creating stable DIBs. Through the implementation of a simple evaporation technique to condition the spontaneously assembled lipid monolayer around each droplet, we increased the success rates of DIB formation for two distinct unsaturated lipids, namely 1,2-dioleoyl- sn -glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl- sn -glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), from less than 10% to near 100%. Separately, using a pendant drop tensiometer, we learned that: (a) DOPC and POPC monolayers do not spontaneously assemble into their tightest possible configurations at an oil-water interface, and (b) reducing the surface area of a water droplet coated with a partially packed monolayer leads to a more tightly packed monolayer with an interfacial tension lower than that achieved by spontaneous assembly alone. We also estimated from Langmuir compression isotherms obtained for both lipids that the brief droplet evaporation procedure prior to DIB formation resulted in a 6%-16% reduction in area per lipid for DOPC and POPC, respectively. Finally, the increased success rates of formation for DOPC and POPC DIBs enabled quantitative characterization of unsaturated lipid membrane properties including electrical resistance, rupture potential, and specific capacitance.

  20. Kinetic Control of Histidine-Tagged Protein Surface Density on Supported Lipid Bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nye, Jeffrey A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Groves, Jay T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-02-28

    Nickel-chelating lipids are general tools for anchoring polyhistidine-tagged proteins to supported lipid bilayers (SLBs), but controversy exists over the stability of the protein-lipid attachment. In this study, we show that chelator lipids are suitable anchors for building stable, biologically active surfaces but that a simple Langmuirian model is insufficient to describe their behavior. Desorption kinetics from chelator lipids are governed by the valency of surface binding: monovalently bound proteins desorb within minutes (t1/2 ≈ 6 min), whereas polyvalently bound species remain bound for hours (t1/2 ≈ 12 h). Evolution between surface states is slow, so equilibrium is unlikely to be reached on experimental timescales. However, by tuning incubation conditions, the populations of each species can be kinetically controlled, providing a wide range of protein densities on SLBs with a single concentration of chelator lipid. In conclusion, we propose guidelines for the assembly of SLB surfaces functionalized with specific protein densities and demonstrate their utility in the formation of hybrid immunological synapses.

  1. Synthesis of new piroxicam derivatives and their influence on lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczęśniak-Sięga, Berenika; Maniewska, Jadwiga; Poła, Andrzej; Środa-Pomianek, Kamila; Malinka, Wiesław; Michalak, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    A novel series of potentially biologically active 1,2-benzothiazine 1,1-dioxides--analogs of piroxicam (a recognized non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) were synthesized from commercially available saccharin. All of the synthesized compounds were subjected to preliminary evaluation for their ability to interact with lipid bilayers. The influence of the new derivatives of piroxicam on liposomes made of EYPC was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy with two fluorescent probes--Laurdan and Prodan. All the studied compounds showed an interaction with model membranes.

  2. Quantitative optical microscopy and micromanipulation studies on the lipid bilayer membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis; Needham, David

    2014-01-01

    to study composition-structure-property materials relationships of free-standing lipid bilayer membranes. Because their size (~5 to 100 m diameter) that is well above the resolution limit of regular light microscopes, GUVs are suitable membrane models for optical microscopy and micromanipulation......This manuscript discusses basic methodological aspects of optical microscopy and micromanipulation methods to study membranes and reviews methods to generate giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). In particular, we focus on the use of fluorescence microscopy and micropipette manipulation techniques...

  3. Lipid diffusion in the distal and proximal leaflets of supported lipid bilayer membranes studied by single particle tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, Rafael L.; Barel, Itay; Brown, Frank L. H.; Haran, Gilad

    2018-03-01

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) have been studied extensively as simple but powerful models for cellular membranes. Yet, potential differences in the dynamics of the two leaflets of a SLB remain poorly understood. Here, using single particle tracking, we obtain a detailed picture of bilayer dynamics. We observe two clearly separate diffusing populations, fast and slow, that we associate with motion in the distal and proximal leaflets of the SLB, respectively, based on fluorescence quenching experiments. We estimate diffusion coefficients using standard techniques as well as a new method based on the blur of images due to motion. Fitting the observed diffusion coefficients to a two-leaflet membrane hydrodynamic model allows for the simultaneous determination of the intermonolayer friction coefficient and the substrate-membrane friction coefficient, without any prior assumptions on the strengths of the relevant interactions. Remarkably, our calculations suggest that the viscosity of the interfacial water confined between the membrane and the substrate is elevated by ˜104 as compared to bulk water. Using hidden Markov model analysis, we then obtain insight into the transbilayer movement of lipids. We find that lipid flip-flop dynamics are very fast, with half times in the range of seconds. Importantly, we find little evidence for membrane defect mediated lipid flip-flop for SLBs at temperatures well above the solid-to-liquid transition, though defects seem to be involved when the SLBs are cooled down. Our work thus shows that the combination of single particle tracking and advanced hydrodynamic modeling provides a powerful means to obtain insight into membrane dynamics.

  4. Next generation macrocyclic and acyclic cationic lipids for gene transfer: Synthesis and in vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubeli, Emile; Maginty, Amanda B; Abdul Khalique, Nada; Raju, Liji; Abdulhai, Mohamad; Nicholson, David G; Larsen, Helge; Pungente, Michael D; Goldring, William P D

    2015-10-01

    Previously we reported the synthesis and in vitro evaluation of four novel, short-chain cationic lipid gene delivery vectors, characterized by acyclic or macrocyclic hydrophobic regions composed of, or derived from, two 7-carbon chains. Herein we describe a revised synthesis of an expanded library of related cationic lipids to include extended chain analogues, their formulation with plasmid DNA (pDNA) and in vitro delivery into Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO-K1) cells. The formulations were evaluated against each other based on structural differences in the hydrophobic domain and headgroup. Structurally the library is divided into four sets based on lipids derived from two 7- or two 11-carbon hydrophobic chains, C7 and C11 respectively, which possess either a dimethylamine or a trimethylamine derived headgroup. Each set includes four cationic lipids based on an acyclic or macrocyclic, saturated or unsaturated hydrophobic domain. All lipids were co-formulated with the commercial cationic lipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EPC) in a 1:1 molar ratio, along with one of two distinct neutral co-lipids, cholesterol or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) in an overall cationic-to-neutral lipid molar ratio of 3:2. Binding of lipid formulations with DNA, and packing morphology associated with the individual lipid-DNA complexes were characterized by gel electrophoresis and small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXD), respectively. As a general trend, lipoplex formulations based on mismatched binary cationic lipids, composed of a shorter C7 lipid and the longer lipid EPC (C14), were generally associated with higher transfection efficiency and lower cytotoxicity than their more closely matched C11/EPC binary lipid formulation counterparts. Furthermore, the cyclic lipids gave transfection levels as high as or greater than their acyclic counterparts, and formulations with cholesterol exhibited higher transfection and lower cytotoxicity than those

  5. Gene delivery by cationic lipids : in and out of an endosome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, D.; Rejman, J.; Wasungu, L.; Shi, F.; Zuhorn, I.

    Cationic lipids are exploited as vectors ('lipoplexes') for delivering nucleic acids, including genes, into cells for both therapeutic and cell biological purposes. However, to meet therapeutic requirements, their efficacy needs major improvement, and better defining the mechanism of entry in

  6. PTEN interaction with tethered bilayer lipid membranes containing PI(4,5)P2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, R.; Shenoy, S.; Shekhar, P.; Kalinowski, A.; Gericke, A.; Heinrich, F.; Loesche, M.

    2009-03-01

    Synthetic lipid membrane models are frequently used for the study of biophysical processes at cell membranes. We use a robust membrane model, the tethered bilayer lipid membrane (tBLM), based on a (C14)2-(PEO)6-thiol anchor, WC14 [1]. Such membranes can be prepared to contain single phospholipids or complex lipid mixtures [2], including functional lipids involved in cell signaling, such as the highly charged phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPs). To study the interaction between the tumor suppressor PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) and model membranes we have incorporated phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) in tBLMs and use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), neutron reflectometry (NR) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for their characterization. NR shows that tBLMs formed with PI(4,5)P2 are complete. FCS of labeled PI(4,5)P2 shows that diffusion occurs at the time scale characteristic of membrane-incorporated lipid. Finally, SPR shows specific binding of PTEN to the model membrane thus confirming the incorporation of PI(4,5)P2 into the tBLM. [1] McGillivray et al, Biointerphases 2, 21-33 (2007) [2] Heinrich et al, Langmuir, submitted

  7. Supercritical angle fluorescence as a tool to study the interaction between lipid bilayer and peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Valentin; Serrano, Diana; Seeger, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    The understanding of processes occurring at the interface between two media are of prior importance in various fields of research, from material sciences to biology. A custom-made microscope objective based on the supercritical angle technique was developed in our group, allowing to probe these interfacial events by carrying out surface-sensitive and low invasive spectroscopy of aqueous samples. A biological example of particular interest is the comprehension of neurodegenerative diseases which seem caused by the interaction of specific peptides with the membrane of the neurons. Taking advantage of our optical setup, we used supercritical angle fluorescence spectroscopy to specifically monitor the interaction between a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) and the Amyloid β peptide, notably responsible of the Alzheimer disease. Different forms of the peptide (40 and 42 amino acids composition) were tested and the interfacial fluorescence measured to get information about the lipid integrity and mobility. The adsorption of the peptide was also characterized in terms of kinetic and affinity.

  8. Structure of functional Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin channels in tethered bilayer lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivray, Duncan J; Valincius, Gintaras; Heinrich, Frank; Robertson, Joseph W F; Vanderah, David J; Febo-Ayala, Wilma; Ignatjev, Ilja; Lösche, Mathias; Kasianowicz, John J

    2009-02-18

    We demonstrate a method for simultaneous structure and function determination of integral membrane proteins. Electrical impedance spectroscopy shows that Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin channels in membranes tethered to gold have the same properties as those formed in free-standing bilayer lipid membranes. Neutron reflectometry provides high-resolution structural information on the interaction between the channel and the disordered membrane, validating predictions based on the channel's x-ray crystal structure. The robust nature of the membrane enabled the precise localization of the protein within 1.1 A. The channel's extramembranous cap domain affects the lipid headgroup region and the alkyl chains in the outer membrane leaflet and significantly dehydrates the headgroups. The results suggest that this technique could be used to elucidate molecular details of the association of other proteins with membranes and may provide structural information on domain organization and stimuli-responsive reorganization for transmembrane proteins in membrane mimics.

  9. Electroporation of Skin Stratum Corneum Lipid Bilayer and Molecular Mechanism of Drug Transport: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rakesh; Rai, Beena

    2018-04-30

    Skin electroporation has been used significantly to increase the drug permeation. However, molecular mechanism, which resulted in enhancement of flux through skin, is still not known. In this study, extensive atomistic molecular dynamics simulation of skin lipids (made up of ceramide (CER), cholesterol (CHOL) and free fatty acid (FFA)) have been performed at various external electric field. We show for the first time the pore formation in the skin lipid bilayer during the electroporation. We show the effect of applied external electrical field on the pore formation dynamics in lipid bilayer of different size and composition. The pore formation and resealing kinetics were different and was found to be highly dependent on the composition of skin lipid bilayer. The pore formation time decreased with increase in the bilayer size. The pore sustaining electric field was found to be in the range of 0.20-0.25 V/nm for equimolar CER, CHOL and FFA lipid bilayer. The skin lipid bilayer (1:1:1), sealed itself within 20 ns after the removal of external electric field. We also present the molecular mechanism of enhancement of drug permeation in the presence of external field as compared to the passive diffusion. The molecular level understanding obtained here could help in optimizing/designing the electroporation experiments for effective drug delivery. For a given skin composition and size of drug molecule, the combination of pore formation time and pore growth model can be used to know aproiri the desired electric field and time for application of electric field.

  10. Mapping the mechanical properties of cholesterol-containing supported lipid bilayers with nanoscale spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamitko-Klingensmith, Nicole; Molchanoff, Kelley M; Burke, Kathleen A; Magnone, George J; Legleiter, Justin

    2012-09-18

    It has been demonstrated that many biological processes are influenced by mechanical changes in membranes comprised of a variety of lipid components. As a result, the ability to map physicomechanical properties of surfaces with high temporal and spatial resolution is desirable. Tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) has proven to be a useful technique for imaging biological surfaces due to its ability to operate in solution; however, access to information concerning the mechanical properties of these surfaces can also be obtained by reconstructing the time-resolved tip/sample force interactions during the imaging process. An advantage of such an approach is the direct correlation of topographical features with mechanical properties. Reconstruction of the tip/sample force is achievable by a technique called scanning probe acceleration microscopy (SPAM), which treats the cantilever as an accelerometer. The acceleration, which is directly related to the tip/sample force, of the cantilever is obtained by taking the second derivative of the cantilever deflection signal during a tapping mode AFM experiment in solution with standard cantilevers. Herein, we describe the applicability of SPAM to study mechanical properties of supported lipid bilayers with nanoscale spatial resolution via numerical simulations and experiment. The maximum and minimum tapping forces respond to changes in specific surface mechanical properties. Furthermore, we demonstrate how these changes can be used to map relative changes in the Young's modulus and adhesive properties of supported total brain lipid extract bilayers containing exogenous cholesterol. Finally, the ability of SPAM to distinguish nanoscale lipid raft domains based on changes in local mechanical properties is demonstrated.

  11. Microchemical device based on microscopic bilayer lipid membranes; Bisho 2 bunshimaku wo mochiiita maikuro kagaku debaisu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, H. [Electrotechnical Lab., Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-04-01

    If an organism is regarded as a macromolecular system, the element device to construct the same is the molecular structure of nano meter scale formed by the functional protein existing in biomembranes. A lot of essential functions of organism such as the sense reception including vision, gustation, etc., photosynthesis, energy-substance production and so on are performed therein. In this paper, the structure, preparing process and the functions of the microchemical device using micro-bilipid membranes are described. The simulation of the sense receiving functions of organisms is tried by said microchemical device wherein, same as biomembranes, the base is bilayer lipid molecular membrane and the receptive protein for receiving signals from exterior and output molecules such as ion channels connected to said receptive protein and the like are incorporated in the membranes. Recently, it becomes possible to make a partial imaging of the bilayer lipid membranes fixed on porous membrane by the observation with scanning Maxwell-stress microscope. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Voltage-sensitive styryl dyes as singlet oxygen targets on the surface of bilayer lipid membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, V S; Gavrilchik, A N; Kulagina, A O; Meshkov, I N; Pohl, P; Gorbunova, Yu G

    2016-08-01

    Photosensitizers are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic agents killing cancer cells by photooxidation of their components. Development of new effective photosensitive molecules requires profound knowledge of possible targets for reactive oxygen species, especially for its singlet form. Here we studied photooxidation of voltage-sensitive styryl dyes (di-4-ANEPPS, di-8-ANEPPS, RH-421 and RH-237) by singlet oxygen on the surface of bilayer lipid membranes commonly used as cell membrane models. Oxidation was induced by irradiation of a photosensitizer (aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate) and monitored by the change of dipole potential on the surface of the membrane. We studied the drop of the dipole potential both in the case when the dye molecules were adsorbed on the same side of the lipid bilayer as the photosensitizer (cis-configuration) and in the case when they were adsorbed on the opposite side (trans-configuration). Based on a simple model, we determined the rate of oxidation of the dyes from the kinetics of change of the potential during and after irradiation. This rate is proportional to steady-state concentration of singlet oxygen in the membrane under irradiation. Comparison of the oxidation rates of various dyes reveals that compounds of ANEPPS series are more sensitive to singlet oxygen than RH type dyes, indicating that naphthalene group is primarily responsible for their oxidation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Fabrication of nanopores with ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes inserted in a lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Xie, Jiani; Li, Ting; Wu, Hai-Chen

    2015-11-01

    We describe a protocol for the insertion of ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) to form nanopores in a Montal-Mueller lipid bilayer. The SWCNTs are designed to bind to a specific analyte of interest; binding will result in the reduction of current in single-channel recording experiments. The first stage of the PROCEDURE is to cut and separate the SWCNTs. We cut long, purified SWCNTs with sonication in concentrated sulfuric acid/nitric acid (3/1). Isolation of ultrashort SWCNTs is carried out by size-exclusion HPLC separation. The second stage is to insert these short SWCNTs into the lipid bilayer. This step requires a microinjection probe made from a glass capillary. The setup for protein nanopore research can be adopted for the single-channel recording experiments without any special treatment. The obtained current traces are of very high quality, showing stable baselines and little background noise. Example procedures are shown for investigating ion transport and DNA translocation through these SWCNT nanopores. This nanopore has potential applications in molecular sensing, nanopore DNA sequencing and early disease diagnosis. For example, we have selectively detected modified 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), which may have implications in screening specific genomic DNA sequences. The protocol takes ∼15 d, including SWCNT purification, cutting and separation, as well as the formation of SWCNT nanopores for DNA analyses.

  14. Structural Insights into the Yersinia pestis Outer Membrane Protein Ail in Lipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Samit Kumar; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M

    2017-08-17

    Yersinia pestis the causative agent of plague, is highly pathogenic and poses very high risk to public health. The outer membrane protein Ail (Adhesion invasion locus) is one of the most highly expressed proteins on the cell surface of Y. pestis, and a major target for the development of medical countermeasures. Ail is essential for microbial virulence and is critical for promoting the survival of Y. pestis in serum. Structures of Ail have been determined by X-ray diffraction and solution NMR spectroscopy, but the protein's activity is influenced by the detergents in these samples, underscoring the importance of the surrounding environment for structure-activity studies. Here we describe the backbone structure of Ail, determined in lipid bilayer nanodiscs, using solution NMR spectroscopy. We also present solid-state NMR data obtained for Ail in membranes containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major component of the bacterial outer membranes. The protein in lipid bilayers, adopts the same eight-stranded β-barrel fold observed in the crystalline and micellar states. The membrane composition, however, appears to have a marked effect on protein dynamics, with LPS enhancing conformational order and slowing down the 15 N transverse relaxation rate. The results provide information about the way in which an outer membrane protein inserts and functions in the bacterial membrane.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and transfection activity of new saturated and unsaturated cationic lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpicco, Silvia; Canevari, Silvana; Ceruti, Maurizio; Galmozzi, Enrico; Rocco, Flavio; Cattel, Luigi

    2004-11-01

    We synthesized new cationic lipids, analogue to N-[1-(2,3-dioleoyloxy)propyl]-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride (DOTMA) and 1,2-dimyristyloxypropyl-3-dimethyl-hydroxyethylammonium bromide (DMRIE), in order to compare those containing a dodecyl chain with those having a relatively long chain with two or five double bonds, such as squalenyl and dihydrofarnesyl derivatives, or complex saturated structures, such as squalane derivatives. The fusogenic helper lipid dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) was added to cationic lipids to form a stable complex. Liposomes composed of 50:50 w/w cationic lipid/DOPE were prepared and incubated with plasmidic DNA at various charge ratios and the diameter and zeta potential of the complexes were measured. The surface charge of the DNA/lipid complexes can be controlled by adjusting the cationic lipid/DNA ratio. Finally, we tested the in vitro transfection efficiency of the cationic lipid/DNA complexes using different cell lines. The transfection efficiency was highest for the dodecyloxy derivative containing a single hydroxyethyl group in the head, followed by the dodecyloxy and the farnesyloxy trimethylammonium derivatives. Instead the C27 squalenyl and C27 squalanyl derivatives resulted inactive.

  16. Lipid compositions modulate fluidity and stability of bilayers: characterization by surface pressure and sum frequency generation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Zhuguang; Fu, Li; Leblanc, Roger M; Yan, Elsa C Y

    2013-12-03

    Cell membranes are crucial to many biological processes. Because of their complexity, however, lipid bilayers are often used as model systems. Lipid structures influence the physical properties of bilayers, but their interplay, especially in multiple-component lipid bilayers, has not been fully explored. Here, we used the Langmuir-Blodgett method to make mono- and bilayers of 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) (DPPG), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) (POPG), and 1-hexadecanoyl-2-(9Z-octadecenoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine (POPS) as well as their 1:1 binary mixtures. We studied the fluidity, stability, and rigidity of these structures using sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy combined with analyses of surface pressure-area isotherms, compression modulus, and stability. Our results show that single-component bilayers, both saturated and unsaturated, may not be ideal membrane mimics because of their low fluidity and/or stability. However, the binary saturated and unsaturated DPPG/POPG and DPPG/POPS systems show not only high stability and fluidity but also high resistance to changes in surface pressure, especially in the range of 25-35 mN/m, the range typical of cell membranes. Because the ratio of saturated to unsaturated lipids is highly regulated in cells, our results underline the possibility of modulating biological properties using lipid compositions. Also, our use of flat optical windows as solid substrates in SFG experiments should make the SFG method more compatible with other techniques, enabling more comprehensive future surface characterizations of bilayers.

  17. Impact of monoolein on aquaporin1-based supported lipid bilayer membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhining; Wang, Xida; Ding, Wande; Wang, Miaoqi; Gao, Congjie; Qi, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) based biomimetic membranes have attracted considerable attention for their potential water purification applications. In this paper, AQP1 incorporated biomimetic membranes were prepared and characterized. The morphology and structure of the biomimetic membranes were characterized by in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM), infrared absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and contact angle measurements. The nanofiltration performance of the AQP1 incorporated membranes was investigated at 4 bar by using 2 g l −1 NaCl as feed solution. Lipid mobility plays an important role in the performance of the AQP1 incorporated supported lipid bilayer (SLB) membranes. We demonstrated that the lipid mobility is successfully tuned by the addition of monoolein (MO). Through in situ AFM and fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) measurements, the membrane morphology and the molecular mobility were studied. The lipid mobility increased in the sequence DPPC < DPPC/MO (R MO = 5/5) < DOPC/MO (R MO = 5/5) < DOPC, which is consistent with the flux increment and salt rejection. This study may provide some useful insights for improving the water purification performance of biomimetic membranes. (paper)

  18. Interactions of the baicalin and baicalein with bilayer lipid membranes investigated by cyclic voltammetry and UV-Vis spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Xuejing; Wang, Lei; Yu, Miao; Han, Xiaojun

    2014-02-01

    The baicalin and baicalein are the major flavonoids found in Radix Scutellariae, an essential herb in traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years. The interactions of the baicalin and baicalein with lipid bilayer membranes were studied using cyclic voltammetry and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The thickness d of supported bilayer lipid membranes was calculated as d=4.59(±0.36) nm using AC impedance spectroscopy. The baicalein interacted with egg PC bilayer membranes in a dose-dependent manner. The responses of K3Fe(CN)6 on lipid bilayer membrane modified Pt electrode linearly increased in a concentration range of baicalein from 6.25μM to 25μM with a detection limit of 0.1μM and current-concentration sensitivity of 0.11(±0.01) μA/μM, and then reached a plateau from 25μM to 50μM. However the baicalin showed much weaker interactions with egg PC bilayer membranes. UV-Vis spectroscopy also confirmed that the baicalein could interact with egg PC membranes noticeably, but the interaction of baicalin with membranes was hard to be detected. The results provide useful information on understanding the mechanism of action of Radix Scutellariae in vivo. © 2013.

  19. Synthesis of novel cationic lipids with fully or partially non-scissile ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Cationic lipids are attracting a lot of current attention owing to their applications in gene therapy 1,2. The functional group that links the backbone bearing the polar head group with the hydrocarbon chains of these lipid molecules plays an important role in their utilization in gene transfer events. For instance, DOTMA, which ...

  20. An oral delivery system for indomethicin engineered from cationic lipid emulsions and silica nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simovic, Spomenka; Hui, He; Song, Yunmei

    2010-01-01

    We report on a porous silica-lipid hybrid microcapsule (SLH) oral delivery system for indomethacin fabricated from Pickering emulsion templates, where the drug forms an electrostatic complex with cationic lipid present in the oil phase. Dry SLH microcapsules prepared either by spray drying...

  1. Cationic solid-lipid nanoparticles can efficiently bind and transfect plasmid DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olbrich, C; Bakowsky, U; Muller, RH; Kneuer, C

    2001-01-01

    The suitability of cationically modified solid-lipid nanoparticles (SLN) as a novel transfection agent was investigated. SLN were produced by hot homogenisation using either Compritol ATO 888 or paraffin as matrix lipid, a mixture of Tween 80 and Span 85 as tenside and either EQ1

  2. Simulation studies of structure and edge tension of lipid bilayer edges: effects of tail structure and force-field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Ana; Ma, Kevin; Chung, Jonathan L; Kindt, James T

    2013-08-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations of lipid bilayer ribbons have been performed to investigate the structures and line tensions associated with free bilayer edges. Simulations carried out for dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine with three different force-field parameter sets yielded edge line tensions of 45 ± 2 pN, over 50% greater than the most recently reported experimentally determined value for this lipid. Edge tensions obtained from simulations of a series of phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayer ribbons with saturated acyl tails of length 12-16 carbons and with monounsaturated acyl tails of length 14-18 carbons could be correlated with the excess area associated with forming the edge, through a two-parameter fit. Saturated-tail lipids underwent local thickening near the edge, producing denser packing that correlated with lower line tensions, while unsaturated-tail lipids showed little or no local thickening. In a dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine ribbon initiated in a tilted gel-phase structure, lipid headgroups tended to tilt toward the nearer edge producing a herringbone pattern, an accommodation that may account for the reported edge-induced stabilization of an ordered structure at temperatures near a lipid gel-fluid phase transition.

  3. How to move an amphipathic molecule across a lipid bilayer: different mechanisms for different ABC transporters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoulou, Frederica L; Carrier, David J; Schaedler, Theresia A; Baldwin, Stephen A; Baker, Alison

    2016-06-15

    Import of β-oxidation substrates into peroxisomes is mediated by ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters belonging to subfamily D. In order to enter the β-oxidation pathway, fatty acids are activated by conversion to fatty acyl-CoA esters, a reaction which is catalysed by acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSs). Here, we present evidence for an unusual transport mechanism, in which fatty acyl-CoA substrates are accepted by ABC subclass D protein (ABCD) transporters, cleaved by the transporters during transit across the lipid bilayer to release CoA, and ultimately re-esterified in the peroxisome lumen by ACSs which interact with the transporter. We propose that this solves the biophysical problem of moving an amphipathic molecule across the peroxisomal membrane, since the intrinsic thioesterase activity of the transporter permits separate membrane translocation pathways for the hydrophobic fatty acid moiety and the polar CoA moiety. The cleavage/re-esterification mechanism also has the potential to control entry of disparate substrates into the β-oxidation pathway when coupled with distinct peroxisomal ACSs. A different solution to the movement of amphipathic molecules across a lipid bilayer is deployed by the bacterial lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO) flippase, PglK, in which the hydrophilic head group and the hydrophobic polyprenyl tail of the substrate are proposed to have distinct translocation pathways but are not chemically separated during transport. We discuss a speculative alternating access model for ABCD proteins based on the mammalian ABC transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and compare it to the novel mechanism suggested by the recent PglK crystal structures and biochemical data. © 2016 The Author(s).

  4. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor recognition of endocannabinoids via the lipid bilayer: molecular dynamics simulations of CB1 transmembrane helix 6 and anandamide in a phospholipid bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Diane L.; Reggio, Patricia H.

    2006-08-01

    The phospholipid bilayer plays a central role in the lifecycle of the endogenous cannabinoid, N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide, AEA). Therefore, the orientation and location of AEA in the phospholipid bilayer with respect to key membrane associated proteins, is a central issue in understanding the mechanism of endocannabinoid signaling. In this paper, we report a test of the hypothesis that a βXX β motif (formed by beta branching amino acids, V6.43 and I6.46) on the lipid face of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor in its inactive state may serve as an initial CB1 interaction site for AEA. Eight 6 ns NAMD2 molecular dynamics simulations of AEA were conducted in a model system composed of CB1 transmembrane helix 6 (TMH6) in a 1,2-dioleoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) bilayer. In addition, eight 6 ns NAMD2 molecular dynamics simulations of a low CB1 affinity (20:2, n-6) analog of AEA were conducted in the same model system. AEA was found to exhibit a higher incidence of V6.43/I6.46 groove insertion than did the (20:2, n-6) analog. In certain cases, AEA established a high energy of interaction with TMH6 by first associating with the V6.43/I6.46 groove and then molding itself to the lipid face of TMH6 to establish a hydrogen bonding interaction with the exposed backbone carbonyl of P6.50. Based upon these results, we propose that the formation of this hydrogen bonded AEA/TMH6 complex may be the initial step in CB1 recognition of AEA in the lipid bilayer.

  5. The effects of ethylene oxide containing lipopolymers and tri-block copolymers on lipid bilayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baekmark, T. R.; Pedersen, S.; Jorgensen, K.

    1997-01-01

    oxide moity, anchored to the bilayer by a 1,2-dioctadecanoyl-s,n-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DC18PE) lipid. The second type, which is a novel type of membrane-spanning object, is an amphiphilic tri-block copolymer composed of two hydrophilic stretches of polyethylene oxide separated by a hydrophobic...... stretch of polystyrene. Hence the tri-block copolymer may act as a membrane-spanning macromolecule mimicking an amphiphilic protein or polypeptide. Differential scanning calorimetry is used to determine a partial phase diagram for the lipopolymer systems and to assess the amount of lipopolymer that can...... be loaded into DC16PC lipid bilayers before micellization takes place. Unilamellar and micellar phase structures are investigated by fluorescence quenching using bilayer permeating dithionite. The chain length-dependent critical lipopolymer concentration, denoting the lamellar-to-micellar phase transition...

  6. Absorption and folding of melittin onto lipid bilayer membranes via unbiased atomic detail microsecond molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Charles H; Wiedman, Gregory; Khan, Ayesha; Ulmschneider, Martin B

    2014-09-01

    Unbiased molecular simulation is a powerful tool to study the atomic details driving functional structural changes or folding pathways of highly fluid systems, which present great challenges experimentally. Here we apply unbiased long-timescale molecular dynamics simulation to study the ab initio folding and partitioning of melittin, a template amphiphilic membrane active peptide. The simulations reveal that the peptide binds strongly to the lipid bilayer in an unstructured configuration. Interfacial folding results in a localized bilayer deformation. Akin to purely hydrophobic transmembrane segments the surface bound native helical conformer is highly resistant against thermal denaturation. Circular dichroism spectroscopy experiments confirm the strong binding and thermostability of the peptide. The study highlights the utility of molecular dynamics simulations for studying transient mechanisms in fluid lipid bilayer systems. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interfacially Active Peptides and Proteins. Guest Editors: William C. Wimley and Kalina Hristova. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Optimizing cationic and neutral lipids for efficient gene delivery at high serum content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chia-Ling; Ewert, Kai K; Majzoub, Ramsey N; Hwu, Yeu-Kuang; Liang, Keng S; Leal, Cecília; Safinya, Cyrus R

    2014-01-01

    Cationic liposome (CL)-DNA complexes are promising gene delivery vectors with potential application in gene therapy. A key challenge in creating CL-DNA complexes for application is that their transfection efficiency (TE) is adversely affected by serum. In particular, little is known about the effects of a high serum content on TE, even though this may provide design guidelines for application in vivo. We prepared CL-DNA complexes in which we varied the neutral lipid [1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerophosphatidylcholine, glycerol-monooleate (GMO), cholesterol], the headgroup charge and chemical structure of the cationic lipid, and the ratio of neutral to cationic lipid; we then measured the TE of these complexes as a function of serum content and assessed their cytotoxicity. We tested selected formulations in two human cancer cell lines (M21/melanoma and PC-3/prostate cancer). In the absence of serum, all CL-DNA complexes of custom-synthesized multivalent lipids show high TE. Certain combinations of multivalent lipids and neutral lipids, such as MVL5(5+)/GMO-DNA complexes or complexes based on the dendritic-headgroup lipid TMVLG3(8+) exhibited high TE both in the absence and presence of serum. Although their TE still dropped to a small extent in the presence of serum, it reached or surpassed that of benchmark commercial transfection reagents, particularly at a high serum content. Two-component vectors (one multivalent cationic lipid and one neutral lipid) can rival or surpass benchmark reagents at low and high serum contents (up to 50%, v/v). We propose guidelines for optimizing the serum resistance of CL-DNA complexes based on a given cationic lipid. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Protein/lipid coaggregates are formed during α-synuclein-induced disruption of lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Maarschalkerweerd, Andreas; Vetri, Valeria; Langkilde, Annette Eva

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid formation is associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Significant α-synuclein (αSN) deposition in lipid-rich Lewy bodies is a hallmark of PD. Nonetheless, an unraveling of the connection between neurodegeneration and amyloid fibrils, including...... the molecular mechanisms behind potential amyloid-mediated toxic effects, is still missing. Interaction between amyloid aggregates and the lipid cell membrane is expected to play a key role in the disease progress. Here, we present experimental data based on hybrid analysis of two-photon-microscopy, solution...... secondary structure. As a result of membrane fragmentation, soluble αSN:-lipid coaggregates are formed, hence, suggesting a novel molecular mechanism behind PD amyloid cytotoxicity....

  9. Steady-state oxidation of cholesterol catalyzed by cholesterol oxidase in lipid bilayer membranes on platinum electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokoch, Michael P.; Devadoss, Anando; Palencsar, Mariela S.; Burgess, James D.

    2004-01-01

    Cholesterol oxidase is immobilized in electrode-supported lipid bilayer membranes. Platinum electrodes are initially modified with a self-assembled monolayer of thiolipid. A vesicle fusion method is used to deposit an outer leaflet of phospholipids onto the thiolipid monolayer forming a thiolipid/lipid bilayer membrane on the electrode surface. Cholesterol oxidase spontaneously inserts into the electrode-supported lipid bilayer membrane from solution and is consequently immobilized to the electrode surface. Cholesterol partitions into the membrane from buffer solutions containing cyclodextrin. Cholesterol oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of cholesterol by molecular oxygen, forming hydrogen peroxide as a product. Amperometric detection of hydrogen peroxide for continuous solution flow experiments are presented, where flow was alternated between cholesterol solution and buffer containing no cholesterol. Steady-state anodic currents were observed during exposures of cholesterol solutions ranging in concentration from 10 to 1000 μM. These data are consistent with the Michaelis-Menten kinetic model for oxidation of cholesterol as catalyzed by cholesterol oxidase immobilized in the lipid bilayer membrane. The cholesterol detection limit is below 1 μM for cholesterol solution prepared in buffered cyclodextrin. The response of the electrodes to low density lipoprotein solutions is increased upon addition of cyclodextrin. Evidence for adsorption of low density lipoprotein to the electrode surface is presented

  10. Smart polymer brush nanostructures guide the self-assembly of pore-spanning lipid bilayers with integrated membrane proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, G.W.; Demarche, S.; Santonicola, M.G.; Tiefenauer, L.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2014-01-01

    Nanopores in arrays on silicon chips are functionalized with pH-responsive poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) brushes and used as supports for pore-spanning lipid bilayers with integrated membrane proteins. Robust platforms are created by the covalent grafting of polymer brushes using surface-initiated

  11. Integrated microfluidic biosensing platform for simultaneous confocal microscopy and electrophysiological measurements on bilayer lipid membranes and ion channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulze Greiving-Stimberg, Verena Carolin; Bomer, Johan G.; de Boer, Hans L.; van den Berg, Albert; le Gac, Severine

    2018-01-01

    Combining high-resolution imaging and electrophysiological recordings is key for various types of experimentation on lipid bilayers and ion channels. Here, we propose an integrated biosensing platform consisting of a microfluidic cartridge and a dedicated chip-holder to conduct such dual

  12. Alpha-helical hydrophobic polypeptides form proton-selective channels in lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, A. E.; Deamer, D. W.

    1994-01-01

    Proton translocation is important in membrane-mediated processes such as ATP-dependent proton pumps, ATP synthesis, bacteriorhodopsin, and cytochrome oxidase function. The fundamental mechanism, however, is poorly understood. To test the theoretical possibility that bundles of hydrophobic alpha-helices could provide a low energy pathway for ion translocation through the lipid bilayer, polyamino acids were incorporated into extruded liposomes and planar lipid membranes, and proton translocation was measured. Liposomes with incorporated long-chain poly-L-alanine or poly-L-leucine were found to have proton permeability coefficients 5 to 7 times greater than control liposomes, whereas short-chain polyamino acids had relatively little effect. Potassium permeability was not increased markedly by any of the polyamino acids tested. Analytical thin layer chromatography measurements of lipid content and a fluorescamine assay for amino acids showed that there were approximately 135 polyleucine or 65 polyalanine molecules associated with each liposome. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated that a major fraction of the long-chain hydrophobic peptides existed in an alpha-helical conformation. Single-channel recording in both 0.1 N HCl and 0.1 M KCl was also used to determine whether proton-conducting channels formed in planar lipid membranes (phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylethanolamine, 1:1). Poly-L-leucine and poly-L-alanine in HCl caused a 10- to 30-fold increase in frequency of conductive events compared to that seen in KCl or by the other polyamino acids in either solution. This finding correlates well with the liposome observations in which these two polyamino acids caused the largest increase in membrane proton permeability but had little effect on potassium permeability. Poly-L-leucine was considerably more conductive than poly-L-alanine due primarily to larger event amplitudes and, to a lesser extent, a higher event frequency. Poly-L-leucine caused two

  13. The binding and insertion of imidazolium-based ionic surfactants into lipid bilayers: the effects of the surfactant size and salt concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwankyu; Jeon, Tae-Joon

    2015-02-28

    Imidazolium-based ionic surfactants with hydrocarbon tails of different sizes were simulated with lipid bilayers at different salt concentrations. Starting with the random position of ionic surfactants outside the bilayer, surfactants with long tails mostly insert into the bilayer, while those with short tails show the insertion of fewer surfactant molecules, indicating the effect of the tail length. In particular, surfactants with a tail of two or four hydrocarbons insert and reversibly detach from the bilayer, while the inserted longer surfactants cannot be reversibly detached because of the strong hydrophobic interaction with lipid tails, in quantitative agreement with experiments. Longer surfactants insert more deeply and irreversibly into the bilayer and thus increase lateral diffusivities of the bilayer, indicating that longer surfactants more significantly disorder lipid bilayers, which also agrees with experiments regarding the effect of the tail length of ionic surfactants on membrane permeability and toxicity. Addition of NaCl ions weakens the electrostatic interactions between headgroups of surfactants and lipids, leading to the binding of fewer surfactants into the bilayer. In particular, our simulation findings indicate that insertion of ionic surfactants can be initiated by either the hydrophobic interaction between tails of surfactants and lipids or the electrostatic binding between imidazolium heads and lipid heads, and the strength of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions depends on the tail length of surfactants.

  14. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Aoki, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Susumu

    2016-02-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15 K and 1 atm). The changes in the membrane properties induced by hepatic canceration were investigated and were compared with previous MD calculations included in our previous study of the changes in membrane properties induced by murine thymic canceration. The calculated model membranes for normal hepatocytes and hepatomas comprised 23 and 24 kinds of lipids, respectively. These included phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. We referred to previously published experimental values for the mole fraction of the lipids adopted in the present calculations. The calculated structural and dynamic properties of the membranes such as lateral structure, order parameters, lateral self-diffusion constants, and rotational correlation times all showed that hepatic canceration causes plasma membranes to become more ordered laterally and less fluid. Interestingly, this finding contrasts with the less ordered structure and increased fluidity of plasma membranes induced by thymic canceration observed in our previous MD study.

  15. Single channel planar lipid bilayer recordings of the melittin variant MelP5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennouri, Aziz; Mayer, Simon Finn; Schroeder, Thomas B H; Mayer, Michael

    2017-10-01

    MelP5 is a 26 amino acid peptide derived from melittin, the main active constituent of bee venom, with five amino acid replacements. The pore-forming activity of MelP5 in lipid membranes is attracting attention because MelP5 forms larger pores and induces dye leakage through liposome membranes at a lower concentration than melittin. Studies of MelP5 have so far focused on ensemble measurements of membrane leakage and impedance; here we extend this characterization with an electrophysiological comparison between MelP5 and melittin using planar lipid bilayer recordings. These experiments reveal that MelP5 pores in lipid membranes composed of 3:1 phosphatidylcholine:cholesterol consist of an average of 10 to 12 monomers compared to an average of 3 to 9 monomers for melittin. Both peptides form transient pores with dynamically varying conductance values similar to previous findings for melittin, but MelP5 occasionally also forms stable, well-defined pores with single channel conductance values that vary greatly and range from 50 to 3000pS in an electrolyte solution containing 100mM KCl. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Batrachotoxin-activated Na+ channels in planar lipid bilayers. Competition of tetrodotoxin block by Na+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moczydlowski, E; Garber, S S; Miller, C

    1984-11-01

    Single Na+ channels from rat skeletal muscle plasma membrane vesicles were inserted into planar lipid bilayers formed from neutral phospholipids and were observed in the presence of batrachotoxin. The batrachotoxin-modified channel activates in the voltage range -120 to -80 mV and remains open almost all the time at voltages positive to -60 mV. Low levels of tetrodotoxin (TTX) induce slow fluctuations of channel current, which represent the binding and dissociation of single TTX molecules to single channels. The rates of association and dissociation of TTX are both voltage dependent, and the association rate is competitively inhibited by Na+. This inhibition is observed only when Na+ is increased on the TTX binding side of the channel. The results suggest that the TTX receptor site is located at the channel's outer mouth, and that the Na+ competition site is not located deeply within the channel's conduction pathway.

  17. A Parallel Sensing Technique for Automatic Bilayer Lipid Membrane Arrays Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele ROSSI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels are transmembrane proteins responsible of cell signaling and a large part of pharmaceutical compounds are interacting with them. In-vitro testing of ion channels is a promising technique for high throughput screening (HTS in drug discovery and personalized medicine. Automated tests of single ion channels embedded in artificial bilayer lipid membranes (BLM is gaining attention over patch clamp technique due to its characteristic of performing parallel tests on selected sets of channels or multiple pharmaceutical targets. However, BLM arrays formation is a critical process based on manual and time-consuming techniques. In this paper, an automatic liquid dispensing system for BLM formation monitored in real-time by using low-noise current amplifiers is presented. As proof of this approach, concurrent formation of BLMs is shown. Additionally, single ion channel recordings on an automatically formed BLM is presented and discussed.

  18. Lipid bilayer membranes: Missing link in the comprehension of synovial lubrication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Ross; Cowley, Leonie; Dubief, Yves

    2010-03-01

    The human body hosts an extremely efficient tribological system in its synovial joints that operate under very low friction and virtually no wear. It has long been assumed that the higher molecular weight molecules present in the synovial fluid (hyaluronic acid, lubricin) are solely responsible for the mechanical properties of joint. Smaller components, unsaturated phospholipids, have a virtually an undefined role, most probably because of the cancellation of their amphiphilic properties ex vivo caused by oxidation. Using experimental observations of multilamellar arrangements in synovial joints, we formulate the assumption that self-assembling structures provide the anisotropy necessary to synovial fluid to resist drainage under normal compression. Our molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate the tremendous mechanical properties of lipid bilayers and also highlight their weakening consistent with modifications resulting from injuries or joint prosthesis.

  19. Poisson-Boltzmann versus Size-Modified Poisson-Boltzmann Electrostatics Applied to Lipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nuo; Zhou, Shenggao; Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M; Li, Bo; McCammon, J Andrew

    2014-12-26

    Mean-field methods, such as the Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE), are often used to calculate the electrostatic properties of molecular systems. In the past two decades, an enhancement of the PBE, the size-modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation (SMPBE), has been reported. Here, the PBE and the SMPBE are reevaluated for realistic molecular systems, namely, lipid bilayers, under eight different sets of input parameters. The SMPBE appears to reproduce the molecular dynamics simulation results better than the PBE only under specific parameter sets, but in general, it performs no better than the Stern layer correction of the PBE. These results emphasize the need for careful discussions of the accuracy of mean-field calculations on realistic systems with respect to the choice of parameters and call for reconsideration of the cost-efficiency and the significance of the current SMPBE formulation.

  20. Hydrodynamic collective effects of active protein machines in solution and lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, Alexander S; Kapral, Raymond

    2015-07-14

    The cytoplasm and biomembranes in biological cells contain large numbers of proteins that cyclically change their shapes. They are molecular machines that can function as molecular motors or carry out various other tasks in the cell. Many enzymes also undergo conformational changes within their turnover cycles. We analyze the advection effects that nonthermal fluctuating hydrodynamic flows induced by active proteins have on other passive molecules in solution or membranes. We show that the diffusion constants of passive particles are enhanced substantially. Furthermore, when gradients of active proteins are present, a chemotaxis-like drift of passive particles takes place. In lipid bilayers, the effects are strongly nonlocal, so that active inclusions in the entire membrane contribute to local diffusion enhancement and the drift. All active proteins in a biological cell or in a membrane contribute to such effects and all passive particles, and the proteins themselves, will be subject to them.

  1. Interaction with prefibrillar species and amyloid-like fibrils changes the stiffness of lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borro, Bruno C; Parolini, Lucia; Cicuta, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    and amyloid-like fibrils of α-lactalbumin. These effects range from substantially lowering the bending rigidity of the membranes to irreversible structural changes and complete disruption of the lipid bilayers. Our findings clearly indicate how the wide heterogeneity in structures occurring during protein......Evaluating the toxicity of self-assembled protein states is a key step towards developing effective strategies against amyloidogenic pathologies such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Such analysis is directly connected to quantitatively probing the stability of the cellular membrane upon...... interaction with different protein states. Using a combination of spectroscopic techniques, morphological observations, and spectral analysis of membrane fluctuations, we identify different destabilisation routes for giant unilamellar vesicles interacting with native-like states, prefibrillar species...

  2. Ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes in a lipid bilayer as a new nanopore sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Yang, Chun; Zhao, Kai; Li, Jingyuan; Wu, Hai-Chen

    2013-01-01

    An important issue in nanopore sensing is to construct stable and versatile sensors that can discriminate analytes with minute differences. Here we report a means of creating nanopores that comprise ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes inserted into a lipid bilayer. We investigate the ion transport and DNA translocation through single-walled carbon nanotube nanopores and find that our results are fundamentally different from previous studies using much longer single-walled carbon nanotubes. Furthermore, we utilize the new single-walled carbon nanotube nanopores to selectively detect modified 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in single-stranded DNA, which may have implications in screening specific genomic DNA sequences. This new nanopore platform can be integrated with many unique properties of carbon nanotubes and might be useful in molecular sensing such as DNA-damage detection, nanopore DNA sequencing and other nanopore-based applications. PMID:24352224

  3. The modulation of protein kinase C activity by membrane lipid bilayer structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, S J; Kelly, M B; Taddeo, F J; Ho, C; Rubin, E; Stubbs, C D

    1994-02-18

    The hypothesis that protein kinase C (PKC) activity is sensitive to phospholipid head group interactions was tested using lipid bilayers of defined composition with PKC purified from rat brain. The head group interactions were modulated by varying phosphatidylcholine cis-unsaturation, vesicle curvature, and by the addition of phosphatidylethanolamine and cholesterol. With unilamellar vesicles (including 20 mol% brain phosphatidylserine), increased phosphatidylcholine unsaturation potentiated basal and phorbol ester stimulated PKC activity. By contrast, in the presence of phosphatidylethanolamine, the activity decreased with increasing phosphatidylcholine unsaturation. Weakening phospholipid head group interactions spaces the head group region and increases interstitial water, and this effect was assessed from its effect on the fluorescence intensity of the phospholipid-labeled fluorophore 1-palmitoyl-2-N-(4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole)aminohexanoylphosphat idylcholin e (C6-NBD-PC). When the PKC activities with vesicles of varying phosphatidylcholine unsaturation, with and without phosphatidylethanolamine, were plotted as a function of the fluorescence intensity of C6-NBD-PC-labeled vesicles, a biphasic profile was obtained, which had an optimum value of intensity, relating to head group spacing, that corresponded to a maximal enzyme activity. A similar biphasic curve was also found when PKC activities were plotted as a function of published bilayer intrinsic curvature x-ray diffraction data, a parameter closely related to head group spacing. By contrast, no simple relationship was evident between PKC activity and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene anisotropy, taken as a measure of lipid order or fluidity. Therefore, increasing the level of phosphatidylcholine unsaturation, phosphatidylethanolamine, or cholesterol either potentiates or attenuates PKC activity, dependent on whether the initial condition is above or below its optimum.

  4. The effect of thiolated phospholipids on formation of supported lipid bilayers on gold substrates investigated by surface-sensitive methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıç, Abdulhalim; Fazeli Jadidi, M; Özer, Hakan Özgür; Kök, Fatma Neşe

    2017-12-01

    Most of the model lipid membrane studies on gold involve the usage of various surface-modification strategies to rupture liposomes and induce lipid bilayer formation since liposomes with polar surfaces do not interact with bare, hydrophobic gold. In this study, a thiol-modified phospholipid, 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphothioethanol (DPPTE) was incorporated into phosphatidylcholine (PC) based liposomes to form supported lipid bilayer (SLB) on gold surfaces without further modification. The binding kinetics of liposomes with different DPPTE ratio (0.01 to 100%mol/mol) and diameters were monitored by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D). The dissipation change per frequency change, i.e. acoustic ratio, which is evaluated as a degree of the viscoelasticity, considerably decreased with the presence of DPPTE (from 162.3GHz -1 for flattened PC liposomes to ca. 89.5GHz -1 for 100% DPPTE liposomes) when compared to the results of two reference rigid monolayers and two viscoelastic layers. To assess the quality of SLB platform, the interpretation of QCM-D data was also complemented with Surface Plasmon Resonance. The optimum thiolated-lipid ratio (1%, lower thiol ratio and higher rigidity) was then used to determine the dry-lipid mass deposition, the water content and the thickness values of the SLB via viscoelastic modelling. Further surface characterization studies were performed by Atomic Force Microscopy with high spatial resolution. The results suggested that model membrane was almost continuous with minimum defects but showed more dissipative/soft nature compared to an ideal bilayer due to partially fused liposomes/overlapped lipid bilayers/multilayer islands. These local elevations distorted the planarity and led the increase of overall membrane thickness to ∼7.0nm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Supported Phospholipid Bilayer Interaction with Components Found in Typical Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids – a QCM-D and AFM Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kervin O. Evans

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D monitoring and atomic force microscopy (AFM were combined to evaluate the defects created by an ionic liquid anion and a cation in a supported phospholipid bilayer composed of zwitterionic lipids on a silica surface. The cation 1-octyl-3-methyl imidazolium (OMIM+ was shown to remove lipids from the bilayer, increase the roughness to approximately 2.8 nm (~0.2 for stable supported bilayer and possibly redeposit lipids with entrapped water. The anion bis(trifluoromethylsulfonylimide (Tf2N- was found to leave distinct defects within the bilayer that had large pore-like interiors which left the surrounding bilayer intact. However, the ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methyl pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonylimide (BMP-Tf2N formed a film over the supported bilayer. This work demonstrates, for the first time, the direct effects common components of ionic liquids have on a supported phospholipids bilayer.

  6. Supported Phospholipid Bilayer Interaction with Components Found in Typical Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids – a QCM-D and AFM Study †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Kervin O.

    2008-01-01

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) monitoring and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were combined to evaluate the defects created by an ionic liquid anion and a cation in a supported phospholipid bilayer composed of zwitterionic lipids on a silica surface. The cation 1-octyl-3-methyl imidazolium (OMIM+) was shown to remove lipids from the bilayer, increase the roughness to approximately 2.8 nm (~0.2 for stable supported bilayer) and possibly redeposit lipids with entrapped water. The anion bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (Tf2N-) was found to leave distinct defects within the bilayer that had large pore-like interiors which left the surrounding bilayer intact. However, the ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methyl pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BMP-Tf2N) formed a film over the supported bilayer. This work demonstrates, for the first time, the direct effects common components of ionic liquids have on a supported phospholipids bilayer. PMID:19325765

  7. Rigid aromatic linking moiety in cationic lipids for enhanced gene transfection efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Zhao, Rui-Mo; Zhang, Ji; Liu, Yan-Hong; Huang, Zheng; Yu, Qing-Ying; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2017-08-18

    Although numerous cationic lipids have been developed as non-viral gene vectors, the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of these materials remains unclear and needs further investigation. In this work, a series of lysine-derived cationic lipids containing linkages with different rigidity were designed and synthesized. SAR studies showed that lipids with rigid aromatic linkage could promote the formation of tight liposomes and enhance DNA condensation, which is essential for the gene delivery process. These lipids could give much higher transfection efficiency than those containing more flexible aliphatic linkage in various cell lines. Moreover, the rigid aromatic linkage also affords the material higher serum tolerance ability. Flow cytometry assay revealed that the target lipids have good cellular uptake, while confocal microscopy observation showed weaker endosome escape than Lipofectamine 2000. To solve such problem and further increase the transfection efficiency, some lysosomotropic reagents were used to improve the endosome escape of lipoplex. As expected, higher transfection efficiency than Lipofectamine 2000 could be obtained via this strategy. Cytotoxicity assay showed that these lipids have lower toxicity in various cell lines than Lipofectamine 2000, suggesting their potential for further application. This work demonstrates that a rigid aromatic linkage might distinctly improve the gene transfection abilities of cationic lipids and affords information to construct safe and efficient gene vector towards practical application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Nanobioarchitectures based on chlorophyll photopigment, artificial lipid bilayers and carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Elisabeta Barbinta-Patrascu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, building biohybrid materials has gained considerable interest in the field of nanotechnology. This paper describes an original design for bionanoarchitectures with interesting properties and potential bioapplications. Multilamellar lipid vesicles (obtained by hydration of a dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine thin film with and without cholesterol were labelled with a natural photopigment (chlorophyll a, which functioned as a sensor to detect modifications in the artificial lipid bilayers. These biomimetic membranes were used to build non-covalent structures with single-walled carbon nanotubes. Different biophysical methods were employed to characterize these biohybrids such as: UV–vis absorption and emission spectroscopy, zeta potential measurements, AFM and chemiluminescence techniques. The designed, carbon-based biohybrids exhibited good physical stability, good antioxidant and antimicrobial properties, and could be used as biocoating materials. As compared to the cholesterol-free samples, the cholesterol-containing hybrid structures demonstrated better stability (i.e., their zeta potential reached the value of −36.4 mV, more pronounced oxygen radical scavenging ability (affording an antioxidant activity of 73.25% and enhanced biocidal ability, offering inhibition zones of 12.4, 11.3 and 10.2 mm in diameter, against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis, respectively.

  9. Diffusion studies on permeable nitroxyl spin probes through bilayer lipid membranes: A low frequency ESR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meenakumari, V.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin, E-mail: miltonfranklin@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, NMSSVN College, Nagamalai, Madurai-625019, Tamilnadu (India); Utsumi, Hideo; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Ken-ichi [Department of Bio-functional Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Hyodo, Fuminori [Innovation Center for Medical Redox Navigation, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Jawahar, A. [Department of Chemistry, NMSSVN College, Nagamalai, Madurai-625019, Tamilnadu (India)

    2015-06-24

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies were carried out for permeable 2mM {sup 14}N-labeled deutrated 3 Methoxy carbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl (MC-PROXYL) in pure water and 1mM, 2mM, 3mM, 4mM concentration of 14N-labeled deutrated MC-PROXYL in 400mM concentration of liposomal solution by using a 300 MHz ESR spectrometer. The ESR parameters such as linewidth, hyperfine coupling constant, g-factor, partition parameter and permeability were reported for these samples. The line broadening was observed for the nitroxyl spin probe in the liposomal solution. The line broadening indicates that the high viscous nature of the liposomal solution. The partition parameter and permeability values indicate the maximum diffusion of nitroxyl spin probes in the bilayer lipid membranes at 2 mM concentration of nitroxyl radical. This study illustrates that ESR can be used to differentiate between the intra and extra- membrane water by loading the liposome vesicles with a lipid-permeable nitroxyl spin probe. From the ESR results, the spin probe concentration was optimized as 2mM in liposomal solution for ESR phantom studies/imaging, invivo and invitro experiments.

  10. Peculiarities of lateral diffusion of lipids in three-component bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, A. V.; Rudakova, M. A.

    2011-03-01

    The lateral diffusion of lipid molecules in macroscopically oriented bilayers of mixed dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC), egg sphingomyeline (SM), and cholesterol (CHOL) and its dependence on cholesterol concentration and temperature was studied by NMR with pulsed field gradient. The system forms a lamellar liquid crystalline (LC) phase; in a certain range of temperatures and concentrations of cholesterol the system is separated into two subphases: a disordered LC phase (ld) enriched with DOPC, and an ordered phase (l0) enriched with SM. These are characterized by their own lateral diffusion coefficients (LDCs), which differ from one another by a factor of 1.5-5. The dependence of the LDCs in the phases on the cholesterol concentration was analyzed. There was no clear dependence for the disordered LC phase, but we found that LDCs tend to grow in the concentration range of 15-35 mol % of CHOL. This behavior could be due to the redistribution of lipid components as the concentration of CHOL increases, eventually leading to a rise in DOPC concentration in the lo phase. In the range of liquid-phase domains, we observed no dependence of LDCs on the diffusion time typical of the restricted diffusion regime, due to spatial restraints in the system. This could be associated with the relatively large size of the domains, and with the domain capability of lateral diffusion in a surrounding continuous phase.

  11. Interaction of elaiophylin with model bilayer membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, J.; Dencheva-Zarkova, M.

    2017-01-01

    Elaiophylin is a new macrodiolide antibiotic, which is produced by the Streptomyces strains [1]. It displays biological activities against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi. The mode of action of this antibiotic has been attributed to an alteration of the membrane permeability. When this antibiotic is inserted into the bilayer membranes destabilization of the membrane and formation of ion-penetrable channels is observed. The macrodiolide antibiotic forms stable cation selective ion channels in synthetic lipid bilayer membranes. The aim of this work was to study the interactions of Elaiophylin with model bilayer membranes and to get information on the mechanical properties of lipid bilayers in presence of this antibiotic. Patch-clamp technique [2] were used in the study

  12. Structure and dynamics of water and lipid molecules in charged anionic DMPG lipid bilayer membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnest, A. K.; Peters, Günther H.J.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2016-01-01

    phase with a monovalent counter-ion and in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The diffusion constant of water as a function of its depth in the membrane has been determined from mean-square-displacement calculations. Also, calculated incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering functions have been...... compared to experimental results and used to determine an average diffusion constant for all water molecules in the system. On extrapolating the diffusion constants inferred experimentally to a temperature of 310 K, reasonable agreement with the simulations is obtained. However, the experiments do not have...... the sensitivity to confirm the diffusion of a small component of water bound to the lipids as found in the simulations. In addition, the orientation of the dipole moment of the water molecules has been determined as a function of their depth in the membrane. Previous indirect estimates of the electrostatic...

  13. Outer membrane phospholipase A in phospholipid bilayers: a model system for concerted computational and experimental investigations of amino acid side chain partitioning into lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Patrick J; Freites, J Alfredo; Moon, C Preston; Tobias, Douglas J; Fleming, Karen G

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the forces that stabilize membrane proteins in their native states is one of the contemporary challenges of biophysics. To date, estimates of side chain partitioning free energies from water to the lipid environment show disparate values between experimental and computational measures. Resolving the disparities is particularly important for understanding the energetic contributions of polar and charged side chains to membrane protein function because of the roles these residue types play in many cellular functions. In general, computational free energy estimates of charged side chain partitioning into bilayers are much larger than experimental measurements. However, the lack of a protein-based experimental system that uses bilayers against which to vet these computational predictions has traditionally been a significant drawback. Moon & Fleming recently published a novel hydrophobicity scale that was derived experimentally by using a host-guest strategy to measure the side chain energetic perturbation due to mutation in the context of a native membrane protein inserted into a phospholipid bilayer. These values are still approximately an order of magnitude smaller than computational estimates derived from molecular dynamics calculations from several independent groups. Here we address this discrepancy by showing that the free energy differences between experiment and computation become much smaller if the appropriate comparisons are drawn, which suggests that the two fields may in fact be converging. In addition, we present an initial computational characterization of the Moon & Fleming experimental system used for the hydrophobicity scale: OmpLA in DLPC bilayers. The hydrophobicity scale used OmpLA position 210 as the guest site, and our preliminary results demonstrate that this position is buried in the center of the DLPC membrane, validating its usage in the experimental studies. We further showed that the introduction of charged Arg at position 210

  14. Development of dual-activity vectors by co-envelopment of adenovirus and SiRNA in artificial lipid bilayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Açelya Yilmazer

    Full Text Available Gene therapy with human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 has been extensively explored for the treatment of diseases resistant to traditional therapies. Intravenous administration leads to rapid clearance from blood circulation and high liver accumulation, which restrict the use of Ad-based vectors in clinical gene therapy protocols that involve systemic administration. We have previously proposed that such limitations can be improved by engineering artificial lipid envelopes around Ad and designed a variety of artificial lipid bilayer envelopes around the viral capsid. In this study, we sought to explore further opportunities that the artificially enveloped virus constructs could offer, by designing a previously unreported gene therapy vector by simultaneous envelopment of Ad and siRNA within the same lipid bilayer. Such a dual-activity vector can offer efficacious therapy for different genetic disorders where both turning on and switching off genes would be needed. Dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to characterize these vectors. Agarose gel electrophoresis, Ribo green and dot blot assays showed that siRNA and Ad virions can be enveloped together within lipid bilayers at high envelopment efficiency. Cellular uptake and in vitro transfection experiments were carried out to show the feasibility of combining siRNA-mediated gene silencing with viral gene transfer using these newly designed dual-activity vectors.

  15. Cocaine-induced closures of single batrachotoxin-activated Na+ channels in planar lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Batrachotoxin (BTX)-activated Na+ channels from rabbit skeletal muscle were incorporated into planar lipid bilayers. These channels appear to open most of the time at voltages greater than -60 mV. Local anesthetics, including QX-314, bupivacaine, and cocaine when applied internally, induce different durations of channel closures and can be characterized as "fast" (mean closed duration less than 10 ms at +50 mV), "intermediate" (approximately 80 ms), and "slow" (approximately 400 ms) blockers, respectively. The action of these local anesthetics on the Na+ channel is voltage dependent; larger depolarizations give rise to stronger binding interactions. Both the dose-response curve and the kinetics of the cocaine-induced closures indicate that there is a single class of cocaine-binding site. QX-314, though a quaternary-amine local anesthetic, apparently competes with the same binding site. External cocaine or bupivacaine application is almost as effective as internal application, whereas external QX-314 is ineffective. Interestingly, external Na+ ions reduce the cocaine binding affinity drastically, whereas internal Na+ ions have little effect. Both the cocaine association and dissociation rate constants are altered when external Na+ ion concentrations are raised. We conclude that (a) one cocaine molecule closes one BTX-activated Na+ channel in an all-or-none manner, (b) the binding affinity of cocaine is voltage sensitive, (c) this cocaine binding site can be reached by a hydrophilic pathway through internal surface and by a hydrophobic pathway through bilayer membrane, and (d) that this binding site interacts indirectly with the Na+ ions. A direct interaction between the receptor and Na+ ions seems minimal. PMID:2851029

  16. Permeability of a Fluid Lipid Bilayer to Short-Chain Alcohols from First Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Jeffrey; Schulten, Klaus; Chipot, Christophe

    2017-06-13

    Computational prediction of membrane permeability to small molecules requires accurate description of both the thermodynamics and kinetics underlying translocation across the lipid bilayer. In this contribution, well-converged, microsecond-long free-energy calculations are combined with a recently developed subdiffusive kinetics framework to describe the membrane permeation of a homologous series of short-tail alcohols, from methanol to 1-butanol, with unprecedented fidelity to the underlying molecular models. While the free-energy profiles exhibit barriers for passage through the center of the bilayer in all cases, the height of these barriers decreases with the length of the aliphatic chain of the alcohol, in quantitative agreement with experimentally determined differential solvation free energies in water and oil. A unique aspect of the subdiffusive model employed herein, which was developed in a previous article, is the determination of a position-dependent fractional order which quantifies the degree to which the motion of the alcohol deviates from classical diffusion along the thickness of the membrane. In the aqueous medium far from the bilayer, this quantity approaches 1.0, the asymptotic limit for purely classical diffusion, whereas it dips below 0.75 near the center of the membrane irrespective of the permeant. Remarkably, the fractional diffusivity near the center of membrane, where its influence on the permeability is the greatest, is similar among the four permeants despite the large difference in molecular weight and lipophilicity between methanol and 1-butanol. The relative permeabilities, which are estimated from the free-energy and fractional diffusivity profiles, are therefore determined predominantly by differences in the former rather than the latter. The predicted relative permeabilities are highly correlated with existing experimental results, albeit they do not agree quantitatively with them. On the other hand, quite unexpectedly, the

  17. Stabilization of functional recombinant cannabinoid receptor CB(2 in detergent micelles and lipid bilayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Vukoti

    Full Text Available Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs is among the most challenging tasks for modern membrane biology. For studies by high resolution analytical methods, these integral membrane receptors have to be expressed in large quantities, solubilized from cell membranes and purified in detergent micelles, which may result in a severe destabilization and a loss of function. Here, we report insights into differential effects of detergents, lipids and cannabinoid ligands on stability of the recombinant cannabinoid receptor CB(2, and provide guidelines for preparation and handling of the fully functional receptor suitable for a wide array of downstream applications. While we previously described the expression in Escherichia coli, purification and liposome-reconstitution of multi-milligram quantities of CB(2, here we report an efficient stabilization of the recombinant receptor in micelles - crucial for functional and structural characterization. The effects of detergents, lipids and specific ligands on structural stability of CB(2 were assessed by studying activation of G proteins by the purified receptor reconstituted into liposomes. Functional structure of the ligand binding pocket of the receptor was confirmed by binding of (2H-labeled ligand measured by solid-state NMR. We demonstrate that a concerted action of an anionic cholesterol derivative, cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHS and high affinity cannabinoid ligands CP-55,940 or SR-144,528 are required for efficient stabilization of the functional fold of CB(2 in dodecyl maltoside (DDM/CHAPS detergent solutions. Similar to CHS, the negatively charged phospholipids with the serine headgroup (PS exerted significant stabilizing effects in micelles while uncharged phospholipids were not effective. The purified CB(2 reconstituted into lipid bilayers retained functionality for up to several weeks enabling high resolution structural studies of this GPCR at

  18. Stabilization of Functional Recombinant Cannabinoid Receptor CB2 in Detergent Micelles and Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukoti, Krishna; Kimura, Tomohiro; Macke, Laura; Gawrisch, Klaus; Yeliseev, Alexei

    2012-01-01

    Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is among the most challenging tasks for modern membrane biology. For studies by high resolution analytical methods, these integral membrane receptors have to be expressed in large quantities, solubilized from cell membranes and purified in detergent micelles, which may result in a severe destabilization and a loss of function. Here, we report insights into differential effects of detergents, lipids and cannabinoid ligands on stability of the recombinant cannabinoid receptor CB2, and provide guidelines for preparation and handling of the fully functional receptor suitable for a wide array of downstream applications. While we previously described the expression in Escherichia coli, purification and liposome-reconstitution of multi-milligram quantities of CB2, here we report an efficient stabilization of the recombinant receptor in micelles - crucial for functional and structural characterization. The effects of detergents, lipids and specific ligands on structural stability of CB2 were assessed by studying activation of G proteins by the purified receptor reconstituted into liposomes. Functional structure of the ligand binding pocket of the receptor was confirmed by binding of 2H-labeled ligand measured by solid-state NMR. We demonstrate that a concerted action of an anionic cholesterol derivative, cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHS) and high affinity cannabinoid ligands CP-55,940 or SR-144,528 are required for efficient stabilization of the functional fold of CB2 in dodecyl maltoside (DDM)/CHAPS detergent solutions. Similar to CHS, the negatively charged phospholipids with the serine headgroup (PS) exerted significant stabilizing effects in micelles while uncharged phospholipids were not effective. The purified CB2 reconstituted into lipid bilayers retained functionality for up to several weeks enabling high resolution structural studies of this GPCR at physiologically relevant

  19. Novel pH-Sensitive Cationic Lipids with Linear Ortho Ester Linkers for Gene Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haigang; Zhang, Huizhen; Thor, Der; Rahimian, Roshanak; Guo, Xin

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to develop pH-sensitive lipoplexes for efficient gene delivery, we report three novel cationic lipids containing a linear ortho ester linker that conjugates either the headgroup (Type I) or one hydrocarbon chain (Type II) with the rest of the lipid molecule. The cationic lipids carry either an iodide or a chloride counterion. Compared to our previously reported cyclic ortho ester linker, the linear ortho ester linker facilitated the construction of cationic liposomes and lipoplexes with different helper lipids. The chloride counterion not only facilitated the hydration of the lipid films during liposome construction, but also enhanced the hydrolysis of the ortho ester linker in the lipoplexes. After incubation at endosomal pH 5.5, the Type I lipoplexes aggregated and destabilized the endosome-mimicking model liposomes, but not the Type II lipoplexes. The helper lipids (DOPE or cholesterol) of the lipoplexes enhanced the pH-sensitivity of the Type I lipoplexes. In CV-1 cells (monkey kidney fibroblast), the Type I ortho ester-based lipoplexes, especially those with the chloride counterion, significantly improved the gene transfection efficiency, in some cases by more than 100 fold, compared to their pH-insensitive counterparts consisting of DOTAP. The gene transfection efficiency of the ortho ester-based lipoplexes was well correlated with their rate of aggregation and membrane destabilization in response to the endosomal pH 5.5. PMID:22480493

  20. How cationic lipids transfer nucleic acids into cells and across cellular membranes: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Zia ur; Zuhorn, Inge S; Hoekstra, Dick

    2013-02-28

    Cationic lipid- and polymer-based nanodevices are considered appropriate alternatives for virus-based particles for delivery of nucleic acids, including genes and siRNA, into eukaryotic cells. Because of colloidal stability concerns and toxicity issues the potential in vivo application of these so-called non-viral systems, in particular cationic lipids, was met with considerable skepticism. However, in recent years, the development of novel ionizable cationic lipid formulations in conjunction with sophisticated procedures to carefully control the size of the nanoparticles has rapidly advanced options for a successful therapeutic application. Thus it would appear that cationic lipids have taken a prominent step ahead in their potential use as nanocarriers for siRNA delivery in gene silencing of target genes in a variety of diseases. Verification and improvement of delivery efficiency as well as screening of targeting ligands justify further work in revealing underlying mechanisms that are instrumental in efficient crossing of cellular barriers by cationic lipid-based nanocarriers. In this regard, triggering entry into specific pathways or modulating trafficking along such pathways, either by targeting of nanoparticles or by affecting specific cellular signaling pathways, may represent promising tools. Such options may involve, for example, facilitating nanoparticle transport across endothelial cells by transcytotic mechanisms, or improving delivery efficiency by affecting nanoparticle trafficking that avoids lysosomal delivery. Here, recent progress in the field of lipid-based nanocarriers is discussed, with a focus on mechanisms underlying their interactions with cells in vitro. Where appropriate, we will include mechanisms for polymer-based systems in our discussion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Single sodium channels from human skeletal muscle in planar lipid bilayers: characterization and response to pentobarbital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartenberg, Hans C; Urban, Bernd W

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the response to general anesthetics of different sodium-channel subtypes, we examined the effects of pentobarbital, a close thiopental analogue, on single sodium channels from human skeletal muscle and compared them to existing data from human brain and human ventricular muscle channels. Sodium channels from a preparation of human skeletal muscle were incorporated into planar lipid bilayers, and the steady-state behavior of single sodium channels and their response to pentobarbital was examined in the presence of batrachotoxin, a sodium-channel activator. Single-channel currents were recorded before and after the addition of pentobarbital (0.34-1.34 mM). In symmetrical 500 mM NaCl, human skeletal muscle sodium channels had an averaged single-channel conductance of 21.0 +/- 0.6 pS, and the channel fractional open time was 0.96 +/- 0.04. The activation midpoint potential was -96.2 +/- 1.6 mV. Extracellular tetrodotoxin blocked the channel with a half-maximal concentration (k1/2) of 60 nM at 0 mV. Pentobarbital reduced the time-averaged conductance of single skeletal muscle sodium channels in a concentration-dependent manner (inhibitory concentration 50% [IC50] = 0.66 mM). The steady-state activation was shifted to more hyperpolarized potentials (-16.7 mV at 0.67 mM pentobarbital). In the planar lipid bilayer system, skeletal muscle sodium channels have some electrophysiological properties that are significantly different compared with those of sodium channels from cardiac or from central nervous tissue. In contrast to the control data, these different human sodium channel subtypes showed the same qualitative and quantitative response to the general anesthetic pentobarbital. The implication of these effects for overall anesthesia will depend on the role the individual channels play within their neuronal networks, but suppression of both central nervous system and peripheral sodium channels may add to general anesthetic effects.

  2. Gene Transfection in High Serum Levels: Case Studies with New Cholesterol Based Cationic Gemini Lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Santosh K.; Biswas, Joydeep; Kondaiah, Paturu; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2013-01-01

    Background Six new cationic gemini lipids based on cholesterol possessing different positional combinations of hydroxyethyl (-CH2CH2OH) and oligo-oxyethylene -(CH2CH2O)n- moieties were synthesized. For comparison the corresponding monomeric lipid was also prepared. Each new cationic lipid was found to form stable, clear suspensions in aqueous media. Methodology/Principal Findings To understand the nature of the individual lipid aggregates, we have studied the aggregation properties using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential measurements and X-ray diffraction (XRD). We studied the lipid/DNA complex (lipoplex) formation and the release of the DNA from such lipoplexes using ethidium bromide. These gemini lipids in presence of a helper lipid, 1, 2-dioleoyl phophatidyl ethanol amine (DOPE) showed significant enhancements in the gene transfection compared to several commercially available transfection agents. Cholesterol based gemini having -CH2-CH2-OH groups at the head and one oxyethylene spacer was found to be the most effective lipid, which showed transfection activity even in presence of high serum levels (50%) greater than Effectene, one of the potent commercially available transfecting agents. Most of these geminis protected plasmid DNA remarkably against DNase I in serum, although the degree of stability was found to vary with their structural features. Conclusions/Significance -OH groups present on the cationic headgroups in combination with oxyethylene linkers on cholesterol based geminis, gave an optimized combination of new genera of gemini lipids possessing high transfection efficiency even in presence of very high percentage of serum. This property makes them preferential transfection reagents for possible in vivo studies. PMID:23861884

  3. How cationic lipids transfer nucleic acids into cells and across cellular membranes : Recent advances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rehman, Zia Ur; Zuhorn, Inge S.; Hoekstra, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Cationic lipid- and polymer-based nanodevices are considered appropriate alternatives for virus-based particles for delivery of nucleic acids, including genes and siRNA, into eukaryotic cells. Because of colloidal stability concerns and toxicity issues the potential in vivo application of these

  4. Fabrication and characterization of an integrated ionic device from suspended polypyrrole and alamethicin-reconstituted lipid bilayer membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Northcutt, Robert; Sundaresan, Vishnu-Baba

    2012-01-01

    Conducting polymers are electroactive materials that undergo conformal relaxation of the polymer backbone in the presence of an electrical field through ion exchange with solid or aqueous electrolytes. This conformal relaxation and the associated morphological changes make conducting polymers highly suitable for actuation and sensing applications. Among smart materials, bioderived active materials also use ion transport for sensing and actuation functions via selective ion transport. The transporter proteins extracted from biological cell membranes and reconstituted into a bilayer lipid membrane in bioderived active materials regulate ion transport for engineering functions. The protein transporter reconstituted in the bilayer lipid membrane is referred to as the bioderived membrane and serves as the active component in bioderived active materials. Inspired by the similarities in the physics of transduction in conducting polymers and bioderived active materials, an integrated ionic device is formed from the bioderived membrane and the conducting polymer membrane. This ionic device is fabricated into a laminated thin-film membrane and a common ion that can be processed by the bioderived and the conducting polymer membranes couple the ionic function of these two membranes. An integrated ionic device, fabricated from polypyrrole (PPy) doped with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (NaDBS) and an alamethicin-reconstituted DPhPC bilayer lipid membrane, is presented in this paper. A voltage-gated sodium current regulates the electrochemical response in the PPy(DBS) layer. The integrated device is fabricated on silicon-based substrates through microfabrication, electropolymerization, and vesicle fusion, and ionic activity is characterized through electrochemical measurements. (paper)

  5. Dendritic cationic lipids with highly charged headgroups for efficient gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, Kai K; Evans, Heather M; Bouxsein, Nathan F; Safinya, Cyrus R

    2006-01-01

    Gene therapy is expected to lead to powerful new approaches for curing many diseases, a potential that is currently explored in worldwide clinical trials. Nonviral DNA delivery systems are desirable to overcome the inherent problems of viral vectors, but their current efficiency requires improvement and the understanding of their mechanism of action is incomplete. We have synthesized new multivalent cationic lipids with highly charged dendritic headgroups to probe the structure-transfection efficiency relationships of cationic liposome (CL)-DNA complexes, a prevalent nonviral vector. The lipid headgroups are constructed from ornithine cores and ornithine or carboxyspermine endgroups. The dendritic lipids were prepared on a gram scale, using a synthetic scheme that permits facile variation of the lipid building blocks headgroup, spacer, and hydrophobic moiety. They carry four to sixteen positive charges in their headgroups. Complexes of DNA with mixtures of the dendritic lipids and neutral 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) exhibit novel structures at high contents of the highly charged lipids, while the well-known lamellar phase is formed at high contents of DOPC. DNA complexes of the new dendritic lipids efficiently transfect mammalian cells in culture without cytotoxicity and, in contrast to lamellar complexes, maintain high transfection efficiency over a broad range of composition.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of cationic lipid coated magnetic nanoparticles using multiple emulsions as microreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbaba, Hasan; Karagöz, Uğur; Selamet, Yusuf; Kantarcı, A. Gülten

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a novel iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis method with in-situ surface coating. For this purpose multiple emulsions were used as microreactors for the first time and magnetic iron oxide particles synthesized in the core of cationic solid lipid nanoparticles. DLS, SEM, TEM, VSM, Raman Spectrometer, XRD, and XPS techniques were performed for characterization of the magnetic nanoparticles. Obtained magnetic nanoparticles are superparamagnetic and no additional process was needed for surface adjustments. They are positively charged as a result of cationic lipid coating and has appropriate particle size (<30 nm) for drug or nucleic acid delivery. Structure analysis showed that magnetic core material is in the form of magnetite. Saturation magnetization value was measured as 15-17 emu g-1 for lipid coated magnetic nanoparticles obtained by multiple emulsion method which is reasonably sufficient for magnetic targeting.

  7. [Reconstitution of large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels into artificial planar lipid bilayers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun; Zeng, Xiao-Rong; Tan, Xiao-Qiu; Li, Peng-Yun; Wen, Jing; Mao, Liang; Yang, Yan

    2017-06-25

    This study was aimed to establish a method to create a stable planar lipid bilayer membranes (PLBMs), in which large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (BK Ca ) were reconstituted. Using spreading method, PLBMs were prepared by decane lipid fluid consisting of N 2 -weathered mixture of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol at 3:1 ratio. After successful incorporation of BK Ca channel into PLBMs, single channel characteristics of BK Ca were studied by patch clamp method. The results showed that i) the single channel conductance of BK Ca was (206.8 ± 16.9) pS; ii) the activities of BK Ca channel were voltage dependent; iii) in the bath solution without Ca 2+ , there was almost no BK Ca channel activities regardless of under hyperpolarization or repolarization conditions; iv) under the condition of +40 mV membrane potential, BK Ca channels were activated in a Ca 2+ concentration dependent manner; v) when [Ca 2+ ] was increased from 1 μmol/L to 100 μmol/L, both the channel open probability and the average open time were increased, and the average close time was decreased from (32.2 ± 2.8) ms to (2.1 ± 1.8) ms; vi) the reverse potential of the reconstituted BK Ca was -30 mV when [K + ] was at 40/140 mmol/L (Cis/Trans). These results suggest that the spreading method could serve as a new method for preparing PLBMs and the reconstituted BK Ca into PLBMs showed similar electrophysiological characteristics to natural BK Ca channels, so the PLBMs with incorporated BK Ca can be used in the studies of pharmacology and dynamics of BK Ca channel.

  8. Sodium channels in planar lipid bilayers. Channel gating kinetics of purified sodium channels modified by batrachotoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Single channel currents of sodium channels purified from rat brain and reconstituted into planar lipid bilayers were recorded. The kinetics of channel gating were investigated in the presence of batrachotoxin to eliminate inactivation and an analysis was conducted on membranes with a single active channel at any given time. Channel opening is favored by depolarization and is strongly voltage dependent. Probability density analysis of dwell times in the closed and open states of the channel indicates the occurrence of one open state and several distinct closed states in the voltage (V) range-120 mV less than or equal to V less than or equal to +120 mV. For V less than or equal to 0, the transition rates between stages are exponentially dependent on the applied voltage, as described in mouse neuroblastoma cells (Huang, L. M., N. Moran, and G. Ehrenstein. 1984. Biophysical Journal. 45:313- 322). In contrast, for V greater than or equal to 0, the transition rates are virtually voltage independent. Autocorrelation analysis (Labarca, P., J. Rice, D. Fredkin, and M. Montal. 1985. Biophysical Journal. 47:469-478) shows that there is no correlation in the durations of successive open or closing events. Several kinetic schemes that are consistent with the experimental data are considered. This approach may provide information about the mechanism underlying the voltage dependence of channel activation. PMID:2426388

  9. Model lipid bilayers mimic non-specific interactions of gold nanoparticles with macrophage plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montis, Costanza; Generini, Viola; Boccalini, Giulia; Bergese, Paolo; Bani, Daniele; Berti, Debora

    2018-04-15

    Understanding the interaction between nanomaterials and biological interfaces is a key unmet goal that still hampers clinical translation of nanomedicine. Here we investigate and compare non-specific interaction of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with synthetic lipid and wild type macrophage membranes. A comprehensive data set was generated by systematically varying the structural and physicochemical properties of the AuNPs (size, shape, charge, surface functionalization) and of the synthetic membranes (composition, fluidity, bending properties and surface charge), which allowed to unveil the matching conditions for the interaction of the AuNPs with macrophage plasma membranes in vitro. This effort directly proved for the first time that synthetic bilayers can be set to mimic and predict with high fidelity key aspects of nanoparticle interaction with macrophage eukaryotic plasma membranes. It then allowed to model the experimental observations according to classical interface thermodynamics and in turn determine the paramount role played by non-specific contributions, primarily electrostatic, Van der Waals and bending energy, in driving nanoparticle-plasma membrane interactions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Functional analysis of Kv1.2 and paddle chimera Kv channels in planar lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xiao; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2010-01-01

    Summary Voltage-dependent K+ channels play key roles in shaping electrical signaling in both excitable as well as non-excitable cells. These channels open and close in response to the voltage changes across the cell membrane. Many studies have been carried out in order to understand the voltage sensing mechanism. Our laboratory recently determined the atomic structures of a mammalian voltage-dependent K+ channel Kv1.2 and a mutant of Kv1.2 named the ‘paddle-chimera’ channel, in which the voltage sensor paddle was transferred from Kv2.1 to Kv1.2. These two structures provide atomic descriptions of voltage-dependent channels with unprecedented clarity. Until now the functional integrity of these two channels biosynthesized in yeast cells have not been assessed. Here we report the electrophysiological and pharmacological properties of Kv1.2 and the paddle chimera channels in planar lipid bilayers. We demonstrate that Pichia yeast produce ‘normally functioning’ mammalian voltage-dependent K+ channels with qualitatively similar features to the Shaker K+ channel in the absence of the N-terminal inactivation gate, and that the paddle chimera mutant channel functions as well as Kv1.2. We find, however, that in several respects the Kv1.2 channel exhibits functional properties that are distinct from Kv1.2 channels reported in the literature. PMID:18638484

  11. Porous nanoparticle-supported lipid bilayers (protocells) for targeted delivery and methods of using same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Carnes, Eric C.; Ashley, Carlee Erin; Willman, Cheryl L.

    2017-02-28

    The present invention is directed to protocells for specific targeting of hepatocellular and other cancer cells which comprise a nanoporous silica core with a supported lipid bilayer; at least one agent which facilitates cancer cell death (such as a traditional small molecule, a macromolecular cargo (e.g. siRNA or a protein toxin such as ricin toxin A-chain or diphtheria toxin A-chain) and/or a histone-packaged plasmid DNA disposed within the nanoporous silica core (preferably supercoiled in order to more efficiently package the DNA into protocells) which is optionally modified with a nuclear localization sequence to assist in localizing protocells within the nucleus of the cancer cell and the ability to express peptides involved in therapy (apoptosis/cell death) of the cancer cell or as a reporter, a targeting peptide which targets cancer cells in tissue to be treated such that binding of the protocell to the targeted cells is specific and enhanced and a fusogenic peptide that promotes endosomal escape of protocells and encapsulated DNA. Protocells according to the present invention may be used to treat cancer, especially including hepatocellular (liver) cancer using novel binding peptides (c-MET peptides) which selectively bind to hepatocellular tissue or to function in diagnosis of cancer, including cancer treatment and drug discovery.

  12. Mesoporous silica-supported lipid bilayers (protocells) for DNA cargo delivery to the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengler, Ellen C; Liu, Juewen; Kerwin, Audra; Torres, Sergio; Olcott, Clara M; Bowman, Brandi N; Armijo, Leisha; Gentry, Katherine; Wilkerson, Jenny; Wallace, James; Jiang, Xingmao; Carnes, Eric C; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Milligan, Erin D

    2013-06-10

    Amorphous mesoporous silica nanoparticles ('protocells') that support surface lipid bilayers recently characterized in vitro as carrier constructs for small drug and DNA delivery are reported here as highly biocompatible both in vitro and in vivo, involving the brain and spinal cord following spinal delivery into the lumbosacral subarachnoid space (intrathecal; i.t.). Specifically, positively charged, 1, 2-Dioleoyl-3-Trimethylammonium-Propane (DOTAP)-cholesterol (DOTAP:Chol) liposome-formulated protocells revealed stable in vitro cargo release kinetics and cellular interleukin-10 (IL-10) transgene transfection. Recent approaches using synthetic non-viral vector platforms to deliver the pain-suppressive therapeutic transgene, IL-10, to the spinal subarachnoid space have yielded promising results in animal models of peripheral neuropathy, a condition involving aberrant neuronal communication within sensory pathways in the nervous system. Non-viral drug and gene delivery protocell platforms offer potential flexibility because cargo release-rates can be pH-dependent. We report here that i.t. delivery of protocells, with modified chemistry supporting a surface coating of DOTAP:Chol liposomes and containing the IL-10 transgene, results in functional suppression of pain-related behavior in rats for extended periods. This study is the first demonstration that protocell vectors offer amenable and enduring in vivo biological characteristics that can be applied to spinal gene delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Micro- and nanofabrication methods for ion channel reconstitution in bilayer lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadaki, Daisuke; Yamaura, Daichi; Arata, Kohei; Ohori, Takeshi; Ma, Teng; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Niwano, Michio; Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi

    2018-03-01

    The self-assembled bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) forms the basic structure of the cell membrane and serves as a major barrier against ion movement. Ion channel proteins function as gated pores that permit ion permeation across the BLM. The reconstitution of ion channel proteins in artificially formed BLMs represents a well-defined system for investigating channel functions and screening drug effects on ion channels. In this review, we will discuss our recent microfabrication approaches to the formation of stable BLMs containing ion channel proteins as a potential platform for next-generation drug screening systems. BLMs formed in a microaperture having a tapered edge exhibited highly stable properties, such as a lifetime of ∼65 h and tolerance to solution changes even after the incorporation of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel. We also explore a new method of efficiently incorporating human ion channels into BLMs by centrifugation. Our approaches to the formation of stable BLMs and efficient channel incorporation markedly improve the experimental efficiency of BLM reconstitution systems, leading to the realization of a BLM-based high-throughput platform for functional assays of various ion channels.

  14. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium conformations of peptides in lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, N; Cheng, Y; Knowles, P F

    1997-04-22

    A synthetic, hydrophobic, 27-amino-acid-residue peptide 'K27', modelled on the trans-membrane domain of the slow voltage-gated potassium channel, IsK, has been incorporated into a lipid bilayer and its conformational properties studied using FT-IR spectroscopy. The conformation following reconstitution is found to be dependent on the nature of the solvent employed. When the reconstitution is conducted by solvent evaporation from a methanol solution, aggregates comprised of beta-strands are stabilised and their concentration is essentially invariant with time. By contrast, when trifluoroethanol is used, the initial conformation of the peptide is alpha-helical. This then relaxes to an equilibrium state between alpha-helices and beta-strands. The alpha-helix-to beta-strand conversion rate is relatively slow, and this allows the kinetics to be studied by FT-IR spectroscopy. The reverse process is much slower but again can be demonstrated by FT-IR. Thus, it appears that a true equilibrium structure can only be achieved by starting with peptide in the alpha-helical conformation. We believe this result should be of general validity for hydrophobic peptide reconstitution. The implications for conformational changes in membrane proteins are discussed.

  15. Characterization of supported lipid bilayer disruption by chrysophsin-3 using QCM-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kathleen F; Nagarajan, Ramanathan; Mello, Charlene M; Camesano, Terri A

    2011-12-29

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are naturally occurring polymers that can kill bacteria by destabilizing their membranes. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) was used to better understand the action of the AMP chrysophsin-3 on supported lipid bilayers (SLB) of phosphatidylcholine. Interaction of the SLB with chrysophsin-3 at 0.05 μM demonstrated changes in frequency (Δf) and energy dissipation (ΔD) that were near zero, indicating little change in the membrane. At higher concentrations of chyrsophsin-3 (0.25-4 μM), decreases in Δf of up to 7 Hz were measured. These negative frequency changes suggest that mass was being added to the SLB, possibly due to peptide insertion into the membrane. At a chrysophsin-3 concentration of 10 μM, there was a net mass loss, which was attributed to pore formation in the membrane. QCM-D can be used to describe a mechanistic relationship between AMP concentration and interaction with a model cell membrane. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. Effect of the Concentration of Cytolytic Protein Cyt2Aa2 on the Binding Mechanism on Lipid Bilayers Studied by QCM-D and AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharad, Sudarat; Iturri, Jagoba; Moreno-Cencerrado, Alberto; Mittendorfer, Margareta; Promdonkoy, Boonhiang; Krittanai, Chartchai; Toca-Herrera, José L

    2015-09-29

    Bacillus thuringiensis is known by its insecticidal property. The insecticidal proteins are produced at different growth stages, including the cytolytic protein (Cyt2Aa2), which is a bioinsecticide and an antimicrobial protein. However, the binding mechanism (and the interaction) of Cyt2Aa2 on lipid bilayers is still unclear. In this work, we have used quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the interaction between Cyt2Aa2 protein and (cholesterol-)lipid bilayers. We have found that the binding mechanism is concentration dependent. While at 10 μg/mL, Cyt2Aa2 binds slowly on the lipid bilayer forming a compliance protein/lipid layer with aggregates, at higher protein concentrations (100 μg/mL), the binding is fast, and the protein/lipid layer is more rigid including holes (of about a lipid bilayer thickness) in its structure. Our study suggests that the protein/lipid bilayer binding mechanism seems to be carpet-like at low protein concentrations and pore forming-like at high protein concentrations.

  17. Channels Formed by Botulinum, Tetanus, and Diphtheria Toxins in Planar Lipid Bilayers: Relevance to Translocation of Proteins across Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, David H.; Romero-Mira, Miryam; Ehrlich, Barbara E.; Finkelstein, Alan; Dasgupta, Bibhuti R.; Simpson, Lance L.

    1985-03-01

    The heavy chains of both botulinum neurotoxin type B and tetanus toxin form channels in planar bilayer membranes. These channels have pH-dependent and voltage-dependent properties that are remarkably similar to those previously described for diphtheria toxin. Selectivity experiments with anions and cations show that the channels formed by the heavy chains of all three toxins are large; thus, these channels could serve as ``tunnel proteins'' for translocation of active peptide fragments. These findings support the hypothesis that the active fragments of botulinum neurotoxin and tetanus toxin, like that of diphtheria toxin, are translocated across the membranes of acidic vesicles.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of cationic lipid coated magnetic nanoparticles using multiple emulsions as microreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbaba, Hasan; Karagöz, Uğur [Ege University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, 35100 Izmir (Turkey); Selamet, Yusuf [Izmir Institute of Technology, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, 35433 Izmir (Turkey); Kantarcı, A. Gülten, E-mail: gulten.kantarci@ege.edu.tr [Ege University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, 35100 Izmir (Turkey)

    2017-03-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a novel iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis method with in-situ surface coating. For this purpose multiple emulsions were used as microreactors for the first time and magnetic iron oxide particles synthesized in the core of cationic solid lipid nanoparticles. DLS, SEM, TEM, VSM, Raman Spectrometer, XRD, and XPS techniques were performed for characterization of the magnetic nanoparticles. Obtained magnetic nanoparticles are superparamagnetic and no additional process was needed for surface adjustments. They are positively charged as a result of cationic lipid coating and has appropriate particle size (<30 nm) for drug or nucleic acid delivery. Structure analysis showed that magnetic core material is in the form of magnetite. Saturation magnetization value was measured as 15–17 emu g{sup −1} for lipid coated magnetic nanoparticles obtained by multiple emulsion method which is reasonably sufficient for magnetic targeting. - Highlights: • A novel iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis method with in-situ surface coating. • Combining advantages of microemulsions and multiple emulsion methods. • Multiple emulsions were used as microreactors for magnetic nanoparticle synthesis. • Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles synthesized in the core of cationic lipids. • Possible delivery systems for nucleic acids, oil soluble compounds or drugs.

  19. Lindane Suppresses the Lipid-bilayer Permeability in Main Transition Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabra, Mads Christian; Jørgensen, Kent; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1996-01-01

    %) of lindane. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to measure the passive permeability of unilamellar DMPC bilayers to Co2+ ions. The data show that lindane seals the bilayer for Co2+ penetration and that this effect increases with increasing lindane concentration. The results are discussed in relation...... to the effects on the permeability of other small molecules, e.g., anesthetics....

  20. Membrane docking geometry of GRP1 PH domain bound to a target lipid bilayer: an EPR site-directed spin-labeling and relaxation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available The second messenger lipid PIP(3 (phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate is generated by the lipid kinase PI3K (phosphoinositide-3-kinase in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, where it regulates a broad array of cell processes by recruiting multiple signaling proteins containing PIP(3-specific pleckstrin homology (PH domains to the membrane surface. Despite the broad importance of PIP(3-specific PH domains, the membrane docking geometry of a PH domain bound to its target PIP(3 lipid on a bilayer surface has not yet been experimentally determined. The present study employs EPR site-directed spin labeling and relaxation methods to elucidate the membrane docking geometry of GRP1 PH domain bound to bilayer-embedded PIP(3. The model target bilayer contains the neutral background lipid PC and both essential targeting lipids: (i PIP(3 target lipid that provides specificity and affinity, and (ii PS facilitator lipid that enhances the PIP(3 on-rate via an electrostatic search mechanism. The EPR approach measures membrane depth parameters for 18 function-retaining spin labels coupled to the PH domain, and for calibration spin labels coupled to phospholipids. The resulting depth parameters, together with the known high resolution structure of the co-complex between GRP1 PH domain and the PIP(3 headgroup, provide sufficient constraints to define an optimized, self-consistent membrane docking geometry. In this optimized geometry the PH domain engulfs the PIP(3 headgroup with minimal bilayer penetration, yielding the shallowest membrane position yet described for a lipid binding domain. This binding interaction displaces the PIP(3 headgroup from its lowest energy position and orientation in the bilayer, but the headgroup remains within its energetically accessible depth and angular ranges. Finally, the optimized docking geometry explains previous biophysical findings including mutations observed to disrupt membrane binding, and the rapid lateral

  1. Lipid Bilayer Membrane in a Silicon Based Micron Sized Cavity Accessed by Atomic Force Microscopy and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Shuja; Dosoky, Noura Sayed; Patel, Darayas; Weimer, Jeffrey; Williams, John Dalton

    2017-07-05

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are widely used in biophysical research to probe the functionality of biological membranes and to provide diagnoses in high throughput drug screening. Formation of SLBs at below phase transition temperature ( Tm ) has applications in nano-medicine research where low temperature profiles are required. Herein, we report the successful production of SLBs at above-as well as below-the Tm of the lipids in an anisotropically etched, silicon-based micro-cavity. The Si-based cavity walls exhibit controlled temperature which assist in the quick and stable formation of lipid bilayer membranes. Fusion of large unilamellar vesicles was monitored in real time in an aqueous environment inside the Si cavity using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the lateral organization of the lipid molecules was characterized until the formation of the SLBs. The stability of SLBs produced was also characterized by recording the electrical resistance and the capacitance using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Analysis was done in the frequency regime of 10 -2 -10⁵ Hz at a signal voltage of 100 mV and giga-ohm sealed impedance was obtained continuously over four days. Finally, the cantilever tip in AFM was utilized to estimate the bilayer thickness and to calculate the rupture force at the interface of the tip and the SLB. We anticipate that a silicon-based, micron-sized cavity has the potential to produce highly-stable SLBs below their Tm . The membranes inside the Si cavity could last for several days and allow robust characterization using AFM or EIS. This could be an excellent platform for nanomedicine experiments that require low operating temperatures.

  2. Single-molecule study of full-length NaChBac by planar lipid bilayer recording.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Jo

    Full Text Available Planar lipid bilayer device, alternatively known as BLM, is a powerful tool to study functional properties of conducting membrane proteins such as ion channels and porins. In this work, we used BLM to study the prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav NaChBac in a well-defined membrane environment. Navs are an essential component for the generation and propagation of electric signals in excitable cells. The successes in the biochemical, biophysical and crystallographic studies on prokaryotic Navs in recent years has greatly promoted the understanding of the molecular mechanism that underlies these proteins and their eukaryotic counterparts. In this work, we investigated the single-molecule conductance and ionic selectivity behavior of NaChBac. Purified NaChBac protein was first reconstituted into lipid vesicles, which is subsequently incorporated into planar lipid bilayer by fusion. At single-molecule level, we were able to observe three distinct long-lived conductance sub-states of NaChBac. Change in the membrane potential switches on the channel mainly by increasing its opening probability. In addition, we found that individual NaChBac has similar permeability for Na+, K+, and Ca2+. The single-molecule behavior of the full-length protein is essentially highly stochastic. Our results show that planar lipid bilayer device can be used to study purified ion channels at single-molecule level in an artificial environment, and such studies can reveal new protein properties that are otherwise not observable in in vivo ensemble studies.

  3. Shape Effect on Particle-Lipid Bilayer Membrane Association, Cellular Uptake, and Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tree-Udom, Thapakorn; Seemork, Jiraporn; Shigyou, Kazuki; Hamada, Tsutomu; Sangphech, Naunpun; Palaga, Tanapat; Insin, Numpon; Pan-In, Porntip; Wanichwecharungruang, Supason

    2015-11-04

    Although computer simulation and cell culture experiments have shown that elongated spherical particles can be taken up into cells more efficiently than spherical particles, experimental investigation on effects of these different shapes over the particle-membrane association has never been reported. Therefore, whether the higher cellular uptake of an elongated spherical particles is a result of a better particle-membrane association as suggested by some calculation works or a consequence of its influence on other cellular trans-membrane components involved in particle translocation process, cannot be concluded. Here, we study the effect of particle shape on the particle-membrane interaction by monitoring the association between particles of various shapes and lipid bilayer membrane of artificial cell-sized liposomes. Among the three shaped lanthanide-doped NaYF4 particles, all with high shape purity and uniformity, similar crystal phase, and surface chemistry, the elongated spherical particle shows the highest level of membrane association, followed by the spherical particle with a similar radius, and the hexagonal prism-shaped particle, respectively. The free energy of membrane curvature calculated based on a membrane indentation induced by a particle association indicates that among the three particle shapes, the elongated spherical particle give the most stable membrane curvature. The elongated spherical particles show the highest cellular uptake into cytosol of human melanoma (A-375) and human liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells when observed through a confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscope. Quantitative study using flow cytometry also gives the same result. The elongated spherical particles also possess the highest cytotoxicity in A-375 and normal skin (WI-38) cell lines, comparing to the other two shaped particles.

  4. Association of acylated cationic decapeptides with dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine-dipalmitoyl- phosphatidylcholine lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, T. B.; Sabra, Mads Christian; Frokjaer, Sven

    2001-01-01

    decapeptides that are N-terminally linked with C-2, C-8, and C-14 acyl chains contain four basic histidine residues in their identical amino acid sequence. A binding model, based on changes in the intrinsic fluorescent properties of the peptides upon association with the DPPC-DPPS membranes, is used...... to estimate the peptide-membrane dissociation constants. The results clearly show that all three peptides have a higher affinity to liposomes containing DPPS lipids due to non-specific electrostatic interactions between the cationic peptides and the anionic DPPS lipids. Furthermore, it is found that the acyl...

  5. Innovative hybrid vs polymeric nanocapsules: The influence of the cationic lipid coating on the "4S".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, C; Manno, D; Serra, A; Musumeci, T; Pepe, V; Tisserand, C; Puglisi, G

    2016-05-01

    Polymeric and hybrid aqueous-core nanocapsules were prepared using a low energy organic-solvent free procedure as innovative nanodevices for the ophthalmic delivery of melatonin. In order to evaluate how different cationic lipids could affect the main properties of the nanodevices, we focused our attention on mean particles size, surface charge, shape and stability (the "4S"). The results of our study confirmed the hypothesis that the coating material differently affects the overall nanoparticles properties, above all in terms of morphology: in particular, the cationic lipid dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide allows the formation of very stable well-defined nanocapsules with non-spherical shape with sustained and prolonged drug release, thus representing a great advantage in ophthalmic application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cationic amphipathic peptides accumulate sialylated proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane of eukaryotic host cells

    OpenAIRE

    Weghuber, Julian; Aichinger, Michael C.; Brameshuber, Mario; Wieser, Stefan; Ruprecht, Verena; Plochberger, Birgit; Madl, Josef; Horner, Andreas; Reipert, Siegfried; Lohner, Karl; Henics, Tamas; Schuetz, Gerhard J

    2011-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) selectively target bacterial membranes by electrostatic interactions with negatively charged lipids. It turned out that for inhibition of microbial growth a high CAMP membrane concentration is required, which can be realized by the incorporation of hydrophobic groups within the peptide. Increasing hydrophobicity, however, reduces the CAMP selectivity for bacterial over eukaryotic host membranes, thereby causing the risk of detrimental side-effects. In t...

  7. Small-angle neutron scattering from multilamellar lipid bilayers: Theory, model, and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemmich, Jesper; Mortensen, Kell; Ipsen, John Hjorth

    1996-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering data obtained from fully hydrated, multilamellar phospholipid bilayers with deuterated acyl chains of different length are presented and analyzed within a paracrystalline theory and a geometric model that permit the bilayer structure to be determined under conditions...... where the lamellar layers are coupled and fluctuating. This theory provides structural information in the region of the solid-fluid bilayer phase transition without invoking the usual decoupling of the scattering intensity function into form and structure factors. Results are presented as a function...

  8. Cationic amphipathic peptides accumulate sialylated proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane of eukaryotic host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weghuber, Julian; Aichinger, Michael C; Brameshuber, Mario; Wieser, Stefan; Ruprecht, Verena; Plochberger, Birgit; Madl, Josef; Horner, Andreas; Reipert, Siegfried; Lohner, Karl; Henics, Tamás; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2011-10-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) selectively target bacterial membranes by electrostatic interactions with negatively charged lipids. It turned out that for inhibition of microbial growth a high CAMP membrane concentration is required, which can be realized by the incorporation of hydrophobic groups within the peptide. Increasing hydrophobicity, however, reduces the CAMP selectivity for bacterial over eukaryotic host membranes, thereby causing the risk of detrimental side-effects. In this study we addressed how cationic amphipathic peptides-in particular a CAMP with Lysine-Leucine-Lysine repeats (termed KLK)-affect the localization and dynamics of molecules in eukaryotic membranes. We found KLK to selectively inhibit the endocytosis of a subgroup of membrane proteins and lipids by electrostatically interacting with negatively charged sialic acid moieties. Ultrastructural characterization revealed the formation of membrane invaginations representing fission or fusion intermediates, in which the sialylated proteins and lipids were immobilized. Experiments on structurally different cationic amphipathic peptides (KLK, 6-MO-LF11-322 and NK14-2) indicated a cooperation of electrostatic and hydrophobic forces that selectively arrest sialylated membrane constituents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Barrier properties of lipid bilayers composed of lecithins with odd chain fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salvati, S.; Serlupi-Crescenzi, G.; Gier, J. de

    Lecithins with fatty acid chain length of 17 carbon atoms and different degrees of unsaturation were synthesized. The thermotropic behaviour and barrier function of derived liposomal bilayers were studied.

  10. Systematic implicit solvent coarse-graining of bilayer membranes: lipid and phase transferability of the force field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Zunjing; Deserno, Markus, E-mail: zwang@cmu.ed, E-mail: deserno@andrew.cmu.ed [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    We study the lipid and phase transferability of our recently developed systematically coarse-grained solvent-free membrane model. The force field was explicitly parameterized to describe a fluid 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayer at 310 K with correct structure and area per lipid, while gaining at least three orders of magnitude in computational efficiency (see Wang and Deserno 2010 J. Phys. Chem. B 114 11207-20). Here, we show that exchanging CG tails, without any subsequent re-parameterization, creates reliable models of 1,2-dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and 1,2-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipids in terms of structure and area per lipid. Furthermore, all CG lipids undergo a liquid-gel transition upon cooling, with characteristics like those observed in experiments and all-atom simulations during phase transformation. These studies suggest a promising transferability of our force field parameters to different lipid species and thermodynamic state points, properties that are a prerequisite for even more complex systems, such as mixtures.

  11. Using crosslinkable diacetylene phospholipids to construct two-dimensional packed beds in supported lipid bilayer separation platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Kai Hu, Sheng-Wen Hsiao, Hsun-Yen Mao, Ya-Ming Chen, Yung Chang and Ling Chao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Separating and purifying cell membrane-associated biomolecules has been a challenge owing to their amphiphilic property. Taking these species out of their native lipid membrane environment usually results in biomolecule degradation. One of the new directions is to use supported lipid bilayer (SLB platforms to separate the membrane species while they are protected in their native environment. Here we used a type of crosslinkable diacetylene phospholipids, diynePC (1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, as a packed material to create a 'two-dimensional (2D packed bed' in a SLB platform. After the diynePC SLB is exposed to UV light, some of the diynePC lipids in the SLB can crosslink and the non-crosslinked monomer lipids can be washed away, leaving a 2D porous solid matrix. We incorporated the lipid vesicle deposition method with a microfluidic device to pattern the location of the packed-bed region and the feed region with species to be separated in a SLB platform. Our atomic force microscopy result shows that the nano-scaled structure density of the '2D packed bed' can be tuned by the UV dose applied to the diynePC membrane. When the model membrane biomolecules were forced to transport through the packed-bed region, their concentration front velocities were found to decrease linearly with the UV dose, indicating the successful creation of packed obstacles in these 2D lipid membrane separation platforms.

  12. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectral components of spin-labeled lipids in saturated phospholipid bilayers: effect of cholesterol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heverton Silva Camargos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy was used to study the main structural accommodations of spin labels in bilayers of saturated phosphatidylcholines with acyl chain lengths ranging from 16 to 22 carbon atoms. EPR spectra allowed the identification of two distinct spectral components in thermodynamic equilibrium at temperatures below and above the main phase transition. An accurate analysis of EPR spectra, using two fitting programs, enabled determination of the thermodynamic profile for these major probe accommodations. Focusing the analysis on two-component EPR spectra of a spin-labeled lipid, the influence of 40 mol % cholesterol in DPPC was studied.

  13. Cationic solid lipid nanoparticles enhance ocular hypotensive effect of melatonin in rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Antonio; Bucolo, Claudio; Drago, Filippo; Salomone, Salvatore; Pignatello, Rosario

    2015-01-15

    The study was aimed at evaluating whether the ocular hypotensive effect of melatonin (MEL) was enhanced by its encapsulation in cationic solid lipid nanoparticles (cSLN), as well as at determining the tolerability of these formulations on the ocular surface. MEL was loaded in cSLN that had already been shown to be suitable for ophthalmic use. The formulations were prepared using Softisan(®) 100 as the main lipid matrix, with the presence of either stearic (SA) or palmitic acid (PA) as lipid modifiers. A fixed positive charge was provided by the addition of a cationic lipid (didecyldimethylammonium bromide). The ocular hypotensive effect was evaluated by measuring the intraocular pressure (IOP) during 24h in albino rabbits. MEL elicited a significant (p<0.01) IOP reduction in rabbit eye. All the formulations tested in vivo demonstrated a good tolerability. The nanocarrier containing SA was the most effective in terms of IOP reduction (maximum IOP reduction: -7 mmHg), and its effect lasted approximately 24h. The experimental data indicate that the new formulations based on cSLN loaded with MEL represent a potent anti-glaucoma treatment with a safe profile, warranting further clinical evaluation of the proposed nanotechnological strategy. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Cationic lipids bearing succinic-based, acyclic and macrocyclic hydrophobic domains: Synthetic studies and in vitro gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubeli, Emile; Maginty, Amanda B; Khalique, Nada Abdul; Raju, Liji; Nicholson, David G; Larsen, Helge; Pungente, Michael D; Goldring, William P D

    2017-01-05

    In this communication we describe the construction of four succinic-based cationic lipids, their formulation with plasmid DNA (pDNA), and an evaluation of their in vitro gene delivery into Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO-K1) cells. The cationic lipids employed in this work possess either a dimethylamine or trimethylamine headgroup, and a macrocyclic or an acyclic hydrophobic domain composed of, or derived from two 16-atom, succinic-based acyl chains. The synthesized lipids and a co-lipid of neutral charge, either cholesterol or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE), were formulated in an overall 3:2 cationic-to-neutral lipid molar ratio, then complexed with plasmid DNA (pDNA). The relative transfection performance was evaluated via a comparison between matched versus mismatched formulations defined by the rigidity relationship between the lipids employed. Gel electrophoresis was used to characterize the binding of the lipid formulations with plasmid DNA and the relative degree of plasmid degradation using a DNase I degradation assay. Small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXD) was employed to characterize the packing morphology of the lipid-DNA complexes. In general, the succinic unit embedded within the hydrophobic domain of the cationic lipids was found to improve lipid hydration. The transfection assays revealed a general trend in which mismatched formulations that employed a rigid lipid combined with a non-rigid (or flexible) lipid, outperformed the matched formulations. The results from this work suggest that the design of the cationic lipid structure and the composition of the lipoplex formulation play key roles in governing the transfection performance of nonviral gene delivery agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparative computational study of interaction of C60-fullerene and tris-malonyl-C60-fullerene isomers with lipid bilayer: relation to their antioxidant effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine E Bozdaganyan

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress induced by excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS has been implicated in the etiology of many human diseases. It has been reported that fullerenes and some of their derivatives-carboxyfullerenes-exhibits a strong free radical scavenging capacity. The permeation of C60-fullerene and its amphiphilic derivatives-C3-tris-malonic-C60-fullerene (C3 and D3-tris-malonyl-C60-fullerene (D3-through a lipid bilayer mimicking the eukaryotic cell membrane was studied using molecular dynamics (MD simulations. The free energy profiles along the normal to the bilayer composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC for C60, C3 and D3 were calculated. We found that C60 molecules alone or in clusters spontaneously translocate to the hydrophobic core of the membrane and stay inside the bilayer during the whole period of simulation time. The incorporation of cluster of fullerenes inside the bilayer changes properties of the bilayer and leads to its deformation. In simulations of the tris-malonic fullerenes we discovered that both isomers, C3 and D3, adsorb at the surface of the bilayer but only C3 tends to be buried in the area of the lipid headgroups forming hydrophobic contacts with the lipid tails. We hypothesize that such position has implications for ROS scavenging mechanism in the specific cell compartments.

  16. Elliptical structure of phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs encapsulated by scaffold proteins: casting the roles of the lipids and the protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skar-Gislinge, Nicholas; Simonsen, Jens Bæk; Mortensen, Kell; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Sligar, Stephen G; Lindberg Møller, Birger; Bjørnholm, Thomas; Arleth, Lise

    2010-10-06

    Phospholipid bilayers host and support the function of membrane proteins and may be stabilized in disc-like nanostructures, allowing for unprecedented solution studies of the assembly, structure, and function of membrane proteins (Bayburt et al. Nano Lett. 2002, 2, 853-856). Based on small-angle neutron scattering in combination with variable-temperature studies of synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering on nanodiscs in solution, we show that the fundamental nanodisc unit, consisting of a lipid bilayer surrounded by amphiphilic scaffold proteins, possesses intrinsically an elliptical shape. The temperature dependence of the curvature of the nanodiscs prepared with two different phospholipid types (DLPC and POPC) shows that it is the scaffold protein that determines the overall elliptical shape and that the nanodiscs become more circular with increasing temperature. Our data also show that the hydrophobic bilayer thickness is, to a large extent, dictated by the scaffolding protein and adjusted to minimize the hydrophobic mismatch between protein and phospholipid. Our conclusions result from a new comprehensive and molecular-based model of the nanodisc structure and the use of this to analyze the experimental scattering profile from nanodiscs. The model paves the way for future detailed structural studies of functional membrane proteins encapsulated in nanodiscs.

  17. Effects of Oriented Surface Dipole on Photoconversion Efficiency in an Alkane/Lipid-Hybrid-Bilayer-Based Photovoltaic Model System

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lixia

    2013-06-21

    When a phospholipid monolayer containing a zinc-coordinated porphyrin species formed atop a self-assembled monolayer of heptadecafluoro-1-decanethiol (CF3(CF2)7(CH2)2SH) is subjected to photoelectrochemical current generation, a significant modulation effect is observed. Compared with devices that contain similar photoactive lipid monolayers but formed on 1-dodecanethiol SAMs, these fluorinated hybrid bilayers produce a >60 % increase in cathodic currents and a similar decrease in anodic currents. Photovoltages recorded from these hybrid bilayers are found to vary in the same fashion. The modulation of photovoltaic responses in these hybrid-bilayer-based devices is explained by the opposite surface dipoles associated with the thiols employed in this study, which in one case (fluorothiol) increase and in another (alkanethiol) decrease the work function of the underlying gold substrates. A similar trend of photovoltage/photocurrent modulation is also observed if fullerene is used as the photoagent in these devices. Our results reveal the intricacy of orientated surface dipole in influencing the photovoltaic processes, and its subtle interplay with other factors related to the photoagents, such as their location and orientation within the organic matrix. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Experimental Investigations of Direct and Converse Flexoelectric Effect in Bilayer Lipid Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Angelio Todorov

    Flexoelectric coefficients (direct and converse), electric properties (capacitance and resistivity) and mechanical properties (thickness and elastic coefficients) have been determined for bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) prepared from egg yolk lecithin (EYL), glycerol monoleate (GMO), phosphatidyl choline (PC) and phosphatidyl serine (PS) as a function of frequency, pH and surface charge modifiers. Direct flexoelectric effect manifested itself in the development of microvolt range a.c. potential (U_{f}) upon subjecting one side of a BLM to an oscillating hydrostatic pressure, in the 100-1000 Hz range. Operationally, the flexoelectric coefficient (f) is expressed by the ratio between U_{f} and the change of curvature (c) which accompanied the flexing of the membrane. Membrane curvature was determined by means of either the electric method (capacitance microphone effect) or by the newly developed method of stroboscopic interferometry. Real-time stroboscopic interferometry coupled with simultaneous electric measurements, provided a direct method for the determination of f. Two different frequency regimes of f were recognized. At low frequencies (free mobility of the surfactant, f-values of 24.1 times 10^{-19} and 0.87 times 10^ {-19} Coulombs were obtained for PC and GMO BLMs. At high frequencies (>300 Hz), associated with blocked mobility of the surfactant, f-values of 16.5 times 10^ {-19} and 0.30 times 10^{-19} Coulombs were obtained for PC and GMO BLMs. The theoretically calculated value for the GMO BLM oscillating at high frequency (0.12 times 10^{-19 } Coulombs) agreed well with that determined experimentally (0.3 times 10 ^{-19} Coulombs). For charged bovine brain PS BLM the observed flexocoefficient was f = 4.0 times 10^{ -18} Coulombs. Converse flexoelectric effect manifested itself in voltage-induced BLM curvature. Observations were carried out on uranyl acetate (UA) stabilized PS BLM under a.c. excitation. Frequency dependence of f was revealed by means of

  19. Probing Membrane Viscosity and Interleaflet Friction of Supported Lipid Bilayers by Tracking Electrostatically Adsorbed, Nano-Sized Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabaei, Seyed R; Gillissen, Jurriaan J J; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-12-01

    Particle tracking is used to measure the diffusional motion of nanosized (≈100 nm), lipid vesicles that are electrostatically adsorbed onto a solid supported lipid bilayer. It is found that the motion of membrane-adhering vesicles is Brownian and depends inversely on the vesicle size, but is insensitive to the vesicle surface charge. The measured diffusivity agrees well with the Evans-Sackmann model for the diffusion of inclusions in supported, fluidic membranes. The agreement implies that the vesicle motion is coupled to that of a nanoscopic lipid cluster in the upper leaflet, which slides over the lower leaflet. The diffusivity of membrane-adhering vesicles is therefore predominantly governed by the interleaflet friction coefficient, while the diffusivity of single lipids is mainly governed by the membrane viscosity. Combined with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis, the interleaflet friction coefficient and the membrane viscosity are determined by applying the Evans-Sackmann model to the measured diffusivity of membrane adhering vesicles and that of supported membrane lipids. This approach provides an alternative to existing methods for measuring the interleaflet friction coefficient and the membrane viscosity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Electron density analysis of the effects of sugars on the structure of lipid bilayers at low hydration - a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenné, T.; Kent, B.; Koster, K.L.; Garvey, C.J.; Bryant, G. (ANSTO); (USD); (ANU); (RMIT)

    2012-02-06

    Small angle X-ray scattering is used to study the effects of sugars on membranes during dehydration. Previous work has shown that the bilayer and chain-chain repeat spacings of DPPC bilayers are relatively unaffected by the presence of sugars. In this work we present a preliminary analysis of the electron density profiles of DPPC in the presence of sugars at low hydration. The difficulties of determining the correct phasing are discussed. Sugars and other small solutes have been shown to have an important role in improving the tolerance of a range of species to desiccation and freezing. In particular it has been shown that sugars can stabilize membranes in the fluid membrane phase during dehydration, and in the fully dehydrated state. Equivalently, at a particular hydration, the presence of sugars lowers the transition temperature between the fluid and gel phases. There are two competing models for explaining the effects of sugars on membrane phase transition temperatures. One, designated the water replacement hypothesis (WRH) states that sugars hydrogen bond to phospholipid headgroups, thus hindering the fluid-gel phase transition. One version of this model suggests that certain sugars (such as trehalose) achieve the measured effects by inserting between the phospholipid head groups. An alternative model explains the observed effects of sugars in terms of the sugars effect on the hydration repulsion that develops between opposing membranes during dehydration. The hydration repulsion leads to a lateral compressive stress in the bilayer which squeezes adjacent lipids more closely together, resulting in a transition to the gel phase. When sugars are present, their osmotic and volumetric effects reduce the hydration repulsion, reduce the compressive stress in the membranes, and therefore tend to maintain the average lateral separation between lipids. This model is called the hydration forces explanation (HFE). We recently showed that neither mono- nor di

  1. Lipid bilayer coated Al(2)O(3) nanopore sensors: towards a hybrid biological solid-state nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Bala Murali; Polans, James; Comer, Jeffrey; Sridhar, Supriya; Wendell, David; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Bashir, Rashid

    2011-08-01

    Solid-state nanopore sensors are highly versatile platforms for the rapid, label-free electrical detection and analysis of single molecules, applicable to next generation DNA sequencing. The versatility of this technology allows for both large scale device integration and interfacing with biological systems. Here we report on the development of a hybrid biological solid-state nanopore platform that incorporates a highly mobile lipid bilayer on a single solid-state Al(2)O(3) nanopore sensor, for the potential reconstitution of ion channels and biological nanopores. Such a system seeks to combine the superior electrical, thermal, and mechanical stability of Al(2)O(3) solid-state nanopores with the chemical specificity of biological nanopores. Bilayers on Al(2)O(3) exhibit higher diffusivity than those formed on TiO(2) and SiO(2) substrates, attributed to the presence of a thick hydration layer on Al(2)O(3), a key requirement to preserving the biological functionality of reconstituted membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that the electrostatic repulsion between the dipole of the DOPC headgroup and the positively charged Al(2)O(3) surface may be responsible for the enhanced thickness of this hydration layer. Lipid bilayer coated Al(2)O(3) nanopore sensors exhibit excellent electrical properties and enhanced mechanical stability (GΩ seals for over 50 h), making this technology ideal for use in ion channel electrophysiology, the screening of ion channel active drugs and future integration with biological nanopores such as α-hemolysin and MspA for rapid single molecule DNA sequencing. This technology can find broad application in bio-nanotechnology.

  2. Evaluation of physical integrity of lipid bilayer under oxidative stress: application of fluorescence microscopy and digital image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ran; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Skibsted, Leif H

    2015-01-01

    Membrane damage as a result of oxidative stress is quantified using digital image heterogeneity analysis of single giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) composed of soy phosphatidylcholine (PC), which were found to undergo budding when containing chlorophyll a (Chla) as photosensitizer in the lipid bilayer. Based on digital image heterogeneity analysis, a dimensionless scalar parameter "entropy" for the budding process was found to change linearly during an initial budding stage. Photo-induced peroxidation of PC to form linoleoyl hydroperoxides, further leading to domains of higher polarities in GUVs, was suggested to initiate the budding process. The effect on budding process of GUVs was suggested for use in assays for evaluation of potential protectors of lipid bilayer integrity under oxidative stress, and "entropy" seemed to be a valid descriptor of such membranal integrity. The one-step procedure for quantification of prooxidative effects and antioxidative protection provided by drug candidates and potential food ingredients in membranes could be easily automated for direct measurement of oxidative and antioxidative effects on cellular integrity.

  3. A Ca-activated K channel from rabbit renal brush-border membrane vesicles in planar lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweifach, A; Desir, G V; Aronson, P S; Giebisch, G H

    1991-07-01

    Rabbit renal brush-border membranes were fused to planar lipid bilayers to gain insight into the nature and properties of ion channels from the luminal membrane of the proximal tubule. Fusion was obtained using osmotic gradients. A large conductance channel was commonly observed. Measurements of reversal potentials indicated that the channel was selective for K over Rb, Na, and Cl. Channel open probability was increased by membrane depolarization and by increased Ca activity on the intracellular face of the channel. The channel was inhibited by charybdotoxin (CTX), a protein from leiurus venom, from the external side of the channel. The channel was also blocked by Ba and quinidine added to the intracellular bathing solution. Na added to the intracellular bathing solution reduced current amplitude in a voltage-dependent fashion. In addition, methylisobutyl amiloride, an analogue of the K-sparing diuretic amiloride, inhibited channel activity when added to the external solution. The possible physiological role of the channel is discussed. The usefulness to the study of renal ion channels of the technique of fusing membrane vesicles to planar lipid bilayers is evaluated.

  4. Reversible tuning of the wettability on a silver mesodendritic surface by the formation and disruption of lipid-like bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuanji; Xia, Bing; Liu, Jie; Ding, Lisheng; Li, Bangjing; Zhou, Yan

    2015-02-01

    This study reported a smart, easy to apply, flexible and green strategy for obtaining a biomimic micro-nanostructures. 1-Mercapto-12-(p-nitrophenoxy) dodecane (MPND) and n-dodecanethiol were used to form low surface energy film on a silver mesodendritic structure coated zinc substrate. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize surface morphology and mesocrystal structures. Noncovalently linked sodium nonanoyloxy benzene sulfonate (NOBS) was used to form "lipid-like bilayers" on the surface, making it possible for the surface to switch its surface wettability reversibly. The water contact angle (CA) on the constructed surface varies from 168 ± 2° (before processed by NOBS) to 55 ± 2° (after processed by NOBS). This phenomenon can be explained by the formation and disruption of "lipid-like bilayers" to affect the wettability of the surface. This work is of great scientific interests and may provide insights into the design of novel functional devices that are relevant to surface wettability, such as microfluidic devices and sensors.

  5. The defense substance allicin from garlic permeabilizes membranes of Beta vulgaris, Rhoeo discolor, Chara corallina and artificial lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruhlke, Martin C H; Hemmis, Birgit; Noll, Ulrike; Wagner, Richard; Lühring, Hinrich; Slusarenko, Alan J

    2015-04-01

    Allicin (diallylthiosulfinate) is the major volatile- and antimicrobial substance produced by garlic cells upon wounding. We tested the hypothesis that allicin affects membrane function and investigated 1) betanine pigment leakage from beetroot (Beta vulgaris) tissue, 2) the semipermeability of the vacuolar membrane of Rhoeo discolor cells, 3) the electrophysiology of plasmalemma and tonoplast of Chara corallina and 4) electrical conductivity of artificial lipid bilayers. Garlic juice and chemically synthesized allicin were used and betanine loss into the medium was monitored spectrophotometrically. Rhoeo cells were studied microscopically and Chara- and artificial membranes were patch clamped. Beet cell membranes were approximately 200-fold more sensitive to allicin on a mol-for-mol basis than to dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and approximately 400-fold more sensitive to allicin than to ethanol. Allicin-treated Rhoeo discolor cells lost the ability to plasmolyse in an osmoticum, confirming that their membranes had lost semipermeability after allicin treatment. Furthermore, allicin and garlic juice diluted in artificial pond water caused an immediate strong depolarization, and a decrease in membrane resistance at the plasmalemma of Chara, and caused pore formation in the tonoplast and artificial lipid bilayers. Allicin increases the permeability of membranes. Since garlic is a common foodstuff the physiological effects of its constituents are important. Allicin's ability to permeabilize cell membranes may contribute to its antimicrobial activity independently of its activity as a thiol reagent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Combined QCM-D and EIS study of supported lipid bilayer formation and interaction with pore-forming peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briand, Elisabeth; Zäch, Michael; Svedhem, Sofia; Kasemo, Bengt; Petronis, Sarunas

    2010-02-01

    A novel set-up combining the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring technique (QCM-D) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) under flow conditions was successfully used to follow supported lipid bilayer (SLB) formation on SiO(2). This study demonstrates the simultaneous detection, in real time, of both the electrical and the structural properties of the SLB. The combination of the two techniques provided novel insights regarding the mechanism of SLB formation: we found indications for an annealing process of the lipid alkyl chains after the mass corresponding to complete bilayer coverage had been deposited. Moreover, the interaction of the SLB with the pore-forming toxin, gramicidin D (grD) was studied for grD concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 40 mg L(-1). Membrane properties were altered depending on the toxin concentration. For low grD concentrations, the electrical properties of the SLB changed upon insertion of active ion channels. For higher concentrations, the QCM-D data showed dramatic changes in the viscoelastic properties of the membrane while the EIS spectra did not change. AFM confirmed significant structural changes of the membrane at higher grD concentrations. Thus, the application of combined QCM-D and EIS detection provides complementary information about the system under study. This information will be particularly important for the continued detailed investigation of interactions at model membrane surfaces.

  7. Investigation of the protonation state of novel cationic lipids designed for gene transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipina, Maria N; Dobner, Bodo; Konovalov, Oleg V; Shapovalov, Vladimir L; Brezesinski, Gerald

    2007-12-13

    In order to be used in versatile DNA delivery systems, novel cationic lipids were synthesized. The head groups of the new compounds represented by monoamines or oligoamines can be charged or uncharged depending on the environmental pH. Since their pK values are unknown, the protonation properties of these lipids have been studied in a wide pH range. In our experiments, the amphiphilic molecules were organized as a Langmuir monolayer at the air-water interface. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TRXF) was used to determine the 2D concentration of bromide counterions bound to a positively charged (protonated) Langmuir monolayer. The protonation rate of the novel cationic lipids was estimated by comparing the fluorescence intensity with that of dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide monolayers as a reference. TRXF investigations were supplemented with results of film-balance measurements, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and X-ray reflectivity data. The results obtained display that the monolayers of all studied compounds are completely uncharged at pH values above 10. In the investigated pH region, the highest protonation rate of the monolayers is observed at pH 3. The influence of the monolayer packing density on the protonation properties is clearly shown.

  8. Bacillus thuringiensis Cyt2Aa2 binding on lipid/cholesterol bilayer depends on protein concentration and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharad, Sudarat; Moreno-Cencerrado, Alberto; Üzülmez, Öykü; Promdonkoy, Boonhiang; Toca-Herrera, Jose L

    2017-10-14

    Bacillus thuringiensis produces cytolytic proteins (Cyt) that show toxicity against dipteran insect larvae acting directly on the cell membrane. Up to now, two different models have been proposed to explain the interaction mechanism of the cytolytic protein Cyt2Aa2 on lipid membranes: pore-forming and detergent-like action. Here we report on the interaction of Cyt2Aa2 with lipid/cholesterol bilayers at early stage (far from equilibrium) as a function of protein concentration. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) measurements showed that the rate of protein adsorption increased with concentration, although the mass of the final protein-lipid was similar after two hours. In addition, the dissipation (compliance of the hybrid lipid/protein layer) increased with decreasing protein concentration. Furthermore, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that the structure of the protein-lipid layer was concentration and time dependent. A rigid hybrid homogeneous layer was observed at protein concentrations of 50 μg/ml and 100 μg/ml after 30 min. At lower concentrations, 10 μg/ml and 17.5 μg/ml, protein adsorption on the lipid layer led to the formation of small aggregates. Interestingly, at 25 μg/ml a transition of a hole-like structure into a homogeneous layer was observed. This suggests that 25 μg/ml is a threshold concentration for the binding mechanism of Cyt2Aa2 on to lipid membranes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Peroxide decoloration of CI Acid Orange 7 catalyzed by manganese chlorophyll derivatives at the surfaces of micelles and lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigure, Shuichi; Mitsui, Tatsuro; Ito, Shingo; Kondo, Yuji; Kawabe, Shigeki; Kondo, Masaharu; Dewa, Takehisa; Mino, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Shigeru; Nango, Mamoru

    2010-06-01

    Manganese-substituted chlorophyll a derivatives (MnChls) were synthesized. We first report peroxidative oxidation of an azo dye, CI Acid Orange 7, catalyzed by MnChls at the surfaces of micelles and lipid bilayers with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) under mild conditions (pH 8.0, 25 degrees C). Peroxide decoloration depended upon the structures of MnChls, surfactants, lipids, and the presence of imidazole. Surprisingly, a largest decoloration rate was observed for MnChls dimer, MnPChlide a-K(MnPChlide a)-His 5 in cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) micellar solution, especially when imidazole was present: this observation is analogous to the decoloration using horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Interestingly, the dimer complexes showed enhanced decoloration in comparison to the corresponding MnChls monomer in the micellar solution. In contrast, the MnChls monomer showed enhanced decoloration in comparison with the MnChls dimer in liposomal suspensions. Further, the imidazole residue covalently linked to the MnChls plays an important role in increasing the decoloration in both micellar and liposomal suspensions as well as in addition of imidazole into the solutions. It is interesting that the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of MnPChlide a ME 2, MnPChlide a-His 3, and MnMPMME-His 7 have 16 peaks around g = 2 in Egg PC or DMPC liposomal suspension with H(2)O(2), which is typical of a mixed-valence Mn(III)-Mn(IV) complex with coupling between two ions. The higher decoloration performance obtained by the monomer porphyrin compounds at the surface of the lipid bilayers appears to be related to the stability of this mixed-valence Mn(III)-Mn(IV) species formed in the lipid bilayers. This finding should provide useful information to note that MnChls, which are easily found in a number of biological systems, are involved in functions such as hydrogen peroxide decomposition in bacteria and the oxidation of water during photosynthesis as well as the peroxidases

  10. Study of pH (low) insertion peptides (pHLIPs) interaction with lipid bilayer of membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerakkody, Dhammika

    The pH-dependent interactions of pHLIPsRTM (pH (Low) Insertion Peptides) with lipid bilayer of membrane provides an opportunity to study and address fundamental questions of protein folding/insertion into membrane and unfolding/exit, as well as develop novel approach to target acidic diseased tissue such as cancer, ischemic myocardium, infection and others. The main goal of the work presented here is to answer the following questions: - What is the molecular mechanism of spontaneous insertion and folding of a peptide in a lipid bilayer of membrane; - What is the molecular mechanism of unfolding and exit of a peptide from a lipid bilayer of membrane; - How polar cargo attached to a peptide's inserting end might affect the process of insertion into a lipid bilayer of membrane; How sequence variation will affect a peptide's interactions with a lipid bilayer of membrane (partitioning into bilayer at neutral and low pH; apparent pK of insertion) with the main goal to identify the best pHLIP variants for imaging and therapy of pathological states such as cancer and others. It has been demonstrated that pHLIP insertion into a membrane is associated with the protonation of Asp/Glu residues, which leads to an increase of hydrophobicity that triggers the folding and insertion of the peptide across a lipid bilayer. The insertion of the pHLIP is unidirectional and it is accompanied by the release of energy. Therefore, the energy of membrane associated-folding can be used to favor the movement of cell-impermeable polar cargo molecules across the hydrophobic membrane bilayer when they are attached to the inserting end of pHLIP. Both pH-targeting behavior and molecular translocation have been demonstrated in cultured cells and in vivo. Thus, there is an opportunity to develop a novel concept in drug delivery, which is based on the use of a monomeric, pH-sensitive peptide molecular transporter, to deliver agents that are significantly more polar than conventional drugs

  11. Exploring the interactions between peptides and lipid bilayers using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and two-photon fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, M.; Mouras, R.; Downes, A.; Elfick, A.

    2011-06-01

    We have used a versatile and powerful microscope[1] for multi-modal biomedical imaging on which we combine Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) with Two Photon Excitation Fluorescence (TPEF) using a Nd: YVO4 pump laser. We acquired 2PEF, CARS, and phase contrast images of Multilamellar Vesicles (MLVs) and Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs), as well as Raman spectra of the constituent lipids. A wide range of peptides are harmful to cells by altering the structure of the biological membranes. This effect depends on the composition of the membrane and the chemical structure of the peptide. The peptide we studied is the beta amyloid Aβ which is a major component of the amyloid plaques deposited on neuronal membranes of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. AD is neurodegenerative disorder in which the hallmark symptoms include cognitive decline and dementia[2] and is characterized by the formation of extracellular amyloid fibrils on the neuronal membranes of the brain. Many questions still remain unanswered concerning the destabilization of cellular ionic homeostasis due to pores formed during the interactions of lipid membranes with peptides. In this project, biomimics of cell membranes are used. The structures that best mimic the plasma membranes are MLVs or GUVs. These vesicles are formed using the gentle hydration technique[3] or the electroformation technique[4] respectively and are composed of phospholipids such as DOPC, DPPC, D62PPC and their binary mixtures. The MLVs and GUVs imaging by CARS and TPEF microscopy not only permits the direct imaging of the leakage phenomenon caused by the toxic peptide (Aβ) on the lipid bilayer, but also records simultaneously the lateral structure of the bilayer and peptide distribution in the plane across the membrane.

  12. Data including GROMACS input files for atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of mixed, asymmetric bilayers including molecular topologies, equilibrated structures, and force field for lipids compatible with OPLS-AA parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Róg, Tomasz; Orłowski, Adam; Llorente, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    In this Data in Brief article we provide a data package of GROMACS input files for atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of multicomponent, asymmetric lipid bilayers using the OPLS-AA force field. These data include 14 model bilayers composed of 8 different lipid molecules. The lipids present......, and cholesterol, while the extracellular leaflet is composed of SM, PC and cholesterol discussed in Van Meer et al. (2008) [2]. The provided data include lipids' topologies, equilibrated structures of asymmetric bilayers, all force field parameters, and input files with parameters describing simulation conditions...

  13. Lipofectamine and related cationic lipids strongly improve adenoviral infection efficiency of primitive human hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byk, T; Haddada, H; Vainchenker, W; Louache, F

    1998-11-20

    Adenoviral vectors have the potential to infect a large number of cell types including quiescent cells. Their use in hematopoietic cells is limited by the episomal form of their DNA, leading to transgene loss in the progeny cells. However, the use of this vector may be interesting for short-term in vitro modifications of primitive human hematopoietic cells. Therefore, we have investigated the ability of adenovirus to transduce cord blood CD34+ cells. Several promoters were tested using the lacZ reporter gene. The PGK and CMV promoters induced transgene expression in 18-25% of the cells, whereas the HTLV-I and especially the RSV promoter were almost inactive. To improve infection efficiency, adenovirus was complexed with cationic lipids. Lipofectamine, Cellfectin, and RPR120535b, but not Lipofectin, Lipofectace, or DOTAP, markedly improved transgene expression in CD34+ cells (from 19 to 35%). Lipofectamine strongly enhanced infection efficiency of the poorly infectable primitive CD34+CD38low cells (from 11 to 28%) whereas the more mature CD34+CD38+ cells were only slightly affected (from 24 to 31%). Lipofectamine tripled the infection of CFU-GMs and LTC-ICs derived from the CD34+CD38low cell fraction (from 4 to 12% and from 5 to 16%, respectively) and doubled that of BFU-Es (from 13 to 26%). We conclude that cationic lipids can markedly increase the efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer into primitive hematopoietic cells.

  14. Molecular distributions in interphases: statistical mechanical theory combined with molecular dynamics simulation of a model lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, T X; Anderson, B D

    1994-03-01

    A mean-field statistical mechanical theory has been developed to describe molecular distributions in interphases. The excluded volume interaction has been modeled in terms of a reversible work that is required to create a cavity of the solute size against a pressure tensor exerted by the surrounding interphase molecules. The free energy change associated with this compression process includes the configuration entropy as well as the change in conformational energy of the surrounding chain molecules. The lateral pressure profile in a model lipid bilayer (30.5 A2/chain molecule) has been calculated as a function of depth in the bilayer interior by molecular dynamics simulation. The lateral pressure has a plateau value of 309 +/- 48 bar in the highly ordered region and decreases abruptly in the center of the bilayer. Model calculations have shown that for solute molecules with ellipsoidal symmetry, the orientational order increases with the ratio of the long to short molecular axes at a given solute volume and increases with solute volume at a given axial ratio, in accordance with recent experimental data. Increased lateral pressure (p perpendicular) results in higher local order and exclusion of solute from the interphase, in parallel with the effect of surface density on the partitioning and local order. The logarithm of the interphase/water partition coefficient for spherical solutes decreases linearly with solute volume. This is also an excellent approximation for elongated solutes because of the relatively weak dependence of solute partitioning on molecular shape. The slope is equal to (2p perpendicular - p parallel)/3KBT, where p parallel is the normal pressure component, and different from that predicted by the mean-field lattice theory. Finally, the lattice theory has been extended herein to incorporate an additional constraint on chain packing in the interphase and to account for the effect of solute size on partitioning.

  15. Atomic force microscope visualization of lipid bilayer degradation due to action of phospholipase A(2) and Humicola lanuginosa lipase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balashev, Konstantin; DiNardo, N. John; Callisen, Thomas H.

    2007-01-01

    . Lipid bilayers were prepared by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique and transferred to an AFM liquid cell. Following injection of the enzyme into the liquid cell, a sequence of images was acquired at regular time intervals to allow the identification of substrate structure, preferred sites of enzyme...

  16. Effect of the aminoacid composition of model α-helical peptides on the physical properties of lipid bilayers and peptide conformation: a molecular dynamics simulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Melicherčík, Milan; Holúbeková, A.; Hianik, T.; Urban, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 11 (2013), s. 4723-4730 ISSN 1610-2940 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Bilayer lipid membranes * Helical peptides * Molecular dynamics simulations * Phase transitions Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.867, year: 2013

  17. New cytotoxic butyltin complexes with 2-sulfobenzoic acid: Molecular interaction with lipid bilayers and DNA as well as in vitro anticancer activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pruchnik, H.; Kral, Teresa; Poradowski, D.; Drynda, A.; Obmińska-Mrukowicz, B.; Hof, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 243, JAN 2016 (2016), s. 107-118 ISSN 0009-2797 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Butyltin 2-sulfobenzoates * Antitumor activity * Lipid bilayer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.143, year: 2016

  18. Impaired biosynthesis of the non-bilayer lipids phosphatidylethanolamine or cardiolipin does not affect peroxisome biogenesis and proliferation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kawalek, Adam; Jagadeesan, Chandhuru; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2016-01-01

    The non-bilayer forming lipids cardiolipin (CL) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) modulate membrane curvature, facilitate membrane fusion and affect the stability and function of membrane proteins. Yeast peroxisomal membranes contain significant amounts of CL and PE. We analysed the effect of CL

  19. The OpenPicoAmp: an open-source planar lipid bilayer amplifier for hands-on learning of neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyonsky, Vadim; Dupuis, Freddy; Gall, David

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the electrical biophysical properties of the cell membrane can be difficult for neuroscience students as it relies solely on lectures of theoretical models without practical hands on experiments. To address this issue, we developed an open-source lipid bilayer amplifier, the OpenPicoAmp, which is appropriate for use in introductory courses in biophysics or neurosciences at the undergraduate level, dealing with the electrical properties of the cell membrane. The amplifier is designed using the common lithographic printed circuit board fabrication process and off-the-shelf electronic components. In addition, we propose a specific design for experimental chambers allowing the insertion of a commercially available polytetrafluoroethylene film. We provide a complete documentation allowing to build the amplifier and the experimental chamber. The students hand-out giving step-by step instructions to perform a recording is also included. Our experimental setup can be used in basic experiments in which students monitor the bilayer formation by capacitance measurement and record unitary currents produced by ionic channels like gramicidin A dimers. Used in combination with a low-cost data acquisition board this system provides a complete solution for hands-on lessons, therefore improving the effectiveness in teaching basic neurosciences or biophysics.

  20. The OpenPicoAmp: an open-source planar lipid bilayer amplifier for hands-on learning of neuroscience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Shlyonsky

    Full Text Available Understanding the electrical biophysical properties of the cell membrane can be difficult for neuroscience students as it relies solely on lectures of theoretical models without practical hands on experiments. To address this issue, we developed an open-source lipid bilayer amplifier, the OpenPicoAmp, which is appropriate for use in introductory courses in biophysics or neurosciences at the undergraduate level, dealing with the electrical properties of the cell membrane. The amplifier is designed using the common lithographic printed circuit board fabrication process and off-the-shelf electronic components. In addition, we propose a specific design for experimental chambers allowing the insertion of a commercially available polytetrafluoroethylene film. We provide a complete documentation allowing to build the amplifier and the experimental chamber. The students hand-out giving step-by step instructions to perform a recording is also included. Our experimental setup can be used in basic experiments in which students monitor the bilayer formation by capacitance measurement and record unitary currents produced by ionic channels like gramicidin A dimers. Used in combination with a low-cost data acquisition board this system provides a complete solution for hands-on lessons, therefore improving the effectiveness in teaching basic neurosciences or biophysics.

  1. Local mobility in lipid domains of supported bilayers characterized by atomic force microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankel, Daniel J.; Buranda, T. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Burns, Alan Richard

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is used to examine mobility of labeled probes at specific sites in supported bilayers consisting of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) lipid domains in 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). Those sites are mapped beforehand with simultaneous atomic force microscopy and submicron confocal fluorescence imaging, allowing characterization of probe partitioning between gel DPPC and disordered liquid DOPC domains with corresponding topography of domain structure. We thus examine the relative partitioning and mobility in gel and disordered liquid phases for headgroup- and tailgroup-labeled GM1 ganglioside probes and for headgroup- and tailgroup-labeled phospholipid probes. For the GM1 probes, large differences in mobility between fluid and gel domains are observed; whereas unexpected mobility is observed in submicron gel domains for the phospholipid probes. We attribute the latter to domain heterogeneities that could be induced by the probe. Furthermore, fits to the FCS data for the phospholipid probes in the DOPC fluid phase require two components (fast and slow). Although proximity to the glass substrate may be a factor, local distortion of the probe by the fluorophore could also be important. Overall, we observe nonideal aspects of phospholipid probe mobility and partitioning that may not be restricted to supported bilayers.

  2. Insertion of Neurotransmitters into a Lipid Bilayer Membrane and Its Implication on Membrane Stability: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chun; Xue, Minmin; Qiu, Hu; Guo, Wanlin

    2017-03-17

    The signaling molecules in neurons, called neurotransmitters, play an essential role in the transportation of neural signals, during which the neurotransmitters interact with not only specific receptors, but also cytomembranes, such as synaptic vesicle membranes and postsynaptic membranes. Through extensive molecular dynamics simulations, the atomic-scale insertion dynamics of typical neurotransmitters, including methionine enkephalin (ME), leucine enkephalin (LE), dopamine (DA), acetylcholine (ACh), and aspartic acid (ASP), into lipid bilayers is investigated. The results show that the first three neurotransmitters (ME, LE, and DA) are able to diffuse freely into both 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) membranes, and are guided by the aromatic residues Tyr and Phe. Only a limited number of these neurotransmitters are allowed to penetrate into the membrane, which suggests an intrinsic mechanism by which the membrane is protected from being destroyed by excessive inserted neurotransmitters. After spontaneous insertion, the neurotransmitters disturb the surrounding phospholipids in the membrane, as indicated by the altered distribution of components in lipid leaflets and the disordered lipid tails. In contrast, the last two neurotransmitters (ACh and ASP) cannot enter the membrane, but instead always diffuse freely in solution. These findings provide an understanding at the atomic level of how neurotransmitters interact with the surrounding cytomembrane, as well as their impact on membrane behavior. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Structure of the antimicrobial beta-hairpin peptide protegrin-1 in a DLPC lipid bilayer investigated by molecular dynamics simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2007-01-01

    -18 to extend perpendicular to the beta-hairpin plane. This bend was driven by a highly persistent hydrogen-bond between the polar peptide side-chain of TYR7 and the unshielded backbone carbonyl oxygen atom of GLY17. The H-bond formation relieves the unfavorable free energy of insertion of polar groups......All atom molecular dynamics simulations of the 18-residue beta-hairpin antimicrobial peptide protegrin-1 (PG-1, RGGRLCYCRRRFCVCVGR-NH(2)) in a fully hydrated dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC) lipid bilayer have been implemented. The goal of the reported work is to investigate the structure......-550]), and to delineate specific peptide-membrane interactions which are responsible for the peptide's membrane binding properties. A novel, previously unknown, "kick" shaped conformation of the peptide was detected, where a bend at the C-terminal beta-strand of the peptide caused the peptide backbone at residues 16...

  4. Solid-state NMR of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid bilayer nanodiscs sedimented by ultracentrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Yi; Fujimoto, L. Miya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR studies of sedimented soluble proteins has been developed recently as an attractive approach for overcoming the size limitations of solution NMR spectroscopy while bypassing the need for sample crystallization or precipitation (Bertini et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108(26):10396–10399, 2011). Inspired by the potential benefits of this method, we have investigated the ability to sediment lipid bilayer nanodiscs reconstituted with a membrane protein. In this study, we show that nanodiscs containing the outer membrane protein Ail from Yersinia pestis can be sedimented for solid-state NMR structural studies, without the need for precipitation or lyophilization. Optimized preparations of Ail in phospholipid nanodiscs support both the structure and the fibronectin binding activity of the protein. The same sample can be used for solution NMR, solid-state NMR and activity assays, facilitating structure–activity correlation experiments across a wide range of timescales

  5. Solid-state NMR of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid bilayer nanodiscs sedimented by ultracentrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Fujimoto, L Miya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M

    2015-04-01

    Solid-state NMR studies of sedimented soluble proteins has been developed recently as an attractive approach for overcoming the size limitations of solution NMR spectroscopy while bypassing the need for sample crystallization or precipitation (Bertini et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108(26):10396-10399, 2011). Inspired by the potential benefits of this method, we have investigated the ability to sediment lipid bilayer nanodiscs reconstituted with a membrane protein. In this study, we show that nanodiscs containing the outer membrane protein Ail from Yersinia pestis can be sedimented for solid-state NMR structural studies, without the need for precipitation or lyophilization. Optimized preparations of Ail in phospholipid nanodiscs support both the structure and the fibronectin binding activity of the protein. The same sample can be used for solution NMR, solid-state NMR and activity assays, facilitating structure-activity correlation experiments across a wide range of timescales.

  6. Solid-state NMR of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid bilayer nanodiscs sedimented by ultracentrifugation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yi; Fujimoto, L. Miya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M., E-mail: fmarassi@sbmri.org [Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Solid-state NMR studies of sedimented soluble proteins has been developed recently as an attractive approach for overcoming the size limitations of solution NMR spectroscopy while bypassing the need for sample crystallization or precipitation (Bertini et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108(26):10396–10399, 2011). Inspired by the potential benefits of this method, we have investigated the ability to sediment lipid bilayer nanodiscs reconstituted with a membrane protein. In this study, we show that nanodiscs containing the outer membrane protein Ail from Yersinia pestis can be sedimented for solid-state NMR structural studies, without the need for precipitation or lyophilization. Optimized preparations of Ail in phospholipid nanodiscs support both the structure and the fibronectin binding activity of the protein. The same sample can be used for solution NMR, solid-state NMR and activity assays, facilitating structure–activity correlation experiments across a wide range of timescales.

  7. Multiscale modelling to understand the self-assembly mechanism of human β2-adrenergic receptor in lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Anirban; Sonavane, Uddhavesh; Joshi, Rajendra

    2014-02-01

    The long perceived notion that G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) function in monomeric form has recently been changed by the description of a number of GPCRs that are found in oligomeric states. The mechanism of GPCR oligomerization, and its effect on receptor function, is not well understood. In the present study, coarse grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) approach was adopted for studying the self-assembly process of the human GPCR, β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR), for which several experimental evidences of the dimerization process and its effect on cellular functions are available. Since the crystal structure of β2-AR lacks the third intracellular loop, initially it was modelled and simulated using restrained MD in order to get a stable starting conformation. This structure was then converted to CG representation and 16 copies of it, inserted into a hydrated lipid bilayer, were simulated for 10 μs using the MARTINI force field. At the end of 10μs, oligomers of β2-AR were found to be formed through the self-assembly mechanism which were further validated through various analyses of the receptors. The lipid bilayer analysis also helped to quantify this assembly mechanism. In order to identify the domains which are responsible for this oligomerization, a reverse transformation of the CG system back to all-atom structure and simulated annealing run were carried out at the end of 10 μs CGMD run. Analysis of the all-atom dimers thus obtained, revealed that TM1/TM1, H8/H8, TM1/TM5 and TM6/TM6 regions formed most of the dimerization surfaces, which is in accordance with some of the experimental observations and recent simulation results. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Communication: Orientational self-ordering of spin-labeled cholesterol analogs in lipid bilayers in diluted conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kardash, Maria E.; Dzuba, Sergei A., E-mail: dzuba@kinetics.nsc.ru [Voevodsky Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russia, and Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-07

    Lipid-cholesterol interactions are responsible for different properties of biological membranes including those determining formation in the membrane of spatial inhomogeneities (lipid rafts). To get new information on these interactions, electron spin echo (ESE) spectroscopy, which is a pulsed version of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), was applied to study 3β-doxyl-5α-cholestane (DCh), a spin-labeled analog of cholesterol, in phospholipid bilayer consisted of equimolecular mixture of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. DCh concentration in the bilayer was between 0.1 mol.% and 4 mol.%. For comparison, a reference system containing a spin-labeled 5-doxyl-stearic acid (5-DSA) instead of DCh was studied as well. The effects of “instantaneous diffusion” in ESE decay and in echo-detected (ED) EPR spectra were explored for both systems. The reference system showed good agreement with the theoretical prediction for the model of spin labels of randomly distributed orientations, but the DCh system demonstrated remarkably smaller effects. The results were explained by assuming that neighboring DCh molecules are oriented in a correlative way. However, this correlation does not imply the formation of clusters of cholesterol molecules, because conventional continuous wave EPR spectra did not show the typical broadening due to aggregation of spin labels and the observed ESE decay was not faster than in the reference system. So the obtained data evidence that cholesterol molecules at low concentrations in biological membranes can interact via large distances of several nanometers which results in their orientational self-ordering.

  9. Communication: Development of standing evanescent-wave fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and its application to the lateral diffusion of lipids in a supported lipid bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otosu, Takuhiro; Yamaguchi, Shoichi

    2017-07-01

    We present standing evanescent-wave fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (SEW-FCS). This technique utilizes the interference of two evanescent waves which generates a standing evanescent-wave. Fringe-pattern illumination created by a standing evanescent-wave enables us to measure the diffusion coefficients of molecules with a super-resolution corresponding to one fringe width. Because the fringe width can be reliably estimated by a simple procedure, utilization of fringes is beneficial to quantitatively analyze the slow diffusion of molecules in a supported lipid bilayer (SLB), a model biomembrane formed on a solid substrate, with the timescale relevant for reliable FCS analysis. Furthermore, comparison of the data between SEW-FCS and conventional total-internal reflection FCS, which can also be performed by the SEW-FCS instrument, effectively eliminates the artifact due to afterpulsing of the photodiode detector. The versatility of SEW-FCS is demonstrated by its application to various SLBs.

  10. Small molecule interactions with lipid bilayers: a molecular dynamics study of chlorhexidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oosten, Brad; Marquardt, Drew; Sternin, Edward; Harroun, Thad

    2013-03-01

    Chlorhexidine presents an interesting modelling challenge with a hydrophobic hexane connecting two biguanides (arginine analogues) and two aromatic rings. We conducted molecular dynamic simulations using the GROMACS simulation software to reproduce the experimental environment of chlorhexidine in a 1,2-Dimyristoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (DMPC) bilayer to produce atomic-level information. We constructed an all-atom force field of chlorhexidine from the CHARMM36 force field using well established parameters of certain amino acids. Partial charges were treated differently, which were calculated using GAUSSIAN software. We will compare and contrast the results of our model to that of our neutron scattering experiments previously done in our lab.

  11. ITO/Poly(Aniline/Sol-Gel Glass: An Optically Transparent, pH-Responsive Substrate for Supported Lipid Bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Obeidi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Described here is fabrication of a pH-sensitive, optically transparent transducer composed of a planar indium-tin oxide (ITO electrode overcoated with a poly(aniline (PANI thin film and a porous sol-gel layer. Adsorption of the PANI film renders the ITO electrode sensitive to pH, whereas the sol-gel spin-coated layer makes the upper surface compatible with fusion of phospholipid vesicles to form a planar supported lipid bilayer (PSLB. The response to changes in the pH of the buffer contacting the sol-gel/PANI/ITO electrode is pseudo-Nernstian with a slope of 52 mV/pH over a pH range of 4–9. Vesicle fusion forms a laterally continuous PSLB on the upper sol-gel surface that is fluid with a lateral lipid diffusion coefficient of 2.2 μm2/s measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Due to its lateral continuity and lack of defects, the PSLB blocks the pH response of the underlying electrode to changes in the pH of the overlying buffer. This architecture is simpler to fabricate than previously reported ITO electrodes derivatized for PSLB formation and should be useful for optical monitoring of proton transport across supported membranes derivatized with ionophores and ion channels.

  12. Nanosecond molecular relaxations in lipid bilayers studied by high energy-resolution neutron scattering and in situ diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheinstädter, Maikel C; Seydel, Tilo; Salditt, Tim

    2007-01-01

    We report a high energy-resolution neutron backscattering study to investigate slow motions on nanosecond time scales in highly oriented solid-supported phospholipid bilayers of the model system deuterated 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine, hydrated with heavy water. Wave-vector-resolved quasielastic neutron scattering is used to determine relaxation times tau , which can be associated with different molecular components, i.e., the lipid acyl chains and the interstitial water molecules in the different phases of the model membrane system. The inelastic data are complemented by both energy-resolved and energy-integrated in situ diffraction. From a combined analysis of the inelastic data in the energy and time domains, the corresponding character of the relaxation, i.e., the exponent of the exponential decay, is also determined. From this analysis we quantify two relaxation processes. We associate the fast relaxation with translational diffusion of lipid and water molecules while the slow process likely stems from collective dynamics.

  13. Orientation of fluorinated cholesterol in lipid bilayers analyzed by 19F tensor calculation and solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumori, Nobuaki; Kasai, Yusuke; Oishi, Tohru; Murata, Michio; Nomura, Kaoru

    2008-04-09

    6-F-cholesterol was reported to exhibit biological and interfacial properties similar to unmodified cholesterol. We have also found that 6-F-cholesterol mimicked the cholesterol activity observed in the systems of amphotericin B and lipid rafts. However, to use 6-F-cholesterol as a molecular probe to explore molecular recognition in membranes, it is indispensable to have detailed knowledge of the dynamic and orientation properties of the molecule in membrane environments. In this paper, we present the molecular orientation of 6-F-cholesterol (30 mol %) in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers revealed by combined use of 19F chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), 2H NMR, and C-F rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) experiments. The axis of rotation of 6-F-cholesterol was shown to be in a similar direction to that of cholesterol in DMPC bilayers, which is almost parallel to the long axis of the molecular frame. The molecular order parameter of 6-F-cholesterol was determined to be ca. 0.85, which is within the range of reported values of cholesterol. These findings suggest that the dynamic properties of 6-F-cholesterol in DMPC are quite similar to those of unmodified cholesterol; therefore, the introduction of a fluorine atom at C6 has virtually no effect on cholesterol dynamics in membranes. In addition, this study demonstrates the practical utility of theoretical calculations for determining the 19F CSA principal axes, which would be extremely difficult to obtain experimentally. The combined use of quantum calculations and solid-state 19F NMR will make it possible to apply the orientation information of 19F CSA tensors to membrane systems.

  14. Using fluorine nuclear magnetic resonance to probe the interaction of membrane-active peptides with the lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buer, Benjamin C; Chugh, Jeetender; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M; Marsh, E Neil G

    2010-07-13

    A variety of biologically active peptides exert their function through direct interactions with the lipid membrane of the cell. These surface interactions are generally transient and highly dynamic, making them hard to study. Here we have examined the feasibility of using solution phase (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study peptide-membrane interactions. Using the antimicrobial peptide MSI-78 as a model system, we demonstrate that peptide binding to either small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) or bicelles can readily be detected by simple one-dimensional (19)F NMR experiments with peptides labeled with l-4,4,4-trifluoroethylglycine. The (19)F chemical shift associated with the peptide-membrane complex is sensitive both to the position of the trifluoromethyl reporter group (whether in the hydrophobic face or positively charged face of the amphipathic peptide) and to the curvature of the lipid bilayer (whether the peptide is bound to SUVs or bicelles). (19)F spin echo experiments using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence were used to measure the transverse relaxation (T(2)) of the nucleus and thereby examine the local mobility of the MSI-78 analogues bound to bicelles. The fluorine probe positioned in the hydrophobic face of the peptide relaxes at a rate that correlates with the tumbling of the bicelle, suggesting that it is relatively immobile, whereas the probe at the positively charged face relaxes more slowly, indicating this position is much more dynamic. These results are in accord with structural models of MSI-78 bound to lipids and point to the feasibility of using fluorine-labeled peptides to monitor peptide-membrane interactions in living cells.

  15. On the hydrodynamics of a solvent-satured lipid bilayer. 2. Stability criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisch, P.M.; Wendel, H.

    1983-01-01

    The semiphenomenological model introduced recently is used to investigate the role of steric forces on the dynamics of black lipid films. A linear stability analysis of hydrodynamic fluctuations for lipid films submitted to an applyed electric field is performed. By neglecting dissipation, this our analysis is concentrated on the competitive effects of electrostatic, van der Waals and steric forces. In the long wavelenght limit it is shown that the stability of the film against bending deformations is governed by the total film tension. Similarly, for periodic thickness fluctuations the stability is determined by the film elasticity. In both cases a stabilizing positive contribution is found of steric forces produced by the overlap of lipid chains at the center of the film. The stability diagram shows a region, for sufficiently small thickness, where only bending modes are unstable. (Author) [pt

  16. Probing topology and dynamics of the second transmembrane domain (M2δ) of the acetyl choline receptor using magnetically aligned lipid bilayers (bicelles) and EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Indra D; Mayo, Daniel J; Subbaraman, Nidhi; Inbaraj, Johnson J; McCarrick, Robert M; Lorigan, Gary A

    2017-08-01

    Characterizing membrane protein structure and dynamics in the lipid bilayer membrane is very important but experimentally challenging. EPR spectroscopy offers a unique set of techniques to investigate a membrane protein structure, dynamics, topology, and distance constraints in lipid bilayers. Previously our lab demonstrated the use of magnetically aligned phospholipid bilayers (bicelles) for probing topology and dynamics of the membrane peptide M2δ of the acetyl choline receptor (AchR) as a proof of concept. In this study, magnetically aligned phospholipid bilayers and rigid spin labels were further utilized to provide improved dynamic information and topology of M2δ peptide. Seven TOAC-labeled AchR M2δ peptides were synthesized to demonstrate the utility of a multi-labeling amino acid substitution alignment strategy. Our data revealed the helical tilts to be 11°, 17°, 9°, 17°, 16°, 11°, 9°±4° for residues I7TOAC, Q13TOAC, A14TOAC, V15TOAC, C16TOAC, L17TOAC, and L18TOAC, respectively. The average helical tilt of the M2δ peptide was determined to be ∼13°. This study also revealed that the TOAC labels were attached to the M2δ peptide with different dynamics suggesting that the sites towards the C-terminal end are more rigid when compared to the sites towards the N-terminus. The dynamics of the TOAC labeled sites were more resolved in the aligned samples when compared to the randomly disordered samples. This study highlights the use of magnetically aligned lipid bilayer EPR technique to determine a more accurate helical tilt and more resolved local dynamics of AchR M2δ peptide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Theory of phase equilibria and critical mixing points in binary lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risbo, Jens; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1995-01-01

    on a statistical mechanical model in which the interaction between lipid acyl chains of different length is formulated in terms of a hydrophobic mismatch. The model permits a series of binary phase diagrams to be determined in terms of a single ''universal'' interaction parameter. The part of the free energy...... for the enthalpy and the compositional fluctuations. It is shown, in accordance with experiments, that the nonideal mixing of lipid species due to mismatch in the hydrophobic lengths leads to a progressively nonideal mixing behavior as the chain-length difference is increased. Moreover, indications are found...

  18. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of gadolinium cationic lipids as tools for biodistribution studies of gene delivery complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Francoise; Cohen-Ohana, Mirit; Mignet, Nathalie; Sbarbati, Andrea; Herscovici, Jean; Scherman, Daniel; Byk, Gerardo

    2003-01-01

    Gadolinium-chelating cationic lipids have been synthesized to obtain lipoplexes with MRI contrast properties. These compounds were designed to follow the biodistribution of synthetic DNA for gene delivery by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. The lipid MCO-I-68 was synthesized, and chelate complexes with gadolinium were formed and characterized in terms of physicochemical and DNA binding properties. The transfection activity of MCO-I-68-Gd/DNA complexes was assayed in vitro on NIH 3T3. Different formulations of the product were tested. When up to 5% of the gadolinium lipid complexes were co-formulated with the cationic lipid RPR120535 used as a reference, the transfection levels were maintained as compared to RPR120535 alone. To date, only a liposomal formulation of a gadolinium-cationic lipid chelate without DNA had been observed using magnetic resonance imaging. In vivo intratumoral administration of MCO-I-68-Gd/DNA lipoplexes to tumor model led to an important increase of the NMR signal. It was demonstrated that the new complexes also acted as transfection carriers when they were formulated from liposomes.

  19. Mapping surface charge density of lipid bilayers by quantitative surface conductivity microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Lasse Hyldgaard; Fuhs, Thomas; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Local surface charge density of lipid membranes influences membrane-protein interactions leading to distinct functions in all living cells, and it is a vital parameter in understanding membrane-binding mechanisms, liposome design and drug delivery. Despite the significance, no method has so far...

  20. Development of an Automation Technique for the Establishment of Functional Lipid Bilayer Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Søndergaard; Perry, Mark; Vogel, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    fabricated in ETFE Teflon film by laser ablation using a carbon dioxide laser. Multiple lipid membranes could be formed across the micro structured 8 x 8 array ETFE partitions. Success rates for the establishment of cellulose-supported BLMs across the multiple aperture arrays were above 95%. However...

  1. Reparameterization of all-atom dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine lipid parameters enables simulation of fluid bilayers at zero tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Jacob; Jensen, M.Ø.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2007-01-01

    lipid of 60.4 ± 0.1 Å2. Compared to the 48 Å2, the new value of 60.4 Å2 is in fair agreement with the experimental value of 64 Å2. In addition, the simulated order parameter profile and electron density profile are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. Thus, the biologically more interesting...

  2. Synthesis of linear and cyclic peptide-PEG-lipids for stabilization and targeting of cationic liposome-DNA complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, Kai K; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Majzoub, Ramsey N; Steffes, Victoria M; Wonder, Emily A; Teesalu, Tambet; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Safinya, Cyrus R

    2016-03-15

    Because nucleic acids (NAs) have immense potential value as therapeutics, the development of safe and effective synthetic NA vectors continues to attract much attention. In vivo applications of NA vectors require stabilized, nanometer-scale particles, but the commonly used approaches of steric stabilization with a polymer coat (e.g., PEGylation; PEG=poly(ethylene glycol)) interfere with attachment to cells, uptake, and endosomal escape. Conjugation of peptides to PEG-lipids can improve cell attachment and uptake for cationic liposome-DNA (CL-DNA) complexes. We present several synthetic approaches to peptide-PEG-lipids and discuss their merits and drawbacks. A lipid-PEG-amine building block served as the common key intermediate in all synthetic routes. Assembling the entire peptide-PEG-lipid by manual solid phase peptide synthesis (employing a lipid-PEG-carboxylic acid) allowed gram-scale synthesis but is mostly applicable to linear peptides connected via their N-terminus. Conjugation via thiol-maleimide or strain-promoted (copper-free) azide-alkyne cycloaddition chemistry is highly amenable to on-demand preparation of peptide-PEG-lipids, and the appropriate PEG-lipid precursors are available in a single chemical step from the lipid-PEG-amine building block. Azide-alkyne cycloaddition is especially suitable for disulfide-bridged peptides such as iRGD (cyclic CRGDKGPDC). Added at 10 mol% of a cationic/neutral lipid mixture, the peptide-PEG-lipids stabilize the size of CL-DNA complexes. They also affect cell attachment and uptake of nanoparticles in a peptide-dependent manner, thereby providing a platform for preparing stabilized, affinity-targeted CL-DNA nanoparticles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Incorporation of Amphipathic Diblock Copolymer in Lipid Bilayer for Improving pH Responsiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Xia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diblock copolymers (mPEG-b-PDPA, which were designed to possess pH-sensitivity as well as amphipathy, were used as an intelligent lock in the liposomal membrane. The so-called pH-sensitive liposomes were prepared by simple mixing of the synthesized mPEG-b-PDPA with phospholipids and cholesterol. Fluorescence polarization at pH 7.4 showed that the membrane stability of the hybrid liposome was significantly increased compared with the pure liposome. Therefore, in the neutral environment, the leakage of doxorubicin (DOX was inhibited. However, when pH decreased to 6.0, DOX release rate increased by 60% due to the escape of copolymer. The effects of the membrane composition and the PDPA segment length on bilayer membrane functions were investigated. These results revealed that the synthesized copolymers increased the difference in DOX cumulative release between pH 7.4 and 6.0, that is, improved the pH-controllability of the drug release from hybrid liposomes.

  4. Coiled-coil formation on lipid bilayers--implications for docking and fusion efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pähler, Gesa; Panse, Cornelia; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas

    2012-12-05

    Coiled-coil formation of four different oligopeptides was characterized in solution, on hydrogels, and on membranes by employing circular dichroism spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy, and ellipsometry. Peptide sequences rich in either glutamic acid (E: E3Cys, i-E3Cys) or lysine (K: K3Cys, i-K3Cys) were used to represent minimal mimics of eukaryotic SNARE motifs. Half of the peptides were synthesized in reverse sequence, so that parallel and antiparallel heptad coiled-coil structures were formed. Either E-peptides or K-peptides were attached covalently to phospholipid anchors via maleimide chemistry, and served as receptors for the recognition of the corresponding binding partners added to solution. Attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy of single bilayers confirmed the formation of coiled-coil complexes at the membrane interface. Coiled-coil formation in solution, as compared with association at the membrane surface, displays considerably larger binding constants that are largely attributed to loss of translational entropy at the interface. Finally, the fusogenicity of the various coiled-coil motifs was explored, and the results provide clear evidence that hemifusion followed by full fusion requires a parallel orientation of α-helices, whereas antiparallel oriented coiled-coil motifs display only docking. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Non-periodic molecular dynamics simulations of coarse grained lipid bilayer in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsalis, E. M.; Hanasaki, I.; Walther, Jens Honore

    2010-01-01

    of the material properties of the system represented by CGMD. In this paper we extend a control algorithm originally developed for atomistic simulations [3], to conduct simulations involving coarse grained water molecules without periodic boundary conditions. We demonstrate the applicability of our method...... in simulating more complex systems by performing a non-periodic Molecular Dynamics simulation of a DPPC lipid in liquid coarse grained water....

  6. Multidimensional oriented solid-state NMR experiments enable the sequential assignment of uniformly 15N labeled integral membrane proteins in magnetically aligned lipid bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mote, Kaustubh R.; Gopinath, T.; Traaseth, Nathaniel J.; Kitchen, Jason; Gor’kov, Peter L.; Brey, William W.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2011-01-01

    Oriented solid-state NMR is the most direct methodology to obtain the orientation of membrane proteins with respect to the lipid bilayer. The method consists of measuring 1 H- 15 N dipolar couplings (DC) and 15 N anisotropic chemical shifts (CSA) for membrane proteins that are uniformly aligned with respect to the membrane bilayer. A significant advantage of this approach is that tilt and azimuthal (rotational) angles of the protein domains can be directly derived from analytical expression of DC and CSA values, or, alternatively, obtained by refining protein structures using these values as harmonic restraints in simulated annealing calculations. The Achilles’ heel of this approach is the lack of suitable experiments for sequential assignment of the amide resonances. In this Article, we present a new pulse sequence that integrates proton driven spin diffusion (PDSD) with sensitivity-enhanced PISEMA in a 3D experiment ([ 1 H, 15 N]-SE-PISEMA-PDSD). The incorporation of 2D 15 N/ 15 N spin diffusion experiments into this new 3D experiment leads to the complete and unambiguous assignment of the 15 N resonances. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated for the membrane protein sarcolipin reconstituted in magnetically aligned lipid bicelles. Taken with low electric field probe technology, this approach will propel the determination of sequential assignment as well as structure and topology of larger integral membrane proteins in aligned lipid bilayers.

  7. Multidimensional oriented solid-state NMR experiments enable the sequential assignment of uniformly {sup 15}N labeled integral membrane proteins in magnetically aligned lipid bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mote, Kaustubh R. [University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry (United States); Gopinath, T. [University of Minnesota, Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics (United States); Traaseth, Nathaniel J. [New York University, Chemistry Department (United States); Kitchen, Jason; Gor' kov, Peter L.; Brey, William W. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (United States); Veglia, Gianluigi, E-mail: vegli001@umn.edu [University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Oriented solid-state NMR is the most direct methodology to obtain the orientation of membrane proteins with respect to the lipid bilayer. The method consists of measuring {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N dipolar couplings (DC) and {sup 15}N anisotropic chemical shifts (CSA) for membrane proteins that are uniformly aligned with respect to the membrane bilayer. A significant advantage of this approach is that tilt and azimuthal (rotational) angles of the protein domains can be directly derived from analytical expression of DC and CSA values, or, alternatively, obtained by refining protein structures using these values as harmonic restraints in simulated annealing calculations. The Achilles' heel of this approach is the lack of suitable experiments for sequential assignment of the amide resonances. In this Article, we present a new pulse sequence that integrates proton driven spin diffusion (PDSD) with sensitivity-enhanced PISEMA in a 3D experiment ([{sup 1}H,{sup 15}N]-SE-PISEMA-PDSD). The incorporation of 2D {sup 15}N/{sup 15}N spin diffusion experiments into this new 3D experiment leads to the complete and unambiguous assignment of the {sup 15}N resonances. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated for the membrane protein sarcolipin reconstituted in magnetically aligned lipid bicelles. Taken with low electric field probe technology, this approach will propel the determination of sequential assignment as well as structure and topology of larger integral membrane proteins in aligned lipid bilayers.

  8. Multidimensional oriented solid-state NMR experiments enable the sequential assignment of uniformly 15N labeled integral membrane proteins in magnetically aligned lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mote, Kaustubh R; Gopinath, T; Traaseth, Nathaniel J; Kitchen, Jason; Gor'kov, Peter L; Brey, William W; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2011-11-01

    Oriented solid-state NMR is the most direct methodology to obtain the orientation of membrane proteins with respect to the lipid bilayer. The method consists of measuring (1)H-(15)N dipolar couplings (DC) and (15)N anisotropic chemical shifts (CSA) for membrane proteins that are uniformly aligned with respect to the membrane bilayer. A significant advantage of this approach is that tilt and azimuthal (rotational) angles of the protein domains can be directly derived from analytical expression of DC and CSA values, or, alternatively, obtained by refining protein structures using these values as harmonic restraints in simulated annealing calculations. The Achilles' heel of this approach is the lack of suitable experiments for sequential assignment of the amide resonances. In this Article, we present a new pulse sequence that integrates proton driven spin diffusion (PDSD) with sensitivity-enhanced PISEMA in a 3D experiment ([(1)H,(15)N]-SE-PISEMA-PDSD). The incorporation of 2D (15)N/(15)N spin diffusion experiments into this new 3D experiment leads to the complete and unambiguous assignment of the (15)N resonances. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated for the membrane protein sarcolipin reconstituted in magnetically aligned lipid bicelles. Taken with low electric field probe technology, this approach will propel the determination of sequential assignment as well as structure and topology of larger integral membrane proteins in aligned lipid bilayers. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

  9. Lipophilic penetration enhancers and their impact to the bilayer structure of stratum corneum lipid model membranes: neutron diffraction studies based on the example oleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, Tanja N; Schroeter, Annett; Hauss, Thomas; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2011-12-01

    The present study analyzes the effect of the lipophilic penetration enhancer oleic acid on the bilayer structure of stratum corneum (SC) lipid model membranes based on Ceramide AP by using the neutron diffraction technique. Our results indicate the formation of a single lamellar phase in the presence of oleic acid under the chosen experimental conditions; a separated fluid-like oleic acid-rich phase was not detected in the present study. By comparing the internal membrane structure received from Fourier synthesis with the model system lacking oleic acid, considerable structural changes in terms of impairment of the lamellar order were found after incorporation of the penetration enhancer into the bilayers. In addition, by using specifically deuterated oleic acid we were able to prove the integration of the enhancer molecules into the model bilayers and moreover, to determine the exact position of oleic acid inside the SC lipid model membrane. From the present results we conclude a strong perturbation of lamellar SC lipid arrangement due to the intercalated penetration enhancer which can account for the promoting effects on drug penetration across the SC known for oleic acid. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Poly(aniline) nanowires in sol-gel coated ITO: A pH-responsive substrate for planar supported lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Chenhao; Orosz, Kristina S.; Armstrong, Neal R.; Saavedra, S. Scott

    2011-01-01

    Facilitated ion transport across an artificial lipid bilayer coupled to a solid substrate is a function common to several types of bioelectronic devices based on supported membranes, including biomimetic fuel cells and ion channel biosensors. Described here is fabrication of a pH-sensitive transducer composed of a porous sol-gel layer derivatized with poly(aniline) (PANI) nanowires grown from an underlying planar indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrode. The upper sol-gel surface is hydrophilic, smooth, and compatible with deposition of a planar supported lipid bilayer (PSLB) formed via vesicle fusion. Conducting tip AFM was used to show that the PANI wires are connected to the ITO, which convert this electrode into a potentiometric pH sensor. The response to changes in the pH of the buffer contacting the PANI nanowire/sol-gel/ITO electrode is blocked by the very low ion permeability of the overlying, fluid PSLB. The feasibility of using this assembly to monitor facilitated proton transport across the PSLB was demonstrated by doping the membrane with lipophilic ionophores that respond to a transmembrane pH gradient, which produced an apparent proton permeability several orders of magnitude greater than values measured for undoped lipid bilayers. PMID:21707069

  11. A novel fluorescent probe that senses the physical state of lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hirotaka; White, Stephen H

    2009-06-03

    Cell membrane lipids and proteins are heterogeneously distributed in the membrane plane. In recent years, much attention has been paid to the heterogeneous distribution of the lipid components, particularly the formation of cholesterol-rich domains that are thought to be important in signaling processes. This has led to renewed interest in the phase diagrams of complex lipid mixtures, such as three-component mixtures containing phospholipids and cholesterol. We report here a novel fluorescent probe (NBD-R595) that is useful for exploring the phase behaviors of one-, two-, and three-component large unilamellar vesicles. In one-component fluid-phase membranes, the probe has the expected spectral characteristic of monomeric 7-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazol, with a fluorescence maximum of 540 nm when excited at 470 nm. But below the gel-to-liquid crystalline phase transition temperature, an additional emission peak appears at approximately 610 nm, because of Förster resonance energy transfer from NBD-R595 monomers to NBD-R595 Jelley aggregates of limited size formed by the association of 7-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazol moieties. This may be the first report of Förster resonance energy transfer from a single fluorophore in two different physical states. In a test of the probe, we found NBD-R595 to be remarkably sensitive to the molar composition of large unilamellar vesicles formed from cholesterol, distearoylphosphatidylcholine, and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine.

  12. Flexibility vs rigidity of amphipathic peptide conjugates when interacting with lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babii, Oleg; Afonin, Sergii; Schober, Tim; Komarov, Igor V; Ulrich, Anne S

    2017-12-01

    For the first time, the photoisomerization of a diarylethene moiety (DAET) in peptide conjugates was used to probe the effects of molecular rigidity/flexibility on the structure and behavior of model peptides bound to lipid membranes. The DAET unit was incorporated into the backbones of linear peptide-based constructs, connecting two amphipathic sequences (derived from the β-stranded peptide (KIGAKI) 3 and/or the α-helical peptide BP100). A β-strand-DAET-α-helix and an α-helix-DAET-α-helix models were synthesized and studied in phospholipid membranes. Light-induced photoisomerization of the linker allowed the generation of two forms of each conjugate, which differed in the conformational mobility of the junction between the α-helical and/or the β-stranded part of these peptidomimetic molecules. A detailed study of their structural, orientational and conformational behavior, both in isotropic solution and in phospholipid model membranes, was carried out using circular dichroism and solid-state 19 F-NMR spectroscopy. The study showed that the rigid and flexible forms of the two conjugates had appreciably different structures only when embedded in an anisotropic lipid environment and only in the gel phase. The influence of the rigidity/flexibility of the studied conjugates on the lipid thermotropic phase transition was also investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. Both models were found to destabilize the lamellar gel phases. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cholesterol Induced Changes in the Characteristics of the Time Series From Planar Lipid Bilayer Membrane during Electroporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotulska, M.; Koronkiewicz, S.; Kalinowski, S.

    2002-01-01

    The electroporation can be used as a non-toxic method for introducing exogenous macromolecules, especially DNA and drugs, into various types of cells. Research in to new therapeutic methods based on Long Duration Electroporation (LDE) is of special interest. A new current-clamp method makes possible the electroporation of very long duration with no damage to bio-membranes. In this paper we compare responses of lipid planar bilayer membranes at physiological concentration of KCl, with lipid membranes formed at higher ionic strength, and membranes containing cholesterol. A longer lifespan of the membranes with cholesterol and membranes with increased ionic strength could be observed. Sensitivity of the power spectrum response to the presence of cholesterol, ionic strength, current intensity, and membrane ageing was examined. The membrane memory was analyzed by means of autocorrelation function and rescaled range analysis. We showed that the memory of the system decreases for higher current intensities and this relation is pronounced better at higher ionic strength. At low current intensities all membranes showed slightly persistent type of noise behavior with crossover to Brownian type of noise for higher current value. The transition w as much faster for higher ionic strength, where the next transition to anti-persistent response was observed for relatively low currents. Very interesting results were obtained from power spectrum analysis. At low current intensity, all membranes exhibited 1/f noise, which disappeared for higher currents, maintaining f β type with rising value of β. Membranes formed at lower ionic strength and with cholesterol showed a pronounced tendency to lose flicker noise while ageing, also with rising β value. (author)

  14. Hydration lubrication and shear-induced self-healing of lipid bilayer boundary lubricants in phosphatidylcholine dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkin, Raya; Kampf, Nir; Zhu, Linyi; Klein, Jacob

    2016-03-14

    Measurements of normal and shear (frictional) forces between mica surfaces across small unilamellar vesicle (SUV) dispersions of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipids DMPC (14:0), DPPC (16:0) and DSPC (18:0) and POPC (16:0, 18:1), at physiologically high pressures, are reported. We have previously studied the normal and shear forces between two opposing surfaces bearing PC vesicles across pure water and showed that liposome lubrication ability improved with increasing acyl chain length, and correlated strongly with the SUV structural integrity on the substrate surface (DSPC > DPPC > DMPC). In the current study, surprisingly, we discovered that this trend is reversed when the measurements are conducted in SUV dispersions, instead of pure water. In their corresponding SUV dispersion, DMPC SUVs ruptured and formed bilayers, which were able to provide reversible and reproducible lubrication with extremely low friction (μ lubrication, but with slightly higher friction coefficients (μ = 10(-3)-10(-4)). We believe these differences originate from fast self-healing of the softer surface layers (which are in their liquid disordered phase, POPC, or close to it, DMPC), which renders the robustness of the DPPC or DSPC (both in their solid ordered phase) less important in these conditions. Under these circumstances, the enhanced hydration of the less densely packed POPC and DMPC surface layers is now believed to play an important role, and allows enhanced lubrication via the hydration lubrication mechanism. Our findings may have implications for the understanding of complex biological systems such us biolubrication of synovial joints.

  15. Predicting solute partitioning in lipid bilayers: Free energies and partition coefficients from molecular dynamics simulations and COSMOmic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobtorweihen, S.; Zuniga, A. Chaides; Ingram, T.; Gerlach, T.; Keil, F. J.; Smirnova, I.

    2014-07-01

    Quantitative predictions of biomembrane/water partition coefficients are important, as they are a key property in pharmaceutical applications and toxicological studies. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to calculate free energy profiles for different solutes in lipid bilayers. How to calculate partition coefficients from these profiles is discussed in detail and different definitions of partition coefficients are compared. Importantly, it is shown that the calculated coefficients are in quantitative agreement with experimental results. Furthermore, we compare free energy profiles from MD simulations to profiles obtained by the recent method COSMOmic, which is an extension of the conductor-like screening model for realistic solvation to micelles and biomembranes. The free energy profiles from these molecular methods are in good agreement. Additionally, solute orientations calculated with MD and COSMOmic are compared and again a good agreement is found. Four different solutes are investigated in detail: 4-ethylphenol, propanol, 5-phenylvaleric acid, and dibenz[a,h]anthracene, whereby the latter belongs to the class of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The convergence of the free energy profiles from biased MD simulations is discussed and the results are shown to be comparable to equilibrium MD simulations. For 5-phenylvaleric acid the influence of the carboxyl group dihedral angle on free energy profiles is analyzed with MD simulations.

  16. Predicting solute partitioning in lipid bilayers: Free energies and partition coefficients from molecular dynamics simulations and COSMOmic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakobtorweihen, S.; Ingram, T.; Gerlach, T.; Smirnova, I.; Zuniga, A. Chaides; Keil, F. J.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative predictions of biomembrane/water partition coefficients are important, as they are a key property in pharmaceutical applications and toxicological studies. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to calculate free energy profiles for different solutes in lipid bilayers. How to calculate partition coefficients from these profiles is discussed in detail and different definitions of partition coefficients are compared. Importantly, it is shown that the calculated coefficients are in quantitative agreement with experimental results. Furthermore, we compare free energy profiles from MD simulations to profiles obtained by the recent method COSMOmic, which is an extension of the conductor-like screening model for realistic solvation to micelles and biomembranes. The free energy profiles from these molecular methods are in good agreement. Additionally, solute orientations calculated with MD and COSMOmic are compared and again a good agreement is found. Four different solutes are investigated in detail: 4-ethylphenol, propanol, 5-phenylvaleric acid, and dibenz[a,h]anthracene, whereby the latter belongs to the class of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The convergence of the free energy profiles from biased MD simulations is discussed and the results are shown to be comparable to equilibrium MD simulations. For 5-phenylvaleric acid the influence of the carboxyl group dihedral angle on free energy profiles is analyzed with MD simulations

  17. NH125 kills methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus persisters by lipid bilayer disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wooseong; Fricke, Nico; Conery, Annie L; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Vlahovska, Petia M; Ausubel, Frederick M; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-01-01

    NH125, a known WalK inhibitor kills MRSA persisters. However, its precise mode of action is still unknown. The mode of action of NH125 was investigated by comparing its spectrum of antimicrobial activity and its effects on membrane permeability and giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) with walrycin B, a WalR inhibitor and benzyldimethylhexadecylammonium chloride (16-BAC), a cationic surfactant. NH125 killed persister cells of a variety of Staphylococcus aureus strains. Similar to 16-BAC, NH125 killed MRSA persisters by inducing rapid membrane permeabilization and caused the rupture of GUVs, whereas walrycin B did not kill MRSA persisters or induce membrane permeabilization and did not affect GUVs. NH125 kills MRSA persisters by interacting with and disrupting membranes in a detergent-like manner.

  18. On the hydrodynamics of a solvent-saturated lipid bilayer. 1. Model of repulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bish, P.M.; Wendel, H.

    1983-01-01

    A semiphenomenological theory of steric repulsion in black lipid films is developed. The model employs the statistical mechanical formulation of the van der Waals theory of simple liquid-vapour interfaces; it is based on the picture that upon diminishing the film thickness the adjacent interfacial layers start overlapping in the film center raising the degree of orientation of the hydrocarbon segments present there. This fact causes a mutual repulsion of the two film surfaces. The general order parameter profile is found to depend on two parameters which are fixed by means of the results of an experiment which recorded the repulsive force as a function of film thickness. (Author) [pt

  19. RNA Interference Induced by the Cationic Lipid Delivery of siRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouxsein, Nathan

    2005-03-01

    Recent discoveries demonstrate that the introduction of synthetically prepared duplexes of 19-21 bp short interfering RNAs (siRNA) into mammalian cells results in the cleavage of target mRNA leading to post transcriptional gene silencing [1]. Our work focuses on the cationic-lipid (CL) mediated delivery of siRNA into mammalian cell lines in an approach similar to CL based gene delivery [2]. Co-transfection of a target and a non-target reporter plasmid followed by the CL delivery of a sequence specific siRNA allows us to probe the silencing efficiency (SE) of the target plasmid relative to non-specific silencing of both plasmids. We have created a phase diagram for SE as a function of the complex membrane charge density and as a function of the CL:siRNA charge ratio. X-ray diffraction was performed to probe the structure of the complexes at points along the phase diagram. Funding provided by NIH AI-12520, AI-20611 and GM-59288. [1] Elbashir et. al., Nature, 411 494-498 (2001) [2] Ewert et. al., Curr. Med. Chem. 11 133-149 (2004)

  20. Comparison of three ternary lipid bilayer mixtures: FRET and ESR reveal nanodomains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, Frederick A; Wu, Jing; Goh, Shih Lin; Petruzielo, Robin S; Feigenson, Gerald W

    2010-11-17

    Phase diagrams of ternary lipid mixtures containing cholesterol have provided valuable insight into cell membrane behaviors, especially by describing regions of coexisting liquid-disordered (Ld) and liquid-ordered (Lo) phases. Fluorescence microscopy imaging of giant unilamellar vesicles has greatly assisted the determination of phase behavior in these systems. However, the requirement for optically resolved Ld + Lo domains can lead to the incorrect inference that in lipid-only mixtures, Ld + Lo domain coexistence generally shows macroscopic domains. Here we show this inference is incorrect for the low melting temperature phosphatidylcholines abundant in mammalian plasma membranes. By use of high compositional resolution Förster resonance energy transfer measurements, together with electron spin resonance data and spectral simulation, we find that ternary mixtures of DSPC and cholesterol together with either POPC or SOPC, do indeed have regions of Ld + Lo coexistence. However, phase domains are much smaller than the optical resolution limit, likely on the order of the Förster distance for energy transfer (R(0), ∼2-8 nm). Copyright © 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Diffusion studies on permeable nitroxyl spin probe through lipid bilayer membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Meenakumari, V. [Department of Physics, NMSSVN College, Nagamalai, Madurai-625019 (India); Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Ken-ichi; Utsumi, Hideo, E-mail: hideo.utsumi.278@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Bio-functional Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Hyodo, Fuminori [Innovation Center for Medical Redox Navigation, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Jawahar, A. [Department of Chemistry, NMSSVN College, Nagamalai, Madurai-625 019 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies were carried out for 2mM {sup 14}N labeled deutrated permeable 3- methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl (MC-PROXYL) in pure water, 1 mM, 2 mM, 3 mM and 4 mM concentration of MC-PROXYL in 300 mM concentration of liposomal solution by using a L-band ESR spectrometer. The ESR parameters such as linewidth, hyperfine coupling constant, g-factor, partition parameter and permeability were reported. The partition parameter and permeability values indicate the maximum spin distribution in the lipid phase at 2 mM concentration. This study illustrates that ESR can be used to differentiate between the intra and extra-membrane water by loading the liposome vesicles with a lipid-permeable nitroxyl spin probe. From the ESR results, the radical concentration was optimized as 2 mM in liposomal solution for ESR phantom studies and experiments.

  2. Haloferax volcanii, as a Novel Tool for Producing Mammalian Olfactory Receptors Embedded in Archaeal Lipid Bilayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Lobasso

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the possibility of using an archaeal microorganism as a host system for expressing mammalian olfactory receptors (ORs. We have selected the archaeon Haloferax volcanii as a cell host system and one of the most extensively investigated OR, namely I7-OR, whose preferred ligands are short-chain aldehydes, such as octanal, heptanal, nonanal. A novel plasmid has been constructed to express the rat I7-OR, fused with a hexahistidine-tag for protein immunodetection. The presence of the recombinant receptor at a membrane level was demonstrated by immunoblot of the membranes isolated from the transgenic archaeal strain. In addition, the lipid composition of archaeonanosomes containing ORs has been characterized in detail by High-Performance Thin-Layer Chromatography (HPTLC in combination with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization—Time-Of-Flight/Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS analysis.

  3. Poisson's ratio and Young's modulus of lipid bilayers in different phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayebeh eJadidi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A general computational method is introduced to estimate the Poisson's ratio for membranes with small thickness.In this method, the Poisson's ratio is calculated by utilizing a rescaling of inter-particle distancesin one lateral direction under periodic boundary conditions. As an example for the coarse grained lipid model introduced by Lenz and Schmid, we calculate the Poisson's ratio in the gel, fluid, and interdigitated phases. Having the Poisson's ratio, enable us to obtain the Young's modulus for the membranes in different phases. The approach may be applied to other membranes such as graphene and tethered membranes in orderto predict the temperature dependence of its Poisson's ratio and Young's modulus.

  4. The nematocyst extract of Hydra attenuata causes single channel events in lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J; Schürholz, T; Neumann, E

    1990-01-01

    The nematocyst extract of Hydra attenuata causes single conductance events in reconstituted planar lipid membranes as well as in inside-out patches derived from liposomes. The smallest single channel conductance level of the toxins is 110 pS. The conductance levels increase stepwise with time up to 2000 pS. These large conductance jumps indicate channel cooperativity. If the membrane-voltage is changed from positive to negative values, the single channel events become undefined and noisy, indicating major reorganizations of the proteins which form the channels. The molecular properties of the ionophoric component(s) of the nematocyst extract may help explain the observed macroscopic effects, such as hemolysis of human erythrocytes, after addition of the nematocyst extract.

  5. Antimicrobial peptides at work: interaction of myxinidin and its mutant WMR with lipid bilayers mimicking the P. aeruginosa and E. coli membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Lucia; Stellato, Marco Ignazio; Oliva, Rosario; Falanga, Annarita; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Petraccone, Luigi; D'Errico, Geradino; de Santis, Augusta; Galdiero, Stefania; Del Vecchio, Pompea

    2017-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are promising candidates as future therapeutics in order to face the problem of antibiotic resistance caused by pathogenic bacteria. Myxinidin is a peptide derived from the hagfish mucus displaying activity against a broad range of bacteria. We have focused our studies on the physico-chemical characterization of the interaction of myxinidin and its mutant WMR, which contains a tryptophan residue at the N-terminus and four additional positive charges, with two model biological membranes (DOPE/DOPG 80/20 and DOPE/DOPG/CL 65/23/12), mimicking respectively Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa membrane bilayers. All our results have coherently shown that, although both myxinidin and WMR interact with the two membranes, their effect on membrane microstructure and stability are different. We further have shown that the presence of cardiolipin plays a key role in the WMR-membrane interaction. Particularly, WMR drastically perturbs the DOPE/DOPG/CL membrane stability inducing a segregation of anionic lipids. On the contrary, myxinidin is not able to significantly perturb the DOPE/DOPG/CL bilayer whereas interacts better with the DOPE/DOPG bilayer causing a significant perturbing effect of the lipid acyl chains. These findings are fully consistent with the reported greater antimicrobial activity of WMR against P. aeruginosa compared with myxinidin.

  6. Interaction of antimicrobial peptide Plantaricin149a and four analogs with lipid bilayers and bacterial membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz de Souza Lopes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The amidated analog of Plantaricin149, an antimicrobial peptide from Lactobacillus plantarum NRIC 149, directly interacts with negatively charged liposomes and bacterial membranes, leading to their lysis. In this study, four Pln149-analogs were synthesized with different hydrophobic groups at their N-terminus with the goal of evaluating the effect of the modifications at this region in the peptide's antimicrobial properties. The interaction of these peptides with membrane models, surface activity, their hemolytic effect on red blood cells, and antibacterial activity against microorganisms were evaluated. The analogs presented similar action of Plantaricin149a; three of them with no hemolytic effect (< 5% until 0.5 mM, in addition to the induction of a helical element when binding to negative liposomes. The N-terminus difference between the analogs and Plantaricin149a retained the antibacterial effect on S. aureus and P. aeruginosa for all peptides (MIC50 of 19 µM and 155 µM to Plantaricin149a, respectively but resulted in a different mechanism of action against the microorganisms, that was bactericidal for Plantaricin149a and bacteriostatic for the analogs. This difference was confirmed by a reduction in leakage action for the analogs. The lytic activity of Plantaricin149a is suggested to be a result of the peptide-lipid interactions from the amphipathic helix and the hydrophobic residues at the N-terminus of the antimicrobial peptide.

  7. Nanomechanical mechanism for lipid bilayer damage induced by carbon nanotubes confined in intracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenpeng; von dem Bussche, Annette; Yi, Xin; Qiu, Yang; Wang, Zhongying; Weston, Paula; Hurt, Robert H; Kane, Agnes B; Gao, Huajian

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the behavior of low-dimensional nanomaterials confined in intracellular vesicles has been limited by the resolution of bioimaging techniques and the complex nature of the problem. Recent studies report that long, stiff carbon nanotubes are more cytotoxic than flexible varieties, but the mechanistic link between stiffness and cytotoxicity is not understood. Here we combine analytical modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, and in vitro intracellular imaging methods to reveal 1D carbon nanotube behavior within intracellular vesicles. We show that stiff nanotubes beyond a critical length are compressed by lysosomal membranes causing persistent tip contact with the inner membrane leaflet, leading to lipid extraction, lysosomal permeabilization, release of cathepsin B (a lysosomal protease) into the cytoplasm, and cell death. The precise material parameters needed to activate this unique mechanical pathway of nanomaterials interaction with intracellular vesicles were identified through coupled modeling, simulation, and experimental studies on carbon nanomaterials with wide variation in size, shape, and stiffness, leading to a generalized classification diagram for 1D nanocarbons that distinguishes pathogenic from biocompatible varieties based on a nanomechanical buckling criterion. For a wide variety of other 1D material classes (metal, oxide, polymer), this generalized classification diagram shows a critical threshold in length/width space that represents a transition from biologically soft to stiff, and thus identifies the important subset of all 1D materials with the potential to induce lysosomal permeability by the nanomechanical mechanism under investigation.

  8. Permeation of halide anions through phospholipid bilayers occurs by the solubility-diffusion mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, S.; Volkov, A. G.; Deamer, D. W.

    1998-01-01

    Two alternative mechanisms are frequently used to describe ionic permeation of lipid bilayers. In the first, ions partition into the hydrophobic phase and then diffuse across (the solubility-diffusion mechanism). The second mechanism assumes that ions traverse the bilayer through transient hydrophilic defects caused by thermal fluctuations (the pore mechanism). The theoretical predictions made by both models were tested for halide anions by measuring the permeability coefficients for chloride, bromide, and iodide as a function of bilayer thickness, ionic radius, and sign of charge. To vary the bilayer thickness systematically, liposomes were prepared from monounsaturated phosphatidylcholines (PC) with chain lengths between 16 and 24 carbon atoms. The fluorescent dye MQAE (N-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-6-methoxyquinolinium bromide) served as an indicator for halide concentration inside the liposomes and was used to follow the kinetics of halide flux across the bilayer membranes. The observed permeability coefficients ranged from 10(-9) to 10(-7) cm/s and increased as the bilayer thickness was reduced. Bromide was found to permeate approximately six times faster than chloride through bilayers of identical thickness, and iodide permeated three to four times faster than bromide. The dependence of the halide permeability coefficients on bilayer thickness and on ionic size were consistent with permeation of hydrated ions by a solubility-diffusion mechanism rather than through transient pores. Halide permeation therefore differs from that of a monovalent cation such as potassium, which has been accounted for by a combination of the two mechanisms depending on bilayer thickness.

  9. Effect of Ring Size in ω-Alicyclic Fatty Acids on the Structural and Dynamical Properties Associated with Fluidity in Lipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poger, David; Mark, Alan E

    2015-10-27

    Fatty acids containing a terminal cyclic group such as cyclohexyl and cycloheptyl are commonly found in prokaryotic membranes, especially in those of thermo-acidophilic bacteria. These so-called ω-alicyclic fatty acids have been proposed to stabilize the membranes of bacteria by reducing the fluidity in membranes and increasing lipid packing and lipid chain order. In this article, molecular dynamics simulations are used to examine the effect of 3- to 7-membered cycloalkyl saturated and unsaturated (cyclopent-2-enyl and phenyl) rings in ω-alicyclic fatty acyl chains on the structure (lipid packing, lipid chain order, and fraction of gauche defects in the chains) and dynamics (lateral lipid diffusion) of a model lipid bilayer. It was found that ω-alicyclic chains in which the ring was saturated reduced lipid condensation and lowered chain order which would be associated with enhanced fluidity. However, this effect was limited. The lateral diffusion of the lipids diminished as the ring size increased. In particular, ω-cyclohexyl and ω-cycloheptyl acyl tails led to a decrease in lipid diffusion. In contrast, ω-alicyclic acyl chains that contain an unsaturated ring promoted membrane fluidity both in terms of changes in membrane structure and lipid diffusion. This may indicate that saturated and unsaturated terminal rings in ω-alicyclic fatty acids fulfill alternative functions within membranes. Overall, the simulations suggest that ω-alicyclic fatty acids in which the terminal ring is saturated might protect the membrane of thermo-acidophilic bacteria from high-temperature and low-pH conditions through a "dynamical barrier" that would limit lipid diffusion and transmembrane diffusion of undesired ions and molecules.

  10. Interaction of cationic drugs with liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Brett A; Chauhan, Anuj

    2009-10-20

    Interactions between cationic drugs and anionic liposomes were studied by measuring binding of drugs and the effect of binding on liposome permeability. The measurements were analyzed in the context of a continuum model based on electrostatic interactions and a Langmuir isotherm. Experiments and modeling indicate that, although electrostatic interactions are important, the fraction of drug sequestered in the double-layer is negligible. The majority of drug enters the bilayer with the charged regions interacting with the charged lipid head groups and the lipophilic regions associated with the bilayer. The partitioning of the drug can be described by a Langmuir isotherm with the electrostatic interactions increasing the sublayer concentration of the drug. The binding isotherms are similar for all tricyclic antidepressants (TCA). Bupivacaine (BUP) binds significantly less compared to TCA because its structure is such that the charged region has minimal interactions with the lipid heads once the BUP molecule partitions inside the bilayer. Conversely, the TCAs are linear with distinct hydrophilic and lipophilic regions, allowing the lipophilic regions to lie inside the bilayer and the hydrophilic regions to protrude out. This conformation maximizes the permeability of the bilayer, leading to an increased release of a hydrophilic fluorescent dye from liposomes.

  11. Two cations, two mechanisms: interactions of sodium and calcium with zwitterionic lipid membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Javanainen, M.; Melcrová, Adéla; Magarkar, Aniket; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Hof, Martin; Jungwirth, Pavel; Martinez-Seara, Hector

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 39 (2017), s. 5380-5383 ISSN 1359-7345 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-03160S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : phospholipid bilayers * molecular dynamics * fluorescence Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 6.319, year: 2016

  12. The influence of the polar head-group of synthetic cationic lipids on the transfection efficiency mediated by niosomes in rat retina and brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, E; Puras, G; Agirre, M; Zarate, J; Grijalvo, S; Eritja, R; Martinez-Navarrete, G; Soto-Sánchez, C; Diaz-Tahoces, A; Aviles-Trigueros, M; Fernández, E; Pedraz, J L

    2016-01-01

    The development of novel non-viral delivery vehicles is essential in the search of more efficient strategies for retina and brain diseases. Herein, optimized niosome formulations prepared by oil-in water (o/w) and film-hydration techniques were characterized in terms of size, PDI, zeta potential, morphology and stability. Three ionizable glycerol-based cationic lipids containing a primary amine group (lipid 1), a triglycine group (lipid 2) and a dimethylamino ethyl pendent group (lipid 3) as polar head-groups were part of such niosomes. Upon the addition of pCMS-EGFP plasmid, nioplexes were obtained at different cationic lipid/DNA ratios (w/w). The resultant nioplexes were further physicochemically characterized and evaluated to condense, release and protect the DNA against enzymatic digestion. In vitro experiments were performed to evaluate transfection efficiency and cell viability in HEK-293, ARPE-19 and PECC cells. Interestingly, niosome formulations based on lipid 3 showed better transfection efficiencies in ARPE-19 and PECC cells than the rest of cationic lipids showed in this study. In vivo experiments in rat retina after intravitreal and subretinal injections together with in rat brain after cerebral cortex administration showed promising transfection efficiencies when niosome formulations based on lipid 3 were used. These results provide new insights for the development of non-viral vectors based on cationic lipids and their applications for efficient delivery of genetic material to the retina and brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ligand partitioning into lipid bilayer membranes under high pressure: Implication of variation in phase-transition temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuki, Hitoshi; Kato, Kentaro; Okamoto, Hirotsugu; Yoshida, Shuntaro; Goto, Masaki; Tamai, Nobutake; Kaneshina, Shoji

    2017-12-01

    The variation in phase-transition temperatures of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer membrane by adding two membrane-active ligands, a long-chain fatty acid (palmitic acid (PA)) and an inhalation anesthetic (halothane (HAL)), was investigated by light-transmittance measurements and fluorometry. By assuming the thermodynamic colligative property for the bilayer membrane at low ligand concentrations, the partitioning behavior of these ligands into the DPPC bilayer membrane was considered. It was proved from the differential partition coefficients between two phases that PA has strong affinity with the gel (lamellar gel) phase in a micro-molal concentration range and makes the bilayer membrane more ordered, while HAL has strong affinity with the liquid crystalline phase in a milli-molal concentration range and does the bilayer membrane more disordered. The transfer volumes of both ligands from the aqueous solution to each phase of the DPPC bilayer membrane showed that the preferential partitioning of the PA molecule into the gel (lamellar gel) produces about 20% decrease in transfer volume as compared with the liquid crystalline phase, whereas that of the HAL molecule into the liquid crystalline phase does about twice increase in transfer volume as compared with the gel (ripple gel) phase. Furthermore, changes in thermotropic and barotropic phase behavior of the DPPC bilayer membrane by adding the ligand was discussed from the viewpoint of the ligand partitioning. Reflecting the contrastive partitioning of PA and HAL into the pressure-induced interdigitated gel phase among the gel phases, it was revealed that PA suppresses the formation of the interdigitated gel phase under high pressure while HAL promotes it. These results clearly indicate that each phase of the DPPC bilayer membrane has a potential to recognize various ligand molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Structure and dynamics of POPC bilayers in water solutions of room temperature ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetto, Antonio [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Laboratory for Neutron Scattering and Imaging, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Bingham, Richard J. [York Centre for Complex Systems Analysis, University of York, York YO10 5GE (United Kingdom); Ballone, Pietro [Center for Life Nano Science @Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), 00185 Roma (Italy); Department of Physics, Università di Roma “La Sapienza,” 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2015-03-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations in the NPT ensemble have been carried out to investigate the effect of two room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), on stacks of phospholipid bilayers in water. We consider RTIL compounds consisting of chloride ([bmim][Cl]) and hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF{sub 6}]) salts of the 1-buthyl-3-methylimidazolium ([bmim]{sup +}) cation, while the phospholipid bilayer is made of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). Our investigations focus on structural and dynamical properties of phospholipid and water molecules that could be probed by inelastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements. The results confirm the fast incorporation of [bmim]{sup +} into the lipid phase already observed in previous simulations, driven by the Coulomb attraction of the cation for the most electronegative oxygens in the POPC head group and by sizeable dispersion forces binding the neutral hydrocarbon tails of [bmim]{sup +} and of POPC. The [bmim]{sup +} absorption into the bilayer favours the penetration of water into POPC, causes a slight but systematic thinning of the bilayer, and further stabilises hydrogen bonds at the lipid/water interface that already in pure samples (no RTIL) display a lifetime much longer than in bulk water. On the other hand, the effect of RTILs on the diffusion constant of POPC (D{sub POPC}) does not reveal a clearly identifiable trend, since D{sub POPC} increases upon addition of [bmim][Cl] and decreases in the [bmim][PF{sub 6}] case. Moreover, because of screening, the electrostatic signature of each bilayer is only moderately affected by the addition of RTIL ions in solution. The analysis of long wavelength fluctuations of the bilayers shows that RTIL sorption causes a general decrease of the lipid/water interfacial tension and bending rigidity, pointing to the destabilizing effect of RTILs on lipid bilayers.

  15. Highly efficient integration of the viral portal proteins from different types of phages into planar bilayers for the black lipid membrane analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Peng; Paraiso, Hallel; Burris, Benjamin

    2016-02-01

    The planar lipid bilayer technology is a technique that yields incredibly useful structural function information about a single channel protein. It is also currently actively utilized as a powerful platform using biological protein nanopores for the development of single-molecule nanopore sensing technology, as well as ultrafast DNA sequencing technology. The portal protein, GP10, from the bacteriophage Φ29 was the first phage portal protein shown to be successfully inserted into planar bilayer membranes, thereby it may inspire more researchers to apply the techniques to portal proteins from the other bacteriophages. However, the technology is far from perfect since the insertion of the channel proteins into planar bilayer membranes is not only technically difficult but also time-consuming. For the fusion of phage portal proteins, vesicles are typically needed to be reconstituted with the portal proteins to form proteoliposomes. However, most of the phage portal proteins have low solubility, and may self-aggregate during the preparation of the proteoliposomes. Furthermore, the fusion of the formed proteoliposomes is sporadic, unpredictable and varied from person to person. Due to the lack of experimental consistency between labs, the results from different methodologies reported for generating fusible proteoliposomes are highly variable. In this research, we propose a new method for the preparation of the fusible proteoliposomes containing portal proteins from bacteriophages, to circumvent the problems aforementioned. Compared to the conventional methods, this method was able to avoid the protein aggregation issues during the vesicle preparation by eliminating the need for detergents and the subsequent time-consuming step for detergent removal. The proteoliposomes prepared by the method were shown to be more efficiently and rapidly inserted into planar bilayer membranes bathed in different conducting buffer solutions including those with nonelectrolytes such as

  16. Dynamics in Diether Lipid Bilayers and Interdigitated Bilayer Structures Studied by Time-Resolved Emission Spectra and Decay Time and Anisotropy Profiles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hutterer, R.; Hof, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2001), s. 227-236 ISSN 1053-0509 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/99/0845 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : lipid interdigitation * solvent relaxation * time-resolved emission spectra Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.702, year: 2001

  17. Time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy for monitoring protein dynamics exemplified by functional studies of Ras protein bound to a lipid bilayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kötting, Carsten; Güldenhaupt, Jörn; Gerwert, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The first time resolved FTIR investigation of a GTPase reaction of a protein anchored at a single lipid bilayer. Display Omitted Highlights: ► FTIR difference spectroscopy monitors protein dynamics with atomic detail. ► ATR–FTIR allows the measurement of a monolayer sample. ► Membrane proteins can be investigated near physiological conditions. ► The hydrolysis reaction of Ras was investigated in this condition for the first time. - Abstract: Time-resolved Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy is a valuable tool for monitoring the dynamics of protein reactions and interactions. Absorbance changes can be monitored with time resolutions down to nanoseconds and followed for time periods that range over nine orders of magnitude. Membrane proteins bound to solid supported lipid bilayers can be investigated in near physiological conditions with the attenuated total reflection (ATR) technique. Here, we review the basics of time-resolved FTIR with a focus on Ras, a GTPase that is mutated in 25% of human tumors. We show the first time-resolved measurements of membrane anchored Ras and observed the switching between its activated and its inactivated state. We compared those measurements with measurements of the truncated Ras in solution. We found that both the kinetics and the functional groups involved were very similar. This suggested that the membrane did not have a major influence on the hydrolysis reaction.

  18. Nanomolar Cellular Antisense Activity of Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) Cholic Acid ("Umbrella") and Cholesterol Conjugates Delivered by Cationic Lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Nielsen, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    of cholesterol and cholic acid ("umbrella") derivatives of splice correction antisense PNA oligomers. While the conjugates alone were practically inactive up to 1 µM, their activity was dramatically improved when delivered by a cationic lipid transfection agent (LipofectAMINE2000). In particular, PNAs...... volume improved transfection efficiency, suggesting that accumulation (condensation) of the PNA/lipid complex on the cellular surface is part of the uptake mechanism. These results provide a novel, simple method for very efficient cellular delivery of PNA oligomers, especially using PNA-cholic acid...... conjugates which, in contrast to PNA-cholesterol conjugates, exhibit sufficient water solubility. The results also question the generality of using cholic acid "umbrella" derivatives as a delivery modality for antisense oligomers....

  19. pH and reduction dual-responsive dipeptide cationic lipids with α-tocopherol hydrophobic tail for efficient gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Su, Rong-Chuan; Yi, Wen-Jing; Zheng, Li-Ting; Lu, Shan-Shan; Zhao, Zhi-Gang

    2017-03-31

    A series of tocopherol-based cationic lipid 3a-3f bearing a pH-sensitive imidazole moiety in the dipeptide headgroup and a reduction-responsive disulfide linkage were designed and synthesized. Acid-base titration of these lipids showed good buffering capacities. The liposomes formed from 3 and co-lipid 1, 2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) could efficiently bind and condense DNA into nanoparticles. Gel binding and HPLC assays confirmed the encapsulated DNA could release from lipoplexes 3 upon addition of 10 mM glutathione (GSH). MTT assays in HEK 293 cells demonstrated that lipoplexes 3 had low cytotoxicity. The in vitro gene transfection studies showed cationic dipeptide headgroups clearly affected the transfection efficiency (TE), and arginine-histidine based dipeptide lipid 3f give the best TE, which was 30.4 times higher than Lipofectamine 3000 in the presence of 10% serum. Cell-uptake assays indicated that basic amino acid containing dipeptide cationic lipids exhibited more efficient cell uptake than serine and aromatic amino acids based dipeptide lipids. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) studies corroborated that 3 could efficiently deliver and release DNA into the nuclei of HeLa cells. These results suggest that tocopherol-based dipeptide cationic lipids with pH and reduction dual-sensitive characteristics might be promising non-viral gene delivery vectors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Two cations, two mechanisms: interactions of sodium and calcium with zwitterionic lipid membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Javanainen, M.; Melcrová, Adéla; Magarkar, Aniket; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Hof, Martin; Jungwirth, Pavel; Martinez-Seara, Hector

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 39 (2017), s. 5380-5383 ISSN 1359-7345 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-03160S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-01074S Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP1102 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : phospholipid bilayers * molecular dynamics * fluorescence Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UOCHB-X) OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry; Physical chemistry (UOCHB-X) Impact factor: 6.319, year: 2016

  1. The structural topology of wild-type phospholamban in oriented lipid bilayers using 15N solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Baker, Shadi; Lu, Jun-Xia; Chu, Shidong; Shetty, Kiran K; Gor'kov, Peter L; Lorigan, Gary A

    2007-11-01

    For the first time, 15N solid-state NMR experiments were conducted on wild-type phospholamban (WT-PLB) embedded inside mechanically oriented phospholipid bilayers to investigate the topology of its cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains. 15N solid-state NMR spectra of site-specific 15N-labeled WT-PLB indicate that the transmembrane domain has a tilt angle of 13 degrees+/-6 degrees with respect to the POPC (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-phosphocholine) bilayer normal and that the cytoplasmic domain of WT-PLB lies on the surface of the phospholipid bilayers. Comparable results were obtained from site-specific 15N-labeled WT-PLB embedded inside DOPC/DOPE (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine) mechanically oriented phospholipids' bilayers. The new NMR data support a pinwheel geometry of WT-PLB, but disagree with a bellflower structure in micelles, and indicate that the orientation of the cytoplasmic domain of the WT-PLB is similar to that reported for the monomeric AFA-PLB mutant.

  2. Tetanus toxoid-loaded cationic non-aggregated nanostructured lipid particles triggered strong humoral and cellular immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Amandeep; Jyoti, Kiran; Rai, Shweta; Sidhu, Rupinder; Pandey, Ravi Shankar; Jain, Upendra Kumar; Katyal, Anju; Madan, Jitender

    2016-05-01

    In the present investigation, non-aggregated cationic and unmodified nanoparticles (TT-C-NLPs4 and TT-NLPs1) were prepared of about 49.2 ± 6.8-nm and 40.8 ± 8.3-nm, respectively. In addition, spherical shape, crystalline architecture and cationic charge were also noticed. Furthermore, integrity and conformational stability of TT were maintained in both TT-C-NLPs4 and TT-NLPs1, as evidenced by symmetrical position of bands and superimposed spectra, respectively in SDS-PAGE and circular dichroism. Cellular uptake in RAW264.7 cells indicating the concentration-dependent internalisation of nanoparticles. Qualitatively, CLSM exhibited enhanced cellular uptake of non-aggregated TT-C-NLPs4 owing to interaction with negatively charged plasma membrane and clevaloe mediated/independent endocytosis. In last, in vivo immunisation with non-aggregated TT-C-NLPs4 elicited strong humoral (anti-TT IgG) and cellular (IFN-γ) immune responses at day 42, as compared to non-aggregated TT-NLPs1 and TT-Alum following booster immunisation at day 14 and 28. Thus, non-aggregated cationic lipid nanoparticles may be a potent immune-adjuvant for parenteral delivery of weak antigens.

  3. Uptake and intracellular fate of cholera toxin subunit b-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticle-supported lipid bilayers (aka protocells) in motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Porras, Maria A; Durfee, Paul; Giambini, Sebastian; Sieck, Gary C; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Mantilla, Carlos B

    2018-04-01

    Cholera toxin B (CTB) modified mesoporous silica nanoparticle supported lipid bilayers (CTB-protocells) are a promising, customizable approach for targeting therapeutic cargo to motoneurons. In the present study, the endocytic mechanism and intracellular fate of CTB-protocells in motoneurons were examined to provide information for the development of therapeutic application and cargo delivery. Pharmacological inhibitors elucidated CTB-protocells endocytosis to be dependent on the integrity of lipid rafts and macropinocytosis. Using immunofluorescence techniques, live confocal and transmission electron microscopy, CTB-protocells were primarily found in the cytosol, membrane lipid domains and Golgi. There was no difference in the amount of motoneuron activity dependent uptake of CTB-protocells in neuromuscular junctions, consistent with clathrin activation at the axon terminals during low frequency activity. In conclusion, CTB-protocells uptake is mediated principally by lipid rafts and macropinocytosis. Once internalized, CTB-protocells escape lysosomal degradation, and engage biological pathways that are not readily accessible by untargeted delivery methods. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. New gluconamide-type cationic surfactants: Interactions with DNA and lipid membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Misiak, P.; Wilk, K. A.; Kral, Teresa; Wozniak, E.; Pruchnik, H.; Frackowiak, R.; Hof, Martin; Rózycka-Roszak, B.

    180-181, OCT-NOV (2013), s. 44-54 ISSN 0301-4622 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Glucose-derived surfactant * Soft surfactant * Cationic surfactant Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.319, year: 2013

  5. Perillyl alcohol: Dynamic interactions with the lipid bilayer and implications for long‐term inhalational chemotherapy for gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlando da Fonseca, Clovis; Khandelia, Himanshu; D’Alincourt Salazar, Marcela

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gliomas display a high degree of intratumor heterogeneity, including changes in physiological parameters and lipid composition of the plasma membrane, which may contribute to the development of drug resistance. Biophysical interactions between therapeutic agents and the lipid componen...

  6. Critical size dependence of domain formation observed in coarse-grained simulations of bilayers composed of ternary lipid mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelopulos, George A; Nagai, Tetsuro; Bandara, Asanga; Panahi, Afra; Straub, John E

    2017-09-07

    Model cellular membranes are known to form micro- and macroscale lipid domains dependent on molecular composition. The formation of macroscopic lipid domains by lipid mixtures has been the subject of many simulation investigations. We present a critical study of system size impact on lipid domain phase separation into liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered macroscale domains in ternary lipid mixtures. In the popular di-C16:0 PC:di-C18:2 PC:cholesterol at 35:35:30 ratio mixture, we find systems with a minimum of 1480 lipids to be necessary for the formation of macroscopic phase separated domains and systems of 10 000 lipids to achieve structurally converged conformations similar to the thermodynamic limit. To understand these results and predict the behavior of any mixture forming two phases, we develop and investigate an analytical Flory-Huggins model which is recursively validated using simulation and experimental data. We find that micro- and macroscale domains can coexist in ternary mixtures. Additionally, we analyze the distributions of specific lipid-lipid interactions in each phase, characterizing domain structures proposed based on past experimental studies. These findings offer guidance in selecting appropriate system sizes for the study of phase separations and provide new insights into the nature of domain structure for a popular ternary lipid mixture.

  7. Critical size dependence of domain formation observed in coarse-grained simulations of bilayers composed of ternary lipid mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelopulos, George A.; Nagai, Tetsuro; Bandara, Asanga; Panahi, Afra; Straub, John E.

    2017-09-01

    Model cellular membranes are known to form micro- and macroscale lipid domains dependent on molecular composition. The formation of macroscopic lipid domains by lipid mixtures has been the subject of many simulation investigations. We present a critical study of system size impact on lipid domain phase separation into liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered macroscale domains in ternary lipid mixtures. In the popular di-C16:0 PC:di-C18:2 PC:cholesterol at 35:35:30 ratio mixture, we find systems with a minimum of 1480 lipids to be necessary for the formation of macroscopic phase separated domains and systems of 10 000 lipids to achieve structurally converged conformations similar to the thermodynamic limit. To understand these results and predict the behavior of any mixture forming two phases, we develop and investigate an analytical Flory-Huggins model which is recursively validated using simulation and experimental data. We find that micro- and macroscale domains can coexist in ternary mixtures. Additionally, we analyze the distributions of specific lipid-lipid interactions in each phase, characterizing domain structures proposed based on past experimental studies. These findings offer guidance in selecting appropriate system sizes for the study of phase separations and provide new insights into the nature of domain structure for a popular ternary lipid mixture.

  8. Efficient molecular mechanics simulations of the folding, orientation, and assembly of peptides in lipid bilayers using an implicit atomic solvation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordner, Andrew J.; Zorman, Barry; Abagyan, Ruben

    2011-10-01

    Membrane proteins comprise a significant fraction of the proteomes of sequenced organisms and are the targets of approximately half of marketed drugs. However, in spite of their prevalence and biomedical importance, relatively few experimental structures are available due to technical challenges. Computational simulations can potentially address this deficit by providing structural models of membrane proteins. Solvation within the spatially heterogeneous membrane/solvent environment provides a major component of the energetics driving protein folding and association within the membrane. We have developed an implicit solvation model for membranes that is both computationally efficient and accurate enough to enable molecular mechanics predictions for the folding and association of peptides within the membrane. We derived the new atomic solvation model parameters using an unbiased fitting procedure to experimental data and have applied it to diverse problems in order to test its accuracy and to gain insight into membrane protein folding. First, we predicted the positions and orientations of peptides and complexes within the lipid bilayer and compared the simulation results with solid-state NMR structures. Additionally, we performed folding simulations for a series of host-guest peptides with varying propensities to form alpha helices in a hydrophobic environment and compared the structures with experimental measurements. We were also able to successfully predict the structures of amphipathic peptides as well as the structures for dimeric complexes of short hexapeptides that have experimentally characterized propensities to form beta sheets within the membrane. Finally, we compared calculated relative transfer energies with data from experiments measuring the effects of mutations on the free energies of translocon-mediated insertion of proteins into lipid bilayers and of combined folding and membrane insertion of a beta barrel protein.

  9. Nanodiscs for immobilization of lipid bilayers and membrane receptors: kinetic analysis of cholera toxin binding to a glycolipid receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Jonas; Torta, Federico; Sligar, Stephen G

    2008-01-01

    nanodiscs and their incorporated membrane receptors can be attached to surface plasmon resonance sensorchips and used to measure the kinetics of the interaction between soluble molecules and membrane receptors inserted in the bilayer of nanodiscs. Cholera toxin and its glycolipid receptor G(M1) constitute...... partner cholera toxin B subunit to the receptor with the sensorchip-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology. The measured stoichiometric and kinetic values of the interaction are in agreement with those reported by previous studies, thus providing proof-of-principle that nanodiscs can be employed...

  10. How proteins move lipids and lipids move proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprong, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/222364815; van der Sluijs, P.; van Meer, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068570368

    2001-01-01

    Cells determine the bilayer characteristics of different membranes by tightly controlling their lipid composition. Local changes in the physical properties of bilayers, in turn, allow membrane deformation, and facilitate vesicle budding and fusion. Moreover, specific lipids at specific locations

  11. Characterization of the nanostructure of complexes formed by a redox-active cationic lipid and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzey, Claire L; Jewell, Christopher M; Hays, Melissa E; Lynn, David M; Abbott, Nicholas L; Kondo, Yukishige; Golan, Sharon; Talmon, Yeshayahu

    2008-05-08

    We report characterization of the nanostructures of complexes formed between the redox-active lipid bis(n-ferrocenylundecyl)dimethylammonium bromide (BFDMA) and DNA using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). A particular focus was directed to the influence of lipid oxidation state (where reduced BFDMA has a net charge of +1 and oxidized BFDMA has a charge of +3) on the nanostructures of the solution aggregates formed. Complexes were characterized over a range of charge ratios of reduced BFDMA to DNA (1.1:1, 2.75:1, and 4:1) in solutions of 1 mM Li2SO4. For these complexes, a single peak in the SANS data at 1.2 nm(-1) indicated that a nanostructure with a periodicity of 5.2 nm was present, similar to that observed with complexes of the classical lipids DODAB/DOPE and DNA (multilamellar spacing of 7.0 nm). The absence of additional Bragg peaks in all the SANS data indicated that the periodicity did not extend over large distances. Both inverse Fourier transform analysis and form factor fitting suggested formation of a multilamellar vesicle. These results were confirmed by cryo-TEM images in which multilamellar complexes with diameters between 50 and 150 nm were observed with no more than seven lamellae per aggregate. In contrast to complexes of reduced BFDMA and DNA, Bragg peaks were absent in SANS spectra of complexes formed by oxidized BFDMA and DNA at all charge ratios investigated. The low-q behavior of the SANS data obtained using oxidized BFDMA and DNA complexes suggested that large, loose aggregates were formed, consistent with complementary cryo-TEM images showing predominantly loose disordered aggregates. Some highly ordered spongelike and cubic phase nanostructures were also detected in cryo-TEM images. We conclude that control of BFDMA oxidation state can be used to manipulate the nanostructures of lipid-DNA complexes formed using BFDMA.

  12. Combination of MIDGE-Th1 DNA vaccines with the cationic lipid SAINT-18 : Studies on formulation, biodistribution and vector clearance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endmann, Anne; Oswald, Detlef; Riede, Oliver; Talman, Eduard G.; Vos, Roelien E.; Schroff, Matthias; Kleuss, Christiane; Ruiters, Marcel H. J.; Juhls, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that the combination of MIDGE-Th1 DNA vectors with the cationic lipid SAINT-18 increases the immune response to the encoded antigen in mice. Here, we report on experiments to further optimize and characterize this approach. We evaluated different formulations of MIDGE-Th1

  13. Nanomolar cellular antisense activity of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) cholic acid ("umbrella") and cholesterol conjugates delivered by cationic lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Nielsen, Peter E

    2012-02-15

    Limited cellular uptake and low bioavailability of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have restricted widespread use of PNAs as antisense/antigene agents for cells in culture and not least for in vivo applications. We now report the synthesis and cellular antisense activity in cultured HeLa pLuc705 cells of cholesterol and cholic acid ("umbrella") derivatives of splice correction antisense PNA oligomers. While the conjugates alone were practically inactive up to 1 μM, their activity was dramatically improved when delivered by a cationic lipid transfection agent (LipofectAMINE2000). In particular, PNAs, conjugated to cholesterol through an ester hemisuccinate linker or to cholic acid, exhibited low nanomolar activity (EC(50) ∼ 25 nM). Excellent sequence specificity was retained, as mismatch PNA conjugates did not show any significant antisense activity. Furthermore, we show that increasing the transfection volume improved transfection efficiency, suggesting that accumulation (condensation) of the PNA/lipid complex on the cellular surface is part of the uptake mechanism. These results provide a novel, simple method for very efficient cellular delivery of PNA oligomers, especially using PNA-cholic acid conjugates which, in contrast to PNA-cholesterol conjugates, exhibit sufficient water solubility. The results also question the generality of using cholic acid "umbrella" derivatives as a delivery modality for antisense oligomers.

  14. Computer Simulations of Small Molecules in Membranes: Insights from Computer Simulations into the Interactions of Small Molecules with Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; New, Michael H.; Schweighofer, Karl; Wilson, Michael A.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Two of Ernest Overton's lasting contributions to biology are the Meyer-Overton relationship between the potency of an anesthetic and its solubility in oil, and the Overton rule which relates the permeability of a membrane to the oil-water partition coefficient of the permeating molecule. A growing body of experimental evidence, however, cannot be reconciled with these theories. In particular, the molecular nature of membranes, unknown to Overton, needs to be included in any description of these phenomena. Computer simulations are ideally suited for providing atomic-level information about the behavior of small molecules in membranes. The authors discuss simulation studies relevant to Overton's ideas. Through simulations it was found that anesthetics tend to concentrate at interfaces and their anesthetic potency correlates better with solubility at the water-membrane interface than with solubility in oil. Simulation studies of membrane permeation revealed the anisotropic nature of the membranes, as evidenced, for example, by the highly nonuniform distribution of free volume in the bilayer. This, in turn, influences the diffusion rates of solutes, which increase with the depth in the membrane. Small solutes tend to move by hopping between voids in the bilayer, and this hopping motion may be responsible for the deviation from the Overton rule of the permeation rates of these molecules.

  15. Data including GROMACS input files for atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of mixed, asymmetric bilayers including molecular topologies, equilibrated structures, and force field for lipids compatible with OPLS-AA parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Róg, Tomasz; Orłowski, Adam; Llorente, Alicia; Skotland, Tore; Sylvänne, Tuulia; Kauhanen, Dimple; Ekroos, Kim; Sandvig, Kirsten; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2016-06-01

    In this Data in Brief article we provide a data package of GROMACS input files for atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of multicomponent, asymmetric lipid bilayers using the OPLS-AA force field. These data include 14 model bilayers composed of 8 different lipid molecules. The lipids present in these models are: cholesterol (CHOL), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (POPE), 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidyl-ethanolamine (SOPE), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS), 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (SOPS), N-palmitoyl-D-erythro-sphingosyl-phosphatidylcholine (SM16), and N-lignoceroyl-D-erythro-sphingosyl-phosphatidylcholine (SM24). The bilayers׳ compositions are based on lipidomic studies of PC-3 prostate cancer cells and exosomes discussed in Llorente et al. (2013) [1], showing an increase in the section of long-tail lipid species (SOPS, SOPE, and SM24) in the exosomes. Former knowledge about lipid asymmetry in cell membranes was accounted for in the models, meaning that the model of the inner leaflet is composed of a mixture of PC, PS, PE, and cholesterol, while the extracellular leaflet is composed of SM, PC and cholesterol discussed in Van Meer et al. (2008) [2]. The provided data include lipids׳ topologies, equilibrated structures of asymmetric bilayers, all force field parameters, and input files with parameters describing simulation conditions (md.mdp). The data is associated with the research article "Interdigitation of Long-Chain Sphingomyelin Induces Coupling of Membrane Leaflets in a Cholesterol Dependent Manner" (Róg et al., 2016) [3].

  16. Raman spectroscopy for detecting supported planar lipid bilayers composed of ganglioside-GM1/sphingomyelin/cholesterol in the presence of amyloid-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhiping; Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Weirong; Zhang, Zhenlong; Gao, Huiping; Mao, Yanli

    2015-09-21

    The aggregation and fibril formation of amyloid β(Aβ) peptides onto a ganglioside-GM1-containing lipid membrane is a cause of neurodegenerative diseases. The mechanism of the initial binding and the conformational changes of Aβ on the membrane should be clarified. Fluorescence microscopy and Raman spectroscopy have been performed to investigate the supporting planar lipid bilayers (SPBs) composed of ganglioside-GM1, sphingomyelin and cholesterol. It is demonstrated that the SPBs are in a liquid-crystalline state when placed on mica, and increasing the amount of ganglioside-GM1 can decrease the lateral interaction between the acyl chains of the SPBs. It has been found that Aβ(1-40) initially interacts with the galactose ring of the ganglioside-GM1 head group, leading to its binding and gradual aggregation on the membrane surface. The obvious change observed in Raman spectroscopy in the ν(C-H) region confirms that the hydrophobic C-terminal of Aβ(1-40) inserts itself into the hydrophobic part of the SPBs. The Raman data indicate that α-helix and β-sheet structures of Aβ(1-40) increase and coexist over longer time frames. Based on these results, a model was proposed to describe the mechanism of the conformational changes and the aggregation of Aβ(1-40) that are mediated by ganglioside-GM1-containing SPBs.

  17. Lipid nanoparticle interactions and assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiss, Matthew Ryan

    oxide nanoparticles encapsulated in the lipid bilayer, the local temperature and membrane fluidity could be observed. DLNAs were encapsulated with different sized nanoparticles and concentrations in order to observe the effect of the bilayer nanoparticles on the lipid bilayer's phase behavior and leakage. Two different sized nanoparticles were used, a 2 nm gold nanoparticle (GNP) much smaller than the thickness of the bilayer and a 4 nm GNP near the thickness of the lipid bilayer. The 2 nm GNPs were shown to affect the lipid bilayer differently than the 4 nm GNP. Specifically, the two nanoparticles altered the phase behavior and leakage differently in a temperature dependent fashion, demonstrating that embedded nanoparticle size can be used induce or inhibit bilayer leakage. A dual solvent exchange method was used to control the lipid surface composition of an iron oxide nanoparticle with a cationic lipid and a polyethylene glycol (PEG) lipid to produce lipid coated magnetic nanoparticles (LMNPs). PEG is well known for its ability to enhance the pharmacokinetics of nanostructures by preventing uptake by the immune system. By controlling the lipid surface composition, the surface charge and PEG conformation can be controlled which allowed the LMNPs to be used as an MRI contrast agent and a delivery system for siRNA that could be triggered with temperature.

  18. Dynamic and reversible self-assembly of photoelectrochemical complexes based on lipid bilayer disks, photosynthetic reaction centers, and single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghossian, Ardemis A; Choi, Jong Hyun; Ham, Moon-Ho; Strano, Michael S

    2011-03-01

    An aqueous solution containing photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs), membrane scaffold proteins (MSPs), phospholipids, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) solubilized with the surfactant sodium cholate (SC) reversibly self-assembles into a highly ordered structure upon dialysis of the latter. The resulting structure is photoelectrochemically active and consists of 4-nm-thick lipid bilayer disks (nanodisks, NDs) arranged parallel to the surface of the SWCNT with the RC housed within the bilayer such that its hole injecting site faces the nanotube surface. The structure can be assembled and disassembled autonomously with the addition or removal of surfactant. We model the kinetic and thermodynamic forces that drive the dynamics of this reversible self-assembly process. The assembly is monitored using spectrofluorimetry during dialysis and subsequent surfactant addition and used to fit a kinetic model to determine the forward and reverse rate constants of ND and ND-SWCNT formation. The calculated ND and ND-SWCNT forward rate constants are 79 mM(-1) s(-1) and 5.4 × 10(2) mM(-1) s(-1), respectively, and the reverse rate constants are negligible over the dialysis time scale. We find that the reaction is not diffusion-controlled since the ND-SWCNT reaction, which consists of entities with smaller diffusion coefficients, has a larger reaction rate constant. Using these rate parameters, we were able to develop a kinetic phase diagram for the formation of ND-SWCNT complexes, which indicates an optimal dialysis rate of approximately 8 × 10(-4) s(-1). We also fit the model to cyclic ND-SWCNT assembly and disassembly experiments and hence mimic the thermodynamic forces used in regeneration processes detailed previously. Such forces may form the basis of both synthetic and natural photoelectrochemical complexes capable of dynamic component replacement and repair.

  19. Conserved molecular superlattices in a series of homologous synthetic mycobacterial cell-wall lipids forming interdigitated bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin-Bertelsen, Birte; Yaghmur, Anan; Franzyk, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    excess water conditions. The MMG analogues differed in the alkyl chain lengths and in the stereochemistry of the polar glycerol headgroup or of the lipid tails (native-like versus alternative compounds). All MMG analogues formed poorly hydrated lamellar phases at low temperatures and inverse hexagonal (H...

  20. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and leukemic GRSL cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Okazaki, Susumu; Ueoka, Ryuichi

    2013-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations for the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and thymus-derived leukemic GRSL cells in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15K and 1 atm) to investigate changes in membrane properties induced by canceration. The model membranes used in our calculations for normal and leukemic thymocytes comprised 23 and 25 kinds of lipids, respectively, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. The mole fractions of the lipids adopted here were based on previously published experimental values. Our calculations clearly showed that the membrane area was increased in leukemic cells, and that the isothermal area compressibility of the leukemic plasma membranes was double that of normal cells. The calculated membranes of leukemic cells were thus considerably bulkier and softer in the lateral direction compared with those of normal cells. The tilt angle of the cholesterol and the conformation of the phospholipid fatty acid tails both showed a lower level of order in leukemic cell membranes compared with normal cell membranes. The lateral radial distribution function of the lipids also showed a more disordered structure in leukemic cell membranes than in normal cell membranes. These observations all show that, for the present thymocytes, the lateral structure of the membrane is considerably disordered by canceration. Furthermore, the calculated lateral self-diffusion coefficient of the lipid molecules in leukemic cell membranes was almost double that in normal cell membranes. The calculated rotational and wobbling autocorrelation functions also indicated that the molecular motion of the lipids was enhanced in leukemic cell membranes. Thus, here we have demonstrated that the membranes of thymocyte leukemic cells are more disordered and more fluid than normal cell membranes. Copyright © 2013

  1. Computer simulation of ion channel gating: the M(2) channel of influenza A virus in a lipid bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweighofer, K. J.; Pohorille, A.

    2000-01-01

    The transmembrane fragment of the influenza virus M(2) protein forms a homotetrameric channel that transports protons. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics simulations to help elucidate the mechanism of channel gating by four histidines that occlude the channel lumen in the closed state. We test two competing hypotheses. In the "shuttle" mechanism, the delta nitrogen atom on the extracellular side of one histidine is protonated by the incoming proton, and, subsequently, the proton on the epsilon nitrogen atom is released on the opposite side. In the "water-wire" mechanism, the gate opens because of electrostatic repulsion between four simultaneously biprotonated histidines. This allows for proton transport along the water wire that penetrates the gate. For each system, composed of the channel embedded in a hydrated phospholipid bilayer, a 1.3-ns trajectory was obtained. It is found that the states involved in the shuttle mechanism, which contain either single-protonated histidines or a mixture of single-protonated histidines plus one biprotonated residue, are stable during the simulations. Furthermore, the orientations and dynamics of water molecules near the gate are conducive to proton transfer. In contrast, the fully biprotonated state is not stable. Additional simulations show that if only two histidines are biprotonated, the channel deforms but the gate remains closed. These results support the shuttle mechanism but not the gate-opening mechanism of proton gating in M(2).

  2. Cationic solid-lipid nanoparticles are as efficient as electroporation in DNA vaccination against visceral leishmaniasis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saljoughian, N; Zahedifard, F; Doroud, D; Doustdari, F; Vasei, M; Papadopoulou, B; Rafati, S

    2013-12-01

    The use of an appropriate delivery system has recently emerged as a promising approach for the development of effective vaccination against visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Here, we compare two vaccine delivery systems, namely electroporation and cationic solid-lipid nanoparticle (cSLN) formulation, to administer a DNA vaccine harbouring the L. donovani A2 antigen along with L. infantum cysteine proteinases [CPA and CPB without its unusual C-terminal extension (CPB(-CTE) )] and evaluate their potential against L. infantum challenge. Prime-boost administration of the pcDNA-A2-CPA-CPB(-CTE) delivered by either electroporation or cSLN formulation protects BALB/c mice against L. infantum challenge and that protective immunity is associated with high levels of IFN-γ and lower levels of IL-10 production, leading to a strong Th1 immune response. At all time points, the ratio of IFN-γ: IL-10 induced upon restimulation with rA2-rCPA-rCPB and F/T antigens was significantly higher in vaccinated animals. Moreover, Th2-efficient protection was elicited through a high humoral immune response. Nitric oxide production, parasite burden and histopathological analysis were also in concordance with other findings. Overall, these data indicate that similar to the electroporation delivery system, cSLNs as a nanoscale vehicle of Leishmania antigens could improve immune response, hence indicating the promise of these strategies against visceral leishmaniasis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Reconstitution and Functional Analysis of a Full-Length Hepatitis C Virus NS5B Polymerase on a Supported Lipid Bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic targeting of membrane-associated viral proteins is complicated by the challenge of investigating their enzymatic activities in the native membrane-bound state. To permit functional characterization of these proteins, we hypothesized that the supported lipid bilayer (SLB) can support in situ reconstitution of membrane-associated viral protein complexes. As proof-of-principle, we selected the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B polymerase which is essential for HCV genome replication, and determined that the SLB platform enables functional reconstitution of membrane protein activity. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) monitoring enabled label-free detection of full-length NS5B membrane association, its interaction with replicase subunits NS3, NS5A, and template RNA, and most importantly its RNA synthesis activity. This latter activity could be inhibited by the addition of candidate small molecule drugs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the SLB platform can support functional studies of membrane-associated viral proteins engaged in critical biological activities. PMID:27504492

  4. PEGylated lipid bilayer-wrapped nano-graphene oxides for synergistic co-delivery of doxorubicin and rapamycin to prevent drug resistance in cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Raj Kumar; Byeon, Jeong Hoon; Choi, Han-Gon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2017-07-01

    Nano-graphene oxide (nGO) is a carbon allotrope studied for its potential as carrier for chemotherapeutic delivery and its photoablation effects. However, interaction of nGO with blood components and the subsequent toxicities warrant a hybrid system for effective cancer drug delivery. Combination chemotherapy aids in effective cancer treatment and prevention of drug resistance. Therefore, in this study, we attempted to prepare polyethylene glycosylated (PEGylated) lipid bilayer-wrapped nGO co-loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) and rapamycin (RAPA), GOLDR, for the prevention and treatment of resistant cancers. Our results revealed a stable GOLDR formulation with appropriate particle size (∼170 nm), polydispersity (∼0.19) and drug loading. Free drug combination (DOX and RAPA) presented synergistic anticancer effects in MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and BT474 cells. Treatment with GOLDR formulation maintained this synergism in treated cancer cells, which was further enhanced by the near infrared (NIR) laser irradiation-induced photothermal effects of nGO. Higher chromatin condensation and apoptotic body formation, and enhanced protein expression of apoptosis-related markers (Bax, p53, p21, and c-caspase 3) following GOLDR treatment in the presence of NIR laser treatment clearly suggests its superiority in effective chemo-photothermal therapy of resistant cancers. The hybrid nanosystem that we developed provides a basis for the effective use of GOLDR treatment in the prevention and treatment of resistant cancer types.

  5. Mechanically stable solvent-free lipid bilayers in nano- and micro-tapered apertures for reconstitution of cell-free synthesized hERG channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadaki, Daisuke; Yamaura, Daichi; Araki, Shun; Yoshida, Miyu; Arata, Kohei; Ohori, Takeshi; Ishibashi, Ken-Ichi; Kato, Miki; Ma, Teng; Miyata, Ryusuke; Tozawa, Yuzuru; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Niwano, Michio; Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi

    2017-12-18

    The self-assembled bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) is the basic component of the cell membrane. The reconstitution of ion channel proteins in artificially formed BLMs represents a well-defined system for the functional analysis of ion channels and screening the effects of drugs that act on them. However, because BLMs are unstable, this limits the experimental throughput of BLM reconstitution systems. Here we report on the formation of mechanically stable solvent-free BLMs in microfabricated apertures with defined nano- and micro-tapered edge structures. The role of such nano- and micro-tapered structures on the stability of the BLMs was also investigated. Finally, this BLM system was combined with a cell-free synthesized human ether-a-go-go-related gene channel, a cardiac potassium channel whose relation to arrhythmic side effects following drug treatment is well recognized. Such stable BLMs as these, when combined with a cell-free system, represent a potential platform for screening the effects of drugs that act on various ion-channel genotypes.

  6. A Gating Model for the Archeal Voltage-Dependent K+ Channel KvAP in DPhPC and POPE:POPG decane lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Daniel; Cross, Sam R.; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channels form the basis of the excitability of nerves and muscles. KvAP is a well-characterized archeal Kv channel that has been widely used to investigate many aspects of Kv channel biochemistry, biophysics and structure. In this study a minimal kinetic gating model for KvAP function in two different phospholipid decane bilayers is developed. In most aspects KvAP gating is similar to the well-studied eukaryotic Shaker Kv channel: conformational changes occur within four voltage sensors followed by pore opening. Unlike Shaker, KvAP possesses an inactivated state that is accessible from the pre-open state of the channel. Changing the lipid composition of the membrane influences multiple gating transitions in the model, but most dramatically the rate of recovery from inactivation. Inhibition by the voltage sensor toxin VSTx1 is most easily explained if VSTx1 binds only to the depolarized conformation of the voltage sensor. By delaying the voltage sensor’s return to the hyperpolarized conformation VSTx1 favors the inactivated state of KvAP. PMID:19481093

  7. A gating model for the archeal voltage-dependent K(+) channel KvAP in DPhPC and POPE:POPG decane lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Daniel; Cross, Samuel R; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2009-07-31

    Voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channels form the basis of the excitability of nerves and muscles. KvAP is a well-characterized archeal Kv channel that has been widely used to investigate many aspects of Kv channel biochemistry, biophysics, and structure. In this study, a minimal kinetic gating model for KvAP function in two different phospholipid decane bilayers is developed. In most aspects, KvAP gating is similar to the well-studied eukaryotic Shaker Kv channel: conformational changes occur within four voltage sensors, followed by pore opening. Unlike the Shaker Kv channel, KvAP possesses an inactivated state that is accessible from the pre-open state of the channel. Changing the lipid composition of the membrane influences multiple gating transitions in the model, but, most dramatically, the rate of recovery from inactivation. Inhibition by the voltage sensor toxin VSTx1 is most easily explained if VSTx1 binds only to the depolarized conformation of the voltage sensor. By delaying the voltage sensor's return to the hyperpolarized conformation, VSTx1 favors the inactivated state of KvAP.

  8. 12-Crown-4-based amphipathic lipid and corresponding metal cation complexes for gene therapy applications: FT-IR characterization and surface charge determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, P.; Fino, V.; Pisani, M.; Tosi, G.; Stipa, P.; Ferraris, P.; Francescangeli, O.

    2009-02-01

    The new lipid 1,2- O-dioleyl-3- O-{2-[(12-crown-4)-methoxy]-ethyl}- sn-glycerol, 12C4L, has been synthesized. This molecule can coordinate different cations that should make the corresponding liposome a good candidate as vector of genetic material for possible applications in gene therapy. An important feature of the molecule is the possibility to modulate the net surface charge of their complexes with metal cations, which is important to provide efficient DNA transfections. The molecule and its complexes with some metal cations (Mg 2+, Ca 2+, Mn 2+) have been characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy and band attributions confirmed by Density Functional Theory calculations. The net surface charge has been determined by Z potential determinations.

  9. Compositional sorting dynamics in coexisting lipid bilayer phases with variations in underlying e-beam formed curvature pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunyankin, Maria O; Longo, Marjorie L

    2013-07-07

    Nanometer-scale curvature patterns of an underlying substrate are imposed on lipid multibilayers with each pattern imparting distinctly different sorting dynamics to a metastable pixelation pattern of coexisting liquid ordered (Lo)-liquid disordered (Ld) lipid phases. Therefore, this work provides pathways toward mechanical energy-based separations for analysis of biomembrane-associate species. The central design concept of the patterned sections of the silica substrate is a square lattice pattern of 100 nm projected radius poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) hemispherical features formed by electron beam lithography which pixelates the coexisting phases in order to balance membrane bending and line energy. In one variation, we surround this pattern with three PMMA walls/fences 100 nm in height which substantially slows the loss of the high line energy pixelated Lo phase by altering the balance of two competing mechanism (Ostwald ripening vs. vesiculation). In another walled variation, we form a gradient of the spacing of the 100 nm features which forces partitioning of the Lo phase toward the end of the gradient with the most open (400 nm spacing) lattice pattern where a single vesicle could grow from the Lo phase. We show that two other variations distinctly impact the dynamics, demonstrating locally slowed loss of the high line energy pixelated Lo phase and spontaneous switching of the pixel location on the unit cell, respectively. Moreover, we show that the pixelation patterns can be regenerated and sharpened by a heating and cooling cycle. We argue that localized variations in the underlying curvature pattern have rather complex consequences because of the coupling and/or competition of dynamic processes to optimize mechanical energy such as lipid diffusion, vesiculation and growth, and phase/compositional partitioning.

  10. Antibacterial activity of the human host defence peptide LL-37 and selected synthetic cationic lipids against bacteria associated with oral and upper respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczynska, Katarzyna; Namiot, Dorota; Byfield, Fitzroy J; Cruz, Katrina; Zendzian-Piotrowska, Malgorzata; Fein, David E; Savage, Paul B; Diamond, Scott; McCulloch, Christopher A; Janmey, Paul A; Bucki, Robert

    2013-03-01

    We aim to develop antibacterial peptide mimics resistant to protease degradation, with broad-spectrum activity at sites of infection. The bactericidal activities of LL-37, ceragenins CSA-13, CSA-90 and CSA-92 and the spermine-conjugated dexamethasone derivative D2S were evaluated using MIC and MBC measurements. Gingival fibroblast counting, interleukin-8 (IL-8) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release from keratinocytes (HaCat) were used to determine effects on cell growth, pro-inflammatory response and toxicity. All tested cationic lipids showed stronger bactericidal activity than LL-37. Incubation of Staphylococcus aureus with half the MIC of LL-37 led to the appearance of bacteria resistant to its bactericidal effects, but identical incubations with CSA-13 or D2S did not produce resistant bacteria. Cathelicidin LL-37 significantly increased the total number of gingival fibroblasts, but ceragenins and D2S did not alter gingival fibroblast growth. Cationic lipids showed no toxicity to HaCat cells at concentrations resulting in bacterial killing. These data suggest that cationic lipids such as ceragenins warrant further testing as potential novel antibacterial agents.

  11. The influence of non polar and polar molecules in mouse motile cells membranes and pure lipid bilayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J Sierra-Valdez

    Full Text Available We report an experimental study of mouse sperm motility that shows chief aspects characteristic of neurons: the anesthetic (produced by tetracaine and excitatory (produced by either caffeine or calcium effects and their antagonic action. While tetracaine inhibits sperm motility and caffeine has an excitatory action, the combination of these two substances balance the effects, producing a motility quite similar to that of control cells. We also study the effects of these agents (anesthetic and excitatory on the melting points of pure lipid liposomes constituted by 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC and dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (DPPA. Tetracaine induces a large fluidization of the membrane, shifting the liposomes melting transition temperature to much lower values. The effect of caffeine is null, but its addition to tetracaine-doped liposomes greatly screen the fluidization effect. A high calcium concentration stiffens pure lipid membranes and strongly reduces the effect of tetracaine. Molecular Dynamics Simulations are performed to further understand our experimental findings at the molecular level. We find a strong correlation between the effect of antagonic molecules that could explain how the mechanical properties suitable for normal cell functioning are affected and recovered.

  12. Inefficient cationic lipid-mediated siRNA and antisense oligonucleotide transfer to airway epithelial cells in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Jim

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cationic lipid Genzyme lipid (GL 67 is the current "gold-standard" for in vivo lung gene transfer. Here, we assessed, if GL67 mediated uptake of siRNAs and asODNs into airway epithelium in vivo. Methods Anti-lacZ and ENaC (epithelial sodium channel siRNA and asODN were complexed to GL67 and administered to the mouse airway epithelium in vivo Transfection efficiency and efficacy were assessed using real-time RT-PCR as well as through protein expression and functional studies. In parallel in vitro experiments were carried out to select the most efficient oligonucleotides. Results In vitro, GL67 efficiently complexed asODNs and siRNAs, and both were stable in exhaled breath condensate. Importantly, during in vitro selection of functional siRNA and asODN we noted that asODNs accumulated rapidly in the nuclei of transfected cells, whereas siRNAs remained in the cytoplasm, a pattern consistent with their presumed site of action. Following in vivo lung transfection siRNAs were only visible in alveolar macrophages, whereas asODN also transfected alveolar epithelial cells, but no significant uptake into conducting airway epithelial cells was seen. SiRNAs and asODNs targeted to β-galactosidase reduced βgal mRNA levels in the airway epithelium of K18-lacZ mice by 30% and 60%, respectively. However, this was insufficient to reduce protein expression. In an attempt to increase transfection efficiency of the airway epithelium, we increased contact time of siRNA and asODN using the in vivo mouse nose model. Although highly variable and inefficient, transfection of airway epithelium with asODN, but not siRNA, was now seen. As asODNs more effectively transfected nasal airway epithelial cells, we assessed the effect of asODN against ENaC, a potential therapeutic target in cystic fibrosis; no decrease in ENaC mRNA levels or function was detected. Conclusion This study suggests that although siRNAs and asODNs can be developed to inhibit

  13. Multifunctional Cationic Lipid-Based Nanoparticles Facilitate Endosomal Escape and Reduction-Triggered Cytosolic siRNA Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujrati, Maneesh; Malamas, Anthony; Shin, Tesia; Jin, Erlei; Sun, Lulu; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has garnered much attention in recent years as a promising avenue for cancer gene therapy due to its ability to silence disease-related genes. Effective gene silencing is contingent upon the delivery of siRNA into the cytosol of target cells and requires the implementation of delivery systems possessing multiple functionalities to overcome delivery barriers. The present work explores the multifunctional properties and biological activity of a recently developed cationic lipid carrier, (1-aminoethyl)iminobis[N-(oleicylcysteinyl-1-amino-ethyl)propionamide]) (ECO). The physicochemical properties and biological activity of ECO/siRNA nanoparticles were assessed over a range of N/P ratios to optimize the formulation. Potent and sustained luciferase silencing in a U87 glioblastoma cell line was observed, even in the presence of serum proteins. ECO/siRNA nanoparticles exhibited pH-dependent membrane disruption at pH levels corresponding to various stages of the intracellular trafficking pathway. It was found that disulfide linkages created during nanoparticle formation enhanced the protection of siRNA from degradation and facilitated site-specific siRNA release in the cytosol by glutathione-mediated reduction. Confocal microscopy confirmed that ECO/siRNA nanoparticles readily escaped from late endosomes prior to cytosolic release of the siRNA cargo. These results demonstrate that the rationally designed multifunctionality of ECO/siRNA nanoparticles is critical for intracellular siRNA delivery and the continuing development of safe and effective delivery systems. PMID:25020033

  14. Interplay of electrostatics and lipid packing determines the binding of charged polymer coated nanoparticles to model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Nupur; Bhattacharya, Rupak; Saha, Arindam; Jana, Nikhil R; Basu, Jaydeep K

    2015-10-07

    Understanding of nanoparticle-membrane interactions is useful for various applications of nanoparticles like drug delivery and imaging. Here we report on the studies of interaction between hydrophilic charged polymer coated semiconductor quantum dot nanoparticles with model lipid membranes. Atomic force microscopy and X-ray reflectivity measurements suggest that cationic nanoparticles bind and penetrate bilayers of zwitterionic lipids. Penetration and binding depend on the extent of lipid packing and result in the disruption of the lipid bilayer accompanied by enhanced lipid diffusion. On the other hand, anionic nanoparticles show minimal membrane binding although, curiously, their interaction leads to reduction in lipid diffusivity. It is suggested that the enhanced binding of cationic QDs at higher lipid packing can be understood in terms of the effective surface potential of the bilayers which is tunable through membrane lipid packing. Our results bring forth the subtle interplay of membrane lipid packing and electrostatics which determine nanoparticle binding and penetration of model membranes with further implications for real cell membranes.

  15. Molecular dynamics modelling of EGCG clusters on ceramide bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeo, Jingjie; Cheng, Yuan; Li, Weifeng; Zhang, Yong-Wei [Institute of High Performance Computing, A*STAR, 138632 (Singapore)

    2015-12-31

    A novel method of atomistic modelling and characterization of both pure ceramide and mixed lipid bilayers is being developed, using only the General Amber ForceField. Lipid bilayers modelled as pure ceramides adopt hexagonal packing after equilibration, and the area per lipid and bilayer thickness are consistent with previously reported theoretical results. Mixed lipid bilayers are modelled as a combination of ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids. This model is shown to be stable after equilibration. Green tea extract, also known as epigallocatechin-3-gallate, is introduced as a spherical cluster on the surface of the mixed lipid bilayer. It is demonstrated that the cluster is able to bind to the bilayers as a cluster without diffusing into the surrounding water.

  16. Biophysical studies of the interaction of squalamine and other cationic amphiphilic molecules with bacterial and eukaryotic membranes: importance of the distribution coefficient in membrane selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pasquale, Eric; Salmi-Smail, Chanaz; Brunel, Jean-Michel; Sanchez, Patrick; Fantini, Jacques; Maresca, Marc

    2010-02-01

    The interaction of squalamine (SQ) with eukaryotic and prokaryotic membranes was studied and compared with the interaction of two other cationic amphipathic antimicrobials (CAAs), i.e. the antibiotic polymyxin B (PMB) and the detergent hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Whole cell experiments showed that the three CAA have in common the ability to interact with lipopolysaccharide-containing membranes through a divalent cation sensitive process. Differences were found regarding their kinetics of membrane permeabilisation and their selectivity for bacteria, with a preferential permeabilisation of bacteria by PMB>SQ and no selectivity for CTAB. Experiments with lipid monolayers and bilayers showed that this selectivity did not correlate with a preferential interaction of the CAAs with lipids but rather relies on differences in their ability to penetrate lipid bilayers and to cause electrically active lesions. Incidentally, our results also suggest that the distribution coefficient of CAAs could be used to predict their selectivity for bacteria.

  17. Pharmacological modification of sodium channels from the human heart atrium in planar lipid bilayers: electrophysiological characterization of responses to batrachotoxin and pentobarbital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartenberg, H C; Wartenberg, J P; Urban, B W

    2003-05-01

    To investigate the effects of barbiturates on batrachotoxin-modified sodium channels from different regions of the human heart. Single sodium channels from human atria were studied and compared with existing data from the human ventricle and from the central nervous system. Sodium channels from preparations of human atrial muscle were incorporated into planar lipid bilayers in the presence of batrachotoxin, a sodium channel activator. The steady-state behaviour of single sodium channels was recorded in symmetrical 500 mmol NaCl before and after the addition of pentobarbital 0.34-1.34 mmol. The batrachotoxin-treated human atrial sodium channel had an average single-channel conductance of 23.8 +/- 1.6 pS in symmetrical 500 mmol NaCl and a channel fractional open time of 0.83 +/- 0.06. The activation mid-point potential was -98.0 +/- 2.3 mV. Extracellular tetrodotoxin (a specific sodium channel blocking agent) blocked these channels with a k(1/2) = 0.53 micromol at 0 mV. Pentobarbital reduced the time average conductance of single atrial sodium channels in a concentration-dependent manner (ID50 = 0.71 mmol). In the same way, the steady-state activation was shifted to more hyperpolarized potentials (-10.6 mV at 0.67 mmol pentobarbital). The properties of batrachotoxin-modified sodium channels from human atrial tissue did not differ greatly from those described for ventricular sodium channels in the literature. Our data yielded no explanation for the observed functional diversity. However, cardiac sodium channels differ from those found in the central nervous system.

  18. Effect of methanol on the phase-transition properties of glycerol-monopalmitate lipid bilayers investigated using molecular dynamics simulations: in quest of the biphasic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laner, Monika; Hünenberger, Philippe H

    2015-02-01

    The effect of methanol on the phase and phase-transition properties of a 2×8×8 glycerol-1-monopalmitate bilayer patch is investigated using a series of 239 molecular dynamics simulations on the 180 ns timescale, considering methanol concentrations cM and temperatures T in the ranges 0-12.3M and 302-338 K, respectively. The results in the form of hysteresis-corrected transition temperatures Tm are compatible with the expected features of the biphasic effect, with a reversal concentration crev of about 5.2 M. Below this concentration, the main transition is between the liquid crystal (LC) and gel (GL) phases, and Tm decreases upon increasing cM. Above this concentration, the interdigitated (ID) phase is the stable ordered phase instead, and Tm slightly increases upon increasing T up to about 10 M. The analysis of the structural and dynamical properties also reveals very different sensitivities and responses of the three phases to changes in cM. In particular, the properties of the GL phase are insensitive to cM, whereas those of the LC and ID phases are altered via an increase of the area per lipid. For the LC phase, increasing cM promotes disorder and fluidity. For the ID phase, in contrast, increasing cM up to about 10 M slightly increases the ordering and rigidity. Two side issues are also addressed, concerning: (i) the occurrence tilt-precession motions in the GL and ID phases; (ii) the influence of the pressure coupling scheme employed in the simulations, semi- or fully-anisotropic, on the simulation results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Trimethyloxonium modification of single batrachotoxin-activated sodium channels in planar bilayers. Changes in unit conductance and in block by saxitoxin and calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley JF; French, RJ; Krueger, BK

    1986-01-01

    Single batrachotoxin-activated sodium channels from rat brain were modified by trimethyloxonium (TMO) after incorporation in planar lipid bilayers. TMO modification eliminated saxitoxin (STX) sensitivity, reduced the single channel conductance by 37%, and reduced calcium block of inward sodium currents. These effects always occurred concomitantly, in an all-or-none fashion. Calcium and STX protected sodium channels from TMO modification with potencies similar to their affinities for block. Calcium inhibited STX binding to rat brain membrane vesicles and relieved toxin block of channels in bilayers, apparently by competing with STX for the toxin binding site. These results suggest that toxins, permeant cations, and blocking cations can interact with a common site on the sodium channel near the extracellular surface. It is likely that permeant cations transiently bind to this superficial site, as the first of several steps in passing inward through the channel. PMID:2419487

  20. Ligand-lipid and ligand-core affinity control the interaction of gold nanoparticles with artificial lipid bilayers and cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broda, Janine; Setzler, Julia; Leifert, Annika; Steitz, Julia; Benz, Roland; Simon, Ulrich; Wenzel, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    Interactions between nanoparticles (NPs) and biomembranes depend on the physicochemical properties of the NPs, such as size and surface charge. Here we report on the size-dependent interaction of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), stabilized with ligands differing in charge, i.e. sodium 3-(diphenylphosphino)benzene sulfonate (TPPMS) and sodium 3,3',3″-triphenylphosphine sulfonate (TPPTS), respectively, with artificial membranes (black lipid membranes; BLMs) and HeLa cells. The TPPTS-stabilized AuNPs affect BLMs at lower size than TPPMS-stabilized ones. On HeLa cells we found decreasing cytotoxicity with increasing particle size, however, with an overall lower cytotoxicity for TPPTS-stabilized AuNPs. We attribute size-dependent BLM properties as well as reduced cytotoxicity of TPPTS-stabilized AuNPs to weaker shielding of the AuNP core when stabilized with TPPTS. We hypothesize that the partially unshielded hydrophobic gold core can embed into the hydrophobic membrane interior. Thereby we demonstrate that ligand-dependent cytotoxicity of NP can occur even when the NPs are not translocated through the membrane. The use of nanoparticles (NPs) in the clinical setting means that there will be interactions between NPs and cell membranes. The authors investigated the underlying processes concerning cellular uptake and potential toxicity of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using particles with ligands different sizes and charges. The findings should further enhance existing knowledge on future design of safer NPs in the clinic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 15N and 31P solid-state NMR study of transmembrane domain alignment of M2 protein of influenza A virus in hydrated cylindrical lipid bilayers confined to anodic aluminum oxide nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Hu, Jun; Gor'kov, Peter L.; Brey, William W.; Cross, Timothy A.; Ruuge, Andres; Smirnov, Alex I.

    2005-04-01

    This communication reports the first example of a high resolution solid-state 15N 2D PISEMA NMR spectrum of a transmembrane peptide aligned using hydrated cylindrical lipid bilayers formed inside nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates. The transmembrane domain SSDPLVVA(A- 15N)SIIGILHLILWILDRL of M2 protein from influenza A virus was reconstituted in hydrated 1,2-dimyristoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine bilayers that were macroscopically aligned by a conventional micro slide glass support or by the AAO nanoporous substrate. 15N and 31P NMR spectra demonstrate that both the phospholipids and the protein transmembrane domain are uniformly aligned in the nanopores. Importantly, nanoporous AAO substrates may offer several advantages for membrane protein alignment in solid-state NMR studies compared to conventional methods. Specifically, higher thermal conductivity of aluminum oxide is expected to suppress thermal gradients associated with inhomogeneous radio frequency heating. Another important advantage of the nanoporous AAO substrate is its excellent accessibility to the bilayer surface for exposure to solute molecules. Such high accessibility achieved through the substrate nanochannel network could facilitate a wide range of structure-function studies of membrane proteins by solid-state NMR.

  2. Cationic lipid-coated PEI/DNA polyplexes with improved efficiency and reduced cytotoxicity for gene delivery into mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song HM

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Hongmei Song, Gang Wang, Bin He, Li Li, Caixia Li, Yusi Lai, Xianghui Xu, Zhongwei GuNational Engineering Research Center for Biomaterials, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: Effective gene transfection without serum deprivation is a prerequisite for successful stem cell-based gene therapy. Polyethylenimine (PEI is an efficient nonviral gene vector, but its application has been hindered by serum sensitivity and severe cytotoxicity.Methods: To solve this problem, a new family of lipopolyplexes was developed by coating PEI/DNA polyplexes with three serum-resistant cationic lipids, namely, lysinylated, histidylated, and arginylated cholesterol. The physical properties, transfection efficiency, cellular uptake, subcellular distribution, and cytotoxicity of the lipopolyplexes was investigated.Results: The outer coat composed of lysinylated or histidylated cholesterol remarkably improved the transfection efficiency of the polyplex with a low PEI/DNA ratio of 2 in the presence of serum. The resulting lysinylated and histidylated cholesterol lipopolyplexes were even more efficient than the best performing polyplex with a high PEI/DNA ratio of 10. Results from cellular uptake and subcellular distribution studies suggest that their higher transfection efficiency may result from accelerated DNA nuclear localization. The superiority of the lipopolyplexes over the best performing polyplex was also confirmed by delivering the therapeutic gene, hVEGF165. Equally importantly, the lipid coating removed the necessity of introducing excess free PEI chains into the transfection solution for higher efficiency, generating lipopolyplexes with no signs of cytotoxicity.Conclusion: Noncovalent modification of polyplexes with lysinylated and histidylated cholesterol lipids can simultaneously improve efficiency and reduce the toxicity of gene delivery under serum conditions, showing great promise for genetic modification of bone

  3. Possible mechanism of adhesion in a mica supported phospholipid bilayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertsin, Alexander; Grunze, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Phospholipid bilayers supported on hydrophilic solids like silica and mica play a substantial role in fundamental studies and technological applications of phospholipid membranes. In both cases the molecular mechanism of adhesion between the bilayer and the support is of primary interest. Since the possibilities of experimental methods in this specific area are rather limited, the methods of computer simulation acquire great importance. In this paper we use the grand canonical Monte Carlo technique and an atomistic force field to simulate the behavior of a mica supported phospholipid bilayer in pure water as a function of the distance between the bilayer and the support. The simulation reveals a possible adhesion mechanism, where the adhesion is due to individual lipid molecules that protrude from the bilayer and form widely spaced links with the support. Simultaneously, the bilayer remains separated from the bilayer by a thin water interlayer which maintains the bilayer fluidity

  4. Polymerization of diacetylene phospolipid bilayers on solid substrate: Influence of the film deposition temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morigaki, Kenichi; Schönherr, Holger; Okazaki, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Micropatterned phospholipid bilayers on solid substrates offer an attractive platform for various applications, such as high throughput drug screening. We have previously developed a photopolymerization-based methodology for generating micropatterned bilayers composed of polymerized and fluid lipid

  5. Interactions of Phospholipid Vesicles with Cationic and Anionic Oligomeric Surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao; Qiao, Fulin; Fan, Yaxun; Han, Yuchun; Wang, Yilin

    2017-07-27

    This work studied the interactions of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) with cationic ammonium surfactants and anionic sulfate or sulfonate surfactants of different oligomeric degrees, including cationic monomeric DTAB, dimeric C 12 C 3 C 12 Br 2 , and trimeric DDAD as well as anionic monomeric SDS, dimeric C 12 C 3 C 12 (SO 3 ) 2 , and trimeric TED-(C 10 SO 3 Na) 3 . The partition coefficient P of these surfactants between the DOPC vesicles and water was determined with isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) by titrating concentrated DOPC solution into the monomer solution of these surfactants. It was found that the P value increases with the increase of the surfactant oligomeric degree. Moreover, the enthalpy change and the Gibbs free energy for the transition of these surfactants from water into the DOPC bilayer become more negative with increasing the oligomeric degree. Meanwhile, the calcein release experiment proves that the surfactant with a higher oligomeric degree shows stronger ability of changing the permeability of the DOPC vesicles. Furthermore, the solubilization of the DOPC vesicles by these oligomeric surfactants was studied by ITC, turbidity, and dynamic light scattering, and thus the phase boundaries for the surfactant/lipid mixtures have been determined. The critical surfactant to lipid ratios for the onset and end of the solubilization for the DOPC vesicles derived from the phase boundaries decrease remarkably with increasing the oligomeric degree. Overall, the surfactant with a larger oligomerization degree shows stronger ability in incorporating into the lipid bilayer, altering the membrane permeability and solubilizing lipid vesicles, which provides comprehensive understanding about the effects of structure and shape of oligomeric surfactant molecules on lipid-surfactant interactions.

  6. The Effects of Alkyl Chain Combinations on the Structural and Mechanical Properties of Biomimetic Ion Pair Amphiphile Bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-hao Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ion pair amphiphile (IPA, a lipid-like complex composed of a pair of cationic and anionic surfactants, has great potentials in various pharmaceutical applications. In this work, we utilized molecular dynamics (MD simulation to systematically examine the structural and mechanical properties of the biomimetic bilayers consist of alkyltrimethyl-ammonium-alkylsulfate (CmTMA+-CnS− IPAs with various alkyl chain combinations. Our simulations show an intrinsic one-atom offset for the CmTMA+ and CnS− alignment, leading to the asymmetric index definition of ΔC = m − (n + 1. Larger |ΔC| gives rise to higher conformational fluctuations of the alkyl chains with the reduced packing order and mechanical strength. In contrast, increasing the IPA chain length enhances the van der Waals interactions within the bilayer and thus improves the bilayer packing order and mechanical properties. Further elongating the CmTMA+-CnS− alkyl chains to m and n ≥ 12 causes the liquid disorder to gel phase transition of the bilayer at 298 K, with the threshold membrane properties of 0.45 nm2 molecular area, deuterium order parameter value of 0.31, and effective bending rigidity of 20 kBT, etc. The combined results provide molecular insights into the design of biomimetic IPA bilayers with wide structural and mechanical characteristics for various applications.

  7. Biophysical changes induced by xenon on phospholipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Ryan D; Sum, Amadeu K

    2013-05-01

    Structural and dynamic changes in cell membrane properties induced by xenon, a volatile anesthetic molecule, may affect the function of membrane-mediated proteins, providing a hypothesis for the mechanism of general anesthetic action. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulation and differential scanning calorimetry to examine the biophysical and thermodynamic effects of xenon on model lipid membranes. Our results indicate that xenon atoms preferentially localize in the hydrophobic core of the lipid bilayer, inducing substantial increases in the area per lipid and bilayer thickness. Xenon depresses the membrane gel-liquid crystalline phase transition temperature, increasing membrane fluidity and lipid head group spacing, while inducing net local ordering effects in a small region of the lipid carbon tails and modulating the bilayer lateral pressure profile. Our results are consistent with a role for nonspecific, lipid bilayer-mediated mechanisms in producing xenon's general anesthetic action. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A simple, highly efficient method for heterologous expression in mammalian primary neurons using cationic lipid-mediated mRNA transfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian J Williams

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Expression of heterologous proteins in adult mammalian neurons is a valuable technique for the study of neuronal function. The postmitotic nature of mature neurons prevents effective DNA transfection using simple, cationic lipid-based methods. Adequate heterologous protein expression is often only achievable using complex techniques that, in many cases, are associated with substantial toxicity. Here, a simple method for high efficiency transfection of mammalian primary neurons using in vitro-transcribed mRNA and the cationic lipid transfection reagent Lipofectamine 2000 is described. Optimal transfection conditions were established in adult mouse dissociated dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons using a 96-well based luciferase activity assay. Using these conditions, a transfection efficiency of 25% was achieved in DRG neurons transfected with EGFP mRNA. High transfection efficiencies were also obtained in dissociated rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG neurons and mouse cortical and hippocampal cultures. Endogenous Ca2+ currents in EGFP mRNA-transfected SCG neurons were not significantly different from untransfected neurons, which suggested that this technique is well suited for heterologous expression in patch clamp recording experiments. Functional expression of a cannabinoid receptor (CB1R, a G protein inwardly-rectifying K+ channel (GIRK4 and a dominant-negative G protein α-subunit mutant (GoA G203T indicate that the levels of heterologous protein expression attainable using mRNA transfection are suitable for most functional protein studies. This study demonstrates that mRNA transfection is a straightforward and effective method for heterologous expression in neurons and is likely to have many applications in neuroscience research.

  9. Effect of lipid composition of cationic SUV liposomes on materno-fetal transfer of warfarin across the perfused human term placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajoria, R; Sooranna, S; Chatterjee, R

    2013-12-01

    Use of drugs that cross the placenta freely are currently avoided during pregnancy. We investigated whether cationic small unilamellar (SUV) liposomes of different lipid compositions could prevent the transfer and uptake of warfarin across human term placenta. Cationic liposomes encapsulated warfarin was prepared by using lecithin (F-SUV) or sterylamine (S-SUV) with cholesterol and stearylamine. The size distribution, encapsulation efficiency, and stability were determined in blood-based media. The transfer kinetics of free and liposomally encapsulated warfarin were studied in a dually perfused isolated lobule of human term placenta with creatinine. Concentrations of warfarin were measured by fluorimetry. Data are expressed as % of initial dose added and given as mean ± sd. Warfarin crossed the placenta freely (14.9 ± 1.1%). Trans placental transfer of warfarin was significantly reduced by F-SUV (6.4 ± 0.6%; P < 0.001) and S-SUV liposomes (5.0 ± 0.8%; P < 0.001). Placental uptake of F-SUV (6.3 ± 1.7%; P < 0.001) was greater than that of S-SUV liposomes (2.2 ± 0.5%; P < 0.001). Our data suggest that cationic liposomes reduce trans placental transfer of warfarin. If confirmed "in vivo", liposomes might provide an alternative non-invasive method of drug delivery to the mother. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The effects of hydration and divalent cations on lamellar-nonlamellar phase transitions in membranes and total lipid extracts from Acholeplasma laidlawii A-EF22 - a 2H NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemi, A.E.; Andersson, A.S.; Rilfors, L.; Lindblom, G.; Arvidson, G.

    1997-01-01

    Acholeplasma laidlawii strain A-EF22 was grown in a medium supplemented with 75 μm α-deuterated palmitic acid (16:0-d 2 ) and 75 μm α-deuterated oleic acid (18:1c-d 2 ), or with 150 μm 18:1c-d 2 . The fatty acids were incorporated into the membrane lipids and 2 H NMR spectra were recorded from intact membranes, total lipid extracts, and the combined glucolipid and neutral lipid fractions of a total lipid extract. The lipids in intact membranes form a bilayer structure up to at least 70 C. The same result was obtained with membranes digested with pronase, which removes a large fraction of the membrane proteins. A reversed hexagonal liquid crystalline (H II ) phase was formed below 70 C by the total lipid extracts hydrated with 20 and 30% (w/w) water; in the presence of 40% (w/w) water only one of the extracts formed an H II phase below 70 C. The H II phase was formed at higher temperatures with an increasing water content. However, only a lamellar liquid crystalline (L α ) phase was formed up to 70 C by the total lipid extracts when the water concentrations were 50% (w/w) or higher. The temperature (T LH ) for the L α to H II phase transition in the combined glucolipid and neutral lipid fractions was only 2-3 C lower than for the total lipids, and the phospholipids thus have a very modest influence on the T LH value. Physiologically relevant concentrations of Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ ions did not affect the phase equilibria of total lipid extracts significantly. It is concluded from comparison with published data that the membrane lipids of the cell wall-less bacterium A. laidlawii have a smaller tendency to form reversed nonlamellar phases than the membrane lipids of three bacterial species surrounded by a cell wall. (orig.)

  11. Binding of Serotonin to Lipid Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Wang, Chunhua; Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj

    2013-01-01

    with the lipid matrix of the synaptic membrane. However, membrane–5-HT interactions remain controversial and superficially investigated. Fundamental knowledge of this interaction appears vital in discussions of putative roles of 5-HT, and we have addressed this by thermodynamic measurements and molecular...... dynamics (MD) simulations. 5-HT was found to interact strongly with lipid bilayers (partitioning coefficient ∼1200 in mole fraction units), and this is highly unusual for a hydrophilic solute like 5-HT which has a bulk, oil–water partitioning coefficient well below unity. It follows that membrane affinity...... must rely on specific interactions, and the MD simulations identified the salt-bridge between the primary amine of 5-HT and the lipid phosphate group as the most important interaction. This interaction anchored cationic 5-HT in the membrane interface with the aromatic ring system pointing inward...

  12. Optimization and physicochemical characterization of a cationic lipid-phosphatidylcholine mixed emulsion formulated as a highly efficient vehicle that facilitates adenoviral gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim SY

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Soo-Yeon Kim,1,2 Sang-Jin Lee,2 Jin-Ki Kim,3 Han-Gon Choi,3 Soo-Jeong Lim1 1Department of Bioscience and Bioengineering, Sejong University, Seoul, Kwangjin-gu, Seoul, 2Immunotherapeutics Branch, Research Institute, National Cancer Center, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, 3College of Pharmacy & Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Hanyang University, Sangnok-gu, Ansan, Republic of Korea Abstract: Cationic lipid-based nanoparticles enhance viral gene transfer by forming electrostatic complexes with adenoviral vectors. We recently demonstrated the superior complexation capabilities of 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane (DOTAP emulsion compared with a liposomal counterpart but the cytotoxicity of DOTAP emulsions remained a challenge. The present study is aimed at formulating an emulsion capable of acting as a highly effective viral gene transfer vehicle with reduced cytotoxicity and to physicochemically characterize the structures of virus-emulsion complexes in comparison with virus–liposome complexes when the only difference between emulsions and liposomes was the presence or absence of inner oil core. The emulsion formulation was performed by 1 reducing the content of DOTAP while increasing the content of zwitterionic lipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC, and 2 optimizing the oil content. The complexation capability of formulated DOTAP:DMPC mixed emulsions was similar to those of emulsions containing DOTAP alone while displaying significantly lower cytotoxicity. The complexation capabilities of the DOTAP:DMPC mixed emulsion were serum-compatible and were monitored in a variety of cell types, whereas its liposomal counterpart was totally ineffective. Characterization by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and dynamic light scattering studies indicated that the optimized emulsions spontaneously surrounded the virus particles to generate emulsions that

  13. A new optimized formulation of cationic solid lipid nanoparticles intended for gene delivery: development, characterization and DNA binding efficiency of TCERG1 expression plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fàbregas, Anna; Sánchez-Hernández, Noemí; Ticó, Josep Ramon; García-Montoya, Encarna; Pérez-Lozano, Pilar; Suñé-Negre, Josep M; Hernández-Munain, Cristina; Suñé, Carlos; Miñarro, Montserrat

    2014-10-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) are being considered as a new approach for therapeutics for many known diseases. In addition to drug delivery, their use as non-viral vectors for gene delivery can be achieved by the inclusion of cationic lipids, which provide a positive surface potential that favours binding to the DNA backbone. This work is based on the idea that the optimization of the components is required as the first step in simplifying the qualitative and quantitative composition of SLNs as much as possible without affecting the essential properties that define SLNs as optimal non-viral vectors for gene delivery. We selected the best lipids and surfactants in terms of particle size and zeta potential and characterized the properties of the resulting nanoparticles using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The SLNs had a particle size of approximately 120 nm and a positive surface charge of 42 mV. In addition, we analysed the main physicochemical characteristics of the bulk components of the nanoparticles using X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and mass spectrometry (MS). The suitability of the optimized SLNs for DNA binding was evaluated after the lyophilisation process using a carboxyl-terminal region of the TCERG1 gene, a human factor that has been implicated in several diseases. We show that the SLNs presented high efficiency in the binding of DNA, and importantly, they presented no toxicity when assayed in an in vivo system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Bilayer interfacial properties modulate the binding of amphipathic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allende, Daniel; Vidal, Adriana; Simon, Sidney A; McIntosh, Thomas J

    2003-01-01

    The free energy of transfer (DeltaG degrees ) from water to lipid bilayers was measured for two amphipathic peptides, the presequence of the mitochondrial peptide rhodanese (MPR) and melittin. Experiments were designed to determine the effects on peptide partitioning of the addition of lipids that produce structural modifications to the bilayer/water interface. In particular, the addition of cholesterol or the cholesterol analog 6-ketocholestanol increases the bilayer area compressibility modulus, indicating that these molecules modify lipid-lipid interactions in the plane of the bilayer. The addition of 6-ketocholestanol or lipids with attached polyethylene glycol chains (PEG-lipids) modify the effective thickness of the interfacial region; 6-ketocholestanol increases the width of hydrophilic headgroup region in the direction of the acyl chains whereas the protruding PEG chains of PEG-lipids increase the structural width of the headgroup region into the surrounding aqueous phase. The incorporation of PEG-lipids with PEG molecular weights of 2000 or 5000 had no appreciable effect on peptide partitioning that could not be accounted for by the presence of surface charge. However, for both MPR and melittin DeltaG degrees decreased linearly with increasing bilayer compressibility modulus, demonstrating the importance of bilayer mechanical properties in the binding of amphipathic peptides.

  15. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Osman; Koch, Peter D; Klug, William S; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-04-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology allows accurate prediction of thickness-mediated protein interactions for arbitrary protein symmetries at arbitrary protein separations and relative orientations. We provide exact analytic solutions for cylindrical integral membrane proteins with constant and varying hydrophobic thickness, and develop perturbative analytic solutions for noncylindrical protein shapes. We complement these analytic solutions, and assess their accuracy, by developing both finite element and finite difference numerical solution schemes. We provide error estimates of our numerical solution schemes and systematically assess their convergence properties. Taken together, the work presented here puts into place an analytic and numerical framework which allows calculation of bilayer-mediated elastic interactions between integral membrane proteins for the complicated protein shapes suggested by structural biology and at the small protein separations most relevant for the crowded membrane

  16. Lipid somersaults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; Menon, Anant K.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane lipids diffuse rapidly in the plane of the membrane but their ability to flip spontaneously across a membrane bilayer is hampered by a significant energy barrier. Thus spontaneous flip-flop of polar lipids across membranes is very slow, even though it must occur rapidly to support diverse...... aspects of cellular life. Here we discuss the mechanisms by which rapid flip-flop occurs, and what role lipid flipping plays in membrane homeostasis and cell growth. We focus on conceptual aspects, highlighting mechanistic insights from biochemical and in silico experiments, and the recent, ground......-breaking identification of a number of lipid scramblases....

  17. Self-assembling bilayers of palladiumthiolates in organic media

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    length. There is evidence to suggest that the alkyl chains are orientationally disordered especially prior to melting. Keywords. Self-assembling bilayers; palladiumthiolates; lamellar structures. 1. Introduction. Lipid bilayers have long been recognized as being central to molecular organization. Synthetic analogues mimicking ...

  18. Cationic lipid-based nanoparticles mediate functional delivery of acetate to tumor cells in vivo leading to significant anticancer effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brody LP

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Leigh P Brody,1,* Meliz Sahuri-Arisoylu,1,* James R Parkinson,1 Harry G Parkes,2 Po Wah So,3 Nabil Hajji,4 E Louise Thomas,1 Gary S Frost,5 Andrew D Miller,6,* Jimmy D Bell1,* 1Department of Life Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Westminster, 2CR-UK Clinical MR Research Group, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey, 3Department of Neuroimaging, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College London, 4Department of Medicine, Division of Experimental Medicine, Centre for Pharmacology & Therapeutics, Toxicology Unit, Imperial College London, 5Faculty of Medicine, Nutrition and Dietetic Research Group, Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Investigative Medicine, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, 6Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, King’s College London, London, UK *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Metabolic reengineering using nanoparticle delivery represents an innovative therapeutic approach to normalizing the deregulation of cellular metabolism underlying many diseases, including cancer. Here, we demonstrated a unique and novel application to the treatment of malignancy using a short-chain fatty acid (SCFA-encapsulated lipid-based delivery system – liposome-encapsulated acetate nanoparticles for cancer applications (LITA-CAN. We assessed chronic in vivo administration of our nanoparticle in three separate murine models of colorectal cancer. We demonstrated a substantial reduction in tumor growth in the xenograft model of colorectal cancer cell lines HT-29, HCT-116 p53+/+ and HCT-116 p53-/-. Nanoparticle-induced reductions in histone deacetylase gene expression indicated a potential mechanism for these anti-proliferative effects. Together, these results indicated that LITA-CAN could be used as an effective direct or adjunct therapy to treat malignant transformation in vivo. Keywords: lipid-based nanoparticles, liposomes

  19. Lipids, lipid droplets and lipoproteins in their cellular context; an ultrastructural approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesman, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    Lipids are essential for cellular life, functioning either organized as bilayer membranes to compartmentalize cellular processes, as signaling molecules or as metabolic energy storage. Our current knowledge on lipid organization and cellular lipid homeostasis is mainly based on biochemical data.

  20. Dispersion of fullerenes in phospholipid bilayers and the subsequent phase changes in the host bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeng, U-S. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30077, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: usjeng@nsrrc.org.tw; Hsu, C.-H. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30077, Taiwan (China); Lin, T.-L. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Wu, C.-M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Chen, H.-L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Tai, L.-A. [Department of Chemistry, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Hwang, K.-C. [Department of Chemistry, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2005-02-28

    We have studied the structure and phase transition characteristics of the fullerenes (C{sub 60})-embedded lipid bilayers. With small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we have observed a degradation of bilayer ordering and a suppression effect on the phase transitions of the host vesicle bilayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), due to the embedment of fullerenes. The fullerene-embedded lipid system with substrate-oriented bilayers is also investigated using X-ray reflectivity and grazing incident small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). In the depth direction, the multilamellar peaks observed in the X-ray reflectivity profile for the oriented DPPC/C{sub 60} bilayers reveal a larger head-to-head distance D{sub HH} of 50.6 A and a bilayer spacing D of 59.8 A, compared to the D{sub HH}=47.7 A and D=59.5 A for a pure DPPC membrane measured at the same conditions. Furthermore, the lipid head layers and water layers in the extracted electron density profile for the complex system are highly smeared, implying a fluctuating or corrugated structure in this zone. Correspondingly, GISAXS for the oriented DPPC/C{sub 60} membrane reveals stronger diffuse scatterings along the membrane plane than that for the pure DPPC system, indicating a higher in-plane correlation associated with the embedded fullerenes.

  1. Determination of the electroporation onset of bilayer lipid membranes as a novel approach to establish ternary phase diagrams: example of the L-α-PC/SM/cholesterol system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Uitert, I.; le Gac, Severine; van den Berg, Albert

    2010-01-01

    The lipid matrix of cell membranes contains phospholipids belonging to two main classes, glycero- and sphingolipids, as well as cholesterol. This matrix can exist in different phases, liquid disordered (l(d)), liquid ordered (l(o)) and possibly solid (s(o)), or even a combination of these. The

  2. Effect of piroxicam on lipid membranes: Drug encapsulation and gastric toxicity aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkosz, Natalia; Rissanen, Sami; Cyza, Małgorzata; Szybka, Renata; Nowakowska, Maria; Bunker, Alex; Róg, Tomasz; Kepczynski, Mariusz

    2017-03-30

    Uptake of piroxicam, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, from the intestines after oral intake is limited due to its low solubility and its wide use is associated with several side effects related to the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and fluorescent spectroscopy were employed to investigate the interaction of piroxicam in neutral, zwitterionic, and cationic forms with lipid bilayers composed of phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol, and PEGylated lipids. Our study was aimed to assess the potential for encapsulation of piroxicam in liposomal carriers and to shed more light on the process of gastrointestinal tract injury by the drug. Through both the MD simulations and laser scanning confocal microscopy, we have demonstrated that all forms of piroxicam can associate with the lipid bilayers and locate close to the water-membrane interface. Conventional liposomes used in drug delivery are usually stabilized by the addition of cholesterol and have their bloodstream lifetime extended through the inclusion of PEGylated lipids in the formulation to create a protective polymer corona. For this reason, we tested the effect of these two modifications on the behavior of piroxicam in the membrane. When the bilayer was PEGylated, piroxicam localize to the PEG layer and within the lipid headgroup region. This suggests that PEGylated liposomes are capable of carrying a larger quantity of piroxicam than the conventional ones. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Protein-lipid interactions: from membrane domains to cellular networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tamm, Lukas K

    2005-01-01

    ... membranes is the lipid bilayer. Embedded in the fluid lipid bilayer are proteins of various shapes and traits. This volume illuminates from physical, chemical and biological angles the numerous - mostly quite weak - interactions between lipids, proteins, and proteins and lipids that define the delicate, highly dynamic and yet so stable fabri...

  4. Light-driven formation and rupture of droplet bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Sanhita S; Kim, Hanyoup; Vasilyev, Arseny; Eid, Aya; Faris, Gregory W

    2010-05-04

    We demonstrate the optical manipulation of nanoliter aqueous droplets containing surfactant or lipid molecules and immersed in an organic liquid using near-infrared light. The resulting emulsion droplets are manipulated using both the thermocapillary effect and convective fluid motion. Droplet-pair interactions induced in the emulsion upon optical initiation and control provide direct observations of the coalescence steps in intricate detail. Droplet-droplet adhesion (bilayer formation) is observed under several conditions. Selective bilayer rupture is also realized using the same infrared laser. The technique provides a novel approach to studying thin film drainage and interface stability in emulsion dynamics. The formation of stable lipid bilayers at the adhesion interface between interacting water droplets can provide an optical platform on which to build droplet-based lipid bilayer assays. The technique also has relevance to understanding and improving microfluidics applications by devising Petri dish-based droplet assays requiring no substrate fabrication.

  5. Actinide cation-cation complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoyer, N.J.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1994-12-01

    The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO 2 + ) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO 2 + ; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO 2 + cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO 2 + ·UO 2 2+ , was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO 2 + species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO 2 + have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO 2 + cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe 3+ and Cr 3+ and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO 2 + ·UO 2 2+ , NpO 2 + ·Th 4+ , PuO 2 + ·UO 2 2+ , and PuO 2 + ·Th 4+ at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 ± 0.2, 1.8 ± 0.9, 2.2 ± 1.5, and ∼0.8 M -1

  6. Ionic strength and composition govern the elasticity of biological membranes. A study of model DMPC bilayers by force- and transmission IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šegota, Suzana; Vojta, Danijela; Pletikapić, Galja; Baranović, Goran

    2015-02-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy was used to quantify the ion mixture effect of seawater (SW), particularly the contribution of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) as dominant divalent cations, on the thermotropic phase behaviour of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-posphocholine (DMPC) bilayers. The changed character of the main transition at 24 °C from sharp to gradual in films and the 1 °C shift of the main transition temperature in dispersions reflect the interactions of lipid headgroups with the ions in SW. Force spectroscopy was used to quantify the nanomechanical hardness of a DMPC supported lipid bilayer (SLB). Considering the electrostatic and ion binding equilibrium contributions while systematically probing the SLB in various salt solutions, we showed that ionic strength had a decisive influence on its nanomechanics. The mechanical hardness of DMPC SLBs in the liquid crystalline phase linearly increases with the increasing fraction of all ion-bound lipids in a series of monovalent salt solutions. It also linearly increases in the gel phase but almost three times faster (the corresponding slopes are 4.9 nN/100 mM and 13.32 nN/100 mM, respectively). We also showed that in the presence of divalent ions (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) the bilayer mechanical hardness was unproportionally increased, and that was accompanied with the decrease of Na(+) ion and increase of Cl(-) ion bound lipids. The underlying process is a cooperative and competitive ion binding in both the gel and the liquid crystalline phase. Bilayer hardness thus turned out to be very sensitive to ionic strength as well as to ionic composition of the surrounding medium. In particular, the indicated correlation helped us to emphasize the colligative properties of SW as a naturally occurring complex ion mixture. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cholesterol interactions with fluid-phase phospholipids: effect on the lateral organization of the bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halling, Katrin K; Ramstedt, Bodil; Nyström, Joel H; Slotte, J Peter; Nyholm, Thomas K M

    2008-10-01

    The lateral organization of lipids and proteins in cell membranes is recognized as an important factor in several cellular processes. Cholesterol is thought to function as a modulator of the lateral segregation of lipids into cholesterol-poor and cholesterol-rich domains. We investigated how the affinity of cholesterol for different phospholipids, as seen in cholesterol partitioning between methyl-beta-cyclodextrin and large unilamellar vesicles, was reflected in the lateral organization of lipids in complex bilayers. We especially wanted to determine how the low-T(m) lipid affected the lateral structure. Partition experiments showed that cholesterol had a higher affinity for N-oleoyl-sphingomyelin (OSM) than for palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers, but the highest preference was for N-palmitoyl-sphingomyelin (PSM)-containing bilayers. Partial phase diagrams of POPC/PSM/cholesterol and OSM/PSM/cholesterol bilayers at 23 degrees C and 37 degrees C were used to gain insight into the lateral organization of lipids in bilayers. Analysis of phase diagrams revealed that the phospholipid composition of cholesterol-poor and cholesterol-rich domains reflected the affinity that cholesterol exhibited toward bilayers composed of different lipids. Therefore, the determined affinity of cholesterol for different phospholipid bilayers was useful in predicting the cholesterol-induced lateral segregation of lipids in complex bilayers.

  8. Lipid protrusions membrane softness, and enzymatic activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Østergaard; Høyrup, P.; Callisen, T.H.

    2004-01-01

    The activity of phospholipase A(2) on lipid bilayers displays a characteristic lag burst behavior that has previously been shown to reflect the physical properties of the substrate. It has remained unclear which underlying molecular mechanism is responsible for this phenomenon. We propose here...... protrusion modes and mechanical softness of phospholipid bilayers and on the other side the activity of enzymes acting on lipid bilayers composed of different unsaturated lipids. Specifically, our experiments show a correlation between the bilayer bending rigidity and the apparent Arrhenius activation energy...

  9. Amphiphilic DNA tiles for controlled insertion and 2D assembly on fluid lipid membranes: the effect on mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohno, Chikara; Makishi, Shingo; Nakatani, Kazuhiko; Contera, Sonia

    2017-03-02

    Future lipid membrane-associated DNA nanostructures are expected to find applications ranging from synthetic biology to nanomedicine. Here we have designed and synthesized DNA tiles and modified them with amphiphilic covalent moieties. dod-DEG groups, which consist of a hydrophilic diethylene glycol (DEG) and a hydrophobic dodecyl group, are introduced at the phosphate backbone to create amphiphilic DNA strands which are subsequently introduced into one face of the DNA tiles. In this way the tile becomes able to stably bind to lipid membranes by insertion of the hydrophobic groups inside the bilayer core. The functionalized tiles do not aggregate in solution. Our results show that these amphiphilic DNA tiles can bind and assemble into 2D lattices on both gel and fluid lipid bilayers. The binding of the DNA structures to membranes is dependent on the lipid phase of the membrane, the concentration of Mg 2+ cations, the length of the amphiphilic modifications to the DNA as well as on the density of the modifications within the tile. Atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy is used to investigate the effect of the inserted DNA tiles on the mechanical properties of the lipid membranes. The results indicate that the insertion of DNA tiles produces an approx. 20% increase of the bilayer breakthrough force.

  10. Anchoring of self-assembled plasmid DNA/ anti-DNA antibody/cationic lipid micelles on bisphosphonate-modified stent for cardiovascular gene delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma G

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Guilei Ma,1,# Yong Wang,1,# Ilia Fishbein,2 Mei Yu,1 Linhua Zhang,1 Ivan S Alferiev,2 Jing Yang,1 Cunxian Song,1 Robert J Levy2 1Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 2Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Abramson Research Building, Philadelphia, PA, USA #These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: To investigate the anchoring of plasmid DNA/anti-DNA antibody/cationic lipid tri-complex (DAC micelles onto bisphosphonate-modified 316 L coronary stents for cardiovascular site-specific gene delivery. Methods: Stents were first modified with polyallylamine bisphosphonate (PAA-BP, thereby enabling the retention of a PAA-BP molecular monolayer that permits the anchoring (via vector-binding molecules of DAC micelles. DAC micelles were then chemically linked onto the PAA-BP-modified stents by using N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithiol-propionate (SPDP as a crosslinker. Rhodamine-labeled DNA was used to assess the anchoring of DAC micelles, and radioactive-labeled antibody was used to evaluate binding capacity and stability. DAC micelles (encoding green fluorescent protein were tethered onto the PAA-BP-modified stents, which were assessed in cell culture. The presence of a PAA-BP molecular monolayer on the steel surface was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscope analysis. Results: The anchoring of DAC micelles was generally uniform and devoid of large-scale patches of defects. Isotopic quantification confirmed that the amount of antibody chemically linked on the stents was 17-fold higher than that of the physical adsorbed control stents and its retention time was also significantly longer. In cell culture, numerous green fluorescent protein-positive cells were found on the PAA-BP modified stents, which demonstrated high localization and efficiency of gene delivery. Conclusion: The DAC micelle

  11. Thermotropic and Barotropic Phase Behavior of Phosphatidylcholine Bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobutake Tamai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilayers formed by phospholipids are frequently used as model biological membranes in various life science studies. A characteristic feature of phospholipid bilayers is to undergo a structural change called a phase transition in response to environmental changes of their surroundings. In this review, we focus our attention on phase transitions of some major phospholipids contained in biological membranes, phosphatidylcholines (PCs, depending on temperature and pressure. Bilayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC, which is the most representative lipid in model membrane studies, will first be explained. Then, the bilayer phase behavior of various kinds of PCs with different molecular structures is revealed from the temperature–pressure phase diagrams, and the difference in phase stability among these PC bilayers is discussed in connection with the molecular structure of the PC molecules. Furthermore, the solvent effect on the phase behavior is also described briefly.

  12. Design and synthesis of short amphiphilic cationic peptidomimetics based on biphenyl backbone as antibacterial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppusamy, Rajesh; Yasir, Muhammad; Berry, Thomas; Cranfield, Charles G; Nizalapur, Shashidhar; Yee, Eugene; Kimyon, Onder; Taunk, Aditi; Ho, Kitty K K; Cornell, Bruce; Manefield, Mike; Willcox, Mark; Black, David StC; Kumar, Naresh

    2018-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and their synthetic mimics have received recent interest as new alternatives to traditional antibiotics in attempts to overcome the rise of antibiotic resistance in many microbes. AMPs are part of the natural defenses of most living organisms and they also have a unique mechanism of action against bacteria. Herein, a new series of short amphiphilic cationic peptidomimetics were synthesized by incorporating the 3'-amino-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-carboxylic acid backbone to mimic the essential properties of natural AMPs. By altering hydrophobicity and charge, we identified the most potent analogue 25g that was active against both Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (MIC = 15.6 μM) and Gram-negative Escherichia coli (MIC = 7.8 μM) bacteria. Cytoplasmic permeability assay results revealed that 25g acts primarily by depolarization of lipids in cytoplasmic membranes. The active compounds were also investigated for their cytotoxicity to human cells, lysis of lipid bilayers using tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs) and their activity against established biofilms of S. aureus and E. coli. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Single channel analysis of membrane proteins in artificial bilayer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Philipp; Harsman, Anke; Wagner, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The planar lipid bilayer technique is a powerful experimental approach for electrical single channel recordings of pore-forming membrane proteins in a chemically well-defined and easily modifiable environment. Here we provide a general survey of the basic materials and procedures required to set up a robust bilayer system and perform electrophysiological single channel recordings of reconstituted proteins suitable for the in-depth characterization of their functional properties.

  14. Cluster Formation of Polyphilic Molecules Solvated in a DPPC Bilayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Yang Guo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We analyse the initial stages of cluster formation of polyphilic additive molecules which are solvated in a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC lipid bilayer. Our polyphilic molecules comprise an aromatic (trans-bilayer core domain with (out-of-bilayer glycerol terminations, complemented with a fluorophilic and an alkyl side chain, both of which are confined within the aliphatic segment of the bilayer. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations (1 μ s total duration of a set of six of such polyphilic additives reveal the initial steps towards supramolecular aggregation induced by the specific philicity properties of the molecules. For our intermediate system size of six polyphiles, the transient but recurrent formation of a trimer is observed on a characteristic timescale of about 100 ns. The alkane/perfluoroalkane side chains show a very distinct conformational distribution inside the bilayer thanks to their different philicity, despite their identical anchoring in the trans-bilayer segment of the polyphile. The diffusive mobility of the polyphilic additives is about the same as that of the surrounding lipids, although it crosses both bilayer leaflets and tends to self-associate.

  15. Novel non-viral vectors for gene delivery: synthesis of a second-generation library of mono-functionalized poly-(guanidinium)amines and their introduction into cationic lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byk, G; Soto, J; Mattler, C; Frederic, M; Scherman, D

    1998-01-01

    The development of new gene delivery technologies is a prerequisite towards gene therapy clinical trials. Because gene delivery mediated by viral vectors remains of limited scope due to immunological and propagation risks, the development of new non-viral gene delivery systems is of crucial importance. We have synthesized a secondary library of mono-functionalized poly-(guanidinium)amines generated from a library of mono-functionalized polyamines applying the concept of "libraries from libraries." The method allows a quick and easy access to mono-functionalized geometrically varied poly-(guanidinium)amines. The new building blocks were introduced into cationic lipids to obtain novel poly-(guanidinium)amine lipids, which are potential DNA vectors for gene delivery. Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. A microassay for the determination of soluble and membrane-bound glutamate decarboxylase activity--influences of cations, lipid composition, and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate on the glutamate decarboxylase binding to liposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagel, C.; Fleissner, A.; Seifert, R.

    1989-01-01

    A radiochemical microassay for soluble and membrane-bound glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is described. Up to 180 samples can be determined per day with a variation coefficient of 2%. The method detects newly synthesized gamma-amino-n-butyric acid in the picomole range and can easily be applied to other enzymes whose substrate and product differ by charge. In an aqueous homogenate of brain (1 + 10; w/v) about 15% of the total GAD activity are spun down by centrifugation (1 h, 100,000g) increasing to 35% of the total GAD activity in solutions with 8 mM calcium chloride or 100 mM potassium acetate. There is similar dependence on the cation concentration when GAD binds to phospholipid vesicles (liposomes) as well as dependence on lipid concentration and lipid composition. The coenzyme pyridoxal 5'-phosphate has no influence on GAD binding to liposomes

  17. Transport limits in defect-engineered LaAlO3/SrTiO3 bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunkel, F.; Wicklein, S.; Hoffmann-Eifert, S.; Meuffels, P.; Brinks, Peter; Huijben, Mark; Waser, R.; Dittmann, R.

    2014-01-01

    The electrical properties of the metallic interface in LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) bilayers are investigated with focus on the role of cationic defects in thin film STO. Systematic growth-control of the STO thin film cation stoichiometry (defect-engineering) yields a relation between cationic defects in

  18. The Molecular Structure of a Phosphatidylserine Bilayer Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Jianjun [University of South Florida, Tampa (USF); Cheng, Xiaolin [ORNL; Monticelli, Luca [Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) and INTS, France; Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL; Kucerka, Norbert [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,; Tieleman, D. Peter [University of Calgary, ALberta, Canada; Katsaras, John [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids play essential roles in biological processes, including enzyme activation and apoptosis. We report on the molecular structure and atomic scale interactions of a fluid bilayer composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS). A scattering density profile model, aided by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was developed to jointly refine different contrast small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data, which yielded a lipid area of 62.7 A2 at 25 C. MD simulations with POPS lipid area constrained at different values were also performed using all-atom and aliphatic united-atom models. The optimal simulated bilayer was obtained using a model-free comparison approach. Examination of the simulated bilayer, which agrees best with the experimental scattering data, reveals a preferential interaction between Na+ ions and the terminal serine and phosphate moieties. Long-range inter-lipid interactions were identified, primarily between the positively charged ammonium, and the negatively charged carboxylic and phosphate oxygens. The area compressibility modulus KA of the POPS bilayer was derived by quantifying lipid area as a function of surface tension from area-constrained MD simulations. It was found that POPS bilayers possess a much larger KA than that of neutral phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. We propose that the unique molecular features of POPS bilayers may play an important role in certain physiological functions.

  19. Photolithographic Polymerization of Diacetylene-Containing Phospholipid Bilayers Studied by Multimode Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morigaki, Kenichi; Schönherr, Holger; Frank, Curtis W.; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Photopolymerization of the diacetylene-containing phospholipid 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (1) in substrate-supported planar lipid bilayers (SPBs) has been studied by using multimode atomic force microscopy (AFM). Monolayers and bilayers of 1 have been transferred onto

  20. Ca2+-induced isotropic motion and phosphatidylcholine flip-flop in phosphatidylcholine-cardiolipin bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, W.J.; Kruijff, B. de; Verkleij, A.J.; Gier, J. de; Deenen, L.L.M. van

    1980-01-01

    Ca2+ induces a structural change in phosphatidylcholine-cardiolipin bilayers, which is visualised by freeze-fracturing as lipidic particles associated with the bilayer and is detected by 31P-NMR as isotropic motion of the phospholipids. In this structure a rapid transbilayer movement of

  1. Methodological issues in lipid bilayer simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anezo, C; de Vries, AH; Holtje, HD; Tieleman, DP; Marrink, SJ

    2003-01-01

    Methodological issues in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, such as the treatment of long-range electrostatic interactions or the type of pressure coupling, have important consequences for the equilibrium properties observed. We report a series of long (up to 150 ns) MD simulations of

  2. High yield, reproducible and quasi-automated bilayer formation in a microfluidic format

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulze Greiving-Stimberg, Verena Carolin; Bomer, Johan G.; van Uitert, I.; van den Berg, Albert; le Gac, Severine

    2013-01-01

    A microfluidic platform is reported for various experimentation schemes on cell membrane models and membrane proteins using a combination of electrical and optical measurements, including confocal microscopy. Bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) are prepared in the device upon spontaneous and

  3. Effect of electrostatic interaction between fluoxetine and lipid membranes on the partitioning of fluoxetine investigated using second derivative spectrophotometry and FTIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Tien T T; Dao, Uyen P N; Bui, Huong T; Nguyen, Trang T

    2017-10-01

    The interaction between a drug molecule and lipid bilayers is highly important regarding the pharmaceutical activity of the drug. In this study, the interaction of fluoxetine, a well-known selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant and lipid bilayers composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) (DPPG) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) was studied from the aspect of electrostatics using second derivative spectrophotometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in order to provide insights into the drug behavior. Changing pH from 7.4 to 9.5 to increases the neutral state of fluoxetine, the partitioning of fluoxetine into the zwitterionic DPPC large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) was increased whereas it was reduced into the negatively charged DPPG LUVs. Fluoxetine was found to exhibit a disordering effect on the acyl chains of DPPC and DPPG bilayers upon its partitioning. In addition, increasing concentration of NaCl lessened the binding of fluoxetine into DPPG bilayers due to the reduction in electrostatic attraction between positively charged fluoxetine and negatively charged DPPG LUVs. In addition, the FTIR study revealed that increasing the NaCl concentration could trigger the shift to higher frequency of the CH 2 stretching as well as the notable blue shift in the PO 2 - regions of DPPG, indicating that fluoxetine had deeper penetration into DPPG LUVs. The differences in the NaCl concentration showed a negligible effect on the incorporation of fluoxetine into the zwitterionic DPPC LUVs. In summary, the electrostatic interaction plays an important role on the partitioning of a cationic amphiphilic SSIR drug into the lipid bilayers and the drug partitioning induces the lipids' conformational change. These imply a possible influence on the drug pharmacology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. AFM characterization of solid-supported lipid multilayers prepared by spin-coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompeo, G; Girasole, M; Cricenti, A; Cattaruzza, F; Flamini, A; Prosperi, T; Generosi, J; Castellano, A Congiu

    2005-06-15

    Lipids are the principal components of biologically relevant structures as cellular membranes. They have been the subject of many studies due to their biological relevance and their potential applications. Different techniques, such as Langmuir-Blodgett and vesicle-fusion deposition, are available to deposit ordered lipid films on etched surfaces. Recently, a new technique of lipid film deposition has been proposed in which stacks of a small and well-controlled number of bilayers are prepared on a suitable substrate using a spin-coater. We studied the morphological properties of multi-layers made of cationic and neutral lipids (DOTAP and DOPC) and mixtures of them using dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). After adapting and optimizing, the spin-coating technique to deposit lipids on a chemically etched Silicon (1,0,0) substrate, a morphological nanometer-scale characterization of the aforementioned samples has been provided. The AFM study showed that an initial layer of ordered vesicles is formed and, afterward, depending on details of the spin-coating preparation protocol and to the dimension of the silicon substrate, vesicle fusion and structural rearrangements of the lipid layers may occur. The present data disclose the possibility to control the lipid's structures by acting on spin-coating parameters with promising perspectives for novel applications of lipid films.

  5. Light-Patterned Current Generation in a Droplet Bilayer Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo Schild, Vanessa; Booth, Michael J.; Box, Stuart J.; Olof, Sam N.; Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R.; Bayley, Hagan

    2017-04-01

    We have created a 4 × 4 droplet bilayer array comprising light-activatable aqueous droplet bio-pixels. Aqueous droplets containing bacteriorhodopsin (bR), a light-driven proton pump, were arranged on a common hydrogel surface in lipid-containing oil. A separate lipid bilayer formed at the interface between each droplet and the hydrogel; each bilayer then incorporated bR. Electrodes in each droplet simultaneously measured the light-driven proton-pumping activities of each bio-pixel. The 4 × 4 array derived by this bottom-up synthetic biology approach can detect grey-scale images and patterns of light moving across the device, which are transduced as electrical current generated in each bio-pixel. We propose that synthetic biological light-activatable arrays, produced with soft materials, might be interfaced with living tissues to stimulate neuronal pathways.

  6. Combined effects of headgroup charge and tail unsaturation of lipids on lateral organization and diffusion of lipids in model biomembranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiao-Jie; Liang Qing

    2017-01-01

    Lateral organization and dynamics of lipids in plasma membranes are crucial for several cellular processes such as signal transduction across the membrane and still remain elusive. In this paper, using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation, we theoretically study the combined effects of headgroup charge and tail unsaturation of lipids on the lateral organization and diffusion of lipids in ternary lipid bilayers. In neutral ternary lipid bilayers composed of saturated lipids, unsaturated lipids, and cholesterols, under the conditions of given temperature and components, the main factor for the phase separation is the unsaturation of unsaturated lipids and the bilayers can be separated into liquid-ordered domains enriched in saturated lipids and cholesterols and liquid-disordered domains enriched in unsaturated lipids. Once the headgroup charge is introduced, the electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged lipid headgroups will increase the distance between the charged lipids. We find that the lateral organization and diffusion of the lipids in the (partially) charged ternary lipid bilayers are determined by the competition between the headgroup charge and the unsaturation of the unsaturated lipids. In the bilayers containing unsaturated lipids with lower unsaturation, the headgroup charge plays a crucial role in the lateral organization and diffusion of lipids. The headgroup charge may make the lipid domains unstable and even can suppress phase separation of the lipids in some systems. However, in the bilayers containing highly unsaturated lipids, the lateral organization and diffusion of lipids are mainly dominated by the unsaturation of the unsaturated lipids. This work may provide some theoretical insights into understanding the formation of nanosized domains and lateral diffusion of lipids in plasma membranes. (paper)

  7. An overview of molecular dynamics simulations of oxidized lipid systems, with a comparison of ELBA and MARTINI force fields for coarse grained lipid simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siani, Pablo; de Souza, R M; Dias, L G

    2016-01-01

    in cellular systems and also affect physical properties of both biological and model lipid bilayers. In this paper we (i) provide a perspective on the existing literature on simulations of lipid bilayer systems containing oxidized lipid species as well as the main related experimental results, (ii) describe...

  8. Effects of Lateral and Terminal Chains of X-Shaped Bolapolyphiles with Oligo(phenylene ethynylene Cores on Self-Assembly Behavior. Part 2: Domain Formation by Self-Assembly in Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Werner

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Supramolecular self-assembly of membrane constituents within a phospholipid bilayer creates complex functional platforms in biological cells that operate in intracellular signaling, trafficking and membrane remodeling. Synthetic polyphilic compounds of macromolecular or small size can be incorporated into artificial phospholipid bilayers. Featuring three or four moieties of different philicities, they reach beyond ordinary amphiphilicity and open up avenues to new functions and interaction concepts. Here, we have incorporated a series of X-shaped bolapolyphiles into DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayers of giant unilamellar vesicles. The bolapolyphiles consist of a rod-like oligo(phenylene ethynylene (OPE core, hydrophilic glycerol-based headgroups with or without oligo(ethylene oxide expansions at both ends and two lateral alkyl chains attached near the center of the OPE core. In the absence of DPPC and water, the compounds showed thermotropic liquid-crystalline behavior with a transition between polyphilic and amphiphilic assembly (see part 1 in this issue. In DPPC membranes, various trends in the domain morphologies were observed upon structure variations, which entailed branched alkyl chains of various sizes, alkyl chain semiperfluorination and size expansion of the headgroups. Observed effects on domain morphology are interpreted in the context of the bulk behavior (part 1 and of a model that was previously developed based on spectroscopic and physicochemical data.

  9. DOD/AMB: in vivo activity of a novel amb formulation with synthetic cationic bilayer fragments DOD/AMB: atividade in vivo de uma nova formulação com fragmentos sintéticos de bicamadas catiônicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Lincopan

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability of the versatile dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB, a bilayer-forming synthetic lipid previously shown to solubilize Amphotericin B (AMB, inspired this evaluation of in vivo activity of the DODAB/AMB formulation (DOD/AMB against systemic candidiasis in a mouse model from survival and tissue burden experiments. AMB was simply added to a DODAB powder dispersion in water previously obtained by sonication with tip at concentrations 0.05 -, regarding elimination of Candida colonization in spleen and kidneys. In summary, DOD/AMB, was effective for treating systemic candidiasis in a mouse model.A habilidade do brometo de dioctadecildimetilamônio (DOBAB, em formar bicamada de lipídio sintético e a demonstração prévia do forte poder solubilizante de anfotericina B (ANB , incentivou-nos a realizar a avaliação da atividade de DODAB/AMB in vivo contra candidíase sistêmica em modelo de camundongos para verificar a sua sobrevida bem como a recuperação das leveduras de C. albicans dos órgãos colonizados (baço e rins. O AMB foi simplesmente adicionado à DODAB em pó previamente disperso em água e sonicado com auxílio de ponteiras, nas concentrações de 0.05, em relação a eliminação da colonização de C. albicans dos rins e baço. Em resumo, DOD/AMB foi efetivo no tratamento de candidíase sistêmica em modelo animal.

  10. Radical cations in condensed phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symons, M.C.R. (Leicester Univ. (UK). Dept. of Chemistry)

    The subject is covered in sections, entitled: introduction (scope of present Review); preparative procedures; alkane and cycloalkane cations; alkene and cyclic alkene cations; alkyl-halide cations; alcohol and ether cations; carbonyl cations (aldehyde, ketone and ester cations); sulphur-centred cations; selenium-centred cations; nitroge