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Sample records for cation specific binding

  1. The specificity of protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides by lactoferrin binding protein B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthau, Ari; Partha, Sarathy K; Adamiak, Paul; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2014-10-01

    A variety of Gram-negative pathogens possess host-specific lactoferrin (Lf) receptors that mediate the acquisition of iron from host Lf. The integral membrane protein component of the receptor, lactoferrin binding protein A specifically binds host Lf and is required for acquisition of iron from Lf. In contrast, the role of the bi-lobed surface lipoprotein, lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB), in Lf binding and iron acquisition is uncertain. A common feature of LbpBs from most species is the presence of clusters of negatively charged amino acids in the protein's C-terminal lobe. Recently it has been shown that the negatively charged regions from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB are responsible for protecting against an 11 amino acid cationic antimicrobial peptide (CAP), lactoferricin (Lfcin), derived from human Lf. In this study we investigated whether the LbpB confers resistance to other CAPs since N. meningitidis is likely to encounter other CAPs from the host. LbpB provided protection against the cathelicidin derived peptide, cathelicidin related antimicrobial peptide (mCRAMP), but did not confer protection against Tritrp 1 or LL37 under our experimental conditions. When tested against a range of rationally designed synthetic peptides, LbpB was shown to protect against IDR-1002 and IDR-0018 but not against HH-2 or HHC10.

  2. Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Maria Teresa; Lee, Jiwoong

    2017-01-01

    and KCN, are selectively bound to the catalyst, providing exceptionally high enantioselectivities for kinetic resolutions, elimination reactions (fluoride base), and Strecker synthesis (cyanide nucleophile). Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis was recently expanded to silicon-based reagents, enabling...... solvents, thus increasing their applicability in synthesis. The expansion of this concept to chiral polyethers led to the emergence of asymmetric cation-binding catalysis, where chiral counter anions are generated from metal salts, particularly using BINOL-based polyethers. Alkali metal salts, namely KF...

  3. Effects of Divalent Cations and Disulfide Bond Reducing Agents on Specific Binding of Growth Hormone to Liver Membrane Receptors from Snakehead Fish (Ophiocephalus argus, Cantor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xun; Zhang, Xin-Na; Zhu, Shang-Quan; Zheng, Han-Qi

    2000-01-01

    Divalent cations, Ca(2 ), Mg(2 ) and Mn(2 ) enhance the binding of bream growth hormone (brGH) to snakehead fish liver membrane, and their optimum concentration was found to be 8 12 mmol/L, at which Ca(2 ), Mg(2 ) and Mn(2 ) could increase, respectively, the specific binding to 230%, 180%, and 200%, compared with the binding in the absence of ions. The Eadie-Scatchard plot was used for the dynamic analysis of the Ca(2 ) binding site. A low affinity Ca(2 ) binding site was found in the GH-receptor complex with K(m)=0.384 mmol/L, and the affinity constant (K(a)) was increased from 1.045x10(9) L.mol(-1) to 1.295x10(9) L.mol(-1) by the addition of 10 mmol/L CaCl(2). The effects of disulfide bond reducing agents, DTT and ME, on (125)I-brGH binding to growth hormone receptor (GHR) on snakehead fish liver memebrane were also analyzed. The addition of 0.1 20 mmol/L DTT or 0.01% 1% ME to the radioreceptor assay system caused a significant dose dependent increase in the specific binding for (125)I-brGH. In the presence of 0.8 mmol/L DTT or 0.08% ME, the specific binding of (125)I-brGH was increased from 10.2% to 15.5% and 13.2% respectively, and the affinity constant was also increased from 1.265x10(9) L.mol(-1) to 2.185x10(9) L.mol(-1) and 1.625x10(9) L.mol(-1), respectively but no changes in the binding capacity were observed. Further studies showed that the effects of reductants on the specific binding of brGH were due in part to the ligand itself and in part to GHR. In addition, it was observed that one of the three disulfide bonds of brGH could be reduced by 0.8 mmol/L DTT.

  4. Predictive model of cationic surfactant binding to humic substances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishiguro, M.; Koopal, L.K.

    2011-01-01

    The humic substances (HS) have a high reactivity with other components in the natural environment. An important factor for the reactivity of HS is their negative charge. Cationic surfactants bind strongly to HS by electrostatic and specific interaction. Therefore, a surfactant binding model is devel

  5. Cation binding site of cytochrome c oxidase: progress report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vygodina, Tatiana V; Kirichenko, Anna; Konstantinov, Alexander A

    2014-07-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase from bovine heart binds Ca(2+) reversibly at a specific Cation Binding Site located near the outer face of the mitochondrial membrane. Ca(2+) shifts the absorption spectrum of heme a, which allowed earlier the determination of the kinetic and equilibrium characteristics of the binding, and, as shown recently, the binding of calcium to the site inhibits cytochrome oxidase activity at low turnover rates of the enzyme [Vygodina, Т., Kirichenko, A., Konstantinov, A.A (2013). Direct Regulation of Cytochrome c Oxidase by Calcium Ions. PloS ONE 8, e74436]. This paper summarizes further progress in the studies of the Cation Binding Site in this group presenting the results to be reported at 18th EBEC Meeting in Lisbon, 2014. The paper revises specificity of the bovine oxidase Cation Binding Site for different cations, describes dependence of the Ca(2+)-induced inhibition on turnover rate of the enzyme and reports very high affinity binding of calcium with the "slow" form of cytochrome oxidase. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference. Guest Editors: Manuela Pereira and Miguel Teixeira.

  6. Theoretical calculation of the NMR spin-spin coupling constants and the NMR shifts allow distinguishability between the specific direct and the water-mediated binding of a divalent metal cation to guanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sychrovský, Vladimír; Sponer, Jirí; Hobza, Pavel

    2004-01-21

    The calculated intermolecular and intramolecular indirect NMR spin-spin coupling constants and NMR shifts were used for the discrimination between the inner-shell and the outer-shell binding motif of hydrated divalent cations Mg(2+) or Zn(2+) with a guanine base. The intermolecular coupling constants (1)J(X,O6) and (1)J(X,N7) (X = Mg(2+), Zn(2+)) can be unambiguously assigned to the specific inner-shell binding motif of the hydrated cation either with oxygen O6 or with nitrogen N7 of guanine. The calculated coupling constants (1)J(Mg,O6) and (1)J(Zn,O6) were 6.2 and -17.5 Hz, respectively, for the inner-shell complex of cation directly interacting with oxygen O6 of guanine. For the inner-shell coordination of the cation at nitrogen N7, the calculated coupling constants (1)J(Mg,N7) and (1)J(Zn,N7) were 5.6 and -36.5 Hz, respectively. When the binding of the cation is water-mediated, the coupling constant is zero. To obtain reliable shifts in NMR parameters, hydrated guanine was utilized as the reference state. The calculated change of NMR spin-spin coupling constants due to the hydration and coordination of the cation with guanine is caused mainly by the variation of Fermi-contact coupling contribution while the variation of diamagnetic spin-orbit, paramagnetic spin-orbit, and spin-dipolar coupling contributions is small. The change of s-character of guanine sigma bonding, sigma antibonding, and lone pair orbitals upon the hydration and cation coordination (calculated using the Natural Bond Orbital analysis) correlates with the variation of the Fermi-contact term. The calculated NMR shifts delta(N7) of -15.3 and -12.2 ppm upon the coordination of Mg(2+) and Zn(2+) ion are similar to the NMR shift of 19.6 ppm toward the high field measured by Tanaka for N7 of guanine upon the coordination of the Cd(2+) cation (Tanaka, Y.; Kojima, C.; Morita, E. H.; Kasai. Y.; Yamasaki, K.; Ono, A.; Kainosho, M.; Taira, K. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2002, 124, 4595-4601). The present data

  7. Binding of cationic surfactants to humic substances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishiguro, M.; Tan, W.; Koopal, L.K.

    2007-01-01

    Commercial surfactants are introduced into the environment either through waste products or site-specific contamination. The amphiphilic nature of both surfactants and humic substances (HS) leads to their mutual attraction especially when surfactant and HS are oppositely charged. Binding of the cati

  8. Cations bind only weakly to amides in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okur, Halil I; Kherb, Jaibir; Cremer, Paul S

    2013-04-01

    We investigated salt interactions with butyramide as a simple mimic of cation interactions with protein backbones. The experiments were performed in aqueous metal chloride solutions using two spectroscopic techniques. In the first, which provided information about contact pair formation, the response of the amide I band to the nature and concentration of salt was monitored in bulk aqueous solutions via attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It was found that molar concentrations of well-hydrated metal cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Li(+)) led to the rise of a peak assigned to metal cation-bound amides (1645 cm(-1)) and a decrease in the peak associated with purely water-bound amides (1620 cm(-1)). In a complementary set of experiments, the effect of cation identity and concentration was investigated at the air/butyramide/water interface via vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy. In these studies, metal ion-amide binding led to the ordering of the adjacent water layer. Such experiments were sensitive to the interfacial partitioning of cations in either a contact pair with the amide or as a solvent separated pair. In both experiments, the ordering of the interactions of the cations was: Ca(2+) > Mg(2+) > Li(+) > Na(+) ≈ K(+). This is a direct cationic Hofmeister series. Even for Ca(2+), however, the apparent equilibrium dissociation constant of the cation with the amide carbonyl oxygen was no tighter than ∼8.5 M. For Na(+) and K(+), no evidence was found for any binding. As such, the interactions of metal cations with amides are far weaker than the analogous binding of weakly hydrated anions.

  9. Alkali cation specific adsorption onto fcc(111) transition metal electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, J N; McCrum, I T; Janik, M J

    2014-07-21

    The presence of alkali cations in electrolyte solutions is known to impact the rate of electrocatalytic reactions, though the mechanism of such impact is not conclusively determined. We use density functional theory (DFT) to examine the specific adsorption of alkali cations to fcc(111) electrode surfaces, as specific adsorption may block catalyst sites or otherwise impact surface catalytic chemistry. Solvation of the cation-metal surface structure was investigated using explicit water models. Computed equilibrium potentials for alkali cation adsorption suggest that alkali and alkaline earth cations will specifically adsorb onto Pt(111) and Pd(111) surfaces in the potential range of hydrogen oxidation and hydrogen evolution catalysis in alkaline solutions.

  10. Interaction between alginates and manganese cations: identification of preferred cation binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerichs, N; Wingender, J; Flemming, H-C; Mayer, C

    2004-04-01

    Algal and bacterial alginates have been studied by means of 13C NMR spectroscopy in presence of paramagnetic manganese ions in order to reveal the nature of their interaction with bivalent cations. It is found that the mannuronate blocks bind manganese cations externally near their carboxylate groups, while guluronate blocks show the capability to integrate Mn2+ into pocket-like structures formed by adjacent guluronate residues. In alternating mannuronate-guluronate blocks, manganese ions preferentially locate in a concave structure formed by guluronate-mannuronate pairs. Partial acetylation of the alginate generally reduces its capability to interact with bivalent cations, however, the selectivity of the binding geometry is conserved. The results may serve as a hint for the better understanding of the alginate gelation in presence of calcium ions.

  11. Cation binding to 15-TBA quadruplex DNA is a multiple-pathway cation-dependent process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnikov, Roman V; Sponer, Jiri; Rassokhina, Olga I; Kopylov, Alexei M; Tsvetkov, Philipp O; Makarov, Alexander A; Golovin, Andrey V

    2011-12-01

    A combination of explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation (30 simulations reaching 4 µs in total), hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach and isothermal titration calorimetry was used to investigate the atomistic picture of ion binding to 15-mer thrombin-binding quadruplex DNA (G-DNA) aptamer. Binding of ions to G-DNA is complex multiple pathway process, which is strongly affected by the type of the cation. The individual ion-binding events are substantially modulated by the connecting loops of the aptamer, which play several roles. They stabilize the molecule during time periods when the bound ions are not present, they modulate the route of the ion into the stem and they also stabilize the internal ions by closing the gates through which the ions enter the quadruplex. Using our extensive simulations, we for the first time observed full spontaneous exchange of internal cation between quadruplex molecule and bulk solvent at atomistic resolution. The simulation suggests that expulsion of the internally bound ion is correlated with initial binding of the incoming ion. The incoming ion then readily replaces the bound ion while minimizing any destabilization of the solute molecule during the exchange.

  12. How Native and Alien Metal Cations Bind ATP: Implications for Lithium as a Therapeutic Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudev, Todor; Grauffel, Cédric; Lim, Carmay

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the major energy currency of the cell, exists in solution mostly as ATP-Mg. Recent experiments suggest that Mg2+ interacts with the highly charged ATP triphosphate group and Li+ can co-bind with the native Mg2+ to form ATP-Mg-Li and modulate the neuronal purine receptor response. However, it is unclear how the negatively charged ATP triphosphate group binds Mg2+ and Li+ (i.e. which phosphate group(s) bind Mg2+/Li+) and how the ATP solution conformation depends on the type of metal cation and the metal-binding mode. Here, we reveal the preferred ATP-binding mode of Mg2+/Li+ alone and combined: Mg2+ prefers to bind ATP tridentately to each of the three phosphate groups, but Li+ prefers to bind bidentately to the terminal two phosphates. We show that the solution ATP conformation depends on the cation and its binding site/mode, but it does not change significantly when Li+ binds to Mg2+-loaded ATP. Hence, ATP-Mg-Li, like Mg2+-ATP, can fit in the ATP-binding site of the host enzyme/receptor, activating specific signaling pathways. PMID:28195155

  13. How Native and Alien Metal Cations Bind ATP: Implications for Lithium as a Therapeutic Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudev, Todor; Grauffel, Cédric; Lim, Carmay

    2017-02-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the major energy currency of the cell, exists in solution mostly as ATP-Mg. Recent experiments suggest that Mg2+ interacts with the highly charged ATP triphosphate group and Li+ can co-bind with the native Mg2+ to form ATP-Mg-Li and modulate the neuronal purine receptor response. However, it is unclear how the negatively charged ATP triphosphate group binds Mg2+ and Li+ (i.e. which phosphate group(s) bind Mg2+/Li+) and how the ATP solution conformation depends on the type of metal cation and the metal-binding mode. Here, we reveal the preferred ATP-binding mode of Mg2+/Li+ alone and combined: Mg2+ prefers to bind ATP tridentately to each of the three phosphate groups, but Li+ prefers to bind bidentately to the terminal two phosphates. We show that the solution ATP conformation depends on the cation and its binding site/mode, but it does not change significantly when Li+ binds to Mg2+-loaded ATP. Hence, ATP-Mg-Li, like Mg2+-ATP, can fit in the ATP-binding site of the host enzyme/receptor, activating specific signaling pathways.

  14. Peptide binding specificity of the chaperone calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, N.; Duus, K.; Jorgensen, C.S.;

    2007-01-01

    Calreticulin is a molecular chaperone with specificity for polypeptides and N-linked monoglucosylated glycans. In order to determine the specificity of polypeptide binding, the interaction of calreticulin with polypeptides was investigated using synthetic peptides of different length and composit......Calreticulin is a molecular chaperone with specificity for polypeptides and N-linked monoglucosylated glycans. In order to determine the specificity of polypeptide binding, the interaction of calreticulin with polypeptides was investigated using synthetic peptides of different length...... and composition. A large set of available synthetic peptides (n=127) was tested for binding to calreticulin and the results analysed by multivariate data analysis. The parameter that correlated best with binding was hydrophobicity while beta-turn potential disfavoured binding. Only hydrophobic peptides longer...... a peptide-binding specificity for hydrophobic sequences and delineate the fine specificity of calreticulin for hydrophobic amino acid residues....

  15. Tissue specificity of endothelin binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolger, G.T.; Liard, F.; Krogsrud, R.; Thibeault, D.; Jaramillo, J. (BioMega, Inc., Laval, Quebec (Canada))

    1990-09-01

    A measurement was made of the binding of 125I-labeled endothelin (125I-ET) to crude membrane fractions prepared from rat aorta, atrium, ventricle, portal vein, trachea, lung parenchyma, vas deferens, ileum, bladder, and guinea-pig taenia coli and lung parenchyma. Scatchard analysis of 125I-ET binding in all tissues indicated binding to a single class of saturable sites. The affinity and density of 125I-ET binding sites varied between tissues. The Kd of 125I-ET binding was approximately 0.5 nM for rat aorta, trachea, lung parenchyma, ventricle, bladder, and vas deferens, and guinea-pig taenia coli and lung parenchyma, 1.8 nM for rat portal vein and atrium, and 3.3 nM for ileum. The Bmax of 125I-ET binding had the following rank order of density in rat tissues: trachea greater than lung parenchyma = vas deferens much greater than aorta = portal vein = atrium greater than bladder greater than ventricle = ileum. The properties of 125I-ET endothelin binding were characterized in rat ventricular membranes. 125I-ET binding was time dependent, reaching a maximum within 45-60 min at 25 degrees C. The calculated microassociation constant was 9.67 x 10(5) s-1 M-1. Only 15-20% of 125I-ET dissociated from its binding site even when dissociation was studied as long as 3 h. Preincubation of ventricular membranes with ET prevented binding of 125I-ET. 125I-ET binding was destroyed by boiling of ventricular membranes and was temperature, pH, and cation (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+) dependent.

  16. Alkali metal cation-hexacyclen complexes: effects of alkali metal cation size on the structure and binding energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, C A; Rodgers, M T

    2014-07-24

    Threshold collision-induced dissociation (CID) of alkali metal cation-hexacyclen (ha18C6) complexes, M(+)(ha18C6), with xenon is studied using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry techniques. The alkali metal cations examined here include: Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+). In all cases, M(+) is the only product observed, corresponding to endothermic loss of the intact ha18C6 ligand. The cross-section thresholds are analyzed to extract zero and 298 K M(+)-ha18C6 bond dissociation energies (BDEs) after properly accounting for the effects of multiple M(+)(ha18C6)-Xe collisions, the kinetic and internal energy distributions of the M(+)(ha18C6) and Xe reactants, and the lifetimes for dissociation of the activated M(+)(ha18C6) complexes. Ab initio and density functional theory calculations are used to determine the structures of ha18C6 and the M(+)(ha18C6) complexes, provide molecular constants necessary for the thermodynamic analysis of the energy-resolved CID data, and theoretical estimates for the M(+)-ha18C6 BDEs. Calculations using a polarizable continuum model are also performed to examine solvent effects on the binding. In the absence of solvent, the M(+)-ha18C6 BDEs decrease as the size of the alkali metal cation increases, consistent with the noncovalent nature of the binding in these complexes. However, in the presence of solvent, the ha18C6 ligand exhibits selectivity for K(+) over the other alkali metal cations. The M(+)(ha18C6) structures and BDEs are compared to those previously reported for the analogous M(+)(18-crown-6) and M(+)(cyclen) complexes to examine the effects of the nature of the donor atom (N versus O) and the number donor atoms (six vs four) on the nature and strength of binding.

  17. Study of Ion Specific Interactions of Alkali Cations with Dicarboxylate Dianions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murdachaew, Garold; Valiev, Marat; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Wang, Xue B.

    2012-02-10

    Alkali metal cations often show pronounced ion specific interactions and selectivity with macromolecules in biological processes, colloids, and interfacial sciences, but a fundamental understanding about the underlying microscopic mechanism is still very limited. Here we report a direct probe of interactions between alkali metal cations (M{sup +}) and dicarboxylate dianions, O{sub 2}C(CH{sub 2})nCO{sub 2} (D{sub n}{sup 2-}) in the gas phase by combined photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and ab initio electronic structure calculation on nine M{sup +}-D{sub n}{sup 2-} complexes (M = Li, Na, K; n = 2, 4, 6). PES spectra show that the electron binding energy (EBE) decreases from Li{sup +} to Na{sup +} to K{sup +} for complexes of M{sup +}-D{sub 2}{sup 2-}, whereas the order is Li{sup +} binding environments are found to depend upon dicarboxylate size n and the specific cation M{sup +}. The observed variance of EBEs reflects how well a specific dicarboxylate dianion accommodates each M{sup +}. This work demonstrates the delicate interplay among several factors (electrostatic interaction, size matching, and strain energy) that likely play critical roles in determining the structures and energetics of gaseous clusters as well as ion specificity and selectivity in solutions and biological systems.

  18. Influence of hydration and cation binding on parvalbumin dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotti, J.-M.; Parello, J.; Bellissent-Funel, M.-C.

    Due to structural characteristics, parvalbumin exerts a major role in intracellular Mg2+ and Ca2+ concentration regulation during the muscular contraction-relieving cycle. This structure-function relationship being established, we are investigating the structure-dynamics-function relationship to take into account the protein dynamics. Because of the strong incoherent neutron scattering cross section of hydrogen and of the abundance of this element in proteins, incoherent inelastic neutron scattering is a unique probe to study vibrations and localised motions in biological macromolecules. We take advantage of the complementarities in energy or time resolution of various neutron spectrometers (time of flight, backscattering, spin-echo) to probe the parvalbumin dynamics from a fraction of a picosecond to a few nanoseconds. Influences of hydration and of the nature of the cation on parvalbumin dynamics are discussed.

  19. Aqueous Cation-Amide Binding: Free Energies and IR Spectral Signatures by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluharova, Eva; Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Schmidt, Burkhard; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-07-03

    Understanding specific ion effects on proteins remains a considerable challenge. N-methylacetamide serves as a useful proxy for the protein backbone that can be well characterized both experimentally and theoretically. The spectroscopic signatures in the amide I band reflecting the strength of the interaction of alkali cations and alkali earth dications with the carbonyl group remain difficult to assign and controversial to interpret. Herein, we directly compute the IR shifts corresponding to the binding of either sodium or calcium to aqueous N-methylacetamide using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the two cations interact with aqueous N-methylacetamide with different affinities and in different geometries. Since sodium exhibits a weak interaction with the carbonyl group, the resulting amide I band is similar to an unperturbed carbonyl group undergoing aqueous solvation. In contrast, the stronger calcium binding results in a clear IR shift with respect to N-methylacetamide in pure water. Support from the Czech Ministry of Education (grant LH12001) is gratefully acknowledged. EP thanks the International Max-Planck Research School for support and the Alternative Sponsored Fellowship program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PJ acknowledges the Praemium Academie award from the Academy of Sciences. Calculations of the free energy profiles were made possible through generous allocation of computer time from the North-German Supercomputing Alliance (HLRN). Calculations of vibrational spectra were performed in part using the computational resources in the National Energy Research Supercomputing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This work was supported by National Science Foundation grant CHE-0431312. CJM is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. PNNL is operated for the Department of Energy by Battelle. MDB is

  20. Dissecting electrostatic screening, specific ion binding, and ligand binding in an energetic model for glycine riboswitch folding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipfert, Jan; Sim, Adelene Y.L.; Herschlag, Daniel; Doniach, Sebastian (Stanford)

    2010-09-17

    Riboswitches are gene-regulating RNAs that are usually found in the 5{prime}-untranslated regions of messenger RNA. As the sugar-phosphate backbone of RNA is highly negatively charged, the folding and ligand-binding interactions of riboswitches are strongly dependent on the presence of cations. Using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and hydroxyl radical footprinting, we examined the cation dependence of the different folding stages of the glycine-binding riboswitch from Vibrio cholerae. We found that the partial folding of the tandem aptamer of this riboswitch in the absence of glycine is supported by all tested mono- and divalent ions, suggesting that this transition is mediated by nonspecific electrostatic screening. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations using SAXS-derived low-resolution structural models allowed us to perform an energetic dissection of this process. The results showed that a model with a constant favorable contribution to folding that is opposed by an unfavorable electrostatic term that varies with ion concentration and valency provides a reasonable quantitative description of the observed folding behavior. Glycine binding, on the other hand, requires specific divalent ions binding based on the observation that Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+} facilitated glycine binding, whereas other divalent cations did not. The results provide a case study of how ion-dependent electrostatic relaxation, specific ion binding, and ligand binding can be coupled to shape the energetic landscape of a riboswitch and can begin to be quantitatively dissected.

  1. The role of aspartate-235 in the binding of cations to an artificial cavity at the radical site of cytochrome c peroxidase.

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzgerald, M. M.; Trester, M. L.; Jensen, G M; McRee, D. E.; Goodin, D B

    1995-01-01

    The activated state of cytochrome c peroxidase, compound ES, contains a cation radical on the Trp-191 side chain. We recently reported that replacing this tryptophan with glycine creates a buried cavity at the active site that contains ordered solvent and that will specifically bind substituted imidazoles in their protonated cationic forms (Fitzgerald MM, Churchill MJ, McRee DE, Goodin DB, 1994, Biochemistry 33:3807-3818). Proposals that a nearby carboxylate, Asp-235, and competing monovalent...

  2. Hydration of cations: a key to understanding of specific cation effects on aggregation behaviors of PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutter, Jacob C; Wu, Tsung-yu; Zhang, Yanjie

    2013-09-05

    This work reports results from the interactions of a series of monovalent and divalent cations with a triblock copolymer, poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO). Phase transition temperatures of the polymer in the presence of chloride salts with six monovalent and eight divalent cations were measured using an automated melting point apparatus. The polymer undergoes a two-step phase transition, consisting of micellization of the polymer followed by aggregation of the micelles, in the presence of all the salts studied herein. The results suggest that hydration of cations plays a key role in determining the interactions between the cations and the polymer. The modulation of the phase transition temperature of the polymer by cations can be explained as a balance between three interactions: direct binding of cations to the oxygen in the polymer chains, cations sharing one water molecule with the polymer in their hydration layer, and cations interacting with the polymer via two water molecules. Monovalent cations Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+) do not bind to the polymer, while Li(+) and NH4(+) and all the divalent cations investigated including Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Cd(2+) bind to the polymer. The effects of the cations correlate well with their hydration thermodynamic properties. Mechanisms for cation-polymer interactions are discussed.

  3. Impact of the associated cation on chloride binding of Portland cement paste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Weerdt, K., E-mail: klaartje.d.weerdt@ntnu.no [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (Norway); Department of Engineering and Applied Sciences, University of Bergamo (Italy); Colombo, A. [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (Norway); Department of Engineering and Applied Sciences, University of Bergamo (Italy); Coppola, L. [Department of Engineering and Applied Sciences, University of Bergamo (Italy); Justnes, H. [SINTEF Building and Infrastructure, Trondheim (Norway); Geiker, M.R. [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (Norway)

    2015-02-15

    Well hydrated cement paste was exposed to MgCl{sub 2}, CaCl{sub 2} and NaCl solutions at 20 °C. The chloride binding isotherms for free chloride concentrations ranging up to 1.5 mol/l were determined experimentally. More chlorides were found to be bound when the associated cation was Mg{sup 2} {sup +} or Ca{sup 2} {sup +} compared to Na{sup +}. The chloride binding capacity of the paste appeared to be related to the pH of the exposure solution. In order to explain the cation dependency of the chloride binding a selection of samples was investigated in detail using experimental techniques such as TG, XRD and SEM–EDS to identify the phases binding the chlorides. The experimentally obtained data were compared with the calculations of a thermodynamic model, GEMS. It was concluded that the measured change in chloride binding depending on the cation was mainly governed by the pH of the exposure solution and thereby the binding capacity of the C-S-H.

  4. The role of aspartate-235 in the binding of cations to an artificial cavity at the radical site of cytochrome c peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, M M; Trester, M L; Jensen, G M; McRee, D E; Goodin, D B

    1995-09-01

    The activated state of cytochrome c peroxidase, compound ES, contains a cation radical on the Trp-191 side chain. We recently reported that replacing this tryptophan with glycine creates a buried cavity at the active site that contains ordered solvent and that will specifically bind substituted imidazoles in their protonated cationic forms (Fitzgerald MM, Churchill MJ, McRee DE, Goodin DB, 1994, Biochemistry 33:3807-3818). Proposals that a nearby carboxylate, Asp-235, and competing monovalent cations should modulate the affinity of the W191G cavity for ligand binding are addressed in this study. Competitive binding titrations of the imidazolium ion to W191G as a function of [K+] show that potassium competes weakly with the binding of imidazoles. The dissociation constant observed for potassium binding (18 mM) is more than 3,000-fold higher than that for 1,2-dimethylimidazole (5.5 microM) in the absence of competing cations. Significantly, the W191G-D235N double mutant shows no evidence for binding imidazoles in their cationic or neutral forms, even though the structure of the cavity remains largely unperturbed by replacement of the carboxylate. Refined crystallographic B-values of solvent positions indicate that the weakly bound potassium in W191G is significantly depopulated in the double mutant. These results demonstrate that the buried negative charge of Asp-235 is an essential feature of the cation binding determinant and indicate that this carboxylate plays a critical role in stabilizing the formation of the Trp-191 radical cation.

  5. Binding properties of oxacalix[4]arenes derivatives toward metal cations; Interactions entre cations metalliques et derives des oxacalix[4]arenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellah, B

    2006-11-15

    The objective of this work was to establish the binding properties of oxacalix[4]arene derivatives with different numbers of the oxa bridges, functional groups (ketones, pyridine, ester, amide and methoxy) and conformations. Their interactions with alkali and alkaline-earth, heavy and transition metal cations have been evaluated according to different approaches: (i) extraction of corresponding picrates from an aqueous phase into dichloromethane; (ii) determination of the thermodynamic parameters of complexation in methanol and/or acetonitrile by UV-spectrophotometry and micro-calorimetry; (iii) determination of the stoichiometry of the complexes by ESI-MS; (iv) {sup 1}H-NMR titrations allowing to localize the metal ions in the ligand cavity. In a first part dealing on homo-oxacalix[4]arenes, selectivities for Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 2+} of ketones derivatives was shown. The presence of oxa bridge in these derivatives increases their efficiency while decreasing their selectivity with respect to related calixarenes. The pyridine derivative prefers transition and heavy metal cations, in agreement with the presence of the soft nitrogen atoms. In the second part, di-oxacalix[4]arene ester and secondary amide derivatives were shown to be less effective than tertiary amide counterparts but to present high selectivities for Li{sup +}, Ba{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+} and Hg{sup 2+}. A third part devoted to the octa-homo-tetra-oxacalix[4]arene tetra-methoxy shows that the 1:1 metal complexes formed are generally more stable than those of calixarenes, suggesting the participation of the oxygen atoms of the bridge in the complexation. Selectivity for Cs{sup +}, Ba{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+} and Hg{sup 2+} were noted. (author)

  6. Binding interaction of cationic phenazinium dyes with calf thymus DNA: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Deboleena; Das, Paramita; Basak, Soumen; Chattopadhyay, Nitin

    2008-07-31

    Absorption, steady-state fluorescence, steady-state fluorescence anisotropy, and intrinsic and induced circular dichroism (CD) have been exploited to explore the binding of calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) with three cationic phenazinium dyes, viz., phenosafranin (PSF), safranin-T (ST), and safranin-O (SO). The absorption and fluorescence spectra of all the three dyes reflect significant modifications upon interaction with the DNA. A comparative study of the dyes with respect to modification of fluorescence and fluorescence anisotropy upon binding, effect of urea, iodide-induced fluorescence quenching, and CD measurements reveal that the dyes bind to the ctDNA principally in an intercalative fashion. The effect of ionic strength indicates that electrostatic attraction between the cationic dyes and ctDNA is also an important component of the dye-DNA interaction. Intrinsic and induced CD studies help to assess the structural effects of dyes binding to DNA and confirm the intercalative mode of binding as suggested by fluorescence and other studies. Finally it is proposed that dyes with bulkier substitutions are intercalated into the DNA to a lesser extent.

  7. Thermodynamics of cationic lipid binding to DNA and DNA condensation: roles of electrostatics and hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulis, Daumantas; Rouzina, Ioulia; Bloomfield, Victor A

    2002-06-26

    Alkylammonium binding to DNA was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry. Experimental data, obtained as functions of alkyl chain length, salt concentration, DNA concentration, and temperature, provided a detailed thermodynamic description of lipid-DNA binding reactions leading to DNA condensation. Lipid binding, counterion displacement, and DNA condensation were highly cooperative processes, driven by a large increase in entropy and opposed by a relatively small endothermic enthalpy at room temperature. Large negative heat capacity change indicated a contribution from hydrophobic interactions between aliphatic tails. An approximation of lipid-DNA binding as dominated by two factors-ionic and hydrophobic interactions-yielded a model that was consistent with experimental data. Chemical group contributions to the energetics of binding were determined and could be used to predict energetics of other lipid binding to DNA. Electrostatic and hydrophobic contributions to Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, entropy, and heat capacity could be distinguished by applying additivity principles. Binding of lipids with two, three, and four aliphatic tails was investigated and compared to single-tailed lipid binding. Structurally, the model suggests that lipid cationic headgroups and aliphatic tails distribute evenly and lay down on DNA surface without the formation of micelles.

  8. The solute specificity profiles of nucleobase cation symporter 1 (NCS1) from Zea mays and Setaria viridis illustrate functional flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Micah; Schein, Jessica; Hunt, Kevin A; Nalam, Vamsi; Mourad, George S; Schultes, Neil P

    2016-03-01

    The solute specificity profiles (transport and binding) for the nucleobase cation symporter 1 (NCS1) proteins, from the closely related C4 grasses Zea mays and Setaria viridis, differ from that of Arabidopsis thaliana and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii NCS1. Solute specificity profiles for NCS1 from Z. mays (ZmNCS1) and S. viridis (SvNCS1) were determined through heterologous complementation studies in NCS1-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. The four Viridiplantae NCS1 proteins transport the purines adenine and guanine, but unlike the dicot and algal NCS1, grass NCS1 proteins fail to transport the pyrimidine uracil. Despite the high level of amino acid sequence similarity, ZmNCS1 and SvNCS1 display distinct solute transport and recognition profiles. SvNCS1 transports adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, cytosine, and allantoin and competitively binds xanthine and uric acid. ZmNCS1 transports adenine, guanine, and cytosine and competitively binds, 5-fluorocytosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, and uric acid. The differences in grass NCS1 profiles are due to a limited number of amino acid alterations. These amino acid residues do not correspond to amino acids essential for overall solute and cation binding or solute transport, as previously identified in bacterial and fungal NCS1, but rather may represent residues involved in subtle solute discrimination. The data presented here reveal that within Viridiplantae, NCS1 proteins transport a broad range of nucleobase compounds and that the solute specificity profile varies with species.

  9. Interaction of polyamines with proteins of photosystem II: Cation binding and photosynthetic oxygen evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchemin, R.; Harnois, J.; Rouillon, R.; Tajmir-Riahi, H. A.; Carpentier, R.

    2007-05-01

    Polyamines are organic cations that function in diverse physiological processes that share as a common thread a close relationship to cell proliferation and growth. Polyamines also affect photosynthetic oxygen evolution and therefore, this study was designed to investigate the interaction of 1,3-diaminopropane, 1,4-diaminobutane (putrescine), and 1,5-diaminopentane (cadaverine) cations with proteins of photosystem II (PSII) using PSII-enriched submembrane fractions with diamine concentrations between 0.01 and 20 mM. Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy with its self-deconvolution and second derivative resolution enhancement, as well as curve-fitting procedures were applied in order to determine the diamine binding mode, the protein conformational changes, and the structural properties of diamine-protein complexes. Spectroscopic evidence showed that diamines interact with proteins (H-bonding) through polypeptide C dbnd O groups with no major perturbations of protein secondary structure. At very low diamine concentration (0.01 mM), no inhibition of oxygen-evolution occurred, while at higher diamine content (5-10 mM), 100% inhibition was observed. Chorophyll fluorescence measurements demonstrated that the inhibition mainly affects the oxygen evolving complex of PSII. Comparisons of the effects of these dipositive organic cations with divalent metal cations on one hand and with polyvalent spermine and spermidine on the other hand, show major alterations of the protein secondary structure as positive charge increases.

  10. Titration kinetics of Asp-85 in bacteriorhodopsin: exclusion of the retinal pocket as the color-controlling cation binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X; Bressler, S; Ottolenghi, M; Eliash, T; Friedman, N; Sheves, M

    1997-10-20

    The spectrum (the purple blue transition) and function of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin are determined by the state of protonation of the Asp-85 residue located in the vicinity of the retinal chromophore. The titration of Asp-85 is controlled by the binding/unbinding of one or two divalent metal cations (Ca2+ or Mg2+). The location of such metal binding site(s) is approached by studying the kinetics of the cation-induced titration of Asp-85 using metal ions and large molecular cations, such as quaternary ammonium ions, R4N+ (R = Et, Pr, a divalent 'bolaform ion' [Et3N+-(CH2)4-N+Et3] and the 1:3 molecular complex formed between Fe2+ and 1,10-phenanthroline (OP). The basic multi-component kinetic features of the titration, extending from 10(-2) to 10(4) s, are unaffected by the charge and size of the cation. This indicates that cation binding to bR triggers the blue --> purple titration in a fast step, which is not rate-determining. In view of the size of the cations involved, these observations indicate that the cation binding site is in an exposed location on, or close to, the membrane surface. This excludes previous models, which placed the color-controlling Ca2+ ion in the retinal binding pocket.

  11. A cation-pi interaction in the binding site of the glycine receptor is mediated by a phenylalanine residue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Millen, Kat S; Hanek, Ariele P;

    2008-01-01

    Cys-loop receptor binding sites characteristically contain many aromatic amino acids. In nicotinic ACh and 5-HT3 receptors, a Trp residue forms a cation-pi interaction with the agonist, whereas in GABA(A) receptors, a Tyr performs this role. The glycine receptor binding site, however, contains pr...

  12. Cationic polymers for DNA origami coating - examining their binding efficiency and tuning the enzymatic reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviaho, Jenny K.; Linko, Veikko; Ora, Ari; Tiainen, Tony; Järvihaavisto, Erika; Mikkilä, Joona; Tenhu, Heikki; Nonappa, Affc; Kostiainen, Mauri A.

    2016-06-01

    DNA origamis are fully tailored, programmable, biocompatible and readily functionalizable nanostructures that provide an excellent foundation for the development of sophisticated drug-delivery systems. However, the DNA origami objects suffer from certain drawbacks such as low cell-transfection rates and low stability. A great deal of studies on polymer-based transfection agents, mainly focusing on polyplex formation and toxicity, exists. In this study, the electrostatic binding between a brick-like DNA origami and cationic block-copolymers was explored. The effect of the polymer structure on the binding was investigated and the toxicity of the polymer-origami complexes evaluated. The study shows that all of the analyzed polymers had a suitable binding efficiency irrespective of the block structure. It was also observed that the toxicity of polymer-origami complexes was insignificant at the biologically relevant concentration levels. Besides brick-like DNA origamis, tubular origami carriers equipped with enzymes were also coated with the polymers. By adjusting the amount of cationic polymers that cover the DNA structures, we showed that it is possible to control the enzyme kinetics of the complexes. This work gives a starting point for further development of biocompatible and effective polycation-based block copolymers that can be used in coating different DNA origami nanostructures for various bioapplications.DNA origamis are fully tailored, programmable, biocompatible and readily functionalizable nanostructures that provide an excellent foundation for the development of sophisticated drug-delivery systems. However, the DNA origami objects suffer from certain drawbacks such as low cell-transfection rates and low stability. A great deal of studies on polymer-based transfection agents, mainly focusing on polyplex formation and toxicity, exists. In this study, the electrostatic binding between a brick-like DNA origami and cationic block-copolymers was explored. The

  13. Regulation by divalent cations of /sup 3/H-baclofen binding to GABA/sub B/ sites in rat cerebellar membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, K.; Goto, M.; Fukuda, H.

    1983-02-21

    When investigating the effects of divalent cations (Mg/sup 2 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, Sr/sup 2 +/, Ba/sup 2 +/, Mn/sup 2 +/ and Ni/sup 2 +/) on /sup 3/H-baclofen binding to rat cerebellar synaptic membranes, we found that the specific binding of /sup 3/H-baclofen was not only dependent on divalent cations, but was increased dose-dependently in the presence of these cations. The effects were in the following order of potency: Mn/sup 2 +/ approx. = Ni/sup 2 +/ > Mg/sup 2 +/ > Ca/sup 2 +/ > Sr/sup 2 +/ > Ba/sup 2 +/. Scatchard analysis of the binding data revealed a single component of the binding sites in the presence of 2.5 mM MgCl/sub 2/, 2.5 mM CaCl/sub 2/ or 0.3 mM MnCl/sub 2/ whereas two components appeared in the presence of 2.5 mM MnCl/sub 2/ or 1 mM NiCl/sub 2/. In the former, divalent cations altered the apparent affinity (K/sub d/) without affecting density of the binding sites (B/sub max/). In the latter, the high-affinity sites showed a higher affinity and lower density of the binding sites than did the single component of the former. As the maximal effects of four cations (Mg/sup 2 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, Mn/sup 2 +/, and Ni/sup 2 +/) were not additive, there are probably common sites of action of these divalent cations. Among the ligands for GABA/sub B/ sites, the affinity for (-), (+) and (+/-)baclofen, GABA and ..beta..-phenyl GABA increased 2 - 6 fold in the presence of 2.5 mM MnCl/sub 2/, in comparison with that in HEPES-buffered Krebs solution (containing 2.5 mM CaCl/sub 2/ and 1.2 mM MgSO/sub 4/), whereas that for muscimol was decreased to one-fifth. Thus, the affinity of GABA/sub B/ sites for its ligands is probably regulated by divalent cations, through common sites of action.

  14. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having Enhanced Binding Affinity and Sequence Specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA strand, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and binding affinity. Methods of increasing binding affinity and sequence specificity of peptide nucleic aci...

  15. Interaction of Sodium Hyaluronate with a Biocompatible Cationic Surfactant from Lysine: A Binding Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bračič, Matej; Hansson, Per; Pérez, Lourdes; Zemljič, Lidija F; Kogej, Ksenija

    2015-11-10

    Mixtures of natural and biodegradable surfactants and ionic polysaccharides have attracted considerable research interest in recent years because they prosper as antimicrobial materials for medical applications. In the present work, interactions between the lysine-derived biocompatible cationic surfactant N(ε)-myristoyl-lysine methyl ester, abbreviated as MKM, and the sodium salt of hyaluronic acid (NaHA) are investigated in aqueous media by potentiometric titrations using the surfactant-sensitive electrode and pyrene-based fluorescence spectroscopy. The critical micelle concentration in pure surfactant solutions and the critical association concentration in the presence of NaHA are determined based on their dependence on the added electrolyte (NaCl) concentration. The equilibrium between the protonated (charged) and deprotonated (neutral) forms of MKM is proposed to explain the anomalous binding isotherms observed in the presence of the polyelectrolyte. The explanation is supported by theoretical model calculations of the mixed-micelle equilibrium and the competitive binding of the two MKM forms to the surface of the electrode membrane. It is suggested that the presence of even small amounts of the deprotonated form can strongly influence the measured electrode response. Such ionic-nonionic surfactant mixtures are a special case of mixed surfactant systems where the amount of the nonionic component cannot be varied independently as was the case for some of the earlier studies.

  16. Solution conformation of the C-terminal domain of skeletal troponin C. Cation, trifluoperazine and troponin I binding effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabikowski, W; Dalgarno, D C; Levine, B A; Gergely, J; Grabarek, Z; Leavis, P C

    1985-08-15

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to study the cation (Mg2+, Ca2+)-dependent conformational states of the C-terminal domain of rabbit skeletal troponin C under a variety of solution conditions. Nuclear Overhauser data and paramagnetic probe observations provide definition of the configuration of this region of troponin C. Comparative study of homologous proteins identify common features of the tertiary structure relevant to the cation binding reaction. Complex formation with troponin I and the drug trifluoperazine is observed to adjust the solution conformation of the C-terminal domain of troponin C. The interactive conformational response to cation coordination and the binding of the drug and troponin I are discussed.

  17. Modeling the Interaction between Integrin-Binding Peptide (RGD) and Rutile Surface: The Effect of Cation Mediation on Asp Adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chunya [Harbin Institute of Technology; Skelton, Adam [Vanderbilt University; Chen, Mingjun [Harbin Institute of Technology; Vlcek, Lukas [ORNL; Cummings, Peter T [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The binding of a negatively charged residue, aspartic acid (Asp) in tripeptide arginine-glycine-aspartic acid, onto a negatively charged hydroxylated rutile (110) surface in aqueous solution, containing divalent (Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, or Sr{sup 2+}) or monovalent (Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, or Rb{sup +}) cations, was studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results indicate that ionic radii and charges will significantly affect the hydration, adsorption geometry, and distance of cations from the rutile surface, thereby regulating the Asp/rutile binding mode. The adsorption strength of monovalent cations on the rutile surface in the order Na{sup +} > K{sup +} > Rb{sup +} shows a 'reverse' lyotropic trend, while the divalent cations on the same surface exhibit a 'regular' lyotropic behavior with decreasing crystallographic radii (the adsorption strength of divalent cations: Sr{sup 2+} > Ca{sup 2+} > Mg{sup 2+}). The Asp side chain in NaCl, KCl, and RbCl solutions remains stably H-bonded to the surface hydroxyls and the inner-sphere adsorbed compensating monovalent cations act as a bridge between the COO{sup -} group and the rutile, helping to 'trap' the negatively charged Asp side chain on the negatively charged surface. In contrast, the mediating divalent cations actively participate in linking the COO{sup -} group to the rutile surface; thus the Asp side chain can remain stably on the rutile (110) surface, even if it is not involved in any hydrogen bonds with the surface hydroxyls. Inner- and outer-sphere geometries are all possible mediation modes for divalent cations in bridging the peptide to the rutile surface.

  18. PACSINs bind to the TRPV4 cation channel. PACSIN 3 modulates the subcellular localization of TRPV4.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuajungco, M.P.; Grimm, C.; Oshima, K.; D'hoedt, D.; Nilius, B.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Plomann, M.; Heller, S.

    2006-01-01

    TRPV4 is a cation channel that responds to a variety of stimuli including mechanical forces, temperature, and ligand binding. We set out to identify TRPV4-interacting proteins by performing yeast two-hybrid screens, and we isolated with the avian TRPV4 amino terminus the chicken orthologues of mamma

  19. Light-induced geometric isomerization of 1,2-diphenylcyclopropanes included within Y zeolites: role of cation-guest binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaanumalle, Lakshmi S; Sivaguru, J; Sunoj, R B; Lakshminarasimhan, P H; Chandrasekhar, J; Ramamurthy, V

    2002-12-13

    Through a systematic study of several diphenylcyclopropane derivatives, we have inferred that the cations present within a zeolite control the excited-state chemistry of these systems. In the parent 1,2-diphenylcylopropane, the cation binds to the two phenyl rings in a sandwich-type arrangement, and such a mode of binding prevents cis-to-trans isomerization. Once an ester or amide group is introduced into the system (derivatives of 2beta,3beta-diphenylcyclopropane-1alpha-carboxylic acid), the cation binds to the carbonyl group present in these chromophores and such a binding has no influence on the cis-trans isomerization process. Cation-reactant structures computed at density functional theory level have been very valuable in rationalizing the observed photochemical behavior of diphenylcyclopropane derivatives included in zeolites. While the parent system, 1,2-diphenylcylopropane, has been extensively investigated in the context of chiral induction in solution, owing to its failure to isomerize from cis to trans, the same could not be investigated in zeolites. However, esters of 2beta,3beta-diphenylcyclopropane-1alpha-carboxylic acid could be studied within zeolites in the context of chiral induction. Chiral induction as high 20% ee and 55% de has been obtained with selected systems. These numbers, although low, are much higher than what has been obtained in solution with the same system or with the parent system by other investigators (maximum approximately 10% ee).

  20. DNA-binding specificities of human transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolma, Arttu; Yan, Jian; Whitington, Thomas; Toivonen, Jarkko; Nitta, Kazuhiro R; Rastas, Pasi; Morgunova, Ekaterina; Enge, Martin; Taipale, Mikko; Wei, Gonghong; Palin, Kimmo; Vaquerizas, Juan M; Vincentelli, Renaud; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Hughes, Timothy R; Lemaire, Patrick; Ukkonen, Esko; Kivioja, Teemu; Taipale, Jussi

    2013-01-17

    Although the proteins that read the gene regulatory code, transcription factors (TFs), have been largely identified, it is not well known which sequences TFs can recognize. We have analyzed the sequence-specific binding of human TFs using high-throughput SELEX and ChIP sequencing. A total of 830 binding profiles were obtained, describing 239 distinctly different binding specificities. The models represent the majority of human TFs, approximately doubling the coverage compared to existing systematic studies. Our results reveal additional specificity determinants for a large number of factors for which a partial specificity was known, including a commonly observed A- or T-rich stretch that flanks the core motifs. Global analysis of the data revealed that homodimer orientation and spacing preferences, and base-stacking interactions, have a larger role in TF-DNA binding than previously appreciated. We further describe a binding model incorporating these features that is required to understand binding of TFs to DNA.

  1. Characterization of selective binding of alkali cations with carboxylate by x-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquid microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saykally, Richard J; Uejio, Janel S.; Schwartz, Craig P.; Duffin, Andrew M.; Drisdell, Walter S.; Cohen, Ronald C.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2008-01-08

    We describe an approach for characterizing selective binding between oppositely charged ionic functional groups under biologically relevant conditions. Relative shifts in K-shell x-ray absorption spectra of aqueous cations and carboxylate anions indicate the corresponding binding strengths via perturbations of carbonyl antibonding orbitals. XAS spectra measured for aqueous formate and acetate solutions containing lithium, sodium, and potassium cations reveal monotonically stronger binding of the lighter metals, supporting recent results from simulations and other experiments. The carbon K-edge spectra of the acetate carbonyl feature centered near 290 eV clearly indicate a preferential interaction of sodium versus potassium, which was less apparent with formate. These results are in accord with the Law of Matching Water Affinities, relating relative hydration strengths of ions to their respective tendencies to form contact ion pairs. Density functional theory calculations of K-shell spectra support the experimental findings.

  2. A Low Protein Binding Cationic Poly(2-oxazoline) as Non-Viral Vector

    KAUST Repository

    He, Zhijian

    2015-04-02

    © 2015 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Developing safe and efficient non-viral gene delivery systems remains a major challenge. We present a new cationic poly(2-oxazoline) (CPOx) block copolymer for gene therapy that was synthesized by sequential polymerization of non-ionic 2-methyl-2-oxazoline and a new 2-oxazoline monomer, 2-(N-methyl, N-Boc-amino)-methyl-2-oxazoline, followed by deprotection of the pendant secondary amine groups. Upon mixing with plasmid DNA (pDNA), CPOx forms small (diameter ≈80 nm) and narrowly dispersed polyplexes (PDI <0.2), which are stable upon dilution in saline and against thermal challenge. These polyplexes exhibited low plasma protein binding and very low cytotoxicity in vitro compared to the polyplexes of pDNA and poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(L-lysine) (PEG-b-PLL). CPOx/pDNA polyplexes at N/P = 5 bound considerably less plasma protein compared to polyplexes of PEG-b-PLL at the same N/P ratio. This is a unique aspect of the developed polyplexes emphasizing their potential for systemic delivery in vivo. The transfection efficiency of the polyplexes in B16 murine melanoma cells was low after 4 h, but increased significantly for 10 h exposure time, indicative of slow internalization of polyplexes. Addition of Pluronic P85 boosted the transfection using CPOx/pDNA polyplexes considerably. The low protein binding of CPOx/pDNA polyplexes is particularly interesting for the future development of targeted gene delivery.

  3. Cationic Gold Clusters Ligated with Differently Substituted Phosphines: Effect of Substitution on Ligand Reactivity and Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Olivares, Astrid M.; Hill, David E.; Laskin, Julia

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the effect of the number of methyl (Me) and cyclohexyl (Cy) functional groups in monodentate phosphine ligands on the solution-phase synthesis of ligated sub-nanometer gold clusters and their gas-phase fragmentation pathways. Small mixed ligand cationic gold clusters were synthesized using ligand exchange reactions between pre-formed triphenylphosphine ligated (PPh3) gold clusters and monodentate Me- and Cy-substituted ligands in solution and characterized using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments. Under the same experimental conditions, larger gold-PPh3 clusters undergo efficient exchange of unsubstituted PPh3 ligands for singly Me- and Cy-substituted PPh2Me and PPh2Cy ligands. The efficiency of ligand exchange decreases with an increasing number of Me or Cy groups in the substituted phosphine ligands. CID experiments performed for a series of ligand-exchanged gold clusters indicate that loss of a neutral Me-substituted ligand is preferred over loss of a neutral PPh¬3 ligand while the opposite trend is observed for Cy-substituted ligands. The branching ratio of the competing ligand loss channels is strongly correlated with the electron donating ability of the phosphorous lone pair as determined by the relative proton affinity of the ligand. The results indicate that the relative ligand binding energies increase in the order PMe3 < PPhMe2 < PPh2Me < PPh3< PPh2Cy < PPhCy2< PCy3. Furthermore, the difference in relative ligand binding energies increases with the number of substituted PPh3-mMem or PPh3-mCym ligands (L) exchanged onto each cluster. This study provides the first experimental determination of the relative binding energies of ligated gold clusters containing differently substituted monophosphine ligands, which are important to controlling their synthesis and reactivity in solution. The results also indicate that ligand substitution is an important

  4. A cation-π interaction at a phenylalanine residue in the glycine receptor binding site is conserved for different agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Hanek, Ariele P; Price, Kerry L

    2011-01-01

    . In the current study, we investigated whether the lower efficacy agonists of the human GlyR β-alanine and taurine also form cation-π interactions with Phe159. By incorporating a series of unnatural amino acids, we found cation-π interactions between Phe159 and the amino groups of β-alanine and taurine....... The strengths of these interactions were significantly weaker than for glycine. Modeling studies suggest that β-alanine and taurine are orientated subtly differently in the binding pocket, with their amino groups further from Phe159 than that of glycine. These data therefore show that similar agonists can have...... similar but not identical orientations and interactions in the binding pocket and provide a possible explanation for the lower potencies of β-alanine and taurine....

  5. Affinity purification of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    We describe a method for affinity purification of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins that is fast and effective. Complementary chemically synthesized oligodeoxynucleotides that contain a recognition site for a sequence-specific DNA binding protein are annealed and ligated to give oligomers. This DNA is then covalently coupled to Sepharose CL-2B with cyanogen bromide to yield the affinity resin. A partially purified protein fraction is combined with competitor DNA and subsequently passed t...

  6. Involvement of fibrinogen specific binding in erythrocyte aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Lominadze, David; DEAN, WILLIAM L.

    2002-01-01

    Increased fibrinogen concentration and erythrocyte aggregation are significant risk factors during various cardiovascular diseases and cerebrovascular disorders. Currently, fibrinogen-induced erythrocyte aggregation is thought to be caused by a non-specific binding mechanism. However, the published data on changes in erythrocyte aggregation during hypertension point to the possible existence of other mechanism(s). Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that specific binding of fibrinogen is invo...

  7. The platelet glycoprotein thrombospondin binds specifically to sulfated glycolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D D; Haverstick, D M; Dixit, V M; Frazier, W A; Santoro, S A; Ginsburg, V

    1985-08-05

    The human platelet glycoprotein thrombospondin (TSP) binds specifically and with high affinity to sulfatides (galactosylceramide-I3-sulfate). Binding of 125I-TSP to lipids from sheep and human erythrocytes and human platelets resolved on thin layer chromatograms indicates that sulfatides are the only lipids in the membrane which bind TSP. Binding to less than 2 ng of sulfatide could be detected. TSP failed to bind to other purified lipids including cholesterol 3-sulfate, phospholipids, neutral glycolipids, and gangliosides. Binding of 125I-TSP was inhibited by unlabeled TSP, by low pH, and by reduction of intersubunit disulfide bonds with dithiothreitol. A monoclonal antibody against TSP (A2.5), which inhibits hemagglutination and agglutination of fixed activated platelets by TSP, strongly inhibited TSP binding to sulfatides. A second monoclonal antibody (C6.7), which inhibits hemagglutination and aggregation of thrombin-activated live platelets, weakly inhibited sulfatide binding. Binding was inhibited by high ionic strength and by some monosaccharide sulfates including methyl-alpha-D-GlcNAc-3-sulfate. Neutral sugars did not inhibit. Fucoidan, a sulfated fucan, strongly inhibited binding with 50% inhibition at 0.3 micrograms/ml fucoidan. Other sulfated polysaccharides including heparin and dextran sulfates were good inhibitors, whereas hyaluronic acid and keratan sulfate were very weak.

  8. Specific insulin binding in bovine chromaffin cells; demonstration of preferential binding to adrenalin-storing cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serck-Hanssen, G.; Soevik, O.

    1987-12-28

    Insulin binding was studied in subpopulations of bovine chromaffin cells enriched in adrenalin-producing cells (A-cells) or noradrenalin-producing cells (NA-cells). Binding of /sup 125/I-insulin was carried out at 15/sup 0/C for 3 hrs in the absence or presence of excess unlabeled hormone. Four fractions of cells were obtained by centrifugation on a stepwise bovine serum albumin gradient. The four fractions were all shown to bind insulin in a specific manner and the highest binding was measured in the cell layers of higher densities, containing mainly A-cells. The difference in binding of insulin to the four subpopulations of chromaffin cells seemed to be related to differences in numbers of receptors as opposed to receptor affinities. The authors conclude that bovine chromaffin cells possess high affinity binding sites for insulin and that these binding sites are mainly confined to A-cells. 24 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  9. Selective enrichment of metal-binding proteins based on magnetic core/shell microspheres functionalized with metal cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Caiyun; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Lu, Haojie

    2015-06-21

    Metal binding proteins play many important roles in a broad range of biological processes. Characterization of metal binding proteins is important for understanding their structure and biological functions, thus leading to a clear understanding of metal associated diseases. The present study is the first to investigate the effectiveness of magnetic microspheres functionalized with metal cations (Ca(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+) and Fe(3+)) as the absorbent matrix in IMAC technology to enrich metal containing/binding proteins. The putative metal binding proteins in rat liver were then globally characterized by using this strategy which is very easy to handle and can capture a number of metal binding proteins effectively. In total, 185 putative metal binding proteins were identified from rat liver including some known less abundant and membrane-bound metal binding proteins such as Plcg1, Acsl5, etc. The identified proteins are involved in many important processes including binding, catalytic activity, translation elongation factor activity, electron carrier activity, and so on.

  10. Pulse radiolysis and spectrophotometric studies on the binding of organic cations with heparin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowska, Małgorzata; Adamus, Jan; Gębicki, Jerzy; Marcinek, Andrzej; Sikora, Adam

    2014-06-01

    Here we present the spectroscopic and pulse radiolysis studies of the interactions of heparin and some organic cations:methylene blue (MB), 1-methylnicotinamide (MNA+), and its dimer 1,3-bis(1-methylnicotinamide)propane (bis(MNA+)).

  11. Computational Analysis of the Binding Specificities of PH Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleckstrin homology (PH domains share low sequence identities but extremely conserved structures. They have been found in many proteins for cellular signal-dependent membrane targeting by binding inositol phosphates to perform different physiological functions. In order to understand the sequence-structure relationship and binding specificities of PH domains, quantum mechanical (QM calculations and sequence-based combined with structure-based binding analysis were employed in our research. In the structural aspect, the binding specificities were shown to correlate with the hydropathy characteristics of PH domains and electrostatic properties of the bound inositol phosphates. By comparing these structure properties with sequence-based profiles of physicochemical properties, PH domains can be classified into four functional subgroups according to their binding specificities and affinities to inositol phosphates. The method not only provides a simple and practical paradigm to predict binding specificities for functional genomic research but also gives new insight into the understanding of the basis of diseases with respect to PH domain structures.

  12. Solution structure and binding specificity of the p63 DNA binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enthart, Andreas; Klein, Christian; Dehner, Alexander; Coles, Murray; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst; Hagn, Franz

    2016-05-26

    p63 is a close homologue of p53 and, together with p73, is grouped into the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is known to be involved in the induction of controlled apoptosis important for differentiation processes, germ line integrity and development. Despite its high homology to p53, especially within the DNA binding domain (DBD), p63-DBD does not show cooperative DNA binding properties and is significantly more stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. Here, we determined the solution structure of p63-DBD and show that it is markedly less dynamic than p53-DBD. In addition, we also investigate the effect of a double salt bridge present in p53-DBD, but not in p63-DBD on the cooperative binding behavior and specificity to various DNA sites. Restoration of the salt bridges in p63-DBD by mutagenesis leads to enhanced binding affinity to p53-specific, but not p63-specific response elements. Furthermore, we show that p63-DBD is capable of binding to anti-apoptotic BclxL via its DNA binding interface, a feature that has only been shown for p53 so far. These data suggest that all p53 family members - despite alterations in the specificity and binding affinity - are capable of activating pro-apoptotic pathways in a tissue specific manner.

  13. Ceruloplasmin ferroxidase activity stimulates cellular iron uptake by a trivalent cation-specific transport mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attieh, Z. K.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Seshadri, V.; Tripoulas, N. A.; Fox, P. L.

    1999-01-01

    The balance required to maintain appropriate cellular and tissue iron levels has led to the evolution of multiple mechanisms to precisely regulate iron uptake from transferrin and low molecular weight iron chelates. A role for ceruloplasmin (Cp) in vertebrate iron metabolism is suggested by its potent ferroxidase activity catalyzing conversion of Fe2+ to Fe3+, by identification of yeast copper oxidases homologous to Cp that facilitate high affinity iron uptake, and by studies of "aceruloplasminemic" patients who have extensive iron deposits in multiple tissues. We have recently shown that Cp increases iron uptake by cultured HepG2 cells. In this report, we investigated the mechanism by which Cp stimulates cellular iron uptake. Cp stimulated the rate of non-transferrin 55Fe uptake by iron-deficient K562 cells by 2-3-fold, using a transferrin receptor-independent pathway. Induction of Cp-stimulated iron uptake by iron deficiency was blocked by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, consistent with a transcriptionally induced or regulated transporter. Cp-stimulated iron uptake was completely blocked by unlabeled Fe3+ and by other trivalent cations including Al3+, Ga3+, and Cr3+, but not by divalent cations. These results indicate that Cp utilizes a trivalent cation-specific transporter. Cp ferroxidase activity was required for iron uptake as shown by the ineffectiveness of two ferroxidase-deficient Cp preparations, copper-deficient Cp and thiomolybdate-treated Cp. We propose a model in which iron reduction and subsequent re-oxidation by Cp are essential for an iron uptake pathway with high ion specificity.

  14. Exploring Protein-Peptide Binding Specificity through Computational Peptide Screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab Bhattacherjee

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The binding of short disordered peptide stretches to globular protein domains is important for a wide range of cellular processes, including signal transduction, protein transport, and immune response. The often promiscuous nature of these interactions and the conformational flexibility of the peptide chain, sometimes even when bound, make the binding specificity of this type of protein interaction a challenge to understand. Here we develop and test a Monte Carlo-based procedure for calculating protein-peptide binding thermodynamics for many sequences in a single run. The method explores both peptide sequence and conformational space simultaneously by simulating a joint probability distribution which, in particular, makes searching through peptide sequence space computationally efficient. To test our method, we apply it to 3 different peptide-binding protein domains and test its ability to capture the experimentally determined specificity profiles. Insight into the molecular underpinnings of the observed specificities is obtained by analyzing the peptide conformational ensembles of a large number of binding-competent sequences. We also explore the possibility of using our method to discover new peptide-binding pockets on protein structures.

  15. Determination of the cationic amphiphilic drug-DNA binding mode and DNA-assisted fluorescence resonance energy transfer amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Zahid; Banday, Abdul Rouf; Hussain, Mohammed Aamir; Tabish, Mohammad; Kabir-ud-Din

    2014-03-25

    Understanding the mechanism of drug-DNA binding is crucial for predicting the potential genotoxicity of drugs. Agarose gel electrophoresis, absorption, steady state fluorescence, and circular dichroism have been used in exploring the interaction of cationic amphiphilic drugs (CADs) such as amitriptyline hydrochloride (AMT), imipramine hydrochloride (IMP), and promethazine hydrochloride (PMT) with calf thymus or pUC19 DNA. Agarose gel electrophoresis assay, along with absorption and steady state fluorescence studies, reveal interaction between the CADs and DNA. A comparative study of the drugs with respect to the effect of urea, iodide induced quenching, and ethidium bromide (EB) exclusion assay reflects binding of CADs to the DNA primarily in an intercalative fashion. Circular dichroism data also support the intercalative mode of binding. Besides quenching, there is fluorescence exchange energy transfer (FRET) in between CADs and EB using DNA as a template.

  16. Crystal structure of an integron gene cassette-associated protein from Vibrio cholerae identifies a cationic drug-binding module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrika N Deshpande

    Full Text Available The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes.We report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators.Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds.

  17. Crystal Structure of an Integron Gene Cassette-Associated Protein from Vibrio cholerae Identifies a Cationic Drug-Binding Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, Chandrika N.; Harrop, Stephen J.; Boucher, Yan; Hassan, Karl A.; Di Leo, Rosa; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Savchenko, Alexei; Chang, Changsoo; Labbate, Maurizio; Paulsen, Ian T.; Stokes, H.W.; Curmi, Paul M.G.; Mabbutt, Bridget C. (MIT); (UT-Australia); (Macquarie); (Toronto); (New South)

    2012-02-15

    The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes. We report the 1.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators. Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds.

  18. Ancestral Protein Reconstruction Yields Insights into Adaptive Evolution of Binding Specificity in Solute-Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Ben E; Jackson, Colin J

    2016-02-18

    The promiscuous functions of proteins are an important reservoir of functional novelty in protein evolution, but the molecular basis for binding promiscuity remains elusive. We used ancestral protein reconstruction to experimentally characterize evolutionary intermediates in the functional expansion of the polar amino acid-binding protein family, which has evolved to bind a variety of amino acids with high affinity and specificity. High-resolution crystal structures of an ancestral arginine-binding protein in complex with l-arginine and l-glutamine show that the promiscuous binding of l-glutamine is enabled by multi-scale conformational plasticity, water-mediated interactions, and selection of an alternative conformational substate productive for l-glutamine binding. Evolution of specialized glutamine-binding proteins from this ancestral protein was achieved by displacement of water molecules from the protein-ligand interface, reducing the entropic penalty associated with the promiscuous interaction. These results provide a structural and thermodynamic basis for the co-option of a promiscuous interaction in the evolution of binding specificity.

  19. Human DC-SIGN binds specific human milk glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Alexander J; Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Duska-McEwen, Geralyn; Buck, Rachael H; Smith, David F; Cummings, Richard D

    2016-05-15

    Human milk glycans (HMGs) are prebiotics, pathogen receptor decoys and regulators of host physiology and immune responses. Mechanistically, human lectins (glycan-binding proteins, hGBP) expressed by dendritic cells (DCs) are of major interest, as these cells directly contact HMGs. To explore such interactions, we screened many C-type lectins and sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) expressed by DCs for glycan binding on microarrays presenting over 200 HMGs. Unexpectedly, DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) showed robust binding to many HMGs, whereas other C-type lectins failed to bind, and Siglec-5 and Siglec-9 showed weak binding to a few glycans. By contrast, most hGBP bound to multiple glycans on other microarrays lacking HMGs. An α-linked fucose residue was characteristic of HMGs bound by DC-SIGN. Binding of DC-SIGN to the simple HMGs 2'-fucosyl-lactose (2'-FL) and 3-fucosyl-lactose (3-FL) was confirmed by flow cytometry to beads conjugated with 2'-FL or 3-FL, as well as the ability of the free glycans to inhibit DC-SIGN binding. 2'-FL had an IC50 of ∼1 mM for DC-SIGN, which is within the physiological concentration of 2'-FL in human milk. These results demonstrate that DC-SIGN among the many hGBP expressed by DCs binds to α-fucosylated HMGs, and suggest that such interactions may be important in influencing immune responses in the developing infant.

  20. Cationic solid-lipid nanoparticles can efficiently bind and transfect plasmid DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olbrich, C; Bakowsky, U; Muller, RH; Kneuer, C

    2001-01-01

    The suitability of cationically modified solid-lipid nanoparticles (SLN) as a novel transfection agent was investigated. SLN were produced by hot homogenisation using either Compritol ATO 888 or paraffin as matrix lipid, a mixture of Tween 80 and Span 85 as tenside and either EQ1 (NN-di-(beta-steaor

  1. Describing the Peptide Binding Specificity of HLA-C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael; Harndahl, Mikkel Nors; Nielsen, Morten;

    . We find preference for hydrophobic residues at the peptide C-terminus for all HLA-C molecules. Most molecules were found to have an additional strong anchor at P2 or P3, with auxiliary anchor observed at P1, P2, P3, and P7. The binding affinity is measured for peptides fitting the specificity matrix...

  2. Computational redesign of endonuclease DNA binding and cleavage specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Justin; Havranek, James J.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Sussman, Django; Monnat, Raymond J.; Stoddard, Barry L.; Baker, David

    2006-06-01

    The reprogramming of DNA-binding specificity is an important challenge for computational protein design that tests current understanding of protein-DNA recognition, and has considerable practical relevance for biotechnology and medicine. Here we describe the computational redesign of the cleavage specificity of the intron-encoded homing endonuclease I-MsoI using a physically realistic atomic-level forcefield. Using an in silico screen, we identified single base-pair substitutions predicted to disrupt binding by the wild-type enzyme, and then optimized the identities and conformations of clusters of amino acids around each of these unfavourable substitutions using Monte Carlo sampling. A redesigned enzyme that was predicted to display altered target site specificity, while maintaining wild-type binding affinity, was experimentally characterized. The redesigned enzyme binds and cleaves the redesigned recognition site ~10,000 times more effectively than does the wild-type enzyme, with a level of target discrimination comparable to the original endonuclease. Determination of the structure of the redesigned nuclease-recognition site complex by X-ray crystallography confirms the accuracy of the computationally predicted interface. These results suggest that computational protein design methods can have an important role in the creation of novel highly specific endonucleases for gene therapy and other applications.

  3. Specific binding of benzodiazepines to human breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinlich, A; Strohmeier, R; Kaufmann, M; Kuhl, H

    1999-01-01

    Binding of [3H]Ro5-4864, a peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) agonist, to BT-20 human, estrogen- (ER) and progesterone- (PR) receptor negative breast cancer cells was characterized. It was found to be specific, dose-dependent and saturable with a single population of binding sites. Dissociation constant (K(D)) was 8.5 nM, maximal binding capacity (Bmax) 339 fM/10(6) cells. Ro5-4864 (IC50 17.3 nM) and PK 11195 (IC50 12.3 nM) were able to compete with [3H]Ro5-4864 for binding, indicating specificity of interaction with PBR. Diazepam was able to displace [3H]Ro5-4864 from binding only at high concentrations (>1 microM), while ODN did not compete for PBR binding. Thymidine-uptake assay showed a biphasic response of cell proliferation. While low concentrations (100 nM) of Ro5-4864, PK 11195 and diazepam increased cell growth by 10 to 20%, higher concentrations (10-100 microM) significantly inhibited cell proliferation. PK 11195, a potent PBR ligand, was able to attenuate growth of BT-20 cells stimulated by 100 nM Ro5-4864 and to reverse growth reduction caused by 1 and 10 microM Ro5-4864, but not by 50 microM and 100 microM. This indicates that the antimitotic activity of higher concentrations of Ro5-4864 is independent of PBR binding. It is suggested, that PBR are involved in growth regulation of certain human breast cancer cell lines, possibly by supplying proliferating cells with energy, as their endogenous ligand is a polypeptide transporting Acyl-CoA.

  4. Specific Features of Motion of Cations and Anions in Electrolyte Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Bulavin, L A; Malomuzh, M P; Pankratov, K M

    2012-01-01

    The nature of mobility of ions and water molecules in dilute aqueous solutions of electrolytes (at most fifteen water molecules per ion) is investigated. It is shown that the behavior of the mobility coefficients of water molecules and ions, as well as the self-diffusion coefficients of water molecules, are determined by the radii of their hard shells rather than by the effect of the hydrogen bond network. It is established that the influence of hydration effects on the density of the system and the self-diffusion coefficients of water molecules does not exceed several per cent. Based on microscopic concepts, it is shown that the different behaviors of a $\\rm K^{+}$ cation and an $\\rm F^{-}$ anion with equal rigid radii are in good agreement with specific features of the intermolecular interaction described by the generalized Stillinger--David potential.

  5. Experimental strategies for studying transcription factor-DNA binding specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geertz, Marcel; Maerkl, Sebastian J

    2010-12-01

    Specific binding of transcription factors (TFs) determines in a large part the connectivity of gene regulatory networks as well as the quantitative level of gene expression. A multiplicity of both experimental and computational methods is currently used to discover and characterize the underlying TF-DNA interactions. Experimental methods can be further subdivided into in vitro- and in vivo-based approaches, each accenting different aspects of TF-binding events. In this review we summarize the flexibility and performance of a selection of both types of experimental methods. In conclusion, we argue that a serial combination of methods with different throughput and data type constitutes an optimal experimental strategy.

  6. The Multiple Carbohydrate Binding Specificities of Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teneberg, Susann

    Persistent colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Adhesion of microbes to the target tissue is an important determinant for successful initiation, establishment and maintenance of infection, and a variety of different candidate carbohydrate receptors for H. pylori have been identified. Here the different the binding specifities, and their potential role in adhesion to human gastric epithelium are described. Finally, recent findings on the roles of sialic acid binding SabA adhesin in interactions with human neutrophils and erythrocytes are discussed.

  7. A specific binding site recognizing a fragment of angiotensin II in bovine adrenal cortex membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, S G; Fournier, A; Guillemette, G

    1994-12-12

    We have characterized a specific binding site for angiotensin IV in bovine adrenal cortex membranes. Pseudo-equilibrium studies at 37 degrees C for 2 h have shown that this binding site recognizes angiotensin IV with a high affinity (Kd = 0.24 +/- 0.03 nM). The binding site is saturable and relatively abundant (maximal binding capacity around 0.5 pmol/mg protein). Non-equilibrium kinetic analyses at 37 degrees C revealed a calculated kinetic Kd of 47 pM. The binding site is pharmacologically distinct from the classic angiotensin receptors AT1 or AT2. Competitive binding studies with bovine adrenal cortex membranes demonstrated the following rank order of effectiveness: angiotensin IV (Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe) = angiotensin II-(3-7) (Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro) > angiotensin III (Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe) > or = angiotensin II-(4-7) (Tyr-Ile-His-Pro) > angiotensin II (Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe) > angiotensin II-(1-6) (Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His) > angiotensin II-(4-8) (Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe) > > > angiotensin II-(3-6) (Val-Tyr-Ile-His), angiotensin II-(4-6) (Tyr-Ile-His), L-158,809 (5,7-dimethyl-2-ethyl-3-[(2'(1-H-tetrazol-5-yl)[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-y l) methyl]-3-H-imidazo[4,5-beta]pyridine H2O) and PD 123319 (1-[4-(dimethylamino)3-methylphenyl]methyl-5-(diphenylacetyl)4,5,6 ,7- tetrahydro-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridine-6-carboxylic acid). The divalent cations Mg2+ and Ca2+ were shown to diminish the binding of 125I-angiotensioffn IV to bovine adrenal cortex membranes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Prediction of DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sumedha Roy; Shayoni Dutta; Kanika Khanna; Shruti Singla; Durai Sundar

    2012-07-01

    Zinc finger proteins interact via their individual fingers to three base pair subsites on the target DNA. The four key residue positions −1, 2, 3 and 6 on the alpha-helix of the zinc fingers have hydrogen bond interactions with the DNA. Mutating these key residues enables generation of a plethora of combinatorial possibilities that can bind to any DNA stretch of interest. Exploiting the binding specificity and affinity of the interaction between the zinc fingers and the respective DNA can help to generate engineered zinc fingers for therapeutic purposes involving genome targeting. Exploring the structure–function relationships of the existing zinc finger–DNA complexes can aid in predicting the probable zinc fingers that could bind to any target DNA. Computational tools ease the prediction of such engineered zinc fingers by effectively utilizing information from the available experimental data. A study of literature reveals many approaches for predicting DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins. However, an alternative approach that looks into the physico-chemical properties of these complexes would do away with the difficulties of designing unbiased zinc fingers with the desired affinity and specificity. We present a physico-chemical approach that exploits the relative strengths of hydrogen bonding between the target DNA and all combinatorially possible zinc fingers to select the most optimum zinc finger protein candidate.

  9. Quantification of specific bindings of biomolecules by magnetorelaxometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinhoff Uwe

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The binding reaction of the biomolecules streptavidin and anti-biotin antibody, both labelled by magnetic nanoparticles (MNP, to biotin coated on agarose beads, was quantified by magnetorelaxometry (MRX. Highly sensitive SQUID-based MRX revealed the immobilization of the MNP caused by the biotin-streptavidin coupling. We found that about 85% of streptavidin-functionalised MNP bound specifically to biotin-agarose beads. On the other hand only 20% of antibiotin-antibody functionalised MNP were specifically bound. Variation of the suspension medium revealed in comparison to phosphate buffer with 0.1% bovine serum albumin a slight change of the binding behaviour in human serum, probably due to the presence of functioning (non heated serum proteins. Furthermore, in human serum an additional non-specific binding occurs, being independent from the serum protein functionality. The presented homogeneous bead based assay is applicable in simple, uncoated vials and it enables the assessment of the binding kinetics in a volume without liquid flow. The estimated association rate constant for the MNP-labelled streptavidin is by about two orders of magnitude smaller than the value reported for free streptavidin. This is probably due to the relatively large size of the magnetic markers which reduces the diffusion of streptavidin. Furthermore, long time non-exponential kinetics were observed and interpreted as agglutination of the agarose beads.

  10. Cations modulate the substrate specificity of bifunctional class I O-methyltransferase from Ammi majus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacin, Richard; Matern, Ulrich; Specker, Silvia; Vogt, Thomas

    2004-11-19

    Caffeoyl-coenzyme A O-methyltransferase cDNA was cloned from dark-grown Ammi majus L. (Apiaceae) cells treated with a crude fungal elicitor and the open reading frame was expressed in Escherichia coli. The translated polypeptide of 27.1-kDa shared significant identity to other members of this highly conserved class of proteins and was 98.8% identical to the corresponding O-methyltransferase from parsley. For biochemical characterization, the recombinant enzyme could be purified to apparent homogeneity by metal-affinity chromatography, although the recombinant enzyme did not contain any affinity tag. Based on sequence analysis and substrate specificity, the enzyme classifies as a cation-dependent O-methyltransferase with pronounced preference for caffeoyl coenzyme A, when assayed in the presence of Mg2+-ions. Surprisingly, however, the substrate specificity changed dramatically, when Mg2+ was replaced by Mn2+ or Co2+ in the assays. This effect could point to yet unknown functions and substrate specificities in situ and suggests promiscuous roles for the lignin specific cluster of plant O-methyltransferases.

  11. Measurement of specific [3H]-ouabain binding to different types of human leucocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boon, Arnold; Oh, V M; Taylor, John E.

    1984-01-01

    -dependent, competitively antagonized by potassium, and facilitated by the presence of divalent cations. The equilibrium dissociation constants were 2.4 +/- 0.7 nmol/l (polymorphs) and 2.4 +/- 0.4 nmol/l (mononuclear cells) (NS). The values of maximal specific ouabain binding, measured by Scatchard analysis...... of concentration vs binding curves (Bmax), were 33.9 +/- 6.0 fmol/10(6) cells (polymorphs) and 59.3 +/- 11.6 fmol/10(6) cells (mononuclear cells) (P less than 0.02). The corresponding numbers of sites per cell were 20415 +/- 3616 and 35712 +/- 6986 respectively (P less than 0.02). When the numbers of binding sites...... were expressed per square micron of cell surface area the difference between the two cell types was proportionately greater (83 and 186 sites per micron 2 respectively). We conclude that the [3H]-ouabain binding sites on mononuclear and polymorphonuclear leucocytes are similar in nature, but different...

  12. Cation-Specific Conformations in a Dual-Function Ion-Pumping Microbial Rhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Giordano F Z; Goblirsch, Brandon R; Tsai, Ah-Lim; Spudich, John L

    2015-06-30

    A recently discovered rhodopsin ion pump (DeNaR, also known as KR2) in the marine bacterium Dokdonia eikasta uses light to pump protons or sodium ions from the cell depending on the ionic composition of the medium. In cells suspended in a KCl solution, DeNaR functions as a light-driven proton pump, whereas in a NaCl solution, DeNaR conducts light-driven sodium ion pumping, a novel activity within the rhodopsin family. These two distinct functions raise the questions of whether the conformations of the protein differ in the presence of K(+) or Na(+) and whether the helical movements that result in the canonical E → C conformational change in other microbial rhodopsins are conserved in DeNaR. Visible absorption maxima of DeNaR in its unphotolyzed (dark) state show an 8 nm difference between Na(+) and K(+) in decyl maltopyranoside micelles, indicating an influence of the cations on the retinylidene photoactive site. In addition, electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of the dark states reveal repositioning of helices F and G when K(+) is replaced with Na(+). Furthermore, the conformational changes assessed by EPR spin-spin dipolar coupling show that the light-induced transmembrane helix movements are very similar to those found in bacteriorhodopsin but are altered by the presence of Na(+), resulting in a new feature, the clockwise rotation of helix F. The results establish the first observation of a cation switch controlling the conformations of a microbial rhodopsin and indicate specific interactions of Na(+) with the half-channels of DeNaR to open an appropriate path for ion translocation.

  13. Changes in BQCA Allosteric Modulation of [(3)H]NMS Binding to Human Cortex within Schizophrenia and by Divalent Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Brian; Hopper, Shaun; Conn, P Jeffrey; Scarr, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    Stimulation of the cortical muscarinic M1 receptor (CHRM1) is proposed as a treatment for schizophrenia, a hypothesis testable using CHRM1 allosteric modulators. Allosteric modulators have been shown to change the activity of CHRMs using cloned human CHRMs and CHRM knockout mice but not human CNS, a prerequisite for them working in humans. Here we show in vitro that BQCA, a positive allosteric CHRM1 modulator, brings about the expected change in affinity of the CHRM1 orthosteric site for acetylcholine in human cortex. Moreover, this effect of BQCA is reduced in the cortex of a subset of subjects with schizophrenia, separated into a discrete population because of a profound loss of cortical [(3)H]pirenzepine binding. Surprisingly, there was no change in [(3)H]NMS binding to the cortex from this subset or those with schizophrenia but without a marked loss of cortical CHRM1. Hence, we explored the nature of [(3)H]pirenzepine and [(3)H]NMS binding to human cortex and showed total [(3)H]pirenzepine and [(3)H]NMS binding was reduced by Zn(2+), acetylcholine displacement of [(3)H]NMS binding was enhanced by Mg(2+) and Zn(2+), acetylcholine displacement of [(3)H]pirenzepine was reduced by Mg(2+) and enhanced by Zn(2+), whereas BQCA effects on [(3)H]NMS, but not [(3)H]pirenzepine, binding was enhanced by Mg(2+) and Zn(2+). These data suggest the orthosteric and allosteric sites on CHRMs respond differently to divalent cations and the effects of allosteric modulation of the cortical CHRM1 is reduced in a subset of people with schizophrenia, a finding that may have ramifications for the use of CHRM1 allosteric modulators in the treatment of schizophrenia.

  14. Sequence-specific binding of a hormonally regulated mRNA binding protein to cytidine-rich sequences in the lutropin receptor open reading frame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kash, J C; Menon, K M

    1999-12-21

    In previous studies, a lutropin receptor mRNA binding protein implicated in the hormonal regulation of lutropin receptor mRNA stability was identified. This protein, termed LRBP-1, was shown by RNA gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay to specifically interact with lutropin receptor RNA sequences. The present studies have examined the specificity of lutropin receptor mRNA recognition by LRBP-1 and mapped the contact site by RNA footprinting and by site-directed mutagenesis. LRBP-1 was partially purified by cation-exchange chromatography, and the mRNA binding properties of the partially purified LRBP-1 were examined by RNA gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay and hydroxyl-radical RNA footprinting. These data showed that the LRBP-1 binding site is located between nucleotides 203 and 220 of the receptor open reading frame, and consists of the bipartite polypyrimidine sequence 5'-UCUC-X(7)-UCUCCCU-3'. Competition RNA gel electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that homoribopolymers of poly(rC) were effective RNA binding competitors, while poly(rA), poly(rG), and poly(rU) showed no effect. Mutagenesis of the cytidine residues contained within the LRBP-1 binding site demonstrated that all the cytidines in the bipartite sequence contribute to LRBP-1 binding specificity. Additionally, RNA gel electrophoretic mobility supershift analysis showed that LRBP-1 was not recognized by antibodies against two well-characterized poly(rC) RNA binding proteins, alphaCP-1 and alphaCP-2, implicated in the regulation of RNA stability of alpha-globin and tyrosine hydroxylase mRNAs. In summary, we show that partially purified LRBP-1 binds to a polypyrimidine sequence within nucleotides 203 and 220 of lutropin receptor mRNA with a high degree of specificity which is indicative of its role in posttranscriptional control of lutropin receptor expression.

  15. Specific endothelial binding and tumor uptake of radiolabeled angiostatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung-Han; Song, Sung Hee; Paik, Jin-Young; Byun, Sang Sung; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Choe, Yearn Seong; Kim, Byung-Tae [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwondong, Kangnamgu, Seoul (Korea)

    2003-07-01

    Angiostatin (AS) is a potent antiangiogenic agent which inhibits tumor growth through specific action on proliferating endothelial cells. Imaging of radiolabeled AS would enhance our knowledge on the pharmacokinetics of AS and might provide useful information relating to tumor neovasculature. We therefore investigated the potential of radiolabeled AS as a novel tumor imaging agent. Human angiostatin was radioiodine labeled using the lactoperoxidase method. Competition binding studies showed a dose-dependent inhibition of {sup 125}I-AS binding to endothelial cells by excess unlabeled AS, and a displacement curve demonstrated that specific binding was dose dependent and saturable, with a K{sub d} value of 169 nM. Gel analysis showed that {sup 125}I-AS remained stable in serum for up to 24 h without significant degradation. Intravenously injected {sup 125}I-AS in rats was cleared from the blood in an exponential fashion. Biodistribution data from human colon cancer-bearing Balb/C nude mice showed high uptake in the kidneys, stomach, liver, and lungs. Tumor uptake was 3.2{+-}0.7, 2.6{+-}0.2, and 1.7{+-}0.2%ID/g at 2, 4, and 9 h after injection, respectively. Tumor to muscle count ratio increased from 3.1{+-}0.5 at 2 h to 4.4{+-}0.5 at 9 h. Serial scintigraphy from 1 to 5 h after {sup 123}I-AS injection demonstrated high uptake in the kidneys and bladder, consistent with renal excretion. There was clear demarcation of tumor by 1 h, with gradual increase in contrast over time (4-h tumor to contralateral thigh ratio =4.7{+-}1.1). Thus, radioiodine-labeled angiostatin binds specifically to endothelial cells and has potential as a novel tumor imaging agent. (orig.)

  16. Effect of curcumin on the binding of cationic, anionic and nonionic surfactants with myoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Satyajit; Ghosh, Soumen

    2017-04-01

    Interaction of a globular protein, myoglobin and different surfactants has been studied in the absence and presence of curcumin in phosphate buffer at pH = 7.4 by UV-VIS spectrophotometry, fluorimetry and fluorescence polarization anisotropy methods. Results show that heme environment of myoglobin is changed by cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium N-dodecanoyl sarcosinate (SDDS). In the presence of curcumin, CTAB cannot change the heme; but SDDS can make change. Nonionic surfactant N-decanoyl-N-methylglucamine (Mega 10) cannot change the heme environment. Protein is unfolded by the surfactant. Curcumin can prevent the unfolding of protein in the low concentration region of ionic surfactants such as CTAB and SDDS. In nonionic surfactant media, curcumin accelerates the denaturation process. Due to myoglobin-curcumin complex formation, rotational motion of curcumin decreases in surfactant media and so anisotropy increases.

  17. Specificity in transition state binding: the Pauling model revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyes, Tina L; Richard, John P

    2013-03-26

    Linus Pauling proposed that the large rate accelerations for enzymes are caused by the high specificity of the protein catalyst for binding the reaction transition state. The observation that stable analogues of the transition states for enzymatic reactions often act as tight-binding inhibitors provided early support for this simple and elegant proposal. We review experimental results that support the proposal that Pauling's model provides a satisfactory explanation for the rate accelerations for many heterolytic enzymatic reactions through high-energy reaction intermediates, such as proton transfer and decarboxylation. Specificity in transition state binding is obtained when the total intrinsic binding energy of the substrate is significantly larger than the binding energy observed at the Michaelis complex. The results of recent studies that aimed to characterize the specificity in binding of the enolate oxygen at the transition state for the 1,3-isomerization reaction catalyzed by ketosteroid isomerase are reviewed. Interactions between pig heart succinyl-coenzyme A:3-oxoacid coenzyme A transferase (SCOT) and the nonreacting portions of coenzyme A (CoA) are responsible for a rate increase of 3 × 10(12)-fold, which is close to the estimated total 5 × 10(13)-fold enzymatic rate acceleration. Studies that partition the interactions between SCOT and CoA into their contributing parts are reviewed. Interactions of the protein with the substrate phosphodianion group provide an ~12 kcal/mol stabilization of the transition state for the reactions catalyzed by triosephosphate isomerase, orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase, and α-glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase. The interactions of these enzymes with the substrate piece phosphite dianion provide a 6-8 kcal/mol stabilization of the transition state for reaction of the appropriate truncated substrate. Enzyme activation by phosphite dianion reflects the higher dianion affinity for binding to the enzyme

  18. A new bile acid-derived lariat-ether: Design, synthesis and cation binding properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Babu; Uday Maitra

    2003-10-01

    A new chola lariat ether (1, a 21-crown-6) was constructed from readily available precursors. The association constant of compound 1 with alkali metal picrates was measured using Cram’s extraction protocol. Evidence is presented for the involvement of the 3-methoxy group for the complexation. Energy minimised structures show that the A-ring gets slightly distorted upon metal ion binding.

  19. SPECIFIC INTERACTION ACTING AT A CELLULOSE-BINDING DOMAIN/CELLULOSE INTERFACE FOR PAPERMAKING APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Yokota

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Specific and strong cellulose-binding characteristics were utilized for promoting retention of additives in contaminated papermaking systems. Cellulose-binding domain (CBD of cellulase derived from Trichoderma viride was separated by digestion with papain, and then introduced into anionic polyacrylamide (A-PAM through a condensation reaction using water-soluble carbodiimide. The CBD-modified A-PAM (CBD-A-PAM showed good retention on pulp fibers, resulting in high tensile strength paper sheets. The effect remained almost unchanged in the presence of model interfering substances such as ligninsulfonate and Ca2+ ions, whereas commercial cationic paper-strengthening polymer became ineffective. The cellulose-binding force of CBD was quantitatively determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM in the liquid state. Histidine-tagged CBD protein was obtained using Escherichia coli via an expression of CBD derived from Cellulomonas fimi, and immobilized on a gold-coated AFM probe. A strong attractive force was detected only at a CBD/cellulose interface, even when Ca2+ ions were present in high concentration. Direct estimation of CBD affinity for cellulose substrate by AFM would provide significant information on the interfacial interactions useful for the functional design of papermaking additives.

  20. Sequence specific visual detection of LAMP reactions by addition of cationic polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirano Tsuyoshi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of a practical gene point-of-care testing device (g-POCT device requires innovative detection methods for demonstrating the results of the gene amplification reaction without the use of expensive equipment. We have studied a new method for the sequence-specific visual detection of minute amounts of nucleic acids using precipitation reaction by addition of cationic polymers to amplicons of Loop mediated isothermal Amplification (LAMP. Results Oligo DNA probes labeled with different fluorescent dyes were prepared for multiple nucleic acid templates, and the templates were amplified by the LAMP reactions under the existence of the probes. At completion of the LAMP reaction, an optimal amount of low molecular weight polyethylenimine (PEI was added, resulting in the precipitation of the insoluble LAMP amplicon-PEI complex. The fluorescently labeled Oligo DNA probes hybridized to the LAMP product were incorporated into the precipitation, and the precipitate emitted fluorescence corresponding to the amplified nucleic acid templates. The color of emitted fluorescence can be detected easily by naked eye on a conventional UV illuminator. Conclusion The presence or absence of minute amount of nucleic acid templates could be detected in a simple manner through visual assessment for the color of the LAMP amplicon-PEI complex precipitate. We conclude that this detection method may facilitate development of small and simple g-POCT device.

  1. Aspartic Acid 397 in Subunit B of the Na+-pumping NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase from Vibrio cholerae Forms Part of a Sodium-binding Site, Is Involved in Cation Selectivity, and Affects Cation-binding Site Cooperativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Michael E.; Juárez, Oscar; Cho, Jonathan; Barquera, Blanca

    2013-01-01

    The Na+-pumping NADH:quinone complex is found in Vibrio cholerae and other marine and pathogenic bacteria. NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase oxidizes NADH and reduces ubiquinone, using the free energy released by this reaction to pump sodium ions across the cell membrane. In a previous report, a conserved aspartic acid residue in the NqrB subunit at position 397, located in the cytosolic face of this protein, was proposed to be involved in the capture of sodium. Here, we studied the role of this residue through the characterization of mutant enzymes in which this aspartic acid was substituted by other residues that change charge and size, such as arginine, serine, lysine, glutamic acid, and cysteine. Our results indicate that NqrB-Asp-397 forms part of one of the at least two sodium-binding sites and that both size and charge at this position are critical for the function of the enzyme. Moreover, we demonstrate that this residue is involved in cation selectivity, has a critical role in the communication between sodium-binding sites, by promoting cooperativity, and controls the electron transfer step involved in sodium uptake (2Fe-2S → FMNC). PMID:24030824

  2. Radiation stability of cations in ionic liquids. 5. Task-specific ionic liquids consisting of biocompatible cations and the puzzle of radiation hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Marin, Timothy W; Wishart, James F; Grills, David C

    2014-09-01

    In 1953, an accidental discovery by Melvin Calvin and co-workers provided the first example of a solid (the α-polymorph of choline chloride) showing hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation: under certain conditions, the radiolytic yield of decomposition approached 5 × 10(4) per 100 eV (which is 4 orders of magnitude greater than usual values), suggesting an uncommonly efficient radiation-induced chain reaction. Twenty years later, the still-accepted mechanism for this rare condition was suggested by Martyn Symons, but no validation for this mechanism has been supplied. Meanwhile, ionic liquids and deep eutectic mixtures that are based on choline, betainium, and other derivitized natural amino compounds are presently finding an increasing number of applications as diluents in nuclear separations, where the constituent ions are exposed to ionizing radiation that is emitted by decaying radionuclides. Thus, the systems that are compositionally similar to radiation hypersensitive solids are being considered for use in high radiation fields, where this property is particularly undesirable! In Part 5 of this series on organic cations, we revisit the phenomenon of radiation hypersensitivity and explore mechanistic aspects of radiation-induced reactions involving this class of task-specific, biocompatible, functionalized cations, both in ionic liquids and in reference crystalline compounds. We demonstrate that Symons' mechanism needs certain revisions and rethinking, and suggest its modification. Our reconsideration suggests that there cannot be conditions leading to hypersensitivity in ionic liquids.

  3. The influence of ion binding and ion specific potentials on the double layer pressure between charged bilayers at low salt concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostrom, M.; Lima, E. R. A.; Tavares, F. W.; Ninham, B. W.

    2008-04-01

    Measurements of surface forces between double-chained cationic bilayers adsorbed onto molecularly smooth mica surfaces across different millimolar salt solutions have revealed a large degree of ion specificity [Pashley et al., J. Phys. Chem. 90, 1637 (1986)]. This has been interpreted in terms of highly specific anion binding to the adsorbed bilayers. We show here that inclusion in the double layer theory of nonspecific ion binding and ion specific nonelectrostatic potentials acting between ions and the two surfaces can account for the phenomenon. It also gives the right Hofmeister series for the double layer pressure.

  4. Cation-induced monolayer collapse at lower surface pressure follows specific headgroup percolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kaushik; Sah, Bijay Kumar; Kundu, Sarathi

    2017-02-01

    A Langmuir monolayer can be considered as a two-dimensional (2D) sheet at higher surface pressure which structurally deform with mechanical compression depending upon the elastic nature of the monolayer. The deformed structures formed after a certain elastic limit are called collapsed structures. To explore monolayer collapses at lower surface pressure and to see the effect of ions on such monolayer collapses, out-of-plane structures and in-plane morphologies of stearic acid Langmuir monolayers have been studied both at lower (≈6.8) and higher (≈9.5) subphase p H in the presence of M g2 +,C a2 +,Z n2 +,C d2 + , and B a2 + ions. At lower subphase p H and in the presence of all cations, the stearic acid monolayer remains as a monolayer before collapse, which generally takes place at higher surface pressure (πc>50 mN /m ). However, at higher subphase p H , structural changes of stearic acid monolayers occur at relatively lower surface pressure depending upon the specific dissolved ions. Among the same group elements of M g2 +,C a2 + , and B a2 + , only for B a2 + ions does monolayer to multilayer transition take place from a much lower surface pressure of the monolayer, remaining, however, as a monolayer for M g2 + and C a2 + ions. For another same group elements of Z n2 + and C d2 + ions, a less covered bilayer structure forms on top of the monolayer structure at lower surface pressure, which is evidenced from both x-ray reflectometry and atomic force microscopy. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms the presence of two coexisting conformations formed by the two different metal-headgroup coordinations and the monolayer to trilayer or multilayer transformation takes place when the coverage ratio of the two molecular conformations changes from the critical value (pc) of ≈0.66 . Such ion-specific monolayer collapses are correlated with the 2D lattice percolation model.

  5. Interfacial binding of divalent cations to calixarene-based Langmuir monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulli, Ludovico G; Wang, Wenjie; Lindemann, William R; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Meier, Wolfgang; Vaknin, David; Shahgaldian, Patrick

    2015-03-03

    The interactions of Langmuir monolayers produced through the self-assembly of an amphiphilic p-carboxycalix[4]arene (1) with a series of divalent, fourth-period transition metals, at the air-water interface, were investigated. Changes in the interfacial behavior of 1 in response to the presence of CuCl2, CoCl2, MnCl2, and NiCl2 were studied by means of Langmuir compression isotherms and Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). The measurements revealed that the self-assembly properties of 1 are significantly affected by Cu(2+) ions. The interactions of 1-based monolayers with Co(2+) and Cu(2+) ions were further investigated by means of synchrotron radiation-based X-ray reflectivity (XRR), X-ray near-total-reflection fluorescence (XNTRF), and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD). XNTRF and XRR analyses revealed that the monolayer of 1 binds more strongly to Cu(2+) than Co(2+) ions. In the presence of relatively high concentrations of Cu(2+) ions in the subphase (1.4 × 10(-3) M), XNTRF exhibited anomalous depth profile behavior and GIXD measurements showed considerably strong diffuse scattering. Both measurements suggest the formation of Cu(2+) clusters contiguous to the monolayer of 1.

  6. Cationic liposomal drug delivery system for specific targeting of human cd14+ monocytes in whole blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    This invention concerns a liposome comprising lipids and at least one active ingredient, wherein at least one of the lipids is a cationic lipid; said liposome exhibiting a net positive charge at physiological conditions at which said liposome preferentially adheres to monocytes in freshly drawn b......, an infectious disease, an inflammatory disease, an autoimmune disease or allergy....

  7. Quantitative analysis of pheromone-binding protein specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Katti, S.; Lokhande, N.; D González; Cassill, A.; Renthal, R

    2012-01-01

    Many pheromones have very low water solubility, posing experimental difficulties for quantitative binding measurements. A new method is presented for determining thermodynamically valid dissociation constants for ligands binding to pheromone-binding proteins (OBPs), using β-cyclodextrin as a solubilizer and transfer agent. The method is applied to LUSH, a Drosophila OBP that binds the pheromone 11-cis vaccenyl acetate (cVA). Refolding of LUSH expressed in E. coli was assessed by measuring N-p...

  8. Crystal structure of the high-affinity Na+,K+-ATPase–ouabain complex with Mg2+ bound in the cation binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Mette; Yatime, Laure; Nissen, Poul

    2013-01-01

    . (2009) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 106(33):13742–13747) shows that the CTS binding pocket of [Mg]E2P allows deep ouabain binding with possible long-range interactions between its polarized five-membered lactone ring and the Mg2+. K+ binding at the same site unwinds a turn of αM4, dragging residues Ile318–Val......325 toward the cation site and thereby hindering deep ouabain binding. Thus, the structural data establish a basis for the interpretation of the biochemical evidence pointing at direct K+–Mg2+ competition and explain the well-known antagonistic effect of K+ on CTS binding....

  9. High DNA-Binding Affinity and Gene-Transfection Efficacy of Bioreducible Cationic Nanomicelles with a Fluorinated Core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Long-Hai; Wu, De-Cheng; Xu, Hang-Xun; You, Ye-Zi

    2016-01-11

    During the last two decades, cationic polymers have become one of the most promising synthetic vectors for gene transfection. However, the weak interactions formed between DNA and cationic polymers result in low transfection efficacy. Furthermore, the polyplexes formed between cationic polymers and DNA generally exhibit poor stability and toxicity because of the large excess of cationic polymer typically required for complete DNA condensation. Herein, we report the preparation of a novel class of bioreducible cationic nanomicelles by the use of disulfide bonds to connect the cationic shell to the fluorocarbon core. These bioreducible nanomicelles form strong interactions with DNA and completely condense DNA at an N/P ratio of 1. The resulting nanomicelle/DNA polyplexes exhibited high biocompatibility and performed very effectively as a gene-delivery system.

  10. Thermodynamics of sequence-specific binding of PNA to DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratilainen, T; Holmén, A; Tuite, E

    2000-01-01

    For further characterization of the hybridization properties of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), the thermodynamics of hybridization of mixed sequence PNA-DNA duplexes have been studied. We have characterized the binding of PNA to DNA in terms of binding affinity (perfectly matched duplexes) and seq......For further characterization of the hybridization properties of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), the thermodynamics of hybridization of mixed sequence PNA-DNA duplexes have been studied. We have characterized the binding of PNA to DNA in terms of binding affinity (perfectly matched duplexes...

  11. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding.

  12. Homogeneous fluorescent specific PCR for the authentication of medicinal snakes using cationic conjugated polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Libing; Hou, Jingyi; Jin, Yan; Huang, Luqi

    2015-11-05

    A label-free, homogenous and sensitive one-step method for the molecular authentication of medicinal snakes has been developed by combining a rapid PCR technique with water-soluble cationic conjugated polyelectrolytes (CCPs). Three medicinal snake materials (Deinagkistrodon acutus, Zaocys dhumnades and Bungarus multicinctus; a total of 35 specimens) and 48 snake specimens with similar morphologies and textures were clearly distinguished by the naked eye by utilizing a CCP-based assay in a high-throughput manner. The identification of medicinal snakes in patented Chinese drugs was successfully performed using this detection system. In contrast to previous fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide detection and direct DNA stain hybridization assays, this method does not require designing dye-labeled primers, and unfavorable dimer fluorescence is avoided in this homogenous method.

  13. Homogeneous fluorescent specific PCR for the authentication of medicinal snakes using cationic conjugated polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Libing; Hou, Jingyi; Jin, Yan; Huang, Luqi

    2015-01-01

    A label-free, homogenous and sensitive one-step method for the molecular authentication of medicinal snakes has been developed by combining a rapid PCR technique with water-soluble cationic conjugated polyelectrolytes (CCPs). Three medicinal snake materials (Deinagkistrodon acutus, Zaocys dhumnades and Bungarus multicinctus; a total of 35 specimens) and 48 snake specimens with similar morphologies and textures were clearly distinguished by the naked eye by utilizing a CCP-based assay in a high-throughput manner. The identification of medicinal snakes in patented Chinese drugs was successfully performed using this detection system. In contrast to previous fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide detection and direct DNA stain hybridization assays, this method does not require designing dye-labeled primers, and unfavorable dimer fluorescence is avoided in this homogenous method. PMID:26537289

  14. Self-Assembly of Hexanuclear Clusters of 4f and 5f Elements with Cation Specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diwu, J.; Good, Justin J.; DiStefano, Victoria H.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2011-02-10

    Six hexanuclear clusters of 4f and 5f elements were synthesized by room-temperature slow concentration experiments. Cerium(IV), thorium(IV), and plutonium(IV) each form two different hexanuclear clusters, among which the cerium and plutonium clusters are isotypic, whereas the thorium clusters show more diversity. The change in ionic radii of approximately 0.08 Å between these different metal ions tunes the cavity size so that NH{sub 4}{sup +} (1.48 Å) has the right dimensions to assemble the cerium and plutonium clusters, whereas Cs{sup +} (1.69 Å) is necessary to assemble the thorium clusters. If these cations are not used in the reactions, only amorphous material is obtained.

  15. Non-specific binding in solid phase immunoassays for autoantibodies correlates with inflammation markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güven, Esin; Duus, Karen; Lydolph, Magnus Christian; Jørgensen, Charlotte Sværke; Laursen, Inga; Houen, Gunnar

    2014-01-31

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is a validated and sensitive method for detection of human autoantibodies, but may have problems with specificity. Non-specific binding is a well-known problem often observed in tests for autoantibodies, when sera are incubated on plastic surfaces, e.g. an ELISA plate. To understand the mechanisms underlying non-specific immunoglobulin deposition, we here analyse the phenomenon in detail and we propose means of reducing false positive test results caused by non-specific binding. The level of non-specific binding, in sera with suspected autoreactivity, was analysed in non-coated and autoantigen-coated ELISA wells and 4-32% of sera showed a high level of non-specific binding depending on the assay conditions and serum properties. Non-specifically binding sera were found to contain increased concentrations of IgG and other inflammatory mediators. Moreover, non-specific binding could be induced in serum by increasing the concentration of IgG and incubating the serum at 40 °C. This suggests that non-specific binding immunoglobulins can be formed during inflammation with high immunoglobulin levels and elevated temperature. We show that the level of non-specific binding correlates with the IgG concentration and therefore propose that non-specific binding may be interpreted as an informative finding indicative of elevated IgG and inflammation.

  16. Microhydrated aromatic cluster cations: Binding motifs of 4-aminobenzonitrile-(H2O)n cluster cations with n ≤ 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmies, Matthias; Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Fujii, Masaaki; Dopfer, Otto

    2014-12-01

    Infrared photodissociation (IRPD) spectra of mass-selected 4-aminobenzonitrile-(water)n cluster cations, ABN+-(H2O)n with n ≤ 4, recorded in the N-H and O-H stretch ranges are analyzed by quantum chemical calculations at the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ level to determine the evolution of the initial microhydration process of this bifunctional aromatic cation in its ground electronic state. IRPD spectra of cold clusters tagged with Ar and N2 display higher resolution and allow for a clear-cut structural assignment. The clusters are generated in an electron impact source, which generates predominantly the most stable isomers. The IRPD spectra are assigned to single isomers for n = 1-3. The preferred cluster growth begins with sequential hydration of the two acidic NH protons of the amino group (n = 1-2), which is followed by attachment of secondary H2O ligands hydrogen-bonded to the first-shell ligands (n = 3-4). These symmetric and branched structures are more stable than those with a cyclic H-bonded solvent network. Moreover, in the size range n ≤ 4 the formation of a solvent network stabilized by strong cooperative effects is favored over interior ion hydration which is destabilized by noncooperative effects. The potential of the ABN+-H2O dimer is characterized in detail and supports the cluster growth derived from the IRPD spectra. Although the N-H bonds are destabilized by stepwise microhydration, which is accompanied by increasing charge transfer from ABN+ to the solvent cluster, no proton transfer to the solvent is observed for n ≤ 4.

  17. Microhydrated aromatic cluster cations: Binding motifs of 4-aminobenzonitrile-(H{sub 2}O){sub n} cluster cations with n ≤ 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmies, Matthias; Dopfer, Otto, E-mail: dopfer@physik.tu-berlin.de [Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Fujii, Masaaki [Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2014-12-07

    Infrared photodissociation (IRPD) spectra of mass-selected 4-aminobenzonitrile-(water){sub n} cluster cations, ABN{sup +}-(H{sub 2}O){sub n} with n ≤ 4, recorded in the N–H and O–H stretch ranges are analyzed by quantum chemical calculations at the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ level to determine the evolution of the initial microhydration process of this bifunctional aromatic cation in its ground electronic state. IRPD spectra of cold clusters tagged with Ar and N{sub 2} display higher resolution and allow for a clear-cut structural assignment. The clusters are generated in an electron impact source, which generates predominantly the most stable isomers. The IRPD spectra are assigned to single isomers for n = 1–3. The preferred cluster growth begins with sequential hydration of the two acidic NH protons of the amino group (n = 1–2), which is followed by attachment of secondary H{sub 2}O ligands hydrogen-bonded to the first-shell ligands (n = 3–4). These symmetric and branched structures are more stable than those with a cyclic H-bonded solvent network. Moreover, in the size range n ≤ 4 the formation of a solvent network stabilized by strong cooperative effects is favored over interior ion hydration which is destabilized by noncooperative effects. The potential of the ABN{sup +}-H{sub 2}O dimer is characterized in detail and supports the cluster growth derived from the IRPD spectra. Although the N–H bonds are destabilized by stepwise microhydration, which is accompanied by increasing charge transfer from ABN{sup +} to the solvent cluster, no proton transfer to the solvent is observed for n ≤ 4.

  18. ProteDNA: a sequence-based predictor of sequence-specific DNA-binding residues in transcription factors

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the design of a sequence-based predictor named ProteDNA for identifying the sequence-specific binding residues in a transcription factor (TF). Concerning protein–DNA interactions, there are two types of binding mechanisms involved, namely sequence-specific binding and nonspecific binding. Sequence-specific bindings occur between protein sidechains and nucleotide bases and correspond to sequence-specific recognition of genes. Therefore, sequence-specific bindings are esse...

  19. On the role of specific drug binding in modelling arterial eluting stents

    OpenAIRE

    McGinty, Sean; Pontrelli, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we consider drug binding in the arterial wall following\\ud delivery by a drug-eluting stent. Whilst it is now generally accepted that a\\ud non-linear saturable reversible binding model is required to properly describe\\ud the binding process, the precise form of the binding model varies between authors.\\ud Our particular interest in this manuscript is in assessing to what extent\\ud modelling specific and non-specific binding in the arterial wall as separate\\ud phases is important...

  20. Sequestration of Alkyltin(IV Compounds in Aqueous Solution: Formation, Stability, and Empirical Relationships for the Binding of Dimethyltin(IV Cation by N- and O-Donor Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agatino Casale

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The sequestering ability of polyamines and aminoacids of biological and environmental relevance (namely, ethylenediamine, putrescine, spermine, a polyallylamine, a branched polyethyleneimine, aspartate, glycinate, lysinate toward dimethyltin(IV cation was evaluated. The stability of various dimethyltin(IV / ligand species was determined in NaClaq at t=25∘C and at different ionic strengths (0.1≤I/mol L-1≤1.0, and the dependence of stability constants on this parameter was modeled by an Extended Debye-Hückel equation and by Specific ion Interaction Theory (SIT approach. At I=0.1 mol L−1, for the ML species we have log K=10.8, 14.2, 12.0, 14.7, 11.9, 7.7, 13.7, and 8.0 for ethylenediamine, putrescine, polyallylamine, spermine, polyethyleneimine, glycinate, lysinate, and aspartate, respectively. The sequestering ability toward dimethyltin(IV cation was defined by calculating the parameter pL50 (the total ligand concentration, as−log CL, able to bind 50% of metal cation, able to give an objective representation of this ability. Equations were formulated to model the dependence of pL50 on different variables, such as ionic strength and pH, and other empirical predictive relationships were also found.

  1. MONKEY: Identifying conserved transcription-factor binding sitesin multiple alignments using a binding site-specific evolutionarymodel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-10-28

    We introduce a method (MONKEY) to identify conserved transcription-factor binding sites in multispecies alignments. MONKEY employs probabilistic models of factor specificity and binding site evolution, on which basis we compute the likelihood that putative sites are conserved and assign statistical significance to each hit. Using genomes from the genus Saccharomyces, we illustrate how the significance of real sites increases with evolutionary distance and explore the relationship between conservation and function.

  2. Specific bindings of glycine peptides of distinctly different chain length on dynamic papain surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2011-06-01

    We investigated the specific bindings of peptides of 1-10 glycine residues (1-10GLY) on dynamic papain surfaces via molecular dynamics and docking simulations. Although the binding specificities of 1-5GLY on papain fluctuated little with time, the binding specificities of 6-10GLY on papain considerably fluctuated with time. Some residues had a significant impact on bindings of 6-10GLY to sites near active center of papain, and some of their residues were specific for each 6GLY, 8GLY, and 10GLY. Modification of these specific residues should allow for control of binding specificity of 6GLY, 8GLY, and 10GLY to the active center.

  3. Statistical analysis of structural determinants for protein-DNA-binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, Rosario I; Guo, Jun-Tao

    2016-08-01

    DNA-binding proteins play critical roles in biological processes including gene expression, DNA packaging and DNA repair. They bind to DNA target sequences with different degrees of binding specificity, ranging from highly specific (HS) to nonspecific (NS). Alterations of DNA-binding specificity, due to either genetic variation or somatic mutations, can lead to various diseases. In this study, a comparative analysis of protein-DNA complex structures was carried out to investigate the structural features that contribute to binding specificity. Protein-DNA complexes were grouped into three general classes based on degrees of binding specificity: HS, multispecific (MS), and NS. Our results show a clear trend of structural features among the three classes, including amino acid binding propensities, simple and complex hydrogen bonds, major/minor groove and base contacts, and DNA shape. We found that aspartate is enriched in HS DNA binding proteins and predominately binds to a cytosine through a single hydrogen bond or two consecutive cytosines through bidentate hydrogen bonds. Aromatic residues, histidine and tyrosine, are highly enriched in the HS and MS groups and may contribute to specific binding through different mechanisms. To further investigate the role of protein flexibility in specific protein-DNA recognition, we analyzed the conformational changes between the bound and unbound states of DNA-binding proteins and structural variations. The results indicate that HS and MS DNA-binding domains have larger conformational changes upon DNA-binding and larger degree of flexibility in both bound and unbound states. Proteins 2016; 84:1147-1161. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Inhibitors of serotonin reuptake and specific imipramine binding in human blood plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brusov, O.S.; Fomenko, A.M.; Katasonov, A.B.; Lidemann, R.R.

    1985-12-01

    This paper describes a method of extraction of endogenous inhibitors of specific IMI binding and of 5-HT reuptake, from human blood plasma and the heterogeneity of these compounds is demonstrated. Specific binding was determined as the difference between binding of /sup 3/H-IMI in the absence and in the presence of 50 microM IMI. Under these conditions, specific binding amounted to 70-80% of total binding of /sup 3/H-IMI. It is shown that extract obtained from human blood contains a material which inhibits dose-dependently both 5-HT reuptake and specific binding of /sup 3/H-IMI. Gel-chromatography of extracts of human blood plasma on Biogel P-2 is also shown.

  5. The biotin repressor: thermodynamic coupling of corepressor binding, protein assembly, and sequence-specific DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streaker, Emily D; Gupta, Aditi; Beckett, Dorothy

    2002-12-03

    The Escherichia coli biotin repressor, an allosteric transcriptional regulator, is activated for binding to the biotin operator by the small molecule biotinyl-5'-AMP. Results of combined thermodynamic, kinetic, and structural studies of the protein have revealed that corepressor binding results in disorder to order transitions in the protein monomer that facilitate tighter dimerization. The enhanced stability of the dimer leads to stabilization of the resulting biotin repressor-biotin operator complex. It is not clear, however, that the allosteric response in the system is transmitted solely through the protein-protein interface. In this work, the allosteric mechanism has been quantitatively probed by measuring the biotin operator binding and dimerization properties of three biotin repressor species: the apo or unliganded form, the biotin-bound form, and the holo or bio-5'-AMP-bound form. Comparisons of the pairwise differences in the bioO binding and dimerization energetics for the apo and holo species reveal that the enhanced DNA binding energetics resulting from adenylate binding track closely with the enhanced assembly energetics. However, when the results for repressor pairs that include the biotin-bound species are compared, no such equivalence is observed.

  6. Divalent cation tolerance protein binds to β-secretase and inhibits the processing of amyloid precursor protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Runzhong Liu; Haibo Hou; Xuelian Yi; Shanwen Wu; Huan Zeng

    2013-01-01

    The deposition of amyloid-beta is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid-beta is derived from amyloid precursor protein through sequential proteolytic cleavages by β-secretase (beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1) and γ-secretase. To further elucidate the roles of beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 in the development of Alzheimer's disease, a yeast two-hybrid system was used to screen a human embryonic brain cDNA library for proteins directly interacting with the intracellular domain of beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1. A potential beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1- interacting protein identified from the positive clones was divalent cation tolerance protein. Immunoprecipitation studies in the neuroblastoma cell line N2a showed that exogenous divalent cation tolerance protein interacts with endogenous beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1. The overexpression of divalent cation tolerance protein did not affect beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 protein levels, but led to increased amyloid precursor protein levels in N2a/APP695 cells, with a concomitant reduction in the processing product amyloid precursor protein C-terminal fragment, indicating that divalent cation tolerance protein inhibits the processing of amyloid precursor protein. Our experimental findings suggest that divalent cation tolerance protein negatively regulates the function of beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1. Thus, divalent cation tolerance protein could play a protective role in Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Rapid detection and purification of sequence specific DNA binding proteins using magnetic separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TIJANA SAVIC

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a method for the rapid identification and purification of sequence specific DNA binding proteins based on magnetic separation is presented. This method was applied to confirm the binding of the human recombinant USF1 protein to its putative binding site (E-box within the human SOX3 protomer. It has been shown that biotinylated DNA attached to streptavidin magnetic particles specifically binds the USF1 protein in the presence of competitor DNA. It has also been demonstrated that the protein could be successfully eluted from the beads, in high yield and with restored DNA binding activity. The advantage of these procedures is that they could be applied for the identification and purification of any high-affinity sequence-specific DNA binding protein with only minor modifications.

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of [(18)F]-fluoromethyl triphenylphosphonium cation as a novel mitochondria-specific positron emission tomography tracer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huahui; Wu, Xiangxiang; Song, Fahuan; Xu, Caiyun; Liu, Hao; Liu, Wendi

    2016-08-08

    We developed a radiosynthesis of the voltage sensitive tracer [(18)F]-fluoromethyltriphenylphosphonium cation ([(18)F]-FTPMP), giving high yield (30-34%, decay-corrected), radiochemical purity (>99%) and specific activity (about 760 GBq/μmol). [(18)F]-FTPMP had suitable lipophilicity (logP = 0.91 ± 0.03) and high in vivo/vitro stability. Biodistribution studies showed that [(18)F]-FTPMP had high heart uptake (>7%ID/g from 10 min to 120 min postinjection) and rapid clearance from the background. Clear cardiac images were obtained at different time periods, and the infarction areas could be detected sensitively with small-animal PET. The autoradiography and myocardial membrane potential studies confirmed the mitochondria specific of [(18)F]-FTPMP in rat myocardia. These excellent pharmacokinetic properties suggest [(18)F]-FTPMP is a promising mitochondria-specific tracer for clinical PET imaging of myocardial diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction.

  9. An RNA aptamer possessing a novel monovalent cation-mediated fold inhibits lysozyme catalysis by inhibiting the binding of long natural substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padlan, Camille S; Malashkevich, Vladimir N; Almo, Steve C; Levy, Matthew; Brenowitz, Michael; Girvin, Mark E

    2014-04-01

    RNA aptamers are being developed as inhibitors of macromolecular and cellular function, diagnostic tools, and potential therapeutics. Our understanding of the physical nature of this emerging class of nucleic acid-protein complexes is limited; few atomic resolution structures have been reported for aptamers bound to their protein target. Guided by chemical mapping, we systematically minimized an RNA aptamer (Lys1) selected against hen egg white lysozyme. The resultant 59-nucleotide compact aptamer (Lys1.2minE) retains nanomolar binding affinity and the ability to inhibit lysozyme's catalytic activity. Our 2.0-Å crystal structure of the aptamer-protein complex reveals a helical stem stabilizing two loops to form a protein binding platform that binds lysozyme distal to the catalytic cleft. This structure along with complementary solution analyses illuminate a novel protein-nucleic acid interface; (1) only 410 Å(2) of solvent accessible surface are buried by aptamer binding; (2) an unusually small fraction (∼18%) of the RNA-protein interaction is electrostatic, consistent with the limited protein phosphate backbone contacts observed in the structure; (3) a single Na(+) stabilizes the loops that constitute the protein-binding platform, and consistent with this observation, Lys1.2minE-lysozyme complex formation takes up rather than displaces cations at low ionic strength; (4) Lys1.2minE inhibits catalysis of large cell wall substrates but not catalysis of small model substrates; and (5) the helical stem of Lys1.2minE can be shortened to four base pairs (Lys1.2minF) without compromising binding affinity, yielding a 45-nucleotide aptamer whose structure may be an adaptable protein binding platform.

  10. Signal transduction of erythrocytes after specific binding of ecdysterone and cholesterol immobilized on nanodispersed magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mykhaylyk, O.M. E-mail: helek@iptelecom.net.ua; Kotzuruba, A.V.; Buchanevich, O.M.; Korduban, A.M.; Meged, E.F.; Gulaya, N.M

    2001-07-01

    Concurrent binding of cholesterol and ecdysterone immobilized on nanodispersed magnetite to intact rat erythrocytes was investigated. Several binding components on erythrocyte plasma membrane with different affinities were revealed in the range of 10{sup -15}-10{sup -8} M. The specific binding modulates signal transduction through adenylate cyclase and guanylate cyclase systems as manifested by the decrease in cAMP and increase in cGMP second messenger production.

  11. Structural Insights into the Phospholipid Binding Specificity of Human Evectin-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Seiji; Kato, Ryuichi; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Uchida, Yasunori; Taguchi, Tomohiko; Arai, Hiroyuki

    Evectin-2 is a recycling endosomal protein and plays an essential role in retrograde transport from recycling endosomes to the trans-Golgi network. The pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of Evectin-2 can specifically binds to phosphatidylserine (PS), which is enriched in recycling endosomes. To elucidate the molecular mechanism how it specifically binds to PS, we solved the crystal structures of human Evectin-2 PH domain for apo and O-phospho-L-serine complexed forms at 1.75 and 1.00 Å resolution, respectively. These structural analyses clearly show that PS-induced conformational change of Evectin-2 PH domain effectively explains the strict phospholipid binding specificity.

  12. OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus of mice and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, R; Richards, J G; Campfield, L A; Tartaglia, L A; Guisez, Y; van der Heyden, J; Travernier, J; Plaetinck, G; Burn, P

    1996-05-28

    Binding studies were conducted to identify the anatomical location of brain target sites for OB protein, the ob gene product. 125I-labeled recombinant mouse OB protein or alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion proteins were used for in vitro and in vivo binding studies. Coronal brain sections or fresh tissue from lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats were probed to identify potential central OB protein-binding sites. We report here that recombinant OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus. The binding of OB protein (either radiolabeled or the alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion protein) and its displacement by unlabeled OB protein was similar in lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats. These findings suggest that OB protein binds with high affinity to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus. After binding to the choroid plexus receptor, OB protein may then be transported across the blood-brain barrier into the cerebrospinal fluid. Alternatively, binding of OB protein to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus may activate afferent neural inputs to the neural network that regulates feeding behavior and energy balance or may result in the clearance or degradation of OB protein. The identification of the choroid plexus as a brain binding site for OB protein will provide the basis for the construction of expression libraries and facilitate the rapid cloning of the choroid plexus OB receptor.

  13. Characterization and DNA-binding specificities of Ralstonia TAL-like effectors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Lixin

    2013-07-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) from Xanthomonas sp. have been used as customizable DNA-binding modules for genome-engineering applications. Ralstonia solanacearum TALE-like proteins (RTLs) exhibit similar structural features to TALEs, including a central DNA-binding domain composed of 35 amino acid-long repeats. Here, we characterize the RTLs and show that they localize in the plant cell nucleus, mediate DNA binding, and might function as transcriptional activators. RTLs have a unique DNA-binding architecture and are enriched in repeat variable di-residues (RVDs), which determine repeat DNA-binding specificities. We determined the DNA-binding specificities for the RVD sequences ND, HN, NP, and NT. The RVD ND mediates highly specific interactions with C nucleotide, HN interacts specifically with A and G nucleotides, and NP binds to C, A, and G nucleotides. Moreover, we developed a highly efficient repeat assembly approach for engineering RTL effectors. Taken together, our data demonstrate that RTLs are unique DNA-targeting modules that are excellent alternatives to be tailored to bind to user-selected DNA sequences for targeted genomic and epigenomic modifications. These findings will facilitate research concerning RTL molecular biology and RTL roles in the pathogenicity of Ralstonia spp. © 2013 The Author.

  14. Characterization of binding specificities of bovine leucocyte class I molecules: impacts for rational epitope discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Andreas M.; Rasmussen, Michael; Svitek, Nicholas;

    2014-01-01

    The binding of peptides to classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I proteins is the single most selective step in antigen presentation. However, the peptide-binding specificity of cattle MHC (bovine leucocyte antigen, BoLA) class I (BoLA-I) molecules remains poorly characterized...

  15. Specificity and commonality of the phosphoinositide-binding proteome analyzed by quantitative mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungmichel, Stephanie; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Choudhary, Chuna Ram;

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIPs) play key roles in signaling and disease. Using high-resolution quantitative mass spectrometry, we identified PIP-interacting proteins and profiled their binding specificities toward all seven PIP variants. This analysis revealed 405 PIP-binding proteins, which is greater...

  16. Phylogenetic and functional analysis of the Cation Diffusion Facilitator (CDF family: improved signature and prediction of substrate specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeandroz Sylvain

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Cation Diffusion Facilitator (CDF family is a ubiquitous family of heavy metal transporters. Much interest in this family has focused on implications for human health and bioremediation. In this work a broad phylogenetic study has been undertaken which, considered in the context of the functional characteristics of some fully characterised CDF transporters, has aimed at identifying molecular determinants of substrate selectivity and at suggesting metal specificity for newly identified CDF transporters. Results Representative CDF members from all three kingdoms of life (Archaea, Eubacteria, Eukaryotes were retrieved from genomic databases. Protein sequence alignment has allowed detection of a modified signature that can be used to identify new hypothetical CDF members. Phylogenetic reconstruction has classified the majority of CDF family members into three groups, each containing characterised members that share the same specificity towards the principally-transported metal, i.e. Zn, Fe/Zn or Mn. The metal selectivity of newly identified CDF transporters can be inferred by their position in one of these groups. The function of some conserved amino acids was assessed by site-directed mutagenesis in the poplar Zn2+ transporter PtdMTP1 and compared with similar experiments performed in prokaryotic members. An essential structural role can be assigned to a widely conserved glycine residue, while aspartate and histidine residues, highly conserved in putative transmembrane domains, might be involved in metal transport. The potential role of group-conserved amino acid residues in metal specificity is discussed. Conclusion In the present study phylogenetic and functional analyses have allowed the identification of three major substrate-specific CDF groups. The metal selectivity of newly identified CDF transporters can be inferred by their position in one of these groups. The modified signature sequence proposed in this work can be

  17. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having Enhanced Binding Affinity, Sequence Specificity and Solubility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA strand, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from a group consisting of naturally......-occurring nucleobases and non-naturally-occurring nucleobases attached to a polyamide backbone, and contain C1-C8 alkylamine side chains. Methods of enhancing the solubility, binding affinity and sequence specificity of PNAs are provided....

  18. A Caenorhabditis elegans PUF protein family with distinct RNA binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Craig R; Kimble, Judith; Wickens, Marvin

    2008-08-01

    PUF proteins comprise a highly conserved family of sequence-specific RNA binding proteins that regulate target mRNAs via binding directly to their 3'UTRs. The Caenorhabditis elegans genome encodes several PUF proteins, which cluster into four groups based on sequence similarity; all share amino acids that interact with the RNA in the cocrystal of human Pumilio with RNA. Members of the FBF and the PUF-8/9 groups bind different but related RNA sequences. We focus here on the binding specificity of representatives of a third cluster, comprising PUF-5, -6, and -7. We performed in vivo selection experiments using the yeast three-hybrid system to identify RNA sequences that bind PUF-5 and PUF-6, and we confirmed binding to optimal sites in vitro. The consensus sequences derived from the screens are similar for PUF-5 and PUF-6 but differ from those of the FBF or PUF-8/-9 groups. Similarly, neither PUF-5 nor PUF-6 bind the recognition sites preferred by the other clusters. Mutagenesis studies confirmed the unique RNA specificity of PUF-5/-6. Using the PUF-5 consensus derived from our experiments, we searched a database of C. elegans 3'UTRs to identify potential targets of PUF-5, several of which indeed bind PUF-5. Therefore the consensus has predictive value and provides a route to finding genuine targets of these proteins.

  19. Detection of cell type and marker specificity of nuclear binding sites for anionic carbohydrate ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chovanec, M; Smetana, K; Purkrábková, T; Holíková, Z; Dvoránková, B; André, S; Pytlík, R; Hozák, P; Plzák, J; Sedo, A; Vacík, J; Gabius, H

    2004-01-01

    The emerging functionality of glycosaminoglycan chains engenders interest in localizing specific binding sites using cytochemical tools. We investigated nuclear binding of labeled heparin, heparan sulfate, a sulfated fucan, chondroitin sulfate, and hyaluronic acid in epidermal keratinocytes, bone marrow stromal cells, 3T3 fibroblasts and glioma cells using chemically prepared biotinylated probes. Binding of the markers was cell-type specific and influenced by extraction of histones, but was not markedly affected by degree of proliferation, differentiation or malignancy. Cell uptake of labeled heparin and other selected probes and their transport into the nucleus also was monitored. Differences between keratinocytes and bone marrow stromal cells were found. Preincubation of permeabilized bone marrow stromal cells with label-free heparin reduced the binding of carrier-immobilized hydrocortisone to its nuclear receptors. Thus, these tools enabled binding sites for glycosaminoglycans to be monitored in routine assays.

  20. Functional Equivalence of Retroviral MA Domains in Facilitating Psi RNA Binding Specificity by Gag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffiny Rye-McCurdy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses specifically package full-length, dimeric genomic RNA (gRNA even in the presence of a vast excess of cellular RNA. The “psi” (Ψ element within the 5′-untranslated region (5′UTR of gRNA is critical for packaging through interaction with the nucleocapsid (NC domain of Gag. However, in vitro Gag binding affinity for Ψ versus non-Ψ RNAs is not significantly different. Previous salt-titration binding assays revealed that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 Gag bound to Ψ RNA with high specificity and relatively few charge interactions, whereas binding to non-Ψ RNA was less specific and involved more electrostatic interactions. The NC domain was critical for specific Ψ binding, but surprisingly, a Gag mutant lacking the matrix (MA domain was less effective at discriminating Ψ from non-Ψ RNA. We now find that Rous sarcoma virus (RSV Gag also effectively discriminates RSV Ψ from non-Ψ RNA in a MA-dependent manner. Interestingly, Gag chimeras, wherein the HIV-1 and RSV MA domains were swapped, maintained high binding specificity to cognate Ψ RNAs. Using Ψ RNA mutant constructs, determinants responsible for promoting high Gag binding specificity were identified in both systems. Taken together, these studies reveal the functional equivalence of HIV-1 and RSV MA domains in facilitating Ψ RNA selectivity by Gag, as well as Ψ elements that promote this selectivity.

  1. Cation ion specifically induces a conformational change in trans-dehydroandrosterone - a solid-state NMR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Darong; Chen, Meiman; Chein, Rong-Jie; Ching, Wei-Min; Hung, Chen-Hsiung; Tzou, Der-Lii M

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we demonstrated that calcium (Ca(+2)) is able to induce a conformational change in trans-dehydroandrosterone (DHEA). To this respect, solid-state NMR spectroscopy was applied to a series of DHEA molecules that were incubated with Ca(+2) under different concentrations. The high-resolution (13)C NMR spectra of the DHEA/Ca(+2) mixtures exhibited two distinct sets of signals; one was attributed to DHEA in the free form, and the second set was due to the DHEA/Ca(+2) complex. Based on chemical shift isotropy and anisotropy analyses, we postulated that Ca(+2) might have associated with the oxygen attached to C17 via a lone-pair of electrons, which induced a conformational change in DHEA. Apart from Ca(+2), we also incubated DHEA with magnesium (Mg(+2)) to determine whether Mg(+2) was able to interact with DHEA in a similar manner to Ca(+2). We found that Mg(+2) was able to induce a conformational change in DHEA deviated from that of Ca(+2). These solid-state NMR observations indicate that DHEA is able to interact with cations, such as Mg(+2) and Ca(+2), with specificity.

  2. Specific binding of eukaryotic ORC to DNA replication origins depends on highly conserved basic residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Hironori; Ohashi, Eiji; Kanamoto, Shota; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2015-10-12

    In eukaryotes, the origin recognition complex (ORC) heterohexamer preferentially binds replication origins to trigger initiation of DNA replication. Crystallographic studies using eubacterial and archaeal ORC orthologs suggested that eukaryotic ORC may bind to origin DNA via putative winged-helix DNA-binding domains and AAA+ ATPase domains. However, the mechanisms how eukaryotic ORC recognizes origin DNA remain elusive. Here, we show in budding yeast that Lys-362 and Arg-367 residues of the largest subunit (Orc1), both outside the aforementioned domains, are crucial for specific binding of ORC to origin DNA. These basic residues, which reside in a putative disordered domain, were dispensable for interaction with ATP and non-specific DNA sequences, suggesting a specific role in recognition. Consistent with this, both residues were required for origin binding of Orc1 in vivo. A truncated Orc1 polypeptide containing these residues solely recognizes ARS sequence with low affinity and Arg-367 residue stimulates sequence specific binding mode of the polypeptide. Lys-362 and Arg-367 residues of Orc1 are highly conserved among eukaryotic ORCs, but not in eubacterial and archaeal orthologs, suggesting a eukaryote-specific mechanism underlying recognition of replication origins by ORC.

  3. C-terminus Methionene Specifically Involved in Binding Corn Odorants to Odorant Binding Protein4 in Macrocentrus cingulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Tofael; Zhang, Tiantao; Wang, Zhenying; He, Kanglai; Bai, Shuxiong

    2017-01-01

    The soluble carrier proteins, OBPs carry odor components through sensilium lymph to specific receptors within the antennal sensilla to trigger behavioral responses. Herein, McinOBP4 was characterized from the Macrocentrus cingulum, which is the specialist parasitic insect of Ostrinia furnacalis for better understanding of olfactory recognition mechanism of this wasp. The classical odorant binding protein McinOBP4 showed good binding affinity to corn green leaf volatiles. RT-qPCR results showed that the McinOBP4 was primarily expressed in male and female wasp antennae, with transcripts levels differing by sex. Fluorescence assays indicate that, McinOBP4 binds corn green leaf volatiles including terpenoides and aliphatic alcohols as well as aldehydes with good affinity. We have also conducted series of binding assay with first mutant (M1), which lacked the last 8 residues and a second mutant (M2), with Met119 replaced by Leucine (Leu119). In the acidic conditions, affinity N-phenylnaphthylamine (1-NPN) to McinOBP4 and M1 were substantially decreased, but increase in basic condition with no significant differences. The lack of C-terminus showed reduced affinity to terpenoides and aliphatic alcohols as well as aldehydes compounds of corn odorants. The mutant M2 with Met119 showed significant reduction in binding affinity to tested odorants, it indicating that Met119 forming hydrophobic chain with the odorants functional group to binding. This finding provides detailed insight of chemosensory function of McinOBP4 in M. cingulum and help to develop low release agents that attract of this wasp to improve ecologically-friendly pest management strategy. PMID:28228732

  4. Position specific variation in the rate of evolution intranscription factor binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Kellis, Manolis; Lander, EricS.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2003-08-28

    The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Here we analyze the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikataeto study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artifacts of computational motif finding algorithms. As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will likely contribute to the effective use of comparative

  5. A Nucleolar PUF RNA-binding Protein with Specificity for a Unique RNA Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Muench, Douglas G

    2015-12-11

    PUF proteins are a conserved group of sequence specific RNA-binding proteins that bind to RNA in a modular fashion. The RNA-binding domain of PUF proteins typically consists of eight clustered Puf repeats. Plant genomes code for large families of PUF proteins that show significant variability in their predicted Puf repeat number, organization, and amino acid sequence. Here we sought to determine whether the observed variability in the RNA-binding domains of four plant PUFs results in a preference for nonclassical PUF RNA target sequences. We report the identification of a novel RNA binding sequence for a nucleolar Arabidopsis PUF protein that contains an atypical RNA-binding domain. The Arabidopsis PUM23 (APUM23) binding sequence was 10 nucleotides in length, contained a centrally located UUGA core element, and had a preferred cytosine at nucleotide position 8. These RNA sequence characteristics differ from those of other PUF proteins, because all natural PUFs studied to date bind to RNAs that contain a conserved UGU sequence at their 5' end and lack specificity for cytosine. Gel mobility shift assays validated the identity of the APUM23 binding sequence and supported the location of 3 of the 10 predicted Puf repeats in APUM23, including the cytosine-binding repeat. The preferred 10-nucleotide sequence bound by APUM23 is present within the 18S rRNA sequence, supporting the known role of APUM23 in 18S rRNA maturation. This work also reveals that APUM23, an ortholog of yeast Nop9, could provide an advanced structural backbone for Puf repeat engineering and target-specific regulation of cellular RNAs.

  6. Ligand specificity and conformational stability of human fatty acid-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, A W; van Moerkerk, H T; Veerkamp, J H

    2001-09-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are small cytosolic proteins with virtually identical backbone structures that facilitate the solubility and intracellular transport of fatty acids. At least eight different types of FABP occur, each with a specific tissue distribution and possibly with a distinct function. To define the functional characteristics of all eight human FABPs, viz. heart (H), brain (B), myelin (M), adipocyte (A), epidermal (E), intestinal (I), liver (L) and ileal lipid-binding protein (I-LBP), we studied their ligand specificity, their conformational stability and their immunological crossreactivity. Additionally, binding of bile acids to I-LBP was studied. The FABP types showed differences in fatty acid binding affinity. Generally, the affinity for palmitic acid was lower than for oleic and arachidonic acid. All FABP types, except E-FABP, I-FABP and I-LBP interacted with 1-anilinonaphtalene-8-sulphonic acid (ANS). Only L-FABP, I-FABP and M-FABP showed binding of 11-((5-dimethylaminonaphtalene-1-sulfonyl)amino)undecanoic acid (DAUDA). I-LBP showed increasing binding of bile acids in the order taurine-conjugated>glycine-conjugated>unconjugated bile acids. A hydroxylgroup of bile acids at position 7 decreased and at position 12 increased the binding affinity to I-LBP. The fatty acid-binding affinity and the conformation of FABP types were differentially affected in the presence of urea. Our results demonstrate significant differences in ligand binding, conformational stability and surface properties between different FABP types which may point to a specific function in certain cells and tissues. The preference of I-LBP (but not L-FABP) for conjugated bile acids is in accordance with a specific role in bile acid reabsorption in the ileum.

  7. Kinetic and thermodynamic consequences of the substitution of SMe for OMe substituents of cryptophane hosts on the binding of neutral and cationic guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Chantal; Humilière, Delphine; Riva, Nathalie; Collet, André; Dutasta, Jean-Pierre

    2003-06-21

    To investigate the origin of the high selectivity of cryptophane-E (1) towards Me3NH+, Me4N+, and CHCl3, and particularly to discriminate the different contributions that stabilize the supramolecular complexes, we have synthesized the new cryptophane 2 bearing six MeS groups instead of MeO groups in 1. This led to a decrease of the negative charge density in the equatorial region of 2 without affecting notably the size of the molecular cavity. The binding properties of 1 and 2 towards the three guests were examined in solution and showed a slight decrease of the deltaGa favoring the complexes of 1, accompanied by a significant modification of the deltaHa vs. deltaSa balance. The binding of the ammonium guests to 1 and 2 was strongly entropy driven, while that of CHCl3 was purely enthalpy driven. A combination of spectroscopic and computational techniques was used to assign the main intermolecular interactions that occurred during the inclusion process. The neutral CHCl3 molecule is more stabilized in the less negatively charged CTV cap of 1. The different behavior towards the ammonium cations can be explained in term of interactions with the electronegative heteroatoms and cation-pi interactions. Moreover, this study revealed a considerable slowing down of the guest exchange kinetics with host 2, for which the association and dissociation rates are reduced by a factor 10(3) to 10(4) with respect to 1. For example, at room temperature, the Me4N+@2 complex exhibits a half-life of ca. 2 years, instead of a few hours for the corresponding complex of 1.

  8. Elucidation of the DNA binding specificity of the natural plant alkaloid chelerythrine: a biophysical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Pritha; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2014-09-05

    Interaction of the anticancer plant alkaloid chelerythrine with four sequence specific synthetic polynucleotides was studied by spectroscopy and calorimetry experiments. The binding resulted in strong hypochromic and bathochromic effects in the absorption spectrum of the alkaloid, enhancement in the fluorescence with the AT polynucleotides and the homo-GC polynucleotide and quenching with the hetero-GC polynucleotide. Cooperative binding was observed with all the polynucleotides. Fluorescence polarization anisotropy, iodide quenching and viscosity results confirmed intercalative binding of the alkaloid. The binding resulted in the thermal stabilization of the polynucleotides and moderate perturbations in the B-conformation of the DNA. The high binding affinity values (∼10(6) M(-1)) evaluated from the spectroscopic data was in excellent agreement with those obtained from calorimetry. The binding was exothermic and favoured by negative standard molar enthalpy and positive standard molar entropic contributions in all cases other than homo-AT polynucleotide, where it was endothermic and entropy driven. Salt-dependent calorimetry data revealed that the binding reaction was driven mostly by non-polyelectrolytic forces. The magnitude of the negative heat capacity values confirmed the role of significant hydrophobic effects in the interaction profile of the alkaloid with the polynucleotides. The results revealed the specificity of chelerythrine to follow homo-GC>hetero-GC>hetero-AT=homo-AT polynucleotide.

  9. Syntax compensates for poor binding sites to encode tissue specificity of developmental enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Emma K; Olson, Katrina M; Zhang, Wei; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Levine, Michael S

    2016-06-07

    Transcriptional enhancers are short segments of DNA that switch genes on and off in response to a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic signals. Despite the discovery of the first enhancer more than 30 y ago, the relationship between primary DNA sequence and enhancer activity remains obscure. In particular, the importance of "syntax" (the order, orientation, and spacing of binding sites) is unclear. A high-throughput screen identified synthetic notochord enhancers that are activated by the combination of ZicL and ETS transcription factors in Ciona embryos. Manipulation of these enhancers elucidated a "regulatory code" of sequence and syntax features for notochord-specific expression. This code enabled in silico discovery of bona fide notochord enhancers, including those containing low-affinity binding sites that would be excluded by standard motif identification methods. One of the newly identified enhancers maps upstream of the known enhancer that regulates Brachyury (Ci-Bra), a key determinant of notochord specification. This newly identified Ci-Bra shadow enhancer contains binding sites with very low affinity, but optimal syntax, and therefore mediates surprisingly strong expression in the notochord. Weak binding sites are compensated by optimal syntax, whereas enhancers containing high-affinity binding affinities possess suboptimal syntax. We suggest this balance has obscured the importance of regulatory syntax, as noncanonical binding motifs are typically disregarded by enhancer detection methods. As a result, enhancers with low binding affinities but optimal syntax may be a vastly underappreciated feature of the regulatory genome.

  10. Screening for PreS specific binding ligands with a phage displayed peptides library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Deng; Ming Zhuang; Yu-Ying Kong; You-Hua Xie; Yuan Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To construct a random peptide phage display library and search for peptides that specifically bind to the PreS region of hepatitis B virus (HBV).METHODS: A phage display vector, pFuse8, based on the gene 8 product (pⅧ) of M13 phage was made and used to construct a random peptide library. E. coli derived thioredoxin-PreS was purified with Thio-bond beads, and exploited as the bait protein for library screening. Five rounds of bio-panning were performed. The PreS-binding specificities of enriched phages were characterized with phage ELISA assay.RESULTS: A phage display vector was successfully constructed as demonstrated to present a pⅧ fused HBV PreS1 epitope on the phage surface with a high efficiency.A cysteine confined random peptide library was constructed containing independent clones exceeding 5±108 clone forming unit (CFU). A pool of phages showing a PreS-binding specificity was obtained after the screening against thioPres with an enrichment of approximately 400 times. Five phages with high PreS-binding specificities were selected and characterized. Sequences of the peptides displayed on these phages were determined.CONCLUSION: A phage library has been constructed,with random peptides displaying as pⅧ-fusion proteins.Specific PreS-binding peptides have been obtained, which may be useful for developing antivirals against HBV infection.

  11. Signal transduction by erythrocytes on specific binding of doxorubicin immobilized on nanodispersed magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mykhaylyk, Olga [Institute Applied Problems Physics and Biophysics, NAS, Sluzhbova 3, UA-03142 Kyiv (Ukraine)]. E-mail: Olga.Mykhaylyk@gmx.net; Kotzuruba, Anatoliy [Institute of Biochemistry, NAS, Leontovicha 9, UA-01030 Kyiv (Ukraine); Dudchenko, Nataliya [Institute Applied Problems Physics and Biophysics, NAS, Sluzhbova 3, UA-03142 Kyiv (Ukraine); Toerok, Gyula [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary)

    2005-05-15

    Two specific binding sites for doxorubicin were revealed at the plasma membrane of human erythrocytes on investigation of the binding of doxorubicin magnetic nanoconjugates. Free and conjugated doxorubicins modulated signal transduction in erythrocytes in a similar way. Both up-regulated nitric oxide and cyclic GMP (cGMP) and down-regulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) production and stabilize the membranes of damaged erythrocytes.

  12. Transcriptional Regulation in Mammalian Cells by Sequence-Specific DNA Binding Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Pamela J.; Tjian, Robert

    1989-07-01

    The cloning of genes encoding mammalian DNA binding transcription factors for RNA polymerase II has provided the opportunity to analyze the structure and function of these proteins. This review summarizes recent studies that define structural domains for DNA binding and transcriptional activation functions in sequence-specific transcription factors. The mechanisms by which these factors may activate transcriptional initiation and by which they may be regulated to achieve differential gene expression are also discussed.

  13. Isocitrate binding at two functionally distinct sites in yeast NAD+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, An-Ping; McAlister-Henn, Lee

    2002-06-21

    Yeast NAD(+)-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is an octamer containing two types of homologous subunits. Ligand-binding analyses were conducted to examine effects of residue changes in putative catalytic and regulatory isocitrate-binding sites respectively contained in IDH2 and IDH1 subunits. Replacement of homologous serine residues in either subunit site, S98A in IDH2 or S92A in IDH1, was found to reduce by half the total number of holoenzyme isocitrate-binding sites, confirming a correlation between detrimental effects on isocitrate binding and respective kinetic defects in catalysis and allosteric activation by AMP. Replacement of both serine residues eliminates isocitrate binding and measurable catalytic activity. The putative isocitrate-binding sites of IDH1 and IDH2 contain five identical and four nonidentical residues. Reciprocal replacement of the four nonidentical residues in either or both subunits (A108R, F136Y, T241D, and N245D in IDH1 and/or R114A, Y142F, D248T, and D252N in IDH2) was found to be permissive for isocitrate binding. This provides further evidence for two types of binding sites in IDH, although the authentic residues have been shown to be necessary for normal kinetic contributions. Finally, the mutant enzymes with residue replacements in the IDH1 site were found to be unable to bind AMP, suggesting that allosteric activation is dependent both upon binding of isocitrate at the IDH1 site and upon the changes in the enzyme normally elicited by this binding.

  14. Controlling the thermodynamic stability of intermediate phases in a cationic-amphiphile-water system with strongly binding counterions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Santosh Prasad; Raghunathan, V A

    2013-07-01

    We have studied the influence of two structurally isomeric organic salts, namely, 2-sodium-3-hydroxy naphthoate (SHN) and 1-sodium-2-hydroxy naphthoate (SHN1), on the phase behavior of concentrated aqueous solutions of the cationic surfactant cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC). Partial phase diagrams of the two systems have been constructed using polarizing optical microscopy and x-ray diffraction techniques. A variety of intermediate phases is seen in both systems for a range of salt concentrations. The CPC-SHN-water system exhibits the rhombohedral and tetragonal mesh phases in addition to the random mesh phase, whereas the CPC-SHN1-water system shows only the tetragonal and random mesh phases. The CPC-SHN-water system also exhibits two nematic phases consisting of cylindrical and disk-like micelles at relatively low and high salt concentrations, respectively. These results show that the concentration of the strongly bound counterion provided by the organic salt can be used as a control parameter to tune the stability of different intermediate phases in amphiphile-water systems.

  15. Specific high-affinity binding of fatty acids to epidermal cytosolic proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raza, H.; Chung, W.L.; Mukhtar, H. (Department of Dermatology, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Case Western Reserve University, OH (USA))

    1991-08-01

    Cytosol from rat, mouse, and human skin or rat epidermis was incubated with (3H)arachidonic acid, (14C)retinoic acid, (14C)oleic acid, (3H)leukotriene A4, (3H)prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or (3H) 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE), and protein-bound ligands were separated using Lipidex-1000 at 4C to assess the binding specificity. The binding of oleic acid and arachidonic acid with rat epidermal cytosol was rapid, saturable, and reversible. Binding of oleic acid was competed out with the simultaneous addition of other ligands and found to be in the following order: arachidonic acid greater than oleic acid greater than linoleic acid greater than lauric acid greater than leukotriene A4 greater than 15-HETE = PGE1 greater than PGE2 = PGF2. Scatchard analysis of the binding with arachidonic acid, oleic acid, and retinoic acid revealed high-affinity binding sites with the dissociation constant in the nM range. SDS-PAGE analysis of the oleic acid-bound epidermal cytosolic protein(s) revealed maximum binding at the 14.5 kDa region. The presence of the fatty acid-binding protein in epidermal cytosol and its binding to fatty acids and retinoic acid may be of significance both in the trafficking and the metabolism of fatty acids and retinoids across the skin.

  16. Concentration-dependent effect of fibrinogen on IgG-specific antigen binding and phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Tobias Konrad; Sojar, Hakimuddin; Denardin, Ernesto

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to characterize fibrinogen-IgG interactions, and explore how fibrinogen alters IgG-mediated phagocytosis. Using enzyme-linked binding assays, we found that fibrinogen binding to IgG is optimized for surfaces coated with high levels of IgG. Using a similar method, we have shown that for an antigen unable to specifically bind fibrinogen, fibrinogen enhances binding of antibodies towards that antigen. For binding of IgG antibodies to cells expressing Fc receptors, we found a bimodal binding response, where low levels of fibrinogen enhance binding of antibody to Fc receptors and high levels reduce it. This corresponds to a bimodal effect on phagocytosis of IgG-coated particles, which is inhibited in the presence of excess IgG during coating of the particles with antibodies and fibrinogen. We conclude that fibrinogen can modulate phagocytosis of IgG-coated particles in vitro by changing IgG binding behavior, and that high fibrinogen levels could negatively affect phagocytosis.

  17. Basis for half-site ligand binding in yeast NAD(+)-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, An-Ping; McAlister-Henn, Lee

    2011-09-27

    Yeast NAD(+)-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase is an allosterically regulated octameric enzyme composed of four heterodimers of a catalytic IDH2 subunit and a regulatory IDH1 subunit. Despite structural predictions that the enzyme would contain eight isocitrate binding sites, four NAD(+) binding sites, and four AMP binding sites, only half of the sites for each ligand can be measured in binding assays. On the basis of a potential interaction between side chains of Cys-150 residues in IDH2 subunits in each tetramer of the enzyme, ligand binding assays of wild-type (IDH1/IDH2) and IDH1/IDH2(C150S) octameric enzymes were conducted in the presence of dithiothreitol. These assays demonstrated the presence of eight isocitrate and four AMP binding sites for the wild-type enzyme in the presence of dithiothreitol and for the IDH1/IDH2(C150S) enzyme in the absence or presence of this reagent, suggesting that interactions between sulfhydryl side chains of IDH2 Cys-150 residues limit access to these sites. However, only two NAD(+) sites could be measured for either enzyme. A tetrameric form of IDH (an IDH1(G15D)/IDH2 mutant enzyme) demonstrated half-site binding for isocitrate (two sites) in the absence of dithiothreitol and full-site binding (four sites) in the presence of dithiothreitol. Only one NAD(+) site could be measured for the tetramer under both conditions. In the context of the structure of the enzyme, these results suggest that an observed asymmetry between heterotetramers in the holoenzyme contributes to interactions between IDH2 Cys-150 residues and to half-site binding of isocitrate, but that a form of negative cooperativity may limit access to apparently equivalent NAD(+) binding sites.

  18. Specific binding of toxin II from Centruroides suffusus suffusus to the sodium channel in electroplaque membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, K P; Barhanin, J; Lazdunski, M

    1982-10-26

    The binding of toxin II from the scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus (CssII) to electroplaque membranes from Electrophorus electricus was studied with the use of a radiolabeled derivative of the toxin ([125I]CssII). Specific binding of the latter to the membranes required the protonation of a group, either in the membrane or in the toxin itself, with an apparent pKa value of 7.5 and also the presence of a certain minimum concentration of ions, though there was no requirement for a specific ion. At 20 degrees C and pH 6 the second-order rate constant for formation of the [125I]CssII-membrane complex was about 5 X 10(6) M-1 s-1, while the first-order constant for its dissociation was about 2 X 10(-3) s-1. Under equilibrium conditions specific binding of [125I]CssII was a simple saturable function of [125I]CssII concentration, characterized by a dissociation constant of 0.4-0.7 nM and a maximum capacity of 0.9-2.4 pmol of toxin/mg of membrane protein. The latter value was the same as the number of membrane sites that could specifically bind a radiolabeled derivative of tetrodotoxin. Unlabeled CssII displaced bound [125I]CssII with an apparent dissociation constant of about 1 nM. None of 19 other neurotoxins or local anaesthetics known to interact with Na+ channels in excitable cells affected [125I]CssII binding, but it was completely inhibited by toxin gamma from the scorpion Tityus serrulatus serrulatus. These findings suggest that the Na+ channel possesses a distinct class of binding sites to which these two scorpion toxins bind with high affinities. On the other hand, no CssII receptor was detected in crab axonal membranes, indicating that it is not a characteristic feature of all Na+ channels.

  19. Selection of DMA aptamer that specific binding human carcinoembryonic antigen in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To select the specific aptamer of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), one of the most attractive molecule for cancer target therapy and imaging. Methods: Seven rounds in vitro selection were performed against the purified CEA protein. Ligand-mediated target purification and Co-immunoprecipitation were adopted to verify the specific binding of the aptamer to the purified and native protein separately. Results:The CEA-specific aptamer which can bind both the purified and native protein with the high specificity was obtained. Conclusion:This is the first time the CEA specific apatmer was produced. The results in this study provides the preliminary evidence for further investigation and application of CEA-aptamer in the future.

  20. The Fanconi anemia associated protein FAAP24 uses two substrate specific binding surfaces for DNA recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienk, Hans; Slootweg, Jack C; Speerstra, Sietske; Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf; Folkers, Gert E

    2013-07-01

    To maintain the integrity of the genome, multiple DNA repair systems exist to repair damaged DNA. Recognition of altered DNA, including bulky adducts, pyrimidine dimers and interstrand crosslinks (ICL), partially depends on proteins containing helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) domains. To understand how ICL is specifically recognized by the Fanconi anemia proteins FANCM and FAAP24, we determined the structure of the HhH domain of FAAP24. Although it resembles other HhH domains, the FAAP24 domain contains a canonical hairpin motif followed by distorted motif. The HhH domain can bind various DNA substrates; using nuclear magnetic resonance titration experiments, we demonstrate that the canonical HhH motif is required for double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) binding, whereas the unstructured N-terminus can interact with single-stranded DNA. Both DNA binding surfaces are used for binding to ICL-like single/double-strand junction-containing DNA substrates. A structural model for FAAP24 bound to dsDNA has been made based on homology with the translesion polymerase iota. Site-directed mutagenesis, sequence conservation and charge distribution support the dsDNA-binding model. Analogous to other HhH domain-containing proteins, we suggest that multiple FAAP24 regions together contribute to binding to single/double-strand junction, which could contribute to specificity in ICL DNA recognition.

  1. Zinc specifically stimulates the selective binding of a peptide analog of bindin to sulfated fucans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, P L; Glabe, C G

    1990-01-01

    A synthetic nonapeptide (Leu-Arg-His-Leu-Arg-His-His-Ser-Asn) derived from the sequence of the sea urchin sperm adhesive protein, bindin, has been shown to bind sulfated fucans in high ionic strength (seawater) conditions. The binding is enhanced by approximately 100-fold in the presence of zinc ions, and no other transition metal tested demonstrates any enhancement. Bindin isolated from sperm contains zinc ion at roughly equimolar concentrations. In the presence of Zn++, the synthetic nonapeptide binds to eggs and inhibits fertilization with a half-maximal effective concentration of 300 microM. The polysaccharide binding selectivity of the peptide/Zn++ complex is similar to bindin but less stringent. Although the order of effectiveness of the inhibitory polysaccharides is the same for bindin and the synthetic peptide, polysaccharides that are only weak inhibitors of fucan binding to bindin show greater effectiveness against the peptide. The effect of chemical modification, pH, and amino acid substitution on the binding properties of the peptide suggest that arginine guanido moieties interact with the sulfated fucans, while histidine groups chelate zinc ions. Although the mechanism of zinc-specific stimulation of fucan binding is not yet clear, one potential explanation is that zinc may stabilize a peptide secondary structure that has a high affinity for fucans.

  2. Mechanism of sequence-specific template binding by the DNA primase of bacteriophage T7

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Seung-Joo

    2010-03-28

    DNA primases catalyze the synthesis of the oligoribonucleotides required for the initiation of lagging strand DNA synthesis. Biochemical studies have elucidated the mechanism for the sequence-specific synthesis of primers. However, the physical interactions of the primase with the DNA template to explain the basis of specificity have not been demonstrated. Using a combination of surface plasmon resonance and biochemical assays, we show that T7 DNA primase has only a slightly higher affinity for DNA containing the primase recognition sequence (5\\'-TGGTC-3\\') than for DNA lacking the recognition site. However, this binding is drastically enhanced by the presence of the cognate Nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs), Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and Cytosine triphosphate (CTP) that are incorporated into the primer, pppACCA. Formation of the dimer, pppAC, the initial step of sequence-specific primer synthesis, is not sufficient for the stable binding. Preformed primers exhibit significantly less selective binding than that observed with ATP and CTP. Alterations in subdomains of the primase result in loss of selective DNA binding. We present a model in which conformational changes induced during primer synthesis facilitate contact between the zinc-binding domain and the polymerase domain. The Author(s) 2010. Published by Oxford University Press.

  3. Peptide binding landscapes: Specificity and homophilicity across sequence space in a lattice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Joohyun; Shell, M. Scott

    2016-10-01

    Peptide aggregation frequently involves sequences with strong homophilic binding character, i.e., sequences that self-assemble with like species in a crowded cellular environment, in the face of a multitude of other peptides or proteins as potential heterophilic binding partners. What kinds of sequences display a strong tendency towards homophilic binding and self-assembly, and what are the origins of this behavior? Here, we consider how sequence specificity in oligomerization processes plays out in a simple two-dimensional (2D) lattice statistical-thermodynamic peptide model that permits exhaustive examination of the entire sequence and configurational landscapes. We find that sequences with strong self-specificities have either alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues or short patches of hydrophobic residues, both which minimize intramolecular hydrophobic interactions in part due to the constraints of the 2D lattice. We also find that these specificities are highly sensitive to entropic and free energetic features of the unbound conformational state, such that direct binding interaction energies alone do not capture the complete behavior. These results suggest that the ability of particular peptide sequences to self-assemble and aggregate in a many-protein environment reflects a precise balance of direct binding interactions and behavior in the unbound (monomeric) state.

  4. The Outwardly Rectifying Current of Layer 5 Neocortical Neurons that was Originally Identified as "Non-Specific Cationic" Is Essentially a Potassium Current.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Revah

    Full Text Available In whole-cell patch clamp recordings from layer 5 neocortical neurons, blockade of voltage gated sodium and calcium channels leaves a cesium current that is outward rectifying. This current was originally identified as a "non-specific cationic current", and subsequently it was hypothesized that it is mediated by TRP channels. In order to test this hypothesis, we used fluorescence imaging of intracellular sodium and calcium indicators, and found no evidence to suggest that it is associated with influx of either of these ions to the cell body or dendrites. Moreover, the current is still prominent in neurons from TRPC1-/- and TRPC5-/- mice. The effects on the current of various blocking agents, and especially its sensitivity to intracellular tetraethylammonium, suggest that it is not a non-specific cationic current, but rather that it is generated by cesium-permeable delayed rectifier potassium channels.

  5. Single-chain antibody-fragment M6P-1 possesses a mannose 6-phosphate monosaccharide-specific binding pocket that distinguishes N-glycan phosphorylation in a branch-specific manner†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackler, Ryan J; Evans, Dylan W; Smith, David F; Cummings, Richard D; Brooks, Cory L; Braulke, Thomas; Liu, Xinyu; Evans, Stephen V; Müller-Loennies, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The acquisition of mannose 6-phosphate (Man6P) on N-linked glycans of lysosomal enzymes is a structural requirement for their transport from the Golgi apparatus to lysosomes mediated by the mannose 6-phosphate receptors, 300 kDa cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (MPR300) and 46 kDa cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (MPR46). Here we report that the single-chain variable domain (scFv) M6P-1 is a unique antibody fragment with specificity for Man6P monosaccharide that, through an array-screening approach against a number of phosphorylated N-glycans, is shown to bind mono- and diphosphorylated Man6 and Man7 glycans that contain terminal αMan6P(1 → 2)αMan(1 → 3)αMan. In contrast to MPR300, scFv M6P-1 does not bind phosphodiesters, monophosphorylated Man8 or mono- or diphosphorylated Man9 structures. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis to 2.7 Å resolution of Fv M6P-1 in complex with Man6P reveals that specificity and affinity is achieved via multiple hydrogen bonds to the mannose ring and two salt bridges to the phosphate moiety. In common with both MPRs, loss of binding was observed for scFv M6P-1 at pH values below the second pKa of Man6P (pKa = 6.1). The structures of Fv M6P-1 and the MPRs suggest that the change of the ionization state of Man6P is the main driving force for the loss of binding at acidic lysosomal pH (e.g. lysosome pH ∼ 4.6), which provides justification for the evolution of a lysosomal enzyme transport pathway based on Man6P recognition. PMID:26503547

  6. Identification of the structural features that mediate binding specificity in the recognition of STAT proteins by dual-specificity phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardin, Christophe; Sticht, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    Inactivation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) proteins is regulated by dual-specificity phosphatases (DSPs) with high substrate specificity. Although experiments have provided useful information about the phosphatase activity and the specificity for STATs, there is up-to-date no data at a molecular level to explain the specific recognition of STAT substrates by this subfamily of phosphatases. Here, a combined approach of molecular modeling, docking and molecular dynamics simulations was used to address the binding between DSPs and their STAT substrates. We identified a binding interface at the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) domain of the DSP VHR that interacts with the SH2-domain of STAT5. This finding is consistent with previous mutational data and supports a "two-step" mechanism for the dephosphorylation event. Application of the same approach suggests the presence of a similar interface between the viral DSP VH1 and STAT1. Furthermore, the interaction network at this interface provides an explanation for the specificity of the DSP-STAT recognition.

  7. Cell-type specificity of ChIP-predicted transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håndstad Tony

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Context-dependent transcription factor (TF binding is one reason for differences in gene expression patterns between different cellular states. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq identifies genome-wide TF binding sites for one particular context—the cells used in the experiment. But can such ChIP-seq data predict TF binding in other cellular contexts and is it possible to distinguish context-dependent from ubiquitous TF binding? Results We compared ChIP-seq data on TF binding for multiple TFs in two different cell types and found that on average only a third of ChIP-seq peak regions are common to both cell types. Expectedly, common peaks occur more frequently in certain genomic contexts, such as CpG-rich promoters, whereas chromatin differences characterize cell-type specific TF binding. We also find, however, that genotype differences between the cell types can explain differences in binding. Moreover, ChIP-seq signal intensity and peak clustering are the strongest predictors of common peaks. Compared with strong peaks located in regions containing peaks for multiple transcription factors, weak and isolated peaks are less common between the cell types and are less associated with data that indicate regulatory activity. Conclusions Together, the results suggest that experimental noise is prevalent among weak peaks, whereas strong and clustered peaks represent high-confidence binding events that often occur in other cellular contexts. Nevertheless, 30-40% of the strongest and most clustered peaks show context-dependent regulation. We show that by combining signal intensity with additional data—ranging from context independent information such as binding site conservation and position weight matrix scores to context dependent chromatin structure—we can predict whether a ChIP-seq peak is likely to be present in other cellular contexts.

  8. Cooperativity in RNA-Protein Interactions: Global Analysis of RNA Binding Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary T. Campbell

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The control and function of RNA are governed by the specificity of RNA binding proteins. Here, we describe a method for global unbiased analysis of RNA-protein interactions that uses in vitro selection, high-throughput sequencing, and sequence-specificity landscapes. The method yields affinities for a vast array of RNAs in a single experiment, including both low- and high-affinity sites. It is reproducible and accurate. Using this approach, we analyzed members of the PUF (Pumilio and FBF family of eukaryotic mRNA regulators. Our data identify effects of a specific protein partner on PUF-RNA interactions, reveal subsets of target sites not previously detected, and demonstrate that designer PUF proteins can precisely alter specificity. The approach described here is, in principle, broadly applicable for analysis of any molecule that binds RNA, including proteins, nucleic acids, and small molecules.

  9. Reversible CO binding enables tunable CO/H₂ and CO/N₂ separations in metal-organic frameworks with exposed divalent metal cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Eric D; Hudson, Matthew R; Mason, Jarad A; Chavan, Sachin; Crocellà, Valentina; Howe, Joshua D; Lee, Kyuho; Dzubak, Allison L; Queen, Wendy L; Zadrozny, Joseph M; Geier, Stephen J; Lin, Li-Chiang; Gagliardi, Laura; Smit, Berend; Neaton, Jeffrey B; Bordiga, Silvia; Brown, Craig M; Long, Jeffrey R

    2014-07-30

    Six metal-organic frameworks of the M2(dobdc) (M = Mg, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn; dobdc(4-) = 2,5-dioxido-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate) structure type are demonstrated to bind carbon monoxide reversibly and at high capacity. Infrared spectra indicate that, upon coordination of CO to the divalent metal cations lining the pores within these frameworks, the C-O stretching frequency is blue-shifted, consistent with nonclassical metal-CO interactions. Structure determinations reveal M-CO distances ranging from 2.09(2) Å for M = Ni to 2.49(1) Å for M = Zn and M-C-O angles ranging from 161.2(7)° for M = Mg to 176.9(6)° for M = Fe. Electronic structure calculations employing density functional theory (DFT) resulted in good agreement with the trends apparent in the infrared spectra and crystal structures. These results represent the first crystallographically characterized magnesium and zinc carbonyl compounds and the first high-spin manganese(II), iron(II), cobalt(II), and nickel(II) carbonyl species. Adsorption isotherms indicate reversible adsorption, with capacities for the Fe, Co, and Ni frameworks approaching one CO per metal cation site at 1 bar, corresponding to loadings as high as 6.0 mmol/g and 157 cm(3)/cm(3). The six frameworks display (negative) isosteric heats of CO adsorption ranging from 52.7 to 27.2 kJ/mol along the series Ni > Co > Fe > Mg > Mn > Zn, following the Irving-Williams stability order. The reversible CO binding suggests that these frameworks may be of utility for the separation of CO from various industrial gas mixtures, including CO/H2 and CO/N2. Selectivities determined from gas adsorption isotherm data using ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) over a range of gas compositions at 1 bar and 298 K indicate that all six M2(dobdc) frameworks could potentially be used as solid adsorbents to replace current cryogenic distillation technologies, with the choice of M dictating adsorbent regeneration energy and the level of purity of the resulting gases.

  10. The binding problem in population neurodynamics: a network model for stimulus-specific coherent oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlásek, J

    1998-12-01

    A hypothesis is presented that coherent oscillatory discharges of spatially distributed neuronal groups (the supposed binding mechanism) are the result of the convergence of stimulus-dependent activity in modality-specific afferent pathways with oscillatory activity generated in unspecific sensory systems. This view is supported by simulation experiments on model networks.

  11. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; Montaño, Sherwin P.; Kurosawa, Kohei; Zheng, Yupeng; Akin, Louesa R.; Świst-Rosowska, Kalina M.; Grzybowski, Adrian T.; Koide, Akiko; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Ruthenburg, Alexander J.; Koide, Shohei

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. This “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies. PMID:26862167

  12. Toward a new twist in Hox and TALE DNA-binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabet, Samir; Lohmann, Ingrid

    2015-02-09

    Hox proteins gain specificity by interacting with TALE-class cofactors. In a recent issue of Cell and in this issue of Developmental Cell, Crocker et al. (2015) and Amin et al. (2015), respectively, demonstrate that non-canonical Hox/TALE binding sequences play a major role in the regionalized regulation of target gene expression in vivo.

  13. Specific and Modular Binding Code for Cytosine Recognition in Pumilio/FBF (PUF) RNA-binding Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Shuyun; Wang, Yang; Cassidy-Amstutz, Caleb; Lu, Gang; Bigler, Rebecca; Jezyk, Mark R.; Li, Chunhua; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.; Wang, Zefeng (NIH); (Beijing U); (UNC)

    2011-10-28

    Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA-binding factor (PUF) proteins possess a recognition code for bases A, U, and G, allowing designed RNA sequence specificity of their modular Pumilio (PUM) repeats. However, recognition side chains in a PUM repeat for cytosine are unknown. Here we report identification of a cytosine-recognition code by screening random amino acid combinations at conserved RNA recognition positions using a yeast three-hybrid system. This C-recognition code is specific and modular as specificity can be transferred to different positions in the RNA recognition sequence. A crystal structure of a modified PUF domain reveals specific contacts between an arginine side chain and the cytosine base. We applied the C-recognition code to design PUF domains that recognize targets with multiple cytosines and to generate engineered splicing factors that modulate alternative splicing. Finally, we identified a divergent yeast PUF protein, Nop9p, that may recognize natural target RNAs with cytosine. This work deepens our understanding of natural PUF protein target recognition and expands the ability to engineer PUF domains to recognize any RNA sequence.

  14. Specific and modular binding code for cytosine recognition in Pumilio/FBF (PUF) RNA-binding domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shuyun; Wang, Yang; Cassidy-Amstutz, Caleb; Lu, Gang; Bigler, Rebecca; Jezyk, Mark R; Li, Chunhua; Hall, Traci M Tanaka; Wang, Zefeng

    2011-07-29

    Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA-binding factor (PUF) proteins possess a recognition code for bases A, U, and G, allowing designed RNA sequence specificity of their modular Pumilio (PUM) repeats. However, recognition side chains in a PUM repeat for cytosine are unknown. Here we report identification of a cytosine-recognition code by screening random amino acid combinations at conserved RNA recognition positions using a yeast three-hybrid system. This C-recognition code is specific and modular as specificity can be transferred to different positions in the RNA recognition sequence. A crystal structure of a modified PUF domain reveals specific contacts between an arginine side chain and the cytosine base. We applied the C-recognition code to design PUF domains that recognize targets with multiple cytosines and to generate engineered splicing factors that modulate alternative splicing. Finally, we identified a divergent yeast PUF protein, Nop9p, that may recognize natural target RNAs with cytosine. This work deepens our understanding of natural PUF protein target recognition and expands the ability to engineer PUF domains to recognize any RNA sequence.

  15. MBSTAR: multiple instance learning for predicting specific functional binding sites in microRNA targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Ghosh, Dip; Mitra, Ramkrishna; Zhao, Zhongming

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) regulates gene expression by binding to specific sites in the 3'untranslated regions of its target genes. Machine learning based miRNA target prediction algorithms first extract a set of features from potential binding sites (PBSs) in the mRNA and then train a classifier to distinguish targets from non-targets. However, they do not consider whether the PBSs are functional or not, and consequently result in high false positive rates. This substantially affects the follow up functional validation by experiments. We present a novel machine learning based approach, MBSTAR (Multiple instance learning of Binding Sites of miRNA TARgets), for accurate prediction of true or functional miRNA binding sites. Multiple instance learning framework is adopted to handle the lack of information about the actual binding sites in the target mRNAs. Biologically validated 9531 interacting and 973 non-interacting miRNA-mRNA pairs are identified from Tarbase 6.0 and confirmed with PAR-CLIP dataset. It is found that MBSTAR achieves the highest number of binding sites overlapping with PAR-CLIP with maximum F-Score of 0.337. Compared to the other methods, MBSTAR also predicts target mRNAs with highest accuracy. The tool and genome wide predictions are available at http://www.isical.ac.in/~bioinfo_miu/MBStar30.htm.

  16. The PP1 binding code: a molecular-lego strategy that governs specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heroes, Ewald; Lesage, Bart; Görnemann, Janina; Beullens, Monique; Van Meervelt, Luc; Bollen, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a single-domain hub protein with nearly 200 validated interactors in vertebrates. PP1-interacting proteins (PIPs) are ubiquitously expressed but show an exceptional diversity in brain, testis and white blood cells. The binding of PIPs is mainly mediated by short motifs that dock to surface grooves of PP1. Although PIPs often contain variants of the same PP1 binding motifs, they differ in the number and combination of docking sites. This molecular-lego strategy for binding to PP1 creates holoenzymes with unique properties. The PP1 binding code can be described as specific, universal, degenerate, nonexclusive and dynamic. PIPs control associated PP1 by interference with substrate recruitment or access to the active site. In addition, some PIPs have a subcellular targeting domain that promotes dephosphorylation by increasing the local concentration of PP1. The diversity of the PP1 interactome and the properties of the PP1 binding code account for the exquisite specificity of PP1 in vivo.

  17. Do Cation-π Interactions Exist in Bacteriorhodopsin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Kun-Sheng; WANG Guang-Yu; HE Jin-An

    2001-01-01

    Metal ions are essential to the structure and physiological functions of bacteriorhodopsin. Experimental evidence suggests the existence of specific cation binding to the negatively charged groups of Asp85 and Asp212 via an electrostatic interaction. However, only using electrostatic force is not enough to explain the role of the metal cations because the carboxylate of Asp85 is well known to be protonated in the M intermediate. Considering the presence of some aromatic amino acid residues in the vicinity of the retinal pocket, the existence of cation-π interactions between the metal cation and aromatic amino acid residues is suggested. Obviously, introduction of this kind of interaction is conducive to understanding the effects of the metal cations and aromatic amino acid residues inside the protein on the structural stability and proton pumping of bacteriorhodopsin.

  18. Specific Internalisation of Gold Nanoparticles into Engineered Porous Protein Cages via Affinity Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tao; Free, Paul; Fernig, David G.; Lim, Sierin; Tomczak, Nikodem

    2016-01-01

    Porous protein cages are supramolecular protein self-assemblies presenting pores that allow the access of surrounding molecules and ions into their core in order to store and transport them in biological environments. Protein cages’ pores are attractive channels for the internalisation of inorganic nanoparticles and an alternative for the preparation of hybrid bioinspired nanoparticles. However, strategies based on nanoparticle transport through the pores are largely unexplored, due to the difficulty of tailoring nanoparticles that have diameters commensurate with the pores size and simultaneously displaying specific affinity to the cages’ core and low non-specific binding to the cages’ outer surface. We evaluated the specific internalisation of single small gold nanoparticles, 3.9 nm in diameter, into porous protein cages via affinity binding. The E2 protein cage derived from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus presents 12 pores, 6 nm in diameter, and an empty core of 13 nm in diameter. We engineered the E2 protein by site-directed mutagenesis with oligohistidine sequences exposing them into the cage’s core. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy analysis show that the structures of E2 protein cages mutated with bis- or penta-histidine sequences are well conserved. The surface of the gold nanoparticles was passivated with a self-assembled monolayer made of a mixture of short peptidols and thiolated alkane ethylene glycol ligands. Such monolayers are found to provide thin coatings preventing non-specific binding to proteins. Further functionalisation of the peptide coated gold nanoparticles with Ni2+ nitrilotriacetic moieties enabled the specific binding to oligohistidine tagged cages. The internalisation via affinity binding was evaluated by electron microscopy analysis. From the various mutations tested, only the penta-histidine mutated E2 protein cage showed repeatable and stable internalisation. The present work overcomes the limitations of

  19. Autoradiographic localization of specific [3H]dexamethasone binding in fetal lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, D G; Butley, M S; Cunha, G R; Malkinson, A M

    1984-10-01

    The cellular and subcellular localization of specific [3H]dexamethasone binding was examined in fetal mouse lung at various stages of development and in human fetal lung at 8 weeks of gestation using a rapid in vitro steroid incubation technique followed by thaw-mount autoradiography. Competition studies with unlabeled steroids demonstrate the specificity of [3H]dexamethasone labeling, and indicate that fetal lung mesenchyme is a primary glucocorticoid target during lung development. Quantitative binding studies, involving incubation of intact tissue with competing ligand and subsequent subcellular fractionation, show this to be specific, nuclear binding characteristic of glucocorticoid receptors. Autoradiographs of [3H]dexamethasone binding in lung tissue at early stages of development demonstrate that the mesenchyme directly adjacent to the more proximal portions of the bronchiolar network is heavily labeled. In contrast, the epithelium which will later differentiate into bronchi and bronchioles, is relatively unlabeled. Distal portions of the growing epithelium, destined to become alveolar ducts and alveoli, do show nuclear localization of [3H]dexamethasone. Because of the known importance of the mesenchyme in controlling lung development and the ability of glucocorticoids to stimulate lung development, these results suggest that many of the growth-promoting effects of glucocorticoids may be mediated through the mesenchyme. In addition, by utilizing a technique which allows the simultaneous examination of extracellular matrix components and [3H]dexamethasone binding, a relationship is observed between extensive mesenchymal [3H]dexamethasone binding and extensive extracellular matrix accumulation. Since glucocorticoids stimulate the synthesis of many extracellular matrix components, these results suggest a role for these hormones in affecting mesenchymal-epithelial interactions during lung morphogenesis.

  20. Site-specific fab fragment biotinylation at the conserved nucleotide binding site for enhanced Ebola detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-07-01

    The nucleotide binding site (NBS) is a highly conserved region between the variable light and heavy chains at the Fab domains of all antibodies, and a small molecule that we identified, indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), binds specifically to this site. Fab fragment, with its small size and simple production methods compared to intact antibody, is good candidate for use in miniaturized diagnostic devices and targeted therapeutic applications. However, commonly used modification techniques are not well suited for Fab fragments as they are often more delicate than intact antibodies. Fab fragments are of particular interest for sensor surface functionalization but immobilization results in damage to the antigen binding site and greatly reduced activity due to their truncated size that allows only a small area that can bind to surfaces without impeding antigen binding. In this study, we describe an NBS-UV photocrosslinking functionalization method (UV-NBS(Biotin) in which a Fab fragment is site-specifically biotinylated with an IBA-EG11-Biotin linker via UV energy exposure (1 J/cm(2)) without affecting its antigen binding activity. This study demonstrates successful immobilization of biotinylated Ebola detecting Fab fragment (KZ52 Fab fragment) via the UV-NBS(Biotin) method yielding 1031-fold and 2-fold better antigen detection sensitivity compared to commonly used immobilization methods: direct physical adsorption and NHS-Biotin functionalization, respectively. Utilization of the UV-NBS(Biotin) method for site-specific conjugation to Fab fragment represents a proof of concept use of Fab fragment for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications with numerous fluorescent probes, affinity molecules and peptides.

  1. Thin-layer chromatographic specification and separation of Cu(1+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+), and Co(2+) cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savasci, Sahin; Akçay, Mehmet; Ergül, Soner

    2010-07-01

    The M(PyDTC)(2) (M: Cu, Co, or Ni) and CuPyDTC complexes, prepared by reactions of ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate with metal nitrates, are examined for qualitative analysis, speciation, and mutual separation using thin-layer chromatography systems. These complexes and their mixtures are spotted to the activated and non-activated thin layers of silica gel 60GF(254) (Si-60GF(254)) with a 250-microm thickness. Toluene-dichloromethane mixtures (4:1, 1:1, 1:4 v/v) are used as mobile phases for running of the complexes. All of these chromatographic systems are successfully used for speciation of Cu(2+) and Cu(1+) cations. The best analytical separation for the qualitative analysis of corresponding metal cations and mutual separation of components in M(PyDTC)(2) and CuPyDTC complexes are obtained when using pure toluene-dichloromethane (1:1 v/v) on the activated layer. This study shows that it is possible to qualitatively analyze and satisfactorily separate a mixture of Cu(1+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+), and Co(2+) cations on cited chromatographic systems. These results may be also said for the adaptability or validity on column chromatography.

  2. CLK-1 protein has DNA binding activity specific to O(L) region of mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2002-04-10

    Mutations in the clk-1 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans extend worm life span and slow down a variety of physiological processes. Here we report that C. elegans CLK-1 as well as its mouse homologue have DNA binding activity that is specific to the O(L) region of mitochondrial DNA. DNA binding activity of CLK-1 is inhibited by ADP, and is altered by mutations that extend nematode life span. Our results suggest that, in addition to its enzymatic function in ubiquinone biosynthesis, CLK-1 is involved in the regulation of mtDNA replication or transcription.

  3. Effect of binding of an oligomeric cationic fluorosurfactant on the dilational rheological properties of gelatin adsorbed at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Ashwin; Kim, Yongsin; Kausch, Charles M; Thomas, Richard R

    2006-09-12

    The effect of binding of an oligomeric cationic fluorooxetane surfactant on the interfacial properties of adsorbed gelatin-fluorooxetane complexes has been studied using dynamic surface tension and dilational rheological measurements. Adsorption kinetics of gelatin-fluorooxetane complexes are reminiscent of a mixed (barrier/diffusion limited) process, while the dilational rheological properties of the interface exhibit a strong dependence on surfactant concentration. At low surfactant concentrations, dilational surface moduli as well as phase angles are relatively insensitive to the presence of the fluorooxetane. However, at the critical aggregation concentration of the polymer-surfactant system, there is a sharp increase in the complex modulus. Further increase in the fluorooxetane concentration does not significantly affect the complex modulus. The phase angle, however, does increase with increasing fluorooxetane concentration due to the transport of bound fluorooxetane from the subsurface to the solution-air interface. These results indicate that, at fluorooxetane concentrations exceeding the critical aggregation concentration, the polymer-surfactant complexes adsorb to form cross-linked multilayers at the solution-air interface.

  4. Improvement of outer membrane-permeabilizing and lipopolysaccharide-binding activities of an antimicrobial cationic peptide by C-terminal modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piers, K L; Brown, M H; Hancock, R E

    1994-10-01

    Antimicrobial cationic peptides have been discovered in many different organisms and often possess a broad range of activity. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of actions of melittin and two synthetic peptides, CEME (a cecropin-melittin hybrid) and CEMA, against gram-negative bacteria. CEMA was produced by recombinant DNA procedures and is an analog of CEME with a modified C terminus resulting in two additional positive charges. All three peptides showed good antimicrobial activity against four different gram-negative bacteria, but only CEMA was able to somewhat augment the activity of some conventional antibiotics in synergy studies. Studies using the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae showed that the peptides all possessed the ability to permeabilize bacterial outer membranes to the hydrophobic fluorophor 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine and the protein lysozyme, with CEMA being the most active. CEMA also had the strongest relative binding affinity for bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide). These data collectively indicated that these peptides all cross the outer membrane by the self-promoted uptake pathway and that CEMA is the peptide most effective at accessing this pathway.

  5. Contribution of distinct homeodomain DNA binding specificities to Drosophila embryonic mesodermal cell-specific gene expression programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian W Busser

    Full Text Available Homeodomain (HD proteins are a large family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors (TFs having diverse developmental functions, often acting within the same cell types, yet many members of this family paradoxically recognize similar DNA sequences. Thus, with multiple family members having the potential to recognize the same DNA sequences in cis-regulatory elements, it is difficult to ascertain the role of an individual HD or a subclass of HDs in mediating a particular developmental function. To investigate this problem, we focused our studies on the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm where HD TFs are required to establish not only segmental identities (such as the Hox TFs, but also tissue and cell fate specification and differentiation (such as the NK-2 HDs, Six HDs and identity HDs (I-HDs. Here we utilized the complete spectrum of DNA binding specificities determined by protein binding microarrays (PBMs for a diverse collection of HDs to modify the nucleotide sequences of numerous mesodermal enhancers to be recognized by either no or a single subclass of HDs, and subsequently assayed the consequences of these changes on enhancer function in transgenic reporter assays. These studies show that individual mesodermal enhancers receive separate transcriptional input from both I-HD and Hox subclasses of HDs. In addition, we demonstrate that enhancers regulating upstream components of the mesodermal regulatory network are targeted by the Six class of HDs. Finally, we establish the necessity of NK-2 HD binding sequences to activate gene expression in multiple mesodermal tissues, supporting a potential role for the NK-2 HD TF Tinman (Tin as a pioneer factor that cooperates with other factors to regulate cell-specific gene expression programs. Collectively, these results underscore the critical role played by HDs of multiple subclasses in inducing the unique genetic programs of individual mesodermal cells, and in coordinating the gene regulatory

  6. Contribution of distinct homeodomain DNA binding specificities to Drosophila embryonic mesodermal cell-specific gene expression programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busser, Brian W; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S; Shokri, Leila; Tansey, Terese R; Gamble, Caitlin E; Bulyk, Martha L; Michelson, Alan M

    2013-01-01

    Homeodomain (HD) proteins are a large family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors (TFs) having diverse developmental functions, often acting within the same cell types, yet many members of this family paradoxically recognize similar DNA sequences. Thus, with multiple family members having the potential to recognize the same DNA sequences in cis-regulatory elements, it is difficult to ascertain the role of an individual HD or a subclass of HDs in mediating a particular developmental function. To investigate this problem, we focused our studies on the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm where HD TFs are required to establish not only segmental identities (such as the Hox TFs), but also tissue and cell fate specification and differentiation (such as the NK-2 HDs, Six HDs and identity HDs (I-HDs)). Here we utilized the complete spectrum of DNA binding specificities determined by protein binding microarrays (PBMs) for a diverse collection of HDs to modify the nucleotide sequences of numerous mesodermal enhancers to be recognized by either no or a single subclass of HDs, and subsequently assayed the consequences of these changes on enhancer function in transgenic reporter assays. These studies show that individual mesodermal enhancers receive separate transcriptional input from both I-HD and Hox subclasses of HDs. In addition, we demonstrate that enhancers regulating upstream components of the mesodermal regulatory network are targeted by the Six class of HDs. Finally, we establish the necessity of NK-2 HD binding sequences to activate gene expression in multiple mesodermal tissues, supporting a potential role for the NK-2 HD TF Tinman (Tin) as a pioneer factor that cooperates with other factors to regulate cell-specific gene expression programs. Collectively, these results underscore the critical role played by HDs of multiple subclasses in inducing the unique genetic programs of individual mesodermal cells, and in coordinating the gene regulatory networks

  7. High affinity binding of /sup 125/I-labeled mouse interferon to a specific cell surface receptor. II. Analysis of binding properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguet, M.; Blanchard, B.

    1981-12-01

    Direct ligand-binding studies with highly purified /sup 125/I-labeled virus-induced mouse interferon on mouse lymphoma L 1210 cells revealed a direct correlation of specific high-affinity binding with the biologic response to interferon. Neutralization of the antiviral effect by anti-interferon gamma globulin occurred at the same antibody concentration as the inhibition of specific binding. These results suggest that specific high-affinity binding of /sup 125/I-interferon occurred at a biologically functional interferon receptor. Competitive inhibition experiments using /sup 125/I- and /sup 127/I-labeled interferon provided strong evidence that the fraction of /sup 125/I-interferon inactivated upon labeling did not bind specifically. Scatchard analysis of the binding data yielded linear plots and thus suggested that interferon binds to homogeneous noncooperative receptor sites. In contrast to a characteristic property of several peptide hormone systems, binding of /sup 125/I-interferon to its specific receptor did not induce subsequent ligand degradation. At 37/sup o/ bound interferon was rapidly released in a biologically active form without evidence for molecular degradation. The expression of interferon receptors was not modified by treatment with interferon. Trypsin treatment of target cells and inhibition of protein synthesis abolished the specific binding of /sup 125/I-interferon. Three major molecular weight species of Newcastle disease virus-induced mouse C 243 cell interferon were isolated, separated, and identified as mouse ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. interferons. These interferons were shown to inhibit competitively the specific binding of the highly purified labeled starting material thus providing evidence for a common receptor site for mouse interferon.

  8. SPECIFIC BINDING OF HUMAN BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN (2A) WITH MOUSE OSTEOBLASTIC CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘新平; 陈苏民; 陈南春; 高磊; 赵忠良

    1996-01-01

    Human bone morphogenetic protein 2A (hBMP2A) cDNA terminal 567 nucleotides were cloned and expressed in a phage display vector pCSM2I. Hulnata BMP2A C-terminal peptide displayed on the surface of the phage can bind specifically to the sttrface of mouse osteoblastie cell (MC3T3) membrane. ELISA assay showed a positive signal of the binding by using antibody against M13 phage gene 8 protein. After labeling with 3HTdR,the counts of the binding groups were 3 to 10 times higher than the control groups. It suggests that the'surface of MC3T3 cells exist the recepzor for hBMP2A.

  9. Obesity risk gene TMEM18 encodes a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaana M Jurvansuu

    Full Text Available Transmembrane protein 18 (TMEM18 has previously been connected to cell migration and obesity. However, the molecular function of the protein has not yet been described. Here we show that TMEM18 localises to the nuclear membrane and binds to DNA in a sequence-specific manner. The protein binds DNA with its positively charged C-terminus that contains also a nuclear localisation signal. Increase in the amount of TMEM18 in cells suppresses expression from a reporter vector with the TMEM18 target sequence. TMEM18 is a small protein of 140 residues and is predicted to be mostly alpha-helical with three transmembrane parts. As a consequence the DNA binding by TMEM18 would bring the chromatin very near to nuclear membrane. We speculate that this closed perinuclear localisation of TMEM18-bound DNA might repress transcription from it.

  10. Pharmacophore screening of the protein data bank for specific binding site chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna-Slater, Valérie; Arrowsmith, Andrew G; Zhao, Yong; Schapira, Matthieu

    2010-03-22

    A simple computational approach was developed to screen the Protein Data Bank (PDB) for putative pockets possessing a specific binding site chemistry and geometry. The method employs two commonly used 3D screening technologies, namely identification of cavities in protein structures and pharmacophore screening of chemical libraries. For each protein structure, a pocket finding algorithm is used to extract potential binding sites containing the correct types of residues, which are then stored in a large SDF-formatted virtual library; pharmacophore filters describing the desired binding site chemistry and geometry are then applied to screen this virtual library and identify pockets matching the specified structural chemistry. As an example, this approach was used to screen all human protein structures in the PDB and identify sites having chemistry similar to that of known methyl-lysine binding domains that recognize chromatin methylation marks. The selected genes include known readers of the histone code as well as novel binding pockets that may be involved in epigenetic signaling. Putative allosteric sites were identified on the structures of TP53BP1, L3MBTL3, CHEK1, KDM4A, and CREBBP.

  11. Screening of a specific peptide binding to esophageal squamous carcinoma cells from phage displayed peptide library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Caixia; Li, Chunyan; Jiang, Dongliang; Gao, Xiaojie; Han, Juanjuan; Xu, Nan; Wu, Qiong; Nie, Guochao; Chen, Wei; Lin, Fenghuei; Hou, Yingchun

    2015-06-01

    To select a specifically binding peptide for imaging detection of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), a phage-displayed 12-mer peptide library was used to screen the peptide that bind to ESCC cells specifically. After four rounds of bio-panning, the phage recovery rate gradually increased, and specific phage clones were effectively enriched. The 60 randomly selected phage clones were tested using cellular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and 41 phage clones were identified as positive clones with the over 2.10 ratio of absorbance higher than other clones, IRP and PBS controls. From the sequencing results of the positive clones, 14 peptide sequences were obtained and ESCP9 consensus sequence was identified as the peptide with best affinity to ESCC cells via competitive inhibition, fluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry. The results indicate that the peptide ESCP9 can bind to ESCC cells specifically and sensitively, and it is a potential candidate to be developed as an useful molecule to the imaging detection and targeting therapy for ESCC.

  12. Effect of AMP on mRNA binding by yeast NAD+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sondra L; Schirf, Virgil; McAlister-Henn, L

    2002-06-04

    Yeast mitochondrial NAD+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) has previously been shown to bind specifically to 5'-untranslated regions of yeast mitochondrial mRNAs, and transcripts containing these regions have been found to allosterically inhibit activity of the enzyme. This inhibition is relieved by AMP, an allosteric activator of this regulatory enzyme of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. We further investigated these enzyme/ligand interactions to determine if binding of RNA and AMP by IDH is competitive or independent. Gel mobility shift experiments indicated no effect of AMP on formation of an IDH/RNA complex. Similarly, sedimentation velocity ultracentrifugation experiments used to analyze interactions in solution indicated that AMP alone had little effect on the formation or stability of an RNA/IDH complex. However, when these sedimentation experiments were conducted in the presence of isocitrate, which has been shown to be essential for binding of AMP by IDH, the proportion of RNA sedimenting in a complex with IDH was significantly reduced by AMP. These results suggest that AMP can affect the binding of RNA by IDH but that this effect is apparent only in the presence of substrate. They also suggest that the catalytic activity of IDH in vivo may be subject to complex allosteric control determined by relative mitochondrial concentrations of mRNA, isocitrate, and AMP. We also found evidence for binding of 5'-untranslated regions of mitochondrial mRNAs by yeast mitochondrial NADP+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDP1) but not by the corresponding cytosolic isozyme (IDP2). However, this appears to be a nonspecific interaction since no evidence was obtained for any effect on the catalytic activity of IDP1.

  13. Study of the effect hydrogen binding in the solvation of alkaline earth cations with MeOH in nitromethane using 1 H NMR technique and determination of ionic solvation number

    CERN Document Server

    Alizadeh, N

    2001-01-01

    A proton NMR method for the study of the effect hydrogen binding and determination of solvation numbers of alkaline earth cations with methanol (MeOH) in in tromethane (NM) as diluent is described. The method is based on monitoring the resonance frequency of MeOH protons as a function of MeOH to metal ion mole ratio at constant metal ion concentration. the average solvation number of cation, n, at any MeOH/ metal ion mole ration was calculated from the NMR chemical shift-mole ration data and was plotted against the mole ration values. The solvation numbers of alkaline earth cations were obtained from the limiting values of the corresponding n, vs. mole ratio plots.

  14. EO-199, a specific antagonist of antiarrhythmic drugs: Assessment by binding experiments and in vivo studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oppenheimer, E.; Harel, G.; Lipinsky, D.; Sarne, Y. (Tel-Aviv Univ. (Israel))

    1991-01-01

    EO-199, a demethylated analog of the novel class I antiarrhythmic drug EO-122 was found to antagonize the antiarrhythmic activity of EO-122 and that of procainamide (Class I{sub A}). EO-199 did not block significantly the activity of a class I{sub B} antiarrhythmic agent, lidocaine. EO-199 also displaced the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)EO-122 to rate heart membranes similarly to procainamide whereas lidocaine did not. The correlation between binding experiments and pharmacological effects points to a possible subclassification of these drugs; the two chemical analogs EO-199 and EO-122, as well as procainamide (I{sub A}) but not lidocaine (I{sub B}), compete at the same site or the same state of the sodium channel. The availability of a specific antagonist might be useful for studying the mechanism of action of antiarrhythmic drugs as well as an antidote in cases of antiarrhythmics overdose intoxication.

  15. Identification of key residues in the A-Raf kinase important for phosphoinositide lipid binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lindsey M; James, Kristy M; Chamberlain, M Dean; Anderson, Deborah H

    2005-03-01

    Raf kinases are involved in regulating cellular signal transduction pathways in response to a wide variety of external stimuli. Upstream signals generate activated Ras-GTP, important for the relocalization of Raf kinases to the membrane. Upon full activation, Raf kinases phosphorylate and activate downstream kinase in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. The Raf family of kinases has three members, Raf-1, B-Raf, and A-Raf. The ability of Raf-1 and B-Raf to bind phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidic acid (PA) has been show to facilitate Raf membrane associations and regulate Raf kinase activity. We have characterized the lipid binding properties of A-Raf, as well as further characterized those of Raf-1. Both A-Raf and Raf-1 were found to bind to 3-, 4-, and 5-monophosphorylated phosphoinositides [PI(3)P, PI(4)P, and PI(5)P] as well as phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate [PI(3,5)P(2)]. In addition, A-Raf also bound specifically to phosphatidylinositol 4,5- and 3,4-bisphosphates [PI(4,5)P(2) and PI(3,4)P(2)] and to PA. A mutational analysis of A-Raf localized the PI(4,5)P(2) binding site to two basic residues (K50 and R52) within the Ras binding domain. Additionally, an A-Raf mutant lacking the first 199 residues [i.e., the entire conserved region 1 (CR1) domain] bound the same phospholipids as full-length Raf-1. This suggests that a second region of A-Raf between amino acids 200 and 606 was responsible for interactions with the monophosphorylated PIs and PI(3,5)P(2). These results raise the possibility that Raf-1 and A-Raf bind to specific phosphoinositides as a mechanism to localize them to particular membrane microdomains rich in these phospholipids. Moreover, the differences in their lipid binding profiles could contribute to their proposed isoform-specific Raf functions.

  16. Thermodynamic and structural investigation of the specific SDS binding of humicola insolens cutinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kold, David; Dauter, Zbigniew; Laustsen, Anne K;

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of lipolytic enzymes with anionic surfactants is of great interest with respect to industrially produced detergents. Here, we report the interaction of cutinase from the thermophilic fungus Humicola insolens with the anionic surfactant SDS, and show the enzyme specifically binds a......, unexpectedly, esterification of the active site serine is accompanied by the ethylation of the active site histidine which flips out from its usual position in the triad....

  17. Selective inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 by targeting a substrate-specific secondary binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn-Wache, Kerstin; Bär, Joachim W; Hoffmann, Torsten; Wolf, Raik; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-03-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4/CD26 (DP4) is a multifunctional serine protease liberating dipeptide from the N-terminus of (oligo)peptides which can modulate the activity of these peptides. The enzyme is involved in physiological processes such as blood glucose homeostasis and immune response. DP4 substrate specificity is characterized in detail using synthetic dipeptide derivatives. The specificity constant k(cat)/K(m) strongly depends on the amino acid in P₁-position for proline, alanine, glycine and serine with 5.0 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 1.8 x 10⁴ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 3.6 x 10² M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 1.1 x 10² M⁻¹ s⁻¹, respectively. By contrast, kinetic investigation of larger peptide substrates yields a different pattern. The specific activity of DP4 for neuropeptide Y (NPY) cleavage comprising a proline in P₁-position is the same range as the k(cat)/K(m) values of NPY derivatives containing alanine or serine in P₁-position with 4 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 9.5 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹ and 2.1 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, respectively. The proposed existence of an additional binding region outside the catalytic center is supported by measurements of peptide substrates with extended chain length. This 'secondary' binding site interaction depends on the amino acid sequence in P₄'-P₈'-position. Interactions with this binding site could be specifically blocked for substrates of the GRF/glucagon peptide family. By contrast, substrates not belonging to this peptide family and dipeptide derivative substrates that only bind to the catalytic center of DP4 were not inhibited. This more selective inhibition approach allows, for the first time, to distinguish between substrate families by substrate-discriminating inhibitors.

  18. A Novel DNA Binding Mechanism for maf Basic Region-Leucine Zipper Factors Inferred from a MafA-DNA Complex Structure and Binding Specificities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xun; Guanga, Gerald P; Wan, Cheng; Rose, Robert B [Z; (W Elec.); (NCSU)

    2012-11-13

    MafA is a proto-oncoprotein and is critical for insulin gene expression in pancreatic β-cells. Maf proteins belong to the AP1 superfamily of basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors. Residues in the basic helix and an ancillary N-terminal domain, the Extended Homology Region (EHR), endow maf proteins with unique DNA binding properties: binding a 13 bp consensus site consisting of a core AP1 site (TGACTCA) flanked by TGC sequences and binding DNA stably as monomers. To further characterize maf DNA binding, we determined the structure of a MafA–DNA complex. MafA forms base-specific hydrogen bonds with the flanking G–5C–4 and central C0/G0 bases, but not with the core-TGA bases. However, in vitro binding studies utilizing a pulse–chase electrophoretic mobility shift assay protocol revealed that mutating either the core-TGA or flanking-TGC bases dramatically increases the binding off rate. Comparing the known maf structures, we propose that DNA binding specificity results from positioning the basic helix through unique phosphate contacts. The EHR does not contact DNA directly but stabilizes DNA binding by contacting the basic helix. Collectively, these results suggest a novel multistep DNA binding process involving a conformational change from contacting the core-TGA to contacting the flanking-TGC bases.

  19. Subfamily-specific adaptations in the structures of two penicillin-binding proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniil M Prigozhin

    Full Text Available Beta-lactam antibiotics target penicillin-binding proteins including several enzyme classes essential for bacterial cell-wall homeostasis. To better understand the functional and inhibitor-binding specificities of penicillin-binding proteins from the pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we carried out structural and phylogenetic analysis of two predicted D,D-carboxypeptidases, Rv2911 and Rv3330. Optimization of Rv2911 for crystallization using directed evolution and the GFP folding reporter method yielded a soluble quadruple mutant. Structures of optimized Rv2911 bound to phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and Rv3330 bound to meropenem show that, in contrast to the nonspecific inhibitor, meropenem forms an extended interaction with the enzyme along a conserved surface. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Rv2911 and Rv3330 belong to different clades that emerged in Actinobacteria and are not represented in model organisms such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Clade-specific adaptations allow these enzymes to fulfill distinct physiological roles despite strict conservation of core catalytic residues. The characteristic differences include potential protein-protein interaction surfaces and specificity-determining residues surrounding the catalytic site. Overall, these structural insights lay the groundwork to develop improved beta-lactam therapeutics for tuberculosis.

  20. The RFA regulatory sequence-binding protein in the promoter of prostate-specific antigen gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    To assure what sequence associated with the androgen regulation, a 15 bp region at the upstream of the ARE of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) promoter, termed RFA, was found indispensable for androgen receptor (AR)-mediated transactivation of PSA promoter. In transfection and CAT assays, some nucleotides substitution in RFA could significantly decrease the androgen inducibility for PSA promoter. The in vitro DNA binding assay demonstrated that RFA bound specifically with some non-receptor protein factors in prostate cell nucleus, but the mutant type of RFA lost this ability, so RFA might be a novel accessory cis-element. The RFA-binding proteins were isolated and purified by affinity chromatography using RFA probes. SDS-PAGE and preliminary protein identification showed these proteins possessed sequence high homology with multifunctional protein heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1, A2 (hnRNP A1, A2). RFA-binding proteins possibly cooperate with AR-mediated transactivation for PSA promoter as coactivator. The study results will facilitate further understanding the mechanism and tissue specificity of PSA promoter.

  1. Hydrophobic fluorescent probes introduce artifacts into single molecule tracking experiments due to non-specific binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti-Domingues, Laura C; Tynan, Christopher J; Rolfe, Daniel J; Clarke, David T; Martin-Fernandez, Marisa

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques are powerful tools to investigate the structure and dynamics of macromolecular complexes; however, data quality can suffer because of weak specific signal, background noise and dye bleaching and blinking. It is less well-known, but equally important, that non-specific binding of probe to substrates results in a large number of immobile fluorescent molecules, introducing significant artifacts in live cell experiments. Following from our previous work in which we investigated glass coating substrates and demonstrated that the main contribution to this non-specific probe adhesion comes from the dye, we carried out a systematic investigation of how different dye chemistries influence the behaviour of spectrally similar fluorescent probes. Single-molecule brightness, bleaching and probe mobility on the surface of live breast cancer cells cultured on a non-adhesive substrate were assessed for anti-EGFR affibody conjugates with 14 different dyes from 5 different manufacturers, belonging to 3 spectrally homogeneous bands (491 nm, 561 nm and 638 nm laser lines excitation). Our results indicate that, as well as influencing their photophysical properties, dye chemistry has a strong influence on the propensity of dye-protein conjugates to adhere non-specifically to the substrate. In particular, hydrophobicity has a strong influence on interactions with the substrate, with hydrophobic dyes showing much greater levels of binding. Crucially, high levels of non-specific substrate binding result in calculated diffusion coefficients significantly lower than the true values. We conclude that the physic-chemical properties of the dyes should be considered carefully when planning single-molecule experiments. Favourable dye characteristics such as photostability and brightness can be offset by the propensity of a conjugate for non-specific adhesion.

  2. Hydrophobic fluorescent probes introduce artifacts into single molecule tracking experiments due to non-specific binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura C Zanetti-Domingues

    Full Text Available Single-molecule techniques are powerful tools to investigate the structure and dynamics of macromolecular complexes; however, data quality can suffer because of weak specific signal, background noise and dye bleaching and blinking. It is less well-known, but equally important, that non-specific binding of probe to substrates results in a large number of immobile fluorescent molecules, introducing significant artifacts in live cell experiments. Following from our previous work in which we investigated glass coating substrates and demonstrated that the main contribution to this non-specific probe adhesion comes from the dye, we carried out a systematic investigation of how different dye chemistries influence the behaviour of spectrally similar fluorescent probes. Single-molecule brightness, bleaching and probe mobility on the surface of live breast cancer cells cultured on a non-adhesive substrate were assessed for anti-EGFR affibody conjugates with 14 different dyes from 5 different manufacturers, belonging to 3 spectrally homogeneous bands (491 nm, 561 nm and 638 nm laser lines excitation. Our results indicate that, as well as influencing their photophysical properties, dye chemistry has a strong influence on the propensity of dye-protein conjugates to adhere non-specifically to the substrate. In particular, hydrophobicity has a strong influence on interactions with the substrate, with hydrophobic dyes showing much greater levels of binding. Crucially, high levels of non-specific substrate binding result in calculated diffusion coefficients significantly lower than the true values. We conclude that the physic-chemical properties of the dyes should be considered carefully when planning single-molecule experiments. Favourable dye characteristics such as photostability and brightness can be offset by the propensity of a conjugate for non-specific adhesion.

  3. Identification of fluorescent compounds with non-specific binding property via high throughput live cell microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Nath

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Compounds exhibiting low non-specific intracellular binding or non-stickiness are concomitant with rapid clearing and in high demand for live-cell imaging assays because they allow for intracellular receptor localization with a high signal/noise ratio. The non-stickiness property is particularly important for imaging intracellular receptors due to the equilibria involved. METHOD: Three mammalian cell lines with diverse genetic backgrounds were used to screen a combinatorial fluorescence library via high throughput live cell microscopy for potential ligands with high in- and out-flux properties. The binding properties of ligands identified from the first screen were subsequently validated on plant root hair. A correlative analysis was then performed between each ligand and its corresponding physiochemical and structural properties. RESULTS: The non-stickiness property of each ligand was quantified as a function of the temporal uptake and retention on a cell-by-cell basis. Our data shows that (i mammalian systems can serve as a pre-screening tool for complex plant species that are not amenable to high-throughput imaging; (ii retention and spatial localization of chemical compounds vary within and between each cell line; and (iii the structural similarities of compounds can infer their non-specific binding properties. CONCLUSION: We have validated a protocol for identifying chemical compounds with non-specific binding properties that is testable across diverse species. Further analysis reveals an overlap between the non-stickiness property and the structural similarity of compounds. The net result is a more robust screening assay for identifying desirable ligands that can be used to monitor intracellular localization. Several new applications of the screening protocol and results are also presented.

  4. Recombinant spider silk with cell binding motifs for specific adherence of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widhe, Mona; Johansson, Ulrika; Hillerdahl, Carl-Olof; Hedhammar, My

    2013-11-01

    Silk matrices have previously been shown to possess general properties governing cell viability. However, many cell types also require specific adhesion sites for successful in vitro culture. Herein, we have shown that cell binding motifs can be genetically fused to a partial spider silk protein, 4RepCT, without affecting its ability to self-assemble into stable matrices directly in a physiological-like buffer. The incorporated motifs were exposed in the formed matrices, and available for binding of integrins. Four different human primary cell types; fibroblasts, keratinocytes, endothelial cells and Schwann cells, were applied to the matrices and investigated under serum-free culture conditions. Silk matrices with cell binding motifs, especially RGD, were shown to promote early adherence of cells, which formed stress fibers and distinct focal adhesion points. Schwann cells acquired most spread-out morphology on silk matrices with IKVAV, where significantly more viable cells were found, also when compared to wells coated with laminin. This strategy is thus suitable for development of matrices that allow screening of various cell binding motifs and their effect on different cell types.

  5. Affinity maturation generates greatly improved xyloglucan-specific carbohydrate binding modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cicortas Gunnarsson Lavinia

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular evolution of carbohydrate binding modules (CBM is a new approach for the generation of glycan-specific molecular probes. To date, the possibility of performing affinity maturation on CBM has not been investigated. In this study we show that binding characteristics such as affinity can be improved for CBM generated from the CBM4-2 scaffold by using random mutagenesis in combination with phage display technology. Results Two modified proteins with greatly improved affinity for xyloglucan, a key polysaccharide abundant in the plant kingdom crucial for providing plant support, were generated. Both improved modules differ from other existing xyloglucan probes by binding to galactose-decorated subunits of xyloglucan. The usefulness of the evolved binders was verified by staining of plant sections, where they performed better than the xyloglucan-binding module from which they had been derived. They discriminated non-fucosylated from fucosylated xyloglucan as shown by their ability to stain only the endosperm, rich in non-fucosylated xyloglucan, but not the integument rich in fucosylated xyloglucan, on tamarind seed sections. Conclusion We conclude that affinity maturation of CBM selected from molecular libraries based on the CBM4-2 scaffold is possible and has the potential to generate new analytical tools for detection of plant carbohydrates.

  6. Related lectins from snowdrop and maize differ in their carbohydrate-binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouquaert, Elke; Smith, David F; Peumans, Willy J; Proost, Paul; Balzarini, Jan; Savvides, Savvas N; Damme, Els J M Van

    2009-03-01

    Searches in an EST database from maize revealed the expression of a protein related to the Galanthus nivalis (GNA) agglutinin, referred to as GNA(maize). Heterologous expression of GNA(maize) in Pichia pastoris allowed characterization of the first nucleocytoplasmic GNA homolog from plants. GNA(maize) is a tetrameric protein which shares 64% sequence similarity with GNA. Glycan microarray analyses revealed important differences in the specificity. Unlike GNA, which binds strongly to high-mannose N-glycans, the lectin from maize reacts almost exclusively with more complex glycans. Interestingly, GNA(maize) prefers complex glycans containing beta1-2 GlcNAc residues. The obvious difference in carbohydrate-binding properties is accompanied by a 100-fold reduced anti-HIV activity. Although the sequences of GNA and GNA(maize) are clearly related they show only 28% sequence identity. Our results indicate that gene divergence within the family of GNA-related lectins leads to changes in carbohydrate-binding specificity, as shown on N-glycan arrays.

  7. Bacteriophage epitope libraries. The generation of specific binding proteins and peptides in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, L M; Hsu, P L

    1994-01-01

    New concepts and methodologies that can be used to generate proteins, such as specific variable regions of immunoglobulins and other binding peptides in an in vitro selection system are reviewed. These technologies can also be used to alter the kinetics, affinity and avidity of various binding interactions. The nature of epitopes recognized by specific antibodies or receptors can be delineated using selected epitopes displayed on bacteriophages. The basic principles of the technology is predicted upon the belief that if one has a large enough variety of keys, one can open any given lock. The range of utility of these systems to generate new reagents will impact upon the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic reagents. This technology should allow for a much wider range of probes which may have increased binding capacity and allow the development of more sensitive assays with higher signal to noise ratios. These reagents can be produced more efficiently without the use of animals and will be used in diagnostic and experimental pathology. This brief review presents a concise description of the concepts and uses of this new technology. Selected references and reviews are given as sources for further details.

  8. A novel and highly specific phage endolysin cell wall binding domain for detection of Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Minsuk; Sim, Jieun; Kang, Taejoon; Nguyen, Hoang Hiep; Park, Hyun Kyu; Chung, Bong Hyun; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2015-09-01

    Rapid, specific and sensitive detection of pathogenic bacteria is crucial for public health and safety. Bacillus cereus is harmful as it causes foodborne illness and a number of systemic and local infections. We report a novel phage endolysin cell wall-binding domain (CBD) for B. cereus and the development of a highly specific and sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based B. cereus detection method using the CBD. The newly discovered CBD from endolysin of PBC1, a B. cereus-specific bacteriophage, provides high specificity and binding capacity to B. cereus. By using the CBD-modified SPR chips, B. cereus can be detected at the range of 10(5)-10(8) CFU/ml. More importantly, the detection limit can be improved to 10(2) CFU/ml by using a subtractive inhibition assay based on the pre-incubation of B. cereus and CBDs, removal of CBD-bound B. cereus, and SPR detection of the unbound CBDs. The present study suggests that the small and genetically engineered CBDs can be promising biological probes for B. cereus. We anticipate that the CBD-based SPR-sensing methods will be useful for the sensitive, selective, and rapid detection of B. cereus.

  9. Specific detection of avidin-biotin binding using liquid crystal droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mashooq; Park, Soo-Young

    2015-03-01

    Poly(acrylicacid-b-4-cynobiphenyl-4'-undecylacrylate) (PAA-b-LCP)-functionalized 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) droplets were made by using microfluidic technique. The PAA chains on the 5CB droplets, were biotinylated, and used to specifically detect avidin-biotin binding at the 5CB/aqueous interface. The avidin-biotin binding was characterized by the configurational change (from radial to bipolar) of the 5CB droplets, as observed through a polarized optical microscope. The maximum biotinylation was obtained by injecting a >100 μg/mL biotin aqueous solution, which enabled a limit of detection of 0.5 μg/mL avidin. This droplet biosensor could specifically detect avidin against other proteins such as bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, hemoglobin, and chymotrypsinogen solutions. Avidin detection with 5CBPAA-biotin droplets having high sensitivity, specificity, and stability demonstrates new applications of the functionalized liquid crystal droplets that can detect specific proteins or other analytes through a ligand/receptor model.

  10. Specific Fluorine Labeling of the HyHEL10 Antibody Affects Antigen Binding and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acchione, Mauro; Lee, Yi-Chien; DeSantis, Morgan E.; Lipschultz, Claudia A.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Li, Mi; Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Walter, Richard L.; Smith-Gill, Sandra; Barchi, Jr., Joseph J. (SAIC); (NCI)

    2012-10-16

    To more fully understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for variations in binding affinity with antibody maturation, we explored the use of site specific fluorine labeling and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Several single-chain (scFv) antibodies, derived from an affinity-matured series of anti-hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) mouse IgG1, were constructed with either complete or individual replacement of tryptophan residues with 5-fluorotryptophan ({sup 5F}W). An array of biophysical techniques was used to gain insight into the impact of fluorine substitution on the overall protein structure and antigen binding. SPR measurements indicated that {sup 5F}W incorporation lowered binding affinity for the HEL antigen. The degree of analogue impact was residue-dependent, and the greatest decrease in affinity was observed when {sup 5F}W was substituted for residues near the binding interface. In contrast, corresponding crystal structures in complex with HEL were essentially indistinguishable from the unsubstituted antibody. {sup 19}F NMR analysis showed severe overlap of signals in the free fluorinated protein that was resolved upon binding to antigen, suggesting very distinct chemical environments for each {sup 5F}W in the complex. Preliminary relaxation analysis suggested the presence of chemical exchange in the antibody-antigen complex that could not be observed by X-ray crystallography. These data demonstrate that fluorine NMR can be an extremely useful tool for discerning structural changes in scFv antibody-antigen complexes with altered function that may not be discernible by other biophysical techniques.

  11. Microscale characterization of the binding specificity and affinity of a monoclonal antisulfotyrosyl IgG antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, K.S.; Bradbury, A.R.; Heegaard, N.H.;

    2008-01-01

    peptides and proteins. The data show that the anti-Tyr(SO(3)H) antibody is completely specific for compounds containing sulfated tyrosyls. Affinity electrophoresis experiments allowed us to estimate dissociation constants for sulfated hirudin fragment (56-65), gastrin-17, and cholecystokinin octapeptide...... (CCK8) in the 1-3 microM range. The affinity of the antibody toward complement 4 protein that contains three sulfotyrosines was analyzed by surface plasmon resonance technology and modeled according to a bivalent-binding model which yielded a K(d1) of 20.1 microM for the monovalent complex. The same...... binding was studied by CE and found to be in the micromolar scale albeit with some uncertainty due to complex separation patterns. The work illustrates the amount of information on antibody-antigen interactions that may be obtained with microelectrophoretic methods consuming minute quantities of material...

  12. In vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging monitors binding of specific probes to cancer biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasaman Ardeshirpour

    Full Text Available One of the most important factors in choosing a treatment strategy for cancer is characterization of biomarkers in cancer cells. Particularly, recent advances in Monoclonal Antibodies (MAB as primary-specific drugs targeting tumor receptors show that their efficacy depends strongly on characterization of tumor biomarkers. Assessment of their status in individual patients would facilitate selection of an optimal treatment strategy, and the continuous monitoring of those biomarkers and their binding process to the therapy would provide a means for early evaluation of the efficacy of therapeutic intervention. In this study we have demonstrated for the first time in live animals that the fluorescence lifetime can be used to detect the binding of targeted optical probes to the extracellular receptors on tumor cells in vivo. The rationale was that fluorescence lifetime of a specific probe is sensitive to local environment and/or affinity to other molecules. We attached Near-InfraRed (NIR fluorescent probes to Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 (HER2/neu-specific Affibody molecules and used our time-resolved optical system to compare the fluorescence lifetime of the optical probes that were bound and unbound to tumor cells in live mice. Our results show that the fluorescence lifetime changes in our model system delineate HER2 receptor bound from the unbound probe in vivo. Thus, this method is useful as a specific marker of the receptor binding process, which can open a new paradigm in the "image and treat" concept, especially for early evaluation of the efficacy of the therapy.

  13. Structural basis for variant-specific neuroligin-binding by α-neurexin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Tanaka

    Full Text Available Neurexins (Nrxs are presynaptic membrane proteins with a single membrane-spanning domain that mediate asymmetric trans-synaptic cell adhesion by binding to their postsynaptic receptor neuroligins. α-Nrx has a large extracellular region comprised of multiple copies of laminin, neurexin, sex-hormone-binding globulin (LNS domains and epidermal growth factor (EGF modules, while that of β-Nrx has but a single LNS domain. It has long been known that the larger α-Nrx and the shorter β-Nrx show distinct binding behaviors toward different isoforms/variants of neuroligins, although the underlying mechanism has yet to be elucidated. Here, we describe the crystal structure of a fragment corresponding to the C-terminal one-third of the Nrx1α ectodomain, consisting of LNS5-EGF3-LNS6. The 2.3 Å-resolution structure revealed the presence of a domain configuration that was rigidified by inter-domain contacts, as opposed to the more common flexible "beads-on-a-string" arrangement. Although the neuroligin-binding site on the LNS6 domain was completely exposed, the location of the α-Nrx specific LNS5-EGF3 segment proved incompatible with the loop segment inserted in the B+ neuroligin variant, which explains the variant-specific neuroligin recognition capability observed in α-Nrx. This, combined with a low-resolution molecular envelope obtained by a single particle reconstruction performed on negatively stained full-length Nrx1α sample, allowed us to derive a structural model of the α-Nrx ectodomain. This model will help us understand not only how the large α-Nrx ectodomain is accommodated in the synaptic cleft, but also how the trans-synaptic adhesion mediated by α- and β-Nrxs could differentially affect synaptic structure and function.

  14. ProteDNA: a sequence-based predictor of sequence-specific DNA-binding residues in transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wen-Yi; Huang, Yu-Feng; Huang, Chun-Chin; Cheng, Yi-Sheng; Huang, Chien-Kang; Oyang, Yen-Jen

    2009-07-01

    This article presents the design of a sequence-based predictor named ProteDNA for identifying the sequence-specific binding residues in a transcription factor (TF). Concerning protein-DNA interactions, there are two types of binding mechanisms involved, namely sequence-specific binding and nonspecific binding. Sequence-specific bindings occur between protein sidechains and nucleotide bases and correspond to sequence-specific recognition of genes. Therefore, sequence-specific bindings are essential for correct gene regulation. In this respect, ProteDNA is distinctive since it has been designed to identify sequence-specific binding residues. In order to accommodate users with different application needs, ProteDNA has been designed to operate under two modes, namely, the high-precision mode and the balanced mode. According to the experiments reported in this article, under the high-precision mode, ProteDNA has been able to deliver precision of 82.3%, specificity of 99.3%, sensitivity of 49.8% and accuracy of 96.5%. Meanwhile, under the balanced mode, ProteDNA has been able to deliver precision of 60.8%, specificity of 97.6%, sensitivity of 60.7% and accuracy of 95.4%. ProteDNA is available at the following websites: http://protedna.csbb.ntu.edu.tw/, http://protedna.csie.ntu.edu.tw/, http://bio222.esoe.ntu.edu.tw/ProteDNA/.

  15. A cellular protein specifically binds to the 3'-terminal sequences of hepatitis C virus intermediate negative-strand RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王巍; 邓庆丽; 黄开红; 段朝晖; 邵静; 黄志清; 黄志明

    2003-01-01

    ObjectiveTo study the mechanism of the cellular proteins involved in the process of replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) negative-strand RNA.MethodsUltraviolet (UV) cross-linking was used to identify the cellular proteins that would bind to the 3'-end of HCV negative-strand RNA. Competition experimentwas used to confirm the specificity of this binding, in which excess nonhomologous protein and RNA transcripts were used as competitors. The required binding sequence was determined by mapping, then the binding site was predicted through secondary structure analysis.ResultsA cellular protein of 45 kD (p45) was found to bind specifically to the 3'-endof HCV negative-strand RNA by UV cross-linking. nhomologous proteins and RNA transcripts could not compete out this binding, whereas the unlabeled 3'-endof HCV negative-strand RNA could. Mapping of the protein-binding site suggested that the 3'-end 131-278nt of HCV negative-strand RNA was the possible protein-binding region. Analysis of RNA secondary structure presumed that the potential binding site was located at 194-GAAAGAAC-201. ConclusionThe cellular protein p45 could specifically bind to the secondary structure of the 3'-end of HCV intermediate negative-strand RNA, and may play an important role in HCV RNA replication.

  16. The PickPocket method for predicting binding specificities for receptors based on receptor pocket similarities: application to MHC-peptide binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, H.; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, M.

    2009-01-01

    of the specificities of MHC molecules in this library weighted by the similarity of their pocket-residues to the query. This PickPocket method is demonstrated to accurately predict MHC-peptide binding for a broad range of MHC alleles, including human and non-human species. In contrast to neural network-based pan......-specific methods, PickPocket was shown to be robust both when data is scarce and when the similarity to MHC molecules with characterized binding specificity is low. A consensus method combining the PickPocket and NetMHCpan methods was shown to achieve superior predictive performance. This study demonstrates how...

  17. Mechanism of selective VEGF-A binding by neuropilin-1 reveals a basis for specific ligand inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W Parker

    Full Text Available Neuropilin (Nrp receptors function as essential cell surface receptors for the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF family of proangiogenic cytokines and the semaphorin 3 (Sema3 family of axon guidance molecules. There are two Nrp homologues, Nrp1 and Nrp2, which bind to both overlapping and distinct members of the VEGF and Sema3 family of molecules. Nrp1 specifically binds the VEGF-A(164/5 isoform, which is essential for developmental angiogenesis. We demonstrate that VEGF-A specific binding is governed by Nrp1 residues in the b1 coagulation factor domain surrounding the invariant Nrp C-terminal arginine binding pocket. Further, we show that Sema3F does not display the Nrp-specific binding to the b1 domain seen with VEGF-A. Engineered soluble Nrp receptor fragments that selectively sequester ligands from the active signaling complex are an attractive modality for selectively blocking the angiogenic and chemorepulsive functions of Nrp ligands. Utilizing the information on Nrp ligand binding specificity, we demonstrate Nrp constructs that specifically sequester Sema3 in the presence of VEGF-A. This establishes that unique mechanisms are used by Nrp receptors to mediate specific ligand binding and that these differences can be exploited to engineer soluble Nrp receptors with specificity for Sema3.

  18. Steric mechanism of auto-inhibitory regulation of specific and non-specific DNA binding by the ETS transcriptional repressor ETV6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Soumya; Chan, Anson C K; Coyne, H Jerome; Bhachech, Niraja; Hermsdorf, Ulrike; Okon, Mark; Murphy, Michael E P; Graves, Barbara J; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2014-04-03

    DNA binding by the ETS transcriptional repressor ETV6 (or TEL) is auto-inhibited ~50-fold due to an α-helix that sterically blocks its ETS domain binding interface. Using NMR spectroscopy, we demonstrate that this marginally stable helix is unfolded, and not displaced to a non-inhibitory position, when ETV6 is bound to DNA containing a consensus (5')GGAA(3') recognition site. Although significantly lower in affinity, binding to non-specific DNA is auto-inhibited ~5-fold and is also accompanied by helix unfolding. Based on NMR chemical shift perturbations, both specific and non-specific DNA are bound via the same canonical ETS domain interface. However, spectral perturbations are smaller for the non-specific complex, suggesting weaker and less well-defined interactions than in the specific complex. In parallel, the crystal structure of ETV6 bound to a specific DNA duplex was determined. The structure of this complex reveals that a non-conserved histidine residue in the ETS domain recognition helix helps establish the specificity of ETV6 for DNA-binding sites containing (5')GGAA(3')versus(5')GGAT(3'). These studies provide a unified steric mechanism for attenuating ETV6 binding to both specific and non-specific DNA and expand the repertoire of characterized auto-inhibitory strategies utilized to regulate ETS factors.

  19. Altered Specificity of DNA-Binding Proteins with Transition Metal Dimerization Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenoud, Bernard; Schepartz, Alanna

    1993-01-01

    The bZIP motif is characterized by a leucine zipper domain that mediates dimerization and a basic domain that contacts DNA. A series of transition metal dimerization domains were used to alter systematically the relative orientation of basic domain peptides. Both the affinity and the specificity of the peptide-DNA interaction depend on domain orientation. These results indicate that the precise configuration linking the domains is important; dimerization is not always sufficient for DNA binding. This approach to studying the effect of orientation on protein function complements mutagenesis and could be used in many systems.

  20. Analysis of a mutation affecting the specificity domain for prohead binding of the bacteriophage lambda terminase.

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Genetic studies have identified a specificity domain for prohead binding in the C-terminal 32 amino acids of gpA, the large subunit of bacteriophage lambda terminase (S. Frackman, D. A. Siegele, and M. Feiss, J. Mol. Biol. 180:283-300, 1984). In the present work, an amber mutation, Aam42, in the fifth-to-last codon of the A gene was found to be lethal in nonsuppressing hosts. The mutation, expected to generate gpA lacking the last five amino acids, caused the production of a terminase that cu...

  1. Novel Prostate Specific Antigen plastic antibody designed withcharged binding sites for an improved protein binding and itsapplication in a biosensor of potentiometric transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Rebelo, Tânia S. C. R.; Santos, C.; Costa-Rodrigues, J.; Fernandes, M. H.; Noronha, João P. C.; Sales, M. Goreti F.

    2014-01-01

    This work shows that the synthesis of protein plastic antibodies tailored with selected charged monomersaround the binding site enhances protein binding. These charged receptor sites are placed over a neutralpolymeric matrix, thus inducing a suitable orientation the protein reception to its site. This is confirmed bypreparing control materials with neutral monomers and also with non-imprinted template. This concepthas been applied here to Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), the protein of choice...

  2. Divergence of Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA binding factor (PUF) protein specificity through variations in an RNA-binding pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chen; Kershner, Aaron; Wang, Yeming; Holley, Cynthia P; Wilinski, Daniel; Keles, Sunduz; Kimble, Judith; Wickens, Marvin; Hall, Traci M Tanaka

    2012-02-24

    mRNA control networks depend on recognition of specific RNA sequences. Pumilio-fem-3 mRNA binding factor (PUF) RNA-binding proteins achieve that specificity through variations on a conserved scaffold. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Puf3p achieves specificity through an additional binding pocket for a cytosine base upstream of the core RNA recognition site. Here we demonstrate that this chemically simple adaptation is prevalent and contributes to the diversity of RNA specificities among PUF proteins. Bioinformatics analysis shows that mRNAs associated with Caenorhabditis elegans fem-3 mRNA binding factor (FBF)-2 in vivo contain an upstream cytosine required for biological regulation. Crystal structures of FBF-2 and C. elegans PUF-6 reveal binding pockets structurally similar to that of Puf3p, whereas sequence alignments predict a pocket in PUF-11. For Puf3p, FBF-2, PUF-6, and PUF-11, the upstream pockets and a cytosine are required for maximal binding to RNA, but the quantitative impact on binding affinity varies. Furthermore, the position of the upstream cytosine relative to the core PUF recognition site can differ, which in the case of FBF-2 originally masked the identification of this consensus sequence feature. Importantly, other PUF proteins lack the pocket and so do not discriminate upstream bases. A structure-based alignment reveals that these proteins lack key residues that would contact the cytosine, and in some instances, they also present amino acid side chains that interfere with binding. Loss of the pocket requires only substitution of one serine, as appears to have occurred during the evolution of certain fungal species.

  3. Analysis of a mutation affecting the specificity domain for prohead binding of the bacteriophage lambda terminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sippy, J; Feiss, M

    1992-02-01

    Genetic studies have identified a specificity domain for prohead binding in the C-terminal 32 amino acids of gpA, the large subunit of bacteriophage lambda terminase (S. Frackman, D. A. Siegele, and M. Feiss, J. Mol. Biol. 180:283-300, 1984). In the present work, an amber mutation, Aam42, in the fifth-to-last codon of the A gene was found to be lethal in nonsuppressing hosts. The mutation, expected to generate gpA lacking the last five amino acids, caused the production of a terminase that cut cos efficiently both in vivo and in vitro but was defective in DNA packaging. lambda Aam42 lysates contained unused proheads, consistent with a defect in prohead binding. Aam42 terminase was more strongly dependent than wild-type terminase on gpFI, the catalyst of prohead binding. Like wild-type terminase, Aam42 terminase did not cut cos in vivo when prohead assembly was blocked by a mutation in one of the genes encoding the prohead.

  4. PTPRT regulates the interaction of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 with Syntaxin 1 through dephosphorylation of specific tyrosine residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, So-Hee; Moon, Jeonghee [Biomedical Proteomics Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Myungkyu [Bionanotechnology Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Ran, E-mail: leejr@kribb.re.kr [Biomedical Proteomics Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •PTPRT is a brain-specific, expressed, protein tyrosine phosphatase. •PTPRT regulated the interaction of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 with Syntaxin 1. •PTPRT dephosphorylated the specific tyrosine residue of Syntaxin-binding protein 1. •Dephosphorylation of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 enhanced the interaction with Syntaxin 1. •PTPRT appears to regulate the fusion of synaptic vesicle through dephosphorylation. -- Abstract: PTPRT (protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor T), a brain-specific tyrosine phosphatase, has been found to regulate synaptic formation and development of hippocampal neurons, but its regulation mechanism is not yet fully understood. Here, Syntaxin-binding protein 1, a key component of synaptic vesicle fusion machinery, was identified as a possible interaction partner and an endogenous substrate of PTPRT. PTPRT interacted with Syntaxin-binding protein 1 in rat synaptosome, and co-localized with Syntaxin-binding protein 1 in cultured hippocampal neurons. PTPRT dephosphorylated tyrosine 145 located around the linker between domain 1 and 2 of Syntaxin-binding protein 1. Syntaxin-binding protein 1 directly binds to Syntaxin 1, a t-SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) protein, and plays a role as catalysts of SNARE complex formation. Syntaxin-binding protein 1 mutant mimicking non-phosphorylation (Y145F) enhanced the interaction with Syntaxin 1 compared to wild type, and therefore, dephosphorylation of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 appeared to be important for SNARE-complex formation. In conclusion, PTPRT could regulate the interaction of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 with Syntaxin 1, and as a result, the synaptic vesicle fusion appeared to be controlled through dephosphorylation of Syntaxin-binding protein 1.

  5. High Specific Selectivity and Membrane-Active Mechanism of Synthetic Cationic Hybrid Antimicrobial Peptides Based on the Peptide FV7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tingting; Wu, Di; Li, Weizhong; Zheng, Xin; Li, Weifen; Shan, Anshan

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid peptides integrating different functional domains of peptides have many advantages, such as remarkable antimicrobial activity, lower hemolysis and ideal cell selectivity, compared with natural antimicrobial peptides. FV7 (FRIRVRV-NH2), a consensus amphiphilic sequence was identified as being analogous to host defense peptides. In this study, we designed a series of hybrid peptides FV7-LL-37 (17–29) (FV-LL), FV7-magainin 2 (9–21) (FV-MA) and FV7-cecropin A (1–8) (FV-CE) by combining the FV7 sequence with the small functional sequences LL-37 (17–29) (LL), magainin 2 (9–21) (MA) and cecropin A (1–8) (CE) which all come from well-described natural peptides. The results demonstrated that the synthetic hybrid peptides, in particular FV-LL, had potent antibacterial activities over a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria with lower hemolytic activity than other peptides. Furthermore, fluorescent spectroscopy indicated that the hybrid peptide FV-LL exhibited marked membrane destruction by inducing outer and inner bacterial membrane permeabilization, while scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that FV-LL damaged membrane integrity by disrupting the bacterial membrane. Inhibiting biofilm formation assays also showed that FV-LL had similar anti-biofilm activity compared with the functional peptide sequence FV7. Synthetic cationic hybrid peptides based on FV7 could provide new models for combining different functional domains and demonstrate effective avenues to screen for novel antimicrobial agents. PMID:28178190

  6. High Specific Selectivity and Membrane-Active Mechanism of Synthetic Cationic Hybrid Antimicrobial Peptides Based on the Peptide FV7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tingting; Wu, Di; Li, Weizhong; Zheng, Xin; Li, Weifen; Shan, Anshan

    2017-02-06

    Hybrid peptides integrating different functional domains of peptides have many advantages, such as remarkable antimicrobial activity, lower hemolysis and ideal cell selectivity, compared with natural antimicrobial peptides. FV7 (FRIRVRV-NH₂), a consensus amphiphilic sequence was identified as being analogous to host defense peptides. In this study, we designed a series of hybrid peptides FV7-LL-37 (17-29) (FV-LL), FV7-magainin 2 (9-21) (FV-MA) and FV7-cecropin A (1-8) (FV-CE) by combining the FV7 sequence with the small functional sequences LL-37 (17-29) (LL), magainin 2 (9-21) (MA) and cecropin A (1-8) (CE) which all come from well-described natural peptides. The results demonstrated that the synthetic hybrid peptides, in particular FV-LL, had potent antibacterial activities over a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria with lower hemolytic activity than other peptides. Furthermore, fluorescent spectroscopy indicated that the hybrid peptide FV-LL exhibited marked membrane destruction by inducing outer and inner bacterial membrane permeabilization, while scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that FV-LL damaged membrane integrity by disrupting the bacterial membrane. Inhibiting biofilm formation assays also showed that FV-LL had similar anti-biofilm activity compared with the functional peptide sequence FV7. Synthetic cationic hybrid peptides based on FV7 could provide new models for combining different functional domains and demonstrate effective avenues to screen for novel antimicrobial agents.

  7. Multiligand Specificity of Pathogen-associated Molecular Pattern-binding Site in Peptidoglycan Recognition Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pradeep; Dube, Divya; Sinha, Mau; Mishra, Biswajit; Dey, Sharmistha; Mal, Gorakh; Pathak, Krishan M. L.; Kaur, Punit; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P.

    2011-01-01

    The peptidoglycan recognition protein PGRP-S is an innate immunity molecule that specifically interacts with microbial peptidoglycans and other pathogen-associated molecular patterns. We report here two structures of the unique tetrameric camel PGRP-S (CPGRP-S) complexed with (i) muramyl dipeptide (MDP) at 2.5 Å resolution and (ii) GlcNAc and β-maltose at 1.7Å resolution. The binding studies carried out using surface plasmon resonance indicated that CPGRP-S binds to MDP with a dissociation constant of 10−7 m, whereas the binding affinities for GlcNAc and β-maltose separately are in the range of 10−4 m to 10−5 m, whereas the dissociation constant for the mixture of GlcNAc and maltose was estimated to be 10−6 m. The data from bacterial suspension culture experiments showed a significant inhibition of the growth of Staphylococcus aureus cells when CPGRP-S was added to culture medium. The ELISA experiment showed that the amount of MDP-induced production of TNF-α and IL-6 decreased considerably after the introduction of CPGRP-S. The crystal structure determinations of (i) a binary complex with MDP and (ii) a ternary complex with GlcNAc and β-maltose revealed that MDP, GlcNAc, and β-maltose bound to CPGRP-S in the ligand binding cleft, which is situated at the interface of molecules C and D of the homotetramer formed by four protein molecules A, B, C, and D. In the binary complex, the muramyl moiety of MDP is observed at the C-D interface, whereas the peptide chain protrudes into the center of tetramer. In the ternary complex, GlcNAc and β-maltose occupy distinct non-overlapping positions belonging to different subsites. PMID:21784863

  8. Research progress in cation-π interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Cation-π interaction is a potent intermolecular interaction between a cation and an aromatic system,which has been viewed as a new kind of binding force,as being compared with the classical interactions(e.g. hydrogen bonding,electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions). Cation-π interactions have been observed in a wide range of biological contexts. In this paper,we present an overview of the typical cation-π interactions in biological systems,the experimental and theoretical investigations on cation-π interactions,as well as the research results on cation-π interactions in our group.

  9. Research progress in cation-π interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG JiaGao; LUO XiaoMin; YAN XiuHua; LI Zhong; TANG Yun; JIANG HuaLiang; ZHU WeiLiang

    2008-01-01

    Cation-π interaction is a potent intermolecular interaction between a cation and an aromatic system, which has been viewed as a new kind of binding force, as being compared with the classical interac-tions (e.g. hydrogen bonding, electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions). Cation-π interactions have been observed in a wide range of biological contexts. In this paper, we present an overview of the typi-cal cation-π interactions in biological systems, the experimental and theoretical investigations on cation-π interactions, as well as the research results on cation-π interactions in our group.

  10. Energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation studies of 1,10-phenanthroline complexes of the late first-row divalent transition metal cations: determination of the third sequential binding energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nose, Holliness; Chen, Yu; Rodgers, M T

    2013-05-23

    The third sequential binding energies of the late first-row divalent transition metal cations to 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) are determined by energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation (CID) techniques using a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. Five late first-row transition metal cations in their +2 oxidation states are examined including: Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+). The kinetic energy dependent CID cross sections for loss of an intact Phen ligand from the M(2+)(Phen)3 complexes are modeled to obtain 0 and 298 K bond dissociation energies (BDEs) after accounting for the effects of the internal energy of the complexes, multiple ion-neutral collisions, and unimolecular decay rates. Electronic structure theory calculations at the B3LYP, BHandHLYP, and M06 levels of theory are employed to determine the structures and theoretical estimates for the first, second, and third sequential BDEs of the M(2+)(Phen)x complexes. B3LYP was found to deliver results that are most consistent with the measured values. Periodic trends in the binding of these complexes are examined and compared to the analogous complexes to the late first-row monovalent transition metal cations, Co(+), Ni(+), Cu(+), and Zn(+), previously investigated.

  11. A CSPG4-specific immunotoxin kills rhabdomyosarcoma cells and binds to primary tumor tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, Hannes; Niesen, Judith; Mladenov, Radoslav; Stein, Christoph; Pardo, Alessa; Fey, Georg; Helfrich, Wijnand; Fischer, Rainer; Gattenlöhner, Stefan; Barth, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) remains challenging, with metastatic and alveolar RMS offering a particularly poor prognosis. Therefore, the identification and evaluation of novel antigens, which are suitable targets for immunotherapy, is one attractive possibility to improve the treatment of this disease. Here we show that chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) is expressed on RMS cell lines and RMS patient material. We evaluated the immunotoxin (IT) αMCSP-ETA', which specifically recognizes CSPG4 on the RMS cell lines RD, FL-OH1, TE-671 and Rh30. It is internalized rapidly, induces apoptosis and thus kills RMS cells selectively. We also demonstrate the specific binding of this IT to RMS primary tumor material from three different patients.

  12. BaalChIP: Bayesian analysis of allele-specific transcription factor binding in cancer genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Santiago, Ines; Liu, Wei; Yuan, Ke; O'Reilly, Martin; Chilamakuri, Chandra Sekhar Reddy; Ponder, Bruce A J; Meyer, Kerstin B; Markowetz, Florian

    2017-02-24

    Allele-specific measurements of transcription factor binding from ChIP-seq data are key to dissecting the allelic effects of non-coding variants and their contribution to phenotypic diversity. However, most methods of detecting an allelic imbalance assume diploid genomes. This assumption severely limits their applicability to cancer samples with frequent DNA copy-number changes. Here we present a Bayesian statistical approach called BaalChIP to correct for the effect of background allele frequency on the observed ChIP-seq read counts. BaalChIP allows the joint analysis of multiple ChIP-seq samples across a single variant and outperforms competing approaches in simulations. Using 548 ENCODE ChIP-seq and six targeted FAIRE-seq samples, we show that BaalChIP effectively corrects allele-specific analysis for copy-number variation and increases the power to detect putative cis-acting regulatory variants in cancer genomes.

  13. Enriching Peptide Libraries for Binding Affinity and Specificity Through Computationally Directed Library Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foight, Glenna Wink; Chen, T Scott; Richman, Daniel; Keating, Amy E

    2017-01-01

    Peptide reagents with high affinity or specificity for their target protein interaction partner are of utility for many important applications. Optimization of peptide binding by screening large libraries is a proven and powerful approach. Libraries designed to be enriched in peptide sequences that are predicted to have desired affinity or specificity characteristics are more likely to yield success than random mutagenesis. We present a library optimization method in which the choice of amino acids to encode at each peptide position can be guided by available experimental data or structure-based predictions. We discuss how to use analysis of predicted library performance to inform rounds of library design. Finally, we include protocols for more complex library design procedures that consider the chemical diversity of the amino acids at each peptide position and optimize a library score based on a user-specified input model.

  14. Specific enrichment of prokaryotic DNA using a recombinant DNA-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandetskaya, Natalia; Naumann, Andreas; Hennig, Katharina; Kuhlmeier, Dirk

    2014-06-01

    Targeted enrichment of DNA is often necessary for its detection and characterization in complex samples. We describe the development and application of the novel molecular tool for the specific enrichment of prokaryotic DNA. A fused protein comprising the DNA-binding subunit of the bacterial topoisomerase II, gyrase, was expressed, purified, and immobilized on magnetic particles. We demonstrated the specific affinity of the immobilized protein towards bacterial DNA and investigated its efficiency in the samples with high background of eukaryotic DNA. The reported approach allowed for the selective isolation and further detection of as few as 5 pg Staphylococcus aureus DNA from the sample with 4 × 10(6)-fold surplus of human DNA. This method is a promising approach for the preparation of such type of samples, for example in molecular diagnostics of sepsis.

  15. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Tse

    Full Text Available Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations

  16. Mineralocorticoid specificity of renal type I receptors: in vivo binding studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, K.; Funder, J.W.

    1987-02-01

    The authors have injected rats with (TH)aldosterone or (TH) corticosterone, plus 100-fold excess of the highly specific glucocorticoid RU 28362, with or without excess unlabeled aldosterone or corticosterone and compared type I receptor occupancy in kidney and hippocampus. Thirty minutes after subcutaneous injection (TH)aldosterone was well retained in renal papilla-inner medulla, renal cortex-outer medulla, and hippocampus; in contrast, (TH)corticosterone was well retained only in hippocampus. Competition studies for (TH)aldosterone binding sites showed corticosterone to be a poor competitor in the kidney compared with hippocampus. Time-course studies, with rats killed 10-180 min after tracer administration, showed very low uptake/retention of (TH)corticosterone by kidney; in hippocampus (TH)corticosterone retention was similar to that of (TH)aldosterone in kidney, and retention of (TH)aldosterone by hippocampus was much more prolonged than of either tracer in any other tissue. Studies in 10-day-old rats, with very low levels of corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), showed a high degree of aldosterone selectivity in both zones of the kidney, whereas 9TH)aldosterone and (TH)corticosterone were equivalently bound in hippocampus. They interpret these data as evidenced for a mechanism unrelated to extravascular CBG conferring mineralocorticoid specificity on renal type I receptors and propose two models derived from their findings consistent with such differential selectivity.

  17. The extrinsic PsbO protein modulates the oxidation/reduction rate of the exogenous Mn cation at the high-affinity Mn-binding site of Mn-depleted PSII membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semin, Boris K; Podkovirina, Tatiana E; Davletshina, Lira N; Timofeev, Kirill N; Ivanov, Il'ya I; Rubin, Andrei B

    2015-08-01

    The oxidation of exogenous Mn(II) cations at the high-affinity (HA) Mn-binding site in Mn-depleted photosystem II (PSII) membranes with or without the presence of the extrinsic PsbO polypeptide was studied by EPR. The six-lines EPR spectrum of Mn(II) cation disappears in the absence of the PsbO protein in membranes under illumination, but there was no effect when PSII preparations bound the PsbO protein. Our study demonstrates that such effect is determined by significant influence of the PsbO protein on the ratio between the rates of Mn oxidation and reduction at the HA site when the membranes are illuminated.

  18. Remodeling a DNA-binding protein as a specific in vivo inhibitor of bacterial secretin PulD

    OpenAIRE

    Mouratou, Barbara; Schaeffer, Francis; Guilvout, Ingrid; Tello-Manigne, Diana; Pugsley, Anthony P.; Alzari, Pedro M.; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    We engineered a class of proteins that binds selected polypeptides with high specificity and affinity. Use of the protein scaffold of Sac7d, belonging to a protein family that binds various ligands, overcomes limitations inherent in the use of antibodies as intracellular inhibitors: it lacks disulfide bridges, is small and stable, and can be produced in large amounts. An in vitro combinatorial/selection approach generated specific, high-affinity (up to 140 pM) binders against bacterial outer ...

  19. Directed evolution of estrogen receptor proteins with altered ligand-binding specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Kazi Mohammed Didarul; Dilcher, Meik; Thurow, Corinna; Vock, Carsten; Krimmelbein, Ilga Kristine; Tietze, Lutz Friedjan; Gonzalez, Victor; Zhao, Huimin; Gatz, Christiane

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional activators that respond to ligands with no cellular targets are powerful tools that can confer regulated expression of a transgene in almost all biological systems. In this study, we altered the ligand-binding specificity of the human estrogen receptor alpha (hER alpha) so that it would recognize a non-steroidal synthetic compound with structural similarities to the phytoestrogen resveratrol. For this purpose, we performed iterative rounds of site-specific saturation mutagenesis of a fixed set of ligand-contacting residues and subsequent random mutagenesis of the entire ligand-binding domain. Selection of the receptor mutants and quantification of the interaction were carried out by exploiting a yeast two-hybrid system that reports the ligand-dependent interaction between hER alpha and steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1). The screen was performed with a synthetic ligand (CV3320) that promoted growth of the reporter yeast strain to half maximal levels at a concentration of 3.7 microM. The optimized receptor mutant (L384F/L387M/Y537S) showed a 67-fold increased activity to the synthetic ligand CV3320 (half maximal yeast growth at 0.055 microM) and a 10-fold decreased activity to 17beta-estradiol (E2; half maximal yeast growth at 4 nM). The novel receptor-ligand pair partially fulfills the requirements for a specific 'gene switch' as it responds to concentrations of the synthetic ligand which do not activate the wildtype receptor. Due to its residual responsiveness to E2 at concentrations (4 nM) that might occur in vivo, further improvements have to be performed to render the system applicable in organisms with endogenous E2 synthesis.

  20. Role of intrinsic DNA binding specificity in defining target genes of the mammalian transcription factor PDX1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberzon, Arthur; Ridner, Gabriela; Walker, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    PDX1 is a homeodomain transcription factor essential for pancreatic development and mature beta cell function. Homeodomain proteins typically recognize short TAAT DNA motifs in vitro: this binding displays paradoxically low specificity and affinity, given the extremely high specificity of action of these proteins in vivo. To better understand how PDX1 selects target genes in vivo, we have examined the interaction of PDX1 with natural and artificial binding sites. Comparison of PDX1 binding sites in several target promoters revealed an evolutionarily conserved pattern of nucleotides flanking the TAAT core. Using competitive in vitro DNA binding assays, we defined three groups of binding sites displaying high, intermediate and low affinity. Transfection experiments revealed a striking correlation between the ability of each sequence to activate transcription in cultured beta cells, and its ability to bind PDX1 in vitro. Site selection from a pool of oligonucleotides (sequence NNNTAATNNN) revealed a non-random preference for particular nucleotides at the flanking locations, resembling natural PDX1 binding sites. Taken together, the data indicate that the intrinsic DNA binding specificity of PDX1, in particular the bases adjacent to TAAT, plays an important role in determining the spectrum of target genes. PMID:14704343

  1. Differential binding properties of Gal/GalNAc specific lectins available for characterization of glycoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, A M; Song, S C; Sugii, S; Herp, A

    1997-01-01

    Differentiating the binding properties of applied lectins should facilitate the selection of lectins for characterization of glycoreceptors on the cell surface. Based on the binding specificities studied by inhibition assays of lectin-glycan interactions, over twenty Gal and/or GalNAc specific lectins have been divided into eight groups according to their specificity for structural units (lectin determinants), which are the disaccharide as all or part of the determinants and of GalNAc alpha 1-->Ser (Thr) of the peptide chain. A scheme of codes for lectin determinants is illustrated as follows: (1) F (GalNAc alpha 1-->3GalNAc), Forssman specific disaccharide--Dolichos biflorus (DBL), Helix pomatia (HPL) and Wistaria floribunda (WFL) lectins. (2) A (GalNAc alpha 1-->3 Gal), blood group A specific disaccharide--Codium fragile subspecies tomentosoides (CFT), Soy bean (SBL), Vicia villosa-A4 (VVL-A4), and Wistaria floribunda (WFL) lectins. (3) Tn (GalNAc alpha 1-->Ser (Thr) of the protein core)--Vicia villosa B4 (VVL-B4), Salvia sclarea (SSL), Maclura pomifera (MPL), Bauhinia purpurea alba (BPL) and Artocarpus integrifolia (Jacalin, AIL). (4) T (Gal beta 1-->3GalNAc), the mucin type sugar sequences on the human erythrocyte membrane(T alpha), T antigen or the disaccharides at the terminal nonreducing end of gangliosides (T beta)--Peanut (PNA), Bauhinia purpurea alba (BPL), Maclura pomifera (MPL), Sophora japonica (SJL), Artocarpus lakoocha (Artocarpin) lectins and Abrus precatorius agglutinin (APA).(5) I and II (Gal beta 1-->3(4)GlcNAc)--the disaccharide residue at the nonreducing end of the carbohydrate chains derived from either N- or O-glycosidic linkage--Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA1), Datura stramonium (TAL, Thorn apple), Erythrina cristagalli (ECL, Coral tree), and Geodia cydonium (GCL). (6) B (Gal alpha 1-->3Gal), human blood group B specific disaccharide--Griffonia(Banderiaea) simplicifolia B4 (GSI-B4). (7) E (Gal alpha 1-->4Gal), receptors for pathogenic E

  2. Effect of water coordination on competition between π and non-π cation binding sites in aromatic amino acids: L-phenylalanine, L-tyrosine, and L-tryptophan Li+, Na +, and K+ complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remko, Milan; Šoralová, Stanislava

    2012-04-01

    Quantum chemistry methods have been applied to charged complexes of the alkali metals Li(+), Na(+), and K(+) with the aromatic amino acids (AAAs) phenylalanine (Phe), tyrosine (Tyr), and tryptophan (Trp). The geometries of 72 different complexes (Phe·M, Tyr·M, Trp·M, M is Li(+), Na(+), or K(+)) were completely optimized at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level of density functional theory. The solvent effect on the geometry and stability of individual complexes was studied by making use of a microsolvation model. The interaction enthalpies, entropies, and Gibbs energies of nine different complexes of the systems Phe·M, Tyr·M, and Trp·M (M is Li(+), Na(+), or K(+)) were also determined at the B3LYP density functional level of theory. The calculated Gibbs binding energies of the M(+)-AAA complexes follow the order Phe < Tyr < Trp for all three metal cations studied. Among the three AAAs studied, the indole ring of Trp is the best π donor for alkali metal cations. Our calculations demonstrated the existence of strong cation-π interactions between the alkali metals and the aromatic side chains of the three AAAs. These AAAs comprise about 8% of all known protein sequences. Thus, besides the potential for hydrogen-bond interaction, aromatic residues of Phe, Tyr, and Trp show great potential for π-donor interactions. The existence of cation-π interaction in proteins has also been demonstrated experimentally. However, more complex experimental studies of metal cation-π interaction in diverse biological systems will no doubt lead to more exact validation of these investigations.

  3. Probing the specificity of binding to the major nuclear localization sequence-binding site of importin-alpha using oriented peptide library screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sundy N Y; Takeda, Agnes A S; Fontes, Marcos R M; Harris, Jonathan M; Jans, David A; Kobe, Bostjan

    2010-06-25

    Importin-alpha is the nuclear import receptor that recognizes the classic monopartite and bipartite nuclear localization sequences (cNLSs), which contain one or two clusters of basic amino acids, respectively. Different importin-alpha paralogs in a single organism are specific for distinct repertoires of cargos. Structural studies revealed that monopartite cNLSs and the C-terminal basic clusters of the bipartite cNLSs bind to the same site on importin-alpha, termed the major cNLS-binding site. We used an oriented peptide library approach with five degenerate positions to probe the specificity of the major cNLS-binding site in importin-alpha. We identified the sequences KKKRR, KKKRK, and KKRKK as the optimal sequences for binding to this site for mouse importin-alpha2, human importin-alpha1, and human importin-alpha5, respectively. The crystal structure of mouse importin-alpha2 with its optimal peptide confirmed the expected binding mode resembling the binding of simian virus 40 large tumor-antigen cNLS. Binding assays confirmed that the peptides containing these sequences bound to the corresponding proteins with low nanomolar affinities. Nuclear import assays showed that the sequences acted as functional cNLSs, with specificity for particular importin-alphas. This is the first time that structural information has been linked to an oriented peptide library screening approach for importin-alpha; the results will contribute to understanding of the sequence determinants of cNLSs, and may help identify as yet unidentified cNLSs in novel proteins.

  4. Characterization of a Single-Stranded DNA-Binding-Like Protein from Nanoarchaeum equitans--A Nucleic Acid Binding Protein with Broad Substrate Specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Olszewski

    Full Text Available SSB (single-stranded DNA-binding proteins play an essential role in all living cells and viruses, as they are involved in processes connected with ssDNA metabolism. There has recently been an increasing interest in SSBs, since they can be applied in molecular biology techniques and analytical methods. Nanoarchaeum equitans, the only known representative of Archaea phylum Nanoarchaeota, is a hyperthermophilic, nanosized, obligatory parasite/symbiont of Ignicoccus hospitalis.This paper reports on the ssb-like gene cloning, gene expression and characterization of a novel nucleic acid binding protein from Nanoarchaeum equitans archaeon (NeqSSB-like protein. This protein consists of 243 amino acid residues and one OB fold per monomer. It is biologically active as a monomer like as SSBs from some viruses. The NeqSSB-like protein displays a low sequence similarity to the Escherichia coli SSB, namely 10% identity and 29% similarity, and is the most similar to the Sulfolobus solfataricus SSB (14% identity and 32% similarity. The NeqSSB-like protein binds to ssDNA, although it can also bind mRNA and, surprisingly, various dsDNA forms, with no structure-dependent preferences as evidenced by gel mobility shift assays. The size of the ssDNA binding site, which was estimated using fluorescence spectroscopy, is 7 ± 1 nt. No salt-dependent binding mode transition was observed. NeqSSB-like protein probably utilizes a different model for ssDNA binding than the SSB proteins studied so far. This protein is highly thermostable; the half-life of the ssDNA binding activity is 5 min at 100 °C and melting temperature (T(m is 100.2 °C as shown by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC analysis.NeqSSB-like protein is a novel highly thermostable protein which possesses a unique broad substrate specificity and is able to bind all types of nucleic acids.

  5. Characterization of a Single-Stranded DNA-Binding-Like Protein from Nanoarchaeum equitans—A Nucleic Acid Binding Protein with Broad Substrate Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, Marcin; Balsewicz, Jan; Nowak, Marta; Maciejewska, Natalia; Cyranka-Czaja, Anna; Zalewska-Piątek, Beata; Piątek, Rafał; Kur, Józef

    2015-01-01

    Background SSB (single-stranded DNA-binding) proteins play an essential role in all living cells and viruses, as they are involved in processes connected with ssDNA metabolism. There has recently been an increasing interest in SSBs, since they can be applied in molecular biology techniques and analytical methods. Nanoarchaeum equitans, the only known representative of Archaea phylum Nanoarchaeota, is a hyperthermophilic, nanosized, obligatory parasite/symbiont of Ignicoccus hospitalis. Results This paper reports on the ssb-like gene cloning, gene expression and characterization of a novel nucleic acid binding protein from Nanoarchaeum equitans archaeon (NeqSSB-like protein). This protein consists of 243 amino acid residues and one OB fold per monomer. It is biologically active as a monomer like as SSBs from some viruses. The NeqSSB-like protein displays a low sequence similarity to the Escherichia coli SSB, namely 10% identity and 29% similarity, and is the most similar to the Sulfolobus solfataricus SSB (14% identity and 32% similarity). The NeqSSB-like protein binds to ssDNA, although it can also bind mRNA and, surprisingly, various dsDNA forms, with no structure-dependent preferences as evidenced by gel mobility shift assays. The size of the ssDNA binding site, which was estimated using fluorescence spectroscopy, is 7±1 nt. No salt-dependent binding mode transition was observed. NeqSSB-like protein probably utilizes a different model for ssDNA binding than the SSB proteins studied so far. This protein is highly thermostable; the half-life of the ssDNA binding activity is 5 min at 100°C and melting temperature (Tm) is 100.2°C as shown by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. Conclusion NeqSSB-like protein is a novel highly thermostable protein which possesses a unique broad substrate specificity and is able to bind all types of nucleic acids. PMID:25973760

  6. Stage-specific adhesion of Leishmania promastigotes to sand fly midguts assessed using an improved comparative binding assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Wilson

    forms, but is absent in the early blood meal and final stages (procyclic and metacyclic forms. Further they show that although gut binding may be necessary for parasite establishment, in several vector-parasite pairs the specificity of such in vitro binding alone is insufficient to explain overall vector specificity. Other significant barriers to development must exist in certain refractory Leishmania parasite-sand fly vector combinations. A re-appraisal of the specificity of the Leishmania-sand fly relationship is required.

  7. Specific binding of /sup 125/I-salmon calcitonin to rat brain. Regional variation and calcitonin specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamuta, H.; Furukawa, S.; Koida, M. (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences); Yajima, H.; Orlowski, R.C.

    1981-02-01

    Rat brain particulate fraction was found to contain binding sites for /sup 125/I-Salmon Calcitonin-I (/sup 125/I-SCT). Maximum binding occurred in the physiological pH range of 7.25 - 7.5. The binding reaction proceeded in a temperature-dependent manner. Binding sites were broadly distributed among the various rat brain regions and considerable regional differences existed in the affinity and density as detected by Scatchard analysis. The highest affinity was recorded in the case of the hypothalamus and the lowest in the case of the cerebellum. The KD (nM) and Bmax (pmole/mg protein) estimated for the binding to four regions were as follows: hypothalamus: 1.4 and 0.19, midbrain, hippocampus plus striatum: 1.5 and 0.08, pon plus medulla oblongata: 3.0 and 0.15 and cerebellum: 8.3 and 0.20. Using a particulate fraction of rat brain void of cerebellum and cortices, a binding assay for calcitonins was developed. Binding of /sup 125/I-SCT was inhibited by unlabeled salmon, (Asu sup(1,7))-eel and porcine calcitonins in a dose-dependent manner and the IC50s were 2.0, 8.0 and 30 nM, respectively. The IC50s were comparable to those estimated using a kidney particulate fraction. Human calcitonin, ..beta..-endorphin and substance P were weak inhibitors of the binding. Other peptides, drugs and putative neurotransmitters tested (totally 23 substances) failed to inhibit the binding at concentrations of 1.0 ..mu..M. The physiological significance of brain binding sites for calcitonin, with the possibility that the brain may possess endogenous ligands for these sites are discussed.

  8. On the specificity of heparin/heparan sulfate binding to proteins. Anion-binding sites on antithrombin and thrombin are fundamentally different.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip D Mosier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The antithrombin-heparin/heparan sulfate (H/HS and thrombin-H/HS interactions are recognized as prototypic specific and non-specific glycosaminoglycan (GAG-protein interactions, respectively. The fundamental structural basis for the origin of specificity, or lack thereof, in these interactions remains unclear. The availability of multiple co-crystal structures facilitates a structural analysis that challenges the long-held belief that the GAG binding sites in antithrombin and thrombin are essentially similar with high solvent exposure and shallow surface characteristics. METHODOLOGY: Analyses of solvent accessibility and exposed surface areas, gyrational mobility, symmetry, cavity shape/size, conserved water molecules and crystallographic parameters were performed for 12 X-ray structures, which include 12 thrombin and 16 antithrombin chains. Novel calculations are described for gyrational mobility and prediction of water loci and conservation. RESULTS: The solvent accessibilities and gyrational mobilities of arginines and lysines in the binding sites of the two proteins reveal sharp contrasts. The distribution of positive charges shows considerable asymmetry in antithrombin, but substantial symmetry for thrombin. Cavity analyses suggest the presence of a reasonably sized bifurcated cavity in antithrombin that facilitates a firm 'hand-shake' with H/HS, but with thrombin, a weaker 'high-five'. Tightly bound water molecules were predicted to be localized in the pentasaccharide binding pocket of antithrombin, but absent in thrombin. Together, these differences in the binding sites explain the major H/HS recognition characteristics of the two prototypic proteins, thus affording an explanation of the specificity of binding. This provides a foundation for understanding specificity of interaction at an atomic level, which will greatly aid the design of natural or synthetic H/HS sequences that target proteins in a specific manner.

  9. Rational steering of insulin binding specificity by intra-chain chemical crosslinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viková, Jitka; Collinsová, Michaela; Kletvíková, Emília; Buděšínský, Miloš; Kaplan, Vojtěch; Žáková, Lenka; Veverka, Václav; Hexnerová, Rozálie; Aviñó, Roberto J. Tarazona; Straková, Jana; Selicharová, Irena; Vaněk, Václav; Wright, Daniel W.; Watson, Christopher J.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.; Jiráček, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone of human metabolism with major therapeutic importance for both types of diabetes. New insulin analogues with more physiological profiles and better glycemic control are needed, especially analogues that preferentially bind to the metabolic B-isoform of insulin receptor (IR-B). Here, we aimed to stabilize and modulate the receptor-compatible conformation of insulin by covalent intra-chain crosslinking within its B22-B30 segment, using the CuI-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of azides and alkynes. This approach resulted in 14 new, systematically crosslinked insulin analogues whose structures and functions were extensively characterized and correlated. One of the analogues, containing a B26-B29 triazole bridge, was highly active in binding to both IR isoforms, with a significant preference for IR-B. Our results demonstrate the potential of chemistry-driven modulation of insulin function, also shedding new light on the functional importance of hormone’s B-chain C-terminus for its IR-B specificity.

  10. Uranyl-specific binding at a functionalised interface: a chemophotonic fibre optic sensor platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Neil W; Tremlett, Clare J; Melfi, Patricia J; Sessler, Jonathon D; Shaw, Andrew M

    2008-05-01

    Detection of radiological materials in the solution phase is restricted by conventional radiation-counting techniques owing to extreme attenuation. Chemical sensing of the resultant radiological species such as uranyl UO(2)(2+) is possible on the surface of a plastic or glass fibre optic. A dihydroxy isoamethryin complex is tethered to the fibre surface which has a large extinction coefficient (119 000 M(-1) cm(-1) at lambda = 439 nm) and changes colour upon binding UO(2)(2+). The spectral changes are greater on the surface than in solution and binding is specific to UO(2)(2+) with small interferences from Gd(3+). Monitoring the spectral response in three detector bands in the red, green and blue enable the optical power change to be measured with sensitivities of 1 mdB, allowing UO(2)(2+) to be detected confidently at 50-100 ppb levels. Real-time kinetic analysis enables discrimination between the target species and possible interferents.

  11. Analysis of Specific Binding and Subcellular Localization of Wheat ERF Transcription Factor W17

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yun-xiang; LIU Pei; XU Zhao-shi; CHEN Ming; LI Lian-cheng; CHEN Yao-feng; XIONG Xiang-jin; MA You-zhi

    2008-01-01

    The study aims to detect the subcellular localization of ERF (ethylene-responsive element binding factor) transcription factor W17 protein, the interaction between W17 and cis-acting regulatory elements GCC-box and DRE in vitro, the binding and transactivating ability in vivo, and the role of W17 in higher plant stress-signal pathway. Recombinant plasmid W17/163hGFP was introduced into onion epidermal cells by the particle bombardment method with a PDS1000/He. Transformed cells were incubated for 24h at 22℃ in the dark and green fluorescence was monitored under a confocal microscope. The gene W17 was fused N-terminus of GST (glutathione-S-transferase) in prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-4T-1 and then transformed into E. coli strain BL21 (DE3). IPTG (0.5mmol L-1) was added to induce the expression of recombinant GST/W17 for 3h. The fused proteins were purified by GST purification columns, and then subjected to gel retardation assay with a 32P-labeled GCC or DRE sequence. The different reporter and effector plasmids were introduced into tobacco leaves through agroinfiltration, then transformed leaves stained by X-Gluc, faded with 75% alcohol and monitored under a Stereozooming microscope. The GFP fused with W17 protein was localized in the nuclei; SDS-PAGE assay demonstrated that the fused protein GST/W17 could be induced and purified with molecular weight at around 42.2kD under the induction of IPTG. Purified fused protein was able to specifically bind to both the wild-type GCC-box and DRE element, but had no interaction with either the mutant DRE or GCC-box; W17 protein can bind to GCC-box and transactive downstream GUS gene in vivo. W17 can localize into the nuclei, and it may be involved not only in biotic stresses controlled by GCC-box, but also in abiotic stresses (e. g., salt-) induced signaling pathway.

  12. Peptide binding specificity of major histocompatibility complex class I resolved into an array of apparently independent subspecificities: quantitation by peptide libraries and improved prediction of binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Pedersen, L O; Romme, T

    1996-01-01

    size are distributed into positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries (PSCPL) to develop a highly efficient, universal and unbiased approach to address MHC specificity. The PSCPL approach appeared qualitatively and quantitatively superior to other currently used strategies. The average effect...... of any amino acid in each position was quantitated, allowing a detailed description of extended peptide binding motifs including primary and secondary anchor residues. It also identified disfavored residues which were found to be surprisingly important in shaping MHC class I specificity. Assuming...

  13. Structure and activity of NO synthase inhibitors specific to the L-arginine binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskuryakov, S Ya; Konoplyannikov, A G; Skvortsov, V G; Mandrugin, A A; Fedoseev, V M

    2005-01-01

    Synthesis of compounds containing a fragment similar to the guanidine group of L-arginine, which is a substrate of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), is the main direction in creating NOS inhibitors. The inhibitory effect of such compounds is caused not only by their competition with the substrate for the L-arginine-binding site and/or oxidizing center of the enzyme (heme) but also by interaction with peptide motifs of the enzyme that influence its dimerization, affinity for cofactors, and interaction with associated proteins. Structures, activities, and relative in vitro and in vivo specificities of various NOS inhibitors (amino acid and non-amino acid) with linear or cyclic structure and containing guanidine, amidine, or isothiuronium group are considered. These properties are mainly analyzed by comparison with effects of the inhibitors on the inducible NOS.

  14. ISR: background, evolution and implementation, with specific consideration for ligand-binding assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, John W A; Kelley, Marian M

    2014-02-01

    ISR was highlighted as a topic of major interest to the US FDA in 2006, having been previously required, then discontinued, by Canadian regulatory authorities. Following an FDA focus on ISR, this topic has also been emphasized by regulatory agencies in Europe, Asia and Latin America. Extensive discussions on proper implementation of programs have taken place in multiple settings, including pharmaceutical companies, regulatory agencies, professional associations and CROs. These efforts have led to recommendations for ISR conduct that are now included in a final guideline on bioanalytical method validation from the European Medicines Agency, a draft validation guidance from the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare in Japan and a revised draft validation guidance from the FDA. In this Review we look at the background, evolution and implementation of ISR for all assays, while including some specific considerations on this topic for ligand-binding assays.

  15. Efficient cell-specific uptake of binding proteins into the cytoplasm through engineered modular transport systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdurmen, Wouter P R; Luginbühl, Manuel; Honegger, Annemarie; Plückthun, Andreas

    2015-02-28

    Through advances in protein scaffold engineering and selection technologies, highly specific binding proteins, which fold under reducing conditions, can be generated against virtually all targets. Despite tremendous therapeutic opportunities, intracellular applications are hindered by difficulties associated with achieving cytosolic delivery, compounded by even correctly measuring it. Here, we addressed cytosolic delivery systematically through the development of a biotin ligase-based assay that objectively quantifies cytosolic delivery in a generic fashion. We developed modular transport systems that consist of a designed ankyrin repeat protein (DARPin) for receptor targeting and a different DARPin for intracellular recognition and a bacterial toxin-derived component for cytosolic translocation. We show that both anthrax pores and the translocation domain of Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ETA) efficiently deliver DARPins into the cytosol. We found that the cargo must not exceed a threshold thermodynamic stability for anthrax pores, which can be addressed by engineering, while the ETA pathway does not appear to have this restriction.

  16. HIM-8 binds to the X chromosome pairing center and mediateschromosome-specific meiotic synapsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Carolyn M.; Wong, Chihunt; Bhalla, Needhi; Carlton,Peter M.; Weiser, Pinky; Meneely, Philip M.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2005-06-05

    The him-8 gene is essential for proper meiotic segregationof the X chromosomes in C. elegans. Herewe show that loss of him-8function causes profound X-chromosome-specific defects in homolog pairingand synapsis.him-8 encodes a C2H2 zinc finger protein that is expressedduring meiosis andconcentrates at a site on the X chromosome known as themeiotic Pairing Center (PC). A role for HIM-8 in PC function is supportedby genetic interactions between PC lesions and him-8 mutations.HIM-8-bound chromosome sites associate with the nuclear envelope (NE)throughout meiotic prophase. Surprisingly, a point mutation in him-8 thatretains both chromosome binding and NE localization fails to stabilizepairing or promote synapsis. These observations indicate thatstabilization of homolog pairing is an active process in which thetethering of chromosome sites to the NE may be necessary but is notsufficient.

  17. A urokinase receptor-associated protein with specific collagen binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Engelholm, L H

    2000-01-01

    membrane-bound lectin with hitherto unknown function. The human cDNA was cloned and sequenced. The protein, designated uPARAP, is a member of the macrophage mannose receptor protein family and contains a putative collagen-binding (fibronectin type II) domain in addition to 8 C-type carbohydrate recognition......The plasminogen activation cascade system, directed by urokinase and the urokinase receptor, plays a key role in extracellular proteolysis during tissue remodeling. To identify molecular interaction partners of these trigger proteins on the cell, we combined covalent protein cross-linking with mass...... spectrometry based methods for peptide mapping and primary structure analysis of electrophoretically isolated protein conjugates. A specific tri-molecular complex was observed upon addition of pro-urokinase to human U937 cells. This complex included the urokinase receptor, pro-urokinase, and an unknown, high...

  18. Characterization of the Escherichia coli prsA1-encoded mutant phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase identifies a divalent cation-nucleotide binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bower, Stanley G.; Harlow, Kenneth W.; Switzer, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    : DLHAXQIQGFFDI/VPI/VD. There was little alteration in the Km for ribose 5-phosphate. The Km for ATP of the mutant enzyme was increased 27-fold when Mg2+ was the activating cation but only 5-fold when Mn2+ was used. Maximal velocities of the wild type and mutant enzymes were the same. The mutant enzyme has a 6...

  19. Binding of Sperm to the Zona Pellucida Mediated by Sperm Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins is not Species-Specific in Vitro between Pigs and Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Nakano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates are candidates for the basis of species-selective interaction of gametes during mammalian fertilization. In this study, we sought to clarify the roles of sugar residues in the species-selective, sperm–oocyte interaction in pigs and cattle. Acrosome-intact porcine and bovine sperm exhibited their strongest binding affinities for β-Gal and α-Man residues, respectively. Porcine-sperm specificity changed from β-Gal to α-Man after the acrosome reaction, while bovine-sperm specificity did not. Binding of acrosome-intact and acrosome-reacted sperm decreased after trypsinization, indicating that the carbohydrate-binding components are proteins. While immature oocytes bound homologous sperm preferentially to heterologous sperm, oocytes matured in vitro bound similar numbers of homologous and heterologous sperm. Lectin staining revealed the aggregation of α-Man residues on the outer surface of the porcine zona during maturation. In both species, zona-free, mature oocytes bound homologous sperm preferentially to heterologous sperm. The lectin-staining patterns of the zona pellucida and zona-free oocytes coincided with the carbohydrate-binding specificities of acrosome-intact and acrosome-reacted sperm, respectively, supporting the involvement of carbohydrates in gamete recognition in pigs and cattle. These results also indicate that sperm-zona pellucida and sperm–oolemma bindings are not strictly species-specific in pigs and cattle, and further suggest that sperm penetration into the zona and/or fusion with oolemma may be species-specific between pigs and cattle.

  20. Binding of Sperm to the Zona Pellucida Mediated by Sperm Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins is not Species-Specific in Vitro between Pigs and Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazuya; Kikuchi, Kazuhiro; Uchida, Yasuomi; Kanai-Kitayama, Saeko; Suzuki, Reiichiro; Sato, Reiko; Toma, Kazunori; Geshi, Masaya; Akagi, Satoshi; Nakano, Minoru; Yonezawa, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrates are candidates for the basis of species-selective interaction of gametes during mammalian fertilization. In this study, we sought to clarify the roles of sugar residues in the species-selective, sperm-oocyte interaction in pigs and cattle. Acrosome-intact porcine and bovine sperm exhibited their strongest binding affinities for β-Gal and α-Man residues, respectively. Porcine-sperm specificity changed from β-Gal to α-Man after the acrosome reaction, while bovine-sperm specificity did not. Binding of acrosome-intact and acrosome-reacted sperm decreased after trypsinization, indicating that the carbohydrate-binding components are proteins. While immature oocytes bound homologous sperm preferentially to heterologous sperm, oocytes matured in vitro bound similar numbers of homologous and heterologous sperm. Lectin staining revealed the aggregation of α-Man residues on the outer surface of the porcine zona during maturation. In both species, zona-free, mature oocytes bound homologous sperm preferentially to heterologous sperm. The lectin-staining patterns of the zona pellucida and zona-free oocytes coincided with the carbohydrate-binding specificities of acrosome-intact and acrosome-reacted sperm, respectively, supporting the involvement of carbohydrates in gamete recognition in pigs and cattle. These results also indicate that sperm-zona pellucida and sperm-oolemma bindings are not strictly species-specific in pigs and cattle, and further suggest that sperm penetration into the zona and/or fusion with oolemma may be species-specific between pigs and cattle.

  1. Lipophilic Cationic Cyanines Are Potent Complex I Inhibitors and Specific in Vitro Dopaminergic Toxins with Mechanistic Similarities to Both Rotenone and MPP(.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadigamuwa, Chamila C; Mapa, Mapa S T; Wimalasena, Kandatege

    2016-09-19

    We have recently reported that simple lipophilic cationic cyanines are specific and potent dopaminergic toxins with a mechanism of toxicity similar to that of the Parkinsonian toxin MPP(+). In the present study, a group of fluorescent lipophilic cyanines have been used to further exploit the structure-activity relationship of the specific dopaminergic toxicity of cyanines. Here, we report that all cyanines tested were highly toxic to dopaminergic MN9D cells with IC50s in the range of 60-100 nM and not toxic to non-neuronal HepG2 cells parallel to that previously reported for 2,2'- and 4,4'-cyanines. All cyanines nonspecifically accumulate in the mitochondria of both MN9D and HepG2 cells at high concentrations, inhibit the mitochondrial complex I with the inhibition potencies similar to the potent complex I inhibitor, rotenone. They increase the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production specifically in dopaminergic cells causing apoptotic cell death. These and other findings suggest that the complex I inhibition, the expression of low levels of antioxidant enzymes, and presence of high levels of oxidatively labile radical propagator, dopamine, could be responsible for the specific increase in ROS production in dopaminergic cells. Thus, the predisposition of dopaminergic cells to produce high levels of ROS in response to mitochondrial toxins together with their inherent greater demand for energy may contribute to their specific vulnerability toward these toxins. The novel findings that cyanines are an unusual class of potent mitochondrial toxins with specific dopaminergic toxicity suggest that their presence in the environment could contribute to the etiology of PD similar to that of MPP(+) and rotenone.

  2. Thermodynamics of Calcium binding to the Calmodulin N-terminal domain to evaluate site-specific affinity constants and cooperativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beccia, Maria Rosa; Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Lemaire, David; Brémond, Nicolas; Pardoux, Romain; Blangy, Stéphanie; Guilbaud, Philippe; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2015-07-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an essential Ca(II)-dependent regulator of cell physiology. To understand its interaction with Ca(II) at a molecular level, it is essential to examine Ca(II) binding at each site of the protein, even if it is challenging to estimate the site-specific binding properties of the interdependent CaM-binding sites. In this study, we evaluated the site-specific Ca(II)-binding affinity of sites I and II of the N-terminal domain by combining site-directed mutagenesis and spectrofluorimetry. The mutations had very low impact on the protein structure and stability. We used these binding constants to evaluate the inter-site cooperativity energy and compared it with its lower limit value usually reported in the literature. We found that site I affinity for Ca(II) was 1.5 times that of site II and that cooperativity induced an approximately tenfold higher affinity for the second Ca(II)-binding event, as compared to the first one. We further showed that insertion of a tryptophan at position 7 of site II binding loop significantly increased site II affinity for Ca(II) and the intra-domain cooperativity. ΔH and ΔS parameters were studied by isothermal titration calorimetry for Ca(II) binding to site I, site II and to the entire N-terminal domain. They showed that calcium binding is mainly entropy driven for the first and second binding events. These findings provide molecular information on the structure-affinity relationship of the individual sites of the CaM N-terminal domain and new perspectives for the optimization of metal ion binding by mutating the EF-hand loops sequences.

  3. Collagen binding specificity of the discoidin domain receptors: binding sites on collagens II and III and molecular determinants for collagen IV recognition by DDR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huifang; Raynal, Nicolas; Stathopoulos, Stavros; Myllyharju, Johanna; Farndale, Richard W; Leitinger, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2 are cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by triple-helical collagen. While normal DDR signalling regulates fundamental cellular processes, aberrant DDR signalling is associated with several human diseases. We previously identified GVMGFO (O is hydroxyproline) as a major DDR2 binding site in collagens I-III, and located two additional DDR2 binding sites in collagen II. Here we extend these studies to the homologous DDR1 and the identification of DDR binding sites on collagen III. Using sets of overlapping triple-helical peptides, the Collagen II and Collagen III Toolkits, we located several DDR2 binding sites on both collagens. The interaction of DDR1 with Toolkit peptides was more restricted, with DDR1 mainly binding to peptides containing the GVMGFO motif. Triple-helical peptides containing the GVMGFO motif induced DDR1 transmembrane signalling, and DDR1 binding and receptor activation occurred with the same amino acid requirements as previously defined for DDR2. While both DDRs exhibit the same specificity for binding the GVMGFO motif, which is present only in fibrillar collagens, the two receptors display distinct preferences for certain non-fibrillar collagens, with the basement membrane collagen IV being exclusively recognised by DDR1. Based on our recent crystal structure of a DDR2-collagen complex, we designed mutations to identify the molecular determinants for DDR1 binding to collagen IV. By replacing five amino acids in DDR2 with the corresponding DDR1 residues we were able to create a DDR2 construct that could function as a collagen IV receptor.

  4. Specific binding of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2A insecticidal proteins to a common site in the midgut of Helicoverpa species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Carmen Sara; Van Vliet, Adri; Bautsoens, Nadine; Van Rie, Jeroen; Ferré, Juan

    2008-12-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the mode of action of Cry2A toxins was unique and different from that of other three-domain Cry toxins due to their apparent nonspecific and unsaturable binding to an unlimited number of receptors. However, based on the homology of the tertiary structure among three-domain Cry toxins, similar modes of action for all of them are expected. To confirm this hypothesis, binding assays were carried out with (125)I-labeled Cry2Ab. Saturation assays showed that Cry2Ab binds in a specific and saturable manner to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMVs) of Helicoverpa armigera. Homologous-competition assays with (125)I-Cry2Ab demonstrated that this toxin binds with high affinity to binding sites in H. armigera and Helicoverpa zea midgut. Heterologous-competition assays showed a common binding site for three toxins belonging to the Cry2A family (Cry2Aa, Cry2Ab, and Cry2Ae), which is not shared by Cry1Ac. Estimation of K(d) (dissociation constant) values revealed that Cry2Ab had around 35-fold less affinity than Cry1Ac for BBMV binding sites in both insect species. Only minor differences were found regarding R(t) (concentration of binding sites) values. This study questions previous interpretations from other authors performing binding assays with Cry2A toxins and establishes the basis for the mode of action of Cry2A toxins.

  5. Specific Binding of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2A Insecticidal Proteins to a Common Site in the Midgut of Helicoverpa Species▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Carmen Sara; Van Vliet, Adri; Bautsoens, Nadine; Van Rie, Jeroen; Ferré, Juan

    2008-01-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the mode of action of Cry2A toxins was unique and different from that of other three-domain Cry toxins due to their apparent nonspecific and unsaturable binding to an unlimited number of receptors. However, based on the homology of the tertiary structure among three-domain Cry toxins, similar modes of action for all of them are expected. To confirm this hypothesis, binding assays were carried out with 125I-labeled Cry2Ab. Saturation assays showed that Cry2Ab binds in a specific and saturable manner to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMVs) of Helicoverpa armigera. Homologous-competition assays with 125I-Cry2Ab demonstrated that this toxin binds with high affinity to binding sites in H. armigera and Helicoverpa zea midgut. Heterologous-competition assays showed a common binding site for three toxins belonging to the Cry2A family (Cry2Aa, Cry2Ab, and Cry2Ae), which is not shared by Cry1Ac. Estimation of Kd (dissociation constant) values revealed that Cry2Ab had around 35-fold less affinity than Cry1Ac for BBMV binding sites in both insect species. Only minor differences were found regarding Rt (concentration of binding sites) values. This study questions previous interpretations from other authors performing binding assays with Cry2A toxins and establishes the basis for the mode of action of Cry2A toxins. PMID:18931285

  6. The hyperpolarization-activated non-specific cation current (In ) adjusts the membrane properties, excitability, and activity pattern of the giant cells in the rat dorsal cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusznák, Zoltán; Pál, Balázs; Kőszeghy, Aron; Fu, Yuhong; Szücs, Géza; Paxinos, George

    2013-03-01

    Giant cells of the cochlear nucleus are thought to integrate multimodal sensory inputs and participate in monaural sound source localization. Our aim was to explore the significance of a hyperpolarization-activated current in determining the activity of giant neurones in slices prepared from 10 to 14-day-old rats. When subjected to hyperpolarizing stimuli, giant cells produced a 4-(N-ethyl-N-phenylamino)-1,2-dimethyl-6-(methylamino) pyridinium chloride (ZD7288)-sensitive inward current with a reversal potential and half-activation voltage of -36 and -88 mV, respectively. Consequently, the current was identified as the hyperpolarization-activated non-specific cationic current (Ih ). At the resting membrane potential, 3.5% of the maximum Ih conductance was available. Immunohistochemistry experiments suggested that hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated, cation non-selective (HCN)1, HCN2, and HCN4 subunits contribute to the assembly of the functional channels. Inhibition of Ih hyperpolarized the membrane by 6 mV and impeded spontaneous firing. The frequencies of spontaneous inhibitory and excitatory postsynaptic currents reaching the giant cell bodies were reduced but no significant change was observed when evoked postsynaptic currents were recorded. Giant cells are affected by biphasic postsynaptic currents consisting of an excitatory and a subsequent inhibitory component. Inhibition of Ih reduced the frequency of these biphasic events by 65% and increased the decay time constants of the inhibitory component. We conclude that Ih adjusts the resting membrane potential, contributes to spontaneous action potential firing, and may participate in the dendritic integration of the synaptic inputs of the giant neurones. Because its amplitude was higher in young than in adult rats, Ih of the giant cells may be especially important during the postnatal maturation of the auditory system.

  7. Molecular cloning of MSSP-2, a c-myc gene single-strand binding protein: characterization of binding specificity and DNA replication activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Takai, Toshiki; Nishita, Yoshinori; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    1994-01-01

    We have previously reported the human cDNA encoding MSSP-1, a sequence-specific double- and single-stranded DNA binding protein [Negishi, Nishita, Saëgusa, Kakizaki, Galli, Kihara, Tamai, Miyajima, Iguchi-Ariga and Ariga (1994) Oncogene, 9, 1133-1143]. MSSP-1 binds to a DNA replication origin/transcriptional enhancer of the human c-myc gene and has turned out to be identical with Scr2, a human protein which complements the defect of cdc2 kinase in S.pombe [Kataoka and Nojima (1994) Nucleic Ac...

  8. LBD1 of Vitellogenin Receptor Specifically Binds to the Female-Specific Storage Protein SP1 via LBR1 and LBR3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lina; Wang, Yejing; Li, Yu; Lin, Ying; Hou, Yong; Zhang, Yan; Wei, Shuguang; Zhao, Peng; Zhao, Ping; He, Huawei

    2016-01-01

    Storage proteins are the major protein synthesized in the fat body, released into hemolymph and re-sequestered into the fat body before pupation in most insect species. Storage proteins are important amino acid and nutrition resources during the non-feeding pupal period and play essential roles for the metamorphosis and oogenesis of insects. The sequestration of storage protein is a selective, specific receptor-mediated process. However, to date, the potential receptor mediating the sequestration of storage protein has not been determined in Bombyx mori. In this study, we expressed and purified the first ligand binding domain of Bombyx mori vitellogenin receptor (BmVgR), LBD1, and found LBD1 could bind with an unknown protein from the hemolymph of the ultimate silkworm larval instar via pull-down assay. This unknown protein was subsequently identified to be the female-specific storage protein SP1 by mass spectrometry. Furthermore, far western blotting assay, immunoprecipitation and isothermal titration calorimetry analysis demonstrated LBD1 specifically bound with the female-specific SP1, rather than another unisex storage protein SP2. The specific binding of LBD1 with SP1 was dependent on the presence of Ca2+ as it was essential for the proper conformation of LBD1. Deletion mutagenesis and ITC analysis revealed the first and third ligand binding repeats LBR1 and LBR3 were indispensable for the binding of LBD1 with SP1, and LBR2 and LBR4 also had a certain contribution to the specific binding. Our results implied BmVgR may mediate the sequestration of SP1 from hemolymph into the fat body during the larval-pupal transformation of Bombyx mori. PMID:27637099

  9. Specific 3H-haloperidol binding to dopamine receptors in the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Y; Takayanagi, I

    1982-12-01

    The anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis has specific dopamine receptors. We carried out a radioligand binding assay for dopamine receptors in ABRM using (3H)-haloperidol as the radioligand. High affinity binding of (3H)-haloperidol has been shown. Scatchard analysis showed a single component of binding with an apparent equilibrium constant (KD) of 1.6 nM and a maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) of 219 fmoles/mg protein. Some dopamine antagonists displaced 3 nM (3H)-haloperidol binding, and the IC50 and Ki-value of these drugs were calculated. Considering these results, this muscle is thought to be suitable for a study of the dopamine receptors.

  10. Cbln3, a novel member of the precerebellin family that binds specifically to Cbln1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Z; Zuo, J; Morgan, J I

    2000-09-01

    Precerebellin (Cbln1) is the precursor of the brain-specific hexadecapeptide cerebellin. Although cerebellin has properties of a conventional neuropeptide, its function is controversial because Cbln1 has structural features characteristic of circulating atypical collagens. Cbln1 is related to the three subunits of the complement C1q complex. Therefore, we hypothesized that Cbln1 participated in analogous heteromeric complexes with precerebellin-related proteins. Using LexA-Cbln1 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen, we isolated a cDNA encoding a novel Cbln1-related protein, designated Cbln3. The gene encoding cbln3 had the same intron-exon structure as cbln1 but mapped to a different mouse chromosome (14). The deduced amino acid sequence of Cbln3 was 55% identical to Cbln1 and also contained a C1q signature domain and signal sequence for secretion. In addition to binding avidly to Cbln3, Cbln1 also formed homomeric complexes. In contrast, Cbln3 homomeric association was weak. These interactions exhibited specificity because C1qB bound to neither Cbln1 nor Cbln3. Like cbln1, cbln3 was expressed in the cerebellum and dorsal cochlear nucleus in which it was detected in granule neurons. Because Cbln1 and Cbln3 are coexpressed in the brain and interact avidly, they may function as a secreted heteromeric complex in vivo.

  11. Squalamine, a novel cationic steroid, specifically inhibits the brush-border Na+/H+ exchanger isoform NHE3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, S; Nath, S K; Tse, C M; Williams, J; Zasloff, M; Donowitz, M

    1999-01-01

    Squalamine, an endogenous molecule found in the liver and other tissues of Squalus acanthias, has antibiotic properties and causes changes in endothelial cell shape. The latter suggested that its potential targets might include transport proteins that control cell volume or cell shape. The effect of purified squalamine was examined on cloned Na+/H+ exchanger isoforms NHE1, NHE2, and NHE3 stably transfected in PS120 fibroblasts. Squalamine (1-h pretreatment) decreased the maximal velocity of rabbit NHE3 in a concentration-dependent manner (13, 47, and 57% inhibition with 3, 5, and 7 micrograms/ml, respectively) and also increased K'[H+]i. Squalamine did not affect rabbit NHE1 or NHE2 function. The inhibitory effect of squalamine was 1) time dependent, with no effect of immediate addition and maximum effect with 1 h of exposure, and 2) fully reversible. Squalamine pretreatment of the ileum for 60 min inhibited brush-border membrane vesicle Na+/H+ activity by 51%. Further investigation into the mechanism of squalamine's effects showed that squalamine required the COOH-terminal 76 amino acids of NHE3. Squalamine had no cytotoxic effect at the concentrations studied, as indicated by monitoring lactate dehydrogenase release. These results indicate that squalamine 1) is a specific inhibitor of the brush-border NHE isoform NHE3 and not NHE1 or NHE2, 2) acts in a nontoxic and fully reversible manner, and 3) has a delayed effect, indicating that it may influence brush-border Na+/H+ exchanger function indirectly, through an intracellular signaling pathway or by acting as an intracellular modulator.

  12. Selective binding of specific mouse genomic DNA fragments by mouse vimentin filaments in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Tolstonog, G; Shoeman, R L; Traub, P

    1996-03-01

    Mouse vimentin intermediate filaments (IFs) reconstituted in vitro were analyzed for their capacity to select certain DNA sequences from a mixture of about 500-bp-long fragments of total mouse genomic DNA. The fragments preferentially bound by the IFs and enriched by several cycles of affinity binding and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification were cloned and sequenced. In general, they were G-rich and highly repetitive in that they often contained Gn, (GT)n, and (GA)n repeat elements. Other, more complex repeat sequences were identified as well. Apart from the capacity to adopt a Z-DNA and triple helix configuration under superhelical tension, many fragments were potentially able to form cruciform structures and contained consensus binding sites for various transcription factors. All of these sequence elements are known to occur in introns and 5'/3'-flanking regions of genes and to play roles in DNA transcription, recombination and replication. A FASTA search of the EMBL data bank indeed revealed that sequences homologous to the mouse repetitive DNA fragments are commonly associated with gene-regulatory elements. Unexpectedly, vimentin IFs also bound a large number of apparently overlapping, AT-rich DNA fragments that could be aligned into a composite sequence highly homologous to the 234-bp consensus centromere repeat sequence of gamma-satellite DNA. Previous experiments have shown a high affinity of vimentin for G-rich, repetitive telomere DNA sequences, superhelical DNA, and core histones. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that, after penetration of the double nuclear membrane via an as yet unidentified mechanism, vimentin IFs cooperatively fix repetitive DNA sequence elements in a differentiation-specific manner in the nuclear periphery subjacent to the nuclear lamina and thus participate in the organization of chromatin and in the control of transcription, replication, and recombination processes. This includes aspects of global

  13. NITRIC OXIDE BINDS TO AND MODULATES THE ACTIVITY OF A POLLEN SPECIFIC ARABIDOPSIS DIACYLGLYCEROL KINASE

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2014-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule in plants. In the pollen of Arabidopsis thaliana, NO causes re-orientation of the growing tube and this response is mediated by 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). However, in plants, NO-sensors have remained somewhat elusive. Here, the findings of an NO-binding candidate, Arabidopsis thaliana DIACYLGLYCEROL KINASE 4 (ATDGK4; AT5G57690) is presented. In addition to the annotated diacylglycerol kinase domain, this molecule also harbors a predicted heme-NO/oxygen (H-NOX) binding site and a guanylyl cyclase (GC) catalytic domain which have been identified based on the alignment of functionally conserved amino acid residues across species. A 3D model of the molecule was constructed, and from which the locations of the kinase catalytic center, the ATP-binding site, the GC and H-NOX domains were estimated. Docking of ATP to the kinase catalytic center was also modeled. The recombinant ATDGK4 demonstrated kinase activity in vitro, catalyzing the ATP-dependent conversion of sn-1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) to phosphatidic acid (PA). This activity was inhibited by the mammalian DAG kinase inhibitor R59949 and importantly also by the NO donors diethylamine NONOate (DEA NONOate) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Recombinant ATDGK4 also has GC activity in vitro, catalyzing the conversion of guanosine-5\\'-triphosphate (GTP) to cGMP. The catalytic domains of ATDGK4 kinase and GC may be independently regulated since the kinase but not the GC, was inhibited by NO while Ca2+ only stimulates the GC. It is likely that the DAG kinase product, PA, causes the release of Ca2+ from the intracellular stores and Ca2+ in turn activates the GC domain of ATDGK4 through a feedback mechanism. Analysis of publicly available microarray data has revealed that ATDGK4 is highly expressed in the pollen. Here, the pollen tubes of mis-expressing atdgk4 recorded slower growth rates than the wild-type (Col-0) and importantly, they showed altered

  14. Collagenase-3 binds to a specific receptor and requires the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein for internalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmina, O. Y.; Walling, H. W.; Fiacco, G. J.; Freije, J. M.; Lopez-Otin, C.; Jeffrey, J. J.; Partridge, N. C.

    1999-01-01

    We have previously identified a specific receptor for collagenase-3 that mediates the binding, internalization, and degradation of this ligand in UMR 106-01 rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cells. In the present study, we show that collagenase-3 binding is calcium-dependent and occurs in a variety of cell types, including osteoblastic and fibroblastic cells. We also present evidence supporting a two-step mechanism of collagenase-3 binding and internalization involving both a specific collagenase-3 receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Ligand blot analysis shows that (125)I-collagenase-3 binds specifically to two proteins ( approximately 170 kDa and approximately 600 kDa) present in UMR 106-01 cells. Western blotting identified the 600-kDa protein as the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Our data suggest that the 170-kDa protein is a specific collagenase-3 receptor. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-null mouse embryo fibroblasts bind but fail to internalize collagenase-3, whereas UMR 106-01 and wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts bind and internalize collagenase-3. Internalization, but not binding, is inhibited by the 39-kDa receptor-associated protein. We conclude that the internalization of collagenase-3 requires the participation of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and propose a model in which the cell surface interaction of this ligand requires a sequential contribution from two receptors, with the collagenase-3 receptor acting as a high affinity primary binding site and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein mediating internalization.

  15. Specific binding of a ligand of sigma-opioid receptors - N-allylnormetazocine (SKF 10047) - with liver membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samovilova, N.N.; Yarygin, K.N.; Vinogradov, V.A.

    1986-08-01

    A ligand of the sigma-opioid receptors - N-allylnormetazocine (SKF 10047) -binds specifically and reversible with rat liver membranes. In relation to a number of properties, the sites binding SKF 10047 in the liver are similar to the sigma-opioid receptors of the central nervous system. They do not interact with classical opiates (morphine, naloxone) and with opioid peptides, but bind well benzomorphans (bremazocine, SKF 10047) and a number of compounds of different chemical structures with a pronounced psychtropic action (haloperidol, imipramine, phencyclidine, etc.).

  16. The N-terminal part of Als1 protein from Candida albicans specifically binds fucose-containing glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, Dagmara S; Ielasi, Francesco S; Goossens, Katty V Y; Willaert, Ronnie G

    2011-06-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans expresses on its surface Als (Agglutinin like sequence) proteins, which play an important role in the adhesion to host cells and in the development of candidiasis. The binding specificity of these proteins is broad, as they can bind to various mammalian proteins, such as extracellular matrix proteins, and N- and E-cadherins. The N-terminal part of Als proteins constitutes the substrate-specific binding domain and is responsible for attachment to epithelial and endothelial cells. We have used glycan array screening to identify possible glycan receptors for the binding domain of Als1p-N. Under those conditions, Als1p-N binds specifically to fucose-containing glycans, which adds a lectin function to the functional diversity of the Als1 protein. The binding between Als1p-N and BSA-fucose glycoconjugate was quantitatively characterized using surface plasmon resonance, which demonstrated a weak millimolar affinity between Als1p-N and fucose. Furthermore, we have also quantified the affinity of Als1p-N to the extracellular matrix proteins proteins fibronectin and laminin, which is situated in the micromolar range. Surface plasmon resonance characterization of Als1p-N-Als1p-N interaction was in the micromolar affinity range.

  17. UPF201 Archaeal Specific Family Members Reveals Structural Similarity to RNA-Binding Proteins but Low Likelihood for RNA-Binding Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, K.N.; Swaminathan, S.; Burley, S. K.

    2008-12-11

    We have determined X-ray crystal structures of four members of an archaeal specific family of proteins of unknown function (UPF0201; Pfam classification: DUF54) to advance our understanding of the genetic repertoire of archaea. Despite low pairwise amino acid sequence identities (10-40%) and the absence of conserved sequence motifs, the three-dimensional structures of these proteins are remarkably similar to one another. Their common polypeptide chain fold, encompassing a five-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet and five {alpha}-helices, proved to be quite unexpectedly similar to that of the RRM-type RNA-binding domain of the ribosomal L5 protein, which is responsible for binding the 5S- rRNA. Structure-based sequence alignments enabled construction of a phylogenetic tree relating UPF0201 family members to L5 ribosomal proteins and other structurally similar RNA binding proteins, thereby expanding our understanding of the evolutionary purview of the RRM superfamily. Analyses of the surfaces of these newly determined UPF0201 structures suggest that they probably do not function as RNA binding proteins, and that this domain specific family of proteins has acquired a novel function in archaebacteria, which awaits experimental elucidation.

  18. UPF201 Archaeal Specific Family Members Reveal Structural Similarity to RNA-Binding Proteins but Low Likelyhood for RNA-Binding Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, K.; Burley, S; Swaminathan, S

    2008-01-01

    We have determined X-ray crystal structures of four members of an archaeal specific family of proteins of unknown function (UPF0201; Pfam classification: DUF54) to advance our understanding of the genetic repertoire of archaea. Despite low pairwise amino acid sequence identities (10-40%) and the absence of conserved sequence motifs, the three-dimensional structures of these proteins are remarkably similar to one another. Their common polypeptide chain fold, encompassing a five-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet and five {alpha}-helices, proved to be quite unexpectedly similar to that of the RRM-type RNA-binding domain of the ribosomal L5 protein, which is responsible for binding the 5S- rRNA. Structure-based sequence alignments enabled construction of a phylogenetic tree relating UPF0201 family members to L5 ribosomal proteins and other structurally similar RNA binding proteins, thereby expanding our understanding of the evolutionary purview of the RRM superfamily. Analyses of the surfaces of these newly determined UPF0201 structures suggest that they probably do not function as RNA binding proteins, and that this domain specific family of proteins has acquired a novel function in archaebacteria, which awaits experimental elucidation.

  19. UPF201 archaeal specific family members reveal structural similarity to RNA-binding proteins but low likelihood for RNA-binding function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamurthy N Rao

    Full Text Available We have determined X-ray crystal structures of four members of an archaeal specific family of proteins of unknown function (UPF0201; Pfam classification: DUF54 to advance our understanding of the genetic repertoire of archaea. Despite low pairwise amino acid sequence identities (10-40% and the absence of conserved sequence motifs, the three-dimensional structures of these proteins are remarkably similar to one another. Their common polypeptide chain fold, encompassing a five-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet and five alpha-helices, proved to be quite unexpectedly similar to that of the RRM-type RNA-binding domain of the ribosomal L5 protein, which is responsible for binding the 5S- rRNA. Structure-based sequence alignments enabled construction of a phylogenetic tree relating UPF0201 family members to L5 ribosomal proteins and other structurally similar RNA binding proteins, thereby expanding our understanding of the evolutionary purview of the RRM superfamily. Analyses of the surfaces of these newly determined UPF0201 structures suggest that they probably do not function as RNA binding proteins, and that this domain specific family of proteins has acquired a novel function in archaebacteria, which awaits experimental elucidation.

  20. Uncovering the Peptide-Binding Specificities of HLA-C: A General Strategy To Determine the Specificity of Any MHC Class I Molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael; Harndahl, Mikkel; Stryhn, Anette;

    2014-01-01

    representing their peptide-binding motifs. The motifs prominently shared a conserved C-terminal primary anchor with hydrophobic amino acid residues, as well as one or more diverse primary and auxiliary anchors at P1, P2, P3, and/or P7. Matrices were used to generate a large panel of HLA-C-specific peptide...

  1. Specific binding of a dihydropyrimidinone derivative with DNA: Spectroscopic, calorimetric and modeling investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Gongke, E-mail: wanggongke@126.com [School of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, Ministry of Education, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); Yan Changling; Wang Dongchao; Li Dan [School of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, Ministry of Education, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); Lu Yan, E-mail: yanlu2001@sohu.com [School of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, Ministry of Education, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China)

    2012-07-15

    One of the dihydropyrimidinone derivative 5-(ethoxycarbonyl)-6-methyl-4-(4-methoxyphenyl) -3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-one (EMMD) was synthesized, and its binding properties with calf-thymus DNA (ctDNA) were investigated using spectroscopic, viscometric, isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) and molecular modeling techniques. Fluorescence spectra suggested that the fluorescence enhancement of the binding interaction of EMMD to ctDNA was a static process with ground state complex formation. The binding constant determined with spectroscopic titration and ITC was found to be in the same order of 10{sup 4} M{sup -1}. According to the results of the viscosity analysis, fluorescence competitive binding experiment, fluorescence quenching studies, absorption spectral and ITC investigations, it can be concluded that EMMD is intercalative binding to ctDNA. Furthermore, the results of molecular modeling confirmed those obtained from spectroscopic, viscosimetric and ITC investigations. Additionally, ITC studies also indicated that the binding interaction is predominantly enthalpy driven. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Medically important dihydropyrimidinones derivative EMMD is synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EMMD is intercalative binding into ctDNA helix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen bonding may play an essential role in the binding of EMCD with ctDNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This binding interaction is predominantly enthalpy driven.

  2. Determination of specific binding interactions at L-cystine crystal surfaces with chemical force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Trinanjana; Ward, Michael D

    2013-04-17

    The pathogenesis of L-cystine kidney stones involves four critical steps: nucleation, crystal growth, crystal aggregation, and crystal adhesion to cells. Although inhibition of crystal growth by L-cystine "imposters" at L-cystine crystal surfaces has been suggested as a plausible route for the suppression of stones, understanding the factors that govern crystal-crystal aggregation and adhesion of crystals to epithelial cells also is essential for devising strategies to mitigate L-cystine stone formation. Chemical force microscopy performed with atomic force microscope tips decorated with functional groups commonly found in urinary constituents that likely mediate aggregation and attachment (e.g., COOH, NH2, SH, CH3, OH) revealed signatures that reflect differences in the chemical affinity of these groups for the (001) and {100} faces of the naturally occurring hexagonal form of L-cystine single crystals and the {110} faces of the non-native tetragonal form. These signatures can be explained by the different chemical compositions of the crystal faces, and they reveal a remarkable binding specificity of the thiol group for the sulfur-rich {100} and {110} faces of the hexagonal and tetragonal forms, respectively. Collectively, these observations suggest that alterations of the crystal habit and polymorph by crystal growth inhibitors may not affect crystal aggregation or adhesion to cells significantly.

  3. Specific binding of DNA to aggregated forms of Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camero, Sergio; Ayuso, Jose M; Barrantes, Alejandro; Benítez, María J; Jiménez, Juan S

    2013-04-01

    Anomalous protein aggregation is closely associated to age-related mental illness. Extraneuronal plaques, mainly composed of aggregated amyloid peptides, are considered as hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis, this disease starts as a consequence of an abnormal processing of the amyloid precursor protein resulting in an excess of amyloid peptides. Nuclear localization of amyloid peptide aggregates together with amyloid-DNA interaction, have been repeatedly reported. In this paper we have used surface plasmon resonance and electron microscopy to study the structure and behavior of different peptides and proteins, including β-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, histone, casein and the amyloid-β peptides related to Alzheimer's disease Aβ25-35 and Aβ1-40. The main purpose of this study is to investigate whether proneness to DNA interaction is a general property displayed by aggregated forms of proteins, or it is an interaction specifically related to the aggregated forms of those particular proteins and peptides related to neurodegenerative diseases. Our results reveal that those aggregates formed by amyloid peptides show a particular proneness to interact with DNA. They are the only aggregated structures capable of binding DNA, and show more affinity for DNA than for other polyanions like heparin and polyglutamic acid, therefore strengthening the hypothesis that amyloid peptides may, by means of interaction with nuclear DNA, contribute to the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Noc protein binds to specific DNA sequences to coordinate cell division with chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling Juan; Ishikawa, Shu; Kawai, Yoshikazu; Oshima, Taku; Ogasawara, Naotake; Errington, Jeff

    2009-07-08

    Coordination of chromosome segregation and cytokinesis is crucial for efficient cell proliferation. In Bacillus subtilis, the nucleoid occlusion protein Noc protects the chromosomes by associating with the chromosome and preventing cell division in its vicinity. Using protein localization, ChAP-on-Chip and bioinformatics, we have identified a consensus Noc-binding DNA sequence (NBS), and have shown that Noc is targeted to about 70 discrete regions scattered around the chromosome, though absent from a large region around the replication terminus. Purified Noc bound specifically to an NBS in vitro. NBSs inserted near the replication terminus bound Noc-YFP and caused a delay in cell division. An autonomous plasmid carrying an NBS array recruited Noc-YFP and conferred a severe Noc-dependent inhibition of cell division. This shows that Noc is a potent inhibitor of division, but that its activity is strictly localized by the interaction with NBS sites in vivo. We propose that Noc serves not only as a spatial regulator of cell division to protect the nucleoid, but also as a timing device with an important role in the coordination of chromosome segregation and cell division.

  5. Lectin domains of polypeptide GalNAc transferases exhibit glycopeptide binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Johannes W; Bennett, Eric P; Schjoldager, Katrine T-B G; Meldal, Morten; Holmér, Andreas P; Blixt, Ola; Cló, Emiliano; Levery, Steven B; Clausen, Henrik; Wandall, Hans H

    2011-09-16

    UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide α-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-Ts) constitute a family of up to 20 transferases that initiate mucin-type O-glycosylation. The transferases are structurally composed of catalytic and lectin domains. Two modes have been identified for the selection of glycosylation sites by GalNAc-Ts: confined sequence recognition by the catalytic domain alone, and concerted recognition of acceptor sites and adjacent GalNAc-glycosylated sites by the catalytic and lectin domains, respectively. Thus far, only the catalytic domain has been shown to have peptide sequence specificity, whereas the primary function of the lectin domain is to increase affinity to previously glycosylated substrates. Whether the lectin domain also has peptide sequence selectivity has remained unclear. Using a glycopeptide array with a library of synthetic and recombinant glycopeptides based on sequences of mucins MUC1, MUC2, MUC4, MUC5AC, MUC6, and MUC7 as well as a random glycopeptide bead library, we examined the binding properties of four different lectin domains. The lectin domains of GalNAc-T1, -T2, -T3, and -T4 bound different subsets of small glycopeptides. These results indicate an additional level of complexity in the initiation step of O-glycosylation by GalNAc-Ts.

  6. Motility assays using myosin attached to surfaces through specific binding to monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, D A; Bourdieu, L; Kinose, F; Libchaber, A

    1995-04-01

    We have analyzed the dependence of actin filament movement on the mode of myosin attachment to surfaces. Monoclonal antibodies that bind to three distinct sites were used to tether myosin to nitrocellulose-coated glass. One antibody reacts with an epitope on the regulatory light chain located at the head-rod junction. The other two react with sites in the rod domain, one in the S2 region near the S2-LMM hinge, and the other at the C terminus of the myosin rod. These monoclonal antibodies were used to provide increasing flexibility in the mode of attachment. Fast skeletal muscle myosin monomers were bound to the surfaces through the specific interaction with these monoclonal antibodies and the sliding movement of fluorescently labeled actin filaments analyzed by video microscopy. Each of these antibodies produced stable, myosin-coated surfaces that supported uniform movement of actin over the course of several hours. Attachment of myosin through the anti-S2 and anti-LMM monoclonal antibodies yielded a maximum velocity of 10 microns/s at 30 degrees C, whereas attachment through anti-LC2 produced a lower velocity of 4-5 microns/s. Each antibody showed a characteristic minimum myosin density below which sliding movement was no longer supported and an exponential dependence of actin filament velocity on myosin surface density below Vmax. Maximum sliding velocity was achieved over a range of myosin surface densities. Thus, the specific mode of attachment can influence the characteristic velocity of actin filament movement and the surface density needed to support movement. These data are being used to analyze the dynamics of sliding filament assays and evaluate estimates of the average number of motor molecules per unit length of actin required to support movement.

  7. Carbohydrate/glycan-binding specificity of legume lectins in respect to their proposed biological functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Viana Ramos

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The lectins, proteins which specifically recognize carbohydrate moieties, have been extensively studied in many biochemical and structural aspects in order to establish the molecular basis of this non-catalytic event. On the other hand, their clinical and agricultural potentials have been growing fast. Although lectins, mainly those from legume plants, had been investigated for biological properties, studies about the physiological functions of lectins are scarce in literature. Therefore, despite the accumulated data on lectins (as proteins, the role played by these signalizing molecules is poorly discussed. In the light of our accumulated results on legume lectins, specially those obtained from plants belonging to the Diocleinae sub-tribe and available data in literature, we discuss here the main hypothesis of their functions according to their carbohydrate/glycan-binding specificity.As lectinas, proteinas que especificamente reconhecem estruturas que contém carboidratos, têm sido extensivamente estudadas em muitos aspectos bioquímicos e estruturais, objetivando estabelecer as bases moleculares deste evento não-catalítico. Por outro lado, os potenciais clínicos e agriculturais destas proteínas têm crescido rapidamente. Embora as lectinas, principalmente aquelas de legumes tenham sido bastante investigadas em suas propriedades biológicas, estudos sobre as funcões fisiológicas de lectinas são escassos na literatura. Além disto, a despeito da quantidade de dados acumulados sobre lectinas (como proteínas, o papel desempenhado por estas moléculas de sinalização é pobremente discutido. Valendo-se de nossos estudos sobre lectinas de leguminosas, principalmente da sub-tribo Diocleinae, e outros dados presentes na literatura, discutimos aqui, as principais hipóteses de suas funções com base na especificidade por carboidratos e glicanos complexos.

  8. The Non-Specific Binding of Fluorescent-Labeled MiRNAs on Cell Surface by Hydrophobic Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Lu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs about 22 nt long that play key roles in almost all biological processes and diseases. The fluorescent labeling and lipofection are two common methods for changing the levels and locating the position of cellular miRNAs. Despite many studies about the mechanism of DNA/RNA lipofection, little is known about the characteristics, mechanisms and specificity of lipofection of fluorescent-labeled miRNAs.Therefore, miRNAs labeled with different fluorescent dyes were transfected into adherent and suspension cells using lipofection reagent. Then, the non-specific binding and its mechanism were investigated by flow cytometer and laser confocal microscopy. The results showed that miRNAs labeled with Cy5 (cyanine fluorescent dye could firmly bind to the surface of adherent cells (Hela and suspended cells (K562 even without lipofection reagent. The binding of miRNAs labeled with FAM (carboxyl fluorescein to K562 cells was obvious, but it was not significant in Hela cells. After lipofectamine reagent was added, most of the fluorescently labeled miRNAs binding to the surface of Hela cells were transfected into intra-cell because of the high transfection efficiency, however, most of them were still binding to the surface of K562 cells. Moreover, the high-salt buffer which could destroy the electrostatic interactions did not affect the above-mentioned non-specific binding, but the organic solvent which could destroy the hydrophobic interactions eliminated it.These results implied that the fluorescent-labeled miRNAs could non-specifically bind to the cell surface by hydrophobic interaction. It would lead to significant errors in the estimation of transfection efficiency only according to the cellular fluorescence intensity. Therefore, other methods to evaluate the transfection efficiency and more appropriate fluorescent dyes should be used according to the cell types for the accuracy of results.

  9. Specific cation interactions as the cause of slow dynamics and hysteresis in dye and perovskite solar cells: a small-perturbation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Lidia; Idígoras, Jesús; Todinova, Anna; Salado, Manuel; Kazim, Samrana; Ahmad, Shahzada; Anta, Juan A

    2016-11-16

    Hysteresis is one of the most remarkable features of perovskite solar cells; however, it is also present in other kinds of devices such as dye-sensitized solar cells. Hysteresis is due to underlying slow dynamic processes that interfere with the process of charge separation which depends critically on the selective contacts used. In this work we focus on the low-frequency (0.1-10 Hz) dynamics using impedance and intensity-modulated photocurrent spectroscopy and found that both perovskite solar cells (PSCs) and "viscous electrolyte containing" dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) can be described on the same fundamental grounds. By comparing different electrolyte compositions in DSSCs and both methylammonium and formamidinium-based PSCs, we find a connection between the polar nature of the cations and the low-frequency component of these solar cells. There is evidence that in both cases ion transport and specific chemical interactions with the TiO2 surface give rise to the slow dynamics and the hysteresis. This is mainly inferred from the slope of the capacitance vs. applied voltage which shows accumulation behavior for the formulations with higher dipole moments only.

  10. Phase diagram and structures in mixtures of poly(styrenesulfonate anion) and alkyltrimethylammonium cations in water: significance of specific hydrophobic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitar, Simona; Goderis, Bart; Hansson, Per; Kogej, Ksenija

    2012-04-19

    Mixtures of polyelectrolytes and oppositely charged surfactants show very rich phase behavior that is influenced by surfactant-ion and polyion properties and by water content. A general feature is associative phase separation as a result of strong electrostatic interactions, whereas the effect of eventual more specific interactions (e.g., hydrophobic) has not been thoroughly investigated. In this paper, we report a detailed study on phase behavior and structures in poly(styrenesulfonate anion) (PSS(-))-cetyltrimethylammonium cation (CTA(+))-water mixtures that are characterized by a hydrophobic interaction between the styrene groups of PSS(-) and the micelle interior. Structures of various phases were determined by small-angle X-ray scattering, and results indicated the presence of a disordered micellar and an ordered hexagonal phase; no cubic phase was found. The general conclusion is that the highlighted hydrophobic interaction promotes dissolution of CTAPSS when the polyion salt is added and provides further stabilization of the dense phase when the surfactant salt is added.

  11. Non-specific recognition is achieved in Pot1pC through the use of multiple binding modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Thayne H.; McKercher, Marissa A.; Wuttke, Deborah S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Pot1 is the protein responsible for binding to and protecting the 3’ single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) overhang at most eukaryotic telomeres. Here we present the crystal structure of one of the two OB-folds (Pot1pC) that make up the ssDNA-binding domain in S. pombe Pot1. Comparison with the homologous human domain reveals unexpected structural divergence in the mode of ligand binding that explains the differing ligand requirements between species. Despite the presence of apparently base-specific hydrogen bonds, Pot1pC is able to bind a wide range of ssDNA sequences with thermodynamic equivalence. To address how Pot1pC binds ssDNA with little to no specificity, multiple structures of Pot1pC bound to non-cognate ssDNA ligands were solved. These structures reveal that this promiscuity is implemented through new binding modes that thermodynamically compensate for base-substitutions through alternate stacking interactions and new H-bonding networks. PMID:23201273

  12. Effects of a Variety of Food Extracts and Juices on the Specific Binding Ability of Norovirus GII.4 P Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, DAN; BAERT, LEEN; XIA, MING; ZHONG, WEIMING; JIANG, XI; UYTTENDAELE, MIEKE

    2014-01-01

    The effects of 13 food extracts and juices, including shellfish, fruits, and vegetables, on the binding ability of human norovirus (NoV) were examined, using P particles of human NoV GII.4 as a research surrogate. The enhancements (positive values) or reductions (negative values) of NoV P particle detection (changes in optical density at 450 nm) in the presence of different food extracts and juices as compared with P particles diluted in phosphate-buffered saline were tested by saliva-binding, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in triplicate. In the presence of different food extracts and juices at different concentrations, an increase or decrease of the receptor-binding ability of the NoV P particles was observed. Due to a higher specific binding and thus a higher accumulation of the viral particles, oysters may be contaminated with human NoV more often than other shellfish species (mussel, hard clams, and razor clams). Cranberry and pomegranate juices were shown to reduce the specific binding ability of human NoV P particles. No such binding inhibition effects were observed for the other tested extracts of fresh produce (strawberry, blackberry, blueberry, cherry tomato, spinach, romaine lettuce) or, notably, for raspberry, which has been associated with human NoV outbreaks. PMID:22980024

  13. Binding specificity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa for purified, native Bombyx mori aminopeptidase N and cadherin-like receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins Jeremy L

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To better understand the molecular interactions of Bt toxins with non-target insects, we have examined the real-time binding specificity and affinity of Cry1 toxins to native silkworm (Bombyx mori midgut receptors. Previous studies on B. mori receptors utilized brush border membrane vesicles or purifed receptors in blot-type assays. Results The Bombyx mori (silkworm aminopeptidase N (APN and cadherin-like receptors for Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal Cry1Aa toxin were purified and their real-time binding affinities for Cry toxins were examined by surface plasmon resonance. Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins did not bind to the immobilized native receptors, correlating with their low toxicities. Cry1Aa displayed moderate affinity for B. mori APN (75 nM, and unusually tight binding to the cadherin-like receptor (2.6 nM, which results from slow dissociation rates. The binding of a hybrid toxin (Aa/Aa/Ac was identical to Cry1Aa. Conclusions These results indicate domain II of Cry1Aa is essential for binding to native B. mori receptors and for toxicity. Moreover, the high-affinity binding of Cry1Aa to native cadherin-like receptor emphasizes the importance of this receptor class for Bt toxin research.

  14. Screening of specific binding peptide targeting blood vessel of human esophageal cancer in vivo in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI Min; WU Kai-chun; HAO Zhi-ming; GUO Chang-cun; YAO Jia-yin

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction remains a virulent malignancy with poor prognosis. Rapid progresses were made in chemotherapeutic agents and the development of molecular markers allowed better identification of candidates for targeted therapy. This study aimed to identify the candidate peptides used for anti-angiogenic therapy of esophageal cancer by in vivo screening C7C peptide library for peptides binding specifically to blood vessels of human esophageal cancer.Methods The phage displayed C7C peptide library was injected intravenously into mice bearing human esophageal tumor xenografts under renal capsule. After 5 rounds of screening, 13 clones were picked up individually and sequenced.During each round of screening, titers of phage recovery were calculated from tumor xenograft and control tissues.Homing of these 9 peptides to tumor vessel was detected by calculating phage titers in the tumor xenograft and control tissues (lung and spleen) after each phage was injected into mice model, and compared with the distribution of phage M13 and Ⅷ-related antigen in tumor xenograft by immunohistochemical staining. Comparisons among groups of data were made using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by the Bonferroni multiple comparisons test.Results The number of phage recovered from tumor tissue of each round increased gradually in tumor group while decreased in control groups (P <0.01 in tumor and spleen, P <0.05 in lung). Immunohistochemical staining showed similar staining pattern with M13 antibody or Ⅷ-related antigen antibody, suggesting that phages displaying the selected peptides could home to blood vessel of human esophageal cancer. According to their DNA, 9 corresponding peptide sequences were deduced. And the homing ability to blood vessel of phages displaying the selected peptides was confirmed by comparing with their recovery in tumor and control tissues. Two motifs, YSXNXW and PXNXXN, were also obtained by

  15. The novel antiepileptic drug levetiracetam (ucb L059) appears to act via a specific binding site in CNS membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyer, M; Gillard, M; Matagne, A; Hénichart, J P; Wülfert, E

    1995-11-14

    Levetiracetam ((S)-alpha-ethyl-2-oxo-pyrrolidine acetamide, ucb L059) is a novel potential antiepileptic agent presently in clinical development with unknown mechanism of action. The finding that its anticonvulsant activity is highly stereoselective (Gower et al., 1992) led us to investigate the presence of specific binding sites for [3H]levetiracetam in rat central nervous system (CNS). Binding assays, performed on crude membranes, revealed the existence of a reversible, saturable and stereoselective specific binding site. Results obtained in hippocampal membranes suggest that [3H]levetiracetam labels a single class of binding sites (nH = 0.92 +/- 0.06) with modest affinity (Kd = 780 +/- 115 nM) and with a high binding capacity (Bmax = 9.1 +/- 1.2 pmol/mg protein). Similar Kd and Bmax values were obtained in other brain regions (cortex, cerebellum and striatum). ucb L060, the (R) enantiomer of levetiracetam, displayed about 1000 times less affinity for these sites. The binding of [3H]levetiracetam is confined to the synaptic plasma membranes in the central nervous system since no specific binding was observed in a range of peripheral tissues including heart, kidneys, spleen, pancreas, adrenals, lungs and liver. The commonly used antiepileptic drugs carbamazepine, phenytoin, valproate, phenobarbital and clonazepam, as well as the convulsant agent t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS), picrotoxin and bicuculline did not displace [3H]levetiracetam binding. However, ethosuximide (pKi = 3.5 +/- 0.1), pentobarbital (pKi = 3.8 +/- 0.1), pentylenetetrazole (pKi = 4.1 +/- 0.1) and bemegride (pKi = 5.0 +/- 0.1) competed with [3H]levetiracetam with pKi values comparable to active drug concentrations observed in vivo. Structurally related compounds, including piracetam and aniracetam, also displaced [3H]levetiracetam binding. (S) Stereoisomer homologues of levetiracetam demonstrated a rank order of affinity for [3H]levetiracetam binding in correlation with their

  16. Quantitative predictions of peptide binding to MHC class I molecules using specificity matrices and anchor-stratified calibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauemøller, S L; Holm, A; Hilden, J;

    2001-01-01

    predictions, we have measured the MHC class I binding of a large number of peptides. In an attempt to further improve predictions and to include sequence dependency, we subdivided the panel of peptides according to whether the peptides had zero, one or two primary anchor residues. This allowed us to define......Peptides are key immune targets. They are generated by fragmentation of antigenic proteins, selected by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules and subsequently presented to T cells. One of the most selective requirements is that of peptide binding to MHC. Accurate descriptions...... and predictions of peptide-MHC interactions are therefore important. Quantitative matrices representing MHC class I specificity can be used to search any query protein for the presence of MHC binding peptides. Assuming that each peptide residue contributes to binding in an additive and sequence independent manner...

  17. Distorted octahedral coordination of tungstate in a subfamily of specific binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollenstein, K.; Comellas-Bigler, M.; Bevers, L.E.; Feiters, M.C.; Meyer-Klaucke, W.; Hagedoorn, P.-L.; Locher, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea import molybdenum and tungsten from the environment in the form of the oxyanions molybdate (MoO4 2−) and tungstate (WO4 2−). These substrates are captured by an external, high-affinity binding protein, and delivered to ATP binding cassette transporters, which move them across th

  18. DNA-binding specificity and molecular functions of NAC transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Addie Nina; Ernst, Heidi Asschenfeldt; Lo Leggio, Leila;

    2005-01-01

    The family of NAC (NAM/ATAF1,2/CUC2) transcription factors has been implicated in a wide range of plant processes, but knowledge on the DNA-binding properties of the family is limited. Using a reiterative selection procedure on random oligonucleotides, we have identified consensus binding sites f...

  19. Identification and Characterization of Single-Chain Antibodies that Specifically Bind GI Noroviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Amy M.; Huang, Wanzhi; Kou, Baijun; Estes, Mary K.; Atmar, Robert L.; Palzkill, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Norovirus infections commonly lead to outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis and spread quickly, resulting in many health and economic challenges prior to diagnosis. Rapid and reliable diagnostic tests are therefore essential to identify infections and to guide the appropriate clinical responses at the point-of-care. Existing tools, including RT-PCR and enzyme immunoassays, pose several limitations based on the significant time, equipment and expertise required to elicit results. Immunochromatographic assays available for use at the point-of-care have poor sensitivity and specificity, especially for genogroup I noroviruses, thus requiring confirmation of results with more sensitive testing methods. Therefore, there is a clear need for novel reagents to help achieve quick and reliable results. In this study, we have identified two novel single-chain antibodies (scFvs)—named NJT-R3-A2 and NJT-R3-A3—that effectively detect GI.1 and GI.7 virus-like particles (VLPs) through selection of a phage display library against the P-domain of the GI.1 major capsid protein. The limits of detection by each scFv for GI.1 and GI.7 are 0.1 and 0.2 ng, and 6.25 and 25 ng, respectively. They detect VLPs with strong specificity in multiple diagnostic formats, including ELISAs and membrane-based dot blots, and in the context of norovirus-negative stool suspensions. The scFvs also detect native virions effectively in norovirus-positive clinical stool samples. Purified scFvs bind to GI.1 and GI.7 VLPs with equilibrium constant (KD) values of 27 nM and 49 nM, respectively. Overall, the phage-based scFv reagents identified and characterized here show utility for detecting GI.1 and GI.7 noroviruses in multiple diagnostic assay formats with strong specificity and sensitivity, indicating promise for integration into existing point-of-care tests to improve future diagnostics. PMID:28095447

  20. Pentamidine binds to tRNA through non-specific hydrophobic interactions and inhibits aminoacylation and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Zhang, Yi

    2008-03-01

    The selective and potent inhibition of mitochondrial translation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by pentamidine suggests a novel antimicrobial action for this drug. Electrophoresis mobility shift assay, T1 ribonuclease footprinting, hydroxyl radical footprinting and isothermal titration calorimetry collectively demonstrated that pentamidine non-specifically binds to two distinct classes of sites on tRNA. The binding was driven by favorable entropy changes indicative of a large hydrophobic interaction, suggesting that the aromatic rings of pentamidine are inserted into the stacked base pairs of tRNA helices. Pentamidine binding disrupts the tRNA secondary structure and masks the anticodon loop in the tertiary structure. Consistently, we showed that pentamidine specifically inhibits tRNA aminoacylation but not the cognate amino acid adenylation. Pentamidine inhibited protein translation in vitro with an EC(50) equivalent to that binds to tRNA and inhibits tRNA aminoacylation in vitro, but drastically higher than that inhibits translation in vivo, supporting the established notion that the antimicrobial activity of pentamidine is largely due to its selective accumulation by the pathogen rather than by the host cell. Therefore, interrupting tRNA aminoacylation by the entropy-driven non-specific binding is an important mechanism of pentamidine in inhibiting protein translation, providing new insights into the development of antimicrobial drugs.

  1. Sensitive and direct detection of receptor binding specificity of highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus in clinical samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadanobu Takahashi

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV recognizes two types of N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac by galactose (Gal linkages, Neu5Acα2,3Gal and Neu5Acα2,6Gal. Avian IAV preferentially binds to Neu5Acα2,3Gal linkage, while human IAV preferentially binds to Neu5Acα2,6Gal linkage, as a virus receptor. Shift in receptor binding specificity of avian IAV from Neu5Acα2,3Gal linkage to Neu5Acα2,6Gal linkage is generally believed to be a critical factor for its transmission ability among humans. Surveillance of this shift of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian IAV (HPAI is thought to be a very important for prediction and prevention of a catastrophic pandemic of HPAI among humans. In this study, we demonstrated that receptor binding specificity of IAV bound to sialo-glycoconjugates was sensitively detected by quantifying the HA gene with real-time reverse-transcription-PCR. The new assay enabled direct detection of receptor binding specificity of HPAIs in chicken clinical samples including trachea and cloaca swabs in only less than 4 h.

  2. Computational design of an epitope-specific Keap1 binding antibody using hotspot residues grafting and CDR loop swapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Taylor, Richard D.; Griffin, Laura; Coker, Shu-Fen; Adams, Ralph; Ceska, Tom; Shi, Jiye; Lawson, Alastair D. G.; Baker, Terry

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic and diagnostic applications of monoclonal antibodies often require careful selection of binders that recognize specific epitopes on the target molecule to exert a desired modulation of biological function. Here we present a proof-of-concept application for the rational design of an epitope-specific antibody binding with the target protein Keap1, by grafting pre-defined structural interaction patterns from the native binding partner protein, Nrf2, onto geometrically matched positions of a set of antibody scaffolds. The designed antibodies bind to Keap1 and block the Keap1-Nrf2 interaction in an epitope-specific way. One resulting antibody is further optimised to achieve low-nanomolar binding affinity by in silico redesign of the CDRH3 sequences. An X-ray co-crystal structure of one resulting design reveals that the actual binding orientation and interface with Keap1 is very close to the design model, despite an unexpected CDRH3 tilt and VH/VL interface deviation, which indicates that the modelling precision may be improved by taking into account simultaneous CDR loops conformation and VH/VL orientation optimisation upon antibody sequence change. Our study confirms that, given a pre-existing crystal structure of the target protein-protein interaction, hotspots grafting with CDR loop swapping is an attractive route to the rational design of an antibody targeting a pre-selected epitope. PMID:28128368

  3. Structural Basis for a Ribofuranosyl Binding Protein: Insights into the Furanose Specific Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagaria, A.; Swaminathan, S.; Kumaran, D.; Burley, S. K.

    2011-04-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC-transporters) are members of one of the largest protein superfamilies, with representatives in all extant phyla. These integral membrane proteins utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to carry out certain biological processes, including translocation of various substrates across membranes and non-transport related processes such as translation of RNA and DNA repair. Typically, such transport systems in bacteria consist of an ATP binding component, a transmembrane permease, and a periplasmic receptor or binding protein. Soluble proteins found in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria serve as the primary receptors for transport of many compounds, such as sugars, small peptides, and some ions. Ligand binding activates these periplasmic components, permitting recognition by the membrane spanning domain, which supports for transport and, in some cases, chemotaxis. Transport and chemotaxis processes appear to be independent of one another, and a few mutants of bifunctional periplasmic components reveal the absence of one or the other function. Previously published high-resolution X-ray structures of various periplasmic ligand binding proteins include Arabinose binding protein (ABP), Allose binding protein (ALBP), Glucose-galactose binding protein (GBP) and Ribose binding protein (RBP). Each of these proteins consists of two structurally similar domains connected by a three-stranded hinge region, with ligand buried between the domains. Upon ligand binding and release, various conformational changes have been observed. For RBP, open (apo) and closed (ligand bound) conformations have been reported and so for MBP. The closed/active form of the protein interacts with the integral membrane component of the system in both transport and chemotaxis. Herein, we report 1.9{angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of the R{sub f}BP periplasmic component of an ABC-type sugar transport system from Hahella chejuensis (UniProt Id Q2S7D2) bound to

  4. Structural Basis for a Ribofuranosyl Binding Protein: Insights into the Furanose Specific Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Bagaria; D Kumaran; S Burley; S Swaminathan

    2011-12-31

    The APT-binding cassette transporters (ABC-transporters) are members of one of the largest protein superfamilies, with representatives in all extant phyla. These integral membrane proteins utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to carry out certain biological processes, including translocation of various substrates across membranes and nontransport related processes such as translation of RNA and DNA repair. typically, such transport systems in bacteria consist of an ATP binding component, a transmembrane permease, and a periplasmic receptor or binding protein. Soluble proteins found in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria serve as the primary receptors for transport of many compounds, such as sugars, small peptides, and some ions. Ligand binding activates these periplasmic components, permitting recognition by the membrane spanning domain, which supports for transport, and, in some cases, chemotaxis. Transport and chemotaxis processes appear to be independent of one another, and a few mutants of bifunctional periplasmic components reveal the absence of one or the other function. Previously published high-resolution X-ray structures of various periplasmic ligand binding proteins include Arabinose binding protein (ABP), Allose binding protein (ALBP), Glucose-galactose binding protein (GBP), and Ribose binding protein (RBP). Each of these proteins consits of two structurally similar domains connected by a three-stranded hinge region, with ligand buried between the domains. Upon ligand binding and release, various conformational changes have been observed. For RBP, open (apo) and closed (ligand bound) conformations hafve been reported and so for MBP. The closed/active form of the protein interacts with the ingral membrane component of the system in both transport and chemotaxis. Herein, they report 1.9 {angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of the R{sub f}BP periplasmic component of an ABC-type sugar transport system from Hahella chejuensis (UniProt Id Q2S7D2) bound

  5. Receptor binding proteins of Listeria monocytogenes bacteriophages A118 and P35 recognize serovar-specific teichoic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielmann, Regula; Habann, Matthias; Eugster, Marcel R. [Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Lurz, Rudi [Max-Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Calendar, Richard [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3202 (United States); Klumpp, Jochen, E-mail: jochen.klumpp@hest.ethz.ch [Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Loessner, Martin J. [Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, ETH Zurich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-03-15

    Adsorption of a bacteriophage to the host requires recognition of a cell wall-associated receptor by a receptor binding protein (RBP). This recognition is specific, and high affinity binding is essential for efficient virus attachment. The molecular details of phage adsorption to the Gram-positive cell are poorly understood. We present the first description of receptor binding proteins and a tail tip structure for the siphovirus group infecting Listeria monocytogenes. The host-range determining factors in two phages, A118 and P35 specific for L. monocytogenes serovar 1/2 have been determined. Two proteins were identified as RBPs in phage A118. Rhamnose residues in wall teichoic acids represent the binding ligands for both proteins. In phage P35, protein gp16 could be identified as RBP and the role of both rhamnose and N-acetylglucosamine in phage adsorption was confirmed. Immunogold-labeling and transmission electron microscopy allowed the creation of a topological model of the A118 phage tail. - Highlights: • We present the first description of receptor binding proteins and a tail tip structure for the Siphovirus group infecting Listeria monocytogenes. • The host-range determining factors in two phages, A118 and P35 specific for L. monocytogenes serovar 1/2 have been determined. • Rhamnose residues in wall teichoic acids represent the binding ligands for both receptor binding proteins in phage A118. • Rhamnose and N-acetylglucosamine are required for adsorption of phage P35. • We preset a topological model of the A118 phage tail.

  6. /sup 125/I-human epidermal growth factor specific binding to placentas and fetal membranes from varoius pregnancy states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, G.E.; Siddiqi, T.A.; Rao, Ch. V.; Carman, F.R.

    1988-01-01

    Specific binding of /sup 125/I-human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) to homogenates of term human placentas and fetal membranes from normal and appropriate for gestational age (N = 20), intrauterine growth retarded (N = 9), twin (N = 11), White class AB diabetic (N = 12), and large for gestational age (N = 13) pregnancies was measured. In all pregnancy states, placentas bound approximately four times more /sup 125/I-hEGF than did fetal membranes (P<0.0001). There was no significant differnce in /sup 125/I-hEGF binding to fetal membranes from the various pregnancy states (P<0.05). /sup 125/I-hEGF specific binding to placentas from intrauterine growth retarded or twin pregnancies was significantly greater compared with placentas from normal and appropriate for gestational age pregnancies (P<0.05). The binding to placentas from pregnancies complicated by White class AB diabetes or large for gestational age infants, on the other hand, was not significantly different from that to placentas from normal and appropriate for gestational age pregnancies. /sup 125/I-hEGF specific binding did not differ between placentas from intrauterine growth retarded or twin pregnancies (P<0.05). Placental and fetal membrane /sup 125/I-hEGF binding did not vary with fetal sex, maternal race, placental weight, or gestational age between 37 to 42 weeks (P<0.05). Placental but not fetal membrane /sup 125/I-hEGF binding increased with increasing infant weight when appropriate for gestational age and large for gestational age infants were included (P<0.05, r = 0.38, N = 32) but not for intrauterine growth retarded, appropriate for gestational age, or large for gestational age infants alone.

  7. Removal of cations using ion-binding terpolymer involving 2-amino-6-nitro-benzothiazole and thiosemicarbazide with formaldehyde by batch equilibrium technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahamed, Mohamed A. Riswan [Department of Chemistry, Oxford Engineering College, Tiruchirappalli 620 009, Tamil Nadu (India); Jeyakumar, Duraisamy [Functional Materials Division, Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630 006, Tamil Nadu (India); Burkanudeen, Abdul R., E-mail: a_deen@rediffmail.com [PG and Research Department of Chemistry, Jamal Mohamed College, Tiruchirappalli 620 020, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2013-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Effect of (a) NaCl, (b) NaNO{sub 3}, (c) NaClO{sub 4} and (d) Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolytes on metal ion uptake. Display Omitted Highlights: ► A novel [(2-amino-6-nitro-benzothiazole)–thiosemicarbazide–formaldehyde] terpolymer has been synthesized. ► SEM images show high porosity in the surface of the resin evidences the effective adsorption of various metal ions. ► BTF terpolymer is a well recyclable cation-exchange resin for industrial waste water treatment. -- Abstract: 2-Amino-6-nitro-benzothiazole and thiosemicarbazide with formaldehyde (BTF) terpolymer was synthesized by the condensation polymerization technique. The elemental analysis and physico-chemical parameters of the terpolymer were measured. This chelation terpolymer was characterized by infrared, electronic and nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR) spectral studies. The molecular weight of the terpolymer was determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Surface analysis of the terpolymer was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The thermal stability of the terpolymer was analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The cation-exchange property of the terpolymer was determined by batch equilibrium method with the effect of pH, contact time and electrolytes. The reusability of the resin was also studied to estimate the effectiveness of the terpolymer resin.

  8. Allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR at the p16INK4a locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Yuno, Miyuki; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-07-28

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has been adopted for a wide range of biological applications including genome editing. In some cases, dissection of genome functions requires allele-specific genome editing, but the use of CRISPR for this purpose has not been studied in detail. In this study, using the p16INK4a gene in HCT116 as a model locus, we investigated whether chromatin states, such as CpG methylation, or a single-nucleotide gap form in a target site can be exploited for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR in vivo. First, we showed that allele-specific locus binding and genome editing could be achieved by targeting allele-specific CpG-methylated regions, which was successful for one, but not all guide RNAs. In this regard, molecular basis underlying the success remains elusive at this stage. Next, we demonstrated that an allele-specific single-nucleotide gap form could be employed for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR, although it was important to avoid CRISPR tolerance of a single nucleotide mismatch brought about by mismatched base skipping. Our results provide information that might be useful for applications of CRISPR in studies of allele-specific functions in the genomes.

  9. Probing the electrostatics and pharmacological modulation of sequence-specific binding by the DNA-binding domain of the ETS family transcription factor PU.1: a binding affinity and kinetics investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munde, Manoj; Poon, Gregory M K; Wilson, W David

    2013-05-27

    Members of the ETS family of transcription factors regulate a functionally diverse array of genes. All ETS proteins share a structurally conserved but sequence-divergent DNA-binding domain, known as the ETS domain. Although the structure and thermodynamics of the ETS-DNA complexes are well known, little is known about the kinetics of sequence recognition, a facet that offers potential insight into its molecular mechanism. We have characterized DNA binding by the ETS domain of PU.1 by biosensor-surface plasmon resonance (SPR). SPR analysis revealed a striking kinetic profile for DNA binding by the PU.1 ETS domain. At low salt concentrations, it binds high-affinity cognate DNA with a very slow association rate constant (≤10(5)M(-)(1)s(-)(1)), compensated by a correspondingly small dissociation rate constant. The kinetics are strongly salt dependent but mutually balance to produce a relatively weak dependence in the equilibrium constant. This profile contrasts sharply with reported data for other ETS domains (e.g., Ets-1, TEL) for which high-affinity binding is driven by rapid association (>10(7)M(-)(1)s(-)(1)). We interpret this difference in terms of the hydration properties of ETS-DNA binding and propose that at least two mechanisms of sequence recognition are employed by this family of DNA-binding domain. Additionally, we use SPR to demonstrate the potential for pharmacological inhibition of sequence-specific ETS-DNA binding, using the minor groove-binding distamycin as a model compound. Our work establishes SPR as a valuable technique for extending our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of ETS-DNA interactions as well as developing potential small-molecule agents for biotechnological and therapeutic purposes.

  10. Assessment of altered binding specificity of bacteriophage for ciprofloxacin-induced antibiotic-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongjin; Jo, Ara; Ding, Tian; Lee, Hyeon-Yong; Ahn, Juhee

    2016-08-01

    This study describes a new effort toward understanding the interaction mechanisms between antibiotic-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium and phages. The antibiotic susceptibility, β-lactamase activity, bacterial motility, gene expression, and lytic activity were evaluated in ciprofloxacin-induced antibiotic-sensitive Salmonella Typhimurium (ASST(CIP)) and ciprofloxacin-induced antibiotic-resistant S. Typhimurium (ARST(CIP)), which were compared to the wild-type strains (ASST(WT) and ARST(WT)). The MIC values of ampicillin, norfloxacin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline were significantly increased to > 512, 16, 16, and 256 μg/ml, respectively, in the ARST(CIP). The lowest and highest extracellular lactamase activities were observed in ASST(WT) (6.85 μmol/min/ml) and ARST(CIP) (48.83 μmol/min/ml), respectively. The acrA, lpfE, and hilA genes were significantly upregulated by more than tenfold in both ASST(CIP) and ARST(CIP). The induction of multiple antibiotic resistance resulted from the increased efflux pump activity (AcrAB-TolC). The highest phage adsorption rates were more than 95 % for ASST(WT), ASST(CIP), and ARST(WT), while the lowest adsorption rate was 52 % for ARST(CIP) at 15 min of infection. The least lytic activity of phage was 20 % against the ARST(CIP), followed by ASST(CIP) (30 %). The adsorption rate of phage against ARST(CIP) was 52 % at 15 min of infection, which resulted in the decrease in lytic activity (12 %). Understanding the interaction of phage and bacteria is essential for the practical application of phage to control and detect antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The results provide useful information for understanding the binding specificity of phages for multiple antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  11. FE65 binds Teashirt, inhibiting expression of the primate-specific caspase-4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Kajiwara

    Full Text Available The Alzheimer disease (AD amyloid protein precursor (APP can bind the FE65 adaptor protein and this complex can regulate gene expression. We carried out yeast two-hybrid studies with a PTB domain of FE65, focusing on those genes that might be involved in nuclear signaling, and identified and validated Teashirt proteins as FE65 interacting proteins in neurons. Using reporter systems, we observed that FE65 could simultaneously recruit SET, a component of the inhibitor of acetyl transferase, and Teashirt, which in turn recruited histone deacetylases, to produce a powerful gene-silencing complex. We screened stable cell lines with a macroarray focusing on AD-related genes and identified CASP4, encoding caspase-4, as a target of this silencing complex. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed a direct interaction of FE65 and Teashirt3 with the promoter region of CASP4. Expression studies in postmortem samples demonstrated decreasing expression of Teashirt and increasing expression of caspase-4 with progressive cognitive decline. Importantly, there were significant increases in caspase-4 expression associated with even the earliest neuritic plaque changes in AD. We evaluated a case-control cohort and observed evidence for a genetic association between the Teashirt genes TSHZ1 and TSHZ3 and AD, with the TSHZ3 SNP genotype correlating with expression of Teashirt3. The results were consistent with a model in which reduced expression of Teashirt3, mediated by genetic or other causes, increases caspase-4 expression, leading to progression of AD. Thus the cell biological, gene expression and genetic data support a role for Teashirt/caspase-4 in AD biology. As caspase-4 shows evidence of being a primate-specific gene, current models of AD and other neurodegenerative conditions may be incomplete because of the absence of this gene in the murine genome.

  12. The D2 period of collagen II contains a specific binding site for the human discoidin domain receptor, DDR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitinger, Birgit; Steplewski, Andrzej; Fertala, Andrzej

    2004-12-03

    The human discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), DDR1 and DDR2, are expressed widely and, uniquely among receptor tyrosine kinases, activated by the extracellular matrix protein collagen. This activation is due to a direct interaction of collagen with the DDR discoidin domain. Here, we localised a specific DDR2 binding site on the triple-helical region of collagen II. Collagen II was found to be a much better ligand for DDR2 than for DDR1. As expected, DDR2 binding to collagen II was dependent on triple-helical collagen and was mediated by the DDR2 discoidin domain. Collagen II served as a potent stimulator of DDR2 autophosphorylation, the first step in transmembrane signalling. To map the DDR2 binding site(s) on collagen II, we used recombinant collagen II variants with specific deletions of one of the four repeating D periods. We found that the D2 period of collagen II was essential for DDR2 binding and receptor autophosphorylation, whereas the D3 and D4 periods were dispensable. The DDR2 binding site on collagen II was further defined by recombinant collagen II-like proteins consisting predominantly of tandem repeats of the D2 or D4 period. The D2 construct, but not the D4 construct, mediated DDR2 binding and receptor autophosphorylation, demonstrating that the D2 period of collagen II harbours a specific DDR2 recognition site. The discovery of a site-specific interaction of DDR2 with collagen II gives novel insight into the nature of the interaction of collagen II with matrix receptors.

  13. The conserved PA14 domain of cell wall-associated fungal adhesins governs their glycan-binding specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, P.W.J.; Klis, F.M.

    2008-01-01

    Yeast cell wall-associated, lectin-like adhesins form large families that mediate flocculation and host cell recognition. The glycan specificity of individual adhesins is largely unknown. Zupancic et al. (this issue of Molecular Microbiology) used glycan microarrays to compare the glycan-binding cha

  14. Identification of amino acid residues in PEPHC1 important for binding to the tumor-specific receptor EGFRvIII

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Charlotte Lund; Hansen, Paul Robert; Pedersen, Nina;

    2008-01-01

    EGFRvIII is a cancer-specific epidermal growth factor tyrosine kinase receptor mutation, expressed in different kinds of cancer, in particular ovarian, glioblastomas, and breast cancer. A peptide, PEPHC1, has previously been shown to bind selectively to EGFRvIII. An alanine scan was performed to ......, Germany....

  15. A conformation-specific interhelical salt bridge in the K+ binding site of gastric H,K-ATPase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, J.B.; Swarts, H.G.P.; Willems, P.; Krieger, E.; Pont, J.J.H.H.M. de

    2004-01-01

    Homology modeling of gastric H, K-ATPase based on the E-2 model of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (Toyoshima, C., and Nomura, H. (2002) Nature 392, 835-839) revealed the presence of a single high-affinity binding site for K+ and an E-2 form-specific salt bridge between Glu(820) (M6) and Lys(791)

  16. Specific binding of [3H]phenytoin in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spero, L

    1985-05-01

    Competition between cold phenytoin and [3H]phenytoin binding was observed in normal human brain. Binding was observed in all areas examined. The highest number of sites was in the amygdala (a total of 717.71 fmol/mg protein) and the lowest in the Brodman area (BA) 4 of the motor cortex (153.91 fmol/mg protein) and cerebellar cortex (154.4 fmol/mg protein). In three areas, amygdala, cortex area BA 38 (inferior parietal lobe), and cortex area BA 8 (premotor cortex), two sets of binding sites were observed. In these areas the Kd for the higher affinity sites ranged from 35 to 116 nM, and for the lower affinity site, from 328 to 866 nM. In the four areas where only one binding site was observed the KdS ranged from 164 to 311 nM and the Scatchard plot was linear.

  17. Molecular determinants for the complex binding specificity of the PDZ domain in PICK1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kenneth L; Beuming, Thijs; Niv, Masha Y

    2005-01-01

    PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) contains a single PDZ domain known to mediate interaction with the C termini of several receptors, transporters, ion channels, and kinases. In contrast to most PDZ domains, the PICK1 PDZ domain interacts with binding sequences classifiable as type I...... (terminating in (S/T)XPhi; X, any residue) as well as type II (PhiXPhi; Phi, any hydrophobic residue). To enable direct assessment of the affinity of the PICK1 PDZ domain for its binding partners we developed a purification scheme for PICK1 and a novel quantitative binding assay based on fluorescence...... polarization. Our results showed that the PICK1 PDZ domain binds the type II sequence presented by the human dopamine transporter (-WLKV) with an almost 15-fold and >100-fold higher affinity than the type I sequences presented by protein kinase Calpha (-QSAV) and the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (-DSLL...

  18. Using RNase sequence specificity to refine the identification of RNA-protein binding regions

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Xinguo; Li Lang; Shen Changyu; Wang Guohua; Wang Xin; Mooney Sean D; Edenberg Howard J; Sanford Jeremy R; Liu Yunlong

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Massively parallel pyrosequencing is a high-throughput technology that can sequence hundreds of thousands of DNA/RNA fragments in a single experiment. Combining it with immunoprecipitation-based biochemical assays, such as cross-linking immunoprecipitation (CLIP), provides a genome-wide method to detect the sites at which proteins bind DNA or RNA. In a CLIP-pyrosequencing experiment, the resolutions of the detected protein binding regions are partially determined by the length of the...

  19. Removal of cations using ion-binding terpolymer involving 2-amino-6-nitro-benzothiazole and thiosemicarbazide with formaldehyde by batch equilibrium technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamed, Mohamed A Riswan; Jeyakumar, Duraisamy; Burkanudeen, Abdul R

    2013-03-15

    2-Amino-6-nitro-benzothiazole and thiosemicarbazide with formaldehyde (BTF) terpolymer was synthesized by the condensation polymerization technique. The elemental analysis and physico-chemical parameters of the terpolymer were measured. This chelation terpolymer was characterized by infrared, electronic and nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H &(13)C NMR) spectral studies. The molecular weight of the terpolymer was determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Surface analysis of the terpolymer was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The thermal stability of the terpolymer was analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The cation-exchange property of the terpolymer was determined by batch equilibrium method with the effect of pH, contact time and electrolytes. The reusability of the resin was also studied to estimate the effectiveness of the terpolymer resin.

  20. Electromotive force and impedance studies of cellulose acetate membranes: Evidence for two binding sites for divalent cations and for an alveolar structure of the skin layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith Sørensen, T.; Jensen, J.B.; Malmgren-Hansen, B.

    1991-01-01

    -degrees-C (in some few cases 35-degrees-C). The ions considered were the cations H+, Li+, Na+, K+, Mg++, Ca++, Ba++ and the anions Cl- and F- (Cl- was always present). The >>fixed>variable...... may be found by the latter method. Earlier results are recapitulated, especially the evidence for an alveolar structure found by interpreting the membrane capacitance increase with salt concentration - found by means of impedance measurements - in the light of a combined Trukhan-Bruggemann theory...... of days. The dissociation of Ba++ was followed at 25-degrees-C and at 35-degrees-C and at different external concentrations of NaCl. The slow relaxation seems connected with the Coulomb interaction between the COO- groups and the Ba++ ions, whereas the fast relaxation is probably reflecting dissociation...

  1. Distorted octahedral coordination of tungstate in a subfamily of specific binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenstein, Kaspar; Comellas-Bigler, Mireia; Bevers, Loes E; Feiters, Martin C; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Locher, Kaspar P

    2009-06-01

    Bacteria and archaea import molybdenum and tungsten from the environment in the form of the oxyanions molybdate (MoO(4) (2-)) and tungstate (WO(4) (2-)). These substrates are captured by an external, high-affinity binding protein, and delivered to ATP binding cassette transporters, which move them across the cell membrane. We have recently reported a crystal structure of the molybdate/tungstate binding protein ModA/WtpA from Archaeoglobus fulgidus, which revealed an octahedrally coordinated central metal atom. By contrast, the previously determined structures of three bacterial homologs showed tetracoordinate molybdenum and tungsten atoms in their binding pockets. Until then, coordination numbers above four had only been found for molybdenum/tungsten in metalloenzymes where these metal atoms are part of the catalytic cofactors and coordinated by mostly non-oxygen ligands. We now report a high-resolution structure of A. fulgidus ModA/WtpA, as well as crystal structures of four additional homologs, all bound to tungstate. These crystal structures match X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements from soluble, tungstate-bound protein, and reveal the details of the distorted octahedral coordination. Our results demonstrate that the distorted octahedral geometry is not an exclusive feature of the A. fulgidus protein, and suggest distinct binding modes of the binding proteins from archaea and bacteria.

  2. Anomer-Specific Recognition and Dynamics in a Fucose-Binding Lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonik, Paweł M; Volkov, Alexander N; Broder, Ursula N; Re, Daniele Lo; van Nuland, Nico A J; Crowley, Peter B

    2016-03-01

    Sugar binding by a cell surface ∼29 kDa lectin (RSL) from the bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum was characterized by NMR spectroscopy. The complexes formed with four monosaccharides and four fucosides were studied. Complete resonance assignments and backbone dynamics were determined for RSL in the sugar-free form and when bound to l-fucose or d-mannose. RSL was found to interact with both the α- and the β-anomer of l-fucose and the "fucose like" sugars d-arabinose and l-galactose. Peak splitting was observed for some resonances of the binding site residues. The assignment of the split signals to the α- or β-anomer was confirmed by comparison with the spectra of RSL bound to methyl-α-l-fucoside or methyl-β-l-fucoside. The backbone dynamics of RSL were sensitive to the presence of ligand, with the protein adopting a more compact structure upon binding to l-fucose. Taking advantage of tryptophan residues in the binding sites, we show that the indole resonance is an excellent reporter on ligand binding. Each sugar resulted in a distinct signature of chemical shift perturbations, suggesting that tryptophan signals are a sufficient probe of sugar binding.

  3. Identification of Plasmodium falciparum RhopH3 protein peptides that specifically bind to erythrocytes and inhibit merozoite invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzón, Carlos Giovanni; Curtidor, Hernando; Reyes, Claudia; Méndez, David; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2008-01-01

    The identification of sequences involved in binding to erythrocytes is an important step for understanding the molecular basis of merozoite–erythrocyte interactions that take place during invasion of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite into host cells. Several molecules located in the apical organelles (micronemes, rhoptry, dense granules) of the invasive-stage parasite are essential for erythrocyte recognition, invasion, and establishment of the nascent parasitophorous vacuole. Particularly, it has been demonstrated that rhoptry proteins play an important role in binding to erythrocyte surface receptors, among which is the PfRhopH3 protein, which triggers important immune responses in patients from endemic regions. It has also been reported that anti-RhopH3 antibodies inhibit in vitro invasion of erythrocytes, further supporting its direct involvement in erythrocyte invasion processes. In this study, PfRhopH3 consecutive peptides were synthesized and tested in erythrocyte binding assays for identifying those regions mediating binding to erythrocytes. Fourteen PfRhopH3 peptides presenting high specific binding activity were found, whose bindings were saturable and presented nanomolar dissociation constants. These high-activity binding peptides (HABPs) were characterized by having α-helical structural elements, as determined by circular dichroism, and having receptors of a possible sialic acid-dependent and/or glycoprotein-dependent nature, as evidenced in enzyme-treated erythrocyte binding assays and further corroborated by cross-linking assay results. Furthermore, these HABPs inhibited merozoite in vitro invasion of normal erythrocytes at 200 μM by up to 60% and 90%, suggesting that some RhopH3 protein regions are involved in the P. falciparum erythrocyte invasion. PMID:18593818

  4. The cationic peptide LL-37 binds Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) with a low dissociation rate and promotes phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianwei; Bajic, Goran; Andersen, Gregers R; Christiansen, Stig Hill; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    As a broad-spectrum anti-microbial peptide, LL-37 plays an important role in the innate immune system. A series of previous reports implicates LL-37 as an activator of various cell surface receptor-mediated functions, including chemotaxis in integrin CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1)-expressing cells. However, evidence is scarce concerning the direct binding of LL-37 to these receptors and investigations on the associated binding kinetics is lacking. Mac-1, a member of the β2 integrin family, is mainly expressed in myeloid leukocytes. Its critical functions include phagocytosis of complement-opsonized pathogens. Here, we report on interactions of LL-37 and its fragment FK-13 with the ligand-binding domain of Mac-1, the α-chain I domain. LL-37 bound the I-domain with an affinity comparable to the complement fragment C3d, one of the strongest known ligands for Mac-1. In cell adhesion assays both LL-37 and FK-13 supported binding by Mac-1 expressing cells, however, with LL-37-coupled surfaces supporting stronger cell adhesion than FK-13. Likewise, in phagocytosis assays with primary human monocytes both LL-37 and FK-13 enhanced uptake of particles coupled with these ligands but with a tendency towards a stronger uptake by LL-37.

  5. SO2-binding properties of cationic η6,η1-NCN-pincer arene ruthenium platinum complexes: spectroscopic and theoretical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonnet, S.A.; van Lenthe, J.H.; van Dam, H.J.J.; van Koten, G.; Klein Gebbink, R.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The SO2-binding properties of a series of h6,h1-NCN-pincer ruthenium platinum complexes (NCN = 2,6-bis[(dimethylamino)methyl]phenyl anion) have been studied by both UV-visible spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. When an electron-withdrawing [Ru(C5R5)]+ fragment (R = H or Me) is h6-coordinated

  6. Tissue- and paralogue-specific functions of acyl-CoA-binding proteins in lipid metabolism in C. elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elle, Ida Coordt; Simonsen, Karina Trankjær; Olsen, Louise Cathrine Braun;

    2011-01-01

    Acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) is a small, primarily cytosolic protein that binds acyl-CoA esters with high specificity and affinity. ACBP has been identified in all eukaryotic species, indicating that it performs a basal cellular function. However, differential tissue expression and the existence...... of several ACBP paralogues in many eukaryotic species indicate that these proteins serve distinct functions. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans expresses seven ACBPs; four basal forms and three ACBP-domain proteins. We find that each of these paralogues is capable of complementing growth of ACBP...

  7. [Application of aspartic acid as a non-specific binding inhibitor in the enrichment of phosphopeptides with titanium dioxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Ming; Bi, Wei; Lu, Zhuang; Song, Lina; Jia, Wei; Zhang, Yangjun; Qian, Xiaohong; Cai, Yun

    2010-02-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of metal oxides widely used for phosphopeptide enrichment in phosphoproteomic research nowadays. However it can bind to some non-phosphorylated peptides containing one or more aspartic acid residues and/or glutamic acid residues. These non-phosphorylated peptides can be eluted along with phosphorylated peptides and cause the reduction of the selectivity. Conventional inhibitors for the non-specific binding of non-phosphorylated peptides can often contaminate the ion source of mass spectrometry and therefore their applications are limited in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). In this study, aspartic acid was reported as a novel non-specific binding inhibitor for phosphopeptide enrichment by titanium dioxide. Firstly, the tryptic peptide mixtures of 3 and 9 standard proteins were used for the comparison of the enrichment efficiency of titanium dioxide. The effects with the presence of aspartic acid, glutamic acid and no-inhibitor in the enrichment systems were compared separately. The results showed that aspartic acid can greatly improve the selectivity of titanium dioxide for phosphopeptide enrichment. Then, aspartic acid was used for the enrichment of tryptic peptide mixture of C57BL/6J mouse liver lysate and good results were also obtained which demonstrated that aspartic acid was a promising non-specific binding inhibitor for complex biological samples. Besides, no contamination in the ion source occurred during the mass spectrometric analysis.

  8. Conformational Dynamics and the Binding of Specific and Nonspecific DNA by the Autoinhibited Transcription Factor Ets-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Geneviève; Okon, Mark; Graves, Barbara J; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2016-07-26

    The affinity of the Ets-1 transcription factor for DNA is autoinhibited by an intrinsically disordered serine-rich region (SRR) and a helical inhibitory module (IM) appended to its winged helix-turn-helix ETS domain. Using NMR spectroscopy, we investigated how Ets-1 recognizes specific versus nonspecific DNA, with a focus on the roles of protein dynamics and autoinhibition in these processes. Upon binding either DNA, the two marginally stable N-terminal helices of the IM predominantly unfold, but still sample partially ordered conformations. Also, on the basis of amide chemical shift perturbation mapping, Ets-1 associates with both specific and nonspecific DNA through the same canonical ETS domain interface. These interactions are structurally independent of the SRR, and thus autoinhibition does not impart DNA-binding specificity. However, relative to the pronounced NMR spectroscopic changes in Ets-1 resulting from specific DNA binding, the spectra of the nonspecific DNA complexes showed conformational exchange broadening and lacked several diagnostic amide and indole signals attributable to hydrogen bonding interactions seen in reported X-ray crystallographic structures of this transcription factor with its cognate DNA sequences. Such differences are highlighted by the chemical shift and relaxation properties of several interfacial lysine and arginine side chains. Collectively, these data support a general model in which Ets-1 interacts with nonspecific DNA via dynamic electrostatic interactions, whereas hydrogen bonding drives the formation of well-ordered complexes with specific DNA.

  9. Application of Celluspots peptide arrays for the analysis of the binding specificity of epigenetic reading domains to modified histone tails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhayalan Arunkumar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic reading domains are involved in the regulation of gene expression and chromatin state by interacting with histones in a post-translational modification specific manner. A detailed knowledge of the target modifications of reading domains, including enhancing and inhibiting secondary modifications, will lead to a better understanding of the biological signaling processes mediated by reading domains. Results We describe the application of Celluspots peptide arrays which contain 384 histone peptides carrying 59 post translational modifications in different combinations as an inexpensive, reliable and fast method for initial screening for specific interactions of reading domains with modified histone peptides. To validate the method, we tested the binding specificities of seven known epigenetic reading domains on Celluspots peptide arrays, viz. the HP1ß and MPP8 Chromo domains, JMJD2A and 53BP1 Tudor domains, Dnmt3a PWWP domain, Rag2 PHD domain and BRD2 Bromo domain. In general, the binding results agreed with literature data with respect to the primary specificity of the reading domains, but in almost all cases we obtained additional new information concerning the influence of secondary modifications surrounding the target modification. Conclusions We conclude that Celluspots peptide arrays are powerful screening tools for studying the specificity of putative reading domains binding to modified histone peptides.

  10. Lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind the Gata3 Tce1 enhancer to mediate lineage-specific programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmura, Sakie; Mizuno, Seiya; Oishi, Hisashi; Ku, Chia-Jui; Hermann, Mary; Hosoya, Tomonori; Takahashi, Satoru; Engel, James Douglas

    2016-03-01

    The transcription factor GATA3 is essential for the genesis and maturation of the T cell lineage, and GATA3 dysregulation has pathological consequences. Previous studies have shown that GATA3 function in T cell development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways and that the Notch nuclear effector, RBP-J, binds specifically to the Gata3 promoter. We previously identified a T cell-specific Gata3 enhancer (Tce1) lying 280 kb downstream from the structural gene and demonstrated in transgenic mice that Tce1 promoted T lymphocyte-specific transcription of reporter genes throughout T cell development; however, it was not clear if Tce1 is required for Gata3 transcription in vivo. Here, we determined that the canonical Gata3 promoter is insufficient for Gata3 transcriptional activation in T cells in vivo, precluding the possibility that promoter binding by a host of previously implicated transcription factors alone is responsible for Gata3 expression in T cells. Instead, we demonstrated that multiple lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind to Tce1 and that this enhancer confers T lymphocyte-specific Gata3 activation in vivo, as targeted deletion of Tce1 in a mouse model abrogated critical functions of this T cell-regulatory element. Together, our data show that Tce1 is both necessary and sufficient for critical aspects of Gata3 T cell-specific transcriptional activity.

  11. A specific domain in alpha-catenin mediates binding to beta-catenin or plakoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, O; Krohn, M; Kemler, R

    1997-08-01

    The E-cadherin-catenin adhesion complex has been the subject of many structural and functional studies because of its importance in development, normal tissue function and carcinogenesis. It is well established that the cytoplasmic domain of E-cadherin binds either beta-catenin or plakoglobin, which both can assemble alpha-catenin into the complex. Recently we have identified an alpha-catenin binding site in beta-catenin and plakoglobin and postulated, based on sequence analysis, that these protein-protein interactions are mediated by a hydrophobic interaction mechanism. Here we have now identified the reciprocal complementary binding site in alpha-catenin which mediates its interaction with beta-catenin and plakoglobin. Using in vitro association assays with C-terminal truncations of alpha-catenin expressed as recombinant fusion proteins, we found that the N-terminal 146 amino acids are required for this interaction. We then identified a peptide of 27 amino acids within this sequence (amino acid positions 117-143) which is necessary and sufficient to bind beta-catenin or plakoglobin. As shown by mutational analysis, hydrophobic amino acids within this binding site are important for the interaction. The results described here, together with our previous work, give strong support for the idea that these proteins associate by hydrophobic interactions of two alpha-helices.

  12. Specificity of anion-binding in the substrate-pocket ofbacteriorhodopsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facciotti, Marc T.; Cheung, Vincent S.; Lunde, Christopher S.; Rouhani, Shahab; Baliga, Nitin S.; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2003-08-30

    The structure of the D85S mutant of bacteriorhodopsin with a nitrate anion bound in the Schiff-base binding site, and the structure of the anion-free protein have been obtained in the same crystal form. Together with the previously solved structures of this anion pump, in both the anion-free state and bromide-bound state, these new structures provide insight into how this mutant of bacteriorhodopsin is able to bind a variety of different anions in the same binding pocket. The structural analysis reveals that the main structural change that accommodates different anions is the repositioning of the polar side-chain of S85. On the basis of these x-ray crystal structures, the prediction is then made that the D85S/D212N double mutant might bind similar anions and do so over a broader pH range than does the single mutant. Experimental comparison of the dissociation constants, K{sub d}, for a variety of anions confirms this prediction and demonstrates, in addition, that the binding affinity is dramatically improved by the D212N substitution.

  13. Binding of cationic peptides (KX)4K to DPPG bilayers. Increasing the hydrophobicity of the uncharged amino acid X drives formation of membrane bound β-sheets: A DSC and FT-IR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hädicke, André; Blume, Alfred

    2016-06-01

    The binding of cationic peptides of the sequence (KX)4K to lipid vesicles of negatively charged dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and temperature dependent Fourier-transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The hydrophobicity of the uncharged amino acid X was changed from G (glycine) over A (alanine), Abu (α-aminobutyric acid), V (valine) to L (leucine). The binding of the peptides caused an increase of the phase transition temperature (Tm) of DPPG by up to 20°C. The shift depended on the charge ratio and on the hydrophobicity of the amino acid X. Unexpectedly, the upward shift of Tm increased with increasing hydrophobicity of X. FT-IR spectroscopy showed a shift of the CH2 stretching vibrations of DPPG to lower frequency, particularly for bilayers in the liquid-crystalline phase, indicating an ordering of the hydrocarbon chains when the peptides were bound. Changes in the lipid C=O vibrational band indicated a dehydration of the lipid headgroup region after peptide binding. (KG)4K was bound in an unordered structure at all temperatures. All other peptides formed intermolecular antiparallel β-sheets, when bound to gel phase DPPG. However, for (KA)4K and (KAbu)4K, the β-sheets converted into an unordered structure above Tm. In contrast, the β-sheet structures of (KV)4K and (KL)4K remained stable even at 80°C when bound to the liquid-crystalline phase of DPPG. Strong aggregation of DPPG vesicles occurred after peptide binding. For the aggregates, we suggest a structure, where aggregated single β-sheets are sandwiched between opposing DPPG bilayers with a dehydrated interfacial region.

  14. Cbln1 binds to specific postsynaptic sites at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Keiko; Kondo, Tetsuro; Iijima, Takatoshi; Matsuda, Shinji; Watanabe, Masahiko; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2009-02-01

    Cbln1, which belongs to the C1q/tumor necrosis factor superfamily, is a unique molecule that is not only required for maintaining normal parallel fiber (PF)-Purkinje cell synapses, but is also capable of inducing new PF synapses in adult cerebellum. Although Cbln1 is reportedly released from granule cells, where and how Cbln1 binds in the cerebellum has remained largely unclear, partly because Cbln1 undergoes proteolysis to yield various fragments that are differentially detected by different antibodies. To circumvent this problem, we characterized the Cbln1-binding site using recombinant Cbln1. An immunohistochemical analysis revealed that recombinant Cbln1 preferentially bound to PF-Purkinje cell synapses in primary cultures and acute slice preparations in a saturable and replaceable manner. Specific binding was observed for intact Cbln1 that had formed a hexamer, but not for the N-terminal or C-terminal fragments of Cbln1 fused to other proteins. Similarly, mutant Cbln1 that had formed a trimer did not bind to the Purkinje cells. Immunoreactivity for the recombinant Cbln1 was observed in weaver cerebellum (which lacks granule cells) but was absent in pcd cerebellum (which lacks Purkinje cells), suggesting that the binding site was located on the postsynaptic sites of PF-Purkinje cell synapses. Finally, a subcellular fractionation analysis revealed that recombinant Cbln1 bound to the synaptosomal and postsynaptic density fractions. These results indicate that Cbln1, released from granule cells as hexamers, specifically binds to a putative receptor located at the postsynaptic sites of PF-Purkinje cell synapses, where it induces synaptogenesis.

  15. Specificity of the Cyclic GMP-Binding Activity and of a Cyclic GMP-Dependent Cyclic GMP Phosphodiesterase in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Walsum, Hans van; Meer, Rob C. van der; Bulgakov, Roman; Konijn, Theo M.

    1982-01-01

    The nucleotide specificity of the cyclic GMP-binding activity in a homogenate of Dictyostelium discoideum was determined by competition of cyclic GMP derivatives with [8-3H] cyclic GMP for the binding sites. The results indicate that cyclic GMP is bound to the binding proteins by hydrogen bonds at N

  16. Characterization of specific binding sites for (/sup 3/H)(d)-N-allylnormetazocine in rat brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itzhak, Y.; Hiller, J.M.; Simon, E.J.

    1985-01-01

    Binding of (/sup 3/H)(d)-N-allylnormetazocine ((/sup 3/H)(d)-NANM) to rat brain membranes is stereospecific, reversible, and saturable (Bmax . 260 fmol/mg of protein) and manifests moderately high affinity (Kd . 20 nM). The rank order of potency among opioidbenzomorphans and phencyclidine (PCP) analogs for competition for (/sup 3/H)(d)-NANM-binding sites is as follows: (d)-NANM . PCP-3-OH greater than (d)-cyclazocine greater than N-ethylphenylcyclohexylamine greater than PCP greater than (l)-cyclazocine . dextrorphan greater than (d/l)-ethylketocyclazocine greater than (d/l)-bremazocine greater than (1)-NANM greater than 1-phenylcyclohexylamine greater than levorphanol. Other opioid ligands, relatively selective for each of the types of opioid binding sites other than sigma, such as morphine (mu), H-Tyr-D-Ala(Me)Phe-NH-CH2-OH (mu), D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin (delta), tifluadom (kappa), and U 50488 (kappa) as well as etorphine and naloxone were all unable to compete with (/sup 3/H)(d)-NANM for specific binding even at a concentration of 1 microM. Regional distribution studies of (/sup 3/H)(d)-NANM-binding sites show high density in the hippocampus, thalamus, hypothalamus, and amygdala and low density in cerebellum and nonfrontal neocortex membranes of the rat brain. These binding sites are very sensitive to protein-modifying enzymes and reagents such as trypsin and N-ethylmaleimide and to heat denaturation. These results provide direct biochemical evidence for the existence of distinct (d)-NANM-binding sites in rat brain.

  17. Phage display selection of tight specific binding variants from a hyperthermostable Sso7d scaffold protein library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ning; Schmitt, Margaret A; Fisk, John D

    2016-04-01

    Antibodies, the quintessential biological recognition molecules, are not ideal for many applications because of their large size, complex modifications, and thermal and chemical instability. Identifying alternative scaffolds that may be evolved into tight, specific binding molecules with improved physical properties is of increasing interest, particularly for biomedical applications in resource-limited environments. Hyperthermophilic organisms, such as Sulfolobus solfataricus, are an attractive source of highly stable proteins that may serve as starting points for alternative molecular recognition scaffolds. We describe the first application of phage display to identify binding proteins based on the S. solfataricus protein Sso7d scaffold. Sso7d is a small cysteine-free DNA-binding protein (approximately 7 kDa, 63 amino acids), with a melting temperature of nearly 100 °C. Tight-binding Sso7d variants were selected for a diverse set of protein targets from a 10(10) member library, demonstrating the versatility of the scaffold. These Sso7d variants are able to discriminate among closely related human, bovine and rabbit serum albumins. Equilibrium dissociation constants in the nanomolar to low micromolar range were measured via competitive ELISA. Importantly, the Sso7d variants continue to bind their targets in the absence of the phage context. Furthermore, phage-displayed Sso7d variants retain their binding affinity after exposure to temperatures up to 70 °C. Taken together, our results suggest that the Sso7d scaffold will be a complementary addition to the range of non-antibody scaffold proteins that may be utilized in phage display. Variants of hyperthermostable binding proteins have potential applications in diagnostics and therapeutics for environments with extreme conditions of storage and deployment.

  18. The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN protein is able to specifically bind DNA through its single Cys2-His2 zinc finger motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dathan, Nina; Zaccaro, Laura; Esposito, Sabrina; Isernia, Carla; Omichinski, James G; Riccio, Andrea; Pedone, Carlo; Di Blasio, Benedetto; Fattorusso, Roberto; Pedone, Paolo V

    2002-11-15

    The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN (SUP) gene has been shown to be important in maintaining the boundary between stamens and carpels, and is presumed to act by regulating cell proliferation. In this work, we show that the SUP protein, which contains a single Cys2-His2 zinc finger domain including the QALGGH sequence, highly conserved in the plant zinc finger proteins, binds DNA. Using a series of deletion mutants, it was determined that the minimal domain required for specific DNA binding (residues 15-78) includes the single zinc finger and two basic regions located on either side of this motif. Furthermore, amino acid substitutions in the zinc finger or in the basic regions, including a mutation that knocks out the function of the SUP protein in vivo (glycine 63 to aspartate), have been found to abolish the activity of the SUP DNA-binding domain. These results strongly suggest that the SUP protein functions in vivo by acting as a DNA-binding protein, likely involved in transcriptional regulation. The association of both an N-terminal and a C-terminal basic region with a single Cys2-His2 zinc finger represents a novel DNA-binding motif suggesting that the mechanism of DNA recognition adopted by the SUP protein is different from that described so far in other zinc finger proteins.

  19. Conformational changes in DNA-binding proteins: relationships with precomplex features and contributions to specificity and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrabi, Munazah; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Ahmad, Shandar

    2014-05-01

    Both Proteins and DNA undergo conformational changes in order to form functional complexes and also to facilitate interactions with other molecules. These changes have direct implications for the stability and specificity of the complex, as well as the cooperativity of interactions between multiple entities. In this work, we have extensively analyzed conformational changes in DNA-binding proteins by superimposing DNA-bound and unbound pairs of protein structures in a curated database of 90 proteins. We manually examined each of these pairs, unified the authors' annotations, and summarized our observations by classifying conformational changes into six structural categories. We explored a relationship between conformational changes and functional classes, binding motifs, target specificity, biophysical features of unbound proteins, and stability of the complex. In addition, we have also investigated the degree to which the intrinsic flexibility can explain conformational changes in a subset of 52 proteins with high quality coordinate data. Our results indicate that conformational changes in DNA-binding proteins contribute significantly to both the stability of the complex and the specificity of targets recognized by them. We also conclude that most conformational changes occur in proteins interacting with specific DNA targets, even though unbound protein structures may have sufficient information to interact with DNA in a nonspecific manner.

  20. Intermediates in monensin biosynthesis: A late step in biosynthesis of the polyether ionophore monensin is crucial for the integrity of cation binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Jonathan B; Leadlay, Peter F

    2014-01-01

    Summary Polyether antibiotics such as monensin are biosynthesised via a cascade of directed ring expansions operating on a putative polyepoxide precursor. The resulting structures containing fused cyclic ethers and a lipophilic backbone can form strong ionophoric complexes with certain metal cations. In this work, we demonstrate for monensin biosynthesis that, as well as ether formation, a late-stage hydroxylation step is crucial for the correct formation of the sodium monensin complex. We have investigated the last two steps in monensin biosynthesis, namely hydroxylation catalysed by the P450 monooxygenase MonD and O-methylation catalysed by the methyl-transferase MonE. The corresponding genes were deleted in-frame in a monensin-overproducing strain of Streptomyces cinnamonensis. The mutants produced the expected monensin derivatives in excellent yields (ΔmonD: 1.13 g L−1 dehydroxymonensin; ΔmonE: 0.50 g L−1 demethylmonensin; and double mutant ΔmonDΔmonE: 0.34 g L−1 dehydroxydemethylmonensin). Single crystals were obtained from purified fractions of dehydroxymonensin and demethylmonensin. X-ray structure analysis revealed that the conformation of sodium dimethylmonensin is very similar to that of sodium monensin. In contrast, the coordination of the sodium ion is significantly different in the sodium dehydroxymonensin complex. This shows that the final constitution of the sodium monensin complex requires this tailoring step as well as polyether formation. PMID:24605157

  1. Intermediates in monensin biosynthesis: A late step in biosynthesis of the polyether ionophore monensin is crucial for the integrity of cation binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Hüttel

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Polyether antibiotics such as monensin are biosynthesised via a cascade of directed ring expansions operating on a putative polyepoxide precursor. The resulting structures containing fused cyclic ethers and a lipophilic backbone can form strong ionophoric complexes with certain metal cations. In this work, we demonstrate for monensin biosynthesis that, as well as ether formation, a late-stage hydroxylation step is crucial for the correct formation of the sodium monensin complex. We have investigated the last two steps in monensin biosynthesis, namely hydroxylation catalysed by the P450 monooxygenase MonD and O-methylation catalysed by the methyl-transferase MonE. The corresponding genes were deleted in-frame in a monensin-overproducing strain of Streptomyces cinnamonensis. The mutants produced the expected monensin derivatives in excellent yields (ΔmonD: 1.13 g L−1 dehydroxymonensin; ΔmonE: 0.50 g L−1 demethylmonensin; and double mutant ΔmonDΔmonE: 0.34 g L−1 dehydroxydemethylmonensin. Single crystals were obtained from purified fractions of dehydroxymonensin and demethylmonensin. X-ray structure analysis revealed that the conformation of sodium dimethylmonensin is very similar to that of sodium monensin. In contrast, the coordination of the sodium ion is significantly different in the sodium dehydroxymonensin complex. This shows that the final constitution of the sodium monensin complex requires this tailoring step as well as polyether formation.

  2. Eubacterial SpoVG homologs constitute a new family of site-specific DNA-binding proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon L Jutras

    Full Text Available A site-specific DNA-binding protein was purified from Borrelia burgdorferi cytoplasmic extracts, and determined to be a member of the highly conserved SpoVG family. This is the first time a function has been attributed to any of these ubiquitous bacterial proteins. Further investigations into SpoVG orthologues indicated that the Staphylococcus aureus protein also binds DNA, but interacts preferentially with a distinct nucleic acid sequence. Site-directed mutagenesis and domain swapping between the S. aureus and B. burgdorferi proteins identified that a 6-residue stretch of the SpoVG α-helix contributes to DNA sequence specificity. Two additional, highly conserved amino acid residues on an adjacent β-sheet are essential for DNA-binding, apparently by contacts with the DNA phosphate backbone. Results of these studies thus identified a novel family of bacterial DNA-binding proteins, developed a model of SpoVG-DNA interactions, and provide direction for future functional studies on these wide-spread proteins.

  3. Technical note: Protozoa-specific antibodies raised in sheep plasma bind to their target protozoa in the rumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Y J; Rea, S M; Popovski, S; Skillman, L C; Wright, A-D G

    2014-12-01

    Binding of IgG antibodies to Entodinium spp. in the rumen of sheep (Ovis aries) was investigated by adding IgG, purified from plasma, directly into the rumen. Plasma IgG was sourced from sheep that had or had not been immunized with a vaccine containing whole fixed Entodinium spp. cells. Ruminal fluid was sampled approximately 2 h after each antibody dosing. Binding of protozoa by a specific antibody was detected using an indirect fluorescent antibody test. An antibody titer in the ruminal fluid was determined by ELISA, and the concentration of ruminal fluid ammonia-N and ruminal pH were also determined. Entodinium spp. and total protozoa from IgG-infused sheep were enumerated by microscopic counts. Two-hourly additions of IgG maintained a low antibody titer in the rumen for 12 h and the binding of the antibody to the rumen protozoa was demonstrated. Increased ammonia-N concentrations and altered ruminal fluid pH patterns indicated that additional fermentation of protein was occurring in the rumen after addition of IgG. No reduction in numbers of Entodinium spp. was observed (P>0.05). Although binding of antibodies to protozoa has been demonstrated in the rumen, it is unclear how much cell death occurred. On the balance of probability, it would appear that the antibody was degraded or partially degraded, and the impact of this on protozoal populations and the measurement of a specific titer is also unclear.

  4. Sequence-specific long range networks in PSD-95/discs large/ZO-1 (PDZ) domains tune their binding selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianni, Stefano; Haq, S Raza; Montemiglio, Linda C; Jürgens, Maike C; Engström, Åke; Chi, Celestine N; Brunori, Maurizio; Jemth, Per

    2011-08-05

    Protein-protein interactions mediated by modular protein domains are critical for cell scaffolding, differentiation, signaling, and ultimately, evolution. Given the vast number of ligands competing for binding to a limited number of domain families, it is often puzzling how specificity can be achieved. Selectivity may be modulated by intradomain allostery, whereby a remote residue is energetically connected to the functional binding site via side chain or backbone interactions. Whereas several energetic pathways, which could mediate intradomain allostery, have been predicted in modular protein domains, there is a paucity of experimental data to validate their existence and roles. Here, we have identified such functional energetic networks in one of the most common protein-protein interaction modules, the PDZ domain. We used double mutant cycles involving site-directed mutagenesis of both the PDZ domain and the peptide ligand, in conjunction with kinetics to capture the fine energetic details of the networks involved in peptide recognition. We performed the analysis on two homologous PDZ-ligand complexes and found that the energetically coupled residues differ for these two complexes. This result demonstrates that amino acid sequence rather than topology dictates the allosteric pathways. Furthermore, our data support a mechanism whereby the whole domain and not only the binding pocket is optimized for a specific ligand. Such cross-talk between binding sites and remote residues may be used to fine tune target selectivity.

  5. Theory on the mechanism of rapid binding of transcription factor proteins at specific-sites on DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Murugan, Rajamanickam

    2014-01-01

    We develop revised theoretical ideas on the mechanism by which the transcription factor proteins locate their specific binding sites on DNA faster than the three-dimensional (3D) diffusion controlled rate limit. We demonstrate that the 3D-diffusion controlled rate limit can be enhanced when the protein molecule reads several possible binding stretches of the template DNA via one-dimensional (1D) diffusion upon each 3D-diffusion mediated collision or nonspecific binding event. The overall enhancement of site-specific association rate is directly proportional to the maximum possible sliding length (LA, square root of (6Do/kr) where Do is the 1D-diffusion coefficient and kr is the dissociation rate constant associated with the nonspecific DNA-protein complex) associated with the 1D-diffusion of protein molecule along DNA. Upon considering several possible mechanisms we find that the DNA binding proteins can efficiently locate their cognate sites on DNA by switching across fast-moving, slow-moving and reading sta...

  6. Recombinant norovirus-specific scFv inhibit virus-like particle binding to cellular ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Michele E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noroviruses cause epidemic outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness in all age-groups. The rapid onset and ease of person-to-person transmission suggest that inhibitors of the initial steps of virus binding to susceptible cells have value in limiting spread and outbreak persistence. We previously generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb 54.6 that blocks binding of recombinant norovirus-like particles (VLP to Caco-2 intestinal cells and inhibits VLP-mediated hemagglutination. In this study, we engineered the antigen binding domains of mAb 54.6 into a single chain variable fragment (scFv and tested whether these scFv could function as cell binding inhibitors, similar to the parent mAb. Results The scFv54.6 construct was engineered to encode the light (VL and heavy (VH variable domains of mAb 54.6 separated by a flexible peptide linker, and this recombinant protein was expressed in Pichia pastoris. Purified scFv54.6 recognized native VLPs by immunoblot, inhibited VLP-mediated hemagglutination, and blocked VLP binding to H carbohydrate antigen expressed on the surface of a CHO cell line stably transfected to express α 1,2-fucosyltransferase. Conclusion scFv54.6 retained the functional properties of the parent mAb with respect to inhibiting norovirus particle interactions with cells. With further engineering into a form deliverable to the gut mucosa, norovirus neutralizing antibodies represent a prophylactic strategy that would be valuable in outbreak settings.

  7. The Caenorhabditis elegans Kinesin-3 motor UNC-104/KIF1A is degraded upon loss of specific binding to cargo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Kumar

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available UNC-104/KIF1A is a Kinesin-3 motor that transports synaptic vesicles from the cell body towards the synapse by binding to PI(4,5P(2 through its PH domain. The fate of the motor upon reaching the synapse is not known. We found that wild-type UNC-104 is degraded at synaptic regions through the ubiquitin pathway and is not retrogradely transported back to the cell body. As a possible means to regulate the motor, we tested the effect of cargo binding on UNC-104 levels. The unc-104(e1265 allele carries a point mutation (D1497N in the PI(4,5P(2 binding pocket of the PH domain, resulting in greatly reduced preferential binding to PI(4,5P(2in vitro and presence of very few motors on pre-synaptic vesicles in vivo. unc-104(e1265 animals have poor locomotion irrespective of in vivo PI(4,5P(2 levels due to reduced anterograde transport. Moreover, they show highly reduced levels of UNC-104 in vivo. To confirm that loss of cargo binding specificity reduces motor levels, we isolated two intragenic suppressors with compensatory mutations within the PH domain. These show partial restoration of in vitro preferential PI(4,5P(2 binding and presence of more motors on pre-synaptic vesicles in vivo. These animals show improved locomotion dependent on in vivo PI(4,5P(2 levels, increased anterograde transport, and partial restoration of UNC-104 protein levels in vivo. For further proof, we mutated a conserved residue in one suppressor background. The PH domain in this triple mutant lacked in vitro PI(4,5P(2 binding specificity, and the animals again showed locomotory defects and reduced motor levels. All allelic variants show increased UNC-104 levels upon blocking the ubiquitin pathway. These data show that inability to bind cargo can target motors for degradation. In view of the observed degradation of the motor in synaptic regions, this further suggests that UNC-104 may get degraded at synapses upon release of cargo.

  8. Method for generation of peptide-specific IgY antibodies directed to Staphylococcus aureus extracellular fibrinogen binding protein epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Maciej; Grzywa, Renata; Łupicka-Słowik, Agnieszka; Skoreński, Marcin; Bobrek, Kamila; Nowak, Daria; Boivin, Stephane; Brown, Eric L; Oleksyszyn, Józef; Sieńczyk, Marcin

    2015-09-01

    The IgY antibodies offer an attractive alternative to mammalian IgGs in research, diagnosis and medicine. The isolation of immunoglobulin Y from the egg yolks is efficient and economical, causing minimal suffering to animals. Here we present the methodology for the production of IgY antibodies specific to Staphylococcus aureus fibrinogen binding protein (Efb) and its peptidyl epitope (spanning residues 127-140). The Efb is an extracellular, adhesion protein which binds both human fibrinogen and complement C3 protein thus contributing to the high infectious potential of this pathogen. The selected epitope of Efb protein is responsible for the interaction with C3. The immunochemical characterization of both anti-Efb and epitope-specific IgY antibodies revealed their similar avidity, titer, and reactivity profile, although some differences in the hen's immune response to administered antigens is discussed.

  9. The intriguing Cyclophilin A-HIV-1 Vpr interaction: prolyl cis/trans isomerisation catalysis and specific binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henklein Petra

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclophilin A (CypA represents a potential target for antiretroviral therapy since inhibition of CypA suppresses human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 replication, although the mechanism through which CypA modulates HIV-1 infectivity still remains unclear. The interaction of HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr with the human peptidyl prolyl isomerase CypA is known to occur in vitro and in vivo. However, the nature of the interaction of CypA with Pro-35 of N-terminal Vpr has remained undefined. Results Characterization of the interactions of human CypA with N-terminal peptides of HIV-1 Vpr has been achieved using a combination of nuclear magnetic resonace (NMR exchange spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR. NMR data at atomic resolution indicate prolyl cis/trans isomerisation of the highly conserved proline residues Pro-5, -10, -14 and -35 of Vpr are catalyzed by human CypA and require only very low concentrations of the isomerase relative to that of the peptide substrates. Of the N-terminal peptides of Vpr only those containing Pro-35 bind to CypA in a biosensor assay. SPR studies of specific N-terminal peptides with decreasing numbers of residues revealed that a seven-residue motif centred at Pro-35 consisting of RHFPRIW, which under membrane-like solution conditions comprises the loop region connecting helix 1 and 2 of Vpr and the two terminal residues of helix 1, is sufficient to maintain strong specific binding. Conclusions Only N-terminal peptides of Vpr containing Pro-35, which appears to be vital for manifold functions of Vpr, bind to CypA in a biosensor assay. This indicates that Pro-35 is essential for a specific CypA-Vpr binding interaction, in contrast to the general prolyl cis/trans isomerisation observed for all proline residues of Vpr, which only involve transient enzyme-substrate interactions. Previously suggested models depicting CypA as a chaperone that plays a role in HIV-1 virulence are

  10. The peptide-binding specificity of HLA-A*3001 demonstrates membership of the HLA-A3 supertype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberth, K; Røder, G; Harndahl, M;

    2008-01-01

    haplotype in populations of African descent, has variously been assigned to the A1, A3, or A24 supertypes. Using a biochemical HLA-A*3001 binding assay, and a large panel of nonamer peptides and peptide libraries, we here demonstrate that the specificity of HLA-A*3001 most closely resembles that of the HLA-A......3 supertype. We discuss approaches to supertype assignment and underscore the importance of experimental verification....

  11. Structural Comparison, Substrate Specificity, and Inhibitor Binding of AGPase Small Subunit from Monocot and Dicot: Present Insight and Future Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Sarma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase is the first rate limiting enzyme of starch biosynthesis pathway and has been exploited as the target for greater starch yield in several plants. The structure-function analysis and substrate binding specificity of AGPase have provided enormous potential for understanding the role of specific amino acid or motifs responsible for allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanisms, which facilitate the engineering of AGPases. We report the three-dimensional structure, substrate, and inhibitor binding specificity of AGPase small subunit from different monocot and dicot crop plants. Both monocot and dicot subunits were found to exploit similar interactions with the substrate and inhibitor molecule as in the case of their closest homologue potato tuber AGPase small subunit. Comparative sequence and structural analysis followed by molecular docking and electrostatic surface potential analysis reveal that rearrangements of secondary structure elements, substrate, and inhibitor binding residues are strongly conserved and follow common folding pattern and orientation within monocot and dicot displaying a similar mode of allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanism. The results from this study along with site-directed mutagenesis complemented by molecular dynamics simulation will shed more light on increasing the starch content of crop plants to ensure the food security worldwide.

  12. Ligand-specific conformational changes in the alpha1 glycine receptor ligand-binding domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Lynch, Joseph W

    2009-01-01

    indicate that channel opening is accompanied by conformational rearrangements in both beta-sheets. In an attempt to resolve ligand-dependent movements in the ligand-binding domain, we employed voltage-clamp fluorometry on alpha1 glycine receptors to compare changes mediated by the agonist, glycine......, and by the antagonist, strychnine. Voltage-clamp fluorometry involves labeling introduced cysteines with environmentally sensitive fluorophores and inferring structural rearrangements from ligand-induced fluorescence changes. In the inner beta-sheet, we labeled residues in loop 2 and in binding domain loops D and E....... At each position, strychnine and glycine induced distinct maximal fluorescence responses. The pre-M1 domain responded similarly; at each of four labeled positions glycine produced a strong fluorescence signal, whereas strychnine did not. This suggests that glycine induces conformational changes...

  13. Purification of proteins specifically binding human endogenous retrovirus K long terminal repeat by affinity elution chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, D O; Zavalova, L L; Akopov, S B; Nikolaev, L G

    2002-11-01

    A novel affinity elution procedure for purification of DNA-binding proteins was developed and employed to purify to near homogeneity the proteins recognizing a 21 base pair sequence within the long terminal repeat of human endogenous retroviruses K. The approach involves loading the initial protein mixture on a heparin-agarose column and elution of protein(s) of interest with a solution of double-stranded oligonucleotide containing binding sites of the protein(s). The affinity elution has several advantages over conventional DNA-affinity chromatography: (i) it is easier and faster, permitting to isolate proteins in a 1 day-one stage procedure; (ii) yield of a target protein is severalfold higher than that in DNA-affinity chromatography; (iii) it is not necessary to prepare a special affinity support for each factor to be isolated. Theaffinity elution could be a useful alternative to conventional DNA-affinity chromatography.

  14. Specific tracking of xylan using fluorescent-tagged carbohydrate-binding module 15 as molecular probe

    OpenAIRE

    Khatri, Vinay; Hébert-Ouellet, Yannick; Meddeb-Mouelhi, Fatma; Beauregard,Marc

    2016-01-01

    Background Xylan has been identified as a physical barrier which limits cellulose accessibility by covering the outer surface of fibers and interfibrillar space. Therefore, tracking xylan is a prerequisite for understanding and optimizing lignocellulosic biomass processes. Results In this study, we developed a novel xylan tracking approach using a two-domain probe called OC15 which consists of a fusion of Cellvibrio japonicus carbohydrate-binding domain 15 with the fluorescent protein mOrange...

  15. Structure and DNA-binding of meiosis-specific protein Hop2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Donghua; Moktan, Hem; Pezza, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Here we report structure elucidation of the DNA binding domain of homologous pairing protein 2 (Hop2), which is important to gene diversity when sperms and eggs are produced. Together with another protein Mnd1, Hop2 enhances the strand invasion activity of recombinase Dmc1 by over 30 times, facilitating proper synapsis of homologous chromosomes. However, the structural and biochemical bases for the function of Hop2 and Mnd1 have not been well understood. As a first step toward such understanding, we recently solved the structure for the N-terminus of Hop2 (1-84) using solution NMR. This fragment shows a typical winged-head conformation with recognized DNA binding activity. DNA interacting sites were then investigated by chemical shift perturbations in a titration experiment. Information of these sites was used to guide protein-DNA docking with MD simulation, revealing that helix 3 is stably lodged in the DNA major groove and that wing 1 (connecting strands 2 and 3) transiently comes in contact with the minor groove in nanosecond time scale. Mutagenesis analysis further confirmed the DNA binding sites in this fragment of the protein.

  16. Analysis of the PDZ binding specificities of Influenza A Virus NS1 proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagasaka Kazunori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Influenza A virus non-structural protein 1 (NS1 is a multifunctional virulence factor with several protein-protein interaction domains, involved in preventing apoptosis of the infected cell and in evading the interferon response. In addition, the majority of influenza A virus NS1 proteins have a class I PDZ-binding motif at the C-terminus, and this itself has been shown to be a virulence determinant. In the majority of human influenza NS1 proteins the consensus motif is RSxV: in avian NS1 it is ESxV. Of the few human strains that have the avian motif, all were from very high mortality outbreaks of the disease. Previous work has shown that minor differences in PDZ-binding motifs can have major effects on the spectrum of cellular proteins targeted. In this study we analyse the effect of these differences upon the binding of Influenza A virus NS1 protein to a range of cellular proteins involved in polarity and signal transduction.

  17. The antenna-specific odorant-binding protein AlinOBP13 of the alfalfa plant bug Adelphocoris lineolatus is expressed specifically in basiconic sensilla and has high binding affinity to terpenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L; Xiao, H-J; Gu, S-H; Zhou, J-J; Guo, Y-Y; Liu, Z-W; Zhang, Y-J

    2014-08-01

    Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) are crucial in the olfactory pathway of insects. In the present study, the antenna-enriched OBP AlinOBP13 was investigated because of its potential contribution to the peripheral olfactory perception in the alfalfa plant bug Adelphocoris lineolatus. The results of quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR showed that the transcript level of AlinOBP13 was higher in the adult stage than in the nymph stages. The transcript levels of AlinOBP13 in the male and female antennae significantly increased after 4 and 8 h of starvation, respectively. Fine ultrastructures of different types of chemosensilla in both female and male antennae were investigated using transmission electron microscopy and immunocytochemical labelling. The results revealed that the anti-AlinOBP13 antiserum strongly and specifically labelled short basiconic sensilla; this antiserum was restricted to the inner lumen and the cavities below the sensillum base of the sensilla. By contrast, multiporous sensilla trichodea, medium long sensilla basiconica, and aporous sensilla chaetica were not labelled. The present study is the first to report an OBP showing specific expression in the short basiconic sensilla of a member of the Hemipteran species. The results of a fluorescence displacement binding assay indicated that recombinant AlinOBP13 showed a more specific binding preference to terpenoids than to sex pheromones and other classes of chemicals. This binding ability was dramatically affected by pH; higher binding affinities were displayed at pH 10.0 than at pH 7.4 and 5.0. In addition, the results of dose-dependent electroantennogram recordings from the antennae showed that both female and male adult bugs responded to the terpenoids tested, suggesting an apparent physiological relevance of AlinOBP13 in A. lineolatus chemoreception. The results of this study suggest that AlinOBP13 functions as a specific carrier of terpenoids and provide insights into the mechanism of A

  18. Mechanistic basis of plasmid-specific DNA binding of the F plasmid regulatory protein, TraM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yun; Lu, Jun; Wong, Joyce J W; Edwards, Ross A; Frost, Laura S; Mark Glover, J N

    2014-11-11

    The conjugative transfer of bacterial F plasmids relies on TraM, a plasmid-encoded protein that recognizes multiple DNA sites to recruit the plasmid to the conjugative pore. In spite of the high degree of amino acid sequence conservation between TraM proteins, many of these proteins have markedly different DNA binding specificities that ensure the selective recruitment of a plasmid to its cognate pore. Here we present the structure of F TraM RHH (ribbon-helix-helix) domain bound to its sbmA site. The structure indicates that a pair of TraM tetramers cooperatively binds an underwound sbmA site containing 12 base pairs per turn. The sbmA is composed of 4 copies of a 5-base-pair motif, each of which is recognized by an RHH domain. The structure reveals that a single conservative amino acid difference in the RHH β-ribbon between F and pED208 TraM changes its specificity for its cognate 5-base-pair sequence motif. Specificity is also dictated by the positioning of 2-base-pair spacer elements within sbmA; in F sbmA, the spacers are positioned between motifs 1 and 2 and between motifs 3 and 4, whereas in pED208 sbmA, there is a single spacer between motifs 2 and 3. We also demonstrate that a pair of F TraM tetramers can cooperatively bind its sbmC site with an affinity similar to that of sbmA in spite of a lack of sequence similarity between these DNA elements. These results provide a basis for the prediction of the DNA binding properties of the family of TraM proteins.

  19. The role of antigen specificity in the binding of murine monoclonal anti-DNA antibodies to microparticles from apoptotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullal, Anirudh J; Marion, Tony N; Pisetsky, David S

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA) are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus and markers of underlying immune system disturbances. These antibodies bind to both single-stranded and double-stranded DNA, mediating pathogenesis by forming immune complexes. As shown recently, DNA in blood exists in both free and particulate forms, with DNA representing an important component of microparticles. Microparticles are membrane-bound vesicles containing nuclear molecules, released by membrane blebbing during cell death and activation. A panel of monoclonal NZB/NZW F1 anti-DNA antibodies was tested for binding to microparticles generated from apoptotic THP-1 and Jurkat cells. These studies showed that only certain anti-DNA antibodies in the panel, specific for double-stranded DNA, bound to microparticles. Binding to particles was reduced by soluble DNA or DNase treatment. Together, these results indicate that particle binding is a feature of only certain anti-DNA antibodies, reflecting immunochemical properties of the antibodies and the nature of the exposed DNA antigens.

  20. Centromere binding specificity in assembly of the F plasmid partition complex

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The segregation of plasmid F of Escherichia coli is highly reliable. The Sop partition locus, responsible for this stable maintenance, is composed of two genes, sopA and sopB and a centromere, sopC, consisting of 12 direct repeats of 43 bp. Each repeat carries a 16-bp inverted repeat motif to which SopB binds to form a nucleoprotein assembly called the partition complex. A database search for sequences closely related to sopC revealed unexpected features that appeared highly conserved. We hav...

  1. Isolation from bovine brain of substances inhibiting specific binding of imipramine and serotonin uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhin, A.G.; Kladnitskii, A.V.; Kovaleva, E.S.; Kudryakova, T.B.

    1986-01-01

    The authors search for endogenous ligands of the ''imipramine receptor'' in brain tissue. Binding of tritium-imipramine with the fraction of unpruified bovine brain synaptic membranes was carried out by the method of Raisman et'al. Uptake of tritium-serotonin by synaptosomes of rat cerebral cortex was estimated. The results do not give a final anser to the question of the existence of an endogenous ligand of the ''imipramine receptor'' but they can serve as the basis for research aimed at purifying the active fractions already obtained and identifying the compounds containined in them.

  2. Specific binding of activated Vip3Aa10 to Helicoverpa armigera brush border membrane vesicles results in pore formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Guo; Yang, Ai-Zhen; Shen, Xiao-Hong; Hua, Bao-Guang; Shi, Guang-Lu

    2011-10-01

    Helicoverpa armigera is one of the most harmful pests in China. Although it had been successfully controlled by Cry1A toxins, some H. armigera populations are building up resistance to Cry1A toxins in the laboratory. Vip3A, secreted by Bacillus thuringiensis, is another potential toxin against H. armigera. Previous reports showed that activated Vip3A performs its function by inserting into the midgut brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) of susceptible insects. To further investigate the binding of Vip3A to BBMV of H. armigera, the full-length Vip3Aa10 toxin expressed in Escherichia coli was digested by trypsin or midgut juice extract, respectively. Among the fragments of digested Vip3Aa10, only a 62kDa fragment (Vip3Aa10-T) exhibited binding to BBMV of H. armigera and has insecticidal activity. Moreover, this interaction was specific and was not affected by the presence of Cry1Ab toxin. Binding of Vip3Aa10-T to BBMV resulted in the formation of an ion channel. Unlike Cry1A toxins, Vip3Aa10-T was just slightly associated with lipid rafts of BBMV. These data suggest that although activated Vip3Aa10 specifically interacts with BBMV of H. armigera and forms an ion channel, the mode of action of it may be different from that of Cry1A toxins.

  3. Transcription of the human beta enolase gene (ENO-3) is regulated by an intronic muscle-specific enhancer that binds myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2 proteins and ubiquitous G-rich-box binding factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feo, S; Antona, V; Barbieri, G; Passantino, R; Calì, L; Giallongo, A

    1995-01-01

    To provide evidence for the cis-regulatory DNA sequences and trans-acting factors involved in the complex pattern of tissue- and stage-specific expression of the beta enolase gene, constructs containing fragments of the gene fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene were used in transient-transfection assays of C2C12 myogenic cells. Deletion analysis revealed the presence of four major regions: two negative regions in the 5'-flanking sequence, a basal promoter region which directs expression at low levels in proliferating and differentiated muscle cells, and a positive region within the first intron that confers cell-type-specific and differentiation-induced expression. This positive regulatory element is located in the 3'-proximal portion of the first intron (nucleotides +504 to +637) and acts as an enhancer irrespective of orientation and position from the homologous beta enolase promoter or the heterologous thymidine kinase promoter, conferring in both cases muscle-specific expression to the linked reporter gene. Deletion of a putative myocyte-specific enhancer factor 1 (MEF-1) binding site, containing a canonical E-box motif, had no effects on muscle-specific transcription, indicating that this site is not required for the activity of the enhancer. Gel mobility shift assays, competition analysis, DNase I footprinting, and mutagenesis studies indicated that this element interacts through an A/T-rich box with a MEF-2 protein(s) and through a G-rich box with a novel ubiquitous factor(s). Mutation of either the G-rich box or the A/T-rich box resulted in a significantly reduced activity of the enhancer in transient-transfection assays. These data indicate that MEF-2 and G-rich-box binding factors are each necessary for tissue-specific expression of the beta enolase gene in skeletal muscle cells. PMID:7565752

  4. Measuring specific receptor binding of a PET radioligand in human brain without pharmacological blockade: The genomic plot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, Mattia; Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Rizzo, Gaia; Bertoldo, Alessandra; Innis, Robert B; Turkheimer, Federico E

    2016-04-15

    PET studies allow in vivo imaging of the density of brain receptor species. The PET signal, however, is the sum of the fraction of radioligand that is specifically bound to the target receptor and the non-displaceable fraction (i.e. the non-specifically bound radioligand plus the free ligand in tissue). Therefore, measuring the non-displaceable fraction, which is generally assumed to be constant across the brain, is a necessary step to obtain regional estimates of the specific fractions. The nondisplaceable binding can be directly measured if a reference region, i.e. a region devoid of any specific binding, is available. Many receptors are however widely expressed across the brain, and a true reference region is rarely available. In these cases, the nonspecific binding can be obtained after competitive pharmacological blockade, which is often contraindicated in humans. In this work we introduce the genomic plot for estimating the nondisplaceable fraction using baseline scans only. The genomic plot is a transformation of the Lassen graphical method in which the brain maps of mRNA transcripts of the target receptor obtained from the Allen brain atlas are used as a surrogate measure of the specific binding. Thus, the genomic plot allows the calculation of the specific and nondisplaceable components of radioligand uptake without the need of pharmacological blockade. We first assessed the statistical properties of the method with computer simulations. Then we sought ground-truth validation using human PET datasets of seven different neuroreceptor radioligands, where nonspecific fractions were either obtained separately using drug displacement or available from a true reference region. The population nondisplaceable fractions estimated by the genomic plot were very close to those measured by actual human blocking studies (mean relative difference between 2% and 7%). However, these estimates were valid only when mRNA expressions were predictive of protein levels (i

  5. Mutagen-specific mutation signature determines global microRNA binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyal Greenberg

    Full Text Available Micro-RNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene products at the post-transcriptional level. It is thought that loss of cell regulation by miRNAs supports cancer development. Based on whole genome sequencing of a melanoma tumor, we predict, using three different computational algorithms, that the melanoma somatic mutations globally reduce binding of miRNAs to the mutated 3'UTRs. This phenomenon reflects the nature of the characteristic UV-induced mutation, C-to-T. Furthermore, we show that seed regions are enriched with Guanine, thus rendering miRNAs prone to reduced binding to UV-mutated 3'UTRs. Accordingly, mutation patterns in non UV-induced malignancies e.g. lung cancer and leukemia do not yield similar predictions. It is suggested that UV-induced disruption of miRNA-mediated gene regulation plays a carcinogenic role. Remarkably, dark-skinned populations have significantly higher GC content in 3'UTR SNPs than light-skinned populations, which implies on evolutionary pressure to preserve regulation by trans-acting oligonucleotides under conditions with excess UV radiation.

  6. Binding properties of a mannose-specific lectin from the snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis) bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, N; Goldstein, I J; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J

    1988-01-15

    Carbohydrate binding properties of a new plant lectin (GNA) isolated from snowdrop bulbs were studied using the technique of quantitative precipitation, hapten inhibition, and affinity chromatography on immobilized lectin. Purified GNA precipitated highly branched yeast mannans but did not react with most glucans. Hapten inhibition experiments showed that D-mannose is an inhibitor of GNA-mannan interaction but neither N-acetyl-D-mannosamine nor D-glucose is an inhibitor. Hapten inhibition with various sugars showed that GNA requires the presence of equatorial hydroxyl groups at the C-3 and C-4 positions and an axial group at the C-2 position of the D-pyranose ring. A nonreducing terminal D-mannose residue is necessary for the interaction of oligosaccharides, and oligosaccharides with terminal Man(alpha-1-3)Man units showed the highest inhibitory potency (10-30 times greater than D-mannose) among the manno-oligosaccharides tested. The presence of the hydrophobic p-nitrophenyl aglycone increased the affinity of D-mannose only slightly. Immobilized GNA bound yeast mannan but did not bind glycogen. The behavior of glycoproteins with high mannose type glycan chains depended on the density and the structure of their glycan chains. Glycopeptides which carry Man(alpha 1-3)Man units were retarded on the immobilized GNA column whereas those lacking this unit or with hybrid type glycan chains were not retarded on the column.

  7. Aptamers that bind specifically to human KPNA2 (importin-α1) and efficiently interfere with nuclear transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, Noriko; Kumar, Penmetcha K R

    2016-11-01

    The importin-α family of proteins plays an important role in the eukaryotic importin/exportin nuclear transport system. These proteins recognize a nuclear localization signal (NLS) within cargo proteins and import them into the nucleus through nuclear pores, in a process mediated by importin-β. Recent studies have shown that importin-α proteins specifically recognize the NLS of several cellular factors and viral proteins, thus regulating their movement. Dysregulation of importin-α is a common hallmark of many pathologies including, multiple cancers. In this study, we isolated aptamers 76 and 72, which bind specifically and efficiently to KPNA2, a member of a subfamily of importin-α1. Both of these aptamers bind to KPNA2 with an equilibrium dissociation constant (K d) of 150 nM and discriminate between KPNA2 and other sub-family members of importin-α, such as KPNA1 and KPNA3. These aptamers specifically interfere with the nuclear transport of cargo proteins mediated by KPNA2 but neither with KPNA1 nor KPNA3, which belongs to other subfamily of importins. These results suggest that the selected aptamers (76 and 72) warrant further study to explore not only their application in cancer diagnosis but also their use as a specific reagent to potentially block KPNA2-dependent nuclear transport of macromolecules across the nuclear membrane.

  8. Importance of Residues Outside the Cation Binding Pocket for Na+ and K+ Binding to the Na+/K+-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Line; Toustrup-Jensen, Mads Schak; Einholm, Anja P.;

    Mutagenesis studies have identified several oxygen-containing residues in the transmembrane region which are important for the coordination of Na+ and/or K+. These were later confirmed by the high-resolution crystal structures of the Na+/K+-ATPase with bound Na+ or K+. However, more information......-established that K+ antagonizes ouabain binding, and vice versa. Furthermore, recent crystal structures have shown that ouabain binds in an extracellular cavity created by residues of transmembrane helices 4, 5, and 6 (3). This cavity, which is lined by Phe785 and Phe788, as well as Phe318, Arg882, and Asp886, may...... aromatic ring, while Arg882 and Asp886 were mutated to leucine and alanine, respectively, to investigate the importance of charge and size of the residues. All three mutants could sustain growth and proliferation under ouabain pressure. However, the mutants exhibited a reduced turnover number. All three...

  9. Sequence-specific, nanomolar peptide binding via cucurbit[8]uril-induced folding and inclusion of neighboring side chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lauren C; Leach, David G; Blaylock, Brittney E; Ali, Omar A; Urbach, Adam R

    2015-03-18

    This paper describes the molecular recognition of the tripeptide Tyr-Leu-Ala by the synthetic receptor cucurbit[8]uril (Q8) in aqueous buffer with nanomolar affinity and exceptional specificity. This combination of characteristics, which also applies to antibodies, is desirable for applications in biochemistry and biotechnology but has eluded supramolecular chemists for decades. Building on prior knowledge that Q8 binds to peptides with N-terminal aromatic residues, a library screen of 105 peptides was designed to test the effects of residues adjacent to N-terminal Trp, Phe, or Tyr. The screen used tetramethylbenzobis(imidazolium) (MBBI) as a fluorescent indicator and resulted in the unexpected discovery that MBBI can serve not only as a turn-off sensor via the simultaneous inclusion of a Trp residue but also as a turn-on sensor via the competitive displacement of MBBI upon binding of Phe- or Tyr-terminated peptides. The unusual fluorescence response of the Tyr series prompted further investigation by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and isothermal titration calorimetry. From these studies, a novel binding motif was discovered in which only 1 equiv of peptide binds to Q8, and the side chains of both the N-terminal Tyr residue and its immediate neighbor bind within the Q8 cavity. For the peptide Tyr-Leu-Ala, the equilibrium dissociation constant value is 7.2 nM, whereas that of its sequence isomer Tyr-Ala-Leu is 34 μM. The high stability, recyclability, and low cost of Q8 combined with the straightforward incorporation of Tyr-Leu-Ala into recombinant proteins should make this system attractive for the development of biological applications.

  10. Lineage-specific differences between human and simian immunodeficiency virus regulation of gp120 trimer association and CD4 binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finzi, Andrés; Pacheco, Beatriz; Xiang, Shi-Hua; Pancera, Marie; Herschhorn, Alon; Wang, Liping; Zeng, Xing; Desormeaux, Anik; Kwong, Peter D; Sodroski, Joseph

    2012-09-01

    Metastable conformations of the gp120 and gp41 envelope glycoproteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) must be maintained in the unliganded state of the envelope glycoprotein trimer. Binding of gp120 to the primary receptor, CD4, triggers the transition to an open conformation of the trimer, promoting interaction with the CCR5 chemokine receptor and ultimately leading to gp41-mediated virus-cell membrane fusion and entry. Topological layers in the gp120 inner domain contribute to gp120-trimer association in the unliganded state and to CD4 binding. Here we describe similarities and differences between HIV-1 and SIVmac gp120. In both viruses, the gp120 N/C termini and the inner domain β-sandwich and layer 2 support the noncovalent association of gp120 with the envelope glycoprotein trimer. Layer 1 of the SIVmac gp120 inner domain contributes more to trimer association than the corresponding region of HIV-1 gp120. On the other hand, layer 1 plays an important role in stabilizing the CD4-bound conformation of HIV-1 but not SIVmac gp120 and thus contributes to HIV-1 binding to CD4. In SIVmac, CD4 binding is instead enhanced by tryptophan 375, which fills the Phe 43 cavity of gp120. Activation of SIVmac by soluble CD4 is dependent on tryptophan 375 and on layer 1 residues that determine a tight association of gp120 with the trimer. Distinct biological requirements for CD4 usage have resulted in lineage-specific differences in the HIV-1 and SIV gp120 structures that modulate trimer association and CD4 binding.

  11. Cloning and expression of a queen pheromone-binding protein in the honeybee: an olfactory-specific, developmentally regulated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danty, E; Briand, L; Michard-Vanhée, C; Perez, V; Arnold, G; Gaudemer, O; Huet, D; Huet, J C; Ouali, C; Masson, C; Pernollet, J C

    1999-09-01

    Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) are small abundant extracellular proteins thought to participate in perireceptor events of odor-pheromone detection by carrying, deactivating, and/or selecting odor stimuli. The honeybee queen pheromone is known to play a crucial role in colony organization, in addition to drone sex attraction. We identified, for the first time in a social insect, a binding protein called antennal-specific protein 1 (ASP1), which binds at least one of the major queen pheromone components. ASP1 was characterized by cDNA cloning, expression in Pichia pastoris, and pheromone binding. In situ hybridization showed that it is specifically expressed in the auxiliary cell layer of the antennal olfactory sensilla. The ASP1 sequence revealed it as a divergent member of the insect OBP family. The recombinant protein presented the exact characteristics of the native protein, as shown by mass spectrometry, and N-terminal sequencing and exclusion-diffusion chromatography showed that recombinant ASP1 is dimeric. ASP1 interacts with queen pheromone major components, opposite to another putative honeybee OBP, called ASP2. ASP1 biosynthetic accumulation, followed by nondenaturing electrophoresis during development, starts at day 1 before emergence, in concomitance with the functional maturation of olfactory neurons. The isobar ASP1b isoform appears simultaneously to ASP1a in workers, but only at approximately 2 weeks after emergence in drones. Comparison of in vivo and heterologous expressions suggests that the difference between ASP1 isoforms might be because of dimerization, which might play a physiological role in relation with mate attraction.

  12. Promiscuous and specific phospholipid binding by domains in ZAC, a membrane-associated Arabidopsis protein with an ARF GAP zinc finger and a C2 domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, R B; Lykke-Andersen, K; Frandsen, G I

    2000-01-01

    containing the ZAC-C2 domain bind anionic phospholipids non-specifically, with some variance in Ca2+ and salt dependence. Similar assays demonstrated specific affinity of the ZAC N-terminal region (residues 1-174) for phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate (PI-3-P). Binding was dependent in part on an intact...... zinc finger motif, but proteins containing only the zinc finger domain (residues 1-105) did not bind PI-3-P. Recombinant ZAC possessed GTPase-activating activity on Arabidopsis ARF proteins. These data identify a novel PI-3-P-binding protein region and thereby provide evidence...

  13. Polarizing a hydrophobic cavity for the efficient binding of organic guests: the case of calix[6]tren, a highly efficient and versatile receptor for neutral or cationic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbost, Ulrich; Rager, Marie-Noëlle; Petit, Samuel; Jabin, Ivan; Reinaud, Olivia

    2005-06-15

    The host-guest properties of calix[6]tren 1 have been evaluated. The receptor is based on a calix[6]arene that is covalently capped at the narrow rim by a tren unit. As a result, the system presents a concave hydrophobic cavity with, at its bottom, a grid-like nitrogenous core. Despite its well-defined cavity and opening to the outside at the large rim, 1 did not behave as a good receptor for neutral molecules in chloroform. However, it exhibited efficient endo-complexation of ammonium guests. By contrast, the per-protonated host, 1.4H(+), behaved as a remarkable receptor for small organic molecules. The complexation is driven by a strong charge-dipole interaction and hydrogen bonds between the polar guest and the tetracationic cap of the calixarene. Finally, coordination of Zn(2+) to the tren core led to the asymmetrization of calixarene cavity and to the strong but selective endo-binding of neutral ligands. This study emphasizes the efficiency of a receptor presenting a concave hydrophobic cavity that is polarized at its bottom. The resulting combination of charge-dipole, hydrogen bonding, CH-pi, and van der Waals interactions highly stabilizes the supramolecular architectures. Also, importantly, the tren cap allows the tuning of the polarization, offering either a basic (1), a highly charged and acidic (1.4H(+)), or a coordination (1.Zn(2+)) site. As a result, the system proved to be highly versatile, tunable, and interconvertible in solution by simple addition of protons, bases, or metal ions.

  14. Evaluation of energy spectral information in nuclear imaging and investigation of protein binding of cationic radionuclides by lactoferrin. Comprehensive progress report, October 1, 1977-September 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffer, P. B.

    1980-06-10

    Construction of an Anger camera-computer system which allows collection of both the position and energy signals from events detected by the scintillation camera has been completed. The system allows correction of energy response non-uniformity of the detector and facilitates research related to effects of energy discrimination in radionuclide scintigraphy. The system consists of electronic hardware to transmit and digitize the energy signal, software to record and process that signal in conjunction with spatial positioning signals, and additional hardware for recording the processed images so that they can be evaluated by observers. Preliminary results indicate that the system is useful in evaluating clinical images. Assymetric (eccentric) energy windows do improve image quality and are of value in improving detection of lesions on liver scintigraphs. The mechanisms by which Ga-67 is taken up in infection and tumor has been elucidated, and the uptake of radiogallium in microorganisms as a function of its interaction with siderophores was also studied. The primary function of these low molecular weight compounds is to trap ferric ion. However, gallium may be substituted for ferric ion and becomes trapped within the microorganism. The uptake of radiogallium by neutrophils and the role that lactoferrin plays in both intracellular localization of radiogallium and subsequent deposition of the radionuclide at sites of infection were also studied. Investigation of ferric ion analogs reveals definate differences in the affinity of these metals for binding molecules which helps explain their biologic activity. While ferric ion has the strongest affinity for such molecules, gallium has very high affinity for siderophores, moderate affinity for lactoferrin, and lower affinity for transferrin. The relative affinity of indium for these molecules is in approximately the reverse order.

  15. Lectin Domains of Polypeptide GalNAc Transferases Exhibit Glycopeptide Binding Specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Johannes W; Bennett, Eric P; Schjoldager, Katrine T-B G;

    2011-01-01

    UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide a-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-Ts) constitute a family of up to 20 transferases that initiate mucin-type O-glycosylation. The transferases are structurally composed of catalytic and lectin domains. Two modes have been identified for the selection...... of glycosylation sites by GalNAc-Ts: confined sequence recognition by the catalytic domain alone, and concerted recognition of acceptor sites and adjacent GalNAc-glycosylated sites by the catalytic and lectin domains, respectively. Thus far, only the catalytic domain has been shown to have peptide sequence...... on sequences of mucins MUC1, MUC2, MUC4, MUC5AC, MUC6, and MUC7 as well as a random glycopeptide bead library, we examined the binding properties of four different lectin domains. The lectin domains of GalNAc-T1, -T2, -T3, and -T4 bound different subsets of small glycopeptides. These results indicate...

  16. Energy Landscape Topography Reveals the Underlying Link Between Binding Specificity and Activity of Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wen-Ting; Wang, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Enzyme activity (often quantified by kcat/Km) is the main function of enzyme when it is active against the specific substrate. Higher or lower activities are highly desired for the design of novel enzyme and drug resistance. However, it is difficult to measure the activities of all possible variants and find the “hot-spot” within the limit of experimental time. In this study, we explore the underlying energy landscape of enzyme-substrate interactions and introduce the intrinsic specificity ratio (ISR), which reflects the landscape topography. By studying two concrete systems, we uncover the statistical correlation between the intrinsic specificity and the enzyme activity kcat/Km. This physics-based concept and method show that the energy landscape topography is valuable for understanding the relationship between enzyme specificity and activity. In addition, it can reveal the underlying mechanism of enzyme-substrate actions and has potential applications on enzyme design.

  17. Binding specificity and stability of duplexes formed by modified oligonucleotides with a 4096-hexanucleotide microarray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, Edward; Mirzabekov, Andrei

    2001-01-01

    The binding of oligodeoxynucleotides modified with adenine 2′-O-methyl riboside, 2,6-diaminopurine 2′-O-methyl riboside, cytosine 2′-O-methyl riboside, 2,6-diaminopurine deoxyriboside or 5-bromodeoxyuridine was studied with a microarray containing all possible (4096) polyacrylamide-bound hexadeoxynucleotides (a generic microchip). The generic microchip was manufactured by using reductive immobilization of aminooligonucleotides in the activated copolymer of acrylamide, bis-acrylamide and N-(2,2-dimethoxyethyl) acrylamide. The binding of the fluorescently labeled modified octanucleotides to the array was analyzed with the use of both melting profiles and the fluorescence distribution at selected temperatures. Up to three substitutions of adenosines in the octamer sequence by adenine 2′-O-methyl ribosides (Am), 2,6-diaminopurine 2′-O-methyl ribosides (Dm) or 2,6-diaminopurine deoxyribosides (D) resulted in increased mismatch discrimination measured at the melting temperature of the corresponding perfect duplex. The stability of complexes formed by 2′-O-methyl-adenosine-modified oligodeoxynucleotides was slightly decreased with every additional substitution, yielding ∼4°C of total loss in melting temperature for three modifications, as followed from microchip thermal denaturation experiments. 2,6-Diaminopurine 2′-O-methyl riboside modifications led to considerable duplex stabilization. The cytosine 2′-O-methyl riboside and 5-bromodeoxyuridine modifications generally did not change either duplex stability or mismatch resolution. Denaturation experiments conducted with selected perfect duplexes on microchips and in solution showed similar results on thermal stabilities. Some hybridization artifacts were observed that might indicate the formation of parallel DNA. PMID:11410672

  18. Cationic lipids and cationic ligands induce DNA helix denaturation: detection of single stranded regions by KMnO4 probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, T K; Gopal, Vijaya; Rao, N Madhusudhana

    2003-09-25

    Cationic lipids and cationic polymers are widely used in gene delivery. Using 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) as a cationic lipid, we have investigated the stability of the DNA in DOTAP:DNA complexes by probing with potassium permanganate (KMnO4). Interestingly, thymidines followed by a purine showed higher susceptibility to cationic ligand-mediated melting. Similar studies performed with other water-soluble cationic ligands such as polylysine, protamine sulfate and polyethyleneimine also demonstrated melting of the DNA but with variations. Small cations such as spermine and spermidine and a cationic detergent, cetyl trimethylammonium bromide, also rendered the DNA susceptible to modification by KMnO4. The data presented here provide direct proof for melting of DNA upon interaction with cationic lipids. Structural changes subsequent to binding of cationic lipids/ligands to DNA may lead to instability and formation of DNA bubbles in double-stranded DNA.

  19. New binding site on common molecular scaffold provides HERG channel specificity of scorpion toxin BeKm-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korolkova, Yuliya V; Bocharov, Eduard V; Angelo, Kamilla

    2002-01-01

    The scorpion toxin BeKm-1 is unique among a variety of known short scorpion toxins affecting potassium channels in its selective action on ether-a-go-go-related gene (ERG)-type channels. BeKm-1 shares the common molecular scaffold with other short scorpion toxins. The toxin spatial structure...... in the alpha-helix and following loop whereas the "traditional" functional site of other short scorpion toxins is formed by residues from the beta-sheet. Thus the unique location of the binding site of BeKm-1 provides its specificity toward the HERG channel....

  20. Repairing the sickle cell mutation. I. Specific covalent binding of a photoreactive third strand to the mutated base pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broitman, S; Amosova, O; Dolinnaya, N G; Fresco, J R

    1999-07-30

    A DNA third strand with a 3'-psoralen substituent was designed to form a triplex with the sequence downstream of the T.A mutant base pair of the human sickle cell beta-globin gene. Triplex-mediated psoralen modification of the mutant T residue was sought as an approach to gene repair. The 24-nucleotide purine-rich target sequence switches from one strand to the other and has four pyrimidine interruptions. Therefore, a third strand sequence favorable to two triplex motifs was used, one parallel and the other antiparallel to it. To cope with the pyrimidine interruptions, which weaken third strand binding, 5-methylcytosine and 5-propynyluracil were used in the third strand. Further, a six residue "hook" complementary to an overhang of a linear duplex target was added to the 5'-end of the third strand via a T(4) linker. In binding to the overhang by Watson-Crick pairing, the hook facilitates triplex formation. This third strand also binds specifically to the target within a supercoiled plasmid. The psoralen moiety at the 3'-end of the third strand forms photoadducts to the targeted T with high efficiency. Such monoadducts are known to preferentially trigger reversion of the mutation by DNA repair enzymes.

  1. Identification and Characterization of Noncovalent Interactions That Drive Binding and Specificity in DD-Peptidases and β-Lactamases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargis, Jacqueline C; Vankayala, Sai Lakshmana; White, Justin K; Woodcock, H Lee

    2014-02-11

    Bacterial resistance to standard (i.e., β-lactam-based) antibiotics has become a global pandemic. Simultaneously, research into the underlying causes of resistance has slowed substantially, although its importance is universally recognized. Key to unraveling critical details is characterization of the noncovalent interactions that govern binding and specificity (DD-peptidases, antibiotic targets, versus β-lactamases, the evolutionarily derived enzymes that play a major role in resistance) and ultimately resistance as a whole. Herein, we describe a detailed investigation that elicits new chemical insights into these underlying intermolecular interactions. Benzylpenicillin and a novel β-lactam peptidomimetic complexed to the Stremptomyces R61 peptidase are examined using an arsenal of computational techniques: MD simulations, QM/MM calculations, charge perturbation analysis, QM/MM orbital analysis, bioinformatics, flexible receptor/flexible ligand docking, and computational ADME predictions. Several key molecular level interactions are identified that not only shed light onto fundamental resistance mechanisms, but also offer explanations for observed specificity. Specifically, an extended π-π network is elucidated that suggests antibacterial resistance has evolved, in part, due to stabilizing aromatic interactions. Additionally, interactions between the protein and peptidomimetic substrate are identified and characterized. Of particular interest is a water-mediated salt bridge between Asp217 and the positively charged N-terminus of the peptidomimetic, revealing an interaction that may significantly contribute to β-lactam specificity. Finally, interaction information is used to suggest modifications to current β-lactam compounds that should both improve binding and specificity in DD-peptidases and their physiochemical properties.

  2. Cardiac myosin binding protein C phosphorylation affects cross-bridge cycle's elementary steps in a site-specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    Full Text Available Based on our recent finding that cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C phosphorylation affects muscle contractility in a site-specific manner, we further studied the force per cross-bridge and the kinetic constants of the elementary steps in the six-state cross-bridge model in cMyBP-C mutated transgenic mice for better understanding of the influence of cMyBP-C phosphorylation on contractile functions. Papillary muscle fibres were dissected from cMyBP-C mutated mice of ADA (Ala273-Asp282-Ala302, DAD (Asp273-Ala282-Asp302, SAS (Ser273-Ala282-Ser302, and t/t (cMyBP-C null genotypes, and the results were compared to transgenic mice expressing wide-type (WT cMyBP-C. Sinusoidal analyses were performed with serial concentrations of ATP, phosphate (Pi, and ADP. Both t/t and DAD mutants significantly reduced active tension, force per cross-bridge, apparent rate constant (2πc, and the rate constant of cross-bridge detachment. In contrast to the weakened ATP binding and enhanced Pi and ADP release steps in t/t mice, DAD mice showed a decreased ADP release without affecting the ATP binding and the Pi release. ADA showed decreased ADP release, and slightly increased ATP binding and cross-bridge detachment steps, whereas SAS diminished the ATP binding step and accelerated the ADP release step. t/t has the broadest effects with changes in most elementary steps of the cross-bridge cycle, DAD mimics t/t to a large extent, and ADA and SAS predominantly affect the nucleotide binding steps. We conclude that the reduced tension production in DAD and t/t is the result of reduced force per cross-bridge, instead of the less number of strongly attached cross-bridges. We further conclude that cMyBP-C is an allosteric activator of myosin to increase cross-bridge force, and its phosphorylation status modulates the force, which is regulated by variety of protein kinases.

  3. Natamycin blocks fungal growth by binding specifically to ergosterol without permeabilizing the membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Welscher, Y.M.; ten Napel, H.H.; Masià Balagué, M.; Souza, C.M.; Riezman, H.; de Kruijff, B.; Breukink, E.J.

    2008-01-01

    Natamycin is a polyene antibiotic that is commonly used as an antifungal agent because of its broad spectrum of activity and the lack of development of resistance. Other polyene antibiotics, like nystatin and filipin are known to interact with sterols, with some specificity for ergosterol thereby ca

  4. Inositol Pentakisphosphate Isomers Bind PH Domains with Varying Specificity and Inhibit Phosphoinositide Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Jackson; S Al-Saigh; C Schultz; M Junop

    2011-12-31

    PH domains represent one of the most common domains in the human proteome. These domains are recognized as important mediators of protein-phosphoinositide and protein-protein interactions. Phosphoinositides are lipid components of the membrane that function as signaling molecules by targeting proteins to their sites of action. Phosphoinositide based signaling pathways govern a diverse range of important cellular processes including membrane remodeling, differentiation, proliferation and survival. Myo-Inositol phosphates are soluble signaling molecules that are structurally similar to the head groups of phosphoinositides. These molecules have been proposed to function, at least in part, by regulating PH domain-phosphoinositide interactions. Given the structural similarity of inositol phosphates we were interested in examining the specificity of PH domains towards the family of myo-inositol pentakisphosphate isomers. In work reported here we demonstrate that the C-terminal PH domain of pleckstrin possesses the specificity required to discriminate between different myo-inositol pentakisphosphate isomers. The structural basis for this specificity was determined using high-resolution crystal structures. Moreover, we show that while the PH domain of Grp1 does not possess this high degree of specificity, the PH domain of protein kinase B does. These results demonstrate that some PH domains possess enough specificity to discriminate between myo-inositol pentakisphosphate isomers allowing for these molecules to differentially regulate interactions with phosphoinositides. Furthermore, this work contributes to the growing body of evidence supporting myo-inositol phosphates as regulators of important PH domain-phosphoinositide interactions. Finally, in addition to expanding our knowledge of cellular signaling, these results provide a basis for developing tools to probe biological pathway.

  5. Inositol pentakisphosphate isomers bind PH domains with varying specificity and inhibit phosphoinositide interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schultz Carsten

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PH domains represent one of the most common domains in the human proteome. These domains are recognized as important mediators of protein-phosphoinositide and protein-protein interactions. Phosphoinositides are lipid components of the membrane that function as signaling molecules by targeting proteins to their sites of action. Phosphoinositide based signaling pathways govern a diverse range of important cellular processes including membrane remodeling, differentiation, proliferation and survival. Myo-Inositol phosphates are soluble signaling molecules that are structurally similar to the head groups of phosphoinositides. These molecules have been proposed to function, at least in part, by regulating PH domain-phosphoinositide interactions. Given the structural similarity of inositol phosphates we were interested in examining the specificity of PH domains towards the family of myo-inositol pentakisphosphate isomers. Results In work reported here we demonstrate that the C-terminal PH domain of pleckstrin possesses the specificity required to discriminate between different myo-inositol pentakisphosphate isomers. The structural basis for this specificity was determined using high-resolution crystal structures. Moreover, we show that while the PH domain of Grp1 does not possess this high degree of specificity, the PH domain of protein kinase B does. Conclusions These results demonstrate that some PH domains possess enough specificity to discriminate between myo-inositol pentakisphosphate isomers allowing for these molecules to differentially regulate interactions with phosphoinositides. Furthermore, this work contributes to the growing body of evidence supporting myo-inositol phosphates as regulators of important PH domain-phosphoinositide interactions. Finally, in addition to expanding our knowledge of cellular signaling, these results provide a basis for developing tools to probe biological pathways.

  6. Oriented Immobilization of Fab Fragments by Site-Specific Biotinylation at the Conserved Nucleotide Binding Site for Enhanced Antigen Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-09-01

    Oriented immobilization of antibodies and antibody fragments has become increasingly important as a result of the efforts to reduce the size of diagnostic and sensor devices to miniaturized dimensions for improved accessibility to the end-user. Reduced dimensions of sensor devices necessitate the immobilized antibodies to conserve their antigen binding activity for proper operation. Fab fragments are becoming more commonly used in small-scaled diagnostic devices due to their small size and ease of manufacture. In this study, we used the previously described UV-NBS(Biotin) method to functionalize Fab fragments with IBA-EG11-Biotin linker utilizing UV energy to initiate a photo-cross-linking reaction between the nucleotide binding site (NBS) on the Fab fragment and IBA-Biotin molecule. Our results demonstrate that immobilization of biotinylated Fab fragments via UV-NBS(Biotin) method generated the highest level of immobilized Fab on surfaces when compared to other typical immobilization methods while preserving antigen binding activity. UV-NBS(Biotin) method provided 432-fold, 114-fold, and 29-fold improved antigen detection sensitivity than physical adsorption, NHS-Biotin, and ε-NH3(+), methods, respectively. Additionally, the limit of detection (LOD) for PSA utilizing Fab fragments immobilized via UV-NBS(Biotin) method was significantly lower than that of the other immobilization methods, with an LOD of 0.4 pM PSA. In summary, site-specific biotinylation of Fab fragments without structural damage or loss in antigen binding activity provides a wide range of application potential for UV-NBS immobilization technique across numerous diagnostic devices and nanotechnologies.

  7. Carbohydrate structure and differential binding of prostate specific antigen to Maackia amurensis lectin between prostate cancer and benign prostate hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Chikara; Hosono, Masahiro; Nitta, Kazuo; Oh-eda, Masayoshi; Yoshikawa, Kazuyuki; Habuchi, Tomonori; Arai, Yoichi; Fukuda, Minoru

    2004-08-01

    Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assay is widely used for detection of prostate cancer. Because PSA is also synthesized from normal prostate, false positive diagnosis cannot be avoided by the conventional serum PSA test. To apply the cancer-associated carbohydrate alteration to the improvement of PSA assay, we first elucidated the structures of PSA purified from human seminal fluid. The predominant core structure of N-glycans of seminal fluid PSA was a complex type biantennary oligosaccharide and was consistent with the structure reported previously. However, we found the sialic acid alpha2-3 galactose linkage as an additional terminal carbohydrate structure on seminal fluid PSA. We then analyzed the carbohydrate moiety of serum PSA from the patients with prostate cancer and benign prostate hypertrophy using lectin affinity chromatography. Lectin binding was assessed by lectin affinity column chromatography followed by determining the amount of total and free PSA. Concanavalin A, Lens culinaris, Aleuria aurantia, Sambucus nigra, and Maackia amurensis lectins were tested for their binding to the carbohydrates on PSA. Among the lectins examined, the M. amurensis agglutinin-bound fraction of free serum PSA is increased in prostate cancer patients compared to benign prostate hypertrophy patients. The binding of PSA to M. amurensis agglutinin, which recognizes alpha2,3-linked sialic acid, was also confirmed by surface plasmon resonance analysis. These results suggest that the differential binding of free serum PSA to M. amurensis agglutinin lectin between prostate cancer and benign prostate hypertrophy could be a potential measure for diagnosis of prostate cancer.

  8. The peripheral binding of 14-3-3γ to membranes involves isoform-specific histidine residues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene J Bustad

    Full Text Available Mammalian 14-3-3 protein scaffolds include seven conserved isoforms that bind numerous phosphorylated protein partners and regulate many cellular processes. Some 14-3-3-isoforms, notably γ, have elevated affinity for membranes, which might contribute to modulate the subcellular localization of the partners and substantiate the importance of investigating molecular mechanisms of membrane interaction. By applying surface plasmon resonance we here show that the binding to phospholipid bilayers is stimulated when 14-3-3γ is complexed with its partner, a peptide corresponding to the Ser19-phosphorylated N-terminal region of tyrosine hydroxylase. Moreover, membrane interaction is dependent on salts of kosmotropic ions, which also stabilize 14-3-3γ. Electrostatic analysis of available crystal structures of γ and of the non-membrane-binding ζ-isoform, complemented with molecular dynamics simulations, indicate that the electrostatic potential distribution of phosphopeptide-bound 14-3-3γ is optimal for interaction with the membrane through amphipathic helices at the N-terminal dimerization region. In addition, His158, and especially His195, both specific to 14-3-3γ and located at the convex lateral side, appeared to be pivotal for the ligand induced membrane interaction, as corroborated by site-directed mutagenesis. The participation of these histidine residues might be associated to their increased protonation upon membrane binding. Overall, these results reveal membrane-targeting motifs and give insights on mechanisms that furnish the 14-3-3γ scaffold with the capacity for tuned shuffling from soluble to membrane-bound states.

  9. Iron binding at specific sites within the octameric HbpS protects streptomycetes from iron-mediated oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Wedderhoff

    Full Text Available The soil bacterium Streptomyces reticuli secretes the octameric protein HbpS that acts as a sensory component of the redox-signalling pathway HbpS-SenS-SenR. This system modulates a genetic response on iron- and haem-mediated oxidative stress. Moreover, HbpS alone provides this bacterium with a defence mechanism to the presence of high concentrations of iron ions and haem. While the protection against haem has been related to its haem-binding and haem-degrading activity, the interaction with iron has not been studied in detail. In this work, we biochemically analyzed the iron-binding activity of a set of generated HbpS mutant proteins and present evidence showing the involvement of one internal and two exposed D/EXXE motifs in binding of high quantities of ferrous iron, with the internal E78XXE81 displaying the tightest binding. We additionally show that HbpS is able to oxidize ferrous to ferric iron ions. Based on the crystal structure of both the wild-type and the mutant HbpS-D78XXD81, we conclude that the local arrangement of the side chains from the glutamates in E78XXE81 within the octameric assembly is a pre-requisite for interaction with iron. The data obtained led us to propose that the exposed and the internal motif build a highly specific route that is involved in the transport of high quantities of iron ions into the core of the HbpS octamer. Furthermore, physiological studies using Streptomyces transformants secreting either wild-type or HbpS mutant proteins and different redox-cycling compounds led us to conclude that the iron-sequestering activity of HbpS protects these soil bacteria from the hazardous side effects of peroxide- and iron-based oxidative stress.

  10. Specific Na+ and K+ Cation Effects on the Interfacial Water Molecules at the Air/Aqueous Salt Solution Interfaces Probed with Non-resonant Second Harmonic Generation (SHG)

    CERN Document Server

    Bian, Hong-tao; Guo, Yuan; Wang, Hong-fei

    2008-01-01

    Here we report the polarization dependent non-resonant second harmonic generation (SHG) measurement of the interfacial water molecules at the aqueous solution of the following salts: NaF, NaCl, NaBr, KF, KCl, and KBr. Through quantitative polarization analysis of the SHG data,the orientational parameter D value and the relative surface density of the interfacial water molecules at these aqueous solution surfaces were determined. From these results we found that addition of each of the six salts caused increase of the thickness of the interfacial water layer at the surfaces to a certain extent. Noticeably, both the cations and the anions contributed to the changes, and the abilities to increase the thickness of the interfacial water layer were in the following order: KBr > NaBr > KCl > NaCl ~ NaF > KF. Since these changes can not be factorized into individual anion and cation contributions, there are possible ion pairing or association effects, especially for the NaF case. We also found that the orientational ...

  11. The crystal structure of a ternary complex of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Provides new insight into the reaction mechanism and shows a novel binding mode of the 2'-phosphate of NADP+ and a novel cation binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Segura, Lilian; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Muñoz-Clares, Rosario A; Horjales, Eduardo

    2009-01-16

    In the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the NAD(P)(+)-dependent betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (PaBADH) may play the dual role of assimilating carbon and nitrogen from choline or choline precursors--abundant at infection sites--and producing glycine betaine and NADPH, potentially protective against the high-osmolarity and oxidative stresses prevalent in the infected tissues. Disruption of the PaBADH gene negatively affects the growth of bacteria, suggesting that this enzyme could be a target for antibiotic design. PaBADH is one of the few ALDHs that efficiently use NADP(+) and one of the even fewer that require K(+) ions for stability. Crystals of PaBADH were obtained under aerobic conditions in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol, glycerol, NADP(+) and K(+) ions. The three-dimensional structure was determined at 2.1-A resolution. The catalytic cysteine (C286, corresponding to C302 of ALDH2) is oxidized to sulfenic acid or forms a mixed disulfide with 2-mercaptoethanol. The glutamyl residue involved in the deacylation step (E252, corresponding to E268 of ALDH2) is in two conformations, suggesting a proton relay system formed by two well-conserved residues (E464 and K162, corresponding to E476 and K178, respectively, of ALDH2) that connects E252 with the bulk water. In some active sites, a bound glycerol molecule mimics the thiohemiacetal intermediate; its hydroxyl oxygen is hydrogen bonded to the nitrogen of the amide groups of the side chain of the conserved N153 (N169 of ALDH2) and those of the main chain of C286, which form the "oxyanion hole." The nicotinamide moiety of the nucleotide is not observed in the crystal, and the adenine moiety binds in the usual way. A salt bridge between E179 (E195 of ALDH2) and R40 (E53 of ALDH2) moves the carboxylate group of the former away from the 2'-phosphate of the NADP(+), thus avoiding steric clashes and/or electrostatic repulsion between the two groups. Finally, the crystal shows two K(+) binding sites per subunit

  12. The designed protein M(II)-Gly-Lys-His-Fos(138-211) specifically cleaves the AP-1 binding site containing DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harford, C; Narindrasorasak, S; Sarkar, B

    1996-04-09

    A new specific DNA cleavage protein, Gly-Lys-His-Fos(138-211), was designed, expressed, and characterized. The DNA-binding component of the design uses the basic and leucine zipper regions of the leucine zipper Fos, which are represented by Fos(138-211). The DNA cleavage moiety was provided by the design of the amino-terminal Cu(II)-, Ni(II)-binding site GKH at the amino terminus of Fos(138-211). Binding of Cu(II) or Ni(II) by the protein activates its cleavage ability. The GKH motif was predicted to form a specific amino-terminal Cu(II)-, Ni(II)-binding motif as previously defined [Predki, P. F., Harford, C., Brar, P., & Sarkar, B. (1992) Biochem. J. 287, 211 -215]. This prediction was verified as the tripeptide, GKH, and the expressed protein, GKH-Fos(138-211), were both shown to be capable of binding Cu(II) and Ni(II). The designed protein upon heterodimerization with Jun(248-334) was shown to bind to and cleave several forms of DNA which contained an AP-1 binding site. The cleavage was shown to be specific. This design demonstrates the versatility of the amino-terminal Cu(II)-, Ni(II)-binding motif and the variety of motifs which can be generated. The site of cleavage by GKH-Fos(138-211) on DNA provides further information regarding the bending of DNA upon binding to Fos-Jun heterodimers.

  13. Study of Small Ligands Which Bind Specifically to Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-03-01

    to a target may yield useful specific small peptide binders. Library screening with streptavidin The quality of the RPL was confirmed by screening...high and low pH buffers. A total of four pans were performed. Library screening with live cells overexpressing ErbB2 Our first screening attempt was...consensus which was related to sequences which were identified using purified protein screenings (see alignment). Library screening with purified

  14. Recombinant production of Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1 trans-activator and characterization of its DNA-binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chun Shen; Goh, Siang Ling; Krishnan, Gopala; Ng, Ching Ching

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the recombinant production of a biologically active Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1 trans-activator, i.e., Z-encoded broadly reactive activator (ZEBRA), that recognized specific DNA motifs. We used auto-induction for histidine-tagged BZLF1 expression in Escherichia coli and immobilized cobalt affinity membrane chromatography for protein purification under native conditions. We obtained the purified BZLF1 at a yield of 5.4mg per gram of wet weight cells at 75% purity, in which 27% of the recombinant BZLF1 remained biologically active. The recombinant BZLF1 bound to oligonucleotides containing ZEBRA response elements, either AP-1 or ZIIIB, but not a ZIIIB mutant. The recombinant BZLF1 showed a specific DNA-binding activity which could be useful for functional studies.

  15. S. Typhimurium strategies to resist killing by cationic antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamouros, Susana; Miller, Samuel I

    2015-11-01

    S. Typhimurium is a broad host range Gram-negative pathogen that must evade killing by host innate immune systems to colonize, replicate, cause disease, and be transmitted to other hosts. A major pathogenic strategy of Salmonellae is entrance, survival, and replication within eukaryotic cell phagocytic vacuoles. These phagocytic vacuoles and gastrointestinal mucosal surfaces contain multiple cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) which control invading bacteria. S. Typhimurium possesses several key mechanisms to resist killing by CAMPs which involve sensing CAMPs and membrane damage to activate signaling cascades that result in remodeling of the bacterial envelope to reduce its overall negative charge with an increase in hydrophobicity to decrease binding and effectiveness of CAMPs. Moreover Salmonellae have additional mechanisms to resist killing by CAMPs including an outer membrane protease which targets cationic peptides at the surface, and specific efflux pumps which protect the inner membrane from damage. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides.

  16. Division of Labor: ER-Resident BiP Co-Chaperones Match Substrates to Fates Based on Specific Binding Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Daniel N; Clerico, Eugenia M; Gierasch, Lila M

    2016-09-01

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Behnke et al. (2016) describe a novel cell-based peptide-binding assay and use it to analyze the binding specificities of the endoplasmic reticulum Hsp70 chaperone and its co-chaperones and to probe their different roles in protein quality control.

  17. Carbohydrate-binding specificities of potential probiotic Lactobacillus strains in porcine jejunal (IPEC-J2) cells and porcine mucin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeriano, Valerie Diane; Bagon, Bernadette B; Balolong, Marilen P; Kang, Dae-Kyung

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial lectins are carbohydrate-binding adhesins that recognize glycoreceptors in the gut mucus and epithelium of hosts. In this study, the contribution of lectin-like activities to adhesion of Lactobacillus mucosae LM1 and Lactobacillus johnsonii PF01, which were isolated from swine intestine, were compared to those of the commercial probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Both LM1 and PF01 strains have been reported to have good adhesion ability to crude intestinal mucus of pigs. To confirm this, we quantified their adhesion to porcine gastric mucin and intestinal porcine enterocytes isolated from the jejunum of piglets (IPEC-J2). In addition, we examined their carbohydrate-binding specificities by suspending bacterial cells in carbohydrate solutions prior to adhesion assays. We found that the selected carbohydrates affected the adherences of LM1 to IPEC-J2 cells and of LGG to mucin. In addition, compared to adhesion to IPEC-J2 cells, adhesion to mucin by both LM1 and LGG was characterized by enhanced specific recognition of glycoreceptor components such as galactose, mannose, and N-acetylglucosamine. Hydrophobic interactions might make a greater contribution to adhesion of PF01. A similar adhesin profile between a probiotic and a pathogen, suggest a correlation between shared pathogen-probiotic glycoreceptor recognition and the ability to exclude enteropathogens such as Escherichia coli K88 and Salmonella Typhimurium KCCM 40253. These findings extend our understanding of the mechanisms of the intestinal adhesion and pathogen-inhibition abilities of probiotic Lactobacillus strains.

  18. Specific amino acid residues are involved in substrate discrimination and template binding of human REV1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Jinlian; Masuda, Yuji; Kamiya, Kenji

    2010-02-05

    REV1 is a member of the Y-family DNA polymerases, but is atypical in utilizing only dCTP with a preference for guanine (G) as the template. Crystallography of the REV1-DNA-dCTP ternary complex has revealed a unique mechanism by which template G is evicted from the DNA helix and incoming dCTP is recognized by an arginine residue in an alpha-loop, termed the N-digit. To better understand functions of its individual amino acid residues, we made a series of mutant human REV1 proteins. We found that R357 and L358 play vital roles in template binding. Furthermore, extensive mutation analysis revealed a novel function of R357 for substrate discrimination, in addition to previously proposed specific interaction with incoming dCTP. We found that the binding pocket for dCTP of REV1 has also significant but latent affinity for dGTP. The results suggest that the positive charge on R357 could prevent interaction with dGTP. We propose that both direct and indirect mechanisms mediated by R357 ensure specificity for dCTP.

  19. Generation of a Monoclonal Antibody Specifically Reacting with Neuron-specific TATA-Box Binding Protein-Associated Factor 1 (N-TAF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gen Tamiya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available TATA-box binding protein-associated factor 1 (TAF1, the largest subunit of the transcription factor IID complex, plays an important role in the RNA polymerase II-mediated gene transcription pathway regulating the transcription of a large number of genes related to cell division. The neuron-specific isoform of the TAF1 gene (N-TAF1 may have an essential role in neurons through transcriptional regulation of many neuron-specific genes. The present study reports the preparation and properties of a monoclonal antibody directed against N-TAF1. The monoclonal antibody, 3A-11F, specifically recognized N-TAF1 protein with no reactivity to TAF1 protein, as evidenced by immunocytochemistry and immunoprecipitation using cultured cells expressing recombinant N-TAF1 or TAF1 protein. Immunohistochemistry using 3A-11F showed that N-TAF1-imunoreactivity was detected in the nuclear region of neurons in the rat brain. The 3A-11F monoclonal antibody promises to be a useful tool for determining the expression pattern and biological function of N-TAF1 in the brain.

  20. Biological sex influences learning strategy preference and muscarinic receptor binding in specific brain regions of prepubertal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissom, Elin M; Hawley, Wayne R; Hodges, Kelly S; Fawcett-Patel, Jessica M; Dohanich, Gary P

    2013-04-01

    According to the theory of multiple memory systems, specific brain regions interact to determine how the locations of goals are learned when rodents navigate a spatial environment. A number of factors influence the type of strategy used by rodents to remember the location of a given goal in space, including the biological sex of the learner. We recently found that prior to puberty male rats preferred a striatum-dependent stimulus-response strategy over a hippocampus-dependent place strategy when solving a dual-solution task, while age-matched females showed no strategy preference. Because the cholinergic system has been implicated in learning strategy and is known to be sexually dimorphic prior to puberty, we explored the relationship between learning strategy and muscarinic receptor binding in specific brain regions of prepubertal males and female rats. We confirmed our previous finding that at 28 days of age a significantly higher proportion of prepubertal males preferred a stimulus-response learning strategy than a place strategy to solve a dual-solution visible platform water maze task. Equal proportions of prepubertal females preferred stimulus-response or place strategies. Profiles of muscarinic receptor binding as assessed by autoradiography varied according to strategy preference. Regardless of biological sex, prepubertal rats that preferred stimulus-response strategy exhibited lower ratios of muscarinic receptor binding in the hippocampus relative to the dorsolateral striatum compared to rats that preferred place strategy. Importantly, much of the variance in this ratio was related to differences in the ventral hippocampus to a greater extent than the dorsal hippocampus. The ratios of muscarinic receptors in the hippocampus relative to the basolateral amygdala also were lower in rats that preferred stimulus-response strategy over place strategy. Results confirm that learning strategy preference varies with biological sex in prepubertal rats with males

  1. The binding of NCAM to FGFR1 induces a specific cellular response mediated by receptor trafficking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francavilla, Chiara; Cattaneo, Paola; Berezin, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    different from that elicited by FGF-2. In contrast to FGF-induced degradation of endocytic FGFR1, NCAM promotes the stabilization of the receptor, which is recycled to the cell surface in a Rab11- and Src-dependent manner. In turn, FGFR1 recycling is required for NCAM-induced sustained activation of various...... effectors. Furthermore, NCAM, but not FGF-2, promotes cell migration, and this response depends on FGFR1 recycling and sustained Src activation. Our results implicate NCAM as a nonconventional ligand for FGFR1 that exerts a peculiar control on the intracellular trafficking of the receptor, resulting...... in a specific cellular response. Besides introducing a further level of complexity in the regulation of FGFR1 function, our findings highlight the link of FGFR recycling with sustained signaling and cell migration and the critical role of these events in dictating the cellular response evoked by receptor...

  2. Substrate Specificity and Ionic Regulation of GlnPQ from Lactococcus lactis. An ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter with Four Extracytoplasmic Substrate-Binding Domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman-Wolters, Gea K.; Poolman, Bert

    2005-01-01

    We report on the functional characterization of GlnPQ, an ATP-binding cassette transporter with four extracytoplasmic substrate-binding domains. The first predicted transmembrane helix of GlnP was cleaved off in the mature protein and most likely serves as the signal sequence for the extracytoplasmi

  3. Ataxin 2-binding protein 1 is a context-specific positive regulator of Notch signaling during neurogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Jay Prakash; Deshpande, Girish; Shashidhara, L S

    2017-03-01

    The role of the Notch pathway during the lateral inhibition that underlies binary cell fate choice is extensively studied, but the context specificity that generates diverse outcomes is less well understood. In the peripheral nervous system of Drosophila melanogaster, differential Notch signaling between cells of the proneural cluster orchestrates sensory organ specification. Here we report functional analysis of Drosophila Ataxin 2-binding protein 1 (A2BP1) during this process. Its human ortholog is linked to type 2 spinocerebellar ataxia and other complex neuronal disorders. Downregulation of Drosophila A2BP1 in the proneural cluster increases adult sensory bristle number, whereas its overexpression results in loss of bristles. We show that A2BP1 regulates sensory organ specification by potentiating Notch signaling. Supporting its direct involvement, biochemical analysis shows that A2BP1 is part of the Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] complex in the presence and absence of Notch. However, in the absence of Notch signaling, the A2BP1 interacting fraction of Su(H) does not associate with the repressor proteins Groucho and CtBP. We propose a model explaining the requirement of A2BP1 as a positive regulator of context-specific Notch activity.

  4. Crystal Structure of the Fab Fragment of an Anti-ofloxacin Antibody and Exploration of Its Specific Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kuo; Du, Xinjun; Sheng, Wei; Zhou, Xiaonan; Wang, Junping; Wang, Shuo

    2016-03-30

    The limited knowledge on the mechanism of interactions between small contaminants and the corresponding antibodies greatly inhibits the development of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. In this study, the crystal structure of a Fab fragment specific for ofloxacin was obtained. On the basis of the crystal characteristics, the modeling of the interactions between ofloxacin and the Fab revealed that TYR31 and HIS99 of the heavy chain and MET20 and GLN79 of the light chain formed a hydrophobic region and that SER52 and ALA97 of the heavy chain and TYR35 of the light chain formed a salt bridge and two hydrogen bonds for specific binding. The key roles of SER52 and ALA97 were further confirmed by site-directed mutation. A specificity analysis using 14 ofloxacin analogues indicates that the length of the bond formed between the piperazine ring and the antibody plays key roles in specific recognition. This work helps to clarify the mechanisms through which antibodies recognize small molecules and improve immune detection methods.

  5. The evolution of gene expression and binding specificity of the largest transcription factor family in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapopoulou, Adamandia; Mathew, Lisha; Wong, Alex; Trono, Didier; Jensen, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    The KRAB-containing zinc finger (KRAB-ZF) proteins represent the largest family of transcription factors (TFs) in humans, yet for the great majority, their function and specific genomic target remain unknown. However, it has been shown that a large fraction of these genes arose from segmental duplications, and that they have expanded in gene and zinc finger number throughout vertebrate evolution. To determine whether this expansion is linked to selective pressures acting on different domains, we have manually curated all KRAB-ZF genes present in the human genome together with their orthologous genes in three closely related species and assessed the evolutionary forces acting at the sequence level as well as on their expression profiles. We provide evidence that KRAB-ZFs can be separated into two categories according to the polymorphism present in their DNA-contacting residues. Those carrying a nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in their DNA-contacting amino acids exhibit significantly reduced expression in all tissues, have emerged in a recent lineage, and seem to be less strongly constrained evolutionarily than those without such a polymorphism. This work provides evidence for a link between age of the TF, as well as polymorphism in their DNA-contacting residues and expression levels-both of which may be jointly affected by selection.

  6. Production of a soluble single-chain variable fragment antibody against okadaic acid and exploration of its specific binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kuo; Zhang, Xiuyuan; Wang, Lixia; Du, Xinjun; Wei, Dong

    2016-06-15

    Okadaic acid is a lipophilic marine algal toxin commonly responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP). Outbreaks of DSP have been increasing and are of worldwide public health concern; therefore, there is a growing demand for more rapid, reliable, and economical analytical methods for the detection of this toxin. In this study, anti-okadaic acid single-chain variable fragment (scFv) genes were prepared by cloning heavy and light chain genes from hybridoma cells, followed by fusion of the chains via a linker peptide. An scFv-pLIP6/GN recombinant plasmid was constructed and transformed into Escherichia coli for expression, and the target scFv was identified with IC-CLEIA (chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay). The IC15 was 0.012 ± 0.02 μg/L, and the IC50 was 0.25 ± 0.03 μg/L. The three-dimensional structure of the scFv was simulated with computer modeling, and okadaic acid was docked to the scFv model to obtain a putative structure of the binding complex. Two predicted critical amino acids, Ser32 and Thr187, were then mutated to verify this theoretical model. Both mutants exhibited significant loss of binding activity. These results help us to understand this specific scFv-antigen binding mechanism and provide guidance for affinity maturation of the antibody in vitro. The high-affinity scFv developed here also has potential for okadaic acid toxin detection.

  7. Pregnancy-specific glycoproteins bind integrin αIIbβ3 and inhibit the platelet-fibrinogen interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel K Shanley

    Full Text Available Pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PSGs are immunoglobulin superfamily members encoded by multigene families in rodents and primates. In human pregnancy, PSGs are secreted by the syncytiotrophoblast, a fetal tissue, and reach a concentration of up to 400 ug/ml in the maternal bloodstream at term. Human and mouse PSGs induce release of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and TGFβ1 from monocytes, macrophages, and other cell types, suggesting an immunoregulatory function. RGD tri-peptide motifs in the majority of human PSGs suggest that they may function like snake venom disintegrins, which bind integrins and inhibit interactions with ligands. We noted that human PSG1 has a KGD, rather than an RGD motif. The presence of a KGD in barbourin, a platelet integrin αIIbβ3 antagonist found in snake venom, suggested that PSG1 may be a selective αIIbβ3 ligand. Here we show that human PSG1 binds αIIbβ3 and inhibits the platelet - fibrinogen interaction. Unexpectedly, however, the KGD is not critical as multiple PSG1 domains independently bind and inhibit αIIbβ3 function. Human PSG9 and mouse Psg23 are also inhibitory suggesting conservation of this function across primate and rodent PSG families. Our results suggest that in species with haemochorial placentation, in which maternal blood is in direct contact with fetal trophoblast, the high expression level of PSGs reflects a requirement to antagonise abundant (3 mg/ml fibrinogen in the maternal circulation, which may be necessary to prevent platelet aggregation and thrombosis in the prothrombotic maternal environment of pregnancy.

  8. Characterization of hydrophobic-ligand-binding proteins of Taenia solium that are expressed specifically in the adult stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M; Lee, E-G; Kim, S-H; Bae, Y-A; Wang, H; Yang, Y; Kong, Y

    2012-09-01

    Taenia solium, a causative agent of taeniasis and cysticercosis, has evolved a repertoire of lipid uptake mechanisms. Proteome analysis of T. solium excretory-secretory products (TsESP) identified 10 kDa proteins displaying significant sequence identity with cestode hydrophobic-ligand-binding-proteins (HLBPs). Two distinct 362- and 352-bp-long cDNAs encoding 264- and 258-bp-long open reading frames (87 and 85 amino acid polypeptides) were isolated by mining the T. solium expressed sequence tags and a cDNA library screening (TsHLBP1 and TsHLBP2; 94% sequence identity). They clustered into the same clade with those found in Moniezia expansa and Hymenolepis diminuta. Genomic structure analysis revealed that these genes might have originated from a common ancestor. Both the crude TsESP and bacterially expressed recombinant proteins exhibited binding activity toward 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (1,8-ANS), which was competitively inhibited by oleic acid. The proteins also bound to cis-parinaric acid (cPnA) and 16-(9-anthroyloxy) palmitic acid (16-AP), but showed no binding activity against 11-[(5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl) amino] undecanoic acid (DAUDA) and dansyl-DL-α-aminocaprylic acid (DACA). Unsaturated fatty acids (FAs) showed greater affinity than saturated FAs. The proteins were specifically expressed in adult worms throughout the strobila. The TsHLBPs might be involved in uptake and/or sequestration of hydrophobic molecules provided by their hosts, thus contributing to host-parasite interface interrelationships.

  9. Oligomeric properties and DNA binding specificities of repressor isoforms from the Streptomyces bacteriophage phiC31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, S E; Smith, M C

    1998-05-15

    Three protein isoforms (74, 54 and 42 kDa) are expressed from repressor gene c in the Streptomyces temperate bacteriophage phiC31. Because expression of the two smaller isoforms, 54 and 42 kDa, is sufficient for superinfection immunity, the interaction between these isoforms was studied. The native 42 kDa repressor (Nat42) and an N-terminally 6x histidine-tagged 54 kDa isoform (His54) were shown by co-purification on a Ni-NTA column to interact in Streptomyces lividans . In vitro three repressor preparations, containing Nat42, His54 and the native 54 and 42 kDa isoforms expressed together (Nat54&42), were subjected to chemical crosslinking and gel filtration analysis. Homo- and hetero-tetramers were observed. Previous work showed that the smallest isoform bound to 17 bp operators containing aconservedinvertedrepeat (CIR) and that the CIRs were located at 16 loci throughout the phiC31 genome. One of the CIRs (CIR6) is believed to be critical for regulating the lytic pathway. The DNA binding activities of the three repressor preparations were studied using fragments containing CIRs (CIR3-CIR6) from the essential early region as templates for DNase I footprinting. Whereas Nat42 bound to CIR6, poorly to CIR5 but undetectably to CIR3 or CIR4, the Nat54&42 preparation could bind to all CIRs tested, albeit poorly to CIR3 and CIR4. The His54 isoform bound all CIRs tested. Isoforms expressed from the phiC31 repressor gene, like those which are expressed from many eukaryotic transcription factor genes, apparently have different binding specificities.

  10. Dengue virus specific dual HLA binding T cell epitopes induce CD8+ T cell responses in seropositive individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comber, Joseph D; Karabudak, Aykan; Huang, Xiaofang; Piazza, Paolo A; Marques, Ernesto T A; Philip, Ramila

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus infects an estimated 300 million people each year and even more are at risk of becoming infected as the virus continues to spread into new areas. Despite the increase in viral prevalence, no anti-viral medications or vaccines are approved for treating or preventing infection. CD8+ T cell responses play a major role in viral clearance. Therefore, effective vaccines that induce a broad, multi-functional T cell response with substantial cross-reactivity between all virus serotypes can have major impacts on reducing infection rates and infection related complications. Here, we took an immunoproteomic approach to identify novel MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes presented by dengue virus infected cells, representing the natural and authentic targets of the T cell response. Using this approach we identified 4 novel MHC-I restricted epitopes: 2 with the binding motif for HLA-A24 molecules and 2 with both HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 binding motifs. These peptides were able to activate CD8+ T cell responses in both healthy, seronegative individuals and in seropositive individuals who have previously been infected with dengue virus. Importantly, the dual binding epitopes activated pre-existing T cell precursors in PBMCs obtained from both HLA-A2+ and HLA-A24+ seropositive individuals. Together, the data indicate that these epitopes are immunologically relevant T cell activating peptides presented on infected cells during a natural infection and therefore may serve as candidate antigens for the development of effective multi-serotype specific dengue virus vaccines.

  11. Cardiac-specific deletion of the microtubule-binding protein CENP-F causes dilated cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Dees

    2012-07-01

    CENP-F is a large multifunctional protein with demonstrated regulatory roles in cell proliferation, vesicular transport and cell shape through its association with the microtubule (MT network. Until now, analysis of CENP-F has been limited to in vitro analysis. Here, using a Cre-loxP system, we report the in vivo disruption of CENP-F gene function in murine cardiomyocytes, a cell type displaying high levels of CENP-F expression. Loss of CENP-F function in developing myocytes leads to decreased cell division, blunting of trabeculation and an initially smaller, thin-walled heart. Still, embryos are born at predicted mendelian ratios on an outbred background. After birth, hearts lacking CENP-F display disruption of their intercalated discs and loss of MT integrity particularly at the costamere; these two structures are essential for cell coupling/electrical conduction and force transduction in the heart. Inhibition of myocyte proliferation and cell coupling as well as loss of MT maintenance is consistent with previous reports of generalized CENP-F function in isolated cells. One hundred percent of these animals develop progressive dilated cardiomyopathy with heart block and scarring, and there is a 20% mortality rate. Importantly, although it has long been postulated that the MT cytoskeleton plays a role in the development of heart disease, this study is the first to reveal a direct genetic link between disruption of this network and cardiomyopathy. Finally, this study has broad implications for development and disease because CENP-F loss of function affects a diverse array of cell-type-specific activities in other organs.

  12. Conformational Analysis of the Streptococcus pneumoniae Hyaluronate Lyase and Characterization of Its Hyaluronan-specific Carbohydrate-binding Module*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suits, Michael D. L.; Pluvinage, Benjamin; Law, Adrienne; Liu, Yan; Palma, Angelina S.; Chai, Wengang; Feizi, Ten; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2014-01-01

    For a subset of pathogenic microorganisms, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, the recognition and degradation of host hyaluronan contributes to bacterial spreading through the extracellular matrix and enhancing access to host cell surfaces. The hyaluronate lyase (Hyl) presented on the surface of S. pneumoniae performs this role. Using glycan microarray screening, affinity electrophoresis, and isothermal titration calorimetry we show that the N-terminal module of Hyl is a hyaluronan-specific carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) and the founding member of CBM family 70. The 1.2 Å resolution x-ray crystal structure of CBM70 revealed it to have a β-sandwich fold, similar to other CBMs. The electrostatic properties of the binding site, which was identified by site-directed mutagenesis, are distinct from other CBMs and complementary to its acidic ligand, hyaluronan. Dynamic light scattering and solution small angle x-ray scattering revealed the full-length Hyl protein to exist as a monomer/dimer mixture in solution. Through a detailed analysis of the small angle x-ray scattering data, we report the pseudoatomic solution structures of the monomer and dimer forms of the full-length multimodular Hyl. PMID:25100731

  13. Interaction of gold and silver nanoparticles with human plasma: Analysis of protein corona reveals specific binding patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wenjia; Wang, Qingsong; Li, Lumeng; Hu, Zhiyuan; Chen, Jiankui; Fang, Qiaojun

    2017-04-01

    Determining how nanomaterials interact with plasma will assist in understanding their effects on the biological system. This work presents a systematic study of the protein corona formed from human plasma on 20nm silver and gold nanoparticles with three different surface modifications, including positive and negative surface charges. The results show that all nanoparticles, even those with positive surface modifications, acquire negative charges after interacting with plasma. Approximately 300 proteins are identified on the coronas, while 99 are commonly found on each nanomaterial. The 20 most abundant proteins account for over 80% of the total proteins abundance. Remarkably, the surface charge and core of the nanoparticles, as well as the isoelectric point of the plasma proteins, are found to play significant roles in determining the nanoparticle coronas. Albumin and globulins are present at levels of less than 2% on these nanoparticle coronas. Fibrinogen, which presents in the plasma but not in the serum, preferably binds to negatively charged gold nanoparticles. These observations demonstrate the specific plasma protein binding pattern of silver and gold nanoparticles, as well as the importance of the surface charge and core in determining the protein corona compositions. The potential downstream biological impacts of the corona proteins were also investigated.

  14. Novel Peptide with Specific Calcium-Binding Capacity from Schizochytrium sp. Protein Hydrolysates and Calcium Bioavailability in Caco-2 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xixi; Lin, Jiaping; Wang, Shaoyun

    2016-01-01

    Peptide-calcium can probably be a suitable supplement to improve calcium absorption in the human body. In this study, a specific peptide Phe-Tyr (FY) with calcium-binding capacity was purified from Schizochytrium sp. protein hydrolysates through gel filtration chromatography and reversed phase HPLC. The calcium-binding capacity of FY reached 128.77 ± 2.57 μg/mg. Results of ultraviolet spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy showed that carboxyl groups, amino groups, and amido groups were the major chelating sites. FY-Ca exhibited excellent thermal stability and solubility, which were beneficial to be absorbed and transported in the basic intestinal tract of the human body. Moreover, the calcium bioavailability in Caco-2 cells showed that FY-Ca could enhance calcium uptake efficiency by more than three times when compared with CaCl2, and protect calcium ions against dietary inhibitors, such as tannic acid, oxalate, phytate, and Zn2+. Our findings further the progress of algae-based peptide-calcium, suggesting that FY-Ca has the potential to be developed as functionally nutraceutical additives. PMID:28036002

  15. Novel Peptide with Specific Calcium-Binding Capacity from Schizochytrium sp. Protein Hydrolysates and Calcium Bioavailability in Caco-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xixi Cai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Peptide-calcium can probably be a suitable supplement to improve calcium absorption in the human body. In this study, a specific peptide Phe-Tyr (FY with calcium-binding capacity was purified from Schizochytrium sp. protein hydrolysates through gel filtration chromatography and reversed phase HPLC. The calcium-binding capacity of FY reached 128.77 ± 2.57 μg/mg. Results of ultraviolet spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy showed that carboxyl groups, amino groups, and amido groups were the major chelating sites. FY-Ca exhibited excellent thermal stability and solubility, which were beneficial to be absorbed and transported in the basic intestinal tract of the human body. Moreover, the calcium bioavailability in Caco-2 cells showed that FY-Ca could enhance calcium uptake efficiency by more than three times when compared with CaCl2, and protect calcium ions against dietary inhibitors, such as tannic acid, oxalate, phytate, and Zn2+. Our findings further the progress of algae-based peptide-calcium, suggesting that FY-Ca has the potential to be developed as functionally nutraceutical additives.

  16. Specific binding of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin fragment to Claudin-b and modulation of zebrafish epidermal barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Ni, Chen; Yang, Zhenguo; Piontek, Anna; Chen, Huapu; Wang, Sijie; Fan, Yiming; Qin, Zhihai; Piontek, Joerg

    2015-08-01

    Claudins (Cldn) are the major components of tight junctions (TJs) sealing the paracellular cleft in tissue barriers of various organs. Zebrafish Cldnb, the homolog of mammalian Cldn4, is expressed at epithelial cell-cell contacts and is important for regulating epidermal permeability. The bacterial toxin Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) has been shown to bind to a subset of mammalian Cldns. In this study, we used the Cldn-binding C-terminal domain of CPE (194-319 amino acids, cCPE 194-319 ) to investigate its functional role in modulating zebrafish larval epidermal barriers. In vitro analyses show that cCPE 194-319 removed Cldn4 from epithelial cells and disrupted the monolayer tightness, which could be rescued by the removal of cCPE 194-319. Incubation of zebrafish larvae with cCPE 194-319 removed Cldnb specifically from the epidermal cell membrane. Dye diffusion analysis with 4-kDa fluorescent dextran indicated that the permeability of the epidermal barrier increased due to cCPE 194-319 incubation. Electron microscopic investigation revealed reversible loss of TJ integrity by Cldnb removal. Collectively, these results suggest that cCPE 194-319 could be used as a Cldnb modulator to transiently open the epidermal barrier in zebrafish. In addition, zebrafish might be used as an in vivo system to investigate the capability of cCPE to enhance drug delivery across tissue barriers.

  17. Kinetic and physiological effects of alterations in homologous isocitrate-binding sites of yeast NAD(+)-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, A P; McCammon, M T; McAlister-Henn, L

    2001-11-27

    Yeast NAD(+)-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase is an allosterically regulated octameric enzyme composed of four each of two homologous but nonidentical subunits designated IDH1 and IDH2. Models based on the crystallographic structure of Escherichia coli isocitrate dehydrogenase suggest that both yeast subunits contain isocitrate-binding sites. Identities in nine residue positions are predicted for the IDH2 site whereas four of the nine positions differ between the IDH1 and bacterial enzyme sites. Thus, we speculate that the IDH2 site is catalytic and that the IDH1 site may bind but not catalytically alter isocitrate. This was examined by kinetic analyses of enzymes with independent and concerted replacement of residues in each yeast IDH subunit site with the residues that differ in the other subunit site. Mutant enzymes were expressed in a yeast strain containing disrupted IDH1 and IDH2 loci and affinity-purified for kinetic analyses. The primary effects of various residue replacements in IDH2 were reductions of 30->300-fold in V(max) values, consistent with the catalytic function of this subunit. In contrast, replacement of all four residues in IDH1 produced a 17-fold reduction in V(max) under the same assay conditions, suggesting that the IDH1 site is not the primary catalytic site. However, single or multiple residue replacements in IDH1 uniformly increased half-saturation concentrations for isocitrate, implying that isocitrate can be bound at this site. Both subunits appear to contribute to cooperativity with respect to isocitrate, but AMP activation is lost only with residue replacements in IDH1. Overall, results are consistent with isocitrate binding by IDH2 for catalysis and with isocitrate binding by IDH1 being a prerequisite for allosteric activation by AMP. The effects of residue substitutions on enzyme function in vivo were assessed by analysis of various growth phenotypes. Results indicate a positive correlation between the level of IDH catalytic

  18. DOF-binding sites additively contribute to guard cell-specificity of AtMYB60 promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cominelli Eleonora

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously demonstrated that the Arabidopsis thaliana AtMYB60 protein is an R2R3MYB transcription factor required for stomatal opening. AtMYB60 is specifically expressed in guard cells and down-regulated at the transcriptional levels by the phytohormone ABA. Results To investigate the molecular mechanisms governing AtMYB60 expression, its promoter was dissected through deletion and mutagenesis analyses. By studying different versions of AtMYB60 promoter::GUS reporter fusions in transgenic plants we were able to demonstrate a modular organization for the AtMYB60 promoter. Particularly we defined: a minimal promoter sufficient to confer guard cell-specific activity to the reporter gene; the distinct roles of different DOF-binding sites organised in a cluster in the minimal promoter in determining guard cell-specific expression; the promoter regions responsible for the enhancement of activity in guard cells; a promoter region responsible for the negative transcriptional regulation by ABA. Moreover from the analysis of single and multiple mutants we could rule out the involvement of a group of DOF proteins, known as CDFs, already characterised for their involvement in flowering time, in the regulation of AtMYB60 expression. Conclusions These findings shed light on the regulation of gene expression in guard cells and provide new promoter modules as useful tools for manipulating gene expression in guard cells, both for physiological studies and future biotechnological applications.

  19. In Vivo Selection of Phage Sequences and Characterization of Peptide-specific Binding to Breast Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Wang; Ruifang Niu; Lin Zhang; Hongkai Zhang; Xiyin Wei; Yi Yang; Shiwu Zhang; Jing Wu; Min Wu; Youjia Cao

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To screen specific polypeptide target binding to breast cancer xenografts in vivo from a phage-displayed peptide library in order to provide peptide sequences for breast cancer tumor-targeting diagnosis and therapy.METHODS A mouse model for carrying breast cancer xenografts was established using Tientsin Albinao Ⅱ mice (TAII). A 12-peptide library was biopanned through 4 rounds.Phages were recovered and titrated from tumor xenografts and control tissue (liver). The distribution of phages was detected by immunohistochemical staining.RESULTS Phage homing to breast cancer was enriched through 4 rounds of biopanning, being 14-fold of that recovered from liver tissue. A peptide sequence, ASANPFPTKALL was characterized by randomly picked-up clones which appeared most frequently.Immunohistochemical staining revealed phage localization in cancer xenografts 40 min after injection of the enriched phages.When a specific phage was tested individually, the phage reclaimed from breast cancer xenografts was 14 times as those from control tissues.CONCLUSION Tumor-specific homing peptides may provide an effective tool for breast cancer target therapy. The in vivo phage display selection technique employed in this study was feasible and applicable to screening peptides that home to.breast cells.

  20. Binding of a candidate splice regulator to a calcitonin-specific splice enhancer regulates calcitonin/CGRP pre-mRNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Timothy P; Tran, Quincy; Roesser, James R

    2003-01-27

    The calcitonin/calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) pre-mRNA is alternatively processed in a tissue-specific manner leading to the production of calcitonin mRNA in thyroid C cells and CGRP mRNA in neurons. A candidate calcitonin/CGRP splice regulator (CSR) isolated from rat brain was shown to inhibit calcitonin-specific splicing in vitro. CSR specifically binds to two regions in the calcitonin-specific exon 4 RNA previously demonstrated to function as a bipartate exonic splice enhancer (ESE). The two regions, A and B element, are necessary for inclusion of exon 4 into calcitonin mRNA. A novel RNA footprinting method based on the UV cross-linking assay was used to define the site of interaction between CSR and B element RNA. Base changes at the CSR binding site prevented CSR binding to B element RNA and CSR was unable to inhibit in vitro splicing of pre-mRNAs containing the mutated CSR binding site. When expressed in cells that normally produce predominantly CGRP mRNA, a calcitonin/CGRP gene containing the mutated CSR binding site expressed predominantly calcitonin mRNA. These observations demonstrate that CSR binding to the calcitonin-specific ESE regulates calcitonin/CGRP pre-mRNA splicing.

  1. Enhanced selectivity of a molecularly imprinted polymer toward the target molecule via esterification of non-specific binding sites with diazomethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenazi, Noof A; Lai, Edward P C; Manthorpe, Jeffrey M

    2014-12-01

    Diazomethane (CH(2)N(2)) was used to methylate the non-specific binding sites after molecularly imprinted polymer particles were prepared using methacrylic acid as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linker and bisphenol A (BPA) as the template. After diazomethane treatment and subsequent removal of BPA by triethylamine, the treated molecularly imprinted polymer (TMIP) particles were tested for binding selectivity toward BPA and other organic compounds by capillary electrophoresis with ultraviolet detection. Even in the presence of compounds that were positively charged, neutral or negatively charged in the background electrolyte, BPA was selectively bound with the highest efficiency. A significant decrease in the affinity for metformin (MF, a positively charged compound), along with (13) C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and electrophoretic mobility data, provided strong evidence for the elimination of non-specific -COOH binding sites in the TMIP particles. Only 8% of MF and 16% of diclofenac sodium salt (a negatively charged compound) remained as non-specific bindings because of hydrophobic interactions. Further comparison with poly(methyl methacrylate) revealed the true merits of the TMIP, which exhibited minimal non-specific bindings while preserving a high level of specific binding owing to molecular recognition.

  2. Evolutionary and structural perspectives of plant cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channels

    KAUST Repository

    Zelman, Alice K.

    2012-05-29

    Ligand-gated cation channels are a frequent component of signaling cascades in eukaryotes. Eukaryotes contain numerous diverse gene families encoding ion channels, some of which are shared and some of which are unique to particular kingdoms. Among the many different types are cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGCs). CNGCs are cation channels with varying degrees of ion conduction selectivity. They are implicated in numerous signaling pathways and permit diffusion of divalent and monovalent cations, including Ca2+ and K+. CNGCs are present in both plant and animal cells, typically in the plasma membrane; recent studies have also documented their presence in prokaryotes. All eukaryote CNGC polypeptides have a cyclic nucleotide-binding domain and a calmodulin binding domain as well as a six transmembrane/one pore tertiary structure. This review summarizes existing knowledge about the functional domains present in these cation-conducting channels, and considers the evidence indicating that plant and animal CNGCs evolved separately. Additionally, an amino acid motif that is only found in the phosphate binding cassette and hinge regions of plant CNGCs, and is present in all experimentally confirmed CNGCs but no other channels was identified. This CNGC-specific amino acid motif provides an additional diagnostic tool to identify plant CNGCs, and can increase confidence in the annotation of open reading frames in newly sequenced genomes as putative CNGCs. Conversely, the absence of the motif in some plant sequences currently identified as probable CNGCs may suggest that they are misannotated or protein fragments. 2012 Zelman, Dawe, Gehring and Berkowitz.

  3. Structural basis for the ligand-binding specificity of fatty acid-binding proteins (pFABP4 and pFABP5) in gentoo penguin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Kim, Jung Eun; Do, Hackwon; Kim, Ryeo-Ok; Lee, Sung Gu; Park, Hyun Ho; Chang, Jeong Ho; Yim, Joung Han; Park, Hyun; Kim, Il-Chan; Lee, Jun Hyuck

    2015-09-11

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are involved in transporting hydrophobic fatty acids between various aqueous compartments of the cell by directly binding ligands inside their β-barrel cavities. Here, we report the crystal structures of ligand-unbound pFABP4, linoleate-bound pFABP4, and palmitate-bound pFABP5, obtained from gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua), at a resolution of 2.1 Å, 2.2 Å, and 2.3 Å, respectively. The pFABP4 and pFABP5 proteins have a canonical β-barrel structure with two short α-helices that form a cap region and fatty acid ligand binding sites in the hydrophobic cavity within the β-barrel structure. Linoleate-bound pFABP4 and palmitate-bound pFABP5 possess different ligand-binding modes and a unique ligand-binding pocket due to several sequence dissimilarities (A76/L78, T30/M32, underlining indicates pFABP4 residues) between the two proteins. Structural comparison revealed significantly different conformational changes in the β3-β4 loop region (residues 57-62) as well as the flipped Phe60 residue of pFABP5 than that in pFABP4 (the corresponding residue is Phe58). A ligand-binding study using fluorophore displacement assays shows that pFABP4 has a relatively strong affinity for linoleate as compared to pFABP5. In contrast, pFABP5 exhibits higher affinity for palmitate than that for pFABP4. In conclusion, our high-resolution structures and ligand-binding studies provide useful insights into the ligand-binding preferences of pFABPs based on key protein-ligand interactions.

  4. Collagen binding specificity of the discoidin domain receptors: Binding sites on collagens II and III and molecular determinants for collagen IV recognition by DDR1

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Huifang; Raynal, Nicolas; Stathopoulos, Stavros; Myllyharju, Johanna; Farndale, Richard W.; Leitinger, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2 are cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by triple-helical collagen. While normal DDR signalling regulates fundamental cellular processes, aberrant DDR signalling is associated with several human diseases. We previously identified GVMGFO (O is hydroxyproline) as a major DDR2 binding site in collagens I–III, and located two additional DDR2 binding sites in collagen II. Here we extend these studies to the homologous DDR1 and the...

  5. Specificity and versatility of substrate binding sites in four catalytic domains of human N-terminal acetyltransferases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Grauffel

    Full Text Available Nt-acetylation is among the most common protein modifications in eukaryotes. Although thought for a long time to protect proteins from degradation, the role of Nt-acetylation is still debated. It is catalyzed by enzymes called N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs. In eukaryotes, several NATs, composed of at least one catalytic domain, target different substrates based on their N-terminal sequences. In order to better understand the substrate specificity of human NATs, we investigated in silico the enzyme-substrate interactions in four catalytic subunits of human NATs (Naa10p, Naa20p, Naa30p and Naa50p. To date hNaa50p is the only human subunit for which X-ray structures are available. We used the structure of the ternary hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG complex and a structural model of hNaa10p as a starting point for multiple molecular dynamics simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/substrate (substrate=MLG, EEE, MKG, hNaa10p/AcCoA/substrate (substrate=MLG, EEE. Nine alanine point-mutants of the hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG complex were also simulated. Homology models of hNaa20p and hNaa30p were built and compared to hNaa50p and hNaa10p. The simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG reproduce the interactions revealed by the X-ray data. We observed strong hydrogen bonds between MLG and tyrosines 31, 138 and 139. Yet the tyrosines interacting with the substrate's backbone suggest that their role in specificity is limited. This is confirmed by the simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/EEE and hNaa10p/AcCoA/MLG, where these hydrogen bonds are still observed. Moreover these tyrosines are all conserved in hNaa20p and hNaa30p. Other amino acids tune the specificity of the S1' sites that is different for hNaa10p (acidic, hNaa20p (hydrophobic/basic, hNaa30p (basic and hNaa50p (hydrophobic. We also observe dynamic correlation between the ligand binding site and helix [Formula: see text] that tightens under substrate binding. Finally, by comparing the four structures we propose maps of the peptide

  6. Lipopolysaccharide Neutralization by Cationic-Amphiphilic Polymers through Pseudoaggregate Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Haldar, Jayanta

    2016-03-14

    Synthetic polymers incorporating the cationic charge and hydrophobicity to mimic the function of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been developed. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind to bacterial membranes that generally contain negatively charged phospholipids and cause membrane disintegration resulting in cell death; however, cationic-amphiphilic antibacterial polymers with endotoxin neutralization properties, to the best of our knowledge, have not been reported. Bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cause sepsis that is responsible for a great amount of mortality worldwide. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers can also bind to negatively charged and hydrophobic LPS and cause detoxification. Hence, we envisaged that cationic-amphiphilic polymers can have both antibacterial as well as LPS binding properties. Here we report synthetic amphiphilic polymers with both antibacterial as well as endotoxin neutralizing properties. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines in human monocytes caused by LPS stimulation were inhibited by >80% when coincubated with these polymers. These reductions were found to be dependent on concentration and, more importantly, on the side-chain chemical structure due to variations in the hydrophobicity profiles of these polymers. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind and cause LPS neutralization and detoxification. Investigations of polymer interaction with LPS using fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that these polymers bind but neither dissociate nor promote LPS aggregation. We show that polymer binding to LPS leads to sort of a pseudoaggregate formation resulting in LPS neutralization/detoxification. These findings provide an unusual mechanism of LPS neutralization using novel synthetic cationic-amphiphilic polymers.

  7. Structure and cell-specific expression of a cloned human retinol binding protein gene: the 5'-flanking region contains hepatoma specific transcriptional signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Onofrio, C; Colantuoni, V; Cortese, R

    1985-08-01

    Human plasma retinol binding protein (RBP) is coded by a single gene and is specifically synthesized in the liver. We have characterized a lambda clone, from a human DNA library, carrying the gene coding for plasma RBP. Southern blot analysis and DNA sequencing show that the gene is composed of six exons and five introns. Primer elongation and S1 mapping experiments allowed the definition of the initiation of transcription and the identification of the putative promoter. The 5'-flanking region of the RBP gene was fused upstream to the coding sequence of the bacterial enzyme chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT): the chimeric gene was introduced, by calcium phosphate precipitation, into the human hepatoma cell line Hep G2 and into HeLa cells. Efficient expression of CAT was obtained only in Hep G2. Primer elongation analysis of the RNA extracted from transfected Hep G2 showed that initiation of transcription of the transfected chimeric gene occurs at a position identical to that of the natural gene. Transcriptional analysis of Bal31 deletions from the 3' end of the RBP 5'-flanking DNA allowed the identification of the RBP gene promoter.

  8. Cold-inducible RNA binding protein (CIRP, a novel XTcf-3 specific target gene regulates neural development in Xenopus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wedlich Doris

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As nuclear mediators of wnt/β-catenin signaling, Lef/Tcf transcription factors play important roles in development and disease. Although it is well established, that the four vertebrate Lef/Tcfs have unique functional properties, most studies unite Lef-1, Tcf-1, Tcf-3 and Tcf-4 and reduce their function to uniformly transduce wnt/β-catenin signaling for activating wnt target genes. In order to discriminate target genes regulated by XTcf-3 from those regulated by XTcf-4 or Lef/Tcfs in general, we performed a subtractive screen, using neuralized Xenopus animal cap explants. Results We identified cold-inducible RNA binding protein (CIRP as novel XTcf-3 specific target gene. Furthermore, we show that knockdown of XTcf-3 by injection of an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide results in a general broadening of the anterior neural tissue. Depletion of XCIRP by antisense morpholino oligonucleotide injection leads to a reduced stability of mRNA and an enlargement of the anterior neural plate similar to the depletion of XTcf-3. Conclusion Distinct steps in neural development are differentially regulated by individual Lef/Tcfs. For proper development of the anterior brain XTcf-3 and the Tcf-subtype specific target XCIRP appear indispensable. Thus, regulation of anterior neural development, at least in part, depends on mRNA stabilization by the novel XTcf-3 target gene XCIRP.

  9. Advancements in Anion Exchange Membrane Cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturgeon, Matthew R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Long, Hai [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Park, Andrew M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pivovar, Bryan S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Anion-exchange membrane fuel cells (AME-FCs) are of increasingly popular interest as they enable the use of non-Pt fuel cell catalysts, the primary cost limitation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Benzyltrimethyl ammonium (BTMA) is the standard cation that has historically been utilized as the hydroxide conductor in AEMs. Herein we approach AEMs from two directions. First and foremost we study the stability of several different cations in a hydroxide solution at elevated temperatures. We specifically targeted BTMA and methoxy and nitro substituted BTMA. We've also studied the effects of adding an akyl spacer units between the ammonium cation and the phenyl group. In the second approach we use computational studies to predict stable ammonium cations, which are then synthesized and tested for stability. Our unique method to study cation stability in caustic conditions at elevated temperatures utilizes Teflon Parr reactors suitable for use under various temperatures and cation concentrations. NMR analysis was used to determine remaining cation concentrations at specific time points with GCMS analysis verifying product distribution. We then compare the experimental results with calculated modeling stabilities. Our studies show that the electron donating methoxy groups slightly increase stability (compared to that of BTMA), while the electron withdrawing nitro groups greatly decrease stability in base. These results give insight into possible linking strategies to be employed when tethering a BTMA like ammonium cation to a polymeric backbone; thus synthesizing an anion exchange membrane.

  10. An external loop region of domain III of dengue virus type 2 envelope protein is involved in serotype-specific binding to mosquito but not mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jan-Jong; Hsieh, Meng-Ti; Young, Ming-Jer; Kao, Chuan-Liang; King, Chwan-Chuen; Chang, Wen

    2004-01-01

    Dengue virus (DV) is a flavivirus and infects mammalian cells through mosquito vectors. This study investigates the roles of domain III of DV type 2 envelope protein (EIII) in DV binding to the host cell. Recombinant EIII interferes with DV infection to BHK21 and C6/36 cells by blocking dengue virion adsorption to these cells. Inhibition of EIII on BHK21 cells was broad with no serotype specificity; however, inhibition of EIII on C6/36 cells was relatively serotype specific. Soluble heparin completely blocks binding of EIII to BHK21 cells, suggesting that domain III binds mainly to cell surface heparan sulfates. This suggestion is supported by the observation that EIII binds very weakly to gro2C and sog9 mutant mammalian cell lines that lack heparan sulfate. In contrast, heparin does not block binding of EIII to mosquito cells. Furthermore, a synthetic peptide that includes amino acids (aa) 380 to 389 of EIII, IGVEPGQLKL, inhibits binding of EIII to C6/36 but not BHK21 cells. This peptide corresponds to a lateral loop region on domain III of E protein, indicating a possible role of this loop in binding to mosquito cells. In summary, these results suggest that EIII plays an important role in binding of DV type 2 to host cells. In addition, EIII interacts with heparan sulfates when binding to BHK21 cells, and a loop region containing aa 380 to 389 of EIII may participate in DV type 2 binding to C6/36 cells.

  11. Connecting Effective Immune Response, Fluorescent Granzyme B-like Peptide, Specific Peptide Binding Patterns, Patients with Cancer and Viral Infection, in Remission, Clinical Significance, and Liquid Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wai Chun Jennifer; Luther, Donald Gene

    2016-11-01

    Functional cytotoxic-T-lymphocytes (CTL) with granzyme B play an important role in an effective immune response to tumor growth and infection progression. Tumor cells and platelets in peripheral whole blood smears of cancer patients have shown the presence of innate binding targets for GP1R, a fluorescent synthetic Granzyme B-like peptide. It is not known if similar GP1R-binding targets and specific binding patterns are detectable in peripheral blood of patients with viral infection. It is also not known if a specific binding pattern may be associated with an effective immune response to indicate a favorable prognosis. We reviewed the GP1R-binding patterns in the peripheral blood smears of 5 patients in remission at the time of sampling (3 with cancer and 2 with flu-like symptoms) and a negative control. We show with fluoroscopic images that there are: 1) fluorescent GP1R-binding targets mostly in the cytoplasmic areas of nucleated cells in patients with breast and lung cancer who have longer survival, 2) intense fluorescent deposits mostly in the nuclear areas of segmented neutrophils in patients recovered from severe to mild flu-like symptoms, 3) discernible fluorescent deposits in the cytoplasmic areas of small lymphocyte-like elements and overall intense fluorescent stain in large cells in the patient with advanced pancreatic cancer who had shorter survival, 4) GP1R-binding targets in numerous platelet-like elements in all 5 patients. The control sample did not show similar binding patterns. The potential association between specific GP1R-binding patterns in peripheral blood samples and prognostic significance, and its use as liquid biopsy are discussed.

  12. Stream specificity and asymmetries in feature binding and content-addressable access in visual encoding and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Duong L; Tripathy, Srimant P; Bedell, Harold E; Ögmen, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Human memory is content addressable-i.e., contents of the memory can be accessed using partial information about the bound features of a stored item. In this study, we used a cross-feature cuing technique to examine how the human visual system encodes, binds, and retains information about multiple stimulus features within a set of moving objects. We sought to characterize the roles of three different features (position, color, and direction of motion, the latter two of which are processed preferentially within the ventral and dorsal visual streams, respectively) in the construction and maintenance of object representations. We investigated the extent to which these features are bound together across the following processing stages: during stimulus encoding, sensory (iconic) memory, and visual short-term memory. Whereas all features examined here can serve as cues for addressing content, their effectiveness shows asymmetries and varies according to cue-report pairings and the stage of information processing and storage. Position-based indexing theories predict that position should be more effective as a cue compared to other features. While we found a privileged role for position as a cue at the stimulus-encoding stage, position was not the privileged cue at the sensory and visual short-term memory stages. Instead, the pattern that emerged from our findings is one that mirrors the parallel processing streams in the visual system. This stream-specific binding and cuing effectiveness manifests itself in all three stages of information processing examined here. Finally, we find that the Leaky Flask model proposed in our previous study is applicable to all three features.

  13. Determinants of binding affinity and specificity for the interaction of TEM-1 and SME-1 beta-lactamase with beta-lactamase inhibitory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Palzkill, Timothy

    2003-11-14

    The hydrolysis of beta-lactam antibiotics by class A beta-lactamases is a common cause of bacterial resistance to these agents. The beta-lactamase inhibitory protein (BLIP) is able to bind and inhibit several class A beta-lactamases, including TEM-1 beta-lactamase and SME-1 beta-lactamase. Although the TEM-1 and SME-1 enzymes share 33% amino acid sequence identity and a similar fold, they differ substantially in surface electrostatic properties and the conformation of a loop-helix region that BLIP binds. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis was performed to identify the residues on BLIP that contribute to its binding affinity for each of these enzymes. The results indicate that the sequence requirements for binding are similar for both enzymes with most of the binding free energy provided by two patches of aromatic residues on the surface of BLIP. Polar residues such as several serines in the interface do not make significant contributions to affinity for either enzyme. In addition, the specificity of binding is significantly altered by mutation of two charged residues, Glu73 and Lys74, that are buried in the structure of the TEM-1.BLIP complex as well as by residues located on two loops that insert into the active site pocket. Based on the results, a E73A/Y50A double mutant was constructed that exhibited a 220,000-fold change in binding specificity for the TEM-1 versus SME-1 enzymes.

  14. Structural insights into parasite eIF4E binding specificity for m7G and m2,2,7G mRNA caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weizhi; Zhao, Rui; McFarland, Craig; Kieft, Jeffrey; Niedzwiecka, Anna; Jankowska-Anyszka, Marzena; Stepinski, Janusz; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Jones, David N M; Davis, Richard E

    2009-11-06

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E recognizes the mRNA cap, a key step in translation initiation. Here we have characterized eIF4E from the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. Schistosome mRNAs have either the typical monomethylguanosine (m(7)G) or a trimethylguanosine (m(2,2,7)G) cap derived from spliced leader trans-splicing. Quantitative fluorescence titration analyses demonstrated that schistosome eIF4E has similar binding specificity for both caps. We present the first crystal structure of an eIF4E with similar binding specificity for m(7)G and m(2,2,7)G caps. The eIF4E.m(7)GpppG structure demonstrates that the schistosome protein binds monomethyl cap in a manner similar to that of single specificity eIF4Es and exhibits a structure similar to other known eIF4Es. The structure suggests an alternate orientation of a conserved, key Glu-90 in the cap-binding pocket that may contribute to dual binding specificity and a position for mRNA bound to eIF4E consistent with biochemical data. Comparison of NMR chemical shift perturbations in schistosome eIF4E on binding m(7)GpppG and m(2,2,7)GpppG identified key differences between the two complexes. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrated significant thermodynamics differences for the binding process with the two caps (m(7)G versus m(2,2,7)G). Overall the NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry data suggest the importance of intrinsic conformational flexibility in the schistosome eIF4E that enables binding to m(2,2,7)G cap.

  15. Mass spectrometric identification of proteins that interact through specific domains of the poly(A) binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Roy; Denis, Clyde L; Zhang, Chongxu; Nielsen, Maria E O; Chiang, Yueh-Chin; Kierkegaard, Morten; Wang, Xin; Lee, Darren J; Andersen, Jens S; Yao, Gang

    2012-09-01

    Poly(A) binding protein (PAB1) is involved in a number of RNA metabolic functions in eukaryotic cells and correspondingly is suggested to associate with a number of proteins. We have used mass spectrometric analysis to identify 55 non-ribosomal proteins that specifically interact with PAB1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because many of these factors may associate only indirectly with PAB1 by being components of the PAB1-mRNP structure, we additionally conducted mass spectrometric analyses on seven metabolically defined PAB1 deletion derivatives to delimit the interactions between these proteins and PAB1. These latter analyses identified 13 proteins whose associations with PAB1 were reduced by deleting one or another of PAB1's defined domains. Included in this list of 13 proteins were the translation initiation factors eIF4G1 and eIF4G2, translation termination factor eRF3, and PBP2, all of whose previously known direct interactions with specific PAB1 domains were either confirmed, delimited, or extended. The remaining nine proteins that interacted through a specific PAB1 domain were CBF5, SLF1, UPF1, CBC1, SSD1, NOP77, yGR250c, NAB6, and GBP2. In further study, UPF1, involved in nonsense-mediated decay, was confirmed to interact with PAB1 through the RRM1 domain. We additionally established that while the RRM1 domain of PAB1 was required for UPF1-induced acceleration of deadenylation during nonsense-mediated decay, it was not required for the more critical step of acceleration of mRNA decapping. These results begin to identify the proteins most likely to interact with PAB1 and the domains of PAB1 through which these contacts are made.

  16. Relationship between alpha-1 receptors and cations in rat liver plasma membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of cations on binding of (/sup 3/H)-prazosin (PRZ), an alpha-1 specific antagonist, to alpha receptor sites in rat liver plasma membranes was examined. All cations tested were able to produce dose-dependent shifts to lower affinity binding sites for PRZ. The maximum number of binding sites was also observed to be altered. Inclusion of cations resulted in a slower observed rate constant for association as well as a delay in the dissociation of specifically bound PRZ following the addition of phentolamine. In contrast, the ability of (-)-norepinephrine to displace PRZ was enhanced by the addition of cations. The influence of alpha-1 receptor stimulation on Na/sup +//K/sup +/-ATPase activity in rat liver was examined by two methods - rat liver plasma membrane Na/sup +//K/sup +/-ATPase activity following liver perfusion in situ and /sup 86/Tb uptake in rat liver slices. The activity of the Na/sup +/ pump was found to be biphasic following exposure to phenylephrine (PE), an alpha-1 agonist. Stimulation (35%) was present over the first two minutes, while activity was inhibited over the interval of 5 to 10 minutes of continued PE exposure. Both phases were blocked by prazosin. The influence of DAG and protein kinase C (PKC) in alpha-1 receptor modulation of the Na/sup +/ pump was studied by employing 4-beta-phorbol (PMA), a phorbol ester which activates PKC. Perfusion of livers with PMA in situ or incubation with slices yielded inhibition of ATPase activity in membranes and /sup 86/Rb uptake in that was qualitatively and quantitatively similar to PE. These results suggest cations may influence receptor function in vivo and in vitro and the inhibitory effects of PE on the sodium pump may be mediated through PKC.

  17. B- and C-RAF display essential differences in their binding to Ras: the isotype-specific N terminus of B-RAF facilitates Ras binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Andreas; Hekman, Mirko; Kuhlmann, Jürgen; Rubio, Ignacio; Wiese, Stefan; Rapp, Ulf R

    2007-09-01

    Recruitment of RAF kinases to the plasma membrane was initially proposed to be mediated by Ras proteins via interaction with the RAF Ras binding domain (RBD). Data reporting that RAF kinases possess high affinities for particular membrane lipids support a new model in which Ras-RAF interactions may be spatially restricted to the plane of the membrane. Although the coupling features of Ras binding to the isolated RAF RBD were investigated in great detail, little is known about the interactions of the processed Ras with the functional and full-length RAF kinases. Here we present a quantitative analysis of the binding properties of farnesylated and nonfarnesylated H-Ras to both full-length B- and C-RAF in the presence and absence of lipid environment. Although isolated RBD fragments associate with high affinity to both farnesylated and nonfarnesylated H-Ras, the full-length RAF kinases revealed fundamental differences with respect to Ras binding. In contrast to C-RAF that requires farnesylated H-Ras, cytosolic B-RAF associates effectively and with significantly higher affinity with both farnesylated and nonfarnesylated H-Ras. To investigate the potential farnesyl binding site(s) we prepared several N-terminal fragments of C-RAF and found that in the presence of cysteine-rich domain only the farnesylated form of H-Ras binds with high association rates. The extreme N terminus of B-RAF turned out to be responsible for the facilitation of lipid independent Ras binding to B-RAF, since truncation of this region resulted in a protein that changed its kinase properties and resembles C-RAF. In vivo studies using PC12 and COS7 cells support in vitro results. Co-localization measurements using labeled Ras and RAF documented essential differences between B- and C-RAF with respect to association with Ras. Taken together, these data suggest that the activation of B-RAF, in contrast to C-RAF, may take place both at the plasma membrane and in the cytosolic environment.

  18. Insights into cellulase-lignin non-specific binding revealed by computational redesign of the surface of green fluorescent protein: Protein Redesign to Lower Protein-lignin Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haarmeyer, Carolyn N. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan 48824; Smith, Matthew D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan 48824; Chundawat, Shishir P. S. [Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC), Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan; Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey; Sammond, Deanne [Biosciences Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden Colorado; Whitehead, Timothy A. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan 48824; Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan 48824

    2016-11-07

    Biological-mediated conversion of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels and biochemicals is a promising avenue towards energy sustainability. However, a critical impediment to the commercialization of cellulosic biofuel production is the high cost of cellulase enzymes needed to deconstruct biomass into fermentable sugars. One major factor driving cost is cellulase adsorption and inactivation in the presence of lignin, yet we currently have a poor understanding of the protein structure-function relationships driving this adsorption. In this work, we have systematically investigated the role of protein surface potential on lignin adsorption using a model monomeric fluorescent protein. We have designed and experimentally characterized 16 model protein variants spanning the physiological range of net charge (-24 to +16 total charges) and total charge density (0.28 to 0.40 charges per sequence length) typical for natural proteins. Protein designs were expressed, purified, and subjected to in silico and in vitro biophysical measurements to evaluate the relationship between protein surface potential and lignin adsorption properties. The designs were comparable to model fluorescent protein in terms of thermostability and heterologous expression yield, although the majority of the designs unexpectedly formed homodimers. Protein adsorption to lignin was studied at two different temperatures using Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring and a subtractive mass balance assay. We found a weak correlation between protein net charge and protein-binding capacity to lignin. No other single characteristic, including apparent melting temperature and 2nd virial coefficient, showed correlation with lignin binding. Analysis of an unrelated cellulase dataset with mutations localized to a family I carbohydrate-binding module showed a similar correlation between net charge and lignin binding capacity. Overall, our study provides strategies to identify highly active

  19. N,N',N"-tris(dihydroxyphosphorylmethyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (Deofix) - a high-affinity, high-specificity chelator for first transition series metal cations with significant deodorant, antimicrobial, and antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laden, Karl; Zaklad, Haim; Simhon, Elliot D; Klein, Joseph Y; Cyjon, Rosa L; Winchell, Harry S

    2003-01-01

    Deofix, N,N',N"-tris(dihydroxyphosphorylmethyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane, is a high-affinity, high-specificity chelator for first transition series cations such as iron, zinc, manganese, and copper. A 1% solution in 50% ethanol was found to be significantly better at reducing underarm malodor than a solution of 0.3% Triclosan in 50% ethanol. Compared to a 50% alcohol control, Deofix was found to produce a significant reduction in malodor for at least 48 hours. Deofix appears to work by reducing the concentration of first transition series metal ions below the levels needed for microbial cell reproduction and by inhibiting oxidative processes by interfering with catalytic formation of free radicals. Deofix has very low levels of toxicity when measured via a number of screening techniques.

  20. pH-dependence of the specific binding of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions to the amyloid-{beta} peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghalebani, Leila, E-mail: leila.ghalebani@ki.se [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, The Arrhenius Laboratories for Natural Sciences, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Wahlstroem, Anna, E-mail: anna.wahlstrom@dbb.su.se [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, The Arrhenius Laboratories for Natural Sciences, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Danielsson, Jens, E-mail: jensd@dbb.su.se [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, The Arrhenius Laboratories for Natural Sciences, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Waermlaender, Sebastian K.T.S., E-mail: seb@dbb.su.se [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, The Arrhenius Laboratories for Natural Sciences, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Graeslund, Astrid, E-mail: astrid@dbb.su.se [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, The Arrhenius Laboratories for Natural Sciences, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cu(II) and Zn(II) display pH-dependent binding to the A{beta}(1-40) peptide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At pH 7.4 both metal ions display residue-specific binding to the A{beta} peptide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At pH 5.5 the binding specificity is lost for Zn(II). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential Cu(II) and Zn(II) binding may help explain metal-induced AD toxicity. -- Abstract: Metal ions like Cu(II) and Zn(II) are accumulated in Alzheimer's disease amyloid plaques. The amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptide involved in the disease interacts with these metal ions at neutral pH via ligands provided by the N-terminal histidines and the N-terminus. The present study uses high-resolution NMR spectroscopy to monitor the residue-specific interactions of Cu(II) and Zn(II) with {sup 15}N- and {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled A{beta}(1-40) peptides at varying pH levels. At pH 7.4 both ions bind to the specific ligands, competing with one another. At pH 5.5 Cu(II) retains its specific histidine ligands, while Zn(II) seems to lack residue-specific interactions. The low pH mimics acidosis which is linked to inflammatory processes in vivo. The results suggest that the cell toxic effects of redox active Cu(II) binding to A{beta} may be reversed by the protective activity of non-redox active Zn(II) binding to the same major binding site under non-acidic conditions. Under acidic conditions, the protective effect of Zn(II) may be decreased or changed, since Zn(II) is less able to compete with Cu(II) for the specific binding site on the A{beta} peptide under these conditions.

  1. Clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecium exhibit strain-specific collagen binding mediated by Acm, a new member of the MSCRAMM family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallapareddy, Sreedhar R; Weinstock, George M; Murray, Barbara E

    2003-03-01

    A collagen-binding adhesin of Enterococcus faecium, Acm, was identified. Acm shows 62% similarity to the Staphylococcus aureus collagen adhesin Cna over the entire protein and is more similar to Cna (60% and 75% similarity with Cna A and B domains respectively) than to the Enterococcus faecalis collagen-binding adhesin, Ace, which shares homology with Acm only in the A domain. Despite the detection of acm in 32 out of 32 E. faecium isolates, only 11 of these (all clinical isolates, including four vancomycin-resistant endocarditis isolates and seven other isolates) exhibited binding to collagen type I (CI). Although acm from three CI-binding vancomycin-resistant E. faecium clinical isolates showed 100% identity, analysis of acm genes and their promoter regions from six non-CI-binding strains identified deletions or mutations that introduced stop codons and/or IS elements within the gene or the promoter region in five out of six strains, suggesting that the presence of an intact functional acm gene is necessary for binding of E. faecium strains to CI. Recombinant Acm A domain showed specific and concentration-dependent binding to collagen, and this protein competed with E. faecium binding to immobilized CI. Consistent with the adherence phenotype and sequence data, probing with Acm-specific IgGs purified from anti-recombinant Acm A polyclonal rabbit serum confirmed the surface expression of Acm in three out of three collagen-binding clinical isolates of E. faecium tested, but in none of the strains with a non-functional pseudo acm gene. Introduction of a functional acm gene into two non-CI-binding natural acm mutant strains conferred a CI-binding phenotype, further confirming that native Acm is sufficient for the binding of E. faecium to CI. These results demonstrate that acm, which encodes a potential virulence factor, is functional only in certain infection-derived clinical isolates of E. faecium, and suggest that Acm is the primary adhesin responsible for the

  2. Crystallography of a Lewis-binding norovirus, elucidation of strain-specificity to the polymorphic human histo-blood group antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutao Chen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Noroviruses, an important cause of acute gastroenteritis in humans, recognize the histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs as host susceptible factors in a strain-specific manner. The crystal structures of the HBGA-binding interfaces of two A/B/H-binding noroviruses, the prototype Norwalk virus (GI.1 and a predominant GII.4 strain (VA387, have been elucidated. In this study we determined the crystal structures of the P domain protein of the first Lewis-binding norovirus (VA207, GII.9 that has a distinct binding property from those of Norwalk virus and VA387. Co-crystallization of the VA207 P dimer with Le(y or sialyl Le(x tetrasaccharides showed that VA207 interacts with these antigens through a common site found on the VA387 P protein which is highly conserved among most GII noroviruses. However, the HBGA-binding site of VA207 targeted at the Lewis antigens through the α-1, 3 fucose (the Lewis epitope as major and the β-N-acetyl glucosamine of the precursor as minor interacting sites. This completely differs from the binding mode of VA387 and Norwalk virus that target at the secretor epitopes. Binding pocket of VA207 is formed by seven amino acids, of which five residues build up the core structure that is essential for the basic binding function, while the other two are involved in strain-specificity. Our results elucidate for the first time the genetic and structural basis of strain-specificity by a direct comparison of two genetically related noroviruses in their interaction with different HBGAs. The results provide insight into the complex interaction between the diverse noroviruses and the polymorphic HBGAs and highlight the role of human HBGA as a critical factor in norovirus evolution.

  3. The lectin domains of polypeptide GalNAc-transferases exhibit carbohydrate-binding specificity for GalNAc: lectin binding to GalNAc-glycopeptide substrates is required for high density GalNAc-O-glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandall, Hans H; Irazoqui, Fernando; Tarp, Mads Agervig;

    2007-01-01

    to the enzyme. We have previously shown that the lectin domain of GalNAc-T4 modulates its substrate specificity to enable unique GalNAc-glycopeptide specificities and that this effect is selectively inhibitable by GalNAc; however, direct evidence of carbohydrate binding of GalNAc-transferase lectins has......-T2). Both lectins exhibited specificity for binding of free GalNAc. Kinetic and time-course analysis of GalNAc-T2 demonstrated that the lectin domain did not affect transfer to initial glycosylation sites, but selectively modulated velocity of transfer to subsequent sites and affected the number......Initiation of mucin-type O-glycosylation is controlled by a large family of UDP GalNAc:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-transferases). Most GalNAc-transferases contain a ricin-like lectin domain in the C-terminal end, which may confer GalNAc-glycopeptide substrate specificity...

  4. Direct binding of specific AUF1 isoforms to tandem zinc finger domains of tristetraprolin (TTP) family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedar, Vishram P; Zucconi, Beth E; Wilson, Gerald M; Blackshear, Perry J

    2012-02-17

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is the prototype of a family of CCCH tandem zinc finger proteins that can bind to AU-rich elements in mRNAs and promote their decay. TTP binds to mRNA through its central tandem zinc finger domain; it then promotes mRNA deadenylation, considered to be the rate-limiting step in eukaryotic mRNA decay. We found that TTP and its related family members could bind to certain isoforms of another AU-rich element-binding protein, HNRNPD/AUF1, as well as a related protein, laAUF1. The interaction domain within AUF1p45 appeared to be a C-terminal "GY" region, and the interaction domain within TTP was the tandem zinc finger domain. Surprisingly, binding of AUF1p45 to TTP occurred even with TTP mutants that lacked RNA binding activity. In cell extracts, binding of AUF1p45 to TTP potentiated TTP binding to ARE-containing RNA probes, as determined by RNA gel shift assays; AUF1p45 did not bind to the RNA probes under these conditions. Using purified, recombinant proteins and a synthetic RNA target in FRET assays, we demonstrated that AUF1p45, but not AUF1p37, increased TTP binding affinity for RNA ∼5-fold. These data suggest that certain isoforms of AUF1 can serve as "co-activators" of TTP family protein binding to RNA. The results raise interesting questions about the ability of AUF1 isoforms to regulate the mRNA binding and decay-promoting activities of TTP and its family members as well as the ability of AUF1 proteins to serve as possible physical links between TTP and other mRNA decay proteins and structures.

  5. Exchanging ligand-binding specificity between a pair of mouse olfactory receptor paralogs reveals odorant recognition principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, Olivia; Yuan, Shuguang; Veya, Luc; Filipek, Slawomir; Vogel, Horst; Pick, Horst

    2015-10-09

    A multi-gene family of ~1000 G protein-coupled olfactory receptors (ORs) constitutes the molecular basis of mammalian olfaction. Due to the lack of structural data its remarkable capacity to detect and discriminate thousands of odorants remains poorly understood on the structural level of the receptor. Using site-directed mutagenesis we transferred ligand specificity between two functionally related ORs and thereby revealed amino acid residues of central importance for odorant recognition and discrimination of the two receptors. By exchanging two of three residues, differing at equivalent positions of the putative odorant binding site between the mouse OR paralogs Olfr73 (mOR-EG) and Olfr74 (mOR-EV), we selectively changed ligand preference but remarkably also signaling activation strength in both ORs. Computer modeling proposed structural details at atomic resolution how the very same odorant molecule might interact with different contact residues to induce different functional responses in two related receptors. Our findings provide a mechanistic explanation of how the olfactory system distinguishes different molecular aspects of a given odorant molecule, and unravel important molecular details of the combinatorial encoding of odorant identity at the OR level.

  6. Strain-specific V3 and CD4 binding site autologous HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies select neutralization-resistant viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, M. Anthony; Gao, Feng; Gurley, Thaddeus C.; Amos, Joshua D.; Kumar, Amit; Hora, Bhavna; Marshall, Dawn J.; Whitesides, John F.; Xia, Shi-Mao; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Lu, Xiaozhi; Bonsignori, Mattia; Finzi, Andrés; Vandergrift, Nathan A.; Alam, S. Munir; Ferrari, Guido; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Kamanga, Gift; Cohen, Myron S.; Sam, Noel E.; Kapiga, Saidi; Gray, Elin S.; Tumba, Nancy L.; Morris, Lynn; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Gorny, Miroslaw K.; Mascola, John R.; Hahn, Beatrice; Shaw, George M.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Montefiori, David C.; Hraber, Peter T.; Korber, Bette T.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The third variable (V3) loop and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of the HIV-1 envelope are frequently targeted by neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in infected individuals. In chronic infection, HIV-1 escape mutants repopulate the plasma, and V3 and CD4bs nAbs emerge that can neutralize heterologous tier 1 easy-to-neutralize, but not tier 2 difficult-to-neutralize HIV-1 isolates. However, neutralization sensitivity of autologous plasma viruses to this type of nAb response has not been studied. We describe the development and evolution in vivo of antibodies distinguished by their target specificity for V3and CD4bs epitopes on autologous tier 2 viruses but not on heterologous tier 2 viruses. A surprisingly high fraction of autologous circulating viruses was sensitive to these antibodies. These findings demonstrate a role for V3 and CD4bs antibodies in constraining the native envelope trimer in vivo to a neutralization-resistant phenotype, explaining why HIV-1 transmission generally occurs by tier 2 neutralization-resistant viruses. PMID:26355218

  7. Microplate-based assay for identifying small molecules that bind a specific intersubunit interface within the assembled HIV-1 capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halambage, Upul D; Wong, Jason P; Melancon, Bruce J; Lindsley, Craig W; Aiken, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    Despite the availability of >30 effective drugs for managing HIV-1 infection, no current therapy is curative, and long-term management is challenging owing to the emergence and spread of drug-resistant mutants. Identification of drugs against novel HIV-1 targets would expand the current treatment options and help to control resistance. The highly conserved HIV-1 capsid protein represents an attractive target because of its multiple roles in replication of the virus. However, the low antiviral potencies of the reported HIV-1 capsid-targeting inhibitors render them unattractive for therapeutic development. To facilitate the identification of more-potent HIV-1 capsid inhibitors, we developed a scintillation proximity assay to screen for small molecules that target a biologically active and specific intersubunit interface in the HIV-1 capsid. The assay, which is based on competitive displacement of a known capsid-binding small-molecule inhibitor, exhibited a signal-to-noise ratio of >9 and a Z factor of >0.8. In a pilot screen of a chemical library containing 2,400 druglike compounds, we obtained a hit rate of 1.8%. This assay has properties that are suitable for screening large compound libraries to identify novel HIV-1 capsid ligands with antiviral activity.

  8. Combinatorial binding leads to diverse regulatory responses: Lmd is a tissue-specific modulator of Mef2 activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo M F Cunha

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how complex patterns of temporal and spatial expression are regulated is central to deciphering genetic programs that drive development. Gene expression is initiated through the action of transcription factors and their cofactors converging on enhancer elements leading to a defined activity. Specific constellations of combinatorial occupancy are therefore often conceptualized as rigid binding codes that give rise to a common output of spatio-temporal expression. Here, we assessed this assumption using the regulatory input of two essential transcription factors within the Drosophila myogenic network. Mutations in either Myocyte enhancing factor 2 (Mef2 or the zinc-finger transcription factor lame duck (lmd lead to very similar defects in myoblast fusion, yet the underlying molecular mechanism for this shared phenotype is not understood. Using a combination of ChIP-on-chip analysis and expression profiling of loss-of-function mutants, we obtained a global view of the regulatory input of both factors during development. The majority of Lmd-bound enhancers are co-bound by Mef2, representing a subset of Mef2's transcriptional input during these stages of development. Systematic analyses of the regulatory contribution of both factors demonstrate diverse regulatory roles, despite their co-occupancy of shared enhancer elements. These results indicate that Lmd is a tissue-specific modulator of Mef2 activity, acting as both a transcriptional activator and repressor, which has important implications for myogenesis. More generally, this study demonstrates considerable flexibility in the regulatory output of two factors, leading to additive, cooperative, and repressive modes of co-regulation.

  9. Combinatorial binding leads to diverse regulatory responses: Lmd is a tissue-specific modulator of Mef2 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Paulo M F; Sandmann, Thomas; Gustafson, E Hilary; Ciglar, Lucia; Eichenlaub, Michael P; Furlong, Eileen E M

    2010-07-01

    Understanding how complex patterns of temporal and spatial expression are regulated is central to deciphering genetic programs that drive development. Gene expression is initiated through the action of transcription factors and their cofactors converging on enhancer elements leading to a defined activity. Specific constellations of combinatorial occupancy are therefore often conceptualized as rigid binding codes that give rise to a common output of spatio-temporal expression. Here, we assessed this assumption using the regulatory input of two essential transcription factors within the Drosophila myogenic network. Mutations in either Myocyte enhancing factor 2 (Mef2) or the zinc-finger transcription factor lame duck (lmd) lead to very similar defects in myoblast fusion, yet the underlying molecular mechanism for this shared phenotype is not understood. Using a combination of ChIP-on-chip analysis and expression profiling of loss-of-function mutants, we obtained a global view of the regulatory input of both factors during development. The majority of Lmd-bound enhancers are co-bound by Mef2, representing a subset of Mef2's transcriptional input during these stages of development. Systematic analyses of the regulatory contribution of both factors demonstrate diverse regulatory roles, despite their co-occupancy of shared enhancer elements. These results indicate that Lmd is a tissue-specific modulator of Mef2 activity, acting as both a transcriptional activator and repressor, which has important implications for myogenesis. More generally, this study demonstrates considerable flexibility in the regulatory output of two factors, leading to additive, cooperative, and repressive modes of co-regulation.

  10. Contribution of the first K-homology domain of poly(C)-binding protein 1 to its affinity and specificity for C-rich oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoga, Yano M K; Traore, Daouda A K; Sidiqi, Mahjooba; Szeto, Chris; Pendini, Nicole R; Barker, Andrew; Leedman, Peter J; Wilce, Jacqueline A; Wilce, Matthew C J

    2012-06-01

    Poly-C-binding proteins are triple KH (hnRNP K homology) domain proteins with specificity for single stranded C-rich RNA and DNA. They play diverse roles in the regulation of protein expression at both transcriptional and translational levels. Here, we analyse the contributions of individual αCP1 KH domains to binding C-rich oligonucleotides using biophysical and structural methods. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), we demonstrate that KH1 makes the most stable interactions with both RNA and DNA, KH3 binds with intermediate affinity and KH2 only interacts detectibly with DNA. The crystal structure of KH1 bound to a 5'-CCCTCCCT-3' DNA sequence shows a 2:1 protein:DNA stoichiometry and demonstrates a molecular arrangement of KH domains bound to immediately adjacent oligonucleotide target sites. SPR experiments, with a series of poly-C-sequences reveals that cytosine is preferred at all four positions in the oligonucleotide binding cleft and that a C-tetrad binds KH1 with 10 times higher affinity than a C-triplet. The basis for this high affinity interaction is finally detailed with the structure determination of a KH1.W.C54S mutant bound to 5'-ACCCCA-3' DNA sequence. Together, these data establish the lead role of KH1 in oligonucleotide binding by αCP1 and reveal the molecular basis of its specificity for a C-rich tetrad.

  11. A lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-specific monoclonal antibody, 88B8, that abolishes the binding of LPL to GPIHBP1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allan, Christopher M; Larsson, Mikael; Hu, Xuchen

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) contains two principal domains: an amino-terminal catalytic domain (residues 1-297) and a carboxyl-terminal domain (residues 298-448) that is important for binding lipids and binding GPIHBP1 (an endothelial cell protein that shuttles LPL to the capillary lumen). The LPL s...

  12. Specificity of RSG-1.2 peptide binding to RRE-IIB RNA element of HIV-1 over Rev peptide is mainly enthalpic in origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Bose, Debojit; Suryawanshi, Hemant; Sabharwal, Harshana; Mapa, Koyeli; Maiti, Souvik

    2011-01-01

    Rev is an essential HIV-1 regulatory protein which binds to the Rev responsive element (RRE) present within the env gene of HIV-1 RNA genome. This binding facilitates the transport of the RNA to the cytoplasm, which in turn triggers the switch between viral latency and active viral replication. Essential components of this complex have been localized to a minimal arginine rich Rev peptide and stem IIB region of RRE. A synthetic peptide known as RSG-1.2 binds with high binding affinity and specificity to the RRE-IIB than the Rev peptide, however the thermodynamic basis of this specificity has not yet been addressed. The present study aims to probe the thermodynamic origin of this specificity of RSG-1.2 over Rev Peptide for RRE-IIB. The temperature dependent melting studies show that RSG-1.2 binding stabilizes the RRE structure significantly (ΔT(m) = 4.3°C), in contrast to Rev binding. Interestingly the thermodynamic signatures of the binding have also been found to be different for both the peptides. At pH 7.5, RSG-1.2 binds RRE-IIB with a K(a) = 16.2±0.6×10(7) M(-1) where enthalpic change ΔH = -13.9±0.1 kcal/mol is the main driving force with limited unfavorable contribution from entropic change TΔS = -2.8±0.1 kcal/mol. A large part of ΔH may be due to specific stacking between U72 and Arg15. In contrast binding of Rev (K(a) = 3.1±0.4×10(7) M(-1)) is driven mainly by entropy (ΔH = 0 kcal/mol and TΔS = 10.2±0.2 kcal/mol) which arises from major conformational changes in the RNA upon binding.

  13. De novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE) hybrid nuclease with novel DNA binding specificity creates double-strand breaks

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2011-01-24

    Site-specific and rare cutting nucleases are valuable tools for genome engineering. The generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes and can facilitate gene targeting, additions, deletions, and inactivation. Zinc finger nucleases have been used to generate DSBs and subsequently, for genome editing but with low efficiency and reproducibility. The transcription activator-like family of type III effectors (TALEs) contains a central domain of tandem repeats that could be engineered to bind specific DNA targets. Here, we report the generation of a Hax3-based hybrid TALE nuclease with a user-selected DNA binding specificity. We show that the engineered TALE nuclease can bind to its target sequence in vitro and that the homodimeric TALE nuclease can cleave double-stranded DNA in vitro if the DNA binding sites have the proper spacing and orientation. Transient expression assays in tobacco leaves suggest that the hybrid nuclease creates DSB in its target sequence, which is subsequently repaired by nonhomologous end-joining repair. Taken together, our data show the feasibility of engineering TALE-based hybrid nucleases capable of generating site-specific DSBs and the great potential for site-specific genome modification in plants and eukaryotes in general.

  14. Effect of phosphorothioate modifications on the ability of GTn oligodeoxynucleotides to specifically recognize single-stranded DNA-binding proteins and to affect human cancer cellular growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morassutti, C; Scaggiante, B; Dapas, B; Xodo, L; Tell, G; Quadrifoglio, F

    1999-12-01

    We have previously identified phosphodiester oligonucleotides exclusively made of G and T bases, named GTn, that significantly inhibit human cancer cell growth and recognize specific nuclear single-stranded DNA binding proteins. We wished to examine the ability of the modified GTn oligonucleotides with different degrees of phosphorothioate modifications to bind specifically to the same nuclear proteins recognized by the GTn phosphodiester analogues and their cytotoxic effect on the human T-lymphoblastic CCRF-CEM cell line. We showed that the full phosphorothioate GTn oligonucleotide was neither able to specifically recognize those nuclear proteins, nor cytotoxic. In contrast, the 3'-phosphorothioate-protected GTn oligonucleotides can maintain the specific protein-binding activity. The end-modified phosphorothioate oligonucleotides were also able to elicit the dose-dependent cell growth inhibition effect, but a loss in the cytotoxic ability was observed increasing the extent of sulphur modification of the sequences. Our results indicate that phosphorothioate oligonucleotides directed at specific single-stranded DNA-binding proteins should contain a number of phosphorothioate end-linkages which should be related to the length of the sequence, in order to maintain the same biological activities exerted by their phosphodiester analogues.

  15. De novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE) hybrid nuclease with novel DNA binding specificity creates double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouz, Magdy M; Li, Lixin; Shamimuzzaman, Md; Wibowo, Anjar; Fang, Xiaoyun; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2011-02-08

    Site-specific and rare cutting nucleases are valuable tools for genome engineering. The generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes and can facilitate gene targeting, additions, deletions, and inactivation. Zinc finger nucleases have been used to generate DSBs and subsequently, for genome editing but with low efficiency and reproducibility. The transcription activator-like family of type III effectors (TALEs) contains a central domain of tandem repeats that could be engineered to bind specific DNA targets. Here, we report the generation of a Hax3-based hybrid TALE nuclease with a user-selected DNA binding specificity. We show that the engineered TALE nuclease can bind to its target sequence in vitro and that the homodimeric TALE nuclease can cleave double-stranded DNA in vitro if the DNA binding sites have the proper spacing and orientation. Transient expression assays in tobacco leaves suggest that the hybrid nuclease creates DSB in its target sequence, which is subsequently repaired by nonhomologous end-joining repair. Taken together, our data show the feasibility of engineering TALE-based hybrid nucleases capable of generating site-specific DSBs and the great potential for site-specific genome modification in plants and eukaryotes in general.

  16. Two residues in the basic region of the yeast transcription factor Yap8 are crucial for its DNA-binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Catarina; Pimentel, Catarina; Matos, Rute G; Arraiano, Cecília M; Matzapetakis, Manolis; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina

    2013-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factor Yap8 is a key determinant in arsenic stress response. Contrary to Yap1, another basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) yeast regulator, Yap8 has a very restricted DNA-binding specificity and only orchestrates the expression of ACR2 and ACR3 genes. In the DNA-binding basic region, Yap8 has three distinct amino acids residues, Leu26, Ser29 and Asn31, at sites of highly conserved positions in the other Yap family of transcriptional regulators and Pap1 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. To evaluate whether these residues are relevant to Yap8 specificity, we first built a homology model of the complex Yap8bZIP-DNA based on Pap1-DNA crystal structure. Several Yap8 mutants were then generated in order to confirm the contribution of the residues predicted to interact with DNA. Using bioinformatics analysis together with in vivo and in vitro approaches, we have identified several conserved residues critical for Yap8-DNA binding. Moreover, our data suggest that Leu26 is required for Yap8 binding to DNA and that this residue together with Asn31, hinder Yap1 response element recognition by Yap8, thus narrowing its DNA-binding specificity. Furthermore our results point to a role of these two amino acids in the stability of the Yap8-DNA complex.

  17. Specific Capture of Peptide-Receptive Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecules by Antibody Micropatterns Allows for a Novel Peptide-Binding Assay in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirscherl, Cindy; Palankar, Raghavendra; Delcea, Mihaela; Kolesnikova, Tatiana A; Springer, Sebastian

    2017-02-02

    Binding assays with fluorescently labeled ligands and recombinant receptor proteins are commonly performed in 2D arrays. But many cell surface receptors only function in their native membrane environment and/or in a specific conformation, such as they appear on the surface of live cells. Thus, receptors on live cells should be used for ligand binding assays. Here, it is shown that antibodies preprinted on a glass surface can be used to specifically array a peptide receptor of the immune system, i.e., the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule H-2K(b) , into a defined pattern on the surface of live cells. Monoclonal antibodies make it feasible to capture a distinct subpopulation of H-2K(b) and hold it at the cell surface. This patterned receptor enables a novel peptide-binding assay, in which the specific binding of a fluorescently labeled index peptide is visualized by microscopy. Measurements of ligand binding to captured cell surface receptors in defined confirmations apply to many problems in cell biology and thus represent a promising tool in the field of biosensors.

  18. BayesPI - a new model to study protein-DNA interactions: a case study of condition-specific protein binding parameters for Yeast transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morigen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have incorporated Bayesian model regularization with biophysical modeling of protein-DNA interactions, and of genome-wide nucleosome positioning to study protein-DNA interactions, using a high-throughput dataset. The newly developed method (BayesPI includes the estimation of a transcription factor (TF binding energy matrices, the computation of binding affinity of a TF target site and the corresponding chemical potential. Results The method was successfully tested on synthetic ChIP-chip datasets, real yeast ChIP-chip experiments. Subsequently, it was used to estimate condition-specific and species-specific protein-DNA interaction for several yeast TFs. Conclusion The results revealed that the modification of the protein binding parameters and the variation of the individual nucleotide affinity in either recognition or flanking sequences occurred under different stresses and in different species. The findings suggest that such modifications may be adaptive and play roles in the formation of the environment-specific binding patterns of yeast TFs and in the divergence of TF binding sites across the related yeast species.

  19. Impact of cadmium, cobalt and nickel on sequence-specific DNA binding of p63 and p73 in vitro and in cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adámik, Matej [Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Královopolská 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Bažantová, Pavla [Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Královopolská 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Department of Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Science, University of Ostrava, Chittussiho 10, 701 03 Ostrava (Czech Republic); Navrátilová, Lucie; Polášková, Alena [Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Královopolská 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Pečinka, Petr [Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Královopolská 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Department of Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Science, University of Ostrava, Chittussiho 10, 701 03 Ostrava (Czech Republic); Holaňová, Lucie [Department of Chemical Drugs, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Palackého 1/3, 61242 Brno (Czech Republic); Tichý, Vlastimil [Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Královopolská 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Brázdová, Marie, E-mail: maruska@ibp.cz [Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Královopolská 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Department of Chemical Drugs, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Palackého 1/3, 61242 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • DNA binding of p53 family core domains is inhibited by cadmium, cobalt and nickel. • Binding to DNA protects p53 family core domains from metal induced inhibition. • Cadmium, cobalt and nickel induced inhibition was reverted by EDTA in vitro. - Abstract: Site-specific DNA recognition and binding activity belong to common attributes of all three members of tumor suppressor p53 family proteins: p53, p63 and p73. It was previously shown that heavy metals can affect p53 conformation, sequence-specific binding and suppress p53 response to DNA damage. Here we report for the first time that cadmium, nickel and cobalt, which have already been shown to disturb various DNA repair mechanisms, can also influence p63 and p73 sequence-specific DNA binding activity and transactivation of p53 family target genes. Based on results of electrophoretic mobility shift assay and luciferase reporter assay, we conclude that cadmium inhibits sequence-specific binding of all three core domains to p53 consensus sequences and abolishes transactivation of several promoters (e.g. BAX and MDM2) by 50 μM concentrations. In the presence of specific DNA, all p53 family core domains were partially protected against loss of DNA binding activity due to cadmium treatment. Effective cadmium concentration to abolish DNA–protein interactions was about two times higher for p63 and p73 proteins than for p53. Furthermore, we detected partial reversibility of cadmium inhibition for all p53 family members by EDTA. DTT was able to reverse cadmium inhibition only for p53 and p73. Nickel and cobalt abolished DNA–p53 interaction at sub-millimolar concentrations while inhibition of p63 and p73 DNA binding was observed at millimolar concentrations. In summary, cadmium strongly inhibits p53, p63 and p73 DNA binding in vitro and in cells in comparison to nickel and cobalt. The role of cadmium inhibition of p53 tumor suppressor family in carcinogenesis is discussed.

  20. Material Specific Rational Design of A1B2C3O7 High-Tc Superconductors without Copper [A, B, C = Cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isikaku-Ironkwe, O'paul; Schaffer, Michael J.

    Soon after the discovery of YBa2Cu3O7 with Tc = 93K, a similar structured system with Ag replacing Cu was discovered with a Tc = 50K. Also, the discovery of Ba0 . 6 K0 . 4 BiO3 with Tc = 30K indicated that Cu was not indispensable for high temperature superconductivity (HTSC). Latter, the discoveries of the Pnictide and Chalcogenide high-Tc superconductors confirmed those earlier experimental indications. Using our recently developed Material Specific Characterization Dataset (MSCD) model for analysis and design of superconductors, we have computed many designs that satisfy the MSCD characteristics of YBa2Cu3O7 as a design model. Our design recognizes the valence state characteristics that make YBa2Cu3O6 a semiconductor, while YBa2Cu3O7is a superconductor. Here we present ten material specific rational design examples of potential A1B2C3O7 HTSCs without Cu, using the YBa2Cu3O7 design model. This MSCD design model opens the possibility for search and discovery of high-Tc oxide superconductor systems without copper.

  1. Investigation of the Binding Interaction of Fatty Acids with Human G Protein-Coupled Receptor 40 Using a Site-Specific Fluorescence Probe by Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiao-Min; Cao, Lin-Ying; Zhang, Jing; Qin, Wei-Ping; Yang, Yu; Wan, Bin; Guo, Liang-Hong

    2016-04-01

    Human G protein-coupled receptor 40 (hGPR40), with medium- and long-chain free fatty acids (FFAs) as its natural ligands, plays an important role in the enhancement of glucose-dependent insulin secretion. To date, information about the direct binding of FFAs to hGPR40 is very limited, and how carbon-chain length affects the activities of FFAs on hGPR40 is not yet understood. In this study, a fluorescein-fasiglifam analogue (F-TAK-875A) conjugate was designed and synthesized as a site-specific fluorescence probe to study the interaction of FFAs with hGPR40. hGPR40 was expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells and labeled with F-TAK-875A. By using flow cytometry, competitive binding of FFA and F-TAK-875A to hGPR40-expressed cells was measured. Binding affinities of 18 saturated FFAs, with carbon-chain lengths ranging from C6 to C23, were analyzed. The results showed that the binding potencies of FFAs to hGPR40 were dependent on carbon length. There was a positive correlation between length and binding potency for seven FFAs (C9-C15), with myristic acid (C15) showing the highest potency, 0.2% relative to TAK-875. For FFAs with a length of fewer than C9 or more than C15, they had very weak or no binding. Molecular docking results showed that the binding pocket of TAK-875 in hGPR40 could enclose FFAs with lengths of C15 or fewer. However, for FFAs with lengths longer than C15, part of the alkyl chain extended out of the binding pocket. This study provided insights into the structural dependence of FFAs binding to and activation of hGPR40.

  2. Interaction of pyracetam with specific /sup 3/H-imipramine binding sites and GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex of brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozhanets, V.V.; Chakhbra, K.K.; Danchev, N.D.; Malin, K.M.; Rusakov, D.Yu.; Val' dman, A.V.

    1986-06-01

    This paper studies the effect of pyracetam on parameters of specific binding of tritium-imipramine and GABA-activated binding of tritium-flunitrazepam with rat brain membranes. The experimental method is described and it is shown that pyracetam and mebicar in experiments in vivo on normal animals can exert their anxiolytic action without the participation of bensodiazepine receptors. Either the interaction of pyracetam and mebicar with benzodiazeprine receptors has a different interpretation than competition of these compounds with specific binding sites of tritium-flunitrazepam, or in experiments on normal animals in vivo GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex does not accept pyracetam and mebicar, for it contains endogenous inhibitors of GABA-modulating action.

  3. Identification of the development stage—specific factors in mouse fetal liver binding to the human β—globin gene promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENYADI; YULONGHU; 等

    1994-01-01

    In order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of globin gene expression during embryonic development,the nuclear extracts from mouse hematopoietic tissue at different stages of development have been prepared.By using DNase I footprinting and gel mobility shift assays,the binding of protein factors in these extracts to the human β-globin promoter was analyzed.The differences in the binding patterns of protein factors during development were observed.An erythroid-specific and stage-specific nuclear protein in the nuclear extrace from d 18 mouse fetal liver was identified,which can bind to the sequence(from-66bp to-90bp) of human β-globin promoter.We therefore speculate that the function of this cis-acting element may be similar to stage selector element(SSE) in chicken βA-promoter.

  4. Transcriptional activation requires protection of the TATA-binding protein Tbp1 by the ubiquitin-specific protease Ubp3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Boon Shang; Siew, Wee Leng; Xiao, Benjamin; Lehming, Norbert

    2010-11-01

    Tbp1, the TATA-binding protein, is essential for transcriptional activation, and Gal4 and Gcn4 are unable to fully activate transcription in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae TBP1E86D mutant strain. In the present study we have shown that the Tbp1E186D mutant protein is proteolytically instable, and we have isolated intragenic and extragenic suppressors of the transcription defects of the TBP1E186D mutant strain. The TBP1R6S mutation stabilizes the Tbp1E186D mutant protein and suppresses the defects of the TBP1E186D mutant strain. Furthermore, we found that the overexpression of the de-ubiquitinating enzyme Ubp3 (ubiquitin-specific protease 3) also stabilizes the Tbp1E186D mutant protein and suppresses of the defects of the TBP1E186D mutant strain. Importantly, the deletion of UBP3 and its cofactor BRE5 lead to increased degradation of wild-type Tbp1 protein and to defects in transcriptional activation by Gal4 and Gcn4. Purified GST (glutathione transferase)-Ubp3 reversed Tbp1 ubiquitination, and the deletion of UBP3 lead to the accumulation of poly-ubiquitinated species of Tbp1 in a proteaseome-deficient genetic background, demonstrating that Ubp3 reverses ubiquitination of Tbp1 in vitro and in vivo. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that Ubp3 was recruited to the GAL1 and HIS3 promoters upon the induction of the respective gene, indicating that protection of promoter-bound Tbp1 by Ubp3 is required for transcriptional activation.

  5. Investigating the function of Fc-specific binding of IgM to Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 mediating erythrocyte rosetting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, Liz; Huda, Pie; Jeppesen, Anine;

    2015-01-01

    Acquired protection from Plasmodium falciparum malaria takes years to develop, probably reflecting the ability of the parasites to evade immunity. A recent example of this is the binding of the Fc region of IgM to VAR2CSA-type PfEMP1. This interferes with specific IgG recognition and phagocytosis...

  6. The non-selective voltage-activated cation channel in the human red blood cell membrane: reconciliation between two conflicting reports and further characterisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaestner, Lars; Christophersen, Palle; Bernhardt, Ingolf;

    2000-01-01

    Erythrocyte; Patch-clamp; Non-specific; cation channel; Voltage dependence; Acetylcholin receptor......Erythrocyte; Patch-clamp; Non-specific; cation channel; Voltage dependence; Acetylcholin receptor...

  7. The secondary cell wall polysaccharide of Bacillus anthracis provides the specific binding ligand for the C-terminal cell wall-binding domain of two phage endolysins, PlyL and PlyG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Jhuma; Low, Lieh Y; Kamal, Nazia; Saile, Elke; Forsberg, L Scott; Gutierrez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Hoffmaster, Alex R; Liddington, Robert; Quinn, Conrad P; Carlson, Russell W; Kannenberg, Elmar L

    2013-07-01

    Endolysins are bacteriophage enzymes that lyse their bacterial host for phage progeny release. They commonly contain an N-terminal catalytic domain that hydrolyzes bacterial peptidoglycan (PG) and a C-terminal cell wall-binding domain (CBD) that confers enzyme localization to the PG substrate. Two endolysins, phage lysin L (PlyL) and phage lysin G (PlyG), are specific for Bacillus anthracis. To date, the cell wall ligands for their C-terminal CBD have not been identified. We recently described structures for a number of secondary cell wall polysaccharides (SCWPs) from B. anthracis and B. cereus strains. They are covalently bound to the PG and are comprised of a -ManNAc-GlcNAc-HexNAc- backbone with various galactosyl or glucosyl substitutions. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) showed that the endolysins PlyL and PlyG bind to the SCWP from B. anthracis (SCWPBa) with high affinity (i.e. in the μM range with dissociation constants ranging from 0.81 × 10(-6) to 7.51 × 10(-6) M). In addition, the PlyL and PlyG SCWPBa binding sites reside with their C-terminal domains. The dissociation constants for the interactions of these endolysins and their derived C-terminal domains with the SCWPBa were in the range reported for other protein-carbohydrate interactions. Our findings show that the SCWPBa is the ligand that confers PlyL and PlyG lysin binding and localization to the PG. PlyL and PlyG also bound the SCWP from B. cereus G9241 with comparable affinities to SCWPBa. No detectable binding was found to the SCWPs from B. cereus ATCC (American Type Culture Collection) 10987 and ATCC 14579, thus demonstrating specificity of lysin binding to SCWPs.

  8. Cationic liposomes enhance targeted delivery and expression of exogenous DNA mediated by N-terminal modified poly(L-lysine)-antibody conjugate in mouse lung endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, V S; Torchilin, V P; Kennel, S; Huang, L

    1992-07-15

    A new and improved system for targeted gene delivery and expression is described. Transfection efficiency of N-terminal modified poly(L-lysine) (NPLL) conjugated with anti-thrombomodulin antibody 34A can be improved by adding to the system a lipophilic component, cationic liposomes. DNA, antibody conjugate and cationic liposomes form a ternary electrostatic complex which preserves the ability to bind specifically to the target cells. At the same time the addition of liposomes enhance the specific transfection efficiency of antibody-polylysine/DNA binary complex by 10 to 20-fold in mouse lung endothelial cells in culture.

  9. Mapping the tail fiber as the receptor binding protein responsible for differential host specificity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophages PaP1 and JG004.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Le

    Full Text Available The first step in bacteriophage infection is recognition and binding to the host receptor, which is mediated by the phage receptor binding protein (RBP. Different RBPs can lead to differential host specificity. In many bacteriophages, such as Escherichia coli and Lactococcal phages, RBPs have been identified as the tail fiber or protruding baseplate proteins. However, the tail fiber-dependent host specificity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa phages has not been well studied. This study aimed to identify and investigate the binding specificity of the RBP of P. aeruginosa phages PaP1 and JG004. These two phages share high DNA sequence homology but exhibit different host specificities. A spontaneous mutant phage was isolated and exhibited broader host range compared with the parental phage JG004. Sequencing of its putative tail fiber and baseplate region indicated a single point mutation in ORF84 (a putative tail fiber gene, which resulted in the replacement of a positively charged lysine (K by an uncharged asparagine (N. We further demonstrated that the replacement of the tail fiber gene (ORF69 of PaP1 with the corresponding gene from phage JG004 resulted in a recombinant phage that displayed altered host specificity. Our study revealed the tail fiber-dependent host specificity in P. aeruginosa phages and provided an effective tool for its alteration. These contributions may have potential value in phage therapy.

  10. Mapping the tail fiber as the receptor binding protein responsible for differential host specificity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophages PaP1 and JG004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Shuai; He, Xuesong; Tan, Yinling; Huang, Guangtao; Zhang, Lin; Lux, Renate; Shi, Wenyuan; Hu, Fuquan

    2013-01-01

    The first step in bacteriophage infection is recognition and binding to the host receptor, which is mediated by the phage receptor binding protein (RBP). Different RBPs can lead to differential host specificity. In many bacteriophages, such as Escherichia coli and Lactococcal phages, RBPs have been identified as the tail fiber or protruding baseplate proteins. However, the tail fiber-dependent host specificity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa phages has not been well studied. This study aimed to identify and investigate the binding specificity of the RBP of P. aeruginosa phages PaP1 and JG004. These two phages share high DNA sequence homology but exhibit different host specificities. A spontaneous mutant phage was isolated and exhibited broader host range compared with the parental phage JG004. Sequencing of its putative tail fiber and baseplate region indicated a single point mutation in ORF84 (a putative tail fiber gene), which resulted in the replacement of a positively charged lysine (K) by an uncharged asparagine (N). We further demonstrated that the replacement of the tail fiber gene (ORF69) of PaP1 with the corresponding gene from phage JG004 resulted in a recombinant phage that displayed altered host specificity. Our study revealed the tail fiber-dependent host specificity in P. aeruginosa phages and provided an effective tool for its alteration. These contributions may have potential value in phage therapy.

  11. Specificity of Bacillus thuringiensis endotoxins is correlated with the presence of high-affinity binding sites in the brush border membrane of target insect midguts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, C.; Vanderbruggen, H.; Hoefte, H.; Van Rie, J.; Jansens, S.; Van Mellaert, H. (J. Plateaustraat, Gent (Belgium))

    1988-11-01

    Binding studies were performed with two {sup 125}I-labeled Bacillus thuringiensis {delta}-endotoxins on brush border membrane vesicles prepared from the larval midgut of the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta or the cabbage butterfly Pieris brassicae. One {delta}-endotoxin, Bt2-protoxin, is a 130-kDa recombinant crystalline protein from B. thuringiensis subsp. berliner. It kills larvae of both insect species. The active Bt2-toxin is a 60-kDa proteolytic fragment of the Bt2-protoxin. It binds saturably and with high affinity to brush border membrane vesicles from the midgut of both species. The other {delta}-endotoxin, Bt4412-protoxin, is a 136-kDa crystalline protein from B. thuringiensis subsp. thuringiensis, which is highly toxic for P. brassicae, but not for M. sexta larvae. Bt4412-toxin, obtained after proteolytic activation of Bt4412-protoxin, shows high-affinity saturable binding to P. brassicae vesicles but not to M. sexta vesicles. The correlation between toxicity and specific binding is further strengthened by competition studies. Other B. thuringiensis {delta}-endotoxins active against M. sexta compete for binding of {sup 125}I-labeled Bt2-toxin to M. sexta vesicles, whereas toxins active against dipteran or coleopteran larvae do not compete. Bt2-toxin and Bt4412-toxin bind to different sites on P. brassicae vesicles.

  12. The fission yeast RNA binding protein Mmi1 regulates meiotic genes by controlling intron specific splicing and polyadenylation coupled RNA turnover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei-Mei Chen

    Full Text Available The polyA tails of mRNAs are monitored by the exosome as a quality control mechanism. We find that fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, adopts this RNA quality control mechanism to regulate a group of 30 or more meiotic genes at the level of both splicing and RNA turnover. In vegetative cells the RNA binding protein Mmi1 binds to the primary transcripts of these genes. We find the novel motif U(U/C/GAAAC highly over-represented in targets of Mmi1. Mmi1 can specifically regulate the splicing of particular introns in a transcript: it inhibits the splicing of introns that are in the vicinity of putative Mmi1 binding sites, while allowing the splicing of other introns that are far from such sites. In addition, binding of Mmi1, particularly near the 3' end, alters 3' processing to promote extremely long polyA tails of up to a kilobase. The hyperadenylated transcripts are then targeted for degradation by the nuclear exonuclease Rrp6. The nuclear polyA binding protein Pab2 assists this hyperadenylation-mediated RNA decay. Rrp6 also targets other hyperadenylated transcripts, which become hyperadenylated in an unknown, but Mmi1-independent way. Thus, hyperadenylation may be a general signal for RNA degradation. In addition, binding of Mmi1 can affect the efficiency of 3' cleavage. Inactivation of Mmi1 in meiosis allows meiotic expression, through splicing and RNA stabilization, of at least 29 target genes, which are apparently constitutively transcribed.

  13. Binding of PTEN to specific PDZ domains contributes to PTEN protein stability and phosphorylation by microtubule-associated serine/threonine kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, Miguel; Andrés-Pons, Amparo; Gomar, Beatriz; Torres, Josema; Gil, Anabel; Tapparel, Caroline; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Pulido, Rafael

    2005-08-12

    The tumor suppressor phosphatase PTEN is a key regulator of cell growth and apoptosis that interacts with PDZ domains from regulatory proteins, including MAGI-1/2/3, hDlg, and MAST205. Here we identified novel PTEN-binding PDZ domains within the MAST205-related proteins, syntrophin-associated serine/threonine kinase and MAST3, characterized the regions of PTEN involved in its interaction with distinctive PDZ domains, and analyzed the functional consequences on PTEN of PDZ domain binding. Using a panel of PTEN mutations, as well as PTEN chimeras containing distinct domains of the related protein TPTE, we found that the PTP and C2 domains of PTEN do not affect PDZ domain binding and that the C-terminal tail of PTEN (residues 350-403) provides selectivity to recognize specific PDZ domains from MAGI-2, hDlg, and MAST205. Binding of PTEN to the PDZ-2 domain from MAGI-2 increased PTEN protein stability. Furthermore, binding of PTEN to the PDZ domains from microtubule-associated serine/threonine kinases facilitated PTEN phosphorylation at its C terminus by these kinases. Our results suggest an important role for the C-terminal region of PTEN in the selective association with scaffolding and/or regulatory molecules and provide evidence that PDZ domain binding stabilizes PTEN and targets this tumor suppressor for phosphorylation by microtubule-associated serine/threonine kinases.

  14. Binding of the biogenic polyamines to deoxyribonucleic acids of varying base composition: base specificity and the associated energetics of the interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Kabir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The thermodynamics of the base pair specificity of the binding of the polyamines spermine, spermidine, putrescine, and cadaverine with three genomic DNAs Clostridium perfringens, 27% GC, Escherichia coli, 50% GC and Micrococcus lysodeikticus, 72% GC have been studied using titration calorimetry and the data supplemented with melting studies, ethidium displacement and circular dichroism spectroscopy results. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Isothermal titration calorimetry, differential scanning calorimetry, optical melting studies, ethidium displacement, circular dichroism spectroscopy are the various techniques employed to characterize the interaction of four polyamines, spermine, spermidine, putersine and cadaverine with the DNAs. Polyamines bound stronger with AT rich DNA compared to the GC rich DNA and the binding varied depending on the charge on the polyamine as spermine>spermidine >putrescine>cadaverine. Thermodynamics of the interaction revealed that the binding was entropy driven with small enthalpy contribution. The binding was influenced by salt concentration suggesting the contribution from electrostatic forces to the Gibbs energy of binding to be the dominant contributor. Each system studied exhibited enthalpy-entropy compensation. The negative heat capacity changes suggested a role for hydrophobic interactions which may arise due to the non polar interactions between DNA and polyamines. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: From a thermodynamic analysis, the AT base specificity of polyamines to DNAs has been elucidated for the first time and supplemented by structural studies.

  15. Specific binding sites in the alcR and alcA promoters of the ethanol regulon for the CREA repressor mediating carbon catabolite repression in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulmburg, P; Mathieu, M; Dowzer, C; Kelly, J; Felenbok, B

    1993-03-01

    The CREA repressor responsible for carbon catabolite repression in Aspergillus nidulans represses the transcription of the ethanol regulon. The N-terminal part of the CREA protein encompassing the two zinc fingers (C2H2 class family) and an alanine-rich region was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with glutathione-S-transferase. Our results show that CREA is a DNA-binding protein able to bind to the promoters of both the specific trans-acting gene, alcR, and of the structural gene, alcA, encoding the alcohol dehydrogenase I. DNase I protection footprinting experiments revealed several specific binding sites in the alcR and in the alcA promoters having the consensus sequence 5'-G/CPyGGGG-3'. The disruption of one of these CREA-binding sites in the alcR promoter overlapping the induction target for the trans-activator ALCR results in a partially derepressed alc phenotype and derepressed alcR transcription, showing that this binding site is functional in vivo. Our data suggest that CREA represses the ethanol regulon by a double lock mechanism repressing both the trans-acting gene, alcR, and the structural gene, alcA.

  16. Human cyclophilin 33 (hCyP33) in T-cell binds specifically to poly(A)~+RNA (mRNA)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张万起; 袁直; 宓怀风; 元云峰; 何炳林; 王亦农

    2002-01-01

    Human cyclophilin 33 (hCyP33), found in 1996, consists of an RNA-binding domain in N-terminus, a cyclophilin domain in C-terminus and a connected part between the two domains. RNA-binding proteins concern functions, such as splicing, modification and transport, after transcription in eukaryotic cells. Cyclophilins (CyPs) possess enzymatic activity, namely peptidyl-proryl cis-trans isomerase (PPlase). They are involved in folding, transport and interaction of proteins. Cyclosporin A (CsA), an immunosuppressant used by organ transplantation, binds to CyPs and suppresses their enzymatic activity. However, up to now it is unknown that which cellular and physiological roles hCyP33, which possesses the above-mentioned both functions, plays. In this paper the binding specificity of hCyP33 to different cellular RNA is investigated by means of ion-exchange chromatography and affinity adsorption. The results show that it binds specifically to poly(A) tailed mRNA, namely poly(A)+RNA.

  17. Human cyclophilin 33 (hCyP33) in T-cell binds specifically to poly(A)+RNA (mRNA)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张万起; 元云峰; 王亦农; 袁直; 宓怀风; 何炳林

    2002-01-01

    Human cyclophilin 33 (hCyP33), found in 1996, consists of an RNA-binding domain in N-terminus, a cyclophilin domain in C-terminus and a connected part between the two domains. RNA-binding proteins concern functions, such as splicing, modification and transport, after transcription in eukaryotic cells. Cyclophilins (CyPs) possess enzymatic activity, namely peptidyl-proryl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase). They are involved in folding, transport and interaction of proteins. Cyclosporin A (CsA), an immunosuppressant used by organ transplantation, binds to CyPs and suppresses their enzymatic activity. However, up to now it is unknown that which cellular and physiological roles hCyP33, which possesses the above-mentioned both functions, plays. In this paper the binding specificity of hCyP33 to different cellular RNA is investigated by means of ion-exchange chromatography and affinity adsorption. The results show that it binds specifically to poly(A) tailed mRNA, namely poly(A)+RNA.

  18. Coinvasion of dentinal tubules by Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus gordonii depends upon binding specificity of streptococcal antigen I/II adhesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, R M; McMillan, M D; Park, Y; Jenkinson, H F

    2000-03-01

    Cell wall-anchored polypeptides of the antigen I/II family are produced by many species of oral streptococci. These proteins mediate adhesion of streptococci to salivary glycoproteins and to other oral microorganisms and promote binding of cells to collagen type I and invasion of dentinal tubules. Since infections of the root canal system have a mixed anaerobic bacterial etiology, we investigated the hypothesis that coadhesion of anaerobic bacteria with streptococci may facilitate invasive endodontic disease. Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 cells were able to invade dentinal tubules when cocultured with Streptococcus gordonii DL1 (Challis) but not when cocultured with Streptococcus mutans NG8. An isogenic noninvasive mutant of S. gordonii, with production of SspA and SspB (antigen I/II family) polypeptides abrogated, was deficient in binding to collagen and had a 40% reduced ability to support adhesion of P. gingivalis. Heterologous expression of the S. mutans SpaP (antigen I/II) protein in this mutant restored collagen binding and tubule invasion but not adhesion to P. gingivalis or the ability to promote P. gingivalis coinvasion of dentin. An isogenic afimbrial mutant of P. gingivalis had 50% reduced binding to S. gordonii cells but was unaffected in the ability to coinvade dentinal tubules with S. gordonii wild-type cells. Expression of the S. gordonii SspA or SspB polypeptide on the surface of Lactococcus lactis cells endowed these bacteria with the abilities to bind P. gingivalis, penetrate dentinal tubules, and promote P. gingivalis coinvasion of dentin. The results demonstrate that collagen-binding and P. gingivalis-binding properties of antigen I/II polypeptides are discrete functions. Specificity of antigen I/II polypeptide recognition accounts for the ability of P. gingivalis to coinvade dentinal tubules with S. gordonii but not with S. mutans. This provides evidence that the specificity of interbacterial coadhesion may influence directly the etiology

  19. High Resolution Structures of Periplasmic Glucose-binding Protein of Pseudomonas putida CSV86 Reveal Structural Basis of Its Substrate Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Suman; Modak, Arnab; Phale, Prashant S; Bhaumik, Prasenjit

    2016-04-01

    Periplasmic substrate-binding proteins (SBPs) bind to the specific ligand with high affinity and mediate their transport into the cytoplasm via the cognate inner membrane ATP-binding cassette proteins. Because of low sequence identities, understanding the structural basis of substrate recognition by SBPs has remained very challenging. There are several structures available for the ligand-bound sugar SBPs, but very few unliganded structures are reported. No structural data are available for sugar SBPs fromPseudomonassp. to date. This study reports the first high resolution crystal structures of periplasmic glucose-binding protein fromPseudomonas putidaCSV86 (ppGBP) in unliganded form (2.5 Å) and complexed with glucose (1.25 Å) and galactose (1.8 Å). Asymmetric domain closure of ppGBP was observed upon substrate binding. The ppGBP was found to have an affinity of ∼ 0.3 μmfor glucose. The structural analysis showed that the sugars are bound to the protein mainly by hydrogen bonds, and the loss of two strong hydrogen bonds between ppGBP and galactose compared with glucose may be responsible for lowering its affinity toward galactose. The higher stability of ppGBP-glucose complex was also indicated by an 8 °C increase in the melting temperature compared with unliganded form and ppGBP-galactose complex. ppGBP binds to monosaccharide, but the structural features revealed it to have an oligosaccharide-binding protein fold, indicating that during evolution the sugar binding pocket may have undergone structural modulation to accommodate monosaccharide only.

  20. Detection of C3d-Binding Donor-Specific Anti-HLA Antibodies at Diagnosis of Humoral Rejection Predicts Renal Graft Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicard, Antoine; Ducreux, Stéphanie; Rabeyrin, Maud; Couzi, Lionel; McGregor, Brigitte; Badet, Lionel; Scoazec, Jean Yves; Bachelet, Thomas; Lepreux, Sébastien; Visentin, Jonathan; Merville, Pierre; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Morelon, Emmanuel; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Dubois, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is a major cause of kidney graft loss, yet assessment of individual risk at diagnosis is impeded by the lack of a reliable prognosis assay. Here, we tested whether the capacity of anti-HLA antibodies to bind complement components allows accurate risk stratification at the time of AMR diagnosis. Among 938 kidney transplant recipients for whom a graft biopsy was performed between 2004 and 2012 at the Lyon University Hospitals, 69 fulfilled the diagnosis criteria for AMR and were enrolled. Sera banked at the time of the biopsy were screened for the presence of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSAs) and their ability to bind C1q and C3d using flow bead assays. In contrast with C4d graft deposition, the presence of C3d-binding DSA was associated with a higher risk of graft loss (P<0.001). Despite similar trend, the difference did not reach significance with a C1q-binding assay (P=0.06). The prognostic value of a C3d-binding assay was further confirmed in an independent cohort of 39 patients with AMR (P=0.04). Patients with C3d-binding antibodies had worse eGFR and higher DSA mean fluorescence intensity. In a multivariate analysis, only eGFR<30 ml/min per 1.73 m2 (hazard ratio [HR], 3.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.46 to 8.70; P=0.005) and the presence of circulating C3d-binding DSA (HR, 2.80; 95% CI, 1.12 to 6.95; P=0.03) were independent predictors for allograft loss at AMR diagnosis. We conclude that assessment of the C3d-binding capacity of DSA at the time of AMR diagnosis allows for identification of patients at risk for allograft loss. PMID:25125383

  1. Insecticidal 3-benzamido-N-phenylbenzamides specifically bind with high affinity to a novel allosteric site in housefly GABA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozoe, Yoshihisa; Kita, Tomo; Ozoe, Fumiyo; Nakao, Toshifumi; Sato, Kazuyuki; Hirase, Kangetsu

    2013-11-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors (GABARs) are an important target for existing insecticides such as fiproles. These insecticides act as noncompetitive antagonists (channel blockers) for insect GABARs by binding to a site within the intrinsic channel of the GABAR. Recently, a novel class of insecticides, 3-benzamido-N-phenylbenzamides (BPBs), was shown to inhibit GABARs by binding to a site distinct from the site for fiproles. We examined the binding site of BPBs in the adult housefly by means of radioligand-binding and electrophysiological experiments. 3-Benzamido-N-(2,6-dimethyl-4-perfluoroisopropylphenyl)-2-fluorobenzamide (BPB 1) (the N-demethyl BPB) was a partial, but potent, inhibitor of [(3)H]4'-ethynyl-4-n-propylbicycloorthobenzoate (GABA channel blocker) binding to housefly head membranes, whereas the 3-(N-methyl)benzamido congener (the N-methyl BPB) had low or little activity. A total of 15 BPB analogs were tested for their abilities to inhibit [(3)H]BPB 1 binding to the head membranes. The N-demethyl analogs, known to be highly effective insecticides, potently inhibited the [(3)H]BPB 1 binding, but the N-methyl analogs did not even though they, too, are considered highly effective. [(3)H]BPB 1 equally bound to the head membranes from wild-type and dieldrin-resistant (rdl mutant) houseflies. GABA allosterically inhibited [(3)H]BPB 1 binding. By contrast, channel blocker-type antagonists enhanced [(3)H]BPB 1 binding to housefly head membranes by increasing the affinity of BPB 1. Antiparasitic macrolides, such as ivermectin B1a, were potent inhibitors of [(3)H]BPB 1 binding. BPB 1 inhibited GABA-induced currents in housefly GABARs expressed in Xenopus oocytes, whereas it failed to inhibit l-glutamate-induced currents in inhibitory l-glutamate receptors. Overall, these findings indicate that BPBs act at a novel allosteric site that is different from the site for channel blocker-type antagonists and that is probably overlapped with the site for macrolides

  2. Nonbonded interactions in membrane active cyclic biopolymers. IV - Cation dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, R.; Sriniv