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Sample records for cation exchange resins

  1. Enhanced DOC removal using anion and cation ion exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Paic, Miguel; Cawley, Kaelin M; Byg, Steve; Rosario-Ortiz, Fernando L

    2016-01-01

    Hardness and DOC removal in a single ion exchange unit operation allows for less infrastructure, is advantageous for process operation and depending on the water source, could enhance anion exchange resin removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Simultaneous application of cationic (Plus) and anionic (MIEX) ion exchange resin in a single contact vessel was tested at pilot and bench scales, under multiple regeneration cycles. Hardness removal correlated with theoretical predictions; where measured hardness was between 88 and 98% of the predicted value. Comparing bench scale DOC removal of solely treating water with MIEX compared to Plus and MIEX treated water showed an enhanced DOC removal, where removal was increased from 0.5 to 1.25 mg/L for the simultaneous resin application compared to solely applying MIEX resin. A full scale MIEX treatment plant (14.5 MGD) reduced raw water DOC from 13.7 mg/L to 4.90 mg/L in the treated effluent at a bed volume (BV) treatment rate of 800, where a parallel operation of a simultaneous MIEX and Plus resin pilot (10 gpm) measured effluent DOC concentrations of no greater than 3.4 mg/L, even at bed volumes of treatment 37.5% greater than the full scale plant. MIEX effluent compared to simultaneous Plus and MIEX effluent resulted in differences in fluorescence intensity that correlated to decreases in DOC concentration. The simultaneous treatment of Plus and MIEX resin produced water with predominantly microbial character, indicating the enhanced DOC removal was principally due to increased removal of terrestrially derived organic matter. The addition of Plus resin to a process train with MIEX resin allows for one treatment process to remove both DOC and hardness, where a single brine waste stream can be sent to sewer at a full-scale plant, completely removing lime chemical addition and sludge waste disposal for precipitative softening processes. PMID:26624231

  2. Study on degradation of cation exchange resin for condensate polishing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degradation of condensate polisher resin might cause the deterioration of water chemistry in power plants. The cause of cation resin degradation was studied in laboratory tests which simulated actual operating condition in a condensate polishing plant. It was found that air-scrubbing and unregenerated storage accelerate the decomposition of the cation exchange resin. Decrease of air-scrubbing times and regenerated storage are suggested as countermeasures against cation exchange resin degradation. (author)

  3. Cation exchange abilities of nanocomposites based on ion exchange resin and zirconium hydrophosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modification of cation-exchange resin with nanoparticles of zirconium hydrophosphate leads to the synergism of ion-exchange properties. The exchange of Cu2+→H+ shows that the nanocomposite ion exchangers demonstrate a high affinity to d-metal ions due to the polymer matrix, as well as to the inorganic component. The best characteristics are obtained for materials containing spherical particles of zirconium hydrophosphate with a diameter of (1.4-1.7) x 10-8 m, these aggregates being the most porous.

  4. Separation of Clay Minerals from Host Sediments Using Cation Exchange Resins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.S. Ismael; H.M. Baioumy

    2003-01-01

    Classic physical and chemical treatments applied to separating clay minerals from the host sediments are often difficult or aggressive for clay minerals. A technique using cation exchange resins (amberlite IRC-50H and amberlite IR-120) is used to separate clay minerals from the host sediments. The technique is based on the exchange of cations in the minerals that may be associated clay minerals in sediments,such as Ca and Mg from dolomite; Ca from calcite,gypsum and francolite with cations carried by resin radicals. The associated minerals such as gypsum,calcite,dolomite and francolite are removed in descending order. Separation of clay minerals using cation exchange resins is less aggressive than that by other classic treatments.The efficiency of amberlite IRC-50H in the removal of associated minerals is greater than that of amberlite IR-120.

  5. Simultaneous Determination of Anions and Cations in Natural Water by Ion-exclusion/Cation-exchange Chromatography with a Weakly Acidic Cation-exchange Resin Column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simultaneous determination of anions (SO4 2-, Cl-, and NO3 -) and cations (Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca2+) in natural water obtained by Nakdong River waters system in Korea were performed by ion-exclusion/cation exchange chromatography with conductimetric detection. The stationary phase was a polymethacrylate-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin column in the H+-form and a weak-acid eluent. When using only a 1.4 mM sulfosalicylic acid/6 mM 18-crown-6 ether as an eluent, good resolution of both anions and cations, minimum time required for the separation, and satisfactory detection sensitivity were obtained in a reasonable time. The method was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of anions and cations in natural waters

  6. Simultaneous Determination of Anions and Cations in Natural Water by Ion-exclusion/Cation-exchange Chromatography with a Weakly Acidic Cation-exchange Resin Column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kwang Pill; Choi, Seong Ho; Park, Yu Chul; Bae, Zun Ung; Lee, Mu Sang; Lee, Sang Hak; Chang, Hye Yong [Graduate School, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Se Mok [Ulsan City Health and Environmental Research Institute, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Tanaka, Kazuhiko [National Industrial Research Institute of Nagoya, Nagoya (Japan)

    2003-09-15

    The simultaneous determination of anions (SO{sub 4} {sup 2-}, Cl{sup -}, and NO{sub 3} {sup -}) and cations (Na{sup +}, NH{sup 4+}, K{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, and Ca{sup 2+}) in natural water obtained by Nakdong River waters system in Korea were performed by ion-exclusion/cation exchange chromatography with conductimetric detection. The stationary phase was a polymethacrylate-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin column in the H{sup +}-form and a weak-acid eluent. When using only a 1.4 mM sulfosalicylic acid/6 mM 18-crown-6 ether as an eluent, good resolution of both anions and cations, minimum time required for the separation, and satisfactory detection sensitivity were obtained in a reasonable time. The method was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of anions and cations in natural waters.

  7. Effect of α-irradiation on the properties of the phosphate cation exchange resin KFP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of α-irradiation in a solution of 2 M nitric acid on the properties of the cation-exchange resins KFP-8 and KFP-16 in the range of doses of irradiation up to 5.5 x 188 rad was investigated. It was shown that irradiation leads to a loss of porosity, a decrease in the mechanical strength of the grains, and dissolution of the resin in nitric acid. The exchange capacity of the resin with respect to phosphate groups is decreased: however, new functional groups with low basicity appear, which leads to an increase in the total exchange capacity when the resin is irradiated. The distribution coefficients of fragment elements between the resin and the nitric acid solutions are changed

  8. Effects of Experimental Conditions on Extraction Yield of Extracellular Polymeric Substances by Cation Exchange Resin

    OpenAIRE

    Jinwoo Cho; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W; Jin Hur

    2012-01-01

    Effects of experimental conditions on the yield of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) extraction by cation exchange resin (CER) were investigated using activated sludge flocs. The experimental variables included resin dose, extraction time, sample dilution, and storage time. An empirical model was proposed to describe the kinetics of extraction process. The extraction yield increases with the extraction time and CER dose until it reached the maximum amount of EPS extraction. The maximu...

  9. Strong cation exchange resin for improving physicochemical properties and sustaining release of ranitidine hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study strong cation exchange resin (Amberlite IRP69 was used to improve the physicochemical properties of ranitidine hydrochloride such as taste and bulk properties and to sustain dissolution rate. Drug-resin complexes were prepared using batch method. Drug loading was done under different processing conditions such as temperature, pH, drug-resin ratio, and drug concentration to get the optimum condition for resinate preparation. Resinate prepared under optimized condition was tested for taste, bulk properties and release rate. Degree of bitterness of ranitidine was found to reduce to zero after complexation with resin. Improvement in flow properties was also observed. Angle of repose for resinate was found to be 33.21 o as compared to 42.27 o for ranitidine HCl. Effect of dissolution medium and particle size on in vitro release of drug from resinate was also investigated. Resinate with drug to resin ratio of 2:3 and particle size> 90 µm showed about 90% of drug release within 12 h. The orodispersible tablet formulated from the resinate containing 10% croscarmellose sodium disintegrated within 35 sec in oral cavity and showed similar dissolution profile as the resinate. Tablets were found stable after stability studies with no change in dissolution profile.

  10. Some investigations on the radiation stability of a strongly acidic cation exchange resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessouki, A. M.; Zahran, A. H.; Rabie, A. M.; Amer, S. I.

    The radiation-chemical stability of Merck Cation Exchanger I, a strongly acidic sulphonated cation exchanger of the polymerization type based on styrene-divinylbenze (DVB) copolymers was investigated. The radiation stability of the resin was assessed from the change in exchange capacity, loss in weight, change in swelling behaviour and formation of new exchange groups. The loss in capacity was 44 and 32% for resin specimens in the H +-form irradiated to 1000 Mrad in air and in vacuum, respectively. The Na +-form of the exchanger showed high resistance to radiation and the loss in capacity did not exceed 7% at a dose of 1000 Mrad. The loss in capacity was accompanied by a loss in weight and a decrease in the degree of swelling of the irradiated resin. The formation of new functional groups of the carboxylic and phenolic types was confirmed. The amount of these group increases with the increase in the integral dose. The amount of sulphuric acid formed as a result of irradiating the resin in the dry and moist states was determined. An increase in the moisture content of the resin resulted in a marked decrease in its radiation stability.

  11. Measurement of the acidities of several cation-exchange resins using hydrogen-isotope exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrogen-isotope exchange reaction between ethanol (unlabeled) and one of three cation-exchange resins labeled with tritium has been observed at 40-80degC. The acidity (acidity based on kinetic logic) at each temperature has been obtained from a A'-McKay plot based on the respective data obtained. The following results have been obtained on the basis of both the acidities obtained in this work and the acidities (of several materials) obtained previously. (1) The order of the reactivity is (Amberlite IRC-76)>(Dowex A-1)>(PVA2000>(Amberlite IRC-50) at 60degC. (2) The higher the temperature, the larger is the reactivity of each material. (3) The temperature dependence of the reactivity of Dowex A-1 is the largest in the four. (4) The reactivity of the functional group (i.e., COOH group or OH group) bonded to the polymer chain can be clarified using the A'-McKay plot method. (5) It seems that method can be applied to analyze other reactions, e.g., other isotope-exchange reactions, surface reactions, catalytic reactions, etc. (author)

  12. Biochemical characterization of Extracellular Polymeric Substances extracted from an intertidal mudflat using a cation exchange resin.

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre, Guillaume; Graber, Marianne; Orvain, Francis; Dupuy, Christine; Maugard, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    The biochemical characterization of Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS) excreted in a European intertidal mudflat (Marennes-Oléron Bay) was performed. Experiments were carried out for the first time in situ, by using an improved extraction recently developed. This innovative procedure, using a cation exchange resin (Dowex), allows separating precisely different fractions of EPS, especially pure bound EPS. Moreover, it avoids the contamination of EPS fractions by residual and intracellula...

  13. Method of producing weakly acidic cation exchange resin particles charged with uranyl ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelmonem, N.; Ringel, H.; Zimmer, E.

    1981-07-21

    Weakly acidic cationic ion exchange resin particles are charged with uranyl ions by contacting the particles step wise with aqueous uranyl nitrate solution at higher uranium concentrations from stage to stage. An alkaline medium is added to the uranyl nitrate solution in each stage to increase the successive pH values of the uranyl nitrate solution contacting the particles in dependence upon the uranium concentration effective for maximum charging of the particles with uranyl ions.

  14. Esterification of oleic acid with ethanol catalyzed by sulfonated cation exchange resin: Experimental and kinetic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Esterification of oleic acid with ethanol was investigated in the presence of sulfonated cation exchange resin. • We studied kinetic model of the esterification of oleic acid with ethanol according to experimental data. • The proposed kinetic model can well predict oleic acid conversion. - Abstract: This paper investigated the effects of ethanol to oleic acid molar ratio, reaction temperature, catalyst loading, water content and catalyst recycling on sulfonated cation exchange resin in a stirred batch reactor under atmospheric pressure. When the esterification was carried out with an ethanol to oleic acid (42.4 g) molar ratio of 9:1, reflux of ethanol at 82 °C, 20 g of catalyst and 8 h of reaction time, the oleic acid conversion rate reached approximately 93%. A pseudo-homogeneous kinetic model for describing the esterification of oleic acid with ethanol by the sulfonated cation exchange resin was developed on the basis of laboratorial results. The kinetic model can well predict the oleic acid conversion

  15. Degradation of functional group of cation exchange nuclear grade resin loaded with different metal ions due to gamma radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchange resins undergo degradation due to ionizing radiation while processing the radioactive water treatment. During this process, the cation resin used for this purpose gets loaded with various metal ions and presence of different metal ions in the resin may result into different degradation behaviors of functional group(s) (lowering the capacity). This work deals with the effect of few cations such as H+, Li+, Na+, Cs+ and Cu2+ on the degradation behavior of functional groups of strong acid cation resins exposed in different dose of 60Co gamma ray. Degradations were estimated by measuring the sulphate ion concentration in leach solution. (author)

  16. DecorporatinC facilities of cation-exchange resins with different characteristics on radioactive strontium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficiency in promoting radiostrontium elimination from the body was studied comparatively for cation-exchange resins differing in type of exchanging moieties, mesh sizes, or extent of cross-linkage in the polymere molecule. The experiments were performed on rats receiving each an oral dose of 5 μCi or 85Sr in a 10 μCi/ml aqueous solution of strontium bichloride. The resins, suspended in sodium carboxymethyl cellulose solution, were administered either 10 or 30 minutes after radionuclide ingestion. From 2 hours to 72 hours after treatment, the animals were whole-body counted, and shortly thereafter their femur radioactivity was measured. All of the resin types tested were found to decrease strontium body burdens, with Amberlite IR-120 and Amberlite IRC-50 showing the most favourable effect. Tne efficiency of the resins did not appear to depend on the type of ion-exchange site. Similarly, no relation was observed with the amount of cross-linkage. It was the resins with minimum mesh sizes that proved more effective. (A.B.)

  17. Ion exchange behaviour of polymeric zirconium cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polymeric zirconium cations formed in weakly acid solutions (pH2) are taken up strongly into macroporous cation exchange resins, while uptake into normal cation exchange resins (pore diameter about 1 nm) is low. Macroporous cation exchange resins loaded with polymeric Zr cations are shown to function as ligand exchange sorbents. (Authors)

  18. Adsorption behavior and mechanism of cadmium on strong-acid cation exchange resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fei; WANG Lian-jun; LI Jian-sheng; SUN Xiu-yun; HAN Wei-qing

    2009-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of Cd2+ on 001×7 strong-acid cation exchange resin was studied with the static adsorption method. The adsorption process was analyzed from thermodynamics and kinetics aspects. The influences of experimental parameters such as pH, temperature, initial concentration and adsorption rate were investigated. The experimental results show that in the studied concentration range, 001×7 resin has a good sorption ability for Cd2+, and the equilibrium adsorption data fit to Freundlich isotherms. The adsorption is an exothermic process which runs spontaneously. Kinetic analysis shows that the adsorption rate is mainly governed by liquid film diffusion. The best adsorption condition is pH 4-5. The saturated resin can be regenerated by 3 mol/L nitric acid, and the desorption efficiency is over 98%. The maximal static saturated adsorption capacity is 355 mg/g (wet resin) at 293 K. The adsorption mechanism of Cd2+ on 001×7 resin was discussed based on IR spectra.

  19. Chemical and dimensional evolution of cationic ions exchange resins in cement pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchange resins (IERs) are widely used by the nuclear industry to decontaminate radioactive effluents. After use they are usually encapsulated in cementitious materials. However, the solidified waste forms can exhibit a strong expansion, possibly leading to cracking. Its origin is not well understood as well as the conditions when it occurs.In this work, the interactions between cationic resins in the Na+ or Ca2+ form and tricalcium silicate (C3S), Portland cement (CEM I) or Blast furnace slag cement (CEM III/C) are investigated at an early age in order to gain a better understanding of the expansion process.The results show that during the hydration of a paste of C3S or CEM I containing IERs in the Na+ form, the resins exhibit a transient expansion of small magnitude due to the decrease in the osmotic pressure of the interstitial solution. This expansion, which occurs just after cement setting, is sufficient to damage the material which is poorly consolidated for several reasons: small hydration degree, precipitation of less cohesive sodium bearing C-S-H, heterogeneous microstructure with highly porous zones and lastly cleavable crystals of portlandite at the interface between resins and paste. This expansion can be prevented by performing a calcium pretreatment of the resins or by using a CEM III/C cement with a slower rate of hydration than that of Portland cement. (author)

  20. Cation exchange resin immobilized bimetallic nickel-iron nanoparticles to facilitate their application in pollutants degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Shou-Qing; Yang, Ning

    2014-04-15

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) usually suffers from reduction of reactivity by aggregation, difficulty of assembling, environmental release and health concerns. Furthermore, data are lacking on the effect of cheap nickel on debromination of decabromodiphenyl ether (DBDE) by immobilized nZVI in aqueous system. In this study, strong acid polystyrene cation-exchange resins with particle diameter from 0.4 to 0.6 mm were utilized as matrices to immobilize bimetallic nickel-iron nanoparticles in order to minimize aggregation and environmental leakage risks of nZVI and to enhance their reactivity. Elemental distribution mapping showed that iron particles distributed uniformly on the surface of the resin and nickel particles were dispersed homogeneously into Fe phase. The reaction rate of resin-bound nZVI is about 55% higher than that of dispersed nZVI. The immobilized bimetallic nanoparticles with 9.69% Ni had the highest debromination percent (96%) and reaction rate (0.493 1/h). The existence of Ni significantly improved the debromination rate, due to the surface coverage of catalytic metal on the reductive metal and the formation of a galvanic cell. The environmental dominant congeners, such as BDE 154, 153, 100, 99 and 47, were produced during the process. Outstanding reactive performance, along with magnetic separation assured that resin-bound bimetallic nickel-iron nanoparticles are promising material that can be utilized to remediate a wide variety of pollutants contaminated sites including polybrominated diphenyl ethers. PMID:24559714

  1. Comparative study of the ionic exchange of Ca++, Sr++, and Ba++ cations on resins and inorganic exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With a view to applying the results to certain problems related to chemical separations in activation analysis, a study has been made, of the possibilities of separating the alkaline-earth elements Ca, Sr and Ba on organic resins and inorganic exchangers using the radioactive indicator method. The partition coefficients of the cations Ca2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+ have been measured on Dowex 50 W (NH4+) x 8 resin in the presence of EDTA - NTA - EGTA and DCTA as complexing agents, and on zirconium phosphate, tungstate and molybdate in the presence of HCl and NH4Cl. Methods have been developed for separating mixtures of alkaline-earth elements using DCTA-NH4+ followed by elution on Dowex 50 W (NH4+) x 8 resin columns and on zirconium phosphate. Amongst the complexing agents used on the ion-exchange resins the most promising appears to be DCTA which leads to partition coefficients Ca, Sr and Ba which are very different. The results of measurements of partition coefficients on zirconium phosphate (NH4+ form) using DCTA-NH4+ show the interesting possibilities of separations on columns. The separation of the alkaline-earth elements on zirconium phosphate seems to be less quantitative than on Dowex 50 resin; it is however much faster in the former case and this can be useful for treating short half-life radioisotopes in activation analysis. (author)

  2. Cation exchange resins labeled with holmium-166 for treatment of liver malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing interest in new therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals is prompting investigators to utilize isotopes with more focused capabilities for treating various tumors, reducing the negative effects on neighboring healthy cells. Local radionuclide therapy using radioactive microspheres is a promising therapy for non-operable group of patients suffering from liver malignancies. Many publications have shown the success of this technique. The emphasis in the present work is the resin-based microspheres labeled with 166Ho. The production of 166Ho is feasible in the IEA-R1 Reactor at IPEN-CNEN/SP, because it does not need high power and high neutron fluxes. Samples of Ho2O3 were irradiated in selected positions of the nuclear reactor IEA-R1 at IPEN/CNEN-SP. The neutron flux was 1.0 x1013 n.s-1.cm-2 for 1 hour. The dissolution of Ho2O3 was studied with different volumes of 0.1M HCl and also varying the heating temperature. The AG50W-X8 200-400 mesh and CM Sephadex C-25 cation exchange resins were labeled with 166Ho. The retention of 166Ho in the resins was studied and also its stability. The results of the dissolution experiments of Ho2O3 showed that there is a direct relation between the increasing volumes needed to dissolve higher masses, and also the positive effect of raising the temperature. The results show very good retention of 166Ho in both columns, even when high volumes of 0.1M HCl are passed through the column containing the resins and its good stability towards saline solution, PBS solution and glucose.Although the resins employed in this work did not have the right particle size (20-50μm), the chemical behavior showed the very good labeling of the resins with 166Ho, and its stability. (author)

  3. Effect of blastfurnace slag addition to Portland cement for cationic exchange resins encapsulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan L.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the nuclear industry, cement-based materials are extensively used to encapsulate spent ion exchange resins (IERs before their final disposal in a repository. It is well known that the cement has to be carefully selected to prevent any deleterious expansion of the solidified waste form, but the reasons for this possible expansion are not clearly established. This work aims at filling the gap. The swelling pressure of IERs is first investigated as a function of ions exchange and ionic strength. It is shown that pressures of a few tenths of MPa can be produced by decreases in the ionic strength of the bulk solution, or by ion exchanges (2Na+ instead of Ca2+, Na+ instead of K+. Then, the chemical evolution of cationic resins initially in the Na+ form is characterized in CEM I (Portland cement and CEM III (Portland cement + blastfurnace slag cements at early age and an explanation is proposed for the better stability of CEM III material.

  4. On the real performance of cation exchange resins in wastewater treatment under conditions of cation competition: the case of heavy metal pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prelot, Benedicte; Ayed, Imen; Marchandeau, Franck; Zajac, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Sorption performance of cation-exchange resins Amberlite® IRN77 and Amberlite™ IRN9652 toward Cs(I) and Sr(II) has been tested in single-component aqueous solutions and simulated waste effluents containing other monovalent (Effluent 1) or divalent (Effluent 2) metal cations, as well as nitrate, borate, or carbonate anions. The individual sorption isotherms of each main component were measured by the solution depletion method. The differential molar enthalpy changes accompanying the ion-exchange between Cs+ or Sr2+ ions and protons at the resin surface from single-component nitrate solutions were measured by isothermal titration calorimetry and they showed a higher specificity of the two resins toward cesium. Compared to the retention limits of both resins under such idealized conditions, an important depression in the maximum adsorption capacity toward each main component was observed in multication systems. The overall effect of ion exchange process appeared to be an unpredictable outcome of the individual sorption capacities of the two resins toward various cations as a function of the cation charge, size, and concentration. The cesium retention capacity of the resins was diminished to about 25% of the "ideal" value in Effluent 1 and 50% in Effluent 2; a further decrease to about 15% was observed upon concomitant strontium addition. The uptake of strontium by the resins was found to be less sensitive to the addition of other metal components: the greatest decrease in the amount adsorbed was 60% of the ideal value in the two effluents for Amberlite® IRN77 and 75% for Amberlite™ IRN9652. It was therefore demonstrated that any performance tests carried out under idealized conditions should be exploited with much caution to predict the real performance of cation exchange resins under conditions of cation competition. PMID:24728575

  5. Salbutamol versus cation-exchange resin (kayexalate) for the treatment of nonoliguric hyperkalemia in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Hakam; Khalaf, Mona; Dana, Ahmed; Yaseen, Noha; Darwich, Maha

    2008-03-01

    Our objective was to compare the efficacy and safety of rectal cation-exchange resin (Kayexalate) versus salbutamol infusion for the treatment of nonoliguric hyperkalemia (NOHK) in preterm infants. Data of all neonates born with NOHK during the study period of 6 years and 8 months were recorded. Diagnostic criteria of NOHK included serum potassium (SK) concentration > or = 7 mmol/L during the first 72 hours of life with urine output > or = 1 mL/kg/hour. This before-after study was divided according to the date of admission; the first 15 patients were treated with Kayexalate enema 1 g/kg every 4 hours, and the remaining 30 patients were treated with intravenous salbutamol infusion as 4 mug/kg every 4 hours. Treatment discontinued when SK became < 6 mmol/L. SK was measured every 4 hours. Daily urine was collected. Fluid intake and output, serum electrolytes, urea, creatinine, and glucose concentrations were obtained in all infants every 12 hours. All infants were observed with a cardiorespiratory monitor and oxygen saturation and blood pressure measurements. Perinatal characteristics in both groups were comparable. Mean gestational age was 26 and 28 weeks for salbutamol and Kayexalate, respectively. The peak of SK ranged between 7 and 9.3 mmol/L in the Kayexalate group and between 7 and 8.7 mmol/L in the salbutamol group ( P = 0.64). At 12 hours of treatment, SK became normal in only 4 patients (26%) in the Kayexalate group compared with 18 patients (60%) in the salbutamol group ( P = 0.003). The number of doses of Kayexalate administration was significantly higher than the doses of salbutamol ( P = 0.003). No significant side effects were detected in the salbutamol-treated infants. In contrast, there were two cases of severe ventricular tachycardia and one case of intestinal obstruction in the cation-exchange resin group. We concluded that salbutamol infusion is more effective with faster action and safer than cation-exchange resin (Kayexalate) for the treatment of

  6. Uranium adsorption from the sulphuric acid leach liquor containing more chlorides with cation-exchange resin SL-406

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of uranium adsorption was studied from the sulphuric acid leach liquor of a uranium ore containing more chlorides with cation-exchange resin SL-406. The influence of some factors on uranium adsorption was investigated. It was shown that the resin possesses better selectivity, stability and higher capacity. It can be effectively used to recovery uranium from leach liquors of uranium ores containing more chlorides

  7. Electrochemical catalytic treatment of wastewater by metal ion supported on cation exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrochemical oxidation of phenol in synthetic wastewater and paper mill wastewater catalyzed by metal ion supported on cation exchange resin in suspended bed electrolytic reactor with graphite electrode has been investigated. The catalyst was characterized by SEM and XPS spectra and the effects of pH, the different metal ion and NaCl on the efficiency of the electrochemical oxidation phenol process were also studied. It was found that the catalyst containing Fe3+ had the highest electrochemical catalytic activity for the electrochemical oxidation of phenol. When the initial concentration of phenol was 200 ppm, up to 90% chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was obtained in 10 min. When the catalyst containing Fe3+ was used to the paper mill wastewater, it still showed high efficiency. The COD removal could get to 75% in 60 min

  8. FACTORS AFFECT THE RELEASE OF PSEUDOEPHDRINE HYDROCHLORIDE FROM THE UNCOATED CATION EXCHANGE RESIN-BASED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM IN VITRO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhenhua; PI Hongqiong; HE Binglin

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, it was investigated that the effect of parameters such as the ionic strength,pH, counter-ion type of release medium, particle size, and cross linkage of cation exchange resin on the release of model drug pseudoephedrine hydrochloride (PE) from uncoated drug-resin complex.The drug-resin complex was prepared by the reaction of PE with strongly acidic cation exchange resin (001 ×4, 001 ×7, 001 ×14). The result showed that the loading of PE increased with the increase of temperatures. The release of PE from drug-resin complex at 37 ℃ was monitored in vitro.From the experiments, it was found that the release rate of PE depends on the pH, composition of the releasing media, increased at lower pH media or with increase of ionic strength of media. Moreover,the release rate of PE was inversely proportional to the cross-linkage and particle size of the cation exchange resin.

  9. SYNTHESIS OF 2—HYDROXYETHYL ACRYLATE BY USING STRONG ACIDIC CATION ION EXCHANGE RESIN AS CATALYST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAODabin

    1992-01-01

    2-Hydroxyethyl acrylate is synthesized from acrylic acid and ethylene glycol under a simple and mild condition by using strong acidic cation ion exchange resin as a catalyst,which could be recycled as long as 10 times with high activation.

  10. Effects of Experimental Conditions on Extraction Yield of Extracellular Polymeric Substances by Cation Exchange Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinwoo Cho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of experimental conditions on the yield of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs extraction by cation exchange resin (CER were investigated using activated sludge flocs. The experimental variables included resin dose, extraction time, sample dilution, and storage time. An empirical model was proposed to describe the kinetics of extraction process. The extraction yield increases with the extraction time and CER dose until it reached the maximum amount of EPS extraction. The maximum yield of EPS was affected as well by the sample dilution, exhibiting a decreasing trend with increasing dilution factor. It was also found that the amount of EPS extracted from a raw sample depends on the storage time. Once EPS was extracted from the sample, however, the EPS keeps its original quantity under storage at 4°C. Based on the model, the maximum amount of EPS extraction and yield rate could be estimated for different conditions. Comparing the model parameters allows one to quantitatively compare the extraction efficiencies under various extracting conditions. Based on the results, we recommend the original sample should be diluted with the volume ratio of above 1 : 2 and a raw sample should be treated quickly to prevent the reduction of sample homogeneity and original integrity.

  11. Effects of experimental conditions on extraction yield of extracellular polymeric substances by cation exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jinwoo; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W; Hur, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Effects of experimental conditions on the yield of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) extraction by cation exchange resin (CER) were investigated using activated sludge flocs. The experimental variables included resin dose, extraction time, sample dilution, and storage time. An empirical model was proposed to describe the kinetics of extraction process. The extraction yield increases with the extraction time and CER dose until it reached the maximum amount of EPS extraction. The maximum yield of EPS was affected as well by the sample dilution, exhibiting a decreasing trend with increasing dilution factor. It was also found that the amount of EPS extracted from a raw sample depends on the storage time. Once EPS was extracted from the sample, however, the EPS keeps its original quantity under storage at 4°C. Based on the model, the maximum amount of EPS extraction and yield rate could be estimated for different conditions. Comparing the model parameters allows one to quantitatively compare the extraction efficiencies under various extracting conditions. Based on the results, we recommend the original sample should be diluted with the volume ratio of above 1:2 and a raw sample should be treated quickly to prevent the reduction of sample homogeneity and original integrity. PMID:22919352

  12. Disintegration and dissolution of spent radioactive cationic exchange resins using Fenton-like oxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Zhong; Xu, Lejin [Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, INET, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Jianlong, E-mail: wangjl@tsinghua.edu.cn [Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, INET, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Radioactive Wastes Treatment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The spent radioactive resins could be oxidized by Fenton-like process. • The influencing factors on resin oxidation were evaluated. • Chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction rate was more than 99%. • SEM and Raman spectrum were used to analyze the resins morphological change. - Abstract: The treatment and disposal of the spent radioactive resins is essential for the sustainable development of the nuclear industry. In this paper, the disintegration and dissolution of spent cationic resins were studied by Fenton-like process. The influencing factors on resin dissolution, such as pH, temperature, type and concentration of catalysts were evaluated. The results showed that the spent resins could be effectively dissolved at pH < 1, [Fe{sup 2+}] = 0.2 M and T = 97 ± 2 °C. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction rate was more than 99%. The scanning electron microscopy and the Raman spectrum were used to observe the morphological changes of the spent resins during the dissolution process. Fenton-like oxidation is an efficient method for the volume reduction and stabilization of the spent resins before further immobilization.

  13. Disintegration and dissolution of spent radioactive cationic exchange resins using Fenton-like oxidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The spent radioactive resins could be oxidized by Fenton-like process. • The influencing factors on resin oxidation were evaluated. • Chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction rate was more than 99%. • SEM and Raman spectrum were used to analyze the resins morphological change. - Abstract: The treatment and disposal of the spent radioactive resins is essential for the sustainable development of the nuclear industry. In this paper, the disintegration and dissolution of spent cationic resins were studied by Fenton-like process. The influencing factors on resin dissolution, such as pH, temperature, type and concentration of catalysts were evaluated. The results showed that the spent resins could be effectively dissolved at pH < 1, [Fe2+] = 0.2 M and T = 97 ± 2 °C. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction rate was more than 99%. The scanning electron microscopy and the Raman spectrum were used to observe the morphological changes of the spent resins during the dissolution process. Fenton-like oxidation is an efficient method for the volume reduction and stabilization of the spent resins before further immobilization

  14. Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of monomer-dimer monoclonal antibody mixtures on a cation exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reck, Jason M; Pabst, Timothy M; Hunter, Alan K; Wang, Xiangyang; Carta, Giorgio

    2015-07-10

    Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics are determined for a monoclonal antibody (mAb) monomer and dimer species, individually and in mixtures, on a macroporous cation exchange resin both under the dilute limit of salt gradient elution chromatography and at high protein loads and low salt based on batch adsorption equilibrium and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) experiments. In the dilute limit and weak binding conditions, the dimer/monomer selectivity in 10mM phosphate at pH 7 varies between 8.7 and 2.3 decreasing with salt concentration in the range of 170-230mM NaCl. At high protein loads and strong binding conditions (0-60mM NaCl), the selectivity in the same buffer is near unity with no NaCl added, but increases gradually with salt concentration reaching high values between 2 and 15 with 60mM added NaCl. For these conditions, the two-component adsorption kinetics is controlled by pore diffusion and is predicted approximately by a dual shrinking core model using parameters based on single component equilibrium and kinetics measurements. PMID:26028510

  15. Relative activities of siloxane monomers toward the cation exchange resin-catalyst in the equilibration reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. GOVEDARICA

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The relative activities of a number of siloxane monomers, both cyclic and linear, toward the cation exchange resin-equilibration catalyst were determined. The determination was based on the fact that when a particular siloxane compound is added to an arbitrarily chosen equilibrate, it takes part in the equilibration process, provoking certain viscosity changes of the reaction mixture. Taking these viscosity changes as a measure of activities, the following order was obtained: hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane > hexamethyldisiloxane > octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane > one linear all-methyl oligosiloxane of number average molecular weight of approximately 800 > decamethylcyclopentasiloxane. The results obtained by using the described viscosimetrical determination method were controlled by measuring the number average molecular weights of the reaction mixtures at the beginning and at the end of the equilibration process. The deviations of the experimentally measured from the calculated values were less than 20 %, as was found in one equilibration system. In most other systems the deviations were about 10 % which is a very good result which strengthens the validity of the applied determination method.

  16. Experimental Characterization and Modelization of Ion Exchange Kinetics for a Carboxylic Resin in Infinite Solution Volume Conditions. Application to Monovalent-Trivalent Cations Exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is devoted to the characterization of ion exchange inside a microsphere of carboxylic resin. It aims at describing the kinetics of this exchange reaction which is known to be controlled by interdiffusion in the particle. The fractional attainment of equilibrium function of time depends on the concentration of the cations in the resin which can be modelled by the Nernst-Planck equation. A powerful approach for the numerical resolution of this equation is introduced in this paper. This modeling is based on the work of Helfferich but involves an implicit numerical scheme which reduces the computational cost. Knowing the diffusion coefficients of the cations in the resin and the radius of the spherical exchanger, the kinetics can be hence completely determined. When those diffusion parameters are missing, they can be deduced by fitting experimental data of fractional attainment of equilibrium. An efficient optimization tool coupled with the implicit resolution has been developed for this purpose. A monovalent/trivalent cation exchange had been experimentally characterized for a carboxylic resin. Diffusion coefficients and concentration profiles in the resin were then deduced through this new model. (authors)

  17. Optimization of acidified oil esterification catalyzed by sulfonated cation exchange resin using response surface methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • As lipid source, acidified oil are from industrial wastes for renewable energy. • The predicted conversion rate of FFAs was 75.24% under the RSM optimized conditions. • The adsorption system was employed to remove the water produced to shift the equilibrium toward ethyl ester production. • Maximum conversion rate of 98.32% was obtained using adsorption system at optimum process parameters. • Compared with tradition methods, molecular sieve dehydration method improved the conversion rate by 23.08%. - Abstract: The esterification of acidified oil with ethanol catalyzed by sulfonated cation exchange resins (SCER) was optimized using the response surface methodology (RSM). The effects of the molar ratio of ethanol to acidified oil, reaction time and catalyst loading on the conversion rate of free fatty acids (FFAs) were investigated at the temperature of the boiling point of ethanol. Results showed that the highest conversion rate of 75.24% was obtained at the molar ratio of ethanol to acidified oil of 23.2, reaction time of 8.0 h and catalyst loading of 35.0 wt.%. Moreover, the conversion rate of FFAs was increased to 98.32% by using a water adsorption apparatus under the RSM optimized conditions. Scanning electronic microscopic–energy dispersive spectrometric (SEM–EDS), X-ray diffractometric (XRD) and thermogravimetric–derivative thermogravimetric (TG–DTG) analyses confirmed that the morphology of catalysts did not change much and the mechanical and thermal stabilities were still good after the reaction. Furthermore, SCER exhibited a high catalytic activity and stability after being reused for five successive times. The fuel properties of the biodiesel were comparable to that of ASTM, EN and GB biodiesel standard

  18. Behavior of cationic, anionic and colloidal species of titanium, zirconium and thorium in presence of ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of titanium, zirconium and thorium is aqueous and resin phases has been studied using strong cationic resin in the R-NH4 form. Solutions of the above elements in perchloric, nitric, hydrochloric and suphuric media were used. Each set of experiments was made by separately varying one of the five parameters - type of anion present, acidity of solution, temperature of percolation, age of solution and concentration of the element. It was found that, depending on the particular balance of these parameters, the elements investigated may be found in acidic solutions either as cationic, anionic or colloidal species. It is emphasized that the colloidal species of titanium, zirconium or thorium are not retained by the ion exchangers, and from this property a method for the separation and purification of the above elements has been outlined

  19. On the swelling behavior of cationic exchange resins saturated with Na+ ions in a C3S paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchange resins (IERs) are widely used in the nuclear industry to decontaminate radioactive effluents. Spent resins are usually encapsulated in cementitious materials. However, the solidified waste form can exhibit strong expansion, possibly leading to cracking, if the appropriate binder is not used. In this work, the interactions between cationic resins in the Na+ form and tricalcium silicate are investigated during the early stages of hydration in order to gain a better understanding of the expansion process. It is shown that the IERs exhibit a transient swelling of small magnitude due to the decrease in the osmotic pressure of the external solution. This expansion, which occurs just after setting, is sufficient to damage the material which is poorly consolidated for several reasons: low degree of hydration, precipitation of poorly cohesive sodium-bearing C-S-H, and very heterogeneous microstructure with zones of high porosity. (authors)

  20. HTGR fuel development: loading of uranium on carboxylic acid cation-exchange resins using solvent extraction of nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reference fuel kernel for recycle of 233U to HTGR's (High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors) is prepared by loading carboxylic acid cation-exchange resins with uranium and carbonizing at controlled conditions. The purified 233UO2(NO3)2 solution from a fuel reprocessing plant contains excess HNO3 (NO3-/U ratio of approximately 2.2). The reference flowsheet for a 233U recycle fuel facility at Oak Ridge uses solvent extraction of nitrate by a 0.3 M secondary amine in a hydrocarbon diluent to prepare acid-deficient uranyl nitrate. This nitrate extraction, along with resin loading and amine regeneration steps, was demonstrated in 14 runs. No significant operating difficulties were encountered. The process is controlled via in-line pH measurements for the acid-deficient uranyl nitrate solutions. Information was developed on pH values for uranyl nitrate solution vs NO3-/U mole ratios, resin loading kinetics, resin drying requirements, and other resin loading process parameters. Calculations made to estimate the capacities of equipment that is geometrically safe with respect to control of nuclear criticality indicate 100 kg/day or more of uranium for single nitrate extraction lines with one continuous resin loading contactor or four batch loading contactors. (auth)

  1. A continuous process for biodiesel production in a fixed bed reactor packed with cation-exchange resin as heterogeneous catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yaohui; Zhang, Aiqing; Li, Jianxin; He, Benqiao

    2011-02-01

    Continuous esterification of free fatty acids (FFA) from acidified oil with methanol was carried out with NKC-9 cation-exchange resin in a fixed bed reactor with an internal diameter of 25 mm and a height of 450 mm to produce biodiesel. The results showed that the FFA conversion increased with increases in methanol/oil mass ratio, reaction temperature and catalyst bed height, whereas decreased with increases in initial water content in feedstock and feed flow rate. The FFA conversion kept over 98.0% during 500 h of continuous esterification processes under 2.8:1 methanol to oleic acid mass ratio, 44.0 cm catalyst bed height, 0.62 ml/min feed flow rate and 65°C reaction temperature, showing a much high conversion and operational stability. Furthermore, the loss of sulfonic acid groups from NKC-9 resin into the production was not found during continuous esterification. In sum, NKC-9 resin shows the potential commercial applications to esterification of FFA. PMID:21078550

  2. Use of Cation Exchange Resins for Production of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Suitable for the Al-U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Powder Metallurgy Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosley, W.C.

    2001-09-17

    This report describes the production of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} powders from three types of cation exchange resins: Dowex 50W, a strong acid, sulfonate resin; AG MP-50, a macroporous form of sulfonate resin; and Bio-Rex 70, a weak acid, carboxylic resin.

  3. A comparative account of the wet oxidation of cation exchange resin with hydrogen peroxide using titanium, vanadium, and molybdenum doped MCM-41 as catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchange resins are widely used in the nuclear industry for treatment of radioactive waste as well as for the upgrading of heavy water used in the primary heat transport system and moderator system. Repeated usage of the resins calls for replacement and treatment before disposal. The present work involves the application of metal-doped MCM-41 material as a catalyst for the wet oxidation of cation exchange resins using hydrogen peroxide as an oxidizing agent. The sulfate produced from the exchangeable group of the resin reflects the extent of decomposition and the carbonate produced reflects the extent of oxidation of the ion exchange resin. Results indicate that the percentage decomposition and oxidation increase with the weight of the catalyst and the volume of the oxidant, i.e., hydrogen peroxide. As much as 0.5 g of the resin could be decomposed by 12 mL of 30% hydrogen peroxide to 98.7% and oxidized to 99.25% using molybdenum doped MCM-41. Vanadium doped and titanium doped MCM-41 required 14 to 16 mL for complete decomposition and 18 to 20 mL for complete oxidation of the ion exchange resin. (orig.)

  4. Ion chromatographic separation of inorganic ions using a combination of hydrophilic interaction chromatographic column and cation-exchange resin column

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaori ARAI; Masanobu MORI; Takahiro HIRONAGA; Hideyuki ITABASHI; Kazuhiko TANAKA

    2012-01-01

    A combination of hydrophilic interaction chromatographic ( HILIC ) column and a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin (WCX) column was used for simultaneous separation of inorganic anions and cations by ion chromatography ( IC ).Firstly,the capability of HILIC column for the separation of analyte ions was evaluated under acidic eluent conditions.The columns used were SeQuant ZIC-HILIC (ZIC-HILIC) with a sulfobetainezwitterion stationary phase (ZIC-HILIC) and Acclaim HILIC-10 with a diol stationary phase (HILIC-10).When using tartaric acid as the eluent,the HILIC columns indicated strong retentions for anions,based on ion-pair interaction.Especially,HILIC-10 could strongly retain anions compared with ZIC-HILIC. The selectivity for analyte anions of HILIC-10 with 5 mmol/L tartaric acid eluent was in the order of I- > NO3- > Br- > Cl- >H2PO4-.However,since HILIC-10 could not separate analyte cations,a WCX column (TSKgel Super IC-A/C) was connected after the HILIC column in series.The combination column system of HILIC and WCX columns could successfully separate ten ions (Na+,NH4+,K+,Mg2+,Ca2+,H2PO4-,Cl-,Br-,NO3- and I-) with elution of 4 mmol/L tartaric acid plus 8 mmol/L 18-crown-6.The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of analyte ions by the system were in the ranges of 0.02% - 0.05% in retention times and 0.18% - 5.3% in peak areas through three-time successive injections.The limits of detection at signal-to-noise ratio of 3 were 0.24 - 0.30 μmol/L for the cations and 0.31 - 1.2 μmol/L for the anions.This system was applied for the simultaneous determination of the cations and the anions in a vegetable juice sample with satisfactory results.

  5. Chromatographic Column Separation of Rare Earth Elements by Resorcinol Formaldehyde Cationic Exchanger Resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to increase use of rare earth elements (REEs) in modern technology in the world over the past years, alternative separation method is essentially requested. Therefore, the main objective of this study is oriented to find efficient process for individual separation of light REEs from each other using resorcinol formaldehyde organic resin. In this investigation different type of eluent namely, oxalic acid, sodium hexameta phosphate and hydrazine have been tested for separation process of REEs. Optimizations of some parameters that affect on separation of REEs such as eluent concentration, flow rate and bed height of column have been performed. The results indicated that, 0.08 M of hydrazine as novel eluent at 1 ml/min is efficient for individual separation of REEs. Thus the improved successfully the separation process that more efficiently recovers the economically valuable REEs. The preliminary investigation has given promising results for lanthanides separation and production using resorcinol formaldehyde resin as stationary phase and hydrazine as novel eluent

  6. Kinetics, thermodynamics and surface heterogeneity assessment of uranium(VI) adsorption onto cation exchange resin derived from a lignocellulosic residue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new cation exchange resin (PGTFS-COOH) having a carboxylate functional group at the chain end was prepared by grafting poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate) onto tamarind fruit shell, TFS (a lignocellulosic residue) using potassium peroxydisulphate-sodium thiosulphate redox initiator, and in the presence of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) as a crosslinking agent, followed by functionalisation. The adsorbent was characterized with the help of FTIR, XRD, scanning electron micrographs (SEM), and potentiometric titrations. The kinetic and isotherm data, obtained at optimum pH value 6.0 at different temperatures could be fitted with pseudo-second-order equation and Sips isotherm model, respectively. An increase in temperature induces positive effect on the adsorption process. The calculated activation energy of adsorption (Ea, 18.67 kJ/mol) indicates that U(VI) adsorption was largely due to diffusion-controlled process. The values of adsorption enthalpy, Gibbs free energy, and entropy were calculated using thermodynamic function relationships. The decrease in adsorption enthalpy with increasing U(VI) uploading on the adsorbent, reflects the surface energetic heterogeneity of the adsorbent. The isosteric heat of adsorption was quantitatively correlated with the fractional loading for the U(VI) ions adsorption onto PGTFS-COOH. The results showed that the PGTFS-COOH possessed heterogeneous surface with sorption sites having different activities.

  7. Method of decomposing radioactive spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To improve the decomposability of spent ion exchange resins such as anionic resins, anionic - cationic mixed resins or the likes issued from nuclear power plants. Method: Spent ion exchange resins containing radioactive materials are decomposed by hydrogen peroxide. In this case, anionic exchange resins or mixture of anionic exchange resins and cationic exchange resins are decomposed by using bivalent or trivalent iron ions coexistent with sulfate groups in excess of the amount corresponding to the molar amount of bivalent or trivalent iron ions as a catalyst. Since the anionic exchange resins or the mixture of the anionic exchange resins and cationic resins are decomposed substantially completely, the amount of residue after the decomposition is reduced and the volume-reducing property of the radioactive wastes can be improved to facilitate the solidifying treatment. (Moriyama, K.)

  8. Irradiation effects on the storage and disposal of radwaste containing organic ion-exchange media. [3 functional forms of resin - sulfonic acid cation exchanger, quarternary ammonium anion exchanger and mixed bed combination of the two

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swyler, K.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Dayal, R.

    1983-10-01

    Polystyrene-divinylbenzene (PS-DVB) based ion exchangers are commonly used in water demineralization or decontamination operations at nuclear facilities. Self-irradiation from sorbed radionuclides may affect the properties of radwaste containing these ion-exchange media. The effects of external irradiation on anion, cation, and mixed bed PS-DVB ion exchangers have been investigated under conditions relevant to radwaste storage and disposal. Three effects are emphasized in the present report: (1) release of acids, radionuclides or chemically aggressive species through radiolytic attack on the functional group, (2) radiolytic generation/uptake of corrosive or combustible gases, (3) effect of irradiation on solidification of resins in cement. Special consideration was placed on external variables such as radiation dose rate, resin chemical loading and moisture conditions, accessibility to atmospheric oxygen, and interactions in multicomponent systems. Such variables may affect the correspondence between laboratory results and field performance. 40 references, 24 figures, 28 tables.

  9. A fast method for the determination of Sr-90 in liquid milk by solid phase extraction with cryptand 222 on cation exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for determining the activity of Sr-90 in liquid milk samples that does not require the usual drying, ashing, acid leaching and precipitation procedures is described. Two solid phase extractants are used, namely: Cryptand 222 bound to a cation exchange resin, and Eichrome Industries' Sr.Spec Resin trademark. These are applied respectively to extract Sr-90 from the milk and to isolate it in a form suitable for measurement by low-level liquid scintillation counting. The results of analyses of 1 liter milk samples contaminated with a known activity of Sr-90 agreed well with the expected values. It was also found that Sr.Spec Resin trademark can be regenerated and re-used several times. As the method requires only minimal operator skill and time, many samples can be analyzed simultaneously. (orig.)

  10. Use of potassium-form cation-exchange resin as a conductimetric enhancer in ion-exclusion chromatography of aliphatic carboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Tomotaka; Mori, Masanobu; Itabashi, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2009-09-15

    In this study, a cation-exchange resin (CEX) of the K(+)-form, i.e., an enhancer resin, is used as a postcolumn conductimetric enhancer in the ion-exclusion chromatography of aliphatic carboxylic acids. The enhancer resin is filled in the switching valve of an ion chromatograph; this valve is usually used as a suppressor valve in ion-exchange chromatography. An aliphatic carboxylic acid (e.g., CH(3)COOH) separated by a weakly acidic CEX column of the H(+)-form converts into that of the K(+)-form (e.g., CH(3)COOK) by passing through the enhancer resin. In contrast, the background conductivity decreases because a strong acid (e.g., HNO(3)) with a higher conductimetric response in an eluent converts into a salt (e.g., KNO(3)) with a lower conductimetric response. Since the pH of the eluent containing the resin enhancer increases from 3.27 to 5.85, the enhancer accelerates the dissociations of analyte acids. Consequently, peak heights and peak areas of aliphatic carboxylic acids (e.g., acetic acid, propionic acid, butyric acid, and valeric acid) with the enhancer resin are 6.3-8.0 times higher and 7.2-9.2 times larger, respectively, than those without the enhancer resin. Calibrations of peak areas for injected analytes are linear in the concentration range of 0.01-1.0mM. The detection limits (signal-to-noise ratio=3) range from 0.10 microM to 0.39 microM in this system, as opposed to those in the range of 0.24-7.1 microM in the separation column alone. The developed system is successfully applied to the determination of aliphatic carboxylic acids in a chicken droppings sample. PMID:19615503

  11. Thermodynamics of ion exchange of trivalent Cosup(III) or Crsup(III) complex with cerium(III) ions on cation exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermodynamic values of ion exchange of [M(B)sub(n)(H2O)sub(6-n)]3+ [M = Cosup(III) or Crsup(III), B = NH3, (ethylenediamine = en)/2, (1,3-diaminopropane = tn)/2, (1,2-diaminopropane = pn)/2 or urea, 0 =3+ ions on Dowex 50W resin of 2,8 or 16% divinylbenzene (DVB) content were determined from selectivity coefficient and heat of exchange measurements at 250C. Further, the equivalent volumes of [M(B)sub(n)(H2O)sub(6-n)]3+-form resins of 2% DVB content were measured. The heat and entropy of exchange were negative for the preferential uptake of [MB6]3+ by Ce3+-form resin of 2% DVB content and they vary significantly with the ligand, B. The sequence of their values is given. From the entropy of exchange on 2% DVB resin, it seems that the interaction between the complex ion and water depends on the surface charge density of complex ion. Further, the heat of exchange on 2% DVB resin and the equivalent volume of resin are explained in terms of the interaction between the complex ion and water. (author)

  12. Investigation of the swelling behavior of cationic exchange resins saturated with Na{sup +} ions in a C{sub 3}S paste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafond, E. [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SPDE, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Cau Dit Coumes, C., E-mail: celine.cau-dit-coumes@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SPDE, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Gauffinet, S. [UMR5209 Institut Carnot de Bourgogne, Université de Bourgogne Dijon, Faculté des Sciences Mirande, 9 Avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon cedex (France); Chartier, D. [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SPDE, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Le Bescop, P. [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Stefan, L. [AREVA, Back End Business Group, Dismantling & Services, 1 place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Défense (France); Nonat, A. [UMR5209 Institut Carnot de Bourgogne, Université de Bourgogne Dijon, Faculté des Sciences Mirande, 9 Avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon cedex (France)

    2015-03-15

    Ion exchange resins (IERs) are widely used by the nuclear industry to decontaminate radioactive effluents. Spent products are usually encapsulated in cementitious materials. However, the solidified waste form can exhibit strong expansion, possibly leading to cracking, if the appropriate binder is not used. In this work, the interactions between cationic resins in the Na{sup +} form and tricalcium silicate are investigated during the early stages of hydration in order to gain a better understanding of the expansion process. It is shown that the IERs exhibit a transient swelling of small magnitude due to the decrease in the osmotic pressure of the external solution. This expansion, which occurs just after setting, is sufficient to damage the material which is poorly consolidated for several reasons: low degree of hydration, precipitation of poorly cohesive sodium-bearing C–S–H, and very heterogeneous microstructure with zones of high porosity.

  13. Ion-exclusion chromatography with conductimetric detection of aliphatic carboxylic acids on a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin by elution with benzoic acid-beta-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Mori, Masanobu; Xu, Qun; Helaleh, Murad I H; Ikedo, Mikaru; Taoda, Hiroshi; Hu, Wenzhi; Hasebe, Kiyoshi; Fritz, James S; Haddad, Paul R

    2003-05-16

    In this study, an aqueous solution consisting of benzoic acid with low background conductivity and beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) of hydrophilic nature and the inclusion effect to benzoic acid were used as eluent for the ion-exclusion chromatographic separation of aliphatic carboxylic acids with different pKa values and hydrophobicity on a polymethacrylate-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin in the H+ form. With increasing concentration of beta-cyclodextrin in the eluent, the retention times of the carboxylic acids decreased due to the increased hydrophilicity of the polymethacrylate-based cation-exchange resin surface from the adsorption of OH groups of beta-cyclodextrin. Moreover, the eluent background conductivity decreased with increasing concentration of beta-cyclodextrin in 1 mM benzoic acid, which could result in higher sensitivity for conductimetric detection. The ion-exclusion chromatographic separation of carboxylic acids with high resolution and sensitivity was accomplished successfully by elution with a 1 mM benzoic acid-10 mM cyclodextrin solution without chemical suppression. PMID:12830884

  14. A novel approach to measure elemental concentrations in cation exchange resins using XRF-scanning technique, and its potential in water pollution studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jyh-Jaan; Lin, Sheng-Chi; Löwemark, Ludvig; Liou, Ya-Hsuan; Chang, Queenie; Chang, Tsun-Kuo; Wei, Kuo-Yen; Croudace, Ian W.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) core-scanning is a fast, and convenient technique to assess elemental variations for a wide variety of research topics. However, the XRF scanning counts are often considered a semi-quantitative measurement due to possible absorption or scattering caused by down core variability in physical properties. To overcome this problem and extend the applications of XRF-scanning to water pollution studies, we propose to use cation exchange resin (IR-120) as an "elemental carrier", and to analyze the resins using the Itrax-XRF core scanner. The use of resin minimizes the matrix effects during the measurements, and can be employed in the field in great numbers due to its low price. Therefore, the fast, and non-destructive XRF-scanning technique can provide a quick and economical method to analyze environmental pollution via absorption in the resin. Five standard resin samples were scanned by the Itrax-XRF core scanner at different exposure times (1 s, 5 s, 15 s, 30 s, 100 s) to allow the comparisons of scanning counts with the absolute concentrations. The regression lines and correlation coefficients of elements that are generally used in pollution studies (Ca, Ti, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb) were examined for the different exposure times. The result shows that within the test range (from few ppm to thousands ppm), the correlation coefficients are all higher than 0.97, even at the shortest exposure time (1 s). Therefore, we propose to use this method in the field to monitor for example sewage disposal events. The low price of resin, and fast, multi elements and precise XRF-scanning technique provide a viable, cost- and time-effective approach that allows large sample numbers to be processed. In this way, the properties and sources of wastewater pollution can be traced for the purpose of environmental monitoring and environmental forensics.

  15. Determination of some aliphatic carboxylic acids in anaerobic digestion process waters by ion-exclusion chromatography with conductimetric detection on a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kazuaki; Takayama, Yohichi; Ikedo, Mikaru; Mori, Masanobu; Taoda, Hiroshi; Xu, Qun; Hu, Wenzhi; Sunahara, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Tsuneo; Sato, Shinji; Hirokawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2004-06-11

    The determination of seven aliphatic carboxylic acids, formic, acetic, propionic, isobutyric, n-butyric, isovaleric and n-valeric acids in anaerobic digestion process waters was examined using ion-exclusion chromatography with conductimetric detection. The analysis of these biologically important carboxylic acids is necessary as a measure for evaluating and controlling the process. The ion-exclusion chromatography system employed consisted of polymethacrylate-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin columns (TSKgel OApak-A or TSKgel Super IC-A/C). weakly acidic eluent (benzoic acid), and conductimetric detection. Particle size and cation-exchange capacity were 5 microm and 0.1 meq./ml for TSKgel OApak-A and 3 microm and 0.2 meq./ml for TSKgel Super IC-A/C, respectively. A dilute eluent (1.0-2.0 mM) of benzoic acid was effective for the high resolution and highly conductimetric detection of the carboxylic acids. The good separation of isobutyric and n-butyric acids was performed using the TSKgel Super IC-A/C column (150 mm x 6.0 mm i.d. x 2). The simple and good chromatograms were obtained by the optimized ion-exclusion chromatography conditions for real samples from mesophilic anaerobic digestors, thus the aliphatic carboxylic acids were successfully determined without any interferences. PMID:15250416

  16. The effect of degradation products of strong acidic cation exchange resins on radionuclide speciation: A case study with Ni2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiolytic degradation experiments with acidic ion-exchange resins revealed oxalate and an unidentified ligand X to be the most strongly complexing ligands of the degradation products. The influence of these ligands on the Ni speciation in groundwater and cement pore water of a repository is assessed. A complete and reliable thermodynamic database is built for this case study. Missing stability constants are estimated by chemical reasoning. Subsequent sensitivity analyses show whether these species are important or not. The backdoor approach used in this study addresses the following question: What concentrations must the ligand have to significantly influence the Ni speciation? In the case of oxalate, the concentration necessary to complex 90% Ni will never be exceeded within the repository or in its environment due to precipitation of Ca-oxalate solids. Thus, a negative effect of oxalate on Ni speciation and sorption need not be considered in safety assessments. In the case of ligand X, calculations demonstrate that Ni speciation is highly dependent on geochemical conditions and is occasionally ambiguous due to uncertainties in estimated stability constants. Hints are given to deal with these ambiguities in future safety assessment, and further experimental investigations are proposed to decrease uncertainties when necessary

  17. Cycloaliphatic epoxide resins for cationic UV - cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces the cyclo - aliphatic epoxide resins used for the various applications of radiation curing and their comparison with acrylate chemistry. Radiation curable coatings and inks are pre - dominantly based on acrylate chemistry but over the last few years, cationic chemistry has emerged successfully with the unique properties inherent with cyclo - aliphatic epoxide ring structures. Wide variety of cationic resins and diluents, the formulation techniques to achieve the desired properties greatly contributes to the advancement of UV - curing technology

  18. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of 137Cs, 85Sr, and 60Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative 137Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either 85Sr or 60Co. Release rates of 137Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. 137Cs, 85Sr, and 60Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement

  19. Electrochemical regeneration of spent ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAN-DECON™, CAN-DEREM™ and CAN-DEREM Plus™ processes developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) are dilute regenerative chemical decontamination processes that employ ion exchange resin to remove dissolved metals and radionuclides and to regenerate the reagents. Depending on the system volume and oxide and radionuclide inventories, a large volume of spent ion exchange resin may be generated. Storage and long term disposal of spent resin may be one of the impediments to routine use of chemical decontamination processes. An electrochemical method is being developed by AECL for the regeneration of spent ion exchange resin generated during application of CAN-DECON, CAN-DEREM and CAN-DEREM Plus processes. In addition, some of the work being carried out is directed at methods for liquid waste treatment. This paper will describe the three-compartment electrochemical cell developed for laboratory tests. The cell consists of an anode, cathode and central compartment, the latter containing either solid spent resin or spent solution. The anode and the cathode compartments are separated from the central section by cation exchange membranes which allow cations to transport from anode to cathode compartments through the membranes. The paper will discuss the results of cyclic voltammetry tests performed in CAN-DEREM reagents to determine the iron redox potential in these electrolytes. The results of iron deposition tests performed in simulated spent CAN-DEREM reagents to study the current efficiency of iron deposition as a function of iron concentration, pH, cathode material and temperature will be presented. The results of tests of several commercial cation exchange membranes to study transport efficiency of iron through these membranes will also be discussed. (author)

  20. Radioactive ion exchange resin pretreatment and treatment system and corresponding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent organic ion exchange resins contain Li (cationic resins) and B (amionic resins) which interfere with cement after encapsulation. Radioactive anionic and cationic resins or their mixture are treated by a soluble aluminum salt for precipitation of insoluble lithium aluminate, then neutralized and mixed with the cement containing calcium oxide for precipitation of boron

  1. Advanced ion exchange resins for PWR condensate polishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The severe chemical and mechanical requirements of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) condensate polishing plant (CPP) present a major challenge to the design of ion exchange resins. This paper describes the development and initial operating experience of improved cation and anion exchange resins that were specifically designed to meet PWR CPP needs. Although this paper focuses specifically on the ion exchange resins and their role in plant performance, it is also recognized and acknowledged that excellent mechanical design and operation of the CPP system are equally essential to obtaining good results. (authors)

  2. Use of a polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin column and propionic acid as an eluent in ion-exclusion/adsorption chromatography of aliphatic carboxylic acids and ethanol in food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Masanobu; Hironaga, Takahiro; Kajiwara, Hiroe; Nakatani, Nobutake; Kozaki, Daisuke; Itabashi, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    We developed an ion-exclusion/adsorption chromatography (IEAC) method employing a polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin (PS-WCX) column with propionic acid as the eluent for the simultaneous determination of multivalent aliphatic carboxylic acids and ethanol in food samples. The PS-WCX column well resolved mono-, di-, and trivalent carboxylic acids in the acidic eluent. Propionic acid as the eluent gave a higher signal-to-noise ratio, and enabled sensitive conductimetric detection of analyte acids. We found the optimal separation condition to be the combination of a PS-WCX column and 20-mM propionic acid. Practical applicability of the developed method was confirmed by using a short precolumn with a strongly acidic cation-exchange resin in the H(+)-form connected before the separation column; this was to remove cations from food samples by converting them to hydrogen ions. Consequently, common carboxylic acids and ethanol in beer, wine, and soy sauce were successfully separated by the developed method. PMID:21558657

  3. Examination of styrene-divinylbenzene ion exchange resins, used in contact with food, for potential migrants

    OpenAIRE

    Sidwell, John Andrew; Willoughby, Bryan

    2006-01-01

    Abstract This study has investigated the nature of extractable substances from five types of styrene-divinylbenzene ion exchange resins used in the preparation of foodstuffs. Resins examined included strong acid cation resins, strong and weak base anion resins and an active carbon replacement resin. These resins are used for a variety of purposes including water softening, decalcification of sugar syrups, demineralisation, removal of nitrate ions from water and decolourisation. The...

  4. Organometallic cation-exchanged phyllosilicates

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming, Shay

    1991-01-01

    Organotin (IV) complexes formed between 0 01 M dimethyltin dichloride solutions prepared at pH 2 6 and 4 0, and trimethyltin chloride prepared at pH 3 4, with Na- 119 montmori 1lonite clay have been characterised using Sn Mflssbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and water sorption isotherms Following cation exchange, Mttssbauer spectroscopy identified two tin species in the dimethyltin (IV)-exchanged clay prepared at pH 2 6 A cis specie...

  5. USE OF STRONG ACID RESIN PUROLITE C100E FOR REMOVING PERMANENT HARDNESS OF WATER – FACTORS AFFECTING CATIONIC EXCHANGE CAPACITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOGDAN BANDRABUR

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper experimentally investigates the performance and capacity of Purolite C100E commercial resin recommended for water softening applications in the food industry. The practical ion exchange capacity and the softening process efficiency are studied in batch mode as a function of the sorption specific process factors. Optimum operation conditions were determined as initial pH 7.1, resin dose 8 g dry resin•L-1, temperature 25 oC, contact time of 360 min, and in those conditions the retention capacity for the Ca2+ ions is 17.18 mg•g-1 that corresponds to a removal efficiency equal to 85.7%.

  6. Commercial Ion Exchange Resin Vitrification in Borosilicate Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bench-scale studies were performed to determine the feasibility of vitrification treatment of six resins representative of those used in the commercial nuclear industry. Each resin was successfully immobilized using the same proprietary borosilicate glass formulation. Waste loadings varied from 38 to 70 g of resin/100 g of glass produced depending on the particular resin, with volume reductions of 28 percent to 68 percent. The bench-scale results were used to perform a melter demonstration with one of the resins at the Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory (CETL). The resin used was a weakly acidic meth acrylic cation exchange resin. The vitrification process utilized represented a approximately 64 percent volume reduction. Glass characterization, radionuclide retention, offgas analyses, and system compatibility results will be discussed in this paper

  7. Low-level radioactive wastes bituminization - ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work describes the research and development of low level radioactive waste treatment by bituminization process in Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN). Low level radioactive solid waste was simulated by mixed ion exchange resin. Cation exchange and anion resin were loaded with lithium and boric acid respectively and were incorporated in bitumen of suitable rheological properties. The simulated solid wastes incorporated in bitumen were 30 to 46 weight %. The rheological properties of waste product bitumen-mixed resin have been reported. The waste product with bitumen V-65 showed best physical and rheological properties and grave lowest leaching rates of boron and lithium. (author)

  8. Mechanism of Electrochemical Catalytic Treatment of Phenol Wastewater Catalyzed by Metal Ion Supported on Cation Exchange Resin%苯酚水在离子交换树脂电化学降解中的机理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王莹; 侯党社; 韩莉萍

    2011-01-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of phenol in synthetic wastewater catalyzed by metal ion supported on cation exchange resin has been investigated.It was found that in the process of the phenol oxidation, hydroxyl radicals and Fe were all attribute to the phenol oxidation.%本文以负载金属的离子交换树脂为催化剂,采用电化学降解的方法研究了苯酚水的降解机理.研究表明苯酚水在离子交换树脂电化学降解中可能是由羟基自由基、金属氧化物、金属离子、电絮凝等协同作用下进行降解.

  9. INTERACTION OF AMINO ACID WITH ION EXCHANGE RESIN Ⅲ.FURTHER INVESTIGA TION OF SUPEREQUIVALENT ADSORPTION MECHANISM OF AMINO ACID ON ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGHui; SHAOTong; 等

    1994-01-01

    The adsorption isotherms of glycine,alanine and oxidized glutathion on strong acid cation and strong base anion exchange resins from aqueous solutions were measured and the superequivalent adsorptions of glycine and alanine observed.The infrared spectra of glycine adsorbed on the cation and the anion exchange resins,001×7 and 201×7,were measured.From these results,it is concluded that the amino acid adsorption on the ion exchange resin proceeds not only through ion exchange and proton transfer mechanisms,but also through aminecarboxylate interaction between the adsorbed amino acid molecules,and the formation of second layer of amino acid molecules is the mechanism of superequivalent adsorption of amino acid,the carboxylate or amine groups of the first layer of amino acid molecules on the ion exchange resin act as the exchange sites for the second layer of amino acid molecules.

  10. Low temperature plasma incineration of radioactive ion-exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the incineration studies of radioactive ion-exchange resin in an oxygen plasma atmosphere at pressures 20...50 mbar are presented. The plasma is generated using a 27.12 MHz radio frequency (RF) generator. The chamber temperature during the incineration varies between 100...140 deg C depending on the oxygen pressure in the chamber. The virtue of the low-temperature incineration is that the radioactive substances remain in the solid ash. The average retention of 60Co and 137Cs in the incineration chamber was about 94 %. The retention of 99mTc was in the average 77 % and of 131I about 70 %. The results indicate that, within the limit of the measurement accuracy, practically all Co and Cs remains in the chamber and can be recovered and further conditioned with the ash. The rest of technetium and iodine can be easily recovered on any cooled surface right after the incineration chamber. The mass reduction achievable with this method is 95 %. The ion-exchange resins in use at the Loviisa NPP were used as test samples. The activity retention and ashing experiments were made with a 1:1 mixture of granular anion and cation resin. The same kind of mixture is used for the primary water purification at the Loviisa NPP. The test resin was labelled with 60Co, 137Cs, 99mTc and 131I. Also spent Loviisa NPP resin was incinerated. The VVER-440 reactors of the Loviisa NPP use boric acid to control the reactivity of the core. The boric acid in the resin presents an extra cumber in the incineration process tending to prevent the oxygen plasma from getting into contact with the resin. The results with the granulated spent Loviisa NPP resin were drastically inferior to the results with the labelled test resin. The average unburnt residual mass was about 20 %. By prior crushing of the resin equal incineration results could be achieved with the test resin and with the spent Loviisa NPP resin. The low-temperature plasma incineration of radioactive ion-exchange resins presents

  11. Radiation degradation in organic ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EPICOR-2 Resin/Liner Investigation: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, studied the degradation effects in EPICOR-II organic ion exchange resins caused by internal radiation. Results of the third sampling analysis of ion exchange resins from prefilters PF-8 and PF-20 are compared with baseline data from tests performed on unirradiated resins and with results from the first and second samplings to determine if degradation has occurred because of the high internal radiation dose. Those results are also compared to findings of other researchers

  12. Decomposing method for ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a method of decomposing ion exchange resins generated in a nuclear power plant to carbon dioxide reliably in a short period of time. (1) The ion exchange resins are mixed with water, and then they are kept for a predetermined period of time in the presence of an inert gas at high temperature and high pressure exceeding the critical point of water to decompose the ion exchange resins. (2) The ion exchange resins is mixed with water, an oxidant is added and they are kept for a predetermined time in the presence of an inert gas at a high temperature and a high pressure exceeding a critical point of water of an inert gas at a high temperature to decompose the ion exchange resins. (3) An alkali or acid is added to ion exchange resins and water to control the hydrogen ion concentration in the solution and the ion exchange resins are decomposed in above-mentioned (1) or (2). Sodium hydroxide is used as the alkali and hydrochloric acid is used as the acid. In addition, oxygen, hydrogen peroxide or ozone is used as an oxidant. (I.S.)

  13. Simultaneous determination of sub μg·g-1 levels of nine impurities in high purity iron by horizontal cation exchange resin mini-column and ICP-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) has been applied to the simultaneous determination of trace impurities in high purity iron after simultaneous separation. Sub μg·g-1 levels of Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn in high purity iron which had been dissolved in hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide were separated from the iron matrix using a horizontal cation exchange resin mini-column. Flow rates and flow directions of solutions through the mini-column were controlled by a peristaltic pump. Adsorbed elements on the resin mini-column were rapidly eluted using a reverse flow of the eluant against the flow for the adsorption. The eluted elements were determined by ICP-AES using an internal standard method and good results were obtained. A 100-fold enrichment of analytes was obtained with this preconcentration system using 1 g of the sample in comparison with an ordinary sample solution in which 0.5 g of the sample was dissolved in 100 cm3 without separation. (author)

  14. Adsorption equilibrium of fructose, glucose and sucrose for cationic resins in the sodium and potassium form

    OpenAIRE

    Nobre, Clarisse; Santos, M. J.; Dominguez, Ana; Torres, Duarte; Peres, António M.; Rocha, Isabel; Ferreira, Eugénio C.; Rodrigues, Lígia R.; Teixeira, José A.

    2009-01-01

    Separation of glucose from mixtures of fructose and sucrose in molasses is a major challenge in industrial sugar chromatographic separations. The efficiency of a chromatographic process is largely dependent on the adsorbent used. Sulfonated poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) (PS-DVB) ion exchange resins are the most frequently used for sugars separation, generally in a cationic form. The cation will complex with the hydroxyl group of the sugar leading to a selective adsorption accord...

  15. Sulfonation Process and Desalination Effect of Polystyrene/PVDF Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Network Cation Exchange Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Yin-lin Lei; Yun-jie Luo; Fei Chen; Le-he Mei

    2014-01-01

    With the classical sulfonation method of polystyrene-based strongly acidic cation exchange resins, polystyrene/polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) alloy particles were sulfonated to obtain a cation exchange resin, which was then directly thermoformed to prepare a semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN) cation exchange membrane. The effects of the swelling agent, sulfonation time and temperature and the relative contents of polystyrene and divinylbenzene (DVB) in the alloy particles on the...

  16. Studies on the characteristics of ion exchange resins in the purification system of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research was conducted which involved the synthesis of ion exchange resin used for the purification of various water streams in nuclear power plants. Polymerization of styrene-divinyl-benzene solvent mixtures including catalyst yielded 40-100 mesh various types of beads. The copolymer beads were sulfonated with sulfuric acid to make cation exchange resin, were chloro-methylated with chloromethylmethylether and aminated with various amines in order to make anion exchange resin. The physical properties of copolymer beads and ion exchange resins were evaluated in this study. The cation exchange resin which was synthesized by using 8.5% divinylbenzene and diluent such as n-heptane had almost the same 4.6 meq/g, dry ion exchange capacity as 4.7 meq/g, dry of Westing House Specification WCAP-7452. But at higher divinylbenzene contents than 15%, the ion exchange capacity started to decrease. Anion exchange capacity in this experiment was lower than 3.5 meq/g,dry of Westing House Specification WCAP-7452. An anion exchange resin was synthesized from allylamine monomers via radiation induced-polymerization, and a new chelate resin was prepared from this resin by introducing a dithiocarbamate group, and the adsorption characteristics of metal ions was examined toward the chelate resin. (Author)

  17. Test procedure for cation exchange chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this test plan is to demonstrate the synthesis of inorganic antimonate ion exchangers and compare their performance against the standard organic cation exchangers. Of particular interest is the degradation rate of both inorganic and organic cation exchangers. This degradation rate will be tracked by determining the ion exchange capacity and thermal stability as a function of time, radiation dose, and chemical reaction

  18. Electrodialytic decontamination of spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of a novel electrodialytic decontamination process for the selective removal of radioactive Cs from spent ion exchange resins containing large amounts of Li is described. The process involves passage of a dc electric current through a bed of the spent ion exchange resin in a specially designed electrodialytic cell. The radiocesium so removed from a volume of the spent resin is concentrated onto a much smaller volume of a Cs selective sorbent to achieve a significant radioactive waste volume reduction. Technical feasibility of the electrodialytic resin decontamination process has been demonstrated on a bench scale with a batch of simulated spent ion exchange resin and using potassium cobalt ferrocyanide as the Cs selective sorbent. A volume reduction factor between 10 and 17 has been estimated. The process appears to be economically attractive. Improvements in process economics can be expected from optimization of the process. Other possible applications of the EDRD process have been identified

  19. Novel silica-based ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    Eichrom`s highly successful Diphonixo resin resembles a conventional ion exchange resin in its use of sulfonic acid ligands on a styrene- divinylbenzene matrix. Diphonix resin exhibits rapid exchange kinetics that allow economical operation of ion exchange systems. Unlike conventional resins, Diphonix resin contains chelating ligands that are diphosphonic acid groups that recognize and remove the targeted metals and reject the more common elements such as sodium, calcium and magnesium. This latter property makes Diphonix ideal for many industrial scale applications, including those involving waste treatment. For treatment of low-level, transuranic (TRU) and high- level radioactive wastes, Diphonix`s polystyrene backbone hinders its application due to radiolytic stability of the carbon-hydrogen bonds and lack of compatibility with expected vitrification schemes. Polystyrene-based Diphonix is approximately 60% carbon- hydrogen. In response to an identified need within the Department of Energy for a resin with the positive attributes of Diphonix that also exhibits greater radiolytic stability and final waste form compatibility, Eichrom has successfully developed a new, silica-based resin version of Diphonix. Target application for this new resin is for use in environmental restoration and waste management situations involving the processing of low-level, transuranic and high-level radioactive wastes. The resin can also be used for processing liquid mixed waste (waste that contains low level radioactivity and hazardous constituents) including mixed wastes contaminated with organic compounds. Silica-based Diphonix is only 10% carbon-hydrogen, with the bulk of the matrix silica.

  20. Characterization Of Cycled Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Ion Exchange Resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents characterization data for two spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin beds that had processed cesium in non-radioactive and radioactive cycles. All column cycle operations for the resin beds including loading, displacements, elution, regeneration, breakthroughs, and solution analyses are reported in Nash and Duignan, 2009a. That report covered four ion exchange (IX) campaigns using the two ∼11 mL beds in columns in a lead-lag arrangement. The first two campaigns used Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 2F nonradioactive simulant while the latter two were fed with actual dissolved salt in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells. Both radioactive cycles ran to cesium breakthrough of the lead column. The resin beds saw in excess of 400 bed volumes of feed in each cycle. Resin disposal plans in tank farm processing depend on characterizations of resin used with actual tank feed. Following a final 30 bed volume (BV) elution with nitric acid, the resin beds were found to contain detectable chromium, barium, boron, aluminum, iron, sodium, sulfur, plutonium, cesium, and mercury. Resin affinity for plutonium is important in criticality safety considerations. Cesium-137 was found to be less than 10E+7 dpm/g of resin, similar to past work with sRF resin. Sulfur levels are reasonably consistent with other work and are expected to represent sulfur chemistry used in the resin manufacture. There were low but detectable levels of technetium, americium, and curium. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) work on the used (eluted) resin samples showed significant contents of mercury, barium, and chromium. One resin sample exceeded the TCLP level for mercury while the other metals were below TCLP levels. TCLP organics measurements indicated measurable benzene in one case, though the source was unknown. Results of this work were compared with other work on similar sRF resin characterizations in this report. This is the first work

  1. Binding of Sr from milk by solid phase extraction with cryptand C222 sorbed on silica gel, cation exchange, chelating or adsorbent resins for simplified 90Sr analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several commercially available resins have been found to bind the bicyclic polyether cryptand C222 from aqueous acetonitrile solutions. The presence of C222 on some of these resins strongly improved their affinity for Sr, so that relatively small amounts of such resins sorbed Sr from milk. The resins investigated were silica gel, polyacrylic acid crosslinked with divinylbenzene (DVB), polystyrene crosslinked with divinylbenzene (PS-DVB) and PS-DVB containing sulphonate, aminomethylphosphonate, iminodiacetate and mercapto groups. The resins for which binding of C222 resulted in the largest improvement in Sr sorption from milk were PS-DVB containing mercapto groups (Chelite S) and silica gel (Si 60). Thus, 2 ml wet volume of either Chelite S containing 133 μmol of C222, or silica gel Si-60 containing 143 μmol of C222 sorbed 90 and 48%, respectively, of the Sr from 100-ml milk samples. As the sorption of Sr from milk by these systems is relatively slow, contact times of 24-36 h are required to attain these results. The Chelite S-C222 system separates Sr effectively from Cs and Ca. Under the conditions described here some 6% of the natural 40K in milk sorbs with Sr to the resin. Ba behaves similarly to Sr. 90Sr/90Y sorbed on the silica gel Si-60-C222 system can be measured directly and efficiently by liquid scintillation counting. If adequate specificity can be attained this system might provide a very simple method of determining 90Sr in milk

  2. Trial Destruction Test of Spent Cationic Resins in a Molten Salt Oxidation Reactor System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent ion-exchange resins have to be disposed of and as such, spent ion-exchange resins are a significant fraction of the combustible organic waste from the nuclear industries. One effective treatment option is incinerating the spent resins to yield ash and gas. However, there are difficulties associated with this approach. One of the criticisms of a high-temperature incinerator is that radioactive and hazardous metals are not retained in the incinerator. In addition, incineration of the cationic exchange resins, which have the sulphurcontaining functional groups of sulfonic acid (-SO3-H+), has revealed significant problems associated with sulfur dioxide (SO2), a primary air pollutant, which must be kept under control. There is therefore the developing need for an alternative destruction process. Molten salt oxidation, or MSO for short, is a promising alternative technology. Molten carbonate filled in a MSO reactor is capable of trapping sulfur during organic destruction. In addition, the relatively low-operation temperature of the MSO reactor reduces the volatility of the radionuclides, compared to the other available high temperature technologies for organics destruction, such as inductively coupled plasma, incineration, plasma arc and microwave heating. Trial destruction tests of spent cationic exchange resins doped with radioactive metal surrogates were performed in this study. Two typical operating parameters, temperature and oxidizing air rate, which significantly affect the organics destruction, were tested to establish the optimum ranges for those parameters

  3. Vitrification of spent organic ion exchange resins- 137Cesium volatility during oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic ion exchange (IX) resins are used to purify coolant water in nuclear power plants. The spent IX resins contain 137Cesium as major long-lived radioisotope. Their vitrification requires complete combustion of organic matter. 137Cesium volatility during their oxidation is most important factor for selection of oxidation procedure. Based on TGA studies, copper and vanadate catalysts were selected respectively for cationic and anionic IX resins to oxidise them at 500-700 degC. Experiments were conducted with 137Cesium and catalyst loaded cationic and anionic resins. About 56 to 60% 137Cesium was released from cationic resins in 3 hours. 137Cesium release from cationic resins could be brought down to 19 to 22% by addition of glass formers. The 137Cesium releases from anionic resins were nearly same for 2 hours heating. In absence of glass formers, the catalyst on anionic resins formed molten mass, which was difficult to remove. Experiment with one litre of 137Cesiuin loaded mixed cationic and anionic resins released 16.8% 137Cesium to off gases and formed a slag having specific gravity of 1.73 due to difficulty in oxidising last traces of carbon. The volume reduction factor achieved was 18.2 as against 68 expected for complete oxidation of IX resins. The higher volume reduction factor can be achieved by using improved oxidation procedure in scaling up studies. (author)

  4. Deuterisation of mixed bed ion exchange resin: kinetics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of deuterisation of a mixture of strongly acidic cationic and strongly basic anionic resins in a mixed bed system has been investigated for kinetics measurement through laboratory scale experiment. The up-flow fluidization method employing a heavy water flow from the bottom end of the mixed bed column at a reasonably low flow rate has been amply exploited for displacement of light water molecules inside the resin pores and adhering to resin surface as well. The course of deuterisation has been tracked down by determination of D2O content as a function of time and the process is found to exhibit a breakthrough type sigmoidal kinetics. An empirical relation, involving half-life of deuterisation and some process parameters such as flow rate, volume of light water to be replaced, could be achieved for plant scale deuterisation of a mixed bed ion exchanger prior to use in purification unit of heavy water process system of a nuclear reactor. (author)

  5. Processing of indium (III) solutions via ion exchange with Lewatit K-2621 resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Diaz-Pavon, A.; Cerpa, A.; Alguacil, F. J.

    2014-10-01

    The processing of indium(III)-hydrochloric acid solutions by the cationic ion exchange Lewatit K-2621 resin has been investigated. The influence of several variables such as the hydrochloric acid and metal concentrations in the aqueous solution and the variation of the amount of resin added has been studied. Moreover, a kinetic study performed in the uptake of indium(III) by Lewatit K-2621, shows that either the film-diffusion and the particle-diffusion models fit the ion exchange process onto the resin, depending upon the initial metal concentration in the aqueous solution. The loaded resin could be eluted by HCl solutions at 20 degree centigrade. (Author)

  6. Electro-assisted regeneration of ion exchange resins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang LIU; Ying WANG; Yansheng LI; Hui CHANG

    2008-01-01

    Electro-assisted regeneration (EAR) for the mixed bed of strongly acidic cation and weakly basic anion exchange resins with the Al(OH)3 suspension in a three-compartment cell was investigated. The desalina-tion experiments were carried out to evaluate the char-acteristic of the regenerated mixed resins. Experimental results showed that the efficiency of resin regeneration was strictly dependent on the voltage, regeneration time, and feed regenerant flow rate. The amount of the effluent reached 50 times the volume of the resins bed, and the conductivity was less than 1.0 μs/cm. Compared to the conventional ER, the total effluent volume of EAR was about 1000 mL more than that of ER under the same conditions, and the outlet conductivity was significantly lower. The desalination and regeneration reaction mechanisms of the mixed resins indicated the regeneration efficiency of resin with Al(OH)3 as the regenerant was much higher than that with H2O.

  7. Pyrolysis and oxidative pyrolysis experiments with organization exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyrolysis may be an important pretreatment step before vitrification in a cold crucible melter (CCM). During vitrification of organic resin the carbon or other remaining residues may harm the performance of the cold crucible melter of the eventual stability of the final glass product. Hence, it is important to reduce or prevent such harmful waste from entry into the cold crucible melter. Pretreatment with pyrolysis will generally provide volume reduction resulting in less amount of solid waste that needs to be handled by the CCM; in addition, the pyrolytic processes may breakdown much of the complex organics causing release through volatilization resulting in less carbon and other harmful substances. Hence, KEPRI has undertaken studies on the pyrolysis and oxidative pyrolysis of organic ion exchange resin. Pyrolysis and oxidative pyrolysis were examined with TGA and a tube furnace. TGA results for pyrolysis with the flow of nitrogen indicate that even after pyrolyzing from room temperature to about 900 deg C, a significant mass fraction of the original cationic resin remains, approximately 46 %. The anionic resin when pyrolytically heated in a flow of nitrogen only, from room temperature to about 900 deg C, produced a final residue mass fraction of about 8 percent. Oxidation at a ratio of air to nitrogen, 1:2, reduced the cationic resin to 5.3% when heated at 5 C/min. Oxidation of anionic resin at the same ratio and same heating rate left almost no solid residue. Pyrolysis (e.g. nitrogen-only environment) in the tube furnace of larger samples relative to the TGA produced very similar results to the TGA. The differences may be attributed to the scale effects such as surface area exposure to the gas stream, temperature distributions throughout the resin, etc. (author) 7 refs., 7 figs

  8. Advancements in Anion Exchange Membrane Cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturgeon, Matthew R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Long, Hai [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Park, Andrew M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pivovar, Bryan S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Anion-exchange membrane fuel cells (AME-FCs) are of increasingly popular interest as they enable the use of non-Pt fuel cell catalysts, the primary cost limitation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Benzyltrimethyl ammonium (BTMA) is the standard cation that has historically been utilized as the hydroxide conductor in AEMs. Herein we approach AEMs from two directions. First and foremost we study the stability of several different cations in a hydroxide solution at elevated temperatures. We specifically targeted BTMA and methoxy and nitro substituted BTMA. We've also studied the effects of adding an akyl spacer units between the ammonium cation and the phenyl group. In the second approach we use computational studies to predict stable ammonium cations, which are then synthesized and tested for stability. Our unique method to study cation stability in caustic conditions at elevated temperatures utilizes Teflon Parr reactors suitable for use under various temperatures and cation concentrations. NMR analysis was used to determine remaining cation concentrations at specific time points with GCMS analysis verifying product distribution. We then compare the experimental results with calculated modeling stabilities. Our studies show that the electron donating methoxy groups slightly increase stability (compared to that of BTMA), while the electron withdrawing nitro groups greatly decrease stability in base. These results give insight into possible linking strategies to be employed when tethering a BTMA like ammonium cation to a polymeric backbone; thus synthesizing an anion exchange membrane.

  9. Management of Spent Organic Ion-Exchange Resins by Photochemical Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivas, C.; Sugilal, S.; Wattal, P. K.

    2003-02-26

    Management of spent ion-exchange resin waste arising from nuclear reactor operations by traditional practice of encapsulation in cement is associated with problems such as swelling and disintegration. Complete oxidation (mineralization) is an attractive alternative option. This paper reports the development of photochemical mineralization process for organic ion-exchange resins of poly (styrene-divinyl benzene) type with sulfonic acid and quaternary ammonium functional groups. It is a two-step process consisting of dissolution (conversion of solid resin into water-soluble reaction products) and photo-Fenton mineralization of the dissolved resin. Cation and anion resin dissolution was effected by reaction of the resin with H2O2 at 50-60 C in the presence of ferrous/copper sulphate catalyst. Direct dissolution of mixed resin was not efficient. However, the cation resin portion in the mixed resin could be selectively dissolved without affecting the anion portion. The solid anion resin after separation from the cation resin solution could be dissolved. About 0.5 liters of 50% H2O2 was required for dissolution of one kg of wet resin. The reaction time was 4-5 hours. Dissolution experiments were conducted on up to 8 liters of wet resin. The second step, viz., photo-Fenton mineralization of the dissolved resin was effected at ambient temperature(25-35 C). Kinetic results of laboratory scale experiments in immersion type photo-reactor and pilot scale experiments in tubular flow photo-reactor were presented. These results clearly demonstrated the photo-Fenton mineralization of dissolved resin at ambient temperature with stoichiometric quantity of H2O2 as against 70-200% excess H2O2 requirement in chemical mineralization experiments under Fenton oxidation conditions at 90-95 C. Based on these studies, a treatment scheme was developed and presented in this paper.

  10. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last seven years, Low Oxidation State Metal Ion reagents (LOMI) have been used to decontaminate the 100 MW(e) Steam Generating Heavy Water Ractor (SGHWR) at Winfrith. The use of these reagents has resulted in a dilute ionic solution containing activation products which are produced by corrosion of metallic components in the reactor. It has been demonstrated that the amount of activity in the solution can be reduced using organic ion exchanger resins. These resins consist of a cross linked polystyrene with sulphonic acid or quaternary ammonium function groups and can be successfully immobilised in blended cement systems. The formulation which has been developed is produced from a 9 to 1 blend of ground granulated blast furnace slag (BFS) and ordinary Portland cement (OPC) containing 28% ion exchange resin in the water saturated form. If 6% Microsilica is added to the blended cement the waste loading can be increased to 36 w/o. (author)

  11. Pyrolysis of Spent Ion Exchange Resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchangers (IEX in international language) are used to remove radionuclides from the primary coolant in all nuclear power stations with a water cooling circuit. This is done by continuously removing a volume of coolant from the primary circuit and passing it through coolers, filters and the ion exchange beds. Cation and anion exchangers, in the form of coarse-grained resin beads in pressurized-water reactors and as finely ground powdered resins in boiling water reactors, are used. The trend for new power stations is to exploit all the possibilities for avoiding the generation of contaminated liquids and then to clean, as far as possible, the solutions that are nevertheless generated using ion exchange for it to be possible to dispose of them as non-radioactive waste. This relieves the burden on evaporator facilities, or means that these can even be dispensed with entirely. Regeneration is possible in principle, but little use is made of it. As the regeneration usual in conventional technologies is not employed in nuclear power stations, it is necessary to dispose of this material as radioactive waste. On the international level, a great number of processes are offered that are intended to meet the relevant national regulations, and these will be discussed in brief with their advantages and disadvantages. The aim is then to find a process which reduces the volume, yields an inert or mineralized product, works at temperatures of no more than approximately 600 deg. C and can be run in a simple facility. Originally, the pyrolysis process was developed to treat liquid organic waste from reprocessing. A typical application is the decomposition of spent solvent (TBP, tributyl phosphate, mixed with kerosene). In this process TBP is pyrolyzed together with calcium hydroxide in a fluidized bed facility at temperatures of around 500 deg. C, the calcium hydroxide reacts with the phosphate groups directly to form calcium pyrophosphate which contains all the radioactivity

  12. Thermal stability of ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The action of heat, radiation and oxidants on carbonchain polymers, such as ion-exchange resins, often cause irreversible chemical changes in macro molecules. These changes can be e g the rupture of the carbon-carbon single or double bond, and/or the degradation of the macro molecule. Ion-exchange materials also contain the far less stable bonds between functional groups and the polymer matrix. For this reason the thermal stability of ion-exchange mat- erials is mainly based on the behaviour of the functional groups, which are responsible for the ion-exchange. The solidification of the ion-exchange resin waste usually involves elevated tempera- tures. Bituminization is carried out at 130-160 degrees C. Cementa- tion is carried out at room temperature. However, cementation can generate temperatures of up to 100-120 degrees C in the solidifica- tion product during the curing period. In this study the swelling/ shrinking properties of different ion-exchange materials have been studied in air and water as a function of the drying time and temp- erature. The air dried resins were used as the reference material. The effect of sodium sulphate as a possible additive to reduce swelling was studied, The experiments which were performed and re- sults observed are discussed in detail in the Appendices. (Authors)

  13. Method of processing spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To decrease the amount of radioactive spent ion exchange resins generated from nuclear power plants, etc and process them into stable inorganic compounds through heat decomposition. Method: Spent ion exchange resins are heat-decomposed in an inert atmosphere to selectively decompose only ion exchange groups in the preceeding step while high molecular skeltons are completely heat-decomposed in an oxidizing atmosphere in the succeeding step. In this way, gaseous sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides are generated in the preceeding step, while gaseous carbon dioxide and hydrogen requiring no discharge gas procession are generated in the succeeding step. Accordingly, the amount of discharged gases requiring procession can significantly be reduced, as well as the residues can be converted into stable inorganic compounds. Further, if transition metals are ionically adsorbed as the catalyst to the ion exchange resins, the ion exchange groups are decomposed at 130 - 300 0C, while the high molecular skeltons are thermally decomposed at 240 - 300 0C. Thus, the temperature for the heat decomposition can be lowered to prevent the degradation of the reactor materials. (Kawakami, Y.)

  14. On the swelling of ion exchange resins used in Swedish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchange resins are used in nuclear power plants for purification and decontamination of water. In some of the cases, the spent resins are solidified by drying at elevated temperatures and then molded together with bitumen before final disposal. The objective of the present work is to study the swelling behavior of such resins and describe it with a model that permits calculation of the water uptake into the bituminized resins and the external swelling pressure that might develop by the swelling resins under repository conditions. The experimental part of the study comprises the swelling of ion exchange resins upon their exposure to water vapour before and after thermal treatment under conditions simulating those used in the various solidification processes. Seven different resins were studied in different chemical forms; H+, N+ and OH-, So42- for the cation an anion exchangers respectively. For each resin, water uptake, density and volume were measured at different water activities at 25 degrees C. The swelling pressure for all resins studied was calculated. A slight increase in swelling pressure after thermal treatment could be observed, especially for anion exchangers. The apparent molar volume of water in the resin phase has been determined and the swelling free energies of swelling has been calculated from experimental data at 25 degrees C and estimated at 0 degrees C. (authors)

  15. Tc-99 Ion Exchange Resin Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2010-08-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by CHPRC to evaluate the release of 99Tc from spent resin used to treat water from well 299-W15-765 and stored for several years. The key questions to be answered are: 1) does 99Tc readily release from the spent ion exchange resin after being in storage for several years; 2) if hot water stripping is used to remove the co-contaminant carbon tetrachloride, will 99Tc that has been sequestered by the resin be released; and 3) can spent resin be encapsulated into a cementitious waste form; if so, how much 99Tc would be released from the weathering of the monolith waste form? The results from the long term stability leach test results confirm that the resin is not releasing a significant amount of the sequestered 99Tc, evident by the less than 0.02% of the total 99Tc loaded being identified in the solution. Furthermore, it is possible that the measured 99Tc concentration is the result of 99Tc contained in the pore spaces of the resin. In addition to these results, analyses conducted to examine the impact of hot water on the release of 99Tc suggest that only a small percentage of the total is being released. This suggest that hot water stripping to remove carbon tetrachloride will not have a significant affect on the resin’s ability to hold-on to sequestered 99Tc. Finally, encapsulation of spent resin in a cementitious material may be a viable disposal option, but additional tests are needed to examine the extent of physical degradation caused by moisture loss and the effect this degradation process can have on the release of 99Tc.

  16. Microbial treatment of ion exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouznetsov, A.; Kniazev, O. [D. Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology of Russia, Dept. Biotechnology, Mocow (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    A bioavailability of ion exchange resins to a microbial destruction as one of the alternative methods of compacting used ionites from the nuclear fuel manufacturing cycle enterprises has been investigated. The bio-destruction was studied after a preliminary chemical treatment or without it. A sensitivity of the ion exchange resins (including highly acidic cationite KU-2-8) to the microbial destruction by heterotrophic and chemo-litho-trophic microorganisms under aerobic conditions was shown in principle. The biodegradation of the original polymer is possible in the presence of the water soluble fraction of the resin obtained after its treatment by Fenton reagent and accelerated in the presence of Mn-ions in optimal concentration 1-2 g of Mn per liter of medium. Thus, the process of bio-destruction of ionite polymer by heterotrophic microorganisms can be compared with the bio-destruction of lignin or humic substances. The optimum parameters of bio-destruction and microorganisms used must be different for resins with different functional groups. (authors)

  17. Microbial treatment of ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bioavailability of ion exchange resins to a microbial destruction as one of the alternative methods of compacting used ionites from the nuclear fuel manufacturing cycle enterprises has been investigated. The bio-destruction was studied after a preliminary chemical treatment or without it. A sensitivity of the ion exchange resins (including highly acidic cationite KU-2-8) to the microbial destruction by heterotrophic and chemo-litho-trophic microorganisms under aerobic conditions was shown in principle. The biodegradation of the original polymer is possible in the presence of the water soluble fraction of the resin obtained after its treatment by Fenton reagent and accelerated in the presence of Mn-ions in optimal concentration 1-2 g of Mn per liter of medium. Thus, the process of bio-destruction of ionite polymer by heterotrophic microorganisms can be compared with the bio-destruction of lignin or humic substances. The optimum parameters of bio-destruction and microorganisms used must be different for resins with different functional groups. (authors)

  18. Treatment of radioactive ionic exchange resins by super- and sub-critical water oxidation (SCWO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the usage of ion exchange resins increases the inventory of spent ion exchange resins increases in nuclear power plants. This study is to find an environmental-friendly process to treat theses spent resins. The test samples were prepared by diluting the slurry made by wet ball milling the spent cationic exchange resins for 24 h. The spent cationic exchange resins were separated from mixed ion exchange resins by a fluidized bed gravimetric separator. The decomposition of the samples was investigated with super-critical water oxidation (SCWO) equipment. A statistical test method - the central composite design as a statistical design of experiments - was adopted to find the optimum condition to decompose the spent exchange resins. The optimum condition was 60% of excess oxygen, 22.5 min of residence time, 0.615 wt% of NaOH, 358 of reaction temperature, and 3600 psi of reaction pressure, which is a sub-critical condition. The liquid product of the decomposition has the characteristics of 80-185 ppm of COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand), 4.0-6.0 of pH, and <1.0 ppm of corrosive components (Ni, Fe, Cr, and Mo). The exhaust gas from the SCWO equipment contained NOx of 0 ppm, SOx of 3 ppm (environment exhaust standard in Korea: NOx 200 ppm, SOx 300 ppm). Co-substituted mock samples were prepared to simulate spent cationic exchange resins from nuclear power plants which can contain radioactive Co isotopes. The conditions to obtain organic compound destruction ratio which conforms the effluent stand for the mock samples were found. The treated water filtered with 0.2-filter contained less than 1 ppm of Co. Thus Co recovery rate of more 99% was achieved.

  19. Solidification method for spent ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hydrophilic binder having a binder effect increased upon contact with water and a cellulose type fibrous binder for reinforcement are added each in an appropriate amount to spent ion exchange resins in a state moistened with water. After the water content of the mixture is appropriately adjusted, they are pelletized by press molding or extrusion molding. With such procedures, less swelling product are obtained which can be solidified into stable products. (T.M.)

  20. Supercritical water oxidation of ion exchange resins: Degradation mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent ion exchange resins are radioactive process wastes for which there is no satisfactory industrial treatment. Supercritical water oxidation could offer a viable treatment alternative to destroy the organic structure of resins and contain radioactivity. IER degradation experiments were carried out in a continuous supercritical water reactor. Total organic carbon degradation rates in the range of 95-98% were obtained depending on operating conditions. GC-MS chromatography analyses were carried out to determine intermediate products formed during the reaction. Around 50 species were identified for cationic and anionic resins. Degradation of poly-styrenic structure leads to the formation of low molecular weight compounds. Benzoic acid, phenol and acetic acid are the main compounds. However, other products are detected in appreciable yields such as phenolic species or heterocycles, for anionic IERs degradation. Intermediates produced by intramolecular rearrangements are also obtained. A radical degradation mechanism is proposed for each resin. In this overall mechanism, several hypotheses are foreseen, according to HOO center dot radical attack sites. (authors)

  1. Americium and samarium determination in aqueous solutions after separation by cation-exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration of trivalent americium and samarium in aqueous samples has been determined by means of alpha-radiometry and UV-Vis photometry, respectively, after chemical separation and pre-concentration of the elements by cation-exchange using Chelex-100 resin. Method calibration was performed using americium (241Am) and samarium standard solutions and resulted in a high chemical recovery for cation-exchange. Regarding, the effect of physicochemical parameters (e.g. pH, salinity, competitive cations and colloidal species) on the separation recovery of the trivalent elements from aqueous solutions by cation-exchange has also been investigated. The investigation was performed to evaluate the applicability of cation-exchange as separation and pre-concentration method prior to the quantitative analysis of trivalent f-elements in water samples, and has shown that the method could be successfully applied to waters with relatively low dissolved solid content. (author)

  2. Cation-Exchange Equilibria with Fused Salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solute distributions of alkali metal, alkaline- earth, transition metal, and actinide ions have been studied in fused salt-cation exchanger systems. The fused salts employed were alkali halides and nitrates. The cation exchangers used were natural zeolites, synthetic zeolites, high-porosity glasses, and molten oxide mixtures. The molten exchangers were composed of Na2O and B2O3 in various proportions. The relative quantities not only determined the exchanger capacity and electrolyte penetration but also produced distribution coefficients for a given solute which varied over several orders of magnitude. Moreover, they produced marked reversals in the selectivity series. Additional studies on the anion distributions, miscibility diagrams, vapour pressures and diffusion rates in these systems have elucidated the mechanisms involved and the relation of selectivity to solute properties, system thermodynamics, exchanger structure and available functional groups. In the region of high Na2O composition, the distribution coefficients for mono-, di- and trivalent cations in NaCl have not only the same order of selectivity found in Dowex 50-HCl systems but also similar values for the distribution coefficients. The results are summarized qualitatively and compared to behaviour in aqueous systems (Table VII). (author)

  3. Sulfonation Process and Desalination Effect of Polystyrene/PVDF Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Network Cation Exchange Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-lin Lei

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available With the classical sulfonation method of polystyrene-based strongly acidic cation exchange resins, polystyrene/polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF alloy particles were sulfonated to obtain a cation exchange resin, which was then directly thermoformed to prepare a semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN cation exchange membrane. The effects of the swelling agent, sulfonation time and temperature and the relative contents of polystyrene and divinylbenzene (DVB in the alloy particles on the feasibility of the membrane formation are discussed. The results indicate that a favorable sulfonation degree above 80% and a suitable ion exchange capacity of 1.5–2.4 mmol/g can be gained, with concentrated sulfuric acid as the sulfonation agent and 1,2-dichloroethane as the swelling agent. The running electrical resistance and desalination effect of the prepared cation exchange membrane were measured in a pilot-scale electrodialyser and not only obviously exceeded a commercial heterogeneous cation exchange membrane, but was also very close to a commercial homogenous membrane. In this way, the authors have combined the classical sulfonation method of polystyrene-based cation exchange resins with the traditional thermoforming manufacturing process of heterogeneous cation exchange membranes, to successfully develop a novel, low-price, but relatively high-performance polystyrene/PVDF cation exchange membrane with the semi-IPN structure.

  4. Coupled acoustic-gravity field for dynamic evaluation of ion exchange with a single resin bead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazaki, Takahiro; Hirawa, Shungo; Harada, Makoto; Okada, Tetsuo

    2010-06-01

    A coupled acoustic-gravity field is efficient for entrapping a particle at the position determined by its acoustic properties rather than its size. This field has been applied to the dynamic observation of ion-exchange reactions occurring in a single resin bead. The replacement of counterions in an ion-exchange resin induces changes in its acoustic properties, such as density and compressibility. Therefore, we can visually trace the advancement of an ion-exchange reaction as a time change in the levitation position of a resin bead entrapped in the field. Cation-exchange reactions occurring in resin beads with diameters of 40-120 microm are typically completed within 100-200 s. Ion-exchange equilibrium or kinetics is often evaluated with off-line chemical analyses, which require a batch amount of ion exchangers. Measurements with a single resin particle allow us to evaluate ion-exchange dynamics and kinetics of ions including those that are difficult to measure by usual off-line analyses. The diffusion properties of ions in resins have been successfully evaluated from the time change in the levitation positions of resin beads. PMID:20462180

  5. Analysis of Ion-Exchange Resin Capability of the RSG-GAS Demineralized Water System (GCA01)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Demineralized water system (GCA01) is a system which is function to process raw water to be demineralized water using ion exchange resin unit consisting of a column of cation exchange resins, anion exchange resin column and the column resin mix bed. After certain time the ion exchange resins to be saturated so that is needed regeneration. The RSG-GAS demineralized water system (GCA01) not operated continuously and indication of when does an ion exchange resin regeneration on The RSG-GAS demineralized water system (GCA01) is the water conductivity from anion exchange resin column output indicates ≥ 5μS/cm. Analysis of capability of the ion exchange resin demineralized water system (GCA01) line I has been performed. The analysis was done by comparing the time required in the system operating cycle of regeneration to the next regeneration during the period 2011 and 2012. From the results of the analysis showed the cycle regeneration time is varies. This shows that ion exchange resin capability of the RSG-GAS demineralized water system (GCA01) is varies depending on the raw water quality and success of the regeneration ion exchange resin. (author)

  6. Treatment of Spent ion-Exchange Resins from NPP by Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent cationic exchange resins and anionic exchange resins were separated from mixed spent exchange resins by a fluidized bed gravimetric separator. The separated resins were identified by an elemental analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. The each test sample was prepared by diluting the slurry made by wet ball milling the cationic exchange resins and the anionic exchange resins separated as a spherical granular form for 24 hours. The resulting test samples showed a slurry form of less than 75 μm of particle size and 25,000 ppm of CODcr. The decomposition conditions of each test samples from a thermal power plant were obtained with a lab-scale(reactor volume: 220 mL) supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) facility. Then pilot plant(reactor volume : 24 L) tests were performed with the test samples from a thermal power plant and a nuclear power plant successively. Based on the optimal decomposition conditions and the operation experiences by lab-scale facility and the pilot plant, a commercial plant(capacity: 150 kg/h) can be installed in a nuclear power plant was designed.

  7. Overall reaction rate analysis of ion-exchange resins incineration by fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A kinetic study on the incineration of ion-exchange resins was conducted using fluidized bed. In the experiment, cation or anion exchange resins with known quantities were fed into the fluidized bed maintained at a constant temperature from 550 to 750degC. The apparent reaction rate constants kap could be evaluated by the time for completion of combustion derived from the continuous measurement of CO2 concentration in the off-gas. It was confirmed that the reaction of the ion-exchange resins proceeded with the shrinking particle model forming no solid product layer and the rate of disappearance of the resins could be expressed by the surface chemical reaction. Most preferable conditions for incinerating the ion-exchange resins were found to be about 650degC for temperature and more than 4.91 x 10-2m·s-1 for the air velocities at fluidized bed uB. Also, kap for cation and anion exchange resins were found to be 1.25 x 10-2 and 1.51 x 10-2s-1, respectively, at 650degC and uB of 5.45 x 10-2m·s-1. (author)

  8. Radiation stability of macro-porous and gel-type cation exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macro-porous cation exchange resin Dianion CPK-08 and gel-type cation exchange resin Dowex 50WX8 were irradiated with γ-rays from 60Co, while soaked in distilled water, 0.5 M HNO3 or 4 M HNO3, and the ion-exchange properties, such as strong- and weak-acid capacities, moisture content and wet resin volume, were examined in relation to absorbed dose. There was no appreciable difference between the radiation stabilities of the two cation exchangers. Increase of HNO3 concentration reduced the loss of strong-acid capacity and increased the decross-linkage and the weak-acid capacity. Elution characteristics of 137Cs and 99Sr from columns packed with γ-irradiated resin were examined and the column distribution ratio of these radionuclides and the theoretical plate number were calculated. These values decreased with the increase of absorbed dose. Dianion CPK-08 was packed into a pressurized column and irradiated with γ-rays at a dose rate of 2x1O6 R/hr, while water was passed through the column at a constant flow rate. The greatest change in the resin properties was observed at an upper stream position from the position of the highest radiation dose of 2x106 R/hr. (T.G.)

  9. Efficiency of lead removal from drinking water using cationic resin Purolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashour Mohammad Merganpour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today, issues such as water shortage, difficulties and costs related to supplying safe water, and anomalous concentrations of heavy metals in groundwater and surface water resources, doubled the necessity of access to technical methods on removing these pollutants from water resources. Methods: In this lab study, cationic resin Purolite S-930 (with co-polymer styrene di-vinyl benzene structure was used for lead removal from drinking water containing up to 22 μg/L. Using statistical analysis and designing a full factorial experiment are the most important effective parameters on lead removal obtained through ion exchange process. Results: Analysis of response and interaction parameters of ion exchange showed that the resin column height has maximum and pH value has minimum effect on the efficiency of lead removal from aquatic environment. Trinary interaction of “effective size, flow rate, resin column high” has the most important for lead removal efficiency in this system. So the maximum efficiency was obtained at the mesh = 40, bed height =1.6 meter, and pH= 6.5. At the best operation conditions, ability to remove 95.42% of lead concentration can be achieved. Conclusion: Using the resin Purolite S-930 during 21-day service with 91.12% of mean lead removal ratio from drinking water is an economic and technical feasibility.

  10. Electrochemical ion exchanger in the water circuit to measure cation conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengtsson, Bernt; Ingemarsson, Rolf; Settervik, Gustav [Ringhals AB, Vaeroebacka (Sweden); Velin, Anna [Vattenfall Research and Development AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-03-15

    At Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), more than four years of successful operation with a full-scale electrode ionization (EDI) unit for the recycling of steam generator blowdown gave the inspiration to modify and scale down this EDI process. As part of this project, the possibility of replacing the cation exchanger columns used for cation conductivity analysis with some small and integrated electrochemical ion exchange cells was explored. Monitoring the cation conductivity requires the use of a small cation resin column upstream of the conductivity probe and is one of the most important analyses at power plants. However, when operating with high alkaline treatment in the steam circuit, there is the disadvantage of rapid exhaustion of the resins, necessitating frequent replacement or regeneration. This causes interruptions in the monitoring and gives rise to a high workload for the maintenance staff. This paper reports on the optimization and testing of two different two-compartment electrochemical cells for possible replacement of the cation resin columns for analyzing cation conductivity in the secondary steam circuit at Ringhals NPP. Field tests during start-up conditions and more than four months of steady operation together with real and simulated tests for impurity influences indicate that an electrical ion exchange (ELIX) process could be successfully used to replace the resin columns in Ringhals while operating with high-pH all-volatile treatment (AVT) using hydrazine and ammonia. Installation of an ELIX system downstream of a particle filter and upstream of a small cation resin column will introduce additional safety and further reduce the maintenance and possible interruptions. Performance of the ELIX process together with other chemical additives (morpholine, ethanolamine, 3-methoxypropylamine, dimethylamine) and dispersants may be further evaluated to qualify the ELIX process as well as steam generator blowdown electrodeionization for wider use in

  11. Method for removing cesium from aqueous liquid, method for purifying the reactor coolant in boiling water and pressurized water reactors and a mixed ion exchanged resin bed, useful in said purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention relates to a method for removing cesium from an aqueous liquid, and to a resin bed containing a mixture of an anion exchange resin and cation exchange resin useful in said purification. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention is a method for purifying the reactor coolant of a presurized water or boiling water reactor. Said method, which is particularly advantageously employed in purifying the reactor coolant in the primary circuit of a pressurized reactor, comprises contacting at least a portion of the reactor coolant with a strong base anion exchange resin and the strong acid cation exchange resin derived from a highly cross-linked, macroporous copolymer of a monovinylidene aromatic and a cross-linking monomer copolymerizable therewith. Although the reactor coolant can sequentially be contacted with one resin type and thereafter with the second resin type, the contact is preferably conducted using a resin bed comprising a mixture of the cation and anion exchange resins. 1 fig., refs

  12. Cation-exchange separation of uranium in dimethylsulphoxide medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janauer, G E; Korkisch, J; Hubbard, S A

    1971-08-01

    Cation-exchange chromatography in a dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) medium is a suitable means for separating uranium from metal ions, including copper, iron, nickel and molybdenum. Quantitative separations of uranium from 26 elements can best be effected on a column of Dowex 50W-X8 (200-400 mesh), using as the eluent a 20% v/v DMSO solution which is 0.6Min hydrochloric acid and 0.25M in sodium acetate. Only calcium is eluted with the uranium and all other elements studied are eluted either before or after uranium. The elution characteristics of uranium and of other metal ions were investigated with respect to changes in eluent and resin compositions. Separations were much less effective at higher concentrations of sodium ion or DMSO. None of the organic solvents methanol, ethanol, methyl glycol, acetone, dioxan or acetic acid was found to produce favourable separation conditions. Results with Dowex 50 resins of lower or higher cross-linkage were inferior to those obtained with the X8 resin. PMID:18960944

  13. Development of heat resistant ion exchange resin. First Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear power stations, as a means of maintaining the soundness of nuclear reactors, the cleaning of reactor cooling water has been carried out. But as for the ion exchange resin which is used as the cleaning agent in the filtrating and desalting facility in reactor water cleaning system, since the heat resistance is low, high temperature reactor water is cooled once and cleaned, therefore large heat loss occurs. If the cleaning can be done at higher temperature, the reduction of heat loss and compact cleaning facilities become possible. In this study, a new ion exchange resin having superior heat resistance has been developed, and the results of the test of evaluating the performance of the developed ion exchange resin are reported. The heat loss in reactor water cleaning system, the heat deterioration of conventional ion exchange resin, and the development of the anion exchange resin of alkyl spacer type are described. The outline of the performance evaluation test, the experimental method, and the results of the heat resistance, ion exchange characteristics and so on of C4 resin are reported. The with standable temperature of the developed anion exchange resin was estimated as 80 - 90degC. The ion exchange performance at 95degC of this resin did not change from that at low temperature in chloride ions and silica, and was equivalent to that of existing anion exchange resin. (K.I.)

  14. Radionuclide Leaching from Organic Ion Exchange Resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory tests were performed to examine the efficacy of leach treatments for decontaminating organic ion exchange resins (OIER), which have been found in a number of samples retrieved from K East Basin sludge. Based on process records, the OIER found in the K Basins is a mixed-bet strong acid/strong base material marketed as Purolitetrademark NRW-037. Radionuclides sorbed or associated with the OIER can restrict its disposal to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The need for testing to support development of a treatment process for K Basin sludge has been described in Section 4.2 of ''Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basins Sludge Treatment Process'' (Flament 1998). To help understand the effects of anticipated OIER elutriation and washing, tests were performed with well-rinsed OIER material from K East Basin floor sludge (sample H-08 BEAD G) and with well-rinsed OIER having approximately 5% added K East canister composite sludge (sample KECOMP). The rinsed resin-bearing material also contained the inorganic ion exchanger Zeolon-900trademark, a zeolite primarily composed of the mineral mordenite. The zeolite was estimated to comprise 27 weight percent of the dry H-08 BEAD G material

  15. Cement waste-form development for ion-exchange resins at the Rocky Flats Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the development of a cement waste form to stabilize ion-exchange resins at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). These resins have an elevated potential for ignition due to inadequate wetness and contact with nitrates. The work focused on the preparation and performance evaluation of several Portland cement/resin formulations. The performance standards were chosen to address Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and Environmental Protection Agency Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements, compatibility with Rocky Flats equipment, and throughput efficiency. The work was performed with surrogate gel-type Dowex cation- and anion-exchange resins chosen to be representative of the resin inventory at RFETS. Work was initiated with nonactinide resins to establish formulation ranges that would meet performance standards. Results were then verified and refined with actinide-containing resins. The final recommended formulation that passed all performance standards was determined to be a cement/water/resin (C/W/R) wt % ratio of 63/27/10 at a pH of 9 to 12. The recommendations include the acceptable compositional ranges for each component of the C/W/R ratio. Also included in this report are a recommended procedure, an equipment list, and observations/suggestions for implementation at RFETS. In addition, information is included that explains why denitration of the resin is unnecessary for stabilizing its ignitability potential

  16. [Preparation of spherical lignin cation adsorption resin with black pulping liquor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Hua; Zou, Jin-Guang; Hong, Shu-Nan; Zeng, Zhen-Ou

    2005-09-01

    Spherical lignin cation adsorption resin was obtained by two-step method with black liquor of paper mill and characterized by the Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). Firstly, the spherical lignin beads were prepared with black liquor of paper mill by applying reverse-phase suspension polymerization technique, and the preparation conditions were also optimized. The suitable conditions include 200 r/min of stirring speed, 90 degrees C of reaction temperature, 1.0 h of reaction time and use epoxy chloropropane (1.5% by weight of lignin) as cross-linking agent, the ideal volume ratio between oil phase and water phase was 3:1 by using kerosene oil as disperse phase, and the perfect dispersant agent was Tween 80 (3% by weight of lignin). Secondly, the spherical lignin cation adsorption resin was developed by grafting the acrylamide onto the back-bone of the spherical lignin beads. The best concentration of acrylamide was 0.72 mol/L at ambient temperature for 2.0 h, and the ideal initiator system was the Fenton reagent of H2O2/Fe2+. Under the above conditions, the ion exchange capacity of the prepared resin could reach 1.640 5 mmol/g. PMID:16366482

  17. Electrochemical ion exchanger in the water circuit to measure cation conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Ringhals NPP, more than four years of successful operation with a full-scale EDI for the recycling of steam generator blow down (SGBD) gave the inspiration to modify and 'scale down' this EDI process. This with purpose to explore the possibilities to replace the cation exchanger columns used for cation conductivity analysis, with some small and integrated electrochemical ion-exchange cells. Monitoring the cation conductivity requires the use of a small cation resin column upstream of the conductivity probe and is one of the most important analyses at power plants. However, when operating with high alkaline treatment in the steam circuit, it's connected to the disadvantage of getting the resins rapidly exhausted, with needs to be frequently replaced or regenerated. This is causing interruptions in the monitoring and giving rise to high workload for the maintenance. This paper reports about some optimization and tests of two different two-compartment electrochemical cells for the possible replacements of cation resin columns when analyzing cation conductivity in the secondary steam circuit at Ringhals NPPs. Field tests during start up condition and more than four months of steady operation together with real and simulated test for impurity influences, indicates that a ELectrical Ion Echange process (ELIX) could be successfully used to replace the resin columns in Ringhals during operating with high pH-AVT (All Volatile Treatment), using hydrazine and ammonia. Installation of an ELIX-system downstream a particle filter and upstream of a small cation resin column, will introduce additional safety and further reduce the maintenance with possible interruptions. Performance of the ELIX-process together with other chemical additives (Morpholine, ETA, MPA, DMA) and dispersants, may be further evaluated to qualify the ELIX-process as well as SGBD-EDI for wider use in nuclear applications. (author)

  18. Gold Loading on Ion Exchange Resins in Non-Ammoniacal Resin-Solution Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrar Muslim

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The loading of gold using strong base anion exchange resin in non-ammoniac resin-solution (NARS systems has been studied. The loading of gold onto ion exchange resins is affected by polythionate concentration, and trithionate can be used as the baseline in the system. The results also show that resin capacity on gold loading increases due to the increase in the equilibrium thiosulfate concentration in the NARS system. Gold loading performances show the need of optimization the equilibrium concentrations of thiosulfate in the NARS system. Keywords: equilibrium, gold loading, resin capacity, thiosulfate, trithionate

  19. Taste masked orodispersible formulation of fexofenadine hydrochloride using ion exchange resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Suares

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research work was to mask the intense bitter taste of fexofenadine hydrochloride using weak cation exchange resins and to formulate orodispersible tablet of taste masked drug-resin complex. Five resins indion 204, indion 234, indion 414, kyron T-114 and kyron T-314 were used. Depending on maximum drug loading capacity of resins indion 234 and kyron T-314 were finalized for further study. Drug-resin complex was optimized by considering parameters such as drug to resin ratio, soaking time of resins, stirring time, temperature and pH on maximum drug loading. The drug-resin complex was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The drug-resin complex was also subjected to various evaluation studies such as taste mask evaluation by panel method, drug content and in vitro drug release at salivary and gastric pH. The orodispersible tablets of taste masked drug-resin complex for indion 234 and kyron T-314 were prepared by direct compression method. Formulated orodispersible tablets were subjected to various evaluation parameters such as diameter and thickness measurement, hardness test, weight variation test, in vitro United States Pharmacopoeia disintegration test, wetting time, test for content uniformity, assay, friability test and in vitro dissolution studies. The results indicate that orodispersible tablets of fexofenadine hydrochloride containing indion 234 and kyron T-314 are palatable and provide quick disintegration and fast drug release without addition of superdisintegrants.

  20. A study on free radical oxidation of spent radioactive ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resin dissolution process was conducted successfully in bench-scale tests. The polystyrene based strong acid cation-exchange resins with water content of about 58% (wt) were dissolved by hydrogen peroxide and ferrous ions as catalyst under pH of 2.0∼3.0 adjusted by sulphuric acid. For the same objective of dissolution of the strong basic anion-exchange resins with water content about 63% (wt), citric acid was the best choice for pH control, and the use of Fe2+ and Cu2+ was verified having a synergetic effect. Mixed resins were also dissolved successfully under proper conditions. The dissolution temperature was generally below 99 degree C. The COD and TOC levels of the dissolution residues depended on the doses and dosing rate of hydrogen peroxide as well as the catalyst supplied. All the three types of dissolution reactions gave the similar degradation pattern

  1. Retention behavior of C1-C6 aliphatic monoamines on anion-exchange and polymethacrylate resins with heptylamine as eluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Kazutoku; Ohashi, Masayoshi; Jin, Ji-Ye; Takeuchi, Toyohide; Fujimoto, Chuzo; Choi, Seong-Ho; Ryoo, Jae Jeong; Lee, Kwang-Pill

    2004-06-11

    Retention behavior of C1-C6, aliphatic monoamines (methylamine, ethylamine, propylamine, butylamine, amylamine and hexylamine) on columns (150 mm x 6 mm i.d.) packed with various anion-exchange resins (styrene-divinylbenzene (PS-DVB) copolymer-based strongly basic anion-exchange resin: TSKgel SAX, polymethacrylate-based strongly basic anion-exchange resin: TSKgel SuperQ-5PW and polymethacrylate-based weakly basic anion-exchange resin: TSKgel DEAE-5PW) and unfunctionized polymethacrylate resins (TSKgel G5000PW and TSKgel G3000PWXL) was investigated with basic solutions (sodium hydroxide and heptylamine) as the eluents. Due to strongly electrostatic repulsion (ion-exclusion effect) between these anion-exchange resins and these amines, peak resolution between these amines on these anion-exchange resin columns was unsatisfactory with both sodium hydroxide and heptylamine as the eluents. In contrast, these polymethacrylate resins were successfully applied as the stationary phases for the separation of these C1-C6 amines with heptylamine as eluent, because of both small hydrophobicity and small cation-exchange ability of these resins. Excellent simultaneous separation, highly sensitive conductimetric detection and symmetrical peaks for these C1-C6 amines were achieved on the TSKgel G3000PWXL column in 35 min with 5 mM heptylamine at pH 11.1 as the eluent. PMID:15250421

  2. Behavior of copper (II )and uranium ( VI) in precipitation chromatography in the system anion exchange resin - hexacyanoferrate (II )

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work it is shown the efficiency of precipitation chromatography for separation and concentration of metallic elements by using a strong anionic-exchange resin saturated with hexacyanoferrate (II). Metallic cations, like Cu (II) and U (VI), are retained from highly diluted solutions and enriched into the resin, in the form of the correspondent insoluble hexacyanoferrate (II), precipitated inside the resin, which permitted the visual observation of a chromatographic zone on the top of the column. It will be discussed the conditions of sorption and elution of the cations uptake by the resin. This system permits the enrichment of the above mentioned cations onto the resin and offers the possibility of interesting separations as well. (author)

  3. Cobalt 60 cation exchange with mexican clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mexican clays can be used to remove radioactive elements from contaminated aqueous solutions. Cation exchange experiments were performed with 60 Co radioactive solution. In the present work the effect of contact time on the sorption of Co 2+ was studied. The contact time in hydrated montmorillonite was from 5 to 120 minutes and in dehydrated montmorillonite 5 to 1400 minutes. The Co 2+ uptake value was, in hydrated montmorillonite, between 0.3 to 0.85 m eq/g and in dehydrated montmorillonite, between 0.6 to 1.40 m eq/g. The experiments were done in a pH 5.1 to 5.7 and normal conditions. XRD patterns were used to characterize the samples. The crystallinity was determined by X-ray Diffraction and it was maintained before and after the cation exchange. DTA thermo grams showed the temperatures of the lost humidity and crystallization water. Finally, was observed that dehydrated montmorillonite adsorb more cobalt than hydrated montmorillonite. (Author)

  4. Separation of boron isotopes using NMG type anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchange separation of boron isotopes (B-10 and B-11) has been studied by using a special boron selective ion exchange resin; NMG (n-methyl glucamine)-type anion exchange resin. The resin has shown a large isotope separation coefficient of 1.02 at the experimental conditions of temperature, 80degC, and boric acid concentration, 0.2 M (mole/dm3). Enriched B-10 (92%) was obtained after the migration of 1149 m by a recyclic operation of ion exchange columns in a merry-go-round method. (author)

  5. Reducing nitrogen crossover in microbial reverse-electrodialysis cells by using adjacent anion exchange membranes and anion exchange resin

    KAUST Repository

    Wallack, Maxwell J.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial reverse electrodialysis cells (MRECs) combine power generation from salinity gradient energy using reverse electrodialysis (RED), with power generation from organic matter using a microbial fuel cell. Waste heat can be used to distill ammonium bicarbonate into high (HC) and low salt concentration (LC) solutions for use in the RED stack, but nitrogen crossover into the anode chamber must be minimized to avoid ammonia loses, and foster a healthy microbial community. To reduce nitrogen crossover, an additional low concentration (LC) chamber was inserted before the anode using an additional anion exchange membrane (AEM) next to another AEM, and filled with different amounts of anion or cation ion exchange resins. Addition of the extra AEM increased the ohmic resistance of the test RED stack from 103 Ω cm2 (1 AEM) to 295 Ω cm2 (2 AEMs). However, the use of the anion exchange resin decreased the solution resistance of the LC chamber by 74% (637 Ω cm2, no resin; 166 Ω cm2 with resin). Nitrogen crossover into the anode chamber was reduced by up to 97% using 50% of the chamber filled with an anion exchange resin compared to the control (no additional chamber). The added resistance contributed by the use of the additional LC chamber could be compensated for by using additional LC and HC membrane pairs in the RED stack.

  6. Treatment of spent ion-exchange resins for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion-exchange resins are used in CANDU-PHW nuclear power stations to purify heavy water in the primary heat transport (PHT) and moderator systems. Two techniques for conditioning spent ion-exchange resins for disposal have been evaluated: direct immobilization, and incineration combined with immobilization of the ash and scrubbed off-gases. When ion-exchange resins were immobilized directly, no volume reductions were obtained at the various resin-to-matrix weight ratios attempted. Volumes of bitumen and glass products were equal to the volumes of untreated resin while the volumes of cement and polyester products were two and three times larger. While incinerating the resin is an extra processing step, high reductions in volume result. Bitumen and glass product volumes were six times smaller than the volumes of untreated resin while cement and polyster product volumes were about half the volume of untreated resin. Since the releases of Cs-137 were about ten times lower for products made by direct immobilization, PHT resins, which have high concentrations of Cs-137, should be immobilized directly. Moderator resins which have high concentrations of C-14 should be incinerated and the ash- and C-14-contaminated scrubbing solutions should be immobilized. By pretreating such resins with calcium chloride, the C-14 present on resin could be released at temperatures below the ignition temperature of the resin. This technique reduces the amount of inactive carbon dioxide that must be scrubbed to trap the C-14. The releases of C-14 from immobilized barium hydroxide scrubbing solution were the same as releases from immobilized resin

  7. Research on Purification Process of Vindoline and Catharanthine from Catharanthus roseus by Means of Cation Exchange Resin%阳离子交换树脂纯化长春花中文多灵和长春质碱的工艺优选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柏道鸣; 周广涛; 代龙

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To select the optimum purifying process of Vindoline and Catharanthine from Catharanthus roseus by means of cation exchange resin. Method: The purifying process of Vindoline and Catharanthine from Catharanthus roseus was performed by cation exchange resin of LSD-001 type, with the solvent of ammonia water, the mixture of ammonia water and ethanol, acid water, the mixture of acid water and ethanol, the mixture of sodium chloride and ethanol, and the content of two alkaloids were determined to choose the optimal technological parameters. Result: The ideal concentration of solvent was: with 80% ethanol ( containing 1% sodium chloride ) eluent elution, two alkaloids eluting attained the highest rate. Conclusion : The purification process has well effect.It can be used for purifying Vindoline and Catharanthine from Catharanthus roseus by means of cation exchange resin.%目的:考察阳离子交换树脂不同洗脱溶剂纯化长春花中文多灵和长春质碱的效果,优选最佳工艺条件.方法:采用LSD-001大孔型阳离子交换树脂对长春花中文多灵和长春质碱进行纯化,以两种生物碱含量为指标,考察以氨水、氨性乙醇、酸水、酸性乙醇、盐醇为洗脱剂纯化两种生物碱的效果.结果:经过优选,离子交换树脂的最佳洗脱条件为:以80%乙醇(含1%氯化钠)洗脱剂洗脱时,两种生物碱的洗脱率最高.结论:优选得到的工艺纯化长春花中文多灵和长春质碱效果好,节省溶剂,工艺简单,可用于长春花中两种生物碱的分离纯化.

  8. MODELING RESULTS FROM CESIUM ION EXCHANGE PROCESSING WITH SPHERICAL RESINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C.; Hang, T.; Aleman, S.

    2011-01-03

    Ion exchange modeling was conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory to compare the performance of two organic resins in support of Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX). In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal at Hanford and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The spherical forms of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) as well as a hypothetical spherical SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 (SL644) are evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake wastes (supernates). Both SuperLig{reg_sign} and resorcinol formaldehyde resin beds can exhibit hydraulic problems in their granular (nonspherical) forms. SRS waste is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. Using VERSE-LC Version 7.8 along with the cesium Freundlich/Langmuir isotherms to simulate the waste decontamination in ion exchange columns, spherical SL644 was found to reduce column cycling by 50% for high-potassium supernates, but sRF performed equally well for the lowest-potassium feeds. Reduced cycling results in reduction of nitric acid (resin elution) and sodium addition (resin regeneration), therefore, significantly reducing life-cycle operational costs. These findings motivate the development of a spherical form of SL644. This work demonstrates the versatility of the ion exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. The value of a resin with increased selectivity for cesium over potassium can be assessed for further development.

  9. A comparison between three methods for the determination of cation exchange capacity and exchangeable cations in soils

    OpenAIRE

    Ciesielski, H.; Sterckeman, T.

    1997-01-01

    The object of this study is to compare the results obtained with three standardized methods of determination of cationic exchange capacity (CEC) and exchangeable cations (Ca, Mg, K) in soils. The three methods are based on different exchange reagents: cobalt hexamine (Cohex) trichloride, barium chloride and ammonium acetate. Exchange procedures are different as well; they are, respectively, single extraction, successive extractions and percolation. Values measured with barium and Cohex as ind...

  10. Organic resin anion exchangers for the treatment of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic anion exchange resins are evaluated for 99-TcO4- (pertechnate) removed from aqueous nuclear waste streams. Chemical, thermal and radiation stabilities were studied. Selected resins were examined in detail for their selectivities in the presence of I-, NO3-, SO4=, CO3=, Cl- and OH-. Ion exchange equilibria and kinetic mechanisms were determined. Preliminary investigations of cement encapsulation in polymer modified form were made and some leach studies carried out. (author)

  11. Modified ion exchange resins - synthesis and properties. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doescher, F.; Klein, J.; Pohl, F.; Widdecke, H.

    1982-01-22

    Sulfomethylated resins are prepared by polymer analogous reactions, starting from macroporous poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) matrices. Different reaction paths are discussed and used in the synthesis. Sulfomethylation can be achieved by reaction of a chloromethylated resin with dimethyl sulfide and sodium sulfonate or alternatively by oxidation of polymer-bound thiol groups. Both methods give high conversions as shown by IR spectra and titration of the sulfonic acid groups. Poly(1-(4-hydroxysulfomethylphenyl)ethylene) (3) is obtained by reaction of poly(1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylene) (2) resin with formaldehyde/sodium sulfonate. The thermal stability, catalytic activity, and ion exchange equilibria of the sulfomethylated resin are investigated.

  12. High energy electron beam curing of epoxy resin systems incorporating cationic photoinitiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mixture of epoxy resins such as a semi-solid triglycidyl ether of tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane and a low viscosity bisphenol A glycidyl ether and a cationic photoinitiator such as a diaryliodonium salt is cured by irradiating with a dosage of electron beams from about 50 to about 150 kGy, forming a cross-linked epoxy resin polymer

  13. The sorption capacity of boron on anionic-exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron sorption capacities on anionic-exchange resins vary with temperature, concentration, and resin cross-linkage. A semiempirical correlation, developed from boron solution chemistry, is presented to account for these variations. The relationship, based on boron chemistry and changes in Gibb's energy, can be stated approximately as Q = a1CBa2Za3 exp[-(a4T + a5T2 + a6Z0.5)]. Correlation parameters, which vary with resin type, are evaluated experimentally. Parameter values for macroporous resin Diaion PA 300 and for gel-type resins Diaion SA10 and Amberlite IRN 78LC are presented. The resulting expression is used to determine boron sorption and desorption limitations on ion exchangers at various temperatures and concentrations, and to determine the interfacial boron concentration in equilibrium and rate models

  14. Radiation degradation in EPICOR-2 ion exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Johnson, D.A.; Sanders, R.D. Sr.

    1990-09-01

    The Low-Level Waste Data base Development -- EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Investigation Program funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is investigating chemical and physical conditions for organic ion exchange resins contained in several EPICOR-II prefilters. Those prefilters were used during cleanup of contaminated water from the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station after the March 1979 accident. The work was performed by EG G Idaho, Inc. at the Idaho Engineering Laboratory. This is the final report of this task and summarizes results and analyses of three samplings of ion exchange resins from prefilters PF-8 and -20. Results are compared with baseline data from tests performed on unirradiated resins supplied by Epicor, Inc. to determine the extent of degradation due to the high internal radiation dose received by the organic resins. Results also are compared with those of other researchers. 18 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Radiation degradation in EPICOR-2 ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Low-Level Waste Data base Development -- EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Investigation Program funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is investigating chemical and physical conditions for organic ion exchange resins contained in several EPICOR-II prefilters. Those prefilters were used during cleanup of contaminated water from the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station after the March 1979 accident. The work was performed by EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. at the Idaho Engineering Laboratory. This is the final report of this task and summarizes results and analyses of three samplings of ion exchange resins from prefilters PF-8 and -20. Results are compared with baseline data from tests performed on unirradiated resins supplied by Epicor, Inc. to determine the extent of degradation due to the high internal radiation dose received by the organic resins. Results also are compared with those of other researchers. 18 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs

  16. Design of systems for handling radioactive ion exchange resin beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The flow of slurries in pipes is a complex phenomenon. There are little slurry data available on which to base the design of systems for radioactive ion exchange resin beads and, as a result, the designs vary markedly in operating plants. With several plants on-line, the opportunity now exists to evaluate the designs of systems handling high activity spent resin beads. Results of testing at Robbins and Meyers Pump Division to quantify the behavior of resin bead slurries are presented. These tests evaluated the following slurry parameters; resin slurry velocity, pressure drop, bead degradation, and slurry concentration effects. A discussion of the general characteristics of resin bead slurries is presented along with a correlation to enable the designer to establish the proper flowrate for a given slurry composition and flow regime as a function of line size. Guidelines to follow in designing a resin handling system are presented

  17. Use of dried ion exchange resin for heavy water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to prevent degradation of D2O in HANARO reflector system due to the moisture in the ion exchange resin, a method using the dried resin is developed. The physical change of dried resin was observed and measured. The performance was tested, and verified. The moisture content in the resin could be reduced to below 1% from its original content of about 55%. The integrated degradation of D2O for 20 years is estimated as 0.23% if the dried resin is used whenever it is replaced. This is much simpler process than the deuteration method which has been used in the other facilities such as heavy water reactors, and the cost of which is almost negligible. Should the dried resin be used for an existing deuteration facility, the generation of degraded D2O will be significantly reduced

  18. Selection of anion exchange resins for boron thermal regeneration systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron concentration changes in the reactor coolant are effected using a new development called the boron thermal regeneration system (BTRS). Thermal regeneration refers to the use of ion-exchange resins in either retaining or releasing borate ions as a function of temperature. For the BTRS the equilibrium capacity of commercial and special anion exchange resins was investigated for the degree of cross-linking of anion resins. The equilibrium capacity increases with decreased temperature and depends strongly on the degree of cross-linking having the maximum point at about 7% of DVB. The temperature coefficient of equilibrium capacity of boric acid is also a function of the concentration of external solution and of the cross-linking having a maximum point of around 7% of DVB. Other basic characteristics of anion exchange resin were also investigated. (author)

  19. Ultrafiltration Membrane Fouling and the Effect of Ion Exchange Resins

    KAUST Repository

    Jamaly, Sanaa

    2011-12-01

    Membrane fouling is a challenging process for the ultrafiltration membrane during wastewater treatment. This research paper determines the organic character of foulants of different kinds of wastewater before and after adding some ion exchange resins. Two advanced organic characterization methods are compared in terms of concentration of dissolved organic carbons: The liquid chromatography with organic carbon (LC-OCD) and Shimadzu total organic carbon (TOC). In this study, two secondary wastewater effluents were treated using ultrafiltration membrane. To reduce fouling, pretreatment using some adsorbents were used in the study. Six ion exchange resins out of twenty were chosen to compare the effect of adsorbents on fouling membrane. Based on the percent of dissolved organic carbon’s removal, three adsorbents were determined to be the most efficient (DOWEX Marathon 11 anion exchange resin, DOWEX Optipore SD2 polymeric adsorbent, and DOWEX PSR2 anion exchange), and three other ones were determined to the least efficient (DOWEX Marathon A2 anion exchange resin, DOWEX SAR anion exchange resin, and DOWEX Optipore L493 polymeric adsorbent). Organic characterization for feed, permeate, and backwash samples were tested using LC-OCD and TOC to better understand the characteristics of foulants to prevent ultrafiltration membrane fouling. The results suggested that the polymeric ion exchange resin, DOWEX SD2, reduced fouling potential for both treated wastewaters. All the six ion exchange resins removed more humic fraction than other organic fractions in different percent, so this fraction is not the main for cause for UF membrane fouling. The fouling of colloids was tested before and after adding calcium. There is a severe fouling after adding Ca2+ to effluent colloids.

  20. Investigation of the volume instability of ion exchange resins embedded in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchange resins (IERs) are widely used by nuclear industry to decontaminate radioactive effluents. Spent resins have to be conditioned and the cementation process is adequate, relatively simple and inexpensive. However, several specificities of IERs have to be taken into account to design a cement formula: -) their ability to exchange ions with the cementitious medium, which may influence the cement hydration process, -) their low mechanical strength, which strongly weakens the compressive strength of the solidified waste forms, -) their strong dimensional variations which can, under severe conditions, induce swelling and cracking of the cement-based matrix. These dimensional variations can result from various processes: osmotic pressure and ion exchange in saturated medium, relative humidity variations in de saturated medium. Free deformations of IERs are measured as a function of different parameters: nature of the ions fixed on the functional groups, ionic strength of the aqueous solution in which the resins are immersed, water saturation degree of the resins. Particular attention is also paid to the quantification of swelling pressures induced by resins in a confined environment, as it may be the case in the cement-based matrix. Cements containing high amounts of blast-furnace slag are more appropriate than Portland cement (OPC) to solidify cationic IERs saturated with sodium or potassium. The rapid expansion observed during the first days of hydration with OPC can indeed be strongly reduced with the blended binders

  1. Northeast utilities, Millstone Station's experience with Eichrom Industries' Diphonixtrademark selective ion-exchange resin in liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three nuclear units at Northeast Utilities' Millstone Station-the General Electric boiling water reactor (Unit 1), the Combustion Engineering pressurized water reactor (Unit 2) and the Westinghouse pressurized water reactor (Unit 3)-completed a series of bench-top and side-stream pilot scale tests of Eichrom Industries Diphonixtrademark resin, a novel gel-type ion-exchange resin. This testing was part of an overall optimization of their radioactive waste (radwaste) systems including use of coagulants and cesium-specific zeolite materials. These tests projected significant improvements over traditional, strong-acid cation-exchange resins. By installing Diphonix resin, Millstone addressed its goals of minimizing the spent resin generated from its liquid radwaste systems and minimizing the activity discharged into the environment from these systems while continuing to use existing capital equipment

  2. Activation product behavior on borated mixed-bed ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Facility uses two separate mixed-bed ion exchange systems to decontaminate solutions. The radioactive solutions to be decontaminated are demineralized water containing boric acid (500 to 3500 ppM B) and lithium hydroxide (approx. 1 ppM Li). Many activation products are formed during nuclear operation. This paper describes the capability of the mixed cation-anion (Li-OH) type resin to remove these activation products from solution. Problems in measuring decontamination factors (DF) are discussed. The tendency of certain isotopes to give early indication of resin exhaustion is shown. Typical DF (ratio of before-ion-exchange concentration to after-ion-exchange concentration) have been determined for 22 different isotopes in the LOFT purification systems

  3. Determination of degradation conditions of exchange resins containing technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantification of Tc-99 in spent exchange resins, coming from nuclear power plants, is indispensable to define their administration. The Tc-99 is a pure beta emitter of 210000 years of half-life, volatile and of a high mobility in water and soil. For this reason, the objective of this work is to establish a digestion method of ionic exchange resins containing technetium that retains more than 95% of this radioisotope. Mineralization tests were carried out of a resin Amberlite IRN-150 by means of an oxidation heat, in acid medium, varying the resin mass, the medium volume, the media type, the temperature and the digestion time. The digested samples were analyzed by gas chromatography to estimate the grade of their degradation. The 99mTc was used as tracer to determine the technetium percentage recovered after mineralizing the resin. The digestion process depends on the temperature and the resin mass. At higher temperature better mineralization of samples and to greater resin mass to a constant temperature, less degradation of the resin. The spectra beta of the 99mTc and 99Tc are presented. (Author)

  4. A study of the wet chemical oxidation and solidification of radioactive spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the research works on the decomposition of Ion-Exchange Resins (IERs) in H2O2-Fe2+/Cu2+ catalysis systems for volume reduction and improvement of immobilization in cement. The resins used in the study were polystyrene strong acidic and basic resins containing about 45% of water. The radioactive spent resins loading 60Co, 137Cs, 134Cs, 90Sr and 51Cr with a radioactive activity level of 4GBq/m3 were obtained from a reactor installation. It has been found in batch scale experiment that many factors has influence on the decomposition of IERs, and the most important ones are H2O2 dosage, H2O2 dose rate, temperature and pH value. The best temperature range is 97-99 deg. C. The pH-value of resin slurry chosen in this study is 2.0-3.0. The appropriate dosage of H2O2(30% vol.) is 200 ml/25 g wet mixed resins. The decomposition ratio is 100% and more than 90% for cation and anion IERs respectively, while it is 85% for mixed resins (as TOC-value). The analytical results indicates that the radioactive nuclides loaded in the spent resins are concentrated in decomposition solution and solid residues. No radioactivity enters into the off-gas, while the condensate from the reaction system has a radioactive activity of 1.65 Bq/l. Foaming is a problem associated with resin dissolution. Addition of a little amount of anti-foam agent can solve this problem very well. Three cementation materials have been chosen for encapsulation of decomposition residue. All of the tree kind of solidification materials can produce qualified cemented products with excellent properties for long term storage. The adopted volume reduction (VR) process can significantly reduce waste volume of solidified product decreases by 40% compared with that of original spent resin. (author). 4 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  5. Thermochemical treatment of spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent ion exchange resins (IER) is a principal type of radioactive waste constantly generated by nuclear plants of various functions. The reduction of volume of this waste and its treatment to the forms suitable for long-term disposal is an urgent problem facing the present-day atomic energetics. Nowadays the technological process THOR (Studsvik, Sweden) based on the thermodestruction of IER is the best developed and realized on the industrial scale. Unfortunately, this process requires expensive equipment and great energy consumption for the moisture to be evaporated and thereafter IER to be destroyed by heat. Meanwhile the capability of some elements (Mg, Al, Si, Ti etc.) has long been known and practical use found for active interaction with water in combustion regime. This property of the metals has been used in the development of new technology of treatment of IERs in SIA ''Radon''. Wet IER is mixed with powder metal fuel (PMF) which represents a mixture of metal powder, a quantity of burning activator and some technological additives. On initiation, the mixture of IER with PMF burns without extra energy supply to generate enough heat for the moisture to be evaporated and products of IER decomposition to be destroyed and evaporated. To burn out the products of IER evaporation the air is used. The thermodynamic simulation data and the results of experiments using a pilot plant show that radionuclides contained in IER are chemically bound in ash residue consisting of metal oxides, spinel, silicates, etc. According to the experimental data, radionuclides in amounts of 90% or more of Cs-137 and up to 95% of Sr-90 and Co-60 are fixed in the ash residue. The residue volume is several times less than the initial volume of IER. Concentrations of hazard gases in off-gases do not exceed maximum permissible ones accepted in different countries. The technological process is easy to perform, it does not require sophisticated equipment and great energy consumption which

  6. Modeling cation exchange using EQ3/6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geochemical modeling codes must be able to predict solid-solution and ion-exchange behavior of zeolites and smectites in order to design and assess strategies for containing and cleaning up toxic and/or radioactive wastes. Cation-exchange and solid-solution models have been implemented in the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling package and used to predict the composition of clinoptilolite under a variety of conditions. Published free energies of cation exchange on clinoptilolite at 25 degrees C were combined with the calorimetric data for clinoptilolite to derive free energies of formation of the component end members of a solid solution in which mixing is allowed only on the exchange site. The solid-solution model and component end-member data were incorporated into EQ3/6 and its data base. An option to treat cation exchange independently of the solid-solution model was also developed and implemented in EQ3/6. This option allows the user to model mixed-phase exchangers, multisite exchangers, and systems in which the exchanger is not in overall equilibrium with the solution. Two open-quotes idealclose quotes cation-exchange conventions [Vanselow (mole fraction) and Gapon (equivalent fraction)] are currently implemented in the code. A description of the cation-exchange models and their implementation into EQ3/6 is presented, and the relationship between the exchange formalisms and the solid-solution models is discussed. The advantages and limitations of the models and currently available thermodynamic data are addressed by comparing cation-exchange compositions of clinoptilolites with (1) published binary exchange data; (2) compositions of coexisting clinoptilolites and formation waters at Yucca Mountain; and (3) experimental sorption isotherms of Cs and Sr on zeolitized tuff

  7. Development of a modified ion exchange resin column for removal of gadolinium from the moderator systems of PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadolinium is used as neutron poison in PHWRs. It is injected to the heavy water (D2O) moderator at 15 ppm concentration during emergency shut down and at 2 ppm during the start up of the reactor. As gadolinium precipitates under neutral and alkaline conditions, pHapp range of 5 - 5.5 is recommended for maintaining gadolinium in the solution and to minimize corrosion of moderator system structural materials and radiolysis. Gadolinium has to be progressively removed as the reactor goes to power. It is removed by the purification system containing ion exchange resin columns. It has been observed that gadolinium precipitates in the ion exchange columns. Experimental investigations were carried out to understand the phenomenon of precipitation of gadolinium in the weak base ion exchange resin. It was found that the strong base groups present in the weak base resin was responsible for the precipitation of gadolinium. Hence, attempts were made to selectively cap the strong base groups present in the weak base anion exchange resin. It was found that the strong base groups of weak base resin can be selectively saturated by treating the resin with 0.2 M NaNO3 and it prevented Gd precipitation. Based on studies carried out on gadolinium pick-up and radiation decomposition with weak base anion exchange resins, a simple mixed bed consisting of nitrate treated weak base resin of poly acrylic based macroporous resin and a strong acid cation exchange resin has been recommended for the removal of gadolinium for both 2 ppm and 15 ppm concentrations as it does not precipitate gadolinium and gives optimum chemistry parameters in the outlet. (author)

  8. Separation of organic ion exchange resins from sludge - engineering study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This engineering study evaluates the use of physical separation technologies to separate organic ion exchange resin from KE Basin sludge prior to nitric acid dissolution. This separation is necessitate to prevent nitration of the organics in the acid dissolver. The technologies under consideration are: screening, sedimentation, elutriation. The recommended approach is to first screen the Sludge and resin 300 microns then subject the 300 microns plus material to elutriation

  9. Separation of organic ion exchange resins from sludge -- engineering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, J.B.

    1998-08-25

    This engineering study evaluates the use of physical separation technologies to separate organic ion exchange resin from KE Basin sludge prior to nitric acid dissolution. This separation is necessitate to prevent nitration of the organics in the acid dissolver. The technologies under consideration are: screening, sedimentation, elutriation. The recommended approach is to first screen the Sludge and resin 300 microns then subject the 300 microns plus material to elutriation.

  10. Microscopic Theory of Cation Exchange in CdSe Nanocrystals

    OpenAIRE

    Ott, Florian D.; Spiegel, Leo L.; Norris, David J.; Erwin, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Although poorly understood, cation-exchange reactions are increasingly used to dope or transform colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots). We used density-functional theory and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to develop a microscopic theory that explains structural, optical, and electronic changes observed experimentally in Ag-cation-exchanged CdSe nanocrystals. We find that Coulomb interactions, both between ionized impurities and with the polarized nanocrystal surface, play a key...

  11. Incorporation of radioactive spent ion exchange resins in plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were undertaken on the incorporation in plastics - polyethylene in particular - of radioactive spent ion exchange resins produced in nuclear power plants. The resulting polyethylene products burdened with radioactive resin were tested to ascertain the properties considered important for radioactive waste management. The items chosen for testing were mechanical strength, leachability of radionuclide and radiation resistance. Polyethylene products burdened with 50 wt % of resin were found to possess an impact strength of 10 kg.cm/cm and a compressive strength of 300 kg/cm2, which values do not indicate any appreciable decrease in mechanical strength compared with polyethylene unburdened with resin. The leaching rate of 137Cs from the resin-burdened polyethylene product was very small - only 0.1% leached out in one year. In respect of decomposition by radiation, the amount of gases evolving upon absorbing a dose of 109 rad was 10 ml/g. The effect of radiation on the mechanical strength was also studied. It is concluded from above results that solidification of radioactive spent ion exchange resin by incorporation in plastics is one of the best methods devised so far for treating spent resins. (auth.)

  12. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement: final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions eg LOMI can be achieved using organic ion exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilised in cement based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% Ordinary Portland Cement 84% gg Blast Furnace Slag, 6% Microsilica with a water cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This information was successfully scaled up to 200 litres giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the product's properties. (author)

  13. Optimizing the management of spent ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety treatment,conditioning and disposal of spent ion exchange resin (SR) from nuclear facilities is a hot topic. The SR features, various treatment and conditioning methods, such as filling into the high integrity container after drying and dewatering, elution, hot compaction, biodegradation, incineration, wet oxidation, bituminization and vitrification are described in this paper. Especially, the cementation is expounded in detail. The swelling mechanism of cementlined spent resins and preventative measures are discussed. It is pointed out that the cementation formulation has to be given more attention and the key point is to comply with disposal requirements. Finally, comments and suggestions for optimizing the management of spent resins are addressed

  14. Recovery of tetrachloroaurate through ion exchange with Dowex 11 resin

    OpenAIRE

    Alguacil, F. J.

    1998-01-01

    The recovery of the tetrachloroaurate complex by the anionic ion exchange resin Dowex 11 has been studied. The kinetics of gold adsorption were dependent of both gold and resin concentrations and temperature. The adsorption isotherm can be described by the expression Q = kCn. The loaded resin could be eluted by an acidic thiourea solution at 20°C. After several adsorption-elution cycles there is not any apparent loss in the adsorption properties of th...

  15. Ion exchange resin fouling of molybdenum in recovery uranium processess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between anion exchange resin fouling and molybdic acid polymerization was studied. By using potentiometer titration and laser-Raman spectroscopy the relationship of molybdic acid polymerization and the pH value of solution or the molybdenum concentration was determined. It was shown that as the concentration of initial molybdenum in solution decreases from 0.2 mol/L to 0.5 mmol/L, the pH value of starting polymerization decreased from 6.5 to 4.5. The experimental results show that the fouling of 201 x 7 resin in the acidic solution is mainly caused by the adsorbing of Mo3O264- ion and occupying the exchange radical site of the resin. Under the leaching conditions the molybdenum and phosphate existing in the leaching liquor can form 12-molybdo-phosphate ion. It also leads to resin fouling. The molybdenum on the fouled resin can synergically be desorbed by mixed desorbents containing ammonium hydroxide and ammonium sulfate. The desorbed resin can be used for uranium adsorption and the desorbed molybdenum can be recovered by ion exchange method

  16. Method and device of processing spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To formulate the residues of thermally decomposed spent ion exchange resins into firm pellets of excellent durability neither with particular high temperature heat treatment nor by the addition of binders. Method: Spent ion exchange resins are thermally or oxidatively decomposed in an inert atmosphere or oxygen-containing atmosphere at a temperature from 300 to 600 deg C and the decomposition residues obtained thereby are hot pressed at a predetermined temperature into pellets, since firm pellets excellent in durability can be prepared from thermally decomposed or oxidatively decomposed residues of spent ion exchange resins neither with particular high temperature heat treatment nor with addition of binders, it is possible to reduce the cost and simplify the system. (Yoshihara, H.)

  17. Pyrolysis of ion exchange resins for volume reduction and inertisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive ion exchange resins are produced in water cleaning systems in nuclear power plants. Studsvik RadWaste AB and GNS have developed a pyrolysis process for the treatment of resins with the goal of an optimal volume reduction and a transformation of the ion exchange resins into a biological and chemical inert state. The degradation products arising from the pyrolysis are char, tar and gas. In the pyrolysis process used by Studsvik RadWaste and GNS about 1/3 char, 1/3 water and tar and 1/3 gas are produced. The char is supercompacted in order to receive a volume reduction of about 10:1 and a better product for final storage. Ion exchange resins with a specific β/γ activity of 1E12 Bq/m3 with 50% of Co-60 can be handled. The retention of the activity has been 0.5E6:1. By processing a total of 100 kg ion exchange resins with a total activity of IE9 Bq only some hundred becquerel have been monitored outside the pyrolyzing unit. This means that the products leaving the pyrolyzing unit, in this case tar, water and gas could be handled as non radioactive material in a conventional waste treatment facility

  18. Purification of drinking water from radioactive contamination by final consumers by means of combined cation and anion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It should be tried to develop an apparatus which makes it possible for the final consumer to purify the drinking water himself in the case of a radioactive contamination of the water. After thorough preliminary studies the most suitable kinds of exchange resins and the best arrangement for a combined cation and anion exchange resins and the best arrangement for a combined cation and anion exchange equipment were determined in inactive preliminary tests. Subsequent the useful capacity (NK) and the purifying factor (RF) were determined for the fission products 90Sr, 131I and 137Cs. The results were for 90Sr: NK = 30 1/2 x 0.5 l resin, RF >= 4.102, for 131I: NK = 32 1/2 x 0.5 l resin, RF = 3.7.102 and for 137Cs: NK > 35 1/2 x 0.5 l resin, RF >= 103. With 2 x 1 l resin the concentration of possible fission products in water can be reduced by 2 orders of magnitude ore more. A proposal for the construction of a household decontamination equipment for drinking water is made. The cost of production will be about A.S. 400,-- to 600,--. (author)

  19. Separation of B-10 with weakly basic anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the study of B-10 isotope separation with weakly basic anion exchanger, the sorption isotherms of boric acid on WA-21 weak-base anion exchange resin and the sorption band shapes as well as its migration velocities in a four-inch diameter ion exchange column, were studied. The isotherms show S-shapes with gentle slope at both low concentration and high concentration regions. In the band migration study, it has been found that these S-shaped isotherms affected the velocities of the peak maximum as the band migrated along the column. The velocities could be calculated with the simple solute movement equation. These results suggest that sorption of molecular species, rather than ion exchange of the counterions is the main process that occurs inside the pores of a weak-base ion exchange resin which is in contact with a very weak electrolytic solution, such as that of boric acid. (author)

  20. Spectrophotometric flow injection catalytic determination of molybdenum in plant digest using ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spectrophotometric flow injection analytical method based on the catalytic action of molybdenum on the oxidation of iodide by hydrogen peroxide in acidic medium is proposed for the molybdenum determination in plant digests. A cation exchange resin column is incorporated into a flow injection system for removal of interferents. The following system variables were investigated and optimized: reagent concentrations, sample injection volume, mixing and reaction coil lengths, temperature, sampling time, pumping rate and concentration of eluting agents. The effects of interfering species and of the acidity of samples on the molybdenum retention by the ion exchange resin column were investigated. The proposed method is characterized by good precision (r.s.d. (2.0%), a sampling rate of about 40 samples per hour, and permits the determination of molybdenum in plant digests in the range 1.0 to 40.0 μg/l. The results compare well with those obtained by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. (author)

  1. Studies on ion exchange equilibria and kinetics. Pt. 5. UO22+-Na+-H+ ternary cation exchange kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of particle-diffusion controlled ion exchange in the ternary system of cations UO22+-Na+-H+ - 001 * 7 strong acidic resin has been studied. In the [R-H+]/Na++UO22+) system, the change of the amount of Na+ in the resin phase with time showed a high peak. In the [R-Na+]/H++UO22+) system, the change of the amount of H+ in the resin phase with time also showed a high peak. In the [R2-UO22+]/(H++Na+) system, the change of the amount of H+ in the resin phase with time showed a merely small peak. This kinetic character of the ternary ion exchange system in the finite solution volume has been analyzed according to the Nerst-Planck equation, and on the whole, the trend of the experimental results is consistent with the resulting numerical solution of the set of Nerst-Planck equations. (author) 11 refs.; 9 figs.; 1 tab

  2. Evaluation of ion exchange resins for the removal of dissolved organic matter from biologically treated paper mill effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassandeh, Mojgan; Antony, Alice; Le-Clech, Pierre; Richardson, Desmond; Leslie, Greg

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the efficiency of six ion exchange resins to reduce the dissolved organic matter (DOM) from a biologically treated newsprint mill effluent was evaluated and the dominant removal mechanism of residual organics was established using advanced organic characterisations techniques. Among the resins screened, TAN1 possessed favourable Freundlich parameters, high resin capacity and solute affinity, closely followed by Marathon MSA and Marathon WBA. The removal efficiency of colour and lignin residuals was generally good for the anion exchange resins, greater than 50% and 75% respectively. In terms of the DOM fractions removal measured through liquid chromatography-organic carbon and nitrogen detector (LC-OCND), the resins mainly targeted the removal of humic and fulvic acids of molecular weight ranging between 500 and 1000 g mol(-1), the portion expected to contribute the most to the aromaticity of the effluent. For the anion exchange resins, physical adsorption operated along with ion exchange mechanism assisting to remove neutral and transphilic acid fractions of DOM. The column studies confirmed TAN1 being the best of those screened, exhibited the longest mass transfer zone and maximum treatable volume of effluent. The treatable effluent volume with 50% reduction in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was 4.8 L for TAN1 followed by Marathon MSA - 3.6L, Marathon 11 - 2.0 L, 21K-XLT - 1.5 L and Marathon WBA - 1.2 L. The cation exchange resin G26 was not effective in DOM removal as the maximum DOC removal obtained was only 27%. The resin capacity could not be completely restored for any of the resins; however, a maximum restoration up to 74% and 93% was achieved for TAN1 and Marathon WBA resins. While this feasibility study indicates the potential option of using ion exchange resins for the reclamation of paper mill effluent, the need for improving the regeneration protocols to restore the resin efficiency is also identified. Similarly, care should be taken

  3. Gamma radiation effect on gas production in anion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced decomposition of Amberlite IRA400 anion exchange resin in hydroxide form by gamma radiolysis has been studied at various doses in different atmospheres (anaerobic, anaerobic with liquid water, and aerobic). The effect of these parameters on the degradation of ion exchange resins is rarely investigated in the literature. We focused on the radiolysis gases produced by resin degradation. When the resin was irradiated under anaerobic conditions with liquid water, the liquid phase over the resin was also analyzed to identify any possible water-soluble products released by degradation of the resin. The main products released are trimethylamine (TMA), molecular hydrogen (H2g) and carbon dioxide (CO2g). TMA and H2g are produced in all the irradiation atmospheres. However, TMA was in gaseous form under anaerobic and aerobic conditions and in aqueous form in presence of liquid water. In the latter conditions, TMAaq was associated with aqueous dimethylamine (DMAaq), monomethylamine (MMAaq) and ammonia (NH4+aq). CO2g is formed in the presence of oxygen due to oxidation of organic compounds present in the system, in particular the degradation products such as TMAg

  4. Purification of degraded TBP solvent using macroreticular anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) diluted with a suitable diluent is commonly used for solvent extraction in Purex process for the recovery of uranium and plutonium from irradiated nuclear fuels. This solvent gets degraded due to various factors, the main degradation product being dibutyl phosphoric acid (HDBP). A solvent cleanup step is generally incorporated in the process for removing the degradation products from the used solvent. A liquid-liquid cleanup system using sodium carbonate or sodium hydroxide solution is routinely used. Considering certain advantages, like the possibility of loading the resin almost to saturation capacity and the subsequent disposal of the spent resin by incineration and the feasibility of adopting it to the process, a liquid-solid system has been tried as an alternate method, employing various available macroreticular anion exchange resins in OH- form for the sorption of HDBP from TBP. After standardizing the various conditions for the satisfactory removal of HDBP from TBP using synthetic mixtures, resins were tested with process solvent in batch contacts. The parameters studied were (1) capacity of different resins for HDBP sorption (2) influence of acidity, uranium and HDBP on the sorption behaviour of the latter (3) removal of fission products from the solvent by the resin and (4) regeneration and recycling of the resin. (author). 2 figs., 13 tabs., 17 refs

  5. Method of eluting radioactive nuclide from spent ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly radioactive spent ion exchange resins containing a great amount of cesium or strontium as radioactive nuclides are immersed in an eluting solution and, by stirring solution, cesium or strontium adsorbed to the spent ion exchange resins are eluted. The eluting solution is passed through a zeolite bed to selectively remove cesium and/or strontium. As an eluent for the eluting solution to be used, sodium salts such as sodium hydroxide or sodium sulfate is preferred. Zeolite having radiation resistance and not suffering from reduction in the absorbent performance by the presence of boric acid or sodium are used. Since the zeolite is highly stabilized with inorganic material by cement or glass solidification, the amount is remarkably reduced as compared with that of the spent resins and the administration is facilitated. (K.M.)

  6. Immobilization of radioactive ion exchange resins in glass. Part I: Pretreatment of the resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full Text: The ion exchange resins are used to retain the radionuclides that contaminate the water in primary and secondary circuits and storage pools of the Argentine nuclear reactors. Once used, this resins are an intermediate level waste. Due to the generated volume of resins during the reactor life, it is necessary to have a proper method for management and final disposal of these wastes. Up to now in National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), the most studied process is cementation. However, this method increases the waste volume and the final product has low compression hardness. The immobilization in glass of these wastes is attractive because of the volume reduction that could be attained and because of the well known durability of glass. In this work we prepared a mixed bed of resins, similar to those used in Argentina nuclear reactors. We use cesium as a simulant for the active elements present in the resins. Absorption of lithium and cesium was controlled by conductivity and/or ph measurements. The so charged resins were thermally decomposed. This process was studied by Dta/T G experiments. Some potentially problematic effects were founded (foam formation, particle explosion), regarding the possibility of immobilisation of the resins in glass by sintering. Finally, the calcination products were analyzed by Sem and X-ray diffraction. This analysis showed that lithium and cesium remain as sulfates. For this reason we decided to use those chemical compounds as simulant s of the calcination products in the following sintering experiments

  7. Q-CEP trademark processing of spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses a commercial process being marketed by Molten Metal Technology (MMT) and Scientific Ecology Group (SEG), aimed at the processing of spent ion exchange resins, to accomplish a volume reduction of a factor of 30, and produce a final state product which is self shielding, stable, and non-exchangeable. The author discusses the facility construction, performance testing, and cost savings based on current and projected disposal costs

  8. THE EFFECT OF IONIC STRENGTH ON THE UPTAKE OF TAURINE ON A STRONG-BASIC ANION EXCHANGE RESIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Studied the effect of ionic strength on the uptake of taurine on a strong-basic anionexchange resin. The batch phase equilibrium experiments of ta urine on the anion exchange resin D290 were conducted at different ionic strength, and then the amounts of uptake of taurine on the resin at different pH were determined. The ion exchange mechanisms of taurine on the anion exchange resin at different pH were discussed. Experimental results showed that with increase of the ionic strength of solution, the adsorbed amount of taurine on the resin D290 decreased; Adding small amounts of NaOH or HCl into the system of taurine aqueous solution/D290 anionresin would make the amount of taurine taken up on the resin to decrease due to the competition uptakes of hydroxyl ion with taurine or the decrease in the amount of absorbable zwitterions of taurine in the solution and excluding the cations of taurine from the anion resin.

  9. Fixation of metallic sulfosalicylate complexes on an anionic exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since sulfosalicylate ions have acid-base properties, sulfosalicylate complexes have an apparent stability which varies with the ph. As a result, the fixation of sulfo-salicylates on an anionic exchange resin depends on the ph of the solution in equilibrium with the resin. This research has been aimed at studying the influence of the ph on the fixation on an anionic exchange resin (Dowex 1 x 4) of sulfosalicylate anions on the one hand, and of metallic sulfosalicylate complexes on the other hand. In the first part of this work, a determination has been made, by frontal analysis of the distribution of sulfosalicylate ions in the resin according to the total sulfosalicylate I concentration in the aqueous solution in equilibrium with the resin. The exchange constants of these ions between the resin and the solution have been calculated. In the second part, a study has been made of the fixation of anionic sulfosalicylate complexes of Fe(III), Al(III), Cr(III), Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Zn(II), Mn(II), Cd(II), Fe(II) and UO22+. By measuring the partition coefficients of these different elements between the resin and the solution it has been possible to give interpretation for the modes of fixation of the metallic ions, and to calculate their exchange constant between the resin and the solution. The relationship has been established for each metallic element studied, between its partition coefficient, the ph and the total concentration of the complexing agent in solution. Such a relationship makes it possible to predict, for given conditions, the nature of the species in solution and in the resin, as well as the partition coefficient of a metallic, element. Finally, in the third part of the work, use has been made of results obtained previously, to carry out some separations (Ni2+ - Co2+; Ni2+ - Co2+ - Cu2+; UO22+ - Fe3+; UO22+ - Cr3+; UO22+ - Cu2+; UO22+ - Ni2+; UO22+ - Co2+; UO22+ - Mn2+ and UO22+ - Cd2+), as well as the purification of a uranyl sulfosalicylate solution

  10. Synthesis and chemical modification of polymeric resins for the treatment of cations and aromatic hydrocarbons in produced oily water; Sintese de modificacao quimica de resina polimerica e aplicacao na remocao de cations e hidrocarbonetos aromaticos presentes em agua produzida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aversa, Thiago M.; Rodrigues, Monique F.; Vieira, Helida V.P.; Queiros, Yure G.C.; Lucas, Elizabete F. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Macromoleculas, Lab. de Macromoleculas e Coloides na Industria do Petroleo, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: thiagoaversa@ima.ufrj.br

    2011-07-01

    The use of chemically modified resins in oily water treatment process is not very developed yet. Because of this, this work suggests to study the styrene and divinylbenzene sulfonation effect on oil and grease, aniline and calcium removal from the water. The aniline, oils and greases belong to a class of toxic organic compounds, with the Brazilian maximum limits established for disposal in CONAMA 393/2007, while the calcium ions belong to the group of cations of alkaline earth metals which improve hardness to the water, may cause fouling as carbonates and sulfates form. By using sulfonated resins in oily water treatment it is possible to remove not only oils and greases but also calcium and aniline. These kinds of polar compounds are removed because of the cation exchange capacity of resin. (author)

  11. STRUCTURAL FEATURE AND EXCHANGE KINETICS OF CARBOXYLATED POLYPROPYLENE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Chinyung; YANG Chaoshiung; YANG Chong

    1987-01-01

    The present article deals with the exchange process of bivalent metal ions, such as Zn2 +, Cd2 + and Hg2+, etc., taken up by non-crosslinked carboxylated polypropylene (CPP) resin. The control factor of the exchange rate deduced from the kinetic data is governed basically by the chemical reaction rather than the mass transfer effect particle diffusion and/or liquid film diffusion. In solution, all the graft chains in the outer shell ofa CPP resin could form a "quasi-macromolecular solution" domain. This opinion further demonstrates the structural pattern of CPP resin proposed in earlier paper[1].

  12. Vitrification of cesium-contaminated organic ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargent, T.N. Jr. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Vitrification has been declared by the Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) as the Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Savannah River Site currently uses a sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) precipitation process to remove Cs-137 from a wastewater solution created from the processing of nuclear fuel. This process has several disadvantages such as the formation of a benzene waste stream. It has been proposed to replace the precipitation process with an ion exchange process using a new resorcinol-formaldehyde resin developed by Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC). Preliminary tests, however, showed that problems such as crust formation and a reduced final glass wasteform exist when the resin is placed in the melter environment. The newly developed stirred melter could be capable of overcoming these problems. This research explored the operational feasibility of using the stirred tank melter to vitrify an organic ion exchange resin. Preliminary tests included crucible studies to determine the reducing potential of the resin and the extent of oxygen consuming reactions and oxygen transfer tests to approximate the extent of oxygen transfer into the molten glass using an impeller and a combination of the impeller and an external oxygen transfer system. These preliminary studies were used as a basis for the final test which was using the stirred tank melter to vitrify nonradioactive cesium loaded organic ion exchange resin. Results from this test included a cesium mass balance, a characterization of the semi-volatile organic compounds present in the off gas as products of incomplete combustion (PIC), a qualitative analysis of other volatile metals, and observations relating to the effect the resin had on the final redox state of the glass.

  13. Vitrification of cesium-contaminated organic ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification has been declared by the Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) as the Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Savannah River Site currently uses a sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) precipitation process to remove Cs-137 from a wastewater solution created from the processing of nuclear fuel. This process has several disadvantages such as the formation of a benzene waste stream. It has been proposed to replace the precipitation process with an ion exchange process using a new resorcinol-formaldehyde resin developed by Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC). Preliminary tests, however, showed that problems such as crust formation and a reduced final glass wasteform exist when the resin is placed in the melter environment. The newly developed stirred melter could be capable of overcoming these problems. This research explored the operational feasibility of using the stirred tank melter to vitrify an organic ion exchange resin. Preliminary tests included crucible studies to determine the reducing potential of the resin and the extent of oxygen consuming reactions and oxygen transfer tests to approximate the extent of oxygen transfer into the molten glass using an impeller and a combination of the impeller and an external oxygen transfer system. These preliminary studies were used as a basis for the final test which was using the stirred tank melter to vitrify nonradioactive cesium loaded organic ion exchange resin. Results from this test included a cesium mass balance, a characterization of the semi-volatile organic compounds present in the off gas as products of incomplete combustion (PIC), a qualitative analysis of other volatile metals, and observations relating to the effect the resin had on the final redox state of the glass

  14. Electron-beam curing of epoxy resins: effect of alcohols on cationic polymerization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N N Ghosh; G R Palmese

    2005-10-01

    Electron-beam (e-beam) induced polymerization of epoxy resins proceeds via cationic mechanism in presence of suitable photoinitiator. Despite good thermal properties and significant processing advantages, epoxy-based composites manufactured using e-beam curing suffer from low compressive strength, poor interlaminar shear strength, and low fracture toughness. A detailed understanding of the reaction mechanism involving e-beam induced polymerization is required to properly address the shortcomings associated with ebeam curable resin systems. This work investigated the effect of hydroxyl containing materials on the reaction mechanism of e-beam induced cationic polymerization of phenyl glycidyl ether (PGE). The alcohols were found to play important roles in polymerization. Compared to hydroxyl group of aliphatic alcohol, phenolic hydroxyl group is significantly less reactive with the oxonium active centre, generated during e-beam induced polymerization of epoxy resin system.

  15. Slag cement matrix for spent cationic resins arising from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct immobilisation of spent IX resins from nuclear power plants in slag cement matrix was investigated. The results showed that slag cement matrix can be satisfactorily used to immobilise cationic resins in K+ form arising from VVERs and mixed resins arising from PHWRs using vermiculite and bentonite admixtures. The optimum slag content of cement is 50 weight percent The cumulative fraction of 137Cesium leached and 137Cesium leach rate values for best slag cement matrix incorporating cationic resins in K+ form from VVER type reactor were 0.0623 and 0.000566 g/cm2/d with 140 days leaching. The cumulative fraction of 137Cesium leached and 137Cesium leach rate values for slag cement matrix incorporating mixed resins from PHWRs type reactors were 0.0705 and 0.0009 g/cm2/d for 95 days leaching. Contraction of swollen bentonite and IX resins while setting of cement and its subsequent curing decreased strength of pure slag cement matrix from 241 to 50 kg/cm2. (author)

  16. Corrosion of steel drums containing immobilized ion exchange-resins and incineration ashes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Argentine Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) is responsible for developing the management nuclear waste disposal programme. This programme contemplates the design and construction of a facility for the final disposal of intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The proposed model is a near-surface monolithic repository similar to those in operation in El Cabril, Spain. The design of this type of repository is based on the use of multiple, independent and redundant barriers. The intermediate radioactive waste consists mostly in spent ionic exchange resins and filters from the nuclear power plants, research reactors and radioisotopes production facilities. The spent resins, as well as the incineration ashes, have to be immobilized before being stored to improve leach resistance of waste matrix and to maintain mechanical stability for safety requirements. Generally, cementation processes have been used as immobilization techniques for economical reasons as well as for being a simple operation. The immobilized resins and incineration ashes are thus contained in steel drums that, in turn, can undergo corrosion depending on the ionic content of the matrix. This work is a part of a systematic study of the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with immobilized cemented exchange-resins with different types and contents of aggressive species and incineration ashes. To this purpose, a special type of specimen was manufactured to simulate the cemented waste in the drum. The evolution of the corrosion potential and the corrosion current density of the steel, as well as the electrical resistivity of the matrix are being monitored along time. The aggressive species studied were chloride ions (the main ionic species present in nature) and sulphate ions (produced during the radiolysis process of the cationic exchange-resins after cementation). Preliminary results show the strong effect of chloride on the corrosion susceptibility of the steel. Monitoring will continue for

  17. Removing and recovering of uranium from the acid mine waters by using ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchange using resins is one of the few processes capable of reducing ionic contaminants in effluents to very low levels. In this study the process was used to remove and recovery uranium from acid mine waters at Pocos de Caldas-MG Uranium Mining and Milling Plant. The local mineralogical features, allied to the biogeochemical phenomena, owing to presence of pyrite in the rock piles, moreover another factors, resulting acid drainage with several pollutants, including uranium ranging from 6 to 14 mg/l, as sulfate complex, that can be removed by anionic exchanger. The iron interference is eliminated by lime pretreatment of water, increasing pH from 2.6 to 3.3-3.8 to precipitate this cation, without changing the uranium amount. Eight anionic resins were tested, based on the uranium loading, in sorption studies. Retention time, and pH influence was verified for the exchanger chose. With breakthrough of 1 mg U/L and 10 mg U/l in the feed solution, the uranium decontamination level was 94%. Typical values of loading resin were 20-30 g U/l and 70-90 g SO4/l. Uranium elution was done with Na Cl solution. Retention time, saline, and acid concentration were the parameters studied. The concentrate, obtained from the eluate by ammonia precipitation, presented uranium (86,8% as U3 O8) and impurities within commercial specifications. (author)

  18. Comparison of anion exchange resins for recovering plutonium from nitric acid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microreticular and macroreticular anion exchange resins were compared for their capability of recovering plutonium from nitric acid waste streams. Plutonium breakthrough capacity and elution behavior of the resins were determined as a function of resin properties. Small-bead microreticular resins with a polystyrene matrix containing 4% divinylbenzene cross-linkage showed the best performance. Of the 20- to 50-mesh resins, the macroreticular resin, Amberlite IRA-938, gave the highest plutonium breakthrough capacity and eluted plutonium the fastest

  19. Ligand Exchange Processes on Solvated Lithium Cations

    OpenAIRE

    Pasgreta, Ewa Maria

    2007-01-01

    In this work the solvation process of Li+ ion, as well as solvent and ligand exchange reactions on Li+ ion were studied. Li+ ions possess interesting properties and like other alkali metal ions are known to form complexes with macrocyclic ligands called cryptands. In this summary, an overview over the insights gained in the factors that control the reactivity of Li+ complexes with respect to the solvent and cryptand properties is presented. Three main questions were addressed: • How does the ...

  20. Conditioning of spent ion exchange resins by embedding in compound matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In ion exchange resin (IER) embedding by the epoxide process, the polymerization temperature peak can be a limit, due to the damages possibly occurring in the solidified IER form. Two evolutions of the epoxide process, using compound matrices, are presented: - the epoxide sand process, where the embedding matrix contains, added to an epoxide resin, an inert filler constituted of Fontainebleau Sand. The properties of the ternary IER - Epoxide - Sand system were studied: results of laboratory experiments and those on a full scale campaign are given. - In the second process, an epoxide cement compound matrix is used for the IER solidification. Two cements, i.e. blast furnace slag cement or flying ash cement, were tested, mixed with an hydrophilic epoxide binder. Applied to mixed bed or pure cationic or anionic IER, the formulation, gives a high embedding ratio and good qualities to the final product. These results allow to plan further industrial development

  1. Phosphorus-contained polycondensation type ion-exchange resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulkun Tursunov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This work describes synthesis and research of new polycondensation type phosphorus-contained ion-exchange polymers by phosphorylation of polymers received through the interaction of furfural (accessible and cheap product of hydrolytic and cotton scraping industry of Uzbekistan with benzyl bromide (chloride. Furfural and its derivatives possess high reactionary ability thanks to presence of carbonyl groups, and presence of a heterocyclic cycle gives to the received polymers high thermal and chemical stability. Polycondensation reaction kinetics of furfural and benzyl bromide, and phosphorylation reaction of the received benzyl bromide-furfural polymer were studied. Sorption, kinetic and thermo-chemical properties of received ion-exchange resins were studied using physico-chemical and chemical analyses to find out specific objects of practical application. Particularly, sorption and selective properties of received ion-exchange resins to ions of such metals as copper, nickel, calcium, magnesium, and uranyl ion were studied. Received results support the application of the investigated ion-exchange resins in processes of clearing of industrial and waste waters of hydrometallurgical manufactures.

  2. The Assay of Alpha- and Beta-Emitters by Means of Scintillating Ion-Exchange Resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of scintillating ion.exchange resins (SIER) has provided a unique system for the detection and counting of alpha- and beta-ray emitting nuclides. The property of ion exchange permits the concentration of ionic radionuclides from aqueous solutions of widely varying chemical conditions. The property of scintillation in response to the emitted particles allows for the detection of the adsorbed radionuclides. Both anionic and cationic SIER have been developed and possess the strongly basic, quaternary ammonium group and the strongly acidic, aryl sulphonic group respectively. Therefore, the voluminous literature on the uses of commercially available ion-exchange resins can be applied in many cases to SIER. The availability of both anionic and cationic resins presents the possibility of a method for the adsorption of almost all elements except the rare gases. The stability of SIER is such that it can be used in solution of strong sodium hydroxide, concentrated hydrochloric and sulphuric acids as well as 6N nitric acid at 25°C for short periods (3 - 4 h) of time. SIER is readily adapted for counting with the available scintillation counting apparatus. The activated resin can be counted in a plastic (or glass) cup coupled to a photomultiplier tube and an electronic pulse counter. It can also be transferred to a glass vial, immersed in aqueous alcohol or toluene, and counted in a liquid scintillation counter. SIER in the form of small spherical beads permits the use of counting vessels with many different geometric configurations. Both alpha- and beta-ray emitting nuclides have been efficiently adsorbed and counted using these methods. The low-energy beta-emitters, such as 63Ni and 14C, have been counted with 12 and 35%efficiencies respectively. The alpha-emitters of 239Pu and 237Np have been adsorbed and efficiently counted (70-90%) on both the anionic and cationic resins. 14C-tagged amino acids have also been counted at over 20% efficiency using a liquid

  3. Ion exchange resin for immobilizing radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, T.S.; Burgman, H.A.; Nahemow, M.D.

    1988-10-25

    A method of making an ion exchange material comprising: (1) implanting a ceramic material with an element selected from the group consisting of sulfur, carbon, phosphorus, nitrogen mixtures thereof; (2) oxidizing the sulfur to sulfate, the carbon to carboxylate or carbonate, the phosphorus to phosphate, the nitrogen to nitrate, or reducing the nitrogen to amine or amide, wherein the element is implanted at an energy of at least about 50 KeV and at a concentration of at least about 10/sup 12/ moieties per cm/sup 2/.

  4. Ion exchange resin for immobilizing radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of making an ion exchange material comprising: (1) implanting a ceramic material with an element selected from the group consisting of sulfur, carbon, phosphorus, nitrogen mixtures thereof; (2) oxidizing the sulfur to sulfate, the carbon to carboxylate or carbonate, the phosphorus to phosphate, the nitrogen to nitrate, or reducing the nitrogen to amine or amide, wherein the element is implanted at an energy of at least about 50 KeV and at a concentration of at least about 10/sup 12/ moieties per cm/sup 2/

  5. Denatured Thermodynamics of Proteins in Weak Cation-exchange Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Rong; CHEN Guo-Liang

    2003-01-01

    The thermostability of some proteins in weak cation-exchange chromatography was investigated at 20-80 ℃. The results show that there is a fixed thermal denaturation transition temperature for each protein. The appearance of the thermal transition temperature indicates that the conformations of the proteins are destroyed seriously. The thermal behavior of the proteins in weak cation-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatographies were compared in a wide temperature range. It was found that the proteins have a higher thermostability in a weak cation-exchange chromatography system. The thermodynamic parameters(ΔH0, ΔS0) of those proteins were determined by means of Vant Hoff relationship(lnk-1/T). According to standard entropy change(ΔS0), the conformational change of the proteins was judged in the chromatographic process. The linear relationships between ΔH0 and ΔS0 can be used to evaluate "compensation temperature"(β) at the protein denaturation and identify the identity of the protein retention mechanism in weak cation-exchange chromatography.

  6. The immobilization of anion exchange resins in polymer modified cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic anion exchange resins, loaded with 99-Tc as the pertechnate ion, were incorporated into polymer modified cements (Flexocrete Ltd, Preston). BFS/OPC (9:1 mix) also was modified by three polymers from the same source (styrene acrylic (2) styrene butadiene) and loaded with anion exchanger containing the pertechnate. Composites were tested for initial compressive strengths, under water and radiation stability and leach rate. IAEA standard leach testing was with simulated sea and ground waters. Ground water leaching also was carried out on composites subjected to 1.109 rads (γ). Leach testing correlated well with compressive strength. Modified composites performed better than the BFS/OPC mix under all conditions studied and were able to encapsulate higher resin loadings. (author)

  7. Method for labeling technetium or rhenium using borohydride exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have established a new method for labelling a disulfide with technetium or rhenium. This method consists of the reduction of both pertechnetate or perrhenate and the disulfide in the presence of borohydride exchange resin resulting in a complex of technetium or rhenium with thiol. This method makes it possible to skip the synthetic step of thiol-protected S-precursor and it can be applied to the production of high value-added radiophamaceuticals

  8. Bituminous solidification, disposal, transport and burial of spent ion-exchange resins. Part of a coordinated programme on treatment of spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project dealing with the incorporation of spent ion-exchange resins into bitumen was performed within the Agency coordinated research programme on treatment of spent ion-exchange resins. Physical and chemical properties of commercial ion-exchange resins, bitumens and bituminized resins were studied. It was shown that bitumen with low oil content and with a softening point of 60-70 deg. C are applicable for the incorporation of resins. The final waste form is allowed to contain maximum 50% resin. The comprehensive study of the biological resistance of B-30 bitumen was performed. That showed that any bacteriological attack can be regarded as generally insignificant. A continuously operating technology was realized on a semi-plant scale. The best operating conditions of this technology were determined. On the basis of the experience gained from the experiments a design of the bituminization plant of 50m3 dry resin/year treatment capacity was proposed

  9. Immobilisation in cement of ion exchange resins arising from the purification of reagents used for the decontamination of reactor circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the programme is to show that ion exchange resins used to remove activity from decontaminating agents used in water reactors can be successfully immobilised in cement. To achieve this, blends of Ordinary Portland Cement and ground granulated Blast Furnace Slag (ratio 9:1) have been used. Improvements in the properties of the product and the waste loading of 50 w/o damp resin can be achieved using microsilica, a finely divided form of silicon dioxide, as an additive to the blended cement. This report contains data on the effects of anion resins, and mixed anion/cation resins, on the performance of the cemented product. The effects of organic acids, especially picolinic and formic acids, bound to anion resins have also been investigated. In addition, formulations developed have been assessed at commercial scale (200 litres of cemented product) for their process and product characteristics. The final part of the report deals with the long-term product performance of samples prepared from cation resins which are now nearly one year old. (author)

  10. Degradation and bacterial survival on nuclear-grade ion exchange resins and implications for waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion-exchange resins are used, among others, for the purification of the moderator of CANDU reactors. The resins are potentially degraded during service due to peroxide and temperature. The resins containing radioactive impurities collected during service are eventually discarded in non-sterile holding tanks or shipping liners, awaiting permanent disposal. In this study, we have investigated the impacts of bacterial survival on resins. We developed protocols to gently degrade resins, simulating damage during service. Resins were then contacted with bacteria. We found that, even though the resins were previously damaged, the impact of bacterial growth on resins (damaged or undamaged) was minimal. (author)

  11. Alkali metal ion-proton exchange equilibria and water sorption studies on nafon 117 membrane and dowex 50 W exchange resins: effect of long storage or aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkali metal ion -H+ exchanges on Nafion 117 membrane treated differently, Dowex 50 W x 4 and Dowex 50 W x 8 resins have been studied at a total ionic strength of 0.1 mol dm-3. The water sorption isotherms of these exchangers in different ionic forms generated over the entire range of water activity, have been analysed by the D'Arcy and Watt equation (DWE). Water sorption studies have shown that the physical structure of the exchangers have changed due to long -storage or aging, resulting in poorer water sorption and even formation of pores in the case of Dowex 50 W x 8 resin. As a result, the counter ions in the exchangers are not hydrated and the water is present in a free form, albeit structured, in the resin phase. The selectivity sequence for the alkali metal ions with reference to the H+ (Li+++) for the exchangers used in the present study is in accordance with that reported in the literature for the ionomers having sulphonic acid as the functional group. In view of the absence of hydration of the cations in the resin phase, the driving force for the selectivity of the cation, namely, the net gain in entropy, is expected to come from the loss of structured water during the exchange process. Pre treating the Nafion 117 membrane with boiling acid solution activates the clustered region of the membrane in the H+ form, while pretreatment with boiling water expands the non-ionic domain (the region connecting the clusters). These modifications influence the state of water present in the Nafion 117 membrane and the ion exchange equilibria. As a result of long storage or aging, the ion exchangers lose their elasticity or swelling characteristics. The results obtained in the present study indicate that in aged materials, the ionogenic groups are existing as isolated ion -pairs rather than in a clustered morphology. (author)

  12. Gamma radiolysis and post-irradiation leaching of ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The knowledge of the behavior under irradiation and in presence of water of Ion Exchange Resins (IER) is very necessary to predict their impact on the environment during the storage phase and in a possible deep geological disposal. The IER studied are the MB400 mixed bed resin and its 'pure' anionic and cationic components. The experimental strategy used in this work was based on the use of chemometric tools permitting to estimate the effect of the irradiation atmosphere, the dose rate, the absorbed dose and the leaching temperature. The gaseous and water-soluble radiolysis products were analyzed by gas Mass Spectrometry (MS) and Ion Chromatography (IC). The IER generated principally H2g, CO2g and amines for which quantities depended of the resin nature and the irradiation conditions. The analysis of solid irradiated resins was investigated by Fourier Transformed Infrared (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (13C NMR) techniques. The last ones revealed structural modifications of the IER solid matrix in function of the experimental conditions. Their behavior in presence of water was studied during 143 days by characterization of the organic matter released after their post-irradiation leaching. The kinetics showed that all the water-soluble components were releasing at the first contact with water. The Total Organic Carbon (TOC) quantity released depends, according to the resin nature, either on the dose, either on the irradiation atmosphere. The dose rate has no effect on the degradation and the leaching of the MB400 resin, which behaved differently than its pure components. (author)

  13. Pyrolysis of spent ion-exchanger resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slametschka, Rainer; Braehler, Georg [NUKEM Technologies GmbH (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Initial tests have shown that ion exchangers (IEX) can be decomposed by pyrolysis with very good results, yielding an inert and chemically resistant product. No additives are necessary. The main constituent of the product, the pyrolysis residues or ash, is carbon. It has been discovered that the entire radioactive inventory remains in the pyrolysis residues during pyrolysis of the IEX. This is achieved by relatively low process temperatures that prevent highly volatile nuclides such as the caesium nuclides from passing into the gaseous phase. Sintered metal filters in pyrolysis plant ensure that even the radioactivity bonded to the dust remains in the pyrolysis residues. In addition to the radionuclides, the main constituents of the residue are carbon from the original polystyrene matrix and sulphur from the functional groups. The pyrolysis residues form a flowable solid material and not a melt. It is thus easy to handle and can be compacted or cemented, depending on the requirements for interim and permanent storage. Any further constituents such as inorganic filter materials or even other organic materials do not interfere with the process, they are dried, calcined or also pyrolysed. (orig.)

  14. Reillex/trademark/ HPQ: A new, macroporous polyvinylpyridine resin for separating plutonium using nitrate anion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anion exchange in nitric acid is the major aqueous process used to recover and purify plutonium from impure scrap materials. Most strong-base anion exchange resins incorporate a styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer. A newly available, macroporous anion exchange resin based on a copolymer of 1-methyl-4-vinylpyridine and divinylbenzene has been evaluated. Comparative data for Pu(IV) sorption kinetics and capacity are presented for this new resin and two other commonly used anion exchange resins. The new resin offers high capacity and rapid sorption kinetics for Pu(IV) from nitric acid, as well as greater stability to chemical and radiolytic degradation. 8 refs., 12 figs

  15. Leaching of 60Co and 137Cs from spent ion exchange resins in cement–bentonite clay matrix

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I B Plecas; R S Pavlovic; S D Pavlovic

    2003-12-01

    The leaching rate of 60Co and 137Cs from the spent cation exchange resins in cement–bentonite matrix has been studied. The solidification matrix was a standard Portland cement mixed with 290–350 (kg/m3) spent cation exchange resins, with or without 2–5% of bentonite clay. The leaching rates from the cement–bentonite matrix for 60Co: (4,2–7,0) × 10-5 (cm/d) and 137Cs: (3,2–6,6) × 10-4 (cm/d), after 125 days were measured. From the leaching data the apparent diffusivity of cobalt and cesium in cement–bentonite clay matrix with a waste load of 290–350 (kg/m3) spent cation exchange resins, was measured for 60Co: (1,1–4,0) × 10-6 (cm2/d) and 137Cs: (0,5–2,6) × 10-4 (cm2/d), after 125 days. The results presented in this paper are part of the results obtained in a 20-year mortar and concrete testing project which will influence the design of radioactive waste management for a future Serbian radioactive waste disposal centre.

  16. 离子色谱分离法提纯异麦芽低聚糖%Purification of isomalto-oligosaccharide by cation exchange chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜守霞; 励雯波; 钟振声

    2003-01-01

    The purification of isomalto-oligsaccharide syrup using cation exchange resin was smdiied. The experiments showed that, when 35 ml raw material was used, the optimal purification result could be achieved on the resin column of 9 × 4000 mm with eluting rate 9 ml/min at 71℃ .The content of gluecose could be decreased whist the content of active components would be relatively increased.The purity of isomalto-oligsaccharide could be further increased by re-purification.

  17. Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-06-11

    Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.0 , which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590 PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590 PTF TEF RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

  18. Recovery of tetrachloroaurate through ion exchange with Dowex 11 resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alguacil, F. J.

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available The recovery of the tetrachloroaurate complex by the anionic ion exchange resin Dowex 11 has been studied. The kinetics of gold adsorption were dependent of both gold and resin concentrations and temperature. The adsorption isotherm can be described by the expression Q = kCn. The loaded resin could be eluted by an acidic thiourea solution at 20°C. After several adsorption-elution cycles there is not any apparent loss in the adsorption properties of the resin.

    Se estudia la recuperación del ion tetracloroaurato mediante la resina aniónica Dowex 11. La extracción de oro depende tanto de las concentraciones del metal y la resina como de la temperatura. La isoterma de adsorción responde a la ecuación Q = kCn. La resina cargada con oro puede ser eluida con una disolución acida de tiourea a 20°C. Después de varios ciclos de adsorción-desorción no hay pérdida de carga por parte de la resina.

  19. Ion Exchange Resin and Clay Vitrification by Plasma Discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lack of treatment of a low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILRW) lead us to propose a vitrification process based on a plasma discharge; this technique incorporates LILRW into a matrix glass composed of ceramic clays material. The Mexican Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ), uses an ion exchange resin IRN 150 (styrene-divinilbence copolymer) in the TRIGA MARK III nuclear reactor. The principal objective of this resin is to absorb particles containing heavy metals and low-level radioactive particles. Once the IRN 150 resin filter capacity has been exceeded, it should be replaced and treated as LILRW. In this work, a transferred plasma system was realized to vitrify this resin taking advantage of its high power density, enthalpy and chemical reactivity as well as its rapid quenching and high operation temperatures. In order to characterize the morphological structure of these clay samples, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) techniques were applied before and after the plasma treatment

  20. Effects of exchanged cation on the microporosity of montmorillonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, D.W.; Chiou, C.T.; Eberl, D.D.

    1997-01-01

    The micropore volumes of 2 montmorillonites (SAz- 1 and SWy-1), each exchanged with Ca, Na, K, Cs and tetramethylammonium (TMA) ions, were calculated from the measured vapor adsorption data of N2 and neo-hexane by use of t- and ??s-plots. The corresponding surface areas of the exchanged clays were determined from Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) plots of N2 adsorption data. Micropore volumes and surface areas of the samples increased with the size of exchanged cation: TMA > Cs > K> Ca > Na. The SAz-1 exchanged clays showed generally greater micropore volumes and surface areas than the corresponding SWy-1 clays. The vapor adsorption data and d(001) measurements for dry clay samples were used together to evaluate the likely locations and accessibility of clay micropores, especially the relative accessibility of their interlayer spacing. For both source clays exchanged with Na, Ca and K ions, the interlayer spacing appeared to be too small to admit nonpolar gases and the accessible micropores appeared to have dimensions greater than 5.0 A??, the limiting molecular dimension of neo -hexane. In these systems, there was a good consistency of micropore volumes detected by N2 and neo-hexane. When the clays were intercalated with relatively large cations (TMA and possibly Cs), the large layer expansion created additional microporosity, which was more readily accessible to small N2 than to relatively large neo-hexane. Hence, the micropore volume as detected by N2 was greater than that detected by neo-hexane. The micropore volumes with pore dimensions greater than 5 A?? determined for clays exchanged with Na, Ca and K likely resulted from the pores on particle edges and void created by overlap regions of layers. The increase in micropore volumes with pore dimensions less than 5 A?? determined for clays exchanged with TMA and possibly Cs could be caused by opening of the interlayer region by the intercalation of these large cations.

  1. ION EXCHANGE RESINS: AN APPROACH TOWARDS TASTE MASKING OF BITTER DRUGS AND SUSTAINED RELEASE FORMULATIONS WITH THEIR PATENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Bilandi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to cover various aspects related with the use of ion exchange resins for taste masking of bitter drugs and for formulating sustained release dosage form. Ion exchange resins are water insoluble cross-linked polymers containing a salt-forming group at repeating positions on the polymer chain and have the ability to exchange counter-ions within aqueous solutions surrounding them. The bitterness of pharmaceutical medicines plays a critical role in patient compliance, as the oral administration of bitter drugs is often hampered by their unpleasant taste which leads to non-compliance and further worsening of diseased condition. One of the popular approaches in the taste masking of bitter drugs is based on IER. For taste masking purpose weak cation exchange or weak anion exchange resins are used, depending on the nature of drug. The drug resin complex is absolutely tasteless with no after taste, and at the same time, its bioavailability is not affected. Sustained release dosage forms are designed to release a drug at a pre determined rate in order to maintain a constant drug concentration for a specific period of time with minimum side effects. The usage of IER during the development of sustained release formulations plays a significant role because of their drug retarding properties. In this review also incorporates various patents related to taste masking and sustained release formulations using IER.

  2. Fluorinated Hydroxytelechelic Polybutadiene as Additive in Cationic Photopolymerization of an Epoxy Resin

    OpenAIRE

    Ameduri, Bruno; Bongiovanni, Roberta; Sangermano, Marco; Priola, Aldo

    2009-01-01

    Fluorinated hydroxytelechelic polybutadiene (PBF), which is synthesized from the radical addition of a fluorinated mercaptan onto a hydroxytelechelic polybutadiene was used as an efficient surface and mechanical modifier in original formulations to enable the UV cationic polymerization of a telechelic diepoxy cycloaliphatic resin, leading to crosslinked films. Various amounts of PBF were used (ranging between 0 and 15 wt %). The kinetics of photocrosslinking revealed that the diepoxyde conver...

  3. Fixing of metallic acetates on an anion-exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After giving a brief review of the theoretical principles governing the fixation of anionic complexes of metallic elements on an anion exchange resin, we consider the particular case of uranyl acetate. By plotting the partition curves we have been able to calculate the exchange constants in the resin. By studying the changes in the logarithm of the limiting partition coefficient as a function of the logarithm of the free acetate ion concentration, it has been possible to calculate the dissociation constants for the complexes in solution. The fixation of a large number of metallic acetates has been studied. All the tests have been negative except in the case of mercury. For this reason we have been able to consider the possibility of separating uranium from a certain number of elements. Some of these separations are possible even in the presence of interfering anions such as chlorides which have a greater affinity for the resin than have the acetate ions. In the case of water-ethanol and water-isopropanol mixtures, we have improved the conditions under which copper acetate and mercury acetate may be fixed. This study has enabled us to calculate the dissociation constant for the CuAc3- complex in the mixtures water +40% (by weight) isopropanol and water +50% (by weight) isopropanol. It should also make it possible to use separation conditions which could not hitherto be applied in aqueous media. (author)

  4. Solidification of Spent Ion Exchange Resin Using ASC Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周耀中; 云桂春; 叶裕才

    2002-01-01

    Ion exchange resins (IERs) have been widely used in nuclear facilities. However, the spent radioactive IERs result in major quantities of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. This article describes a laboratory experimental study on solidification processing of IERs using a new type of cement named ASC cement. The strength of the cementation matrix is in the range of 18-20 MPa (28 d); the loading of the spent IER in the cement-resin matrix is over 45% and leaching rates of 137Cs, 90Sr and 60Co are 7.92×10-5, 5.7×10-6, and 1.19×10-8 cm/d. The results show that ASC cement can be a preferable cementation material for immobilization of radioactive spent IER.

  5. Leach method including means to protect ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for recovering uranium and/or related values which include means for protecting ion-exchange resins in the recovery operation from oxidative degradation due to contact with hydrogen peroxide. A guard chamber is positioned in the elution circuit so that barren eluant, after it is stripped of its uranium and/or related values by treatment with hydrogen peroxide, will flow through the chamber. The guard chamber contains catalytic material, e.g. activated carbon, which decomposes hydrogen peroxide upon contact into water and oxygen. The barren eluant, after it passes through the catalytic material, is used to make up fresh eluant for reuse in the recovery method without the risk of the fresh eluant causing oxidative degradation of the resins

  6. Uranium recovery process with protection for ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ion-exchange resins in uranium recovery operations are protected from oxidative degradation caused by contact with hydrogen peroxide. A guard chamber is positioned in the elution circuit so that barren eluant will flow through the chamber. The guard chamber contains catalytic material, e.g. activated carbon, which decomposes hydrogen peroxide upon contact into water and oxygen. The barren eluant, after it passes through the catalytic material, is used to make up fresh eluant for reuse in the recovery method without the risk of the fresh eluant causing oxidative degradation of the resins. The concentration of hydrogen peroxide may be determined by monitoring the amount of oxygen generated when the hydrogen peroxide is catalytically decomposed

  7. Cation exchange interaction between antibiotic ciprofloxacin and montmorillonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chih-Jen [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Li, Zhaohui, E-mail: li@uwp.edu [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Geosciences, University of Wisconsin - Parkside, Kenosha, WI 53144 (United States); Jiang, Wei-Teh, E-mail: atwtj@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Liu, Chia-Chuan [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2010-11-15

    Exploring the interactions between antibiotics and soils/minerals is of great importance in resolving their fate, transport, and elimination in the environment due to their frequent detection in wastewater, river water, sewage sludge and soils. This study focused on determining the adsorption properties and mechanisms of interaction between antibiotic ciprofloxacin and montmorillonite (SAz-1), a swelling dioctahedral mineral with Ca{sup 2+} as the main interlayer cation. In acidic and neutral aqueous solutions, a stoichiometric exchange between ciprofloxacin and interlayer cations yielded an adsorption capacity as high as 330 mg/g, corresponding to 1.0 mmol/g. When solution pH was above its pK{sub a2} (8.7), adsorption of ciprofloxacin was greatly reduced due to the net repulsion between the negatively charged clay surfaces and the ciprofloxacin anion. The uptake of ciprofloxacin expanded the basal spacing (d{sub 001}) of montmorillonite from 15.04 to 17.23 A near its adsorption capacity, confirming cation exchange within the interlayers in addition to surface adsorption. Fourier transform infrared results further suggested that the protonated amine group of ciprofloxacin in its cationic form was electrostatically attracted to negatively charged sites of clay surfaces, and that the carboxylic acid group was hydrogen bonded to the basal oxygen atoms of the silicate layers. The results indicate that montmorillonite is an effective sorbent to remove ciprofloxacin from water.

  8. Cation exchange interaction between antibiotic ciprofloxacin and montmorillonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exploring the interactions between antibiotics and soils/minerals is of great importance in resolving their fate, transport, and elimination in the environment due to their frequent detection in wastewater, river water, sewage sludge and soils. This study focused on determining the adsorption properties and mechanisms of interaction between antibiotic ciprofloxacin and montmorillonite (SAz-1), a swelling dioctahedral mineral with Ca2+ as the main interlayer cation. In acidic and neutral aqueous solutions, a stoichiometric exchange between ciprofloxacin and interlayer cations yielded an adsorption capacity as high as 330 mg/g, corresponding to 1.0 mmol/g. When solution pH was above its pKa2 (8.7), adsorption of ciprofloxacin was greatly reduced due to the net repulsion between the negatively charged clay surfaces and the ciprofloxacin anion. The uptake of ciprofloxacin expanded the basal spacing (d001) of montmorillonite from 15.04 to 17.23 A near its adsorption capacity, confirming cation exchange within the interlayers in addition to surface adsorption. Fourier transform infrared results further suggested that the protonated amine group of ciprofloxacin in its cationic form was electrostatically attracted to negatively charged sites of clay surfaces, and that the carboxylic acid group was hydrogen bonded to the basal oxygen atoms of the silicate layers. The results indicate that montmorillonite is an effective sorbent to remove ciprofloxacin from water.

  9. Preparation of Medium Cation Exchange Stationary Phase of Polymeric Matrix and Their Chromatographic Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN,Gang; GONG,Bo-Lin; BAI,Quan; GENG,Xin-Du

    2007-01-01

    Based on the monodisperse poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylenedimethacrylate) beads (PGMA/EDMA) with macropore as a medium, a new hydrophilic medium cation exchange (MCX) stationary phase for HPLC was synthesized by a new chemically modified method. The stationary phase was evaluated with the property of ion exchange, separability, reproducibility, hydrophilicity, effect of salt concentration, salt types, column loading and pH on the separation and retention of proteins in detail. It was found that it follows ion exchange chromatographic (IEC)retention mechanism. The measured bioactivity recovery for lysozyme was (96±5)%. The dynamic protein loading capacity of the synthesized MCX packings was 21.8 mg/g. Five proteins were almost completely separated within 6.0 min at a flow rate of 4 mL/min using the synthesized MCX resin. The MCX resin was also used for the rapid separation and purification of lysozyme from egg white with only one step. The purity and specific bioactivity of the purified lysozyme was found more than 95% and 70345 U/mg, respectively.

  10. Characterization of an aluminum pillared montmorillonite with cation exchange properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods of PIGE and XRF were used to determine the elemental composition and the structural formulae of a specially tailored PILC material during the steps of its preparation. The CEC, a crucial property for the characterization of a cation exchanger, was monitored through all stages of preparation. In addition, the charge carried by the pillars, a critical quantity of the pillaring process, was estimated. Exchange isotherms of strontium and cesium were performed through the use of radiotracers' exchange isotherms of 137Cs and 85Sr with typical γ-ray spectroscopy. These isotherms were of the Langmuir type and PILCs adsorption capacity was determined. The latter property was compared with the CEC determined by the elemental analysis and was found equal to the amount of the exchangeable interlamellar sodium ions. (author)

  11. Chemically modified polymeric resins for separation of cations, organic acids, and small polar moleculea by high performance liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J.B.

    1993-07-01

    This thesis is divided into 4 parts: a review, ion chromatography of metal cations on carboxylic resins, separation of hydrophilic organic acids and small polar compounds on macroporous resin columns, and use of eluent modifiers for liquid chromatographic separation of carboxylic acids using conductivity detection.

  12. Processing of indium (III solutions via ion exchange with Lewatit K-2621 resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López Díaz-Pavón, Adrián

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The processing of indium(III-hydrochloric acid solutions by the cationic ion exchange Lewatit K-2621 resin has been investigated. The influence of several variables such as the hydrochloric acid and metal concentrations in the aqueous solution and the variation of the amount of resin added has been studied. Moreover, a kinetic study performed in the uptake of indium(III by Lewatit K-2621, shows that either the film-diffusion and the particle-diffusion models fit the ion exchange process onto the resin, depending upon the initial metal concentration in the aqueous solution. The loaded resin could be eluted by HCl solutions at 20 °C.Se ha investigado el tratamiento de disoluciones de ácido clorhídrico conteniendo indio(III mediante la resina de cambio catiónico Lewatit K-2621. Las variables ensayadas han sido las concentraciones de ácido y de metal en la disolución acuosa y la cantidad de resina empleada en el tratamiento de dichas disoluciones. Asimismo, se ha llevado a cabo un estudio cinético del proceso de intercambio catiónico entre el indio(III y la resina Lewatit K-2621. Este estudio muestra que el proceso de intercambio responde a un mecanismo de difusión en la disolución o en la partícula de resina dependiendo de la concentración inicial del metal en el medio acuoso. El metal cargado en la resina puede ser eluido con disoluciones de ácido clorhídrico a 20 °C.

  13. Evaluation of indigenous anion exchange resins for plutonium purification - effect of gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purification and concentration of plutonium is carried out presently with an imported anion exchange resin (Dowex 1X4). A programme has been initiated in our laboratory to substitute the same with indigenous resins. In this connection, the effect of gamma radiation on imported and indigenous anion exchange resins has been studied in nitric acid medium and its influence on total exchange capacity, strong base capacity and plutonium distribution ratio (Kd) are presented in this paper. (author)

  14. Biocompatibility Research of a Novel pH Sensitive Ion Exchange Resin Microsphere

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, HongFei; Shi, Shuangshuang; Pan, Weisan; Sun, Changshan; Zou, Xiaomian; Fu, Min; Feng, Yingshu; Ding, Hui

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate biocompatibility and provide in-vivo pharmacological and toxicological evidence for further investigation of the possibility of pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere for clinical utilizations. Acute toxicity study and general pharmacological studies were conducted on the pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere we prepared. The general pharmacological studies consist of the effects of the pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere ...

  15. Ion-exchange resin separation applied to activation analysis (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The separation techniques based on ion-exchange resins have been used, in this study, for carrying out activation analyses on about thirty impurities. A separation process has been developed so as to standardise these analyses and to render them execution a matter of routine. The reparation yields obtained are excellent and make it possible to carry out analyses on samples having a large activation cross-section ween working inside a reinforced fume-cupboard. This technique has been applied to the analysis of impurities in tantalum, iron, gallium, germanium, terphenyl, and tungsten. The extension of this process to other impurities and to other matrices is now being studied. (authors)

  16. Treatment of liquids of exchange resins washing from RA6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work nanometric magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by hydrochemical co-precipitation method to achieve the adsorption and extraction of the contaminant species present in the water coming from the regeneration of exchange resins in Research Reactor RA6. It has been possible to obtain a mean nanoparticle size of 16 nm, necessary to increase the specific surface area of the material and thus, its adsorbent capability. The synthesis parameters and adsorption conditions made it possible to achieve a treatment efficiency superior to 80% for Cs-137 (author)

  17. Esterification of levulinic acid with butanol over ion exchange resins

    OpenAIRE

    Tejero Iborra, M. Àngels; Ramírez Rangel, Eliana; Fité Piquer, Carles; Tejero Salvador, Xavier; Cunill García, Fidel

    2016-01-01

    Alkyl levulinates are biobased chemicals with a great number of applications and great biofuel potential for blending to conventional diesel or gasoline. The present work focuses on the liquid-phase synthesis of butyl levulinate (BL) by esterification of levulinic acid (LA) with 1-butanol (BuOH) using a set of acidic ion-exchange resins. Experiments were performed at 80 °C and 2.5 MPa in a batch reactor by using an initial molar ratio AL/BuOH of 1/3 and a catalyst loading of 0.8%. It has been...

  18. Treatment by absorbers of oil contaminated process waters. Ion exchange resins and filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors have a system devoted to the purification and upgrading of the collected heavy water leaks. The purification train is fed with different degradation ratios (D2O/H2O) activities and impurities. The water is distilled in a packed bed column filled with a mesh type packing. With the purpose of minimizing the column stack corrosion, the water is pretreated in a train consisting on an activated charcoal bed-strong cationic-anionic resin and a final polishing mixed bed resin. Traces of oils are retained by the charcoal bed but some compounds extracted by the aqueous phase are suspected to be responsible for the resins fouling or precursors of potentially aggressive agents inside the distillation column. In the present work, the identification, evaluation of alternatives for the retention like dead end and cross flow micro filtration, adsorption and ion exchange were tested and the results compared to the original products present in the water upgrading purification train. (author)

  19. Anion exchange resin as support for invertase immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vitolo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    The invertase (EC 3.2.1.26 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was employed as a model enzyme in the evaluation of the adsorption capacity of DOWEX-1X8-50®, a basic anion exchange resin, when used as support in enzyme immobilization. By mixing 100mg of resin with 27mg of invertase (pI = 4.0 in buffer solution (pH 4.6, 25°C, stirred at 100rpm, an adsorption of 93% was achieved. The activities (1U = amount of enzyme forming 1mg reducing sugars/min of soluble and insoluble invertase were 0.084 U/mgE and 0.075 U/mgE, respectively, giving an immobilization coefficient of 90.4%. The immobilized invertase had a higher thermal stability than the soluble form. The highest activity was observed at pH 4.5 in both forms of the enzyme, whereas the pH stability ranges for soluble and insoluble invertase were 3.5-5.0 and 4.5-5.5, respectively. The kinetic constants for soluble invertase were KM = 18.3 mM and Vmax = 0.084 U/mgE, and for the insoluble form, KM = 29.1 mM and Vmax = 0.075 U/mgE. The resin tested adsorbed the invertase very well, provided the enzyme molecule had a net negative charge, i.e., the immobilization and reaction procedures had to be carried out at pH > pI. Keywords: Invertase, immobilization, adsorption, anionexchange resin.

  20. Catalytic oxidative pyrolysis of spent organic ion exchange resins from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent IX resins from nuclear power reactors are highly active solid wastes generated during operations of nuclear reactors. Catalytic oxidative pyrolysis of these resins can lead to high volume reduction of these wastes. Low temperature pyrolysis of transition metal ion loaded IX resins in presence of nitrogen was carried out in order to optimize catalyst composition to achieve maximum weight reduction. Thermo gravimetric analysis of the pyrolysis residues was carried out in presence of air in order to compare the oxidative characteristics of transition metal oxide catalysts. Copper along with iron, chromium and nickel present in the spent IX resins gave the most efficient catalyst combination for catalytic and oxidative pyrolysis of the residues. During low temperature catalytic pyrolysis, 137Cesium volatility was estimated to be around 0.01% from cationic resins and around 0.1% from anionic resins. During oxidative pyrolysis at 700 degC, nearly 10 to 40% of 137Cesium was found to be released to off gases depending upon type of resin and catalyst loaded on to it. The oxidation of pyrolytic residues at 700 degC gave weight reduction of 15% for cationic resins and 93% for anionic resins. Catalytic oxidative pyrolysis is attractive for reducing weight and volume of spent cationic resins from PHWRs and VVERs. (author)

  1. Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-07-02

    Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.01, which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590-PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590-PTF-TEF-RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

  2. Determination of 14C in spent moderator ion-exchange resin from Bruce Nuclear Generating Station A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent ion-exchange resins are produced in the purification of coolant and moderator systems during the normal operation of CANDU (Canada deuterium uranium) nuclear reactors. Carbon-14 is a radionuclide of concern in disposal of ion-exchange resins because of its relatively long half-life, its potential high mobility and its ability to be easily incorporated into organisms. Only limited data are presently available on the 14C concentrations of spent from CANDU reactors. To establish a more comprehensive database for this radionuclide, concentrations of 14C were determined for two moderator resins from Bruce Nuclear Generating Station A. Mixed bed resins were separated into anion and cation fractions using a sugar solution, and the 14C concentrations were determined for each fraction. Carbon-14 was located predominantly in the anion beads. Samples of anion resin were found to undergo an 81% loss in the 14C concentration over a period of 160 d following the sugar separation procedure. Some evidence is given to suggest this loss in 14C may result from microbial activity. Concentrations and distributions of other predominant radionuclides, such as 60Co and 153Gd, are discussed as well. (author) 5 refs.; 2 figs.; 6 tabs

  3. Plasma arc pyrolysis of radioactive ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on two ion exchange resins (IRN 77 and IRN 78) which were pyrolysed in a plasma-arc furnace. Both continuous and batch tests were performed. Volume reduction ratios of 10 to 1 and 10 to 3.5 were achieved for IRN 78 and IRN 77 respectively. The product of the resin pyrolysis was a char which contained the radioactive elements such as cobalt. The off-gases consisted of mainly hydrogen and carbon monoxide. There was a relatively small amount of dust in the off-gases. At the present time radioactive ion exchange resign is being kept in storage. The volume of this waste is increasing and it is important that the volume be reduce. The volume reduction ratio should be of the order of ten-to-one. Also, it is required that the radioactive elements can be collected or fixed in a form which could easily be disposed of. Plasma arc treatment offers considerable potential for the processing of the waste

  4. Application of mixed-mode, solid-phase extraction in environmental and clinical chemistry. Combining hydrogen-bonding, cation-exchange and Van der Waals interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, M.S.; Thurman, E.M.; Pedersen, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Silica- and styrene-divinylbenzene-based mixed-mode resins that contain C8, C18 and sulphonated cation-exchange groups were compared for their efficiency in isolation of neutral triazine compounds from water and of the basic drug, benzoylecgonine, from urine. The triazine compounds were isolated by a combination of Van der Waals and hydrogen-bonding interactions, and benzoylecgonine was isolated by Van der Waals interactions and cation exchange. All analytes were eluted with a polar organic solvent contaning 2% ammonium hydroxide. Larger recoveries (95%) were achieved on copolymerized mixed-mode resins where C18 and sulfonic acid are in closer proximity than on 'blended' mixed-mode resins (60-70% recovery).

  5. Radiolytic and chemical degradation of strong acidic ion-exchange resins: Study of ligands formed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of water-soluble organic ligands by radiolytic and chemical degradation of several strong acidic ion-exchange resins was investigated under conditions close to those of the near field of a cementitious repository. The most important degradation products were studied and their complexing properties evaluated. Irradiation of strong acidic cation exchange resins (Powder PCH and Lewatite S-100) resulted in the formation of mainly sulfate and dissolved organic carbon. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis indicated the presence of oxalate, contributing to 10 to 20% of the organic carbon. The identity of the remainder is unknown. The presence of oxalate as a complexant is consistent with results from earlier work. Complexation studies with Cu2+ and Ni2+ showed the presence of two ligands: oxalate and ligand X. Although ligand X could not be identified, it could be characterized by its concentration ([X]T ∼ 10-5 to 10-6 M), a deprotonation constant (pKH approximately 7.4 at I = 0.1 M), and a complexation constant for the NiX complex (log KNiXapproximately 7.0 at I = 0.1 M). In the absence of irradiation, no evidence for the formation of ligands was found

  6. Immobilisation Of Spent Ion Exchange Resins Using Portland Cement Blending With Organic Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immobilisation of spent ion exchange resins (spent resins) using Portland cement blending with organic material for example bio char was investigated. The performance of cement-bio char matrix for immobilisation of spent ion exchange resins was evaluated based on their compression strength and leachability under different experimental conditions. The results showed that the amount of bio char and spent resins loading effect the compressive strength of the waste form. Several factors affecting the leaching behaviour of immobilised spent resins in cement-bio char matrix. (author)

  7. 阳离子交换树脂催化制备纳米纤维素晶体的谱学性能与流变行为%Spectrum and Rheological Properties of Nanocellulose Crystal Prepared with Cation Exchange Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐丽荣; 黄彪; 戴达松; 欧文; 李涛; 周东东; 陈学榕

    2011-01-01

    采用强酸型阳离子交换树脂在超声波辅助作用下制备了纳米纤维素晶体(NCC).采用场发射环境扫描电子显微镜(ESEM-FEG)、场发射透射电子显微镜(HR-TEM)、X射线粉末衍射仪(XRD)、傅利叶红外光谱仪(FT-IR)和转子式流变仪对所制备NCC的形貌、谱学和流变学行为进行了研究.结果表明,所制备NCC为近球形,颗粒尺寸约为25nm~50nm,样品属于纤维素Ⅰ型,结晶度为84.26%,晶粒平均由6个晶胞组成.由FT-IR分析可知,NCC仍具有纤维素的基本化学结构.NCC胶体为剪切变稀的假塑性流体,随着温度的升高,其黏度逐渐减小,并最终趋于平缓,结果表明NCC胶体具有较好的稳定性.%Nanocellulose crystal (NCC) was prepared by ultrasonic-assisted hydrolysis with strong acidic cation exchange resin. The size and morphology, crystal structure, spectrum properties and rheological behavior of nanocellulose crystal were investigated by field emission gun environment scanning electron microscopes (ESEM-FEG), field emission transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry(FT-IR) and rotor rheometer. The results indicate that the nanocellulose crystal is spherical and the size is about 25 nm~50 nm. The samples have the crystalline cellulose I structure, the crystallinity is 84.26% , and the grain is composed of 6 unit crystal cell. Moreover, the results of FT-IR show that NCC still has the basic chemical structure of cellulose. NCC is the shear thinned pseudoplastic fluid. Futhermore, as the temperature increases, its viscosity decreases, and gradually tends to flat, the results indicate that the samples enjoy nice stability.

  8. Transformation of thorium sulfate in thorium nitrate by ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure for transforming thorium sulfate into thorium nitrate by means of a strong cationic ion exchanger is presented. The thorium sulfate solution (approximately 15 g/L Th (SO4) 2) is percolate through the resin and the column is washed first with water, with a 0,2 M N H4 OH solution and then with a 0.2 M N H4 NO3 solution in order to eliminate sulfate ion. Thorium is eluted with a 2 M solution of (N H4) 2 CO3. This eluate is treated with a solution of nitric acid in order to obtain the complete transformation into Th (NO3) 4. The proposed procedure leads to good quality thorium nitrate with high uranium decontamination. (author)

  9. A study on wet catalysis oxidation of spent radioactive ion-exchange resin by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent radioactive ion-exchange resin (IER) is one of the main kinds of wastes produced by nuclear installations. The authors describe the study on decomposition behaviors of cationic, anionic and mixed IER in H2O2-Ni2+/Cu2+, H2O2-Mn2+/Cu2+, H2O2-Fe2+/Cu2+ and H2O2-Cu2+ systems, analyzes the effects on reaction process and consequence of many factors such as amount of H2O2, catalyst, temperature, pH-value, NaOH and so on. The relation between cementation process and the amount of decomposition residuals was studied. It provided the possible maximum COD-value under which the solidification process would not be affected. The reaction mechanism of the wet chemical oxidation of IER was discussed preliminarily

  10. Oxidative degradation of spent ion-exchange resins and alpha-bearing wastes in aqueous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different treatment processes of spent ion-exchange resins aiming at volume reduction are under development or on fullscale operation. A new volume reduction technique for treatment of ion-exchange resin materials was developed using hydrogen peroxide as oxidizing agent in presence of catalyst. Details information for this technique is introduced in this report. A newly developed simple and economically attractive technique for oxidative decomposition of spent ion-exchange resins was studied aiming at achieving remarkable volume and weight reduction. Different factors affecting semi-continuous oxidative degradation process e.g. effect of addition rate of oxidant, pH value, grain size of resin as well as type and concentration of catalyst were studied, keeping the reaction time and weight of resins constant for both cationite and anionite forms. In conclusion, the oxidative degradation of ion-exchange resin in aqueous medium could be considered as a very attractive process. (M.N.)

  11. Preparation and characterization of high capacity, strong cation-exchange fiber based adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwellenbach, Jan; Taft, Florian; Villain, Louis; Strube, Jochen

    2016-05-20

    Motivated by the demand for more economical capture and polishing steps in downstream processing of protein therapeutics, a novel strong cation-exchange chromatography stationary phase based on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) high surface area short-cut fibers is presented. The fiber surface is modified by grafting glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) and a subsequent derivatization leading to sulfonic acid groups. The obtained cation-exchange fibers have been characterized and compared to commercially available resin and membrane based adsorbers. High volumetric static binding capacities for lysozyme (90mg/mL) and polyclonal human IgG (hIgG, 92mg/mL) were found, suggesting an efficient multi-layer binding within the grafted hydrogel layer. A packed bed of randomly orientated fibers has been tested for packing efficiency, permeability and chromatographic performance. High dynamic binding capacities for lysozyme (50mg/mL) and hIgG (54mg/mL) were found nearly independent of the bed-residence time, revealing a fast mass-transport mechanism. Height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) values in the order of 0.1 cm and a peak asymmetry factor (AF) of 1.8 have been determined by tracer experiments. Additionally inverse size-exclusion chromatography (iSEC) revealed a bimodal structure within the fiber bed, consisting of larger transport channels, formed by the voidage between the fibers, and a hydrogel layer with porous properties. PMID:27106396

  12. Treatment of spent ion-exchange resins for storage and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the experience gained by different countries on storage of spent ion exchange resins, immobilization of them into various matrices and the development of new methods in decomposition and solidification of spent resins. The report contains all the results of the Coordinated Research Programme together with additional data available from countries not participating in this programme. A review of practical industrial experience in treating spent ion exchange resins is given in the annex

  13. Electron exchange involving a sulfur-stabilized ruthenium radical cation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Anthony P; Ryland, Bradford L; Norton, Jack R; Buccella, Daniela; Moscatelli, Alberto

    2007-07-01

    Half-sandwich Ru(II) amine, thiol, and thiolate complexes were prepared and characterized by X-ray crystallography. The thiol and amine complexes react slowly with acetonitrile to give free thiol or amine and the acetonitrile complex. With the thiol complex, the reaction is dissociative. The thiolate complex has been oxidized to its Ru(III) radical cation and the solution EPR spectrum of that radical cation recorded. Cobaltocene reduces the thiol complex to the thiolate complex. The 1H and 31P NMR signals of the thiolate complex in acetonitrile become very broad whenever the thiolate and thiol complexes are present simultaneously. The line broadening is primarily due to electron exchange between the thiolate complex and its radical cation; the latter is generated by an unfavorable redox equilibrium between the thiol and thiolate complexes. Pyramidal inversion of sulfur in the thiol complex is fast at room temperature but slow at lower temperatures; major and minor conformers of the thiol complex were observed by 31P NMR at -98 degrees C in CD2Cl2. PMID:17569530

  14. Effect of cation exchange of major cation chemistry in the large scale redox experiment at Aespoe. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geochemical modeling was used to test the hypothesis that cation exchange with fracture-lining clays during fluid mixing in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory can significantly affect major element chemistry. Conservative mixing models do not adequately account for changes in Na, Ca and Mg concentrations during mixing. Mixing between relatively dilute shallow waters and more concentrated waters at depth along fracture zones was modeled using the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling package. A cation exchange model was added to the code to describe simultaneously aqueous speciation, mineral precipitation/dissolution, and equilibration between a fluid and a cation exchanger. Fluid chemistries predicted to result from mixing were compared with those monitored from boreholes intersecting the fracture zone. Modeling results suggest that less than 0.1 equivalent of a smectite exchanger per liter of groundwater is necessary to account for discrepancies between predictions from a conservative mixing model and measured Na and Ca concentrations. This quantity of exchanger equates to an effective fracture coating thickness of 20 microm or less given a fracture aperture width of 1,000 microm or less. Trends in cation ratios in the fluid cannot be used to predict trends in cation ratios on the exchanger because of the influence of ionic strength on heterovalent exchange equilibrium. It is expected that Na for Ca exchange will dominate when shallow waters such as HBHO2 are mixed with deeper waters. In contrast, Na for Mg exchange will dominate mixing between deeper waters

  15. Uses of complexone III and ion exchange resins in colorimetric determination with o-phenanthroline of Fe traces in uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of small quantities of iron using o-phenanthroline, assumes the elimination of some cations interference by means of pH control before the formation of a coloured complex. We have eluded that difficulty by the connected action of complexones III and ion exchange. the previous forms quelate with the iron (III) with a stability constant high enough to permit the pass of an iron solution through a cation resin column without being fixed which never occurs with the interferer cations. Mercury is the only element with a similar stability, but it has been eliminated previously. (Author) 16 refs

  16. Adsorption of U(VI) from HCl solutions on anion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The adsorption capacity of different commercial exchange resins, such as: Amberlite-RA 900 Cl; Amberjet 4400 Cl; Dowex 1-X8; Dowex-Marathon and CEPU-5M (synthesized specially for uranium isotope exchange), for uranyl chlorocomplexes in HCl solutions was determined. The measurements were performed at different temperatures and HCl solution concentrations using two contact methods for solution-resin system, namely through chromatography on column and batch operation. For anion exchange resins as Amberlite-IRA 900 Cl, Dowex 1-X8 and Dowex-Marathon, the uranium adsorption capacities increased with HCl concentrations and contact temperatures. The same behaviour was observed for anion exchange strong basic resin CEPU-5M, synthesized specially for uranium isotope exchange. Uranyl chlorocomplex molecule adsorbed on resin is [UO2Cl3]-, as determined by batch operation from uranium adsorption capacities of Dowex-Marathon. (author)

  17. Porous metal oxide microspheres from ion exchange resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picart, S.; Parant, P.; Caisso, M.; Remy, E.; Mokhtari, H.; Jobelin, I.; Bayle, J. P.; Martin, C. L.; Blanchart, P.; Ayral, A.; Delahaye, T.

    2015-07-01

    This study is devoted to the synthesis and the characterization of porous metal oxide microsphere from metal loaded ion exchange resin. Their application concerns the fabrication of uranium-americium oxide pellets using the powder-free process called Calcined Resin Microsphere Pelletization (CRMP). Those mixed oxide ceramics are one of the materials envisaged for americium transmutation in sodium fast neutron reactors. The advantage of such microsphere precursor compared to classical oxide powder is the diminution of the risk of fine dissemination which can be critical for the handling of highly radioactive powders such as americium based oxides and the improvement of flowability for the filling of compaction chamber. Those millimetric oxide microspheres incorporating uranium and americium were synthesized and characterizations showed a very porous microstructure very brittle in nature which occurred to be adapted to shaping by compaction. Studies allowed to determine an optimal heat treatment with calcination temperature comprised between 700-800 °C and temperature rate lower than 2 °C/min. Oxide Precursors were die-pressed into pellets and then sintered under air to form regular ceramic pellets of 95% of theoretical density (TD) and of homogeneous microstructure. This study validated thus the scientific feasibility of the CRMP process to prepare bearing americium target in a powder free manner.

  18. Porous metal oxide microspheres from ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is devoted to the synthesis and the characterization of porous metal oxide microsphere from metal loaded ion exchange resin. Their application concerns the fabrication of uranium-americium oxide pellets using the powder-free process called Calcined Resin Microsphere Pelletizing (CRMP). Those mixed oxide ceramics are one of the materials envisaged for americium transmutation in sodium fast neutron reactors. The advantage of such microsphere precursor compared to classical oxide powder is the diminution of the risk of fine dissemination which can be critical for the handling of highly radioactive powders such as americium based oxides and the improvement of the ability to flow for the filling of the compaction chamber. Those millimetric oxide microspheres incorporating uranium and americium were synthesized and characterizations showed a very porous microstructure very brittle in nature which occurred to be adapted to shaping by compaction. Studies allowed to determine an optimal heat treatment with calcination temperature comprised between 700-800 Celsius degrees and temperature rate lower than 2 Celsius degrees/min. Oxide Precursors were die-pressed into pellets and then sintered under air to form regular ceramic pellets of 95% of theoretical density and of homogeneous microstructure. This study validated thus the scientific feasibility of the CRMP process to prepare bearing americium target in a powder free manner. (authors)

  19. Computer simulation of methanol exchange dynamics around cations and anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Santanu; Dang, Liem X.

    2016-03-03

    In this paper, we present the first computer simulation of methanol exchange dynamics between the first and second solvation shells around different cations and anions. After water, methanol is the most frequently used solvent for ions. Methanol has different structural and dynamical properties than water, so its ion solvation process is different. To this end, we performed molecular dynamics simulations using polarizable potential models to describe methanol-methanol and ion-methanol interactions. In particular, we computed methanol exchange rates by employing the transition state theory, the Impey-Madden-McDonald method, the reactive flux approach, and the Grote-Hynes theory. We observed that methanol exchange occurs at a nanosecond time scale for Na+ and at a picosecond time scale for other ions. We also observed a trend in which, for like charges, the exchange rate is slower for smaller ions because they are more strongly bound to methanol. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  20. Half-scale solidification experiment of spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent ion exchange resin was solidified into three half-scale concrete containers at the Loviisa Poweer Plant in 1987. At the same time small specimens were prepared for laboratory-scale leaching experiments. The half-scale waste packages have been immersed in groundwater since September 1987. After eighteen months of underwater storage the containers are in good condition and no changes have been detected in their weights or dimensions. No radionuclides have escaped from the containers into the storage water. The laboratory-scale leaching experiments have been underway for over a year. The measured leach rates correspond well with the results of earlier experiments. The research will be continued for several years to demonstrate the long-term durability of the waste packages in the chemical conditions of an underground repository

  1. Volume reduction of ion exchange resins by catalytic incineration, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For development of fluidized bed incineration system armed with copper monoxide catalyst, minimum fluidization velocities at room temperature and high temperatures were examined. By comparing these data with calculated values, it was found that Wen-Yu's equation was applicable. Also by operating in various temperatures and gas velocities, most preferable condition for incinerating ion exchange resins by fluidized bed combustion was found to be temperature of 650degC, bed velocity of more than 4.91 x 10-2m·s-1, and free board velocity of less than 3.36 x 10-2m·s-1. Moreover by using apparent reaction rate constants obtained in this experiment, the overall reaction rate of scale-up apparatus may be predictable. (author)

  2. Treatment of Soil Decontamination Solution by the Cs+ Ion Selective Ion Exchange Resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Occasionally, radioactively contaminated soils have been excavated and stored at the temporary storage facility. Cesium as a radionuclide is one of the most toxic elements and it has a long half decay life. During the operation of nuclear facility, soils near the facility would be contaminated with radioactive cesium and it will cause the deleterious effect to human body and environment. In this study, Cs+ ion selective ion exchange resin was prepared by changing the functional group of commercial anion exchange resin for a ferrocyanide ion. Ion exchange capability of using the soil decontamination solution was investigated. We also performed the feasibility test of recycling the spent Cs ion selective ion exchange resin

  3. Separation of boron isotopes by ion exchange chromatography: studies with Duolite-162, a type-II resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The selection of resin plays an important role in the process of separation of boron isotopes by ion exchange chromatography. The determination of (i) ion exchange capacity of Duolite-162 resin for hydroxyl - chloride exchange, (ii) hydroxyl - borate exchange, (iii) isotopic exchange separation factor by batch method and (iv) effect of concentration of boric acid on isotopic exchange separation factor to test the suitability of the above resin for this process are discussed in this report. (author)

  4. Study on technology of removing soluble organic matter in ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most ion exchange resins contain soluble organic matter which is pulled in during synthesis. The soluble organic matter can release continuously when the resins are used, which will influence the outlet water quality of mixed bed. Technology of removing soluble organic matter in condensate polishing resins, JL201 and JL001, includes demineralized water eluting and alkaline eluting is discussed. The results show that the methods selected are effective, economical, feasible and almost have no effect on exchange capacity and mechanical strength of the resins

  5. Uptake of actinides by sulphonated phosphinic acid resin from acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The removal of uranium and americium from nitric acid solutions by sulphonated phosphinic acid resin has been investigated. The capacity of the sulphonated resin exceeds the capacities of phosphinic acid resin and commercial cation exchange resin. Other advantages of the sulphonated resin for uranium and americium removal include reduced sensitivity to acidity and inert salt concentration. (author)

  6. Separation of cadmium from not waters by ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between the ion exchange reaction in a column and temperature was examined in the system cadmium-ion exchanger resin Lewatin S 1080. Cadmium was bound by 0.02 M NHO3 and then eluted by 2.0 M HCl. Working temperature was gradually increased from 273 to 333 K. Cadmium concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Thermostated columns were of our own construction. The distillation plate theory was applied for the same ion eluated at different temperatures. It was necessary to determine graphically the following parameters: cex, cmax, Vmax, and the width of elution band. These parameters obtained for elution curves were related to temperature. The elution curves were found to be temperature specific. Deviations from Gauss normal distribution are larger at higher temperatures. This value can be determined from the segment of the elution curve with the ordinate cmax/e. Consequently, we suggest the width of elution curve to be a measure of elution conditions at higher temperatures. (author). 19 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  7. Vitrification of spent ion exchange resin from Korean NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent resin is the main wet waste generated by nuclear power plants (NPPs). Vitrification is conceptually attractive because of the potential durability of the final product and the large volume reduction. The vitrification of spent resin from NPPs is examined. There is a large amount of sulfate in spent resin ash. However, the limited solubility of sulfate in glass resulted in the low waste loading of spent resin. High sulfate in glass led to the phase separation. Some well-developed glasses frits have been used to vitrify spent resin from Korean NPPs. The waste loading is less than 5 wt percent of resin ash. Spent resin also was added to the borate waste glasses, 20 g of dry resin could be vitrified in 100 g of borate waste glass without phase separation and final waste from has good durability. (author). 12 refs., 6 tabs

  8. Soil exchangeable cations: A geostatistical study from Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayfun Aşkın

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In present study, geostatistical techniques was applied to assess the spatial variability of exchangeable cations such as; calcium (Ex-Ca2+, magnesium (Ex-Mg2+, potassium (Ex-K+ and sodium (Ex-Na+ in the tillaged layer in a Perm State Agricultural Academy Farm site in Perm region, West Urals, Russia. A 250x100 m plot (approximately 2.35 ha was divided into grids with 25x25 m spacing that included 51 sampling points from 0-0.2 m in depth. Soil reaction (pH was the least variable property while the Ex-K was the most variable. The greatest range of influence (237.6 m occurred for Ex-Ca and the least range (49.7 m for Ex-Mg.

  9. PEMFC contamination model: Foreign cation exchange with ionomer protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Pierre, Jean

    2011-08-01

    A generic, transient fuel cell ohmic loss mathematical model was developed for the case of contaminants that ion exchange with ionomer protons. The model was derived using step changes in contaminant concentration, constant operating conditions and foreign cation transport via liquid water droplets. In addition, the effect of ionomer cations redistribution within the ionomer on thermodynamic, kinetic and mass transport losses and migration were neglected. Thus, a simpler, ideal, ohmic loss case is defined and is applicable to uncharged contaminant species and gas phase contaminants. The closed form solutions were validated using contamination data from a membrane exposed to NH3. The model needs to be validated against contamination and recovery data sets including an NH4+ contaminated membrane exposed to a water stream. A method is proposed to determine model parameters and relies on the prior knowledge of the initial ionomer resistivity. The model expands the number of previously derived cases. Most models in this inventory, derived with the assumption that the reactant is absent, lead to different dimensionless current vs. time behaviors similar to a fingerprint. These model characteristics facilitate contaminant mechanism identification. Separation between membrane and catalyst (electroinactive contaminant) contamination is conceivably possible using additional indicative cell resistance measurements. Contamination is predicted to be significantly more severe under low relative humidity conditions.

  10. Atomistic understanding of cation exchange in PbS nanocrystals using simulations with pseudoligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhaochuan; Lin, Li-Chiang; Buijs, Wim; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; van Huis, Marijn A.

    2016-05-01

    Cation exchange is a powerful tool for the synthesis of nanostructures such as core-shell nanocrystals, however, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Interactions of cations with ligands and solvent molecules are systematically ignored in simulations. Here, we introduce the concept of pseudoligands to incorporate cation-ligand-solvent interactions in molecular dynamics. This leads to excellent agreement with experimental data on cation exchange of PbS nanocrystals, whereby Pb ions are partially replaced by Cd ions from solution. The temperature and the ligand-type control the exchange rate and equilibrium composition of cations in the nanocrystal. Our simulations reveal that Pb ions are kicked out by exchanged Cd interstitials and migrate through interstitial sites, aided by local relaxations at core-shell interfaces and point defects. We also predict that high-pressure conditions facilitate strongly enhanced cation exchange reactions at elevated temperatures. Our approach is easily extendable to other semiconductor compounds and to other families of nanocrystals.

  11. Use of type-II strong base anion exchange resins for ion exchange chromatographic separation of isotopes of boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimum conditions for the regeneration of strong base anion exchange resins of type-I and type-II were determined for cost - effective separation of isotopes of boron by ion exchange chromatography. The possibility of using unspent alkali content of the effluent was also exploited. Removal of carbonate impurity from rayon grade caustic lye (used as regenerant after dilution) and recycling of Ba(OH)2 was studied to avoid waste disposal problems. The determination of (i) ion exchange capacity of Duolite-162 resin for hydroxyl - chloride and hydroxyl - borate exchanges, (ii) isotopic exchange separation factor by batch method and (iii) effect of concentration of boric acid (in presence and absence of mannitol) on isotopic exchange separation factor to test the suitability of the type-II resin for this process are discussed. (author)

  12. Study on selection of nuclear-grade exchange resin for purification in marine nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear-grade exchange resin for purification plays an important role in the primary water chemistry of marine nuclear power plant. But systematic and comprehensive guidance for its application is absent in engineering practice. The study in this paper is based on the EJ/T734 and the standards for the exchange resin used in water purification for fossil fuel power plant. The adopted environment factors have been taken into account in this study on selection of the nuclear-grade ion exchange resin. The selection principle is developed to utilize the new performance index and performance test method as well as the evaluation criterion. (authors)

  13. Uranium Adsorption on Ion-Exchange Resins - Batch Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    The uranium adsorption performance of five resins (Dowex 1, Dowex 21K 16-30 [fresh], Dowex 21K 16-30 [regenerated], Purofine PFA600/4740, and ResinTech SIR-1200) were tested using unspiked, nitrate-spiked, and nitrate-spiked/pH adjusted source water from well 299-W19-36. These batch tests were conducted in support of a resin selection process in which the best resin to use for uranium treatment in the 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system will be identified. The results from these tests are as follows: • The data from the high-nitrate (1331 mg/L) tests indicated that Dowex 1, Dowex 21K 16-30 (fresh), Purofine PFA600/4740, and ResinTech SIR-1200 all adsorbed uranium similarly well with Kd values ranging from ~15,000 to 95,000 ml/g. All four resins would be considered suitable for use in the treatment system based on uranium adsorption characteristics. • Lowering the pH of the high nitrate test conditions from 8.2 to 7.5 did not significantly change the uranium adsorption isotherms for the four tested resins. The Kd values for these four resins under high nitrate (1338 mg/L), lower pH (7.5) ranged from ~15,000 to 80,000 ml/g. • Higher nitrate concentrations greatly reduced the uranium adsorption on all four resins. Tests conducted with unspiked (no amendments; nitrate at 337 mg/L and pH at 8.2) source water yielded Kd values for Dowex 1, Dowex 21K 16-30 (fresh), Purofine PFA600/4740, and ResinTech SIR-1200 resins ranging from ~800,000 to >3,000,000 ml/g. These values are about two orders of magnitude higher than the Kd values noted from tests conducted using amended source water. • Compared to the fresh resin, the regenerated Dowex 21K 16-30 resin exhibited significantly lower uranium-adsorption performance under all test conditions. The calculated Kd values for the regenerated resin were typically an order of magnitude lower than the values calculated for the fresh resin. • Additional testing using laboratory columns is recommended to better

  14. Reducing ion exchange resins rad-wastes, experience at EDF PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Life time of an ion exchange resin in a Nuclear Power Station (EDF PWR). At the end of its life, an ion exchange resin which has been used to treat radioactive streams becomes a radwaste itself. Its level of radioactivity depends on the point of use and consequently on the circuit where it was used. Roughly speaking, in a Nuclear Power Station PWR we can consider two types of radwaste families: High radioactive family Ion exchange resins which come from primary circuit: reactor control and storage pools. Ion exchange resins which have worked in a decontamination circuit: waste water treatment. Low radioactive family Ion exchange resins which come from secondary circuit: Steam Generator Blowdown By understanding and carefully applying some critical properties of ion exchange resins, such as total capacity, selectivity, and physical structure, it is possible for nuclear power stations to minimize radwaste volumes, while at the same time improving plant performance. This type of improvement can be facilitated by close cooperation and communication between the resin producer and the nuclear power user. (authors)

  15. Influence of the Functionalization Degree of Acidic Ion-Exchange Resins on Ethyl Octyl Ether Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Guilera, J.; Hanková, L. (Libuše); Jeřábek, K. (Karel); Ramírez, E.; Tejero, J.

    2014-01-01

    Ethyl octyl ether (EOE) can be obtained by the ethylation of 1-octanol by means of ethanol or diethyl carbonate over acidic ion-exchange resins. However, EOE formation has to compete with the less steric demanding formation of diethyl ether, by-product obtained from ethanol dehydration or diethyl carbonate decomposition. In the present work, the influence of the resin functionalization degree on EOE formation has been evaluated. A series of partially sulfonated resins were prepared by the sul...

  16. Iridium containing honeycomb Delafossites by topotactic cation exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roudebush, John H; Ross, K A; Cava, R J

    2016-06-01

    We report the structure and magnetic properties of two new iridium-based honeycomb Delafossite compounds, Cu3NaIr2O6 and Cu3LiIr2O6, formed by a topotactic cation exchange reaction. The starting materials Na2IrO3 and Li2IrO3, which are based on layers of IrO6 octahedra in a honeycomb lattice separated by layers of alkali ions, are transformed to the title compounds by a topotactic exchange reaction through heating with CuCl below 450 °C; higher temperature reactions cause decomposition. The new compounds display dramatically different magnetic behavior from their parent compounds - Cu3NaIr2O6 has a ferromagnetic like magnetic transition at 10 K, while Cu3LiIr2O6 retains the antiferromagnetic transition temperature of its parent compound but displays significantly stronger dominance of antiferromagnetic coupling between spins. These results reveal that a surprising difference in the magnetic interactions between the magnetic Ir ions has been induced by a change in the non-magnetic interlayer species. A combination of neutron and X-ray powder diffraction is used for the structure refinement of Cu3NaIr2O6 and both compounds are compared to their parent materials. PMID:27147423

  17. A summary of methods for conditioning and immobilizing ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion-exchange resins are used in CANDU-PHW nuclear power stations to purify heavy water in the primary heat transport (PHT) and moderator systems. Two promising techniques for conditioning spent ion-exchange resins for disposal have been evaluated: direct immobilization and incineration combined with immobilization of the ash and scrubbed off-gases. When ion-exchange resins were immobilized directly, volumes of bitumen products were about 0.75 times the volumes of untreated resin, while the volumes of cement and polyester products were 2 to 3 times larger. While incinerating the resin is an extra processing step, much smaller volumes result from the latter option. Bitumen and glass product volumes were six and ten times smaller, respectively, than the volumes of untreated resin, while cement and polyester product volumes were about one-half the volume of untreated resin. Since the releases of Cs-136 by leaching were lowest for products made by immobilization in glass, PHT resins which have high concentrations of Cs-137 should be vitrified. Moderator resins which have high concentrations of C-14 should be incinerated and the ash and C-14-contaminated scrubbing solutions should be immobilized. By pretreating such resins with calcium chloride or carbon dioxide, the C-14 present on resin could be released at temperatures below the ignition temperature of the resin. The pretreatment technique reduces the amount of inactive carbon dioxide that must be scrubbed to trap the C-14. The releases of C-14 from immobilized barium hydroxide scrubbing solution were the same as releases from immobilized resin

  18. Gamma-rays initiated cationic polymerization of epoxy resins and their carbon nanotubes composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybytniak, Grażyna; Nowicki, Andrzej; Mirkowski, Krzysztof; Stobiński, Leszek

    2016-04-01

    Epoxy resins based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) in the presence cationic initiator in the form of iodonium salt were exposed to gamma-rays in order to initiate curing process. The influence of the initiator concentration, dose rate, chemical structure of monomers and the presence of carbon nanotubes were determined on the basis of the recorded on-line thermal effects. The induction time of radiation curing increased with lowering concentration of the initiator and oxirane groups as well as with decreasing dose rates. As was confirmed by SEM images, carbon nanotubes were uniformly distributed over the matrix and closely surrounded by the macromolecules. Such a structure resulted from adsorption of the initiator on the filler surface what allowed to begin polymerization around nanoparticles and facilitated their incorporation into the matrix. As a consequence, the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites were improved.

  19. The removal of radioactive radium (Ra226) from chloride liquors by columnar ion exchange in the presence of calcium, magnesium and iron cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work was to study the feasibility of controlling the discharge of soluble Ra226, in the presence of Ca, Mg and Fe cations in synthetic chloride effluents, by adsorption on cation exchange resins to decrease Ra226-concentrations to federal environmental levels of 10 pCi Ra226/litre. Environmentally acceptable effluents were produced from synthetic chloride feed liquors containing 10 ppm Ca, 5 ppm Mg, 120 ppm Fe plus 20,000 pCi Ra226/litre. Environmentally acceptable effluents were not produced, by cation exchange, from a synthetic chloride liquor containing 490 ppm Ca, 97 ppm Mg, 720 ppm Fe in addition to 20,000 pCi Ra226/litre. The mass interference of the Ca + Mg + Fe cation concentrations in the feed liquor was in over-powering competition, for resin sites, with the Ra226-cations. To obtain realistic data, the adsorption process should be reexamined using a chloride liquor produced under optimal chloride leaching conditions of an Elliot Lake uranium ore. This would, in all probability, reveal other cations unavailable in the synthetic chloride liquors

  20. Ion-exchange Resin Catalyzed Esterification of Lactic Acid with Isopropanol: a Kinetic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrit P. Toor

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic behavior of esterification of lactic acid with isopropanol over an acidic cation exchange resin, Amberlyst 15, was studied under isothermal condition. Isopropyl lactate synthesized in this reaction is an important pharmaceutical intermediate. The experiments were carried out in a stirred batch reactor in the temperature range of 323.15 to 353.15 K. The effect of various parameters such as temperature, molar ratio and catalyst loading was studied. Variation in parameters on rate of reaction demonstrated that the reaction was intrinsically controlled. Kinetic modeling was performed using Eley-Rideal model which acceptably fits the experimental data. The activation energy was found to be 22.007 kJ/mol and frequency factor was 0.036809 l2 g-1 mol-1 min-1 for forward reaction. The value of entropy for the forward reaction was found to be 182.317 J K-1 mol-1 . © 2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 19th January 2011, Revised: 16th March 2011; Accepted: 16th March 2011[How to Cite: A.P. Toor, M. Sharma, S. Thakur, and R. K. Wanchoo. (2011. Ion-exchange Resin Catalyzed Esterification of Lactic Acid with Isopropanol: a Kinetic Study. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 6(1: 39-45. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.1.791.39-45][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.1.791.39-45 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/791 ] | View in  

  1. Studies on the adsorption of boric acid on anion exchange resins, 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borate-form anion exchange resin (type I) is repeatedly used between the process of boric acid adsorption at a low temperature (5 0C) and its desorption at a high temperature (80 0C), to control the boric acid concentration of the primary coolant in PWRs. The thermal stability of the borate form anion exchange resin is an important index for evaluating operational reliability of the processes in the long term. To determine the thermal stability of the resins, heat cycle tests were carried out using borate, OH-, and Cl- form resins. Average mole values (average n) of boric acid adsorbed per functional group of the ion exchange resin were not changed by heat cycling. Residual ratios of salt spiliting capacity of the borate form resins decreased in the range of 92 to 97 % for 0.00924 to 0.185 M boric acid solution after 1700 heat cycles. The ratios for OH- or Cl- form resins which were tested as a reference, were 70 and 95 % respectively. The thermal stability of the resin decreased with an increase in the pH value in the resin phase. (author)

  2. Evaluation of anion exchange resins for plutonium-uranium separations in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellicular, macroreticular and microreticular (gel type) anion exchange resins were compared for separation of plutonium from nitric acid solutions of mixed plutonium-uranium. All the macroreticular resins were 20 to 50 mesh beads. Dowex 1-X4 gel resin was 50 to 80 mesh beads. The resins were held in glass columns with coarse glass frits at the bottom of the columns. The top of the columns contained 50 ml reservoirs. The flow rates were controlled at 4 cm3.min-1.cm-2. One-centimeter bore columns with 15-cm resin bed heights were used for the plutonium elution and breakthrough capacity experiments, whereas 1.7 cm bore columns with 20 cm bed heights were used for the uranium washing experiments. As Pellionex SAX (pellicular resin) and Amberlite IRA-93 (weak base macroreticular anion exchange resin) were found to have better uranium washing and plutonium eluating characteristics than any of the resins tested. However, the capacity of the pellicular resin was much lower than that of the other resins. (T.G.)

  3. High-temperature conditioning of spent ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research investigates the high-temperature processing of the NPP spent ion-exchange resins (IER). This method allows processing initial IERs into the solid bulk material suitable for its further incorporation into stable solid matrices (e.g. cement or glass). The experiments on determination of conditions for high-temperature processing of ion-exchange resins were conducted using the pilot installation based on the rotary calciner design. The basic working unit of the rotary calciner is a stainless steel tube-retort tilted slightly with respect to the horizon. A motor-reducer is used for the retort rotation. The retort is heated by SiC heaters. The processes of water evaporation, IER suspension drying and bulk powdery product formation are successively taking place as the initial material is passed through the calciner retort. The preliminary thermographic analysis (TGA) has been performed to determine boundary values of the thermal IER decomposition process. TGA has revealed that the maximum IER processing temperature should not exceed 500degC since a further temperature increase will result in the IER decomposition causing the formation of toxic combustion products. The experiments on high-temperature IER processing were conducted using KU-2 resin at a solid-to-liquid ratio of 1:5. The rate of the suspension feed into the calciner and the rate of the retort rotation were varied in the ranges of 5-10 l/h and 10-20 r/min, respectively. The processed IERs (PIERs) were analyzed to determine the following physicochemical characteristics: particle-size distribution, bulk density, and angle of repose. It has been shown that as a result of calcination the volume of the initial IER with a natural moisture content decreased by 3 times, while the final moisture content of IER (∼3 wt.%) remained virtually invariable when kept in the open air for 7 days. Additional studies demonstrated the cementation method applicability for immobilization of the products resulting

  4. Immobilization in cement of ion exchange resins from Spanish nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchange materials used at nuclear power plants can be immobilized in cements less expensive than polymer matrices. Cement solidification of spent ion exchange resins shows swelling and cracking troubles (during setting time, or of storage). The objective of this study was to select the types of cement that produce the best quality on immobilization of three kinds of resins and to set up cement formulations containing the maximum possible loading of resin. Four cements were selected to carried out the study. After a study of hydration-dehydration phenomena of ion exchange resins, a systematic work has been carried out on immobilization. Tests were performed to study compressive strength and underwater stability by changing water/cement ratio and resin/cement ratio. Mixtures made with water, cement and resin only were loaded with 10% by weight dry resin. Mixtures with higher loadings show poor workability. Tests were carried out by adding organic plasticizers and silica products to improve waste loading. Plasticizers reduced water demand and silica products permit the use of more water. Leaching tests have been performed at 40OC. In conclusion Blast Furnace Slag is the best cement for immobilization of ion exchange resin both bead and powdered form for mechanical strength, stability and leaching

  5. Studies concerning the anion ex-change resins catalyzed esterification of epichlorohydrin with organic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Muresan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies the esterification of carboxylic acids with epichlorohydrin over two macroporous strong base anion exchange resins with different polymer matrix. For both resins, the influence of reaction parameters (temperature, catalyst loading, molar ratio on the reaction rate and the yields of the two isomeric esters were investigated.

  6. UREA/ammonium ion removal system for the orbiting frog otolith experiment. [ion exchange resins for water treatment during space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, J. R.; Anselmi, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of using free urease enzyme and ANGC-101 ion exchange resin to remove urea and ammonium ion for space system waste water applications was studied. Specifically examined is the prevention of urea and ammonia toxicity in a 30-day Orbiting Frog Otolith (OFO) flight experiment. It is shown that free urease enzyme used in conjunction with ANGC-101 ion-exchange resin and pH control can control urea and amonium ion concentration in unbuffered recirculating water. In addition, the resin does not adversely effect the bullfrogs by lowering the concentration of cations below critical minimum levels. Further investigations on bioburden control, frog waste excretion on an OFO diet, a trade-off analysis of methods of automating the urea/ammonium ion removal system and fabrication and test of a semiautomated breadboard were recommended as continuing efforts. Photographs of test equipment and test animals are shown.

  7. Analysis of Ion Exchange Resin Waste of RSG-GAS Primary Cooling Water Purification System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ion exchange resin of the primary cooling water purification system serves to remove primary cooling water impurities to keep primary cooling water quality at the specified level. To identify the water impurities caught by ion exchange resin, it has been performed analysis of waste ion exchange resin coming from the primary cooling water purification system. Analysis was performed by taking waste ion exchange resin sample which will be sent to Centre for Radioactive Waste Technology (PTLR). Then the sample was counted with gamma spectrometer with HPGe detector. It showed that the identified nuclides were: Co-60, Cs-137, Mn-54, Zn-65 and Sb-124, which were long and medium half-lived primary cooling water impurities. (author)

  8. Sorption of Pu(IV) from nitric acid by bifunctional anion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anion exchange is attractive for separating plutonium because the Pu(IV) nitrate complex is very strongly sorbed and few other metal ions form competing anionic nitrate complexes. The major disadvantage of this process has been the unusually slow rate at which the Pu(IV) nitrate complex is sorbed by the resin. The paper summarizes the concept of bifunctional anion-exchange resins, proposed mechanism for Pu(IV) sorption, synthesis of the alkylating agent, calculation of Kd values from Pu(IV) sorption results, and conclusions from the study of Pu(IV) sorption from 7M nitric acid by macroporous anion-exchange resins including level of crosslinking, level of alkylation, length of spacer, and bifunctional vs. monofunctional anion-exchange resins

  9. Method of volume-reducing ion exchange resin with catalytic combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention concerns a method of complete combustion of unburnt products such as soot formed upon combustion of ion exchange resin. Ion exchange resins are burnt under the supply of air at 650 - 850degC. Combustion is taken place on a free board under the pressure of a flowing catalyst of fine alumina particles. The ion exchange resins do not burn completely but produce soots and unburnt organic products. Then, a catalyst comprising a copper net and a stainless steel net is disposed on the free board, so that the unburnt products undergo complete combustion in contact with the catalyst. Thus, complete combustion of the ion exchange resins is possible to attain volume-reduction thereof. (K.M.)

  10. The radiolytic and chemical degradation of organic ion exchange resins under alkaline conditions: effect on radionuclide speciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loon, L. van; Hummel, W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-10-01

    The formation of water soluble organic ligands by the radiolytic and chemical degradation of several ion exchange resins was investigated under conditions close to those of the near field of a cementitious repository. The most important degradation products were characterised and their role on radionuclide speciation evaluated thoroughly. Irradiation of strong acidic cation exchange resins (Powdex PCH and Lewatite S-100) resulted in the formation of mainly sulphate and dissolved organic carbon. A small part of the carbon (10-20%) could be identified as oxalate. The identity of the remainder is unknown. Complexation studies with Cu{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} showed the presence of two ligands: oxalate and ligand X. Although ligand X could not be identified, it could be characterised by its concentration, a deprotonation constant and a complexation constant for the NiX complex. The influence of oxalate and ligand X on the speciation of radionuclides is examined in detail. For oxalate no significant influence on the speciation of radionuclides is expected. The stronger complexing ligand X may exert some influence depending on its concentration and the values of other parameters. These critical parameters are discussed and limiting values are evaluated. In absence of irradiation, no evidence for the formation of ligands was found. Irradiation of strong basic anion exchange resins (Powdex PAO and Lewatite M-500) resulted in the formation of mainly ammonia, amines and dissolved organic carbon. Up to 50% of the carbon could be identified as methyl-, dimethyl- and trimethylamine. Complexation studies with Eu{sup 3+} showed that the complexing capacity under near field conditions was negligible. The speciation of cations such as Ag, Ni, Cu and Pd can be influenced by the presence of amins. The strongest amine-complexes are formed with Pd and therefore, as an example, the aqueous Pd-ammonia system is examined in great detail. (author) 30 figs., 10 tabs., refs.

  11. The radiolytic and chemical degradation of organic ion exchange resins under alkaline conditions: effect on radionuclide speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of water soluble organic ligands by the radiolytic and chemical degradation of several ion exchange resins was investigated under conditions close to those of the near field of a cementitious repository. The most important degradation products were characterised and their role on radionuclide speciation evaluated thoroughly. Irradiation of strong acidic cation exchange resins (Powdex PCH and Lewatite S-100) resulted in the formation of mainly sulphate and dissolved organic carbon. A small part of the carbon (10-20%) could be identified as oxalate. The identity of the remainder is unknown. Complexation studies with Cu2+ and Ni2+ showed the presence of two ligands: oxalate and ligand X. Although ligand X could not be identified, it could be characterised by its concentration, a deprotonation constant and a complexation constant for the NiX complex. The influence of oxalate and ligand X on the speciation of radionuclides is examined in detail. For oxalate no significant influence on the speciation of radionuclides is expected. The stronger complexing ligand X may exert some influence depending on its concentration and the values of other parameters. These critical parameters are discussed and limiting values are evaluated. In absence of irradiation, no evidence for the formation of ligands was found. Irradiation of strong basic anion exchange resins (Powdex PAO and Lewatite M-500) resulted in the formation of mainly ammonia, amines and dissolved organic carbon. Up to 50% of the carbon could be identified as methyl-, dimethyl- and trimethylamine. Complexation studies with Eu3+ showed that the complexing capacity under near field conditions was negligible. The speciation of cations such as Ag, Ni, Cu and Pd can be influenced by the presence of amins. The strongest amine-complexes are formed with Pd and therefore, as an example, the aqueous Pd-ammonia system is examined in great detail. (author) 30 figs., 10 tabs., refs

  12. Adsorption of copper from the sulphate solution of low copper contents using the cationic resin Amberlite IR 120

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, Manis Kumar; Nghiem Van Nguyen [Minerals and Materials Processing Division, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), 92 Gwahang-no, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-chun, E-mail: jclee@kigam.re.kr [Minerals and Materials Processing Division, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), 92 Gwahang-no, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jinki; Yoo, Jae-Min [Minerals and Materials Processing Division, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), 92 Gwahang-no, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-30

    In view of the increasing importance of the waste processing and recycling to meet the strict environmental regulations, the present investigation reports an adsorption process using the cationic exchanger Amberlite IR 120 for the recovery/removal of copper from the synthetic sulphate solution containing copper {<=}0.7 mg/mL similar to the CMP waste effluent of electronic industry. Various process parameters, viz. contact time, solution pH, resin dose, and acid concentration of eluant were investigated for the adsorption of copper from the effluents. The 99.99% copper was found to be adsorbed from the sulphate solution containing copper 0.3-0.7 mg/mL of solution (feed pH 5) at A/R ratio 100 and eq. pH 2.5 in contact time 14 min. The mechanism for the adsorption of copper was found to follow Langmuir isotherm and second order rate. From the loaded organic, copper was eluted effectively by 1.8 M sulphuric acid at A/R ratio 25. The raffinate obtained after the recovery copper could be disposed safely without affecting the environment.

  13. Determination of the amount of ion exchange resin in concrete containing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for determining the amount of ion exchange resin in waste concrete was tested on a (approximately 2 g) piece of concrete containing a known amount of ion exchange resin. The difference between the reference and the analysis values was less than ten per cent, and it seems likely that the reproducibility is considerably better. It was concluded that the method is suitable for homogeneity determinations, although some further experiments are needed before it can be used as a standard method. (Auth.)

  14. X-Ray Fluorescence Determination of Trace Gold in an Ion-Exchange Resin

    OpenAIRE

    Mikhailov, I. F.; Baturin, A. A.; A. I. Mikhailov; L.P. Fomina

    2014-01-01

    The use of portable X ray optics with a secondary radiator in the determination of trace gold in an ion exchange resin within the mass fraction range of 1–50 ppm is described. It is shown that the secondary radiator design with primary radiation filtering allows one to determine trace gold in an ion exchange resin when the mass fraction of gold is lower than 1 ppm.

  15. Lawps ion exchange column gravity drain of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duignan, M. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Herman, D. T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Restivo, M. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-01-28

    Experiments at several different scales were performed to understand the removal of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) ion exchange resin using a gravity drain system with a valve located above the resin screen in the ion exchange column (IXC). This is being considered as part of the design for the Low Activity Waste Pretreatment System (LAWPS) to be constructed at the DOE Hanford Site.

  16. The assessment of pellicular anion-exchange resins for the determination of anions by ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because pellicular anion-exchange resins suitable for the determination, by ion chromatography, of anions with alkaline eluents were unavailable in South Africa at the inception of this work, an attempt was made to prepare such resins. In this study it is shown that the pellicular resins produced are more efficient than the surface-aminated resins used previously. The simultaneous separation and determination of five common anions is demonstrated. The method was applied to the analysis of uranium leach liquors, effluent samples, and a solid sample of ferric oxide (goethite)

  17. The encapsulation of spent ion-exchange resins in an epoxide resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic and organic IX resins have been incorporated into a water-tolerant epoxide resin system. The effect of γ-irradiation to 5 x 109 rads on the mechanical properties of samples containing wet IX resins has been investigated. It was found that although there is a marked embrittlement of the epoxide matrix, useful mechanical properties are retained up to this dose. Gas evolution studies under irradiation and thermogravimetric analyses have also been carried out. (author)

  18. Ion-Isotopic Exchange Reaction Kinetics using Anion Exchange Resins Dowex 550A LC and Indion-930A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.U. Singare

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the characterization of ion exchange resins Dowex 550A LC and Indion-930A based on kinetics of ion-isotopic exchange reactions for which the short lived radioactive isotopes 131I and 82Br were used as a tracers. The study was performed for different concentration of ionic solution varying from 0.001 mol/L to 0.004 mol/L and temperature in the range of 30.0 °C to 45.0 °C. The results indicate that as compared to bromide ion-isotopic exchange reaction, iodide exchange reaction take place at the faster rate. For both the ion-isotopic exchange reactions, under identical experimental conditions, the values of specific reaction rate increases with increase in the ionic concentration and decreases with rise in temperature. It was observed that at 35.00C, 1.000 g of ion exchange resins and 0.002 mol/L labeled iodide ion solution for iodide ion-isotopic exchange reaction, the values of specific reaction rate (min-1, amount of ion exchanged (mmol, initial rate of ion exchange (mmol/min and log Kd were 0.270, 0.342, 0.092 and 11.8 respectively for Dowex 550A LC resin, which was higher than the respective values of 0.156, 0.241, 0.038 and 7.4 as that obtained for Indion-930A resins. From the results, it appears that Dowex 550A LC resins show superior performance over Indion-930A resins under identical experimental conditions.

  19. Simple cation-exchange separation for ICP-MS measurement of 79Se in spent nuclear fuel sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple separation using a single cation-exchange column has been developed for the measurement of 79Se in a spent nuclear fuel solution with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). An irradiated UO2 pellet cut out from a PWR fuel rod was dissolved and used as a standard sample. A known amount of 82Se (20 ng) was added to the sample solution for the determination of the amount of 79Se by isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). The 82Se-spiked and non-spiked sample solutions were fed to each cation-exchange resin-packed column, followed by 1 M nitric acid for washing. The first 3 mL of the effluent was directly injected to the ICP-MS for obtaining the isotopic ratio of 79Se/82Se. The recovery of Se in the effluent was 92%, while no leakage of Gd3+ (158Gd) and Dy3+ (164Dy) which cause major isobaric interferences on 79Se and 82Se determinations by forming 158Gd2+ and 164Dy2+, respectively, was observed. In addition, the highly radioactive coexisting components e.g., Sr2+, Y3+, Cs+, and Ba2+ were retained on the cation-exchange resin, leading to the decrease in the surface dose rate of the sample solution from 0.3 mSv/h to a background level. The isotopic ratio 82Se/79Se of the non-spiked and the spiked fractions were 5.4 ± 1.0 and 13.7 ± 2.2, respectively. From these isotopic ratios, the amounts of 79Se and 82Se in the sample solution were calculated to be 2.4 ± 0.7 and 13.3 ± 4.6 ng, respectively. (author)

  20. Separation of boron isotopes by ion exchange chromatography: studies on regeneration of strong base anion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimum conditions for the regeneration of strong base anion exchange resins of type-I and type-II were determined for cost-effective separation of isotopes of boron by ion exchange chromatography where the hydroxyl form of an anion exchange resin is equilibrated with boric acid solution containing mannitol as a complexing reagent. The possibility of using unspent alkali content of the effluent was also exploited. Removal of carbonate impurity from Rayon grade caustic lye (used as regenerant after dilution) and recycling of Ba(OH)2 was studied to avoid waste disposal problems. (author)

  1. An evaluation of organic substance fraction removal during ion exchange with Miex-DOC resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolska, Małgorzata

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the usefulness of Miex-DOC resin in eliminating organic substances and their fractions from water sources for drinking water was evaluated. The objects of study were samples from three surface water sources and one infiltration water source taken at water treatment plants before treatment in technical conditions. In particular, the effectiveness of removing biodegradable and non-biodegradable fractions as a function of resin dosages and water-resin contact times was evaluated. The ion exchange process with the Miex-DOC resin achieved a high effectiveness in removing aromatic non-biodegradable organic substances, and therefore a reduction in UV254 absorbance. The biodegradable fraction is much less susceptible to removal yet its removal effectiveness allows for a significant reduction in hazards connected with secondary microorganism development. The results of this study indicate the possibility of using ion exchange with the Miex-DOC resin for effective removal of disinfection by-product precursors. PMID:25976333

  2. Management of spent ion-exchange resins from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information presented at the IAEA organized Technical Committee Meeting in December 1976 is given on the management of spent ion-exchange resins with respect to their treatment and conditioning. Currently available processes, methods and technologies such as volume reduction techniques, immobilization techniques, etc. for the treatment and conditioning are described on the basis of operating experiences. Economic aspects associated with the use, treatment, packaging and disposal of ion-exchange resins are dealt with the purpose to serve as an example of an appropriate economic evaluation. The current and prospective status of the resin disposal in USA, France, Federal Republic of Germany, United Kingdom and India is briefly discussed

  3. Application of a weak base anion exchange resin for recovery of uranium at Uravan, Colorado, U.S.A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resin ion-exchange technology has been used to recover uranium at the Uravan, Colorado plant for over 18 years; however, since the end of U.S. Atomic Energy Commission purchase of U3O8 concentrate in 1970, it has become necessary to develop techniques for upgrading the product to meet the more stringent specifications of private sales. The standard gel type quaternary ammonium anion exchange resin had been used previously. The development of the tertiary amine anion exchange resin, Amberlite XE-299, led to an experimental program of laboratory and pilot plant work to evaluate the resin on actual plant solutions. General information on ion-exchange resin structure and chemistry is discussed. Summary data of specific test work on loading the resin, various elution schemes, resin regeneration and product purity from the pilot plant tests and comments on actual plant operation using Amberlite XE-299 resin are presented. (author)

  4. Method of processing spent ion exchange resins by steam decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To lower the decomposing temperature and reduce the decomposing pressure to the atmospheric pressure upon decomposing resin wastes by steam decomposition. Method: Prior to the steam decomposition of resin wastes, alkali metal ions or alkaline earth metal ions are ionically adsorbed as catalysts. When Na+ ions, for example, are absorbed ionically to the resin wastes, Na+ ions are uniformly dispersed within the resin waste particles and Na+ ions are converted into Na2CO3 with a high catalytic activity at a decomposing temperature higher than 600 deg C. As a result, the decomposing temperature for the resin under the steam atmosphere and atmospheric pressure can be reduced from 1000 deg C to 700 deg C due to Na2CO3 uniformly dispersed within the resin wastes, and the required amount of the catalyst can only be from 0.5 to 1.0 meq/g of the resins. This enables to prevent the degradation of the reactor materials and can save the amount of the catalyst as compared with the conventional case of adding powdery catalysts. (Takahashi, M.)

  5. Production of large quantities of 90Y by ion-exchange chromatography using an organic resin and a chelating agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of a system composed of an organic cation exchanger (Dowex 50Wx8) and a chelating agent (EDTA) previously described for the successful production of 90Y via a 90Sr/90Y generator is assessed under dynamic conditions. In an attempt to overcome the established limitation of ion-exchange resins for the separation of subcurie quantities of activity, 90Y is repeatedly isolated from an 11.8-GBq (320 mCi) 90Sr cow using a three-column tandem arrangement. The high recovery and radionuclidic purity obtained for 90Y and the parameters of the separation (time, eluant concentration, pH and flow rate range) strongly suggest that Ci quantities of 90Y can be handled satisfactorily by the ion-exchange method. No replacement or treatment of the cow, low waste generation and 90Sr losses less than 0.1% after each run were observed during the present study which, in combination with the low cost of this resin, may result in an attractive alternate method for the production of large quantities of 90Y.

  6. Modeling Ion-Exchange Processing With Spherical Resins For Cesium Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hang, T.; Nash, C. A.; Aleman, S. E.

    2012-09-19

    The spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde and hypothetical spherical SuperLig(r) 644 ion-exchange resins are evaluated for cesium removal from radioactive waste solutions. Modeling results show that spherical SuperLig(r) 644 reduces column cycling by 50% for high-potassium solutions. Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde performs equally well for the lowest-potassium wastes. Less cycling reduces nitric acid usage during resin elution and sodium addition during resin regeneration, therefore, significantly decreasing life-cycle operational costs. A model assessment of the mechanism behind ''cesium bleed'' is also conducted. When a resin bed is eluted, a relatively small amount of cesium remains within resin particles. Cesium can bleed into otherwise decontaminated product in the next loading cycle. The bleed mechanism is shown to be fully isotherm-controlled vs. mass transfer controlled. Knowledge of residual post-elution cesium level and resin isotherm can be utilized to predict rate of cesium bleed in a mostly non-loaded column. Overall, this work demonstrates the versatility of the ion-exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. This evaluation justifies further development of a spherical form of the SL644 resin.

  7. SuperLig Ion Exchange Resin Swelling and Buoyancy Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to achieve a fundamental understanding of SuperLig resin swelling and shrinking characteristics, which lead to channeling and early breakthrough during loading cycles. The density of salt solution that causes resin floating was also determined to establish a limit for operation. Specific tests performed include (a) pH dependence, (b) ionic strength dependence and (c) buoyancy effect vs. simulant composition

  8. Black Carbon Increases Cation Exchange Capacity in Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black Carbon (BC) may significantly affect nutrient retention and play a key role in a wide range of biogeochemical processes in soils, especially for nutrient cycling. Anthrosols from the Brazilian Amazon (ages between 600 and 8700 yr BP) with high contents of biomass-derived BC had greater potential cation exchange capacity (CEC measured at pH 7) per unit organic C than adjacent soils with low BC contents. Synchrotron-based near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy coupled with scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) techniques explained the source of the higher surface charge of BC compared with non-BC by mapping cross-sectional areas of BC particles with diameters of 10 to 50 (micro)m for C forms. The largest cross-sectional areas consisted of highly aromatic or only slightly oxidized organic C most likely originating from the BC itself with a characteristic peak at 286.1 eV, which could not be found in humic substance extracts, bacteria or fungi. Oxidation significantly increased from the core of BC particles to their surfaces as shown by the ratio of carboxyl-C/aromatic-C. Spotted and non-continuous distribution patterns of highly oxidized C functional groups with distinctly different chemical signatures on BC particle surfaces (peak shift at 286.1 eV to a higher energy of 286.7 eV) indicated that non-BC may be adsorbed on the surfaces of BC particles creating highly oxidized surface. As a consequence of both oxidation of the BC particles themselves and adsorption of organic matter to BC surfaces, the charge density (potential CEC per unit surface area) was greater in BC-rich Anthrosols than adjacent soils. Additionally, a high specific surface area was attributable to the presence of BC, which may contribute to the high CEC found in soils that are rich in BC

  9. chromatographic studies for separation of light lanthanides using Dowex-50X8 cation exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    chromatographic elution of light lanthanides (La, Ce, Nd and Sm) using the strong cation exchange resin, Dowex-50X8 has been investigated through certain elution parameters. elution profiles of La, Ce, Nd and Sm were studied with three different mobile phases: oxalic acid, citric acid and sodium hexameta phosphate. considering % recovered, sodium hexameta phosphate showed the highest values with all investigated elements but it has some disadvantages like tailing, low separation and resolution values that indicating a poor separation pattern and long elution time. on other side citric acid showed many advantages as an eluent over the other eluents, where it has narrow and symmetrical elution peaks compared to those of the other eluents. increasing citric acid concentration , it was observed that the separation factor decreased although the % recovered increased. from ph 3.5-6.5 the retention volumes of the investigated ions decreased drastically, indicating that the separation factor between each neighboring element also decreased . it was also observed that, the distribution coefficient not affected by changing the flow rate from 1 to 10 ml/min. for easy detection and identification , the ion chromatography technique was used.

  10. Purification of Lactic Acid by Heterogeneous Catalytic Distillation Using Ion-exchange Resins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马利; 张阳; 杨基础

    2005-01-01

    The purification of lactic acid based on the esterification of raw lactic acid from fermentation broth and then the catalytic distillation hydrolysis of methyl lactate simultaneously to achieve pure lactic acid is reported. The esterification kinetics of lactic acid with methanol catalyzed by strong-acid cation-exchange resins (Amberlyst-15,D001, D002, NKC, 002) was studied under the condition that simulates the real catalytic environment. Experimental results were correlated by a Langmuir-Hinselwood model and the nonideality of the solution was taken into account by using activities calculated by the universal quasichemical functional group activity coefficient (UNIFAC) method.A good agreement between the model and the experimental data was achieved. Continuous purification experiments were conducted to find the optimum column configuration and operation condition for the system. The effects of various parameters, e.g. the length of different section of the column, feed rate and ratio of reactants, packing material and catalyst type, were studied. This novel system shows good separation results in lab scale, and is potential for industrial application.

  11. Boron isotope separation by ion exchange chromatography using weakly basic anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopic plateau displacement chromatography, a useful method for isotope separation is presented. The boric acid band formed in a column of weakly basic anion exchange resin Diaion WA21 can be eluted with pure water. In order to obtain good accumulation of the isotope effect, a series of experiments with different migration length were carried out. The boron-10 enriched part of the boric acid absorbed band was always preceded by the isotopic plateau part, in which the atomic fraction of boron-10 was maintained at its original value. The atomic fraction of boron-10 at the end of the chromatogram increased with migration length, and in the case of 256-m migration, boron-10 was enriched from its original atomic fraction of 19.84 to 91.00%, the separation factor S being constant irrespective of migration length: S = 1.0100 +- 0.0005. (author)

  12. Ion exchange resins. January 1970-August 1988 (Citations from the US Patent data base). Report for January 1970-August 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography contains citations concerning preparation, regeneration, and applications of ion-exchange resins. Applications include water and waste treatment; food processing; chemical recovery, separation, purification, and catalysis; desalination; and ore treatment and recovery. Methods are included for the processing of spent ion exchange resins and of protecting ion exchange resins from oxidation and chemical degradation. (Contains 227 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  13. Effect of temperature (and the degree of crosslinking) on the reactivity of anion-exchange resins by applying the OT-for-OH exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to reveal (i) the exchange ability of OT- resulting from the dissociation of HTO, (ii) the effect of temperature on the reactivity of anion-exchange resins, and (iii) the effect of the degree of crosslinking on the reactivity of the resins, the OT-for-OH exchange reaction between each OH--form anion-exchange resin and HTO water was observed in the equilibrium state. The anion-exchange resins used were Amberlite IRA-400, and Biorad AG1-X2, X4, X8. The temperature used was 20, 30, 40, 60 or 80 C. The activity of each resin based on the OT-forcounter. Analyzing the data obtained, it ws found that: (1) the higher the temperature is, the smaller is the activity of IRA-400 resin within the range of 40-80 C; (2) the larger the degree of crosslinking in each Biorad AG1 resin, the lower the activity of the resin. Accordingly, it can be concluded that: (1) as for the dissociation of HTO at high temperature, the formula (HTOT++OH-) is more predominant than the formula (HTOH++OT-); (2) the resin with lower porosity (i.e., the resin having the larger degree of crosslinking) shows a lesser tendency for the OT-for-OH exchange reaction to occur than the resin with a higher porosity. (orig.)

  14. The effect of loading solution and dissolution media on release of Diclofenac from ion exchange resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Atyabi F

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Drugs can be loaded on ion exchange resins in order to control their release. Loading of diclofenac sodium on the resin beads not only sustain its release but also reduce its gastrointestinal mucosal injury. In this study the effect of loading solution and concentration of diclofenac in loading solution on total amount of drug loaded on the resin beads (Amberlite IRA-900 and the release characteristic of drug in different media were examined. Results showed that diclofenac resin complex did not release their drug content in simulated gastric fluid but released it in simulated intestinal fluid independent of exposure time in acidic conditions. The effect of a number of parameters such as ionic strength and pH on the release characteristic of drug - resin complexes were also examined. Results showed that although ionic strength is an important factor, drug release is more affected by the pH of the media. NO ABSTRACT

  15. The characteristic assessment of spent ion exchange resin from PUSPATI TRIGA REACTOR (RTP) for immobilization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahida, Nurul; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Majid, Amran Ab; Wahab, Mohd Abd; Marzukee, Nik; Paulus, Wilfred; Phillip, Esther; Thanaletchumy, Irwan, M. N.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, spent ion exchange resin generated from PUSPATI TRIGA reactor (RTP) in Malaysian Nuclear Agency were characterized based on the water content, radionuclide content and radionuclide leachability. The result revealed that the water content in the spent resin is 48%. Gamma spectrometry analysis indicated the presence of 134Cs, 137Cs, 152Eu, 54Mn, 58Co, 60Co and 65Zn. The leachability test shows a small concentrations (<1 Bq/l) of 152Eu and 134Cs were leached out from the spent resin while 60Co activity concentrations slightly exceeded the limit generally used for industrial wastewater i.e. 1 Bq/l. Characterization of spent ion exchange resin sampled from RTP show that this characterization is important as a basis to immobilize this radioactive waste using geopolymer technology.

  16. The characteristic assessment of spent ion exchange resin from PUSPATI TRIGA REACTOR (RTP) for immobilization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahida, Nurul [School of Applied Physics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia and Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Majid, Amran Ab; Irwan, M. N. [School of Applied Physics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Wahab, Mohd Abd; Marzukee, Nik; Paulus, Wilfred; Phillip, Esther; Thanaletchumy [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    In this paper, spent ion exchange resin generated from PUSPATI TRIGA reactor (RTP) in Malaysian Nuclear Agency were characterized based on the water content, radionuclide content and radionuclide leachability. The result revealed that the water content in the spent resin is 48%. Gamma spectrometry analysis indicated the presence of {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 152}Eu, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 58}Co, {sup 60}Co and {sup 65}Zn. The leachability test shows a small concentrations (<1 Bq/l) of {sup 152}Eu and {sup 134}Cs were leached out from the spent resin while {sup 60}Co activity concentrations slightly exceeded the limit generally used for industrial wastewater i.e. 1 Bq/l. Characterization of spent ion exchange resin sampled from RTP show that this characterization is important as a basis to immobilize this radioactive waste using geopolymer technology.

  17. Method for in situ determination cation exchange capacities of subsurface formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is disclosed for the in situ examination of each subsurface formation penetrated by a borehole to ascertain the cation exchange capacity of such formations within a geological region. Natural γ ray logging is used to develop signals functionally related to the total γ radiation and to the potassium-40, uranium and thorium energy-band radiations. A first borehole is traversed by a potential γ ray spectrometer to provide selected measurements of natural γ radiation. Core samples are taken from the logged formation and laboratory tests performed to determine the cation exchange capacity thereof. The cation exchange capacities thus are developed then correlated with selected parameters provided by the γ ray spectrometer to establish functional relationships. Cation exchange capacities of formations in subsequent boreholes within the region are then determined in situ by use of the natural γ ray spectrometer and these established relationships. (author)

  18. High-Capacity and Rapid Removal of Refractory NOM Using Nanoscale Anion Exchange Resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Billy R; Eldred, Tim B; Nguyen, Andy T; Payne, William M; Schmidt, Emily E; Alansari, Amir Y; Amburgey, James E; Poler, Jordan C

    2016-07-20

    As human health concerns over disinfection byproducts (DBP) in drinking water increase, so does the need to develop new materials that remove them rapidly and at high capacity. Ion exchange (IEX) is an effective method for the removal of natural organic matter (NOM), especially anion exchange resins (AERs) with quaternary ammonium functional groups. However, capacity is limited in existing commercial resin materials because adsorbates can only interact with the outermost surface area, which makes these products inefficient on a mass basis. We have synthesized a novel "NanoResin" exploiting the enhanced NOM removal of the quaternary ammonium resin while utilizing the vast surface area of SWCNTs, which act as scaffolding for the resin. Our nanomaterials show increased adsorption capacity compared to commercially available adsorbents, in a fraction of the time. This NanoResin requires only about 10 s to reach ion-exchange equilibrium. Comparatively, commercial AERs only achieved partial removal after more than 30 min. High capacity adsorption of a low molecular weight (MW) surrogate has been measured. NOM removal was demonstrated in solutions of both low and high specific UV absorbance (SUVA) composition with these nanomaterials. Additionally, the NanoResin showed enhanced removal of a NOM concentrate sample taken from Myrtle Beach, SC, demonstrating NanoResin is an effective method of removal for refractory NOM in a natural aqueous environment. Synthesis and characterization of the polymers and nanomaterials are presented below. Adsorption capacity, adsorption kinetics, and the regeneration and reusability of these new materials for NOM removal are described. The open matrix microstructure precludes any intraparticle diffusion of adsorbates; thus, these nanomaterials act as a "contact resin". PMID:27348616

  19. P123-T Oligonucleotide Purification Strategies using a New High-Capacity Anion Exchange Resin

    OpenAIRE

    Deetz, M.; Fisher, J. R.; Gehris, A.; Maikner, J.; Kinzey, M.

    2007-01-01

    With the advent of nucleic acid silencing technologies and the need for high purity diagnostic and therapeutic oligonucleotides, there is a need for high-capacity chromatographic supports that can deliver economic purification processes. A new, 30 micron, mono-sized, polymeric resin has been recently developed that provides high resolution and high capacity for synthetic oligonucleotides. Physical properties of this new resin will be described, including particle size uniformity, ion exchange...

  20. Repeated use of ion-exchange resin membranes in calcareous soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, S.K.; Belnap, Jayne; Miller, M.E.

    2003-01-01

    This study compared the consistency of nutrient extraction among repeated cycles of ion-exchange resin membrane use. Two sandy calcareous soils and different equilibration temperatures were tested. No single nutrient retained consistent values from cycle to cycle in all treatments, although both soil source and temperature conferred some influence. It was concluded that the most conservative use of resin membranes is single-use.

  1. A method for the preparation of uranium fuel particles by loading ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complete loading of weakly acid resin particles could be attained by multi-stage exchange with uranyl nitrate solutions of growing concentration. The setting of pH-values for the individual stages was achieved by the addition of ammonia. For the technical implementation, a loading cascade was constructed, consisting of 4 stages and working according to the counter-current principle. The loaded resin particles obtained by this method can be further processed into fuel particles by subsequent heat treatment. (orig.)

  2. ''Spray'' drying unit for spent ion-exchange resins sludges and radioactive concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The procedure consisting in drying radwaste either in liquid form or in aqueous suspension is a very attractive solution for volume Reduction. Technicatome presents an experimental spray drying station for 50 kg/hr, using the LEAFLASH process, developed by Rhone Poulenc Recherches. This process, used at full scale in a large number of branches in industry, is applicable to the drying of various materials: bead type ion-echange resins, powered ion exchange resins, centrifuge sludges, filter sludges, evaporator bottoms

  3. Design of Ion-Exchange Resins Through EDTA and DTPA Modified Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    Catechol, resorcinol, and their admixtures with EDTA and DTPA moieties were converted into polymeric resins by alkaline polycondensation with formaldehyde. The resins were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, ion-exchange capacity, and distribution coefficient (D for heavy metal and radionuclide such as Cs and Sr. 137Cs and 90Sr constitutes a major source of heat in nuclear waste streams and in regards to recent nuclear event their remediation in complex solution – sea water - represent an important issue.

  4. Permissible radionuclide loading for organic ion exchange resins from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A questionnaire on the use of ion exchange resins in nuclear power plants was sent to all operating reactors in the US. Responses were received from 23 of the 48 utilities approached. Information was sought concerning the amounts of radionuclides held by the resins, and the effects of its radiation on the resins both during operation and after removal from service. Relevant information from the questionnaires is summarized and discussed. Available literature on the effects of ionizing radiation on organic ion exchange resins has been reviewed. On the basis of published data on damage to resins by radiation, the technical rationale is given to support NRC's draft branch technical position on a maximum permissible radionuclide loading. It is considered advisable to formulate the rule in terms of a delivered dose rather than a curie loading. A maximum permissible dose of 108 rad is chosen because, while it is large enough that a measurable amount of damage will be done to the resin, it is small enough that the damage will be negligible at a power plant or disposal site. A test procedure has been written which a generator could use to qualify a specific resin for service at a higher dose than permitted by the general rule

  5. Immobilization of ion exchange radioactive resins of the TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work has the objective to develop the process and to define the agglutinating material which allows the immobilization of the ion exchange radioactive resins coming from the TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor contaminated with Ba-133, Co-60, Cs-137, Eu-152, and Mn-54 through the behavior analysis of different immobilization agents such as: bitumens, cement and polyester resin. According to the International Standardization the archetype samples were observed with the following tests: determination of free liquid, leaching, charge resistance, biodegradation, irradiation, thermal cycle, burned resistance. Generally all the tests were satisfactorily achieved, for each agent. Therefore, the polyester resin could be considered as the main immobilizing. (Author)

  6. Radiochemical application on industrial grade ion exchange resins Indion 830 (Type-1) Indion N-IP (Type 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    131I as a radioactive tracer isotopes were used to study the ion-isotopic self diffusion reaction using industrial grade ion exchange resins Indion 830 (Type-1) and Indion N-IP (Type-2). The effect of concentration of iodide ions in external exchanging medium and the amount of ion exchange resins on the self diffusion reaction was investigated. From the results it appears that, for Indion N-IP (Type - 2) resins the amount of iodide ions exchanged (millimoles) was higher than that for Indion 830 (Type - 1) resins which was due to the higher initial rate of iodide ion exchanged (millimoles/min). The results indicates the high level efficiency of Indion N-IP (Type-2) resins as against Indion 830 (Type 1) resins for complex and time consuming separation processes involved in industries, for the assessment of which radiochemical tracer technique was successfully applied in the present investigation. (author)

  7. Performance evaluation method for an anion exchange resin and a method of controlling water processing system by using the method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a method of previously forecasting the limit for the use of an anion exchange resin to be used in a condensate desalting device in a nuclear power plant. A polystyrene sulfonic acid (PSS) is previously absorbed to an anion exchange resin and then a reaction rate of the anionic exchange resin is measured. The relation between the adsorbing amount of PSS and the reaction rate is measured, and the extent of degradation of the anionic exchange resin can be evaluated based on the PSS adsorption amount at a portion where the reaction rate is greatly lowered. Namely, the anionic exchange resin is more degraded as the reaction rate is lowered at a lesser adsorption amount, and it is judged that the resin is close to the working limit. With such procedures, the water processing system can be controlled stably. (T.M.)

  8. Studies of Vitrification of Ion-Exchange Resins. A Joint USA-Argentina Collaborative Work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the Science and Technology Implementing Arrangement for Cooperation on Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management (JCCRM), the U.S.Department of Energy (DOE) is helping to transfer waste treatment technology to international atomic energy commissions.As part of the JCCRM, DOE has established a collaborative research agreement with the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (Cnea).The Cnea is investigating treatment and disposal options for organic ion exchange resins currently stored at two nuclear power plants in the Republic of Argentina.The major hazards of the ion exchange resins are their organic composition and the contaminants that are present on the resins after purification processes.The principal contaminants are usually the radioactive species that are removed.For these studies, actual non-radioactive resins from Argentina's Embalse and Atucha plants were tested.The glass produced during the runs was durable was measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT).The product had a predictable, mostly amorphous composition throughout the demonstrations; though there was some evidence of the formation of clinopyroxene crystals.The immobilized product represented an approximately 70% volume reduction from the simulated Argentine ion exchange resin (i.e., a reduction from the volume of as-stored wet resin to the volume of the ultimate borosilicate glass product).For all runs, the radioactive surrogate retention was near 100%

  9. Protein adsorption on ion exchange resins and monoclonal antibody charge variant modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guélat, Bertrand; Khalaf, Rushd; Lattuada, Marco; Costioli, Matteo; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-05-20

    A novel multicomponent adsorption equilibrium model for proteins on ion-exchange resins is developed on a statistical thermodynamic basis including surface coverage effects and protein-resin and protein-protein interactions. The resulting model exhibits a general competitive Langmuirian behavior and was applied to the study and optimization of the separation of monoclonal antibody charge variants on two strong cation exchangers. The model accounts explicitly for the effect of both pH and salt concentration, and its parameters can be determined in diluted conditions, that is, through physically sound assumptions, all model parameters can be obtained using solely experiments in diluted conditions, and be used to make predictions in overloaded conditions. The parameterization of the model and optimization of the separation is based on a two-step approach. First, gradient experiments in diluted conditions are undertaken in order to determine the model parameters. Based on these experiments and on information about the proteins of interest and the stationary phase used, all the model parameters can be estimated. Second, using the parameterized model, an initial Pareto optimization is undertaken where overloaded operating conditions are investigated. Experiments from this Pareto set are then used to refine the estimation of the model parameters. A second Pareto optimization can then be undertaken, this time with the refined parameters. This can be repeated until a satisfactory set of model parameters is found. This iterative approach is shown to be extremely efficient and to provide large amounts of knowledge based on only a few experiments. It is shown that due to the strong physical foundation of the model and the very low number of adjustable parameters, the number of iterations is expected to be at most two or three. Furthermore, the model based tool is improved as more experimental knowledge is provided, allowing for better estimations of the chromatographic

  10. Aspects of the super-equivalent sorption of glycine by cation exchanger KU-2-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlova, O. N.; Khokhlov, V. Yu.; Trunaeva, E. S.; Nechaeva, L. S.

    2016-07-01

    The structure formed in a sorbent during the super-equivalent sorption of glycine by cation exchanger KU-2-8 is optimized via quantum chemical simulation. The differential thermodynamic characteristics of ion exchange and super-equivalent sorption in the studied system are calculated using a thermodynamic approach that allows us to describe the simultaneous exchange and super-equivalent sorption of compounds by ion-exchangers.

  11. Incineration technology in combination with fluidized bed and copper oxide catalyst for spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As development of incineration technology for spent ion exchange resins in combination with primary combustion by fluidized bed and secondary combustion by copper oxide catalyst, incineration experiments with non-radioactive resins and with radioactive resins were carried out, in order to examine the incineration efficiency of this technology and the catalytic capacity of copper oxide, and in order to observe distribution of radionuclides during incineration, respectively. In incinerating non-radioactive resins, 10,000 was obtained as a weight reduction factor (weight of resins bed into the furnace/weight of remaining combustibles in the off-gas) and more than 100,000 for only weight of black pyrolysis products in the remaining combustibles. It was also confirmed that black pyrolysis products and carbon oxide gas were burned completely in contact with the catalyst, and that the catalyst had sufficient effect on the secondary combustion of the other unburnt pyrolysis products. In the experiment with resins adsorbing radioisotopes, approximately 10% of radioactivities fed into the furnace remained in the fluidized bed materials, between 50% and 70% was held in the catalyst and between 20% and 40% was carried off by the gas flow to the off-gas cleaning system. In incinerating JMTR spent resins, the distribution of radionuclide was the same as the result of incinerating resins adsorbing radioisotopes. (author)

  12. Mathematical modelling and reactor design for multi-cycle bioregeneration of nitrate exhausted ion exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Shelir; Roberts, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate contamination is one of the largest issues facing communities worldwide. One of the most common methods for nitrate removal from water is ion exchange using nitrate selective resin. Although these resins have a great capacity for nitrate removal, they are considered non regenerable. The sustainability of nitrate-contaminated water treatment processes can be achieved by regenerating the exhausted resin several times rather than replacing and incineration of exhausted resin. The use of multi-cycle exhaustion/bioregeneration of resin enclosed in a membrane has been shown to be an effective and innovative regeneration method. In this research, the mechanisms for bioregeneration of resin were studied and a mathematical model which incorporated physical desorption process with biological removal kinetics was developed. Regardless of the salt concentration of the solution, this specific resin is a pore-diffusion controlled process (XδD ¯CDr0(5+2α)temperature and salt concentration. High Thiele modulus (>3) shows that the bioregeneration process is controlled by reaction kinetics and is governed by biological removal of nitrate. The model was validated by comparison to experimental data; the average of R-squared values for cycle 1 to 5 of regeneration was 0.94 ± 0.06 which shows that the developed model predicted the experimental results very well. The model sensitivity for different parameters was evaluated and a model bioreactor design for bioregeneration of highly selective resins was also presented. PMID:26595098

  13. Incineration of ion-exchange resins in fluidized bed. Part of a coordinated programme on treatment of spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incineration of ion-exchange resins in a fluidized bed was studied on the pilot plant scale. The test programme performed consisted of the testing of various bed materials and finding the optimal conditions of incineration of spent resins. Granular resins were incinerated in an ethanol-water mixture. Incinernation converts the organic resin into inert oxide material, which can be solidified for instance with cement. The weight of the ash was 1...20% and the volume 2...30% of the original resins, which contained 15...25% moisture. When solidified with cement the volume of the ash-concrete is 4...22% of the concrete of equal compressive strength acquired by direct solidification. Water immersion and heat tests of solidified ash showed satisfactory results. The absorption of Cs and Co in various bed materials was studied by means of inactive tracer materials. Biotite and chamotte absorbed significantly, but this absorption does not drastically help on the off gas side. The sintering of the bed materials in the presence of sodium was studied. Corundum, chamotte and biotite have a safety limit of 5% sodium of the bed's weight at 8500C

  14. Casting granular ion exchange resins with medium-active waste in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medium active waste from nuclear power stations in Sweden is trapped in granular ion exchange resins. The resin is mixed with cement paste and cast in a concrete shell which is cubic and has an edge dimension of 1.2 m. In some cases the ion exchange cement mortar has cracked. The report presents laboratory sutdies of the properties of the ion exchange resin and the mortar. Also the leaching of the moulds has been investigated. It was shown that a mixture with a water cement ratio higher than about 0.5 swells considerably during the first weeks after casting. The diffusion constant for cesium 137 has been determined at 3.10-4 cm2/24-hour period in conjunction with exposure of the mould and mortar to sea water. The Swedish language report has 400 pages with 90 figures and 30 tables. (author)

  15. Kinetic Study of Esterification of Acetic Acid with n-butanol and isobutanol Catalyzed by Ion Exchange Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrit Pal Toor

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Esters are an important pharmaceutical intermediates and very useful perfumery agents. In this study the esterification of acetic acid with n-butanol and iso-butanol over an acidic cation exchange resin, Amberlyst 15 were carried out. The effects of certain parameters such as temperature, catalyst loading, initial molar ratio between reactants on the rate of reaction were studied. The experiments were conducted in a stirred batch reactor in the temperature range of 351.15 K to 366.15K.Variation of parameters on rate of reaction demonstrated that the reaction was intrinsically controlled.The activation energy for the esterification of acetic acid with n-butanol and iso butanol is found to be 28.45 k J/mol and 23.29 kJ/mol respectively. ©2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.(Received: 16th December 2010, Revised: 19th March 2011; Accepted: 7th April 2011[How to Cite: A.P. Toor, M. Sharma, G. Kumar, and R. K. Wanchoo. (2011. Kinetic Study of Esterification of Acetic Acid with n-butanol and isobutanol Catalyzed by Ion Exchange Resin. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 6(1: 23-30. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.1.665.23-30][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.1.665.23-30 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/665 ] | View in 

  16. Studies on the absorption of boric acid on anion exchange resin, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron Thermal Regeneration (BTR) with an anion exchange resin is a system for the control of boric acid concentration in the primary coolant of a pressurized water reactor. The absorption characteristics of boric acid on strong base anion exchange resin was investigated at 250C. Boric acid absorption was estimated by analysis of solution eluted with sodium chloride solution, from the ion exchange resin column. The average value adsorbed experimentally per ion exchange group was in the range of 1.4 to 4.2 for boric acid solutions in concentrations of 0.00925 to 0.647 mol dm-3. The pH within the borate form resin was pH 8 to 14 for boric acid solutions in concentrations of 0.00925 to 0.462 mol dm-3. The presence of orthoborate ion, tetraborate (mono and divalent) ion and pentaborate (mono and divalent) ion was anticipated in the resin phase. Acid dissociation constants (pK) of these five ion species were estimated to be 8.95 for orthoborate, 5.6 for monovalent tetraborate, 15.2 for divalent tetraborate, 5.6 for monovalent pentaborate and 13.8 for divalent pentaborate. (author)

  17. Development of volume reduction system for spent radioactive ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the development of the volume reduction system for spent radioactive ion-exchange resins originating from atomic energy facilities. The volume of ion-exchange resins can be reduced by chemical decomposition with hydrogen peroxide used as the oxidizing agent in the presence of iron and copper ions used as the catalyst. Comparing with the combustion method, the chemical decomposition method have the advantage of requring no complicated off-gas line and smaller installation area. The results of experiments of the prototype volume reduction system show high decomposition rate and volume reduction rate. (author)

  18. Impact of powdered activated carbon and anion exchange resin on photocatalytic treatment of textile wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Dhas, Preethi Grace Theva Neethi; Gulyas, Holger; Otterpohl, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    In order to clarify the impact of activated carbon and anion exchange resin on photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) of textile industry wastewater, TiO2-based PCO was investigated with aqueous solutions containing the reactive dye Reactive Blue 4 (RB4) and with a textile dye house effluent in the absence and in the presence of powdered activated carbon (PAC) and the anion exchange resin Lewatit MP 500. Addition of Lewatit improved RB4 removal to a larger extent than PAC addition. Contrasting to chl...

  19. Modeling of the interaction between chemical and mechanical behavior of ion exchange resins encapsulated into a cement-based matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchange resins (IER) are widely used in the nuclear industry to purge non directly storable infected effluents. IER then become a solid waste which could be stored as any classical nuclear waste. One way of conditioning consists in embedding it into a cement paste matrix. This process raises some concerns regarding the cohesiveness of the composite. Once embedded, the IER might indeed interact with the cement paste which would lead, in some cases, to the swelling of the composite. This thesis has been set up to address this potential issue, with the aim to develop a numerical tool able to predict the mechanical behavior of this kind of material. This work only focuses on the long term behavior and more specifically on the potential degradations of the cement paste/IER composite due to cationic IER. (author)

  20. Chemical treatment of secondary waste solutions resulting from wet oxidative degradation of spent ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present experimental work has been carried out to evaluate the chemical treatment process of radioactive secondary waste solutions resulting from the wet oxidative degradation of simulated spent radioactive cation-exchange resins using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. The present study aims mainly to evaluate the ability of ferrocyanide compound of nickel for selective fixation of radio-cesium from the secondary waste solution in presence of traces of soluble organic residues. Based on the data obtained, it was found that, using 5 x 10-3 of nickel ferrocyanide, at ph range from 1-9 and in the presence of traces of soluble organic carbon, more than 99% of the radiocesium initially found could be efficiently removed from the secondary radioactive waste solutions under consideration

  1. Atomistic understanding of cation exchange in PbS nanocrystals using simulations with pseudoligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhaochuan; Lin, Li-Chiang; Buijs, Wim; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; van Huis, Marijn A.

    2016-01-01

    Cation exchange is a powerful tool for the synthesis of nanostructures such as core–shell nanocrystals, however, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Interactions of cations with ligands and solvent molecules are systematically ignored in simulations. Here, we introduce the concept of pseudoligands to incorporate cation-ligand-solvent interactions in molecular dynamics. This leads to excellent agreement with experimental data on cation exchange of PbS nanocrystals, whereby Pb ions are partially replaced by Cd ions from solution. The temperature and the ligand-type control the exchange rate and equilibrium composition of cations in the nanocrystal. Our simulations reveal that Pb ions are kicked out by exchanged Cd interstitials and migrate through interstitial sites, aided by local relaxations at core–shell interfaces and point defects. We also predict that high-pressure conditions facilitate strongly enhanced cation exchange reactions at elevated temperatures. Our approach is easily extendable to other semiconductor compounds and to other families of nanocrystals. PMID:27160371

  2. Adsorption of reovirus to clay minerals: effects of cation-exchange capacity, cation saturation, and surface area.

    OpenAIRE

    Lipson, S M; Stotzky, G

    1983-01-01

    The adsorption of reovirus to clay minerals has been reported by several investigators, but the mechanisms defining this association have been studied only minimally. The purpose of this investigation was to elucidate the mechanisms involved with this interaction. More reovirus type 3 was adsorbed, in both distilled and synthetic estuarine water, by low concentrations of montmorillonite than by comparable concentrations of kaolinite containing a mixed complement of cations on the exchange com...

  3. Exchangeable cations-mediated photodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on smectite surface under visible light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Roles of exchangeable cations in PAHs photodegradation on clay surafces under visible light. - Highlights: • Photolysis rate are strongly dependent on the type of cations on clay surface. • The strength of “cation–π” interactions governs the photodegradation rate of PAHs. • Several exchangeable cations could cause a shift in the absorption spectrum of PAHs. • Exchangeable cations influence the type and amount of reactive intermediates. - Abstract: Clay minerals saturated with different exchangeable cations are expected to play various roles in photodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) via direct and/or indirect pathways on clay surfaces. In the present study, anthracene and phenanthrene were selected as molecule probes to investigate the roles of exchangeable cations on their photodegradation under visible light irradiation. For five types of cation-modified smectite clays, the photodegradation rate of anthracene and phenanthrene follows the order: Fe3+ > Al3+ > Cu2+ >> Ca2+ > K+ > Na+, which is consistent with the binding energy of cation–π interactions between PAHs and exchangeable cations. The result suggests that PAHs photolysis rate depends on cation–π interactions on clay surfaces. Meanwhile, the deposition of anthracene at the Na+-smectite and K+-smectite surface favors solar light absorption, resulting in enhanced direct photodecomposition of PAHs. On the other hand, smectite clays saturated with Fe3+, Al3+, and Cu2+ are highly photoreactive and can act as potential catalysts giving rise to oxidative radicals such as O2−· , which initiate the transformation of PAHs. The present work provides valuable insights into understanding the transformation and fate of PAHs in the natural soil environment and sheds light on the development of technologies for contaminated land remediation

  4. Exchangeable cations-mediated photodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on smectite surface under visible light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Hanzhong, E-mail: jiahz@ms.xjb.ac.cn [Laboratory of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Li, Li [Laboratory of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Chen, Hongxia; Zhao, Yue [Laboratory of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); School of Geology and Mining Engineering, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046 (China); Li, Xiyou [Laboratory of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Wang, Chuanyi, E-mail: cywang@ms.xjb.ac.cn [Laboratory of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China)

    2015-04-28

    Graphical abstract: Roles of exchangeable cations in PAHs photodegradation on clay surafces under visible light. - Highlights: • Photolysis rate are strongly dependent on the type of cations on clay surface. • The strength of “cation–π” interactions governs the photodegradation rate of PAHs. • Several exchangeable cations could cause a shift in the absorption spectrum of PAHs. • Exchangeable cations influence the type and amount of reactive intermediates. - Abstract: Clay minerals saturated with different exchangeable cations are expected to play various roles in photodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) via direct and/or indirect pathways on clay surfaces. In the present study, anthracene and phenanthrene were selected as molecule probes to investigate the roles of exchangeable cations on their photodegradation under visible light irradiation. For five types of cation-modified smectite clays, the photodegradation rate of anthracene and phenanthrene follows the order: Fe{sup 3+} > Al{sup 3+} > Cu{sup 2+} >> Ca{sup 2+} > K{sup +} > Na{sup +}, which is consistent with the binding energy of cation–π interactions between PAHs and exchangeable cations. The result suggests that PAHs photolysis rate depends on cation–π interactions on clay surfaces. Meanwhile, the deposition of anthracene at the Na{sup +}-smectite and K{sup +}-smectite surface favors solar light absorption, resulting in enhanced direct photodecomposition of PAHs. On the other hand, smectite clays saturated with Fe{sup 3+}, Al{sup 3+}, and Cu{sup 2+} are highly photoreactive and can act as potential catalysts giving rise to oxidative radicals such as O{sub 2}{sup −}· , which initiate the transformation of PAHs. The present work provides valuable insights into understanding the transformation and fate of PAHs in the natural soil environment and sheds light on the development of technologies for contaminated land remediation.

  5. Studies on thermal stability of type I and type II anion exchange resins used for separation of isotopes of boron by ion exchange chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal stability of indigenously available type I and type II anion exchange resins were studied in chloride and hydroxyl forms. The results of the study indicated that the resins under study were thermally stable up to 50 deg C even when heated in an oven for 180 days and there was no appreciable loss in ion exchange capacity of the resins for boric acid. (author)

  6. Irradiation effects in the storage and disposal of radioactive ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research is under way to characterize the effects of self-irradiation on radwastes which may be generated when organic ion-exchange media are used in water demineralization or decontamination operations at nuclear facilities. External factors affecting the relation between laboratory evaluations and field performance are emphasized. Initial experiments do not yet indicate substantial radiation dose-rate effects on radiolytic gas yields or acid product formation, when (fully swollen) sulfonic acid resins are irradiated in a sealed air environment. At the same time, oxygen gas is removed from the environment of irradiated resins. Interaction between mild steel coupons and acidic species produced in the irradiation induced decomposition of sulfonic acid resin results in irradiation enhanced corrosion. Corrosion rates depend on radiation dose rate, moisture content and resin chemical loading. In some cases, corrosion rates decrease with time, suggesting depletion of acidic species within the resin bed, or a synergistic interaction between resin and corrosion coupon. Implications of these and other results on evaluating field behavior of radwaste containing ion-exchange media are discussed. 4 figures, 2 tables

  7. Irradiation effects in the storage and disposal of radioactive ion-exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swyler, K.J.; Dodge, C.E.; Dayal, R.; Weiss, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    Research is under way to characterize the effects of self-irradiation on radwastes which may be generated when organic ion-exchange media are used in water demineralization or decontamination operations at nuclear facilities. External factors affecting the relation between laboratory evaluations and field performance are emphasized. Initial experiments do not yet indicate substantial radiation dose-rate effects on radiolytic gas yields or acid product formation, when (fully swollen) sulfonic acid resins are irradiated in a sealed air environment. At the same time, oxygen gas is removed from the environment of irradiated resins. Interaction between mild steel coupons and acidic species produced in the irradiation induced decomposition of sulfonic acid resin results in irradiation enhanced corrosion. Corrosion rates depend on radiation dose rate, moisture content and resin chemical loading. In some cases, corrosion rates decrease with time, suggesting depletion of acidic species within the resin bed, or a synergistic interaction between resin and corrosion coupon. Implications of these and other results on evaluating field behavior of radwaste containing ion-exchange media are discussed. 4 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Selective Anion Exchange Resins for the Removal of Perchlorate [(CIO{sub 4}{sup -})] from Groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, B.

    1999-05-20

    The primary objective of this project was to evaluate a novel bifunctional anion exchange resin for the cost-effective, in situ treatment of groundwater contaminated with perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}). Both laboratory and field studies were performed to determine the selectivity and capacity of the bifunctional synthetic resins to sorb ClO{sub 4}{sup -} from simulated or actual contaminated groundwater. A number of synthetic bifunctional resins, including two commercial versions made by Purolite International and three commercially available, mono-functional resins, were tested. Initial laboratory batch and column breakthrough studies determined the best synthetic resins and the optimal conditions for the field experiment. Laboratory results indicated that the bifunctional synthetic resins, D-3696 and RO-02-119 were highly selective toward ClO{sub 4}{sup -} and performed {approx}5 times better than the best commercial nitrate resin (Purolite{reg_sign} A-520E) and more than an order of magnitude better than some nonselective commercial resins (e.g. Amberlite{reg_sign} IRA-900). The bifunctional resins were particularly effective in removing trace quantities of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} in groundwater to below the detection limit ({approx} 3 {micro}g/L). A field trial demonstrated that the bifunctional resin (D-3696) was able to treat {approx} 110,000 bed volumes of groundwater before a 10% breakthrough of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} occurred under the column flow-through conditions (running at {approx} 2 bed volumes per minute). On the other hand, the Purolite{reg_sign} A-520E resin was able to treat {approx} 23,000 bed volumes of groundwater under the same experimental conditions. No pretreatment was needed to remove either dissolved organic matter or other competing anions (such as SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} or NO{sub 3}{sup -}) in the groundwater, and the treatment process did not alter the water quality by removing or adding secondary by-products because of the high selectivity of the

  9. Ion-exchange resins. October 1983-December 1987 (Citations from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for October 1983-December 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography contains citations concerning preparation, properties, and applications of ion-exchange resins. Applications include water and waste treatment; chemical recovery, separation, purification, and catalysis; desalination; and ore treatment and recovery. Regeneration and disposal of ion-exchange resins are also covered. (This updated bibliography contains 430 citations, none of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  10. Ion-exchange resins. January 1988-December 1988 (Citations from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for January 1988-December 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography contains citations concerning preparation, properties, and applications of ion-exchange resins. Applications include water and waste treatment; chemical recovery, separation, purification, and catalysis; desalination; and ore treatment and recovery. Regeneration and disposal of ion-exchange resins are also covered. (This updated bibliography contains 174 citations, all of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  11. INTERACTION MECHANISM OF ORGANIC MATTER WITH GEL TYPE POLYSTYRENE STROUGLY BASIC ANION EXCHANGE RESIN AND REGENERATION OF THE ORGANISM FOULED RESIN I.The interreaction mechanism be

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhuXingbao; WangZhansen; 等

    1995-01-01

    It was generally considered that contamination of the gel type polystyrene strong basic anion exchange resin by or ganic matter in natural water is the result of ion exchange and Van der waal′s adsorption on it.On the basis of laboratory and industrial experiments,this paper confirmed that the interreaction between organic matter and resin polymer matrix is primarily controled by a Van der waal′s adsorption.

  12. Characterization and disposal of ion exchange resins used in nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To dispose of an appropriate way the used ion exchange resins so much in the pool water purification systems of the TRIGA Mark III reactor like in the JS6500 gamma irradiator, of the National Institute of Nuclear Research, were carried out a series of analytic nuclear techniques and complementary conventional to those recommended by the ASTM, with the object of to control and to manage 14 lots of worn out resins appropriately. For its were identified the radioactive isotopes, the resins type, the grade of chemical pollution and the physicochemical degradation of the same ones. The lots of resins that didn't contain radioactive isotopes its were regenerated in an usual way, as long as those that if they controlled them they selected options for its final disposition. The first selected option was the extraction method of ion radioactive isotopes, concentrating the elution product by evaporation. As second option it was carried out the resins stabilization damaged by micro-encapsulation by forged to ambient temperature, using an organic polymer. Previous to the immobilization the resins were pretreated by vacuum drying, pulverization and thermal drying, however before carrying out this last, it was carried out a thermal gravimetric analysis to determine the drying conditions of the resins avoiding its chemical decomposition. (Author)

  13. REMOVAL OF GLUCORAPHENIN FROM THE EXTRACT OF RADISH PIGMENT BY ANION EXCHANGE RESIN 201×7

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhouXiaohua; ChenQi

    1998-01-01

    A method for removimg glucoraphenin from the extract of Radish pigment by anion exchange resin 201×7 was studied.The adsorption capacity of 201×7 resin for glucoraphenin was 72.8mg/ml resin,the equilibrium time 55 minutes,and the optinum pH5.5.All glucoraphenin that had been adsorbed on 201×7 resin was eluted by 1.5BV.hr-1, eluent in whinc concentration of NaOH was 0.05mol·L-1 at the flow rate of 1.5BV/h.Extracting solution of deglucoraphenin was enriched by vacuum and spray drying.A powder product of Radish pigment was obtained and E1cm1%=4.30.

  14. Characterization and cation exchange capacity of seeds of Ziziphus spina-christi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadia M. Sirry

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available There are several naturally existing materials have ability to utilize as ion-exchangers. Most of these materials are by-products of waste material from industry or agriculture. Agriculture ion exchange materials include: lemon orange, grapefruit, apple, peas, broad bean, and meddler peels, kernel core, and grape skins. This research deals with the utilization of agriculture waste biomass of napak seed as natural cation exchanger for removal of cationic pollutant from aqueous solution. Methylene blue dye method was used to determine the cation exchange capacity of the stone and it was characterized by IR and TGA methods. The results showed that the highest dye sorption capacity was found at pH 7, the equilibrium time was 60 min, sorbent dose = 0.1g, particle size 177μm and methylene blue concentration range 10-50 ppm. The equilibrium sorption data were analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models.

  15. Cation exchange separation of 61Cu2+ from natCo targets and preparation of 61Cu-DOTA-HSA as a blood pool agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved method for isolation of 61Cu2+ from a natCo target using cation exchange was developed. 61Cu2+ was eluted from a cation exchange resin column by 0.2 M HCl with 90% acetone, while Co2+ remained on the column. The whole separation process was completed within 50 min at more than 72% yield. The Co2+ impurity level in 61Cu2+ solution was reduced to less than 0.1 ppm. Highly pure 61Cu2+ solution was then applied to prepare 61Cu-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-human serum albumin (HSA) which showed good blood pool imaging properties

  16. Development of a treatment process for the removal of heavy metals from raw water for drinking water supply using chelating ion exchange resins. Subproject 1. Final report; Entwicklung der Verfahrenstechnik zur Eliminierung von Schwermetallen aus Rohwaessern zur Trinkwassergewinnung mit chelatbildenden Kationenaustauscherharzen zur technischen Reife. Teilprojekt 1. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overath, H.; Stetter, D.; Doerdelmann, O.

    2002-07-01

    Chelating cation exchange resins with iminodiacetic acid group (Lewatit TP 207 and Amberlite IRC 748) were tested for the removal of heavy metals in a drinking water treatment plant. The pilot scale filtration experiments were conducted by varying the operating conditions, such as flow rate and feed concentrations. Heavy metal concentrations (nickel, lead, cadmium, zinc) in the feed were adjusted between 20 and 200 {mu}g/L. Different methods for regeneration and conditioning of the resins were developed and investigated. Finally the ion exchange resins were tested according to German health regulations for ion exchangers in drinking water treatment. (orig.)

  17. 1-Butanol absorption in poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) ion exchange resins for catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Maciá, M A; Curcó, D; Bringué, R; Iborra, M; Rodríguez-Ropero, F; van der Vegt, N F A; Aleman, Carlos

    2015-12-21

    The swelling behaviour of poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene), P(S-DVB), ion exchange resins in 1-butanol (BuOH) has been studied by means of atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations (MD). The topological characteristics reported for the resin in the dry state, which exhibited complex internal loops (macropores), were considered for the starting models used to examine the swelling induced by BuOH contents ranging from 10% to 50% w/w. Experimental measurements using a laser diffraction particle size analyzer indicate that swelling causes a volume variation with respect to the dry resin of 21%. According to MD simulations, such a volume increment corresponds to a BuOH absorption of 31-32% w/w, which is in excellent agreement with the indirect experimental estimation (i.e. 31% w/w). Simulations reveal that, independently of the content of BuOH, the density of the swelled resin is higher than that of the dry resin, evidencing that the alcohol provokes important structural changes in the polymeric matrix. Thus, BuOH molecules cause a collapse of the resin macropores when the content of alcohol is ≤20% w/w. In contrast, when the concentration of BuOH is close to the experimental value (∼30% w/w), P(S-DVB) chains remain separated by pores faciliting the access of the reactants to the reaction centers. On the other hand, evaluation of both bonding and non-bonding interactions indicates that the mixing energy is the most important contribution to the absorption of BuOH into the P(S-DVB) resin. Overall, the results displayed in this work represent a starting point for the theoretical study of the catalytic conversion of BuOH into di-n-butyl ether in P(S-DVB) ion exchange resins using sophisticated electronic methods. PMID:26411792

  18. Synthesis, structural characterization, and performance evaluation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) ion-exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 177 underground storage tanks at the DOE's Hanford Site contain an estimated 180 million tons of high-level radioactive wastes. It is desirable to remove and concentrate the highly radioactive fraction of the tank wastes for vitrification. Resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resin, an organic ion-exchange resin with high selectivity and capacity for the cesium ion, which is a candidate ion-exchange material for use in remediation of tank wastes. The report includes information on the structure/function analysis of R-F resin and the synthetic factors that affect performance of the resin. CS-100, a commercially available phenol-formaldehyde (P-F) resin, and currently the baseline ion-exchanger for removal of cesium ion at Hanford, is compared with the R-F resin. The primary structural unit of the R-F resin was determined to consist of a 1,2,3,4-tetrasubstituted resorcinol ring unit while CS-100, was composed mainly of a 1,2,4-trisubstituted ring. CS-100 shows the presence of phenoxy-ether groups, and this may account for the much lower decontamination factor of CS-100 for cesium ion. Curing temperatures for the R-F resin were found to be optimal at 105--130C. At lower temperatures, insufficient curing, hence crosslinking, of the polymer resin occurs and selectivity for cesium drops. Curing at elevated temperatures leads to chemical degradation. Optimal particle size for R-F resin is in the range of 20--50 mesh-sized particles. R-F resin undergoes chemical degradation or oxidation which destroys ion-exchange sites. The ion-exchange sites (hydroxyl groups) are converted to quinones and ketones. CS-100, though it has much lower performance for cesium ion-exchange, is significantly more chemically stable than R-F resin. To gamma radiation, CS-100 is more radiolytically stable than R-F resin

  19. Use of an Italian pozzolanic cement for the solidification of bead ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granular ion-exchange resins represent a large portion of the medium-active wastes generated at nuclear power stations. The most common practice for their confinement is to mix them with cement paste and cast the mixture in a concrete shell. Such a procedure however does not prove successful in many cases, because of the extreme swelling to which the embedded resin can give rise. This phenomenon has been investigated carefully. In particular, measurements of the swelling pressure have been made together with evaluation of the volume changes of the resin beads due to ion exchange and of the weight increase as a function of relative humidity. The ion exchange capacity, which continues even after incorporation in the cement matrix has also been put into evidence. The conclusion was drawn that a three component diagram (water - dry resin- cement) has to be prepared every time in order to identify the region corresponding to the better formulations. With this in mind the optimum waste loading of 11.5 wt% of dry resin was chosen to incorporate a mixed bed resin (Amberlite IR 120 Na+ and IRA 400 Cl- in the weight ratio of 1:1) into an Italian pozzolanic cement (425 type). Several properties of the final waste form have been investigated, ranging from mechanical (crushing strength, tensile strength, flexural strength, ultrasonic pulse velocity, elastic modulus and Poisson ratio), to thermal stability, radiation stability, permeability, leachability and resistance to bacterial attack. Dimensional stability was also measured with the aim of examining the expansion phenomena which can take place in the presence of resin beads. The data obtained are encouraging for future application of the type 425 cement tested in the field of radwastes. An attempt to explain the performance of this binder, based on its intrinsic properties, was also made. (author)

  20. Adsorption Mechanisms of Heavy Metal Ions from Drinking Water by Weakly Basic Anion Exchange Resins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵璇; 何仕均; 杨磊

    2002-01-01

    Heavy metal micro-contaminants can be removed from water sources technologies. Weakly basic anion exchange resins offer the best ability to remove trace amounts of heavy metals with high selectivity. This paper discusses how weakly basic resins adsorb heavy metals using two different approaches. The removal of mercury, cadmium, and lead ions is based on the fundamental theory of coordination chemistry. The mechanism is not ion exchange but extractive adsorption of heavy metal salts. However, the marked preferential adsorption of chromate by weakly basic anion exchange can be explained using the traditional theory of ion exchange. A lab-scale study produced positive results for the removal of trace amounts of heavy metal ions from drinking water.

  1. Resin Longevity Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive resin waste has been generated at the Savannah River Site as a result of water treatment at F- and H-Areas. Key factors in the risk assessment of disposing of these materials in trenches include resin retention of 129I, a long-lived isotope, and the degradation rate of the organic resin itself. In order to estimate the degradation of resin wastes during underground burial, simulated aging studies were carried out with Dowex 21K, CG-8, and GT-73 ion exchange resins. These resins have a polystyrene-base but bear different functional groups. The specific resins considered in this study include anion (Dowex 21K), cation (CG8), and neutral (GT73) resins with, respectively, quaternary ammonium, sulfonate, and thiol functionalities. The objective of this study is to carry out laboratory experiments to simulate aging of organic resin wastes in order to (1) determine the functional life span of CG8, GT73 and Dowex 21K resins under field (trench) conditions, and (2) determine the expected performance of these resins as they degrade

  2. Irradiation stability of polyethylene products incorporating spent granular ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were made on the irradiation stability of polyethylene products incorporating spent ion-exchange resins (granular) from LWR nuclear power plants. The absorbed doses of the products incorporating actual spent resins were estimated to be about 106 to 108 rad by calculation. The polyethylene - ion-exchange resin products were prepared with a twin screw extruder and irradiated with an external 60Co γ-ray source up to 109 rad. Although the products turned hard and brittle at doses above 108 rad losing their toughness, no significant decrease in the compressive strength was observed up to 109 rad. Swelling of the products was not observed up to 109 rad. Radiolysis gas generated in the products was mostly hydrogen (81 - 97%) which evolved at a generation rate of about 2.5 x 10-2 cm3/g.Mrad. For this generation rate, the possibility of hydrogen explosion in storing the polyethylene products in enclosures is discussed. (author)

  3. Investigating water purification system of primary coolant circuits of Russian WWER reactor using ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The protection of environment from contamination, especially radioactive material is an important task. The operation of nuclear power plants is usually with production of radioactive elements in the first element cycle, Combined using Ion Exchange Resins, The Radioactive d elements will be Separated from coolant cycle. In this project, the decontamination system of first coolant cycle in WWER power plant is considered for the determination of decontamination factor of several ion exchange resins. Amberlite and Dowex were used and after the Passing of Atomic Energy Organization of Iran-Reactor coolant water, the capability of re mines were determined. The Results indicates that Amberlite Resin has better efficiency for absorption of radioactive elements. and can be used in the first coolant cycle of WWER nuclear power plants

  4. Studies on radiolytic degradation of anion exchange resin under acidic condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With a view to understand the onset of degradation phenomenon of anion exchange resin used in PUREX process for the final purification of Pu, investigation were carried out to trace the chemical signature of radiolytic degradation species soluble in nitric acidic solutions. With this aim Dowex 1x 4 anion exchange resin was subjected to radiolytic degradation in presence of water and nitric acid medium of different strengths ranging from 2M to 7M. The aqueous acidic solutions have been analysed for the presence of aqueous soluble organic fragments arising from resin matrix and change in acidity. The extracted products have also been analysed by Gas chromatography. GLC fingerprint suggest of several degradation products especially at 7M nitric acid and dose of 87 Mrad. (author)

  5. New anion-exchange resins for improved separations of nuclear materials. Mid-year progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'The authors are developing multi-functional anion-exchange resins that facilitate anion uptake by carefully controlling the structure of the anion receptor site. The new ion-exchange resins interface the rapidly developing field of ion-specific chelating ligands with robust, commercial ion exchange technology. The overall objective of the research is to develop a predictive capability which allows the facile design and implementation of multi-functionalized anion exchange materials which selectively sorb metal complexes of interest from targeted process, waste, and environmental streams. The basic scientific issues addressed are actinide complex speciation along with modeling of the metal complex/functional site interactions in order to determine optimal binding-site characteristics. Their approach uses a thorough determination of the chemical species both in solution and as bound to the resin to determine the characteristics of resin active sites which can actively facilitate specific metal-complex sorption to the resin. The first year milestones were designed to allow us to build off of their extensive expertise with plutonium in nitrate solutions prior to investigating other, less familiar systems. While the principle investigators have successfully developed actinide chelators and ion-exchange materials in the past, the authors were fully aware that integration of this two fields would be challenging, rewarding and, at times, highly frustrating. Relatively small differences in the substrate (cross-linkage, impurities), the active sites (percent substitution, physical accessibility), the actinide solution (oxidation state changes, purity) and the analytical procedures (low detection limits) can produce inconsistent sorption behavior which is difficult to interpret. The potential paybacks for success, however, are enormous. They feel that they have learned a great deal about how to control these numerous variables to produce consistent, reliable analysis of

  6. Radiotracer application for characterization of nuclear grade anion exchange resins Tulsion A-23 and Dowex SBR LC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singare, P.U. [Bhavan' s College, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    2015-12-15

    Radio isotopic tracer technique as one of the versatile nondestructive technique is employed to evaluate the performance of nuclear grade anion exchange resins Tulsion A-23 and Dowex SBR LC. The evaluation was made on the basis of ion-isotopic exchange reaction kinetics by using {sup 131}I and {sup 82}Br radioactive tracer isotopes. It was observed that for both the resins, the values of specific reaction rate (min{sup -1}), amount of ion exchanged (mmol) and initial rate of ion exchange (mmol/min) were calculated to be lower for bromide ion-isotopic exchange reaction than that for iodide ion-isotopic exchange reaction. It was observed that for iodide ion-isotopic exchange reaction under identical experimental conditions of 30.0 C, 1.000 g of ion exchange resins and 0.001 mol/L labeled iodide ion solution, the values of specific reaction rate (min{sup -1}), amount of iodide ion exchanged (mmol), initial rate of iodide ion exchange (mmol/min) and log K{sub d} were calculated as 0.377, 0.212, 0.080 and 15.5 respectively for Dowex SBR LC resin, which was higher than 0.215, 0.144, 0.031 and 14.1 respectively as that obtained for Tulsion A23 resins. Also at a constant temperature of 30.0 C, as the concentration of labeled iodide ion solution increases from 0.001 mol/L to 0.004 mol/L, the percentage of iodide ions exchanged increases from 84.75 % to 90.20 % for Dowex SBR LC resins which was higher than increases from 57.66 % to 62.38 % obtained for Tulsion A23 resins. The identical trend was observed for the two resins during bromide ion-isotopic exchange reaction. The overall results indicate superior performance of Dowex SBR LC over Tulsion A23 resins under identical experimental conditions.

  7. Radiotracer application for characterization of nuclear grade anion exchange resins Tulsion A-23 and Dowex SBR LC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radio isotopic tracer technique as one of the versatile nondestructive technique is employed to evaluate the performance of nuclear grade anion exchange resins Tulsion A-23 and Dowex SBR LC. The evaluation was made on the basis of ion-isotopic exchange reaction kinetics by using 131I and 82Br radioactive tracer isotopes. It was observed that for both the resins, the values of specific reaction rate (min-1), amount of ion exchanged (mmol) and initial rate of ion exchange (mmol/min) were calculated to be lower for bromide ion-isotopic exchange reaction than that for iodide ion-isotopic exchange reaction. It was observed that for iodide ion-isotopic exchange reaction under identical experimental conditions of 30.0 C, 1.000 g of ion exchange resins and 0.001 mol/L labeled iodide ion solution, the values of specific reaction rate (min-1), amount of iodide ion exchanged (mmol), initial rate of iodide ion exchange (mmol/min) and log Kd were calculated as 0.377, 0.212, 0.080 and 15.5 respectively for Dowex SBR LC resin, which was higher than 0.215, 0.144, 0.031 and 14.1 respectively as that obtained for Tulsion A23 resins. Also at a constant temperature of 30.0 C, as the concentration of labeled iodide ion solution increases from 0.001 mol/L to 0.004 mol/L, the percentage of iodide ions exchanged increases from 84.75 % to 90.20 % for Dowex SBR LC resins which was higher than increases from 57.66 % to 62.38 % obtained for Tulsion A23 resins. The identical trend was observed for the two resins during bromide ion-isotopic exchange reaction. The overall results indicate superior performance of Dowex SBR LC over Tulsion A23 resins under identical experimental conditions.

  8. Studies on resin degradation products encountered during purification of plutonium by anion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the methods available for the purification of plutonium in Purex process, anion exchange method offers several advantages. However, on repeated use, the resin gets degraded due to thermal, radiolytic and chemical attacks resulting in chemical as well as physical damage. Frequently, plutonium product eluted from such resin contains significant quantities of white precipitates. A few anion exchange resins were leached with 8 M HNO3 at 60-80degC and the resin degradation products (RDP) in the leach-extract were found to give similar precipitates with tetravalent metal ions like Pu(IV), Th(IV) etc. Tetra propyl ammonium hydroxide in 8 M HNO3 (TPAN) also gave a white precipitate with plutonium similar to the one found in the elution streams. The results indicate that delinked quaternary ammonium functional groups might be responsible for the formation of precipitate. The characteristics of precipitates Th-RDP, Th-TPAN and that isolated from elution stream have been investigated. In a separate study a tentative formula for Th-RDP compound is proposed. The influence of RDP on the extraction of plutonium and other components in Purex process was studied and it was found that RDP complexes metal ions thus marginally affecting the kd values. A spectrophotometric method has been standardised to monitor the extent of degradation of anion exchange resins which is based on the ability of RDP to reduce the colour intensity of Th-thoron complex. This technique can be used to study the stability of the anion exchange resins. (author). 8 refs., 8 tabs., 5 figs.,

  9. Corrosion of steel drums containing cemented ion-exchange resins as intermediate level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • There are no works related to the corrosion of drums containing radioactive waste. • Chloride induces high corrosion rate and after 1 year it drops abruptly. • Decrease in the corrosion rate is due to the lack of water to sustain the process. • Cementated ion-exchange resins do not pose risks of corrosion of the steel drums. -- Abstract: Exhausted ion-exchange resins used in nuclear reactors are immobilized by cementation before being stored. They are contained in steel drums that may undergo internal corrosion depending on the presence of certain contaminants. The objective of this work is to evaluate the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins with different aggressive species. The corrosion potential and the corrosion rate of the steel, and the electrical resistivity of the matrix were monitored for 900 days. Results show that the cementation of ion-exchange resins seems not to pose special risks regarding the corrosion of the steel drums

  10. Corrosion of steel drums containing cemented ion-exchange resins as intermediate level nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffó, G.S. [Departamento de Materiales, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Tecnológicas – CONICET, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Farina, S.B., E-mail: farina@cnea.gov.ar [Departamento de Materiales, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Tecnológicas – CONICET, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Schulz, F.M. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Tecnológicas – CONICET, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • There are no works related to the corrosion of drums containing radioactive waste. • Chloride induces high corrosion rate and after 1 year it drops abruptly. • Decrease in the corrosion rate is due to the lack of water to sustain the process. • Cementated ion-exchange resins do not pose risks of corrosion of the steel drums. -- Abstract: Exhausted ion-exchange resins used in nuclear reactors are immobilized by cementation before being stored. They are contained in steel drums that may undergo internal corrosion depending on the presence of certain contaminants. The objective of this work is to evaluate the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins with different aggressive species. The corrosion potential and the corrosion rate of the steel, and the electrical resistivity of the matrix were monitored for 900 days. Results show that the cementation of ion-exchange resins seems not to pose special risks regarding the corrosion of the steel drums.

  11. Investigation of an anion exchange resin for cleanup of a coolant used to machine nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes the interaction of Dowex SBR-P, which is a strongly basic anion exchange resin, with ions found in a used machining coolant. The coolant is used in machining enriched uranium and contains uranium, chloride, nitrite, borate ions, water, and propylene glycol

  12. Influence of Partial Neutralization on Catalytic Activity of Ion Exchange Resin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holub, Ladislav; Hanková, Libuše; Jeřábek, Karel

    Praha, 2004. PO8. [International Conference on Polymer s and Organic Chemistry POC'04 /11./. 18.07.2004-23.07.2004, Praha] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/02/1104 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : catalytic activity * exchange resin Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  13. Influence of the Functionalization Degree of Acidic Ion-Exchange Resins on Ethyl Octyl Ether Formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Guilera, J.; Hanková, Libuše; Jeřábek, Karel; Ramírez, E.; Tejero, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 78, MAY (2014), s. 14-22. ISSN 1381-5148 Grant ostatní: SEURDO(ES) CTQ2010-16047 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : acidic ion-exchange resin * sulfonation degree * ISEC Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.515, year: 2014

  14. Effect of Lanthanum Accumulation on Cation Exchange Capacity and Solution Composition of Red Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Pot and adsorption-exchange experiments were carried out by collecting the soil samples from the surface layer (0~15 cm) of red soil at the Ecological Experiment Station of Red Soil, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in Jiangxi Province of China. When concentration of the exogenous La3+ exceeded 400 mg kg-1, there was less non-exchangeable La3+ than exchangeable La3+ in the soil. Cation exchange capacity of the soil changed slightly with increasing concentration of the exogenous La3+ in both experiments. However, in the adsorption-exchange experiment, when concentration of the exogenous La3+ was higher than 300 mg kg-1, exchangeable basic cations decreased significantly, while exchangeable hydrogen and exchangeable aluminum increased significantly compared with the control treatments. The amounts of base cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, K+ and Na+) exchanged by La3+ in the supernatant solution increased with the concentration of the exogenous La3+, especially when concentration of the exogenous La3+ was higher than 50 mg kg-1.

  15. Charge exchange of a polar molecule at its cation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Landau-Herring method is used to derive an analytic expression for the one-electron exchange interaction of a polar molecule with its positively charged ion, induced by a σ-electron. Analogously to the classical Van der Pole method, the exchange interaction potential is averaged over the rotational states of colliding particles. The resonant charge-transfer cross section is calculated, and the effect of the dipole moments of the core on the cross section is analyzed. It is shown that allowance for the dependence of the exchange potential on the orientation of the dipole moments relative to the molecular axis may change the dependence of the cross section on the velocity of colliding particles, which is typical of the resonant charge exchange, from the resonance to the quasi-resonance dependence.

  16. Destruction of Ion Exchange Resins by a Supercritical Water Oxidation process: optimization of operating parameters for nuclear application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchange is widely used in the nuclear industry for the radioactive wastewater. Spent ion exchange resins (IER) are radioactive process wastes for which there is no satisfactory industrial treatment with enough waste volume and radioactivity reduction. In the particular case of IER, supercritical water oxidation could offer a viable treatment alternative to destroy the organic structure of resins and contain the radioactivity. Under supercritical water conditions, water, organic compounds and gases are completely miscible and a fast oxidation reaction is achieved. Radionuclides would stay in the liquid effluent and could be recovered by means of precipitation and separation. Moreover, the operating conditions (P = 30 MPa and T > 673 K) lead to two problems: corrosion and salt precipitation. The stirred double shell reactor has been developed by the CEA Marcoule to overcome these problems. A stainless steel vessel withstands pressure and a titanium inner tube confines the aggressive medium. Moreover, a stirrer keeps salts in suspension and improves heat transfer. With this experimental set-up, a co-fuel, isopropanol, has been used in order to improve degradation rates by initiating the oxidation reaction and increasing the reaction medium temperature. High efficiency were obtained with a treatment capacity of 200 g/h for pure liquid organic and also for suspensions of solid organic materials like ion exchange resins up to 20 wt%. Total Organic Carbon reduction rates higher than 99% were obtained thanks to this process, without using any catalyst. In this case, for degradation of resins suspensions in isopropanol, IERs functional groups are converted into sulfates ions (cationic IERs) or nitrates, nitrites ions (anionic IERs). The influence of parameters such as IERs feed concentration, IERs nature, counter ion (alkali ions) or stirring velocity is discussed. CFD calculations with Fluent of the reactive fluid flow in the reactor are used as a design tool. They

  17. Effects of ionizing radiation on modern ion exchange materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, S.F.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1993-10-01

    We review published studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on ion exchange materials, emphasizing those published in recent years. A brief overview is followed by a more detailed examination of recent developments. Our review includes styrene/divinylbenzene copolymers with cation-exchange or anion-exchange functional groups, polyvinylpyridine anion exchangers, chelating resins, multifunctional resins, and inorganic exchangers. In general, strong-acid cation exchange resins are more resistant to radiation than are strong-base anion exchange resins, and polyvinylpyridine resins are more resistant than polystyrene resins. Cross-linkage, salt form, moisture content, and the surrounding medium all affect the radiation stability of a specific exchanger. Inorganic exchangers usually, but not always, exhibit high radiation resistance. Liquid ion exchangers, which have been used so extensively in nuclear processing applications, also are included.

  18. Effects of ionizing radiation on modern ion exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review published studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on ion exchange materials, emphasizing those published in recent years. A brief overview is followed by a more detailed examination of recent developments. Our review includes styrene/divinylbenzene copolymers with cation-exchange or anion-exchange functional groups, polyvinylpyridine anion exchangers, chelating resins, multifunctional resins, and inorganic exchangers. In general, strong-acid cation exchange resins are more resistant to radiation than are strong-base anion exchange resins, and polyvinylpyridine resins are more resistant than polystyrene resins. Cross-linkage, salt form, moisture content, and the surrounding medium all affect the radiation stability of a specific exchanger. Inorganic exchangers usually, but not always, exhibit high radiation resistance. Liquid ion exchangers, which have been used so extensively in nuclear processing applications, also are included

  19. Ion Exchange Modeling Of Cesium Removal From Hanford Waste Using Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the expected performance of spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange resin for the removal of cesium from alkaline Hanford radioactive waste. Predictions of full scale column performance in a carousel mode are made for the Hot Commissioning, Envelope B, and Subsequent Operations waste compositions under nominal operating conditions and for perturbations from the nominal. Only the loading phase of the process cycle is addressed in this report. Pertinent bench-scale column tests, kinetic experiments, and batch equilibrium experiments are used to estimate model parameters and to benchmark the ion-exchange model. The methodology and application presented in this report reflect the expected behavior of spherical RF resin manufactured at the intermediate-scale (i.e., approximately 100 gallon batch size; batch 5E-370/641). It is generally believed that scale-up to production-scale in resin manufacturing will result in similarly behaving resin batches whose chemical selectivity is unaffected while total capacity per gram of resin may vary some. As such, the full-scale facility predictions provided within this report should provide reasonable estimates of production-scale column performance.

  20. ION EXCHANGE MODELING FOR REMOVAL OF CESIUM FROM HANFORD WASTE USING SUPERLIG 644 RESIN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expected performance of a proposed ion exchange column using SuperLig(regsign) 644 resin for the removal of cesium from Hanford high level radioactive alkaline waste is discussed. This report represents a final report on the ability and knowledge with regard to modeling the Cesium-SuperLig(regsign) 644 resin ion exchange system. Only the loading phase of the cycle process is addressed within this report. Pertinent bench-scale column tests and batch equilibrium experiments are addressed. The methodology employed and sensitivity analyses are also included (i.e., existing methodology employed is referenced to prior developmental efforts while updated methodology is discussed). Pilot-scale testing is not assessed since no pilot-scale testing was available at the time of this report. Column performance predictions are made considering three selected feed compositions under nominal operating conditions. The sensitivity analyses provided help to identify key parameters that aid in resin procurement acceptance criteria. The methodology and application presented within this report reflect the expected behavior of SuperLig(regsign) 644 resin manufactured at the production-scale (i.e, 250 gallon batch size level). The primary objective of this work was, through modeling and verification based on experimental assessments, to predict the cesium removal performance of SuperLig(regsign) 644 resin for application in the RPP pretreatment facility

  1. Use of Anion Exchange Resins for One-Step Processing of Algae from Harvest to Biofuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Poenie

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Some microalgae are particularly attractive as a renewable feedstock for biodiesel production due to their rapid growth, high content of triacylglycerols, and ability to be grown on non-arable land. Unfortunately, obtaining oil from algae is currently cost prohibitive in part due to the need to pump and process large volumes of dilute algal suspensions. In an effort to circumvent this problem, we have explored the use of anion exchange resins for simplifying the processing of algae to biofuel. Anion exchange resins can bind and accumulate the algal cells out of suspension to form a dewatered concentrate. Treatment of the resin-bound algae with sulfuric acid/methanol elutes the algae and regenerates the resin while converting algal lipids to biodiesel. Hydrophobic polymers can remove biodiesel from the sulfuric acid/methanol, allowing the transesterification reagent to be reused. We show that in situ transesterification of algal lipids can efficiently convert algal lipids to fatty acid methyl esters while allowing the resin and transesterification reagent to be recycled numerous times without loss of effectiveness.

  2. Adsorption characteristics of boric acid on strong-base anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Boron Thermal Regeneration System (BTRS) is capable of controlling boron concentration in primary coolant and reducing the amount of liquid waste at the end of fuel cycle in a pressurized water reactor, but the system has not been in effective operation yet because of the lack of detailed information regarding the boron adsorption characteristics of the ion exchange resin packed in the demineralizers of BTRS. In this study, the adsorption characteristics of boric acid on a strong-base anion exchange resin, an Amberlite IRN-78LC resin in OH- form, were investigated at temperature from 10 .deg. C to 60 .deg. C in the concentrations of boron up to 1500 ppm covering the BTRS operational conditions. A computer code was developed to calculate the composition of borate ions in solution as a function of boron concentration, temperature and pH. From the calculated composition of borate ions and experimental data of adsorption equilibrium, the model was proposed for the adsorption isotherm of boric acid on the resin. The diffusion coefficient of the boric acid in the resin was calculated by the particle diffusion model and found that the temperature dependency of the coefficient follows an Arrhenius equation. The results in this study can be applied for the optimum operation of BTRS

  3. Technical assessment of NOx generation from vitrification process of spent ion-exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the radioactive spent ion-exchange resin is being treated in vitrification system, due to the nitrogen in the anion exchange resin media and the nitrogen in air inleaked to the system, the nitrogen oxide (NOx) is generated from both glass melter and the second combustion chamber among the unit-processes in the vitrification plant. The NOx is very hazardous to environment and to human health the emission limit of NOx is regulated very severely. In this study, the NOx generation characteristics are technically analyzed based on the demonstration-test resultes conducted recently by burning simulated spent resin. When burning 30kg/h of simulated resin in CCM under 50% of excess the theoretically needed, the NOx was measured as between 3000 ∼ 3500ppm after 1h of transient test period. And when only the propane is burning in PCC without resin burning in CCM, the concentration of NOx exceeded the detectable limit(4000 ppm) of PGA. The former and the latter were considered as the fuel NOx and the thermal NOx respectively

  4. ION EXCHANGE MODELING FOR REMOVAL OF CESIUM FROM HANFORD WASTE USING SUPERLIG 644 RESIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamm, L

    2004-05-01

    The expected performance of a proposed ion exchange column using SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 resin for the removal of cesium from Hanford high level radioactive alkaline waste is discussed. This report represents a final report on the ability and knowledge with regard to modeling the Cesium-SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 resin ion exchange system. Only the loading phase of the cycle process is addressed within this report. Pertinent bench-scale column tests and batch equilibrium experiments are addressed. The methodology employed and sensitivity analyses are also included (i.e., existing methodology employed is referenced to prior developmental efforts while updated methodology is discussed). Pilot-scale testing is not assessed since no pilot-scale testing was available at the time of this report. Column performance predictions are made considering three selected feed compositions under nominal operating conditions. The sensitivity analyses provided help to identify key parameters that aid in resin procurement acceptance criteria. The methodology and application presented within this report reflect the expected behavior of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 resin manufactured at the production-scale (i.e, 250 gallon batch size level). The primary objective of this work was, through modeling and verification based on experimental assessments, to predict the cesium removal performance of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 resin for application in the RPP pretreatment facility.

  5. Synthetic crystalline calcium silicate hydrate (I): cation exchange and caesium selectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid crystalline calcium silicate hydrate (I) synthesized from equimolar amounts of Ca and Si under hydrothermal conditions at 120 oC shows cation exchange properties towards divalent metal cations such as Ni, Cu, Cd, or Hg. It also exhibits caesium selectivity in the presence of Na+. The exchange capacity and selectivity of the solid can be increased by 10 and 28 %, respectively, upon substitution of 0.01 mol of the Ca2+ in its structure by Na+. The ability of metal cation uptake by the solid was found to obey the order Ni2+ > Hg2+ > Cu2+ > Cd2+. The different affinities of calcium silicate hydrate (I) towards these ions can be used for their separation from solutions and also in nuclear waste treatment. The mechanism of the exchange reaction is discussed. (author)

  6. High throughput determination of cleaning solutions to prevent the fouling of an anion exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elich, Thomas; Iskra, Timothy; Daniels, William; Morrison, Christopher J

    2016-06-01

    Effective cleaning of chromatography resin is required to prevent fouling and maximize the number of processing cycles which can be achieved. Optimization of resin cleaning procedures, however, can lead to prohibitive material, labor, and time requirements, even when using milliliter scale chromatography columns. In this work, high throughput (HT) techniques were used to evaluate cleaning agents for a monoclonal antibody (mAb) polishing step utilizing Fractogel(®) EMD TMAE HiCap (M) anion exchange (AEX) resin. For this particular mAb feed stream, the AEX resin could not be fully restored with traditional NaCl and NaOH cleaning solutions, resulting in a loss of impurity capacity with resin cycling. Miniaturized microliter scale chromatography columns and an automated liquid handling system (LHS) were employed to evaluate various experimental cleaning conditions. Cleaning agents were monitored for their ability to maintain resin impurity capacity over multiple processing cycles by analyzing the flowthrough material for turbidity and high molecular weight (HMW) content. HT experiments indicated that a 167 mM acetic acid strip solution followed by a 0.5 M NaOH, 2 M NaCl sanitization provided approximately 90% cleaning improvement over solutions containing solely NaCl and/or NaOH. Results from the microliter scale HT experiments were confirmed in subsequent evaluations at the milliliter scale. These results identify cleaning agents which may restore resin performance for applications involving fouling species in ion exchange systems. In addition, this work demonstrates the use of miniaturized columns operated with an automated LHS for HT evaluation of chromatographic cleaning procedures, effectively decreasing material requirements while simultaneously increasing throughput. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1251-1259. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26552005

  7. Studies on the removal of trace amounts of 137Cs and 90Sr from low level effluents using PSS type cation exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usability of commercial polystyrene sulphonate cation exchanger, for the removal of trace concentrations of 137Cs and 90Sr from low level effluent stream generated from nuclear installations is studied. Batch sorption experiments are carried out under different experimental conditions from 137Cs and 90Sr spiked aqueous solutions of varied pH to evaluate and establish suitable operating parameters for the removal of the two most potentially mobile radionuclides. Results show that the resin can be used for the sorption of these radionuclide from spent fuel pond as well as from waste streams containing low concentrations of salt. (author)

  8. A cation exchange method for separation of 111In from inactive silver, copper, traces of iron and radioactive gallium and zinc isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    111In was produced by the 109Ag(α, 2n)111In reaction. A simple radiochemical separation technique, using Dowex-50 cation exchange resin (with prior removal of copper bulk, if present), has been employed to separate radioindium from inactive contaminants like Ag, Cu, Fe and active contaminant like 67Ga and 65Zn. The radiochemical separation yield was 90-99%. The radionuclide purity of 111In was >99% at 60 h after EOB. The level of all the inactive contaminants was <5 μg/mL in the final product. (Author)

  9. Actinides and beta emitters in the process water and ion exchange resin samples from the Loviisa power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process waters and the ion exchange resins used for purification of the process waters of the Loviisa nuclear power plant, where are two VVER-440-type PWR reactors, were analysed for their concentrations of alpha and beta emitters. Co-60, Ni-63, Sr-90, Cs-137, U-234, U-238, Pu-239,240, Am-241, Cm-242 and Cm-243,244 were determined in the primary coolant, the ion exchange resins of the primary circuit and the waste tank TW30B03, which contains all used ion exchange resins. The coolant and ion exchange resin samples from the primary circuit represented the normal operation state and a fuel leakage situation. In addition, the concentrations of Tc-99 and I-129 were determined in the waste tank resins

  10. ION EXCHANGE RESINS: AN APPROACH TOWARDS TASTE MASKING OF BITTER DRUGS AND SUSTAINED RELEASE FORMULATIONS WITH THEIR PATENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Ajay Bilandi; Amiya Kanta Mishra

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to cover various aspects related with the use of ion exchange resins for taste masking of bitter drugs and for formulating sustained release dosage form. Ion exchange resins are water insoluble cross-linked polymers containing a salt-forming group at repeating positions on the polymer chain and have the ability to exchange counter-ions within aqueous solutions surrounding them. The bitterness of pharmaceutical medicines plays a critical role in patient compliance...

  11. Literature study of volatile radioiodine release from ion-exchange resins during transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A transport package is currently being developed by Ontario Hydro to carry used filters and ion-exchange columns from the Pickering and Darlington Nuclear Generating Stations to the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station for disposal. The main reason that the transport package must be licensed is the possibility that volatile radionuclides being transported in the package might be released during transport accidents. Of particular concern is the iodine that might become volatile due to the degradation of the ion exchange resin. This report reviews the literature on the thermal and radiolytic degradation of ion exchange resins and provides calculations to estimate the fraction of volatile iodine as a function of time under postulated accident conditions

  12. Bio nitrate Project: a new technology for water nitrate elimination by means of ionic exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of ion exchange resins for nitrate elimination from water generates a waste containing a sodium chloride mixture plus the retained nitrates. this waste must be correctly disposed. In this project, the resin ionic form is modified to be regenerated with other compounds, different from the common salt, which are interesting because of the presence of mineral nutrition. So, with Bio nitrate Project, nitrates are recovered and the regeneration waste is apt to be use as fertilizer, for agricultural uses, or as complementary contribution of nutrients in biological water treatment. (Author) 27 refs.

  13. The influence of resin functional group on the ion-exchange recovery of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The selectivity of ion-exchange sites varies with the matrix of the polymer, the nature of the site, and the method of application. The effect of these variables on the recovery of uranium is examined, with particular attention to vinyl pyridine and to symmetrical and asymmetrical quaternary ammonium sites. The effect, on the loading, of high concentrations of chlorides in the liquors is discussed, and other components of the liquors that may cause fouling of the resin are also considered. The discussion is supported by the results of tests conducted on various types of resins. The economics of the process is discussed briefly

  14. REAL WASTE TESTING OF SPHERICAL RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

    2009-10-30

    This report presents data on batch contact and column testing tasks for spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin. The testing used a non-radioactive simulant of SRS Tank 2F dissolved salt, as well as an actual radioactive waste sample of similar composition, which are both notably high in sodium (6 M). The resin was Microbeads batch 5E-370/641 which had been made on the hundred gallon scale. Equilibrium batch contact work focused on cesium at a temperature of 25 C due to the lack of such data to better benchmark existing isotherm models. Two campaigns were performed with small-scale ion exchange columns, first with Tank 2F simulant, then with actual dissolved salt in the Shielded Cells. An extrapolation of the batch contact results with radioactive waste over-predicted the cesium loaded onto the IX sRF resin bed by approximately 11%. This difference is not unexpected considering uncertainties from measurement and extrapolation and because the ion exchange that occurs when waste flows through a resin bed probably cannot reach the same level of equilibrium as when waste and resin are joined in a long term batch contact. Resin was also characterized to better understand basic chemistry issues such as holdup of trace transition metals present in the waste feed streams. The column tests involved using two beds of sRF resin in series, with the first bed referred to as the Lead column and the second bed as the Lag column. The test matrix included two complete IX cycles for both the simulant and actual waste phases. A cycle involves cesium adsorption, until the resin in the Lead column reaches saturation, and then regenerating the sRF resin, which includes eluting the cesium. Both the simulated and the actual wastes were treated with two cycles of operation, and the resin beds that were used in the Lead and Lag columns of simulant test phase were regenerated and reused in the actual waste test phase. This task is the first to demonstrate the treatment of SRS waste

  15. Drying of ion-exchange resin and filter media: [Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchange resins, filter media and sludges are currently either dewatered or solidified, for stabilization, prior to disposal at a low level waste facility. The Nuclear Packaging, Inc. (NuPac) Resin Drying System was developed and placed in commercial service to provide a system which meets the regulatory requirements for free standing water, with a relatively short process duration, requiring no chemical or material addition, and utilizing more efficiently the available container volume than was previously achievable. The volume reduction of 10 to 14% associated with this system coupled with reductions in operator radiation exposure provide a significant economic advantage over other options a utility may have for processing resins and sludges. 2 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Selective removal of nitrate by using a novel macroporous acrylic anion exchange resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Ou Song; Yang Zhou; Ai Min Li; Sandra Mueller

    2012-01-01

    An anion exchange resin NDP-5 has been prepared successfully and applied on the selective removal of nit-ate from SO42-/NO3- binary co-existence system.The composition and morphology of NDP-5 were confirmed by FT-IR and SEM.The NDP-5 resin exhibits the completely different behavior on the adsorption capacity,adsorption kinetic and the effect of the completing anion in the absence or presence of sulfate,compared to D213.And,the resultants of kinetic are well fitted by the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models.These results are very important to develop novel resins with great features.

  17. Cementation of ILW ion exchange resins: Impact of sulfate ions released by radiolysis on hydrated matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizon, F.; Cau-dit-Coumes, C.

    2006-12-01

    Some of the ion exchange resins used during treatment of spent nuclear fuels are intermediate level radioactive wastes which may be damaged by radiolysis process, releasing sulfate ions directly into the cement-based encapsulating material. This work consists in an experimental study of the resulting sulfate attack on the properties of the hydrated matrix: dimensional stability, mineralogy and microstructure of the samples, as well as variations in the chemical composition of the curing solution, were studied during six months. Three sites of delayed ettringite formation were detected: into the cement matrix near the surface exposed to solution, localized in the interfacial transition zone between cement matrix and resins, or progressively replacing the portlandite that initially fulfilled the cracks of anionic resins. During the experiment period, the ettringite precipitation and the expansion detected were moderate, and did not lead to cracking. The material involved was considered as having a good resistance to sulfate attack.

  18. Effect of polysulfonate resins and direct compression fillers on multiple-unit sustained-release dextromethorphan resinate tablets

    OpenAIRE

    Pongjanyakul, Thaned; Priprem, Aroonsri; Chitropas, Padungkwan; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of different polysulfonate resins and direct compression fillers on physical properties of multiple-unit sustained-release dextromethorphan (DMP) tablets. DMP resinates were formed by a complexation of DMP and strong cation exchange resins, Dowex 50 W and Amberlite IRP69. The tablets consisted of the DMP resinates and direct compression fillers, such as microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCP), and spray-dried...

  19. Feasibility study on vitrification of spent ion exchange resins from TRIGA Reactor Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feasibility studies on the vitrification of spent ion exchange resins combined with glass cullet powder have been conducted using a High Temperature Test Furnace. Bottle glass cullet powder was used as matrix material to convert the ash of the spent resins into a glass. Vitrification of spent ion exchange resins presents a reasonable disposal alternative, because of its inherent organic destruction capabilities, the volume reduction levels obtainable, and the durable product that it yields. In this study, the spent ion exchange resin from the PUSPATI TRIGA reactor of Nuclear Malaysia was combusted in a lab scale combustor and the resulting ash was vitrified together with glass cullet powder in a high temperature furnace to produce a stable spent resin ash embedded in glass. The factors affecting this immobilized waste, such as thermal stability, radiological stability and leachability have all been investigated. However, the outcome of these tests, which include the radionuclide activity concentration in the slag, the optimum conditioning temperature - in relation with volume reduction during vitrification - and the volume mixing ratio of matrix material were reported. It was found that the radionuclides present in spent resins were 54Mn, 60Co and 152Eu. The elementary chemical composition (carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulphur) of spent resins was 27.6 % C, 5.68 % H, 2.04 % N and 4.20 % S, respectively. The maximum calorific value of spent resins was 1735 kJ/ kg. The average activity concentrations of 54Mn and 60Co in ash at 200 degree Celsius were 9,411 ± 243 Bq/ Kg and 12,637 ± 201 Bq/ Kg. flue gases containing CO2, CO, SO2 and NO started to be emitted above 200 degree Celsius. The optimum conditioning temperature was also the highest tested, for example 900 degree Celsius in 45 minutes, and the best mixing ratio ash to matrix material was also the highest, for example 1:9. Finally, the leaching analysis of slag at 900 degree Celsius in 45 minutes showed that

  20. Nondestructive radio isotopic technique for performance evaluation of industrial grade anion exchange resins Amberlite IRN78 and Indion NSSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study deals with the application of radiotracers 131I and 82Br as a non-destructive tool to evaluate the performance of Amberlite IRN78 (nuclear grade) and Indion NSSR (non-nuclear grade) anion exchange resins. In general based on radiotracer applications it was observed that Amberlite IRN78 resins show superior performance over Indion NSSR resins under identical operational parameters.

  1. Nondestructive radio isotopic technique for performance evaluation of industrial grade anion exchange resins Amberlite IRN78 and Indion NSSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singare, Pravin U. [Bhavan' s College, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-01-15

    The present study deals with the application of radiotracers 131I and 82Br as a non-destructive tool to evaluate the performance of Amberlite IRN78 (nuclear grade) and Indion NSSR (non-nuclear grade) anion exchange resins. In general based on radiotracer applications it was observed that Amberlite IRN78 resins show superior performance over Indion NSSR resins under identical operational parameters.

  2. Oxidative degradation of ion-exchange resins in acid medium. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume reduction of spent ion-exchange resins used in nuclear facilities receive increasing importance due to the increase in storage cost, unstable physical and chemical properties and their relatively high specific activity (in some cases up to 1 Ci per liter). The present study is part of research program on the treatment and immobilization of radioactive spent ion-exchange resins simulate; hydrogen peroxide was used for the oxidative degradation of spent ion-exchange resins simulate in sulphuric acid medium. Five liters ring digester developed in Karlsruhe nuclear research center-(KFK)- in germany was the chosen option to perform the oxidation process. The work reported focused on the kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation process. Heating the organic resins in sulphuric acid results in its carbonization and partial oxidation of only 1.7% of the carbon added. Results show that the oxidation reaction is a relatively slow process of first order with K value in the order of 10-4 min-1, and the main oxidation product was carbon dioxide. The production of carbon oxide in the off gas stream increased sharply by the addition of hydrogen peroxide to the hot sulphuric acid-resin mixture. The results obtained show that more than 97% of the carbon added was oxidized to carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. The rate constant value (K) of this reaction was calculated to be (1.69±0.13) x 10-2 min-1. The results of gas chromatographic analysis indicate that no significant amounts of hazardous organic materials were detected in the off-gas streams. 6 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Pilot-scale tests to vitrify ion exchange resin from Korean NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification pilot plant had been constructed in Taejon, Korea to tackle or overcome, in advance of the future commercial plant, any difficulties which may occur when treating various types of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated from nuclear power plants (NPPs) in Korea. As a part of this project, Nuclear Environment Technology Institute (NETEC) has finished its pilot-scale tests for ion exchange resin as well as test operation. First phase of the tests would focus on observation and measurement of off-gas characteristics during the combustion of resin. This paper presents the test results of utilizing a selected glass frit to vitrify simulated resin from Korean NPPs by analyzing the compositional change in the glassy material or dust deposited through the melter and its downstreams. B, Na and Fe in base glass were found to be selectively lost during the glass melting. On the wall above the glass melt surface, sodium sulfates appears to be major compound with sulfates of potassium and calcium present. Particularly, in the dust samples on the horizontal cooler surface, the sulfur as well as the carbon unburnt from the organic resin was present in higher concentration. It is expected that more boron and iron would condensate on the cooler surface. However, the iron analysis was obtained to imply the trend. In more oxydizing condition combined with the larger amount resin fed in the test run R02, more sulfur appears to be oxidized into gaseous phase or to entrain downstream as particles

  4. Review of disposal techniques for radioactively contaminated organic ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic ion-exchange resins are used in the UK nuclear industry to remove radioactive nuclides from dilute aqueous solution. Resins represent a significant proportion of the organic content of ILW and LLW, particularly ILW. Spent resins are destined to be disposed of in the UK deep repository. There are concerns regarding the potential effects of organic materials on long-term repository performance, and these effects have been the subject of much recent research work. The object of this study has been to conduct a worldwide review of treatment and conditioning techniques available for spent organic ion-exchange resins with the intention of recommending the best option for dealing with the waste in the UK. Data on available techniques have been gathered together, and are presented in tabular form at the back of the report. The techniques have been reviewed and compared considering safety, practicality and cost, and a best option selected on the basis of current knowledge. On balance it would appear that wet oxidation using hydrogen peroxide with residue encapsulation in BFS/OPC is the most appropriate technique, probably implemented using a mobile plant. This conclusion and recommendation is not however clear cut and further advice regarding the acceptability of organic material in the repository is necessary before a definite recommendation can be made. (Author)

  5. Qualification of Reillex{trademark} HPQ anion exchange resin for use in SRS processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crooks, W.J. III

    2000-05-18

    The Phase 2 portion of the HB-Line facility was built in the early 1980's to process plutonium and neptunium from nitric acid solutions into oxide suitable for storage in a vault. Although the other portions of HB-Line were started up in the mid 1980's and have operated since that time, the anion exchange and precipitation processes in Phase 2 were never started up. As part of the material stabilization efforts, Phase 2 is currently being started up. A new anion exchange resin is needed because the resins that were proposed for use 10 years ago are limited by performance characteristics, disposal requirements, or are no longer commercially available. SRTC is responsible for qualifying all resins prior to their use in Nuclear Materials Stabilization and Storage (NMSS) processes. Qualification consists of both process suitability and thermal stability with nitric acid. This report describes the thermal stability qualification of Reillex{trademark} HPQ, the new resin proposed for processing plutonium and neptunium in the HB Line facility.

  6. Impact of sediment-seawater cation exchange on Himalayan chemical weathering fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupker, Maarten; France-Lanord, Christian; Lartiges, Bruno

    2016-08-01

    Continental-scale chemical weathering budgets are commonly assessed based on the flux of dissolved elements carried by large rivers to the oceans. However, the interaction between sediments and seawater in estuaries can lead to additional cation exchange fluxes that have been very poorly constrained so far. We constrained the magnitude of cation exchange fluxes from the Ganga-Brahmaputra river system based on cation exchange capacity (CEC) measurements of riverine sediments. CEC values of sediments are variable throughout the river water column as a result of hydrological sorting of minerals with depth that control grain sizes and surface area. The average CEC of the integrated sediment load of the Ganga-Brahmaputra is estimated ca. 6.5 meq 100 g-1. The cationic charge of sediments in the river is dominated by bivalent ions Ca2+ (76 %) and Mg2+ (16 %) followed by monovalent K+ (6 %) and Na+ (2 %), and the relative proportion of these ions is constant among all samples and both rivers. Assuming a total exchange of exchangeable Ca2+ for marine Na+ yields a maximal additional Ca2+ flux of 28 × 109 mol yr-1 of calcium to the ocean, which represents an increase of ca. 6 % of the actual river dissolved Ca2+ flux. In the more likely event that only a fraction of the adsorbed riverine Ca2+ is exchanged, not only for marine Na+ but also Mg2+ and K+, estuarine cation exchange for the Ganga-Brahmaputra is responsible for an additional Ca2+ flux of 23 × 109 mol yr-1, while ca. 27 × 109 mol yr-1 of Na+, 8 × 109 mol yr-1 of Mg2+ and 4 × 109 mol yr-1 of K+ are re-absorbed in the estuaries. This represents an additional riverine Ca2+ flux to the ocean of 5 % compared to the measured dissolved flux. About 15 % of the dissolved Na+ flux, 8 % of the dissolved K+ flux and 4 % of the Mg2+ are reabsorbed by the sediments in the estuaries. The impact of estuarine sediment-seawater cation exchange appears to be limited when evaluated in the context of the long-term carbon cycle and

  7. Differential enthalpy of cation exchange of alkaline metals on amorphous zirconium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work presents the results of calorimetric research of sorption process of alkaline metals cations on hydrogen form of amorphous zirconium phosphates. It is defined that the general regularities of passing of ion exchange reaction are the same for the samples of zirconium phosphate with different content of phosphor.

  8. Nongeminate Radiative Recombination of Free Charges in Cation-Exchanged PbS Quantum Dot Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Ashley R.; Beard, Matthew C.; Johnson, Justin C.

    2016-06-01

    Using photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy we explore the radiative recombination pathways in PbS quantum dots (QDs) synthesized by two methods. We compare conventionally synthesized PbS from a PbO precursor to PbS synthesized using cation-exchange from CdS QDs. We show that strongly coupled films of PbS QDs from the cation-exchange luminesce with significant efficiency at room temperature. This is in stark contrast to conventional PbS QDs, which have exceedingly weak room temperature emission. Moreover, the power dependence of the emission is quadratic, indicating bimolecular radiative recombination that is reasonably competitive with trap-assisted recombination, a feature previously unreported in coupled PbS QD films. We interpret these results in terms of a greatly reduced defect concentration for cation-exchanged QDs that mitigates the influence of trap-assisted recombination. Cation-exchanged QDs have recently been employed in highly efficient and air-stable lead chalcogenide QD devices, and the reduced number of trap states inferred here may lead to improved current collection and higher open circuit voltage.

  9. The degradation of strong basic anion exchange resins and mixed-bed ion-exchange resins: Effect of degradation products on radionuclide speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most important water-soluble products of the radiolytic degradation of anion exchange resins in a cementitious environment are ammonia and methylamines. These ligands do not form complexes with most radionuclides. Exceptions are Ni, Ag, and Pd, which form strong complexes with amines. Other degradation products of anion and mixed-bed ion-exchange resins are of no importance concerning the complexation of trivalent radionuclides. This is shown indirectly by adsorption experiments: The degradation products do not have a significant effect on the adsorption of Eu(III) on calcite. The effect of ammonia and methylamines on the complexation of Ni, Ag, and Pd is investigated by chemical modeling. For Ni and Ag, rather reliable predictions can be made using available thermodynamic data. In the case of Pd, large uncertainties are encountered due to unreliable data and gaps in the set of important species. The system Pd(II)-ammonia-water is explored in detail. Predominant species are inferred by chemical analogy, and their thermodynamic data are estimated. The uncertainty in these estimated and measured but unreliable data is bound by qualitative and quantitative chemical reasoning

  10. SYNTESIS OF THE COMPLEXES OF MACROPOROUS SULFONATED RESINS WITH FERRIC CHLORIDE AND THEIR CATALYTIC BEHAVIOR FOR SETERIFICATION OF ACETIC ACID WITH BUTANOL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuangWenqiang; HouXin; 等

    1997-01-01

    The complex resins prepared from macroporous sulfonated resin D72(H+ form) with ferric chloride or ferric chloride hexahydrate have both sites of Bronsted acid and Lewis acid.In the catalysis of exterification of acetic acid with butanol the complex resins show to have much higher catalytic activity than that of its matrix.a conventional sulfonated cation exchange resin D72.

  11. Adsorption of Monobutyl Phthalate from Aqueous Phase onto Two Macroporous Anion-Exchange Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengwen Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As new emerging pollutants, phthalic acid monoesters (PAMs pose potential ecological and human health risks. In the present study, adsorption performance of monobutyl phthalate (MBP onto two macroporous base anion-exchange resins (D-201 and D-301 was discussed. It was found that the adsorption isotherms were best fitted by the Langmuir equation while the adsorption kinetics were well described by pseudo-first-order model. Analyses of sorption isotherms and thermodynamics proved that the adsorption mechanisms for DBP onto D-201 were ion exchange. However, the obtained enthalpy values indicate that the sorption process of MBP onto D-301 is physical adsorption. The equilibrium adsorption capacities and adsorption rates of DBP on two different resins increased with the increasing temperature of the solution. D-301 exhibited a higher adsorption capacity of MBP than D-201. These results proved that D-301, as an effective sorbent, can be used to remove phthalic acid monoesters from aqueous solution.

  12. Estimate method for life of ion-exchange resin for BWR's condensate demineralizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Life of ion-exchange resin (IER) for condensate demineralizers (CDs) of nuclear power plants is generally judged by pressure of seawater leakage resistance, concretely, by a judgement standard of exchanging IER with or without feature operable against seawater leakage corresponding to 10 GPM for 2.5 hours. However, recently, some accidents occur on increase of sulfate ion in reactor water just after beginning of the plant operation and so on. As the increase is caused by pyrolysis and radiolysis of impurities (TOC) mainly solved out from deteriorated IERs, effect of IER for CDs using large amounts of IERs can be thought to be large. Therefore, here were simply introduced a method precisely capable of forecasting the sulfate ion concentration in reactor water just after beginning of the plant operation and an evaluation tester on the solved out matters of IERs developed by authors on resins sampled at stopping of the plant. (G.K.)

  13. Selective separation of sodium ions from a mixture with phenylalanine by Donnan dialysis with a profiled sulfogroup cation exchange membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'eva, V. I.; Goleva, E. A.

    2013-11-01

    The possibility of separating ions of metal from a mixture with ampholyte (an amino acid) by Donnan dialysis with an MK-40 sulfogroup cation exchange membrane is demonstrated. Conditions ensuring the selectivity and intensity of the mass transfer of sodium ions from a mixture with bipolar phenylalanine ions into a diffusate containing hydrochloric acid through a cation exchange membrane are found.

  14. A Joint USA - Argentina Study on Vitrification of Spent Ion-Exchange Resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the Science and Technology Implementing Arrangement for Cooperation on Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management (JCCRM), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is helping to transfer waste treatment technology to international atomic energy commissions. The results obtained thus far show that spent ion exchange resins can be effectively treated using vitrification to immobilize the contained radionuclides. This work is continuing into FY01

  15. Kinetics and adsorption isotherm of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis on ion-exchange resins

    OpenAIRE

    Sala, L; F. S. Figueira; G. P. Cerveira; C. C. Moraes; S. J. Kalil

    2014-01-01

    C-phycocyanin is a natural blue dye extracted from Spirulina platensis, which has many applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In this paper the effect of pH and temperature on the adsorption of C-phycocyanin onto two different ion exchange resins (Streamline DEAE and Streamline Q XL) for expanded bed adsorption chromatography was investigated. Moreover, the kinetics and adsorption isotherm were evaluated. The equilibrium for the Q XL matrix was reached after 60 min, while for...

  16. Performance evaluation of anion exchange resins Purolite NRW-5050 and Duolite A-611 by application of radioisotopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioanalytical techniques using 131I and 82Br as tracer isotopes were applied to study the kinetics of iodide and bromide ion-isotopic exchange reactions taking place between the external labeled ionic solution and the resin surface. The results indicate low values of specific reaction rate (min-1), amount of ion exchanged (mmol) and initial rate of ion exchange (mmol/min) for bromide ion-isotopic exchange reaction as compared to that obtained for iodide ion-isotopic exchange reaction. It was observed that for iodide ion-isotopic exchange reaction performed at 35.0 C, 1 000 g of ion exchange resins and 0.002 mol/L labeled iodide ion solution, the values of specific reaction rate (min-1), amount of iodide ion exchanged (mmol), initial rate of iodide ion exchange (mmol/min) and log Kd were 0.340, 0.394, 0.134 and 20.2 respectively for Purolite NRW-5050 resin, which was higher than the respective values of 0.216, 0.290, 0.063 and 18.2 as that obtained by using Duolite A-611. The results of present investigation indicate that during the two ion-isotopic exchange reactions, for both the resins, there exists a strong positive linear correlation between amount of ions exchanged and concentration of ionic solution; and strong negative correlation between amount of ions exchanged and temperature of exchanging medium. From the results it appears that as compared to Duolite A-611 resins, Purolite NRW-5050 resins shows superior performance under identical experimental conditions.

  17. Engineering study for the treatment of spent ion exchange resin resulting from nuclear process applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is an engineering study of spent ion exchange resin treatment processes with the purpose of identifying one or more suitable treatment technologies. Classifications of waste considered include all classes of low-level waste (LLW), mixed LLW, transuranic (TRU) waste, and mixed TRU waste. A total of 29 process alternatives have been evaluated. Evaluation parameters have included economic parameters (both total life-cycle costs and capital costs), demonstrated operability, environmental permitting, operational availability, waste volume reduction, programmatic consistency, and multiple utilization. The results of this study suggest that there are a number of alternative process configurations that are suitable for the treatment of spent ion exchange resin. The determinative evaluation parameters were economic variables (total life-cycle cost or capital cost) and waste volume reduction. Immobilization processes are generally poor in volume reduction. Thermal volume reduction processes tend to have high capital costs. There are immobilization processes and thermal volume reduction processes that can treat all classifications of spent ion exchange resin likely to be encountered. 40 refs., 19 figs., 17 tabs

  18. A basic study for the boron thermal regeneration system using anion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the boron thermal regeneration system (BTRS), the basic characteristics of commercial anion exchange resin have been investigated on the swelling characteristics, absorption, desorption and temperature coefficient of exchange capacity for boric acid. The equilibrium capacity increases as decrease of temperature and depends strongly on the degrees of cross linking having a maximum point at about 7% of DVB. The temperature coefficient of equilibrium capacity of boric acid is also a function of the concentration of external solution and of the cross linking having a maximum point around 7% of DVB. (author)

  19. Thermal Modeling Of Ion Exchange Columns With Spherical RF Resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal performance of RF columns fully loaded with radioactive cesium. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated during Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process upset conditions with a focus on implementation at Hanford. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results will provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on RF. The current full-scale design for the SCIX system includes a central cooling tube, and one objective of these calculations was to examine its elimination to simplify the design. Results confirmed that a column design without a central cooling tube is feasible for RF, allowing for the possibility of significant design simplifications if it can be assumed that the columns are always filled with liquid. With active cooling through the four outer tubes, the maximum column diameter expected to maintain the temperature below the assumed media and safety limits is 26 inches, which is comparable to the current design diameter. Additional analysis was conducted to predict the maximum column temperatures for the previously unevaluated accident scenario involving inadvertent drainage of liquid from a cesium-saturated column, with retention of the ion exchange media and cesium in the column. As expected, much higher maximum temperatures are observed in this case due to the poor heat transfer properties of air versus liquid. For this hypothetical accident scenario involving inadvertent and complete drainage of liquid from a cesium-saturated column, the modeling results indicate that the maximum temperature within a 28 inch diameter RF column with external cooling is expected to exceed 250 C within 2 days, while the maximum temperature of a 12 inch column is maintained below

  20. Ion Exchange Study of Some New Copolymer Resins Derived from 8-Hydroxyquinoline-5-sulphonic Acid, Biuret and Formaldehyde

    OpenAIRE

    Dhakite, P. A.; W. B. Gurnule

    2011-01-01

    Copolymer resins (8-HQSABF) were synthesized by the condensation of 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulphonic acid and biuret with formaldehyde in the presence of hydrochloric acid as catalyst, proved to be selective chelation ion exchange copolymer resins for certain metals. Chelation ion exchange properties to these polymers were studied for Cu2+, Cd2+, Co2+ and Zn2+ ions. A batch equilibrium method was employed in the study of the selectivity of the distribution of a given metal ions between the poly...

  1. Ion exchange behavior of plutonium(IV) on imidazolium nitrate immobilized resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imidazolium nitrate anchored on poly(styrenedivinylbenzene) co-polymer, Im-NO3, has been synthesized and evaluated for plutonium purification. The results are compared with those obtained using Dowex 1 9 4 anion exchange resin. The distribution coefficient (Kd) of Pu(IV) increased with increase in concentration of nitric acid, reached a maximum at 8 M, followed by decrease in Kd values. Rapid ion exchange of Pu(IV) followed by the establishment of equilibrium occurred within 100 min of equilibration and the data was fitted in to first order rate equation. Variation of distribution coefficient of Pu(IV) as a function of exchange capacity and nitrate ion concentration suggest the involvement of anion exchange mechanism is responsible for extraction. The apparent ion exchange capacity was 310 mg/g at 8 M nitric acid. The performance of the Im-NO3 under dynamic condition was assessed by column breakthrough experiments. Radiolytic degradation of Im-NO3 resin in presence and absence of nitric acid (8 M) was studied and the results are reported in this paper. (author)

  2. Radiocatalytic degradation of spent organic ion exchange resins using BaF2/TiO2/Ceramic nanocomposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A BaF2/TiO2/ceramic nanocomposite has been prepared to investigate the decomposition of spent resin using high energy radiation for volume reduction. It was found that high energy radiation can be converted by BaF2 scintillator to induce TiO2 based photocatalytic degradation of organic resin. The synthesis of nanocomposite was performed using TiCl4 hydrolysis, EDTA chelating method and calcinated at 450 degree C. The composite was further characterized and used to facilitate radiocatalytic degradation of Purolite cationic resin, Preliminary result exhibited that granular resin will be gradually decomposed into small molecules under 1 MBq 60Co irradiation. The hybridization of photocatalytic TiO2 and radiation-sensitive BaF2 are expected to be a promising tool and have to be studied in more detail. The radiocatalytic degradation of resin will further be studied by weight loss, pH effect, and TOC level.

  3. Treatment of groundwater for nitrate removal by portable ion exchange resin, OSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The locations of Palmitas in the Province of Soriano is supplied with groundwater from a shallow and high nitrogen content in sedimentary aquifer (Asencio Formation). Due to lack of alternative sources, groundwater or surface water, it was decided to test the water treatment from a perforation whose tenors were of the order of 51-66 mg / L of nitrates. The methodology used for the removal of nitrate is ion exchange resins .The main issue raised in this case was the disposal of effluent from the washing of the resins, because there is no collective sanitation network Palmitas nor a sufficient stream flow for discharge . Several alternatives (installation of a transitional deposit, haulage trucks, dumping at distant points, etc.), which were ruled by their poor viability and / or high costs were studied. Finally it was decided to install a device that will have three cylinders with resins were transportable, for which should have a weight less than 75 kg and those which would be used alternately. Regeneration of the resins is carried out in the city of Mercedes, distant 40 km, where the necessary water for the discharge conditions exist with a high content of sodium chloride, resulting from ion exchange. This pilot project represents a first step in treatment for nitrate removal in groundwater using transportable resins which aims to supply the public . Due to the nature of the above location , the chosen methodology had to be adapted to fulfill their duties satisfactorily. The first results of this project to a year of commissioning implementation, which has been funded by SBI and developed by his staff, in order to be used in other places with similar problems are presented in this report

  4. Influence of the Ion Coordination Number on Cation Exchange Reactions with Copper Telluride Nanocrystals

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Renyong; Bertoni, Giovanni; Lak, Aidin; Gaspari, Roberto; Rapallo, Arnaldo; Cavalli, Andrea; De Trizio, Luca; Manna, Liberato

    2016-01-01

    Cu2-xTe nanocubes were used as starting seeds to access metal telluride nanocrystals by cation exchanges at room temperature. The coordination number of the entering cations was found to play an important role in dictating the reaction pathways. The exchanges with tetrahedrally coordinated cations (i.e. with coordination number 4), such as Cd2+ or Hg2+, yielded monocrystalline CdTe or HgTe nanocrystals with Cu2-xTe/CdTe or Cu2-xTe/HgTe Janus-like heterostructures as intermediates. The formation of Janus-like architectures was attributed to the high diffusion rate of the relatively small tetrahedrally coordinated cations, which could rapidly diffuse in the Cu2-xTe NCs and nucleate the CdTe (or HgTe) phase in a preferred region of the host structure. Also, with both Cd2+ and Hg2+ ions the exchange led to wurtzite CdTe and HgTe phases rather than the more stable zinc-blende ones, indicating that the anion framework of the starting Cu2- xTe particles could be more easily deformed to match the anion framework of t...

  5. New Anion-Exchange Resins for Improved Separations of Nuclear Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improved separations of nuclear materials will have a significant impact upon a broad range of DOE activities. DOE-EM Focus Areas and Crosscutting Programs have identified improved methods for the extraction and recovery of radioactive metal ions from process, waste, and environmental waters as critical needs for the coming years. We propose to develop multifunctional anion-exchange resins that facilitate anion uptake by carefully controlling the structure of the anion receptor site. Our new ion-exchange resins interface the field of ion-specific chelating ligands with robust, commercial ion-exchange technology to provide materials which exhibit superior selectivity and kinetics of sorption and desorption. The following Focus Areas and Crosscutting Programs have described needs that would be favorably impacted by the new material: Efficient Separations and Processing - radionuclide removal from aqueous phases; Plutonium - Pu, Am or total alpha removal to meet regulatory requirement s before discharge to the environment; Plumes - U and Tc in groundwater, U, Pu, Am, and Tc in soils; Mixed Waste - radionuclide partitioning; High-Level Tank Waste - actinide and Tc removal from supernatants and/or sludges. The basic scientific issues which need to be addressed are actinide complex speciation along with modeling of metal complex/functional site interactions in order to determine optimal binding-site characteristics. Synthesis of multifunctionalized extractants and ion-exchange materials that implement key features of the optimized binding site, and testing of these materials, will provide feedback to the modeling and design activities. Resin materials which actively facilitate the uptake of actinide complexes from solution should display both improved selectivity and kinetic properties. The long-range implications of this research, however, go far beyond the nuclear complex. This new methodology of ''facilitated uptake'' could revolutionize ion-exchange technology

  6. The influence of plutonium concentration and solution flow rate on the effective capacity of macroporous anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal aqueous process used to recover and purify plutonium at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility is anion exchange in nitric acid. Previous studies with gel-type anion exchange resin have shown an inverse relationship between plutonium concentration in the feed solution and the optimum flow rate for this process. Because gel-type resin has been replaced with macroporous resin at Los Alamos, the relationship between plutonium concentration and solution flow rate was reexamined with the selected Lewatit MP-500-FK resin using solutions of plutonium in nitric acid and in nitric acid with high levels of added nitrate salts. Our results with this resin differ significantly from previous data obtained with gel-type resin. Flow-rate variation from 10 to 80 liters per hour had essentially no effect on the measured quantities of plutonium sorbed by the macroporous resin. However, the effect of plutonium concentration in the feed solutions was pronounced, as feed solutions that contained the highest concentrations of plutonium also produced the highest resin loadings. The most notable effect of high concentrations of dissolved nitrate salts in these solutions was an increased resin capacity for plutonium at low flow rates. 16 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Studies on the quality control of reactor water and adsorption characteristics of ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer code has been developed, which classified the data about the water quality of nuclear power plant Kori Unit No. 1 which has been operated for 6 years. The computer code is composed of Data Base, which compiles the data, and 16 subroutines which present the useful outputs. It produced some results such as the conversion of the raw data to useful one, the average value of each data, the variation of the data per power, the average value of each data for the power greater than specific value and abnormal change of some data during accidents. In future, the optimal condition of the reactor water for normal operation and the pre-indication of some accident for its prevention will be obtained from the computer code. Also, it will give the basic data for safety inspection of nuclear power plants, the chemical decontamination of steam generator, the analysis of reactor accident and the safety analysis of nuclear fuel assembly. Meanwhile, the total dose delivered against the ion exchange resin during service in the demineralizer of nuclear power plants could not cause a serious problem of radiation damage. But the radiation damage occurred by adsorbed radionuclides on the resin turned out to cause the corrosion of the used resin containers. From the view of such a problem, it is reconmmended that the total dose of about 100 Mrad be the maximum allowable irradiation dose for ion exchange resins used in reactor coolant purification system. The experimental results on the radiation effects such as ion exchange capacity decrease, pH change and adsorption characteristics of radionuclides showed that the above recommendation was resonable. (Author)

  8. Separation of Fe (III) ions from acidic leach liquor of metasummatite Saghand ore by anion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferric ions in dilute acidic leach liquor of uranium ore of Saghand were separated by anion exchange resins. In this research, a simulated solution similar to the actual leach liquor of Saghand was prepared. The simulated solution which was containing chloride and ferric ions. rare earth elements, and some other impurities was treated by different types of Dowex anion exchange resins for ferric ions removal. It appeared that hydrochloric acidic concentration, resin types and particle sizes have a great impact on ferric ions adsorption. Dowex 1 X 4 (200-400 mesh) has the best adsorption of 91% in simulated solution and 79% in actual leach liquor of uranium ore of Saghand respectively

  9. Oxidative degradation of low and intermediate level Radioactive organic wastes 2. Acid decomposition on spent Ion-Exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work provides a simplified, effective and economic method for the chemical decomposition of radioactively contaminated solid organic waste, especially spent ion - exchange resins. The goal is to achieve volume reduction and to avoid technical problems encountered in processes used for similar purposes (incineration, pyrolysis). Factors efficiency and kinetics of the oxidation of the ion exchange resins in acid medium using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant, namely, duration of treatment and the acid to resin ratio were studied systematically on a laboratory scale. Moreover the percent composition of the off-gas evolved during the decomposition process was analysed. 3 figs., 5 tabs

  10. Alternative solidification techniques for radioactive ion exchange resins and liquid concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods, that are used or are under development for solidification of radioactive ion exchange resins or liquid concentrates, utilize normally cement, bitumen or some polymere as matrix material. This report contains a review and a description of these solidification processes and their products, especially of relatively new techniques that are under development in different countries. It is possible that solidification in thermosetting resins will be more used in the future, especially when product quality requirements are high (for instance when solidifying medium level resins) or when special waste categories has to be solidified. However it is not probable that thermosetting resins will be extensively used in a broad application as matrix material. In that case the methods are to complicated and expensive compared to, for instance, solidification in concrete. Systems for incorporation in polyesteremulsions (Dow-process) have a potential as they are quite simple and can accept a large variation of liquid wastes. Some methods in an early stage of development (for instance Inert Carrier Radwaste Process) will have to be tested in active application before they can be further evaluated. (author)

  11. Adsorption Properties of Ni(II by D301R Anion Exchange Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Xiuling

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of Ni(II with D301R resin was investigated in this paper. The results showed that the saturated extent of adsorption Ni(II by the resin was 84.3 mg/g. The equilibrium data of Ni(II sorption was better described by Langmuir isotherm model (r2=0.994 while that of Ni(II sorption also fitted in Freundlich isotherm model within the experimental concentration range. The amount of the constant (q0 of Ni(II under 298 K in Langmuir model was 76.92 mg/g, which was close to the experimental results. The constant n was within 2–10 in Freundlich model; it was shown that adsorption of Ni(II by the resin was easy to take place. The uptake kinetics followed the Lagergren pseudo-first-order rate equation (r2=0.9813. The particle diffusion controlled the adsorption process of Ni(II. The coefficient of the intraparticle diffusion increased with the increase of the pH values and the concentration of Ni(II in aqueous solution. There was a drop of 20.1 cm−1 for the bending vibration frequency of N–H bond. Results showed that the adsorption of Ni(II by D301R anion exchange resin was the surface complexation through the infrared spectrum analysis.

  12. Application of mixture design to optimize cementation of simulated spent radioactive ion exchange resins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAN Xue-Ying; BAO Liang-Jin; LIN Mei-Qiong; James D.NAVRATIL

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of a mixture design for spent resin immobilization in cement as well as to examine the cement-slag-ash system for spent resin solidification. Eighteen distinct combinations, consisting of Portland cement, blast furnace slag, fly ash, organic ion exchange resins and water, were selected by a mixture design computer procedure to compose representative experiment points. The measured properties of solidified forms resulting from the combinations included 28-day compressive strength, 42-day immersion strength,42-day immersion weight and slump. These data were fit to a mathematic model with the aid of Scheffe quadratic polynomial, and the effects of each ingredient on the measured properties were identified through an analysis of the response trace plots and contour plots. Utilization of an optimality function singled out an optimal combination comprising water=0.16(wt/wt), slag=0.21, ash=0.10, cement=0.27 and resin=0.26 from which the resulting response was 1 1MPa for the 28-day strength, 110mm for the slump and 5.4% for the 42-day increase in strength.

  13. Immobilization of Ion Exchange radioactive resins of the TRIGA Mark III Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last decades many countries in the world have taken interest in the use, availability, and final disposal of dangerous wastes in the environment, within these, those dangerous wastes that contain radioactive material. That is why studies have been made on materials used as immobilization agent of radioactive waste that may guarantee its storage for long periods of time under drastic conditions of humidity, temperature change and biodegradation. In mexico, the development of different applications of radioactive material in the industry, medicine and investigation, have generated radioactive waste, sealed and open sources, whose require a special technological development for its management and final disposal. The present work has as a finality to develop the process and define the agglutinating material, bitumen, cement and polyester resin that permits immobilization of resins of Ionic Exchange contaminated by Barium 153, Cesium 137, Europium 152, Cobalt 60 and Manganese 54 generated from the nuclear reactor TRIGA Mark III. Ionic interchange contaminated resin must be immobilized and is analysed under different established tests by the Mexican Official Standard NOM-019-NUCL-1995 Low level radioactive wastes package requirements for its near-surface final disposal. Immobilization of ionic interchange contaminated resins must count with the International Standards applicable in this process; in these standards, the following test must be taken in prototype examples: Free-standing water, leachability, compressive strength, biodegradation, radiation stability, thermal stability and burning rate. (Author)

  14. Exchange of interlayer cations in micaceous minerals. Progress report, August 1, 1974--July 31, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information pertaining to the sorption and exchange of interlayer cations in micaceous minerals was developed along several lines. Cs sorption experiments with different minerals and particle sizes established the periods required for maximum sorption at different temperatures and downgraded the impact anticipated from a contraction of particle edges by Cs. Added interlayer Cs in even highly charged minerals (degraded muscovite) proved to be very exchangeable in air-dry, clay size particles. Heat treatments greatly retarded the exchange of this sorbed Cs and by doing so have circumvented the commonly observed small particle effects. Structural Fe in micas was shown to be susceptible to oxidation by various Br2 treatments but these treatments also removed a lot of K that must be accounted for in a determination of changes in interlayer K exchangeability. Changes in the rate of interlayer K exchange were induced in some micaceous minerals by adding H2O2 but not in others. Specific effects of heat treatments on dioctahedral and trioctahedral micas were examined in great detail. Interlayer cation exchange experiments with different concentrations of Na and Al have produced predictable results. (U.S.)

  15. Purification by ion exchange resins of the heavy water of the reactors EL 1 and EL 2. A - the purifying process. Equipment and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heavy water was purified by tapping off part of the moderator over a mixed bed of anion and cation exchangers. The heavy water leaving the columns has a resistivity reaching several-meg-ohms, which allows the resistivity of the moderator to be maintained between 105 and 106 ohms/cm. Two methods of deuteration of the ion exchangers are described, as well as the heavy water recuperation from resins charged with radioactive products. The influence of the purity of the water on the radiolytic dissociation is investigated. An interpretation of the variations in pH and of the formation of hydrogen peroxide is given. In addition the report contains a general description of the EL1 and EL2 purification installations. (author)

  16. Understanding and modeling removal of anionic organic contaminants (AOCs) by anion exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huichun; Shields, Anthony J; Jadbabaei, Nastaran; Nelson, Maurice; Pan, Bingjun; Suri, Rominder P S

    2014-07-01

    Ionic organic contaminants (OCs) are a growing concern for water treatment and the environment and are removed inefficiently by many existing technologies. This study examined removal of anionic OCs by anion exchange resins (AXRs) as a promising alternative. Results indicate that two polystyrene AXRs (IRA910 and IRA96) have higher sorption capacities and selectivity than a polyacrylate resin (A860). For the polystyrene resins, selectivity follows: phenolates ≥ aromatic dicarboxylates > aromatic monocarboxylates > benzenesulfonate > aliphatic carboxylates. This trend can be explained based on hydration energy, the number of exchange groups, and aromaticity and hydrophobicity of the nonpolar moiety (NPM) of the anions. For A860, selectivity only varies within a narrow range (0.13-1.64). Despite the importance of the NPM of the anions, neutral solutes were sorbed much less, indicating synergistic combinations of electrostatic and nonelectrostatic interactions in the overall sorption. By conducting multiple linear regression between Abraham's descriptors and nature log of selectivity, induced dipole-related interactions and electrostatic interactions were found to be the most important interaction forces for sorption of the anions, while solute H-bond basicity has a negative effect. A predictive model was then developed for carboxylates and phenolates based on the poly parameter linear free energy relationships established for a diverse range of 16 anions and 5 neutral solutes, and was validated by accurate prediction of sorption of five test solutes within a wide range of equilibrium concentrations and that of benzoate at different pH. PMID:24877792

  17. Removal of cesium from wastewater: A cesium-specific ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Researchers at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) have applied for a patent for an ion exchange resin that will remove cesium from water. Radioactive cesium-137 is a fission product of nuclear reactor operations. Cesium may enter the water of spent fuel holding basins through defects in fuel cladding. Control of cesium in these basins is desirable to keep personnel exposure to a minimum. Cesium is also present in the waste from reprocessing of defense nuclear reactor fuel. Research has been underway at SRL for over a decade to improve management of high-level reprocessing waste. The current technology separates the waste into soluble and insoluble components. Radioactive constituents are removed from the soluble component stream and combined with the insoluble components, which are then converted to a glass for long-term storage. Cesium is the most radioactive constituent of the soluble components stream. The SRL resin is a resorcinol-formaldehyde condensation polymer highly specific for cesium and is about 10 times more effective in removal of cesium than other ion exchange resins evaluated for use in processing defense nuclear waste. Tests have been run at SRL using both simulated and actual waste streams

  18. Separation of boron isotopes in anion exchange resin column. Isotopic enrichment of 10 B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The separation of boron isotopes (10 B and 11 B) was carried out by isotopic exchange reaction between boric acid in solution and borate/poly borate anions adsorbed on an ammonium quaternary (Dowex 1 X 8 and 2 X 8) anion exchange resin packed in columns. Each resin column had 100 cm length and 1.4 cm in diameter. The columns were connected in series during displacement of boric bands. The enrichment line used pressure ranging from 2.5 to 3.0 Kg f.cm-2. N2 gas was used as in inert atmosphere in order to prevent C O2 formation. Enrichments in 10 B of 43% were obtained using Dowex 1 X 8 resin, 0.1 eq.L-1 H3 B O3 solution and band displacement of 1,876 cm. With Dowex 2 X 8 the enrichment was 40% with 1,330 cm of band displacement and 0.1 eq. L-1 H3 B O3. The boron isotopes were analysed, as methyl borate, by mass spectrometry. (author). 13 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  19. Study on elution ability of salicylic acid on ion exchange resins in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping YUAN; Jianguo CAI; Junjie GONG; Xiu DENG

    2009-01-01

    The elution ability of salicylic acid on ion exchange resins in supercritical carbon dioxide has been studied. Some factors influencing elution recovery,including entrainer, temperature, pressure and the flow rate of supercritical fluid CO2 are discussed in this work.The addition of a small amount of entrainer, such as ethanol, triethanolamine and their mixture to supercritical CO2 can cause dramatic effects on the elution ability. The results show that the salicylic acid can be only slightly eluted from the resin with supercritical CO2 alone with temperatures ranging from 307.15 to 323.15K and pressures ranging from 10 to 30MPa. Meanwhile, with the same T, P conditions, 40.58% and 73.08% salicylic acid can be eluted from the ion exchange resin with ethanol and ethanol + triethanolamine as the entrainer, respec-tively. An improved PR equation of state with VDWl mixing rules is used to calculate the elution recovery of salicylic acid in supercritical CO2 and the results agree well with the experimental data.

  20. Separation of rare earths in nitric acid medium by a novel silica-based pyridinium anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To separate rare earths in nitric acid medium by anion exchange process, a novel silica-based macro-reticular anion exchange resin (SiPyR-N4) with pyridinium as functional group has been synthesized. It was found that the SiPyR-N4 resin exhibits a quite strong adsorption for some rare earths especially the light rare earth elements such as La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Pm whose distribution coefficients onto SiPyR-N4 reach 10-25 dm3/kg-resin, which are much higher than the reported values for these elements with conventional anion exchange resins. The results from the column experiments show that the rare earths can be separated into the three groups: light, moderate and heavy rare earths and, a perfect separation between La-Pr group and Sm-Gd group can be achieved

  1. Advanced reactor water cleanup system with high-temperature electrophoresis demineralization process as alternative to ion-exchange resin process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ion-exchange resin process has been widely applied to reactor water cleanup systems to remove impurities from the water used in boiling water reactors (BWRs). Toshiba has developed a high-temperature electrophoresis demineralization process as an alternative to the ion-exchange resin process for an advanced reactor water cleanup system. Since the new process uses only inorganic materials, high-temperature and high-pressure water can be fed directly to the system. The new system was confirmed to remove ions with high efficiency in a performance test using high-temperature and high-pressure water simulating BWR water. The advanced reactor water cleanup system will be greatly simplified because heat exchangers and resin-handling equipment are not required. It will also be economical due to reductions in heat loss and resin waste. (author)

  2. Spray-type drying unit for spent ion exchange resins, sludges and radioactive concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process for drying radwaste in the liquid form or in aqueous suspension is a very attractive solution from the standpoint of volume reduction. Most of the existing drying facilities are not well adapted for drying the varieties of aqueous waste produced by the nuclear research centres and nuclear power plants, such as: - ion exchange resins, bead type or powdered resins, - centrifuge sludges, - settling sludges, - evaporator bottoms. Technicatome has selected the LEAFLASH process developed by Rhone Poulenc Recherches for drying the nuclear aqueous waste. This process has been well tried at full scale in a large number of industrial branches. The advantages of the process have been confirmed by the results obtained in operating a pilot facility. They include: - high flexibility in operation: - quick start-up and stoppage procedures, - adaptation to a wide spectrum of liquid waste without significant changes in the adjustment of the device. - compactness, - low power consumption, - complete drying of the waste for any initial concentration

  3. Esterification of free fatty acids in waste cooking oils (WCO): Role of ion-exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalan Ozbay; Nuray Oktar; N. Alper Tapan [Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey). Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of Chemical Engineering

    2008-08-15

    Although WCO plays a crucial role for the economical production of biodiesel, free fatty acid (FFA) level in the nature of WCO cause saponification problems during transesterification. Acidic ion-exchange resins can be used to decrease WCO free fatty acid level. In this study, activities of resins (Amberlyst-15 (A-15), Amberlyst-35 (A-35), Amberlyst-16 (A-16) and Dowex HCR-W2) in direct FFA esterification were examined in the temperature range of 50-60{sup o}C and the effect of catalyst amount (1-2 wt%) on FFA conversion was also analyzed. FFA conversion increased with increasing reaction temperature and catalyst amount. Order of catalytic activities was found as A-15 > A-35 > A-16 > Dowex HCR-W2. This was related to the size of average pore diameters and magnitude of BET surface area. 44 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Vitrification of ion-exchange (IEX) resins: Advantages and technical challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technologies are being developed by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the commercial sector to convert low-level radioactive ion exchange (IEX) resin wastes from the nuclear utilities to solid stabilized waste forms for permanent disposal. One of the alternative waste stabilization technologies is vitrification of the resin into glass. Wastes can be vitrified at elevated temperatures by thermal treatment. One alternative thermal treatment is conventional Joule heated melting. Vitrification of wastes into glass is an attractive option because it atomistically bonds both hazardous and radioactive species in the glass structure, and volume reduces the wastes by 70-80%. The large volume reductions allow for large associated savings in disposal and/or long term storage costs

  5. Pyro-hydrolysis treatment technology of the ion exchange resin by pebble-bed pyrolysis reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment method of spent ion-exchange resin and sludge for sub surface disposal, such as from reactor water clean-up system and from fuel pool cooling cleanup system, is unestablished even now. However, such technology is essential task because increasing the volume of these wastes from decommissioning is unavoidable problem. Due to the solutions, NGK INSULATORS, LTD (NGK) has successfully developed and confirmed that pyro-hydrolysis can treat these waste. This treatment technology, which is based on pebble-bed pyrolyser in nitrogen atmosphere by NUKEM Technologies GmbH, has been improved with superheated steam. This report describes that overview, characteristic and examination result of the treatment technology for such resins with pyro-hydrolysis. (author)

  6. Effect of Simulated N Deposition on Soil Exchangeable Cations in Three Forest Types of Subtropical China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xian-Kai; MO Jiang-Ming; P.GUNDERSERN; ZHU Wei-Xing; ZHOU Guo-Yi; LI De-Jun; ZHANG Xu

    2009-01-01

    The effects of simulated nitrogen (N) deposition on soil exchangeable cations were studied in three forest types of subtropical China.Four N treatments with three replications were designed for the monsoon evergreen broadleaf forest (mature forest):control (0 kg N ha-1 year-1),low N (50 kg N ha-1 year-1),medium N (100 kg N ha-1 year-1) and high N (150 kg N ha-1 ycar-1),and only three treatments (i.e.,control,low N,medium N) were established for the pine and mixed forests.Nitrogen had been applied continuously for 26 months before the measurement.The mature forest responded more rapidly and intensively to N additions than the pine and mixed forests,and exhibited some significant negative symptoms,e.g.,soil acidification,Al mobilization and leaching of base cations from soil.The pine and mixed forests responded slowly to N additions and exhibited no significant response of soil cations.Response of soil exchangeable cations to N deposition varied in the forests of subtropical China,depending on soil N status and land-nse history.

  7. Cationic Covalent Organic Frameworks: A Simple Platform of Anionic Exchange for Porosity Tuning and Proton Conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Heping; Liu, Bailing; Li, Bin; Zhang, Liming; Li, Yang-Guang; Tan, Hua-Qiao; Zang, Hong-Ying; Zhu, Guangshan

    2016-05-11

    Mimicking proton conduction mechanism of Nafion to construct novel proton-conducting materials with low cost and high proton conductivity is of wide interest. Herein, we have designed and synthesized a cationic covalent organic framework with high thermal and chemical stability by combining a cationic monomer, ethidium bromide (EB) (3,8-diamino-5-ethyl-6-phenylphenanthridinium bromide), with 1,3,5-triformylphloroglucinol (TFP) in Schiff base reactions. This is the first time that the stable cationic crystalline frameworks allowed for the fabrication of a series of charged COFs (EB-COF:X, X = F, Cl, Br, I) through ion exchange processes. Exchange of the extra framework ions can finely modulate the COFs' porosity and pore sizes at nanoscale. More importantly, by introducing PW12O40(3-) into this porous cationic framework, we can greatly enhance the proton conductivity of ionic COF-based material. To the best of our knowledge, EB-COF:PW12 shows the best proton conductivity at room temperature among ever reported porous organic materials. PMID:27094048

  8. Performance of selected anion exchange resins for the treatment of a high DOC content surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbert, Hugues; Gallard, Hervé; Suty, Hervé; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2005-05-01

    The objective of this study was first to compare the performance of four strong anion exchange resins (AERs) (MIEX from Orica Pty Ltd, DOWEX-11 and DOWEX-MSA from DOW chemical and IRA-938 from Rohm and Haas) for their application in drinking water treatment (natural organic matter (NOM), mineral anions (nitrate, sulfate and bromide) and pesticide removal) using bench-scale experimental procedures on a high DOC content surface water. The efficiency of MIEX for NOM and mineral anions removal was furthermore evaluated using bench-scale dose-response experiments on raw, clarified and post-ozonated waters. NOM removal was assessed using the measurement of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV254) and the use of high-performance size exclusion chromatography with UV (HPSEC/UV) and fluorescence detection (HPSEC/FLUO). The MIEX and IRA938 anionic resins exhibit a faster removal of NOM and mineral anions compared to the DOWEX11 and MSA AERs. All the resins were found to be very effective with similar performances after 30 to 45 min of contact time. As expected, only limited sorption of atrazine and isoproturon (C0=1 microg/L) occurred with MIEX, DOWEX11 and MSA AERs. MIEX resin proved to be very efficient in eliminating NOM of high-molecular weight but also a large part of the smallest UV absorbing organic compounds which were refractory to coagulation/flocculation treatment. Remaining DOC levels after 30 min of contact with MIEX were found similar in raw water, clarified water and even post-ozonated water implying no DOC benefit can be gained by employing conventional treatment prior to MIEX treatment. Removal of bromide (initial concentration 110 microg/L) was also observed and ranged from 30% to 65% for resin dose increasing from 2 to 8 mL/L. T PMID:15899268

  9. Quantum-CEP processing spent ion exchange resins from nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum-CEP (Q-CEP) is an innovative and proprietary technology developed by Molten Metal Technology, Inc, which can process radioactive and mixed waste streams to decontaminate and recover resources of commercial value while achieving significant volume reduction and radionuclide stabilization. A Q-CEP facility, located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, processes low-level radioactive spent ion exchange resins (IER) from U.S commercial nuclear power plants. The first campaign processing low level radioactive spent IER was successfully completed in December 1996. Other milestones, since December, include operating parallel Trains A and B simultaneously and processing 25,000 lb. dry resin (50,000 lb. wet resin) or six equivalent High Integrity Containers (HICs) in one batch campaign, in March; and processing 50,000 lb. dry resin or 12 equivalent HICs in one batch campaign in May. This paper presents results from the March campaign (97-008) in which 25,000 lb. of dry spent IER from five nuclear power stations were processed. This campaign has been selected since it is representative of campaigns completed during the first five months of operation. Key highlights for this campaign include processing six HICs in batch campaign while achieving a volume reduction of 24: 1. Key performance targets for the facility are to process an average of six HICs per campaign batch and achieve a volume reduction of 30: 1. The average batch size and other performance parameters have steadily improved during the initial operating period with radioactive resin. The progress was dramatically demonstrated by the May campaign during which 12 HICs were processed - achieving a volume reduction estimated to exceed 50: 1. The campaigns in March and May demonstrate that the facility's design and technology are capable of achieving and even exceeding the facility's key target performance parameters

  10. Cation-exchange membranes: comparison of homopolymer, block copolymer, and heterogeneous membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schauer, Jan; Llanos, J.; Žitka, Jan; Hnát, J.; Bouzek, K.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 124, SI 1 (2012), E66-E72. ISSN 0021-8995 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E08005 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 212903 - WELTEMP Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : cation-exchange membranes * poly(phenylene oxide) * poly(ether ketones) Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.395, year: 2012

  11. Determination of degradation conditions of exchange resins containing technetium; Determinacion de condiciones de degradacion de resinas de intercambio conteniendo tecnecio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera S, A.; Monroy G, F.; Quintero P, E., E-mail: aa_1190@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The quantification of Tc-99 in spent exchange resins, coming from nuclear power plants, is indispensable to define their administration. The Tc-99 is a pure beta emitter of 210000 years of half-life, volatile and of a high mobility in water and soil. For this reason, the objective of this work is to establish a digestion method of ionic exchange resins containing technetium that retains more than 95% of this radioisotope. Mineralization tests were carried out of a resin Amberlite IRN-150 by means of an oxidation heat, in acid medium, varying the resin mass, the medium volume, the media type, the temperature and the digestion time. The digested samples were analyzed by gas chromatography to estimate the grade of their degradation. The {sup 99m}Tc was used as tracer to determine the technetium percentage recovered after mineralizing the resin. The digestion process depends on the temperature and the resin mass. At higher temperature better mineralization of samples and to greater resin mass to a constant temperature, less degradation of the resin. The spectra beta of the {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 99}Tc are presented. (Author)

  12. Experimental design approach for identification of the factors influencing the γ-radiolysis of ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma radiolysis was investigated on a nuclear grade mixed bed ion exchange resin and its pure components under different irradiation conditions. Screening designs were performed to identify the factors influencing gas production after their γ-radiolysis and to compare their γ-degradation stability. Only hydrogen and trimethylamine quantities were considered as the response in the experimental designs. The other detected gases and water-soluble products were used to improve the resins degradation. Aerobic irradiation atmosphere decreased the H2g production of AmbOH, MB400, and amines. The water presence increased the H2g quantities for AmbH and decreased those for MB400 resin. Liquid water had no effect on H2g production from AmbOH but was favorable to increased amine production. The H2g production of AmbH increased with the absorbed dose that had little effect on the AmbOH resin. No impact of dose on the H2g production was detected for MB400 that appeared to be less degraded. - Highlights: • Ion exchange resins were irradiated under different conditions. • Resins degradation was studied from the gases and water-soluble products analyses. • A screening design allowed identifying the factors influencing gases production. • The resins gamma stability was estimated from the response of experimental designs. • A reaction scheme was proposed for each resin degraded under different conditions

  13. Solubility and cation exchange in phosphate rock and saturated clinoptilolite mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, E. R.; Hossner, L. R.; Ming, D. W.; Henninger, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    Mixtures of zeolite and phosphate rock (PR) have the potential to provide slow-release fertilization of plants in synthetic soils by dissolution and ion-exchange reactions. This study was conducted to examine solubility and cation-exchange relationships in mixtures of PR and NH4- and K-saturated clinoptilolite (Cp). Batch-equilibration experiments were designed to investigate the effect of PR source, the proportion of exchangeable K and NH4, and the Cp to PR ratio on solution N, P, K, and Ca concentrations. The dissolution and cation-exchange reactions that occurred after mixing NH4- and K-saturated Cp with PR increased the solubility of the PR and simultaneously released NH4 and K into solution. The more reactive North Carolina (NC) PR rendered higher solution concentrations of NH4 and K when mixed with Cp than did Tennessee (TN) PR. Solution P concentrations for the Cp-NC PR mixture and the Cp-TN PR mixture were similar. Solution concentrations of N, P, K, and Ca and the ratios of these nutrients in solution varied predictably with the type of PR, the Cp/PR ratio, and the proportions of exchangeable K and NH4 on the Cp. Our research indicated that slow-release fertilization using Cp/PR media may provide adequate levels of N, P, and K to support plant growth. Solution Ca concentrations were lower than optimum for plant growth.

  14. Exchangeable cation composition of the smectite-rich plate boundary fault at the Japan Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Jun; Inaoi, Chisaki; Conin, Marianne

    2016-04-01

    To better understand physicochemical processes in smectite-rich fault zones, we examined exchangeable cation composition of samples from the slip zone of the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake (Mw9.0) recovered by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 343. Our chemical analyses revealed that the exchangeable Ca2+ and Mg2+ are enriched in the slip zone, while Na+ is depleted. K+ shows a complicated depth profile probably due to K fixation. Based on fluid chemistry data, we estimated apparent selectivity coefficients of exchange reactions in the ternary Ca2+-Mg2+-Na+ system. The results suggest that the Na+ to Mg2+ exchange reaction on smectite might have progressed in the slip zone. One explanation for this feature is local progress of the reaction triggered by coseismic thermogenesis during the earthquake. Considering that the frictional property of smectite gouge is dependent on the exchangeable cation composition, chemical processes as observed in this study are intimately linked to physical aspect of smectite-bearing faults.

  15. Electron beam induced cationic polymerization of epoxy resins. Dependence of Tg on conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The high-energy radiation curing of monomer blends polymerizing by a free radical or by a cationic mechanism receives increasing attention in the perspective of high performance composite materials. In the present work, we have focused our attention on epoxy formulations as models of the matrices polymerizing by a cationic mechanism that could be used in fiber-reinforced composites for aerospace applications. We have examined the progress of the electron beam (EB) induced polymerization of diglycidylether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) in the presence of a diaryliodonium salt (DAIS) by FTIR spectroscopy and by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMA). The obtained results allow to draw the gradual increase of the temperature for the network thermomechanical transition (Ta, associated with the glass transition temperature Tg) over a broad range of conversion (p) and reveal a peculiar behavior at high conversion. In this domain (p > 0.90), the material's Tg is shown to decrease when conversion approaches unity. Moreover, the post-irradiation thermal treatment of the materials, that generally yields effective 'dark curing', appears to induce a decrease of Tg, with an amplitude correlated with the amount of DAIS in the formulation. Owing to the particular nature of the propagating centers in cationic polymerisation, the thermal relaxation of ionic clusters trapped in the glassy matrix can be reasonably invoked as a possible cause for this behavior

  16. The importance of cerium substituted phosphates as cation exchanger some unique properties and related application potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven different samples of an inorganic ion exchanger, cerium phosphate, suitable for column use have been prepared under varying conditions. The property of these exchangers has been characterized by Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy. These exchangers are stable in water, dilute mineral acids, ethanol, methanol, acetone and ether. However, in concentrated HCl and HNO3 they decompose. They retain about 50% of their exchange value after drying at 80 degC, and can be regenerated twice without any decrease in exchange capacity. The distribution coefficient measurements for alkaline earth metals, tellurium, iodine and molybdenum using these seven ion exchangers were studied. This revealed the relative affinity for each exchanger, where the sorption in general was most effective at P H 6-8. The titration curves of cerium phosphate (disodium) with alkaline earth metals showed that the selectivity sequence Ba2+>Sr2+>CA2+>Mg2+ is observed. Furthermore, it could be deduced that the adsorption of alkaline earth metal cations greatly depends on the cation. These studies have also shown that cerium phosphates with divalent ions are strongly preferred to monovalent ones. Therefore, as for the cerium phosphates with large monovalent ions, the lack of exchange for Ba2+, Mg2+ or other alkaline earth metal ions should be essentially due to steric hindrance and this could include any one of the following: the large crystalline radius of metal ions or large hydrated ionic radius and high energy of hydration for other divalent ions. Three binary separations of TeIV - MoIV, TeIV -I1 has been developed and the recovery ranging from 90 to 100% has been achieved on cerium phosphate (disodium) columns

  17. Cation Exchange in Dynamic 3D Porous Magnets: Improvement of the Physical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grancha, Thais; Acosta, Alvaro; Cano, Joan; Ferrando-Soria, Jesús; Seoane, Beatriz; Gascon, Jorge; Pasán, Jorge; Armentano, Donatella; Pardo, Emilio

    2015-11-16

    We report two novel three-dimensional porous coordination polymers (PCPs) of formulas Li4{Mn4[Cu2(Me3mpba)2]3}·68H2O (2) and K4{Mn4[Cu2(Me3mpba)2]3}·69H2O (3) obtained-via alkali cation exchange in a single-crystal to single-crystal process-from the earlier reported anionic manganese(II)-copper(II) PCP of formula Na4{Mn4[Cu2(Me3mpba)2]3}·60H2O (1) [Me3mpba(4-) = N,N'-2,4,6-trimethyl-1,3-phenylenebis(oxamate)]. This postsynthetic process succeeds where the direct synthesis in solution from the corresponding building blocks fails and affords significantly more robust PCPs with enhanced magnetic properties [long-range 3D magnetic ordering temperatures for the dehydrated phases (1'-3') of 2.0 (1'), 12.0 (2'), and 20.0 K (3')]. Changes in the adsorptive properties upon postsynthetic exchange suggest that the nature, electrostatic properties, mobility, and location of the cations within the framework are crucial for the enhanced structural stability. Overall, these results further confirm the potential of postsynthetic methods (including cation exchange) to obtain PCPs with novel or enhanced physical properties while maintaining unaltered their open-framework structures. PMID:26492551

  18. Tuning light emission of PbS nanocrystals from infrared to visible range by cation exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binetti, Enrico; Striccoli, Marinella; Sibillano, Teresa; Giannini, Cinzia; Brescia, Rosaria; Falqui, Andrea; Comparelli, Roberto; Corricelli, Michela; Tommasi, Raffaele; Agostiano, Angela; Curri, M. Lucia

    2015-10-01

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, with intense and sharp-line emission between red and near-infrared spectral regions, are of great interest for optoelectronic and bio-imaging applications. The growth of an inorganic passivation layer on nanocrystal surfaces is a common strategy to improve their chemical and optical stability and their photoluminescence quantum yield. In particular, cation exchange is a suitable approach for shell growth at the expense of the nanocrystal core size. Here, the cation exchange process is used to promote the formation of a CdS passivation layer on the surface of very small PbS nanocrystals (2.3 nm in diameter), blue shifting their optical spectra and yielding luminescent and stable nanostructures emitting in the range of 700-850 nm. Structural, morphological and compositional investigation confirms the nanocrystal size contraction after the cation-exchange process, while the PbS rock-salt crystalline phase is retained. Absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrate the growth of a passivation layer with a decrease of the PbS core size, as inferred by the blue-shift of the excitonic peaks. The surface passivation strongly increases the photoluminescence intensity and the excited state lifetime. In addition, the nanocrystals reveal increased stability against oxidation over time. Thanks to their absorption and emission spectral range and the slow recombination dynamics, such highly luminescent nano-objects can find interesting applications in sensitized photovoltaic cells and light-emitting devices.

  19. Tuning light emission of PbS nanocrystals from infrared to visible range by cation exchange

    KAUST Repository

    Binetti, Enrico

    2015-10-27

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, with intense and sharp-line emission between red and near-infrared spectral regions, are of great interest for optoelectronic and bio-imaging applications. The growth of an inorganic passivation layer on nanocrystal surfaces is a common strategy to improve their chemical and optical stability and their photoluminescence quantum yield. In particular, cation exchange is a suitable approach for shell growth at the expense of the nanocrystal core size. Here, the cation exchange process is used to promote the formation of a CdS passivation layer on the surface of very small PbS nanocrystals (2.3 nm in diameter), blue shifting their optical spectra and yielding luminescent and stable nanostructures emitting in the range of 700–850 nm. Structural, morphological and compositional investigation confirms the nanocrystal size contraction after the cation-exchange process, while the PbS rock-salt crystalline phase is retained. Absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrate the growth of a passivation layer with a decrease of the PbS core size, as inferred by the blue-shift of the excitonic peaks. The surface passivation strongly increases the photoluminescence intensity and the excited state lifetime. In addition, the nanocrystals reveal increased stability against oxidation over time. Thanks to their absorption and emission spectral range and the slow recombination dynamics, such highly luminescent nano-objects can find interesting applications in sensitized photovoltaic cells and light-emitting devices.

  20. L(+-Lactic acid recovery from cassava bagasse based fermented medium using anion exchange resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojan P. John

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The properties of the ion exchange resins, Amberlite IRA 402, a strong anion exchange resin and IRA 67, a weak anion exchange resin were determined to evaluate their comparative suitability for lactic acid recovery from fermented cassava bagasse. Data on binding capacities and recovery proved that weak base resin in chloride form was the most favourable ones for lactic acid recovery from aqueous solutions and fermentation media. Fermented media obtained through simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cassava bagasse starch hydrolysate based medium were used for lactic acid recovery study using weak base resin column. Amberlite IRA 67 had much more efficiency than Amberlite IRA 402 to recover lactic acid. Like in other reports, due to the presence of nutrients and ions other than lactate, the binding capacity was slightly lesser while using fermented media (~93% instead of aqueous lactic acid solutions (~98%.As propriedades das resinas de troca iônica, da Amberlite IRA 402, uma resina de troca aniônica forte, e da IRA 67, uma resina de troca aniônica fraca, foram determinadas para se avaliar a adequabilidade comparativa delas à obtenção de ácido lático de bagaço de mandioca fermentado. Dados sobre a capacidade de ligação e sobre a obtenção provaram que a resina de base fraca na forma de cloreto era a mais adequada para a obtenção de ácido lático em soluções aquosas e meios de fermentação. Os meios de fermentação obtidos da sacarificação e da fermentação simultâneas de meios baseados hidrolisados de fécula de bagaço de mandioca foram usados para o estudo da obtenção de ácido lático usando uma coluna de resina de base fraca. A Amberlite IRA 67 mostrou-se muito mais eficaz do que a Amberlite IRA 402 para a obtenção de ácido lático. Como em outros relatórios, devido à presença de nutrientes e íons que não lactatos, a capacidade de ligação foi ligeiramente inferior enquanto se utilizavam meios

  1. Kinetics study on separation of cadmium from tellurium in acidic solution media using ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of using ion-exchange resins to separate cadmium from tellurium in acidic solutions of the two metals was investigated. We studied the competitive adsorption of cadmium and tellurium in such resins under varying acid strengths and contact time. We found that low sulfuric acid strength (i.e., 0.5 M) was most effective in removing cadmium from solutions. Different ion-exchange resins were tested for their affinity for cadmium and tellurium ions. In the selected systems, the ion-exchange rate of cadmium was rapid in the first 20 min, and reached equilibrium within 2 h. The Lagergren first-order model described the kinetic data with high coefficient of determination and correlation values. At room temperatures the ion-exchange for cadmium onto the resin followed the Freundlich isotherm model. The maximum removal of cadmium obtained from batch studies using resin A was 91%. Column studies with the same resin showed a removal of cadmium of 99.99% or higher

  2. Study on immobilization of spent ion exchange resins generated at CIAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At nuclear facilities the process for control system chemistry or the removal of radioactive containment in reactor primary coolants and /or cleanup of spent fuel pool, removal of boric acid and nuclear study centers have typically used organic ion exchange resin While their useful life ended, their ability of regeneration sharply depressed. Usually regeneration is not practiced. Due to considerable radioactive nuclei loading on it and in such a practice large amount of secondary liquid waste would be conducted to the waste treatment system. The used resin usually will be removed from the column and conveyed to shielded storage tank by compressed air system. Spent ion exchanger has been considered to be problematic wet solid waste. To avoid radiation dispersing into the environment, to make out an appropriate way for conditioning the waste is very important. According to contract with nation and Tsinghua university characterization of spent ion exchanger generated in our facilities has been finished at our lab. A direct cementation process has been set up and 1:1 scale demonstration has been fulfilled using formulation developed by Tsinghua University on the cementation process. Peak of temperature during hydration has been measured. Compressive strength and endure resistibility of the waste form for water and atmosphere have been tested. Results shown that performance of waste form can meet demand on national criteria. The process is easy to operate and its main advantages are described as following (1) the lay out of equipment is so compact that a shield from radiation for operation and maintenance is facilitated. (2) Type and shape of the resins involved in the experiment can completely represent that of reactors by now as well as in the future. (authors)

  3. Synergistic desorption of molybdenum from the strong base anion exchange resin by molybdnum fouling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the synerglstic desorption of molybdenum from the strong base anion exchange resin is studied using ammonium hydroxide and ammonium sulfate, sodium hydroxide and sodium sulfate or sodium hydroxide and sodium chloride mixed chloride mixed desorbents. The coefficients of synergistlc desorption for various mixed desorbents are obtained. The experimental results show that the desorption efficiency of the mixed desorbent containing ammonium hydroxide and ammonium sulfate is so high that it can substitute for the mixed desorbent used in the plant. The harmful affect of the chloride ion on production can be eliminated if this mixed desorbent is used for the plant

  4. Artificial liver support for postoperative hepatic failure with anion exchange resin (BR-601).

    OpenAIRE

    Sakagami,Kenichi; MIYAZAKI, MASASHI; Matsuoka, Junji; Shiozaki,Shigehiro; Saito, Shinya; Orita,Kunzo

    1986-01-01

    An artificial liver support system for plasma exchange and plasma perfusion through BR-601 resin using a membrane separator was applied to 5 patients with postoperative liver failure. Percent absorption of total and direct bilirubin, and of bile acids were 77.1 +/- 6.4, 78.4 +/- 6.1, and 93.4 +/- 3.6%, respectively, when 250 ml of plasma was treated. Percent reductions in total and direct bilirubin, and in bile acids were 24.5 +/- 5.8, 25.5 +/- 5.8 and 30.9 +/- 8.5%, respectively. In contrast...

  5. Flow injection spectrophotometric determination of low concentrations of orthosphate in natural waters employing ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and fast method for the determination of low concentrations of orthophosphate in natural waters is described. Ion exchange is incorporated into a flow injection system by usina a resin column in the sample loop of a proportion injector. Effects of sample aspiration rate, sampling time, eluting agent concentration, pumping rate of the sample carrier stream and interfaces, were investigated both using 32PO3-4 or 31PO3-4 with columns coupled to a gerger-muller detector and incorporated in a flow system with molybdenum blue colorinetry. (M.A.C.)

  6. Synthesis, characterization and ion exchange properties of zirconium(IV) tungstoiodophosphate, a new cation exchanger

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Weqar Ahmad Siddiqui; Shakeel Ahmad Khan

    2007-02-01

    Zirconium(IV) tungstoiodophosphate has been synthesized under a variety of conditions. The most chemically and thermally stable sample is prepared by adding a mixture of aqueous solutions of 0.5 mol L-1 sodium tungstate, potassium iodate and 1 mol L-1 orthophosphoric acid to aqueous solution of 0.1 mol L-1 zirconium(IV) oxychloride. Its ion exchange capacity for Na+ and K+ was found to be 2.20 and 2.35 meq g-1 dry exchanger, respectively. The material has been characterized on the basis of chemical composition, pH titration, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis. The effect on the exchange capacity of drying the exchanger at different temperatures has been studied. The analytical importance of the material has been established by quantitative separation of Pb2+ from other metal ions.

  7. CATION-EXCHANGE MEMBRANES WITH POLYANILINE SURFACE LAYER FOR WATER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinar Dilshatovich Fazullin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ion-exchange membranes are widely used in modern technologies, particularly in the field of water treatment and make it possible to considerably reduce expenses for wastewater treatment and ensure high degree of purification. Currently, perfluorinated sulfated proton-conducting membranes are often used, such as NAFION and its Russian analogue, MF-4SK based on co-polymerization product of a perfluorinated vinyl ether with tetrafluoroethylene. However, with development of the industry, materials with improved properties and lower cost are required. The aim is to obtain ion-exchange membranes for water treatment from metal ions and to study physico-chemical properties of obtained membranes. In this study, cation exchange composite membranes with modified polyaniline surface layer on nylon and PTFE substrate have been obtained. Changes in the structure of membranes were recorded using a microscope. Throughput capacity of the membranes was determined by passing a certain volume of distilled water through the membrane. The experiment intended to determine electivity of membranes was performed by passing a certain volume of metal salt solutions of a known concentration, after which the filtrate was collected. Concentrations of the studied metal ions in the original solution and in the filtrate were determined by the method of atomic adsorptive spectrometry with electro thermal atomization "Quantum Z.ETA". Prepared highly selective ion exchange membranes. Properties of modified membranes, such as selective permeability and ion-exchange capacity have been determined. The membranes feature high selectivity for heavy metal ions. Moisture-retaining power and swelling ability of the membranes have been studied. Selectivity of the membrane to heavy metal ions is between 70 and 99%. Ion-exchange capacity of the obtained nylon polyaniline membrane is not inferior to some commercially available cation-exchange membranes. Use of the modified membranes in the

  8. Ion exchange kinetics of alkaline earth metals on acrylamide zirconium(IV) phosphate cation exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) exchange with H(I) on acrylamide zirconium(IV) phosphate has been studied applying the Nernst-Planck equation. The rate of exchange is found to be particle diffusion controlled at a metal ion concentration ≥ 0.01M in aqueous medium. The energy and entropy of activation vary linearly with the ionic radii and mobilities. (author)

  9. Preliminary studies of the total cation exchange capacity of sediments from two North Atlantic study sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initially four different methods of measuring total cation exchange capacity were compared. There were two chemical methods (ammonium saturation with displacement into seawater, and barium saturation followed by replacement with magnesium) and two radiochemical methods (sodium-22 and caesium-134 saturation). The barium-magnesium and sodium-22 methods were then applied to sediment samples from Core D10164Pound1K from the Nares Fracture Valley, and Core D10554Pound11K from the eastern flank of the Great Meteor Rise. The material at site 10164 is a pelagic clay whereas at site 10554 it is carbonate ooze. The total cation exchange capacities (T.C.E.C.) of samples from the two sites are similar when measured by the sodium-22 method, the mean for Core 10164 was 21.7 meq/100g and 24.4 meq/100g for Core 10554. However for Core 10554 the barium-magnesium method gives a mean of 42.8 meq/100g. The difference in T.C.E.C. measured by the two methods appears to be due to the high calcite content of core 10554 sediment. Measured exchange capacities are lower than in coastal sediments. In deep sea sediments organic matter either makes a very small contribution to the T.C.E.C. (core 10164) or actually blocks exchange sites (Core 10554). Amorphous oxides of iron and manganese contribute between 20 and 50% of the T.C.E.C. (author)

  10. Extra-framework cation release from heulandite-type rich tuffs on exchange with NH(4)(+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantiranis, N; Sikalidis, K; Godelitsas, A; Squires, C; Papastergios, G; Filippidis, A

    2011-06-01

    The outgoing cations of Greek heulandite-rich tuff samples (heulandite type-III, 91wt.%, mica 4wt.%, feldspar 5wt. %, CEC 2.22meq/g) were analysed upon exchange with ammonium acetate using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The kinetic curves of each cation were investigated over a total time of contact of 720h with sampling at frequent intervals. The materials were examined by powder X-ray diffraction, SEM-EDS, and AAS. The sorption ability was measured using the ammonium acetate saturation method. It was found that Ca(2+) presents an unexpected extra-framework release and a surprisingly high degree of exchange (90%). The exchange of Mg (57%) is also worthy of note whereas the behavior of K(+) showed an expected rapid initial release. The behavior of Na(+) must be similar. However, its lower concentration in the zeolitic material minimizes its overall significance somewhat. On the other hand, Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) release is kinetically much slower, compared to that of alkali metal ions, and this phenomenon indicates that different exchange energies are needed till final equilibrium. PMID:21296480

  11. Determination of plutonium in urine by means of ion-exchanging resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having recalled the biological and biophysical hazards related to plutonium, and that urine analysis is the only way to assess internal contamination by plutonium, otherwise not accessible by direct measurement, this report outlines the difficulties associated with such measurements. The author proposes a simple and fast method, and therefore easily applicable to a great number of routine analyses, based on the use of anionic resins. He evokes previous works on the use of ion exchanging resins for the concentration and purification of plutonium at an industrial scale, and preliminary tests. The author then reports the development of a method applicable to urine. It comprises three main steps: plutonium concentration (plutonium co-precipitation, preparation of the fixing liquid), purification on resin, final sample measurement. After a discussion on this method, the author details the various treatment techniques and steps to be implemented for urines recovery and processing, for the determination of plutonium in water. Efficiency is said to be about 88 per cent for urine and 95 per cent for water

  12. Concentration and separation of vanadium from alkaline media by strong alkaline anion-exchange resin 717

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jinwen; SU Peng; WU Wenwei; LIAO Sen; QIN Huiquan; WU Xuehang; HE Xiaohu; TAO Liujia; FAN Yanjin

    2010-01-01

    With strong alkaline anion-exchange resin 717 as the sorbent and NaOH solution as the eluent, a study on the sorption from alkaline solution and elution of vanadium(Ⅴ), silicon(Ⅳ), and aluminium(Ⅲ) was carried out. Different parameters affecting the sorption and elution process,including temperature, pH values as well as the ratio of resin to solution, were investigated. The results show that sorption degree of vanadium(Ⅴ) increases with a decrease of pH values, and V(Ⅴ) ions are easier sorbed than Si(Ⅳ) and Al(Ⅲ) ions under the same conditions. The sorption degree of V(Ⅴ), Si(Ⅳ), and Al(Ⅲ) at pH 9.14 for 15 min are 90.6%, 33.5%, and 21.6%, respectively. Si(Ⅳ), Al(Ⅲ), and V(Ⅴ) ions sorbed on 717 resin were eluted by use of 2 mol.L-1 NaOH solution; the desorption degree of V(Ⅴ), Si(Ⅳ), and Al(Ⅲ) for 5 min are 81.7 %,99.1%, and 99.3%, respectively.

  13. Evaluation and application of anion exchange resins to measure groundwater uranium flux at a former uranium mill site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucker, Valerie; Ranville, James; Newman, Mark; Peacock, Aaron; Cho, Jaehyun; Hatfield, Kirk

    2011-10-15

    Laboratory tests and a field validation experiment were performed to evaluate anion exchange resins for uranium sorption and desorption in order to develop a uranium passive flux meter (PFM). The mass of uranium sorbed to the resin and corresponding masses of alcohol tracers eluted over the duration of groundwater installation are then used to determine the groundwater and uranium contaminant fluxes. Laboratory based batch experiments were performed using Purolite A500, Dowex 21K and 21K XLT, Lewatit S6328 A resins and silver impregnated activated carbon to examine uranium sorption and extraction for each material. The Dowex resins had the highest uranium sorption, followed by Lewatit, Purolite and the activated carbon. Recoveries from all ion exchange resins were in the range of 94-99% for aqueous uranium in the environmentally relevant concentration range studied (0.01-200 ppb). Due to the lower price and well-characterized tracer capacity, Lewatit S6328 A was used for field-testing of PFMs at the DOE UMTRA site in Rifle, CO. The effect on the flux measurements of extractant (nitric acid)/resin ratio, and uranium loading were investigated. Higher cumulative uranium fluxes (as seen with concentrations>1 ug U/gram resin) yielded more homogeneous resin samples versus lower cumulative fluxes (<1 ug U/gram resin), which caused the PFM to have areas of localized concentration of uranium. Resin homogenization and larger volume extractions yield reproducible results for all levels of uranium fluxes. Although PFM design can be improved to measure flux and groundwater flow direction, the current methodology can be applied to uranium transport studies. PMID:21798572

  14. Recovery of uranium from UCF liquid waste by anion exchange resin CG-400: Breakthrough curves, elution behavior and modeling studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Amberlite CG-400 anion exchange resin has been used for the recovery of uranium. ► The breakthrough curves and elution behaviors of CG-400 resin have been studied in detailed. ► The mathematical models have been used to analyze the experimental data. ► The CG-400 resin has been applied successfully for uranium recovery from UCF liquid waste. - Abstract: Continuous fixed-bed column studies were carried out by using Amberlite CG-400 anion exchange resin for the recovery of uranium from aqueous solutions (synthetic solutions and uranium conversion facility (UCF) liquid waste). Effects of operating parameters such as flow rate and bed height were studied. The breakthrough capacity decreases with increasing flow rate, but this dependence was not significant with a long column. The maximum breakthrough capacity of uranium ions were achieved by CG-400 resin at a flow rate of 0.2 mL min−1 and bed height 9.1 cm (4 g resin). The elution behavior of uranium from CG-400 resin by various eluents have been investigated and the results show that 0.5 mol L−1 HNO3 is a good eluent for uranium recovery. The Adams–Bohart, Thomas, Yoon–Nelson and Dose–Response models were applied to the experimental data to determine the characteristic parameters of the column for process design using linear regression. The breakthrough curve calculated from the Dose–Response model was in best agreement with the experimental data

  15. Experimental measurement and modeling of the distribution of solvent and ions between an aqueous phase and an ion exchange resin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren Gregers; Thomsen, Kaj

    2005-01-01

    The distribution of solutes and solvent between an aqueous solution of salt and an ion exchange resin has been measured at ambient temperature. The experiments have been performed for aqueous solutions of KNO3, KCl, Ca(NO3)2 and CaCl2 in the concentration range of 0-3N. The absorption has been...... measured for 3 gel type and 3 macroreticular resins with a degree of crosslinking varying from 10.5 to 18.5%. The experimental results have been modeled with the Extended UNIQUAC model combined with an elastic term taking the elastic properties of the resin structure into account. The model shows very good...

  16. Strongly reduced band gap in NiMn2O4 due to cation exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NiMn2O4 is extensively used as a basis material for temperature sensors due to its negative temperature coefficient of resistance (NTCR), which is commonly attributed to the hopping mechanism involving coexisting octahedral-site Mn4+ and Mn3+. Using density-functional theory + Hubbard U calculations, we identify a ferrimagnetic inverse spinel phase as the collinear ground state of NiMn2O4. By a 12.5% cation exchange, a mixed phase with slightly higher energy can be constructed, accompanied by the formation of an impurity-like band in the original 1 eV band gap. This impurity-like band reduces the gap to 0.35 eV, suggesting a possible source of NTCR. - Highlights: • Density functional based calculations were used to study collinear phase of NiMn2O4. • The ground-state structure is a ferrimagnetic inverse spinel phase. • The tetrahedral and octahedral Mn cations have ferromagnetic interactions. • A 12.5% cation exchange introduces an impurity-like band in the original 1 eV gap. • The 0.35 eV gap suggests a source of negative temperature coefficient of resistance

  17. Erionite-Na upon heating: dehydration dynamics and exchangeable cations mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballirano, Paolo; Pacella, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    Erionite is a fibrous zeolite significantly more tumorigenic than crocidolite asbestos upon inhalation. In recent years, several papers have been published aimed at characterizing from the crystal-chemical point of view erionite fibres. As their toxicity has been ascribed to Fe acquired within the human body, studies aimed at characterizing the iron topochemistry have also been published, suggesting a possible important role played by the ionic exchange properties and cations mobility of this zeolite on developing carcinogenicity. Here we report the analysis results of the thermal behaviour of erionite-Na, which has been found to deviate significantly from that of erionite-K. This result is in contrast with the current scientific view that differences in weighted ionic potential, Si/Al ratio and size of exchangeable cations result in significantly different thermal behaviours, all those parameters being nearly identical or very similar in both species. The different mobility of the extraframework cations observed in erionite samples with dissimilar chemistry is of particular interest within the frame of the hypothesis that their biological activity could depend, apart from surface interactions, also on bulk effects.

  18. Uranium recovery and uranium remove from acid mine waters by ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchange using resins is one of few processes capable of reducing contaminants in effluents to very low levels according to environmental legislation. In this study the process was used to remove and recovery uranium from acid mine waters at Pocos de Caldas-MG Uranium Mining and Milling Plant. The presence of pyrite in the waste rock piles, resulting acid drainage with several pollutants. Including uranium ranging from 6 to 14 mg/l, as sulfate complex, that can be removed by an anionic exchanger. Studies of uranium sorption without treatment, and with lime pretreatment of water to precipitate the iron and recovery uranium as commercial product, are presented. Uranium elution was done with NaCl solutions. Saline concentration and retention time were the parameters studied. the uranium decontaminations level in the effluents from acid mine water was 94%. (author)

  19. Leaching tests of immobilized spent ion-exchange resins contaminated with 14 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the conditioning of ion exchangers generated from operation of Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 techniques of direct immobilization in cement, bitumen and organic polymers have been experimented. The selected process for conditioning of spent resins is their bituminization using industrial bitumen, I 60-70, made in Romania. The conditioning pilot plant was built in 1997 and the bituminization experiments were run during 300 hours in 1997-1998 using simulated inactive wastes (A 600 and C100H ion exchangers). The anionite was loaded with inactive carbon by equilibrating with a known amount of CO32- from the stock solution. This paper presents the results of leach tests on bitumen products for determination of leaching rates of 14 C. (authors)

  20. Radiolysis of the AV-17×8 ČS anion-exchange resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoníček, B.; Habersbergerová, A.; Janovský, I.; Kysela, J.; Pejša, R.

    The mixture of the anion exchange resin AV-17×8 čs in borate form and of a deaerated aqueous solution containing H 3BO 3 and NH 3 ( pH = 7) was irradiated with gamma rays in both static and dynamic conditions. A loss of strong-base exchange capacity and an increase of weak-base capacity was observed. In the solution, (CH 3) 3N, (CH 3) 2NH and CH 3NH 2 were found as the radiolytic products, their relative ratio being 15.7 : 3.7 : 1. Further, NH 3 is formed with the concentration of the same order as that of CH 3NH 2. Beside hydrogen, which is the prevailing gaseous product of the radiolysis of the mixture, methane and ethane arise, their ratio in the dynamic irradiation being 2.8 to 6.0. The main features of the radiolysis are outlined.

  1. Radiolysis of the AV-17 x 8 cs anion-exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mixture of the anion exchange resin AV-17 x 8 cs in borate form and of a deaerated aqueous solution containing H3BO3 and NH3 (pH = 7) was irradiated with gamma rays in both static and dynamic conditions. A loss of strong-base exchange capacity and an increase of weak-base capacity was observed. In the solution, (CH3)3N, (CH3)2NH and CH3NH2 were found as the radiolytic products, their relative ratio being 15.7: 3.7: 1. Further, NH3 is formed with the concentration of the same order as that of CH3NH2. Beside hydrogen, which is the prevailing gaseous product of the radiolysis of the mixture, methane and ethane arise, their ratio in the dynamic irradiation being 2.8 to 6.0. The main features of the radiolysis are outlined. (author)

  2. Preparation of a Cation Exchanger from Cork Waste: Thermodynamic Study of the Ion Exchange Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An ion exchanger was prepared by sulfonation of cork-waste chars. The exchange properties of the resultant materialwere characterized using Na+, Ca2+ or Fe3+ aqueous solutions, The content of metal ions in the solutions weredetermined by atomic absorption spectrometry. On the basis of the results obtained, the chemical equilibrium andits thermodynamic aspects related to the ion exchange process were studied. It was found that equilibrium constantK varies by the order: Na+<Ca2+<Fe3+, its value increasing with increasing temperature, and that △H°>0 and△S°>0, with -△G° following the sequence: Ca2+>Na+>Fe3+,

  3. Adsorption of uranium (VI) from mixed chloride-fluoride solutions by anion-exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakholkov, V.S.; Denisova, L.A.; Rychkov, V.N.; Kurnosenko, N.A.

    1988-03-01

    Experimental data are reported and discussed concerning the adsorption of uranium from 0.025 M solutions of UO/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/, containing HCl, HF, and NH/sub 4/Cl over a wide concentration range, using anion-exchange resins of varying basicities. UV and IR spectroscopic studies were conducted in order to clarify the chemical mechanism of uranium adsorption. Adsorption isotherms for all of the ion-exchange resins studied are convex in shape and can be described by the following equations: log K/sub d/ = a + b (-log C/sub e/), and log A = a + (b + 1) log C/sub e/, where A is the adsorptivity in mmole U/g; K/sub d/ is the distribution coefficient in mg/liter; and C/sub e/ is the equilibrium concentration of U in mmole/ml. General mathematical models have been obtained to describe the adsorption process; these consist of a system of regression equations derived from the results of a complete 2/sup 3/ factorial study.

  4. Artificial liver support for postoperative hepatic failure with anion exchange resin (BR-601.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakagami,Kenichi

    1986-10-01

    Full Text Available An artificial liver support system for plasma exchange and plasma perfusion through BR-601 resin using a membrane separator was applied to 5 patients with postoperative liver failure. Percent absorption of total and direct bilirubin, and of bile acids were 77.1 +/- 6.4, 78.4 +/- 6.1, and 93.4 +/- 3.6%, respectively, when 250 ml of plasma was treated. Percent reductions in total and direct bilirubin, and in bile acids were 24.5 +/- 5.8, 25.5 +/- 5.8 and 30.9 +/- 8.5%, respectively. In contrast, percent reductions in total and direct bilirubin, and in bile acids by plasma exchange were 30.9 +/- 13.3, 34.5 +/- 12.5 and 24.2 +/- 8.5%, respectively. The coma grade was improved in 4 out of 5 cases, but unfortunately the patients did not recover. In conclusion, plasma perfusion through BR-601 resin is expected to play a promising role in artificial liver support systems because of its capacity to absorb bilirubin and bile acids.

  5. Heat transfer of spent ion exchange resin in iron ore sintering process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent ion exchange resin (SIER) is a kind of solid waste which derived from water treatment process in iron and steel industry. Utilization of SIER as a replacement of fuel in sintering process is a promising method of SIER treatment. In order to investigate the feasibility of this method, heat transfer effects of SIER in iron ore sintering process were studied in this paper via numerical simulation. A 3D unsteady numerical reference model was developed on the basis of the porous media model and local non-equilibrium thermodynamics model and verified by the data form measurement. Heat transfer effects of different SIER mass fractions (0–8%) in sintering material during the sintering process were studied on the numerical model established in this paper. The results showed that with the increasing mass fraction of SIER, the maximum combustion zone thickness and flame front speed are both increased, the heating-up point, the moment when solid temperature reached the top and the maximum temperatures were all became earlier in different location of sintering bed. When SIER content is 8%, the maximum sintering temperature exceeds the maximum limit of best sintering temperature. - Highlights: • A mathematical model for heat transfer in sintering process was established. • An effective way of spent ion exchange resin (SIER) treatment was proposed. • Heat transfer effects of SIER in sintering process were studied. • Effect on maximum sintering temperature of different SIER content was discussed

  6. Treatment of spent ion exchange resin with oxidative decomposition in supercritical water and activity separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A treatment system of spent ion exchange resin with oxidative decomposition was developed. The system consisted of the volume deduction process by oxidative decomposition of organic compounds in supercritical water and the separation process of radioactive materials from the decomposition solution. The features of the process are summarized as followings: (1) decrease of treatment cost by separation of the high level beta and gamma wastes and the low level radioactive wastes, (2) the large volume reduction rate is obtained by decomposition more than 99% organic compounds and the high level beta and gamma wastes without organic compounds becomes the stable wastes for a long period, (3) the high level beta and gamma wastes reacts cement to produce solid without sulfate and (4) simple constitution of system is easily operated for high radioactive ray. It was shown in the experiments that the spent ion exchange resins were decomposed perfectly in supercritical water in a short time and that the radioactive materials were separated from the solution by coprecipitation and adsorption with iron ion. The volume of solid wastes buried under the ground by this method is one twentieth of that by the direct solidification with cement. (S.Y.)

  7. Modification of cation-exchange properties of activated carbon by treatment with nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uptake of inorganic cations by high-surface-area activated carbon can be increased by an order of magnitude by controlled exposure to high concentrations of nitric acid at elevated temperatures. Distribution coefficients of cations are also increased. Oxidation treatment causes some loss in particle strength. Acid strength of the functional groups from the nitric acid treatment is greater than those of the starting material. Surface area measurements from small-angle neutron scattering indicate that the increase in effective ion-exchange capacity is not accompanied by gross changes in the structure of the material. 13C-NMR on solid samples suggests that the concentration of carboxyl and phenolic functional groups in the carbon is increased by the treatment

  8. Carbon dioxide and nitrogen adsorption on cation-exchanged SSZ-13 zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Trong D; Liu, Qingling; Lobo, Raul F

    2013-01-15

    Samples of high-silica SSZ-13, ion exchanged with protons and alkali-metal cations Li(+), Na(+), and K(+), were investigated using adsorption isotherms of CO(2) and N(2). The results show that Li-, Na-SSZ-13 have excellent CO(2) capacity at ambient temperature and pressure; in general, Li-SSZ-13 shows the highest capacity for N(2), CO(2) particularly in the low-pressure region. The effect of cation type and Si/Al ratio (6 and 12) on the adsorption properties was investigated through analysis of adsorption isotherms and heats of adsorption. The separation of CO(2) in a flue gas mixture was evaluated for these adsorbents in the pressure swing adsorption and vacuum pressure adsorption processes. PMID:23249267

  9. Determination of plutonium, uranium and americium/curium isotopes in environmental samples with anion exchange, UTEVA, Sr and DGA resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents a quantitative sequential radiochemical separation method for the Pu, U, Sr and Am/Cm isotopes with an anion exchange resin, UTEVA resin, Sr resin and DGA resin in environmental samples. After the radionuclides were leached from samples with 8M HNO3, the Pu, U, Sr and Am/Cm isotopes were sequentially adsorbed on the anion exchange column, UTEVA column connected with Sr Spec column and DGA column. The Pu isotopes were purified from other nuclides through the anion exchange column, and the uranium isotopes were separated from other nuclides through the UTEVA column. Also, 90Sr was separated from other hindrance elements such as Ca2+, Ba2+ and Y3+ with the Sr Spec column. Finally, Am/Cm fractions were purified with the DGA and anion exchange resins. After α source preparation for the purified Pu, U and Am/Cm isotopes with the micro-coprecipitation method, the Pu, U and Am/Cm isotopes were measured by an alpha spectrometry. Strontium-90 was measured by a low level liquid scintillation counter. The radiochemical procedure for Pu, U and Am nuclides investigated in this study has been validated by application to IAEA Reference soils. (orig.)

  10. Effects of exchanged cation and layer charge on the sorption of water and EGME vapors on montmorillonite clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, C.T.; Rutherford, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of exchanged cation and layer charge on the sorption of water and ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (EGME) vapors on montmorillonite have been studied on SAz-1 and SWy-1 source clays, each exchanged respectively with Ca, Na, K, Cs and tetramethylammonium (TMA) cations. The corresponding lattice expansions were also determined, and the corresponding N2 adsorption data were provided for comparison. For clays exchanged with cations of low hydrating powers (such as K, Cs and TMA), water shows a notably lower uptake than does N2 at low relative pressures (P/P0). By contrast, EGME shows higher uptakes than N2 on all exchanged clays at all P/P0. The anomaly for water is attributed to its relatively low attraction for siloxane surfaces of montmorillonite because of its high cohesive energy density. In addition to solvating cations and expanding interlayers, water and EGME vapors condense into small clay pores and interlayer voids created by interlayer expansion. The initial (dry) interlayer separation varies more significantly with cation type than with layer charge; the water-saturated interlayer separation varies more with cation type than the EGME-saturated interlayer separation. Because of the differences in surface adsorption and interlayer expansion for water and EGME, no general correspondence is found between the isotherms of water and EGME on exchanged clays, nor is a simple relation observed between the overall uptake of either vapor and the cation solvating power. The excess interlayer capacities of water and of EGME that result from lattice expansion of the exchanged clays are estimated by correcting for amounts of vapor adsorption on planar clay surfaces and of vapor condensation into intrinsic clay pores. The resulting data follow more closely the relative solvating powers of the exchanged cations.

  11. Obtention of the cation exchange capacity of a natural kaolinite with radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the more used techniques for the elimination of the heavy metals present in water systems is to use adsorbent mineral phases like zeolites and clays, among others. The clays are able to exchange easily the fixed ions in the external surface of its crystals or well the ions present in the interlaminar spaces of the structures, for other existent ones in the encircling aqueous solutions for that the Cation exchange capacity (CIC) is defined as the sum of all the cations exchange that a mineral can possess independent to the physicochemical conditions. The CIC is equal to the measure of the total of negative charges of the mineral by mass of the solid (meq/g). In this investigation work, the value of the CIC equal to 2.5 meq/100 g is obtained, of a natural kaolinite from the State of Hidalgo studying the retention of the sodium in the kaolinite with the aid of the radioactive isotope 24 Na and of the selective electrodes technique, making vary the pH value. So is experimentally demonstrated that the CIC is an intrinsic property of the mineral independent of the pH value of the solution and of the charges origin. (Author)

  12. Assessing the role of cation exchange in controlling groundwater chemistry during fluid mixing in fractured granite at Aespoe, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geochemical modeling was used to simulate the mixing of dilute shallow groundwater with deeper more saline groundwater in the fractured granite of the Redox Zone at the Aespoe underground Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL). Fluid mixing simulations were designed to assess the role that cation exchange plays in controlling the composition of fluids entering the HRL via fracture flow. Mixing simulations included provision for the effects of mineral precipitation and cation exchange on fluid composition. Because the predominant clay mineral observed in fractures in the Redox Zone has been identified as illite or mixed layer illite smectite, an exchanger with the properties of illite was used to simulate cation exchange. Cation exchange on illite was modeled using three exchange sites, a planar or basal plane site with properties similar to smectite, and two edge sites that have very high affinities for K, Rb, and Cs. Each site was assumed to obey an ideal Vanselow exchange model, and exchange energies for each site were taken from the literature. The predicted behaviors of Na, Ca, and Mg during mixing were similar to those reported in a previous study in which smectite was used as the model for the exchanger. The trace elements Cs and Rb were predicted to be strongly associated with the illite exchanger, and the predicted concentrations of Cs in fracture fill were in reasonable agreement with reported chemical analyses of exchangeable Cs in fracture fill. The results of the geochemical modeling suggest that Na, Ca, and Sr concentrations in the fluid phase may be controlled by cation exchange reactions that occur during mixing, but that Mg appears to behave conservatively. There is currently not enough data to make conclusions regarding the behavior of Cs and Rb

  13. Removal of CdTe in acidic media by magnetic ion-exchange resin: A potential recycling methodology for cadmium telluride photovoltaic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Sulfonated magnetic microsphere was prepared as one strong acid cation-exchange resin. • Cd and Te can be removed directly from the highly acidic leaching solution of CdTe. • Good chemical stability, fast adsorbing rate and quick magnetic separation in strong acidic media. • A potential path for recycling CdTe photovoltaic waste. - Abstract: Sulfonated magnetic microspheres (PSt-DVB-SNa MPs) have been successfully prepared as adsorbents via an aqueous suspension polymerization of styrene-divinylbenzene and a sulfonation reaction successively. The resulting adsorbents were confirmed by means of Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The leaching process of CdTe was optimized, and the removal efficiency of Cd and Te from the leaching solution was investigated. The adsorbents could directly remove all cations of Cd and Te from a highly acidic leaching solution of CdTe. The adsorption process for Cd and Te reached equilibrium in a few minutes and this process highly depended on the dosage of adsorbents and the affinity of sulfonate groups with cations. Because of its good adsorption capacity in strong acidic media, high adsorbing rate, and efficient magnetic separation from the solution, PSt-DVB-SNa MPs is expected to be an ideal material for the recycling of CdTe photovoltaic waste

  14. Removal of CdTe in acidic media by magnetic ion-exchange resin: A potential recycling methodology for cadmium telluride photovoltaic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Teng, E-mail: zhangteng@mail.iee.ac.cn; Dong, Zebin; Qu, Fei; Ding, Fazhu; Peng, Xingyu; Wang, Hongyan; Gu, Hongwei

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • Sulfonated magnetic microsphere was prepared as one strong acid cation-exchange resin. • Cd and Te can be removed directly from the highly acidic leaching solution of CdTe. • Good chemical stability, fast adsorbing rate and quick magnetic separation in strong acidic media. • A potential path for recycling CdTe photovoltaic waste. - Abstract: Sulfonated magnetic microspheres (PSt-DVB-SNa MPs) have been successfully prepared as adsorbents via an aqueous suspension polymerization of styrene-divinylbenzene and a sulfonation reaction successively. The resulting adsorbents were confirmed by means of Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The leaching process of CdTe was optimized, and the removal efficiency of Cd and Te from the leaching solution was investigated. The adsorbents could directly remove all cations of Cd and Te from a highly acidic leaching solution of CdTe. The adsorption process for Cd and Te reached equilibrium in a few minutes and this process highly depended on the dosage of adsorbents and the affinity of sulfonate groups with cations. Because of its good adsorption capacity in strong acidic media, high adsorbing rate, and efficient magnetic separation from the solution, PSt-DVB-SNa MPs is expected to be an ideal material for the recycling of CdTe photovoltaic waste.

  15. The effect of organic ion-exchange resin on properties of heterogeneous ion-exchange membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křivčík, J.; Vladařová, J.; Hadrava, J.; Černín, A.; Brožová, Libuše

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 14, - (2010), s. 179-184. ISSN 1944-3994. [Membrane Science and Technology Conference of Visegrad Countries /4./ PERMEA 2009, 07.07.2009-11.07.2009] R&D Projects: GA MPO FT-TA4/116 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : heterogeneous ion-exchange membrane * membrane modification * particle size of distribution Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 0.752, year: 2010

  16. Spray drying of bead resins: feasibility tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockwell International has developed a volume reduction system for low-level reactor wastes based on drying the wastes in a heated-air spray dryer. The drying of slurries of sodium sulfate, boric acid, and powdered ion exchange resins was demonstrated in previous tests. The drying of bead ion exchange resins can be especially difficult due to the relatively large size of bead resins (about 500 to 800 microns) and their natural affinity for water. This water becomes part of the pore structure of the resins and normally comprises 50 t 60 wt % of the resin weight. A 76-cm-diameter spray dryer was used for feasibility tests of spray drying of cation and anion bead resins. These resins were fed to the dryer in the as-received form (similar to dewatered resins) and as slurries. A dry, free-flowing product was produced in all the tests. The volume of the spray-dried product was one-half to one-third the volume of the as-received material. An economic analysis was made of the potential cost savings that can be achieved using the Rockwel spray dryer system. In-plant costs, transportation costs, and burial costs of spray-dried resins were compared to similar costs for disposal of dewatered resins. A typical utility producing 170 m3 (6,000 ft3) per year of dewatered resins can save $600,000 to $700,000 per year using this volume reduction system

  17. Determination of organoarsenic species in marine samples using gradient elution cation exchange HPLC-ICP-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Jens Jørgen; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Julshamn, Kåre

    2003-01-01

    A method for the determination of arsenic species in marine samples using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to inductively coupled mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) has been developed. Cation exchange HPLC with gradient elution using pyridine formate as the mobile phase was employed for...... the separation of a large number of arsenicals that occurred in the samples. The arsenic species were extracted using a 50% (v/v) methanol-water mixture and mechanical agitation overnight. The effect of the sample matrix on HPLC retention time was investigated and showed a dramatic effect for...

  18. Refolding of Denatured/Reduced Lysozyme Using Weak-Cation Exchange Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan WANG; Bo Lin GONG; Xin Du GENG

    2003-01-01

    Oxidative refolding of the denatured/reduced lysozyme was investigated by using weak-cation exchange chromatography (WCX). The stationary phase of WCX binds to the reduced lysozyme and prevented it from forming intermolecular aggregates. At the same time urea and ammonium sulfate were added to the mobile phase to increase the elution strength for lysozyme. Ammonium sulfate can more stabilize the native protein than a common eluting agent, sodium chloride. Refolding of lysozyme by using this WCX is successfully. It was simply carried out to obtain a completely and correctly refolding of the denatured lysozyme at high concentration of 20.0 mg/mL.

  19. Ion-exchange resins. October 1983-December 1987 (citations from the Engineering Index data base). Report for Octiber 1983-December 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography contains citations concerning preparation, properties, and applications of ion-exchange resins. Applications include water and waste treatment; chemical recovery, separation, purification, and catalysis; desalination; and ore treatment and recovery. Regeneration and disposal of ion-exchange resins are also covered. (This updated bibliography contains 430 citations, 192 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  20. Preparation of Weak Cation Exchange Packings Based on Monodisperse Poly (chloromethylstyrene-co-divinylbenzene) Particles and Its Chromatographic Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卫引茂; 陈强; 耿信笃

    2001-01-01

    Monodisperse poly ( chloromethylstyrene-co-divinylbenzene )particles were firstly prepared by a two-step swelling method.Based on this media, one kind of weak cation ion exchange packings was prepared. It was demonstrated that the prepared packings have comparative advantages for biopolymer separation with high column efficiency, low interstitial volume and low column backpressure, and have good resolution to proteins. The effects of salt concentration and pH of mobile phase on protein retentions were investigated. The properties of the weak cation ion exchange packings were evaluated by the unified retention model for mixed-mode interaction mechanison in ion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

  1. Study of Japanese and Serbia bentonite on the fraction of 137Cs from cement-ion exchange resins-bentonite clay mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching tests in cement-ion exchange resins-bentonite matrix, were carried out in accordance with a method recommended by IAEA. The cement specimens were prepared from construction cement which is basically a standard Portland cement. The cement was mixed with saturated wet cation exchange resins, (100 g. of dry resins +100 g. of water containing 137Cs) and two bentonite clay, from Serbia, and another from Japan. After each leaching period the radioactivity in the leachant was measured. All results exhibit practically the same general characteristics. An enhanced initial period of leaching occurs during the first 25-30 days or so, followed by a distinct reduction in the leach rate which is broadly maintained up to the long period of leaching. The leach behaviour of cement-mortar materials can be explained as a combination of two processes: surface wash-off, which is not diffusion controlled, followed by a static diffusion stage. Enhanced initial period of leaching can be explained in terms of a rapid equilibrium being established between spaces present in the surface pores of the Portland cement and ions in solution in the leachant; hence the term wash-off. It is the second stage which is controlled by diffusion that dominates the long-term leaching behaviour of the material. We also prove that increasing amount of bentonite causes a significant reduction in the leaching rate, because of bentonite good sorption characteristics and ion selectivity. We showed that the bentonite from Serbia can successfully be used for the immobilisation of radioactive waste with same quality as Japanese bentonite

  2. Incorporation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in microspheres used as anion exchange resin via suspension polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathy, Mahmoud; Abdel Moghny, Th.; Awadallah, Ahmed E.; El-Bellihi, Abdel-Hameed A.-A.

    2014-06-01

    Amination of vinylbenzyl chloride-divinylbenzene (VBC-DVB) copolymers is an effective method for preparation of anion-exchange resins. Conventionally, the starting polymer is produced by chloromethylation of a styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer that utilizes chloromethyl methyl ether, a known carcinogen. An alterative approach is to copolymerize vinylbenzyl chloride with divinylbenzene to generate the necessary VBC-DVB. This method provides precise control over the density of the ion-exchange groups. The regiochemistry of the vinylbenzyl chloride methods was realized using solvent-ion exchange groups. These resulting anion-exchange polymers were characterized by a variety of techniques such as analytical titrations, transform infrared spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis. Testing of these copolymers for breakthrough was performed. The results indicate that these anion exchangers have a meaningful increase in thermal stability over commercial anionic exchange beads. Resins containing MWCNTs achieved anion exchange capacity value of 323.6 meq/100 g over than that of copolymer resins and that useful in water desalination or treatment.

  3. The recovery of by-product uranium from wet process phosphoric acid solutions using selective ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction of uranium from phosphoric acid using two types of ion exchange resin is reported. Levextrel-type resins containing the synergistic mixture di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid - tri-octyl phosphine oxide readily extract uranium in the presence of impurities, though Fe2+ inhibits sorption. Elution is possible using 3M H3PO4 at 40 deg C in the presence of Fe2+. Duolite ES 467, a commercially available chelating resin containing aminophosphonic acid groups, extracts uranium in the four- and six-valency state. The kinetics of this resin are slow but improve substantially at 60 deg C. Elution is efficient using (NH4)2CO3 at 20 deg C to produce an enriched product. A conceptual flowsheet is given to illustrate a simple process route using Duolite ES 467. (author)

  4. Effects of biofouling on ion transport through cation exchange membranes and microbial fuel cell performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mi-Jin; Chae, Kyu-Jung; Ajayi, Folusho F; Kim, Kyoung-Yeol; Yu, Hye-Weon; Kim, Chang-Won; Kim, In S

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the effects of biofouling on the electrochemical properties of cation exchange membranes (CEMs), such as membrane electrical resistance (MER), specific proton conductivity (SC), and ion transport number (t(+)), in addition to on microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance. CEM biofouling using a 15.5 ± 4.6 μm biofilm was found to slightly increase the MER from 15.65 Ω cm(2) (fresh Nafion) to 19.1 Ω cm(2), whereas an increase of almost two times was achieved when the electrolyte was changed from deionized water to an anolyte containing a high cation concentration supporting bacterial growth. The simple physical cleaning of CEMs had little effect on the Coulombic efficiency (CE), whereas replacing a biofouled CEM with new one resulted in considerable increase of up to 59.3%, compared to 45.1% for a biofouled membrane. These results clearly suggest the internal resistance increase of MFC was mainly caused by the sulfonate functional groups of CEM being occupied with cations contained in the anolyte, rather than biofouling itself. PMID:20659795

  5. EPICOR-II resin degradation results from first resin samples of PF-8 and PF-20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 28 March 1979 accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 released approximately 560,000 gallons of contaminated water to the Auxiliary and Fuel Handling Buildings. The water was decontaminated using a demineralization system called EPICOR-II developed by Epicor, Inc. The Low-Level Waste Data Base Development - EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Investigation Project is studying the chemical and physical conditions of the synthetic ion exchange resins found in several EPICOR-II prefilters. This report summarizes results and analyses of the first sampling of ion exchange resins from EPICOR-II prefilters PE-8 and -20. Results are compared with baseline data from tests performed on unirradiated Epicor, Inc. resins to determine if degradation has occurred due to the high internal radiation dose received by the EPICOR-II resins. Results also are compared with recent findings on resin degradation by Battelle Columbus Laboratories and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Analyses comparing test results of resins from EPICOR-II prefilters PF-8 and -20 with unirradiated resins obtained from Epicor, Inc. show resin degradation has occurred in some of the EPICOR-II resins examined. The mechanism of degradation is compared with work of other researchers and is consistent with their findings. The strong acid cation resins (divinylbenzene, styrene base structure) are losing effective cross-linking along with scission of functional groups and are experiencing first an increase and eventually a decrease in total exchange capacity as the absorbed radiation dose increases. The phenolic cation resins (phenol-formaldehyde base structure) show a loss of effective cross-linking and oxidation of the polymer chain. Analyses of resins removed from EPICOR-II prefilters PF-8 and -20 over the next several years should show a further increase in degradation

  6. Uses of complexone III and ion exchange resins in colorimetric determination with o-phenanthroline of Fe traces in uranium compounds; Aplicacion de la complexona III y resinas combadoras a la determinacion colorimetrica con orto-fenantro-lina de trazas de dhierro en compuesto de uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Cellini, R.; Ruiz Sanchez, F.

    1956-07-01

    The determination of small quantities of iron using o-phenanthroline, assumes the elimination of some cations interference by means of pH control before the formation of a coloured complex. We have eluded that difficulty by the connected action of complexones III and ion exchange. the previous forms quelate with the iron (III) with a stability constant high enough to permit the pass of an iron solution through a cation resin column without being fixed which never occurs with the interferer cations. Mercury is the only element with a similar stability, but it has been eliminated previously. (Author) 16 refs.

  7. Influence of Types and Charges of Exchangeable Cations on Ciprofloxacin Sorption by Montmorillonite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Qingfeng; LI Zhaohui; HONG Hanlie

    2012-01-01

    As one of the most important soil components,montmorillonite plays a vital role in transport and retention of organic pollutants in soils.Ciprofloxacin (CIP),an antibiotic of fluoroquiolones,has been frequently detected in water and soil environments due to its wide use in human and veterinary medicine.In this study,the adsorption of CIP onto different homoionic montmorillonite such as Na-,Ca- and Al-MMT was investigated,and the influence of types and charges of exchangeable cations in the interlayer of montmorillonite on CIP adsorption was evaluated.The results showed that different homoionic montmorillonite exhibited different sorption capacity of CIP.At pH 3,the sorption capacity of CIP decreased in the order Na-MMT > Ca-MMT > Al-MMT,following the lyotropic series.When solution pH increased to 11,the sorption capacity of CIP followed the order Ca-MMT > Al-MMT > Na-MMT.Accompanying CIP adsorption on Ca-MMT,a certain amount of Ca2+ was released into solution.Compared to pH 3,the lower Ca concentration in solution at pH 11 indicated that the adsorption of CIP on Ca-MMT at strong alkaline pH was no longer via cation exchange,and surface complexation or cation bridging might contribute to CIP adsorption.The adsorption of CIP on Na-and Ca-MMT at pH 3 and 11 resulted in the expansion of d-spacing,indicative of intercalation of CIP into the interlayer space of the montmorillonite.However,a decrease of d-spacing was observed when CIP adsorbed on Al-MMT at pH 11,which might be attributed to the dissolution of Al-CIP complex formed between CIP and Al3+ in the interlayer of montmorillonite.The results suggest that the types and charges of exchangeable cations in the interlayer of montmorillonite play an important role in CIP adsorption on montmorillonite.

  8. EPICOR-II: a field leaching test of solidified radioactively loaded ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of an ongoing research program investigating the disposal of radioactive solid wastes in the environment' the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is participating with Argonne National Laboratory, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in a study of the leachability of solidified EPICOR-II ion-exchange resin under simulated disposal conditions. To simulate disposal, a group of five 2-m3 soil lysimeters has been installed in Solid Waste Storage Area Six at ORNL, with each lysimeter containing a small sample of solidified resin at its center. Two solidification techniques are being investigated: a Portland cement and a vinyl ester-styrene treatment. During construction, soil moisture temperature cells were placed in each lysimeter, along with five porous ceramic tubes for sampling water near the waste source. A meteorological station was set up at the study site to monitor climatic conditions (primarily precipitation and air temperature), and a data acquisition system was installed to keep daily records of these meteorological parameters as well as lysimeter soil moisture and temperature conditions. This report documents the first year of the long-term field study and includes discussions of lysimeter installation, calibration of soil moisture probes, installation of the site meteorological station, and the results of the first-quarter sampling for radionuclides in lysimeter leachate. In addition, the data collection and processing system developed for this study is documented, and the results of the first three months of data collection are summarized in Appendix D

  9. Kinetics and adsorption isotherm of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis on ion-exchange resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sala

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available C-phycocyanin is a natural blue dye extracted from Spirulina platensis, which has many applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In this paper the effect of pH and temperature on the adsorption of C-phycocyanin onto two different ion exchange resins (Streamline DEAE and Streamline Q XL for expanded bed adsorption chromatography was investigated. Moreover, the kinetics and adsorption isotherm were evaluated. The equilibrium for the Q XL matrix was reached after 60 min, while for DEAE it was only reached after 140 min. C-phycocyanin showed the highest partition coefficient at pH 7.5 for both resins at 25 ºC. The C-phycocyanin adsorption isotherm was very well represented by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Langmuir-Freundlich models, where the estimated values for Qm and Kd obtained by the Langmuir isotherm were, respectively, 33.92 mg.mL-1 and 0.123 mg.mL-1 for DEAE, and 28.12 mg.mL-1 and 0.082 mg.mL-1 for the Q XL matrix. A negative cooperativity was observed for C-phycocyanin binding when the Q XL matrix was used, while the cooperativity was purely independent using the DEAE matrix.

  10. FORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF ION EXCHANGE RESIN MATRIX TABLETS OF PROPRANOLOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhosale Rahul

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, an attempt was made to prepare and evaluate Indion 254 ion exchange resin based matrix tablets by using sodium alginate, carrageenan and tamarind seed polyose for controlled release of propranolol HCl. The tablets were prepared by wet granulation method. The weight and drug contents of all the tablets were found to be uniform with the low SD values. The hardness and friability were within specified range. The pure drug propranolol HCl has shown complete dissolution within 60 min, whereas, drug-resin complex has shown drug release for 2.5 hrs. With the increase in concentration of carrageenan, the drug release was decreased whereas with the increase in concentration of tamarind seed polyose drug release was increased. The DSC and XRD analysis indicated that the drug was uniformly dispersed in an amorphous state in the polymer matrix. The FTIR analysis ruled out the interaction between drug and polymers used in the preparation. Swelling of the tablets decreased with an increased amount of carrageenan and it further decreased when the tablets were treated with glutaraldehyde. Swelling of the tablets increased with an increased amount of tamarind seed polyose. The in vitro drug release study indicated that the tablets containing tamarind seed polyose were capable of releasing the drug for 24 hrs. Drug release mechanism followed anomalous transport. The stability studies indicated that the formulations were stable, with respect to drug content and physical changes.

  11. Fixation and separation of the elements thorium and uranium using anion exchange resins in nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exchange of thorium and uranium between a strong base anion resin and a mixed water + ethanol solvent containing nitrate ions is studied. It is assumed that in the resin the thorium and uranium are fixed in the form of the complexes Th(NO3)62- and UO2(NO3)42- in solution these elements are present in the form of complexes having the general formula: Th(NO3)6-nn-2 and UO2(NO3)4-nn-2 It has been possible to deduce a law for the changes in the partition functions of thorium and uranium as a function of the concentrations of the various species in solution and of the complexing ion NO3. From this has been deduced the optimum operational conditions for separating a mixture of these two elements. Finally, in these conditions, the influence of a few interfering ions has been studied: Ba, Bi, Ce, La, Mo, Pb, Zr. The method proposed can be used either as a preparation, or for the dosage of thorium by a quantitative separation. (author)

  12. Purification of urokinase by combined cation exchanger and affinity chromatographic cartridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, K C; Zaniewski, R

    1990-02-23

    Crude urokinase from human urine processed through foam flotation and ammonium sulfate precipitation containing 720 National Health Institute Committee on Thrombolytic Agents U/mg activity was purified by an SP cation exchanger followed by a zinc-chelated affinity chromatographic cartridge. The cartridges were of a radial-flow type formed by using acrylic and cellulose composite matrices. The high rigidity of the matrix structure permits fast flow of protein solutions (liters per minute) and thus allows processing of a large volume of crude urokinase under low operating pressures. A greater than six-fold increase in specific enzyme activity of urokinase was achieved by adsorbing and eluting 1 l of a 3 mg/ml crude urokinase solution on an SP cartridge. The eluent was further purified by passing through a zinc-chelated affinity cartridge to achieve greater than a eighteen-fold increase in urokinase specific activity. This report demonstrates the combined use of a cation exchanger with zinc-chelated chromatographic cartridges in purifying urokinase on a relatively large scale. The relationship between the amount of zinc chelated in the matrix to its effect on urokinase purification is also discussed. PMID:2329161

  13. Light-induced cation exchange for copper sulfide based CO2 reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzi, Aurora; Simon, Thomas; Sonnleitner, Clemens; Döblinger, Markus; Wyrwich, Regina; Stern, Omar; Stolarczyk, Jacek K; Feldmann, Jochen

    2015-11-11

    Copper(I)-based catalysts, such as Cu2S, are considered to be very promising materials for photocatalytic CO2 reduction. A common synthesis route for Cu2S via cation exchange from CdS nanocrystals requires Cu(I) precursors, organic solvents, and neutral atmosphere, but these conditions are not compatible with in situ applications in photocatalysis. Here we propose a novel cation exchange reaction that takes advantage of the reducing potential of photoexcited electrons in the conduction band of CdS and proceeds with Cu(II) precursors in an aqueous environment and under aerobic conditions. We show that the synthesized Cu2S photocatalyst can be efficiently used for the reduction of CO2 to carbon monoxide and methane, achieving formation rates of 3.02 and 0.13 μmol h(-1) g(-1), respectively, and suppressing competing water reduction. The process opens new pathways for the preparation of new efficient photocatalysts from readily available nanostructured templates. PMID:26479775

  14. Effect of ionophores on the rate of intramolecular cation exchange in durosemiquinone ion pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, M. P.; Bruno, G. V.; Mcguyer, C. A.; Gutierrez, A. R.; Shannon, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of the ionophores 15-crown-5 (15C5), 18-crown-6 (18C6), dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DBC) and cryptand 222 (C222) on intramolecular cation exchange in ion pairs of the sodium salt of the durosemiquinone anion in benzene solution are investigated. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the 18C6 and 15C5 complexes with durosemiquinone reduced by contact with a sodium mirror show an alternating line width which indicates that the sodium ion is being exchanged between equivalent sites near the oxygens of the semiquinone with activation energies of 8.7 and 6.0 kcal/mole and Arrhenius preexponential factors of 9 x 10 to the 12th/sec and 10 to the 12th/sec, respectively. Spectra obtained for the DBC complexes show no evidence of exchange, while those of C222 indicate rapid exchange. It is also noted that the hyperfine splitting constants measured do not change over the 50-K temperature interval studied.

  15. Measurements of the Efficiency of Ion Exchange Resin Used in HANARO Primary Coolant Purification System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the normal operation of HANARO, 30 MW open-pool type research reactor, several radionuclides are dispersed in pool or coolant water. The nuclides in the water are generated by activations of coolant, dissolved substances and corrosion products. In addition, there are several fission products caused by uranium contamination on fuel cladding surface. The radionuclides disappear by radioactive decay, release out of the water, and they are also eliminated by the ion exchange resin in the coolant purification system. Thus, the information on its efficiency to remove the nuclides from the coolant is necessary to estimate the radiological effect of a research reactor. In this work, the efficiency is measured by the gamma-ray spectroscopy for the coolant of HANARO

  16. Evaluation of ion exchange resin performance in Kuosheng nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different types and brands of bead and powdered ion exchange resin have been widely used in condensate and reactor water clean-up system in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). The importance of primary coolant quality control has been well recognized. Recently, some measures both in promoting the conductivity of reactor water and minimizing iron crud of feed-water have been recommended by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research. The variation of water quality between the condensate and reactor water is closely related with the performance of condensate polisher and precoat condition. In order to ensure optimization of water chemistry quality in reactor system, historical water chemistry data have been reviewed and evaluated. The most probable causes of exceeding the chemistry limits and guidelines should be identified and some reasonable corrective actions have been documented as a reference for promoting the water quality and run length extending in the plant normal operation. (author)

  17. Calculation of isotopic profile during band displacement on ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method has been developed to calculate the isotopic profile during band displacement on ion exchange resins using computer simulation. Persoz had utilized this technique earlier for calculating the isotopic profile during band displacement as well as frontal analysis. The present report deals with a simplification of the method used by Persoz by reducing the number of variables and making certain approximations where the separation factor is not far from unity. Calculations were made for the typical case of boron isotope separation. The results obtained by the modified method were found to be in very good agreement with those obtained by using an exact equation, at the same time requiring conside--rably less computer time. (author)

  18. Atmospheric Ionic Deposition in Tropical Sites of Central Sulawesi Determined by Ion Exchange Resin Collectors and Bulk Water Collector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, S; Jungkunst, H F; Gutzler, C; Herrera, R; Gerold, G

    2012-09-01

    In the light of global change, the necessity to monitor atmospheric depositions that have relevant effects on ecosystems is ever increasing particularly for tropical sites. For this study, atmospheric ionic depositions were measured on tropical Central Sulawesi at remote sites with both a conventional bulk water collector system (BWS collector) and with a passive ion exchange resin collector system (IER collector). The principle of IER collector to fix all ionic depositions, i.e. anions and cations, has certain advantages referring to (1) post-deposition transformation processes, (2) low ionic concentrations and (3) low rainfall and associated particulate inputs, e.g. dust or sand. The ionic concentrations to be measured for BWS collectors may easily fall below detection limits under low deposition conditions which are common for tropical sites of low land use intensity. Additionally, BWS collections are not as independent from the amount of rain fallen as are IER collections. For this study, the significant differences between both collectors found for nearly all measured elements were partly correlated to the rainfall pattern, i.e. for calcium, magnesium, potassium and sodium. However, the significant differences were, in most cases, not highly relevant. More relevant differences between the systems were found for aluminium and nitrate (434-484 %). Almost five times higher values for nitrate clarified the advantage of the IER system particularly for low deposition rate which is one particularity of atmospheric ionic deposition in tropical sites of extensive land use. The monthly resolution of the IER data offers new insights into the temporal distribution of annual ionic depositions. Here, it did not follow the tropical rain pattern of a drier season within generally wet conditions. PMID:22865942

  19. Preliminiary flowsheet: Ion exchange process for the separation of cesium from Hanford tank waste using Duolite trademark CS-100 resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This preliminary flowsheet document describes an ion exchange process which uses Duolite trademark CS-100 resin to remove cesium from Hanford Tank waste. The flowsheet describes one possible equipment configuration, and contains mass balances based on that configuration with feeds of Neutralized Current Acid Waste, and Double Shell Slurry Feed. Process alternatives, unresolved issues, and development needs are discussed which relate to the process

  20. Cu2Se and Cu Nanocrystals as Local Sources of Copper in Thermally Activated In Situ Cation Exchange

    KAUST Repository

    Casu, Alberto

    2016-01-27

    Among the different synthesis approaches to colloidal nanocrystals a recently developed toolkit is represented by cation exchange reactions, where the use of template nanocrystals gives access to materials that would be hardly attainable via direct synthesis. Besides, post-synthetic treatments, such as thermally activated solid state reactions, represent a further flourishing route to promote finely controlled cation exchange. Here, we report that, upon in situ heating in a transmission electron microscope, Cu2Se nanocrystals deposited on an amorphous solid substrate undergo partial loss of Cu atoms, which are then engaged in local cation exchange reactions with Cu “acceptors” phases represented by rod- and wire- shaped CdSe nanocrystals. This thermal treatment slowly transforms the initial CdSe nanocrystals into Cu2-xSe nanocrystals, through the complete sublimation of Cd and the partial sublimation of Se atoms. Both Cu “donor” and “acceptor” particles were not always in direct contact with each other, hence the gradual transfer of Cu species from Cu2Se or metallic Cu to CdSe nanocrystals was mediated by the substrate and depended on the distance between the donor and acceptor nanostructures. Differently from what happens in the comparably faster cation exchange reactions performed in liquid solution, this study shows that slow cation exchange reactions can be performed at the solid state, and helps to shed light on the intermediate steps involved in such reactions.