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Sample records for cation specific binding

  1. Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Maria Teresa; Lee, Jiwoong

    2017-01-01

    solvents, thus increasing their applicability in synthesis. The expansion of this concept to chiral polyethers led to the emergence of asymmetric cation-binding catalysis, where chiral counter anions are generated from metal salts, particularly using BINOL-based polyethers. Alkali metal salts, namely KF...... and KCN, are selectively bound to the catalyst, providing exceptionally high enantioselectivities for kinetic resolutions, elimination reactions (fluoride base), and Strecker synthesis (cyanide nucleophile). Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis was recently expanded to silicon-based reagents, enabling...

  2. Asymmetric Aminalization via Cation-Binding Catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Sang Yeon; Liu, Yidong; Oh, Joong Suk

    2018-01-01

    Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis, in principle, can generate "chiral" anionic nucleophiles, where the counter cations are coordinated within chiral environments. Nitrogen-nucleophiles are intrinsically basic, therefore, its use as nucleophiles is often challenging and limiting the scope...... of the reaction. Particularly, a formation of configurationally labile aminal centers with alkyl substituents has been a formidable challenge due to the enamine/imine equilibrium of electrophilic substrates. Herein, we report enantioselective nucleophilic addition reactions of potassium phthalimides to Boc-protected...

  3. A Cationic Smart Copolymer for DNA Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Ribeiro

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A new block copolymer with a temperature-responsive block and a cationic block was prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT polymerization, with good control of its size and composition. The first block is composed by di(ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate (DEGMA and oligo(ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate (OEGMA, with the ratio DEGMA/OEGMA being used to choose the volume phase transition temperature of the polymer in water, tunable from ca. 25 to above 90 °C. The second block, of trimethyl-2-methacroyloxyethylammonium chloride (TMEC, is positively charged at physiological pH values and is used for DNA binding. The coacervate complexes between the block copolymer and a model single strand DNA are characterized by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. The new materials offer good prospects for biomedical application, for example in controlled gene delivery.

  4. Binding of cationic surfactants to humic substances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishiguro, M.; Tan, W.; Koopal, L.K.

    2007-01-01

    Commercial surfactants are introduced into the environment either through waste products or site-specific contamination. The amphiphilic nature of both surfactants and humic substances (HS) leads to their mutual attraction especially when surfactant and HS are oppositely charged. Binding of the

  5. Does alkali cation binding to aromatic ring retard the fluxional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Kalpana

    2017-11-10

    Nov 10, 2017 ... the role of cation on haptotropic migration. Cation binding not only enhances the complex interaction energy but also delicately affects the fluxionality in the molecule by increasing the barrier to haptotropic shift of Cr(CO)3. The competing nature of the bifacial acids with sandwiched aromatic ring is ...

  6. How Native and Alien Metal Cations Bind ATP: Implications for Lithium as a Therapeutic Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudev, Todor; Grauffel, Cédric; Lim, Carmay

    2017-02-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the major energy currency of the cell, exists in solution mostly as ATP-Mg. Recent experiments suggest that Mg2+ interacts with the highly charged ATP triphosphate group and Li+ can co-bind with the native Mg2+ to form ATP-Mg-Li and modulate the neuronal purine receptor response. However, it is unclear how the negatively charged ATP triphosphate group binds Mg2+ and Li+ (i.e. which phosphate group(s) bind Mg2+/Li+) and how the ATP solution conformation depends on the type of metal cation and the metal-binding mode. Here, we reveal the preferred ATP-binding mode of Mg2+/Li+ alone and combined: Mg2+ prefers to bind ATP tridentately to each of the three phosphate groups, but Li+ prefers to bind bidentately to the terminal two phosphates. We show that the solution ATP conformation depends on the cation and its binding site/mode, but it does not change significantly when Li+ binds to Mg2+-loaded ATP. Hence, ATP-Mg-Li, like Mg2+-ATP, can fit in the ATP-binding site of the host enzyme/receptor, activating specific signaling pathways.

  7. Binding properties of oxacalix[4]arenes derivatives toward metal cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellah, B.

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this work was to establish the binding properties of oxacalix[4]arene derivatives with different numbers of the oxa bridges, functional groups (ketones, pyridine, ester, amide and methoxy) and conformations. Their interactions with alkali and alkaline-earth, heavy and transition metal cations have been evaluated according to different approaches: (i) extraction of corresponding picrates from an aqueous phase into dichloromethane; (ii) determination of the thermodynamic parameters of complexation in methanol and/or acetonitrile by UV-spectrophotometry and micro-calorimetry; (iii) determination of the stoichiometry of the complexes by ESI-MS; (iv) 1 H-NMR titrations allowing to localize the metal ions in the ligand cavity. In a first part dealing on homo-oxacalix[4]arenes, selectivities for Na + , K + , Ca 2+ , Pb 2+ and Mn 2+ of ketones derivatives was shown. The presence of oxa bridge in these derivatives increases their efficiency while decreasing their selectivity with respect to related calixarenes. The pyridine derivative prefers transition and heavy metal cations, in agreement with the presence of the soft nitrogen atoms. In the second part, di-oxacalix[4]arene ester and secondary amide derivatives were shown to be less effective than tertiary amide counterparts but to present high selectivities for Li + , Ba 2+ , Zn 2+ and Hg 2+ . A third part devoted to the octa-homo-tetra-oxacalix[4]arene tetra-methoxy shows that the 1:1 metal complexes formed are generally more stable than those of calixarenes, suggesting the participation of the oxygen atoms of the bridge in the complexation. Selectivity for Cs + , Ba 2+ , Cu 2+ and Hg 2+ were noted. (author)

  8. Cation-π interactions as lipid-specific anchors for phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauffel, Cédric; Yang, Boqian; He, Tao; Roberts, Mary F; Gershenson, Anne; Reuter, Nathalie

    2013-04-17

    Amphitropic proteins, such as the virulence factor phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from Bacillus thuringiensis , often depend on lipid-specific recognition of target membranes. However, the recognition mechanisms for zwitterionic lipids, such as phosphatidylcholine, which is enriched in the outer leaflet of eukaryotic cells, are not well understood. A 500 ns long molecular dynamics simulation of PI-PLC at the surface of a lipid bilayer revealed a strikingly high number of interactions between tyrosines at the interfacial binding site and lipid choline groups with structures characteristic of cation-π interactions. Membrane affinities of PI-PLC tyrosine variants mostly tracked the simulation results, falling into two classes: (i) those with minor losses in affinity, Kd(mutant)/Kd(wild-type) ≤ 5 and (ii) those where the apparent Kd was 50-200 times higher than wild-type. Estimating ΔΔG for these Tyr/PC interactions from the apparent Kd values reveals that the free energy associated with class I is ~1 kcal/mol, comparable to the value predicted by the Wimley-White hydrophobicity scale. In contrast, removal of class II tyrosines has a higher energy cost: ~2.5 kcal/mol toward pure PC vesicles. These higher energies correlate well with the occupancy of the cation-π adducts throughout the MD simulation. Together, these results strongly indicate that PI-PLC interacts with PC headgroups via cation-π interactions with tyrosine residues and suggest that cation-π interactions at the interface may be a mechanism for specific lipid recognition by amphitropic and membrane proteins.

  9. Selectivity of externally facing ion-binding sites in the Na/K pump to alkali metals and organic cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratheal, Ian M; Virgin, Gail K; Yu, Haibo; Roux, Benoît; Gatto, Craig; Artigas, Pablo

    2010-10-26

    The Na/K pump is a P-type ATPase that exchanges three intracellular Na(+) ions for two extracellular K(+) ions through the plasmalemma of nearly all animal cells. The mechanisms involved in cation selection by the pump's ion-binding sites (site I and site II bind either Na(+) or K(+); site III binds only Na(+)) are poorly understood. We studied cation selectivity by outward-facing sites (high K(+) affinity) of Na/K pumps expressed in Xenopus oocytes, under voltage clamp. Guanidinium(+), methylguanidinium(+), and aminoguanidinium(+) produced two phenomena possibly reflecting actions at site III: (i) voltage-dependent inhibition (VDI) of outwardly directed pump current at saturating K(+), and (ii) induction of pump-mediated, guanidinium-derivative-carried inward current at negative potentials without Na(+) and K(+). In contrast, formamidinium(+) and acetamidinium(+) induced K(+)-like outward currents. Measurement of ouabain-sensitive ATPase activity and radiolabeled cation uptake confirmed that these cations are external K(+) congeners. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that bound organic cations induce minor distortion of the binding sites. Among tested metals, only Li(+) induced Na(+)-like VDI, whereas all metals tested except Na(+) induced K(+)-like outward currents. Pump-mediated K(+)-like organic cation transport challenges the concept of rigid structural models in which ion specificity at site I and site II arises from a precise and unique arrangement of coordinating ligands. Furthermore, actions by guanidinium(+) derivatives suggest that Na(+) binds to site III in a hydrated form and that the inward current observed without external Na(+) and K(+) represents cation transport when normal occlusion at sites I and II is impaired. These results provide insights on external ion selectivity at the three binding sites.

  10. Specificity of binding to four-way junctions in DNA by bacteriophage T7 endonuclease I.

    OpenAIRE

    Parsons, C A; West, S C

    1990-01-01

    T7 endonuclease I binds specifically to four-way junctions in duplex DNA and promotes their resolution into linear duplexes. Under conditions in which the nuclease activity is blocked by the absence of divalent cations, the enzyme forms a distinct protein-DNA complex with the junction, as detected by gel retardation and filter binding assays. The formation of this complex is structure-specific and contrasts with the short-lived binding complexes formed on linear duplex DNA. The binding comple...

  11. Dissecting Hofmeister Effects: Direct Anion-Amide Interactions Are Weaker than Cation-Amide Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balos, Vasileios; Kim, Heejae; Bonn, Mischa; Hunger, Johannes

    2016-07-04

    Whereas there is increasing evidence for ion-induced protein destabilization through direct ion-protein interactions, the strength of the binding of anions to proteins relative to cation-protein binding has remained elusive. In this work, the rotational mobility of a model amide in aqueous solution was used as a reporter for the interactions of different anions with the amide group. Protein-stabilizing salts such as KCl and KNO3 do not affect the rotational mobility of the amide. Conversely, protein denaturants such as KSCN and KI markedly reduce the orientational freedom of the amide group. Thus these results provide evidence for a direct denaturation mechanism through ion-protein interactions. Comparing the present findings with results for cations shows that in contrast to common belief, anion-amide binding is weaker than cation-amide binding. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Tissue specificity of endothelin binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolger, G.T.; Liard, F.; Krogsrud, R.; Thibeault, D.; Jaramillo, J. (BioMega, Inc., Laval, Quebec (Canada))

    1990-09-01

    A measurement was made of the binding of 125I-labeled endothelin (125I-ET) to crude membrane fractions prepared from rat aorta, atrium, ventricle, portal vein, trachea, lung parenchyma, vas deferens, ileum, bladder, and guinea-pig taenia coli and lung parenchyma. Scatchard analysis of 125I-ET binding in all tissues indicated binding to a single class of saturable sites. The affinity and density of 125I-ET binding sites varied between tissues. The Kd of 125I-ET binding was approximately 0.5 nM for rat aorta, trachea, lung parenchyma, ventricle, bladder, and vas deferens, and guinea-pig taenia coli and lung parenchyma, 1.8 nM for rat portal vein and atrium, and 3.3 nM for ileum. The Bmax of 125I-ET binding had the following rank order of density in rat tissues: trachea greater than lung parenchyma = vas deferens much greater than aorta = portal vein = atrium greater than bladder greater than ventricle = ileum. The properties of 125I-ET endothelin binding were characterized in rat ventricular membranes. 125I-ET binding was time dependent, reaching a maximum within 45-60 min at 25 degrees C. The calculated microassociation constant was 9.67 x 10(5) s-1 M-1. Only 15-20% of 125I-ET dissociated from its binding site even when dissociation was studied as long as 3 h. Preincubation of ventricular membranes with ET prevented binding of 125I-ET. 125I-ET binding was destroyed by boiling of ventricular membranes and was temperature, pH, and cation (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+) dependent.

  13. New fluorescent reagents specific for Ca2+-binding proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Hail, Danya; Lemelson, Daniela; Israelson, Adrian; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► New reagents specifically inhibit the activity of Ca 2+ -dependent proteins. ► FITC-Ru and EITC-Ru allow for mechanism-independent probing of Ca 2+ -binding proteins. ► Changes in reagents fluorescence allow characterization of protein Ca 2+ -binding properties. -- Abstract: Ca 2+ carries information pivotal to cell life and death via its interactions with specific binding sites in a protein. We previously developed a novel photoreactive reagent, azido ruthenium (AzRu), which strongly inhibits Ca 2+ -dependent activities. Here, we synthesized new fluorescent ruthenium-based reagents containing FITC or EITC, FITC-Ru and EITC-Ru. These reagents were purified, characterized and found to specifically interact with and markedly inhibit Ca 2+ -dependent activities but not the activity of Ca 2+ -independent reactions. In contrast to many reagents that serve as probes for Ca 2+ , FITC-Ru and EITC-Ru are the first fluorescent divalent cation analogs to be synthesized and characterized that specifically bind to Ca 2+ -binding proteins and inhibit their activity. Such reagents will assist in characterizing Ca 2+ -binding proteins, thereby facilitating better understanding of the function of Ca 2+ as a key bio-regulator.

  14. Peptide binding specificity of the chaperone calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, N.; Duus, K.; Jorgensen, C.S.

    2007-01-01

    Calreticulin is a molecular chaperone with specificity for polypeptides and N-linked monoglucosylated glycans. In order to determine the specificity of polypeptide binding, the interaction of calreticulin with polypeptides was investigated using synthetic peptides of different length and composit...

  15. Takifugu rubripes cation independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor: Cloning, expression and functional characterization of the IGF-II binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Ajith Kumar; Nadimpalli, Siva Kumar

    2018-01-31

    Mannose 6-phosphate/IGF-II receptor mediated lysosomal clearance of insulin-like growth factor-II is significantly associated with the evolution of placental mammals. The protein is also referred to as the IGF-II receptor. Earlier studies suggested relatively low binding affinity between the receptor and ligand in prototherian and metatherian mammals. In the present study, we cloned the IGF-II binding domain of the early vertebrate fugu fish and expressed it in bacteria. A 72000Da truncated receptor containing the IGF-II binding domain was obtained. Analysis of this protein (covering domains 11-13 of the CIMPR) for its affinity to fish and human IGF-II by ligand blot assays and ELISA showed that the expressed receptor can specifically bind to both fish and human IGF-II. Additionally, a peptide-specific antibody raised against the region of the IGF-II binding domain also was able to recognize the IGF-II binding regions of mammalian and non-mammalian cation independent MPR protein. These interactions were further characterized by Surface Plasma resonance support that the receptor binds to fish IGF-II, with a dissociation constant of 548nM. Preliminary analysis suggests that the binding mechanism as well as the affinity of the fish and human receptor for IGF-II may have varied according to different evolutionary pressures. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Theoretical Calculation of the NMR Spin-Spin Coupling Constants and the NMR Shifts Allow Distinguishability between the Specific Direct and the Water-Mediated Binding of a Divalent Metal Cation to Guanine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sychrovský, Vladimír; Šponer, Jiří; Hobza, Pavel

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 126, č. 2 (2004), s. 663-672 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : nuclear-magnetic-resonance * ion binding * base-pairs Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.903, year: 2004

  17. Dissecting electrostatic screening, specific ion binding, and ligand binding in an energetic model for glycine riboswitch folding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipfert, Jan; Sim, Adelene Y.L.; Herschlag, Daniel; Doniach, Sebastian (Stanford)

    2010-09-17

    Riboswitches are gene-regulating RNAs that are usually found in the 5{prime}-untranslated regions of messenger RNA. As the sugar-phosphate backbone of RNA is highly negatively charged, the folding and ligand-binding interactions of riboswitches are strongly dependent on the presence of cations. Using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and hydroxyl radical footprinting, we examined the cation dependence of the different folding stages of the glycine-binding riboswitch from Vibrio cholerae. We found that the partial folding of the tandem aptamer of this riboswitch in the absence of glycine is supported by all tested mono- and divalent ions, suggesting that this transition is mediated by nonspecific electrostatic screening. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations using SAXS-derived low-resolution structural models allowed us to perform an energetic dissection of this process. The results showed that a model with a constant favorable contribution to folding that is opposed by an unfavorable electrostatic term that varies with ion concentration and valency provides a reasonable quantitative description of the observed folding behavior. Glycine binding, on the other hand, requires specific divalent ions binding based on the observation that Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+} facilitated glycine binding, whereas other divalent cations did not. The results provide a case study of how ion-dependent electrostatic relaxation, specific ion binding, and ligand binding can be coupled to shape the energetic landscape of a riboswitch and can begin to be quantitatively dissected.

  18. Use of thallium to identify monovalent cation binding sites in GroEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiser, Philip D.; Lorimer, George H.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    GroEL is a bacterial chaperone protein that assembles into a homotetra­decameric complex exhibiting D 7 symmetry and utilizes the co-chaperone protein GroES and ATP hydrolysis to assist in the proper folding of a variety of cytosolic proteins. GroEL utilizes two metal cofactors, Mg2+ and K+, to bind and hydrolyze ATP. A K+-binding site has been proposed to be located next to the nucleotide-binding site, but the available structural data do not firmly support this conclusion. Moreover, more than one functionally significant K+-binding site may exist within GroEL. Because K+ has important and complex effects on GroEL activity and is involved in both positive (intra-ring) and negative (inter-ring) cooperativity for ATP hydrolysis, it is important to determine the exact location of these cation-binding site(s) within GroEL. In this study, the K+ mimetic Tl+ was incorporated into GroEL crystals, a moderately redundant 3.94 Å resolution X-ray diffraction data set was collected from a single crystal and the strong anomalous scattering signal from the thallium ion was used to identify monovalent cation-binding sites. The results confirmed the previously proposed placement of K+ next to the nucleotide-binding site and also identified additional binding sites that may be important for GroEL function and cooperativity. These findings also demonstrate the general usefulness of Tl+ for the identification of monovalent cation-binding sites in protein crystal structures, even when the quality and resolution of the diffraction data are relatively low. PMID:19851000

  19. Importance of Residues Outside the Cation Binding Pocket for Na+ and K+ Binding to the Na+/K+-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Line; Toustrup-Jensen, Mads Schak; Einholm, Anja P.

    Mutagenesis studies have identified several oxygen-containing residues in the transmembrane region which are important for the coordination of Na+ and/or K+. These were later confirmed by the high-resolution crystal structures of the Na+/K+-ATPase with bound Na+ or K+. However, more information...... is needed to reveal the translocation pathway through the Na+/K+-ATPase. Mutagenesis studies have shown that several other transmembrane residues located outside the cation binding pocket, including Phe785 and Phe788, affect the ion binding properties of the Na+/K+-ATPase (1,2). It is well...... not significantly affect the Na+ binding properties of the Na+/K+-ATPase. 1. Vilsen, B. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 11389 2. Rodacker, V. et al (2006) JBC 281, 18539 3. Laursen M et al. (2013) PNAS 110, 10958...

  20. A cation-pi interaction in the binding site of the glycine receptor is mediated by a phenylalanine residue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Millen, Kat S; Hanek, Ariele P

    2008-01-01

    Cys-loop receptor binding sites characteristically contain many aromatic amino acids. In nicotinic ACh and 5-HT3 receptors, a Trp residue forms a cation-pi interaction with the agonist, whereas in GABA(A) receptors, a Tyr performs this role. The glycine receptor binding site, however, contains...... of fluorinated Phe derivatives using unnatural amino acid mutagenesis. The data reveal a clear correlation between the glycine EC(50) value and the cation-pi binding ability of the fluorinated Phe derivatives at position 159, but not at positions 207 or 63, indicating a single cation-pi interaction between...

  1. Binding properties of oxacalix[4]arenes derivatives toward metal cations; Interactions entre cations metalliques et derives des oxacalix[4]arenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellah, B

    2006-11-15

    The objective of this work was to establish the binding properties of oxacalix[4]arene derivatives with different numbers of the oxa bridges, functional groups (ketones, pyridine, ester, amide and methoxy) and conformations. Their interactions with alkali and alkaline-earth, heavy and transition metal cations have been evaluated according to different approaches: (i) extraction of corresponding picrates from an aqueous phase into dichloromethane; (ii) determination of the thermodynamic parameters of complexation in methanol and/or acetonitrile by UV-spectrophotometry and micro-calorimetry; (iii) determination of the stoichiometry of the complexes by ESI-MS; (iv) {sup 1}H-NMR titrations allowing to localize the metal ions in the ligand cavity. In a first part dealing on homo-oxacalix[4]arenes, selectivities for Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 2+} of ketones derivatives was shown. The presence of oxa bridge in these derivatives increases their efficiency while decreasing their selectivity with respect to related calixarenes. The pyridine derivative prefers transition and heavy metal cations, in agreement with the presence of the soft nitrogen atoms. In the second part, di-oxacalix[4]arene ester and secondary amide derivatives were shown to be less effective than tertiary amide counterparts but to present high selectivities for Li{sup +}, Ba{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+} and Hg{sup 2+}. A third part devoted to the octa-homo-tetra-oxacalix[4]arene tetra-methoxy shows that the 1:1 metal complexes formed are generally more stable than those of calixarenes, suggesting the participation of the oxygen atoms of the bridge in the complexation. Selectivity for Cs{sup +}, Ba{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+} and Hg{sup 2+} were noted. (author)

  2. Water-Mediated Differential Binding of Strontium and Cesium Cations in Fulvic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhu, Biswajit; Sundararajan, Mahesh; Bandyopadhyay, Tusar

    2015-08-27

    The migration of potentially harmful radionuclides, such as cesium ((137)Cs) and strontium ((90)Sr), in soil is governed by the chemical and biological reactivity of soil components. Soil organic matter (SOM) that can be modeled through fulvic acid (FA) is known to alter the mobility of radionuclide cations, Cs(+) and Sr(2+). Shedding light on the possible interaction mechanisms at the atomic level of these two ions with FA is thus vital to explain their transport behavior and for the design of new ligands for the efficient extraction of radionuclides. Here we have performed molecular dynamics, metadynamics simulations, and density-functional-theory-based calculations to understand the binding mechanism of Sr(2+) and Cs(+) cations with FA. Our studies predict that interaction of Cs(+) to FA is very weak as compared with Sr(2+). While the water-FA interaction is largely responsible for the weak binding of Cs(+) to FA, leading to the outer sphere complexation of the ion with FA, the interaction between Sr(2+) and FA is stronger and thus can surpass the existing secondary nonbonding interaction between coordinated waters and FA, leading to inner sphere complexation of the ion with FA. We also find that entropy plays a dominant role for Cs(+) binding to FA, whereas Sr(2+) binding is an enthalpy-driven process. Our predicted results are found to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data on complexation of Cs(+) and Sr(2+) with SOM.

  3. Reaction enthalpy from the binding of multivalent cations to anionic polyelectrolytes in dilute solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansch, Markus; Kaub, Hans Peter; Deck, Sascha; Carl, Nico; Huber, Klaus

    2018-03-01

    Dilute solutions of sodium poly(styrene sulfonate) (NaPSS) in the presence of Al3+, Ca2+, and Ba2+ were analysed by means of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) in order to investigate the heat effect of bond formation between those cations and the anionic SO3- residues of NaPSS. The selection of the cations was guided by the solution behavior of the corresponding PSS salts from a preceding study [M. Hansch et al., J. Chem. Phys. 148(1), 014901 (2018)], where bonds between Ba2+ and anionic PSS showed an increasing solubility with decreasing temperature and Al3+ exhibited the inverse trend. Unlike to Al3+ and Ba2+, Ca2+ is expected to behave as a purely electrostatically interacting bivalent cation and was thus included in the present study. Results from ITC satisfactorily succeeded to explain the temperature-dependent solution behavior of the salts with Al3+ and Ba2+ and confirmed the non-specific behavior of Ca2+. Additional ITC experiments with salts of Ca2+ and Ba2+ and sodium poly(acrylate) complemented the results on PSS by data from a chemically different polyanion. Availability of these joint sets of polyanion-cation combinations not only offers the chance to identify common features and subtle differences in the solution behavior of polyelectrolytes in the presence of multi-valent cations but also points to a new class of responsive materials.

  4. Cation-pi interactions with a model for the side chain of tryptophan: structures and absolute binding energies of alkali metal cation-indole complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Chunhai; Yang, Zhibo; Hallowita, Nuwan; Rodgers, M T

    2005-12-22

    Threshold collision-induced dissociation techniques are employed to determine bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of mono- and bis-complexes of alkali metal cations, Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, and Cs+, with indole, C8H7N. The primary and lowest energy dissociation pathway in all cases is endothermic loss of an intact indole ligand. Sequential loss of a second indole ligand is observed at elevated energies for the bis-complexes. Density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G level of theory are used to determine the structures, vibrational frequencies, and rotational constants of these complexes. Theoretical BDEs are determined from single point energy calculations at the MP2(full)/6-311+G(2d,2p) level using the B3LYP/6-31G* geometries. The agreement between theory and experiment is very good for all complexes except Li+ (C8H7N), where theory underestimates the strength of the binding. The trends in the BDEs of these alkali metal cation-indole complexes are compared with the analogous benzene and naphthalene complexes to examine the influence of the extended pi network and heteroatom on the strength of the cation-pi interaction. The Na+ and K+ binding affinities of benzene, phenol, and indole are also compared to those of the aromatic amino acids, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan to elucidate the factors that contribute to the binding in complexes to the aromatic amino acids. The nature of the binding and trends in the BDEs of cation-pi complexes between alkali metal cations and benzene, phenol, and indole are examined to help understand nature's preference for engaging tryptophan over phenylalanine and tyrosine in cation-pi interactions in biological systems.

  5. Cationic polymers for DNA origami coating - examining their binding efficiency and tuning the enzymatic reaction rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviaho, Jenny K; Linko, Veikko; Ora, Ari; Tiainen, Tony; Järvihaavisto, Erika; Mikkilä, Joona; Tenhu, Heikki; Nonappa; Kostiainen, Mauri A

    2016-06-02

    DNA origamis are fully tailored, programmable, biocompatible and readily functionalizable nanostructures that provide an excellent foundation for the development of sophisticated drug-delivery systems. However, the DNA origami objects suffer from certain drawbacks such as low cell-transfection rates and low stability. A great deal of studies on polymer-based transfection agents, mainly focusing on polyplex formation and toxicity, exists. In this study, the electrostatic binding between a brick-like DNA origami and cationic block-copolymers was explored. The effect of the polymer structure on the binding was investigated and the toxicity of the polymer-origami complexes evaluated. The study shows that all of the analyzed polymers had a suitable binding efficiency irrespective of the block structure. It was also observed that the toxicity of polymer-origami complexes was insignificant at the biologically relevant concentration levels. Besides brick-like DNA origamis, tubular origami carriers equipped with enzymes were also coated with the polymers. By adjusting the amount of cationic polymers that cover the DNA structures, we showed that it is possible to control the enzyme kinetics of the complexes. This work gives a starting point for further development of biocompatible and effective polycation-based block copolymers that can be used in coating different DNA origami nanostructures for various bioapplications.

  6. The solute specificity profiles of nucleobase cation symporter 1 (NCS1) from Zea mays and Setaria viridis illustrate functional flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Micah; Schein, Jessica; Hunt, Kevin A; Nalam, Vamsi; Mourad, George S; Schultes, Neil P

    2016-03-01

    The solute specificity profiles (transport and binding) for the nucleobase cation symporter 1 (NCS1) proteins, from the closely related C4 grasses Zea mays and Setaria viridis, differ from that of Arabidopsis thaliana and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii NCS1. Solute specificity profiles for NCS1 from Z. mays (ZmNCS1) and S. viridis (SvNCS1) were determined through heterologous complementation studies in NCS1-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. The four Viridiplantae NCS1 proteins transport the purines adenine and guanine, but unlike the dicot and algal NCS1, grass NCS1 proteins fail to transport the pyrimidine uracil. Despite the high level of amino acid sequence similarity, ZmNCS1 and SvNCS1 display distinct solute transport and recognition profiles. SvNCS1 transports adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, cytosine, and allantoin and competitively binds xanthine and uric acid. ZmNCS1 transports adenine, guanine, and cytosine and competitively binds, 5-fluorocytosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, and uric acid. The differences in grass NCS1 profiles are due to a limited number of amino acid alterations. These amino acid residues do not correspond to amino acids essential for overall solute and cation binding or solute transport, as previously identified in bacterial and fungal NCS1, but rather may represent residues involved in subtle solute discrimination. The data presented here reveal that within Viridiplantae, NCS1 proteins transport a broad range of nucleobase compounds and that the solute specificity profile varies with species.

  7. Cationic polymers for DNA origami coating - examining their binding efficiency and tuning the enzymatic reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviaho, Jenny K.; Linko, Veikko; Ora, Ari; Tiainen, Tony; Järvihaavisto, Erika; Mikkilä, Joona; Tenhu, Heikki; Nonappa, Affc; Kostiainen, Mauri A.

    2016-06-01

    DNA origamis are fully tailored, programmable, biocompatible and readily functionalizable nanostructures that provide an excellent foundation for the development of sophisticated drug-delivery systems. However, the DNA origami objects suffer from certain drawbacks such as low cell-transfection rates and low stability. A great deal of studies on polymer-based transfection agents, mainly focusing on polyplex formation and toxicity, exists. In this study, the electrostatic binding between a brick-like DNA origami and cationic block-copolymers was explored. The effect of the polymer structure on the binding was investigated and the toxicity of the polymer-origami complexes evaluated. The study shows that all of the analyzed polymers had a suitable binding efficiency irrespective of the block structure. It was also observed that the toxicity of polymer-origami complexes was insignificant at the biologically relevant concentration levels. Besides brick-like DNA origamis, tubular origami carriers equipped with enzymes were also coated with the polymers. By adjusting the amount of cationic polymers that cover the DNA structures, we showed that it is possible to control the enzyme kinetics of the complexes. This work gives a starting point for further development of biocompatible and effective polycation-based block copolymers that can be used in coating different DNA origami nanostructures for various bioapplications.DNA origamis are fully tailored, programmable, biocompatible and readily functionalizable nanostructures that provide an excellent foundation for the development of sophisticated drug-delivery systems. However, the DNA origami objects suffer from certain drawbacks such as low cell-transfection rates and low stability. A great deal of studies on polymer-based transfection agents, mainly focusing on polyplex formation and toxicity, exists. In this study, the electrostatic binding between a brick-like DNA origami and cationic block-copolymers was explored. The

  8. Relation between heat of vaporization, ion transport, molar volume, and cation-anion binding energy for ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodin, Oleg

    2009-09-10

    A number of correlations between heat of vaporization (H(vap)), cation-anion binding energy (E(+/-)), molar volume (V(m)), self-diffusion coefficient (D), and ionic conductivity for 29 ionic liquids have been investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations that employed accurate and validated many-body polarizable force fields. A significant correlation between D and H(vap) has been found, while the best correlation was found for -log(DV(m)) vs H(vap) + 0.28E(+/-). A combination of enthalpy of vaporization and a fraction of the cation-anion binding energy was suggested as a measure of the effective cohesive energy for ionic liquids. A deviation of some ILs from the reported master curve is explained based upon ion packing and proposed diffusion pathways. No general correlations were found between the ion diffusion coefficient and molecular volume or the diffusion coefficient and cation/anion binding energy.

  9. Binding CO2from Air by a Bulky Organometallic Cation Containing Primary Amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yang-Hui; Chen, Chen; Hong, Dan-Li; He, Xiao-Tong; Wang, Jing-Wen; Ding, Ting; Wang, Bo-Jun; Sun, Bai-Wang

    2018-03-21

    The organometallic cation 1 (Fe(bipy-NH 2 ) 3 2+ , bipy-NH 2 = 4,4'-diamino-2,2'-bipyridine), which was constructed in situ in solution, can bind CO 2 from air effectively with a stoichiometric ratio of 1:4 (1/CO 2 ), through the formation of "H-bonded CO 2 " species: [CO 2 -OH-CO 2 ] - and [CO 2 -CO 2 -OH] - . These two species, along with the captured individual CO 2 molecules, connected 1 into a novel 3D (three-dimensional) architecture, that was crystal 1·2(OH - )·4(CO 2 ). The adsorption isotherms, recycling investigations, and the heat capacity of 1 have been investigated; the results revealed that the organometallic cation 1 can be recycled at least 10 times for the real-world CO 2 capture applications. The strategies presented here may provide new hints for the development of new alkanolamine-related absorbents or technologies for CO 2 capture and sequestration.

  10. Differential sensitivity of [3H]nitrendipine binding to cations of toxicological interest in various rat brain areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rius, R.A.; Govoni, S.; Battaini, F.

    1985-01-01

    [ 3 H]Nitrendipine ([ 3 H]NTP) is a radiolabelled calcium antagonist which can be used to study neuronal calcium (Ca 2+ ) channels. The interaction of Mn 2+ , Zn 2+ , Pb 2+ and La 3+ on [ 3 H]NTP binding was studied in 3 brain areas particularly rich in [ 3 H]NTP binding sites. Differences were observed in the brain regional distribution of [ 3 H]NTP binding as well as in their sensitivity to the metal ions Pb, Mn and Zn. The binding data suggest that neuronal Ca 2+ channels in different brain areas display distinct sensitivity to selected divalent cations. (Auth.)

  11. Ceruloplasmin revisited: structural and functional roles of various metal cation-binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bento, Isabel; Peixoto, Cristina; Zaitsev, Vjacheslav N.; Lindley, Peter F.

    2007-01-01

    The three-dimensional molecular structure of human serum ceruloplasmin has been reinvestigated using X-ray synchrotron data collected at 100 K from a crystal frozen to liquid-nitrogen temperature. The three-dimensional molecular structure of human serum ceruloplasmin has been reinvestigated using X-ray synchrotron data collected at 100 K from a crystal frozen to liquid-nitrogen temperature. The resulting model, with an increase in resolution from 3.1 to 2.8 Å, gives an overall improvement of the molecular structure, in particular the side chains. In addition, it enables the clear definition of previously unidentified Ca 2+ -binding and Na + -binding sites. The Ca 2+ cation is located in domain 1 in a configuration very similar to that found in the activated bovine factor Va. The Na + sites appear to play a structural role in providing rigidity to the three protuberances on the top surface of the molecule. These features probably help to steer substrates towards the mononuclear copper sites prior to their oxidation and to restrict the size of the approaching substrate. The trinuclear copper centre appears to differ from the room-temperature structure in that a dioxygen moiety is bound in a similar way to that found in the endospore coat protein CotA from Bacillus subtilis

  12. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having Enhanced Binding Affinity and Sequence Specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA strand, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and binding affinity. Methods of increasing binding affinity and sequence specificity of peptide nucleic acids...

  13. Measurement of specific [3H]-ouabain binding to different types of human leucocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boon, Arnold; Oh, V M; Taylor, John E.

    1984-01-01

    We have studied the specific binding of [3H]-ouabain to intact mononuclear leucocytes (82% lymphocytes) and polymorphonuclear leucocytes. In both types of cells [3H]-ouabain binding was saturable, confined to a single site of high affinity, slow to reach equilibrium, slow to reverse, temperature......-dependent, competitively antagonized by potassium, and facilitated by the presence of divalent cations. The equilibrium dissociation constants were 2.4 +/- 0.7 nmol/l (polymorphs) and 2.4 +/- 0.4 nmol/l (mononuclear cells) (NS). The values of maximal specific ouabain binding, measured by Scatchard analysis...... were expressed per square micron of cell surface area the difference between the two cell types was proportionately greater (83 and 186 sites per micron 2 respectively). We conclude that the [3H]-ouabain binding sites on mononuclear and polymorphonuclear leucocytes are similar in nature, but different...

  14. In vivo cation exchange in quantum dots for tumor-specific imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangyou; Braun, Gary B; Qin, Mingde; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Sugahara, Kazuki N

    2017-08-24

    In vivo tumor imaging with nanoprobes suffers from poor tumor specificity. Here, we introduce a nanosystem, which allows selective background quenching to gain exceptionally tumor-specific signals. The system uses near-infrared quantum dots and a membrane-impermeable etchant, which serves as a cation donor. The etchant rapidly quenches the quantum dots through cation exchange (ionic etching), and facilitates renal clearance of metal ions released from the quantum dots. The quantum dots are intravenously delivered into orthotopic breast and pancreas tumors in mice by using the tumor-penetrating iRGD peptide. Subsequent etching quenches excess quantum dots, leaving a highly tumor-specific signal provided by the intact quantum dots remaining in the extravascular tumor cells and fibroblasts. No toxicity is noted. The system also facilitates the detection of peritoneal tumors with high specificity upon intraperitoneal tumor targeting and selective etching of excess untargeted quantum dots. In vivo cation exchange may be a promising strategy to enhance specificity of tumor imaging.The imaging of tumors in vivo using nanoprobes has been challenging due to the lack of sufficient tumor specificity. Here, the authors develop a tumor-specific quantum dot system that permits in vivo cation exchange to achieve selective background quenching and high tumor-specific imaging.

  15. A Low Protein Binding Cationic Poly(2-oxazoline) as Non-Viral Vector

    KAUST Repository

    He, Zhijian

    2015-04-02

    © 2015 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Developing safe and efficient non-viral gene delivery systems remains a major challenge. We present a new cationic poly(2-oxazoline) (CPOx) block copolymer for gene therapy that was synthesized by sequential polymerization of non-ionic 2-methyl-2-oxazoline and a new 2-oxazoline monomer, 2-(N-methyl, N-Boc-amino)-methyl-2-oxazoline, followed by deprotection of the pendant secondary amine groups. Upon mixing with plasmid DNA (pDNA), CPOx forms small (diameter ≈80 nm) and narrowly dispersed polyplexes (PDI <0.2), which are stable upon dilution in saline and against thermal challenge. These polyplexes exhibited low plasma protein binding and very low cytotoxicity in vitro compared to the polyplexes of pDNA and poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(L-lysine) (PEG-b-PLL). CPOx/pDNA polyplexes at N/P = 5 bound considerably less plasma protein compared to polyplexes of PEG-b-PLL at the same N/P ratio. This is a unique aspect of the developed polyplexes emphasizing their potential for systemic delivery in vivo. The transfection efficiency of the polyplexes in B16 murine melanoma cells was low after 4 h, but increased significantly for 10 h exposure time, indicative of slow internalization of polyplexes. Addition of Pluronic P85 boosted the transfection using CPOx/pDNA polyplexes considerably. The low protein binding of CPOx/pDNA polyplexes is particularly interesting for the future development of targeted gene delivery.

  16. NMR studies on DNA binding specificity of the lac repressor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopke Salinas, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    The thesis describes NMR structures of two protein-DNA complexes. The first structure shows how the protein, the DNA binding domain of lac repressor, recognizes its natural DNA binding site, by adaptation and read out of the nucleotide sequence. The second one shows how the DNA binding specificity

  17. The role of polar and facial amphipathic character in determining lipopolysaccharide-binding properties in synthetic cationic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, S A; Awasthi, S K; Balaram, P

    2000-01-01

    Two series of peptides, designated K and NK were synthesized and tested for lipid A binding and neutralizing properties. K2, which has an 11-residue amphiphilic core, and a branched N-terminus bearing two branched lysinyl residues does not bind lipid A, while NK2, also with an 11-residue amphiphilic core comprised entirely of non-ionizable residues, and a similarly branched, cationic N-terminus, binds lipid A very weakly. Both peptides do not inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activity in the Limulus assay, nor do they inhibit LPS-induced TNF-alpha and NO production in J774 cells. These results are entirely unlike a homologous peptide with an exclusively hydrophobic core whose LPS-binding and neutralizing properties are very similar to that of polymyxin B [David SA, Awasthi SK, Wiese A et al. Characterization of the interactions of a polycationic, amphiphilic, terminally branched oligopeptide with lipid A and lipopolysaccharide from the deep rough mutant of Salmonella minnesota. J Endotoxin Res 1996; 3: 369-379]. These data suggest that a clear segregation of charged and apolar domains is crucial in molecules designed for purposes of LPS sequestration and that head-tail (polar) orientation of the cationic/hydrophobic regions is preferable to molecules with mixed or facial cationic/amphipathic character.

  18. Kinetics of Cation and Oxyanion Adsorption and Desorption on Ferrihydrite: Roles of Ferrihydrite Binding Sites and a Unified Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lei; Shi, Zhenqing; Lu, Yang; Dohnalkova, Alice C; Lin, Zhang; Dang, Zhi

    2017-09-19

    Quantitative understanding the kinetics of toxic ion reactions with various heterogeneous ferrihydrite binding sites is crucial for accurately predicting the dynamic behavior of contaminants in environment. In this study, kinetics of As(V), Cr(VI), Cu(II), and Pb(II) adsorption and desorption on ferrihydrite was studied using a stirred-flow method, which showed that metal adsorption/desorption kinetics was highly dependent on the reaction conditions and varied significantly among four metals. High resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed that all four metals were distributed within the ferrihydrite aggregates homogeneously after adsorption reactions. Based on the equilibrium model CD-MUSIC, we developed a novel unified kinetics model applicable for both cation and oxyanion adsorption and desorption on ferrihydrite, which is able to account for the heterogeneity of ferrihydrite binding sites, different binding properties of cations and oxyanions, and variations of solution chemistry. The model described the kinetic results well. We quantitatively elucidated how the equilibrium properties of the cation and oxyanion binding to various ferrihydrite sites and the formation of various surface complexes controlled the adsorption and desorption kinetics at different reaction conditions and time scales. Our study provided a unified modeling method for the kinetics of ion adsorption/desorption on ferrihydrite.

  19. Crystal structure of the high-affinity Na+K+-ATPase-ouabain complex with Mg2+ bound in the cation binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Mette; Yatime, Laure; Nissen, Poul; Fedosova, Natalya U

    2013-07-02

    The Na(+),K(+)-ATPase maintains electrochemical gradients for Na(+) and K(+) that are critical for animal cells. Cardiotonic steroids (CTSs), widely used in the clinic and recently assigned a role as endogenous regulators of intracellular processes, are highly specific inhibitors of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase. Here we describe a crystal structure of the phosphorylated pig kidney Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in complex with the CTS representative ouabain, extending to 3.4 Å resolution. The structure provides key details on CTS binding, revealing an extensive hydrogen bonding network formed by the β-surface of the steroid core of ouabain and the side chains of αM1, αM2, and αM6. Furthermore, the structure reveals that cation transport site II is occupied by Mg(2+), and crystallographic studies indicate that Rb(+) and Mn(2+), but not Na(+), bind to this site. Comparison with the low-affinity [K2]E2-MgF(x)-ouabain structure [Ogawa et al. (2009) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 106(33):13742-13747) shows that the CTS binding pocket of [Mg]E2P allows deep ouabain binding with possible long-range interactions between its polarized five-membered lactone ring and the Mg(2+). K(+) binding at the same site unwinds a turn of αM4, dragging residues Ile318-Val325 toward the cation site and thereby hindering deep ouabain binding. Thus, the structural data establish a basis for the interpretation of the biochemical evidence pointing at direct K(+)-Mg(2+) competition and explain the well-known antagonistic effect of K(+) on CTS binding.

  20. A cation-π interaction at a phenylalanine residue in the glycine receptor binding site is conserved for different agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Hanek, Ariele P; Price, Kerry L

    2011-01-01

    . In the current study, we investigated whether the lower efficacy agonists of the human GlyR β-alanine and taurine also form cation-π interactions with Phe159. By incorporating a series of unnatural amino acids, we found cation-π interactions between Phe159 and the amino groups of β-alanine and taurine....... The strengths of these interactions were significantly weaker than for glycine. Modeling studies suggest that β-alanine and taurine are orientated subtly differently in the binding pocket, with their amino groups further from Phe159 than that of glycine. These data therefore show that similar agonists can have...... similar but not identical orientations and interactions in the binding pocket and provide a possible explanation for the lower potencies of β-alanine and taurine....

  1. Effects of alkali metal cations on phospho-enzyme levels and [3H] ouabain binding to (Na+ + K+)-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, C S; Tobin, T; Akera, T; Brody, T M

    1976-05-13

    The effects of several alkali metal cations on the relationship between steady state phospho-enzyme levels and initial velocity and equilibrium levels of [3H]-ouabain binding to (Na+ + K+)-ATPase (ATP phosphohydrolase EC 3.6.1.3.) were examined. Only Na+ increased both phospho-enzyme and [3H] ouabain binding levels above those observed in the presence of Mg2+ alone. While Na+ stimulated phosphorylation with an apparent Km of about 1 mM, its stimulation of [3H] ouabain binding was biphasic, the lower Km for stimulation corresponding to the Km for formation of phospho-enzyme. Among the other alkali metal cations, potassium, rubidium and lithium were at least eight times more effect in reducing phospho-enzyme levels than in reducing [3H] ouabain binding. This discrepancy is not due to the stability of the enzyme-ouabain complex, nor to any action on the rates of formation or dissociation of the enzyme-ouabain complex. The data thus suggest that [3H] ouabain interacts with the K+, Rb+ or Li+ -enzyme complexes. For Li+, this hypothesis is further supported by the observation that Li+ can cirectly increase the equilibrium level of [3H] ouabain binding to this enzyme under certain conditions.

  2. Specific binding of beta-endorphin to normal human erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenet, B.; Hollis, V. Jr.; Kang, Y.; Simpkins, C.

    1986-03-05

    Beta-endorphin (BE) exhibits peripheral functions which may not be mediated by interactions with receptors in the brain. Recent studies have demonstrated binding of BE to both opioid and non-opioid receptors on lymphocytes and monocytes. Abood has reported specific binding of /sup 3/H-dihydromorphine in erythrocytes. Using 5 x 10/sup -11/M /sup 125/I-beta-endorphin and 10/sup -5/M unlabeled BE, they have detected 50% specific binding to human erythrocytes. This finding is supported by results from immunoelectron microscopy using rabbit anti-BE antibody and biotinylated secondary antibody with avidin-biotin complexes horseradish peroxidase. Binding is clearly observed and is confined to only one side of the cells. Conclusions: (1) BE binding to human erythrocytes was demonstrated by radioreceptor assay and immunoelectron microscopy, and (2) BE binding sites exist on only one side of the cells.

  3. Xanthurenic acid binds to neuronal G-protein-coupled receptors that secondarily activate cationic channels in the cell line NCB-20.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Taleb

    Full Text Available Xanthurenic acid (XA is a metabolite of the tryptophan oxidation pathway through kynurenine and 3-hydroxykynurenine. XA was until now considered as a detoxification compound and dead-end product reducing accumulation of reactive radical species. Apart from a specific role for XA in the signaling cascade resulting in gamete maturation in mosquitoes, nothing was known about its functions in other species including mammals. Based upon XA distribution, transport, accumulation and release in the rat brain, we have recently suggested that XA may potentially be involved in neurotransmission/neuromodulation, assuming that neurons presumably express specific XA receptors. Recently, it has been shown that XA could act as a positive allosteric ligand for class II metabotropic glutamate receptors. This finding reinforces the proposed signaling role of XA in brain. Our present results provide several lines of evidence in favor of the existence of specific receptors for XA in the brain. First, binding experiments combined with autoradiography and time-course analysis led to the characterization of XA binding sites in the rat brain. Second, specific kinetic and pharmacological properties exhibited by these binding sites are in favor of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR. Finally, in patch-clamp and calcium imaging experiments using NCB-20 cells that do not express glutamate-induced calcium signals, XA elicited specific responses involving activation of cationic channels and increases in intracellular Ca(2+ concentration. Altogether, these results suggest that XA, acting through a GPCR-induced cationic channel modulatory mechanism, may exert excitatory functions in various brain neuronal pathways.

  4. Determination of the cationic amphiphilic drug-DNA binding mode and DNA-assisted fluorescence resonance energy transfer amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Zahid; Banday, Abdul Rouf; Hussain, Mohammed Aamir; Tabish, Mohammad; Kabir-ud-Din

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the mechanism of drug-DNA binding is crucial for predicting the potential genotoxicity of drugs. Agarose gel electrophoresis, absorption, steady state fluorescence, and circular dichroism have been used in exploring the interaction of cationic amphiphilic drugs (CADs) such as amitriptyline hydrochloride (AMT), imipramine hydrochloride (IMP), and promethazine hydrochloride (PMT) with calf thymus or pUC19 DNA. Agarose gel electrophoresis assay, along with absorption and steady state fluorescence studies, reveal interaction between the CADs and DNA. A comparative study of the drugs with respect to the effect of urea, iodide induced quenching, and ethidium bromide (EB) exclusion assay reflects binding of CADs to the DNA primarily in an intercalative fashion. Circular dichroism data also support the intercalative mode of binding. Besides quenching, there is fluorescence exchange energy transfer (FRET) in between CADs and EB using DNA as a template.

  5. Crystal Structure of an Integron Gene Cassette-Associated Protein from Vibrio cholerae Identifies a Cationic Drug-Binding Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, Chandrika N.; Harrop, Stephen J.; Boucher, Yan; Hassan, Karl A.; Di Leo, Rosa; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Savchenko, Alexei; Chang, Changsoo; Labbate, Maurizio; Paulsen, Ian T.; Stokes, H.W.; Curmi, Paul M.G.; Mabbutt, Bridget C. (MIT); (UT-Australia); (Macquarie); (Toronto); (New South)

    2012-02-15

    The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes. We report the 1.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators. Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds.

  6. Crystal structure of an integron gene cassette-associated protein from Vibrio cholerae identifies a cationic drug-binding module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrika N Deshpande

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes.We report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators.Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds.

  7. Specific insulin binding in bovine chromaffin cells; demonstration of preferential binding to adrenalin-storing cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serck-Hanssen, G.; Soevik, O.

    1987-01-01

    Insulin binding was studied in subpopulations of bovine chromaffin cells enriched in adrenalin-producing cells (A-cells) or noradrenalin-producing cells (NA-cells). Binding of 125 I-insulin was carried out at 15 0 C for 3 hrs in the absence or presence of excess unlabeled hormone. Four fractions of cells were obtained by centrifugation on a stepwise bovine serum albumin gradient. The four fractions were all shown to bind insulin in a specific manner and the highest binding was measured in the cell layers of higher densities, containing mainly A-cells. The difference in binding of insulin to the four subpopulations of chromaffin cells seemed to be related to differences in numbers of receptors as opposed to receptor affinities. The authors conclude that bovine chromaffin cells possess high affinity binding sites for insulin and that these binding sites are mainly confined to A-cells. 24 references, 2 figures, 1 table

  8. Electrophysiological analysis of the mutated Na,K-ATPase cation binding pocket.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, J.B.; Geibel, S.; Grabsch, E.; Pont, J.J.H.H.M. de; Bamberg, E.; Friedrich, T.

    2003-01-01

    Na,K-ATPase mediates net electrogenic transport by extruding three Na+ ions and importing two K+ ions across the plasma membrane during each reaction cycle. We mutated putative cation coordinating amino acids in transmembrane hairpin M5-M6 of rat Na,K-ATPase: Asp776 (Gln, Asp, Ala), Glu779 (Asp,

  9. Cationic solid-lipid nanoparticles can efficiently bind and transfect plasmid DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olbrich, C; Bakowsky, U; Muller, RH; Kneuer, C

    2001-01-01

    The suitability of cationically modified solid-lipid nanoparticles (SLN) as a novel transfection agent was investigated. SLN were produced by hot homogenisation using either Compritol ATO 888 or paraffin as matrix lipid, a mixture of Tween 80 and Span 85 as tenside and either EQ1

  10. Mutated Leguminous Lectin Containing a Heparin-Binding like Motif in a Carbohydrate-Binding Loop Specifically Binds to Heparin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirohito Abo

    Full Text Available We previously introduced random mutations in the sugar-binding loops of a leguminous lectin and screened the resulting mutated lectins for novel specificities using cell surface display. Screening of a mutated peanut agglutinin (PNA, revealed a mutated PNA with a distinct preference for heparin. Glycan microarray analyses using the mutated lectin fused to the Fc region of human immunoglobulin, revealed that a particular sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG, heparin, had the highest binding affinity for mutated PNA among 97 glycans tested, although wild-type PNA showed affinity towards Galβ1-3GalNAc and similar galactosylated glycans. Further analyses of binding specificity using an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay demonstrated that the mutated PNA specifically binds to heparin, and weakly to de-2-O-sulfated heparin, but not to other GAG chains including de-6-O-sulfated and de-N-sulfated heparins. The mutated PNA had six amino acid substitutions within the eight amino acid-long sugar-binding loop. In this loop, the heparin-binding like motif comprised three arginine residues at positions 124, 128, and 129, and a histidine at position 125 was present. Substitution of each arginine or histidine residue to alanine reduced heparin-binding ability, indicating that all of these basic amino acid residues contributed to heparin binding. Inhibition assay demonstrated that heparin and dextran sulfate strongly inhibited mutated PNA binding to heparin in dose-dependent manner. The mutated PNA could distinguish between CHO cells and proteoglycan-deficient mutant cells. This is the first report establishing a novel leguminous lectin that preferentially binds to highly sulfated heparin and may provide novel GAG-binding probes to distinguish between heterogeneous GAG repeating units.

  11. Mutated Leguminous Lectin Containing a Heparin-Binding like Motif in a Carbohydrate-Binding Loop Specifically Binds to Heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo, Hirohito; Soga, Keisuke; Tanaka, Atsuhiro; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    We previously introduced random mutations in the sugar-binding loops of a leguminous lectin and screened the resulting mutated lectins for novel specificities using cell surface display. Screening of a mutated peanut agglutinin (PNA), revealed a mutated PNA with a distinct preference for heparin. Glycan microarray analyses using the mutated lectin fused to the Fc region of human immunoglobulin, revealed that a particular sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG), heparin, had the highest binding affinity for mutated PNA among 97 glycans tested, although wild-type PNA showed affinity towards Galβ1-3GalNAc and similar galactosylated glycans. Further analyses of binding specificity using an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay demonstrated that the mutated PNA specifically binds to heparin, and weakly to de-2-O-sulfated heparin, but not to other GAG chains including de-6-O-sulfated and de-N-sulfated heparins. The mutated PNA had six amino acid substitutions within the eight amino acid-long sugar-binding loop. In this loop, the heparin-binding like motif comprised three arginine residues at positions 124, 128, and 129, and a histidine at position 125 was present. Substitution of each arginine or histidine residue to alanine reduced heparin-binding ability, indicating that all of these basic amino acid residues contributed to heparin binding. Inhibition assay demonstrated that heparin and dextran sulfate strongly inhibited mutated PNA binding to heparin in dose-dependent manner. The mutated PNA could distinguish between CHO cells and proteoglycan-deficient mutant cells. This is the first report establishing a novel leguminous lectin that preferentially binds to highly sulfated heparin and may provide novel GAG-binding probes to distinguish between heterogeneous GAG repeating units.

  12. Quantification of Cooperativity in Heterodimer-DNA Binding Improves the Accuracy of Binding Specificity Models*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakova, Alina; Berset, Yves; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Deplancke, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Many transcription factors (TFs) have the ability to cooperate on DNA elements as heterodimers. Despite the significance of TF heterodimerization for gene regulation, a quantitative understanding of cooperativity between various TF dimer partners and its impact on heterodimer DNA binding specificity models is still lacking. Here, we used a novel integrative approach, combining microfluidics-steered measurements of dimer-DNA assembly with mechanistic modeling of the implicated protein-protein-DNA interactions to quantitatively interrogate the cooperative DNA binding behavior of the adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ):retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer. Using the high throughput MITOMI (mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions) platform, we derived equilibrium DNA binding data for PPARγ, RXRα, as well as the PPARγ:RXRα heterodimer to more than 300 target DNA sites and variants thereof. We then quantified cooperativity underlying heterodimer-DNA binding and derived an integrative heterodimer DNA binding constant. Using this cooperativity-inclusive constant, we were able to build a heterodimer-DNA binding specificity model that has superior predictive power than the one based on a regular one-site equilibrium. Our data further revealed that individual nucleotide substitutions within the target site affect the extent of cooperativity in PPARγ:RXRα-DNA binding. Our study therefore emphasizes the importance of assessing cooperativity when generating DNA binding specificity models for heterodimers. PMID:26912662

  13. Quantification of Cooperativity in Heterodimer-DNA Binding Improves the Accuracy of Binding Specificity Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakova, Alina; Berset, Yves; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Deplancke, Bart

    2016-05-06

    Many transcription factors (TFs) have the ability to cooperate on DNA elements as heterodimers. Despite the significance of TF heterodimerization for gene regulation, a quantitative understanding of cooperativity between various TF dimer partners and its impact on heterodimer DNA binding specificity models is still lacking. Here, we used a novel integrative approach, combining microfluidics-steered measurements of dimer-DNA assembly with mechanistic modeling of the implicated protein-protein-DNA interactions to quantitatively interrogate the cooperative DNA binding behavior of the adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ):retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer. Using the high throughput MITOMI (mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions) platform, we derived equilibrium DNA binding data for PPARγ, RXRα, as well as the PPARγ:RXRα heterodimer to more than 300 target DNA sites and variants thereof. We then quantified cooperativity underlying heterodimer-DNA binding and derived an integrative heterodimer DNA binding constant. Using this cooperativity-inclusive constant, we were able to build a heterodimer-DNA binding specificity model that has superior predictive power than the one based on a regular one-site equilibrium. Our data further revealed that individual nucleotide substitutions within the target site affect the extent of cooperativity in PPARγ:RXRα-DNA binding. Our study therefore emphasizes the importance of assessing cooperativity when generating DNA binding specificity models for heterodimers. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Kinetics of Cation and Oxyanion Adsorption and Desorption on Ferrihydrite: Roles of Ferrihydrite Binding Sites and a Unified Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Lei [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006, People’s Republic of China; The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry; Shi, Zhenqing [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006, People’s Republic of China; The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry; Lu, Yang [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006, People’s Republic of China; The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry; Dohnalkova, Alice C. [Environmental; Lin, Zhang [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006, People’s Republic of China; The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry; Dang, Zhi [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006, People’s Republic of China; The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry

    2017-08-29

    Understanding the kinetics of toxic ion reactions with ferrihydrite is crucial for predicting the dynamic behavior of contaminants in soil environments. In this study, the kinetics of As(V), Cr(VI), Cu, and Pb adsorption and desorption on ferrihydrite were investigated with a combination of laboratory macroscopic experiments, microscopic investigation and mechanistic modeling. The rates of As(V), Cr(VI), Cu, and Pb adsorption and desorption on ferrihydrite, as systematically studied using a stirred-flow method, was highly dependent on the reaction pH and metal concentrations and varied significantly among four metals. Spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM) showed, at sub-nano scales, all four metals were distributed within the ferrihydrite particle aggregates homogeneously after adsorption reactions, with no evidence of surface diffusion-controlled processes. Based on experimental results, we developed a unifying kinetics model for both cation and oxyanion adsorption/desorption on ferrihydrite based on the mechanistic-based equilibrium model CD-MUSIC. Overall, the model described the kinetic results well, and we quantitatively demonstrated how the equilibrium properties of the cation and oxyanion binding to various ferrihydrite sites affected the adsorption and desorption rates. Our results provided a unifying quantitative modeling method for the kinetics of both cation and oxyanion adsorption/desorption on iron minerals.

  15. Specific binding of atrial natriuretic factor in brain microvessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabrier, P.E.; Roubert, P.; Braquet, P.

    1987-01-01

    Cerebral capillaries constitute the blood-brain barrier. Studies of specific receptors (neurotransmitters or hormones) located on this structure can be performed by means of radioligand-binding techniques on isolated brain microvessels. The authors examined on pure bovine cerebral microvessel preparations the binding of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), using 125 I-labeled ANF. Saturation and competition experiments demonstrated the presence of a single class of ANF-binding sites with high affinity and with a binding capacity of 58 fmol/mg of protein. The binding of 125 I-labeled ANF to brain microvessels is specific, reversible, and time dependent, as is shown by association-dissociation experiments. The demonstration of specific ANF-binding sites on brain microvessels supposes a physiological role of ANF on brain microvasculature. The coexistence of ANF and angiotensin II receptors on this cerebrovascular tissue suggests that the two circulating peptides may act as mutual antagonists in the regulation of brain microcirculation and/or blood-brain barrier function

  16. Ceruloplasmin ferroxidase activity stimulates cellular iron uptake by a trivalent cation-specific transport mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attieh, Z. K.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Seshadri, V.; Tripoulas, N. A.; Fox, P. L.

    1999-01-01

    The balance required to maintain appropriate cellular and tissue iron levels has led to the evolution of multiple mechanisms to precisely regulate iron uptake from transferrin and low molecular weight iron chelates. A role for ceruloplasmin (Cp) in vertebrate iron metabolism is suggested by its potent ferroxidase activity catalyzing conversion of Fe2+ to Fe3+, by identification of yeast copper oxidases homologous to Cp that facilitate high affinity iron uptake, and by studies of "aceruloplasminemic" patients who have extensive iron deposits in multiple tissues. We have recently shown that Cp increases iron uptake by cultured HepG2 cells. In this report, we investigated the mechanism by which Cp stimulates cellular iron uptake. Cp stimulated the rate of non-transferrin 55Fe uptake by iron-deficient K562 cells by 2-3-fold, using a transferrin receptor-independent pathway. Induction of Cp-stimulated iron uptake by iron deficiency was blocked by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, consistent with a transcriptionally induced or regulated transporter. Cp-stimulated iron uptake was completely blocked by unlabeled Fe3+ and by other trivalent cations including Al3+, Ga3+, and Cr3+, but not by divalent cations. These results indicate that Cp utilizes a trivalent cation-specific transporter. Cp ferroxidase activity was required for iron uptake as shown by the ineffectiveness of two ferroxidase-deficient Cp preparations, copper-deficient Cp and thiomolybdate-treated Cp. We propose a model in which iron reduction and subsequent re-oxidation by Cp are essential for an iron uptake pathway with high ion specificity.

  17. Surfactant-free Colloidal Particles with Specific Binding Affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wel, Casper; Bossert, Nelli; Mank, Quinten J; Winter, Marcel G T; Heinrich, Doris; Kraft, Daniela J

    2017-09-26

    Colloidal particles with specific binding affinity are essential for in vivo and in vitro biosensing, targeted drug delivery, and micrometer-scale self-assembly. Key to these techniques are surface functionalizations that provide high affinities to specific target molecules. For stabilization in physiological environments, current particle coating methods rely on adsorbed surfactants. However, spontaneous desorption of these surfactants typically has an undesirable influence on lipid membranes. To address this issue and create particles for targeting molecules in lipid membranes, we present here a surfactant-free coating method that combines high binding affinity with stability at physiological conditions. After activating charge-stabilized polystyrene microparticles with EDC/Sulfo-NHS, we first coat the particles with a specific protein and subsequently covalently attach a dense layer of poly(ethyelene) glycol. This polymer layer provides colloidal stability at physiological conditions as well as antiadhesive properties, while the protein coating provides the specific affinity to the targeted molecule. We show that NeutrAvidin-functionalized particles bind specifically to biotinylated membranes and that Concanavalin A-functionalized particles bind specifically to the glycocortex of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. The affinity of the particles changes with protein density, which can be tuned during the coating procedure. The generic and surfactant-free coating method reported here transfers the high affinity and specificity of a protein onto colloidal polystyrene microparticles.

  18. RNA binding specificity of Ebola virus transcription factor VP30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlereth, Julia; Grünweller, Arnold; Biedenkopf, Nadine; Becker, Stephan; Hartmann, Roland K

    2016-09-01

    The transcription factor VP30 of the non-segmented RNA negative strand Ebola virus balances viral transcription and replication. Here, we comprehensively studied RNA binding by VP30. Using a novel VP30:RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay, we tested truncated variants of 2 potential natural RNA substrates of VP30 - the genomic Ebola viral 3'-leader region and its complementary antigenomic counterpart (each ∼155 nt in length) - and a series of other non-viral RNAs. Based on oligonucleotide interference, the major VP30 binding region on the genomic 3'-leader substrate was assigned to the internal expanded single-stranded region (∼ nt 125-80). Best binding to VP30 was obtained with ssRNAs of optimally ∼ 40 nt and mixed base composition; underrepresentation of purines or pyrimidines was tolerated, but homopolymeric sequences impaired binding. A stem-loop structure, particularly at the 3'-end or positioned internally, supports stable binding to VP30. In contrast, dsRNA or RNAs exposing large internal loops flanked by entirely helical arms on both sides are not bound. Introduction of a 5´-Cap(0) structure impaired VP30 binding. Also, ssDNAs bind substantially weaker than isosequential ssRNAs and heparin competes with RNA for binding to VP30, indicating that ribose 2'-hydroxyls and electrostatic contacts of the phosphate groups contribute to the formation of VP30:RNA complexes. Our results indicate a rather relaxed RNA binding specificity of filoviral VP30, which largely differs from that of the functionally related transcription factor of the Paramyxoviridae which binds to ssRNAs as short as 13 nt with a preference for oligo(A) sequences.

  19. Thermodynamics of sequence-specific binding of PNA to DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratilainen, T; Holmén, A; Tuite, E

    2000-01-01

    For further characterization of the hybridization properties of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), the thermodynamics of hybridization of mixed sequence PNA-DNA duplexes have been studied. We have characterized the binding of PNA to DNA in terms of binding affinity (perfectly matched duplexes) and seq......For further characterization of the hybridization properties of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), the thermodynamics of hybridization of mixed sequence PNA-DNA duplexes have been studied. We have characterized the binding of PNA to DNA in terms of binding affinity (perfectly matched duplexes......) and sequence specificity of binding (singly mismatched duplexes) using mainly absorption hypochromicity melting curves and isothermal titration calorimetry. For perfectly sequence-matched duplexes of varying lengths (6-20 bp), the average free energy of binding (DeltaG degrees ) was determined to be -6...... relative to that of the perfectly matched sequence with a corresponding free energy penalty of about 15 kJ mol(-1) bp(-1). The average cost of a single mismatch is therefore estimated to be on the order of or larger than the gain of two matched base pairs, resulting in an apparent binding constant of only...

  20. Species specificity for HBsAg binding protein endonexin II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBruin, WCC; Leenders, WPJ; Moshage, H; vanHaelst, UJGM

    Background/Aims: Hepatitis B virus displays a distinct species and tissue tropism, Previously we have demonstrated that a human liver plasma membrane protein,vith a molecular weight of approximately 34 kiloDalton specifically binds to HBsAg. This protein was identified as endonexin II, a Ca2+

  1. Describing the Peptide Binding Specificity of HLA-C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael; Harndahl, Mikkel Nors; Nielsen, Morten

    . We find preference for hydrophobic residues at the peptide C-terminus for all HLA-C molecules. Most molecules were found to have an additional strong anchor at P2 or P3, with auxiliary anchor observed at P1, P2, P3, and P7. The binding affinity is measured for peptides fitting the specificity matrix...

  2. Expression and divalent cation binding properties of the novel chemotactic inflammatory protein psoriasin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorum, H; Madsen, Peder; Rasmussen, H H

    1996-01-01

    Psoriasin is a novel chemotactic inflammatory protein that possesses weak similarity to the S100 family members of Ca(2+)-binding proteins, and that is highly up-regulated in hyperproliferative psoriatic keratinocytes. Here we have used the psoriasin cDNA to express recombinant human (rh) psoriasin...... in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein containing a hexa His tag and a factor Xa cleavage site in the NH2-terminus. The protein was purified by affinity chromatography on Ni(2+)-nitrilotriacetic acid agarose, digested with factor Xa, further purified by ion-exchange chromatography and characterized by two......-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis and NH2-terminal sequencing. The ability of rh psoriasin to bind Ca2+, Zn2+, and Mg2+ was determined by dialysis experiments. We found that rh psoriasin may bind at least seven molecules of Ca2+ in KCl and several molecules in NaCl, with an affinity for the first bound...

  3. Experimental strategies for studying transcription factor-DNA binding specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geertz, Marcel; Maerkl, Sebastian J

    2010-12-01

    Specific binding of transcription factors (TFs) determines in a large part the connectivity of gene regulatory networks as well as the quantitative level of gene expression. A multiplicity of both experimental and computational methods is currently used to discover and characterize the underlying TF-DNA interactions. Experimental methods can be further subdivided into in vitro- and in vivo-based approaches, each accenting different aspects of TF-binding events. In this review we summarize the flexibility and performance of a selection of both types of experimental methods. In conclusion, we argue that a serial combination of methods with different throughput and data type constitutes an optimal experimental strategy.

  4. The Multiple Carbohydrate Binding Specificities of Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teneberg, Susann

    Persistent colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Adhesion of microbes to the target tissue is an important determinant for successful initiation, establishment and maintenance of infection, and a variety of different candidate carbohydrate receptors for H. pylori have been identified. Here the different the binding specifities, and their potential role in adhesion to human gastric epithelium are described. Finally, recent findings on the roles of sialic acid binding SabA adhesin in interactions with human neutrophils and erythrocytes are discussed.

  5. Quantification of specific bindings of biomolecules by magnetorelaxometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinhoff Uwe

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The binding reaction of the biomolecules streptavidin and anti-biotin antibody, both labelled by magnetic nanoparticles (MNP, to biotin coated on agarose beads, was quantified by magnetorelaxometry (MRX. Highly sensitive SQUID-based MRX revealed the immobilization of the MNP caused by the biotin-streptavidin coupling. We found that about 85% of streptavidin-functionalised MNP bound specifically to biotin-agarose beads. On the other hand only 20% of antibiotin-antibody functionalised MNP were specifically bound. Variation of the suspension medium revealed in comparison to phosphate buffer with 0.1% bovine serum albumin a slight change of the binding behaviour in human serum, probably due to the presence of functioning (non heated serum proteins. Furthermore, in human serum an additional non-specific binding occurs, being independent from the serum protein functionality. The presented homogeneous bead based assay is applicable in simple, uncoated vials and it enables the assessment of the binding kinetics in a volume without liquid flow. The estimated association rate constant for the MNP-labelled streptavidin is by about two orders of magnitude smaller than the value reported for free streptavidin. This is probably due to the relatively large size of the magnetic markers which reduces the diffusion of streptavidin. Furthermore, long time non-exponential kinetics were observed and interpreted as agglutination of the agarose beads.

  6. NAD+ Modulates p53 DNA Binding Specificity and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLure, Kevin G.; Takagi, Masatoshi; Kastan, Michael B.

    2004-01-01

    DNA damage induces p53 DNA binding activity, which affects tumorigenesis, tumor responses to therapies, and the toxicities of cancer therapies (B. Vogelstein, D. Lane, and A. J. Levine, Nature 408:307-310, 2000; K. H. Vousden and X. Lu, Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:594-604, 2002). Both transcriptional and transcription-independent activities of p53 contribute to DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and aneuploidy prevention (M. B. Kastan et al., Cell 71:587-597, 1992; K. H. Vousden and X. Lu, Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:594-604, 2002). Small-molecule manipulation of p53 DNA binding activity has been an elusive goal, but here we show that NAD+ binds to p53 tetramers, induces a conformational change, and modulates p53 DNA binding specificity in vitro. Niacinamide (vitamin B3) increases the rate of intracellular NAD+ synthesis, alters radiation-induced p53 DNA binding specificity, and modulates activation of a subset of p53 transcriptional targets. These effects are likely due to a direct effect of NAD+ on p53, as a molecule structurally related to part of NAD+, TDP, also inhibits p53 DNA binding, and the TDP precursor, thiamine (vitamin B1), inhibits intracellular p53 activity. Niacinamide and thiamine affect two p53-regulated cellular responses to ionizing radiation: rereplication and apoptosis. Thus, niacinamide and thiamine form a novel basis for the development of small molecules that affect p53 function in vivo, and these results suggest that changes in cellular energy metabolism may regulate p53. PMID:15509798

  7. Visualization of specific binding sites of benzodiazepine in human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinotoh, H.; Yamasaki, T.; Inoue, O.; Itoh, T.; Suzuki, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Tateno, Y.; Ikehira, H.

    1986-01-01

    Using 11C-labeled Ro15-1788 and positron emission tomography, studies of benzodiazepine binding sites in the human brain were performed on four normal volunteers. Rapid and high accumulation of 11C activity was observed in the brain after i.v. injection of [11C]Ro15-1788, the maximum of which was within 12 min. Initial distribution of 11C activity in the brain was similar to the distribution of the normal cerebral blood flow. Ten minutes after injection, however, a high uptake of 11C activity was observed in the cerebral cortex and moderate uptake was seen in the cerebellar cortex, the basal ganglia, and the thalamus. The accumulation of 11C activity was low in the brain stem. This distribution of 11C activity was approximately parallel to the known distribution of benzodiazepine receptors. Saturation experiments were performed on four volunteers with oral administration of 0.3-1.8 mg/kg of cold Ro15-1788 prior to injection. Initial distribution of 11C activity following injection peaked within 2 min and then the accumulation of 11C activity decreased rapidly and remarkably throughout the brain. The results indicated that [11C] Ro15-1788 associates and dissociates to specific and nonspecific binding sites rapidly and has a high ratio of specific receptor binding to nonspecific binding in vivo. Carbon-11 Ro15-1788 is a suitable radioligand for the study of benzodiazepine receptors in vivo in humans

  8. Immobilized sialyloligo-macroligand and its protein binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narla, Satya Nandana; Sun, Xue-Long

    2012-05-14

    We report a chemoenzymatic synthesis of chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers with different linkages and their oriented immobilization for glycoarray and SPR-based glyco-biosensor applications. Specifically, O-cyanate chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers were synthesized by enzymatic α2,3- and α2,6-sialylation of a lactose-containing glycopolymer that was synthesized by cyanoxyl-mediated free radical polymerization. (1)H NMR showed almost quantitative α2,3- and α2,6-sialylation. The O-cyanate chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers were printed onto amine-functionalized glass slides via isourea bond formation for glycoarray formation. Specific protein binding activity of the arrays was confirmed with α2,3- and α2,6-sialyl specific binding lectins together with inhibition assays. Further, immobilizing O-cyanate chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers onto amine-modified SPR chip via isourea bond formation afforded SPR-based glyco-biosensor, which showed specific binding activity for lectins and influenza viral hemagglutinins (HA). These sialyloligo-macroligand derived glycoarray and SPR-based glyco-biosensor are closely to mimic 3D nature presentation of sialyloligosaccharides and will provide important high-throughput tools for virus diagnosis and potential antiviral drug candidates screening applications.

  9. Non-specific binding of Na+ and Mg2+ to RNA determined by force spectroscopy methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizarro, C. V.; Alemany, A.; Ritort, F.

    2012-01-01

    RNA duplex stability depends strongly on ionic conditions, and inside cells RNAs are exposed to both monovalent and multivalent ions. Despite recent advances, we do not have general methods to quantitatively account for the effects of monovalent and multivalent ions on RNA stability, and the thermodynamic parameters for secondary structure prediction have only been derived at 1M [Na+]. Here, by mechanically unfolding and folding a 20 bp RNA hairpin using optical tweezers, we study the RNA thermodynamics and kinetics at different monovalent and mixed monovalent/Mg2+ salt conditions. We measure the unfolding and folding rupture forces and apply Kramers theory to extract accurate information about the hairpin free energy landscape under tension at a wide range of ionic conditions. We obtain non-specific corrections for the free energy of formation of the RNA hairpin and measure how the distance of the transition state to the folded state changes with force and ionic strength. We experimentally validate the Tightly Bound Ion model and obtain values for the persistence length of ssRNA. Finally, we test the approximate rule by which the non-specific binding affinity of divalent cations at a given concentration is equivalent to that of monovalent cations taken at 100-fold concentration for small molecular constructs. PMID:22492710

  10. Crystal structure of the high-affinity Na+,K+-ATPase–ouabain complex with Mg2+ bound in the cation binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Mette; Yatime, Laure; Nissen, Poul

    2013-01-01

    we describe a crystal structure of the phosphorylated pig kidney Na+,K+-ATPase in complex with the CTS representative ouabain, extending to 3.4 Å resolution. The structure provides key details on CTS binding, revealing an extensive hydrogen bonding network formed by the β-surface of the steroid core......The Na+,K+-ATPase maintains electrochemical gradients for Na+ and K+ that are critical for animal cells. Cardiotonic steroids (CTSs), widely used in the clinic and recently assigned a role as endogenous regulators of intracellular processes, are highly specific inhibitors of the Na+,K+-ATPase. Here...... of ouabain and the side chains of αM1, αM2, and αM6. Furthermore, the structure reveals that cation transport site II is occupied by Mg2+, and crystallographic studies indicate that Rb+ and Mn2+, but not Na+, bind to this site. Comparison with the low-affinity [K2]E2–MgFx–ouabain structure [Ogawa et al...

  11. Investigating the effect of hardness cations on coagulation: The aspect of neutralisation through Al(III)-dissolved organic matter (DOM) binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuxuan; Yan, Mingquan; Liu, Ruiping; Wang, Dongsheng; Qu, Jiuhui

    2017-05-15

    Hardness cations are ubiquitous and abundant in source water, while the effect of hardness on the performance of coagulation for dissolved organic matter (DOM) removal in water treatment remains unclear due to the limitation of methods that can characterise the subtle interactions between DOM, coagulant and hardness cations. This work quantified the competition between coagulant Al 3+ and hardness cations to bind onto DOM using absorbance spectroscopy acquired at different Al 3+ concentrations in the absence and presence of Ca 2+ or Mg 2+ . The results indicate that, in the presence of either Mg 2+ or Ca 2+ , an increasing depression of the binding of Al 3+ -DOM could be observed in the differential spectra of DOM with the increasing of Mg 2+ or Ca 2+ at a level of 10, 100 and 1000 μM, with the observation being more significant at higher pH from 6.5 to 8.5. The results of zeta potentials of DOM indicate that the competition of hardness cations results in the negative DOM being less efficiently neutralised by Al 3+ . This study demonstrates that the removal of DOM by coagulation would significantly deteriorate with the presence of hardness cations, which would compete with coagulant Al 3+ to neutralise the unsaturated sites in DOM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cationic composition and acid-base state of the extracellular fluid, and specific buffer value of hemoglobin from the branchiopod crustacean Triops cancriformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirow, Ralph; Buchen, Ina; Richter, Marc; Allmer, Carsten; Nunes, Frank; Günsel, Andreas; Heikens, Wiebke; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; von Reumont, Björn M; Hetz, Stefan K

    2009-04-01

    Recent insights into the allosteric control of oxygen binding in the extracellular hemoglobin (Hb) of the tadpole shrimp Triops cancriformis raised the question about the physico-chemical properties of the protein's native environment. This study determined the cationic composition and acid-base state of the animal's extracellular fluid. The physiological concentrations of potential cationic effectors (calcium, magnesium) were more than one order of magnitude below the level effective to increase Hb oxygen affinity. The extracellular fluid in the pericardial space had a typical bicarbonate concentration of 7.6 mM but a remarkably high CO(2) partial pressure of 1.36 kPa at pH 7.52 and 20 degrees C. The discrepancy between this high CO(2) partial pressure and the comparably low values for water-breathing decapods could not solely be explained by the hemolymph-sampling procedure but may additionally arise from differences in cardiovascular complexity and efficiency. T. cancriformis hemolymph had a non-bicarbonate buffer value of 2.1 meq L(-1) pH(-1). Hb covered 40-60% of the non-bicarbonate buffering power. The specific buffer value of Hb of 1.1 meq (mmol heme)(-1) pH(-1) suggested a minimum requirement of two titratable histidines per heme-binding domain, which is supported by available information from N-terminal sequencing and expressed sequence tags.

  13. A mosquito hemolymph odorant-binding protein family member specifically binds juvenile hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il Hwan; Pham, Van; Jablonka, Willy; Goodman, Walter G.; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Andersen, John F.

    2017-07-27

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a key regulator of insect development and reproduction. In adult mosquitoes, it is essential for maturation of the ovary and normal male reproductive behavior, but how JH distribution and activity is regulated after secretion is unclear. Here, we report a new type of specific JH-binding protein, given the name mosquito juvenile hormone-binding protein (mJHBP), which circulates in the hemolymph of pupal and adult Aedes aegypti males and females. mJHBP is a member of the odorant-binding protein (OBP) family, and orthologs are present in the genomes of Aedes, Culex, and Anopheles mosquito species. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that mJHBP specifically binds JH II and JH III but not eicosanoids or JH derivatives. mJHBP was crystallized in the presence of JH III and found to have a double OBP domain structure reminiscent of salivary “long” D7 proteins of mosquitoes. We observed that a single JH III molecule is contained in the N-terminal domain binding pocket that is closed in an apparent conformational change by a C-terminal domain-derived α-helix. The electron density for the ligand indicated a high occupancy of the natural 10R enantiomer of JH III. Of note, mJHBP is structurally unrelated to hemolymph JHBP from lepidopteran insects. A low level of expression of mJHBP in Ae. aegypti larvae suggests that it is primarily active during the adult stage where it could potentially influence the effects of JH on egg development, mating behavior, feeding, or other processes.

  14. Bioinformatic Characterization of the Trimeric Intracellular Cation-Specific Channel Protein Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverio, Abe L. F.

    2014-01-01

    Trimeric intracellular cation-specific (TRIC) channels are integral to muscle excitation–contraction coupling. TRIC channels provide counter-ionic flux when calcium is rapidly transported from intracellular stores to the cell cytoplasm. Until recently, knowledge of the presence of these proteins was limited to animals. We analyzed the TRIC family and identified a profusion of prokaryotic family members with topologies and motifs similar to those of their eukaryotic counterparts. Prokaryotic members far outnumber eukaryotic members, and although none has been functionally characterized, the evidence suggests that they function as secondary carriers. The presence of fused N- or C-terminal domains of known biochemical functions as well as genomic context analyses provide clues about the functions of these prokaryotic homologs. They are proposed to function in metabolite (e.g., amino acid/ nucleotide) efflux. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that TRIC channel homologs diverged relatively early during evolutionary history and that horizontal gene transfer was frequent in prokaryotes but not in eukaryotes. Topological analyses of TRIC channels revealed that these proteins possess seven putative transmembrane segments (TMSs), which arose by intragenic duplication of a three-TMS polypeptide-encoding genetic element followed by addition of a seventh TMS at the C terminus to give the precursor of all current TRIC family homologs. We propose that this family arose in prokaryotes. PMID:21519847

  15. Cations affect [3H]mazindol and [3H]WIN 35,428 binding to the human dopamine transporter in a similar fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q; Coffey, L L; Reith, M E

    1997-09-01

    The present study addresses the possibility that there are different cocaine-related and mazindol-related binding domains on the dopamine transporter (DAT) that show differential sensitivity to cations. The effects of Zn2+, Mg2+, Hg2+, Li+, K+, and Na+ were assessed on the binding of [3H]mazindol and [3H]WIN 35,428 to the human (h) DAT expressed in C6 glioma cells under identical conditions for intact cell and membrane assays. The latter were performed at both 0 and 21 degrees C. Zn2+ (30-100 microM) stimulated binding of both radioligands to membranes, with a relatively smaller effect for [3H]mazindol; Mg2+ (0.1-100 microM) had no effect; Hg2+ at approximately 3 microM stimulated binding to membranes, with a relatively smaller effect for [3H]mazindol than [3H]WIN 35,428 at 0 degrees C, and at 30-100 microM inhibited both intact cell and membrane binding; Li+ and K+ substitution (30-100 mM) inhibited binding to membranes more severely than to intact cells; and Na+ substitution was strongly stimulatory. With only a few exceptions, the patterns of ion effects were remarkably similar for both radioligands at both 0 and 21 degrees C, suggesting the involvement of common binding domains on the hDAT impacted similarly by cations. Therefore, if there are different binding domains for WIN 35,428 and mazindol, these are not affected differentially by the cations studied in the present experiments, except for the stimulatory effect of Zn2+ at 0 and 21 degrees C and Hg2+ at 0 degrees C.

  16. The equivalent of a thallium binding residue from an archeal homolog controls cation interactions in brain glutamate transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichman, Shlomit; Qu, Shaogang; Kanner, Baruch I

    2009-08-25

    Glutamate transporters maintain low synaptic concentrations of neurotransmitter by coupling uptake to flux of other ions. Their transport cycle consists of two separate translocation steps, namely cotransport of glutamic acid with three Na(+) followed by countertransport of K(+). Two Tl(+) binding sites, presumed to serve as sodium sites, were observed in the crystal structure of a related archeal homolog and the side chain of a conserved aspartate residue contributed to one of these sites. We have mutated the corresponding residue of the eukaryotic glutamate transporters GLT-1 and EAAC1 to asparagine, serine, and cysteine. Remarkably, these mutants exhibited significant sodium-dependent radioactive acidic amino acid uptake when expressed in HeLa cells. Reconstitution experiments revealed that net uptake by the mutants in K(+)-loaded liposomes was impaired. However, with Na(+) and unlabeled L-aspartate inside the liposomes, exchange levels were around 50-90% of those by wild-type. In further contrast to wild-type, where either substrate or K(+) stimulated the anion conductance by the transporter, substrate but not K(+) modulated the anion conductance of the mutants expressed in oocytes. Both with wild-type EAAC1 and EAAC1-D455N, not only sodium but also lithium could support radioactive acidic amino acid uptake. In contrast, with D455S and D455C, radioactive uptake was only observed in the presence of sodium. Thus the conserved aspartate is required for transporter-cation interactions in each of the two separate translocation steps and likely participates in an overlapping sodium and potassium binding site.

  17. Divalent cations regulate glucagon binding. Evidence for actions on receptor-N/sub s/ complexes and on receptors uncoupled from N/sub s/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipson, K.E.; Kolhatkar, A.A.; Maki, R.G.; Donner, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of Mg 2+ or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on 125 I-glucagon binding to rat liver plasma membranes have been characterized. In the absence of guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), maximal binding of 125 I-glucagon occurs in the absence of added Mg 2+ . Addition of EDTA or Mg 2+ diminishes binding in a dose-dependent manner. In the presence of GTP, maximal binding occurs in the presence of 2.5 mM Mg 2+ while EDTA or higher concentrations of Mg 2+ diminish binding. Response to exogenous Mg 2+ or EDTA depends on the concentration of Mg 2+ in the membranes and may vary with the method used for membrane isolation. In the absence of GTP, 40 mM Mg 2+ or 5 mM EDTA diminishes receptor affinity for hormone and the fraction of 125 I-glucagon in high molecular weight receptor-N/sub s/ complexes without affecting site number. Thus, while GTP promotes disaggregation of recepton-N/sub s/ complexes, Mg 2+ or EDTA diminishes the affinity with which these species bind hormone. In the presence of GTP, hormone binds to lower affinity, low molecular weight receptors uncoupled from N/sub s/. Binding site affinity is diminished by 40 mM Mg 2+ or 5 mM EDTA and increased by 0.5 mM Mg 2+ without significantly changing the amount of 125 I-glucagon in high molecular weight receptor-N/sub s/ complexes. The ability of Mg 2+ to alter binding to receptors uncoupled from N/sub s/ suggests the presence of a cation binding site in the glucagon receptor. Thus, divalent cations also affect the sensitivity of hormone-receptor-regulatory protein complexes to GTP-induced disaggregation

  18. Electromotive force and impedance studies of cellulose acetate membranes: Evidence for two binding sites for divalent cations and for an alveolar structure of the skin layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith Sørensen, T.; Jensen, J.B.; Malmgren-Hansen, B.

    1991-01-01

    from the lamellar wall is of some significance only at low salt concentrations. Measured Nernst distribution coefficients in dense CA-membranes agree roughly with calculated values. We also focus on new results for the binding of divalent cations to the glucuronic acid groups of the CA-chains, which...... asymmetic membranes. The skin layer in asymmetric membranes is assumed to have properties similar to dense membranes. The EMF measurements were interpreted by means of a Donnan-Nernst-Planck (Teorell-Meyer-Sievers) model, which functions quite well due to the low fixed charge in the membrane. The membrane...... may temporarily transform the membranes from weak cationic exchange membranes to weak anionic exchange membranes. The divalent cations may be washed out, but the rate of dissociation is very low. There seems to be two relaxations, the slower being of the order of weeks, the faster being of the order...

  19. Binding energy and preferred adsorption sites of CO on gold and silver-gold cluster cations: adsorption kinetics and quantum chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumaier, Marco; Weigend, Florian; Hampe, Oliver; Kappes, Manfred M

    2008-01-01

    We revisit the reactivity of trapped pure gold (Au(n)+, n cluster cations (Ag(m)Au(n)+, m + n adsorption sites, associated vibrational frequencies) of CO to the noble metal as a function of cluster size and composition. Starting from results for pure gold cluster cations for which an overall decrease of CO binding energy with increasing cluster size was experimentally observed--from about 1.09 +/- 0.1 eV (for n = 6) to below 0.65 +/- 0.1 eV (for n > 26) we demonstrate that metal--CO bond energies correlate with the total electron density and with the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) on the bare metal cluster cation as obtained by density functional theory (DFT) computations. This is a consequence of the predominantly sigma-donating character of the CO-M bond. Further support for this concept is found by contrasting the predictions of binding energies to the experimental results for small alloy cluster cations (Ag(m)Au(n)+, 4 adsorption sites and pre-screen favorable isomers.

  20. Isomerization of propargyl cation to cyclopropenyl cation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    step) for isomerization of the linear propargyl cation to the aromatic cyclopropenyl cation, also probing the phenomenon of solvation of this reaction by simple lone pair donors (NH3, H2O, H2S and HF) which bind to the substrate at two sites.

  1. Electrical detection of specific versus non-specific binding events in breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Benjamin C.; Clark, Michael; Burkhead, Thomas; Sethu, Palaniappan; Rai, Shesh; Kloecker, Goetz; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2012-10-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from patient blood samples offers a desirable alternative to invasive tissue biopsies for screening of malignant carcinomas. A rigorous CTC detection method must identify CTCs from millions of other formed elements in blood and distinguish them from healthy tissue cells also present in the blood. CTCs are known to overexpress surface receptors, many of which aid them in invading other tissue, and these provide an avenue for their detection. We have developed carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film devices to specifically detect these receptors in intact cells. The CNT sidewalls are functionalized with antibodies specific to Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM), a marker overexpressed by breast and other carcinomas. Specific binding of EpCAM to anti-EpCAM antibodies causes a change in the local charge environment of the CNT surface which produces a characteristic electrical signal. Two cell lines were tested in the device: MCF7, a mammary adenocarcinoma line which overexpresses EpCAM, and MCF10A, a non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial line which does not. Introduction of MCF7s caused significant changes in the electrical conductance of the devices due to specific binding and associated charge environment change near the CNT sidewalls. Introduction of MCF10A displays a different profile due to purely nonspecific interactions. The profile of specific vs. nonspecific interaction signatures using carbon based devices will guide development of this diagnostic tool towards clinical sample volumes with wide variety of markers.

  2. Specific binding-adsorbent assay method and test means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    A description is given of an improved specific binding assay method and test means employing a nonspecific adsorbent for the substance to be determined, particularly hepatitis B surface (HBsub(s)) antigen, in its free state or additionally in the form of its immune complex. The invention is illustrated by 1) the radioimmunoadsorbent assay for HBsub(s) antigen, 2) the radioimmunoadsorbent assay for HBsub(s) antigen in the form of immune complex with antibody, 3) a study of adsorption characteristics of various anion exchange materials for HBsub(s) antigen, 4) the use of hydrophobic adsorbents in a radioimmunoadsorbent assay for HBsub(s) antigen and 5) the radioimmunoadsorbent assay for antibody to HBsub(s) antigen. The advantages of the present method for detecting HBsub(s) antigen compared to previous methods include the manufacturing advantages of eliminating the need for insolubilised anti-HBsub(s) and the advantages of a single incubation step, fewer manipulations, storability of adsorbent materials, increased sensitivity and versatility of detecting HBsub(s) antigen in the form of its immune complex if desired. (U.K.)

  3. Prediction of DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-25

    Jun 25, 2012 ... Support Vector Machine (SVM) is a state-of-the-art classifica- tion technique. Using canonical binding model, the C2H2 zinc finger protein–DNA interaction interface is modelled by the pairwise amino acid–base interactions. Using a classification framework, known examples of non-binding ZF–DNA pairs.

  4. Cationic Au Nanoparticle Binding with Plasma Membrane-like Lipid Bilayers: Potential Mechanism for Spontaneous Permeation to Cells Revealed by Atomistic Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkila, E.; Martinez-Seara, H.; Gurtovenko, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Au nanoparticles interacting with realistic membranes and explicit solvent using a model system that comprises two cellular compartments, extracellular and cytosolic, divided by two asymmetric lipid bilayers. The membrane-AuNP+ binding and membrane reorganization processes are discovered...... to be governed by cooperative effects where AuNP+, counterions, water, and the two membrane leaflets all contribute. On the extracellular side, we find that the nanoparticle has to cross a free energy barrier of about 5 k(B)T prior forming a stable contact with the membrane. This results in a rearrangement......Despite being chemically inert as a bulk material, nanoscale gold can pose harmful side effects to living organisms. In particular, cationic Au nanoparticles (AuNP+) of 2 nm diameter or less permeate readily through plasma membranes and induce cell death. We report atomistic simulations of cationic...

  5. Gram-negative trimeric porins have specific LPS binding sites that are essential for porin biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunmanee, Wanatchaporn; Pathania, Monisha; Solovyova, Alexandra S.; Le Brun, Anton P.; Ridley, Helen; Baslé, Arnaud; van den Berg, Bert; Lakey, Jeremy H.

    2016-01-01

    The outer membrane (OM) of gram-negative bacteria is an unusual asymmetric bilayer with an external monolayer of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and an inner layer of phospholipids. The LPS layer is rigid and stabilized by divalent cation cross-links between phosphate groups on the core oligosaccharide regions. This means that the OM is robust and highly impermeable to toxins and antibiotics. During their biogenesis, OM proteins (OMPs), which function as transporters and receptors, must integrate into this ordered monolayer while preserving its impermeability. Here we reveal the specific interactions between the trimeric porins of Enterobacteriaceae and LPS. Isolated porins form complexes with variable numbers of LPS molecules, which are stabilized by calcium ions. In earlier studies, two high-affinity sites were predicted to contain groups of positively charged side chains. Mutation of these residues led to the loss of LPS binding and, in one site, also prevented trimerization of the porin, explaining the previously observed effect of LPS mutants on porin folding. The high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of a trimeric porin–LPS complex not only helps to explain the mutagenesis results but also reveals more complex, subtle porin–LPS interactions and a bridging calcium ion. PMID:27493217

  6. Metal Ion Binding at the Catalytic Site Induces Widely Distributed Changes in a Sequence Specific Protein-DNA Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Kaustubh; Sangani, Sahil S; Kehr, Andrew D; Rule, Gordon S; Jen-Jacobson, Linda

    2016-11-08

    Metal ion cofactors can alter the energetics and specificity of sequence specific protein-DNA interactions, but it is unknown if the underlying effects on structure and dynamics are local or dispersed throughout the protein-DNA complex. This work uses EcoRV endonuclease as a model, and catalytically inactive lanthanide ions, which replace the Mg 2+ cofactor. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) titrations indicate that four Lu 3+ or two La 3+ cations bind, and two new crystal structures confirm that Lu 3+ binding is confined to the active sites. NMR spectra show that the metal-free EcoRV complex with cognate (GATATC) DNA is structurally distinct from the nonspecific complex, and that metal ion binding sites are not assembled in the nonspecific complex. NMR chemical shift perturbations were determined for 1 H- 15 N amide resonances, for 1 H- 13 C Ile-δ-CH 3 resonances, and for stereospecifically assigned Leu-δ-CH 3 and Val-γ-CH 3 resonances. Many chemical shifts throughout the cognate complex are unperturbed, so metal binding does not induce major conformational changes. However, some large perturbations of amide and side chain methyl resonances occur as far as 34 Å from the metal ions. Concerted changes in specific residues imply that local effects of metal binding are propagated via a β-sheet and an α-helix. Both amide and methyl resonance perturbations indicate changes in the interface between subunits of the EcoRV homodimer. Bound metal ions also affect amide hydrogen exchange rates for distant residues, including a distant subdomain that contacts DNA phosphates and promotes DNA bending, showing that metal ions in the active sites, which relieve electrostatic repulsion between protein and DNA, cause changes in slow dynamics throughout the complex.

  7. Metal Ion Binding at the Catalytic Site Induces Widely Distributed Changes in a Sequence Specific Protein–DNA Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Metal ion cofactors can alter the energetics and specificity of sequence specific protein–DNA interactions, but it is unknown if the underlying effects on structure and dynamics are local or dispersed throughout the protein–DNA complex. This work uses EcoRV endonuclease as a model, and catalytically inactive lanthanide ions, which replace the Mg2+ cofactor. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) titrations indicate that four Lu3+ or two La3+ cations bind, and two new crystal structures confirm that Lu3+ binding is confined to the active sites. NMR spectra show that the metal-free EcoRV complex with cognate (GATATC) DNA is structurally distinct from the nonspecific complex, and that metal ion binding sites are not assembled in the nonspecific complex. NMR chemical shift perturbations were determined for 1H–15N amide resonances, for 1H–13C Ile-δ-CH3 resonances, and for stereospecifically assigned Leu-δ-CH3 and Val-γ-CH3 resonances. Many chemical shifts throughout the cognate complex are unperturbed, so metal binding does not induce major conformational changes. However, some large perturbations of amide and side chain methyl resonances occur as far as 34 Å from the metal ions. Concerted changes in specific residues imply that local effects of metal binding are propagated via a β-sheet and an α-helix. Both amide and methyl resonance perturbations indicate changes in the interface between subunits of the EcoRV homodimer. Bound metal ions also affect amide hydrogen exchange rates for distant residues, including a distant subdomain that contacts DNA phosphates and promotes DNA bending, showing that metal ions in the active sites, which relieve electrostatic repulsion between protein and DNA, cause changes in slow dynamics throughout the complex. PMID:27786446

  8. B700, a murine melanoma-specific antigen, binds Vitamin D3; conservation of binding among albuminoid molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farzaneh, N.K.; Walden, T.L. Jr.; Hearing, V.J.; Gersten, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    B700, a murine melanoma-specific antigen, is a member of the serum albumin protein family. Other members of this family include serum albumin (SMA), a-fetoprotein (AFP), vitamin D binding protein (DBP), and C700. The primary structure and biochemical functions of B700, as well as its in vivo metabolic fate are largely unknown. The authors examined the functional characteristics of MSA, AFP, and DBP, and for their ability to specifically bind [ 3 H]-1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D 3 . Scatchard analysis revealed a single binding site for B700 with a Kd of 51,000 M and a Bmax of 4.51 x 10 -7 . There is no significant difference between the Kd and Bmax values among the albuminoid proteins. However, differences in the binding sites could be distinguished by competition of the 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D 3 with other steroids. 2nM of vitamin D 3 , vitamin D 2 , or estrogen competed for the specific binding of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D 3 by B700 but not by DBP. The MSA binding site for 1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D 3 more closely resembles that of DBP than B700. These data indicate that the binding function of the albuminoid proteins has been conserved in the B700 melanoma antigen

  9. New type of tachykinin binding site in the rat brain characterized by specific binding of a labeled eledoisin derivative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaujouan, J.C.; Torrens, Y.; Viger, A.; Glowinski, J.

    1984-09-01

    A new ligand for investigating tachykinin-binding site subtypes was synthesized by coupling the /sup 125/I-Bolton and Hunter reagent to eledoisin (/sup 125/I-BHE). Using a synaptosomal preparation (P2 fraction) of rat cerebral cortex, /sup 125/I-BHE was shown to bind with apparent high affinity (apparent Kd . 15.3 nM). When concentrations of up to 30 nM /sup 125/I-BHE were used, /sup 125/I-BHE binding was specific, saturable, reversible, and temperature-dependent. In contrast to (/sup 3/H)dopamine, /sup 125/I-BHE was not taken up within synaptosomes by an ouabain-sensitive process. Eledoisin, kassinin, and substance P were examined for their ability to inhibit specific /sup 125/I-BHE binding to cortical synaptosomes. Eledoisin and kassinin were considerably more potent than substance P, in contrast to the order of potency observed for specific /sup 125/I-Bolton-Hunter substance P (/sup 125/I-BHSP) binding. Specific /sup 125/I-BHE binding was highest in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus; intermediate in the hippocampus, striatum, and thalamus; low in the mesencephalon, septum, and substantia nigra; and absent in the cerebellum. Comparison of these data with those previously obtained for /sup 125/I-BHSP binding to synaptosomes indicated that /sup 125/I-BHE-labeled binding sites differ markedly from those of /sup 125/I-BHSP-labeled binding sites. Therefore, tachykinin receptors other than substance P receptors seem to be present in the central nervous system.

  10. Differential Effects of Penicillin Binding Protein Deletion on the Susceptibility of Enterococcus faecium to Cationic Peptide Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakoulas, George; Kumaraswamy, Monika; Nonejuie, Poochit; Werth, Brian J; Rybak, Micahel J; Pogliano, Joseph; Rice, Louis B; Nizet, Victor

    2015-10-01

    Beta-lactam antibiotics sensitize Enterococcus faecium to killing by endogenous antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of the innate immune system and daptomycin through mechanisms yet to be elucidated. It has been speculated that beta-lactam inactivation of select E. faecium penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) may play a pivotal role in this sensitization process. To characterize the specific PBP inactivation that may be responsible for these phenotypes, we utilized a previously characterized set of E. faecium PBP knockout mutants to determine the effects of such mutations on the activity of daptomycin and the AMP human cathelicidin (LL-37). Enhanced susceptibility to daptomycin was dependent more on a cumulative effect of multiple PBP deletions than on inactivation of any single specific PBP. Selective knockout of PBPZ rendered E. faecium more vulnerable to killing by both recombinant LL-37 and human neutrophils, which produce the antimicrobial peptide in high quantities. Pharmacotherapy targeting multiple PBPs may be used as adjunctive therapy with daptomycin to treat difficult E. faecium infections. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. MONKEY: Identifying conserved transcription-factor binding sitesin multiple alignments using a binding site-specific evolutionarymodel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-10-28

    We introduce a method (MONKEY) to identify conserved transcription-factor binding sites in multispecies alignments. MONKEY employs probabilistic models of factor specificity and binding site evolution, on which basis we compute the likelihood that putative sites are conserved and assign statistical significance to each hit. Using genomes from the genus Saccharomyces, we illustrate how the significance of real sites increases with evolutionary distance and explore the relationship between conservation and function.

  12. Prediction of DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-25

    Jun 25, 2012 ... respective DNA can help to generate engineered zinc fingers for therapeutic purposes involving genome targeting. Exploring the structure–function relationships of the existing zinc finger–DNA complexes can aid in predicting the probable zinc .... tered to a defined family based on binding data. How-.

  13. An RNA aptamer possessing a novel monovalent cation-mediated fold inhibits lysozyme catalysis by inhibiting the binding of long natural substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padlan, Camille S; Malashkevich, Vladimir N; Almo, Steve C; Levy, Matthew; Brenowitz, Michael; Girvin, Mark E

    2014-04-01

    RNA aptamers are being developed as inhibitors of macromolecular and cellular function, diagnostic tools, and potential therapeutics. Our understanding of the physical nature of this emerging class of nucleic acid-protein complexes is limited; few atomic resolution structures have been reported for aptamers bound to their protein target. Guided by chemical mapping, we systematically minimized an RNA aptamer (Lys1) selected against hen egg white lysozyme. The resultant 59-nucleotide compact aptamer (Lys1.2minE) retains nanomolar binding affinity and the ability to inhibit lysozyme's catalytic activity. Our 2.0-Å crystal structure of the aptamer-protein complex reveals a helical stem stabilizing two loops to form a protein binding platform that binds lysozyme distal to the catalytic cleft. This structure along with complementary solution analyses illuminate a novel protein-nucleic acid interface; (1) only 410 Å(2) of solvent accessible surface are buried by aptamer binding; (2) an unusually small fraction (∼18%) of the RNA-protein interaction is electrostatic, consistent with the limited protein phosphate backbone contacts observed in the structure; (3) a single Na(+) stabilizes the loops that constitute the protein-binding platform, and consistent with this observation, Lys1.2minE-lysozyme complex formation takes up rather than displaces cations at low ionic strength; (4) Lys1.2minE inhibits catalysis of large cell wall substrates but not catalysis of small model substrates; and (5) the helical stem of Lys1.2minE can be shortened to four base pairs (Lys1.2minF) without compromising binding affinity, yielding a 45-nucleotide aptamer whose structure may be an adaptable protein binding platform.

  14. Preliminary studies of 99mTc-PQQ-NMDAR binding and effect of specificity binding by mannitol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xingqin Zhou; Yanyan Kong; Guoxian Cao; Jiankang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a powerful neuroprotectant that specifically binds to brain NMDA receptors and inhibits excitotoxicity. Imaging this binding reaction in the brain remains a long sought goal in this field of study, and one of the primary challenges remaining is enabling soluble labeled PQQ to pass the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Previously, our group successfully labeled PQQ with Technetium-99m ( 99m Tc), a metastable nuclear isomer used in radioactive isotope medical tests. In this work, we determined the specific binding of 99m Tc-PQQ and NMDAR by radioligand receptor assay. Ebselen (EB) and MK-801 both effectively inhibited 99m Tc-PQQ binding. We then investigated methods of opening the BBB using mannitol to enable entry to the brain by 99m Tc-PQQ. Our results showed that 7.5 mL/kg of 20 % mannitol effectively opened the BBB and 20 min was the optimum treatment time. Competition studies showed that mannitol did not affect the specific binding between 99m Tc-PQQ and NMDA receptors. Using this method, the amount of 99m Tc-PQQ uptake and retention was increased most significantly in the hippocampus and cortex, and re-opening the BBB did not affect binding. Together, our results demonstrate that the use of mannitol to open the BBB may contribute significantly to improving image quality by increasing the uptake amount of a water-soluble agent in brain. (author)

  15. Inhibitors of serotonin reuptake and specific imipramine binding in human blood plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brusov, O.S.; Fomenko, A.M.; Katasonov, A.B.; Lidemann, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a method of extraction of endogenous inhibitors of specific IMI binding and of 5-HT reuptake, from human blood plasma and the heterogeneity of these compounds is demonstrated. Specific binding was determined as the difference between binding of 3 H-IMI in the absence and in the presence of 50 microM IMI. Under these conditions, specific binding amounted to 70-80% of total binding of 3 H-IMI. It is shown that extract obtained from human blood contains a material which inhibits dose-dependently both 5-HT reuptake and specific binding of 3 H-IMI. Gel-chromatography of extracts of human blood plasma on Biogel P-2 is also shown

  16. Demonstration of specific binding sites for /sup 3/H-RRR-alpha-tocopherol on human erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitabchi, A.E.; Wimalasena, J.

    1982-01-01

    Previous work from our laboratory demonstrated specific binding sites for /sup 3/H-RRR-alpha-tocopherol (/sup 3/H-d alpha T) in membranes of rat adrenal cells. As tocopherol deficiency is associated with increased susceptibility of red blood cells to hemolysis, we investigated tocopherol binding sites in human RBCs. Erythrocytes were found to have specific binding sites for /sup 3/H-d alpha T that exhibited saturability and time and cell-concentration dependence as well as reversibility of binding. Kinetic studies of binding demonstrated two binding sites--one with high affinity (Ka of 2.6 x 10(7) M-1), low capacity (7,600 sites per cell) and the other with low affinity (1.2 x 10(6) M-1), high capacity (150,000 sites per cell). In order to localize the binding sites further, RBCs were fractionated and greater than 90% of the tocopherol binding was located in the membranes. Similar to the findings in intact RBCs, the membranes exhibited two binding sites with a respective Ka of 3.3 x 10(7) M-1 and 1.5 x 10(6) M-1. Specificity data for binding demonstrated 10% binding for RRR-gamma-tocopherol, but not other tocopherol analog exhibited competition for /sup 3/H-d alpha T binding sites. Instability data suggested a protein nature for these binding sites. Preliminary studies on Triton X-100 solubilized fractions resolved the binding sites to a major component with an Mr of 65,000 and a minor component with an Mr of 125,000. We conclude that human erythrocyte membranes contain specific binding sites for RRR-alpha-tocopherol. These sites may be of physiologic significance in the function of tocopherol on the red blood cell membrane.

  17. Demonstration of specific binding sites for 3H-RRR-alpha-tocopherol on human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitabchi, A.E.; Wimalasena, J.

    1982-01-01

    Previous work from our laboratory demonstrated specific binding sites for 3 H-RRR-alpha-tocopherol ( 3 H-d alpha T) in membranes of rat adrenal cells. As tocopherol deficiency is associated with increased susceptibility of red blood cells to hemolysis, we investigated tocopherol binding sites in human RBCs. Erythrocytes were found to have specific binding sites for 3 H-d alpha T that exhibited saturability and time and cell-concentration dependence as well as reversibility of binding. Kinetic studies of binding demonstrated two binding sites--one with high affinity (Ka of 2.6 x 10(7) M-1), low capacity (7,600 sites per cell) and the other with low affinity (1.2 x 10(6) M-1), high capacity (150,000 sites per cell). In order to localize the binding sites further, RBCs were fractionated and greater than 90% of the tocopherol binding was located in the membranes. Similar to the findings in intact RBCs, the membranes exhibited two binding sites with a respective Ka of 3.3 x 10(7) M-1 and 1.5 x 10(6) M-1. Specificity data for binding demonstrated 10% binding for RRR-gamma-tocopherol, but not other tocopherol analog exhibited competition for 3 H-d alpha T binding sites. Instability data suggested a protein nature for these binding sites. Preliminary studies on Triton X-100 solubilized fractions resolved the binding sites to a major component with an Mr of 65,000 and a minor component with an Mr of 125,000. We conclude that human erythrocyte membranes contain specific binding sites for RRR-alpha-tocopherol. These sites may be of physiologic significance in the function of tocopherol on the red blood cell membrane

  18. Role of specific cations and water entropy on the stability of branched DNA motif structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Tod A; Goddard, William A; Maiti, Prabal K; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2012-10-11

    DNA three-way junctions (TWJs) are important intermediates in various cellular processes and are the simplest of a family of branched nucleic acids being considered as scaffolds for biomolecular nanotechnology. Branched nucleic acids are stabilized by divalent cations such as Mg(2+), presumably due to condensation and neutralization of the negatively charged DNA backbone. However, electrostatic screening effects point to more complex solvation dynamics and a large role of interfacial waters in thermodynamic stability. Here, we report extensive computer simulations in explicit water and salt on a model TWJ and use free energy calculations to quantify the role of ionic character and strength on stability. We find that enthalpic stabilization of the first and second hydration shells by Mg(2+) accounts for 1/3 and all of the free energy gain in 50% and pure MgCl(2) solutions, respectively. The more distorted DNA molecule is actually destabilized in pure MgCl(2) compared to pure NaCl. Notably, the first shell, interfacial waters have very low translational and rotational entropy (i.e., mobility) compared to the bulk, an entropic loss that is overcompensated by increased enthalpy from additional electrostatic interactions with Mg(2+). In contrast, the second hydration shell has anomalously high entropy as it is trapped between an immobile and bulklike layer. The nonmonotonic entropic signature and long-range perturbations of the hydration shells to Mg(2+) may have implications in the molecular recognition of these motifs. For example, we find that low salt stabilizes the parallel configuration of the three-way junction, whereas at normal salt we find antiparallel configurations deduced from the NMR. We use the 2PT analysis to follow the thermodynamics of this transition and find that the free energy barrier is dominated by entropic effects that result from the decreased surface area of the antiparallel form which has a smaller number of low entropy waters in the first

  19. Classification and purification of proteins of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles by RNA-binding specificities.

    OpenAIRE

    Swanson, M S; Dreyfuss, G

    1988-01-01

    Several proteins of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) particles display very high binding affinities for different ribonucleotide homopolymers. The specificity of some of these proteins at high salt concentrations and in the presence of heparin allows for their rapid one-step purification from HeLa nucleoplasm. We show that the hnRNP C proteins are poly(U)-binding proteins and compare their specificity to that of the previously described cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein. Thes...

  20. Beyond molecular recognition: using a repulsive field to tune interfacial valency and binding specificity between adhesive surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santore, Maria M; Zhang, Jun; Srivastava, Sudhanshu; Rotello, Vincent M

    2009-01-06

    Surface-bound biomolecular fragments enable "smart" materials to recognize cells and other particles in applications ranging from tissue engineering and medical diagnostics to colloidal and nanoparticle assembly. Such smart surfaces are, however, limited in their design to biomolecular selectivity. This feature article demonstrates, using a completely nonbiological model system, how specificity can be achieved for particle (and cell) binding, employing surface designs where immobilized nanoscale adhesion elements are entirely nonselective. Fundamental principles are illustrated by a model experimental system where 11 nm cationic nanoparticles on a planar negative silica surface interact with flowing negative silica microspheres having 1.0 and 0.5 microm diameters. In these systems, the interfacial valency, defined as the number of cross-bonds needed to capture flowing particles, is tunable through ionic strength, which alters the range of the background repulsion and therefore the effective binding strength of the adhesive elements themselves. At high ionic strengths where long-range electrostatic repulsions are screened, single surface-bound nanoparticles capture microspheres, defining the univalent regime. At low ionic strengths, competing repulsions weaken the effective nanoparticle adhesion so that multiple nanoparticles are needed for microparticle capture. This article discusses important features of the univalent regime and then illustrates how multivalency produces interfacial-scale selectivity. The arguments are then generalized, providing a possible explanation for highly specific cell binding in nature, despite the degeneracy of adhesion molecules and cell types. The mechanism for the valency-related selectivity is further developed in the context of selective flocculation in the colloidal literature. Finally, results for multivalent binding are contrasted with the current thinking for interfacial design and the presentation of adhesion moieties on

  1. Distinct phosphotyrosines on a growth factor receptor bind to specific molecules that mediate different signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantl, W J; Escobedo, J A; Martin, G A; Turck, C W; del Rosario, M; McCormick, F; Williams, L T

    1992-05-01

    The receptor for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) binds two proteins containing SH2 domains, GTPase activating protein (GAP) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase). The sites on the receptor that mediate this interaction were identified by using phosphotyrosine-containing peptides representing receptor sequences to block specifically binding of either PI3-kinase or GAP. These results suggested that PI3-kinase binds two phosphotyrosine residues, each located in a 5 aa motif with an essential methionine at the fourth position C-terminal to the tyrosine. Point mutations at these sites caused a selective elimination of PI3-kinase binding and loss of PDGF-stimulated DNA synthesis. Mutation of the binding site for GAP prevented the receptor from associating with or phosphorylating GAP, but had no effect on PI3-kinase binding and little effect on DNA synthesis. Therefore, GAP and PI3-kinase interact with the receptor by binding to different phosphotyrosine-containing sequence motifs.

  2. VASP: a volumetric analysis of surface properties yields insights into protein-ligand binding specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Y Chen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Many algorithms that compare protein structures can reveal similarities that suggest related biological functions, even at great evolutionary distances. Proteins with related function often exhibit differences in binding specificity, but few algorithms identify structural variations that effect specificity. To address this problem, we describe the Volumetric Analysis of Surface Properties (VASP, a novel volumetric analysis tool for the comparison of binding sites in aligned protein structures. VASP uses solid volumes to represent protein shape and the shape of surface cavities, clefts and tunnels that are defined with other methods. Our approach, inspired by techniques from constructive solid geometry, enables the isolation of volumetrically conserved and variable regions within three dimensionally superposed volumes. We applied VASP to compute a comparative volumetric analysis of the ligand binding sites formed by members of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR-related lipid transfer (START domains and the serine proteases. Within both families, VASP isolated individual amino acids that create structural differences between ligand binding cavities that are known to influence differences in binding specificity. Also, VASP isolated cavity subregions that differ between ligand binding cavities which are essential for differences in binding specificity. As such, VASP should prove a valuable tool in the study of protein-ligand binding specificity.

  3. Detection and comparison of specific hemin binding by Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia.

    OpenAIRE

    Tompkins, G R; Wood, D P; Birchmeier, K R

    1997-01-01

    A radioligand assay was designed to detect and compare specific hemin binding by the periodontal anaerobic black-pigmenting bacteria (BPB) Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia. The assay included physiological concentrations of the hemin-binding protein rabbit serum albumin (RSA) to prevent self-aggregation and nonspecific interaction of hemin with cellular components. Under these conditions, heme-starved P. intermedia cells (two strains) expressed a single binding site species ...

  4. Extreme sequence divergence but conserved ligand-binding specificity in Streptococcus pyogenes M protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Many pathogenic microorganisms evade host immunity through extensive sequence variability in a protein region targeted by protective antibodies. In spite of the sequence variability, a variable region commonly retains an important ligand-binding function, reflected in the presence of a highly conserved sequence motif. Here, we analyze the limits of sequence divergence in a ligand-binding region by characterizing the hypervariable region (HVR of Streptococcus pyogenes M protein. Our studies were focused on HVRs that bind the human complement regulator C4b-binding protein (C4BP, a ligand that confers phagocytosis resistance. A previous comparison of C4BP-binding HVRs identified residue identities that could be part of a binding motif, but the extended analysis reported here shows that no residue identities remain when additional C4BP-binding HVRs are included. Characterization of the HVR in the M22 protein indicated that two relatively conserved Leu residues are essential for C4BP binding, but these residues are probably core residues in a coiled-coil, implying that they do not directly contribute to binding. In contrast, substitution of either of two relatively conserved Glu residues, predicted to be solvent-exposed, had no effect on C4BP binding, although each of these changes had a major effect on the antigenic properties of the HVR. Together, these findings show that HVRs of M proteins have an extraordinary capacity for sequence divergence and antigenic variability while retaining a specific ligand-binding function.

  5. Specificity and commonality of the phosphoinositide-binding proteome analyzed by quantitative mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungmichel, Stephanie; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Choudhary, Chuna Ram

    2014-01-01

    than the total number of phospho- or ubiquitin-binding domains. Translocation and inhibitor assays of identified PIP-binding proteins confirmed that our methodology targets direct interactors. The PIP interactome encompasses proteins from diverse cellular compartments, prominently including the nucleus......Phosphoinositides (PIPs) play key roles in signaling and disease. Using high-resolution quantitative mass spectrometry, we identified PIP-interacting proteins and profiled their binding specificities toward all seven PIP variants. This analysis revealed 405 PIP-binding proteins, which is greater......, this dual specificity is explained by a decreased number of positively charged residues in the L1 subdomain compared with DOCK1. The presented PIP-binding proteome and its specificity toward individual PIPs should be a valuable resource for the community....

  6. Identification of Putative Vero Cell Protein(s) that Bind Specifically to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with a cellular membrane [3,4]. The initial binding of dengue virus to target cells is mediated by binding of the envelope protein to a specific and unidentified cell surface receptor(s) [5]. Viral interaction with its targets observed by electron microscopy has been already reported. [6]. The structure of the ectodomain of DEN-2E.

  7. Characterization and DNA-binding specificities of Ralstonia TAL-like effectors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Lixin

    2013-07-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) from Xanthomonas sp. have been used as customizable DNA-binding modules for genome-engineering applications. Ralstonia solanacearum TALE-like proteins (RTLs) exhibit similar structural features to TALEs, including a central DNA-binding domain composed of 35 amino acid-long repeats. Here, we characterize the RTLs and show that they localize in the plant cell nucleus, mediate DNA binding, and might function as transcriptional activators. RTLs have a unique DNA-binding architecture and are enriched in repeat variable di-residues (RVDs), which determine repeat DNA-binding specificities. We determined the DNA-binding specificities for the RVD sequences ND, HN, NP, and NT. The RVD ND mediates highly specific interactions with C nucleotide, HN interacts specifically with A and G nucleotides, and NP binds to C, A, and G nucleotides. Moreover, we developed a highly efficient repeat assembly approach for engineering RTL effectors. Taken together, our data demonstrate that RTLs are unique DNA-targeting modules that are excellent alternatives to be tailored to bind to user-selected DNA sequences for targeted genomic and epigenomic modifications. These findings will facilitate research concerning RTL molecular biology and RTL roles in the pathogenicity of Ralstonia spp. © 2013 The Author.

  8. Target-specific binding of immunoliposomes in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmberg, E.; Maruyama, K.; Kennel, S.; Klibanov, A.; Torchilin, V.; Ryan, U.; Huang, L.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow; Miami Univ., FL; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1989-01-01

    Our group at the University of Tennessee has been concentrating on using monoclonal antibody for targeting of a liposomal drug carrier system. This paper discusses our initial effort to target these liposomes using an organ-specific monoclonal antibody. 9 refs., 9 figs

  9. Target-specific binding of immunoliposomes in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, E.; Maruyama, K.; Kennel, S.; Klibanov, A.; Torchilin, V.; Ryan, U.; Huang, L.

    1989-01-01

    Our group at the University of Tennessee has been concentrating on using monoclonal antibody for targeting of a liposomal drug carrier system. This paper discusses our initial effort to target these liposomes using an organ-specific monoclonal antibody. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  10. Biomimetic conformation-specific assembly of proteins at artificial binding sites nano-patterned on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rica, Roberto; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Biomolecules such as enzymes and antibodies possess binding sites where the molecular architecture and the physicochemical properties are optimum for their interaction with a particular target, in some cases even differentiating between stereoisomers. Here, we mimic this exquisite specificity via the creation of a suitable chemical environment by fabricating artificial binding sites for the protein calmodulin (CaM). By downscaling well-known surface chemical modification methodologies to the nanometer scale via silicon nanopatterning, the Ca2+-CaM conformer was found to selectively bind the biomimetic binding sites. The methodology could be adapted to mimic other protein-receptor interactions for sensing and catalysis. PMID:19757782

  11. Subtype-Specific Agonists for NMDA Receptor Glycine Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maolanon, Alex R.; Risgaard, Rune; Wang, Shuang Yan

    2017-01-01

    A series of analogues based on serine as lead structure were designed, and their agonist activities were evaluated at recombinant NMDA receptor subtypes (GluN1/2A-D) using two-electrode voltage-clamp (TEVC) electrophysiology. Pronounced variation in subunit-selectivity, potency, and agonist...... efficacy was observed in a manner that was dependent on the GluN2 subunit in the NMDA receptor. In particular, compounds 15a and 16a are potent GluN2C-specific superagonists at the GluN1 subunit with agonist efficacies of 398% and 308% compared to glycine. This study demonstrates that subunit......-selectivity among glycine site NMDA receptor agonists can be achieved and suggests that glycine-site agonists can be developed as pharmacological tool compounds to study GluN2C-specific effects in NMDA receptor-mediated neurotransmission....

  12. K+/Na+ Selectivity in Toy Cation Binding Site Models Is Determined by the ‘Host’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostick, David L.; Arora, Karunesh; Brooks, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    The macroscopic ion-selective behavior of K+ channels is mediated by a multitude of physiological factors. However, considering the carbonyl-lined binding site of a conductive K+ channel as a canonical eightfold coordinated construct can be useful in understanding the principles that correlate the channel's structure with its function. We probe the effects of structure and chemical composition on the K+/Na+ selectivity provided by a variety of simplified droplet-like ion binding site models. We find that when carbonyl- and water-based models capture the qualitative structural features of the K+ channel binding site, a selective preference for K+ emerges. Thus our findings suggest that the preference for K+ over Na+ exhibited by such models is principally built-in, and is not due to a unique K+-selective property of carbonyl functional groups. This suggestion is confirmed by a general thermodynamic assessment, which provides a basis for using simplified models to study the design principles underlying the molecular evolution of K+ channels. PMID:19450462

  13. Cross-modal working memory binding and word recognition skills: how specific is the link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shinmin; Allen, Richard J

    2018-04-01

    Recent research has suggested that the creation of temporary bound representations of information from different sources within working memory uniquely relates to word recognition abilities in school-age children. However, it is unclear to what extent this link is attributable specifically to the binding ability for cross-modal information. This study examined the performance of Grade 3 (8-9 years old) children on binding tasks requiring either temporary association formation of two visual items (i.e., within-modal binding) or pairs of visually presented abstract shapes and auditorily presented nonwords (i.e., cross-modal binding). Children's word recognition skills were related to performance on the cross-modal binding task but not on the within-modal binding task. Further regression models showed that cross-modal binding memory was a significant predictor of word recognition when memory for its constituent elements, general abilities, and crucially, within-modal binding memory were taken into account. These findings may suggest a specific link between the ability to bind information across modalities within working memory and word recognition skills.

  14. Specificity and sensitivity of binding proteins in the radioimmunoassay of cortisol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gijzen, A.H.J.

    1977-01-01

    A comparison concerning avidity towards cortisol and 10 other steroids was made between several binding proteins either in solution or bound to cellulose as so called ''solid phase'' reagent. Human blood cortisol binding protein (CBP, transcortin), and two distinctly different cortisol-binding rabbit antisera and the isolated immunoglobulins thereof were compared in their avidity to bind cortisol and several other steroids. The antisera were harvested from rabbits immunized with either cortisol-21-succinyl-albumin (CSA) or cortisol-3-oxim-albumin (COA). The latter antiserum, having the highest titre in cortisol titration, showed the greatest specificity and was most useful as a binding reagent in cortisol radioimmunoassay when used as a solid phase reagent. The determination of cortisol in micro samples of blood serum is possible without steroid extraction or serum protein denaturation and with only minor influence of steroid impurities in the sample to be analyzed. Affinity constants for all compared binding reagents and steroids are given

  15. Proteoform-specific protein binding of small molecules in complex matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characterizing the specific binding between protein targets and small molecules is critically important for drug discovery. Conventional assays require isolation and purification of small molecules from complex matrices through multistep chromatographic fractionation, which may alter their original ...

  16. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having Enhanced Binding Affinity, Sequence Specificity and Solubility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA strand, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from a group consisting of naturally......-occurring nucleobases and non-naturally-occurring nucleobases attached to a polyamide backbone, and contain C1-C8 alkylamine side chains. Methods of enhancing the solubility, binding affinity and sequence specificity of PNAs are provided....

  17. Effect of halo-substituted aromatic salts on counterion binding constants obtained from cationic nanoparticle catalyzed reactions of piperidine and phenyl salicylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagge, Ibrahim I.; Yusof, Nor Saadah M.; Zain, Sharifuddin Md; Khan, M. Niyaz

    2017-12-01

    Halo-substitutions at 3-position of benzene ring of the salts of aromatic carboxylate, MX, revealed the effect of two different halide ions (Br- and Cl-) on the counterion binding constants obtained from cationic nanoparticle catalyzed piperidinolysis of ionized phenyl salicylate (PhS-). The values of observed rate constant, kobs, determined at a constant total concentration of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, [CTABr]T, piperidine, ([P]T), [PhS-]T, NaOH, and various concentration of MX (MX = 3-BrC6H4CO2Na and 3-ClC6H4CO2Na), were determined using UV-visible X spectrophotometric technique at 35 °C and 370 nm. The average value of nanoparticle binding constant, KXBr, for X- = 3-BrC6H4CO2- (RXBr = 57) was found to be about 2-fold larger than that for X- = 3-ClC6H4CO2- (RXBr = 30). These XX values were dependent of substituents 3-Br and 3-Cl, and independent of [CTABr]T. Both are related to the presence of different extent of viscoelastic worm-like nanoparticles formation in the [CTABr]T of 6 and 10 mM.

  18. Actinide cation-cation complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoyer, N.J.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1994-12-01

    The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO 2 + ) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO 2 + ; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO 2 + cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO 2 + ·UO 2 2+ , was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO 2 + species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO 2 + have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO 2 + cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe 3+ and Cr 3+ and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO 2 + ·UO 2 2+ , NpO 2 + ·Th 4+ , PuO 2 + ·UO 2 2+ , and PuO 2 + ·Th 4+ at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 ± 0.2, 1.8 ± 0.9, 2.2 ± 1.5, and ∼0.8 M -1

  19. [3H]aniracetam binds to specific recognition sites in brain membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallarino, F; Genazzani, A A; Silla, S; L'Episcopo, M R; Camici, O; Corazzi, L; Nicoletti, F; Fioretti, M C

    1995-08-01

    [3H]Aniracetam bound to specific and saturable recognition sites in membranes prepared from discrete regions of rat brain. In crude membrane preparation from rat cerebral cortex, specific binding was Na+ independent, was still largely detectable at low temperature (4 degrees C), and underwent rapid dissociation. Scatchard analysis of [3H]aniracetam binding revealed a single population of sites with an apparent KD value of approximately 70 nM and a maximal density of 3.5 pmol/mg of protein. Specifically bound [3H]aniracetam was not displaced by various metabolites of aniracetam, nor by other pyrrolidinone-containing nootropic drugs such as piracetam or oxiracetam. Subcellular distribution studies showed that a high percentage of specific [3H]aniracetam binding was present in purified synaptosomes or mitochondria, whereas specific binding was low in the myelin fraction. The possibility that at least some [3H]aniracetam binding sites are associated with glutamate receptors is supported by the evidence that specific binding was abolished when membranes were preincubated at 37 degrees C under fast shaking (a procedure that substantially reduced the amount of glutamate trapped in the membranes) and could be restored after addition of either glutamate or alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) but not kainate. The action of AMPA was antagonized by DNQX, which also reduced specific [3H]aniracetam binding in unwashed membranes. High levels of [3H]aniracetam binding were detected in hippocampal, cortical, or cerebellar membranes, which contain a high density of excitatory amino acid receptors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Bookmarking by specific and nonspecific binding of FoxA1 pioneer factor to mitotic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaca, Juan Manuel; Donahue, Greg; Becker, Justin S; He, Ximiao; Vinson, Charles; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2013-02-01

    While most transcription factors exit the chromatin during mitosis and the genome becomes silent, a subset of factors remains and "bookmarks" genes for rapid reactivation as cells progress through the cell cycle. However, it is unknown whether such bookmarking factors bind to chromatin similarly in mitosis and how different binding capacities among them relate to function. We compared a diverse set of transcription factors involved in liver differentiation and found markedly different extents of mitotic chromosome binding. Among them, the pioneer factor FoxA1 exhibits the greatest extent of mitotic chromosome binding. Genomically, ~15% of the FoxA1 interphase target sites are bound in mitosis, including at genes that are important for liver differentiation. Biophysical, genome mapping, and mutagenesis studies of FoxA1 reveals two different modes of binding to mitotic chromatin. Specific binding in mitosis occurs at sites that continue to be bound from interphase. Nonspecific binding in mitosis occurs across the chromosome due to the intrinsic chromatin affinity of FoxA1. Both specific and nonspecific binding contribute to timely reactivation of target genes post-mitosis. These studies reveal an unexpected diversity in the mechanisms by which transcription factors help retain cell identity during mitosis.

  1. Specificity of cellular DNA-binding sites of microbial populations in a Florida reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, J.H.; Pichard, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    The substrate specificity of the DNA-binding mechanism(s) of bacteria in a Florida reservoir was investigated in short- and long-term uptake studies with radiolabeled DNA and unlabeled competitors. Thymine oligonucleotides ranging in size from 2 base pairs to 19 to 24 base pairs inhibited DNA binding in 20-min incubations by 43 to 77%. Deoxynucleoside monophosphates, thymidine, and thymine had little effect on short-term DNA binding, although several of these compounds inhibited the uptake of the radiolabel from DNA in 4-h incubations. Inorganic phosphate and glucose-1-phosphate inhibited neither short- nor long-term binding of [ 3 H]- or [ 32 P]DNA, indicating that DNA was not utilized as a phosphorous source in this reservoir. RNA inhibited both short- and long-term radiolabeled DNA uptake as effectively as unlabeled DNA. Collectively these results indicate that aquatic bacteria possess a generalized nuclei acid uptake/binding mechanism specific for compounds containing phosphodiester bonds and capable of recognizing oligonucleotides as short as dinucleotides. This binding site is distinct from nucleoside-, nucleotide-, phosphomonoester-, and inorganic phosphate-binding sites. Such a nucleic acid-binding mechanism may have evolved for the utilization of extracellular DNA (and perhaps RNA), which is abundant in many marine and freshwater environments

  2. Cloning of a cDNA encoding the human cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate-specific receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlmann, R.; Nagel, G.; Schmidt, B.

    1987-01-01

    Complementary DNA clones for the human cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate-specific receptor have been isolated from a human placenta library in λgt11. The nucleotide sequence of the 2463-base-pair cDNA insert includes a 145-base-pair 5' untranslated region, an open reading frame of 831 base pairs corresponding to 277 amino acids, and a 1487-base-pair 3' untranslated region. The deduced amino acid sequence is colinear with that determined by amino acid sequencing of the N-terminus peptide (41 residues) and nine tryptic peptides (93 additional residues). The receptor is synthesized as a precursor with a signal peptide of 20 amino acids. The hydrophobicity profile of the receptor indicates a single membrane-spanning domain, which separates an N-terminal region containing five potential N-glycosylation sites from a C-terminal region lacking N-glycosylation sites. Thus the N-terminal (M/sub r/ = 18,299) and C-terminal (M/sub r/ ≤ 7648) segments of the mature receptor are assumed to be exposed to the extracytosolic and cytosolic sides of the membrane, respectively. Analysis of a panel of somatic cell (mouse-human) hybrids shows that the gene for the receptor is located on human chromosome 12

  3. A new optimized formulation of cationic solid lipid nanoparticles intended for gene delivery: development, characterization and DNA binding efficiency of TCERG1 expression plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fàbregas, Anna; Sánchez-Hernández, Noemí; Ticó, Josep Ramon; García-Montoya, Encarna; Pérez-Lozano, Pilar; Suñé-Negre, Josep M; Hernández-Munain, Cristina; Suñé, Carlos; Miñarro, Montserrat

    2014-10-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) are being considered as a new approach for therapeutics for many known diseases. In addition to drug delivery, their use as non-viral vectors for gene delivery can be achieved by the inclusion of cationic lipids, which provide a positive surface potential that favours binding to the DNA backbone. This work is based on the idea that the optimization of the components is required as the first step in simplifying the qualitative and quantitative composition of SLNs as much as possible without affecting the essential properties that define SLNs as optimal non-viral vectors for gene delivery. We selected the best lipids and surfactants in terms of particle size and zeta potential and characterized the properties of the resulting nanoparticles using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The SLNs had a particle size of approximately 120 nm and a positive surface charge of 42 mV. In addition, we analysed the main physicochemical characteristics of the bulk components of the nanoparticles using X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and mass spectrometry (MS). The suitability of the optimized SLNs for DNA binding was evaluated after the lyophilisation process using a carboxyl-terminal region of the TCERG1 gene, a human factor that has been implicated in several diseases. We show that the SLNs presented high efficiency in the binding of DNA, and importantly, they presented no toxicity when assayed in an in vivo system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Position specific variation in the rate of evolution intranscription factor binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Kellis, Manolis; Lander, EricS.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2003-08-28

    The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Here we analyze the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikataeto study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artifacts of computational motif finding algorithms. As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will likely contribute to the effective use of comparative

  5. Specific binding of a bacteriophage at a hydrocarbon-water interface. [Acinetobacter calcoaceticus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pines, O.; Gutnick, D.

    1984-01-01

    Emulsan, the extracellular polyanionic emulsifying agent produced by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG-1, has been implicated as a receptor for a specific virulent RAG-1 bacteriophage, ap3. Aqueous solutions of emulsan did not interfere with phage ap3 adsorption to RAG-1 cells. However, binding of phage ap3 occurred at the interfaces of hexadecane-in-water emulsions specifically stabilized by emulsan polymers. Binding of ap3 to emulsions was inhibited either in the presence of anti-emulsan antibodies or in the presence of a specific emulsan depolymerase. Moreover, when the phage was first bound to emulsan-stabilized emulsions and the emulsions subsequently treated with emulsan depolymerase, viable phage was released, indicating that phage ap3 DNA ejection was not triggered by binding. The results indicate that emulsan functions as the ap3 receptor and suggest that to function as a receptor, emulsan assumes a specific conformation conferred on it by its specific interaction with hydrophobic surfaces.

  6. Quantitative correlation between counterion (X binding affinity to cationic micelles and X – Induced micellar growth for substituted iodobenzoates (X

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Saadah M. Yusof

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A new semi-empirical kinetic (SEK method has been used to calculate the values of KXBr or RXBr (X represents substituted iodobenzoates, with KX and KBr representing CTABr micellar binding constants of counterions X− (in the presence of either spherical or non-spherical micelles and Br− (in the presence of only spherical micelles, respectively. Steady-shear rheological properties of mixed 0.015 M CTABr/[MX] aqueous solutions reveal the presence of flexible wormlike micelles where MX represents sodium 3- and 4-iodobenzoates. The maxima of the plots of viscosity vs. [MX] at 0.015 M CTABr for MX representing sodium 3- and 4-iodobenzoates support the presence of long linear and entangled wormlike micelles.

  7. DEK binding to class II MHC Y-box sequences is gene- and allele-specific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Barbara S; Cha, Hyuk C; Cleary, Joanne; Haiying, Tan; Wang, Hongling; Sitwala, Kajal; Markovitz, David M

    2003-01-01

    Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we examined sequence-specific binding of DEK, a potential autoantigen in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, to conserved Y-box regulatory sequences in class II MHC gene promoters. Nuclear extracts from several cell lines of different phenotypes contained sequence-specific binding activity recognizing DRA, DQA1*0101, and DQA1*0501 Y-box sequences. Participation of both DEK and NF-Y in the DQA1 Y-box binding complex was confirmed by 'supershifting' with anti-DEK and anti-NF-Y antibodies. Recombinant DEK also bound specifically to the DQA1*0101 Y box and to the polymorphic DQA1*0501 Y box, but not to the consensus DRA Y box. Measurement of the apparent dissociation constants demonstrated a two- to fivefold difference in DEK binding to the DQA1 Y-box sequence in comparison with other class II MHC Y-box sequences. Residues that are crucial for DEK binding to the DQA1*0101 Y box were identified by DNase I footprinting. The specific characteristics of DEK binding to these related sequences suggests a potential role for DEK in differential regulation of class II MHC expression, and thus in the pathogenesis of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:12823858

  8. Predicting sequence and structural specificities of RNA binding regions recognized by splicing factor SRSF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA-binding proteins (RBPs play diverse roles in eukaryotic RNA processing. Despite their pervasive functions in coding and noncoding RNA biogenesis and regulation, elucidating the sequence specificities that define protein-RNA interactions remains a major challenge. Recently, CLIP-seq (Cross-linking immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing has been successfully implemented to study the transcriptome-wide binding patterns of SRSF1, PTBP1, NOVA and fox2 proteins. These studies either adopted traditional methods like Multiple EM for Motif Elicitation (MEME to discover the sequence consensus of RBP's binding sites or used Z-score statistics to search for the overrepresented nucleotides of a certain size. We argue that most of these methods are not well-suited for RNA motif identification, as they are unable to incorporate the RNA structural context of protein-RNA interactions, which may affect to binding specificity. Here, we describe a novel model-based approach--RNAMotifModeler to identify the consensus of protein-RNA binding regions by integrating sequence features and RNA secondary structures. Results As an example, we implemented RNAMotifModeler on SRSF1 (SF2/ASF CLIP-seq data. The sequence-structural consensus we identified is a purine-rich octamer 'AGAAGAAG' in a highly single-stranded RNA context. The unpaired probabilities, the probabilities of not forming pairs, are significantly higher than negative controls and the flanking sequence surrounding the binding site, indicating that SRSF1 proteins tend to bind on single-stranded RNA. Further statistical evaluations revealed that the second and fifth bases of SRSF1octamer motif have much stronger sequence specificities, but weaker single-strandedness, while the third, fourth, sixth and seventh bases are far more likely to be single-stranded, but have more degenerate sequence specificities. Therefore, we hypothesize that nucleotide specificity and

  9. Demonstration of binding components specific for 7,8-disubstituted guanine ribonucleosides in murine B lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, M.G. (Research Institute of Scripps Clinic, La Jolla, CA (USA))

    1990-12-25

    7,8-Disubstituted guanine ribonucleosides are known to be potent intracellular modulators of immune responses. These compounds trigger and modulate a wide variety of lymphocyte responses including effects exerted directly on B cells. However, little is known about their mechanism of action. The current paper describes studies undertaken to evaluate whether binding components specific for these bioactive molecules exist in splenic B lymphocytes. After exposure of cells to labeled nucleoside, two different pools of nucleoside can be distinguished: a rapidly exchangeable nucleoside pool and a slowly exchangeable pool. The material in the latter pool consists of authentic unaltered nucleoside that is complexed to a relatively hydrophobic cellular component with an apparent Mr of 30,000-40,000; binding appears to interfere with free interaction of the nucleoside's cis hydroxyls with a boronate affinity resin. The slowly exchangeable nucleoside pool is seen to localize predominantly to the nucleus in electron microscopic autoradiographs. This pool is maximally bound by 30 min of incubation. Specific, saturable binding is demonstrable, with an apparent Kd of approximately 7 microM. This value correlates well with concentrations at which half-maximal biological activity occurs and suggests that the binding component likely mediates antigen-dependent immunomodulatory activity. Splenic B cells express approximately 2 x 10(4) binding sites/cell, whereas thymic lymphocytes, which do not respond functionally to nucleosides, do not display a measurable number of nucleoside binding sites. Ligand specificity of the binding interaction is confirmed by binding inhibition studies, in which binding inhibitory activity of unlabeled agonistic structural analogs recapitulate their degree of immunobiological activity.

  10. Variable Extent of Lineage-Specificity and Developmental Stage-Specificity of Cohesin and CCCTC-Binding Factor Binding Within the Immunoglobulin and T Cell Receptor Loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Loguercio

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF is largely responsible for the 3D architecture of the genome, in concert with the action of cohesin, through the creation of long-range chromatin loops. Cohesin is hypothesized to be the main driver of these long-range chromatin interactions by the process of loop extrusion. Here, we performed ChIP-seq for CTCF and cohesin in two stages each of T and B cell differentiation and examined the binding pattern in all six antigen receptor (AgR loci in these lymphocyte progenitors and in mature T and B cells, ES cells, and fibroblasts. The four large AgR loci have many bound CTCF sites, most of which are only occupied in lymphocytes, while only the CTCF sites at the end of each locus near the enhancers or J genes tend to be bound in non-lymphoid cells also. However, despite the generalized lymphocyte restriction of CTCF binding in AgR loci, the Igκ locus is the only locus that also shows significant lineage-specificity (T vs. B cells and developmental stage-specificity (pre-B vs. pro-B in CTCF binding. We show that cohesin binding shows greater lineage- and stage-specificity than CTCF at most AgR loci, providing more specificity to the loops. We also show that the culture of pro-B cells in IL7, a common practice to expand the number of cells before ChIP-seq, results in a CTCF-binding pattern resembling pre-B cells, as well as other epigenetic and transcriptional characteristics of pre-B cells. Analysis of the orientation of the CTCF sites show that all sites within the large V portions of the Igh and TCRβ loci have the same orientation. This suggests either a lack of requirement for convergent CTCF sites creating loops, or indicates an absence of any loops between CTCF sites within the V region portion of those loci but only loops to the convergent sites at the D-J-enhancer end of each locus. The V region portions of the Igκ and TCRα/δ loci, by contrast, have CTCF sites in both orientations, providing many options for

  11. Specificity of the activation of ( sup 3 H)hemicholinium-3 binding by phospholipase A2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, K.; Saltarelli, M.D.; Coyle, J.T. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1989-06-01

    Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) treatment has been shown previously to stimulate the sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake system as assessed by both the specific binding of (3H)hemicholinium-3 (( 3H)HCh-3) and the uptake of (3H)choline. In the present study, the specificity of PLA2-induced stimulation upon (3H)HCh-3 binding has been examined. PLA2, as well as phospholipase C (PLC), treatment of synaptic membranes produced a dose-dependent increase in the specific binding of (3H)HCh-3 whereas neither phospholipase B nor phospholipase D had any effect. PLC-induced stimulation of (3H)HCh-3 binding resulted from a significant decrease in the Kd without a change in the maximum binding of (3H)HCh-3 binding. PLC treatment of synaptosomes resulted in an inhibition of (3H)choline uptake accompanied by an inhibition of Na+, K+-adenosine triphosphatase activity. In contrast to the increase of (3H)HCh-3 binding, the specific binding of both (3H)desipramine and (3H)mazindol was decreased by PLA2 treatment. After PLA2 treatment, (3H)HCh-3 binding was increased about 2.5-fold over basal levels in different regions of the brain. Electrolytic lesions of the medial septal nucleus and kainic acid-induced lesions of the striatum resulted in a marked reduction of (3H)HCh-3 binding in the hippocampus and the striatum, respectively. Residual (3H)HCh-3 binding in the denervated hippocampus and lesioned striatum was increased by PLA2 treatment but remained lower than that in PLA2-treated controls. Finally, atropine-induced up-regulation of (3H)HCh-3 binding in vivo was not additive with PLA2-induced stimulation. These results support the hypothesis that PLA2 might be involved in the regulation of the sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake.

  12. Specificity of the activation of [3H]hemicholinium-3 binding by phospholipase A2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, K.; Saltarelli, M.D.; Coyle, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) treatment has been shown previously to stimulate the sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake system as assessed by both the specific binding of [3H]hemicholinium-3 ([ 3H]HCh-3) and the uptake of [3H]choline. In the present study, the specificity of PLA2-induced stimulation upon [3H]HCh-3 binding has been examined. PLA2, as well as phospholipase C (PLC), treatment of synaptic membranes produced a dose-dependent increase in the specific binding of [3H]HCh-3 whereas neither phospholipase B nor phospholipase D had any effect. PLC-induced stimulation of [3H]HCh-3 binding resulted from a significant decrease in the Kd without a change in the maximum binding of [3H]HCh-3 binding. PLC treatment of synaptosomes resulted in an inhibition of [3H]choline uptake accompanied by an inhibition of Na+, K+-adenosine triphosphatase activity. In contrast to the increase of [3H]HCh-3 binding, the specific binding of both [3H]desipramine and [3H]mazindol was decreased by PLA2 treatment. After PLA2 treatment, [3H]HCh-3 binding was increased about 2.5-fold over basal levels in different regions of the brain. Electrolytic lesions of the medial septal nucleus and kainic acid-induced lesions of the striatum resulted in a marked reduction of [3H]HCh-3 binding in the hippocampus and the striatum, respectively. Residual [3H]HCh-3 binding in the denervated hippocampus and lesioned striatum was increased by PLA2 treatment but remained lower than that in PLA2-treated controls. Finally, atropine-induced up-regulation of [3H]HCh-3 binding in vivo was not additive with PLA2-induced stimulation. These results support the hypothesis that PLA2 might be involved in the regulation of the sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake

  13. Characterization of binding specificities of bovine leucocyte class I molecules: impacts for rational epitope discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Andreas M.; Rasmussen, Michael; Svitek, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    The binding of peptides to classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I proteins is the single most selective step in antigen presentation. However, the peptide-binding specificity of cattle MHC (bovine leucocyte antigen, BoLA) class I (BoLA-I) molecules remains poorly characterized....... Using this strategy, we characterized eight BoLA-I molecules, and found the peptide specificity to resemble that of human MHC-I molecules with primary anchors most often at P2 and P9, and occasional auxiliary P1/P3/P5/P6 anchors. We analyzed nine reported CTL epitopes from Theileria parva, and in eight...... cases, stable and high affinity binding was confirmed. A set of peptides were tested for binding affinity to the eight BoLA proteins and used to refine the predictors of peptide-MHC binding NetMHC and NetMHCpan. The inclusion of BoLA-specific peptide-binding data led to a significant improvement...

  14. Studying binding specificities of peptide recognition modules by high-throughput phage display selections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haiming; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2011-01-01

    Peptide recognition modules (PRMs) play critical roles in cellular processes, including differentiation, proliferation and cytoskeleton organization. PRMs normally bind to short linear motifs in protein ligands, and by so doing recruit proteins into signaling complexes. Based on the binding specificity profile of a PRM, one can predict putative natural interaction partners by searching genome databases. Candidate interaction partners can in turn provide clues to assemble potential in vivo protein complexes that the PRM may be involved with. Combinatorial peptide libraries have proven to be effective tools for profiling the binding specificities of PRMs. Herein, we describe high-throughput methods for the expression and purification of PRM proteins and the use of peptide-phage libraries for PRM specificity profiling. These high-throughput methods greatly expedite the study of PRM families on a genome-wide scale.

  15. Achieving peptide binding specificity and promiscuity by loops: case of the forkhead-associated domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Ming M; Chang, Chia-En A

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of a series of cellular events requires specific protein-protein interactions, which are usually mediated by modular domains to precisely select a particular sequence from diverse partners. However, most signaling domains can bind to more than one peptide sequence. How do proteins create promiscuity from precision? Moreover, these complex interactions typically occur at the interface of a well-defined secondary structure, α helix and β sheet. However, the molecular recognition primarily controlled by loop architecture is not fully understood. To gain a deep understanding of binding selectivity and promiscuity by the conformation of loops, we chose the forkhead-associated (FHA) domain as our model system. The domain can bind to diverse peptides via various loops but only interact with sequences containing phosphothreonine (pThr). We applied molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for multiple free and bound FHA domains to study the changes in conformations and dynamics. Generally, FHA domains share a similar folding structure whereby the backbone holds the overall geometry and the variety of sidechain atoms of multiple loops creates a binding surface to target a specific partner. FHA domains determine the specificity of pThr by well-organized binding loops, which are rigid to define a phospho recognition site. The broad range of peptide recognition can be attributed to different arrangements of the loop interaction network. The moderate flexibility of the loop conformation can help access or exclude binding partners. Our work provides insights into molecular recognition in terms of binding specificity and promiscuity and helpful clues for further peptide design.

  16. Specific binding of lactoferrin to Escherichia coli isolated from human intestinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, S.S.; Erdei, J.; Forsgren, A.; Naidu, A.S. (Departments of Medical Microbiology, Malmoe General Hospital (Sweden)); Czirok, E.; Gado, I. (National Institute of Hygiene, Budapest (Hungary)); Kalfas, S. (School of Dentistry, University of Lund, Malmoe (Sweden)); Thoren, A. (Infectious Diseases, Malmoe General Hospital (Sweden))

    1991-01-01

    The degrees of human lactoferrin (HLf) and bovine lactoferrin (BLf) binding in 169 Escherichia coli strains isolated from human intestinal infections, and in an additional 68 strains isolated from healthy individuals, were examined in a {sup 125}I-labelled protein binding assay. The binding was expressed as a percentage calculated from the total labelled ligand added to bacteria. The HLf and BLf binding to E. coli was in the range 3.7 to 73.4% and 4.8 to 61.6%, respectively. Enterotoxigenic strains demonstrated a significantly higher HLf binding (median = 19%) than enteropathogenic, enteroinvasive, enterohaemorrhagic strains or normal intestinal E. coli isolates (medians 6 to 9). Enteropathogenic strains belonging to serotypes O44 and O127 demonstrated significantly higher HLf binding compared to O26, O55, O111, O119 and O126. No significant differences in the degree of HLf or BLf binding were found between aerobactin-producing and non-producing strains. The interaction was further characterized in a high Lf-binging EPEC strain, E34663 (serotype O127). The binding was stable in the pH range 4.0 to 7.5, did not dissociate in the presence of 2M NaCl or 2M urea, and reached saturation within two h. Unlabelled HLf and BLf displaced the {sup 125}I-HLf binding to E34663 in a dose-dependent manner. Apo- and iron-saturated forms of Lf demonstrated similar binding to E34663. Among various unlabelled subephithelial matrix proteins and carbohydrates tested (in 10{sup 4}-fold excess) only fibronectin and fibrinogen caused a moderate inhibition of {sup 125}I-HLf binding. According to Scatchard plot analysis, 5,400 HLf-binding sites/cell, with an affinity constant (K{sub a}) of 1.4 x 10{sup -7} M, were estimated in strain E34663. These data establish the presence of a specific Lf-binding mechanism in E. coli. (au).

  17. MeCP2 Binding Cooperativity Inhibits DNA Modification-Specific Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrapunov, Sergei; Tao, Yisong; Cheng, Huiyong; Padlan, Camille; Harris, Richard; Galanopoulou, Aristea S; Greally, John M; Girvin, Mark E; Brenowitz, Michael

    2016-08-09

    Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a multifunctional protein that guides neuronal development through its binding to DNA, recognition of sites of methyl-CpG (mCpG) DNA modification, and interaction with other regulatory proteins. Our study explores the relationship between mCpG and hydroxymethyl-CpG (hmCpG) recognition mediated by its mCpG binding domain (MBD) and binding cooperativity mediated by its C-terminal polypeptide. Previous study of the isolated MBD of MeCP2 documented an unusual mechanism by which ion uptake is required for discrimination of mCpG and hmCpG from CpG. MeCP2 binding cooperativity suppresses discrimination of modified DNA and is highly sensitive to both the total ion concentration and the type of counterions. Higher than physiological total ion concentrations completely suppress MeCP2 binding cooperativity, indicating a dominant electrostatic component to the interaction. Substitution of SO4(2-) for Cl(-) at physiological total ion concentrations also suppresses MeCP2 binding cooperativity, This effect is of particular note as the intracellular Cl(-) concentration changes during neuronal development. A related effect is that the protein-stabilizing solutes, TMAO and glutamate, reduce MeCP2 (but not isolated MBD) binding affinity by 2 orders of magnitude without affecting the apparent binding cooperativity. These observations suggest that polypeptide flexibility facilitates DNA binding by MeCP2. Consistent with this view, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses show that ions have discrete effects on the structure of MeCP2, both MBD and the C-terminal domains. Notably, anion substitution results in changes in the NMR chemical shifts of residues, including some whose mutation causes the autism spectrum disorder Rett syndrome. Binding cooperativity makes MeCP2 an effective competitor with histone H1 for accessible DNA sites. The relationship between MeCP2 binding specificity and cooperativity is discussed in the context of chromatin

  18. Cell-type specificity of ChIP-predicted transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håndstad Tony

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Context-dependent transcription factor (TF binding is one reason for differences in gene expression patterns between different cellular states. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq identifies genome-wide TF binding sites for one particular context—the cells used in the experiment. But can such ChIP-seq data predict TF binding in other cellular contexts and is it possible to distinguish context-dependent from ubiquitous TF binding? Results We compared ChIP-seq data on TF binding for multiple TFs in two different cell types and found that on average only a third of ChIP-seq peak regions are common to both cell types. Expectedly, common peaks occur more frequently in certain genomic contexts, such as CpG-rich promoters, whereas chromatin differences characterize cell-type specific TF binding. We also find, however, that genotype differences between the cell types can explain differences in binding. Moreover, ChIP-seq signal intensity and peak clustering are the strongest predictors of common peaks. Compared with strong peaks located in regions containing peaks for multiple transcription factors, weak and isolated peaks are less common between the cell types and are less associated with data that indicate regulatory activity. Conclusions Together, the results suggest that experimental noise is prevalent among weak peaks, whereas strong and clustered peaks represent high-confidence binding events that often occur in other cellular contexts. Nevertheless, 30-40% of the strongest and most clustered peaks show context-dependent regulation. We show that by combining signal intensity with additional data—ranging from context independent information such as binding site conservation and position weight matrix scores to context dependent chromatin structure—we can predict whether a ChIP-seq peak is likely to be present in other cellular contexts.

  19. Study of the effect hydrogen binding in the solvation of alkaline earth cations with MeOH in nitromethane using 1 H NMR technique and determination of ionic solvation number

    CERN Document Server

    Alizadeh, N

    2001-01-01

    A proton NMR method for the study of the effect hydrogen binding and determination of solvation numbers of alkaline earth cations with methanol (MeOH) in in tromethane (NM) as diluent is described. The method is based on monitoring the resonance frequency of MeOH protons as a function of MeOH to metal ion mole ratio at constant metal ion concentration. the average solvation number of cation, n, at any MeOH/ metal ion mole ration was calculated from the NMR chemical shift-mole ration data and was plotted against the mole ration values. The solvation numbers of alkaline earth cations were obtained from the limiting values of the corresponding n, vs. mole ratio plots.

  20. Study of the effect hydrogen binding in the solvation of alkaline earth cations with MeOH in nitromethane using 1 H NMR technique and determination of ionic solvation number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh, N.

    2001-01-01

    A proton NMR method for the study of the effect hydrogen binding and determination of solvation numbers of alkaline earth cations with methanol (MeOH) in in tromethane (NM) as diluent is described. The method is based on monitoring the resonance frequency of MeOH protons as a function of MeOH to metal ion mole ratio at constant metal ion concentration. the average solvation number of cation, n, at any MeOH/ metal ion mole ration was calculated from the NMR chemical shift-mole ration data and was plotted against the mole ration values. The solvation numbers of alkaline earth cations were obtained from the limiting values of the corresponding n, vs. mole ratio plots

  1. Mechanism of sequence-specific template binding by the DNA primase of bacteriophage T7

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Seung-Joo

    2010-03-28

    DNA primases catalyze the synthesis of the oligoribonucleotides required for the initiation of lagging strand DNA synthesis. Biochemical studies have elucidated the mechanism for the sequence-specific synthesis of primers. However, the physical interactions of the primase with the DNA template to explain the basis of specificity have not been demonstrated. Using a combination of surface plasmon resonance and biochemical assays, we show that T7 DNA primase has only a slightly higher affinity for DNA containing the primase recognition sequence (5\\'-TGGTC-3\\') than for DNA lacking the recognition site. However, this binding is drastically enhanced by the presence of the cognate Nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs), Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and Cytosine triphosphate (CTP) that are incorporated into the primer, pppACCA. Formation of the dimer, pppAC, the initial step of sequence-specific primer synthesis, is not sufficient for the stable binding. Preformed primers exhibit significantly less selective binding than that observed with ATP and CTP. Alterations in subdomains of the primase result in loss of selective DNA binding. We present a model in which conformational changes induced during primer synthesis facilitate contact between the zinc-binding domain and the polymerase domain. The Author(s) 2010. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Non-ionic detergents facilitate non-specific binding of M13 bacteriophage to polystyrene surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakami, Abdulrahim R; Ball, Jonathan K; Tarr, Alexander W

    2015-09-01

    Phage-displayed random peptide libraries are widely used for identifying peptide interactions with proteins and other substrates. Selection of peptide ligands involves iterative rounds of affinity enrichment. The binding properties of the selected phage clones are routinely tested using immunoassay after propagation to high titre in a bacterial host and precipitation using polyethylene glycol (PEG) and high salt concentration. These immunoassays can suffer from low sensitivity and high background signals. Polysorbate 20 (Tween(®) 20) is a non-ionic detergent commonly used in immunoassay washing buffers to reduce non-specific binding, and is also used as a blocking reagent. We have observed that Tween 20 enhances non-specific M13 library phage binding in a peptide-independent manner. Other non-ionic detergents were also found to promote significant, dose-dependent non-specific phage binding in ELISA. This effect was not observed for assays using phage concentrated by ultracentrifugation, suggesting that interactions occur between detergents and the PEG-precipitated phage, irrespective of the displayed peptide motif. This artefact may impact on successful affinity selection of peptides from phage-display libraries. We propose alternative methods for screening phage libraries for identifying binding interactions with target ligands. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Specific DNA-binding proteins and DNA sequences involved in steroid hormone regulation of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spelsberg, T.; Hora, J.; Horton, M.; Goldberger, A.; Littlefield, B.; Seelke, R.; Toyoda, H.

    1987-01-01

    Steroid hormones circulate in the blood and are taken by target cells via complexes with intracellular binding proteins termed receptors, that are hormone and tissue specific. Each receptor binds it specific steroid with very high affinity, having an equilibrium dissociation constant (K/sub d/) in the range of 10 -9 to 10 -10 M. Once bound by their specific steroid hormones, the steroid receptors undergo a conformational change which allows them to bind with high affinity to sites on chromatin, termed nuclear acceptor sites. There are estimated 5,000 to 10,000 of these sites expressed with an equal number not expressed (''masked'') in intact chromatin. The result of the binding to nuclear acceptor sites is an alteration of gene transcription or, in some cases, gene expression as measured by the changing levels of specific RNAs and proteins in that target tissue. Each steroid regulates specific effects on the RNA and protein profiles. The chronology of the above mechanism of action after injection of radiolabelled steroid as is follows: Steroid-receptor complex formation (1 minute), nuclear acceptor sites (2 minutes), effects on RNA synthesis (10 to 30 minutes), and finally the changing protein profiles via changes in protein synthesis and protein turnover (1 to 6 hours). Thus steroid receptors represent one of the first identified intracellular gene regulation proteins. The receptor molecules themselves are regulated by the presence or absence of the steroid molecule

  4. The Outwardly Rectifying Current of Layer 5 Neocortical Neurons that was Originally Identified as "Non-Specific Cationic" Is Essentially a Potassium Current.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Revah

    Full Text Available In whole-cell patch clamp recordings from layer 5 neocortical neurons, blockade of voltage gated sodium and calcium channels leaves a cesium current that is outward rectifying. This current was originally identified as a "non-specific cationic current", and subsequently it was hypothesized that it is mediated by TRP channels. In order to test this hypothesis, we used fluorescence imaging of intracellular sodium and calcium indicators, and found no evidence to suggest that it is associated with influx of either of these ions to the cell body or dendrites. Moreover, the current is still prominent in neurons from TRPC1-/- and TRPC5-/- mice. The effects on the current of various blocking agents, and especially its sensitivity to intracellular tetraethylammonium, suggest that it is not a non-specific cationic current, but rather that it is generated by cesium-permeable delayed rectifier potassium channels.

  5. Thermodynamic and structural investigation of the specific SDS binding of humicola insolens cutinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kold, Daniel; Dauter, Zbigniew; Laustsen, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of lipolytic enzymes with anionic surfactants is of great interest with respect to industrially produced detergents. Here, we report the interaction of cutinase from the thermophilic fungus Humicola insolens with the anionic surfactant SDS, and show the enzyme specifically binds...... a single SDS molecule under nondenaturing concentrations. Protein interaction with SDS was investigated by NMR, ITC and molecular dynamics simulations. The NMR resonances of the protein were assigned, with large stretches of the protein molecule not showing any detectable resonances. SDS is shown...... to specifically interact with the loops surrounding the catalytic triad with medium affinity (Ka ≈ 105 M−1). The mode of binding is closely similar to that seen previously for binding of amphiphilic molecules and substrate analogues to cutinases, and hence SDS acts as a substrate mimic. In addition, the structure...

  6. Cooperativity in RNA-Protein Interactions: Global Analysis of RNA Binding Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary T. Campbell

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The control and function of RNA are governed by the specificity of RNA binding proteins. Here, we describe a method for global unbiased analysis of RNA-protein interactions that uses in vitro selection, high-throughput sequencing, and sequence-specificity landscapes. The method yields affinities for a vast array of RNAs in a single experiment, including both low- and high-affinity sites. It is reproducible and accurate. Using this approach, we analyzed members of the PUF (Pumilio and FBF family of eukaryotic mRNA regulators. Our data identify effects of a specific protein partner on PUF-RNA interactions, reveal subsets of target sites not previously detected, and demonstrate that designer PUF proteins can precisely alter specificity. The approach described here is, in principle, broadly applicable for analysis of any molecule that binds RNA, including proteins, nucleic acids, and small molecules.

  7. Cation Exchange Water Softeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    WaterSense released a notice of intent to develop a specification for cation exchange water softeners. The program has made the decision not to move forward with a spec at this time, but is making this information available.

  8. Guanylate kinase domains of the MAGUK family scaffold proteins as specific phospho-protein-binding modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinwei; Shang, Yuan; Xia, Caihao; Wang, Wenning; Wen, Wenyu; Zhang, Mingjie

    2011-11-25

    Membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs) are a large family of scaffold proteins that play essential roles in tissue developments, cell-cell communications, cell polarity control, and cellular signal transductions. Despite extensive studies over the past two decades, the functions of the signature guanylate kinase domain (GK) of MAGUKs are poorly understood. Here we show that the GK domain of DLG1/SAP97 binds to asymmetric cell division regulatory protein LGN in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The structure of the DLG1 SH3-GK tandem in complex with a phospho-LGN peptide reveals that the GMP-binding site of GK has evolved into a specific pSer/pThr-binding pocket. Residues both N- and C-terminal to the pSer are also critical for the specific binding of the phospho-LGN peptide to GK. We further demonstrate that the previously reported GK domain-mediated interactions of DLGs with other targets, such as GKAP/DLGAP1/SAPAP1 and SPAR, are also phosphorylation dependent. Finally, we provide evidence that other MAGUK GKs also function as phospho-peptide-binding modules. The discovery of the phosphorylation-dependent MAGUK GK/target interactions indicates that MAGUK scaffold-mediated signalling complex organizations are dynamically regulated.

  9. Deep convolutional neural networks for pan-specific peptide-MHC class I binding prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Youngmahn; Kim, Dongsup

    2017-12-28

    Computational scanning of peptide candidates that bind to a specific major histocompatibility complex (MHC) can speed up the peptide-based vaccine development process and therefore various methods are being actively developed. Recently, machine-learning-based methods have generated successful results by training large amounts of experimental data. However, many machine learning-based methods are generally less sensitive in recognizing locally-clustered interactions, which can synergistically stabilize peptide binding. Deep convolutional neural network (DCNN) is a deep learning method inspired by visual recognition process of animal brain and it is known to be able to capture meaningful local patterns from 2D images. Once the peptide-MHC interactions can be encoded into image-like array(ILA) data, DCNN can be employed to build a predictive model for peptide-MHC binding prediction. In this study, we demonstrated that DCNN is able to not only reliably predict peptide-MHC binding, but also sensitively detect locally-clustered interactions. Nonapeptide-HLA-A and -B binding data were encoded into ILA data. A DCNN, as a pan-specific prediction model, was trained on the ILA data. The DCNN showed higher performance than other prediction tools for the latest benchmark datasets, which consist of 43 datasets for 15 HLA-A alleles and 25 datasets for 10 HLA-B alleles. In particular, the DCNN outperformed other tools for alleles belonging to the HLA-A3 supertype. The F1 scores of the DCNN were 0.86, 0.94, and 0.67 for HLA-A*31:01, HLA-A*03:01, and HLA-A*68:01 alleles, respectively, which were significantly higher than those of other tools. We found that the DCNN was able to recognize locally-clustered interactions that could synergistically stabilize peptide binding. We developed ConvMHC, a web server to provide user-friendly web interfaces for peptide-MHC class I binding predictions using the DCNN. ConvMHC web server can be accessible via http://jumong.kaist.ac.kr:8080/convmhc

  10. Specific Internalisation of Gold Nanoparticles into Engineered Porous Protein Cages via Affinity Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tao; Free, Paul; Fernig, David G.; Lim, Sierin; Tomczak, Nikodem

    2016-01-01

    Porous protein cages are supramolecular protein self-assemblies presenting pores that allow the access of surrounding molecules and ions into their core in order to store and transport them in biological environments. Protein cages’ pores are attractive channels for the internalisation of inorganic nanoparticles and an alternative for the preparation of hybrid bioinspired nanoparticles. However, strategies based on nanoparticle transport through the pores are largely unexplored, due to the difficulty of tailoring nanoparticles that have diameters commensurate with the pores size and simultaneously displaying specific affinity to the cages’ core and low non-specific binding to the cages’ outer surface. We evaluated the specific internalisation of single small gold nanoparticles, 3.9 nm in diameter, into porous protein cages via affinity binding. The E2 protein cage derived from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus presents 12 pores, 6 nm in diameter, and an empty core of 13 nm in diameter. We engineered the E2 protein by site-directed mutagenesis with oligohistidine sequences exposing them into the cage’s core. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy analysis show that the structures of E2 protein cages mutated with bis- or penta-histidine sequences are well conserved. The surface of the gold nanoparticles was passivated with a self-assembled monolayer made of a mixture of short peptidols and thiolated alkane ethylene glycol ligands. Such monolayers are found to provide thin coatings preventing non-specific binding to proteins. Further functionalisation of the peptide coated gold nanoparticles with Ni2+ nitrilotriacetic moieties enabled the specific binding to oligohistidine tagged cages. The internalisation via affinity binding was evaluated by electron microscopy analysis. From the various mutations tested, only the penta-histidine mutated E2 protein cage showed repeatable and stable internalisation. The present work overcomes the limitations of

  11. Many Routes to an Antibody Heavy-Chain CDR3: Necessary, Yet Insufficient, for Specific Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Angelo, Sara; Ferrara, Fortunato; Naranjo, Leslie; Erasmus, M. Frank; Hraber, Peter; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.

    2018-01-01

    Because of its great potential for diversity, the immunoglobulin heavy-chain complementarity-determining region 3 (HCDR3) is taken as an antibody molecule’s most important component in conferring binding activity and specificity. For this reason, HCDR3s have been used as unique identifiers to investigate adaptive immune responses in vivo and to characterize in vitro selection outputs where display systems were employed. Here, we show that many different HCDR3s can be identified within a target-specific antibody population after in vitro selection. For each identified HCDR3, a number of different antibodies bearing differences elsewhere can be found. In such selected populations, all antibodies with the same HCDR3 recognize the target, albeit at different affinities. In contrast, within unselected populations, the majority of antibodies with the same HCDR3 sequence do not bind the target. In one HCDR3 examined in depth, all target-specific antibodies were derived from the same VDJ rearrangement, while non-binding antibodies with the same HCDR3 were derived from many different V and D gene rearrangements. Careful examination of previously published in vivo datasets reveals that HCDR3s shared between, and within, different individuals can also originate from rearrangements of different V and D genes, with up to 26 different rearrangements yielding the same identical HCDR3 sequence. On the basis of these observations, we conclude that the same HCDR3 can be generated by many different rearrangements, but that specific target binding is an outcome of unique rearrangements and VL pairing: the HCDR3 is necessary, albeit insufficient, for specific antibody binding. PMID:29568296

  12. Many Routes to an Antibody Heavy-Chain CDR3: Necessary, Yet Insufficient, for Specific Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Sara; Ferrara, Fortunato; Naranjo, Leslie; Erasmus, M Frank; Hraber, Peter; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2018-01-01

    Because of its great potential for diversity, the immunoglobulin heavy-chain complementarity-determining region 3 (HCDR3) is taken as an antibody molecule's most important component in conferring binding activity and specificity. For this reason, HCDR3s have been used as unique identifiers to investigate adaptive immune responses in vivo and to characterize in vitro selection outputs where display systems were employed. Here, we show that many different HCDR3s can be identified within a target-specific antibody population after in vitro selection. For each identified HCDR3, a number of different antibodies bearing differences elsewhere can be found. In such selected populations, all antibodies with the same HCDR3 recognize the target, albeit at different affinities. In contrast, within unselected populations, the majority of antibodies with the same HCDR3 sequence do not bind the target. In one HCDR3 examined in depth, all target-specific antibodies were derived from the same VDJ rearrangement, while non-binding antibodies with the same HCDR3 were derived from many different V and D gene rearrangements. Careful examination of previously published in vivo datasets reveals that HCDR3s shared between, and within, different individuals can also originate from rearrangements of different V and D genes, with up to 26 different rearrangements yielding the same identical HCDR3 sequence. On the basis of these observations, we conclude that the same HCDR3 can be generated by many different rearrangements, but that specific target binding is an outcome of unique rearrangements and VL pairing: the HCDR3 is necessary, albeit insufficient, for specific antibody binding.

  13. Specific Internalisation of Gold Nanoparticles into Engineered Porous Protein Cages via Affinity Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramelle, David; Peng, Tao; Free, Paul; Fernig, David G; Lim, Sierin; Tomczak, Nikodem

    2016-01-01

    Porous protein cages are supramolecular protein self-assemblies presenting pores that allow the access of surrounding molecules and ions into their core in order to store and transport them in biological environments. Protein cages' pores are attractive channels for the internalisation of inorganic nanoparticles and an alternative for the preparation of hybrid bioinspired nanoparticles. However, strategies based on nanoparticle transport through the pores are largely unexplored, due to the difficulty of tailoring nanoparticles that have diameters commensurate with the pores size and simultaneously displaying specific affinity to the cages' core and low non-specific binding to the cages' outer surface. We evaluated the specific internalisation of single small gold nanoparticles, 3.9 nm in diameter, into porous protein cages via affinity binding. The E2 protein cage derived from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus presents 12 pores, 6 nm in diameter, and an empty core of 13 nm in diameter. We engineered the E2 protein by site-directed mutagenesis with oligohistidine sequences exposing them into the cage's core. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy analysis show that the structures of E2 protein cages mutated with bis- or penta-histidine sequences are well conserved. The surface of the gold nanoparticles was passivated with a self-assembled monolayer made of a mixture of short peptidols and thiolated alkane ethylene glycol ligands. Such monolayers are found to provide thin coatings preventing non-specific binding to proteins. Further functionalisation of the peptide coated gold nanoparticles with Ni2+ nitrilotriacetic moieties enabled the specific binding to oligohistidine tagged cages. The internalisation via affinity binding was evaluated by electron microscopy analysis. From the various mutations tested, only the penta-histidine mutated E2 protein cage showed repeatable and stable internalisation. The present work overcomes the limitations of currently

  14. Specific cell components of Bacteroides gingivalis mediate binding and degradation of human fibrinogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantz, M.S.; Allen, R.D.; Vail, T.A.; Switalski, L.M.; Hook, M. (Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis, which has been implicated as an etiologic agent in human periodontal diseases, has been shown to bind and degrade human fibrinogen. B. gingivalis strains bind fibrinogen reversibly and with high affinity and bind to a specific region of the fibrinogen molecule that appears to be located between the D and E domains. The authors now report that human fibrinogen is bound and then degraded by specific B. gingivalis components that appear to be localized at the cell surface. Fibrinogen binding to bacterial cells occurred at 4, 22, and 37{degree}C. A functional fibrinogen-binding component (M{sub r}, 150 000) was identified when sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized bacteria were fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and probed with {sup 125}I-fibrinogen. Fibrinogen degradation did not occur at 4{degree}C but did occur at 22 and 37{degree}C. When bacteria and iodinated fibrinogen were incubated at 37{degree}C, two major fibrinogen fragments (M{sub r}, 97 000 and 50 000) accumulated in incubation mixture supernatant fractions. Two major fibrinogen-degrading components (M{sub r}, 120 000 and 150 000) have been identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in substrate-containing gels. Fibrinogen degradation by the M{sub r}-120 000 and -150 000 proteases was enhanced by reducing agents, completely inhibited by N-{alpha}-p-tosyl-L-lysyl chloromethyl ketone, and partially inhibited by n-ethyl maleimide, suggesting that these enzymes are thiol-dependent proteases with trypsinlike substrate specificity. The fibrinogen-binding component could be separated from the fibrinogen-degrading components by selective solubilization of bacteria in sodium deoxycholate.

  15. Displacement of specific serotonin and lysergic acid diethylamide binding by Ergalgin, a new antiserotonin drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelszner, W.

    1980-01-01

    [ 3 H]-serotonin and [ 3 H]-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) bind with a high affinity, Ksub(D) = 12 nM and 6 nM, respectively, to distinct receptors of rat caudate membranes in vitro. Displacement experiments with unlabeled serotonin and LSD support the hypothesis of serotonin receptors existing in an agonist and antagonist state. Methysergide and Ergalgin display quite similar potenties in displacing [ 3 H]-serontonin and [ 3 H]-LSD from their specific binding sites (Ksub(i) = 46.7 and 53.4 nM; 22.3 and 36.5 nM, respectively). Contrary to pharmacological findings these binding results are in favour of mixed agonist/antagonist properties of these compounds. (author)

  16. G-quadruplex RNA binding and recognition by the lysine-specific histone demethylase-1 enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschi, Alexander; Martin, William J; Luka, Zigmund; Loukachevitch, Lioudmila V; Reiter, Nicholas J

    2016-08-01

    Lysine-specific histone demethylase 1 (LSD1) is an essential epigenetic regulator in metazoans and requires the co-repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (CoREST) to efficiently catalyze the removal of mono- and dimethyl functional groups from histone 3 at lysine positions 4 and 9 (H3K4/9). LSD1 interacts with over 60 regulatory proteins and also associates with lncRNAs (TERRA, HOTAIR), suggesting a regulatory role for RNA in LSD1 function. We report that a stacked, intramolecular G-quadruplex (GQ) forming TERRA RNA (GG[UUAGGG]8UUA) binds tightly to the functional LSD1-CoREST complex (Kd ≈ 96 nM), in contrast to a single GQ RNA unit ([UUAGGG]4U), a GQ DNA ([TTAGGG]4T), or an unstructured single-stranded RNA. Stabilization of a parallel-stranded GQ RNA structure by monovalent potassium ions (K(+)) is required for high affinity binding to the LSD1-CoREST complex. These data indicate that LSD1 can distinguish between RNA and DNA as well as structured versus unstructured nucleotide motifs. Further, cross-linking mass spectrometry identified the primary location of GQ RNA binding within the SWIRM/amine oxidase domain (AOD) of LSD1. An ssRNA binding region adjacent to this GQ binding site was also identified via X-ray crystallography. This RNA binding interface is consistent with kinetic assays, demonstrating that a GQ-forming RNA can serve as a noncompetitive inhibitor of LSD1-catalyzed demethylation. The identification of a GQ RNA binding site coupled with kinetic data suggests that structured RNAs can function as regulatory molecules in LSD1-mediated mechanisms. © 2016 Hirschi et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  17. Specificity of Signal-Binding via Non-AHL LuxR-Type Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brameyer, Sophie; Heermann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a typical communication system among Gram-negative bacteria used to control group-coordinated behavior via small diffusible molecules dependent on cell number. The key components of a quorum sensing system are a LuxI-type synthase, producing acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) as signaling molecules, and a LuxR-type receptor that detects AHLs to control expression of specific target genes. Six conserved amino acids are present in the signal-binding domain of AHL-sensing LuxR-type proteins, which are important for ligand-binding and -specificity as well as shaping the ligand-binding pocket. However, many proteobacteria possess LuxR-type regulators without a cognate LuxI synthase, referred to as LuxR solos. The two LuxR solos PluR and PauR from Photorhabdus luminescens and Photorhabdus asymbiotica, respectively, do not sense AHLs. Instead PluR and PauR sense alpha-pyrones and dialkylresorcinols, respectively, and are part of cell-cell communication systems contributing to the overall virulence of these Photorhabdus species. However, PluR and PauR both harbor substitutions in the conserved amino acid motif compared to that in AHL sensors, which appeared to be important for binding the corresponding signaling molecules. Here we analyze the role of the conserved amino acids in the signal-binding domain of these two non-AHL LuxR-type receptors for their role in signal perception. Our studies reveal that the conserved amino acid motif alone is essential but not solely responsible for ligand-binding.

  18. Pharmacophore screening of the protein data bank for specific binding site chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna-Slater, Valérie; Arrowsmith, Andrew G; Zhao, Yong; Schapira, Matthieu

    2010-03-22

    A simple computational approach was developed to screen the Protein Data Bank (PDB) for putative pockets possessing a specific binding site chemistry and geometry. The method employs two commonly used 3D screening technologies, namely identification of cavities in protein structures and pharmacophore screening of chemical libraries. For each protein structure, a pocket finding algorithm is used to extract potential binding sites containing the correct types of residues, which are then stored in a large SDF-formatted virtual library; pharmacophore filters describing the desired binding site chemistry and geometry are then applied to screen this virtual library and identify pockets matching the specified structural chemistry. As an example, this approach was used to screen all human protein structures in the PDB and identify sites having chemistry similar to that of known methyl-lysine binding domains that recognize chromatin methylation marks. The selected genes include known readers of the histone code as well as novel binding pockets that may be involved in epigenetic signaling. Putative allosteric sites were identified on the structures of TP53BP1, L3MBTL3, CHEK1, KDM4A, and CREBBP.

  19. Alterations in hemagglutinin receptor-binding specificity accompany the emergence of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heider, Alla; Mochalova, Larisa; Harder, Timm; Tuzikov, Alexander; Bovin, Nicolai; Wolff, Thorsten; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Schweiger, Brunhilde

    2015-05-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) of hemagglutinin H5 and H7 subtypes emerge after introduction of low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIVs) from wild birds into poultry flocks, followed by subsequent circulation and evolution. The acquisition of multiple basic amino acids at the endoproteolytical cleavage site of the hemagglutinin (HA) is a molecular indicator for high pathogenicity, at least for infections of gallinaceous poultry. Apart from the well-studied significance of the multibasic HA cleavage site, there is only limited knowledge on other alterations in the HA and neuraminidase (NA) molecules associated with changes in tropism during the emergence of HPAIVs from LPAIVs. We hypothesized that changes in tropism may require alterations of the sialyloligosaccharide specificities of HA and NA. To test this hypothesis, we compared a number of LPAIVs and HPAIVs for their HA-mediated binding and NA-mediated desialylation of a set of synthetic receptor analogs, namely, α2-3-sialylated oligosaccharides. NA substrate specificity correlated with structural groups of NAs and did not correlate with pathogenic potential of the virus. In contrast, all HPAIVs differed from LPAIVs by a higher HA receptor-binding affinity toward the trisaccharides Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ (3'SLN) and Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-3GlcNAcβ (SiaLe(c)) and by the ability to discriminate between the nonfucosylated and fucosylated sialyloligosaccharides 3'SLN and Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAcβ (SiaLe(x)), respectively. These results suggest that alteration of the receptor-binding specificity accompanies emergence of the HPAIVs from their low-pathogenic precursors. Here, we have found for the first time correlations of receptor-binding properties of the HA with a highly pathogenic phenotype of poultry viruses. Our study suggests that enhanced receptor-binding affinity of HPAIVs for a typical "poultry-like" receptor, 3'SLN, is provided by substitutions in the receptor-binding

  20. Alterations in Hemagglutinin Receptor-Binding Specificity Accompany the Emergence of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochalova, Larisa; Harder, Timm; Tuzikov, Alexander; Bovin, Nicolai; Wolff, Thorsten; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Schweiger, Brunhilde

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) of hemagglutinin H5 and H7 subtypes emerge after introduction of low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIVs) from wild birds into poultry flocks, followed by subsequent circulation and evolution. The acquisition of multiple basic amino acids at the endoproteolytical cleavage site of the hemagglutinin (HA) is a molecular indicator for high pathogenicity, at least for infections of gallinaceous poultry. Apart from the well-studied significance of the multibasic HA cleavage site, there is only limited knowledge on other alterations in the HA and neuraminidase (NA) molecules associated with changes in tropism during the emergence of HPAIVs from LPAIVs. We hypothesized that changes in tropism may require alterations of the sialyloligosaccharide specificities of HA and NA. To test this hypothesis, we compared a number of LPAIVs and HPAIVs for their HA-mediated binding and NA-mediated desialylation of a set of synthetic receptor analogs, namely, α2-3-sialylated oligosaccharides. NA substrate specificity correlated with structural groups of NAs and did not correlate with pathogenic potential of the virus. In contrast, all HPAIVs differed from LPAIVs by a higher HA receptor-binding affinity toward the trisaccharides Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ (3′SLN) and Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-3GlcNAcβ (SiaLec) and by the ability to discriminate between the nonfucosylated and fucosylated sialyloligosaccharides 3′SLN and Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAcβ (SiaLex), respectively. These results suggest that alteration of the receptor-binding specificity accompanies emergence of the HPAIVs from their low-pathogenic precursors. IMPORTANCE Here, we have found for the first time correlations of receptor-binding properties of the HA with a highly pathogenic phenotype of poultry viruses. Our study suggests that enhanced receptor-binding affinity of HPAIVs for a typical “poultry-like” receptor, 3′SLN, is provided by

  1. The fine specificity of mannose-binding and galactose-binding lectins revealed using outlier motif analysis of glycan array data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, Kevin A; Liden, Daniel; Haab, Brian B

    2012-01-01

    Glycan-binding proteins are commonly used as analytical reagents to detect the levels of specific glycan structures in biological samples. A detailed knowledge of the specificities of glycan-binding proteins is required for properly interpreting their binding data. A powerful technology for characterizing glycan-binding specificity is the glycan array. However, the interpretation of glycan-array data can be difficult due to the complex fine specificities of certain glycan-binding proteins. We developed a systematic approach, called outlier-motif analysis, for extracting fine-specificity information from glycan-array data, and we applied the method to the study of four commonly used lectins: two mannose binders (concanavalin A and Lens culinaris) and two galactose binders (Bauhinia purpurea and peanut agglutinin). The study confirmed the known, primary specificity of each lectin and also revealed new insights into their binding preferences. Lens culinaris's main specificity may be non-terminal, α-linked mannose with a single linkage at its 2' carbon, which is more restricted than previous definitions. We found broader specificity for bauhinea purpurea (BPL) than previously reported, showing that BPL can bind terminal N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) and penultimate β-linked galactose under certain limitations. Peanut agglutinin may bind terminal Galβ1,3Gal, a glycolipid motif, in addition to terminal Galβ1,3GalNAc, a common O-linked glycoprotein motif. These results could be used to more accurately interpret data obtained using these well-studied lectins. Furthermore, this study demonstrates a systematic and general approach for extracting fine-specificity information from glycan-array data.

  2. Autoradiographic localization of specific (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone binding in fetal lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, D.G.; Butley, M.S.; Cunha, G.R.; Malkinson, A.M.

    1984-10-01

    The cellular and subcellular localization of specific (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone binding was examined in fetal mouse lung at various stages of development and in human fetal lung at 8 weeks of gestation using a rapid in vitro steroid incubation technique followed by thaw-mount autoradiography. Competition studies with unlabeled steroids demonstrate the specificity of (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone labeling, and indicate that fetal lung mesenchyme is a primary glucocorticoid target during lung development. Autoradiographs of (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone binding in lung tissue at early stages of development demonstrate that the mesenchyme directly adjacent to the more proximal portions of the bronchiolar network is heavily labeled. In contrast, the epithelium which will later differentiate into bronchi and bronchioles, is relatively unlabeled. Distal portions of the growing epithelium, destined to become alveolar ducts and alveoli, do show nuclear localization of (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone. In addition, by utilizing a technique which allows the simultaneous examination of extracellular matrix components and (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone binding, a relationship is observed between extensive mesenchymal (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone binding and extensive extracellular matrix accumulation. Since glucocorticoids stimulate the synthesis of many extracellular matrix components, these results suggest a role for these hormones in affecting mesenchymal-epithelial interactions during lung morphogenesis.

  3. Inducible super-enhancers are organized based on canonical signal-specific transcription factor binding elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojcsuk, Dóra; Nagy, Gergely; Balint, Balint L

    2017-04-20

    Super-enhancers are established through the interactions of several enhancers and a large number of proteins, including transcription factors and co-regulators; however, the formation of these interactions is poorly understood. By re-analysing previously published estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) ChIP-seq data sets derived from the MCF-7 cell line, we observed that in the absence of stimulation, future super-enhancers are represented by one or a few transcription factor binding event(s) and these extraordinary enhancers possess a response element largely specific to the ERα dimer. Upon hormonal stimulation, these primary binding sites are surrounded by a large amount of ERα and the critical components of active enhancers, such as P300 and MED1, and together with neighbouring sites bound by newly recruited ERα, they generate the functional super-enhancers. To further validate the role of canonical elements in super-enhancer formation, we investigated some additional signal-dependent transcription factors, confirming that certain, distinguished binding elements have a general organizer function. These results suggest that certain signal-specific transcription factors guide super-enhancer formation upon binding to strong response elements. These findings may reshape the current understanding of how these regulatory units assemble, highlighting the involvement of DNA elements instead of protein-protein interactions. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. The PickPocket method for predicting binding specificities for receptors based on receptor pocket similarities: application to MHC-peptide binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, H.; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, M.

    2009-01-01

    of the specificities of MHC molecules in this library weighted by the similarity of their pocket-residues to the query. This PickPocket method is demonstrated to accurately predict MHC-peptide binding for a broad range of MHC alleles, including human and non-human species. In contrast to neural network-based pan-specific......Motivation: Receptor-ligand interactions play an important role in controlling many biological systems. One prominent example is the binding of peptides to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules controlling the onset of cellular immune responses. Thousands of MHC allelic versions...... exist, making determination of the binding specificity for each variant experimentally infeasible. Here, we present a method that can extrapolate from variants with known binding specificity to those where no experimental data are available. Results: For each position in the peptide ligand, we extracted...

  5. Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Theoretical Studies of Anion-pi Interactions: Binding Strength and Anion Specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Bin; Sun, Zhenrong; Wang, Xue B.

    2015-01-01

    Proposed in theory and confirmed to exist, anion–π interactions have been recognized as new and important non-covalent binding forces. Despite extensive theoretical studies, numerous crystal structural identifications, and a plethora of solution phase investigations, intrinsic anion–π interaction strengths that are free from complications of condensed phases’ environments, have not been directly measured in the gas phase. Herein we present a joint photoelectron spectroscopic and theoretical study on this subject, in which tetraoxacalix[2]arene[2]triazine 1, an electron-deficient and cavity self-tunable macrocyclic was used as a charge-neutral molecular host to probe its interactions with a series of anions with distinctly different shapes and charge states (spherical halides Cl⁻, Br⁻, I⁻, linear thiocyanate SCN⁻, trigonal planar nitrate NO₃⁻, pyramidic iodate IO₃⁻, and tetrahedral sulfate SO₄²⁻). The binding energies of the resultant gaseous 1:1 complexes (1•Cl⁻,1•Br⁻, 1•I⁻, 1•SCN⁻, 1•NO₃⁻, 1•IO₃⁻ and 1•SO₄²⁻) were directly measured experimentally, exhibiting substantial non-covalent interactions with pronounced anion specific effects. The binding strengths of Cl⁻, NO₃⁻, IO₃⁻ with 1 are found to be strongest among all singly charged anions, amounting to ca. 30 kcal/mol, but only about 40% of that between 1 and SO₄²⁻. Quantum chemical calculations reveal that all anions reside in the center of the cavity of 1 with anion–π binding motif in the complexes’ optimized structures, where 1 is seen to be able to self-regulate its cavity structure to accommodate anions of different geometries and three-dimensional shapes. Electron density surface and natural bond orbital charge distribution analysis further support anion–π binding formation. The calculated binding energies of the anions and 1 nicely reproduce the experimentally estimated electron binding energy increase. This work

  6. EO-199, a specific antagonist of antiarrhythmic drugs: Assessment by binding experiments and in vivo studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oppenheimer, E.; Harel, G.; Lipinsky, D.; Sarne, Y. (Tel-Aviv Univ. (Israel))

    1991-01-01

    EO-199, a demethylated analog of the novel class I antiarrhythmic drug EO-122 was found to antagonize the antiarrhythmic activity of EO-122 and that of procainamide (Class I{sub A}). EO-199 did not block significantly the activity of a class I{sub B} antiarrhythmic agent, lidocaine. EO-199 also displaced the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)EO-122 to rate heart membranes similarly to procainamide whereas lidocaine did not. The correlation between binding experiments and pharmacological effects points to a possible subclassification of these drugs; the two chemical analogs EO-199 and EO-122, as well as procainamide (I{sub A}) but not lidocaine (I{sub B}), compete at the same site or the same state of the sodium channel. The availability of a specific antagonist might be useful for studying the mechanism of action of antiarrhythmic drugs as well as an antidote in cases of antiarrhythmics overdose intoxication.

  7. Biodistribution, binding specificity and metabolism of [{sup 18}F]fluoroethylflumazenil in rodents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, Philippe; Labar, Daniel; Gallez, Bernard E-mail: gallez@cmfa.ucl.ac.be

    2001-10-01

    Pre-clinical studies were carried out in order to characterize in rodents the biodistribution, the binding specificity and the metabolism of [{sup 18}F]Fluoroethylflumazenil ([{sup 18}F]FEF), a potential candidate for in vivo imaging of the benzodiazepine receptors. In vivo competition with flumazenil indicates that [{sup 18}F]FEF binds specifically to the benzodiazepine receptor in the brain. The accumulation of [{sup 18}F]FEF was significantly lower than using [{sup 3}H]Flumazenil. The rather low accumulation in the brain is due to a rapid metabolism of [{sup 18}F]FEF in hydrophylic metabolites which cannot cross the blood brain barrier, and are rapidly eliminated in the urine. Inhibition of the metabolism by acetaminophen (chemically induced hepatitis) led to a significant increase of the radioactivity found in the circulating blood and in the brain, while these results were not observed using classical inhibitors of the cytochrome CYP450, cimetidine and ketoconazole.

  8. Methyldopa blocks MHC class II binding to disease-specific antigens in autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrov, David A; Alkanani, Aimon; McDaniel, Kristen A; Case, Stephanie; Baschal, Erin E; Pyle, Laura; Ellis, Samuel; Pöllinger, Bernadette; Seidl, Katherine J; Shah, Viral N; Garg, Satish K; Atkinson, Mark A; Gottlieb, Peter A; Michels, Aaron W

    2018-02-13

    Major histocompatibility (MHC) class II molecules are strongly associated with many autoimmune disorders. In type 1 diabetes, the DQ8 molecule is common, confers significant disease risk and is involved in disease pathogenesis. We hypothesized blocking DQ8 antigen presentation would provide therapeutic benefit by preventing recognition of self-peptides by pathogenic T cells. We used the crystal structure of DQ8 to select drug-like small molecules predicted to bind structural pockets in the MHC antigen-binding cleft. A limited number of the predicted compounds inhibited DQ8 antigen presentation in vitro with one compound preventing insulin autoantibody production and delaying diabetes onset in an animal model of spontaneous autoimmune diabetes. An existing drug of similar structure, methyldopa, specifically blocked DQ8 in recent-onset patients with type 1 diabetes along with reducing inflammatory T cell responses toward insulin, highlighting the relevance of blocking disease-specific MHC class II antigen presentation to treat autoimmunity.

  9. Identification of Specific Hydroxyapatite {001} Binding Heptapeptide by Phage Display and Its Nucleation Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Mao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available With recent developments of molecular biomimetics that combine genetic engineering and nanotechnology, peptides can be genetically engineered to bind specifically to inorganic components and execute the task of collagen matrix proteins. In this study, using biogenous tooth enamel as binding substrate, we identified a new heptapeptide (enamel high-affinity binding peptide, EHBP from linear 7-mer peptide phage display library. Through the output/input affinity test, it was found that EHBP has the highest affinity to enamel with an output/input ratio of 14.814 × 10−7, while a random peptide (RP displayed much lower output/input ratio of 0.00035 × 10−7. This binding affinity was also verified by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM analysis. It was found that EHBP absorbing onto the enamel surface exhibits highest normalized fluorescence intensity (5.6 ± 1.2, comparing to the intensity of EHBP to enamel longitudinal section (1.5 ± 0.9 (p < 0.05 as well as to the intensity of a low-affinity binding peptide (ELBP to enamel (1.5 ± 0.5 (p < 0.05. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Attenuated total Reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR, and X-ray Diffraction (XRD studies further confirmed that crystallized hydroxyapatite were precipitated in the mineralization solution containing EHBP. To better understand the nucleation effect of EHBP, EHBP was further investigated on its interaction with calcium phosphate clusters through in vitro mineralization model. The calcium and phosphate ion consumption as well as zeta potential survey revealed that EHBP might previously adsorb to phosphate (PO43− groups and then initiate the precipitation of calcium and phosphate groups. This study not only proved the electrostatic interaction of phosphate group and the genetically engineering solid-binding peptide, but also provided a novel nucleation motif for potential applications in guided hard tissue biomineralization and

  10. Mass-action equilibrium and non-specific interactions in protein binding networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, Sergei

    2009-03-01

    Large-scale protein binding networks serve as a paradigm of complex properties of living cells. These networks are naturally weighted with edges characterized by binding strength and protein-nodes -- by their concentrations. However, the state-of-the-art high-throughput experimental techniques generate just a binary (yes or no) information about individual interactions. As a result, most of the previous research concentrated just on topology of these networks. In a series of recent publications [1-4] my collaborators and I went beyond purely topological studies and calculated the mass-action equilibrium of a genome-wide binding network using experimentally determined protein concentrations, localizations, and reliable binding interactions in baker's yeast. We then studied how this equilibrium responds to large perturbations [1-2] and noise [3] in concentrations of proteins. We demonstrated that the change in the equilibrium concentration of a protein exponentially decays (and sign-alternates) with its network distance away from the perturbed node. This explains why, despite a globally connected topology, individual functional modules in such networks are able to operate fairly independently. In a separate study [4] we quantified the interplay between specific and non-specific binding interactions under crowded conditions inside living cells. We show how the need to limit the waste of resources constrains the number of types and concentrations of proteins that are present at the same time and at the same place in yeast cells. [1] S Maslov, I. Ispolatov, PNAS 104:13655 (2007). [2] S. Maslov, K. Sneppen, I. Ispolatov, New J. of Phys. 9: 273 (2007). [3] K-K. Yan, D. Walker, S. Maslov, PRL accepted (2008). [4] J. Zhang, S. Maslov, and E. I. Shakhnovich, Mol Syst Biol 4, 210 (2008).

  11. Positive selection underlies the species-specific binding of Plasmodium falciparum RH5 to human basigin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forni, Diego; Pontremoli, Chiara; Cagliani, Rachele; Pozzoli, Uberto; Clerici, Mario; Sironi, Manuela

    2015-09-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the deadliest form of malaria, is a member of the Laverania subgenus, which includes ape-infecting parasites. P. falciparum is thought to have originated in gorillas, although infection is now restricted to humans. Laverania parasites display remarkable host-specificity, which is partially mediated by the interaction between parasite ligands and host receptors. We analyse the evolution of BSG (basigin) and GYPA (glycophorin A) in primates/hominins, as well as of their Plasmodium-encoded ligands, PfRH5 and PfEBA175. We show that, in primates, positive selection targeted two sites in BSG (F27 and H102), both involved in PfRH5 binding. A population genetics-phylogenetics approach detected the strongest selection for the gorilla lineage: one of the positively selected sites (K191) is a major determinant of PfRH5 binding affinity. Analysis of RH5 genes indicated episodic selection on the P. falciparum branch; the positively selected W447 site is known to stabilize the interaction with human basigin. Conversely, we detect no selection in the receptor-binding region of EBA175 in the P. falciparum lineage. Its host receptor, GYPA, shows evidence of positive selection in all hominid lineages; selected codons include glycosylation sites that modulate PfEBA175 binding affinity. Data herein provide an evolutionary explanation for species-specific binding of the PfRH5-BSG ligand-receptor pair and support the hypothesis that positive selection at these genes drove the host shift leading to the emergence of P. falciparum as a human pathogen. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Conversion of scFv peptide-binding specificity for crystal chaperone development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, Jennifer C.; Culver, Jeffrey A.; Drury, Jason E.; Motani, Rakesh S.; Lieberman, Raquel L.; Maynard, Jennifer A. (GIT); (UMM); (Texas)

    2012-02-07

    In spite of advances in protein expression and purification over the last decade, many proteins remain recalcitrant to structure determination by X-ray crystallography. One emerging tactic to obtain high-quality protein crystals for structure determination, particularly in the case of membrane proteins, involves co-crystallization with a protein-specific antibody fragment. Here, we report the development of new recombinant single-chain antibody fragments (scFv) capable of binding a specific epitope that can be introduced into internal loops of client proteins. The previously crystallized hexa-histidine-specific 3D5 scFv antibody was modified in the complementary determining region and by random mutagenesis, in conjunction with phage display, to yield scFvs with new biochemical characteristics and binding specificity. Selected variants include those specific for the hexa-histidine peptide with increased expression, solubility (up to 16.6 mg/ml) and sub-micromolar affinity, and those with new specificity for the EE hexa-peptide (EYMPME) and nanomolar affinity. Complexes of one such chaperone with model proteins harboring either an internal or a terminal EE tag were isolated by gel filtration. The 3.1 {angstrom} resolution structure of this chaperone reveals a binding surface complementary to the EE peptide and a {approx}52 {angstrom} channel in the crystal lattice. Notably, in spite of 85% sequence identity, and nearly identical crystallization conditions, the engineered scFv crystallizes in a different space group than the parent 3D5 scFv, and utilizes two new crystal contacts. These engineered scFvs represent a new class of chaperones that may eliminate the need for de novo identification of candidate chaperones from large antibody libraries.

  13. Crucial Roles of Single Residues in Binding Affinity, Specificity, and Promiscuity in the Cellulosomal Cohesin-Dockerin Interface*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutzki, Michal; Reshef, Dan; Barak, Yoav; Haimovitz, Rachel; Rotem-Bamberger, Shahar; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A.; Schueler-Furman, Ora

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between cohesin and dockerin modules play a crucial role in the assembly of multienzyme cellulosome complexes. Although intraspecies cohesin and dockerin modules bind in general with high affinity but indiscriminately, cross-species binding is rare. Here, we combined ELISA-based experiments with Rosetta-based computational design to evaluate the contribution of distinct residues at the Clostridium thermocellum cohesin-dockerin interface to binding affinity, specificity, and promiscuity. We found that single mutations can show distinct and significant effects on binding affinity and specificity. In particular, mutations at cohesin position Asn37 show dramatic variability in their effect on dockerin binding affinity and specificity: the N37A mutant binds promiscuously both to cognate (C. thermocellum) as well as to non-cognate Clostridium cellulolyticum dockerin. N37L in turn switches binding specificity: compared with the wild-type C. thermocellum cohesin, this mutant shows significantly increased preference for C. cellulolyticum dockerin combined with strongly reduced binding to its cognate C. thermocellum dockerin. The observation that a single mutation can overcome the naturally observed specificity barrier provides insights into the evolutionary dynamics of this system that allows rapid modulation of binding specificity within a high affinity background. PMID:25833947

  14. Characterization of nicotine binding to the rat brain P2 preparation: the identification of multiple binding sites which include specific up-regulatory site(s)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloan, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    These studies show that nicotine binds to the rat brain P 2 preparation by saturable and reversible processes. Multiple binding sites were revealed by the configuration of saturation, kinetic and Scatchard plots. A least squares best fit of Scatchard data using nonlinear curve fitting programs confirmed the presence of a very high affinity site, an up-regulatory site, a high affinity site and one or two low affinity sites. Stereospecificity was demonstrated for the up-regulatory site where (+)-nicotine was more effective and for the high affinity site where (-)-nicotine had a higher affinity. Drugs which selectively up-regulate nicotine binding site(s) have been identified. Further, separate very high and high affinity sites were identified for (-)- and (+)-[ 3 H]nicotine, based on evidence that the site density for the (-)-isomer is 10 times greater than that for the (+)-isomer at these sites. Enhanced nicotine binding has been shown to be a statistically significant phenomenon which appears to be a consequence of drugs binding to specific site(s) which up-regulate binding at other site(s). Although Scatchard and Hill plots indicate positive cooperatively, up-regulation more adequately describes the function of these site(s). A separate up-regulatory site is suggested by the following: (1) Drugs vary markedly in their ability to up-regulate binding. (2) Both the affinity and the degree of up-regulation can be altered by structural changes in ligands. (3) Drugs with specificity for up-regulation have been identified. (4) Some drugs enhance binding in a dose-related manner. (5) Competition studies employing cold (-)- and (+)-nicotine against (-)- and (+)-[ 3 H]nicotine show that the isomers bind to separate sites which up-regulate binding at the (-)- and (+)-nicotine high affinity sites and in this regard (+)-nicotine is more specific and efficacious than (-)-nicotine

  15. Affinity maturation generates greatly improved xyloglucan-specific carbohydrate binding modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cicortas Gunnarsson Lavinia

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular evolution of carbohydrate binding modules (CBM is a new approach for the generation of glycan-specific molecular probes. To date, the possibility of performing affinity maturation on CBM has not been investigated. In this study we show that binding characteristics such as affinity can be improved for CBM generated from the CBM4-2 scaffold by using random mutagenesis in combination with phage display technology. Results Two modified proteins with greatly improved affinity for xyloglucan, a key polysaccharide abundant in the plant kingdom crucial for providing plant support, were generated. Both improved modules differ from other existing xyloglucan probes by binding to galactose-decorated subunits of xyloglucan. The usefulness of the evolved binders was verified by staining of plant sections, where they performed better than the xyloglucan-binding module from which they had been derived. They discriminated non-fucosylated from fucosylated xyloglucan as shown by their ability to stain only the endosperm, rich in non-fucosylated xyloglucan, but not the integument rich in fucosylated xyloglucan, on tamarind seed sections. Conclusion We conclude that affinity maturation of CBM selected from molecular libraries based on the CBM4-2 scaffold is possible and has the potential to generate new analytical tools for detection of plant carbohydrates.

  16. Structure of P-Glycoprotein Reveals a Molecular Basis for Poly-Specific Drug Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aller, Stephen G.; Yu, Jodie; Ward, Andrew; Weng, Yue; Chittaboina, Srinivas; Zhuo, Rupeng; Harrell, Patina M.; Trinh, Yenphuong T.; Zhang, Qinghai; Urbatsch, Ina L.; Chang, Geoffrey; (Scripps); (TTU)

    2009-04-22

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) detoxifies cells by exporting hundreds of chemically unrelated toxins but has been implicated in multidrug resistance (MDR) in the treatment of cancers. Substrate promiscuity is a hallmark of P-gp activity, thus a structural description of poly-specific drug-binding is important for the rational design of anticancer drugs and MDR inhibitors. The x-ray structure of apo P-gp at 3.8 angstroms reveals an internal cavity of -6000 angstroms cubed with a 30 angstrom separation of the two nucleotide-binding domains. Two additional P-gp structures with cyclic peptide inhibitors demonstrate distinct drug-binding sites in the internal cavity capable of stereoselectivity that is based on hydrophobic and aromatic interactions. Apo and drug-bound P-gp structures have portals open to the cytoplasm and the inner leaflet of the lipid bilayer for drug entry. The inward-facing conformation represents an initial stage of the transport cycle that is competent for drug binding.

  17. Identification of fluorescent compounds with non-specific binding property via high throughput live cell microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Nath

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Compounds exhibiting low non-specific intracellular binding or non-stickiness are concomitant with rapid clearing and in high demand for live-cell imaging assays because they allow for intracellular receptor localization with a high signal/noise ratio. The non-stickiness property is particularly important for imaging intracellular receptors due to the equilibria involved. METHOD: Three mammalian cell lines with diverse genetic backgrounds were used to screen a combinatorial fluorescence library via high throughput live cell microscopy for potential ligands with high in- and out-flux properties. The binding properties of ligands identified from the first screen were subsequently validated on plant root hair. A correlative analysis was then performed between each ligand and its corresponding physiochemical and structural properties. RESULTS: The non-stickiness property of each ligand was quantified as a function of the temporal uptake and retention on a cell-by-cell basis. Our data shows that (i mammalian systems can serve as a pre-screening tool for complex plant species that are not amenable to high-throughput imaging; (ii retention and spatial localization of chemical compounds vary within and between each cell line; and (iii the structural similarities of compounds can infer their non-specific binding properties. CONCLUSION: We have validated a protocol for identifying chemical compounds with non-specific binding properties that is testable across diverse species. Further analysis reveals an overlap between the non-stickiness property and the structural similarity of compounds. The net result is a more robust screening assay for identifying desirable ligands that can be used to monitor intracellular localization. Several new applications of the screening protocol and results are also presented.

  18. Accurate pan-specific prediction of peptide-MHC class II binding affinity with improved binding core identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreatta, Massimo; Karosiene, Edita; Rasmussen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A key event in the generation of a cellular response against malicious organisms through the endocytic pathway is binding of peptidic antigens by major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC class II) molecules. The bound peptide is then presented on the cell surface where it can be recognized...... by T helper lymphocytes. NetMHCIIpan is a state-of-the-art method for the quantitative prediction of peptide binding to any human or mouse MHC class II molecule of known sequence. In this paper, we describe an updated version of the method with improved peptide binding register identification. Binding...... register prediction is concerned with determining the minimal core region of nine residues directly in contact with the MHC binding cleft, a crucial piece of information both for the identification and design of CD4+ T cell antigens. When applied to a set of 51 crystal structures of peptide-MHC complexes...

  19. Thermodynamic and structural investigation of the specific SDS binding of humicola insolens cutinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kold, David; Dauter, Zbigniew; Laustsen, Anne K; Brzozowski, Andrzej M; Turkenburg, Johan P; Nielsen, Anders D; Koldsø, Heidi; Petersen, Evamaria; Schiøtt, Birgit; De Maria, Leonardo; Wilson, Keith S; Svendsen, Allan; Wimmer, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of lipolytic enzymes with anionic surfactants is of great interest with respect to industrially produced detergents. Here, we report the interaction of cutinase from the thermophilic fungus Humicola insolens with the anionic surfactant SDS, and show the enzyme specifically binds a single SDS molecule under nondenaturing concentrations. Protein interaction with SDS was investigated by NMR, ITC and molecular dynamics simulations. The NMR resonances of the protein were assigned, with large stretches of the protein molecule not showing any detectable resonances. SDS is shown to specifically interact with the loops surrounding the catalytic triad with medium affinity (Ka ≈ 105 M−1). The mode of binding is closely similar to that seen previously for binding of amphiphilic molecules and substrate analogues to cutinases, and hence SDS acts as a substrate mimic. In addition, the structure of the enzyme has been solved by X-ray crystallography in its apo form and after cocrystallization with diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate (DNPP) leading to a complex with monoethylphosphate (MEP) esterified to the catalytically active serine. The enzyme has the same fold as reported for other cutinases but, unexpectedly, esterification of the active site serine is accompanied by the ethylation of the active site histidine which flips out from its usual position in the triad. PMID:24832484

  20. The Sac10b homolog in Methanococcus maripaludis binds DNA at specific sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuchen; Guo, Li; Guo, Rong; Wong, Richard L; Hernandez, Hilda; Hu, Jinchuan; Chu, Yindi; Amster, I Jonathan; Whitman, William B; Huang, Li

    2009-04-01

    The Sac10b protein family, also known as Alba, is widely distributed in Archaea. Sac10b homologs in thermophilic Sulfolobus species are very abundant. They bind both DNA and RNA with high affinity and without sequence specificity, and their physiological functions are still not fully understood. Mma10b from the euryarchaeote Methanococcus maripaludis is a mesophilic member of the Sac10b family. Mma10b is not abundant and constitutes only approximately 0.01% of the total cellular protein. Disruption of mma10b resulted in poor growth of the mutant in minimal medium at near the optimal growth temperature but had no detectable effect on growth in rich medium. Quantitative proteomics, real time reverse transcription-PCR, and enzyme assays revealed that the expression levels of some genes involved in CO(2) assimilation and other activities were changed in the Deltamma10b mutant. Chromatin immunoprecipitation suggested a direct association of Mma10b with an 18-bp DNA binding motif in vivo. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting confirmed that Mma10b preferentially binds specific sequences of DNA with an apparent Kd in the 100 nM range. These results suggested that the physiological role of Mma10b in the mesophilic methanococci is greatly diverged from that of homologs in thermophiles.

  1. A novel and highly specific phage endolysin cell wall binding domain for detection of Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Minsuk; Sim, Jieun; Kang, Taejoon; Nguyen, Hoang Hiep; Park, Hyun Kyu; Chung, Bong Hyun; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2015-09-01

    Rapid, specific and sensitive detection of pathogenic bacteria is crucial for public health and safety. Bacillus cereus is harmful as it causes foodborne illness and a number of systemic and local infections. We report a novel phage endolysin cell wall-binding domain (CBD) for B. cereus and the development of a highly specific and sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based B. cereus detection method using the CBD. The newly discovered CBD from endolysin of PBC1, a B. cereus-specific bacteriophage, provides high specificity and binding capacity to B. cereus. By using the CBD-modified SPR chips, B. cereus can be detected at the range of 10(5)-10(8) CFU/ml. More importantly, the detection limit can be improved to 10(2) CFU/ml by using a subtractive inhibition assay based on the pre-incubation of B. cereus and CBDs, removal of CBD-bound B. cereus, and SPR detection of the unbound CBDs. The present study suggests that the small and genetically engineered CBDs can be promising biological probes for B. cereus. We anticipate that the CBD-based SPR-sensing methods will be useful for the sensitive, selective, and rapid detection of B. cereus.

  2. Beta atomic contacts: identifying critical specific contacts in protein binding interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Kwoh, Chee Keong; Hoi, Steven C H

    2013-01-01

    Specific binding between proteins plays a crucial role in molecular functions and biological processes. Protein binding interfaces and their atomic contacts are typically defined by simple criteria, such as distance-based definitions that only use some threshold of spatial distance in previous studies. These definitions neglect the nearby atomic organization of contact atoms, and thus detect predominant contacts which are interrupted by other atoms. It is questionable whether such kinds of interrupted contacts are as important as other contacts in protein binding. To tackle this challenge, we propose a new definition called beta (β) atomic contacts. Our definition, founded on the β-skeletons in computational geometry, requires that there is no other atom in the contact spheres defined by two contact atoms; this sphere is similar to the van der Waals spheres of atoms. The statistical analysis on a large dataset shows that β contacts are only a small fraction of conventional distance-based contacts. To empirically quantify the importance of β contacts, we design βACV, an SVM classifier with β contacts as input, to classify homodimers from crystal packing. We found that our βACV is able to achieve the state-of-the-art classification performance superior to SVM classifiers with distance-based contacts as input. Our βACV also outperforms several existing methods when being evaluated on several datasets in previous works. The promising empirical performance suggests that β contacts can truly identify critical specific contacts in protein binding interfaces. β contacts thus provide a new model for more precise description of atomic organization in protein quaternary structures than distance-based contacts.

  3. Binding of ADAM12, a marker of skeletal muscle regeneration, to the muscle-specific actin-binding protein, alpha -actinin-2, is required for myoblast fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galliano, M F; Huet, C; Frygelius, J

    2000-01-01

    of differentiation. Using the yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that the muscle-specific alpha-actinin-2 strongly binds to the cytoplasmic tail of ADAM12. In vitro binding assays with GST fusion proteins confirmed the specific interaction. The major binding site for alpha-actinin-2 was mapped to a short sequence......ADAM12 belongs to the transmembrane metalloprotease ADAM ("a disintegrin and metalloprotease") family. ADAM12 has been implicated in muscle cell differentiation and fusion, but its precise function remains unknown. Here, we show that ADAM12 is dramatically up-regulated in regenerated, newly formed...... in a dominant negative fashion by inhibiting fusion of C2C12 cells, whereas expression of a cytosolic ADAM12 lacking the major alpha-actinin-2 binding site had no effect on cell fusion. Our results suggest that interaction of ADAM12 with alpha-actinin-2 is important for ADAM12 function....

  4. A constitutive damage specific DNA-binding protein is synthesized at higher levels in UV-irradiated primate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschfeld, S.; Levine, A.S.; Ozato, K.; Protic, M.

    1990-01-01

    Using a DNA band shift assay, we have identified a DNA-binding protein complex in primate cells which is present constitutively and has a high affinity for UV-irradiated, double-stranded DNA. Cells pretreated with UV light, mitomycin C, or aphidicolin have higher levels of this damage-specific DNA-binding protein complex, suggesting that the signal for induction can either be damage to the DNA or interference with cellular DNA replication. Physiochemical modifications of the DNA and competition analysis with defined substrates suggest that the most probable target site for the damage-specific DNA-binding protein complex is a 6-4'-(pyrimidine-2'-one)-pyrimidine dimer: specific binding could not be detected with probes which contain -TT- cyclobutane dimers, and damage-specific DNA binding did not decrease after photoreactivation of UV-irradiated DNA. This damage-specific DNA-binding protein complex is the first such inducible protein complex identified in primate cells. Cells from patients with the sun-sensitive cancer-prone disease, xeroderma pigmentosum (group E), are lacking both the constitutive and the induced damage-specific DNA-binding activities. These findings suggest a possible role for this DNA-binding protein complex in lesion recognition and DNA repair of UV-light-induced photoproducts

  5. Peptide binding specificity of major histocompatibility complex class I resolved into an array of apparently independent subspecificities: quantitation by peptide libraries and improved prediction of binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Pedersen, L O; Romme, T

    1996-01-01

    Considerable interest has focused on understanding how major histocompatibility complex (MHC) specificity is generated and characterizing the specificity of MHC molecules with the ultimate goal being to predict peptide binding. We have used a strategy where all possible peptides of a particular...

  6. Cell surface-bound heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) mediates perforin-independent apoptosis by specific binding and uptake of granzyme B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Catharina; Koelch, Walter; DeMaio, Antonio; Arispe, Nelson; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2003-10-17

    Cell surface-bound heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) renders tumor cells more sensitive to the cytolytic attack mediated by natural killer (NK) cells. A 14-amino acid Hsp70 sequence, termed TKD (TKDNNLLGRFELSG, aa450-463) could be identified as the extracellular localized recognition site for NK cells. Here, we show by affinity chromatography that both, full-length Hsp70-protein and Hsp70-peptide TKD, specifically bind a 32-kDa protein derived from NK cell lysates. The serine protease granzyme B was uncovered as the 32-kDa Hsp70-interacting protein using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass peptide fingerprinting. Incubation of tumor cells with increasing concentrations of perforin-free, isolated granzyme B shows specific binding and uptake in a dose-dependent manner and results in initiation of apoptosis selectively in tumor cells presenting Hsp70 on the cell surface. Remarkably, Hsp70 cation channel activity was also determined selectively in purified phospholipid membranes of Hsp70 membrane-positive but not in membrane-negative tumor cells. The physiological role of our findings was demonstrated in primary NK cells showing elevated cytoplasmic granzyme B levels following contact with TKD. Furthermore, an increased lytic activity of Hsp70 membrane-positive tumor cells could be associated with granzyme B release by NK cells. Taken together we propose a novel perforin-independent, granzyme B-mediated apoptosis pathway for Hsp70 membrane-positive tumor cells.

  7. Receptor specificity and erythrocyte binding preferences of avian influenza viruses isolated from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawar Shailesh D

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hemagglutination (HA and hemagglutination inhibition (HI assays are conventionally used for detection and identification of influenza viruses. HI assay is also used for detection of antibodies against influenza viruses. Primarily turkey or chicken erythrocytes [red blood cells (RBCs] are used in these assays, as they are large, nucleated, and sediment fast, which makes it easy to determine the titer. Human influenza viruses agglutinate RBCs from chicken, human, and guinea pig, but not from horse. Human influenza viruses bind preferentially to sialic acid (SA linked to galactose (Gal by α 2, 6 linkage (SA α 2, 6-Gal, whereas avian influenza (AI viruses bind preferentially to SA α 2, 3-Gal linkages. With this background, the present study was undertaken to study erythrocyte binding preferences and receptor specificities of AI viruses isolated from India. Materials and methods A total of nine AI virus isolates (four subtypes from India and three reference AI strains (three subtypes were tested in HA and HI assays against mammalian and avian erythrocytes. The erythrocytes from turkey, chicken, goose, guinea pig and horse were used in the study. The receptor specificity determination assays were performed using goose and turkey RBCs. The amino acids present at 190 helix, 130 and 220 loops of the receptor-binding domain of the hemagglutinin protein were analyzed to correlate amino acid changes with the receptor specificity. Results All tested highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 viruses reacted with all five types of RBCs in the HA assay; AI H9N2 and H5N2 viruses did not react with horse RBCs. For H5N1 viruses guinea pig and goose RBCs were best for both HA and HI assays. For H9N2 viruses, guinea pig, fowl and turkey RBCs were suitable. For other tested AI subtypes, avian and guinea pig RBCs were better. Eight isolates of H5N1, one H4N6 and one H7N1 virus showed preference to avian sialic acid receptors. Importantly

  8. Interleukin-11 binds specific EF-hand proteins via their conserved structural motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, Alexei S; Sokolov, Andrei S; Vologzhannikova, Alisa A; Permyakova, Maria E; Khorn, Polina A; Ismailov, Ramis G; Denessiouk, Konstantin A; Denesyuk, Alexander I; Rastrygina, Victoria A; Baksheeva, Viktoriia E; Zernii, Evgeni Yu; Zinchenko, Dmitry V; Glazatov, Vladimir V; Uversky, Vladimir N; Mirzabekov, Tajib A; Permyakov, Eugene A; Permyakov, Sergei E

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-11 (IL-11) is a hematopoietic cytokine engaged in numerous biological processes and validated as a target for treatment of various cancers. IL-11 contains intrinsically disordered regions that might recognize multiple targets. Recently we found that aside from IL-11RA and gp130 receptors, IL-11 interacts with calcium sensor protein S100P. Strict calcium dependence of this interaction suggests a possibility of IL-11 interaction with other calcium sensor proteins. Here we probed specificity of IL-11 to calcium-binding proteins of various types: calcium sensors of the EF-hand family (calmodulin, S100B and neuronal calcium sensors: recoverin, NCS-1, GCAP-1, GCAP-2), calcium buffers of the EF-hand family (S100G, oncomodulin), and a non-EF-hand calcium buffer (α-lactalbumin). A specific subset of the calcium sensor proteins (calmodulin, S100B, NCS-1, GCAP-1/2) exhibits metal-dependent binding of IL-11 with dissociation constants of 1-19 μM. These proteins share several amino acid residues belonging to conservative structural motifs of the EF-hand proteins, 'black' and 'gray' clusters. Replacements of the respective S100P residues by alanine drastically decrease its affinity to IL-11, suggesting their involvement into the association process. Secondary structure and accessibility of the hinge region of the EF-hand proteins studied are predicted to control specificity and selectivity of their binding to IL-11. The IL-11 interaction with the EF-hand proteins is expected to occur under numerous pathological conditions, accompanied by disintegration of plasma membrane and efflux of cellular components into the extracellular milieu.

  9. Mechanism of selective VEGF-A binding by neuropilin-1 reveals a basis for specific ligand inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W Parker

    Full Text Available Neuropilin (Nrp receptors function as essential cell surface receptors for the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF family of proangiogenic cytokines and the semaphorin 3 (Sema3 family of axon guidance molecules. There are two Nrp homologues, Nrp1 and Nrp2, which bind to both overlapping and distinct members of the VEGF and Sema3 family of molecules. Nrp1 specifically binds the VEGF-A(164/5 isoform, which is essential for developmental angiogenesis. We demonstrate that VEGF-A specific binding is governed by Nrp1 residues in the b1 coagulation factor domain surrounding the invariant Nrp C-terminal arginine binding pocket. Further, we show that Sema3F does not display the Nrp-specific binding to the b1 domain seen with VEGF-A. Engineered soluble Nrp receptor fragments that selectively sequester ligands from the active signaling complex are an attractive modality for selectively blocking the angiogenic and chemorepulsive functions of Nrp ligands. Utilizing the information on Nrp ligand binding specificity, we demonstrate Nrp constructs that specifically sequester Sema3 in the presence of VEGF-A. This establishes that unique mechanisms are used by Nrp receptors to mediate specific ligand binding and that these differences can be exploited to engineer soluble Nrp receptors with specificity for Sema3.

  10. Induction of Chitin-Binding Proteins during the Specific Attachment of the Marine Bacterium Vibrio harveyi to Chitin

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, Michael T.; Kirchman, David L.

    1994-01-01

    Previous work has shown that attachment of Vibrio harveyi to chitin is specific and involves at least two chitin-binding peptides. However, the roles and regulation of these chitin-binding peptides in attachment are still unclear. Here we show that preincubation with the oligomeric sugars composing chitin stimulated chitinase activity, cellular attachment to chitin, and production of chitin-binding peptides. One of these peptides, a 53-kDa peptide, is produced constitutively and appears to me...

  11. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Amanda; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib) and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib) kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations of key mediating

  12. Structures of Orf Virus Chemokine Binding Protein in Complex with Host Chemokines Reveal Clues to Broad Binding Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couñago, Rafael M; Knapp, Karen M; Nakatani, Yoshio; Fleming, Stephen B; Corbett, Michael; Wise, Lyn M; Mercer, Andrew A; Krause, Kurt L

    2015-07-07

    The chemokine binding protein (CKBP) from orf virus (ORFV) binds with high affinity to chemokines from three classes, C, CC, and CXC, making it unique among poxvirus CKBPs described to date. We present its crystal structure alone and in complex with three CC chemokines, CCL2, CCL3, and CCL7. ORFV CKBP possesses a β-sandwich fold that is electrostatically and sterically complementary to its binding partners. Chemokines bind primarily through interactions involving the N-terminal loop and a hydrophobic recess on the ORFV CKBP β-sheet II surface, and largely polar interactions between the chemokine 20s loop and a negatively charged surface groove located at one end of the CKBP β-sheet II surface. ORFV CKBP interacts with leukocyte receptor and glycosaminoglycan binding sites found on the surface of bound chemokines. SEC-MALLS and chromatographic evidence is presented supporting that ORFV CKBP is a dimer in solution over a broad range of protein concentrations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification and further characterization of the specific cell binding fragment from sponge aggregation factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramzow, M; Bachmann, M; Uhlenbruck, G; Dorn, A; Müller, W E

    1986-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) were raised against the aggregation factor (AF) from the marine sponge Geodia cydonium. Two clones were identified that secrete McAbs against the cell binding protein of the AF complex. Fab fragments of McAbs: 5D2-D11 completely abolished the activity of the AF to form secondary aggregates from single cells. The McAbs were determined to react with the AF in vitro; this interaction was prevented by addition of the aggregation receptor, isolated and purified from the same species. After dissociation of the AF by sodium dodecyl sulfate and 2-mercaptoethanol, followed by electrophoretical fractionation, a 47-kD protein was identified by immunoblotting which interacted with the McAbs: 5D2-D11. During this dissociation procedure, the sunburst structure of the AF was destroyed. In a second approach, the 47-kD protein was isolated by immunoprecipitation; 12 molecules of this protein species were calculated to be associated with the intact AF particle. The 47-kD AF fragment bound to dissociated Geodia cells with a high affinity (Ka of 7 X 10(8) M-1) even in the absence of Ca++ ions; the number of binding sites was approximately 4 X 10(6)/cell. This interaction was prevented by addition of the aggregation receptor to the 47-kD protein in the homologous cell system. Moreover, it was established that this binding occurs species-specifically. The 47-kD fragment of the AF was localized only extracellularly by indirect immunofluorescence staining in cryostat slices. These data suggest that the 47-kD protein is the cell binding molecule of the AF from Geodia.

  14. Binding of Sr from milk by solid phase extraction with cryptand C222 sorbed on silica gel, cation exchange, chelating or adsorbent resins for simplified 90Sr analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tait, David; Wiechen, Arnold; Haase, Gerhard

    1995-01-01

    Several commercially available resins have been found to bind the bicyclic polyether cryptand C222 from aqueous acetonitrile solutions. The presence of C222 on some of these resins strongly improved their affinity for Sr, so that relatively small amounts of such resins sorbed Sr from milk. The resins investigated were silica gel, polyacrylic acid crosslinked with divinylbenzene (DVB), polystyrene crosslinked with divinylbenzene (PS-DVB) and PS-DVB containing sulphonate, aminomethylphosphonate, iminodiacetate and mercapto groups. The resins for which binding of C222 resulted in the largest improvement in Sr sorption from milk were PS-DVB containing mercapto groups (Chelite S) and silica gel (Si 60). Thus, 2 ml wet volume of either Chelite S containing 133 μmol of C222, or silica gel Si-60 containing 143 μmol of C222 sorbed 90 and 48%, respectively, of the Sr from 100-ml milk samples. As the sorption of Sr from milk by these systems is relatively slow, contact times of 24-36 h are required to attain these results. The Chelite S-C222 system separates Sr effectively from Cs and Ca. Under the conditions described here some 6% of the natural 40 K in milk sorbs with Sr to the resin. Ba behaves similarly to Sr. 90 Sr/ 90 Y sorbed on the silica gel Si-60-C222 system can be measured directly and efficiently by liquid scintillation counting. If adequate specificity can be attained this system might provide a very simple method of determining 90 Sr in milk

  15. Presence of specific growth hormone binding sites in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) tissues: characterization of the hepatic receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, K.; Niu, P.D.; Le Gac, F.; Le Bail, P.Y.

    1991-01-01

    The present work outlines the presence of specific binding for chinook salmon growth hormone (sGH) in different tissue preparations of rainbow trout. Optimal incubation conditions (pH, Tris, MgCl 2 ) were determined. Specific binding was very sensitive to salt concentration during incubation. The specific binding reached a plateau after 15 and 25 hr of incubation at 12 and 4 degree. At 20 degree, specific and nonspecific binding were not stable. Specific binding dissociation was slower than association and was only partial. The binding was saturable (Bmax = 187 +/- 167 pmol), of high affinity (Ka = 2.4 +/- 0.8 10(9) M-1), and very specific for GH, properties which are in agreement with the characteristics of hormonal receptors. Sea bream and mammalian GH appeared 2- and 30-fold, respectively, less potent than cold sGH2 for displacing 125 I-sGH2. Tissue preparations from ovary, testis, fat, skin, cartilage, gill, blood pellet, brain, spleen, kidney, and muscle showed significant saturable binding

  16. High Specific Selectivity and Membrane-Active Mechanism of Synthetic Cationic Hybrid Antimicrobial Peptides Based on the Peptide FV7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tingting; Wu, Di; Li, Weizhong; Zheng, Xin; Li, Weifen; Shan, Anshan

    2017-02-06

    Hybrid peptides integrating different functional domains of peptides have many advantages, such as remarkable antimicrobial activity, lower hemolysis and ideal cell selectivity, compared with natural antimicrobial peptides. FV7 (FRIRVRV-NH₂), a consensus amphiphilic sequence was identified as being analogous to host defense peptides. In this study, we designed a series of hybrid peptides FV7-LL-37 (17-29) (FV-LL), FV7-magainin 2 (9-21) (FV-MA) and FV7-cecropin A (1-8) (FV-CE) by combining the FV7 sequence with the small functional sequences LL-37 (17-29) (LL), magainin 2 (9-21) (MA) and cecropin A (1-8) (CE) which all come from well-described natural peptides. The results demonstrated that the synthetic hybrid peptides, in particular FV-LL, had potent antibacterial activities over a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria with lower hemolytic activity than other peptides. Furthermore, fluorescent spectroscopy indicated that the hybrid peptide FV-LL exhibited marked membrane destruction by inducing outer and inner bacterial membrane permeabilization, while scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that FV-LL damaged membrane integrity by disrupting the bacterial membrane. Inhibiting biofilm formation assays also showed that FV-LL had similar anti-biofilm activity compared with the functional peptide sequence FV7. Synthetic cationic hybrid peptides based on FV7 could provide new models for combining different functional domains and demonstrate effective avenues to screen for novel antimicrobial agents.

  17. A microassay for the determination of soluble and membrane-bound glutamate decarboxylase activity--influences of cations, lipid composition, and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate on the glutamate decarboxylase binding to liposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagel, C.; Fleissner, A.; Seifert, R.

    1989-01-01

    A radiochemical microassay for soluble and membrane-bound glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is described. Up to 180 samples can be determined per day with a variation coefficient of 2%. The method detects newly synthesized gamma-amino-n-butyric acid in the picomole range and can easily be applied to other enzymes whose substrate and product differ by charge. In an aqueous homogenate of brain (1 + 10; w/v) about 15% of the total GAD activity are spun down by centrifugation (1 h, 100,000g) increasing to 35% of the total GAD activity in solutions with 8 mM calcium chloride or 100 mM potassium acetate. There is similar dependence on the cation concentration when GAD binds to phospholipid vesicles (liposomes) as well as dependence on lipid concentration and lipid composition. The coenzyme pyridoxal 5'-phosphate has no influence on GAD binding to liposomes

  18. Simplified immunoassay for rapid Dengue serotype diagnosis, revealing insensitivity to non-specific binding interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda C.C.L. Loureiro

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Proof of concept of an immunoassay, which is easy to implement, for rapid Dengue virus (DENV serotype diagnosis, in the early infection stage, is reported. The four-layer assay is immobilized onto a thin gold film and relies on a low cost, disposable polymer biochip for optical surface plasmon resonance sensing and detection. The protocol comprises Neutravidin-Biotin mediated monoclonal antibody (MAB attachment as the functionalized sensing element. Formation of the MAB-DENV complex results in a pronounced thickness change that is optically recorded in real time, employing a microfluidic set-up. Virus presence is confirmed by atomic force microscopy from the same sample. Serum samples were collected from a patient in acute febrile state. Simultaneous serological analysis by means of the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, independently, confirmed presence of DENV2 and DENV3. The protocol proved applicable in presence of strong non-specific binding interference that originates from, and is caused by, various blood, serum and other body fluid constituents. False positive indications for both, negative serum and blood control samples were not observed. The achievable limit of detection was estimated to be 2×104 particles/ml. Eventually, the method can be modified towards detection of other viruses by using the same protocol. Keywords: Immuno-assay, Dengue virus detection, Non-specific binding

  19. Specific binding sites for growth hormone in cultured mouse thymic epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban, E.; Haour, F. (Institut Pasteur, Paris (France)); Gagnerault, M.; Dardenne, M.; Postel-Vinay, M. (Hopital Necker, Paris (France)); Jammes, H. (Endocrinologie Molecuaire, INRA, Jouy-en-Josas (France))

    1991-01-01

    Growth hormones bound specifically to murine thymic epithelial cells, which represent the major component of thymic micro-environment and can be modulated by pituitary hormones. The Kds found with human growth hormone and bovine growth hormone were 0.14 and 0.27 nM with a Bmax 0.56 and 0.35 fmol/10{sup 6} cells respectively. Competition experiment analysis showed ED{sub 50} of 0.24 nM for hGH, 0.46 nM for rGH, 0.71 nM for bGH, 11.8 nM for hPRL and 11.2 nM for oPRL. No specific binding of ({sup 125}I)-oPRL was observed under the same conditions. Both hPRL and bGH showed a negative regulatory effect on the number of the hGH binding sites when incubated with the culture for three days. The presence of GH receptors on thymic epithelial cells provides biochemical evidence for the effect of GH on thymic function.

  20. Phospho switch triggers Brd4 chromatin binding and activator recruitment for gene-specific targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Lee, A-Young; Lai, Hsien-Tsung; Zhang, Hong; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    2013-03-07

    Bromodomain-containing protein 4 (Brd4) is an epigenetic reader and transcriptional regulator recently identified as a cancer therapeutic target for acute myeloid leukemia, multiple myeloma, and Burkitt's lymphoma. Although chromatin targeting is a crucial function of Brd4, there is little understanding of how bromodomains that bind acetylated histones are regulated, nor how the gene-specific activity of Brd4 is determined. Via interaction screen and domain mapping, we identified p53 as a functional partner of Brd4. Interestingly, Brd4 association with p53 is modulated by casein kinase II (CK2)-mediated phosphorylation of a conserved acidic region in Brd4 that selectively contacts either a juxtaposed bromodomain or an adjacent basic region to dictate the ability of Brd4 binding to chromatin and also the recruitment of p53 to regulated promoters. The unmasking of bromodomains and activator recruitment, concurrently triggered by the CK2 phospho switch, provide an intriguing mechanism for gene-specific targeting by a universal epigenetic reader. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cocaine abstinence induces emotional impairment and brain region-specific upregulation of the oxytocin receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Polymnia; Zanos, Panos; Hourani, Susanna; Kitchen, Ian; Bailey, Alexis

    2016-10-01

    The key problem in treating cocaine addiction is the maintenance of a drug-free state as negative emotional symptoms during abstinence often trigger relapse. The mechanisms underpinning the emotional dysregulation during abstinence are currently not well-understood. There is evidence suggesting a role of the neuropeptide oxytocin in the modulation of drug addiction processes. However, its involvement during long-term abstinence from cocaine use remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to behaviourally characterize a mouse model of long-term cocaine withdrawal and assess the effect of chronic cocaine administration and long-term cocaine abstinence on the central oxytocinergic system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Fourteen-day escalating-dose cocaine administration (3 × 15-30 mg/kg/day) and 14-day withdrawal increased plasma corticosterone levels and oxytocin receptor (OTR) binding in piriform cortex, lateral septum and amygdala. A specific cocaine withdrawal-induced increase in OTR binding was observed in the medial septum. These biochemical alterations occurred concomitantly with the emergence of memory impairment, contextual psychomotor sensitization and an anhedonic and anxiogenic phenotype during withdrawal. Our study established a clear relationship between cocaine abstinence and emotional impairment in a novel translationally relevant model of cocaine withdrawal and demonstrated for the first time brain region-specific neuroadaptations of the oxytocin system, which may contribute to abstinence-induced negative emotional state. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Specific binding sites for growth hormone in cultured mouse thymic epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, E.; Haour, F.; Gagnerault, M.; Dardenne, M.; Postel-Vinay, M.; Jammes, H.

    1991-01-01

    Growth hormones bound specifically to murine thymic epithelial cells, which represent the major component of thymic micro-environment and can be modulated by pituitary hormones. The Kds found with human growth hormone and bovine growth hormone were 0.14 and 0.27 nM with a Bmax 0.56 and 0.35 fmol/10 6 cells respectively. Competition experiment analysis showed ED 50 of 0.24 nM for hGH, 0.46 nM for rGH, 0.71 nM for bGH, 11.8 nM for hPRL and 11.2 nM for oPRL. No specific binding of ( 125 I)-oPRL was observed under the same conditions. Both hPRL and bGH showed a negative regulatory effect on the number of the hGH binding sites when incubated with the culture for three days. The presence of GH receptors on thymic epithelial cells provides biochemical evidence for the effect of GH on thymic function

  3. Porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and analysis of their peptide-binding specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Harndahl, Mikkel; Rasmussen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In all vertebrate animals, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are controlled by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules. These are highly polymorphic peptide receptors selecting and presenting endogenously derived epitopes to circulating CTLs. The polymorphism of the MHC...... effectively individualizes the immune response of each member of the species. We have recently developed efficient methods to generate recombinant human MHC-I (also known as human leukocyte antigen class I, HLA-I) molecules, accompanying peptide-binding assays and predictors, and HLA tetramers for specific...... CTL staining and manipulation. This has enabled a complete mapping of all HLA-I specificities (“the Human MHC Project”). Here, we demonstrate that these approaches can be applied to other species. We systematically transferred domains of the frequently expressed swine MHC-I molecule, SLA-1*0401, onto...

  4. Enriching peptide libraries for binding affinity and specificity through computationally directed library design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foight, Glenna Wink; Chen, T. Scott; Richman, Daniel; Keating, Amy E.

    2017-01-01

    Peptide reagents with high affinity or specificity for their target protein interaction partner are of utility for many important applications. Optimization of peptide binding by screening large libraries is a proven and powerful approach. Libraries designed to be enriched in peptide sequences that are predicted to have desired affinity or specificity characteristics are more likely to yield success than random mutagenesis. We present a library optimization method in which the choice of amino acids to encode at each peptide position can be guided by available experimental data or structure-based predictions. We discuss how to use analysis of predicted library performance to inform rounds of library design. Finally, we include protocols for more complex library design procedures that consider the chemical diversity of the amino acids at each peptide position and optimize a library score based on a user-specified input model. PMID:28236241

  5. Purification of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins by affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrigan, L A; Kadonaga, J T

    2001-05-01

    Affinity chromatography is a very effective and straightforward means of purifying a protein based on its sequence-specific DNA-binding properties. The affinity chromatography procedure described in this unit uses DNA containing specific recognition sites for the desired protein that has been covalently linked to a solid support. The first basic protocol describes preparation of a DNA affinity resin, including cyanogen bromide (CNBr) activation of the agarose support. An provides a method to couple DNA to commercially available CNBr-activated Sepharose, and a support protocol describes how to purify crude synthetic oligonucleotides by gel electrophoresis prior to preparation of the affinity resin. The second basic protocol outlines the affinity chromatography procedure. A second support protocol describes determination of the appropriate type and quantity of nonspecific competitor DNA that should be used in the procedure and its preparation. Parameters essential to the success of an affinity chromatography experiment are discussed in detail in the Commentary.

  6. Analysis of the sugar-binding specificity of mannose-binding-type Jacalin-related lectins by frontal affinity chromatography--an approach to functional classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Tsuruta, Sachiko; Uchiyama, Noboru; Peumans, Willy J; Van Damme, Els J M; Totani, Kiichiro; Ito, Yukishige; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2008-03-01

    The Jacalin-related lectin (JRL) family comprises galactose-binding-type (gJRLs) and mannose-binding-type (mJRLs) lectins. Although the documented occurrence of gJRLs is confined to the family Moraceae, mJRLs are widespread in the plant kingdom. A detailed comparison of sugar-binding specificity was made by frontal affinity chromatography to corroborate the structure-function relationships of the extended mJRL subfamily. Eight mJRLs covering a broad taxonomic range were used: Artocarpin from Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit, Moraceae), BanLec from Musa acuminata (banana, Musaceae), Calsepa from Calystegia sepium (hedge bindweed, Convolvulaceae), CCA from Castanea crenata (Japanese chestnut, Fagaceae), Conarva from Convolvulus arvensis (bindweed, Convolvulaceae), CRLL from Cycas revoluta (King Sago palm tree, Cycadaceae), Heltuba from Helianthus tuberosus (Jerusalem artichoke, Asteraceae) and MornigaM from Morus nigra (black mulberry, Moraceae). The result using 103 pyridylaminated glycans clearly divided the mJRLs into two major groups, each of which was further divided into two subgroups based on the preference for high-mannose-type N-glycans. This criterion also applied to the binding preference for complex-type N-glycans. Notably, the result of cluster analysis of the amino acid sequences clearly corresponded to the above specificity classification. Thus, marked correlation between the sugar-binding specificity of mJRLs and their phylogeny should shed light on the functional significance of JRLs.

  7. Effect of receptor binding specificity on the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of influenza virus A H1 vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiangjie; Cao, Weiping; Pappas, Claudia; Liu, Feng; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Tumpey, Terrence M.

    2018-01-01

    The biological basis for the poor immunogenicity of unadjuvanted avian influenza A virus vaccines in mammals is not well understood. Here, we mutated the hemagglutinin (HA) of two H1N1 virus vaccines to determine whether virus receptor binding specificity contributes to the low immunogenicity of avian influenza virus vaccines. Mutations were introduced into the HA of an avian influenza virus, A/Duck/New York/15024–21/96 (Dk/96) which switched the binding preference from α2,3- to α2,6-linked sialic acid (SA). A switch in receptor specificity of the human A/South Carolina/1/18 (SC/18) virus generated a mutant virus with α2,3 SA (avian) binding preference. Inactivated vaccines were generated and administered to mice and ferrets intramuscularly. We found that the vaccines with human receptor binding preference induced slightly higher antibody titers and cell-mediated immune responses compared to their isogenic viruses with avian receptor binding specificity. Upon challenge with DK/96 or SC18 virus, differences in lung virus titers between the vaccine groups with different receptor-binding specificities were minimal. Overall, our data suggest that receptor binding specificity contributes only marginally to the immunogenicity of avian influenza vaccines and that other factors may also be involved. PMID:25078114

  8. Molecular and Functional Characterization of ssDNA Aptamers that Specifically Bind Leishmania infantum PABP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Guerra-Pérez

    Full Text Available A poly (A-binding protein from Leishmania infantum (LiPABP has been recently cloned and characterized in our laboratory. Although this protein shows a very high homology with PABPs from other eukaryotic organisms including mammals and other parasites, exist divergences along the sequence that convert them in potential diagnostic markers and/or therapeutics targets. Aptamers are oligonucleotide ligands that are selected in vitro by their affinity and specificity for the target as a consequence of the particular tertiary structure that they are able to acquire depending on their sequence. Development of high-affinity molecules with the ability to recognize specifically Leishmania proteins is essential for the progress of this kind of study.We have selected a ssDNA aptamer population against a recombinant 6xHIS-LiPABP protein (rLiPABP that is able to recognize the target with a low Kd. Cloning, sequencing and in silico analysis of the aptamers obtained from the population yielded three aptamers (ApPABP#3, ApPABP#7 and ApPABP#11 that significantly bound to PABP with higher affinity than the naïve population. These aptamers were analyzed by ELONA and slot blot to establish affinity and specificity for rLiPABP. Results demonstrated that the three aptamers have high affinity and specificity for the target and that they are able to detect an endogenous LiPABP (eLiPABP protein amount corresponding to 2500 L. infantum promastigotes in a significant manner. The functional analysis of the aptamers also revealed that ApPABP#11 disrupts the binding of both Myc-LiPABP and eLiPABP to poly (A in vitro. On the other hand, these aptamers are able to bind and purify LiPABP from complex mixes.Results presented here demonstrate that aptamers represent new reagents for characterization of LiPABP and that they can affect LiPABP activity. At this respect, the use of these aptamers as therapeutic tool affecting the physiological role of PABP has to be analyzed.

  9. The conformational state of the nucleosome entry–exit site modulates TATA box-specific TBP binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieb, Aaron R.; Gansen, Alexander; Böhm, Vera; Langowski, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    The TATA binding protein (TBP) is a critical transcription factor used for nucleating assembly of the RNA polymerase II machinery. TBP binds TATA box elements with high affinity and kinetic stability and in vivo is correlated with high levels of transcription activation. However, since most promoters use less stable TATA-less or TATA-like elements, while also competing with nucleosome occupancy, further mechanistic insight into TBP's DNA binding properties and ability to access chromatin is needed. Using bulk and single-molecule FRET, we find that TBP binds a minimal consensus TATA box as a two-state equilibrium process, showing no evidence for intermediate states. However, upon addition of flanking DNA sequence, we observe non-specific cooperative binding to multiple DNA sites that compete for TATA-box specificity. Thus, we conclude that TBP binding is defined by a branched pathway, wherein TBP initially binds with little sequence specificity and is thermodynamically positioned by its kinetic stability to the TATA box. Furthermore, we observed the real-time access of TBP binding to TATA box DNA located within the DNA entry–exit site of the nucleosome. From these data, we determined salt-dependent changes in the nucleosome conformation regulate TBP's access to the TATA box, where access is highly constrained under physiological conditions, but is alleviated by histone acetylation and TFIIA. PMID:24829456

  10. The conformational state of the nucleosome entry-exit site modulates TATA box-specific TBP binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieb, Aaron R; Gansen, Alexander; Böhm, Vera; Langowski, Jörg

    2014-07-01

    The TATA binding protein (TBP) is a critical transcription factor used for nucleating assembly of the RNA polymerase II machinery. TBP binds TATA box elements with high affinity and kinetic stability and in vivo is correlated with high levels of transcription activation. However, since most promoters use less stable TATA-less or TATA-like elements, while also competing with nucleosome occupancy, further mechanistic insight into TBP's DNA binding properties and ability to access chromatin is needed. Using bulk and single-molecule FRET, we find that TBP binds a minimal consensus TATA box as a two-state equilibrium process, showing no evidence for intermediate states. However, upon addition of flanking DNA sequence, we observe non-specific cooperative binding to multiple DNA sites that compete for TATA-box specificity. Thus, we conclude that TBP binding is defined by a branched pathway, wherein TBP initially binds with little sequence specificity and is thermodynamically positioned by its kinetic stability to the TATA box. Furthermore, we observed the real-time access of TBP binding to TATA box DNA located within the DNA entry-exit site of the nucleosome. From these data, we determined salt-dependent changes in the nucleosome conformation regulate TBP's access to the TATA box, where access is highly constrained under physiological conditions, but is alleviated by histone acetylation and TFIIA. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Stage-specific adhesion of Leishmania promastigotes to sand fly midguts assessed using an improved comparative binding assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Wilson

    2010-09-01

    and metacyclic forms. Further they show that although gut binding may be necessary for parasite establishment, in several vector-parasite pairs the specificity of such in vitro binding alone is insufficient to explain overall vector specificity. Other significant barriers to development must exist in certain refractory Leishmania parasite-sand fly vector combinations. A re-appraisal of the specificity of the Leishmania-sand fly relationship is required.

  12. On the specificity of heparin/heparan sulfate binding to proteins. Anion-binding sites on antithrombin and thrombin are fundamentally different.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip D Mosier

    Full Text Available The antithrombin-heparin/heparan sulfate (H/HS and thrombin-H/HS interactions are recognized as prototypic specific and non-specific glycosaminoglycan (GAG-protein interactions, respectively. The fundamental structural basis for the origin of specificity, or lack thereof, in these interactions remains unclear. The availability of multiple co-crystal structures facilitates a structural analysis that challenges the long-held belief that the GAG binding sites in antithrombin and thrombin are essentially similar with high solvent exposure and shallow surface characteristics.Analyses of solvent accessibility and exposed surface areas, gyrational mobility, symmetry, cavity shape/size, conserved water molecules and crystallographic parameters were performed for 12 X-ray structures, which include 12 thrombin and 16 antithrombin chains. Novel calculations are described for gyrational mobility and prediction of water loci and conservation.The solvent accessibilities and gyrational mobilities of arginines and lysines in the binding sites of the two proteins reveal sharp contrasts. The distribution of positive charges shows considerable asymmetry in antithrombin, but substantial symmetry for thrombin. Cavity analyses suggest the presence of a reasonably sized bifurcated cavity in antithrombin that facilitates a firm 'hand-shake' with H/HS, but with thrombin, a weaker 'high-five'. Tightly bound water molecules were predicted to be localized in the pentasaccharide binding pocket of antithrombin, but absent in thrombin. Together, these differences in the binding sites explain the major H/HS recognition characteristics of the two prototypic proteins, thus affording an explanation of the specificity of binding. This provides a foundation for understanding specificity of interaction at an atomic level, which will greatly aid the design of natural or synthetic H/HS sequences that target proteins in a specific manner.

  13. Improved pan-specific MHC class I peptide-binding predictions using a novel representation of the MHC-binding cleft environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrasco Pro, S.; Zimic, M.; Nielsen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play a key role in cell-mediated immune responses presenting bounded peptides for recognition by the immune system cells. Several in silico methods have been developed to predict the binding affinity of a given peptide to a specific MHC molecule. O...

  14. Absorptive-mediated endocytosis of cationized albumin and a beta-endorphin-cationized albumin chimeric peptide by isolated brain capillaries. Model system of blood-brain barrier transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagai, A.K.; Eisenberg, J.B.; Pardridge, W.M.

    1987-11-05

    Cationized albumin (pI greater than 8), unlike native albumin (pI approximately 4), enters cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rapidly from blood. This suggests that a specific uptake mechanism for cationized albumin may exist at the brain capillary wall, i.e. the blood-brain barrier. Isolated bovine brain capillaries rapidly bound cationized (/sup 3/H)albumin and approximately 70% of the bound radioactivity was resistant to mild acid wash, which is assumed to represent internalized peptide. Binding was saturable and a Scatchard plot gave a maximal binding capacity (Ro) = 5.5 +/- 0.7 micrograms/mgp (79 +/- 10 pmol/mgp), and a half-saturation constant (KD) = 55 +/- 8 micrograms/ml (0.8 +/- 0.1 microM). The binding of cationized (/sup 3/H)albumin (pI = 8.5-9) was inhibited by protamine, protamine sulfate, and polylysine (molecular weight = 70,000) with a Ki of approximately 3 micrograms/ml for all three proteins. The use of cationized albumin in directed delivery of peptides through the blood-brain barrier was examined by coupling (/sup 3/H)beta-endorphin to unlabeled cationized albumin (pI = 8.5-9) using the bifunctional reagent, N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)proprionate. The (/sup 3/H)beta-endorphin-cationized albumin chimeric peptide was rapidly bound and endocytosed by isolated bovine brain capillaries, and this was inhibited by unlabeled cationized albumin but not by unconjugated beta-endorphin or native bovine albumin. Cationized albumin provides a new tool for studying absorptive-mediated endocytosis at the brain capillary and may also provide a vehicle for directed drug delivery through the blood-brain barrier.

  15. Differential binding properties of Gal/GalNAc specific lectins available for characterization of glycoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, A M; Song, S C; Sugii, S; Herp, A

    1997-01-01

    Differentiating the binding properties of applied lectins should facilitate the selection of lectins for characterization of glycoreceptors on the cell surface. Based on the binding specificities studied by inhibition assays of lectin-glycan interactions, over twenty Gal and/or GalNAc specific lectins have been divided into eight groups according to their specificity for structural units (lectin determinants), which are the disaccharide as all or part of the determinants and of GalNAc alpha 1-->Ser (Thr) of the peptide chain. A scheme of codes for lectin determinants is illustrated as follows: (1) F (GalNAc alpha 1-->3GalNAc), Forssman specific disaccharide--Dolichos biflorus (DBL), Helix pomatia (HPL) and Wistaria floribunda (WFL) lectins. (2) A (GalNAc alpha 1-->3 Gal), blood group A specific disaccharide--Codium fragile subspecies tomentosoides (CFT), Soy bean (SBL), Vicia villosa-A4 (VVL-A4), and Wistaria floribunda (WFL) lectins. (3) Tn (GalNAc alpha 1-->Ser (Thr) of the protein core)--Vicia villosa B4 (VVL-B4), Salvia sclarea (SSL), Maclura pomifera (MPL), Bauhinia purpurea alba (BPL) and Artocarpus integrifolia (Jacalin, AIL). (4) T (Gal beta 1-->3GalNAc), the mucin type sugar sequences on the human erythrocyte membrane(T alpha), T antigen or the disaccharides at the terminal nonreducing end of gangliosides (T beta)--Peanut (PNA), Bauhinia purpurea alba (BPL), Maclura pomifera (MPL), Sophora japonica (SJL), Artocarpus lakoocha (Artocarpin) lectins and Abrus precatorius agglutinin (APA).(5) I and II (Gal beta 1-->3(4)GlcNAc)--the disaccharide residue at the nonreducing end of the carbohydrate chains derived from either N- or O-glycosidic linkage--Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA1), Datura stramonium (TAL, Thorn apple), Erythrina cristagalli (ECL, Coral tree), and Geodia cydonium (GCL). (6) B (Gal alpha 1-->3Gal), human blood group B specific disaccharide--Griffonia(Banderiaea) simplicifolia B4 (GSI-B4). (7) E (Gal alpha 1-->4Gal), receptors for pathogenic E

  16. Radical cations in condensed phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symons, M.C.R. (Leicester Univ. (UK). Dept. of Chemistry)

    The subject is covered in sections, entitled: introduction (scope of present Review); preparative procedures; alkane and cycloalkane cations; alkene and cyclic alkene cations; alkyl-halide cations; alcohol and ether cations; carbonyl cations (aldehyde, ketone and ester cations); sulphur-centred cations; selenium-centred cations; nitrogen-centred cations; phosphorus-centred cations; tin- and lead-centred cations; aromatic cations; five membered hetero-aromatic cations; vinyl cations; inorganic cations.

  17. Deposition of chemically reactive and repellent sites on biosensor chips for reduced non-specific binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhiraman, R P; Gubala, V; Le, N C H; Nam, Le Cao Hoai; Volcke, C; Doyle, C; James, B; Daniels, S; Williams, D E

    2010-08-01

    The performances of new polymeric materials with excellent optical properties and good machinability have led the biomedical diagnostics industry to develop cheap disposable biosensor platforms appropriate for point of care applications. Zeonor, a type of cycloolefin polymer (COP), is one such polymer that presents an excellent platform for biosensor chips. These polymer substrates have to be modified to have suitable physico-chemical properties for immobilizing proteins. In this work, we have demonstrated the amine functionalization of COP substrates, by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD), through codeposition of ethylene diamine and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane precursors, for building chemistries on the plastic chip. The elemental composition, adhesion, ageing and reactivity of the plasma polymerized film were examined. The Si-O functionality present in amino silane contributed for a good interfacial adhesion of the coating to COP substrates and also acted as a network building layer for plasma polymerization. Wet chemical modification was then carried out on the amine functionalized chips to create chemically reactive isothiocyanate sites and protein repellent fluorinated sites on the same chip. The density of the reactive and repellent sites was altered by choosing appropriate mixtures of homofunctional phenyldiisothiocyanate (PDITC), pentafluoroisothiocyanate (5FITC) and phenylisothiocyanate (PITC) compounds. By tailoring the density of reactive binding sites and protein repellent sites, the non-specific binding of ssDNA has been decreased to a significant extent. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Specific deficit of colour-colour short-term memory binding in sporadic and familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Mario A; Sala, Sergio Della; Abrahams, Sharon; Logie, Robert H; Méndez, Luis Guillermo; Lopera, Francisco

    2011-06-01

    Short-term memory binding of visual features which are processed across different dimensions (shape-colour) is impaired in sporadic Alzheimer's disease, familial Alzheimer's disease, and in asymptomatic carriers of familial Alzheimer's disease. This study investigated whether Alzheimer's disease also impacts on within-dimension binding processes. The study specifically explored whether visual short-term memory binding of features of the same type (colour-colour) is sensitive to Alzheimer's disease. We used a neuropsychological battery and a short-term memory binding task to assess patients with sporadic Alzheimer's disease (Experiment 1), familial Alzheimer's disease (Experiment 2) due to the mutation E280A of the Presenilin-1 gene and asymptomatic carriers of the mutation. The binding task assessed change detection within arrays of unicoloured objects (Colour Only) or bicoloured objects the colours of which had to be remembered separately (Unbound Colours) or together (Bound Colours). Performance on the Bound Colours condition (1) explained the largest proportion of variance between patients (sporadic and familial Alzheimer's disease), (2) combined more sensitivity and specificity for the disease than other more traditional neuropsychological tasks, (3) identified asymptomatic carriers of the mutation even when traditional neuropsychological measures and other measures of short-term memory did not and, (4) contrary to shape-colour binding, correlated with measures of hippocampal functions. Colour-colour binding and shape-colour binding both appear to be sensitive to AD even though they seem to rely on different brain mechanisms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Specific binding of (/sup 3/H)substance P to the rat submaxillary gland. The effects of ions and guanine nucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahouth, S.W.; Musacchio, J.M.

    1985-08-01

    (/sup 3/H)Substance P ((/sup 3/H)SP), in a high ionic strength incubation medium, binds to a single class of saturable, noninteracting binding sites on rat submaxillary gland membranes with a KD = 2.8 +/- 0.34 nM and maximum binding (Bmax) = 220 +/- 31 fmol/mg of protein. The rank order of potency of various tachykinins, SP fragments and analogs to compete against (/sup 3/H)SP is correlated with their potency to induce salivation. These findings indicate that, under the conditions described, (/sup 3/H)SP binds to a physiologically relevant tachykinin receptor of the SP-P subtype. (/sup 3/H)SP binding increases by 35% in the presence of optimal concentrations of Mn++ and Mg++ whereas guanine nucleotides reduce (/sup 3/H)SP binding. The effect produced by either divalent cations or guanine nucleotides is due to increasing or decreasing the Bmax, respectively, without changing the affinity of (/sup 3/H)SP. Guanine nucleotides reduce the Bmax of (/sup 3/H)SP to the same level in the presence or absence of divalent cations, indicating that divalent cations increase the population of SP receptors that are sensitive to guanine nucleotides. In low ionic strength media, and when the nonspecific binding is defined by 1 microM SP, (/sup 3/H)SP binds to two sites: a high affinity site with a KD of 0.14 nM and a Bmax of 370 fmol/mg of protein and a low affinity high capacity site. When the nonspecific binding is defined by 1 microM physalaemin, the high affinity is the only detectable site. However, in low ionic strength media, physalaemin has about one-fiftieth the potency of SP in competing with (/sup 3/H)SP.

  20. Changes in avidity and specificity of IgG during electro-oxidation. Relevance of binding of antibodies to beta2-GPI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozic, B; Cucnik, S; Kveder, T; Rozman, B

    2006-11-01

    The immune response may be changed due to altered proteins or modifications of immunoglobulins, including oxidative processes. The susceptibility to oxidative modifications depends greatly on amino-acid moiety composition due to chemical characteristics (instability) of their side-chains. Initial steps of oxidation may change the specificity and avidity of immunoglobulins due to chemical alteration of the hypervariable region. The oxidation of antibodies increases the hydrophilic nature of the paratopes and makes them more susceptible for the binding to cationic surfaces even without the strong surface-to-surface fitting. The electro-oxidation of IgG significantly changes the immunoreactivity and specificity of IgG fractions, regardless of the initial immunoreactivity to a specific autoantigen also in healthy persons. Data are presented on changes in the immunoreactivity as well as the avidity of antibodies against beta2-glycoprotein I after being exposed to direct current. ELISA measurements showed increased reactivity of anti-beta2-glycoprotein I antibodies at the beginning and various, fluctuating results after prolonged exposure to electro-oxidation. Inter-individual differences in chemical stability of immunoglobulins and patient's antioxidative status may influence the range of their alterations and their impact on health/disease balance.

  1. Developmental-form-specific DNA-binding proteins in Chlamydia spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagar, E A; Stephens, R S

    1988-01-01

    We identified DNA-binding proteins specific to the elementary body (EB) developmental form of Chlamydia spp. Chlamydial proteins from whole lysates were separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose, and probed with nick-translated chlamydial DNA. By this method, C. trachomatis serovar L2 EBs had three unique protein bands of 58,000, 25,700, and 17,000 molecular weight not seen in the reticulate bodies. The 17,000-molecular-weight protein and the 25,700-molecular-weight protein were identified in an acid-soluble protein fraction and were resistant to high-salt elution, similar to other procaryotic nucleoproteins. The 17,000-molecular-weight protein was also detected in preparations with isolated chromosomes from EBs. Preliminary characterization indicated that the protein-DNA interaction was principally charge related. Images PMID:3384472

  2. Uncovering the Peptide-Binding Specificities of HLA-C: A General Strategy To Determine the Specificity of Any MHC Class I Molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael; Harndahl, Mikkel; Stryhn, Anette

    2014-01-01

    MHC class I molecules (HLA-I in humans) present peptides derived from endogenous proteins to CTLs. Whereas the peptide-binding specificities of HLA-A and -B molecules have been studied extensively, little is known about HLA-C specificities. Combining a positional scanning combinatorial peptide...... library approach with a peptide-HLA-I dissociation assay, in this study we present a general strategy to determine the peptide-binding specificity of any MHC class I molecule. We applied this novel strategy to 17 of the most common HLA-C molecules, and for 16 of these we successfully generated matrices...... representing their peptide-binding motifs. The motifs prominently shared a conserved C-terminal primary anchor with hydrophobic amino acid residues, as well as one or more diverse primary and auxiliary anchors at P1, P2, P3, and/or P7. Matrices were used to generate a large panel of HLA-C-specific peptide...

  3. Binding proteins enhance specific uptake rate by increasing the substrate-transporter encounter rate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosdriesz, E.; Magnúsdóttir, S.; Bruggeman, F.J.; Teusink, B.; Molenaar, D.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms rely on binding-protein assisted, active transport systems to scavenge for scarce nutrients. Several advantages of using binding proteins in such uptake systems have been proposed. However, a systematic, rigorous and quantitative analysis of the function of binding proteins is

  4. Theoretical study of binding of hydrated Zn(II) and Mg(II) cations to 5'-guanosine monophosphate. Toward polarizable molecular mechanics for DNA and RNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gresh, N.; Šponer, Judit E.; Špačková, Naďa; Leszczynski, J.; Šponer, Jiří

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 33 (2003), s. 8669-8681 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A016 Grant - others:National Science Foundation(US) CREST 9805465; National Institutes of Health(US) RCMI G1 2RR13459-21; Wellcome Trust(GB) GR067507MF Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : polarizable molecular mechanics * quantum-chemical computations * hydrated cations Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.679, year: 2003

  5. Acetylcholine-Binding Protein Engineered to Mimic the α4-α4 Binding Pocket in α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Reveals Interface Specific Interactions Important for Binding and Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Ahring, Philip K; Olsen, Jeppe A

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are attractive drug targets for psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and smoking cessation aids. Recently, a third agonist binding site between two α4 subunits in the (α4)(3)(β2)(2) receptor subpopulation was discovered. In particular, three...... specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor interfaces....... by introduction of three point mutations, R104H, L112Q, and M114T, into the binding pocket of Lymnaea stagnalis acetylcholine-binding protein (Ls-AChBP). Cocrystallization with two agonists possessing distinct pharmacologic profiles, NS3920 [1-(6-bromopyridin-3-yl)-1,4-diazepane] and NS3573 [1-(5-ethoxypyridin-3...

  6. /sup 3/H-neurokinin A labels a specific tachykinin-binding site in the rat duodenal smooth muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, L.B.; Beaujouan, J.C.; Torrens, Y.; Saffroy, M.; Glowinski, J.; Lavielle, S.; Chassaing, G.; Marquet, A.; D' Orleans-Juste, P.; Dion, S.

    1987-12-01

    /sup 3/H-Neurokinin A (/sup 3/H-NKA) with high specific activity (75 Ci/mmol) was synthesized to study NKA (NK-2)-binding sites on membrane preparations of various tissues in the rat, including brain, spinal cord, duodenum, vas deferens, and ileum. The binding capacity of /sup 3/H-NKA (0.9 nM) was very low in membrane preparations of different central nervous system regions and the ileum smooth muscle (0.2-2 fmol/mg of protein). In contrast, relatively high specific binding was found in membrane suspensions of the rat duodenal smooth muscle (18 fmol/mg of protein) and the vas deferens (8 fmol/mg of protein). /sup 3/H-NKA-binding sites were further characterized on the rat duodenal smooth muscle. The specific binding of /sup 3/H-NKA was shown to be temperature dependent, saturable, reversible, and increased in parallel with the protein concentration. Scatchard analyses and Hill plots of equilibrium binding studies in the concentration range of 0.40-30 nM revealed that /sup 3/H-NKA bound to a single class of noninteracting binding sites (Bmax = 270 fmol/mg of protein, KD = 13.3 nM). Displacement of /sup 3/H-NKA with different tachykinin-related peptides gave the following rank order of potencies: NKA greater than NKA (4-10) greater than kassinin greater than eledoisin greater than NKB much greater than substance P greater than physalaemin, which suggests that the binding site labeled by /sup 3/H-NKA is different from substance P (NK-1)-and NKB (NK-3)-binding sites. The biological activities of tachykinins and related peptides were tested by measuring their contractile effects on the rat duodenum and rabbit pulmonary artery, two tissues known to be sensitive for NKA. Ki values were correlated with the EC50 obtained in biological assays.

  7. Structure-function relationships of Na+, K+, ATP, or Mg2+ binding and energy transduction in Na,K-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Peter L.; Pedersen, Per Amstrup

    2000-01-01

    Na,K-ATPase; Mutagenesis; Na+ binding; K+ binding; Tl+ binding; Mg2+ binding; ATP binding; Cation binding site; Energy transduction......Na,K-ATPase; Mutagenesis; Na+ binding; K+ binding; Tl+ binding; Mg2+ binding; ATP binding; Cation binding site; Energy transduction...

  8. DNA-binding specificity and molecular functions of NAC transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Addie Nina; Ernst, Heidi Asschenfeldt; Lo Leggio, Leila

    2005-01-01

    . The ability of NAC proteins to dimerize and to bind DNAwas analysed by structure-based mutagenesis. This identified two salt bridge-forming residues essential for NAC protein dimerization. Alteration of basic residues in a loop region containing several highly conserved residues abolished DNA binding. Thus....... Furthermore, NAC protein binding to the CaMV 35S promoter was shown to depend on sequences similar to the consensus of the selected oligonucleotides. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that NAC proteins bind DNA as homo- or heterodimers and that dimerization is necessary for stable DNA binding......The family of NAC (NAM/ATAF1,2/CUC2) transcription factors has been implicated in a wide range of plant processes, but knowledge on the DNA-binding properties of the family is limited. Using a reiterative selection procedure on random oligonucleotides, we have identified consensus binding sites...

  9. Specific equilibrium behavior of hydrogen isotopes adsorbed onto synthetic zeolite A-type governed by lithium cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takashima, Shoji [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, Moto-oka 744, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Kotoh, Kenji, E-mail: kotoh@nucl.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, Moto-oka 744, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Moto-oka 744, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Isotherms for H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} adsorbed onto SZ-LiA at 77.4 K are shown. • The adsorption isotherms exhibit specific deviation in the range lower than 10 Pa. • SZ-LiA indicates the power of several 100-times at 0.1 Pa, compared with SZ-NaA. • Experimental isotherms are described empirically by a dual-site Langmuir equation. • The isotope effect on adsorption isotherms appears in the Langmuir constants. -- Abstract: Since synthetic zeolites (SZs) are powerfully adsorptive for hydrogen isotopes at cryogenic temperatures such as liquefied nitrogen, adsorption processes using these have been considered applicable to such as recovery of tritium from the lithium blanket of DT fusion reactor system. Onto these zeolites the adsorptions isotherms for hydrogen isotopes onto SZ-NaA, SZ-CaA and SZ-NaX at 77.4 K were already clarified experimentally and analytically. These isotherms exhibit similar profiles of Langmuir type. In this work, adsorption isotherms were examined for H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} on SZ-LiA at 77.4 K. SZ-LiA was made from SZ-NaA by exchanging its sodium ions for lithium ones, provided by TOSOH Corp. The experimental results demonstrate the specific equilibrium behavior of hydrogen isotopes adsorbed on SZ-LiA, deviating from isothermal profiles on SZ-CaA and SZ-NaX. SZ-LiA show the isothermal profiles of adsorption for H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} similar to on the conventional zeolites in the range from around 1 kPa to the atmospheric pressure, but exhibit a plateau around 1 mol/kg between 0.1 Pa and 100 Pa, while other zeolites show linearly profiling isotherms. This deviation indicates the adsorptive power of SZ-LiA remarkably greater than that of the others.

  10. Specific equilibrium behavior of hydrogen isotopes adsorbed onto synthetic zeolite A-type governed by lithium cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashima, Shoji; Kotoh, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Isotherms for H 2 and D 2 adsorbed onto SZ-LiA at 77.4 K are shown. • The adsorption isotherms exhibit specific deviation in the range lower than 10 Pa. • SZ-LiA indicates the power of several 100-times at 0.1 Pa, compared with SZ-NaA. • Experimental isotherms are described empirically by a dual-site Langmuir equation. • The isotope effect on adsorption isotherms appears in the Langmuir constants. -- Abstract: Since synthetic zeolites (SZs) are powerfully adsorptive for hydrogen isotopes at cryogenic temperatures such as liquefied nitrogen, adsorption processes using these have been considered applicable to such as recovery of tritium from the lithium blanket of DT fusion reactor system. Onto these zeolites the adsorptions isotherms for hydrogen isotopes onto SZ-NaA, SZ-CaA and SZ-NaX at 77.4 K were already clarified experimentally and analytically. These isotherms exhibit similar profiles of Langmuir type. In this work, adsorption isotherms were examined for H 2 and D 2 on SZ-LiA at 77.4 K. SZ-LiA was made from SZ-NaA by exchanging its sodium ions for lithium ones, provided by TOSOH Corp. The experimental results demonstrate the specific equilibrium behavior of hydrogen isotopes adsorbed on SZ-LiA, deviating from isothermal profiles on SZ-CaA and SZ-NaX. SZ-LiA show the isothermal profiles of adsorption for H 2 and D 2 similar to on the conventional zeolites in the range from around 1 kPa to the atmospheric pressure, but exhibit a plateau around 1 mol/kg between 0.1 Pa and 100 Pa, while other zeolites show linearly profiling isotherms. This deviation indicates the adsorptive power of SZ-LiA remarkably greater than that of the others

  11. Specific interactions and binding energies between thermolysin and potent inhibitors: molecular simulations based on ab initio molecular orbital method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Tatsuya; Fujita, Seiya; Ohyama, Tatsuya; Dedachi, Kenichi; Khan, Mahmud Tareq Hassan; Sylte, Ingebrigt; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2012-03-01

    Biochemical functions of the metalloprotease thermolysin (TLN) are controlled by various inhibitors. In a recent study we identified 12 compounds as TLN inhibitors by virtual screening and in vitro competitive binding assays. However, the specific interactions between TLN and these inhibitors have not been clarified. We here investigate stable structures of the solvated TLN-inhibitor complexes by classical molecular mechanics simulations and elucidate the specific interactions between TLN and these inhibitors at an electronic level by using ab initio fragment molecular orbital (FMO) calculations. The calculated binding energies between TLN and the inhibitors are qualitatively consistent with the experimental results, and the FMO results elucidate important amino acid residues of TLN for inhibitor binding. Based on the calculated results, we propose a novel potent inhibitor having a large binding affinity to TLN. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Exploring the specificities of glycan-binding proteins using glycan array data and the GlycoSearch software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletter, Doron; Curnutte, Bryan; Maupin, Kevin A; Bern, Marshall; Haab, Brian B

    2015-01-01

    The glycan array is a powerful tool for investigating the specificities of glycan-binding proteins. By incubating a glycan-binding protein on a glycan array, the relative binding to hundreds of different oligosaccharides can be quantified in parallel. Based on these data, much information can be obtained about the preference of a glycan-binding protein for specific subcomponents of oligosaccharides or motifs. In many cases, the analysis and interpretation of glycan array data can be time consuming and imprecise if done manually. Recently we developed software, called GlycoSearch, to facilitate the analysis and interpretation of glycan array data based on the previously developed methods called Motif Segregation and Outlier Motif Analysis. Here we describe the principles behind the software, the use of the software, and an example application. The automated, objective, and precise analysis of glycan array data should enhance the value of the data for a broad range of research applications.

  13. Blood coagulation factor XIa binds specifically to a site on activated human platelets distinct from that for factor XI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, D.; Seaman, F.S.; Koshy, A.; Knight, L.C.; Walsh, P.N.

    1984-01-01

    Binding of 125 I-Factor XIa to platelets required the presence of high molecular weight kininogen, was enhanced when platelets were stimulated with thrombin, and reached a plateau after 4-6 min of incubation at 37 degrees C. Factor XIa binding was specific: 50- to 100-fold molar excesses of unlabeled Factor XIa prevented binding, whereas Factor XI, prekallikrein, Factor XIIa, and prothrombin did not. When washed erythrocytes, added at concentrations calculated to provide an equivalent surface area to platelets, were incubated with Factor XIa, only a low level of nonspecific, nonsaturable binding was detected. Factor XIa binding to platelets was partially reversible and was saturable at concentrations of added Factor XIa of 0.2-0.4 microgram/ml (1.25-2.5 microM). The number of Factor XIa binding sites on activated platelets was estimated to be 225 per platelet (range, 110-450). We conclude that specific, high affinity, saturable binding sites for Factor XIa are present on activated platelets, are distinct from those previously demonstrated for Factor XI, and require the presence of high molecular weight kininogen

  14. Specific binding of the glycosaminoglycan /sup 3/H-heparin to bull, monkey, and rabbit spermatozoa in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handrow, R.R.; Boehm, S.K.; Lenz, R.W.; Robinson, J.A.; Ax, R.L.

    In Vitro binding and some binding parameters of the glycosaminoglycan heparin to viable epididymal or ejaculated bull spermatozoa, ejaculated rabbit spermatozoa, and frozen-thawed rhesus monkey spermatozoa were investigated. Nonspecific binding was affected only by the concentration of /sup 3/H-heparin, whereas specific binding was saturable, reversible, and dependent on the pH, temperature, and calcium concentration of the incubation medium. Magnesium concentration dependence was observed in the presence of calcium but could not be detected in the absence of calcium. Bound /sup 3/H-heparin was displaced by several orders of magnitude greater concentrations of chondroitin sulfate. Scatchard plot analysis suggested multiple binding affinities for /sup 3/H-heparin to spermatozoa. /sup 3/H-heparin was shown to bind to sperm heads and flagella. Fluorescein-labeled heparin bound to acrosomal, postacrosomal, and flagellar membranes. It was concluded that the specific binding of heparin involved a proteinaceous component on, or intercalated with, spermatozoal membranes. Thus, glycosaminoglycans present in the female reproductive tract may contribute to sperm capacitation and enhance the likelihood of successful fertilization in mammals.

  15. UPF201 archaeal specific family members reveal structural similarity to RNA-binding proteins but low likelihood for RNA-binding function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamurthy N Rao

    Full Text Available We have determined X-ray crystal structures of four members of an archaeal specific family of proteins of unknown function (UPF0201; Pfam classification: DUF54 to advance our understanding of the genetic repertoire of archaea. Despite low pairwise amino acid sequence identities (10-40% and the absence of conserved sequence motifs, the three-dimensional structures of these proteins are remarkably similar to one another. Their common polypeptide chain fold, encompassing a five-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet and five alpha-helices, proved to be quite unexpectedly similar to that of the RRM-type RNA-binding domain of the ribosomal L5 protein, which is responsible for binding the 5S- rRNA. Structure-based sequence alignments enabled construction of a phylogenetic tree relating UPF0201 family members to L5 ribosomal proteins and other structurally similar RNA binding proteins, thereby expanding our understanding of the evolutionary purview of the RRM superfamily. Analyses of the surfaces of these newly determined UPF0201 structures suggest that they probably do not function as RNA binding proteins, and that this domain specific family of proteins has acquired a novel function in archaebacteria, which awaits experimental elucidation.

  16. Nitric Oxide Binds to and Modulates the Activity of a Pollen Specific Arabidopsis Diacylglycerol Kinase

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2014-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule in plants. In the pollen of Arabidopsis thaliana, NO causes re-orientation of the growing tube and this response is mediated by 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). However, in plants, NO-sensors have remained somewhat elusive. Here, the findings of an NO-binding candidate, Arabidopsis thaliana DIACYLGLYCEROL KINASE 4 (ATDGK4; AT5G57690) is presented. In addition to the annotated diacylglycerol kinase domain, this molecule also harbors a predicted heme-NO/oxygen (H-NOX) binding site and a guanylyl cyclase (GC) catalytic domain which have been identified based on the alignment of functionally conserved amino acid residues across species. A 3D model of the molecule was constructed, and from which the locations of the kinase catalytic center, the ATP-binding site, the GC and H-NOX domains were estimated. Docking of ATP to the kinase catalytic center was also modeled. The recombinant ATDGK4 demonstrated kinase activity in vitro, catalyzing the ATP-dependent conversion of sn-1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) to phosphatidic acid (PA). This activity was inhibited by the mammalian DAG kinase inhibitor R59949 and importantly also by the NO donors diethylamine NONOate (DEA NONOate) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Recombinant ATDGK4 also has GC activity in vitro, catalyzing the conversion of guanosine-5\\'-triphosphate (GTP) to cGMP. The catalytic domains of ATDGK4 kinase and GC may be independently regulated since the kinase but not the GC, was inhibited by NO while Ca2+ only stimulates the GC. It is likely that the DAG kinase product, PA, causes the release of Ca2+ from the intracellular stores and Ca2+ in turn activates the GC domain of ATDGK4 through a feedback mechanism. Analysis of publicly available microarray data has revealed that ATDGK4 is highly expressed in the pollen. Here, the pollen tubes of mis-expressing atdgk4 recorded slower growth rates than the wild-type (Col-0) and importantly, they showed altered

  17. AcrB drug-binding pocket substitution confers clinically relevant resistance and altered substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Jessica M A; Bavro, Vassiliy N; Ricci, Vito; Modi, Niraj; Cacciotto, Pierpaolo; Kleinekathӧfer, Ulrich; Ruggerone, Paolo; Vargiu, Attilio V; Baylay, Alison J; Smith, Helen E; Brandon, Yvonne; Galloway, David; Piddock, Laura J V

    2015-03-17

    The incidence of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections is increasing globally and the need to understand the underlying mechanisms is paramount to discover new therapeutics. The efflux pumps of Gram-negative bacteria have a broad substrate range and transport antibiotics out of the bacterium, conferring intrinsic multidrug resistance (MDR). The genomes of pre- and posttherapy MDR clinical isolates of Salmonella Typhimurium from a patient that failed antibacterial therapy and died were sequenced. In the posttherapy isolate we identified a novel G288D substitution in AcrB, the resistance-nodulation division transporter in the AcrAB-TolC tripartite MDR efflux pump system. Computational structural analysis suggested that G288D in AcrB heavily affects the structure, dynamics, and hydration properties of the distal binding pocket altering specificity for antibacterial drugs. Consistent with this hypothesis, recreation of the mutation in standard Escherichia coli and Salmonella strains showed that G288D AcrB altered substrate specificity, conferring decreased susceptibility to the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin by increased efflux. At the same time, the substitution increased susceptibility to other drugs by decreased efflux. Information about drug transport is vital for the discovery of new antibacterials; the finding that one amino acid change can cause resistance to some drugs, while conferring increased susceptibility to others, could provide a basis for new drug development and treatment strategies.

  18. Experimental and theoretical studies on the DNA-binding of cationic yttrium(III) complex containing 2,2‧-bipyridine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam; Akbari, Alireza; Mirkazehi-Rigi, Sohaila

    2015-03-01

    The interaction of DNA with [Y(bpy)(OH2)6]+3, where bpy is 2,2‧-bipyridine has been studied at physiological pH in Tris-HCl buffer. Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy, agarose gel electrophoresis as well as EB quenching experiments are used to study DNA binding of the complex. The results reveal that DNA have the strong ability to bind with Y(III) complex. The binding constant, Kb and the Stern-Volmer quenching constant, KSV are determined. For characterization of the binding mode between the Y(III) complex and DNA various procedures such as: iodide quenching assay, salt effect and thermodynamical investigation are used. The results suggest that minor groove binding should be the interaction mode of complex to DNA. A gel electrophoresis assay demonstrates the ability of the complex to cleave the DNA via oxidative pathway. Electronic structure of [Y(bpy)(OH2)6]+3 was also carried out applying the density functional theory (DFT) method and applied to explain some obtained experimental observations.

  19. Role of Chitin-Binding Proteins in the Specific Attachment of the Marine Bacterium Vibrio harveyi to Chitin

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, Michael T.; Kirchman, David L.

    1993-01-01

    We examined the mechanism of attachment of the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi to chitin. Wheat germ agglutinin and chitinase bind to chitin and competitively inhibited the attachment of V. harveyi to chitin, but not to cellulose. Bovine serum albumin and cellulase do not bind to chitin and had no effect on bacterial attachment to chitin. These data suggest that this bacterium recognizes specific attachment sites on the chitin particle. The level of attachment of a chitinase-overproducing mut...

  20. Simultaneous localization of an hepatic binding protein specific for galactose and of galactose-containing receptors on rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horisberger, M; VonLanthen, M

    1978-11-01

    The hepatic binding protein, specific for galactose-terminated glycoproteins (asialoglycoproteins) and the receptors for the Ricinus communis lectin, specific for galactose residues (RCA1), were simultaneously localized on isolated rat hepatocytes by the gold method. The marker for the binding protein was prepared from gold granules (5 nm in diam.) labeled with ceruloplasmin and desialylated. The marker specific for galactose-containing receptors consisted of granules (17 nm in diameter) labeled with RCA1. It was established that both markers did not interact. Hepatocytes (fresh or briefly fixed with glutaraldehyde) were successively incubated with the asialoceruloplasmin and the RCA1 marker. Examination of thin sections by electron microscopy indicated that the binding protein and the RCA1 receptors were often in the proximity of each other on the plasmamembrane. Using the same technique, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) receptors were generally found on area of the plasmamembrane poorly marked by the RCA1 gold marker. The binding of asialoceruloplasmin gold markers was studied as a function of the size of the granules. It became insignificant when the size was above 17 nm. Previous results have shown that the binding of RCA1 is low when the marker reaches 50 nm in size while WGA markers up to 75 nm are well bound by hepatocytes. It is therefore hypothesized that the binding protein and RCA1 receptors are located between glycoprotein brushes of increasing spacing while part or all of the WGA receptors are located at the periphery of the brushes.

  1. Comprehensive identification and annotation of cell type-specific and ubiquitous CTCF-binding sites in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebing Chen

    Full Text Available Chromatin insulators are DNA elements that regulate the level of gene expression either by preventing gene silencing through the maintenance of heterochromatin boundaries or by preventing gene activation by blocking interactions between enhancers and promoters. CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF, a ubiquitously expressed 11-zinc-finger DNA-binding protein, is the only protein implicated in the establishment of insulators in vertebrates. While CTCF has been implicated in diverse regulatory functions, CTCF has only been studied in a limited number of cell types across human genome. Thus, it is not clear whether the identified cell type-specific differences in CTCF-binding sites are functionally significant. Here, we identify and characterize cell type-specific and ubiquitous CTCF-binding sites in the human genome across 38 cell types designated by the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE consortium. These cell type-specific and ubiquitous CTCF-binding sites show uniquely versatile transcriptional functions and characteristic chromatin features. In addition, we confirm the insulator barrier function of CTCF-binding and explore the novel function of CTCF in DNA replication. These results represent a critical step toward the comprehensive and systematic understanding of CTCF-dependent insulators and their versatile roles in the human genome.

  2. Identification and Characterization of Single-Chain Antibodies that Specifically Bind GI Noroviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M Hurwitz

    Full Text Available Norovirus infections commonly lead to outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis and spread quickly, resulting in many health and economic challenges prior to diagnosis. Rapid and reliable diagnostic tests are therefore essential to identify infections and to guide the appropriate clinical responses at the point-of-care. Existing tools, including RT-PCR and enzyme immunoassays, pose several limitations based on the significant time, equipment and expertise required to elicit results. Immunochromatographic assays available for use at the point-of-care have poor sensitivity and specificity, especially for genogroup I noroviruses, thus requiring confirmation of results with more sensitive testing methods. Therefore, there is a clear need for novel reagents to help achieve quick and reliable results. In this study, we have identified two novel single-chain antibodies (scFvs-named NJT-R3-A2 and NJT-R3-A3-that effectively detect GI.1 and GI.7 virus-like particles (VLPs through selection of a phage display library against the P-domain of the GI.1 major capsid protein. The limits of detection by each scFv for GI.1 and GI.7 are 0.1 and 0.2 ng, and 6.25 and 25 ng, respectively. They detect VLPs with strong specificity in multiple diagnostic formats, including ELISAs and membrane-based dot blots, and in the context of norovirus-negative stool suspensions. The scFvs also detect native virions effectively in norovirus-positive clinical stool samples. Purified scFvs bind to GI.1 and GI.7 VLPs with equilibrium constant (KD values of 27 nM and 49 nM, respectively. Overall, the phage-based scFv reagents identified and characterized here show utility for detecting GI.1 and GI.7 noroviruses in multiple diagnostic assay formats with strong specificity and sensitivity, indicating promise for integration into existing point-of-care tests to improve future diagnostics.

  3. Positive cooperativity of the specific binding between Hg2+ ion and T:T mismatched base pairs in duplex DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torigoe, Hidetaka; Miyakawa, Yukako; Ono, Akira; Kozasa, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hg 2+ specifically bound with the T:T mismatched base pair at 1:1 molar ratio. ► The binding constant between Hg 2+ and the T:T mismatched base pair was 10 6 M −1 . ► The binding constant was larger than those for nonspecific metal–DNA interactions. ► The binding constant for the second Hg 2+ was larger than that for the first Hg 2+ . ► The positive cooperative binding was observed between Hg 2+ and multiple T:T. - Abstract: Metal-mediated base pairs by the interaction between metal ions and artificial bases in oligonucleotides have been developed for their potential applications in nanotechnology. We recently found that a natural T:T mismatched base pair bound with Hg 2+ ion to form a novel T–Hg–T base pair. Here, we examined the thermodynamic properties of the binding between Hg 2+ and each of the single and double T:T mismatched base pair duplex DNAs by isothermal titration calorimetry. Hg 2+ specifically bound with the T:T mismatched base pair at 1:1 molar ratio with 10 6 M −1 binding constant, which was significantly larger than those for nonspecific metal ion–DNA interactions. In the Hg 2+ –double T:T mismatched base pair interaction, the affinity for the second Hg 2+ binding was significantly larger than that for the first Hg 2+ binding. The positively cooperative binding may be favorable to align multiple Hg 2+ in duplex DNA for the application of the metal-mediated base pairs in nanotechnology.

  4. Removal of cations using ion-binding terpolymer involving 2-amino-6-nitro-benzothiazole and thiosemicarbazide with formaldehyde by batch equilibrium technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamed, Mohamed A Riswan; Jeyakumar, Duraisamy; Burkanudeen, Abdul R

    2013-03-15

    2-Amino-6-nitro-benzothiazole and thiosemicarbazide with formaldehyde (BTF) terpolymer was synthesized by the condensation polymerization technique. The elemental analysis and physico-chemical parameters of the terpolymer were measured. This chelation terpolymer was characterized by infrared, electronic and nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H &(13)C NMR) spectral studies. The molecular weight of the terpolymer was determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Surface analysis of the terpolymer was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The thermal stability of the terpolymer was analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The cation-exchange property of the terpolymer was determined by batch equilibrium method with the effect of pH, contact time and electrolytes. The reusability of the resin was also studied to estimate the effectiveness of the terpolymer resin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Sequence-specific DNA binding by glucocorticoid receptor "zinc finger peptides".

    OpenAIRE

    Archer, T K; Hager, G L; Omichinski, J G

    1990-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors can activate or repress transcription from responsive loci by binding to DNA. We have examined the mechanism of DNA binding by individually synthesizing the putative "zinc finger peptides" from the rat glucocorticoid receptor. Atomic absorption studies show that the peptides will bind zinc on an equimolar basis, and circular dichroism experiments demonstrate a significant alteration in secondary structure in the presence of zinc. The results from a series of experime...

  6. Specific membrane binding of factor VIII is mediated by O-phospho-L-serine, a moiety of phosphatidylserine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, G E; Drinkwater, D

    1993-09-21

    Phosphatidylserine, a negatively charged lipid, is exposed on the platelet membrane following cell stimulation, correlating with the expression of factor VIII receptors. We have explored the importance of the negative electrostatic potential of phosphatidylserine vs chemical moieties of phosphatidylserine for specific membrane binding of factor VIII. Fluorescein-labeled factor VIII bound to membranes containing 15% phosphatidic acid, a negatively charged phospholipid, with low affinity compared to phosphatidylserine-containing membranes. Binding was not specific as it was inhibited by other proteins in plasma. Factor VIII bound to membranes containing 10% phosphatidylserine in spite of a varying net charge provided by 0-15% stearylamine, a positively charged lipid. The soluble phosphatidylserine moiety, O-phospho-L-serine, inhibited factor VIII binding to phosphatidylserine-containing membranes with a Ki of 20 mM, but the stereoisomer, O-phospho-D-serine, was 5-fold less effective. Furthermore, binding of factor VIII to membranes containing synthetic phosphatidyl-D-serine was 5-fold less than binding to membranes containing phosphatidyl-L-serine. Membranes containing synthetic phosphatidyl-L-homoserine, differing from phosphatidylserine by a single methylene, supported high-affinity binding, but it was not specific as factor VIII was displaced by other plasma proteins. O-Phospho-L-serine also inhibited the binding of factor VIII to platelet-derived microparticles with a Ki of 20 mM, and the stereoisomer was 4-fold less effective. These results indicate that membrane binding of factor VIII is mediated by a stereoselective recognition O-phospho-L-serine of phosphatidylserine and that negative electrostatic potential is of lesser importance.

  7. Specific binding of a dihydropyrimidinone derivative with DNA: Spectroscopic, calorimetric and modeling investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Gongke, E-mail: wanggongke@126.com [School of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, Ministry of Education, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); Yan Changling; Wang Dongchao; Li Dan [School of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, Ministry of Education, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); Lu Yan, E-mail: yanlu2001@sohu.com [School of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, Ministry of Education, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China)

    2012-07-15

    One of the dihydropyrimidinone derivative 5-(ethoxycarbonyl)-6-methyl-4-(4-methoxyphenyl) -3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-one (EMMD) was synthesized, and its binding properties with calf-thymus DNA (ctDNA) were investigated using spectroscopic, viscometric, isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) and molecular modeling techniques. Fluorescence spectra suggested that the fluorescence enhancement of the binding interaction of EMMD to ctDNA was a static process with ground state complex formation. The binding constant determined with spectroscopic titration and ITC was found to be in the same order of 10{sup 4} M{sup -1}. According to the results of the viscosity analysis, fluorescence competitive binding experiment, fluorescence quenching studies, absorption spectral and ITC investigations, it can be concluded that EMMD is intercalative binding to ctDNA. Furthermore, the results of molecular modeling confirmed those obtained from spectroscopic, viscosimetric and ITC investigations. Additionally, ITC studies also indicated that the binding interaction is predominantly enthalpy driven. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Medically important dihydropyrimidinones derivative EMMD is synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EMMD is intercalative binding into ctDNA helix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen bonding may play an essential role in the binding of EMCD with ctDNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This binding interaction is predominantly enthalpy driven.

  8. Design of sequence-specific DNA binding ligands that use a two-stranded peptide motif for DNA sequence recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, V A; Grokhovsky, S L; Surovaya, A N; Leinsoo, T A; Sidorova NYu; Zasedatelev, A S; Zhuze, A L; Strahan, G A; Shafer, R H; Gursky, G V

    1996-08-01

    The design and DNA binding activity of beta-structure-forming peptides and netropsin-peptide conjugates are reported. It is found that a pair of peptides-S,S'-bis(Lys-Gly-Val-Cys-Val-NH-NH-Dns)-bridged by an S-S bond binds at least 10 times more strongly to poly(dG).poly(dC) than to poly(dA).poly(dT). This peptide can also discriminate between 5'-GpG-3' and 5'-GpC-3' steps in the DNA minor groove. Based on these observations, new synthetic ligands, bis-netropsins, were constructed in which two netropsin-like fragments were attached by means of short linkers to a pair of peptides-Gly-Cys-Gly- or Val-Cys-Val-bridged by S-S bonds. These compounds possess a composite binding specificity: the peptide chains recognize 5'-GpG-3' steps on DNA, whereas the netropsin-like fragments bind preferentially to runs of 4 AT base pairs. Our data indicate that combining the AT-base-pair specific properties of the netropsin-type structure with the 5'-GpG-3'-specific properties of certain oligopeptides offers a new approach to the synthesis of ligands capable of recognizing mixed sequences of AT- and GC-base pairs in the DNA minor groove. These compounds are potential models for DNA-binding domains in proteins which specifically recognize base pair sequences in the minor groove of DNA.

  9. Unique structure and dynamics of the EphA5 ligand binding domain mediate its binding specificity as revealed by X-ray crystallography, NMR and MD simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelu Huan

    Full Text Available The 16 EphA and EphB receptors represent the largest family of receptor tyrosine kinases, and their interactions with 9 ephrin-A and ephrin-B ligands initiate bidirectional signals controlling many physiological and pathological processes. Most interactions occur between receptor and ephrins of the same class, and only EphA4 can bind all A and B ephrins. To understand the structural and dynamic principles that enable Eph receptors to utilize the same jellyroll β-sandwich fold to bind ephrins, the VAPB-MSP domain, peptides and small molecules, we have used crystallography, NMR and molecular dynamics (MD simulations to determine the first structure and dynamics of the EphA5 ligand-binding domain (LBD, which only binds ephrin-A ligands. Unexpectedly, despite being unbound, the high affinity ephrin-binding pocket of EphA5 resembles that of other Eph receptors bound to ephrins, with a helical conformation over the J-K loop and an open pocket. The openness of the pocket is further supported by NMR hydrogen/deuterium exchange data and MD simulations. Additionally, the EphA5 LBD undergoes significant picosecond-nanosecond conformational exchanges over the loops, as revealed by NMR and MD simulations, but lacks global conformational exchanges on the microsecond-millisecond time scale. This is markedly different from the EphA4 LBD, which shares 74% sequence identity and 87% homology. Consequently, the unbound EphA5 LBD appears to comprise an ensemble of open conformations that have only small variations over the loops and appear ready to bind ephrin-A ligands. These findings show how two proteins with high sequence homology and structural similarity are still able to achieve distinctive binding specificities through different dynamics, which may represent a general mechanism whereby the same protein fold can serve for different functions. Our findings also suggest that a promising strategy to design agonists/antagonists with high affinity and selectivity

  10. The Non-Specific Binding of Fluorescent-Labeled MiRNAs on Cell Surface by Hydrophobic Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Lu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs about 22 nt long that play key roles in almost all biological processes and diseases. The fluorescent labeling and lipofection are two common methods for changing the levels and locating the position of cellular miRNAs. Despite many studies about the mechanism of DNA/RNA lipofection, little is known about the characteristics, mechanisms and specificity of lipofection of fluorescent-labeled miRNAs.Therefore, miRNAs labeled with different fluorescent dyes were transfected into adherent and suspension cells using lipofection reagent. Then, the non-specific binding and its mechanism were investigated by flow cytometer and laser confocal microscopy. The results showed that miRNAs labeled with Cy5 (cyanine fluorescent dye could firmly bind to the surface of adherent cells (Hela and suspended cells (K562 even without lipofection reagent. The binding of miRNAs labeled with FAM (carboxyl fluorescein to K562 cells was obvious, but it was not significant in Hela cells. After lipofectamine reagent was added, most of the fluorescently labeled miRNAs binding to the surface of Hela cells were transfected into intra-cell because of the high transfection efficiency, however, most of them were still binding to the surface of K562 cells. Moreover, the high-salt buffer which could destroy the electrostatic interactions did not affect the above-mentioned non-specific binding, but the organic solvent which could destroy the hydrophobic interactions eliminated it.These results implied that the fluorescent-labeled miRNAs could non-specifically bind to the cell surface by hydrophobic interaction. It would lead to significant errors in the estimation of transfection efficiency only according to the cellular fluorescence intensity. Therefore, other methods to evaluate the transfection efficiency and more appropriate fluorescent dyes should be used according to the cell types for the accuracy of results.

  11. Binding specificity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa for purified, native Bombyx mori aminopeptidase N and cadherin-like receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins Jeremy L

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To better understand the molecular interactions of Bt toxins with non-target insects, we have examined the real-time binding specificity and affinity of Cry1 toxins to native silkworm (Bombyx mori midgut receptors. Previous studies on B. mori receptors utilized brush border membrane vesicles or purifed receptors in blot-type assays. Results The Bombyx mori (silkworm aminopeptidase N (APN and cadherin-like receptors for Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal Cry1Aa toxin were purified and their real-time binding affinities for Cry toxins were examined by surface plasmon resonance. Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins did not bind to the immobilized native receptors, correlating with their low toxicities. Cry1Aa displayed moderate affinity for B. mori APN (75 nM, and unusually tight binding to the cadherin-like receptor (2.6 nM, which results from slow dissociation rates. The binding of a hybrid toxin (Aa/Aa/Ac was identical to Cry1Aa. Conclusions These results indicate domain II of Cry1Aa is essential for binding to native B. mori receptors and for toxicity. Moreover, the high-affinity binding of Cry1Aa to native cadherin-like receptor emphasizes the importance of this receptor class for Bt toxin research.

  12. Enteroantigen (eAg)-binding B lymphocytes in the mouse - phenotype, distribution, function and eAg-specific antibody secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venning, Freja Albjerg; Trempenau, Mette Louise; Schmidt, Esben

    2013-01-01

    cells in causing proliferation of eAg-specific T cells. In comparison with eAg- B cells, eAg+ B cells secrete a significant amount of IL-10 in vitro, suggesting an anti-inflammatory potential. Compared with wild-type B cells, B cell receptor (BCR) transgenic, hen egg lysozyme-specific B cells show...... inferior eAg binding and T cell stimulatory activity suggesting involvement of the BCR in eAg binding and processing. After activation of CD19(+) B cells by eAg and hybridization with hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine (HAT) sensitive ×63 lymphoma cells followed by cloning at limiting dilution conditions...

  13. Carbohydrate/glycan-binding specificity of legume lectins in respect to their proposed biological functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Viana Ramos

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The lectins, proteins which specifically recognize carbohydrate moieties, have been extensively studied in many biochemical and structural aspects in order to establish the molecular basis of this non-catalytic event. On the other hand, their clinical and agricultural potentials have been growing fast. Although lectins, mainly those from legume plants, had been investigated for biological properties, studies about the physiological functions of lectins are scarce in literature. Therefore, despite the accumulated data on lectins (as proteins, the role played by these signalizing molecules is poorly discussed. In the light of our accumulated results on legume lectins, specially those obtained from plants belonging to the Diocleinae sub-tribe and available data in literature, we discuss here the main hypothesis of their functions according to their carbohydrate/glycan-binding specificity.As lectinas, proteinas que especificamente reconhecem estruturas que contém carboidratos, têm sido extensivamente estudadas em muitos aspectos bioquímicos e estruturais, objetivando estabelecer as bases moleculares deste evento não-catalítico. Por outro lado, os potenciais clínicos e agriculturais destas proteínas têm crescido rapidamente. Embora as lectinas, principalmente aquelas de legumes tenham sido bastante investigadas em suas propriedades biológicas, estudos sobre as funcões fisiológicas de lectinas são escassos na literatura. Além disto, a despeito da quantidade de dados acumulados sobre lectinas (como proteínas, o papel desempenhado por estas moléculas de sinalização é pobremente discutido. Valendo-se de nossos estudos sobre lectinas de leguminosas, principalmente da sub-tribo Diocleinae, e outros dados presentes na literatura, discutimos aqui, as principais hipóteses de suas funções com base na especificidade por carboidratos e glicanos complexos.

  14. Flow Cytometry-Based Bead-Binding Assay for Measuring Receptor Ligand Specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprokholt, Joris K.; Hertoghs, Nina; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we describe a fluorescent bead-binding assay, which is an efficient and feasible method to measure interaction between ligands and receptors on cells. In principle, any ligand can be coated on fluorescent beads either directly or via antibodies. Binding between ligand-coated beads

  15. Identification of Putative Vero Cell Protein(s) that Bind Specifically to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The 45 KDa, 43 KDa and 30 KDa plasma membrane proteins were identified as viral envelope targets. Competitive binding assay showed these proteins competing with dengue virus binding. MTT assay indicate that viability of vero cells increases in cultures pretreated with 45 KDa, 43 KDa and 30 KDa proteins ...

  16. Guanylate kinase domains of the MAGUK family scaffold proteins as specific phospho-protein-binding modules

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jinwei; Shang, Yuan; Xia, Caihao; Wang, Wenning; Wen, Wenyu; Zhang, Mingjie

    2011-01-01

    Membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUK) family proteins contain an inactive guanylate kinase (GK) domain, whose function has been elusive. Here, this domain is revealed as a new type of phospho-peptide-binding module, in which the GMP-binding site has evolved to accommodate phospho-serines or -threonines.

  17. Distorted octahedral coordination of tungstate in a subfamily of specific binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollenstein, K.; Comellas-Bigler, M.; Bevers, L.E.; Feiters, M.C.; Meyer-Klaucke, W.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Locher, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea import molybdenum and tungsten from the environment in the form of the oxyanions molybdate (MoO4 2?) and tungstate (WO4 2?). These substrates are captured by an external, high-affinity binding protein, and delivered to ATP binding cassette transporters, which move them across

  18. Liposome-binding assays to assess specificity and affinity of phospholipid-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Julkowska, M.M.; Rankenberg, J.M.; Testerink, C.

    2013-01-01

    Protein-lipid interactions play an important role in cellular protein relocation, activation and signal transduction. The liposome-binding assay is a simple and inexpensive method to examine protein-lipid binding in vitro. The phospholipids used for liposome production are dried and hydrated.

  19. Role of Lysine-54 in determining cofactor specificity and binding in human dihydrofolate reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Shaoming; Tan, Xuehai; Thompson, P.D.; Freisheim, J.H.; Appleman, J.R.; Blakley, R.L.; Sheridan, R.P.; Venkataraghavan, R.

    1990-01-01

    Lysine-54 of human dihydrofolate reductase (hDHFR) appears to be involved in the interaction with the 2'-phosphate of NADPH and is conserved as a basic residue in other species. Studies have suggested that in Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase Arg-43, the homologous residue at this position, plays an important role in the binding of NADPH and in the differentiation of K m values for NADPH and NADH. A Lys-54 to Gln-54 mutant (K54Q) of hDHFR has been constructed by oligodeoxynucleotide-directed mutagenesis in order to study the role of Lys-54 in differentiating K m and k cat values for NADPH and NADH as well as in other functions of hDHFR. The purpose of this paper is to delineate in quantitative terms the magnitude of the effect of the Lys-54 to Gln-54 replacement on the various kinetic parameters of hDHFR. Such quantitative effects cannot be predicted solely on the basis of X-ray structures. The ratio of K m (NADH)/K m (NADPH) decreases from 69 in the wild-type enzyme to 4.7 in the K54Q enzyme, suggesting that Lys-54, among other interactions between protein side-chain residues and the 2'-phosphate, makes a major contribution in terms of binding energy and differentiation of K m values for NADPH and NADH. Agents at concentrations that show activating effects on the wild-type enzyme such as potassium chloride and urea all inactivate the K54Q enzyme. There appear to be no gross conformational differences between wild-type and K54Q enzyme molecules as judged by competitive ELISA using peptide-specific antibodies against human dihydrofolate reductase and from protease susceptibility studies on both wild-type and K54Q mutant enzymes. The pH-rate profiles using NADPH for K54Q and wild-type enzymes show divergences at certain pH values, suggesting the possibility of alteration(s) in the steps of the catalytic pathway for the K54Q enzyme

  20. Regulation of segmentation and segmental identity by Drosophila homeoproteins: the role of DNA binding in functional activity and specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggin, M D; McGinnis, W

    1997-11-01

    Recent advances have shed new light on how the Q50 homeoproteins act in Drosophila. These transcription factors have remarkably similar and promiscuous DNA-binding specificities in vitro; yet they each specify distinct developmental fates in vivo. One current model suggests that, because the Q50 homeoproteins have distinct biological functions, they must each regulate different target genes. According to this 'co-selective binding' model, significant binding of Q50 homeoproteins to functional DNA elements in vivo would be dependent upon cooperative interactions with other transcription factors (cofactors). If the Q50 homeoproteins each interact differently with cofactors, they could be selectively targeted to unique, limited subsets of their in vitro recognition sites and thus control different genes. However, a variety of experiments question this model. Molecular and genetic experiments suggest that the Q50 homeoproteins do not regulate very distinct sets of genes. Instead, they mostly control the expression of a large number of shared targets. The distinct morphogenic properties of the various Q50 homeoproteins may principally result from the different manners in which they either activate or repress these common targets. Further, in vivo binding studies indicate that at least two Q50 homeoproteins have very broad and similar DNA-binding specificities in embryos, a result that is inconsistent with the 'co-selective binding' model. Based on these and other data, we suggest that Q50 homeoproteins bind many of their recognition sites without the aid of cofactors. In this 'widespread binding' model, cofactors act mainly by helping to distinguish the way in which homeoproteins regulate targets to which they are already bound.

  1. The Drosophila Gr28bD product is a non-specific cation channel that can be used as a novel thermogenetic tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Aditi; Salari, Autoosa; Berigan, Benton R; Miguel, Kayla C; Amirshenava, Marzie; Robinson, Abbey; Zars, Benjamin C; Lin, Jenna L; Milescu, Lorin S; Milescu, Mirela; Zars, Troy

    2018-01-17

    Extrinsic control of single neurons and neuronal populations is a powerful approach for understanding how neural circuits function. Adding new thermogenetic tools to existing optogenetic and other forms of intervention will increase the complexity of questions that can be addressed. A good candidate for developing new thermogenetic tools is the Drosophila gustatory receptor family, which has been implicated in high-temperature avoidance behavior. We examined the five members of the Gr28b gene cluster for temperature-dependent properties via three approaches: biophysical characterization in Xenopus oocytes, functional calcium imaging in Drosophila motor neurons, and behavioral assays in adult Drosophila. Our results show that Gr28bD expression in Xenopus oocytes produces a non-specific cationic current that is activated by elevated temperatures. This current is non-inactivating and non-voltage dependent. When expressed in Drosophila motor neurons, Gr28bD can be used to change the firing pattern of individual cells in a temperature-dependent fashion. Finally, we show that pan-neuronal or motor neuron expression of Gr28bD can be used to alter fruit fly behavior with elevated temperatures. Together, these results validate the potential of the Gr28bD gene as a founding member of a new class of thermogenetic tools.

  2. Highly Pathogenic Influenza A(H5Nx) Viruses with Altered H5 Receptor-Binding Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongbo; de Vries, Erik; McBride, Ryan; Dekkers, Jojanneke; Peng, Wenjie; Bouwman, Kim M; Nycholat, Corwin; Verheije, M Helene; Paulson, James C; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; de Haan, Cornelis A M

    2017-02-01

    Emergence and intercontinental spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5Nx) virus clade 2.3.4.4 is unprecedented. H5N8 and H5N2 viruses have caused major economic losses in the poultry industry in Europe and North America, and lethal human infections with H5N6 virus have occurred in Asia. Knowledge of the evolution of receptor-binding specificity of these viruses, which might affect host range, is urgently needed. We report that emergence of these viruses is accompanied by a change in receptor-binding specificity. In contrast to ancestral clade 2.3.4 H5 proteins, novel clade 2.3.4.4 H5 proteins bind to fucosylated sialosides because of substitutions K222Q and S227R, which are unique for highly pathogenic influenza virus H5 proteins. North American clade 2.3.4.4 virus isolates have retained only the K222Q substitution but still bind fucosylated sialosides. Altered receptor-binding specificity of virus clade 2.3.4.4 H5 proteins might have contributed to emergence and spread of H5Nx viruses.

  3. Binding of the mannose-specific lectin, Griffithsin, to HIV-1 gp120 exposes the CD4-binding site

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Alexandre, Kabamba B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available and Reagent Program. The subtype C-specific anti-V3 MAb 3468L was isolated from an HIV-positive patient (22). The anti-CCR5 inhibitor PRO140, the CD4 receptor surrogate CD4-IgG2, and soluble CD4 (sCD4) were generously provided by Progenics Pharmaceuticals..., except that the 50% infective dose (ID50) and ID80 were calculated. Since PRO140 is a CCR5 inhibitor, TZM-bl cells were first incubated with a dilution series of the compound prior to the addition of the virus with or without GRFT (in a dilution series...

  4. Receptor binding proteins of Listeria monocytogenes bacteriophages A118 and P35 recognize serovar-specific teichoic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielmann, Regula; Habann, Matthias; Eugster, Marcel R. [Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Lurz, Rudi [Max-Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Calendar, Richard [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3202 (United States); Klumpp, Jochen, E-mail: jochen.klumpp@hest.ethz.ch [Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Loessner, Martin J. [Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-03-15

    Adsorption of a bacteriophage to the host requires recognition of a cell wall-associated receptor by a receptor binding protein (RBP). This recognition is specific, and high affinity binding is essential for efficient virus attachment. The molecular details of phage adsorption to the Gram-positive cell are poorly understood. We present the first description of receptor binding proteins and a tail tip structure for the siphovirus group infecting Listeria monocytogenes. The host-range determining factors in two phages, A118 and P35 specific for L. monocytogenes serovar 1/2 have been determined. Two proteins were identified as RBPs in phage A118. Rhamnose residues in wall teichoic acids represent the binding ligands for both proteins. In phage P35, protein gp16 could be identified as RBP and the role of both rhamnose and N-acetylglucosamine in phage adsorption was confirmed. Immunogold-labeling and transmission electron microscopy allowed the creation of a topological model of the A118 phage tail. - Highlights: • We present the first description of receptor binding proteins and a tail tip structure for the Siphovirus group infecting Listeria monocytogenes. • The host-range determining factors in two phages, A118 and P35 specific for L. monocytogenes serovar 1/2 have been determined. • Rhamnose residues in wall teichoic acids represent the binding ligands for both receptor binding proteins in phage A118. • Rhamnose and N-acetylglucosamine are required for adsorption of phage P35. • We preset a topological model of the A118 phage tail.

  5. Intermediates in monensin biosynthesis: A late step in biosynthesis of the polyether ionophore monensin is crucial for the integrity of cation binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Hüttel

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Polyether antibiotics such as monensin are biosynthesised via a cascade of directed ring expansions operating on a putative polyepoxide precursor. The resulting structures containing fused cyclic ethers and a lipophilic backbone can form strong ionophoric complexes with certain metal cations. In this work, we demonstrate for monensin biosynthesis that, as well as ether formation, a late-stage hydroxylation step is crucial for the correct formation of the sodium monensin complex. We have investigated the last two steps in monensin biosynthesis, namely hydroxylation catalysed by the P450 monooxygenase MonD and O-methylation catalysed by the methyl-transferase MonE. The corresponding genes were deleted in-frame in a monensin-overproducing strain of Streptomyces cinnamonensis. The mutants produced the expected monensin derivatives in excellent yields (ΔmonD: 1.13 g L−1 dehydroxymonensin; ΔmonE: 0.50 g L−1 demethylmonensin; and double mutant ΔmonDΔmonE: 0.34 g L−1 dehydroxydemethylmonensin. Single crystals were obtained from purified fractions of dehydroxymonensin and demethylmonensin. X-ray structure analysis revealed that the conformation of sodium dimethylmonensin is very similar to that of sodium monensin. In contrast, the coordination of the sodium ion is significantly different in the sodium dehydroxymonensin complex. This shows that the final constitution of the sodium monensin complex requires this tailoring step as well as polyether formation.

  6. A urokinase receptor-associated protein with specific collagen binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Jensen, O N; Engelholm, L H

    2000-01-01

    membrane-bound lectin with hitherto unknown function. The human cDNA was cloned and sequenced. The protein, designated uPARAP, is a member of the macrophage mannose receptor protein family and contains a putative collagen-binding (fibronectin type II) domain in addition to 8 C-type carbohydrate recognition...... domains. It proved capable of binding strongly to a single type of collagen, collagen V. This collagen binding reaction at the exact site of plasminogen activation on the cell may lead to adhesive functions as well as a contribution to cellular degradation of collagen matrices....

  7. Binding of the mannose-specific lectin, griffithsin, to HIV-1 gp120 exposes the CD4-binding site

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Alexandre, Kabamba B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Reference and Reagent Program. The subtype C 12 specific anti-V3 mAb, 3468L was isolated from an HIV-positive patient (22). The 13 anti-CCR5 inhibitor PRO140, the CD4 receptor surrogate CD4-IgG2 and the soluble 14 CD4 (sCD4) were generously provided... was measured as for 20 b12 except that here ID50 and ID80 were calculated. Since PRO140 is a CCR5 21 inhibitor, TZM-bl cells were first incubated with a dilution series of this compound 22 prior to the addition of the virus with or without GRFT (in a...

  8. Defining Binding Efficiency and Specificity of Auxins for SCFTIR1/AFB-Aux/IAA Co-receptor Complex Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Structure–activity profiles for the phytohormone auxin have been collected for over 70 years, and a number of synthetic auxins are used in agriculture. Auxin classification schemes and binding models followed from understanding auxin structures. However, all of the data came from whole plant bioassays, meaning the output was the integral of many different processes. The discovery of Transport Inhibitor-Response 1 (TIR1) and the Auxin F-Box (AFB) proteins as sites of auxin perception and the role of auxin as molecular glue in the assembly of co-receptor complexes has allowed the development of a definitive quantitative structure–activity relationship for TIR1 and AFB5. Factorial analysis of binding activities offered two uncorrelated factors associated with binding efficiency and binding selectivity. The six maximum-likelihood estimators of Efficiency are changes in the overlap matrixes, inferring that Efficiency is related to the volume of the electronic system. Using the subset of compounds that bound strongly, chemometric analyses based on quantum chemical calculations and similarity and self-similarity indices yielded three classes of Specificity that relate to differential binding. Specificity may not be defined by any one specific atom or position and is influenced by coulomb matrixes, suggesting that it is driven by electrostatic forces. These analyses give the first receptor-specific classification of auxins and indicate that AFB5 is the preferred site for a number of auxinic herbicides by allowing interactions with analogues having van der Waals surfaces larger than that of indole-3-acetic acid. The quality factors are also examined in terms of long-standing models for the mechanism of auxin binding. PMID:24313839

  9. Assessment of altered binding specificity of bacteriophage for ciprofloxacin-induced antibiotic-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongjin; Jo, Ara; Ding, Tian; Lee, Hyeon-Yong; Ahn, Juhee

    2016-08-01

    This study describes a new effort toward understanding the interaction mechanisms between antibiotic-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium and phages. The antibiotic susceptibility, β-lactamase activity, bacterial motility, gene expression, and lytic activity were evaluated in ciprofloxacin-induced antibiotic-sensitive Salmonella Typhimurium (ASST(CIP)) and ciprofloxacin-induced antibiotic-resistant S. Typhimurium (ARST(CIP)), which were compared to the wild-type strains (ASST(WT) and ARST(WT)). The MIC values of ampicillin, norfloxacin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline were significantly increased to > 512, 16, 16, and 256 μg/ml, respectively, in the ARST(CIP). The lowest and highest extracellular lactamase activities were observed in ASST(WT) (6.85 μmol/min/ml) and ARST(CIP) (48.83 μmol/min/ml), respectively. The acrA, lpfE, and hilA genes were significantly upregulated by more than tenfold in both ASST(CIP) and ARST(CIP). The induction of multiple antibiotic resistance resulted from the increased efflux pump activity (AcrAB-TolC). The highest phage adsorption rates were more than 95 % for ASST(WT), ASST(CIP), and ARST(WT), while the lowest adsorption rate was 52 % for ARST(CIP) at 15 min of infection. The least lytic activity of phage was 20 % against the ARST(CIP), followed by ASST(CIP) (30 %). The adsorption rate of phage against ARST(CIP) was 52 % at 15 min of infection, which resulted in the decrease in lytic activity (12 %). Understanding the interaction of phage and bacteria is essential for the practical application of phage to control and detect antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The results provide useful information for understanding the binding specificity of phages for multiple antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  10. Localization and specificity of the phospholipid and actin binding sites on the tail of Acanthamoeba myosin IC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    We used bacterially expressed beta-galactosidase fusion proteins to localize the phospholipid binding domain of Acanthamoeba myosin IC to the region between amino acids 701 and 888 in the NH2-terminal half of the tail. Using a novel immobilized ligand lipid binding assay, we determined that myosin I can bind to several different acidic phospholipids, and that binding requires a minimum of 5 mol% acidic phospholipid in a neutral lipid background. The presence of di- and triglycerides and sterols in the lipid bilayer do not contribute to the affinity of myosin I for membranes. We confirm that the ATP-insensitive actin binding site is contained in the COOH-terminal 30 kD of the tail as previously shown for Acanthamoeba myosin IA. We conclude that the association of the myosin IC tail with acidic phospholipid head groups supplies much of the energy for binding myosin I to biological membranes, but probably not specificity for targeting myosin I isoforms to different cellular locations. PMID:1607386

  11. A conformation-specific interhelical salt bridge in the K+ binding site of gastric H,K-ATPase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, J.B.; Swarts, H.G.P.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Krieger, E.; Pont, J.J.H.H.M. de

    2004-01-01

    Homology modeling of gastric H, K-ATPase based on the E-2 model of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (Toyoshima, C., and Nomura, H. (2002) Nature 392, 835-839) revealed the presence of a single high-affinity binding site for K+ and an E-2 form-specific salt bridge between Glu(820) (M6) and Lys(791)

  12. A conformation-specific interhelical salt bridge in the K+ binding site of gastric H,K-ATPase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, J.B.; Swarts, H.G.P.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Krieger, E.; Pont, J.J.H.H.M. de

    2004-01-01

    Homology modeling of gastric H,K-ATPase based on the E2 model of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (Toyoshima, C., and Nomura, H. (2002) Nature 392, 835-839) revealed the presence of a single high-affinity binding site for K+ and an E2 form-specific salt bridge between Glu820 (M6) and Lys791 (M5).

  13. A dominant-negative mutant of Max that inhibits sequence-specific DNA binding by Myc proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Billaud, Marc; Isselbacher, Kurt J.; Bernards, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Myc proteins are basic helix-loop-helix/ leucine-zipper proteins that bind to specific DNA sequences. In vivo, Myc proteins have been found associated with Max, another basic helix4oop-helix/leucine-zipper protein. However, it is not known to what extent the dimerization of Myc with Max is

  14. A study of hypoxia sensitive and specific 99Tcm-MIBI binding protein of mitochondrial membrane in rat myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Jun; Xie Wenhui; Han Maoqiang

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the 99 Tc m -MIBI binding mechanism independent of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Methods: The cardiac mitochondrial fragments and heart slices were prepared. The techniques of the thin layer chromatography (TLC) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) were employed to characterize the specific binding sites of 99 Tc m -MIBI. Results: Two separate peaks of 99 Tc m -MIBI binding activity in mitochondrial fragments were identified in TLC. One of these binding activity peaks was characterized with a K d of (5.8±1.7) nmol/L and B max of (11.5±3.1) pmol/mg of protein. The bound 99 Tc m -MIBI could be displaced permanently with 20 μmol/L 99 Tc-MIBI and transiently with 50 μmol/L cyclosproin A. Three discrete 90 Tc m -MIBI labelled proteins of MW about 4.3 x 10 4 , 2.3 x 10 4 and 1.0 x 10 4 were revealed in PAGE. The clearance of 99 tc m -MIBI could be also induced by hypoxia. Conclusions: There is a specific 99 Tc m -MIBI binding protein which is sensitive to hypoxia metabolism in myocardial mitochondrial membrane with at least two protein subunits of different functions and affinities

  15. Cholera toxin binding affinity and specificity for gangliosides determined by surface plasmon resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuziemko, G.M.; Stroh, M.; Stevens, R.C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-05-21

    The present study determines the affinity of cholera toxin for the ganglioside series GM1, GM2, GM3, GD1A, GD1B, GT1B, asialo GM1, globotriosyl ceramide, and lactosyl ceramide using real time biospecific interaction analysis (surface plasmon resonance, SPR). SPR shows that cholera toxin preferably binds to gangliosides in the following sequence: GM1 > GM2 > GD1A > GM3 > GT1B > GD1B > asialo-GM1. The measured binding affinity of cholera toxin for the ganglioside sequence ranges from 4.61 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} M for GM1 to 1.88 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} M for asialo GM1. The picomolar values obtained by surface plasmon resonance are similar to K{sub d} values determined with whole-cell binding assays. Both whole-cell assays ans SPR measurements on synthetic membranes are higher than free solution measurements by several orders of magnitude. This difference may be caused by the effects of avidity and charged lipid head-groups, which may play a major role in the binding between cholera toxin, the receptor, and the membrane surface. The primary difference between free solution binding studies and surface plasmon resonance studies is that the latter technique is performed on surfaces resembling the cell membrane. Surface plasmon resonance has the further advantage of measuring apparent kinetic association and dissociation rates in real time, providing direct information about binding events at the membrane surface. 34 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Specific binding of a fungal glucan phytoalexin elicitor to membrane fractions from soybean Glycine max

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, W.E.; Ebel, J.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment of soybean tissues with elicitors results in the production of phytoalexins, one of a number of inducible plant defense reactions against microbial infections. The present study uses a β-1,3-[ 3 H] glucan elicitor fraction from Phytophthora megasperma f.sp. glycinea, a fungal pathogen of soybean, to identify putative elicitor targets in soybean tissues. Use of the radiolabeled elicitor disclosed saturable high-affinity elicitor binding site(s) in membrane fractions of soybean roots. Highest binding activity is associated with a plasma membrane-enriched fraction. The apparent K/sub d/ value for β-glucan elicitor binding is ≅ 0.2 x 10 -6 M and the maximum number of binding sites is 0.5 pmol per mg of protein. Competition studies the [ 3 H]glucan elicitor and a number of polysaccharides demonstrate that only polysaccharides of a branched β-glucan type effectively displace the radiolabeled ligand from membrane binding. Differential displacing activity of the glucans on P. megasperma elicitor binding corresponds closely to their respective ability to elicit phytoalexin production in a cotyledon bioassay

  17. Predicting the functionally distinct residues in the heme, cation, and substrate-binding sites of peroxidase from stress-tolerant mangrove specie, Avicennia marina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabeen, Uzma; Abbasi, Atiya; Salim, Asmat

    2011-11-01

    Recent work was conducted to predict the structure of functionally distinct regions of Avicennia marina peroxidase (AP) by using the structural coordinates of barley grains peroxidase as the template. This enzyme is utilized by all living organisms in many biosynthetic or degradable processes and in defense against oxidative stress. The homology model showed some distinct structural changes in the heme, calcium, and substrate-binding regions. Val53 was found to be an important coordinating residue between distal calcium ion and the distal heme site while Ser176 is coordinated to the proximal histidine through Ala174 and Leu172. Different ionic and hydrogen-bonded interactions were also observed in AP. Analyses of various substrate-enzyme interactions revealed that the substrate-binding pocket is provided by the residues, His41, Phe70, Gly71, Asp138, His139, and Lys176; the later three residues are not conserved in the peroxidase family. We have also performed structural comparison of the A. marina peroxidase with that of two class III salt-sensitive species, peanut and soybean. Four loop regions were found to have largest structural deviation. The overall protein sequence was also analyzed for the presence of probable post-translational modification sites and the functional significance of these sites were outlined.

  18. Importance of the Sequence-Directed DNA Shape for Specific Binding Site Recognition by the Estrogen-Related Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kareem Mohideen-Abdul

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Most nuclear receptors (NRs bind DNA as dimers, either as hetero- or as homodimers on DNA sequences organized as two half-sites with specific orientation and spacing. The dimerization of NRs on their cognate response elements (REs involves specific protein–DNA and protein–protein interactions. The estrogen-related receptor (ERR belongs to the steroid hormone nuclear receptor (SHR family and shares strong similarity in its DNA-binding domain (DBD with that of the estrogen receptor (ER. In vitro, ERR binds with high affinity inverted repeat REs with a 3-bps spacing (IR3, but in vivo, it preferentially binds to single half-site REs extended at the 5′-end by 3 bp [estrogen-related response element (ERREs], thus explaining why ERR was often inferred as a purely monomeric receptor. Since its C-terminal ligand-binding domain is known to homodimerize with a strong dimer interface, we investigated the binding behavior of the isolated DBDs to different REs using electrophoretic migration, multi-angle static laser light scattering (MALLS, non-denaturing mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance. In contrast to ER DBD, ERR DBD binds as a monomer to EREs (IR3, such as the tff1 ERE-IR3, but we identified a DNA sequence composed of an extended half-site embedded within an IR3 element (embedded ERRE/IR3, where stable dimer binding is observed. Using a series of chimera and mutant DNA sequences of ERREs and IR3 REs, we have found the key determinants for the binding of ERR DBD as a dimer. Our results suggest that the sequence-directed DNA shape is more important than the exact nucleotide sequence for the binding of ERR DBD to DNA as a dimer. Our work underlines the importance of the shape-driven DNA readout mechanisms based on minor groove recognition and electrostatic potential. These conclusions may apply not only to ERR but also to other members of the SHR family, such as androgen or glucocorticoid, for which a strong well-conserved half

  19. Novel interactions of ankyrins-G at the costameres: The muscle-specific Obscurin/Titin-Binding-related Domain (OTBD) binds plectin and filamin C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiweilidan, Yimingjiang; Klauza, Izabela; Kordeli, Ekaterini, E-mail: ekaterini.kordeli@inserm.fr

    2011-04-01

    Ankyrins, the adapters of the spectrin skeleton, are involved in local accumulation and stabilization of integral proteins to the appropriate membrane domains. In striated muscle, tissue-dependent alternative splicing generates unique Ank3 gene products (ankyrins-G); they share the Obscurin/Titin-Binding-related Domain (OTBD), a muscle-specific insert of the C-terminal domain which is highly conserved among ankyrin genes, and binds obscurin and titin to Ank1 gene products. We previously proposed that OTBD sequences constitute a novel domain of protein-protein interactions which confers ankyrins with specific cellular functions in muscle. Here we searched for muscle proteins binding to ankyrin-G OTBD by yeast two hybrid assay, and we found plectin and filamin C, two organizing elements of the cytoskeleton with essential roles in myogenesis, muscle cell cytoarchitecture, and muscle disease. The three proteins coimmunoprecipitate from skeletal muscle extracts and colocalize at costameres in adult muscle fibers. During in vitro myogenesis, muscle ankyrins-G are first expressed in postmitotic myocytes undergoing fusion to myotubes. In western blots of subcellular fractions from C2C12 cells, the majority of muscle ankyrins-G appear associated with membrane compartments. Occasional but not extensive co-localization at nascent costameres suggested that ankyrin-G interactions with plectin and filamin C are not involved in costamere assembly; they would rather reinforce stability and/or modulate molecular interactions in sarcolemma microdomains by establishing novel links between muscle-specific ankyrins-G and the two costameric dystrophin-associated glycoprotein and integrin-based protein complexes. These results report the first protein-protein interactions involving the ankyrin-G OTBD domain and support the hypothesis that OTBD sequences confer ankyrins with a gain of function in vertebrates, bringing further consolidation and resilience of the linkage between sarcomeres

  20. Specific histamine binding activity of a new lipocalin from Hyalomma asiaticum (Ixodidae) and therapeutic effects on allergic asthma in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanan; Li, Zhuang; Zhou, Yongzhi; Cao, Jie; Zhang, Houshuang; Gong, Haiyan; Zhou, Jinlin

    2016-09-17

    Lipocalin proteins are secreted by tick salivary glands as an important strategy to interfere with the immune response of hosts. A large number of lipocalins are secreted, but the functions of most of these proteins are unclear. Here, we report a new lipocalin protein with particular histamine binding capacity, which was isolated from the salivary glands of the tick Hyalomma asiaticum. The full length cDNA of the Ha24 gene was obtained by RACE, and Ha24 gene was expressed in E. coli; after protein purification and mice immunizations, specific Polyclonal antibodies (PcAb) were created in response to the recombinant protein. Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), Quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), indirect immunofluorescence antibody (IFA) assay and western blot were used to detect the existence of native Ha24 in ticks. To confirm the histamine-binding capacity of rHa24, a histamine-binding assay was completed in vitro (ELISA) and in vivo by inhibition of allergic asthma in mice. Ha24 is coded by 681 bases, contains 227 amino acids, and has a molecular weight of 23.3 kDa. Abundant expression in the salivary glands of feeding ticks was confirmed by the identification of native Ha24 in ticks. The results of a histamine binding assay both in vitro and in vivo demonstrated that rHa24 binds specifically with histamine in a dose-dependent manner, and can provide relief from allergic asthma in mice. Ha24 is a new tick lipocalin with specific histamine binding activity that can provide relief from host inflammation response.

  1. On binding specificity of (6–4) photolyase to a T(6–4)T DNA photoproduct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalbæk Jepsen, Katrine; Solov'yov, Ilia

    2017-01-01

    this binding for a specific enzyme called (6–4) photolyase, which is capable of repairing certain UV-induced damage in DNA. Through molecular dynamics simulations we describe the binding between photolyase and the DNA and reveal that several charged amino acid residues in the enzyme, such as arginines...... and lysines turn out to be important. Especially R421 is crucial, as it keeps the DNA strands at the damaged site inside the repair pocket of the enzyme separated. DNA photolyase is structurally highly homologous to a protein called cryptochrome. Both proteins are biologically activated similarly, namely...

  2. Ca2+ bound to the high affinity divalent cation-binding site of actin enhances actophorin-induced depolymerization of muscle F-actin but inhibits actophorin-induced depolymerization of Acanthamoeba F-actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossakowska, M; Korn, E D

    1996-08-01

    The cation tightly bound to actin, Mg2+ or Ca2+, affects the ability of actophorin to accelerate depolymerization of filaments and bind to monomers of actin prepared from rabbit skeletal muscle and Acanthamoeba castellanii. Actophorin interacted similarly with muscle and Acanthamoeba Mg2(+)-F-actin but depolymerized muscle Mg2(+)-F-actin more efficiently. Muscle Ca2(+)-F-actin depolymerized about 5 times more rapidly than Mg2(+)-F-actin in the presence of actophorin but Acanthamoeba Ca2(+)-F-actin was highly resistant to actophorin. Muscle actin subunits dissociated more rapidly than Acanthamoeba actin subunits from copolymers of muscle and Acanthamoeba Ca2(+)-actin upon addition of actophorin although Acanthamoeba actin dissociated much more rapidly from copolymers than from its homopolymer. The Kd of the 1:1 complex between actophorin and monomeric actin was somewhat lower for muscle Mg2(+)-ATP-G-actin than for both Acanthamoeba Mg2(+)-ATP-G-actin and muscle Ca2(+)-ATP-G-actin. The data for the interactions of actophorin with Acanthamoeba Ca2(+)-ATP-G-actin or muscle and amoeba Mg2(+)- and Ca2(+)-ADP-G-actin were incompatible with the formation of 1:1 actin: actophorin complexes and, thus, Kd values could not be calculated. While it may not be surprising that actophorin would interact differently with Mg2(+)- and Ca2(+)-actin, it is unexpected that the nature of the tightly bound cation would have such dramatically opposite effects on the ability of actophorin to depolymerize muscle and Acanthamoeba F-actin. Differential severing by actophorin, with Acanthamoeba Ca2(+)-actin being almost totally resistant, is sufficient to explain the results but other possibilities cannot be ruled out.

  3. Specificity of anion-binding in the substrate-pocket ofbacteriorhodopsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facciotti, Marc T.; Cheung, Vincent S.; Lunde, Christopher S.; Rouhani, Shahab; Baliga, Nitin S.; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2003-08-30

    The structure of the D85S mutant of bacteriorhodopsin with a nitrate anion bound in the Schiff-base binding site, and the structure of the anion-free protein have been obtained in the same crystal form. Together with the previously solved structures of this anion pump, in both the anion-free state and bromide-bound state, these new structures provide insight into how this mutant of bacteriorhodopsin is able to bind a variety of different anions in the same binding pocket. The structural analysis reveals that the main structural change that accommodates different anions is the repositioning of the polar side-chain of S85. On the basis of these x-ray crystal structures, the prediction is then made that the D85S/D212N double mutant might bind similar anions and do so over a broader pH range than does the single mutant. Experimental comparison of the dissociation constants, K{sub d}, for a variety of anions confirms this prediction and demonstrates, in addition, that the binding affinity is dramatically improved by the D212N substitution.

  4. Specificity Characterization of SLA Class I Molecules Binding to Swine-Origin Viral Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitope Peptides in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixia Gao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Swine leukocyte antigen (SLA class I molecules play a crucial role in generating specific cellular immune responses against viruses and other intracellular pathogens. They mainly bind and present antigens of intracellular origin to circulating MHC I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs. Binding of an appropriate epitope to an SLA class I molecule is the single most selective event in antigen presentation and the first step in the killing of infected cells by CD8+ CTLs. Moreover, the antigen epitopes are strictly restricted to specific SLA molecules. In this study, we constructed SLA class I complexes in vitro comprising viral epitope peptides, the extracellular region of the SLA-1 molecules, and β2-microglobulin (β2m using splicing overlap extension polymerase chain reaction (SOE-PCR. The protein complexes were induced and expressed in an Escherichia coli prokaryotic expression system and subsequently purified and refolded. Specific binding of seven SLA-1 proteins to one classical swine fever virus (CSFV and four porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV epitope peptides was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA-based method. The SLA-1∗13:01, SLA-1∗11:10, and SLA-1∗11:01:02 proteins were able to bind specifically to different CTL epitopes of CSFV and PRRSV and the MHC restrictions of the five epitopes were identified. The fixed combination of Asn151Val152 residues was identified as the potentially key amino acid residues influencing the binding of viral several CTL epitope peptides to SLA-1∗13:01 and SLA-1∗04:01:01 proteins. The more flexible pocket E in the SLA-1∗13:01 protein might have fewer steric limitations and therefore be able to accommodate more residues of viral CTL epitope peptides, and may thus play a critical biochemical role in determining the peptide-binding motif of SLA-1∗13:01. Characterization of the binding specificity of peptides to SLA class I molecules provides an

  5. Validating fragment-based drug discovery for biological RNAs: lead fragments bind and remodel the TPP riboswitch specifically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Katherine Deigan; Homan, Philip; Weeks, Kevin M; Smith, Alison G; Abell, Chris; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2014-05-22

    Thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) riboswitches regulate essential genes in bacteria by changing conformation upon binding intracellular TPP. Previous studies using fragment-based approaches identified small molecule "fragments" that bind this gene-regulatory mRNA domain. Crystallographic studies now show that, despite having micromolar Kds, four different fragments bind the TPP riboswitch site-specifically, occupying the pocket that recognizes the aminopyrimidine of TPP. Unexpectedly, the unoccupied site that would recognize the pyrophosphate of TPP rearranges into a structure distinct from that of the cognate complex. This idiosyncratic fragment-induced conformation, also characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering and chemical probing, represents a possible mechanism for adventitious ligand discrimination by the riboswitch, and suggests that off-pathway conformations of RNAs can be targeted for drug development. Our structures, together with previous screening studies, demonstrate the feasibility of fragment-based drug discovery against RNA targets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular determinants for the complex binding specificity of the PDZ domain in PICK1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kenneth L; Beuming, Thijs; Niv, Masha Y

    2005-01-01

    polarization. Our results showed that the PICK1 PDZ domain binds the type II sequence presented by the human dopamine transporter (-WLKV) with an almost 15-fold and >100-fold higher affinity than the type I sequences presented by protein kinase Calpha (-QSAV) and the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (-DSLL......), respectively. Mutational analysis of Lys(83) in the alphaB1 position of the PDZ domain suggested that this residue mimics the function of hydrophobic residues present in this position in regular type II PDZ domains. The PICK1 PDZ domain was moreover found to prefer small hydrophobic residues in the C......-terminal P(0) position of the ligand. Molecular modeling predicted a rank order of (Val > Ile > Leu) that was verified experimentally with up to a approximately 16-fold difference in binding affinity between a valine and a leucine in P(0). The results define the structural basis for the unusual binding...

  7. A SILAC-based screen for Methyl-CpG binding proteins identifies RBP-J as a DNA methylation and sequence-specific binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie J J Bartels

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays a crucial role in a variety of biological processes. Methylated DNA is specifically bound by Methyl-CpG Binding Proteins (MBPs. Three different types of MBPs have been identified so far: the Methyl-CpG Binding Domain (MBD family proteins, three BTB/POZ-Zn-finger proteins, and UHRF1. Most of the known MBPs have been identified via homology with the MBD and Zn-finger domains as present in MeCP2 and Kaiso, respectively. It is conceivable that other proteins are capable of recognizing methylated DNA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For the purpose of identifying novel 'readers' we set up a methyl-CpG pull-down assay combined with stable-isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC. In a methyl-CpG pull-down with U937 nuclear extracts, we recovered several known MBPs and almost all subunits of the MBD2/NuRD complex as methylation specific binders, providing proof-of-principle. Interestingly, RBP-J, the transcription factor downstream of Notch receptors, also bound the DNA in a methylation dependent manner. Follow-up pull-downs and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs showed that RBP-J binds methylated DNA in the context of a mutated RBP-J consensus motif. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The here described SILAC/methyl-CpG pull-down constitutes a new approach to identify potential novel DNAme readers and will advance unraveling of the complete methyl-DNA interactome.

  8. Identification of 14-3-3 Proteins Phosphopeptide-Binding Specificity Using an Affinity-Based Computational Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Li

    Full Text Available The 14-3-3 proteins are a highly conserved family of homodimeric and heterodimeric molecules, expressed in all eukaryotic cells. In human cells, this family consists of seven distinct but highly homologous 14-3-3 isoforms. 14-3-3σ is the only isoform directly linked to cancer in epithelial cells, which is regulated by major tumor suppressor genes. For each 14-3-3 isoform, we have 1,000 peptide motifs with experimental binding affinity values. In this paper, we present a novel method for identifying peptide motifs binding to 14-3-3σ isoform. First, we propose a sampling criteria to build a predictor for each new peptide sequence. Then, we select nine physicochemical properties of amino acids to describe each peptide motif. We also use auto-cross covariance to extract correlative properties of amino acids in any two positions. Finally, we consider elastic net to predict affinity values of peptide motifs, based on ridge regression and least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO. Our method tests on the 1,000 known peptide motifs binding to seven 14-3-3 isoforms. On the 14-3-3σ isoform, our method has overall pearson-product-moment correlation coefficient (PCC and root mean squared error (RMSE values of 0.84 and 252.31 for N-terminal sublibrary, and 0.77 and 269.13 for C-terminal sublibrary. We predict affinity values of 16,000 peptide sequences and relative binding ability across six permutated positions similar with experimental values. We identify phosphopeptides that preferentially bind to 14-3-3σ over other isoforms. Several positions on peptide motifs are in the same amino acid category with experimental substrate specificity of phosphopeptides binding to 14-3-3σ. Our method is fast and reliable and is a general computational method that can be used in peptide-protein binding identification in proteomics research.

  9. Sequence-specific DNA binding by MYC/MAX to low-affinity non-E-box motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allevato, Michael; Bolotin, Eugene; Grossman, Mark; Mane-Padros, Daniel; Sladek, Frances M.

    2017-01-01

    The MYC oncoprotein regulates transcription of a large fraction of the genome as an obligatory heterodimer with the transcription factor MAX. The MYC:MAX heterodimer and MAX:MAX homodimer (hereafter MYC/MAX) bind Enhancer box (E-box) DNA elements (CANNTG) and have the greatest affinity for the canonical MYC E-box (CME) CACGTG. However, MYC:MAX also recognizes E-box variants and was reported to bind DNA in a “non-specific” fashion in vitro and in vivo. Here, in order to identify potential additional non-canonical binding sites for MYC/MAX, we employed high throughput in vitro protein-binding microarrays, along with electrophoretic mobility-shift assays and bioinformatic analyses of MYC-bound genomic loci in vivo. We identified all hexameric motifs preferentially bound by MYC/MAX in vitro, which include the low-affinity non-E-box sequence AACGTT, and found that the vast majority (87%) of MYC-bound genomic sites in a human B cell line contain at least one of the top 21 motifs bound by MYC:MAX in vitro. We further show that high MYC/MAX concentrations are needed for specific binding to the low-affinity sequence AACGTT in vitro and that elevated MYC levels in vivo more markedly increase the occupancy of AACGTT sites relative to CME sites, especially at distal intergenic and intragenic loci. Hence, MYC binds diverse DNA motifs with a broad range of affinities in a sequence-specific and dose-dependent manner, suggesting that MYC overexpression has more selective effects on the tumor transcriptome than previously thought. PMID:28719624

  10. The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN protein is able to specifically bind DNA through its single Cys2-His2 zinc finger motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dathan, Nina; Zaccaro, Laura; Esposito, Sabrina; Isernia, Carla; Omichinski, James G; Riccio, Andrea; Pedone, Carlo; Di Blasio, Benedetto; Fattorusso, Roberto; Pedone, Paolo V

    2002-11-15

    The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN (SUP) gene has been shown to be important in maintaining the boundary between stamens and carpels, and is presumed to act by regulating cell proliferation. In this work, we show that the SUP protein, which contains a single Cys2-His2 zinc finger domain including the QALGGH sequence, highly conserved in the plant zinc finger proteins, binds DNA. Using a series of deletion mutants, it was determined that the minimal domain required for specific DNA binding (residues 15-78) includes the single zinc finger and two basic regions located on either side of this motif. Furthermore, amino acid substitutions in the zinc finger or in the basic regions, including a mutation that knocks out the function of the SUP protein in vivo (glycine 63 to aspartate), have been found to abolish the activity of the SUP DNA-binding domain. These results strongly suggest that the SUP protein functions in vivo by acting as a DNA-binding protein, likely involved in transcriptional regulation. The association of both an N-terminal and a C-terminal basic region with a single Cys2-His2 zinc finger represents a novel DNA-binding motif suggesting that the mechanism of DNA recognition adopted by the SUP protein is different from that described so far in other zinc finger proteins.

  11. Kinetic study of the effects of calcium ions on cationic artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) peroxidase: calcium binding, steady-state kinetics and reactions with hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiner, Alexander N P; Sidrach, Lara; Chazarra, Soledad; Varón, Ramón; Tudela, José; García-Cánovas, Francisco; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno

    2004-01-01

    The apparent catalytic constant (k(cat)) of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) peroxidase (AKPC) with 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) increased 130-fold in the presence of calcium ions (Ca2+) but the affinity (K(m)) of the enzyme for ABTS was 500 times lower than for Ca2+-free AKPC. AKPC is known to exhibit an equilibrium between 6-aquo hexa-coordinate and penta-coordinate forms of the haem iron that is modulated by Ca2+ and affects compound I formation. Measurements of the Ca2+ dissociation constant (K(D)) were complicated by the water-association/dissociation equilibrium yielding a global value more than 1000 times too high. The value for the Ca2+ binding step alone has now been determined to be K(D) approximately 10 nM. AKPC-Ca2+ was more resistant to inactivation by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and exhibited increased catalase activity. An analysis of the complex H(2)O(2) concentration dependent kinetics of Ca2+-free AKPC is presented.

  12. Specificity and kinetics of norovirus binding to magnetic bead- conjugated histo-blood group antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histo-blood group antigens (HBGA) have been identified as candidate receptors for human norovirus (NOR). Type A, type H1, and Lewis histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) in humans have been identified as major targets for NOR binding. Pig HBGA-conjugated magnetic beads have been utilized as a means ...

  13. Ligand specificity of pheromone-binding proteins of the processionary moth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feixas, J; Prestwich, G D; Guerrero, A

    1995-12-01

    Photoaffinity labeling of proteins extracted from sensory hairs and antennal branches of the processionary moth Thaumetopoea pityocampa with a tritium-labeled diazoacetate analogue of the sex pheromone (Z)-13-hexadecen-11-ynyl acetate revealed a 15-kDa pheromone-binding protein in male moth sensory hairs (SH-15). A different 15-kDa protein in male antennal branches (B-15) was not photolabeled. All extracts except male sensory hairs showed a photolabeled 20-kDa protein; a photolabeled male 30-kDa protein in the branches (B-30) was also observed. The 20-kDa proteins in the sensory hairs (SH-20) and branches (B-20) showed differing affinities for the photoaffinity analogues; moreover, SH-15 exhibits higher affinity for the natural pheromone, (Z)-13-hexadecen-11-ynyl acetate, than for its alcohol metabolite and other analogues in competitive displacement experiments. The affinity shown by the pheromone-binding protein for the metabolic product suggests that the alcohol may be also transported by the binding protein. Interestingly, a shift in labeling from SH-15 to SH-20 was produced in the presence of an excess of the natural pheromone, its alcohol and other analogues. The binding showed little discrimination among structurally similar analogues of the pheromone, while saturated and aromatic molecules showed little affinity for the proteins of either sensory hairs or antennal branches.

  14. [Phage display selection on MRC-5 cells yield peptides specific for HCMV-binding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Li; Yu, Ping

    2010-01-01

    To screen the special binding peptides to the MRC-5 cells infected by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) so as to study the progress how HCMV recognizes susceptive host cells. The special binding peptides to MRC-5 cells infected by HCMV rather than normal MRC-5 cells were screened by phage display system, and then identified by ELISA, the sequence of single strand DNA were determined and analyzed. In addition, the amino acid sequence of target protein was compared in protein sequence database from BLAST in GenBank, and then the physico-chemical property was also analyzed by Vector NTI software. The high affinity phage-ligands to MRC-5 infected by HCMV were found, and then sequences of peptides are EVNMSDS, NVSVFET and GQQPTTV respectively. These three peptides sequences were found in HCMV gB and gH protein. The peptides that can special bind HCMV-infected MRC-5 cells has been screened by phage display system. This new finding should bring new ideas for studying the functional domain through which HCMV can recognize and bind host cells.

  15. Technical note: Protozoa-specific antibodies raised in sheep plasma bind to their target protozoa in the rumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Y J; Rea, S M; Popovski, S; Skillman, L C; Wright, A-D G

    2014-12-01

    Binding of IgG antibodies to Entodinium spp. in the rumen of sheep (Ovis aries) was investigated by adding IgG, purified from plasma, directly into the rumen. Plasma IgG was sourced from sheep that had or had not been immunized with a vaccine containing whole fixed Entodinium spp. cells. Ruminal fluid was sampled approximately 2 h after each antibody dosing. Binding of protozoa by a specific antibody was detected using an indirect fluorescent antibody test. An antibody titer in the ruminal fluid was determined by ELISA, and the concentration of ruminal fluid ammonia-N and ruminal pH were also determined. Entodinium spp. and total protozoa from IgG-infused sheep were enumerated by microscopic counts. Two-hourly additions of IgG maintained a low antibody titer in the rumen for 12 h and the binding of the antibody to the rumen protozoa was demonstrated. Increased ammonia-N concentrations and altered ruminal fluid pH patterns indicated that additional fermentation of protein was occurring in the rumen after addition of IgG. No reduction in numbers of Entodinium spp. was observed (P>0.05). Although binding of antibodies to protozoa has been demonstrated in the rumen, it is unclear how much cell death occurred. On the balance of probability, it would appear that the antibody was degraded or partially degraded, and the impact of this on protozoal populations and the measurement of a specific titer is also unclear.

  16. Eubacterial SpoVG homologs constitute a new family of site-specific DNA-binding proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon L Jutras

    Full Text Available A site-specific DNA-binding protein was purified from Borrelia burgdorferi cytoplasmic extracts, and determined to be a member of the highly conserved SpoVG family. This is the first time a function has been attributed to any of these ubiquitous bacterial proteins. Further investigations into SpoVG orthologues indicated that the Staphylococcus aureus protein also binds DNA, but interacts preferentially with a distinct nucleic acid sequence. Site-directed mutagenesis and domain swapping between the S. aureus and B. burgdorferi proteins identified that a 6-residue stretch of the SpoVG α-helix contributes to DNA sequence specificity. Two additional, highly conserved amino acid residues on an adjacent β-sheet are essential for DNA-binding, apparently by contacts with the DNA phosphate backbone. Results of these studies thus identified a novel family of bacterial DNA-binding proteins, developed a model of SpoVG-DNA interactions, and provide direction for future functional studies on these wide-spread proteins.

  17. SATB1 regulates SPARC expression in K562 cell line through binding to a specific sequence in the third intron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, K.; Cai, R.; Dai, B.B.; Zhang, X.Q.; Wang, H.J.; Ge, S.F.; Xu, W.R.; Lu, J.

    2007-01-01

    Special AT-rich binding protein 1 (SATB1), a cell type-specific nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR) DNA-binding protein, tethers to a specific DNA sequence and regulates gene expression through chromatin remodeling and HDAC (histone deacetylase complex) recruitment. In this study, a SATB1 eukaryotic expression plasmid was transfected into the human erythroleukemia K562 cell line and individual clones that stably over-expressed the SATB1 protein were isolated. Microarray analysis revealed that hundreds of genes were either up- or down-regulated in the SATB1 over-expressing K562 cell lines. One of these was the extra-cellular matrix glycoprotein, SPARC (human secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine). siRNA knock-down of SATB1 also reduced SPARC expression, which was consistent with elevated SPARC levels in the SATB1 over-expressing cell line. Bioinformatics software Mat-inspector showed that a 17 bp DNA sequence in the third intron of SPARC possessed a high potential for SATB1 binding; a finding confirmed by Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with anti-SATB1 antibody. Our results show for the first time that forced-expression of SATB1 in K562 cells triggers SPARC up-regulation by binding to a 17 bp DNA sequence in the third intron

  18. Recombinant norovirus-specific scFv inhibit virus-like particle binding to cellular ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Michele E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noroviruses cause epidemic outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness in all age-groups. The rapid onset and ease of person-to-person transmission suggest that inhibitors of the initial steps of virus binding to susceptible cells have value in limiting spread and outbreak persistence. We previously generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb 54.6 that blocks binding of recombinant norovirus-like particles (VLP to Caco-2 intestinal cells and inhibits VLP-mediated hemagglutination. In this study, we engineered the antigen binding domains of mAb 54.6 into a single chain variable fragment (scFv and tested whether these scFv could function as cell binding inhibitors, similar to the parent mAb. Results The scFv54.6 construct was engineered to encode the light (VL and heavy (VH variable domains of mAb 54.6 separated by a flexible peptide linker, and this recombinant protein was expressed in Pichia pastoris. Purified scFv54.6 recognized native VLPs by immunoblot, inhibited VLP-mediated hemagglutination, and blocked VLP binding to H carbohydrate antigen expressed on the surface of a CHO cell line stably transfected to express α 1,2-fucosyltransferase. Conclusion scFv54.6 retained the functional properties of the parent mAb with respect to inhibiting norovirus particle interactions with cells. With further engineering into a form deliverable to the gut mucosa, norovirus neutralizing antibodies represent a prophylactic strategy that would be valuable in outbreak settings.

  19. The Rab27a-binding protein, JFC1, regulates androgen-dependent secretion of prostate-specific antigen and prostatic-specific acid phosphatase1

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Jennifer L.; Ellis, Beverly A.; Noack, Deborah; Seabra, Miguel C.; Catz, Sergio D.

    2005-01-01

    Two of the major proteins secreted by the prostate epithelium secretory cells are PSA (prostate-specific antigen) and PSAP (prostatic-specific acid phosphatase). The molecules involved in the secretory machinery of PSA and PSAP, and the regulation of this machinery, remain unknown. In the present paper, we provide evidence that JFC1 [synaptotagmin-like protein (slp1)], a Rab27a- and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-binding protein, regulates the androgen-dependent secretion of PSAP and PSA in human LNCaP pros...

  20. Evaluation of energy spectral information in nuclear imaging and investigation of protein binding of cationic radionuclides by lactoferrin. Comprehensive progress report, October 1, 1977-September 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffer, P. B.

    1980-06-10

    Construction of an Anger camera-computer system which allows collection of both the position and energy signals from events detected by the scintillation camera has been completed. The system allows correction of energy response non-uniformity of the detector and facilitates research related to effects of energy discrimination in radionuclide scintigraphy. The system consists of electronic hardware to transmit and digitize the energy signal, software to record and process that signal in conjunction with spatial positioning signals, and additional hardware for recording the processed images so that they can be evaluated by observers. Preliminary results indicate that the system is useful in evaluating clinical images. Assymetric (eccentric) energy windows do improve image quality and are of value in improving detection of lesions on liver scintigraphs. The mechanisms by which Ga-67 is taken up in infection and tumor has been elucidated, and the uptake of radiogallium in microorganisms as a function of its interaction with siderophores was also studied. The primary function of these low molecular weight compounds is to trap ferric ion. However, gallium may be substituted for ferric ion and becomes trapped within the microorganism. The uptake of radiogallium by neutrophils and the role that lactoferrin plays in both intracellular localization of radiogallium and subsequent deposition of the radionuclide at sites of infection were also studied. Investigation of ferric ion analogs reveals definate differences in the affinity of these metals for binding molecules which helps explain their biologic activity. While ferric ion has the strongest affinity for such molecules, gallium has very high affinity for siderophores, moderate affinity for lactoferrin, and lower affinity for transferrin. The relative affinity of indium for these molecules is in approximately the reverse order.

  1. The intriguing Cyclophilin A-HIV-1 Vpr interaction: prolyl cis/trans isomerisation catalysis and specific binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henklein Petra

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclophilin A (CypA represents a potential target for antiretroviral therapy since inhibition of CypA suppresses human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 replication, although the mechanism through which CypA modulates HIV-1 infectivity still remains unclear. The interaction of HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr with the human peptidyl prolyl isomerase CypA is known to occur in vitro and in vivo. However, the nature of the interaction of CypA with Pro-35 of N-terminal Vpr has remained undefined. Results Characterization of the interactions of human CypA with N-terminal peptides of HIV-1 Vpr has been achieved using a combination of nuclear magnetic resonace (NMR exchange spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR. NMR data at atomic resolution indicate prolyl cis/trans isomerisation of the highly conserved proline residues Pro-5, -10, -14 and -35 of Vpr are catalyzed by human CypA and require only very low concentrations of the isomerase relative to that of the peptide substrates. Of the N-terminal peptides of Vpr only those containing Pro-35 bind to CypA in a biosensor assay. SPR studies of specific N-terminal peptides with decreasing numbers of residues revealed that a seven-residue motif centred at Pro-35 consisting of RHFPRIW, which under membrane-like solution conditions comprises the loop region connecting helix 1 and 2 of Vpr and the two terminal residues of helix 1, is sufficient to maintain strong specific binding. Conclusions Only N-terminal peptides of Vpr containing Pro-35, which appears to be vital for manifold functions of Vpr, bind to CypA in a biosensor assay. This indicates that Pro-35 is essential for a specific CypA-Vpr binding interaction, in contrast to the general prolyl cis/trans isomerisation observed for all proline residues of Vpr, which only involve transient enzyme-substrate interactions. Previously suggested models depicting CypA as a chaperone that plays a role in HIV-1 virulence are

  2. Specific PGF-2 alpha binding by the corpus luteum of the pregnant and non-pregnant mare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, M W; Strauss, S; Simonelli, M; Zavy, M T; Sharp, D C

    1979-01-01

    The binding of prostaglandin (PG) F-2 alpha to corpora lutea (CL) from pregnant and non-pregnant Pony mares was examined. Studies of the rates of association and dissociation indicated that [3H]PGF was bound specifically and reversibly to a luteal cell membrane preparation (MP) that was isolated by high speed (100,000 g) ultracentrifugation. Various PGs and PG metabolites displaced [3H]PGF from the receptors in the following decreasing order: PGF-2 alpha greater than 13, 14-dihydro-PGF-2 alpha = 13,14-dihydro-15-keto PGF-2 alpha greater than PGD-2 greater than PGF-1 alpha = PGE-2 greater than PGE-2 beta greater than PGE-1. These data implicate the 9 alpha-OH and 5,6 cis double bond as major contributors to PGF receptor recognition. The membrane preparation appeared to contain at least two receptor populations, a high affinity, low capacity and a low affinity, high capacity receptor. The binding of PGF (pg/mg MP protein +/- s.e.m. (n)) to CL of the non-pregnant mare increased from 4.09 +/- 11.6 (4), on Day 4 after ovulation, to reach maximal levels by Day 12, 15.01 +/- 2.5 (4), and declined thereafter. In pregnancy the binding of PGF continued to increase until Day 18, reaching 27.47 +/- 1.7 (3), before it declined on Day 20. The reduction in binding by Day 16 in the non-pregnant mare may reflect the process of luteolysis, while high PGF binding capacity of CL between Days 16 and 18 of pregnancy indicated that luteal maintenance during pregnancy is not associated with a reduction of PGF binding capabilities.

  3. High-throughput bioscreening system utilizing high-performance affinity magnetic carriers exhibiting minimal non-specific protein binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Naohiro; Nishio, Kosuke; Hatakeyama, Mamoru; Yasuno, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Tada, Masaru; Nakagawa, Takashi; Sandhu, Adarsh; Abe, Masanori; Handa, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    For affinity purification of drug target protein we have developed magnetic carriers, narrow in size distribution (184±9 nm), which exhibit minimal non-specific binding of unwanted proteins. The carriers were highly dispersed in aqueous solutions and highly resistant to organic solvents, which enabled immobilization of various hydrophobic chemicals as probes on the carrier surfaces. Utilizing the carriers we have automated the process of separation and purification of the target proteins that had been done by manual operation previously.

  4. Specificity of anti-MHC class II antibody binding to synthetic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chersi, A; Romano, T F; Ruocco, E

    1989-01-01

    This study indicates that antibodies raised against a DR4,w6; DQw1,3 positive cell line may bind to synthetic peptides selected from the polymorphic amino acid sequences 51-59 and 63-79 on the DQw2 beta chain. This cross-reaction may be explained by the relatively high sequence homology of these sequences in the beta chains of class II histocompatibility antigens, and suggests that antibody binding to small peptides may be scarsely selective. Based on the observations of the reactivity of the antibodies with several cell lines, and comparison of the amino acid sequences of beta chains of DR and DQ molecules, an attempt to identify the cross-reacting epitope is presented.

  5. Toward understanding macrocycle specificity of iron on the dioxygen-binding ability: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yong; Chen, Kexian; Jia, Lu; Li, Haoran

    2011-08-14

    In an effort to examine the interaction between dioxygen and iron-macrocyclic complexes, and to understand how this interaction was affected by those different macrocyclic ligands, dioxygen binding with iron-porphyrin, iron-phthalocyanine, iron-dibenzotetraaza[14]annulene, and iron-salen complexes is investigated by means of quantum chemical calculations utilizing Density Functional Theory (DFT). Based on the analysis of factors influencing the corresponding dioxygen binding process, it showed that different macrocyclic ligands possess different O-O bond distances, and different electronic configurations for the bound O(2) and non-aromatic macrocyclic ligands favor dioxygen activation. Furthermore, the smaller the energy gap between the HOMO of iron-macrocyclic complexes and the LUMO of dioxygen, the more active the bound O(2) becomes, with a longer O-O bond distance and a shorter Fe-O bond length.

  6. A Conserved Motif Provides Binding Specificity to the PP2A-B56 Phosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Emil Peter Thrane; Kruse, Thomas; Davey, Norman E

    2016-01-01

    -exposed pocket on PP2A regulatory B56 subunits binds to a consensus sequence on interacting proteins, which we term the LxxIxE motif. The composition of the motif modulates the affinity for B56, which in turn determines the phosphorylation status of associated substrates. Phosphorylation of amino acid residues......Dynamic protein phosphorylation is a fundamental mechanism regulating biological processes in all organisms. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is the main source of phosphatase activity in the cell, but the molecular details of substrate recognition are unknown. Here, we report that a conserved surface...... within the motif increases B56 binding, allowing integration of kinase and phosphatase activity. We identify conserved LxxIxE motifs in essential proteins throughout the eukaryotic domain of life and in human viruses, suggesting that the motifs are required for basic cellular function. Our study provides...

  7. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide specific binding in pheochromocytoma cells PC12

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maletínská, Lenka; Maixnerová, Jana; Matyšková, Resha; Haugvicová, Renata; Šloncová, Eva; Elbert, Tomáš; Slaninová, Jiřina; Železná, Blanka

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 559, 2/3 (2007), s. 109-114 ISSN 0014-2999 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/05/0614 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : radioligand binding * CART * PC12 cells * food intake Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.376, year: 2007

  8. Specific ligand binding domain residues confer low dioxin responsiveness to AHR1β of Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odio, Camila; Holzman, Sarah A; Denison, Michael S; Fraccalvieri, Domenico; Bonati, Laura; Franks, Diana G; Hahn, Mark E; Powell, Wade H

    2013-03-12

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) family protein that mediates the toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in vertebrates. Frogs are remarkably insensitive to TCDD, and AHRs from Xenopus laevis bind TCDD with low affinity. We sought to identify structural features of X. laevis AHR1β associated with low TCDD sensitivity. Substitution of the entire ligand binding domain (LBD) with the corresponding sequence from mouse AHR(b-1) dramatically increased TCDD responsiveness in transactivation assays. To identify the amino acid residues responsible, we constructed a comparative model of the AHR1β LBD using homologous domains of PAS proteins HIF2α and ARNT. The model revealed an internal cavity with dimensions similar to those of the putative binding cavity of mouse AHR(b-1), suggesting the importance of side chain interactions over cavity size. Of residues with side chains clearly pointing into the cavity, only two differed from the mouse sequence. When A354, located within a conserved β-strand, was changed to serine, the corresponding mouse residue, the EC50 for TCDD decreased more than 15-fold. When N325 was changed to serine, the EC50 decreased 3-fold. When the mutations were combined, the EC50 decreased from 18.6 to 0.8 nM, the value nearly matching the TCDD sensitivity of mouse AHR. Velocity sedimentation analysis confirmed that mutant frog AHRs exhibited correspondingly increased levels of TCDD binding. We also assayed mutant AHRs for responsiveness to a candidate endogenous ligand, 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ). Mutations that increased sensitivity to TCDD also increased sensitivity to FICZ. This comparative study represents a novel approach to discerning fundamental information about the structure of AHR and its interactions with biologically important agonists.

  9. Engineering of specific uranyl-coordination sites in the calcium-binding motif of Calmodulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beccia, M.; Pardoux, R.; Sauge-Merle, S.; Bremond, N.; Lemaire, D.; Berthomieu, C.; Delangle, P.; Guilbaud, P.

    2014-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: Characterization of heavy metals interactions with proteins is fundamental for understanding the molecular factors and mechanisms governing ions toxicity and speciation in cells. This line of research will also help in developing new molecules able to selectively and efficiently bind toxic metal ions, which could find application for bio-detection or bioremediation purposes. We have used the regulatory calcium-binding protein Calmodulin (CaM) from A. thaliana as a structural model and, starting from it, we have designed various mutants by site-directed mutagenesis. We have analysed thermodynamics of uranyl ion binding to both sites I and II of CaM N-terminal domain and we have identified structural factors governing this interaction. Selectivity for uranyl ion has been tested by studying reactions of the investigated peptides with Ca 2+ , in the same conditions used for UO 2 2+ . Spectro-fluorimetric titrations and FTIR analysis have shown that the affinity for uranyl increases by phosphorylation of a threonine in site I, especially approaching the physiological pH, where the phospho-threonine side chain is deprotonated. Based on structural models obtained by Molecular Dynamics, we tested the effect of a two residues deletion on site I properties. We obtained an almost two orders of magnitude increase in affinity for uranyl, with a sub-nanomolar dissociation constant for the uranyl complex with the non phosphorylated peptide, and an improved uranyl/calcium selectivity. Allosteric effects depending on Ca 2+ and UO 2 2+ binding have been investigated by comparing thermodynamic parameters obtained for mutants having both sites I and II able to chelate metal ions with those of mutants consisting of just one active site

  10. Insulin-Insulin-like Growth Factors Hybrids as Molecular Probes of Hormone:Receptor Binding Specificity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křížková, Květoslava; Chrudinová, Martina; Povalová, Anna; Selicharová, Irena; Collinsová, Michaela; Vaněk, Václav; Brzozowski, A. M.; Jiráček, Jiří; Žáková, Lenka

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 21 (2016), s. 2903-2913 ISSN 0006-2960 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-19018S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : alanine scanning mutagenesis * high-affinity binding * type 1 IGF receptor Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.938, year: 2016 http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/acs.biochem.6b00140

  11. Contribution of Specific Amino Acid Changes in Penicillin Binding Protein 1 to Amoxicillin Resistance in Clinical Helicobacter pylori isolates ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Nadia N.; Morikis, Dimitrios; Schiller, Neal L.

    2011-01-01

    Amoxicillin is commonly used to treat Helicobacter pylori, a major cause of peptic ulcers, stomach cancer, and B-cell mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Amoxicillin resistance in H. pylori is increasing steadily, especially in developing countries, leading to treatment failures. In this study, we characterize the mechanism of amoxicillin resistance in the U.S. clinical isolate B258. Transformation of amoxicillin-susceptible strain 26695 with the penicillin binding protein 1 gene (pbp1) from B258 increased the amoxicillin resistance of 26695 to equal that of B258, while studies using biotinylated amoxicillin showed a decrease in the binding of amoxicillin to the PBP1 of B258. Transformation with 4 pbp1 fragments, each encompassing several amino acid substitutions, combined with site-directed mutagenesis studies, identified 3 amino acid substitutions in PBP1 of B258 which affected amoxicillin susceptibility (Val 469 Met, Phe 473 Leu, and Ser 543 Arg). Homology modeling showed the spatial orientation of these specific amino acid changes in PBP1 from 26695 and B258. The results of these studies demonstrate that amoxicillin resistance in the clinical U.S. isolate B258 is due solely to an altered PBP1 protein with a lower binding affinity for amoxicillin. Homology modeling analyses using previously identified amino acid substitutions of amoxicillin-resistant PBP1s demonstrate the importance of specific amino acid substitutions in PBP1 that affect the binding of amoxicillin in the putative binding cleft, defining those substitutions deemed most important in amoxicillin resistance. PMID:20956585

  12. Contribution of specific amino acid changes in penicillin binding protein 1 to amoxicillin resistance in clinical Helicobacter pylori isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Nadia N; Morikis, Dimitrios; Schiller, Neal L

    2011-01-01

    Amoxicillin is commonly used to treat Helicobacter pylori, a major cause of peptic ulcers, stomach cancer, and B-cell mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Amoxicillin resistance in H. pylori is increasing steadily, especially in developing countries, leading to treatment failures. In this study, we characterize the mechanism of amoxicillin resistance in the U.S. clinical isolate B258. Transformation of amoxicillin-susceptible strain 26695 with the penicillin binding protein 1 gene (pbp1) from B258 increased the amoxicillin resistance of 26695 to equal that of B258, while studies using biotinylated amoxicillin showed a decrease in the binding of amoxicillin to the PBP1 of B258. Transformation with 4 pbp1 fragments, each encompassing several amino acid substitutions, combined with site-directed mutagenesis studies, identified 3 amino acid substitutions in PBP1 of B258 which affected amoxicillin susceptibility (Val 469 Met, Phe 473 Leu, and Ser 543 Arg). Homology modeling showed the spatial orientation of these specific amino acid changes in PBP1 from 26695 and B258. The results of these studies demonstrate that amoxicillin resistance in the clinical U.S. isolate B258 is due solely to an altered PBP1 protein with a lower binding affinity for amoxicillin. Homology modeling analyses using previously identified amino acid substitutions of amoxicillin-resistant PBP1s demonstrate the importance of specific amino acid substitutions in PBP1 that affect the binding of amoxicillin in the putative binding cleft, defining those substitutions deemed most important in amoxicillin resistance.

  13. Analysis of the DNA binding proteins interacting with specific upstream sequences of the S. purpuratus CyI actin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganster, R; Paul, H; Katula, K S

    1992-12-01

    The CyI actin gene of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, is regulated temporally and spatially within the cells of the early embryo. In an effort to understand the molecular basis for the CyI actin pattern of expression, we have begun analyzing the protein-DNA interactions within regions previously shown to be of potential functional importance (Katula et al., 1987). Using DNase I footprinting, 10 protected regions were identified containing both conserved and apparently novel protein binding sites. Gel mobility shift competition assays confirmed the presence of multiple protein factors which specifically recognize CyI actin upstream sequences. Determination of a relative affinity constant value (Kr) indicated that most of the protein factors preferred their respective oligonucleotide sequences vs. a synthetic competitor DNA in a range of 10(4). The highest affinity binding was observed for proteins binding to the oligonucleotide probe containing the octamer element (Kr approximately 10(6)). Heterologous gel shift competition assays were carried out to investigate the interrelatedness of the protein factors. These studies, combined with other data, indicate there are both unique and redundant protein-DNA interactions in the region being examined. Possible alterations in CyI actin DNA binding proteins were investigated during the period of CyI transcriptional activation by gel mobility shift analysis. An increase in binding activity was observed for most of the factors, indicating that early transcriptional activity of CyI actin may involve a general increase in the amount or activity of specific transcription factors. In addition, qualitative changes, as seen by alterations in the shift patterns, were observed for some of the oligonucleotide probes.

  14. Proteomic Analysis of the Excretory and Secretory Proteins of Haemonchus contortus (HcESP Binding to Goat PBMCs In Vivo Revealed Stage-Specific Binding Profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javaid Ali Gadahi

    Full Text Available Haemonchus contortus is a parasitic gastrointestinal nematode, and its excretory and secretory products (HcESPs interact extensively with the host cells. In this study, we report the interaction of proteins from HcESPs at different developmental stages to goat peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs in vivo using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 407 HcESPs that interacted with goat PBMCs at different time points were identified from a H. contortus protein database using SEQUEST searches. The L4 and L5 stages of H. contortus represented a higher proportion of the identified proteins compared with the early and late adult stages. Both stage-specific interacting proteins and proteins that were common to multiple stages were identified. Forty-seven interacting proteins were shared among all stages. The gene ontology (GO distributions of the identified goat PBMC-interacting proteins were nearly identical among all developmental stages, with high representation of binding and catalytic activity. Cellular, metabolic and single-organism processes were also annotated as major biological processes, but interestingly, more proteins were annotated as localization processes at the L5 stage than at the L4 and adult stages. Based on the clustering of homologous proteins, we improved the functional annotations of un-annotated proteins identified at different developmental stages. Some unnamed H. contortus ATP-binding cassette proteins, including ADP-ribosylation factor and P-glycoprotein-9, were identified by STRING protein clustering analysis.

  15. Analysis of the PDZ binding specificities of Influenza A Virus NS1 proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagasaka Kazunori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Influenza A virus non-structural protein 1 (NS1 is a multifunctional virulence factor with several protein-protein interaction domains, involved in preventing apoptosis of the infected cell and in evading the interferon response. In addition, the majority of influenza A virus NS1 proteins have a class I PDZ-binding motif at the C-terminus, and this itself has been shown to be a virulence determinant. In the majority of human influenza NS1 proteins the consensus motif is RSxV: in avian NS1 it is ESxV. Of the few human strains that have the avian motif, all were from very high mortality outbreaks of the disease. Previous work has shown that minor differences in PDZ-binding motifs can have major effects on the spectrum of cellular proteins targeted. In this study we analyse the effect of these differences upon the binding of Influenza A virus NS1 protein to a range of cellular proteins involved in polarity and signal transduction.

  16. Structural Comparison, Substrate Specificity, and Inhibitor Binding of AGPase Small Subunit from Monocot and Dicot: Present Insight and Future Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Sarma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase is the first rate limiting enzyme of starch biosynthesis pathway and has been exploited as the target for greater starch yield in several plants. The structure-function analysis and substrate binding specificity of AGPase have provided enormous potential for understanding the role of specific amino acid or motifs responsible for allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanisms, which facilitate the engineering of AGPases. We report the three-dimensional structure, substrate, and inhibitor binding specificity of AGPase small subunit from different monocot and dicot crop plants. Both monocot and dicot subunits were found to exploit similar interactions with the substrate and inhibitor molecule as in the case of their closest homologue potato tuber AGPase small subunit. Comparative sequence and structural analysis followed by molecular docking and electrostatic surface potential analysis reveal that rearrangements of secondary structure elements, substrate, and inhibitor binding residues are strongly conserved and follow common folding pattern and orientation within monocot and dicot displaying a similar mode of allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanism. The results from this study along with site-directed mutagenesis complemented by molecular dynamics simulation will shed more light on increasing the starch content of crop plants to ensure the food security worldwide.

  17. A Simple PB/LIE Free Energy Function Accurately Predicts the Peptide Binding Specificity of the Tiam1 PDZ Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Panel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available PDZ domains generally bind short amino acid sequences at the C-terminus of target proteins, and short peptides can be used as inhibitors or model ligands. Here, we used experimental binding assays and molecular dynamics simulations to characterize 51 complexes involving the Tiam1 PDZ domain and to test the performance of a semi-empirical free energy function. The free energy function combined a Poisson-Boltzmann (PB continuum electrostatic term, a van der Waals interaction energy, and a surface area term. Each term was empirically weighted, giving a Linear Interaction Energy or “PB/LIE” free energy. The model yielded a mean unsigned deviation of 0.43 kcal/mol and a Pearson correlation of 0.64 between experimental and computed free energies, which was superior to a Null model that assumes all complexes have the same affinity. Analyses of the models support several experimental observations that indicate the orientation of the α2 helix is a critical determinant for peptide specificity. The models were also used to predict binding free energies for nine new variants, corresponding to point mutants of the Syndecan1 and Caspr4 peptides. The predictions did not reveal improved binding; however, they suggest that an unnatural amino acid could be used to increase protease resistance and peptide lifetimes in vivo. The overall performance of the model should allow its use in the design of new PDZ ligands in the future.

  18. A Simple PB/LIE Free Energy Function Accurately Predicts the Peptide Binding Specificity of the Tiam1 PDZ Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panel, Nicolas; Sun, Young Joo; Fuentes, Ernesto J; Simonson, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    PDZ domains generally bind short amino acid sequences at the C-terminus of target proteins, and short peptides can be used as inhibitors or model ligands. Here, we used experimental binding assays and molecular dynamics simulations to characterize 51 complexes involving the Tiam1 PDZ domain and to test the performance of a semi-empirical free energy function. The free energy function combined a Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) continuum electrostatic term, a van der Waals interaction energy, and a surface area term. Each term was empirically weighted, giving a Linear Interaction Energy or "PB/LIE" free energy. The model yielded a mean unsigned deviation of 0.43 kcal/mol and a Pearson correlation of 0.64 between experimental and computed free energies, which was superior to a Null model that assumes all complexes have the same affinity. Analyses of the models support several experimental observations that indicate the orientation of the α 2 helix is a critical determinant for peptide specificity. The models were also used to predict binding free energies for nine new variants, corresponding to point mutants of the Syndecan1 and Caspr4 peptides. The predictions did not reveal improved binding; however, they suggest that an unnatural amino acid could be used to increase protease resistance and peptide lifetimes in vivo . The overall performance of the model should allow its use in the design of new PDZ ligands in the future.

  19. Characteristics Studies of 125I- and total PSA antibody's Binding with prostate specific antigen (PSA) in Human Uterus Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mudaffar, S.; Al-Salihi, J.

    2005-01-01

    Two groups of uterus tumors (benign and malignant) postmenopausal patients were used to investigate the presence of prostate specific antigen (PSA). Preliminary experiments were performed to follow the binding of '1 25 I-anti total PSA antibody with PSA in uterus tissues homogenates of the two groups with their corresponding antigen and found to be (8.8,7.1%) for benign and malignant tumors, respectively. An Immuno Radio Metric Assay (IRMA) procedure was developed for measuring PSA in benign and malignant uterus tumors homogenates. The optimum conditions of the binding of 125 I-anti total PSA antibody with PSA were as follows: PSA concentration (150,200 μg protein),tracer antibody concentration (125,250 μg protein), p H (7.6,7.2), temp (15,25?C) and time (1.5 hrs) for postmenopausal benign and malignant uterus tumors tissue homogenates, respectively. The use of different concentrations of Na + and Mg 2+ ions were shown to cause an increase in the binding at concentration of (125,75 mΜ) of Na 1+ ions (75,225 mΜ) of Mg 2+ ions for benign and malignant uterus tumors homogenates, respectively, while the use of different concentrations of urea and polyethylene glycol (PEG) Caused a decrease in the binding with the increase in the concentration of each of urea and PEG in the both cases

  20. Multivalent binding and biomimetic cell rolling improves the sensitivity and specificity of circulating tumor cell capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Ja Hye; Eblan, Michael J; Caster, Joseph M; Park, Sinjung; Poellmann, Michael J; Wang, Kyle; Tepper, Joel E; Tam, Kevin A; Miller, Seth M; Shen, Colette; Chen, Ronald C; Zhang, Tian; Chera, Bhishamjit; Wang, Andrew Z; Hong, Seungpyo

    2018-03-15

    We aimed to examine the effects of multivalent binding and biomimetic cell rolling on the sensitivity and specificity of circulating tumor cell (CTC) capture. We also investigated the clinical significance of CTCs and their kinetic profiles in cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) treatment. Patients with histologically confirmed primary carcinoma undergoing RT, with or without chemotherapy, were eligible for enrollment. Peripheral blood was collected prospectively at up to 5 time points, including prior to RT, at the first week, mid-point and final week of treatment, as well as 4 to 12 weeks after completion of RT. CTC capture was accomplished using a nanotechnology-based assay (CapioCyte) functionalized with aEpCAM, aHER-2, and aEGFR. CapioCyte was able to detect CTCs in all 24 cancer patients enrolled. Multivalent binding via poly(amidoamine) dendrimers further improved capture sensitivity. We also showed that cell rolling effect can improve CTC capture specificity (% of captured cells that are CK+/CD45-/DAPI+) up to 38%. Among the 18 patients with sequential CTC measurements, the median CTC decreased from 113 CTCs/mL before RT to 32 CTCs/mL at completion of RT (p = 0.001). CTCs declined throughout RT in patients with complete clinical and/or radiographic response, in contrast to an elevation in CTCs at mid or post-RT in the 2 patients with known pathologic residual disease. Our study demonstrated that multivalent binding and cell rolling can improve the sensitivity and specificity of CTC capture compared to multivalent binding alone, allowing reliable monitoring of CTC changes during and after treatment. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Effects of substrate binding site residue substitutions of xynA from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens on substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Anil S; Pawar, Vishakha A; Panchal, Ketankumar J; Sudhir, Ankit P; Dave, Bhaumik R; Patel, Darshan H; Subramanian, R B

    2018-02-13

    The aromatic residues of xylanase enzyme, W187, Y124, W144, Y128 and W63 of substrate binding pocket from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens were investigated for their role in substrate binding by homology modelling and sequence analysis. These residues are highly conserved and play an important role in substrate binding through steric hindrance. The substitution of these residues with alanine allows the enzyme to accommodate nonspecific substrates. Wild type and mutated genes were cloned and overexpressed in BL21. Optimum pH and temperature of rBAxn exhibited pH 9.0 and 50 °C respectively and it was stable up to 215 h. Along with the physical properties of rBAxn, kinetic parameters (K m 19.34 ± 0.72 mg/ml; k cat 6449.12 ± 155.37 min - 1 and k cat /K m 333.83 ± 6.78 ml min - 1  mg - 1 ) were also compared with engineered enzymes. Out of five mutations, W63A, Y128A and W144A lost almost 90% activity and Y124A and W187A retained almost 40-45% xylanase activity. The site-specific single mutation, led to alteration in substrate specificity from xylan to CMC while in case of double mutant the substrate specificity was altered from xylan to CMC, FP and avicel, indicating the role of aromatic residues on substrate binding, catalytic process and overall catalytic efficiency.

  2. Specific binding of an immunoreactive and biologically active 125I-labeled substance P derivative to mouse mesencephalic cells in primary culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaujouan, J.C.; Torrens, Y.; Herbet, A.; Daguet, M.C.; Glowinski, J.; Prochiantz, A.

    1982-01-01

    Binding characteristics of 125 I-labeled Bolton-Hunter substance P ([ 125 I]BHSP), a radioactive analogue of substance P, were studied with mesencephalic primary cultures prepared from embryonic mouse brain. Nonspecific binding represented no more than 20% of the total binding observed on the cells. In contrast, significant specific binding--saturable, reversible, and temperature-dependent--was demonstrated. Scatchard analysis of concentration-dependent binding saturation indicates a single population of noninteracting sites with a high affinity (Kd . 169 pM). Substance P and different substance P analogues were tested for their competitive potencies with regard to [ 125 I]BHSP binding. BHSP itself, substance P, (Tyr8)-substance P, and (nor-Leu11)-substance P strongly inhibited the binding. Good inhibition was also obtained with physalaemin and eledoisin, two peptides structurally related to substance P. When substance P C-terminal fragments were tested for their ability to compete with [ 125 I]BHSP binding, a good relationship was found between competitive activity and peptide length. Regional distribution of [ 125 I]BHSP binding sites was found using primary cultures obtained from different regions of embryonic mouse brain. Mesencephalic, hypothalamic, and striatal cultures had the highest [ 125 I]BHSP binding capacities, whereas cortical, hippocampal, and cerebellar cells shared only little binding activity. Finally, when mesencephalic cells were grown under conditions impairing glial development, [ 125 I]BHSP binding was not affected, demonstrating that binding sites are located on neuronal cells

  3. Identification and further characterization of the specific cell binding fragment from sponge aggregation factor

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) were raised against the aggregation factor (AF) from the marine sponge Geodia cydonium. Two clones were identified that secrete McAbs against the cell binding protein of the AF complex. Fab fragments of McAbs: 5D2-D11 completely abolished the activity of the AF to form secondary aggregates from single cells. The McAbs were determined to react with the AF in vitro; this interaction was prevented by addition of the aggregation receptor, isolated and purified from t...

  4. Binding of von Willebrand factor to collagen type III: role of specific amino acids in the collagen binding domain of vWF and effects of neighboring domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Plas, R. M.; Gomes, L.; Marquart, J. A.; Vink, T.; Meijers, J. C.; de Groot, P. G.; Sixma, J. J.; Huizinga, E. G.

    2000-01-01

    Binding of von Willebrand Factor (vWF) to sites of vascular injury is the first step of hemostasis. Collagen types I and III are important binding sites for vWF. We have previously determined the three-dimensional structure of the collagen binding A3 domain of vWF (Huizinga et al., Structure 1997;

  5. The substrate-binding protein in bacterial ABC transporters: dissecting roles in the evolution of substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Abbas; Horler, Richard S P; Muller, Axel; Wilkinson, Anthony J; Wilson, Keith S; Thomas, Gavin H

    2015-10-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, although being ubiquitous in biology, often feature a subunit that is limited primarily to bacteria and archaea. This subunit, the substrate-binding protein (SBP), is a key determinant of the substrate specificity and high affinity of ABC uptake systems in these organisms. Most prokaryotes have many SBP-dependent ABC transporters that recognize a broad range of ligands from metal ions to amino acids, sugars and peptides. Herein, we review the structure and function of a number of more unusual SBPs, including an ABC transporter involved in the transport of rare furanose forms of sugars and an SBP that has evolved to specifically recognize the bacterial cell wall-derived murein tripeptide (Mtp). Both these examples illustrate that subtle changes in binding-site architecture, including changes in side chains not directly involved in ligand co-ordination, can result in significant alteration of substrate range in novel and unpredictable ways. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  6. Revisiting the link between body and agency: visual movement congruency enhances intentional binding but is not body-specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zopf, Regine; Polito, Vince; Moore, James

    2018-01-09

    Embodiment and agency are key aspects of how we perceive ourselves that have typically been associated with independent mechanisms. Recent work, however, has suggested that these mechanisms are related. The sense of agency arises from recognising a causal influence on the external world. This influence is typically realised through bodily movements and thus the perception of the bodily self could also be crucial for agency. We investigated whether a key index of agency - intentional binding - was modulated by body-specific information. Participants judged the interval between pressing a button and a subsequent tone. We used virtual reality to manipulate two aspects of movement feedback. First, form: participants viewed a virtual hand or sphere. Second, movement congruency: the viewed object moved congruently or incongruently with the participant's hidden hand. Both factors, form and movement congruency, significantly influenced embodiment. However, only movement congruency influenced intentional binding. Binding was increased for congruent compared to incongruent movement feedback irrespective of form. This shows that the comparison between viewed and performed movements provides an important cue for agency, whereas body-specific visual form does not. We suggest that embodiment and agency mechanisms both depend on comparisons across sensorimotor signals but that they are influenced by distinct factors.

  7. Disparate Degrees of Hypervariable Loop Flexibility Control T-Cell Receptor Cross-Reactivity, Specificity, and Binding Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Daniel R.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Corcelli, Steven A.; Baker, Brian M. (Notre)

    2012-06-19

    {alpha}{beta} T-cell receptors (TCRs) recognize multiple antigenic peptides bound and presented by major histocompatibility complex molecules. TCR cross-reactivity has been attributed in part to the flexibility of TCR complementarity-determining region (CDR) loops, yet there have been limited direct studies of loop dynamics to determine the extent of its role. Here we studied the flexibility of the binding loops of the {alpha}{beta} TCR A6 using crystallographic, spectroscopic, and computational methods. A significant role for flexibility in binding and cross-reactivity was indicated only for the CDR3{alpha} and CDR3{beta} hypervariable loops. Examination of the energy landscapes of these two loops indicated that CDR3{beta} possesses a broad, smooth energy landscape, leading to rapid sampling in the free TCR of a range of conformations compatible with different ligands. The landscape for CDR3{alpha} is more rugged, resulting in more limited conformational sampling that leads to specificity for a reduced set of peptides as well as the major histocompatibility complex protein. In addition to informing on the mechanisms of cross-reactivity and specificity, the energy landscapes of the two loops indicate a complex mechanism for TCR binding, incorporating elements of both conformational selection and induced fit in a manner that blends features of popular models for TCR recognition.

  8. Alkaline cation complexing with calixarenes in electro-spray / mass spectrometry. Specificity for cesium, influence of solvation on ion species and radiolytic stability of the complexing media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allain, Francoise

    2000-01-01

    Radioactive waste management is a rather difficult issue. In order to reduce the volume of waste storage, particularly the Cs 135 (radioactive half-life 2.3 10 6 years), liquid-liquid extraction experiments have shown that crown calixarenes were able to selectively extract cesium cation in wastes. However, the stability under radiolysis of this type of macrocycle is unknown and is the theme of this thesis. Through the coupling of electro-spray and mass spectrometry, the selectivity of crown calixarenes for cesium has been confirmed. The necessity to optimize operating conditions during the utilization of this ionization mode was acknowledged for a correct interpretation of mass spectrum. The solvent nature, source temperature, applied voltage on the cone, gaseous phase stability and species ionization desorption rate are indeed parameters that should be taken into account. Experiments show that the solution species stability is inverse to the one in gaseous phase. In a solution, species stability is linked to the nature of the solvent (solvating power) whereas in gaseous phase, it is linked to the cationic affinity. In the current radiolysis conditions it has been demonstrated that calixarenes have a stable structure. Degradation products are very largely substitution products and do not hinder the caesium cation complexing. Concerning the quantitative aspect, an estimation was produced, however results are not satisfying: reference product synthesis is in fact necessary in order to establish calibration curves that will allow to precisely dose the various components derived from radiolysis [fr

  9. Novel control of cardiac myofilament response to calcium by S-glutahionylation at specific sites of myosin binding protein C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindiya G Patel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies demonstrated a relation between glutathionylation of cardiac myosin binding protein C and diastolic dysfunction in a hypertensive mouse model stressed by treatment with salt, deoxycorticosterone acetate, and unilateral nephrectomy. Although these results strongly indicated an important role for S-glutathionylation of myosin binding protein C as a modifier of myofilament function, indirect effects of other post-translational modifications may have occurred. Moreover, we did not determine the sites of thiol modification by glutathionylation. To address these issues, we developed an in vitro method to mimic the in situ S-glutathionylation of myofilament proteins and determined direct functional effects and sites of oxidative modification employing Western blotting and mass spectrometry. We induced glutathionylation in vitro by treatment of isolated myofibrils and detergent extracted fiber bundles (skinned fibers with oxidized glutathione (GSSG. Immuno-blotting results revealed increased glutathionylation with GSSG treatment of a protein band around 140 kDa. Using tandem mass spectrometry, we identified the 140 kDa band as cardiac myosin binding protein C and determined the sites of glutathionylation to be at cysteines 655, 479, and 627. Determination of the relation between Ca2+-activation of myofibrillar acto-myosin ATPase rate demonstrated an increased Ca2+-sensitivity induced by the S-glutathionylation. Force generating skinned fiber bundles also showed an increase in Ca-sensitivity when treated with oxidized glutathione, which was reversed with the reducing agent, dithiothreitol. Our data demonstrate that a specific and direct effect of S-glutathionylation of myosin binding protein C is a significant increase in myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity. Our data also provide new insights into the functional significance of oxidative modification of myosin binding protein C and the potential role of domains not previously considered to

  10. Liquid-solid extraction of cationic metals by cationic amphiphiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, W.

    2010-01-01

    In the field of selective separation for recycling of spent nuclear fuel, liquid-liquid extraction processes are widely used (PUREX, DIAMEX..) in industrial scale. In order to guarantee a sustainable nuclear energy for the forthcoming generations, alternative reprocessing techniques are under development. One of them bases on the studies from Heckmann et al in the 80's and consists in selectively precipitating actinides from aqueous waste solutions by cationic surfactants (liquid-solid extraction). This technique has some interesting advantages over liquid-liquid extraction techniques, because several steps are omitted like stripping or solvent washing. Moreover, the amount of waste is decreased considerably, since no contaminated organic solvent is produced. In this thesis, we have carried out a physico-chemical study to understand the specific interactions between the metallic cations with the cationic surfactant. First, we have analysed the specific effect of the different counter-ions (Cl - , NO 3 - , C 2 O 4 2- ) and then the effect of alkaline cations on the structural properties of the surfactant aggregation in varying thermodynamical conditions. Finally, different multivalent cations (Cu 2+ , Zn 2+ , UO 2 2+ , Fe 3+ , Nd 3+ , Eu 3+ , Th 4+ ) were considered; we have concluded that depending on the anionic complex of these metals formed in acidic media, we can observe either an adsorption at the micellar interface or not. This adsorption has a large influence of the surfactant aggregation properties and determines the limits of the application in term of ionic strength, temperature and surfactant concentration. (author) [fr

  11. Hemagglutinating and fusogenic activities of Newcastle disease virus: studies on receptor binding specificity and pH-induced conformational changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. S. Couceiro

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinal and wild strains of Newcastle Disease virus (NDV were analyzed for cell receptor binding and fusogenic biological properties associated with their HN (hemagglutinin-neuraminidase and F (fusion protein surface structures respectively. The evaluation of the biological activities of HN and F was carried out respectively by determination of hemagglutinating titers and hemolysis percentages, using erythrocytes from various animal origins at different pH values. Significant differences in hemagglutination titers for some strains of NDV were detected, when interacting with goose, sheep, guinea-pip and human "O" group erythrocytes at neutral pH. Diversity of hemolysis percentagens was observed between different NDV strains at acid pH. These analysis were developed to evaluate particular aspects of the actual influence of the receptor specifity and pH on the receptor binding and fusogenic processes of Newcastle Disease viruses.

  12. New binding site on common molecular scaffold provides HERG channel specificity of scorpion toxin BeKm-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korolkova, Yuliya V; Bocharov, Eduard V; Angelo, Kamilla

    2002-01-01

    The scorpion toxin BeKm-1 is unique among a variety of known short scorpion toxins affecting potassium channels in its selective action on ether-a-go-go-related gene (ERG)-type channels. BeKm-1 shares the common molecular scaffold with other short scorpion toxins. The toxin spatial structure...... resolved by NMR consists of a short alpha-helix and a triple-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet. By toxin mutagenesis study we identified the residues that are important for the binding of BeKm-1 to the human ERG K+ (HERG) channel. The most critical residues (Tyr-11, Lys-18, Arg-20, Lys-23) are located...... in the alpha-helix and following loop whereas the "traditional" functional site of other short scorpion toxins is formed by residues from the beta-sheet. Thus the unique location of the binding site of BeKm-1 provides its specificity toward the HERG channel....

  13. Quantitative Molecular Imaging with a Single Gd-Based Contrast Agent Reveals Specific Tumor Binding and Retention in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Mette L; Gao, Ying; Hutnick, Melanie A; Craig, Sonya E L; Pokorski, Jonathan K; Flask, Chris A; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M

    2017-06-06

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an indispensable tool in the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, especially cancer. However, the poor sensitivity of MRI relative to other imaging modalities, such as PET, has hindered the development and clinical use of molecular MRI contrast agents that could provide vital diagnostic information by specifically locating a molecular target altered in the disease process. This work describes the specific and sustained in vivo binding and retention of a protein tyrosine phosphatase mu (PTPμ)-targeted, molecular magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent with a single gadolinium (Gd) chelate using a quantitative MRI T 1 mapping technique in glioma xenografts. Quantitative T 1 mapping is an imaging method used to measure the longitudinal relaxation time, the T 1 relaxation time, of protons in a magnetic field after excitation by a radiofrequency pulse. T 1 relaxation times can in turn be used to calculate the concentration of a gadolinium-containing contrast agent in a region of interest, thereby allowing the retention or clearance of an agent to be quantified. In this context, retention is a measure of molecular contrast agent binding. Using conventional peptide chemistry, a PTPμ-targeted peptide was linked to a chelator that had been conjugated to a lysine residue. Following complexation with Gd, this PTPμ-targeted molecular contrast agent containing a single Gd ion showed significant tumor enhancement and a sustained increase in Gd concentration in both heterotopic and orthotopic tumors using dynamic quantitative MRI. This single Gd-containing PTPμ agent was more effective than our previous version with three Gd ions. Differences between nonspecific and specific agents, due to specific tumor binding, can be determined within the first 30 min after agent administration by examining clearance rates. This more facile chemistry, when combined with quantitative MR techniques, allows for widespread adoption by academic

  14. Ligand-specific conformational changes in the alpha1 glycine receptor ligand-binding domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Lynch, Joseph W

    2009-01-01

    , and by the antagonist, strychnine. Voltage-clamp fluorometry involves labeling introduced cysteines with environmentally sensitive fluorophores and inferring structural rearrangements from ligand-induced fluorescence changes. In the inner beta-sheet, we labeled residues in loop 2 and in binding domain loops D and E....... At each position, strychnine and glycine induced distinct maximal fluorescence responses. The pre-M1 domain responded similarly; at each of four labeled positions glycine produced a strong fluorescence signal, whereas strychnine did not. This suggests that glycine induces conformational changes...... in the inner beta-sheet and pre-M1 domain that may be important for activation, desensitization, or both. In contrast, most labeled residues in loops C and F yielded fluorescence changes identical in magnitude for glycine and strychnine. A notable exception was H201C in loop C. This labeled residue responded...

  15. Deciphering the specific high-affinity binding of cucurbit[7]uril to amino acids in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Wha; Lee, Hyun Hee L; Ko, Young Ho; Kim, Kimoon; Kim, Hugh I

    2015-04-02

    This work presents a systematic study on the host-guest interactions between the macrocyclic host molecule cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) and amino acids (AAs) including three basic AAs (Lys, Arg, and His) and three aromatic AAs (Phe, Tyr, and Trp) to elucidate the origin of the high selectivity of CB[7] toward AA residues in proteins. Complex formation between CB[7] and each AA was examined in solution (by isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR) as well as in the gas phase (by ion mobility mass spectrometry and collision-induced dissociation), and the results were further combined with computational investigations. Generally, the aromatic AAs show higher binding affinities than the basic AAs in buffer solutions with various pH values. On the contrary, the gas-phase stabilities of the basic AA complex ions are higher than those of the aromatic AA complex ions, suggesting that the direct ion-dipole interactions between the charged side chains of the basic AAs and the polar carbonyl groups of CB[7] predominate in the absence of water. The ion-dipole interactions are less significant in water, since the original interactions of the guests with water are lost upon complex formation. In contrast, the transfer of the hydrophobic groups from the bulk into the hydrophobic CB[7] cavity suffers less from the desolvation penalty, resulting in higher binding affinities in water. Therefore, initial guest solvation is another key factor which should be considered when designing high-affinity host-guest systems, in addition to the contribution from the release of high-energy water molecules from the CB[7] cavity (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2012, 134, 15318-15323).

  16. Specificity of DNA-binding by the FAX-1 and NHR-67 nuclear receptors of Caenorhabditis elegans is partially mediated via a subclass-specific P-box residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Eric L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nuclear receptors of the NR2E class play important roles in pattern formation and nervous system development. Based on a phylogenetic analysis of DNA-binding domains, we define two conserved groups of orthologous NR2E genes: the NR2E1 subclass, which includes C. elegans nhr-67, Drosophila tailless and dissatisfaction, and vertebrate Tlx (NR2E2, NR2E4, NR2E1, and the NR2E3 subclass, which includes C. elegans fax-1 and vertebrate PNR (NR2E5, NR2E3. PNR and Tll nuclear receptors have been shown to bind the hexamer half-site AAGTCA, instead of the hexamer AGGTCA recognized by most other nuclear receptors, suggesting unique DNA-binding properties for NR2E class members. Results We show that NR2E3 subclass member FAX-1, unlike NHR-67 and other NR2E1 subclass members, binds to hexamer half-sites with relaxed specificity: it will bind hexamers with the sequence ANGTCA, although it prefers a purine to a pyrimidine at the second position. We use site-directed mutagenesis to demonstrate that the difference between FAX-1 and NHR-67 binding preference is partially mediated by a conserved subclass-specific asparagine or aspartate residue at position 19 of the DNA-binding domain. This amino acid position is part of the "P box" that plays a critical role in defining binding site specificity and has been shown to make hydrogen-bond contacts to the second position of the hexamer in co-crystal structures for other nuclear receptors. The relaxed specificity allows FAX-1 to bind a much larger repertoire of half-sites than NHR-67. While NR2E1 class proteins bind both monomeric and dimeric sites, the NR2E3 class proteins bind only dimeric sites. The presence of a single strong site adjacent to a very weak site allows dimeric FAX-1 binding, further increasing the number of dimeric binding sites to which FAX-1 may bind in vivo. Conclusion These findings identify subclass-specific DNA-binding specificities and dimerization properties for the NR2E1

  17. Improved pan-specific prediction of MHC class I peptide binding using a novel receptor clustering data partitioning strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Andreas Holm; Kringelum, Jens Vindahl; Garde, C.

    2016-01-01

    Pan-specific prediction of receptor-ligand interaction is conventionally done using machine-learning methods that integrates information about both receptor and ligand primary sequences. To achieve optimal performance using machine learning, dealing with overfitting and data redundancy is critical...... strategy with the aim of altering this and construct data sets optimal for training of pan-specific receptor-ligand predictions focusing on receptor similarity rather than ligand similarity. We show that this receptor clustering method consistently in benchmarks covering affinity predictions, MHC ligand....... Most often so-called ligand clustering methods have been used to deal with these issues in the context of pan-specific receptor-ligand predictions, and the MHC system the approach has proven highly effective for extrapolating information from a limited set of receptors with well characterized binding...

  18. MOBE-ChIP: Probing Cell Type-Specific Binding Through Large-Scale Chromatin Immunoprecipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenqi; Lau, On Sun

    2018-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, the initiation and maintenance of specific cell types often require the activity of cell type-specific transcriptional regulators. Understanding their roles in gene regulation is crucial but probing their DNA targets in vivo, especially in a genome-wide manner, remains a technical challenge with their limited expression. To improve the sensitivity of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) for detecting the cell type-specific signals, we have developed the Maximized Objects for Better Enrichment (MOBE)-ChIP, where ChIP is performed at a substantially larger experimental scale and under low background conditions. Here, we describe the procedure in the study of transcription factors in the model plant Arabidopsis. However, with some modifications, the technique should also be implemented in other systems. Besides cell type-specific studies, MOBE-ChIP can also be used as a general strategy to improve ChIP signals.

  19. A Specific Peptide with Calcium-Binding Capacity from Defatted Schizochytrium sp. Protein Hydrolysates and the Molecular Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xixi Cai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Marine microorganisms have been proposed as a new kind of protein source. Efforts are needed in order to transform the protein-rich biological wastes left after lipid extraction into value-added bio-products. Thus, the utilization of protein recovered from defatted Schizochytrium sp. by-products presents an opportunity. A specific peptide Tyr-Leu (YL with calcium-binding capacity was purified from defatted Schizochytrium sp. protein hydrolysates through gel filtration chromatography and RP-HPLC. The calcium-binding activity of YL reached 126.34 ± 3.40 μg/mg. The calcium-binding mechanism was investigated through ultraviolet, fluorescence and infrared spectroscopy. The results showed that calcium ions could form dative bonds with carboxyl oxygen atoms and amino nitrogen atoms as well as the nitrogen and oxygen atoms of amide bonds. YL-Ca exhibited excellent thermal stability and solubility, which was beneficial for its absorption and transport in the basic intestinal tract of the human body. Moreover, the cellular uptake of calcium in Caco-2 cells showed that YL-Ca could enhance calcium uptake efficiency and protect calcium ions against precipitation caused by dietary inhibitors such as tannic acid, oxalate, phytate and metal ions. The findings indicate that the by-product of Schizochytrium sp. is a promising source for making peptide-calcium bio-products as algae-based functional supplements for human beings.

  20. DNA binding specificities of Escherichia coli Cas1–Cas2 integrase drive its recruitment at the CRISPR locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moch, Clara; Fromant, Michel; Blanquet, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Prokaryotic adaptive immunity relies on the capture of fragments of invader DNA (protospacers) followed by their recombination at a dedicated acceptor DNA locus. This integrative mechanism, called adaptation, needs both Cas1 and Cas2 proteins. Here, we studied in vitro the binding of an Escherichia coli Cas1–Cas2 complex to various protospacer and acceptor DNA molecules. We show that, to form a long-lived ternary complex containing Cas1–Cas2, the acceptor DNA must carry a CRISPR locus, and the protospacer must not contain 3΄-single-stranded overhangs longer than 5 bases. In addition, the acceptor DNA must be supercoiled. Formation of the ternary complex is synergistic, in such that the binding of Cas1–Cas2 to acceptor DNA is reinforced in the presence of a protospacer. Mutagenesis analysis at the CRISPR locus indicates that the presence in the acceptor plasmid of the palindromic motif found in CRISPR repeats drives stable ternary complex formation. Most of the mutations in this motif are deleterious even if they do not prevent cruciform structure formation. The leader sequence of the CRISPR locus is fully dispensable. These DNA binding specificities of the Cas1–Cas2 integrase are likely to play a major role in the recruitment of this enzyme at the CRISPR locus. PMID:28034956

  1. Structure and specificity of the RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 during DNA interrogation, target binding and cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephs, Eric A.; Kocak, D. Dewran; Fitzgibbon, Christopher J.; McMenemy, Joshua; Gersbach, Charles A.; Marszalek, Piotr E.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-associated endonuclease Cas9 cuts DNA at variable target sites designated by a Cas9-bound RNA molecule. Cas9's ability to be directed by single ‘guide RNA’ molecules to target nearly any sequence has been recently exploited for a number of emerging biological and medical applications. Therefore, understanding the nature of Cas9's off-target activity is of paramount importance for its practical use. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we directly resolve individual Cas9 and nuclease-inactive dCas9 proteins as they bind along engineered DNA substrates. High-resolution imaging allows us to determine their relative propensities to bind with different guide RNA variants to targeted or off-target sequences. Mapping the structural properties of Cas9 and dCas9 to their respective binding sites reveals a progressive conformational transformation at DNA sites with increasing sequence similarity to its target. With kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations, these results provide evidence of a ‘conformational gating’ mechanism driven by the interactions between the guide RNA and the 14th–17th nucleotide region of the targeted DNA, the stabilities of which we find correlate significantly with reported off-target cleavage rates. KMC simulations also reveal potential methodologies to engineer guide RNA sequences with improved specificity by considering the invasion of guide RNAs into targeted DNA duplex. PMID:26384421

  2. Minimizing the non-specific binding of nanoparticles to the brain enables active targeting of Fn14-positive glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Craig S; Perez, Jimena G; Cheng, Emily; Zhang, Clark; Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Hanes, Justin; Winkles, Jeffrey A; Woodworth, Graeme F; Kim, Anthony J

    2015-02-01

    A major limitation in the treatment of glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and deadly primary brain cancer, is delivery of therapeutics to invading tumor cells outside of the area that is safe for surgical removal. A promising way to target invading GBM cells is via drug-loaded nanoparticles that bind to fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14), thereby potentially improving efficacy and reducing toxicity. However, achieving broad particle distribution and nanoparticle targeting within the brain remains a significant challenge due to the adhesive extracellular matrix (ECM) and clearance mechanisms in the brain. In this work, we developed Fn14 monoclonal antibody-decorated nanoparticles that can efficiently penetrate brain tissue. We show these Fn14-targeted brain tissue penetrating nanoparticles are able to (i) selectively bind to recombinant Fn14 but not brain ECM proteins, (ii) associate with and be internalized by Fn14-positive GBM cells, and (iii) diffuse within brain tissue in a manner similar to non-targeted brain penetrating nanoparticles. In addition, when administered intracranially, Fn14-targeted nanoparticles showed improved tumor cell co-localization in mice bearing human GBM xenografts compared to non-targeted nanoparticles. Minimizing non-specific binding of targeted nanoparticles in the brain may greatly improve the access of particulate delivery systems to remote brain tumor cells and other brain targets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cardiac myosin binding protein C phosphorylation affects cross-bridge cycle's elementary steps in a site-specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    Full Text Available Based on our recent finding that cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C phosphorylation affects muscle contractility in a site-specific manner, we further studied the force per cross-bridge and the kinetic constants of the elementary steps in the six-state cross-bridge model in cMyBP-C mutated transgenic mice for better understanding of the influence of cMyBP-C phosphorylation on contractile functions. Papillary muscle fibres were dissected from cMyBP-C mutated mice of ADA (Ala273-Asp282-Ala302, DAD (Asp273-Ala282-Asp302, SAS (Ser273-Ala282-Ser302, and t/t (cMyBP-C null genotypes, and the results were compared to transgenic mice expressing wide-type (WT cMyBP-C. Sinusoidal analyses were performed with serial concentrations of ATP, phosphate (Pi, and ADP. Both t/t and DAD mutants significantly reduced active tension, force per cross-bridge, apparent rate constant (2πc, and the rate constant of cross-bridge detachment. In contrast to the weakened ATP binding and enhanced Pi and ADP release steps in t/t mice, DAD mice showed a decreased ADP release without affecting the ATP binding and the Pi release. ADA showed decreased ADP release, and slightly increased ATP binding and cross-bridge detachment steps, whereas SAS diminished the ATP binding step and accelerated the ADP release step. t/t has the broadest effects with changes in most elementary steps of the cross-bridge cycle, DAD mimics t/t to a large extent, and ADA and SAS predominantly affect the nucleotide binding steps. We conclude that the reduced tension production in DAD and t/t is the result of reduced force per cross-bridge, instead of the less number of strongly attached cross-bridges. We further conclude that cMyBP-C is an allosteric activator of myosin to increase cross-bridge force, and its phosphorylation status modulates the force, which is regulated by variety of protein kinases.

  4. Mass spectrometric identification of proteins that interact through specific domains of the poly(A) binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Roy; Denis, Clyde L; Zhang, Chongxu

    2012-01-01

    Poly(A) binding protein (PAB1) is involved in a number of RNA metabolic functions in eukaryotic cells and correspondingly is suggested to associate with a number of proteins. We have used mass spectrometric analysis to identify 55 non-ribosomal proteins that specifically interact with PAB1 from...... Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because many of these factors may associate only indirectly with PAB1 by being components of the PAB1-mRNP structure, we additionally conducted mass spectrometric analyses on seven metabolically defined PAB1 deletion derivatives to delimit the interactions between these proteins...

  5. Sequence specific DNA binding by P53 is enhanced by ionizing radiation and is mediated via DNA-PK activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachnic, L.A.; Wunsch, H.; Mekeel, K.L.; De Frank, J.S.; Powell, S.N.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: P53 is known to be involved in the cellular response to DNA damage. It mediates many of its effects by acting as a transcription factor via sequence-specific DNA binding. The half-life of p53 is prolonged following DNA damage, and this results in elevated levels of p53 for a period of 2-8 hours. The increase in p53 is often relatively small, but this produces significant stimulation of a downstream gene such as p21(WAF1/cip1). We investigated post-translational modification of p53 following ionizing radiation damage. Materials and Methods: The response of normal Balb-C mouse fibroblasts (FC) to ionizing radiation (IR, 8 Gy) was measured at 0,3,6,9 and 24 hours, by the levels of p53, p21, flow cytometry and the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). EMSA utilized a 26 bp consensus sequence end-labeled oligonucleotide to measure sequence-specific p53 binding. P53 specificity was confirmed by an enhanced mobility shift (retardation) when using p53 antibody. Comparison was made with scid fibroblasts (FS) and FC cells transfected with a plasmid (CX3) containing mutant p53 (alanine-143) or infected with a retrovirus containing the E6 protein of human papilloma virus type 16. Results: The response of p53 to DNA damage shows a 3-fold increase at 3-6 hours, and was not significantly different between FC and FS. FC-CX3 showed detectable basal levels of p53, and a 2-fold further induction of p53 after IR. FC-E6 showed no detectable levels of p53 before or after IR. No induction of p21 or G1/S arrest was seen in FC-CX3 or FC-E6, as has been observed previously. The induction of p21 in FS cells was attenuated and delayed: a 2-3-fold increase seen maximally at 9 hours, compared with a 5-fold increase seen maximally at 3-6 hours in FC cells. The accumulation of cells at the G1/S junction after IR showed the same kinetics as p21 induction: the peak of cells in G1 occurs at 3-6 hours in FC, but not until 9-24 hours in FS. The response is reminiscent of that seen in

  6. Human proteins that specifically bind to 8-oxoguanine-containing RNA and their responses to oxidative stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Hiroshi; Fujikane, Aya; Ito, Riyoko; Matsumoto, Masaki; Nakayama, Keiichi I.; Sekiguchi, Mutsuo

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → We performed comprehensive survey for proteins that bind to oxidized RNA. → HNRNPD and HNRNPC proteins were identified as oxidized RNA binding proteins. → Knockdown of HNRNPD/C expression caused increased sensitivity to H 2 O 2 . → Amounts of HNRNPD protein rapidly decreased when cells were exposed to H 2 O 2 . -- Abstract: Exposure of cells to oxygen radicals damage various biologically important molecules. Among the oxidized bases produced in nucleic acids, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoguanine) is particularly important since it causes base mispairing. To ensure accurate gene expression, organisms must have a mechanism to discriminate 8-oxoguanine-containing RNA from normal transcripts. We searched for proteins that specifically bind to 8-oxoguanine-containing RNA from human HeLa cell extracts, and the candidate proteins were identified using mass spectrometry. Among the identified candidates, splicing isoform 1 of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein D0 (HNRNPD) and splicing isoform C1 of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (HNRNPC) exhibited strong abilities to bind to oxidized RNA. The amount of HNRNPD protein rapidly decreased when cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide, an agent that enhances oxidative stress. Moreover, the suppression of HNRNPD expression by siRNA caused cells to exhibit an increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. The application of siRNA against HNRNPC also caused an increase in sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Since no additive effect was observed with a combined addition of siRNAs for HNRNPD and HNRNPC, we concluded that the two proteins may function in the same mechanism for the accurate gene expression.

  7. The peripheral binding of 14-3-3γ to membranes involves isoform-specific histidine residues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene J Bustad

    Full Text Available Mammalian 14-3-3 protein scaffolds include seven conserved isoforms that bind numerous phosphorylated protein partners and regulate many cellular processes. Some 14-3-3-isoforms, notably γ, have elevated affinity for membranes, which might contribute to modulate the subcellular localization of the partners and substantiate the importance of investigating molecular mechanisms of membrane interaction. By applying surface plasmon resonance we here show that the binding to phospholipid bilayers is stimulated when 14-3-3γ is complexed with its partner, a peptide corresponding to the Ser19-phosphorylated N-terminal region of tyrosine hydroxylase. Moreover, membrane interaction is dependent on salts of kosmotropic ions, which also stabilize 14-3-3γ. Electrostatic analysis of available crystal structures of γ and of the non-membrane-binding ζ-isoform, complemented with molecular dynamics simulations, indicate that the electrostatic potential distribution of phosphopeptide-bound 14-3-3γ is optimal for interaction with the membrane through amphipathic helices at the N-terminal dimerization region. In addition, His158, and especially His195, both specific to 14-3-3γ and located at the convex lateral side, appeared to be pivotal for the ligand induced membrane interaction, as corroborated by site-directed mutagenesis. The participation of these histidine residues might be associated to their increased protonation upon membrane binding. Overall, these results reveal membrane-targeting motifs and give insights on mechanisms that furnish the 14-3-3γ scaffold with the capacity for tuned shuffling from soluble to membrane-bound states.

  8. The influence of specific binding of collagen-silk chimeras to silk biomaterials on hMSC behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Bo; DesRochers, Teresa M; Qin, Guokui; Xia, Xiaoxia; Thiagarajan, Geetha; Brodsky, Barbara; Kaplan, David L

    2013-01-01

    Collagen-like proteins in the bacteria Streptococcus pyogenes adopt a triple-helix structure with a thermal stability similar to that of animal collagens, can be expressed in high yield in Escherichia coli and can be easily modified through molecular biology techniques. However, potential applications for such recombinant collagens are limited by their lack of higher order structure to achieve the physical properties needed for most biomaterials. To overcome this problem, the S. pyogenes collagen domain was fused to a repetitive Bombyx mori silk consensus sequence, as a strategy to direct specific non-covalent binding onto solid silk materials whose superior stability, mechanical and material properties have been previously established. This approach resulted in the successful binding of these new collagen-silk chimeric proteins to silk films and porous scaffolds, and the binding affinity could be controlled by varying the number of repeats in the silk sequence. To explore the potential of collagen-silk chimera for regulating biological activity, integrin (Int) and fibronectin (Fn) binding sequences from mammalian collagens were introduced into the bacterial collagen domain. The attachment of bioactive collagen-silk chimeras to solid silk biomaterials promoted hMSC spreading and proliferation substantially in comparison to the controls. The ability to combine the biomaterial features of silk with the biological activities of collagen allowed more rapid cell interactions with silk-based biomaterials, improved regulation of stem cell growth and differentiation, as well as the formation of artificial extracellular matrices useful for tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Human proteins that specifically bind to 8-oxoguanine-containing RNA and their responses to oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Hiroshi, E-mail: hiroshi@college.fdcnet.ac.jp [Department of Functional Bioscience and Advanced Science Research Center, Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka 814-0193 (Japan); Fujikane, Aya; Ito, Riyoko [Department of Functional Bioscience and Advanced Science Research Center, Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka 814-0193 (Japan); Matsumoto, Masaki; Nakayama, Keiichi I. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Mutsuo [Department of Functional Bioscience and Advanced Science Research Center, Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka 814-0193 (Japan)

    2010-12-10

    Research highlights: {yields} We performed comprehensive survey for proteins that bind to oxidized RNA. {yields} HNRNPD and HNRNPC proteins were identified as oxidized RNA binding proteins. {yields} Knockdown of HNRNPD/C expression caused increased sensitivity to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. {yields} Amounts of HNRNPD protein rapidly decreased when cells were exposed to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. -- Abstract: Exposure of cells to oxygen radicals damage various biologically important molecules. Among the oxidized bases produced in nucleic acids, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoguanine) is particularly important since it causes base mispairing. To ensure accurate gene expression, organisms must have a mechanism to discriminate 8-oxoguanine-containing RNA from normal transcripts. We searched for proteins that specifically bind to 8-oxoguanine-containing RNA from human HeLa cell extracts, and the candidate proteins were identified using mass spectrometry. Among the identified candidates, splicing isoform 1 of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein D0 (HNRNPD) and splicing isoform C1 of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (HNRNPC) exhibited strong abilities to bind to oxidized RNA. The amount of HNRNPD protein rapidly decreased when cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide, an agent that enhances oxidative stress. Moreover, the suppression of HNRNPD expression by siRNA caused cells to exhibit an increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. The application of siRNA against HNRNPC also caused an increase in sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Since no additive effect was observed with a combined addition of siRNAs for HNRNPD and HNRNPC, we concluded that the two proteins may function in the same mechanism for the accurate gene expression.

  10. Binding-site specificity of the radiolytically induced crosslinking of phenylalanine to glucagon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.J.; Mee, L.K.; Adelstein, S.J.; Taub, I.A.

    1984-01-01

    The γ-radiation-induced crosslinking of phenylalanine to glucagon, mediated by OH, has been shown to involve a limited number of binding sites on the glucagon molecule. Glucagon-phenylalanine adducts were partially separated from other radiolysis products with Sephadex gel filtration; further isolation of adducts was achieved with reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HLPC). Amino acid analysis of the isolated adducts indicates that the aromatic residues (phenylalanine and tyrosine), basic residues (histidine and lysine), and sulfur-containing residue (methionine) of glucagon are predominantly involved in crosslinking; these are essentially the same residues implicated in glucagon-glucagon crosslinking. Acid hydrolysates and chymotryptic digests of glucagon-phenylalanine adducts were examined with HPLC. The number of amino acid-phenylalanine adducts and also chymotryptic peptides observed was much greater than would have been expected based on the amino acid analysis. This observation is best accounted for by the involvement in crosslinking of radicals formed on the glucagon with more than one possible phenylalanine-derived free radical

  11. Cell Surface Properties of Lactococcus lactis Reveal Milk Protein Binding Specifically Evolved in Dairy Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarazanova, Mariya; Huppertz, Thom; Beerthuyzen, Marke; van Schalkwijk, Saskia; Janssen, Patrick; Wels, Michiel; Kok, Jan; Bachmann, Herwig

    2017-01-01

    Surface properties of bacteria are determined by the molecular composition of the cell wall and they are important for interactions of cells with their environment. Well-known examples of bacterial interactions with surfaces are biofilm formation and the fermentation of solid materials like food and feed. Lactococcus lactis is broadly used for the fermentation of cheese and buttermilk and it is primarily isolated from either plant material or the dairy environment. In this study, we characterized surface hydrophobicity, charge, emulsification properties, and the attachment to milk proteins of 55 L. lactis strains in stationary and exponential growth phases. The attachment to milk protein was assessed through a newly developed flow cytometry-based protocol. Besides finding a high degree of biodiversity, phenotype-genotype matching allowed the identification of candidate genes involved in the modification of the cell surface. Overexpression and gene deletion analysis allowed to verify the predictions for three identified proteins that altered surface hydrophobicity and attachment of milk proteins. The data also showed that lactococci isolated from a dairy environment bind higher amounts of milk proteins when compared to plant isolates. It remains to be determined whether the alteration of surface properties also has potential to alter starter culture functionalities. PMID:28936202

  12. Cell Surface Properties of Lactococcus lactis Reveal Milk Protein Binding Specifically Evolved in Dairy Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya Tarazanova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface properties of bacteria are determined by the molecular composition of the cell wall and they are important for interactions of cells with their environment. Well-known examples of bacterial interactions with surfaces are biofilm formation and the fermentation of solid materials like food and feed. Lactococcus lactis is broadly used for the fermentation of cheese and buttermilk and it is primarily isolated from either plant material or the dairy environment. In this study, we characterized surface hydrophobicity, charge, emulsification properties, and the attachment to milk proteins of 55 L. lactis strains in stationary and exponential growth phases. The attachment to milk protein was assessed through a newly developed flow cytometry-based protocol. Besides finding a high degree of biodiversity, phenotype-genotype matching allowed the identification of candidate genes involved in the modification of the cell surface. Overexpression and gene deletion analysis allowed to verify the predictions for three identified proteins that altered surface hydrophobicity and attachment of milk proteins. The data also showed that lactococci isolated from a dairy environment bind higher amounts of milk proteins when compared to plant isolates. It remains to be determined whether the alteration of surface properties also has potential to alter starter culture functionalities.

  13. Microscale characterization of the binding specificity and affinity of a monoclonal antisulfotyrosyl IgG antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, K.S.; Bradbury, A.R.; Heegaard, N.H.

    2008-01-01

    complicated by the absence of specific immunoreagents (antibodies) for this modification as well as the chemical lability of the sulfate group. Here, we investigate the properties of a novel mAb against sulfated tyrosyl groups (anti-Tyr(SO(3)H) antibody) using CE and a panel of sulfated and nonsulfated...... peptides and proteins. The data show that the anti-Tyr(SO(3)H) antibody is completely specific for compounds containing sulfated tyrosyls. Affinity electrophoresis experiments allowed us to estimate dissociation constants for sulfated hirudin fragment (56-65), gastrin-17, and cholecystokinin octapeptide...

  14. The binding of NCAM to FGFR1 induces a specific cellular response mediated by receptor trafficking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francavilla, Chiara; Cattaneo, Paola; Berezin, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) associates with fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor-1 (FGFR1). However, the biological significance of this interaction remains largely elusive. In this study, we show that NCAM induces a specific, FGFR1-mediated cellular response that is remarkably...... in a specific cellular response. Besides introducing a further level of complexity in the regulation of FGFR1 function, our findings highlight the link of FGFR recycling with sustained signaling and cell migration and the critical role of these events in dictating the cellular response evoked by receptor...

  15. Cationic amino acids specific biomimetic silicification in ionic liquid: a quest to understand the formation of 3-D structures in diatoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Ramanathan

    Full Text Available The intricate, hierarchical, highly reproducible, and exquisite biosilica structures formed by diatoms have generated great interest to understand biosilicification processes in nature. This curiosity is driven by the quest of researchers to understand nature's complexity, which might enable reproducing these elegant natural diatomaceous structures in our laboratories via biomimetics, which is currently beyond the capabilities of material scientists. To this end, significant understanding of the biomolecules involved in biosilicification has been gained, wherein cationic peptides and proteins are found to play a key role in the formation of these exquisite structures. Although biochemical factors responsible for silica formation in diatoms have been studied for decades, the challenge to mimic biosilica structures similar to those synthesized by diatoms in their natural habitats has not hitherto been successful. This has led to an increasingly interesting debate that physico-chemical environment surrounding diatoms might play an additional critical role towards the control of diatom morphologies. The current study demonstrates this proof of concept by using cationic amino acids as catalyst/template/scaffold towards attaining diatom-like silica morphologies under biomimetic conditions in ionic liquids.

  16. Evolutionary and structural perspectives of plant cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channels

    KAUST Repository

    Zelman, Alice K.

    2012-05-29

    Ligand-gated cation channels are a frequent component of signaling cascades in eukaryotes. Eukaryotes contain numerous diverse gene families encoding ion channels, some of which are shared and some of which are unique to particular kingdoms. Among the many different types are cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGCs). CNGCs are cation channels with varying degrees of ion conduction selectivity. They are implicated in numerous signaling pathways and permit diffusion of divalent and monovalent cations, including Ca2+ and K+. CNGCs are present in both plant and animal cells, typically in the plasma membrane; recent studies have also documented their presence in prokaryotes. All eukaryote CNGC polypeptides have a cyclic nucleotide-binding domain and a calmodulin binding domain as well as a six transmembrane/one pore tertiary structure. This review summarizes existing knowledge about the functional domains present in these cation-conducting channels, and considers the evidence indicating that plant and animal CNGCs evolved separately. Additionally, an amino acid motif that is only found in the phosphate binding cassette and hinge regions of plant CNGCs, and is present in all experimentally confirmed CNGCs but no other channels was identified. This CNGC-specific amino acid motif provides an additional diagnostic tool to identify plant CNGCs, and can increase confidence in the annotation of open reading frames in newly sequenced genomes as putative CNGCs. Conversely, the absence of the motif in some plant sequences currently identified as probable CNGCs may suggest that they are misannotated or protein fragments. 2012 Zelman, Dawe, Gehring and Berkowitz.

  17. Comprehensive meta-analysis of Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STAT genomic binding patterns discerns cell-specific cis-regulatory modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Keunsoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytokine-activated transcription factors from the STAT (Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription family control common and context-specific genetic programs. It is not clear to what extent cell-specific features determine the binding capacity of seven STAT members and to what degree they share genetic targets. Molecular insight into the biology of STATs was gained from a meta-analysis of 29 available ChIP-seq data sets covering genome-wide occupancy of STATs 1, 3, 4, 5A, 5B and 6 in several cell types. Results We determined that the genomic binding capacity of STATs is primarily defined by the cell type and to a lesser extent by individual family members. For example, the overlap of shared binding sites between STATs 3 and 5 in T cells is greater than that between STAT5 in T cells and non-T cells. Even for the top 1,000 highly enriched STAT binding sites, ~15% of STAT5 binding sites in mouse female liver are shared by other STATs in different cell types while in T cells ~90% of STAT5 binding sites are co-occupied by STAT3, STAT4 and STAT6. In addition, we identified 116 cis-regulatory modules (CRM, which are recognized by all STAT members across cell types defining a common JAK-STAT signature. Lastly, in liver STAT5 binding significantly coincides with binding of the cell-specific transcription factors HNF4A, FOXA1 and FOXA2 and is associated with cell-type specific gene transcription. Conclusions Our results suggest that genomic binding of STATs is primarily determined by the cell type and further specificity is achieved in part by juxtaposed binding of cell-specific transcription factors.

  18. Identification of the β-Lactamase Inhibitor Protein-II (BLIP-II) Interface Residues Essential for Binding Affinity and Specificity for Class A β-Lactamases*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nicholas G.; Chow, Dar-Chone; Ruprecht, Kevin E.; Palzkill, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    The interactions between β-lactamase inhibitory proteins (BLIPs) and β-lactamases have been used as model systems to understand the principles of affinity and specificity in protein-protein interactions. The most extensively studied tight binding inhibitor, BLIP, has been characterized with respect to amino acid determinants of affinity and specificity for binding β-lactamases. BLIP-II, however, shares no sequence or structural homology to BLIP and is a femtomolar to picomolar potency inhibitor, and the amino acid determinants of binding affinity and specificity are unknown. In this study, alanine scanning mutagenesis was used in combination with determinations of on and off rates for each mutant to define the contribution of residues on the BLIP-II binding surface to both affinity and specificity toward four β-lactamases of diverse sequence. The residues making the largest contribution to binding energy are heavily biased toward aromatic amino acids near the center of the binding surface. In addition, substitutions that reduce binding energy do so by increasing off rates without impacting on rates. Also, residues with large contributions to binding energy generally exhibit low temperature factors in the structures of complexes. Finally, with the exception of D206A, BLIP-II alanine substitutions exhibit a similar trend of effect for all β-lactamases, i.e., a substitution that reduces affinity for one β-lactamase usually reduces affinity for all β-lactamases tested. PMID:23625930

  19. Electrostatic contributions to residue-specific protonation equilibria and proton binding capacitance for a small protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindman, Stina; Linse, Sara; Mulder, Frans A. A.; Andre, Ingemar

    2006-01-01

    Charge-charge interactions in proteins are important in a host of biological processes. Here we use C-13 NMR chemical shift data for individual aspartate and glutamate side chain carboxylate groups to accurately detect site-specific protonation equilibria in a variant of the B1 domain of protein G

  20. p53 Specifically Binds Triplex DNA In Vitro and in Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brázdová, Marie; Tichý, Vlastimil; Helma, Robert; Bažantová, Pavla; Polášková, Alena; Krejčí, Aneta; Petr, Marek; Navrátilová, Lucie; Tichá, Olga; Nejedlý, Karel; Bennink, Martin L; Subramaniam, Vinod; Bábková, Zuzana; Martínek, Tomáš; Lexa, Matej; Adámik, Matej

    2016-01-01

    Triplex DNA is implicated in a wide range of biological activities, including regulation of gene expression and genomic instability leading to cancer. The tumor suppressor p53 is a central regulator of cell fate in response to different type of insults. Sequence and structure specific modes of DNA

  1. P53 specifically binds triplex DNA in vitro and in cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brázdová, Marie; Tichý, Vlastimil; Helma, Robert; Bažantová, Pavla; Polášková, Alena; Krejčí, Aneta; Petr, Marek; Navrátilová, Lucie; Tichá, Olga; Nejedlý, Karel; Bennink, Martin L.; Subramaniam, Vinod; Bábková, Zuzana; Martínek, Tomáš; Lexa, Matej; Adámik, Matej

    2016-01-01

    Triplex DNA is implicated in a wide range of biological activities, including regulation of gene expression and genomic instability leading to cancer. The tumor suppressor p53 is a central regulator of cell fate in response to different type of insults. Sequence and structure specific modes of DNA

  2. Prediction of mono- and di-nucleotide-specific DNA-binding sites in proteins using neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizuguchi Kenji

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA recognition by proteins is one of the most important processes in living systems. Therefore, understanding the recognition process in general, and identifying mutual recognition sites in proteins and DNA in particular, carries great significance. The sequence and structural dependence of DNA-binding sites in proteins has led to the development of successful machine learning methods for their prediction. However, all existing machine learning methods predict DNA-binding sites, irrespective of their target sequence and hence, none of them is helpful in identifying specific protein-DNA contacts. In this work, we formulate the problem of predicting specific DNA-binding sites in terms of contacts between the residue environments of proteins and the identity of a mononucleotide or a dinucleotide step in DNA. The aim of this work is to take a protein sequence or structural features as inputs and predict for each amino acid residue if it binds to DNA at locations identified by one of the four possible mononucleotides or one of the 10 unique dinucleotide steps. Contact predictions are made at various levels of resolution viz. in terms of side chain, backbone and major or minor groove atoms of DNA. Results Significant differences in residue preferences for specific contacts are observed, which combined with other features, lead to promising levels of prediction. In general, PSSM-based predictions, supported by secondary structure and solvent accessibility, achieve a good predictability of ~70–80%, measured by the area under the curve (AUC of ROC graphs. The major and minor groove contact predictions stood out in terms of their poor predictability from sequences or PSSM, which was very strongly (>20 percentage points compensated by the addition of secondary structure and solvent accessibility information, revealing a predominant role of local protein structure in the major/minor groove DNA-recognition. Following a detailed

  3. Site-specific binding of a water molecule to the sulfa drugs sulfamethoxazole and sulfisoxazole: a laser-desorption isomer-specific UV and IR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlemann, Thomas; Seidel, Sebastian; Müller, Christian W

    2018-02-20

    To determine the preferred water molecule binding sites of the polybasic sulfa drugs sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and sulfisoxazole (SIX), we have studied their monomers and monohydrated complexes through laser-desorption conformer-specific UV and IR spectroscopy. Both the SMX and SIX monomer adopt a single conformer in the molecular beam. On the basis of their conformer-specific IR spectra in the NH stretch region, these conformers were assigned to the SMX and SIX global minimum structures, both exhibiting a staggered sulfonamide group and an intramolecular C-HO[double bond, length as m-dash]S hydrogen bond. The SMX-H 2 O and SIX-H 2 O complexes each adopt a single isomer in the molecular beam. Their isomeric structures were determined based on their isomer-specific IR spectra in the NH/OH stretch region. Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules analysis of the calculated electron densities revealed that in the SMX-H 2 O complex the water molecule donates an O-HN hydrogen bond to the heterocycle nitrogen atom and accepts an N-HO hydrogen bond from the sulfonamide NH group. In the SIX-H 2 O complex, however, the water molecule does not bind to the heterocycle but instead donates an O-HO[double bond, length as m-dash]S hydrogen bond to the sulfonamide group and accepts an N-HO hydrogen bond from the sulfonamide NH group. Both water complexes are additionally stabilized by a C ph -HOH 2 hydrogen bond. Interacting Quantum Atoms analysis suggests that all intermolecular hydrogen bonds are dominated by the short-range exchange-correlation contribution.

  4. Subtractive Cell-SELEX Selection of DNA Aptamers Binding Specifically and Selectively to Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells with High Metastatic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Relapse and metastasis are two key risk factors of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC prognosis; thus, it is emergent to develop an early and accurate detection method for prognostic evaluation of HCC after surgery. In this study, we sought to acquire oligonucleotide DNA aptamers that specifically bind to HCC cells with high metastatic potential. Two HCC cell lines derived from the same genetic background but with different metastatic potential were employed: MHCC97L (low metastatic properties as subtractive targets and HCCLM9 (high metastatic properties as screening targets. To mimic a fluid combining environment, initial DNA aptamers library was firstly labelled with magnetic nanoparticles using biotin-streptavidin system and then applied for aptamers selection. Through 10-round selection with subtractive Cell-SELEX, six aptamers, LY-1, LY-13, LY-46, LY-32, LY-27/45, and LY-7/43, display high affinity to HCCLM9 cells and do not bind to MHCC97L cells, as well as other tumor cell lines, including breast cancer, lung cancer, colon adenocarcinoma, gastric cancer, and cervical cancer, suggesting high specificity for HCCLM9 cells. Thus, the aptamers generated here will provide solid basis for identifying new diagnostic targets to detect HCC metastasis and also may provide valuable clues for developing new targeted therapeutics.

  5. Carbohydrate-binding specificities of potential probiotic Lactobacillus strains in porcine jejunal (IPEC-J2) cells and porcine mucin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeriano, Valerie Diane; Bagon, Bernadette B; Balolong, Marilen P; Kang, Dae-Kyung

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial lectins are carbohydrate-binding adhesins that recognize glycoreceptors in the gut mucus and epithelium of hosts. In this study, the contribution of lectin-like activities to adhesion of Lactobacillus mucosae LM1 and Lactobacillus johnsonii PF01, which were isolated from swine intestine, were compared to those of the commercial probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Both LM1 and PF01 strains have been reported to have good adhesion ability to crude intestinal mucus of pigs. To confirm this, we quantified their adhesion to porcine gastric mucin and intestinal porcine enterocytes isolated from the jejunum of piglets (IPEC-J2). In addition, we examined their carbohydrate-binding specificities by suspending bacterial cells in carbohydrate solutions prior to adhesion assays. We found that the selected carbohydrates affected the adherences of LM1 to IPEC-J2 cells and of LGG to mucin. In addition, compared to adhesion to IPEC-J2 cells, adhesion to mucin by both LM1 and LGG was characterized by enhanced specific recognition of glycoreceptor components such as galactose, mannose, and N-acetylglucosamine. Hydrophobic interactions might make a greater contribution to adhesion of PF01. A similar adhesin profile between a probiotic and a pathogen, suggest a correlation between shared pathogen-probiotic glycoreceptor recognition and the ability to exclude enteropathogens such as Escherichia coli K88 and Salmonella Typhimurium KCCM 40253. These findings extend our understanding of the mechanisms of the intestinal adhesion and pathogen-inhibition abilities of probiotic Lactobacillus strains.

  6. Ultrasensitive human thyrotropin (h TSH) immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) set up, through identification and minimization of non specific bindings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peroni, C.N.

    1994-01-01

    An IRMA of h TSH, based on magnetic solid phase separation, was studied especially for what concerns its non specific bindings. These were identified as a product of the interaction between an altered form of radioiodinated anti-h TSH monoclonal antibody ( 125 I-m AB) and the uncoupled magnetizable cellulose particle (matrix). Apparently this form of 125 I-m AB is a type of aggregate that can be partly resolved from the main peak on Sephadex G-200 and further minimized via a single pre-incubation with the same matrix. Solid phase saturation with milk proteins, tracer storage at 4 0 C and serum addition during incubation were also found particularly effective is preventing its formation. These findings were used in order to reproducibly decrease non specific bindings to values 60 /B O ) up to values of 300-500. This way we obtained h TSH radio assays with functional sensitivities of about 0.05 m IU/L and analytical sensitivities of the order of 0.02 m IU/L, which classify them at least as among the best second generation assays and that are excellent indeed for magnetic IRMA s. A more optimistic sensitivity calculation, based on Rodbard's definition, provided values down to 0.008 m IU/L. Such sensitivities, moreover, were obtained in a very reproducible way and all over the useful tracer life. (author). 83 refs, 13 figs, 25 tabs

  7. Force fields for monovalent and divalent metal cations in TIP3P water based on thermodynamic and kinetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamatkulov, Shavkat; Schwierz, Nadine

    2018-02-01

    Metal cations are essential in many vital processes. In order to capture the role of different cations in all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of biological processes, an accurate parametrization is crucial. Here, we develop force field parameters for the metal cations Li+, Na+, K+, Cs+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+ in combination with the TIP3P water model that is frequently used in biomolecular simulations. In progressing toward improved force fields, the approach presented here is an extension of previous efforts and allows us to simultaneously reproduce thermodynamic and kinetic properties of aqueous solutions. We systematically derive the parameters of the 12-6 Lennard-Jones potential which accurately reproduces the experimental solvation free energy, the activity derivative, and the characteristics of water exchange from the first hydration shell of the metal cations. In order to reproduce all experimental properties, a modification of the Lorentz-Berthelot combination rule is required for Mg2+. Using a balanced set of solution properties, the optimized force field parameters aim to capture the fine differences between distinct metal cations including specific ion binding affinities and the kinetics of cation binding to biologically important anionic groups.

  8. Magnesium-dependent non-specific binding of [125I]prolactin to myelinated tracts in the rat central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangurian, L.P.; Walsh, R.J.; Posner, B.I.

    1989-01-01

    An in vitro autoradiographic assay was used in identifying a magnesium-dependent, non-specific binding of [ 125 I] prolactin to myelinated fiber tracts in the rat brain. Frozen tissue sections were incubated for 18 h at 4 degrees C in media which included [ 125 I]prolactin alone or with a 500 fold excess of unlabelled prolactin. Magnesium in the incubation medium caused a non-specific binding of radiolabelled prolactin to the myelinated fiber tracts in the brain. In contrast, calcium did not facilitate prolactin non-specific binding to myelin. Hence, calcium should optimize the detection of specific prolactin binding sites in the brain by in vitro autoradiographic or radioreceptor assays

  9. Ligand size is a major determinant of specificity in periplasmic oxyanion-binding proteins: the 1.2 A resolution crystal structure of Azotobacter vinelandii ModA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, D M; Williams, C E; Mitchenall, L A; Pau, R N

    1998-12-15

    . Periplasmic receptors constitute a diverse class of binding proteins that differ widely in size, sequence and ligand specificity. Nevertheless, almost all of them display a common beta/alpha folding motif and have similar tertiary structures consisting of two globular domains. The ligand is bound at the bottom of a deep cleft, which lies at the interface between these two domains. The oxyanion-binding proteins are notable in that they can discriminate between very similar ligands. . Azotobacter vinelandii is unusual in that it possesses two periplasmic molybdate-binding proteins. The crystal structure of one of these with bound ligand has been determined at 1.2 A resolution. It superficially resembles the structure of sulphate-binding protein (SBP) from Salmonella typhimurium and uses a similar constellation of hydrogen-bonding interactions to bind its ligand. However, the detailed interactions are distinct from those of SBP and the more closely related molybdate-binding protein of Escherichia coli. . Despite differences in the residues involved in binding, the volumes of the binding pockets in the A. vinelandii and E. coli molybdate-binding proteins are similar and are significantly larger than that of SBP. We conclude that the discrimination between molybdate and sulphate shown by these binding proteins is largely dependent upon small differences in the sizes of these two oxyanions.

  10. Biological sex influences learning strategy preference and muscarinic receptor binding in specific brain regions of prepubertal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissom, Elin M; Hawley, Wayne R; Hodges, Kelly S; Fawcett-Patel, Jessica M; Dohanich, Gary P

    2013-04-01

    According to the theory of multiple memory systems, specific brain regions interact to determine how the locations of goals are learned when rodents navigate a spatial environment. A number of factors influence the type of strategy used by rodents to remember the location of a given goal in space, including the biological sex of the learner. We recently found that prior to puberty male rats preferred a striatum-dependent stimulus-response strategy over a hippocampus-dependent place strategy when solving a dual-solution task, while age-matched females showed no strategy preference. Because the cholinergic system has been implicated in learning strategy and is known to be sexually dimorphic prior to puberty, we explored the relationship between learning strategy and muscarinic receptor binding in specific brain regions of prepubertal males and female rats. We confirmed our previous finding that at 28 days of age a significantly higher proportion of prepubertal males preferred a stimulus-response learning strategy than a place strategy to solve a dual-solution visible platform water maze task. Equal proportions of prepubertal females preferred stimulus-response or place strategies. Profiles of muscarinic receptor binding as assessed by autoradiography varied according to strategy preference. Regardless of biological sex, prepubertal rats that preferred stimulus-response strategy exhibited lower ratios of muscarinic receptor binding in the hippocampus relative to the dorsolateral striatum compared to rats that preferred place strategy. Importantly, much of the variance in this ratio was related to differences in the ventral hippocampus to a greater extent than the dorsal hippocampus. The ratios of muscarinic receptors in the hippocampus relative to the basolateral amygdala also were lower in rats that preferred stimulus-response strategy over place strategy. Results confirm that learning strategy preference varies with biological sex in prepubertal rats with males

  11. Binding of doa kinase to specific loci in polytene chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kováčiková, M.; Raška, Ivan; Mateášik, A.; Chase, B. A.; Farkaš, R.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 1 (2006), s. 21-27 ISSN 1210-0668 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC535; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/02/0342 Grant - others:VEGA(SK) 2/3025/23; SAV(SK) APVT-51-027402; NSF(US) IBN-97-24006; US-SK(SK) 13/029/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : specific protein kinases * DOA * polytene chromosomes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  12. Sorption by cation exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Baeyens, B.

    1994-04-01

    A procedure for introducing exchange into geochemical/surface complexation codes is described. Beginning with selectivity coefficients, K c , defined in terms of equivalent fractional ion occupancies, a general expression for the molar based exchange code input parameters, K ex , is derived. In natural systems the uptake of nuclides onto complex sorbents often occurs by more than one mechanism. The incorporation of cation exchange and surface complexation into a geochemical code therefore enables sorption by both mechanisms to be calculated simultaneously. The code and model concepts are tested against sets of experimental data from widely different sorption studies. A proposal is made to set up a data base of selectivity coefficients. Such a data base would form part of a more general one consisting of sorption mechanism specific parameters to be used in conjunction with geochemical/sorption codes to model and predict sorption. (author) 6 figs., 6 tabs., 26 refs

  13. hMSH2 forms specific mispair-binding complexes with hMSH3 and hMSH6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, S; Wilson, T; Gradia, S; Kane, M F; Guerrette, S; Marsischky, G T; Kolodner, R; Fishel, R

    1996-11-26

    The genetic and biochemical properties of three human MutS homologues, hMSH2, hMSH3, and hMSH6, have been examined. The full-length hMSH6 cDNA and genomic locus were isolated and characterized, and it was demonstrated that the hMSH6 gene consisted of 10 exons and mapped to chromosome 2p15-16. The hMSH3 cDNA was in some cases found to contain a 27-bp deletion resulting in a loss of nine amino acids, depending on the individual from which the cDNA was isolated. hMSH2, hMSH3, and hMSH6 all showed similar tissue-specific expression patterns. hMSH2 protein formed a complex with both hMSH3 and hMSH6 proteins, similar to protein complexes demonstrated by studies of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae MSH2, MSH3, and MSH6. hMSH2 was also found to form a homomultimer complex, but neither hMSH3 nor hMSH6 appear to interact with themselves or each other. Analysis of the mismatched nucleotide-binding specificity of the hMSH2-hMSH3 and hMSH2-hMSH6 protein complexes showed that they have overlapping but not identical binding specificity. These results help to explain the distribution of mutations in different mismatch-repair genes seen in hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer.

  14. CREB Binding Protein Interacts with Nucleoporin-Specific FG Repeats That Activate Transcription and Mediate NUP98-HOXA9 Oncogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Lawryn H.; Brindle, Paul K.; Schnabel, Catherine A.; Pritchard, Colin E. J.; Cleary, Michael L.; van Deursen, Jan M. A.

    1999-01-01

    Genes encoding the Phe-Gly (FG) repeat-containing nucleoporins NUP98 and CAN/NUP214 are at the breakpoints of several chromosomal translocations associated with human acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but their role in oncogenesis is unclear. Here we demonstrate that the NUP98-HOXA9 fusion gene encodes two nuclear oncoproteins with either 19 or 37 NUP98 FG repeats fused to the DNA binding and PBX heterodimerization domains of the transcription factor HOXA9. Both NUP98-HOXA9 chimeras transformed NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, and this transformation required the HOXA9 domains for DNA binding and PBX interaction. Surprisingly, the FG repeats acted as very potent transactivators of gene transcription. This NUP98-derived activity is essential for transformation and can be replaced by the bona fide transactivation domain of VP16. Interestingly, FG repeat-containing segments derived from the nucleoporins NUP153 and CAN/NUP214 functioned similarly to those from NUP98. We further demonstrate that transactivation by FG repeat-rich segments of NUP98 correlates with their ability to interact functionally and physically with the transcriptional coactivators CREB binding protein (CBP) and p300. This finding shows, for the first time, that a translocation-generated fusion protein appears to recruit CBP/p300 as an important step of its oncogenic mechanism. Together, our results suggest that NUP98-HOXA9 chimeras are aberrant transcription factors that deregulate HOX-responsive genes through the transcriptional activation properties of nucleoporin-specific FG repeats that recruit CBP/p300. Indeed, FG repeat-mediated transactivation may be a shared pathogenic function of nucleoporins implicated human AML. PMID:9858599

  15. Dengue virus specific dual HLA binding T cell epitopes induce CD8+ T cell responses in seropositive individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comber, Joseph D; Karabudak, Aykan; Huang, Xiaofang; Piazza, Paolo A; Marques, Ernesto T A; Philip, Ramila

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus infects an estimated 300 million people each year and even more are at risk of becoming infected as the virus continues to spread into new areas. Despite the increase in viral prevalence, no anti-viral medications or vaccines are approved for treating or preventing infection. CD8+ T cell responses play a major role in viral clearance. Therefore, effective vaccines that induce a broad, multi-functional T cell response with substantial cross-reactivity between all virus serotypes can have major impacts on reducing infection rates and infection related complications. Here, we took an immunoproteomic approach to identify novel MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes presented by dengue virus infected cells, representing the natural and authentic targets of the T cell response. Using this approach we identified 4 novel MHC-I restricted epitopes: 2 with the binding motif for HLA-A24 molecules and 2 with both HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 binding motifs. These peptides were able to activate CD8+ T cell responses in both healthy, seronegative individuals and in seropositive individuals who have previously been infected with dengue virus. Importantly, the dual binding epitopes activated pre-existing T cell precursors in PBMCs obtained from both HLA-A2+ and HLA-A24+ seropositive individuals. Together, the data indicate that these epitopes are immunologically relevant T cell activating peptides presented on infected cells during a natural infection and therefore may serve as candidate antigens for the development of effective multi-serotype specific dengue virus vaccines. PMID:25668665

  16. Diverse monoclonal antibodies against the CA 19-9 antigen show variation in binding specificity with consequences for clinical interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partyka, Katie; Maupin, Kevin A; Brand, Randall E; Haab, Brian B

    2012-07-01

    The CA 19-9 antigen is currently the best individual marker for the detection of pancreatic cancer. In order to optimize the CA 19-9 assay and to develop approaches to further improve cancer detection, it is important to understand the specificity differences between CA 19-9 antibodies and the consequential affect on biomarker performance. Antibody arrays enabled multiplexed comparisons between five different CA 19-9 antibodies used in the analysis of plasma samples from pancreatic cancer patients and controls. Major differences were observed between antibodies in their detection of particular patient samples. Glycan array analysis revealed that certain antibodies were highly specific for the canonical CA 19-9 epitope, sialyl-Lewis A, while others bound sialyl-Lewis A in addition to a related structure called sialyl-Lewis C and modification with Nue5Gc. In a much larger patient cohort, we confirmed the binding of sialyl-Lewis C glycan by one of the antibodies and showed that the broader specificity led to the detection of an increased number of cancer patients without increasing detection of pancreatitis patient samples. This work demonstrates that variation between antibody specificity for cancer-associated glycans can have significant implications for biomarker performance and highlights the value of characterizing and detecting the range of glycan structures that are elevated in cancer. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. mRNA Display Selection of a High-Affinity, Modification-Specific Phospho-IκBα-Binding Fibronectin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, C. Anders; Liao, Hsiang-I; Sun, Ren; Roberts, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    The complexity of the human proteome is greatly expanded by post-translational modifications. New tools capable of recognizing these modifications in a sequence-specific fashion provide a route to purify these modified proteins, to alter protein trafficking, and to visualize signal transduction in real time. Here, we have evolved novel, modification-specific ligands that target phosphorylated IκBα. To do this, we employed mRNA display-based in vitro selection using a 30-trillion-member protein library based on the fibronectin type III domain. The selection yielded one fibronectin molecule, 10C17C25, that binds a phospho-IκBα peptide with Kd = 18 nM and is over 1000-fold specific compared to the nonphosphorylated peptide. 10C17C25 specifically recognizes endogenous phosphorylated IκBα from mammalian cell extract and stabilizes phospho-IκBα in vivo. We also incorporated 10C17C25 into a FRET indicator that detects IκB kinase (IKK) activity in vitro, demonstrating the utility of selecting designed adaptors for kinase activity sensors. PMID:18590330

  18. mRNA display selection of a high-affinity, modification-specific phospho-IkappaBalpha-binding fibronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, C Anders; Liao, Hsiang-I; Sun, Ren; Roberts, Richard W

    2008-08-15

    The complexity of the human proteome is greatly expanded by post-translational modifications. New tools capable of recognizing these modifications in a sequence-specific fashion provide a route to purify these modified proteins, to alter protein trafficking, and to visualize signal transduction in real time. Here, we have evolved novel, modification-specific ligands that target phosphorylated IkappaBalpha. To do this, we employed mRNA display-based in vitro selection using a 30-trillion-member protein library based on the fibronectin type III domain. The selection yielded one fibronectin molecule, 10C17C25, that binds a phospho-IkappaBalpha peptide with K d = 18 nM and is over 1000-fold specific compared to the nonphosphorylated peptide. 10C17C25 specifically recognizes endogenous phosphorylated IkappaBalpha from mammalian cell extract and stabilizes phospho-IkappaBalpha in vivo. We also incorporated 10C17C25 into a FRET indicator that detects IkappaB kinase (IKK) activity in vitro, demonstrating the utility of selecting designed adaptors for kinase activity sensors.

  19. 125I-Clq-binding and specific antibodies as indicators of pulmonary disease activity in cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, R.B.; Hsu, Y.P.; Lewiston, N.J.

    1981-01-01

    We studied the incidence and levels of circulating immune complexes by the 125 I-Clq-binding assay in patients with cystic fibrosis in relation to clinical respiratory status and specific IgG and IgE antibodies to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Candida albicans. Overall prevalence of CIC was 43%, but 86% of serially studied patients had evidence of CIC at some time. Patients with acute respiratory exacerbations and deteriorating pulmonary function had a higher incidence of CIC (76%) as compared to stable patients (36%, P less than 0.01), as well as significantly higher levels of CIC. Acute exacerbations were also associated with significant increases in IgG antibody to Pseudomonas (P less than 0.005) but not in other antibodies. CIC did not correlate with Pseudomonas-specific IgG nor with any other specific antibody studied. A variety of age-related differences in specific antibody levels were seen. The episodic appearance of CIC is common in CF and is usually associated with exacerbation of lung disease

  20. Structural basis for the ligand-binding specificity of fatty acid-binding proteins (pFABP4 and pFABP5) in gentoo penguin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Kim, Jung Eun; Do, Hackwon; Kim, Ryeo-Ok; Lee, Sung Gu; Park, Hyun Ho; Chang, Jeong Ho; Yim, Joung Han; Park, Hyun; Kim, Il-Chan; Lee, Jun Hyuck

    2015-09-11

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are involved in transporting hydrophobic fatty acids between various aqueous compartments of the cell by directly binding ligands inside their β-barrel cavities. Here, we report the crystal structures of ligand-unbound pFABP4, linoleate-bound pFABP4, and palmitate-bound pFABP5, obtained from gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua), at a resolution of 2.1 Å, 2.2 Å, and 2.3 Å, respectively. The pFABP4 and pFABP5 proteins have a canonical β-barrel structure with two short α-helices that form a cap region and fatty acid ligand binding sites in the hydrophobic cavity within the β-barrel structure. Linoleate-bound pFABP4 and palmitate-bound pFABP5 possess different ligand-binding modes and a unique ligand-binding pocket due to several sequence dissimilarities (A76/L78, T30/M32, underlining indicates pFABP4 residues) between the two proteins. Structural comparison revealed significantly different conformational changes in the β3-β4 loop region (residues 57-62) as well as the flipped Phe60 residue of pFABP5 than that in pFABP4 (the corresponding residue is Phe58). A ligand-binding study using fluorophore displacement assays shows that pFABP4 has a relatively strong affinity for linoleate as compared to pFABP5. In contrast, pFABP5 exhibits higher affinity for palmitate than that for pFABP4. In conclusion, our high-resolution structures and ligand-binding studies provide useful insights into the ligand-binding preferences of pFABPs based on key protein-ligand interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Multi-species, multi-transcription factor binding highlights conserved control of tissue-specific biological pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Benoit; Medina-Rivera, Alejandra; Schmidt, Dominic; Gonzàlez-Porta, Mar; Carlucci, Matthew; Chen, Xiaoting; Chessman, Kyle; Faure, Andre J; Funnell, Alister PW; Goncalves, Angela; Kutter, Claudia; Lukk, Margus; Menon, Suraj; McLaren, William M; Stefflova, Klara; Watt, Stephen; Weirauch, Matthew T; Crossley, Merlin; Marioni, John C; Odom, Duncan T; Flicek, Paul; Wilson, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    As exome sequencing gives way to genome sequencing, the need to interpret the function of regulatory DNA becomes increasingly important. To test whether evolutionary conservation of cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) gives insight into human gene regulation, we determined transcription factor (TF) binding locations of four liver-essential TFs in liver tissue from human, macaque, mouse, rat, and dog. Approximately, two thirds of the TF-bound regions fell into CRMs. Less than half of the human CRMs were found as a CRM in the orthologous region of a second species. Shared CRMs were associated with liver pathways and disease loci identified by genome-wide association studies. Recurrent rare human disease causing mutations at the promoters of several blood coagulation and lipid metabolism genes were also identified within CRMs shared in multiple species. This suggests that multi-species analyses of experimentally determined combinatorial TF binding will help identify genomic regions critical for tissue-specific gene control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02626.001 PMID:25279814

  2. Interaction of gold and silver nanoparticles with human plasma: Analysis of protein corona reveals specific binding patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wenjia; Wang, Qingsong; Li, Lumeng; Hu, Zhiyuan; Chen, Jiankui; Fang, Qiaojun

    2017-04-01

    Determining how nanomaterials interact with plasma will assist in understanding their effects on the biological system. This work presents a systematic study of the protein corona formed from human plasma on 20nm silver and gold nanoparticles with three different surface modifications, including positive and negative surface charges. The results show that all nanoparticles, even those with positive surface modifications, acquire negative charges after interacting with plasma. Approximately 300 proteins are identified on the coronas, while 99 are commonly found on each nanomaterial. The 20 most abundant proteins account for over 80% of the total proteins abundance. Remarkably, the surface charge and core of the nanoparticles, as well as the isoelectric point of the plasma proteins, are found to play significant roles in determining the nanoparticle coronas. Albumin and globulins are present at levels of less than 2% on these nanoparticle coronas. Fibrinogen, which presents in the plasma but not in the serum, preferably binds to negatively charged gold nanoparticles. These observations demonstrate the specific plasma protein binding pattern of silver and gold nanoparticles, as well as the importance of the surface charge and core in determining the protein corona compositions. The potential downstream biological impacts of the corona proteins were also investigated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Novel Peptide with Specific Calcium-Binding Capacity from Schizochytrium sp. Protein Hydrolysates and Calcium Bioavailability in Caco-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xixi Cai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Peptide-calcium can probably be a suitable supplement to improve calcium absorption in the human body. In this study, a specific peptide Phe-Tyr (FY with calcium-binding capacity was purified from Schizochytrium sp. protein hydrolysates through gel filtration chromatography and reversed phase HPLC. The calcium-binding capacity of FY reached 128.77 ± 2.57 μg/mg. Results of ultraviolet spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy showed that carboxyl groups, amino groups, and amido groups were the major chelating sites. FY-Ca exhibited excellent thermal stability and solubility, which were beneficial to be absorbed and transported in the basic intestinal tract of the human body. Moreover, the calcium bioavailability in Caco-2 cells showed that FY-Ca could enhance calcium uptake efficiency by more than three times when compared with CaCl2, and protect calcium ions against dietary inhibitors, such as tannic acid, oxalate, phytate, and Zn2+. Our findings further the progress of algae-based peptide-calcium, suggesting that FY-Ca has the potential to be developed as functionally nutraceutical additives.

  4. Progesterone--specific binding sites in the kidney of the female baboon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaker, F.J.; Herbert, D.C.; Sheridan, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    The uptake and retention of a radiolabeled synthetic progestin, ORG 2058, was studied in the urinary tract of the female baboon. Four estrogen-primed baboons were injected intravenously with 2.5 micrograms./kg. body weight of 3H-ORG 2058. One animal, which served as a control, received an additional injection of 2.5 mg./kg. body weight of unlabeled progesterone. One hour after the injections, the animals were killed and the kidneys, ureters and urinary bladder were removed and processed for autoradiography. Localization of progestin was observed in the nuclei of the convoluted and straight segments of the distal tubule, the ascending thick limb of the loop of Henle and both cortical and medullary collecting tubules. Connective tissue cells were also labeled in the medulla and cortex of the kidney. An absence of silver grains was noted in the renal corpuscle, all segments of the proximal tubule and the thin loop of Henle. Concentration of the tritiated steroid was not observed in either the ureter or bladder or in any portions of the urinary tract of the control animal. This study suggests that progesterone has a direct effect via a progesterone specific receptor on the various target cells that sequestered the 3H-ORG 2058

  5. Polyhydroxylated [60]fullerene binds specifically to functional recognition sites on a monomeric and a dimeric ubiquitin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanzoni, Serena; Ceccon, Alberto; Assfalg, Michael; Singh, Rajesh K.; Fushman, David; D'Onofrio, Mariapina

    2015-04-01

    The use of nanoparticles (NPs) in biomedical applications requires an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms by which NPs interact with biomolecules. NPs associating with proteins may interfere with protein-protein interactions and affect cellular communication pathways, however the impact of NPs on biomolecular recognition remains poorly characterized. In this respect, particularly relevant is the study of NP-induced functional perturbations of proteins implicated in the regulation of key biochemical pathways. Ubiquitin (Ub) is a prototypical protein post-translational modifier playing a central role in numerous essential biological processes. To contribute to the understanding of the interactions between this universally distributed biomacromolecule and NPs, we investigated the adsorption of polyhydroxylated [60]fullerene on monomeric Ub and on a minimal polyubiquitin chain in vitro at atomic resolution. Site-resolved chemical shift and intensity perturbations of Ub's NMR signals, together with 15N spin relaxation rate changes, exchange saturation transfer effects, and fluorescence quenching data were consistent with the reversible formation of soluble aggregates incorporating fullerenol clusters. The specific interaction epitopes were identified, coincident with functional recognition sites in a monomeric and lysine48-linked dimeric Ub. Fullerenol appeared to target the open state of the dynamic structure of a dimeric Ub according to a conformational selection mechanism. Importantly, the protein-NP association prevented the enzyme-catalyzed synthesis of polyubiquitin chains. Our findings provide an experiment-based insight into protein/fullerenol recognition, with implications in functional biomolecular communication, including regulatory protein turnover, and for the opportunity of therapeutic intervention in Ub-dependent cellular pathways.The use of nanoparticles (NPs) in biomedical applications requires an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms by which

  6. Elimination of Endogenous Toxin, Creatinine from Blood Plasma Depends on Albumin Conformation: Site Specific Uremic Toxicity & Impaired Drug Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Ankita; Rehan, Mohd; Subbarao, Naidu; Rabbani, Gulam; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Uremic syndrome results from malfunctioning of various organ systems due to the retention of uremic toxins which, under normal conditions, would be excreted into the urine and/or metabolized by the kidneys. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the renal elimination of uremic toxin creatinine that accumulate in chronic renal failure. Quantitative investigation of the plausible correlations was performed by spectroscopy, calorimetry, molecular docking and accessibility of surface area. Alkalinization of normal plasma from pH 7.0 to 9.0 modifies the distribution of toxin in the body and therefore may affect both the accumulation and the rate of toxin elimination. The ligand loading of HSA with uremic toxin predicts several key side chain interactions of site I that presumably have the potential to impact the specificity and impaired drug binding. These findings provide useful information for elucidating the complicated mechanism of toxin disposition in renal disease state. PMID:21386972

  7. Computational Biology Tools for Identifying Specific Ligand Binding Residues for Novel Agrochemical and Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neshich, Izabella Agostinho Pena; Nishimura, Leticia; de Moraes, Fabio Rogerio; Salim, Jose Augusto; Villalta-Romero, Fabian; Borro, Luiz; Yano, Inacio Henrique; Mazoni, Ivan; Tasic, Ljubica; Jardine, Jose Gilberto; Neshich, Goran

    2015-01-01

    The term "agrochemicals" is used in its generic form to represent a spectrum of pesticides, such as insecticides, fungicides or bactericides. They contain active components designed for optimized pest management and control, therefore allowing for economically sound and labor efficient agricultural production. A "drug" on the other side is a term that is used for compounds designed for controlling human diseases. Although drugs are subjected to much more severe testing and regulation procedures before reaching the market, they might contain exactly the same active ingredient as certain agrochemicals, what is the case described in present work, showing how a small chemical compound might be used to control pathogenicity of Gram negative bacteria Xylella fastidiosa which devastates citrus plantations, as well as for control of, for example, meningitis in humans. It is also clear that so far the production of new agrochemicals is not benefiting as much from the in silico new chemical compound identification/discovery as pharmaceutical production. Rational drug design crucially depends on detailed knowledge of structural information about the receptor (target protein) and the ligand (drug/agrochemical). The interaction between the two molecules is the subject of analysis that aims to understand relationship between structure and function, mainly deciphering some fundamental elements of the nanoenvironment where the interaction occurs. In this work we will emphasize the role of understanding nanoenvironmental factors that guide recognition and interaction of target protein and its function modifier, an agrochemical or a drug. The repertoire of nanoenvironment descriptors is used for two selected and specific cases we have approached in order to offer a technological solution for some very important problems that needs special attention in agriculture: elimination of pathogenicity of a bacterium which is attacking citrus plants and formulation of a new fungicide. Finally

  8. Pancreatic α-Amylase Controls Glucose Assimilation by Duodenal Retrieval through N-Glycan-specific Binding, Endocytosis, and Degradation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date, Kimie; Satoh, Ayano; Iida, Kaoruko; Ogawa, Haruko

    2015-01-01

    α-Amylase, a major pancreatic protein and starch hydrolase, is essential for energy acquisition. Mammalian pancreatic α-amylase binds specifically to glycoprotein N-glycans in the brush-border membrane to activate starch digestion, whereas it significantly inhibits glucose uptake by Na+/glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) at high concentrations (Asanuma-Date, K., Hirano, Y., Le, N., Sano, K., Kawasaki, N., Hashii, N., Hiruta, Y., Nakayama, K., Umemura, M., Ishikawa, K., Sakagami, H., and Ogawa, H. (2012) Functional regulation of sugar assimilation by N-glycan-specific interaction of pancreatic α-amylase with glycoproteins of duodenal brush border membrane. J. Biol. Chem. 287, 23104–23118). However, how the inhibition is stopped was unknown. Here, we show a new mechanism for the regulation of intestinal glucose absorption. Immunohistochemistry revealed that α-amylase in the duodena of non-fasted, but not fasted, pigs was internalized from the pancreatic fluid and immunostained. We demonstrated that after N-glycan binding, pancreatic α-amylase underwent internalization into lysosomes in a process that was inhibited by α-mannoside. The internalized α-amylase was degraded, showing low enzymatic activity and molecular weight at the basolateral membrane. In a human intestinal Caco-2 cell line, Alexa Fluor 488-labeled pancreatic α-amylase bound to the cytomembrane was transported to lysosomes through the endocytic pathway and then disappeared, suggesting degradation. Our findings indicate that N-glycan recognition by α-amylase protects enterocytes against a sudden increase in glucose concentration and restores glucose uptake by gradual internalization, which homeostatically controls the postprandial blood glucose level. The internalization of α-amylase may also enhance the supply of amino acids required for the high turnover of small intestine epithelial cells. This study provides novel and significant insights into the control of blood sugar during the absorption

  9. Detection of substrate binding of a collagen-specific molecular chaperone HSP47 in solution using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Akira; Ishida, Yoshihito; Kubota, Hiroshi; Pack, Chan-Gi; Homma, Takayuki; Ito, Shinya; Araki, Kazutaka; Kinjo, Masataka; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2018-02-26

    Heat shock protein 47 kDa (HSP47), an ER-resident and collagen-specific molecular chaperone, recognizes collagenous hydrophobic amino acid sequences (Gly-Pro-Hyp) and assists in secretion of correctly folded collagen. Elevated collagen production is correlated with HSP47 expression in various diseases, including fibrosis and keloid. HSP47 knockdown ameliorates liver fibrosis by inhibiting collagen secretion, and inhibition of the interaction of HSP47 with procollagen also prevents collagen secretion. Therefore, a high-throughput system for screening of drugs capable of inhibiting the interaction between HSP47 and collagen would aid the development of novel therapies for fibrotic diseases. In this study, we established a straightforward method for rapidly and quantitatively measuring the interaction between HSP47 and collagen in solution using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The diffusion rate of HSP47 labeled with Alexa Fluor 488 (HSP47-AF), a green fluorescent dye, decreased upon addition of type I or III collagen, whereas that of dye-labeled protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) did not, indicating that specific binding of HSP47 to collagen could be detected using FCS. Using this method, we calculated the dissociation constant of the interaction between HSP47 and collagen. The binding ratio between HSP47-AF and collagen did not change in the presence of sodium chloride, confirming that the interaction was hydrophobic in nature. In addition, we observed dissociation of collagen from HSP47 at low pH and re-association after recovery to neutral pH. These observations indicate that this system is appropriate for detecting the interaction between HSP47 and collagen, and could be applied to high-throughput screening for drugs capable of suppressing and/or curing fibrosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prolactin receptors in liver, kidney, and gill of the tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus): Characterization and effect of salinity on specific binding of iodinated ovine prolactin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dauder, S.; Young, G.; Hass, L.; Bern, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    Specific binding of 125 I-ovine prolactin (oPRL) to microsomal fractions from gill, kidney, and liver of adult tilapia was determined. Specific binding varied among tissues, the highest values being displayed by kidney membranes. In the liver, the binding of oPRL was not strongly displaced by tilapia prolactins (tPRL177 and tPRL188), although tPRL177 was six times more potent than tPRL188. On the other hand, in kidney and gill membranes, the two tPRLs were equipotent. Tilapia PRLs showed low potency in competing for oPRL-binding sites when pregnant rat liver membranes were utilized. Tilapia growth hormone (tGH) and human growth hormone (hGH) displaced 125 I-oPRL from liver as well as did tPRL177 but were not recognized well by renal or branchial receptors. Two 125 I-oPRL-binding sites were detected in every tissue tested. These binding sites are subject to physiological regulation since adaptation to seawater resulted in a significant decrease in specific binding

  11. DOF-binding sites additively contribute to guard cell-specificity of AtMYB60 promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cominelli Eleonora

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously demonstrated that the Arabidopsis thaliana AtMYB60 protein is an R2R3MYB transcription factor required for stomatal opening. AtMYB60 is specifically expressed in guard cells and down-regulated at the transcriptional levels by the phytohormone ABA. Results To investigate the molecular mechanisms governing AtMYB60 expression, its promoter was dissected through deletion and mutagenesis analyses. By studying different versions of AtMYB60 promoter::GUS reporter fusions in transgenic plants we were able to demonstrate a modular organization for the AtMYB60 promoter. Particularly we defined: a minimal promoter sufficient to confer guard cell-specific activity to the reporter gene; the distinct roles of different DOF-binding sites organised in a cluster in the minimal promoter in determining guard cell-specific expression; the promoter regions responsible for the enhancement of activity in guard cells; a promoter region responsible for the negative transcriptional regulation by ABA. Moreover from the analysis of single and multiple mutants we could rule out the involvement of a group of DOF proteins, known as CDFs, already characterised for their involvement in flowering time, in the regulation of AtMYB60 expression. Conclusions These findings shed light on the regulation of gene expression in guard cells and provide new promoter modules as useful tools for manipulating gene expression in guard cells, both for physiological studies and future biotechnological applications.

  12. Distinct Subfamilies of Odorant Binding Proteins in Locust (Orthoptera, Acrididae: Molecular Evolution, Structural Variation, and Sensilla-Specific Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingcong Jiang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Odorant binding proteins (OBPs play an important role in insect olfaction, facilitating transportation of odorant molecules in the sensillum lymph. While most of the researches are concentrated on Lepidopteran and Dipteran species, our knowledge about Orthopteran species is still very limited. In this study, we have investigated OBPs of the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria, a representative Orthopteran species. We have identified 14 transcripts from a S. gregaria antennal transcriptome encoding SgreOBPs, and recapitulated the phylogenetic relationship of SgreOBPs together with OBPs from three other locust species. Two conserved subfamilies of classic OBPs have been identified, named I-A and II-A, exhibiting both common and subfamily-specific amino acid motifs. Distinct evolutionary features were observed for subfamily I-A and II-A OBPs. Surface topology and interior cavity were elucidated for OBP members from the two subfamilies. Antennal topographic expression revealed distinct sensilla- and cellular- specific expression patterns for SgreOBPs from subfamily I-A and II-A. These findings give first insight into the repertoire of locust OBPs with respect to their molecular and evolutionary features as well as their expression in the antenna, which may serve as an initial step to unravel specific roles of distinct OBP subfamilies in locust olfaction.

  13. Specific reduction of calcium-binding protein (28-kilodalton calbindin-D) gene expression in aging and neurodegenerative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacopino, A.M.; Christakos, S.

    1990-01-01

    The present studies establish that there are specific, significant decreases in the neuronal calcium-binding protein (28-kDa calbindin-D) gene expression in aging and in neurodegenerative diseases. The specificity of the changes observed in calbindin mRNA levels was tested by reprobing blots with calmodulin, cyclophilin, and B-actin cDNAs. Gross brain regions of the aging rat exhibited specific, significant decreases in calbindin·mRNA and protein levels in the cerebellum, corpus striatum, and brain-stem region but not in the cerebral cortex or hippocampus. Discrete areas of the aging human brain exhibited significant decreases in calbindin protein and mRNA in the cerebellum, corpus striatum, and nucleus basalis but not in the neocortex, hippocampus, amygdala, locus ceruleus, or nucleus raphe dorsalis. Comparison of diseased human brain tissue with age- and sex-matched controls yielded significant decreases calbindin protein and mRNA in the substantia nigra (Parkinson disease), in the corpus striatum (Huntington disease), in the nucleus basalis (Alzheimer disease), and in the hippocampus and nucleus raphe dorsalis (Parkinson, Huntington, and Alzheimer diseases) but not in the cerebellum, neocortex, amygdala, or locus ceruleus. These findings suggest that decreased calbindin gene expression may lead to a failure of calcium buffering or intraneuronal calcium homeostasis, which contributes to calcium-mediated cytotoxic events during aging and in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases

  14. DOF-binding sites additively contribute to guard cell-specificity of AtMYB60 promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background We previously demonstrated that the Arabidopsis thaliana AtMYB60 protein is an R2R3MYB transcription factor required for stomatal opening. AtMYB60 is specifically expressed in guard cells and down-regulated at the transcriptional levels by the phytohormone ABA. Results To investigate the molecular mechanisms governing AtMYB60 expression, its promoter was dissected through deletion and mutagenesis analyses. By studying different versions of AtMYB60 promoter::GUS reporter fusions in transgenic plants we were able to demonstrate a modular organization for the AtMYB60 promoter. Particularly we defined: a minimal promoter sufficient to confer guard cell-specific activity to the reporter gene; the distinct roles of different DOF-binding sites organised in a cluster in the minimal promoter in determining guard cell-specific expression; the promoter regions responsible for the enhancement of activity in guard cells; a promoter region responsible for the negative transcriptional regulation by ABA. Moreover from the analysis of single and multiple mutants we could rule out the involvement of a group of DOF proteins, known as CDFs, already characterised for their involvement in flowering time, in the regulation of AtMYB60 expression. Conclusions These findings shed light on the regulation of gene expression in guard cells and provide new promoter modules as useful tools for manipulating gene expression in guard cells, both for physiological studies and future biotechnological applications. PMID:22088138

  15. Noncovalent cation-π interactions – their role in nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Fink

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-covalent interactions play an extremely important role in organisms. The main non-covalent interactions in nature are: ion-ion interactions, dipole-dipole interactions, hydrogen bonds, and van der Waals interactions. A new kind of intermolecular interactions – cation-π interactions – is gaining increasing attention. These interactions occur between a cation and a π system. The main contributors to cation-π interactions are electrostatic, polarization and, to a lesser extent, dispersion interactions. At first, cation-π interactions were studied in a gas phase, with metal cation–aromatic system complexes. The characteristics of these complexes are as follows: an increase of cation atomic number leads to a decrease of interaction energy, and an increase of cation charge leads to an increase of interaction energy. Aromatic amino acids bind with metal cations mainly through interactions with their main chain. Nevertheless, cation-π interaction with a hydrophobic side chain significantly enhances binding energy. In water solutions most cations preferentially interact with water molecules rather than aromatic systems. Cation-π interactions occur in environments with lower accessibility to a polar solvent. Cation-π interactions can have a stabilizing role on the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure of proteins. These interactions play an important role in substrate or ligand binding sites in many proteins, which should be taken into consideration when the screening of effective inhibitors for these proteins is carried out. Cation-π interactions are abundant and play an important role in many biological processes.

  16. Identification of amino acid residues in PEPHC1 important for binding to the tumor-specific receptor EGFRvIII

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Charlotte Lund; Hansen, Paul Robert; Pedersen, Nina

    2008-01-01

    to identify the amino acid residues important for binding of PEPHC1 to EGFRvIII. The results indicate that the amino acid residues at the N-terminus of PEPHC1 are essential for the binding to the mutated receptor. One analog, [Ala(12)]PEPHC1, showed higher selective binding to EGFRvIII than PEPHC1...

  17. An external loop region of domain III of dengue virus type 2 envelope protein is involved in serotype-specific binding to mosquito but not mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jan-Jong; Hsieh, Meng-Ti; Young, Ming-Jer; Kao, Chuan-Liang; King, Chwan-Chuen; Chang, Wen

    2004-01-01

    Dengue virus (DV) is a flavivirus and infects mammalian cells through mosquito vectors. This study investigates the roles of domain III of DV type 2 envelope protein (EIII) in DV binding to the host cell. Recombinant EIII interferes with DV infection to BHK21 and C6/36 cells by blocking dengue virion adsorption to these cells. Inhibition of EIII on BHK21 cells was broad with no serotype specificity; however, inhibition of EIII on C6/36 cells was relatively serotype specific. Soluble heparin completely blocks binding of EIII to BHK21 cells, suggesting that domain III binds mainly to cell surface heparan sulfates. This suggestion is supported by the observation that EIII binds very weakly to gro2C and sog9 mutant mammalian cell lines that lack heparan sulfate. In contrast, heparin does not block binding of EIII to mosquito cells. Furthermore, a synthetic peptide that includes amino acids (aa) 380 to 389 of EIII, IGVEPGQLKL, inhibits binding of EIII to C6/36 but not BHK21 cells. This peptide corresponds to a lateral loop region on domain III of E protein, indicating a possible role of this loop in binding to mosquito cells. In summary, these results suggest that EIII plays an important role in binding of DV type 2 to host cells. In addition, EIII interacts with heparan sulfates when binding to BHK21 cells, and a loop region containing aa 380 to 389 of EIII may participate in DV type 2 binding to C6/36 cells.

  18. The kinetics of specific [3H]flunitrazepam ([3H]FNZ) binding in the brain of the epaulette shark (hemiscyllium ocellatum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, G.; Renshaw, G.M.C.; Dodd, P.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: We have previously established that the epaulette shark is tolerant to hypoxia and that the resulting brain hypometabolism appears to be correlated with increased levels of GABA. It is of interest to determine whether there is a change in GABA A receptor number and/or binding characteristics in response to hypoxia. The focus of this initial study is to determine the kinetics of [ 3 H]FNZ binding to the benzodiazapine binding site on the GABA A receptor in the brain, so that the effect of hypoxia on GABA A receptors can be determined. Adult epaulette sharks were anaesthetised with 80mg/L of MS222 and the brain was dissected and rapidly frozen. Membranes were prepared at 4 deg C by homogenising the dissected tissue in 0.32M sucrose and centrifuging the homogenate for 10 min at 6 000g. The supernatant was layered onto an aliquat of 0.8M sucrose then centrifuged for 30 min at 40 000g. After washing the membranes, the binding characteristics of [ 3 H]FNZ were examined using in vitro centrifugation assays. This method revealed that [ 3 H]FNZ bound specifically to low-affinity binding sites in an elasmobranch brain. This finding is in contrast with previous reports of little to no specific binding of [ 3 H]FNZ in elasmobranchs, which precluded an estimation of binding parameters. Copyright (1998) Australian Neuroscience Society

  19. Stream specificity and asymmetries in feature binding and content-addressable access in visual encoding and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Duong L; Tripathy, Srimant P; Bedell, Harold E; Ögmen, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Human memory is content addressable-i.e., contents of the memory can be accessed using partial information about the bound features of a stored item. In this study, we used a cross-feature cuing technique to examine how the human visual system encodes, binds, and retains information about multiple stimulus features within a set of moving objects. We sought to characterize the roles of three different features (position, color, and direction of motion, the latter two of which are processed preferentially within the ventral and dorsal visual streams, respectively) in the construction and maintenance of object representations. We investigated the extent to which these features are bound together across the following processing stages: during stimulus encoding, sensory (iconic) memory, and visual short-term memory. Whereas all features examined here can serve as cues for addressing content, their effectiveness shows asymmetries and varies according to cue-report pairings and the stage of information processing and storage. Position-based indexing theories predict that position should be more effective as a cue compared to other features. While we found a privileged role for position as a cue at the stimulus-encoding stage, position was not the privileged cue at the sensory and visual short-term memory stages. Instead, the pattern that emerged from our findings is one that mirrors the parallel processing streams in the visual system. This stream-specific binding and cuing effectiveness manifests itself in all three stages of information processing examined here. Finally, we find that the Leaky Flask model proposed in our previous study is applicable to all three features.

  20. Filtration assay for quantitation of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) specific binding to whole cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dold, K.M.; Greenlee, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive filtration assay for quantitating the specific binding of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) to whole cells in culture is described. Cell monolayers are incubated with [3H]TCDD in the presence or absence of excess unlabeled ligand, detached from the culture dish with trypsin, filtered, and washed with cold (-78 degrees C) acetone to separate free and nonspecifically bound TCDD from specifically bound TCDD. TCDD receptor binding parameters were characterized in the murine hepatoma cell line Hepa1c1c7. The lower limit of detection of TCDD specific binding was in a sample equivalent to 10 micrograms of total cell protein. The equilibrium dissociation constant and stereospecificity for binding to the TCDD receptor were the same as those previously reported with other TCDD receptor assays on broken cell preparations. Analysis of binding in the murine hepatoma TCDD receptor variants TAO-c1BPrc1 and BPrc1 indicated that this assay will detect receptor number or affinity variants, but will not detect nuclear transfer deficient variants. The major advantage of the whole cell binding assay is that it provides the means to rapidly and reproducibly quantitate TCDD specific binding in small samples of whole cells in culture. In addition, this method eliminates loss or degradation of the receptor protein during the fractionation of cells required in previously reported methods. This method should prove useful in screening clonal cell populations for TCDD receptor number and affinity variants, and in screening for TCDD receptor binding activity in complementation studies of receptor deficient cells

  1. Isomerization of propargyl cation to cyclopropenyl cation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    step) for isomeri- zation of the linear propargyl cation to ..... C3, C4 and C5. The ZPE corrections in each case are derived from the. B3LYP calculations. ..... the converse of which gives the relative capacity of the. LPD's to stabilize TS6 with respect ...

  2. A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study on glycan array data to determine the specificities of glycan-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Pengfei; Zhang, Yuehua; Tzeng, Tzuen-rong Jeremy; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Luo, Feng

    2012-04-01

    Advances in glycan array technology have provided opportunities to automatically and systematically characterize the binding specificities of glycan-binding proteins. However, there is still a lack of robust methods for such analyses. In this study, we developed a novel quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) method to analyze glycan array data. We first decomposed glycan chains into mono-, di-, tri- or tetrasaccharide subtrees. The bond information was incorporated into subtrees to help distinguish glycan chain structures. Then, we performed partial least-squares (PLS) regression on glycan array data using the subtrees as features. The application of QSAR to the glycan array data of different glycan-binding proteins demonstrated that PLS regression using subtree features can obtain higher R(2) values and a higher percentage of variance explained in glycan array intensities. Based on the regression coefficients of PLS, we were able to effectively identify subtrees that indicate the binding specificities of a glycan-binding protein. Our approach will facilitate the glycan-binding specificity analysis using the glycan array. A user-friendly web tool of the QSAR method is available at http://bci.clemson.edu/tools/glycan_array.

  3. Fluorescent Protein-Based Ca2+ Sensor Reveals Global, Divalent Cation-Dependent Conformational Changes in Cardiac Troponin C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam A Badr

    Full Text Available Cardiac troponin C (cTnC is a key effector in cardiac muscle excitation-contraction coupling as the Ca2+ sensing subunit responsible for controlling contraction. In this study, we generated several FRET sensors for divalent cations based on cTnC flanked by a donor fluorescent protein (CFP and an acceptor fluorescent protein (YFP. The sensors report Ca2+ and Mg2+ binding, and relay global structural information about the structural relationship between cTnC's N- and C-domains. The sensors were first characterized using end point titrations to decipher the response to Ca2+ binding in the presence or absence of Mg2+. The sensor that exhibited the largest responses in end point titrations, CTV-TnC, (Cerulean, TnC, and Venus was characterized more extensively. Most of the divalent cation-dependent FRET signal originates from the high affinity C-terminal EF hands. CTV-TnC reconstitutes into skinned fiber preparations indicating proper assembly of troponin complex, with only ~0.2 pCa unit rightward shift of Ca2+-sensitive force development compared to WT-cTnC. Affinity of CTV-TnC for divalent cations is in agreement with known values for WT-cTnC. Analytical ultracentrifugation indicates that CTV-TnC undergoes compaction as divalent cations bind. C-terminal sites induce ion-specific (Ca2+ versus Mg2+ conformational changes in cTnC. Our data also provide support for the presence of additional, non-EF-hand sites on cTnC for Mg2+ binding. In conclusion, we successfully generated a novel FRET-Ca2+ sensor based on full length cTnC with a variety of cellular applications. Our sensor reveals global structural information about cTnC upon divalent cation binding.

  4. Impact of cadmium, cobalt and nickel on sequence-specific DNA binding of p63 and p73 in vitro and in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adámik, Matej; Bažantová, Pavla; Navrátilová, Lucie; Polášková, Alena; Pečinka, Petr; Holaňová, Lucie; Tichý, Vlastimil; Brázdová, Marie

    2015-01-02

    Site-specific DNA recognition and binding activity belong to common attributes of all three members of tumor suppressor p53 family proteins: p53, p63 and p73. It was previously shown that heavy metals can affect p53 conformation, sequence-specific binding and suppress p53 response to DNA damage. Here we report for the first time that cadmium, nickel and cobalt, which have already been shown to disturb various DNA repair mechanisms, can also influence p63 and p73 sequence-specific DNA binding activity and transactivation of p53 family target genes. Based on results of electrophoretic mobility shift assay and luciferase reporter assay, we conclude that cadmium inhibits sequence-specific binding of all three core domains to p53 consensus sequences and abolishes transactivation of several promoters (e.g. BAX and MDM2) by 50μM concentrations. In the presence of specific DNA, all p53 family core domains were partially protected against loss of DNA binding activity due to cadmium treatment. Effective cadmium concentration to abolish DNA-protein interactions was about two times higher for p63 and p73 proteins than for p53. Furthermore, we detected partial reversibility of cadmium inhibition for all p53 family members by EDTA. DTT was able to reverse cadmium inhibition only for p53 and p73. Nickel and cobalt abolished DNA-p53 interaction at sub-millimolar concentrations while inhibition of p63 and p73 DNA binding was observed at millimolar concentrations. In summary, cadmium strongly inhibits p53, p63 and p73 DNA binding in vitro and in cells in comparison to nickel and cobalt. The role of cadmium inhibition of p53 tumor suppressor family in carcinogenesis is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The lectin domains of polypeptide GalNAc-transferases exhibit carbohydrate-binding specificity for GalNAc: lectin binding to GalNAc-glycopeptide substrates is required for high density GalNAc-O-glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandall, Hans H; Irazoqui, Fernando; Tarp, Mads Agervig

    2007-01-01

    Initiation of mucin-type O-glycosylation is controlled by a large family of UDP GalNAc:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-transferases). Most GalNAc-transferases contain a ricin-like lectin domain in the C-terminal end, which may confer GalNAc-glycopeptide substrate specificity...... to the enzyme. We have previously shown that the lectin domain of GalNAc-T4 modulates its substrate specificity to enable unique GalNAc-glycopeptide specificities and that this effect is selectively inhibitable by GalNAc; however, direct evidence of carbohydrate binding of GalNAc-transferase lectins has...... not been previously presented. Here, we report the direct carbohydrate binding of two GalNAc-transferase lectin domains, GalNAc-T4 and GalNAc-T2, representing isoforms reported to have distinct glycopeptide activity (GalNAc-T4) and isoforms without apparent distinct GalNAc-glycopeptide specificity (Gal...

  6. Insight into the role of substrate-binding residues in conferring substrate specificity for the multifunctional polysaccharide lyase Smlt1473.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Logan C; Berger, Bryan W

    2014-06-27

    Anionic polysaccharides are of growing interest in the biotechnology industry due to their potential pharmaceutical applications in drug delivery and wound treatment. Chemical composition and polymer length strongly influence the physical and biological properties of the polysaccharide and thus its potential industrial and medical applications. One promising approach to determining monomer composition and controlling the degree of polymerization involves the use of polysaccharide lyases, which catalyze the depolymerization of anionic polysaccharides via a β-elimination mechanism. Utilization of these enzymes for the production of custom-made oligosaccharides requires a high degree of control over substrate specificity. Previously, we characterized a polysaccharide lyase (Smlt1473) from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia k279a, which exhibited significant activity against hyaluronan (HA), poly-β-d-glucuronic acid (poly-GlcUA), and poly-β-d-mannuronic acid (poly-ManA) in a pH-regulated manner. Here, we utilize a sequence structure guided approach based on a homology model of Smlt1473 to identify nine putative substrate-binding residues and examine their effect on substrate specificity via site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, single point mutations H221F and R312L resulted in increased activity and specificity toward poly-ManA and poly-GlcUA, respectively. Furthermore, a W171A mutant nearly eliminated HA activity, while increasing poly-ManA and poly-GlcUA activity by at least 35%. The effect of these mutations was analyzed by comparison with the high resolution structure of Sphingomonas sp. A1-III alginate lyase in complex with poly-ManA tetrasaccharide and by taking into account the structural differences between HA, poly-GlcUA, and poly-ManA. Overall, our results demonstrate that even minor changes in active site architecture have a significant effect on the substrate specificity of Smlt1473, whose structural plasticity could be applied to the design of highly

  7. Differential neutralizing activities of a single domain camelid antibody (VHH specific for ricin toxin's binding subunit (RTB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Herrera

    Full Text Available Ricin, a member of the A-B family of ribosome-inactivating proteins, is classified as a Select Toxin by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention because of its potential use as a biothreat agent. In an effort to engineer therapeutics for ricin, we recently produced a collection of alpaca-derived, heavy-chain only antibody VH domains (VHH or "nanobody" specific for ricin's enzymatic (RTA and binding (RTB subunits. We reported that one particular RTB-specific VHH, RTB-B7, when covalently linked via a peptide spacer to different RTA-specific VHHs, resulted in heterodimers like VHH D10/B7 that were capable of passively protecting mice against a lethal dose challenge with ricin. However, RTB-B7 itself, when mixed with ricin at a 1 ∶ 10 toxin:antibody ratio did not afford any protection in vivo, even though it had demonstrable toxin-neutralizing activity in vitro. To better define the specific attributes of antibodies associated with ricin neutralization in vitro and in vivo, we undertook a more thorough characterization of RTB-B7. We report that RTB-B7, even at 100-fold molar excess (toxin:antibody was unable to alter the toxicity of ricin in a mouse model. On the other hand, in two well-established cytotoxicity assays, RTB-B7 neutralized ricin with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 that was equivalent to that of 24B11, a well-characterized and potent RTB-specific murine monoclonal antibody. In fact, RTB-B7 and 24B11 were virtually identical when compared across a series of in vitro assays, including adherence to and neutralization of ricin after the toxin was pre-bound to cell surface receptors. RTB-B7 differed from both 24B11 and VHH D10/B7 in that it was relatively less effective at blocking ricin attachment to receptors on host cells and was not able to form high molecular weight toxin:antibody complexes in solution. Whether either of these activities is important in ricin toxin neutralizing activity in vivo remains to be determined.

  8. Ontogeny of specific prolactin binding sites in the rat choroid plexus and their temporal relation to the prolactin short-loop feedback system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, F.

    1985-01-01

    The development of prolactin receptors in the choroid plexus of the rat was examined using the in vivo autoradiographic approach employing the principle of competitive binding. Animals aged 0, 10, 14, and 18 days postnatal were perfusion fixed following hormone injection and prepared for light microscopic autoradiography. The choroid plexus first demonstrated specific binding of prolactin at 14 days postnatal. The lactogen specificity of these binding sites was further defined by the ability of I 125 -prolactin to be displaced by unlabelled human growth hormone, which is lactogenic in rats, and not by unlabelled insulin, which is structurally dissimilar to prolactin. Morphometric analysis was performed on electron micrographs of choroid plexus from 10 and 14 day postnatal rats. The volume densities of constituents known to be involved in the synthesis and/or function of polypeptide hormone receptors were measured and differences tested for statistical significance. A semi-quantitative histo-fluorescence technique was used to evaluate the ability of prolactin to stimulate secretion of its inhibiting factor, dopamine, in 10 day postnatal rats. The present findings indicate that the ontogenesis of specific prolactin binding sites is not temporally connected with the establishment of the prolactin short-loop feedback system since activation of the system occurs prior to the establishment of specific prolactin binding at choroid plexus

  9. N,N',N"-tris(dihydroxyphosphorylmethyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (Deofix) - a high-affinity, high-specificity chelator for first transition series metal cations with significant deodorant, antimicrobial, and antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laden, Karl; Zaklad, Haim; Simhon, Elliot D; Klein, Joseph Y; Cyjon, Rosa L; Winchell, Harry S

    2003-01-01

    Deofix, N,N',N"-tris(dihydroxyphosphorylmethyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane, is a high-affinity, high-specificity chelator for first transition series cations such as iron, zinc, manganese, and copper. A 1% solution in 50% ethanol was found to be significantly better at reducing underarm malodor than a solution of 0.3% Triclosan in 50% ethanol. Compared to a 50% alcohol control, Deofix was found to produce a significant reduction in malodor for at least 48 hours. Deofix appears to work by reducing the concentration of first transition series metal ions below the levels needed for microbial cell reproduction and by inhibiting oxidative processes by interfering with catalytic formation of free radicals. Deofix has very low levels of toxicity when measured via a number of screening techniques.

  10. Strain-Specific V3 and CD4 Binding Site Autologous HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Select Neutralization-Resistant Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, M Anthony; Gao, Feng; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Amos, Joshua D; Kumar, Amit; Hora, Bhavna; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Xia, Shi-Mao; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Lu, Xiaozhi; Bonsignori, Mattia; Finzi, Andrés; Vandergrift, Nathan A; Alam, S Munir; Ferrari, Guido; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D; Kamanga, Gift; Cohen, Myron S; Sam, Noel E; Kapiga, Saidi; Gray, Elin S; Tumba, Nancy L; Morris, Lynn; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Mascola, John R; Hahn, Beatrice H; Shaw, George M; Sodroski, Joseph G; Liao, Hua-Xin; Montefiori, David C; Hraber, Peter T; Korber, Bette T; Haynes, Barton F

    2015-09-09

    The third variable (V3) loop and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of the HIV-1 envelope are frequently targeted by neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in infected individuals. In chronic infection, HIV-1 escape mutants repopulate the plasma, and V3 and CD4bs nAbs emerge that can neutralize heterologous tier 1 easy-to-neutralize but not tier 2 difficult-to-neutralize HIV-1 isolates. However, neutralization sensitivity of autologous plasma viruses to this type of nAb response has not been studied. We describe the development and evolution in vivo of antibodies distinguished by their target specificity for V3 and CD4bs epitopes on autologous tier 2 viruses but not on heterologous tier 2 viruses. A surprisingly high fraction of autologous circulating viruses was sensitive to these antibodies. These findings demonstrate a role for V3 and CD4bs antibodies in constraining the native envelope trimer in vivo to a neutralization-resistant phenotype, explaining why HIV-1 transmission generally occurs by tier 2 neutralization-resistant viruses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Localization of hyaluronan with a hyaluronan-specific hyaluronic acid binding protein in the placenta in pre-eclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matejevic, D; Neudeck, H; Graf, R; Müller, T; Dietl, J

    2001-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA), a high molecular weight polysaccharide, is a major component of connective tissue and is thus present in the extracellular matrix of most tissues. Increased serum concentrations have been reported in association with pre-eclampsia and liver malfunction, amongst other disorders. We have performed histochemical investigations with a HA-specific hyaluronic acid binding protein in placentas from uncomplicated pregnancies and from patients with pre-eclampsia. Staining for HA was found in the stroma and blood vessel walls of stem villi in all the placentas investigated. The syncytiotrophoblast and cytotrophoblast cells usually remained unstained. In addition, reactivity for HA was found within and on the surface of intervillous and perivillous fibrinoid deposits. Since fibrinoid deposits are increased in pre-eclampsia, our findings suggest that the increased HA serum concentrations in cases of pre-eclampsia could result from the stroma of the infarcted villi and from the fibrinoid deposits. HA may reach the maternal blood through fibrinoid gaps. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  12. Promiscuous and specific phospholipid binding by domains in ZAC, a membrane-associated Arabidopsis protein with an ARF GAP zinc finger and a C2 domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, R B; Lykke-Andersen, K; Frandsen, G I

    2000-01-01

    Arabidopsis proteins were predicted which share an 80 residue zinc finger domain known from ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase-activating proteins (ARF GAPs). One of these is a 37 kDa protein, designated ZAC, which has a novel domain structure in which the N-terminal ARF GAP domain and a C-terminal C2...... containing the ZAC-C2 domain bind anionic phospholipids non-specifically, with some variance in Ca2+ and salt dependence. Similar assays demonstrated specific affinity of the ZAC N-terminal region (residues 1-174) for phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate (PI-3-P). Binding was dependent in part on an intact...

  13. Combinatorial binding leads to diverse regulatory responses: Lmd is a tissue-specific modulator of Mef2 activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo M F Cunha

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how complex patterns of temporal and spatial expression are regulated is central to deciphering genetic programs that drive development. Gene expression is initiated through the action of transcription factors and their cofactors converging on enhancer elements leading to a defined activity. Specific constellations of combinatorial occupancy are therefore often conceptualized as rigid binding codes that give rise to a common output of spatio-temporal expression. Here, we assessed this assumption using the regulatory input of two essential transcription factors within the Drosophila myogenic network. Mutations in either Myocyte enhancing factor 2 (Mef2 or the zinc-finger transcription factor lame duck (lmd lead to very similar defects in myoblast fusion, yet the underlying molecular mechanism for this shared phenotype is not understood. Using a combination of ChIP-on-chip analysis and expression profiling of loss-of-function mutants, we obtained a global view of the regulatory input of both factors during development. The majority of Lmd-bound enhancers are co-bound by Mef2, representing a subset of Mef2's transcriptional input during these stages of development. Systematic analyses of the regulatory contribution of both factors demonstrate diverse regulatory roles, despite their co-occupancy of shared enhancer elements. These results indicate that Lmd is a tissue-specific modulator of Mef2 activity, acting as both a transcriptional activator and repressor, which has important implications for myogenesis. More generally, this study demonstrates considerable flexibility in the regulatory output of two factors, leading to additive, cooperative, and repressive modes of co-regulation.

  14. Specificity of the second binding protein of the peptide ABC-transporter (Dpp) of Lactococcus lactis IL1403

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanz, Y; Toldra, F; Renault, P; Poolman, B

    2003-01-01

    The genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis IL1403 revealed the presence of a putative peptide-binding protein-dependent ABC-transporter (Dpp). The genes for two peptide-binding proteins (dppA and dppP) precede the membrane components, which include two transmembrane protein genes (dppB and dppC) and

  15. Specificity of cGMP binding to a purified cGMP-stimulated phosphodiesterase from bovine adrenal tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miot, Françoise; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Erneux, Christophe

    1985-01-01

    The binding of [3H]cGMP (guanosine 3’,5’-monophosphate) to purified bovine adrenal cGMP-stimulated phosphodiesterase was measured by Millipore filtration on cellulose ester filter. [3H]cGMP-binding activity was enhanced when the assay was terminated in buffer containing 70% of saturated ammonium

  16. [3H]sildenafil binding to phosphodiesterase-5 is specific, kinetically heterogeneous, and stimulated by cGMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Jackie D; Blount, Mitsi A; Weeks, James L; Beasley, Alfreda; Kuhn, Karl P; Ho, Yew S J; Saidi, Layla F; Hurley, James H; Kotera, Jun; Francis, Sharron H

    2003-06-01

    Sildenafil (Viagra) potentiates penile erection by acting as a nonhydrolyzable analog of cGMP and competing with this nucleotide for catalysis by phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5), but the characteristics of direct binding of radiolabeled sildenafil to PDE5 have not been determined. [3H]Sildenafil binding to PDE5 was retained when filtered through nitrocellulose or glass-fiber membranes. Binding was inhibited by excess sildenafil, 2-(2-methylpyridin-4-yl)methyl-4-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-8-(pyrimidin-2-yl)methoxy-1,2-dihydro-1-oxo-2,7-naphthyridine-3-carboxylic acid methyl ester hydrochloride (T-0156), 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, EDTA, or cGMP, but not by cAMP or 5'-GMP. PDE5 was the only [3H]sildenafil binding protein detected in human lung extract. Using purified recombinant PDE5, [3H]sildenafil exchange dissociation yielded two components with t1/2 values of 1 and 14 min and corresponding calculated KD values of 12 and 0.83 nM, respectively. This implied the existence of two conformers of the PDE5 catalytic site. [3H]Sildenafil binding isotherm of PDE5 indicated KD was 8.3 to 13.3 nM, and low cGMP decreased the KD to 4.8 nM but only slightly increased Bmax to a maximum of 0.61 mol/mol-subunit. Results suggest that these effects occur via cGMP binding to the allosteric cGMP binding sites of PDE5. Results imply that by inhibiting PDE5 and thereby increasing cGMP, sildenafil accentuates its own binding affinity for PDE5, which further elevates cGMP. The data also indicate that after physiological elevation, cGMP may directly stimulate the catalytic site by binding to the allosteric cGMP-binding sites of PDE5, thus causing negative feedback on this pathway.

  17. Region specific and worldwide distribution of collagen-binding M proteins with PARF motifs among human pathogenic streptococcal isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reissmann, Silvana; Gillen, Christine M; Fulde, Marcus; Bergmann, René; Nerlich, Andreas; Rajkumari, Reena; Brahmadathan, Kootallur N; Chhatwal, Gursharan S; Nitsche-Schmitz, D Patric

    2012-01-01

    Some of the variety of Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis (SDSE) M proteins act as collagen-binding adhesins that facilitate acute infection. Moreover, their potential to trigger collagen autoimmunity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute rheumatic fever and attributed to a collagen-binding motif called PARF (peptide associated with rheumatic fever). For the first time we determine the rate of clinical isolates with collagen-binding M proteins that use a PARF motif (A/T/E)XYLXX(L/F)N in a defined geographic region, Vellore in South India. In this region both, incidence of streptococcal infections and prevalence of acute rheumatic fever are high. M proteins with PARF motif conferred collagen-binding activity to 3.9% of 153 S. pyogenes and 10.6% of 255 SDSE clinical isolates from Vellore. The PARF motif occurred in three S. pyogenes and 22 SDSE M protein types. In one of the S. pyogenes and five of the SDSE M proteins that contained the motif, collagen-binding was impaired, due to influences of other parts of the M protein molecule. The accumulated data on the collagen binding activity of certain M protein types allowed a reanalysis of published worldwide emm-typing data with the aim to estimate the rates of isolates that bind collagen via PARF. The results indicate that M proteins, which bind collagen via a PARF motif, are epidemiologically relevant in human infections, not only in Vellore. It is imperative to include the most relevant collagen-binding M types in vaccines. But when designing M protein based vaccines it should be considered that collagen binding motifs within the vaccine antigen remain potential risk factors.

  18. Impact of cadmium, cobalt and nickel on sequence-specific DNA binding of p63 and p73 in vitro and in cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adámik, Matej [Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Královopolská 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Bažantová, Pavla [Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Královopolská 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Department of Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Science, University of Ostrava, Chittussiho 10, 701 03 Ostrava (Czech Republic); Navrátilová, Lucie; Polášková, Alena [Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Královopolská 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Pečinka, Petr [Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Královopolská 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Department of Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Science, University of Ostrava, Chittussiho 10, 701 03 Ostrava (Czech Republic); Holaňová, Lucie [Department of Chemical Drugs, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Palackého 1/3, 61242 Brno (Czech Republic); Tichý, Vlastimil [Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Královopolská 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Brázdová, Marie, E-mail: maruska@ibp.cz [Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Královopolská 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Department of Chemical Drugs, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Palackého 1/3, 61242 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • DNA binding of p53 family core domains is inhibited by cadmium, cobalt and nickel. • Binding to DNA protects p53 family core domains from metal induced inhibition. • Cadmium, cobalt and nickel induced inhibition was reverted by EDTA in vitro. - Abstract: Site-specific DNA recognition and binding activity belong to common attributes of all three members of tumor suppressor p53 family proteins: p53, p63 and p73. It was previously shown that heavy metals can affect p53 conformation, sequence-specific binding and suppress p53 response to DNA damage. Here we report for the first time that cadmium, nickel and cobalt, which have already been shown to disturb various DNA repair mechanisms, can also influence p63 and p73 sequence-specific DNA binding activity and transactivation of p53 family target genes. Based on results of electrophoretic mobility shift assay and luciferase reporter assay, we conclude that cadmium inhibits sequence-specific binding of all three core domains to p53 consensus sequences and abolishes transactivation of several promoters (e.g. BAX and MDM2) by 50 μM concentrations. In the presence of specific DNA, all p53 family core domains were partially protected against loss of DNA binding activity due to cadmium treatment. Effective cadmium concentration to abolish DNA–protein interactions was about two times higher for p63 and p73 proteins than for p53. Furthermore, we detected partial reversibility of cadmium inhibition for all p53 family members by EDTA. DTT was able to reverse cadmium inhibition only for p53 and p73. Nickel and cobalt abolished DNA–p53 interaction at sub-millimolar concentrations while inhibition of p63 and p73 DNA binding was observed at millimolar concentrations. In summary, cadmium strongly inhibits p53, p63 and p73 DNA binding in vitro and in cells in comparison to nickel and cobalt. The role of cadmium inhibition of p53 tumor suppressor family in carcinogenesis is discussed.

  19. De novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE) hybrid nuclease with novel DNA binding specificity creates double-strand breaks

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2011-01-24

    Site-specific and rare cutting nucleases are valuable tools for genome engineering. The generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes and can facilitate gene targeting, additions, deletions, and inactivation. Zinc finger nucleases have been used to generate DSBs and subsequently, for genome editing but with low efficiency and reproducibility. The transcription activator-like family of type III effectors (TALEs) contains a central domain of tandem repeats that could be engineered to bind specific DNA targets. Here, we report the generation of a Hax3-based hybrid TALE nuclease with a user-selected DNA binding specificity. We show that the engineered TALE nuclease can bind to its target sequence in vitro and that the homodimeric TALE nuclease can cleave double-stranded DNA in vitro if the DNA binding sites have the proper spacing and orientation. Transient expression assays in tobacco leaves suggest that the hybrid nuclease creates DSB in its target sequence, which is subsequently repaired by nonhomologous end-joining repair. Taken together, our data show the feasibility of engineering TALE-based hybrid nucleases capable of generating site-specific DSBs and the great potential for site-specific genome modification in plants and eukaryotes in general.

  20. A heparin binding synthetic peptide from human HIP / RPL29 fails to specifically differentiate between anticoagulantly active and inactive species of heparin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, David E; Carson, Daniel D; Höök, Magnus

    2003-01-01

    Despite extensive progress in determining structures within heparin and heparan sulfate (Hp/HS) and the discovery of numerous proteinaceous binding partners for Hp/HS so far; the only detailed characterization of a specific protein-glycosaminoglycan interaction is antithrombin III (ATIII) binding to a Hp pentasaccharide containing a unique 3-O-sulfated glucosamine residue. Previously, it was reported from our laboratories that a 16 amino acid synthetic peptide derived from the C-terminus of human HIP/RPL29 (HIP peptide-1) enriched for ATIII-dependent anticoagulant activity, presumably by specifically binding the ATIII pentasaccharide. Herein, we demonstrate that HIP peptide-1 cannot enrich ATIII-dependent anticoagulant activity from a starting pool of porcine intestinal mucosa Hp through a bio-specific interaction. However, a HIP peptide-1 column can be used to enrich for anticoagulantly active Hp from a diverse pool of glycosaminoglycans known as Hp byproducts by a mechanism of nonspecific charge interactions. Thus, HIP peptide-1 cannot recognize Hp via bio-specific interactions but binds glycosaminoglycans by non-specific charge interactions. PMID:12659638

  1. An intact sequence-specific DNA-binding domain is required for human cytomegalovirus-mediated sequestration of p53 and may promote in vivo binding to the viral genome during infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenke, Kyle; Samuel, Melanie A.; McDowell, Eric T.; Toerne, Melissa A.; Fortunato, Elizabeth A.

    2006-01-01

    The p53 protein is stabilized during infection of primary human fibroblasts with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). However, the p53 in HCMV-infected cells is unable to activate its downstream targets. HCMV accomplishes this inactivation, at least in part, by sequestering p53 into viral replication centers within the cell's nucleus soon after they are established. In order to better understand the interplay between HCMV and p53 and the mechanism of sequestration, we constructed a panel of mutant p53-GFP fusion constructs for use in transfection/infection experiments. These mutants affected several post-translational modification sites and several sites within the central sequence-specific DNA-binding domain of the protein. Two categories of p53 sequestration were observed when the mutant constructs were transfected into primary fibroblasts and then infected at either high or low multiplicity. The first category, including all of the post-translational modification mutants, showed sequestration comparable to a wild-type (wt) control, while the second category, mutants affecting the DNA-binding core, were not specifically sequestered above control GFP levels. This suggested that the DNA-binding ability of the protein was required for sequestration. When the HCMV genome was analyzed for p53 consensus binding sites, 21 matches were found, which localized either to the promoters or the coding regions of viral proteins involved in DNA replication and processing as well as structural proteins. An analysis of in vivo binding to these identified sites via chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed differential binding to several of the sites over the course of infection

  2. Multiple POU-binding motifs, recognized by tissue-specific nuclear factors, are important for Dll1 gene expression in neural stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Kohzo; Nagase, Kazuko; Tokutake, Yuriko; Koh, Chang-Sung; Hiratochi, Masahiro; Ohkawara, Takeshi; Nakayama, Noriko

    2004-01-01

    We cloned the 5'-flanking region of the mouse homolog of the Delta gene (Dll1) and demonstrated that the sequence between nucleotide position -514 and -484 in the 5'-flanking region of Dll1 played a critical role in the regulation of its tissue-specific expression in neural stem cells (NSCs). Further, we showed that multiple POU-binding motifs, located within this short sequence of 30 bp, were essential for transcriptional activation of Dll1 and also that multiple tissue-specific nuclear factors recognized these POU-binding motifs in various combinations through differentiation of NSCs. Thus, POU-binding factors may play an important role in Dll1 expression in developing NSCs

  3. Cation-cation interaction in neptunyl(V) compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krot, N.N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physical Chemistry (Russian Federation); Saeki, Masakatsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The original manuscript was prepared by Professor N.N. Krot of Institute of Physical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, in 1997. Saeki tried to translate that into Japanese and to add some new data since 1997. The contents include the whole picture of cation-cation interactions mainly in 5-valence neptunium compounds. Firstly, characteristic structures of neptunium are summarized of the cation-cation bonding in compounds. Secondly, it is mentioned how the cation-cation bonding affects physical and chemical properties of the compounds. Then, characterization-methods for the cation-cation bonding in the compounds are discussed. Finally, the cation-cation interactions in compounds of other actinide-ions are shortly reviewed. (author)

  4. Cloning of an SNF2/SWI2-related protein that binds specifically to the SPH motifs of the SV40 enhancer and to the HIV-1 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, P L; Schorpp, M; Voz, M L; Jones, K A

    1995-03-03

    We have isolated a human cDNA clone encoding HIP116, a protein that binds to the SPH repeats of the SV40 enhancer and to the TATA/inhibitor region of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 promoter. The predicted HIP116 protein is related to the yeast SNF2/SWI2 transcription factor and to other members of this extended family and contains seven domains similar to those found in the vaccinia NTP1 ATPase. Interestingly, HIP116 also contains a C3HC4 zinc-binding motif (RING finger) interspersed between the ATPase motifs in an arrangement similar to that found in the yeast RAD5 and RAD16 proteins. The HIP116 amino terminus is unique among the members of this family, and houses a specific DNA-binding domain. Antiserum raised against HIP116 recognizes a 116-kDa nuclear protein in Western blots and specifically supershifts SV40 and HIV-1 protein-DNA complexes in gel shift experiments. The binding site for HIP116 on the SV40 enhancer directly overlaps the site for TEF-1, and like TEF-1, binding of HIP116 to the SV40 enhancer is destroyed by mutations that inhibit SPH enhancer activity in vivo. Purified fractions of HIP116 display strong ATPase activity that is preferentially stimulated by SPH DNA and can be inhibited specifically by antibodies to HIP116. These findings suggest that HIP116 might affect transcription, directly or indirectly, by acting as a DNA binding site-specific ATPase.

  5. Defining binding efficiency and specificity of auxins for SCF(TIR1/AFB)-Aux/IAA co-receptor complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sarah; Sundaram, Shanthy; Armitage, Lynne; Evans, John P; Hawkes, Tim; Kepinski, Stefan; Ferro, Noel; Napier, Richard M

    2014-03-21

    Structure-activity profiles for the phytohormone auxin have been collected for over 70 years, and a number of synthetic auxins are used in agriculture. Auxin classification schemes and binding models followed from understanding auxin structures. However, all of the data came from whole plant bioassays, meaning the output was the integral of many different processes. The discovery of Transport Inhibitor-Response 1 (TIR1) and the Auxin F-Box (AFB) proteins as sites of auxin perception and the role of auxin as molecular glue in the assembly of co-receptor complexes has allowed the development of a definitive quantitative structure-activity relationship for TIR1 and AFB5. Factorial analysis of binding activities offered two uncorrelated factors associated with binding efficiency and binding selectivity. The six maximum-likelihood estimators of Efficiency are changes in the overlap matrixes, inferring that Efficiency is related to the volume of the electronic system. Using the subset of compounds that bound strongly, chemometric analyses based on quantum chemical calculations and similarity and self-similarity indices yielded three classes of Specificity that relate to differential binding. Specificity may not be defined by any one specific atom or position and is influenced by coulomb matrixes, suggesting that it is driven by electrostatic forces. These analyses give the first receptor-specific classification of auxins and indicate that AFB5 is the preferred site for a number of auxinic herbicides by allowing interactions with analogues having van der Waals surfaces larger than that of indole-3-acetic acid. The quality factors are also examined in terms of long-standing models for the mechanism of auxin binding.

  6. Drosophila Syncrip binds the gurken mRNA localisation signal and regulates localised transcripts during axis specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne M. McDermott

    2012-04-01

    In the Drosophila oocyte, mRNA transport and localised translation play a fundamental role in axis determination and germline formation of the future embryo. gurken mRNA encodes a secreted TGF-α signal that specifies dorsal structures, and is localised to the dorso-anterior corner of the oocyte via a cis-acting 64 nucleotide gurken localisation signal. Using GRNA chromatography, we characterised the biochemical composition of the ribonucleoprotein complexes that form around the gurken mRNA localisation signal in the oocyte. We identified a number of the factors already known to be involved in gurken localisation and translational regulation, such as Squid and Imp, in addition to a number of factors with known links to mRNA localisation, such as Me31B and Exu. We also identified previously uncharacterised Drosophila proteins, including the fly homologue of mammalian SYNCRIP/hnRNPQ, a component of RNA transport granules in the dendrites of mammalian hippocampal neurons. We show that Drosophila Syncrip binds specifically to gurken and oskar, but not bicoid transcripts. The loss-of-function and overexpression phenotypes of syncrip in Drosophila egg chambers show that the protein is required for correct grk and osk mRNA localisation and translational regulation. We conclude that Drosophila Syncrip is a new factor required for localisation and translational regulation of oskar and gurken mRNA in the oocyte. We propose that Syncrip/SYNCRIP is part of a conserved complex associated with localised transcripts and required for their correct translational regulation in flies and mammals.

  7. Sex- and Tissue-Specific Expression Profiles of Odorant Binding Protein and Chemosensory Protein Genes in Bradysia odoriphaga (Diptera: Sciaridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhe Zhao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Bradysia odoriphaga is an agricultural pest insect affecting the production of Chinese chive and other liliaceous vegetables in China, and it is significantly attracted by sex pheromones and the volatiles derived from host plants. Despite verification of this chemosensory behavior, however, it is still unknown how B. odoriphaga recognizes these volatile compounds on the molecular level. Many of odorant binding proteins (OBPs and chemosensory proteins (CSPs play crucial roles in olfactory perception. Here, we identified 49 OBP and 5 CSP genes from the antennae and body transcriptomes of female and male adults of B. odoriphaga, respectively. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis among Dipteran OBPs and CSPs were analyzed. The sex- and tissue-specific expression profiles of 54 putative chemosensory genes among different tissues were investigated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. qRT-PCR analysis results suggested that 22 OBP and 3 CSP genes were enriched in the antennae, indicating they might be essential for detection of general odorants and pheromones. Among these antennae-enriched genes, nine OBPs (BodoOBP2/4/6/8/12/13/20/28/33 were enriched in the male antennae and may play crucial roles in the detection of sex pheromones. Moreover, some OBP and CSP genes were enriched in non-antennae tissues, such as in the legs (BodoOBP3/9/19/21/34/35/38/39/45 and BodoCSP1, wings (BodoOBP17/30/32/37/44, abdomens and thoraxes (BodoOBP29/36, and heads (BodoOBP14/23/31 and BodoCSP2, suggesting that these genes might be involved in olfactory, gustatory, or other physiological processes. Our findings provide a starting point to facilitate functional research of these chemosensory genes in B. odoriphaga at the molecular level.

  8. The fission yeast RNA binding protein Mmi1 regulates meiotic genes by controlling intron specific splicing and polyadenylation coupled RNA turnover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei-Mei Chen

    Full Text Available The polyA tails of mRNAs are monitored by the exosome as a quality control mechanism. We find that fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, adopts this RNA quality control mechanism to regulate a group of 30 or more meiotic genes at the level of both splicing and RNA turnover. In vegetative cells the RNA binding protein Mmi1 binds to the primary transcripts of these genes. We find the novel motif U(U/C/GAAAC highly over-represented in targets of Mmi1. Mmi1 can specifically regulate the splicing of particular introns in a transcript: it inhibits the splicing of introns that are in the vicinity of putative Mmi1 binding sites, while allowing the splicing of other introns that are far from such sites. In addition, binding of Mmi1, particularly near the 3' end, alters 3' processing to promote extremely long polyA tails of up to a kilobase. The hyperadenylated transcripts are then targeted for degradation by the nuclear exonuclease Rrp6. The nuclear polyA binding protein Pab2 assists this hyperadenylation-mediated RNA decay. Rrp6 also targets other hyperadenylated transcripts, which become hyperadenylated in an unknown, but Mmi1-independent way. Thus, hyperadenylation may be a general signal for RNA degradation. In addition, binding of Mmi1 can affect the efficiency of 3' cleavage. Inactivation of Mmi1 in meiosis allows meiotic expression, through splicing and RNA stabilization, of at least 29 target genes, which are apparently constitutively transcribed.

  9. Specificity of Bacillus thuringiensis endotoxins is correlated with the presence of high-affinity binding sites in the brush border membrane of target insect midguts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, C.; Vanderbruggen, H.; Hoefte, H.; Van Rie, J.; Jansens, S.; Van Mellaert, H.

    1988-01-01

    Binding studies were performed with two 125 I-labeled Bacillus thuringiensis δ-endotoxins on brush border membrane vesicles prepared from the larval midgut of the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta or the cabbage butterfly Pieris brassicae. One δ-endotoxin, Bt2-protoxin, is a 130-kDa recombinant crystalline protein from B. thuringiensis subsp. berliner. It kills larvae of both insect species. The active Bt2-toxin is a 60-kDa proteolytic fragment of the Bt2-protoxin. It binds saturably and with high affinity to brush border membrane vesicles from the midgut of both species. The other δ-endotoxin, Bt4412-protoxin, is a 136-kDa crystalline protein from B. thuringiensis subsp. thuringiensis, which is highly toxic for P. brassicae, but not for M. sexta larvae. Bt4412-toxin, obtained after proteolytic activation of Bt4412-protoxin, shows high-affinity saturable binding to P. brassicae vesicles but not to M. sexta vesicles. The correlation between toxicity and specific binding is further strengthened by competition studies. Other B. thuringiensis δ-endotoxins active against M. sexta compete for binding of 125 I-labeled Bt2-toxin to M. sexta vesicles, whereas toxins active against dipteran or coleopteran larvae do not compete. Bt2-toxin and Bt4412-toxin bind to different sites on P. brassicae vesicles

  10. Impact of cadmium, cobalt and nickel on sequence-specific DNA binding of p63 and p73 in vitro and in cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adámik, Matěj; Bažantová, Pavla; Navrátilová, Lucie; Polášková, Alena; Pečinka, Petr; Holanová, L.; Tichý, Vlastimil; Brázdová, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 456, č. 1 (2015), s. 29-34 ISSN 0006-291X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-36108S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : p53 protein family * Sequence-specific DNA binding * Heavy metals Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.371, year: 2015

  11. Two carbohydrate recognizing domains from Cycas revoluta leaf lectin show the distinct sugar-binding specificity-A unique mannooligosaccharide recognition by N-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Michiko; Haraguchi, Tomokazu; Minami, Yuji; Yagi, Fumio; Hiemori, Keiko; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Cycas revoluta leaf lectin (CRLL) of mannose-recognizing jacalin-related lectin (mJRL) has two tandem repeated carbohydrate recognition domains, and shows the characteristic sugar-binding specificity toward high mannose-glycans, compared with other mJRLs. We expressed the N-terminal domain and C-terminal domain (CRLL-N and CRLL-C) separately, to determine the fine sugar-binding specificity of each domain, using frontal affinity chromatography, glycan array and equilibrium dialysis. The specificity of CRLL toward high mannose was basically derived from CRLL-N, whereas CRLL-C had affinity for α1-6 extended mono-antennary complex-type glycans. Notably, the affinity of CRLL-N was most potent to one of three Man 8 glycans and Man 9 glycan, whereas the affinity of CRLL-C decreased with the increase in the number of extended α1-2 linked mannose residue. The recognition of the Man 8 glycans by CRLL-N has not been found for other mannose recognizing lectins. Glycan array reflected these specificities of the two domains. Furthermore, it was revealed by equilibrium dialysis method that the each domain had two sugar-binding sites, similar with Banlec, banana mannose-binding Jacalin-related lectin. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Pathogen recognition of a novel C-type lectin from Marsupenaeus japonicus reveals the divergent sugar-binding specificity of QAP motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenton, Rod Russel R; Koiwai, Keiichiro; Miyaguchi, Kohei; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo

    2017-04-04

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are calcium-dependent carbohydrate-binding proteins known to assist the innate immune system as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). The binding specificity of CTLs lies in the motif of their carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD), the tripeptide motifs EPN and QPD bind to mannose and galactose, respectively. However, variants of these motifs were discovered including a QAP sequence reported in shrimp believed to have the same carbohydrate specificity as QPD. Here, we characterized a novel C-type lectin (MjGCTL) possessing a CRD with a QAP motif. The recombinant MjGCTL has a calcium-dependent agglutinating capability against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, and its sugar specificity did not involve either mannose or galactose. In an encapsulation assay, agarose beads coated with rMjGCTL were immediately encapsulated from 0 h followed by melanization at 4 h post-incubation with hemocytes. These results confirm that MjGCTL functions as a classical CTL. The structure of QAP motif and carbohydrate-specificity of rMjGCTL was found to be different to both EPN and QPD, suggesting that QAP is a new motif. Furthermore, MjGCTL acts as a PRR binding to hemocytes to activate their adherent state and initiate encapsulation.

  13. Specific binding of tubeimoside-2 with proteins in hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells: investigation by molecular spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sun; Shi-Sheng, Sun; Ying-Yong, Zhao; Jun, Fan

    2012-07-01

    In this study, we compared different binding interactions of TBMS2 with proteins both in hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells and in normal embryo hepatic L02 cells by using fluorescence, absorption, and CD spectroscopy. The fluorescence data revealed that the fluorescence intensity of proteins in the HepG2 and L02 cells decreased in the presence of TBMS2 by 30.79% and 12.01%, respectively. Binding constants and thermodynamic parameters were obtained for systems of TBMS2 with the two kinds of cell proteins. The results indicated that HepG2 cell proteins had a higher TBMS2 binding activity than those in the L02 cells. Analysis of the TBMS2 cytotoxic activities showed that TBMS2 could selectively induce apoptosis of HepG2 cells by binding to them, while its apoptotic effect on L02 cells was relatively weaker.

  14. Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol increases sequence-specific AP-1 DNA-binding activity and Fos-related antigens in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcella, A; Gessa, G L; Pani, L

    1998-05-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC), the psychoactive principle of marijuana, has been shown to upregulate the mRNA levels of immediate-early genes in the rat brain. Using electrophoretic mobility-shift assay and one-dimensional Western blot, we here report that delta9-THC increases Activator protein-1 (AP-1) DNA-binding and Fos-related antigen activity in discrete areas of the rat brain. One hour after the intraperitoneal administration of delta9-THC at a dose of 10 or 15 mg/kg, AP-1 DNA-binding activity in the nucleus accumbens increased by 33 and 49%, respectively, while Western blot showed an increase in both c-Fos, FosB, Fra-1 (Fos-related antigen) and Fra-2. In the cingulate cortex and caudate-putamen, delta9-THC significantly increased AP-1 DNA-binding activity only at the highest dose used (57 and 71%, respectively). While in the caudate-putamen the increase in AP-1 DNA binding was mainly due to an elevation of the c-Fos and FosB proteins, the same phenomenon depended on the FosB, Fra-1 and Fra-2 peptides in the cingulate cortex. The effect of delta9-THC on the AP-1 DNA binding and the Fos-related antigens in the nucleus accumbens was blocked by the specific cannabinoid antagonist SR141716 A (3 mg/kg i.p.). delta9-THC failed to modify Specificity protein 1 (Sp1) DNA-binding activity. The results indicate that delta9-THC activates gene coding for AP-1 DNA-binding proteins by acting on cannabinoid receptors, and induces a different transcriptional program on the early-immediate gene of the Fos family, in different areas in the rat brain, suggesting that this mechanism might be involved in the central actions of cannabinoids.

  15. Binding of the biogenic polyamines to deoxyribonucleic acids of varying base composition: base specificity and the associated energetics of the interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Ayesha; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2013-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the base pair specificity of the binding of the polyamines spermine, spermidine, putrescine, and cadaverine with three genomic DNAs Clostridium perfringens, 27% GC, Escherichia coli, 50% GC and Micrococcus lysodeikticus, 72% GC have been studied using titration calorimetry and the data supplemented with melting studies, ethidium displacement and circular dichroism spectroscopy results. Isothermal titration calorimetry, differential scanning calorimetry, optical melting studies, ethidium displacement, circular dichroism spectroscopy are the various techniques employed to characterize the interaction of four polyamines, spermine, spermidine, putersine and cadaverine with the DNAs. Polyamines bound stronger with AT rich DNA compared to the GC rich DNA and the binding varied depending on the charge on the polyamine as spermine>spermidine >putrescine>cadaverine. Thermodynamics of the interaction revealed that the binding was entropy driven with small enthalpy contribution. The binding was influenced by salt concentration suggesting the contribution from electrostatic forces to the Gibbs energy of binding to be the dominant contributor. Each system studied exhibited enthalpy-entropy compensation. The negative heat capacity changes suggested a role for hydrophobic interactions which may arise due to the non polar interactions between DNA and polyamines. From a thermodynamic analysis, the AT base specificity of polyamines to DNAs has been elucidated for the first time and supplemented by structural studies.

  16. Binding of the biogenic polyamines to deoxyribonucleic acids of varying base composition: base specificity and the associated energetics of the interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Kabir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The thermodynamics of the base pair specificity of the binding of the polyamines spermine, spermidine, putrescine, and cadaverine with three genomic DNAs Clostridium perfringens, 27% GC, Escherichia coli, 50% GC and Micrococcus lysodeikticus, 72% GC have been studied using titration calorimetry and the data supplemented with melting studies, ethidium displacement and circular dichroism spectroscopy results. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Isothermal titration calorimetry, differential scanning calorimetry, optical melting studies, ethidium displacement, circular dichroism spectroscopy are the various techniques employed to characterize the interaction of four polyamines, spermine, spermidine, putersine and cadaverine with the DNAs. Polyamines bound stronger with AT rich DNA compared to the GC rich DNA and the binding varied depending on the charge on the polyamine as spermine>spermidine >putrescine>cadaverine. Thermodynamics of the interaction revealed that the binding was entropy driven with small enthalpy contribution. The binding was influenced by salt concentration suggesting the contribution from electrostatic forces to the Gibbs energy of binding to be the dominant contributor. Each system studied exhibited enthalpy-entropy compensation. The negative heat capacity changes suggested a role for hydrophobic interactions which may arise due to the non polar interactions between DNA and polyamines. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: From a thermodynamic analysis, the AT base specificity of polyamines to DNAs has been elucidated for the first time and supplemented by structural studies.

  17. Stimulus-response bindings code both abstract and specific representations of stimuli: evidence from a classification priming design that reverses multiple levels of response representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, A J; Henson, R N

    2011-11-01

    Repetition priming can be caused by the rapid retrieval of previously encoded stimulus-response (S-R) bindings. S-R bindings have recently been shown to simultaneously code multiple levels of response representation, from specific Motor-actions to more abstract Decisions ("yes"/"no") and Classifications (e.g., "man-made"/"natural"). Using an experimental design that reverses responses at all of these levels, we assessed whether S-R bindings also code multiple levels of stimulus representation. Across two experiments, we found effects of response reversal on priming when switching between object pictures and object names, consistent with S-R bindings that code stimuli at an abstract level. Nonetheless, the size of this reversal effect was smaller for such across-format (e.g., word-picture) repetition than for within-format (e.g., picture-picture) repetition, suggesting additional coding of format-specific stimulus representations. We conclude that S-R bindings simultaneously represent both stimuli and responses at multiple levels of abstraction.

  18. Specific binding sites for an antifungal plant defensin from Dahlia (Dahlia merckii) on fungal cells are required for antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevissen, K; Osborn, R W; Acland, D P; Broekaert, W F

    2000-01-01

    Dm-AMP1, an antifungal plant defensin from seeds of dahlia (Dahlia merckii), was radioactively labeled with t-butoxycarbonyl-[35S]-L-methionine N-hydroxy-succinimi-dylester. This procedure yielded a 35S-labeled peptide with unaltered antifungal activity. [35S]Dm-AMP1 was used to assess binding on living cells of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa and the unicellular fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Binding of [35S]Dm-AMP1 to fungal cells was saturable and could be competed for by preincubation with excess, unlabeled Dm-AMP1 as well as with Ah-AMP1 and Ct-AMP1, two plant defensins that are highly homologous to Dm-AMP1. In contrast, binding could not be competed for by more distantly related plant defensins or structurally unrelated antimicrobial peptides. Binding of [35S]Dm-AMP1 to either N. crassa or S. cerevisiae cells was apparently irreversible. In addition, whole cells and microsomal membrane fractions from two independently obtained S. cerevisiae mutants selected for resistance to Dm-AMP1 exhibited severely reduced binding affinity for [35S]Dm-AMP1, compared with wild-type yeast. This finding suggests that binding of Dm-AMP1 to S. cerevisiae plasma membranes is required for antifungal activity of this protein.

  19. Specific binding of 125I-labeled human chorionic gonadotropin to gonadal tissue: comparison of limited-point saturation analyses to Scatchard analyses for determining binding capacities and factors affecting estimates of binding capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spicer, L.J.; Ireland, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to compare gonadotropin binding capacity calculated from limited-point saturation analyses to those obtained from Scatchard analyses, and to test the effects of membrane purity and source of gonadotropin receptors on determining the maximum percentage of radioiodinated hormone bound to receptors (maximum bindability). One- to four-point saturation analyses gave results comparable to results by Scatchard analyses when examining relative binding capacities of receptors. Crude testicular homogenates had lower estimates of maximum bindability of 125 I-labeled human chorionic gonadotropin than more purified gonadotropin receptor preparations. Under similar preparation techniques, some gonadotropin receptor sources exhibited low maximum bindability

  20. The Ewing sarcoma protein (EWS) binds directly to the proximal elements of the macrophage-specific promoter of the CSF-1 receptor (csf1r) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A; Sasmono, Tedjo; Himes, S Roy; Sharma, Sudarshana M; Bronisz, Agnieszka; Constantin, Myrna; Ostrowski, Michael C; Ross, Ian L

    2008-05-15

    Many macrophage-specific promoters lack classical transcriptional start site elements such as TATA boxes and Sp1 sites. One example is the CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R, CD115, c-fms), which is used as a model of the transcriptional regulation of macrophage genes. To understand the molecular basis of start site recognition in this gene, we identified cellular proteins binding specifically to the transcriptional start site (TSS) region. The mouse and human csf1r TSS were identified using cap analysis gene expression (CAGE) data. Conserved elements flanking the TSS cluster were analyzed using EMSAs to identify discrete DNA-binding factors in primary bone marrow macrophages as candidate transcriptional regulators. Two complexes were identified that bind in a highly sequence-specific manner to the mouse and human TSS proximal region and also to high-affinity sites recognized by myeloid zinc finger protein 1 (Mzf1). The murine proteins were purified by DNA affinity isolation from the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line and identified by mass spectrometry as EWS and FUS/TLS, closely related DNA and RNA-binding proteins. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments in bone marrow macrophages confirmed that EWS, but not FUS/TLS, was present in vivo on the CSF-1R proximal promoter in unstimulated primary macrophages. Transfection assays suggest that EWS does not act as a conventional transcriptional activator or repressor. We hypothesize that EWS contributes to start site recognition in TATA-less mammalian promoters.

  1. The ligand specificities of the insulin receptor and the insulin-like growth factor I receptor reside in different regions of a common binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjeldsen, T.; Andersen, A.S.; Wiberg, F.C.; Rasmussen, J.S.; Schaeffer, L.; Balschmidt, P.; Moller, K.B.; Moller, N.P.H. (Novo Nordisk, Bagsvaerd (Denmark))

    1991-05-15

    To identify the region(s) of the insulin receptor and the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptor responsible for ligand specificity (high-affinity binding), expression vectors encoding soluble chimeric insulin/IGF-I receptors were prepared. The chimeric receptors were expressed in mammalian cells and partially purified. Binding studies revealed that a construct comprising an IGF-I receptor in which the 68 N-terminal amino acids of the insulin receptor {alpha}-subunit had replaced the equivalent IGF-I receptor segment displayed a markedly increased affinity for insulin. In contrast, the corresponding IGF-I receptor sequence is not critical for high-affinity IGF-I binding. It is shown that part of the cysteine-rich domain determines IGF-I specificity. The authors have previously shown that exchanging exons 1, 2, and 3 of the insulin receptor with the corresponding IGF-I receptor sequence results in loss of high affinity for insulin and gain of high affinity for IGF-I. Consequently, it is suggested that the ligand specificities of the two receptors (i.e., the sequences that discriminate between insulin and IGF-I) reside in different regions of a binding site with common features present in both receptors.

  2. Stage-specific binding profiles of cohesin in resting and activated B lymphocytes suggest a role for cohesin in immunoglobulin class switching and maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Günal-Sadık

    Full Text Available The immunoglobulin heavy chain locus (Igh features higher-order chromosomal interactions to facilitate stage-specific assembly of the Ig molecule. Cohesin, a ring-like protein complex required for sister chromatid cohesion, shapes chromosome architecture and chromatin interactions important for transcriptional regulation and often acts together with CTCF. Cohesin is likely involved in B cell activation and Ig class switch recombination. Hence, binding profiles of cohesin in resting mature murine splenic B lymphocytes and at two stages after cell activation were elucidated by chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep sequencing. Comparative genomic analysis revealed cohesin extensively changes its binding to transcriptional control elements after 48 h of stimulation with LPS/IL-4. Cohesin was clearly underrepresented at switch regions regardless of their activation status, suggesting that switch regions need to be cohesin-poor. Specific binding changes of cohesin at B-cell specific gene loci Pax5 and Blimp-1 indicate new cohesin-dependent regulatory pathways. Together with conserved cohesin/CTCF sites at the Igh 3'RR, a prominent cohesin/CTCF binding site was revealed near the 3' end of Cα where PolII localizes to 3' enhancers. Our study shows that cohesin likely regulates B cell activation and maturation, including Ig class switching.

  3. Comparative analysis of cation/proton antiporter superfamily in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Chuyu [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Xia, Xinli [Beijing Forestry University, China; Yin, Weilun [Beijing Forestry University, China

    2013-01-01

    The cation/proton antiporter superfamily is associated with the transport of monovalent cations across membranes. This superfamily was annotated in the Arabidopsis genome and some members were functionally characterized. In the present study, a systematic analysis of the cation/proton antiporter genes in diverse plant specieswas reported.We identified 240 cation/proton antiporters in alga, moss, and angiosperm. A phylogenetic tree was constructed showing these 240members are separated into three families, i.e., Na+/H+ exchangers, K+ efflux antiporters, and cation/H+ exchangers. Our analysis revealed that tandem and/or segmental duplications contribute to the expansion of cation/H+ exchangers in the examined angiospermspecies. Sliding windowanalysis of the nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution ratios showed some differences in the evolutionary fate of cation/proton antiporter paralogs. Furthermore, we identified over-represented motifs among these 240 proteins and foundmostmotifs are family specific, demonstrating diverse evolution of the cation/proton antiporters among three families. In addition, we investigated the co-expressed genes of the cation/proton antiporters in Arabidopsis thaliana. The results showed some biological processes are enriched in the co-expressed genes, suggesting the cation/proton antiporters may be involved in these biological processes. Taken together, this study furthers our knowledge on cation/proton antiporters in plants.

  4. Measurement of {sup 11}C-raclopride binding in micropig brain with high and low specific activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Jin; Lee, Jae Sung; Eo, Jae Seon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2005-07-01

    In vitro, a saturation hyperbola or Scatchard plot is applied for the determination of receptor density (Bmax) and affinity (Kd). Simillary, Bmax and Kd could be obtained in vivo by performing two or more PET experiments with high and low specific activities (SA). To measure these parameters, the binding potential (BP) of 11C-raclopride for striatal D2 receptor in micropig brain at high and low SA was measured in this study. A normal male PWG micropig (weight: 38 kg, age: 24 months) was used in this study. The animals were anesthetized with ketamine (2 mL/10 kg, i.m.) and xylazine (1mL/10kg, i.m.), and placed in a supine position. Dynamic PET data was acquired for 60 min after injection of 11C-raclopride (2.5 mCi) through the catheter placed in a femoral vein. High SA and low SA (6.8 uCi/nmol) PET and T1 SPGR MRI scans were performed. MR image was co-registered to the static PET images and ROIs were drawn on striatum and cerebellum to obtain the time activity curve. The BP in striatum was computed by both the Lammertsma and Logan reference tissue methods using cerebellum tissue input function. BP parametric images were also generated using the Logan method. The value of striatum BP was 1.46/0.32 (high SA / low SA) and 1.34/0.31 in Lammertsma and Logan methods, respectively. The D2 occupancy by the cold raclopride was approximately 78% in micropig striatum. The Logan BP parametric image visualized well the change of receptor occupancy between the two scans. In this study, BP values at high and low SA and their percent change estimated by the two different methods were correlated well. This preliminary result suggests that the experimental procedures established in this study would be useful for the quantification of the density of D2 receptor and affinity in the micropig brain.

  5. Affinity and sequence specificity of DNA binding and site selection for primer synthesis by Escherichia coli primase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khopde, Sujata; Biswas, Esther E; Biswas, Subhasis B

    2002-12-17

    Primase is an essential DNA replication enzyme in Escherichia coli and responsible for primer synthesis during lagging strand DNA replication. Although the interaction of primase with single-stranded DNA plays an important role in primer RNA and Okazaki fragment synthesis, the mechanism of DNA binding and site selection for primer synthesis remains unknown. We have analyzed the energetics of DNA binding and the mechanism of site selection for the initiation of primer RNA synthesis on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Quantitative analysis of DNA binding by primase was carried out using a number of oligonucleotide sequences: oligo(dT)(25) and a 30 bp oligonucleotide derived from bacteriophage G4 origin (G4ori-wt). Primase bound both sequences with moderate affinity (K(d) = 1.2-1.4 x 10(-)(7) M); however, binding was stronger for G4ori-wt. G4ori-wt contained a CTG trinucleotide, which is a preferred site for initiation of primer synthesis. Analysis of DNA binding isotherms derived from primase binding to the oligonucleotide sequences by fluorescence anisotropy indicated that primase bound to DNA as a dimer, and this finding was further substantiated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) and UV cross-linking of the primase-DNA complex. Dissection of the energetics involved in the primase-DNA interaction revealed a higher affinity of primase for DNA sequences containing the CTG triplet. This sequence preference of primase may likely be responsible for the initiation of primer synthesis in the CTG triplet sites in the E. coli lagging strand as well as in the origin of replication of bacteriophage G4.

  6. Analysis of Metal-Binding Features of the Wild Type and Two Domain-Truncated Mutant Variants of Littorina littorea Metallothionein Reveals Its Cd-Specific Character

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Òscar Palacios

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available After the resolution of the 3D structure of the Cd9-aggregate of the Littorina littorea metallothionein (MT, we report here a detailed analysis of the metal binding capabilities of the wild type MT, LlwtMT, and of two truncated mutants lacking either the N-terminal domain, Lltr2MT, or both the N-terminal domain, plus four extra flanking residues (SSVF, Lltr1MT. The recombinant synthesis and in vitro studies of these three proteins revealed that LlwtMT forms unique M9-LlwtMT complexes with Zn(II and Cd(II, while yielding a complex mixture of heteronuclear Zn,Cu-LlwtMT species with Cu(I. As expected, the truncated mutants gave rise to unique M6-LltrMT complexes and Zn,Cu-LltrMT mixtures of lower stoichiometry with respect to LlwtMT, with the SSVF fragment having an influence on their metal binding performance. Our results also revealed a major specificity, and therefore a better metal-coordinating performance of the three proteins for Cd(II than for Zn(II, although the analysis of the Zn(II/Cd(II displacement reaction clearly demonstrates a lack of any type of cooperativity in Cd(II binding. Contrarily, the analysis of their Cu(I binding abilities revealed that every LlMT domain is prone to build Cu4-aggregates, the whole MT working by modules analogously to, as previously described, certain fungal MTs, like those of C. neoformans and T. mesenterica. It is concluded that the Littorina littorea MT is a Cd-specific protein that (beyond its extended binding capacity through an additional Cd-binding domain confers to Littorina littorea a particular adaptive advantage in its changeable marine habitat.

  7. The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN protein is able to specifically bind DNA through its single Cys2–His2 zinc finger motif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dathan, Nina; Zaccaro, Laura; Esposito, Sabrina; Isernia, Carla; Omichinski, James G.; Riccio, Andrea; Pedone, Carlo; Di Blasio, Benedetto; Fattorusso, Roberto; Pedone, Paolo V.

    2002-01-01

    The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN (SUP) gene has been shown to be important in maintaining the boundary between stamens and carpels, and is presumed to act by regulating cell proliferation. In this work, we show that the SUP protein, which contains a single Cys2–His2 zinc finger domain including the QALGGH sequence, highly conserved in the plant zinc finger proteins, binds DNA. Using a series of deletion mutants, it was determined that the minimal domain required for specific DNA binding (residues 15–78) includes the single zinc finger and two basic regions located on either side of this motif. Furthermore, amino acid substitutions in the zinc finger or in the basic regions, including a mutation that knocks out the function of the SUP protein in vivo (glycine 63 to aspartate), have been found to abolish the activity of the SUP DNA-binding domain. These results strongly suggest that the SUP protein functions in vivo by acting as a DNA-binding protein, likely involved in transcriptional regulation. The association of both an N-terminal and a C-terminal basic region with a single Cys2–His2 zinc finger represents a novel DNA-binding motif suggesting that the mechanism of DNA recognition adopted by the SUP protein is different from that described so far in other zinc finger proteins. PMID:12433998

  8. Energies and physicochemical properties of cation-π interactions in biological structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qi-Shi; Meng, Jian-Zong; Liao, Si-Ming; Huang, Ri-Bo

    2012-04-01

    The cation-π interactions occur frequently within or between proteins due to six (Phe, Tyr, Trp, Arg, Lys, and His) of the twenty natural amino acids potentially interacting with metallic cations via these interactions. In this study, quantum chemical calculations and molecular orbital (MO) theory are used to study the energies and properties of cation-π interactions in biological structures. The cation-π interactions of H⁺ and Li⁺ are similar to hydrogen bonds and lithium bonds, respectively, in which the small, naked cations H⁺ and Li⁺ are buried deep within the π-electron density of aromatic molecules, forming stable cation-π bonds that are much stronger than the cation-π interactions of other alkali metal cations. The cation-π interactions of metallic cations with atomic masses greater than that of Li⁺ arise mainly from the coordinate bond comprising empty valence atomic orbitals (AOs) of metallic cations and π-MOs of aromatic molecules, though electrostatic interactions may also contribute to the cation-π interaction. The binding strength of cation-π interactions is determined by the charge and types of AOs in the metallic cations. Cation-π interaction energies are distance- and orientation-dependent; energies decrease with the distance (r) and the orientation angle (θ). In solution, the cation-π energies decrease with the increase of the dielectric constant (ɛ) of the solvent; however, solvation has less influence on the H⁺-π and H₃O⁺-π interactions than on interactions with other cations. The conclusions from this study provide useful theoretical insights into the nature of cation-π interactions and may contribute to the development of better force field parameters for describing the molecular dynamics of cation-π interactions within and between proteins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Vaccine-Induced Plasma IgA Specific for the C1 Region of the HIV-1 Envelope Blocks Binding and Effector Function of IgG

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    demonstrated that plasma IgG against the HIV -1 envelope ( Env ) variable region 1 and 2 inversely correlatedwith risk, whereas HIV -1 Env -specific plasma IgA...uninfected vaccine recipients in RV144. Moreover, Env -specific IgA antibodies from RV144 vaccinees blocked the binding of ADCC-mediating mAb to HIV -1 Env ... HIV -1–infected CD4+ T cells coated with RV144-induced IgG antibodies. We show that monomeric Env -specific IgA, as part of postvaccination poly

  10. Subtype-specific sequence variation of the HIV type 1 long terminal repeat and primer-binding site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baar, M. P.; de Ronde, A.; Berkhout, B.; Cornelissen, M.; van der Horn, K. H.; van der Schoot, A. M.; de Wolf, F.; Lukashov, V. V.; Goudsmit, J.

    2000-01-01

    We studied sequence differences in regulatory elements of the long terminal repeat (LTR) and primer-binding site (PBS) among various human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtypes. Phylogenetic sequence analysis of a fragment of 729 base pairs (bp) covering the Gag-coding region for half of

  11. Design and synthesis of a stable oxidized phospholipid mimic with specific binding recognition for macrophage scavenger receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turner, William W; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Boullier, Agnes

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage scavenger receptors appear to play a major role in the clearance of oxidized phospholipid (OxPL) products. Discrete peptide-phospholipid conjugates with the phosphatidylcholine headgroup have been shown to exhibit binding affinity for these receptors. We report the preparation of a water...

  12. Brain-specific fatty acid-binding protein is elevated in serum of patients with dementia-related diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, C.E.; Veerhuis, R.; de Vente, J.; Verhey, F.R.J.; Vreeling, F.; van Boxtel, M.P.J.; Glatz, J.F.C.; Pelsers, M.A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is a need for biomarkers in accessible matrices, such as blood, for the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this study was to measure the serum levels of brain-type fatty acid-binding protein (FABP) and heart-type FABP in patients with dementia-involving diseases.

  13. Binding specificity and in vivo targets of the EH domain, a novel protein-protein interaction module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salcini, A E; Confalonieri, S; Doria, M

    1997-01-01

    EH is a recently identified protein-protein interaction domain found in the signal transducers Eps15 and Eps15R and several other proteins of yeast nematode. We show that EH domains from Eps15 and Eps15R bind in vitro to peptides containing an asparagine-proline-phenylalanine (NPF) motif. Direct...

  14. Green fluorescent protein fused to the C terminus of RAD51 specifically interferes with secondary DNA binding by the RAD51-ssDNA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Wataru; Sekine, Satoshi; Machida, Shinichi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP), fused to the N or C terminus of a protein of interest, is widely used to monitor the localization and mobility of proteins in cells. RAD51 is an essential protein that functions in mitotic DNA repair and meiotic chromosome segregation by promoting the homologous recombination reaction. A previous genetic study with Arabidopsis thaliana revealed that GFP fused to the C terminus of RAD51 (RAD51-GFP) inhibits mitotic DNA repair, but meiotic homologous recombination remained unaffected. To determine how the C-terminal GFP specifically inhibits mitotic DNA repair by RAD51, we purified rice RAD51A1-GFP and RAD51A2-GFP, and performed biochemical analyses. Interestingly, purified RAD51A1-GFP and RAD51A2-GFP are proficient in DNA binding and ATP hydrolysis. However, nucleoprotein complexes containing single-stranded DNA and RAD51A1-GFP or RAD51A2-GFP are significantly defective in binding to the second DNA molecule (secondary DNA binding), and consequently fail to catalyze homologous pairing. In contrast, RAD51A1-GFP and RAD51A2-GFP efficiently stimulated homologous pairing promoted by the meiosis-specific RAD51 isoform DMC1. These biochemical characteristics are well conserved in human RAD51-GFP. Therefore, GFP fused to the C terminus of RAD51 abolishes the homologous pairing activity of RAD51 by disrupting secondary DNA binding, but does not affect its DMC1-stimulating activity.

  15. pocketZebra: a web-server for automated selection and classification of subfamily-specific binding sites by bioinformatic analysis of diverse protein families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suplatov, Dmitry; Kirilin, Eugeny; Arbatsky, Mikhail; Takhaveev, Vakil; Svedas, Vytas

    2014-07-01

    The new web-server pocketZebra implements the power of bioinformatics and geometry-based structural approaches to identify and rank subfamily-specific binding sites in proteins by functional significance, and select particular positions in the structure that determine selective accommodation of ligands. A new scoring function has been developed to annotate binding sites by the presence of the subfamily-specific positions in diverse protein families. pocketZebra web-server has multiple input modes to meet the needs of users with different experience in bioinformatics. The server provides on-site visualization of the results as well as off-line version of the output in annotated text format and as PyMol sessions ready for structural analysis. pocketZebra can be used to study structure-function relationship and regulation in large protein superfamilies, classify functionally important binding sites and annotate proteins with unknown function. The server can be used to engineer ligand-binding sites and allosteric regulation of enzymes, or implemented in a drug discovery process to search for potential molecular targets and novel selective inhibitors/effectors. The server, documentation and examples are freely available at http://biokinet.belozersky.msu.ru/pocketzebra and there are no login requirements. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Cell wall regeneration in Bangia atropurpurea (Rhodophyta) protoplasts observed using a mannan-specific carbohydrate-binding module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, Yoshiaki; Araki, Toshiyoshi

    2010-02-01

    The cell wall of the red alga Bangia atropurpurea is composed of three unique polysaccharides (beta-1,4-mannan, beta-1,3-xylan, and porphyran), similar to that in Porphyra. In this study, we visualized beta-mannan in the regenerating cell walls of B. atropurpurea protoplasts by using a fusion protein of a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) and green fluorescent protein (GFP). A mannan-binding family 27 CBM (CBM27) of beta-1,4-mannanase (Man5C) from Vibrio sp. strain MA-138 was fused to GFP, and the resultant fusion protein (GFP-CBM27) was expressed in Escherichia coli. Native affinity gel electrophoresis revealed that GFP-CBM27 maintained its binding ability to soluble beta-mannans, while normal GFP could not bind to beta-mannans. Protoplasts were isolated from the fronds of B. atropurpurea by using three kinds of bacterial enzymes. The GFP-CBM27 was mixed with protoplasts from different growth stages, and the process of cell wall regeneration was observed by fluorescence microscopy. Some protoplasts began to excrete beta-mannan at certain areas of their cell surface after 12 h of culture. As the protoplast culture progressed, beta-mannans were spread on their entire cell surfaces. The percentages of protoplasts bound to GFP-CBM27 were 3%, 12%, 17%, 29%, and 25% after 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 h of culture, respectively. Although GFP-CBM27 bound to cells at the initial growth stages, its binding to the mature fronds was not confirmed definitely. This is the first report on the visualization of beta-mannan in regenerating algal cell walls by using a fluorescence-labeled CBM.

  17. Insights into cellulase-lignin non-specific binding revealed by computational redesign of the surface of green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarmeyer, Carolyn N; Smith, Matthew D; Chundawat, Shishir P S; Sammond, Deanne; Whitehead, Timothy A

    2017-04-01

    Biological-mediated conversion of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels and biochemicals is a promising avenue toward energy sustainability. However, a critical impediment to the commercialization of cellulosic biofuel production is the high cost of cellulase enzymes needed to deconstruct biomass into fermentable sugars. One major factor driving cost is cellulase adsorption and inactivation in the presence of lignin, yet we currently have a poor understanding of the protein structure-function relationships driving this adsorption. In this work, we have systematically investigated the role of protein surface potential on lignin adsorption using a model monomeric fluorescent protein. We have designed and experimentally characterized 16 model protein variants spanning the physiological range of net charge (-24 to +16 total charges) and total charge density (0.28-0.40 charges per sequence length) typical for natural proteins. Protein designs were expressed, purified, and subjected to in silico and in vitro biophysical measurements to evaluate the relationship between protein surface potential and lignin adsorption properties. The designs were comparable to model fluorescent protein in terms of thermostability and heterologous expression yield, although the majority of the designs unexpectedly formed homodimers. Protein adsorption to lignin was studied at two different temperatures using Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring and a subtractive mass balance assay. We found a weak correlation between protein net charge and protein-binding capacity to lignin. No other single characteristic, including apparent melting temperature and 2nd virial coefficient, showed correlation with lignin binding. Analysis of an unrelated cellulase dataset with mutations localized to a family I carbohydrate-binding module showed a similar correlation between net charge and lignin binding capacity. Overall, our study provides strategies to identify highly active, low

  18. Electron microscopic and physico-chemical studies of DNA complexes with synthetic oligopeptides: binding specificity and DNA compact structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengerov, Y Y; Semenov, T E; Surovaya, A N; Sidorova NYu; Streltsov, S A; Khorlin, A A; Zhuze, A L; Gursky, G V

    1988-10-01

    Binding to DNA of two synthetic peptides, Val-Thr-Thr-Val-Val-NH-NH-Dns and Thr-Val-Thr-Lys-Val-Gly-Thr-Lsy-Val-Gly-Thr-Val-Val-NH-NH-Dns (where Dns is a residue of 5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid), has been studied by circular dichroism, electron microscopy and fluorescence methods. It has been found that these two peptides can self-associate in aqueous solution as follows from the fact that concentration-dependent changes are observed in the UV absorbance and fluorescence spectra. The two peptides can bind to DNA both in self-associated and monomeric forms. The pentapeptide in the beta-associated form binds more strongly to poly(dG).poly(dC) than to poly[d(A-C)].poly[d(G-T)] and poly(dA).poly(dT) whereas the tridecapeptide exhibits an opposite order of preferences binding more strongly to poly[d(A-C)].poly[d(G-T)] and poly(dA).poly(dT) than to poly(dG).poly(dC). Binding is a cooperative process which is accompanied by the DNA compaction at peptide/DNA base pair ratios greater than 1. At the initial stage of the compaction process, the coalescence of DNA segments covered by bound peptide molecules leads to the formation of DNA loops stabilized by the interaction between peptide molecules bound to different DNA segments. Further increase in the peptide/DNA ratio leads to the formation of rod-like structures each consisting of two or more double-stranded DNA segments. The final stage of the compaction process involves folding of fibrillar macromolecular complexes into a globular structure containing only one DNA molecule.

  19. Identifi cation of Sectarianism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinovich Vladimir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available «New religious movements and society» is traditionally one of the most sophisticated topics in the area of new religions studies. Its problem field is so huge that up to now by far not all important research themes where even touched by scientists from all over the world. The problem of the process of the identification of sectarianism by diff erent societal institutions is one of such untouched themes that is taken as the main subject of this article. This process by itself is an inseparable part of the every societal deliberate reaction to the very existence of unconventional religiosity, its unstructured and mainly structured types. The focal point of the article is step-by-step analysis of the general structure elements of the process of the identification of sectarianism without any reference to the specific time and place of its flow. Special attention is paid to the analysis of the subjects of the identification of sectarianism, to the criteria for religious groups to be qualified as new religious movements, and to the specific features of the process of documents filtration. The causes of selective perception of sectarianism are disclosed. Some main consequences and unpredictable outcomes of the process of the identification of sectarianism are described.

  20. Remnant cationic dendrimers block RNA migration in electrophoresis after monophasic lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Jung-Hua Steven; Lin, Yi-Lin

    2007-05-01

    Cationic dendrimers such as poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) and poly(propyleneimine) (PPI) have attractive characteristics for the delivery of nucleic acid and various biomedical applications. Most studies have focused on cationic dendrimer-based intracellular delivery, and very few studies have focused on the non-specific interaction of remnant cationic dendrimers with total RNA after isolation directly from cells in vitro. We examined RNA isolation using the common method of monophasic lysis from human macrophage-like cells (U937) and mouse fibroblast cells (NIH/3T3) that had been exposed to dendrimers and DNA/dendrimer complexes using gel electrophoresis. We found that PAMAM and PPI dendrimers strongly altered the mobility of RNA in the gels. In addition, the extent of dendrimer-induced alteration in RNA mobility was directly dendrimer-generation-dependent: the alteration was greater with higher-generation dendrimers. We also found that DNA/dendrimer complexes at higher dendrimer to DNA ratios interacted with RNA after isolation while gene expression was maintained. The interactions between RNA and remnant dendrimers after isolation were caused by electrostatic bindings, and we recovered total RNA using high ionic strength solvents (2M NaCl solution) to disrupt the electrostatic forces binding dendrimers to RNA. Because RNA isolation is routinely used for biological applications, such dendrimer-induced alteration in RNA mobility should be accounted for in the further processing of RNA-related applications.

  1. Screening of specific nucleic acid aptamers binding tumor markers in the serum of the lung cancer patients and identification of their activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Xiu, Chen-Lin; Gao, Li-Ming; Liang, Hua-Gang; Xu, Shu-Feng; Shi, Ming; Li, Jian; Liu, Zhi-Wei

    2017-07-01

    Lung cancer is by far the leading cause of cancer death in the world. Despite the improvements in diagnostic methods, the status of early detection was not achieved. So, a new diagnostic method is needed. The aim of this study is to obtain the highly specific nucleic acid aptamers with strong affinity to tumor markers in the serum of the lung cancer patients for targeting the serum. Aptamers specifically binding to tumor markers in the serum of the lung cancer patients were screened from the random single-stranded DNA library with agarose beads as supports and the serum as a target by target-substituting subtractive SELEX technique and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction technique. Subsequently, the secondary single-stranded DNA library obtained by 10 rounds of screening was amplified to double-stranded DNA, followed by high-throughput genome sequence analysis to screen aptamers with specific affinity to tumor markers in the serum of the lung cancer patients. Finally, six aptamers obtained by 10 rounds of screening were identified with high specific affinity to tumor markers in the serum of the lung cancer patients. Compared with other five aptamers, the aptamer 43 was identified both with the highest specificity to bind target molecule and without any obvious affinity to non-specific proteins. The screened aptamers have relatively high specificity to combine tumor markers in the serum of the lung cancer patients, which provides breakthrough points for early diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer.

  2. Insulin: its binding to specific receptors and its stimulation of DNA synthesis and 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide phosphohydrolase in embryonic mouse brain cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanker, G.; Pieringer, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Previously, the authors demonstrated that ornithine decarboxylase was stimulated by insulin in cultures of embryonic mouse brain cells. In the present work, they have investigated the presence and specificity of insulin receptors in these cultures. A time study showed that maximum binding of 125 [I] labelled insulin was around 75 min. Other studies measured the influence of concentration and age on insulin binding. A displacement study using increasing concentrations of cold insulin, glucagon or growth hormone demonstrated that the specificity of the receptors for insulin was rather high. It was also found that insulin displayed a clear dose-dependent stimulation of thymidine incorporation into the brain cells. Insulin also stimulated the glial enzyme 2':3'-cyclic nucleotide phosphohydrolase (CNP-ase). The results suggest a dual role for insulin; it regulates both cell proliferation as well as differentiation

  3. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Izzo

    Full Text Available Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta 1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors--i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, t